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Sample records for phosphate acceptor site

  1. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  2. Acceptor sites for retroviral integrations map near DNase I-hypersensitive sites in chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya, S; Steffen, D L; Robinson, H L

    1986-01-01

    Seven cellular loci with acceptor sites for retroviral integrations have been mapped for the presence of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in chromatin. Integrations in three of these loci, chicken c-erbB, rat c-myc, and a rat locus, dsi-1, had been selected for in retrovirus-induced tumors. Of the remaining four, two, designated dsi-3 and dsi-4, harbored acceptor sites for apparently unselected integrations of Moloney murine leukemia virus in a Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced thymoma, and two, designated C and F, harbored unselected acceptor sites for Moloney murine leukemia virus integrations in a rat fibroblast cell line. Each acceptor site mapped to within 500 base pairs of a DNase I-hypersensitive site. In the analyses of the unselected integrations, six hypersensitive sites were observed in 39 kilobases of DNA. The four acceptor sites in this DNA were localized between 0.05 and 0.43 kilobases of a hypersensitive site. The probability of this close association occurring by chance was calculated to be extremely low. Hypersensitive sites were mapped in cells representing the lineage in which integration had occurred as well as in an unrelated lineage. In six of the seven acceptor loci hypersensitive sites could not be detected in the unrelated lineage. Our results indicate that retroviruses preferentially integrate close to DNase I-hypersensitive sites and that many of these sites are expressed in some but not all cells. Images PMID:3490582

  3. Ligand-bound Structures and Site-directed Mutagenesis Identify the Acceptor and Secondary Binding Sites of Streptomyces coelicolor Maltosyltransferase GlgE*

    PubMed Central

    Syson, Karl; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Miah, Farzana; Barclay, J. Elaine; Tang, Minhong; Gorelik, Andrii; Rashid, Abdul M.; Lawson, David M.; Bornemann, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    GlgE is a maltosyltransferase involved in α-glucan biosynthesis in bacteria that has been genetically validated as a target for tuberculosis therapies. Crystals of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme diffract at low resolution so most structural studies have been with the very similar Streptomyces coelicolor GlgE isoform 1. Although the donor binding site for α-maltose 1-phosphate had been previously structurally defined, the acceptor site had not. Using mutagenesis, kinetics, and protein crystallography of the S. coelicolor enzyme, we have now identified the +1 to +6 subsites of the acceptor/product, which overlap with the known cyclodextrin binding site. The sugar residues in the acceptor subsites +1 to +5 are oriented such that they disfavor the binding of malto-oligosaccharides that bear branches at their 6-positions, consistent with the known acceptor chain specificity of GlgE. A secondary binding site remote from the catalytic center was identified that is distinct from one reported for the M. tuberculosis enzyme. This new site is capable of binding a branched α-glucan and is most likely involved in guiding acceptors toward the donor site because its disruption kinetically compromises the ability of GlgE to extend polymeric substrates. However, disruption of this site, which is conserved in the Streptomyces venezuelae GlgE enzyme, did not affect the growth of S. venezuelae or the structure of the polymeric product. The acceptor subsites +1 to +4 in the S. coelicolor enzyme are well conserved in the M. tuberculosis enzyme so their identification could help inform the design of inhibitors with therapeutic potential. PMID:27531751

  4. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicholas D; Regan, John M

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD(+), respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP(+), respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190 mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  5. Splicing-coupled 3' end formation requires a terminal splice acceptor site, but not intron excision.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lee; West, Steven

    2013-08-01

    Splicing of human pre-mRNA is reciprocally coupled to 3' end formation by terminal exon definition, which occurs co-transcriptionally. It is required for the final maturation of most human pre-mRNAs and is therefore important to understand. We have used several strategies to block splicing at specific stages in vivo and studied their effect on 3' end formation. We demonstrate that a terminal splice acceptor site is essential to establish coupling with the poly(A) signal in a chromosomally integrated β-globin gene. This is in part to alleviate the suppression of 3' end formation by U1 small nuclear RNA, which is known to bind pre-mRNA at the earliest stage of spliceosome assembly. Interestingly, blocks to splicing that are subsequent to terminal splice acceptor site function, but before catalysis, have little observable effect on 3' end formation. These data suggest that early stages of spliceosome assembly are sufficient to functionally couple splicing and 3' end formation, but that on-going intron removal is less critical. PMID:23716637

  6. Alternative 3' splice acceptor sites modulate enzymic activity in derivative alleles of the maize bronze1-mutable 13 allele.

    PubMed Central

    Okagaki, R J; Sullivan, T D; Schiefelbein, J W; Nelson, O E

    1992-01-01

    The defective Suppressor-mutator (dSpm)-induced allele bronze1-mutable 13 (bz1-m13) and many of its derivative alleles are leaky mutants with measurable levels of flavonol O3-glucosyltransferase activity. This activity results from splicing at acceptor site-1, one of two cryptic 3' splice sites within the dSpm insertion in bz1-m13. In this study, splicing in bz1-m13 change-in-state (CS) alleles CS-3 and CS-64 was shown to be altered from bz1-m13; previous work found altered splicing in CS-9. CS-64 is a null allele and lacks the acceptor site-1-spliced transcript because this site is deleted. CS-3 and CS-9 had increased levels of the acceptor site-1 transcript relative to bz1-m13 and increased enzymic activities. A deletion in CS-9 altered splicing by eliminating acceptor site-2. Both acceptor sites were intact in CS-3, but a deletion removed most of a 275-bp GC-rich sequence in dSpm. This suggests that GC-rich sequences affect splicing and is consistent with models postulating a role for AU content in the splicing of plant introns. Splicing does not necessarily occur, however, at the junction of AU-rich intron sequences and GC-rich exon sequences. PMID:1477558

  7. The metal-binding sites of glycose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Gilg, Kathrin; Mayer, Tobias; Ghaschghaie, Natascha; Klüfers, Peter

    2009-10-14

    In aqueous solution, the reducing sugar phosphates D-arabinose 5-phosphate, D-ribose 5-phosphate, D-fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, D-fructose 6-phosphate, D-glucose 6-phosphate and D-mannose 6-phosphate provide metal-binding sites at their glycose core on reaction with Pd(II)(en) or M(III)(tacn) residues (M = Ga, Co; en = ethylenediamine, tacn = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane). The individual species were detected by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The coordination patterns are related to the metal-binding modes of the respective parent glycoses. In detail, ribo- and arabinofuranose phosphate favour kappaO(1,3) coordination, whereas the ketofuranose core of fructose phosphate and fructose bisphosphate provides the kappaO(2,3) chelator thus maintaining the configuration of the respective major solution anomer. On palladium excess, D-fructose 6-phosphate is metallated twice in a unique kappaO(1,3):kappaO(2,4) metallation pattern. Dimetallation is also found for the aldohexose phosphates. A mixed glycose-core-phosphate chelation was detected for Pd(II)(en) and M(III)(tacn) residues with M = Al, Ga in the pH range just above the physiological pH for the D-fructose 1,6-bisphosphate ligand. The results are discussed in relation to D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate-metabolism in class-II aldolases. PMID:19771356

  8. New Splice Site Acceptor Mutation in AIRE Gene in Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Mireia; Hanzu, Felicia A.; Pradas-Juni, Marta; Aranda, Gloria B.; Halperin, Irene; Puig-Domingo, Manuel; Aguiló, Sira; Fernández-Rebollo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1, OMIM 240300) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by the presence of at least two of three major diseases: hypoparathyroidism, Addison’s disease, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. We aim to identify the molecular defects and investigate the clinical and mutational characteristics in an index case and other members of a consanguineous family. We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site acceptor (SSA) of intron 5 (c.653-1G>A) in two siblings with different clinical outcomes of APS-1. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that this AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the constitutive SSA of intron 5, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSA in intron 5. Surprisingly, the use of an alternative SSA entails the uncovering of a cryptic donor splice site in exon 5. This new transcript generates a truncated protein (p.A214fs67X) containing the first 213 amino acids and followed by 68 aberrant amino acids. The mutation affects the proper splicing, not only at the acceptor but also at the donor splice site, highlighting the complexity of recognizing suitable splicing sites and the importance of sequencing the intron-exon junctions for a more precise molecular diagnosis and correct genetic counseling. As both siblings were carrying the same mutation but exhibited a different APS-1 onset, and one of the brothers was not clinically diagnosed, our finding highlights the possibility to suspect mutations in the AIRE gene in cases of childhood chronic candidiasis and/or hypoparathyroidism otherwise unexplained, especially when the phenotype is associated with other autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988226

  9. A Novel SLC27A4 Splice Acceptor Site Mutation in Great Danes with Ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Julia; Wöhlke, Anne; Mischke, Reinhard; Hoffmann, Annalena; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Küch, Eva-Maria; Naim, Hassan Y.; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    Ichthyoses are a group of various different types of hereditary disorders affecting skin cornification. They are characterized by hyperkeratoses of different severity levels and are associated with a dry and scaling skin. Genome-wide association analysis of nine affected and 13 unaffected Great Danes revealed a genome-wide significant peak on chromosome 9 at 57–58 Mb in the region of SLC27A4. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA of SLC27A4 revealed the non-synonymous SNV SLC27A4:g.8684G>A in perfect association with ichthyosis-affection in Great Danes. The mutant transcript of SLC27A4 showed an in-frame loss of 54 base pairs in exon 8 probably induced by a new splice acceptor site motif created by the mutated A- allele of the SNV. Genotyping 413 controls from 35 different breeds of dogs and seven wolves revealed that this mutation could not be found in other populations except in Great Danes. Affected dogs revealed high amounts of mutant transcript but only low levels of the wild type transcript. Targeted analyses of SLC27A4 protein from skin tissues of three affected and two unaffected Great Danes indicated a markedly reduced or not detectable wild type and truncated protein levels in affected dogs but a high expression of wild type SLC27A4 protein in unaffected controls. Our data provide evidence of a new splice acceptor site creating SNV that results in a reduction or loss of intact SLC27A4 protein and probably explains the severe skin phenotype in Great Danes. Genetic testing will allow selective breeding to prevent ichthyosis-affected puppies in the future. PMID:26506231

  10. Single-site copper(II) water oxidation electrocatalysis: rate enhancements with HPO₄²⁻ as a proton acceptor at pH 8.

    PubMed

    Coggins, Michael K; Zhang, Ming-Tian; Chen, Zuofeng; Song, Na; Meyer, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    The complex Cu(II)(Py3P) (1) is an electrocatalyst for water oxidation to dioxygen in H2PO4(-)/HPO4(2-) buffered aqueous solutions. Controlled potential electrolysis experiments with 1 at pH 8.0 at an applied potential of 1.40 V versus the normal hydrogen electrode resulted in the formation of dioxygen (84% Faradaic yield) through multiple catalyst turnovers with minimal catalyst deactivation. The results of an electrochemical kinetics study point to a single-site mechanism for water oxidation catalysis with involvement of phosphate buffer anions either through atom-proton transfer in a rate-limiting O-O bond-forming step with HPO4(2-) as the acceptor base or by concerted electron-proton transfer with electron transfer to the electrode and proton transfer to the HPO4(2-) base. PMID:25243584

  11. 76 FR 38389 - Caraleigh Phosphate and Fertlizer Works Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... response costs concerning the Caraleigh Phosphate and Fertilizer Works Superfund Site located in Raleigh...-0534 or Site name Caraleigh Phosphate and Fertilizer Works Superfund Site by one of the...

  12. Splicing and spliceosome formation of the yeast MATa1 transcript require a minimum distance from the 5' splice site to the internal branch acceptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Köhrer, K; Domdey, H

    1988-01-01

    Small deletions of 6, 7, and 12 nucleotides introduced between the 5' splice site and the internal branch acceptor site of the first intron of the yeast MATa1 gene completely abolish accurate splicing in vitro in these constructs. Splicing only occurs at an alternative 5' splice site which was found in the first exon of the MATa1 gene and which is used both in vivo and in vitro. The splicing defect cannot be cured by expanding the distance from the branch point to the 3' splice site. If the alternative 5' splice site is deleted as well in these constructs, neither spliced products nor spliceosomes are formed. Our findings especially lead to the conclusion that a minimum distance between the 5' splice site and the internal branch acceptor site of the intron is required for the formation of splicing complexes and for accurate splicing. Images PMID:3054807

  13. Hexose phosphate binding sites of fructose-6-phosphate,2-kinase:fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Sakakibara, R.; Kitajima, S.; Hartman, F.C.; Uyeda, K.

    1984-11-25

    The hexose phosphate binding sites of a bifunctional enzyme, fructose-6-P,2-kinase:fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase were studied. N-Bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate is a competitive inhibitor with respect to fructose-6-P and a noncompetitive inhibitor with ATP (K/sub i/ = 0.8 mM). The reagent inactivates fructose-6-P,2-kinase but not fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, and the inactivation is prevented by fructose-6-P. The inactivation reaction follows pseudo first-order kinetics to completion and with increasing concentrations of N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate a rate saturation effect is observed. The concentration of the reagent giving the half-maximum inactivation is 2.2 mM and the apparent first order rate constant is 0.0046 s/sup -1/. The enzyme alkylated by N-bromoacetylethanolamine-P has lost over 90% of the kinase activity, retains nearly full activity of fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, and its inhibition by fructose-6-P is not altered. 3-Bromo-1,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 1,4-bisphosphate is also a competitive inhibitor of fructose-6-P,2-kinase with respect to fructose-6-P in the forward reaction and fructose-2,6-P/sub 2/ in the reverse direction. This reagent inhibits 93% of fructose-6-P,2-kinase but activated fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3.7-fold. 3-Bromo-1,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 1,4-bisphosphate alters the fructose-2,6-P/sub 2/ saturation kinetic curve from negative cooperativity to normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics with K/sub 0.5/ of 0.8 ..mu..M. The reagent, however, has no effect on the fructose-6-P inhibition of phosphatase. These results strongly suggest that hexose phosphate binding sites of fructose-6-P,2-kinase and fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase are distinct and located in different regions of this bifunctional enzyme. 19 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  14. The active centre of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase. The site that is labelled by glycidol phosphate.

    PubMed

    Miller, J C; Waley, S G

    1971-06-01

    1. Glycidol (2,3-epoxypropanol) phosphate is a specific irreversible inhibitor of rabbit muscle triose phosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.1); the site of attachment has now been studied. 2. The labelled enzyme was digested with pepsin and a modified peptide isolated. The sequence of the peptide is: Ala-Tyr-Glu-Pro-Val-Trp. 3. It is the glutamic acid residue in this peptide that is labelled: the peptide is thus a gamma-glutamyl ester derived from glycerol phosphoric acid. The same site is labelled by a mixture of glycidol and inorganic phosphate. 4. Kinetic and stereochemical features of these reactions are discussed.

  15. Importance of RNA secondary structure information for yeast donor and acceptor splice site predictions by neural networks.

    PubMed

    Marashi, Sayed-Amir; Goodarzi, Hani; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Eslahchi, Changiz; Pezeshk, Hamid

    2006-02-01

    Previously, Patterson et al. showed that mRNA structure information aids splice site prediction in human genes [Patterson, D.J., Yasuhara, K., Ruzzo, W.L., 2002. Pre-mRNA secondary structure prediction aids splice site prediction. Pac. Symp. Biocomput. 7, 223-234]. Here, we have attempted to predict splice sites in selected genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the information obtained from the secondary structures of corresponding mRNAs. From Ares database, 154 genes were selected and their structures were predicted by Mfold. We selected a 20-nucleotide window around each site, each containing 4 nucleotides in the exon region. Based on whether the nucleotide is in a stem or not, the conventional four-letter nucleotide alphabet was translated into an eight-letter alphabet. Two different three-layer-based perceptron neural networks were devised to predict the 5' and 3' splice sites. In case of 5' site determination, a network with 3 neurons at the hidden layer was chosen, while in case of 3' site 20 neurons acted more efficiently. Both neural nets were trained applying Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation method, using half of the available genes as training inputs and the other half for testing and cross-validations. Sequences with GUs and AGs non-sites were used as negative controls. The correlation coefficients in the predictions of 5' and 3' splice sites using eight-letter alphabet were 98.0% and 69.6%, respectively, while these values were 89.3% and 57.1% when four-letter alphabet is applied. Our results suggest that considering the secondary structure of mRNA molecules positively affects both donor and acceptor site predictions by increasing the capacity of neural networks in learning the patterns.

  16. Global transcriptional start site mapping in Geobacter sulfurreducens during growth with two different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    González, Getzabeth; Labastida, Aurora; Jímenez-Jacinto, Verónica; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Olvera, Maricela; Morett, Enrique; Juárez, Katy

    2016-09-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is an anaerobic soil bacterium that is involved in biogeochemical cycles of elements such as Fe and Mn. Although significant progress has been made in the understanding of the electron transfer processes in G. sulfurreducens, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms involved in their control. To expand the study of gene regulation in G. sulfurreducens, we carried out a genome-wide identification of transcription start sites (TSS) by 5'RACE and by deep RNA sequencing of primary mRNAs in two growth conditions. TSSs were identified along G. sulfurreducens genome and over 50% of them were located in the upstream region of the associated gene, and in some cases we detected genes with more than one TSS. Our global mapping of TSSs contributes with valuable information, which is needed for the study of transcript structure and transcription regulation signals and can ultimately contribute to the understanding of transcription initiation phenomena in G. sulfurreducens. PMID:27488344

  17. Genome-wide meta-analysis reveals common splice site acceptor variant in CHRNA4 associated with nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Hancock, D B; Reginsson, G W; Gaddis, N C; Chen, X; Saccone, N L; Lutz, S M; Qaiser, B; Sherva, R; Steinberg, S; Zink, F; Stacey, S N; Glasheen, C; Chen, J; Gu, F; Frederiksen, B N; Loukola, A; Gudbjartsson, D F; Brüske, I; Landi, M T; Bickeböller, H; Madden, P; Farrer, L; Kaprio, J; Kranzler, H R; Gelernter, J; Baker, T B; Kraft, P; Amos, C I; Caporaso, N E; Hokanson, J E; Bierut, L J; Thorgeirsson, T E; Johnson, E O; Stefansson, K

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a 1000 Genomes-imputed genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis for nicotine dependence, defined by the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence in 17 074 ever smokers from five European-ancestry samples. We followed up novel variants in 7469 ever smokers from five independent European-ancestry samples. We identified genome-wide significant association in the alpha-4 nicotinic receptor subunit (CHRNA4) gene on chromosome 20q13: lowest P=8.0 × 10(-9) across all the samples for rs2273500-C (frequency=0.15; odds ratio=1.12 and 95% confidence interval=1.08-1.17 for severe vs mild dependence). rs2273500-C, a splice site acceptor variant resulting in an alternate CHRNA4 transcript predicted to be targeted for nonsense-mediated decay, was associated with decreased CHRNA4 expression in physiologically normal human brains (lowest P=7.3 × 10(-4)). Importantly, rs2273500-C was associated with increased lung cancer risk (N=28 998, odds ratio=1.06 and 95% confidence interval=1.00-1.12), likely through its effect on smoking, as rs2273500-C was no longer associated with lung cancer after adjustment for smoking. Using criteria for smoking behavior that encompass more than the single 'cigarettes per day' item, we identified a common CHRNA4 variant with important regulatory properties that contributes to nicotine dependence and smoking-related consequences. PMID:26440539

  18. Characterization of an Additional Splice Acceptor Site Introduced into CYP4B1 in Hominoidae during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Oliver T.; Roellecke, Katharina; Freund, Marcel; Gombert, Michael; Lottmann, Nadine; Steward, Charles A.; Kramm, Christof M.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Rettie, Allan E.; Hanenberg, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    CYP4B1 belongs to the cytochrome P450 family 4, one of the oldest P450 families whose members have been highly conserved throughout evolution. The CYP4 monooxygenases typically oxidize fatty acids to both inactive and active lipid mediators, although the endogenous ligand(s) is largely unknown. During evolution, at the transition of great apes to humanoids, the CYP4B1 protein acquired a serine instead of a proline at the canonical position 427 in the meander region. Although this alteration impairs P450 function related to the processing of naturally occurring lung toxins, a study in transgenic mice suggested that an additional serine insertion at position 207 in human CYP4B1 can rescue the enzyme stability and activity. Here, we report that the genomic insertion of a CAG triplet at the intron 5–exon 6 boundary in human CYP4B1 introduced an additional splice acceptor site in frame. During evolution, this change occurred presumably at the stage of Hominoidae and leads to two major isoforms of the CYP4B1 enzymes of humans and great apes, either with or without a serine 207 insertion (insSer207). We further demonstrated that the CYP4B1 enzyme with insSer207 is the dominant isoform (76%) in humans. Importantly, this amino acid insertion did not affect the 4-ipomeanol metabolizing activities or stabilities of the native rabbit or human CYP4B1 enzymes, when introduced as transgenes in human primary cells and cell lines. In our 3D modeling, this functional neutrality of insSer207 is compatible with its predicted location on the exterior surface of CYP4B1 in a flexible side chain. Therefore, the Ser207 insertion does not rescue the P450 functional activity of human CYP4B1 that has been lost during evolution. PMID:26355749

  19. Genome-wide meta-analysis reveals common splice site acceptor variant in CHRNA4 associated with nicotine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, D B; Reginsson, G W; Gaddis, N C; Chen, X; Saccone, N L; Lutz, S M; Qaiser, B; Sherva, R; Steinberg, S; Zink, F; Stacey, S N; Glasheen, C; Chen, J; Gu, F; Frederiksen, B N; Loukola, A; Gudbjartsson, D F; Brüske, I; Landi, M T; Bickeböller, H; Madden, P; Farrer, L; Kaprio, J; Kranzler, H R; Gelernter, J; Baker, T B; Kraft, P; Amos, C I; Caporaso, N E; Hokanson, J E; Bierut, L J; Thorgeirsson, T E; Johnson, E O; Stefansson, K

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a 1000 Genomes–imputed genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis for nicotine dependence, defined by the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence in 17 074 ever smokers from five European-ancestry samples. We followed up novel variants in 7469 ever smokers from five independent European-ancestry samples. We identified genome-wide significant association in the alpha-4 nicotinic receptor subunit (CHRNA4) gene on chromosome 20q13: lowest P=8.0 × 10−9 across all the samples for rs2273500-C (frequency=0.15; odds ratio=1.12 and 95% confidence interval=1.08–1.17 for severe vs mild dependence). rs2273500-C, a splice site acceptor variant resulting in an alternate CHRNA4 transcript predicted to be targeted for nonsense-mediated decay, was associated with decreased CHRNA4 expression in physiologically normal human brains (lowest P=7.3 × 10−4). Importantly, rs2273500-C was associated with increased lung cancer risk (N=28 998, odds ratio=1.06 and 95% confidence interval=1.00–1.12), likely through its effect on smoking, as rs2273500-C was no longer associated with lung cancer after adjustment for smoking. Using criteria for smoking behavior that encompass more than the single ‘cigarettes per day' item, we identified a common CHRNA4 variant with important regulatory properties that contributes to nicotine dependence and smoking-related consequences. PMID:26440539

  20. cis-Acting sequences in addition to donor and acceptor sites are required for template switching during synthesis of plus-strand DNA for duck hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Havert, M B; Loeb, D D

    1997-01-01

    A characteristic of all hepadnaviruses is the relaxed-circular conformation of the DNA genome within an infectious virion. Synthesis of the relaxed-circular genome by reverse transcription requires three template switches. These template switches, as for the template switches or strand transfers of other reverse-transcribing genetic elements, require repeated sequences (the donor and acceptor sites) between which a complementary strand of nucleic acid is transferred. The mechanism for each of the template switches in hepadnaviruses is poorly understood. To determine whether sequences other than the donor and acceptor sites are involved in the template switches of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a series of molecular clones which express viral genomes bearing deletion mutations were analyzed. We found that three regions of the DHBV genome, which are distinct from the donor and acceptor sites, are required for the synthesis of relaxed-circular DNA. One region, located near the 3' end of the minus-strand template, is required for the template switch that circularizes the genome. The other two regions, located in the middle of the genome and near DR2, appear to be required for plus-strand primer translocation. We speculate that these cis-acting sequences may play a role in the organization of the minus-strand DNA template within the capsid particle so that it supports efficient template switching during plus-strand DNA synthesis. PMID:9188603

  1. Relationship between Nitrite Reduction and Active Phosphate Uptake in the Phosphate-Accumulating Denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. Strain JR 12

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Yoram; van Rijn, Jaap

    2000-01-01

    Phosphate uptake by the phosphate-accumulating denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. JR12 was examined with different combinations of electron and carbon donors and electron acceptors. Phosphate uptake in acetate-supplemented cells took place with either oxygen or nitrate but did not take place when nitrite served as the final electron acceptor. Furthermore, nitrite reduction rates by this denitrifier were shown to be significantly reduced in the presence of phosphate. Phosphate uptake assays in the presence of the H+-ATPase inhibitor N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), in the presence of the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), or with osmotic shock-treated cells indicated that phosphate transport over the cytoplasmic membrane of this bacterium was mediated by primary and secondary transport systems. By examining the redox transitions of whole cells at 553 nm we found that phosphate addition caused a significant oxidation of a c-type cytochrome. Based on these findings, we propose that this c-type cytochrome serves as an intermediate in the electron transfer to both nitrite reductase and the site responsible for active phosphate transport. In previous studies with this bacterium we found that the oxidation state of this c-type cytochrome was significantly higher in acetate-supplemented, nitrite-respiring cells (incapable of phosphate uptake) than in phosphate-accumulating cells incubated with different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. Based on the latter finding and results obtained in the present study it is suggested that phosphate uptake in this bacterium is subjected to a redox control of the active phosphate transport site. By means of this mechanism an explanation is provided for the observed absence of phosphate uptake in the presence of nitrite and inhibition of nitrite reduction by phosphate in this organism. The implications of these findings regarding denitrifying, phosphate removal wastewater plants is discussed. PMID

  2. Localization of the site for the nucleotide effectors of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase using site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mora, P; Rubio, V; Fresquet, V; Cervera, J

    1999-03-01

    Replacement by alanine of Ser-948, Thr-974 and Lys-954 of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) shows that these residues are involved in binding the allosteric inhibitor UMP and the activator IMP. The mutant CPSs are active in vivo and in vitro and exhibit normal activation by ornithine, but the modulation by both UMP and IMP is either lost or diminished. The results demonstrate that the sites for UMP and IMP overlap and that the activator ornithine binds elsewhere. Since the mutated residues were found in the crystal structure of CPS near a bound phosphate, Ser-948, Thr-974 and Lys-954 bind the phosphate moiety of UMP and IMP. PMID:10100629

  3. Inactive mutants of human pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase: a possible role for a noncatalytic pyridoxal 5'-phosphate tight binding site.

    PubMed

    Ghatge, Mohini S; Karve, Sayali S; David, Tanya M S; Ahmed, Mostafa H; Musayev, Faik N; Cunningham, Kendra; Schirch, Verne; Safo, Martin K

    2016-05-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) is a cofactor for many vitamin B6-requiring enzymes that are important for the synthesis of neurotransmitters. Pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase (PNPO) is one of two enzymes that produce PLP. Some 16 known mutations in human PNPO (hPNPO), including R95C and R229W, lead to deficiency of PLP in the cell and have been shown to cause neonatal epileptic encephalopathy (NEE). This disorder has no effective treatment, and is often fatal unless treated with PLP. In this study, we show that R95C hPNPO exhibits a 15-fold reduction in affinity for the FMN cofactor, a 71-fold decrease in affinity for the substrate PNP, a 4.9-fold decrease in specific activity, and a 343-fold reduction in catalytic activity, compared to the wild-type enzyme. We have reported similar findings for R229W hPNPO. This report also shows that wild-type, R95C and R229W hPNPO bind PLP tightly at a noncatalytic site and transfer it to activate an apo-B6 enzyme into the catalytically active holo-form. We also show for the first time that hPNPO forms specific interactions with several B6 enzymes with dissociation constants ranging from 0.3 to 12.3 μm. Our results suggest a possible in vivo role for the tight binding of PLP in hPNPO, whether wild-type or variant, by protecting the very reactive PLP, and transferring this PLP directly to activate apo-B6 enzymes. PMID:27419045

  4. Evaluation of selected benzoquinones, naphthoquinones, and anthraquinones as replacements for phylloquinone in the A sub 1 acceptor site of the photosystem I reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Biggins, J. )

    1990-08-07

    Selected substituted 1,4-benzoquinones, 1,4-naphthoquinones, and 9,10-anthraquinones were investigated as possible replacement quinones in spinach photosystem I (PSI) preparations that had been depleted of endogenous phylloquinone by extraction with hexane/methanol. As a criterion for successful biochemical reconstitution, the restoration of electron transfer was determined by measuring P-430 turnover at room temperature from flash-induced absorbance transients. Restoration of complete electron transfer between A{sub 0}{sup {minus}} and P-430 (terminal iron-sulfur centers, F{sub A}F{sub B}) was demonstrated by using phylloquinone, 2-methyl-3-decyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-methyl-3-(isoprenyl){sub 2}-1,4-naphthoquinone, and 2-methyl-3-(isoprenyl){sub 4}-1,4-naphthoquinone. All other quinones tested did not restore P-430 turnover but acted as electron acceptors and oxidized A{sub 0}{sup {minus}}. It is concluded that the specificity of the replacement quinone for interaction with the primary acceptor, A{sub 0}{sup {minus}}, is low but additional structural constraints are required for the quinone occupying the A{sub 1} site to donate to the iron-sulfur center, F{sub x}. It is suggested that the 3-phytyl side chain of phylloquinone and the 3-alkyl tails of the three naphthoquinones that restored P-430 turnover may be required for interaction with a hydrophobic domain of the A{sub 1} site in the PSI core to promote electron transfer to F{sub x} and then to F{sub A}F{sub B}.

  5. Reaction of phosphorylase-a with α-D-glucose 1-phosphate and maltodextrin acceptors to give products with degree of polymerization 6-89.

    PubMed

    Kazłowski, Bartosz; Ko, Yuan-Tih

    2014-06-15

    A series of linear glucan saccharides (GS) with defined quantity and degree of polymerization (DP) were synthesized from α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (α-d-Glc 1-P) by phosphorylase-a. The GS product fractions with average DP 11, 22, 38, 52, 60, 70, and 79 were measured by HPSEC-ELSD system. Then the same seven fractions were resolved into individual peaks with DP: 6-14, 10-32, 27-55, 37-67, 44-75, 49-83 and 53-89 by HPAEC-PAD system. Results showed that measurement of α-d-Glc 1-P amount consuming during GS synthesis by both systems enable calculation of reaction yield. The reaction yield for the 24h biosynthesis of the GS product was 25.3% (measured by HPSEC-ELSD) or 29.1% (measured by HPAEC-PAD). The HPSEC-ELSD and HPAEC-PAD systems were also successfully used for phosphorylase-a activity measurement in order to perform its kinetic characterization. This study established feasible systems for preparation of various sizes of the GS with defined DP and quantity as well as characterization of phosphorylase-a kinetics.

  6. Structural basis for phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Jorge, Carla D.; Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Kim, Minah; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Santos, Helena; Mancia, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol is critical for intracellular signalling and anchoring of carbohydrates and proteins to outer cellular membranes. The defining step in phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is catalysed by CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases, transmembrane enzymes that use CDP-diacylglycerol as donor substrate for this reaction, and either inositol in eukaryotes or inositol phosphate in prokaryotes as the acceptor alcohol. Here we report the structures of a related enzyme, the phosphatidylinositol-phosphate synthase from Renibacterium salmoninarum, with and without bound CDP-diacylglycerol to 3.6 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal the location of the acceptor site, and the molecular determinants of substrate specificity and catalysis. Functional characterization of the 40%-identical ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, supports the proposed mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis. This work therefore provides a structural and functional framework to understand the mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis.

  7. Structural basis for phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Jorge, Carla D.; Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Kim, Minah; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Santos, Helena; Mancia, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol is critical for intracellular signalling and anchoring of carbohydrates and proteins to outer cellular membranes. The defining step in phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is catalysed by CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases, transmembrane enzymes that use CDP-diacylglycerol as donor substrate for this reaction, and either inositol in eukaryotes or inositol phosphate in prokaryotes as the acceptor alcohol. Here we report the structures of a related enzyme, the phosphatidylinositol-phosphate synthase from Renibacterium salmoninarum, with and without bound CDP-diacylglycerol to 3.6 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal the location of the acceptor site, and the molecular determinants of substrate specificity and catalysis. Functional characterization of the 40%-identical ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, supports the proposed mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis. This work therefore provides a structural and functional framework to understand the mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis. PMID:26510127

  8. Further investigations on the inorganic phosphate binding site of beef heart mitochondrial F1-ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Pougeois, R.; Lauquin, G.J.

    1985-02-12

    The possibility that 4-azido-2-nitrophenyl phosphate (ANPP), a photoreactive derivative of inorganic phosphate (P /sub i/ ), could mimic ATP was investigated. ANPP was hydrolyzed in the dark by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ but not in the presence of ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. ANPP was not hydrolyzed by purified mitochondrial F1-ATPase; however, ADP and ATP protected F1-ATPase against ANPP photoinactivation. On the other hand, the trinitrophenyl nucleotide analogues (TNP-ADP, TNP-ATP, and TNP-AMP-PNP), which bind specifically at the two catalytic sites of F1-ATPase, abolished P /sub i/ binding on F1-ATPase; they do not protect F1-ATPase against ANPP photoinactivation. Furthermore, ANPP-photoinactivated F1-ATPase binds the TNP analogues in the same way as the native enzyme. The Pi binding site of F1-ATPase, which is shown to be photolabeled by ANPP, does not appear to be at the gamma-phosphate position of the catalytic sites.

  9. The phosphate site of trehalose phosphorylase from Schizophyllum commune probed by site-directed mutagenesis and chemical rescue studies.

    PubMed

    Goedl, Christiane; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2008-03-01

    Schizophyllum communealpha,alpha-trehalose phosphorylase utilizes a glycosyltransferase-like catalytic mechanism to convert its disaccharide substrate into alpha-d-glucose 1-phosphate and alpha-d-glucose. Recruitment of phosphate by the free enzyme induces alpha,alpha-trehalose binding recognition and promotes the catalytic steps. Like the structurally related glycogen phosphorylase and other retaining glycosyltransferases of fold family GT-B, the trehalose phosphorylase contains an Arg507-XXXX-Lys512 consensus motif (where X is any amino acid) comprising key residues of its putative phosphate-binding sub-site. Loss of wild-type catalytic efficiency for reaction with phosphate (kcat/Km=21,000 m(-1).s(-1)) was dramatic (>or=10(7)-fold) in purified Arg507-->Ala (R507A) and Lys512-->Ala (K512A) enzymes, reflecting a corresponding change of comparable magnitude in kcat (Arg507) and Km (Lys512). External amine and guanidine derivatives selectively enhanced the activity of the K512A mutant and the R507A mutant respectively. Analysis of the pH dependence of chemical rescue of the K512A mutant by propargylamine suggested that unprotonated amine in combination with H2PO4-, the protonic form of phosphate presumably utilized in enzymatic catalysis, caused restoration of activity. Transition state-like inhibition of the wild-type enzyme A by vanadate in combination with alpha,alpha-trehalose (Ki=0.4 microm) was completely disrupted in the R507A mutant but only weakened in the K512A mutant (Ki=300 microm). Phosphate (50 mm) enhanced the basal hydrolase activity of the K512A mutant toward alpha,alpha-trehalose by 60% but caused its total suppression in wild-type and R507A enzymes. The results portray differential roles for the side chains of Lys512 and Arg507 in trehalose phosphorylase catalysis, reactant state binding of phosphate and selective stabilization of the transition state respectively. PMID:18205830

  10. Impacts of phosphate amendments on lead biogeochemistry at a contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinde; Ma, Lena Q; Chen, Ming; Singh, Satya P; Harris, Willie G

    2002-12-15

    Soil amendments can be used to cost-effectively reduce the bioavailability and mobility of toxic metals in contaminated soils. In this study a field demonstration was conducted at a Pb-contaminated site to evaluate the effectiveness of P-induced Pb immobilization. Phosphate was applied at a 4.0 molar ratio of P to Pb with three treatments: T1, 100% of P from H3PO4; T2, 50% P from H3PO4 + 50% P from Ca(H2PO4)2; and T3, 50% P from H3PO4 + 5% phosphate rock. Phosphate amendments effectively transformed soil Pb from the nonresidual (sum of exchangeable, carbonate, Fe/Mn, and organic) to the residual fraction, with residual Pb increase by 19-48% for T1, 22-50% for T2, and 11-55% for T3, respectively. Lead immobilization was attributed to the P-induced formation of chloropyromorphite [Pb10(PO4)6Cl2], which was identified in the surface soil, subsurface soil, and plant rhizosphere soil. Occurrence of chloropyromorphite was evident 220 days after P addition for T1 and T2 treatments and 330 days for T3. Visual MINTEQ model and activity-ratio diagram indicated that lead phosphate minerals controlled Pb2+ activities in the P-treated soils. Phosphate treatments significantly reduced Pb translocation from the roots to the shoots in the St. Augustine grass (Stenotaphrum secundatum), possibly via the formation of chloropyromorphite on the cell walls of roots. This field observation suggested that P amendments are efficient in reducing Pb mobility via in situ formation of insoluble chloropyromorphite minerals at a field setting. Lead immobilization shows a long-term stability. A mixture of H3PO4 and phosphate rock yields the best overall results for in situ Pb immobilization, with less soil pH change and less P leaching. Application of combined H3PO4 with phosphate rock may provide an effective alternative to the current phosphate remediation technologies for contaminated soils.

  11. Oxygen as Acceptor.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    Like most bacteria, Escherichia coli has a flexible and branched respiratory chain that enables the prokaryote to live under a variety of environmental conditions, from highly aerobic to completely anaerobic. In general, the bacterial respiratory chain is composed of dehydrogenases, a quinone pool, and reductases. Substrate-specific dehydrogenases transfer reducing equivalents from various donor substrates (NADH, succinate, glycerophosphate, formate, hydrogen, pyruvate, and lactate) to a quinone pool (menaquinone, ubiquinone, and dimethylmenoquinone). Then electrons from reduced quinones (quinols) are transferred by terminal reductases to different electron acceptors. Under aerobic growth conditions, the terminal electron acceptor is molecular oxygen. A transfer of electrons from quinol to O₂ is served by two major oxidoreductases (oxidases), cytochrome bo₃ encoded by cyoABCDE and cytochrome bd encoded by cydABX. Terminal oxidases of aerobic respiratory chains of bacteria, which use O₂ as the final electron acceptor, can oxidize one of two alternative electron donors, either cytochrome c or quinol. This review compares the effects of different inhibitors on the respiratory activities of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd in E. coli. It also presents a discussion on the genetics and the prosthetic groups of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd. The E. coli membrane contains three types of quinones that all have an octaprenyl side chain (C₄₀). It has been proposed that the bo₃ oxidase can have two ubiquinone-binding sites with different affinities. "WHAT'S NEW" IN THE REVISED ARTICLE: The revised article comprises additional information about subunit composition of cytochrome bd and its role in bacterial resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stresses. Also, we present the novel data on the electrogenic function of appBCX-encoded cytochrome bd-II, a second bd-type oxidase that had been thought not to contribute to generation of a proton motive force in E

  12. Oxygen as Acceptor.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    Like most bacteria, Escherichia coli has a flexible and branched respiratory chain that enables the prokaryote to live under a variety of environmental conditions, from highly aerobic to completely anaerobic. In general, the bacterial respiratory chain is composed of dehydrogenases, a quinone pool, and reductases. Substrate-specific dehydrogenases transfer reducing equivalents from various donor substrates (NADH, succinate, glycerophosphate, formate, hydrogen, pyruvate, and lactate) to a quinone pool (menaquinone, ubiquinone, and dimethylmenoquinone). Then electrons from reduced quinones (quinols) are transferred by terminal reductases to different electron acceptors. Under aerobic growth conditions, the terminal electron acceptor is molecular oxygen. A transfer of electrons from quinol to O₂ is served by two major oxidoreductases (oxidases), cytochrome bo₃ encoded by cyoABCDE and cytochrome bd encoded by cydABX. Terminal oxidases of aerobic respiratory chains of bacteria, which use O₂ as the final electron acceptor, can oxidize one of two alternative electron donors, either cytochrome c or quinol. This review compares the effects of different inhibitors on the respiratory activities of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd in E. coli. It also presents a discussion on the genetics and the prosthetic groups of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd. The E. coli membrane contains three types of quinones that all have an octaprenyl side chain (C₄₀). It has been proposed that the bo₃ oxidase can have two ubiquinone-binding sites with different affinities. "WHAT'S NEW" IN THE REVISED ARTICLE: The revised article comprises additional information about subunit composition of cytochrome bd and its role in bacterial resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stresses. Also, we present the novel data on the electrogenic function of appBCX-encoded cytochrome bd-II, a second bd-type oxidase that had been thought not to contribute to generation of a proton motive force in E

  13. Water-quality and hydrogeologic data for three phosphate industry waste-disposal sites in central Florida, 1979-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Ronald L.; Sutcliffe, Horace

    1982-01-01

    This report is a complilation of geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data and information on test holes collected in the vicinity of gypsum stack complexes at two phosphate chemical plants and one phosphatic clayey waste disposal pond at a phosphate mine and beneficiation plant in central Florida. The data were collected from September 1979 to October 1980 at thee AMAX Phosphate, Inc., chemical plant, Piney Point; the USS AgriChemicals chemical plant, Bartow; and the International Minerals and Chemical Corporation Clear Springs mine, Bartow. Approximmmtely 5,400 field and laboratory water-quality determinations on water samples were collected from about 78 test holes and 31 surface-water, rainfall, and other sampling sites at phosphate industry beneficiation and chemical plant waste-disposal operations. Maps show locations of sampling sites. (USGS)

  14. Effects of phosphate neutralization on the shape of the AP-1 transcription factor binding site in duplex DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Tomky, L A; Strauss-Soukup, J K; Maher, L J

    1998-01-01

    Previous electrophoretic experiments suggest that the AP-1 site in duplex DNA bends in response to the pattern of amino acid charges distal to the basic region in bound bZIP proteins. The extent and direction of apparent DNA bending are consistent with the prediction that DNA will collapse locally upon asymmetric phosphate charge neutralization. To prove that asymmetric phosphate neutralization could produce the observed degree of DNA bending, the present experiments partially substitute anionic phosphate diesters in the AP-1 site with various numbers of neutral methylphosphonate linkages. DNA bending is induced toward the neutralized face of DNA. The degree of DNA bending induced by methylphosphonate substitution (approximately 3.5 degrees per neutralized phosphate) is comparable to that induced by GCN4 variants carrying increasing numbers of additional basic amino acids. It is plausible, therefore, that asymmetric phosphate neutralization is the cause of DNA bending in such complexes. PMID:9580678

  15. Effects of three phosphate industrial sites on ground-water quality in central Florida, 1979 to 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.L.; Sutcliffe, Horace

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, hydrologic, and water quality data and information on test holes collected in the vicinity of gypsum stack complexes at two phosphate chemical plants and one phosphatic clayey waste disposal pond at a phosphate mine and beneficiation plant in central Florida are presented. The data were collected from September 1979 to October 1980 at the AMAX Phosphate, Inc. chemical plant, Piney Point; the USS Agri-Chemicals chemical plant, Bartow; and the International Minerals and Chemical Corporation Clear Springs mine, Bartow. Approximately 5,400 field and laboratory water quality determinations on water samples collected from about 100 test holes and 28 surface-water , 5 rainfall, and other sampling sites at phosphate industry beneficiation and chemical plant waste disposal operations are tabulated. Maps are included to show sampling sites. (USGS)

  16. Splice acceptor site mutation of the transporter associated with antigen processing-1 gene in human bare lymphocyte syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Murata, Shigeo; Yabe, Toshio; Shimbara, Naoki; Keicho, Naoto; Kashiwase, Kouichi; Watanabe, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Yoshihide; Akaza, Tatsuya; Tadokoro, Kenji; Tohma, Shigeto; Inoue, Tetsufumi; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Keiji; Juji, Takeo

    1999-01-01

    Expression of histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on the cell surface depends on the heterodimer of the transporter associated with antigen processing 1 and 2 (TAP1 and TAP2), which transport peptides cleaved by proteasome to the class I molecules. Defects in the TAP2 protein have been reported in two families with HLA class I deficiency, the so-called bare lymphocyte syndrome (BLS) type I. We have, to our knowledge, identified for the first time a splice site mutation in the TAP1 gene of another BLS patient. In addition, class I heavy chains (HCs) did not form the normal complex with tapasin in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the cells of our patient. J. Clin. Invest. 103:649–652 (1999) PMID:10074494

  17. Regulation of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase. Evidence for overlap of the allosteric nucleotide binding sites.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, B; Meister, A

    1982-12-10

    Regulation of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase by UMP and IMP was examined in studies with various analogs of these nucleotides. Whereas UMP inhibits enzyme activity, the arabinose analog of UMP was found to be an activator. dUMP neither activates nor inhibits, but binds to the enzyme in a manner similar to UMP as evaluated by direct binding studies, sedimentation behavior, and ultraviolet difference spectral measurements. dUMP decreases inhibition by UMP and activation by IMP, but has no effect on activation by L-ornithine. The findings are in accord with the view that IMP and UMP bind to the same region of the enzyme; a possible general model for such overlapping binding sites is considered. Additional evidence is presented that inorganic phosphate can modulate regulation of the activity by nucleotides. Phosphate (and arsenate) markedly increase inhibition by UMP, decrease activation by IMP, but do not affect activation by L-ornithine. The extent of activation by IMP and by L-ornithine and that of inhibition by UMP are decreased when Mg2+ concentrations are increased relative to a fixed concentration of ATP. The findings suggest that the allosteric effectors may affect affinity of the enzyme for divalent metal ions as well as, as previously shown, the affinity of the enzyme for Mg-ATP. PMID:6754720

  18. Evidence for a reactive cysteine at the nucleotide binding site of spinach ribulose-5-phosphate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Omnaas, J.; Porter, M.A.; Hartman, F.C.

    1985-02-01

    Ribulose-5-phosphate kinase from spinach was rapidly inactivated by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate in a bimolecular fashion with a k2 of 2.0 m s at 2C and pH 8.0. Ribulose 5-phosphate had little effect on the rate of inactivation, whereas complete protection was afforded by ADP or ATP. The extent of incorporation as determined with UC-labeled reagent was about 1 molar equivalent per subunit in the presence of ATP with full retention of enzymatic activity, and about 2 molar equivalents per subunit in the completely inactivated enzyme. Amino acid analyses of enzyme derivatized with UC-labeled reagent reveal that all of the covalently incorporated reagent was associated with cysteinyl residues. Hence, two sulfhydryls are reactive, but the inactivation correlates with alkylation of one cysteinyl residue at or near the enzyme's nucleotide binding site. The kinase was also extremely sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagents 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and N-ethylmaleimide. The reactive sulfhydryl groups are likely to be those generated by reduction of a disulfide during activation. 20 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Bacterially produced calcium phosphate nanobiominerals: sorption capacity, site preferences, and stability of captured radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Handley-Sidhu, S; Hriljac, J A; Cuthbert, M O; Renshaw, J C; Pattrick, R A D; Charnock, J M; Stolpe, B; Lead, J R; Baker, S; Macaskie, L E

    2014-06-17

    A Serratia sp. bacterium manufactures amorphous calcium phosphate nanominerals (BHAP); this material has shown increased sorption capacity for divalent radionuclide capture. When heat-treated (≥450 °C) the cell biomass is removed and the biominerals are transformed to hydroxyapatite (HAP). Using a multimethod approach, we have elucidated both the site preferences and stability of analogue radionuclide incorporation for Sr, Co, Eu, and U. Strontium incorporates within the bulk amorphous inorganic phase of BHAP; however, once temperature modified to crystalline HAP, bonding was consistent with Sr substitution at the Ca(1) and/or Ca(2) sites. Cobalt incorporation occurs within the bulk inorganic amorphous phase of BHAP and within the amorphous grain boundaries of HAP. Europium (an analogue for trivalent actinides) substituted at the Ca(2) and/or the Ca(3) position of tricalcium phosphate, a known component of HAP grain boundaries. Uranium was surface complexed with no secondary minerals detected. With multiple sites for targeted radionuclide incorporation, high loadings, and good stability against remobilization, BHAP is shown to be a potential material for the remediation of aqueous radionuclide in groundwater. PMID:24823240

  20. Bacterially produced calcium phosphate nanobiominerals: sorption capacity, site preferences, and stability of captured radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Handley-Sidhu, S; Hriljac, J A; Cuthbert, M O; Renshaw, J C; Pattrick, R A D; Charnock, J M; Stolpe, B; Lead, J R; Baker, S; Macaskie, L E

    2014-06-17

    A Serratia sp. bacterium manufactures amorphous calcium phosphate nanominerals (BHAP); this material has shown increased sorption capacity for divalent radionuclide capture. When heat-treated (≥450 °C) the cell biomass is removed and the biominerals are transformed to hydroxyapatite (HAP). Using a multimethod approach, we have elucidated both the site preferences and stability of analogue radionuclide incorporation for Sr, Co, Eu, and U. Strontium incorporates within the bulk amorphous inorganic phase of BHAP; however, once temperature modified to crystalline HAP, bonding was consistent with Sr substitution at the Ca(1) and/or Ca(2) sites. Cobalt incorporation occurs within the bulk inorganic amorphous phase of BHAP and within the amorphous grain boundaries of HAP. Europium (an analogue for trivalent actinides) substituted at the Ca(2) and/or the Ca(3) position of tricalcium phosphate, a known component of HAP grain boundaries. Uranium was surface complexed with no secondary minerals detected. With multiple sites for targeted radionuclide incorporation, high loadings, and good stability against remobilization, BHAP is shown to be a potential material for the remediation of aqueous radionuclide in groundwater.

  1. Mutational analysis of the active site of indoleglycerol phosphate synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Darimont, B.; Stehlin, C.; Szadkowski, H.; Kirschner, K.

    1998-01-01

    Indoleglycerol phosphate synthase catalyzes the ring closure of 1-(2-carboxyphenylamino)-1-deoxyribulose 5'-phosphate to indoleglycerol phosphate, the fifth step in the pathway of tryptophan biosynthesis from chorismate. Because chemical synthesis of indole derivatives from arylamino ketones requires drastic solvent conditions, it is interesting by what mechanism the enzyme catalyzes the same condensation reaction. Seven invariant polar residues in the active site of the enzyme from Escherichia coli have been mutated directly or randomly, to identify the catalytically essential ones. A strain of E. coli suitable for selecting and classifying active mutants by functional complementation was constructed by precise deletion of the trpC gene from the genome. Judged by growth rates of transformants on selective media, mutants with either S58 or S60 replaced by alanine were indistinguishable from the wild-type, but R186 replaced by alanine was still partially active. Saturation random mutagenesis of individual codons showed that E53 was partially replaceable by aspartate and cysteine, whereas K114, E163, and N184 could not be replaced by any other residue. Partially active mutant proteins were purified and their steady-state kinetic and inhibitor binding constants determined. Their relative catalytic efficiencies paralleled their relative complementation efficiencies. These results are compatible with the location of the essential residues in the active site of the enzyme and support a chemically plausible catalytic mechanism. It involves two enzyme-bound intermediates and general acid-base catalysis by K114 and E163 with the support of E53 and N184. PMID:9605328

  2. Mechanism of allosteric modulation of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase probed by site-directed mutagenesis of ornithine site residues.

    PubMed

    Rochera, Lourdes; Fresquet, Vicente; Rubio, Vicente; Cervera, Javier

    2002-03-13

    The role of residues of the ornithine activator site is probed by mutagenesis in Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS). Mutations E783A, E783L, E892A and E892L abolish ornithine binding, E783D and T1042V decrease 2-3 orders of magnitude and E892D decreased 10-fold apparent affinity for ornithine. None of the mutations inactivates CPS. E783 mutations hamper carbamate phosphorylation and increase K(+) and MgATP requirements, possibly by perturbing the K(+)-loop near the carbamate phosphorylation site. Mutation E892A activates the enzyme similarly to ornithine, possibly by altering the position of K891 at the opening of the tunnel that delivers the carbamate to its phosphorylation site. T1042V also influences modulation by IMP and UMP, supporting signal transmission from the nucleotide effector to the ornithine site mediated by a hydrogen bond network involving T1042. Ornithine activation of CPS may be mediated by K(+)-loop and tunnel gating changes. PMID:11943174

  3. Required allosteric effector site for N-acetylglutamate on carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I.

    PubMed

    McCudden, C R; Powers-Lee, S G

    1996-07-26

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I (CPSase I) catalyzes the entry and rate-limiting step in the urea cycle, the pathway by which mammals detoxify ammonia. One facet of CPSase I regulation is a requirement for N-acetylglutamate (AGA), which induces an active enzyme conformation and does not participate directly in the chemical reaction. We have utilized labeling with carbodiimide-activated [14C]AGA to identify peptides 120-127, 234-237, 625-630, and 1351-1356 as potentially being near the binding site for AGA. Identification of peptide 1351-1356 confirms the previous demonstration (Rodriquez-Aparicio, L. B., Guadalajara, A. M., and Rubio, V.(1989) Biochemistry 28, 3070-3074) that the C-terminal region is involved in binding AGA. Identification of peptides 120-127 and 234-237 constitutes the first evidence that the N-terminal region of the synthetase is involved in ligand binding. Since peptides 631-638 and 1327-1348 have been identified near the ATP site of CPSase I (Potter, M. D., and Powers-Lee, S. G.(1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 2023-2031), the present finding of involvement of peptides 625-630 and 1351-1356 at an "allosteric" activator site was unexpected. The idea that portions of the AGA effector site might be derived from an ancestral glutamine substrate site via a gene duplication and diversification event was considered. PMID:8663466

  4. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 reporter mice reveal receptor activation sites in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Mari; Tucker, Ana E.; Tran, Jennifer; Bergner, Jennifer B.; Turner, Ewa M.; Proia, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the GPCR sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates key physiological processes. S1P1 activation also has been implicated in pathologic processes, including autoimmunity and inflammation; however, the in vivo sites of S1P1 activation under normal and disease conditions are unclear. Here, we describe the development of a mouse model that allows in vivo evaluation of S1P1 activation. These mice, known as S1P1 GFP signaling mice, produce a S1P1 fusion protein containing a transcription factor linked by a protease cleavage site at the C terminus as well as a β-arrestin/protease fusion protein. Activated S1P1 recruits the β-arrestin/protease, resulting in the release of the transcription factor, which stimulates the expression of a GFP reporter gene. Under normal conditions, S1P1 was activated in endothelial cells of lymphoid tissues and in cells in the marginal zone of the spleen, while administration of an S1P1 agonist promoted S1P1 activation in endothelial cells and hepatocytes. In S1P1 GFP signaling mice, LPS-mediated systemic inflammation activated S1P1 in endothelial cells and hepatocytes via hematopoietically derived S1P. These data demonstrate that S1P1 GFP signaling mice can be used to evaluate S1P1 activation and S1P1-active compounds in vivo. Furthermore, this strategy could be potentially applied to any GPCR to identify sites of receptor activation during normal physiology and disease. PMID:24667638

  5. Associative Memory Acceptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Roger

    The properties of an associative memory are examined in this paper from the viewpoint of automata theory. A device called an associative memory acceptor is studied under real-time operation. The family "L" of languages accepted by real-time associative memory acceptors is shown to properly contain the family of languages accepted by one-tape,…

  6. Disruption of NAD+ binding site in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase affects its intranuclear interactions

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia; Mishra, Anurag; Barrero, Carlos; Merali, Salim; Gothe, Scott A; Krynetskiy, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize phosphorylation of human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and mobility of GAPDH in cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS: We used proteomics analysis to detect and characterize phosphorylation sites within human GAPDH. Site-specific mutagenesis and alanine scanning was then performed to evaluate functional significance of phosphorylation sites in the GAPDH polypeptide chain. Enzymatic properties of mutated GAPDH variants were assessed using kinetic studies. Intranuclear dynamics parameters (diffusion coefficient and the immobile fraction) were estimated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments and confocal microscopy. Molecular modeling experiments were performed to estimate the effects of mutations on NAD+ cofactor binding. RESULTS: Using MALDI-TOF analysis, we identified novel phosphorylation sites within the NAD+ binding center of GAPDH at Y94, S98, and T99. Using polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-T99-containing peptide within GAPDH, we demonstrated accumulation of phospho-T99-GAPDH in the nuclear fractions of A549, HCT116, and SW48 cancer cells after cytotoxic stress. We performed site-mutagenesis, and estimated enzymatic properties, intranuclear distribution, and intranuclear mobility of GAPDH mutated variants. Site-mutagenesis at positions S98 and T99 in the NAD+ binding center reduced enzymatic activity of GAPDH due to decreased affinity to NAD+ (Km = 741 ± 257 μmol/L in T99I vs 57 ± 11.1 µmol/L in wild type GAPDH. Molecular modeling experiments revealed the effect of mutations on NAD+ binding with GAPDH. FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching) analysis showed that mutations in NAD+ binding center of GAPDH abrogated its intranuclear interactions. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest an important functional role of phosphorylated amino acids in the NAD+ binding center in GAPDH interactions with its intranuclear partners. PMID:26629320

  7. Myb-binding site regulates the expression of glucosamine-6-phosphate isomerase in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Tabata, K; Matsuda, Y; Viller, E; Masamune, Y; Katayama, T; Yasukawa, H

    2001-10-01

    A homolog of the glucosamine-6-phosphate isomerase in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum has been analyzed. The gene disruption mutant was arrested at the mound stage, demonstrating that the gene is important for development. The gene was expressed in vegetatively growing cells, silenced on starvation and expressed again in prestalk cells during the multicellular stages. The upstream region of the gene (1376 bp relative to ATG) was cloned and sequenced to study the transcription control mechanisms. Analysis of deletion mutants and a site-directed mutant indicated that the Myb-binding sequence (5'-AACTG-3') localized in the upstream region is important for gene expression. The results of gel-shift assays showed the presence of an Myb-related protein binding to the sequence at the growing phase and another protein binding to the sequence at developmental stages. PMID:11576175

  8. Overview of Phosphate-Based Remediation Technologies At The Hanford Site, Richland Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, K. M.; Fruchter, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Phosphate-based technologies have been tested to sequester strontium-90 and uranium at the Hanford Site, part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)nuclear weapons complex that encompasses approximately 586 square miles in southeast Washington State. The Columbia River flows through the site (Hanford Reach) where localized groundwater plumes upwell into the river. Efforts to reduce the flux of Sr-90 to the Columbia River from Hanford Site 100-N Area past practice liquid waste disposal sites have been underway since the early 1990s. Termination of all liquid discharges to the ground in 1993 was a major step toward meeting this goal. However, Sr 90 adsorbed onto sediment beneath liquid waste disposal sites, and onto sediment that extends beneath the near-shore riverbed, remains a continuing contaminant source for impacting groundwater and the Columbia River. Initial remediation efforts using a pump-and treat system proved to be ineffective as a long-term solution because of the geochemical characteristics of Sr-90. Following an evaluation of potential Sr-90 treatment technologies and their applicability under 100-N Area hydrogeologic conditions, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed to evaluate apatite sequestration as the primary remedial technology, combined with a secondary polishing step utilizing phytoextraction if necessary. DOE is also evaluating the efficacy of using polyphosphate to reduce uranium concentrations in the groundwater with the goal of meeting drinking water standards (30 μg/L). This technology works by forming phosphate minerals (autunite and apatite) in the aquifer that directly sequester the existing aqueous uranium in autunite minerals and precipitates apatite minerals for sorption and long-term treatment of uranium migrating into the treatment zone, thus reducing current and future aqueous uranium concentrations. These remedial technologies are being developed by Pacific Northwest National

  9. Evidence for abasic site sugar phosphate-mediated cytotoxicity in alkylating agent treated Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Heacock, Michelle; Poltoratsky, Vladimir; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H

    2012-01-01

    To better understand alkylating agent-induced cytotoxicity and the base lesion DNA repair process in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we replaced the RAD27(FEN1) open reading frame (ORF) with the ORF of the bifunctional human repair enzyme DNA polymerase (Pol) β. The aim was to probe the effect of removal of the incised abasic site 5'-sugar phosphate group (i.e., 5'-deoxyribose phosphate or 5'-dRP) in protection against methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced cytotoxicity. In S. cerevisiae, Rad27(Fen1) was suggested to protect against MMS-induced cytotoxicity by excising multinucleotide flaps generated during repair. However, we proposed that the repair intermediate with a blocked 5'-end, i.e., 5'-dRP group, is the actual cytotoxic lesion. In providing a 5'-dRP group removal function mediated by dRP lyase activity of Pol β, the effects of the 5'-dRP group were separated from those of the multinucleotide flap itself. Human Pol β was expressed in S. cerevisiae, and this partially rescued the MMS hypersensitivity observed with rad27(fen1)-null cells. To explore this rescue effect, altered forms of Pol β with site-directed eliminations of either the 5'-dRP lyase or polymerase activity were expressed in rad27(fen1)-null cells. The 5'-dRP lyase, but not the polymerase activity, conferred the resistance to MMS. These results suggest that after MMS exposure, the 5'-dRP group in the repair intermediate is cytotoxic and that Rad27(Fen1) protection against MMS in wild-type cells is due to elimination of the 5'-dRP group. PMID:23144716

  10. Mutation of active site serine residue with cysteine displays change in acyl-acceptor preference of β-peptidyl aminopeptidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Arima, Jiro; Tanaka, Ayumi; Morimoto, Masazumi; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2014-02-01

    A β-peptidyl aminopeptidase, a peptidase belonging to the P1 family, catalyzes aminolysis in accordance with its hydrolytic activity. We specifically examined β-peptidyl aminopeptidase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (BapF) to assess the effects of mutation of catalytic Ser with Cys or Thr on its catalytic ability. Recombinant BapF and its S237C mutant exhibited p-nitroaniline release activity toward β-homo-Gly-p-nitroanilide (βhGly-pNA), but the products of the enzyme reaction differed completely from one another. Wild-type BapF showed βhGly-βhGly-pNA synthetic activity, but the product vanished in a few minutes and converted to free βhGly. In contrast, the product βhGly-βhGly-pNA was synthesized by S237C BapF efficiently without degradation, indicating that because of the mutation, the enzyme came to recognize only the amine group as an acyl acceptor instead of water. Furthermore, a difference in acyl acceptor preference between that of wild type and S237C BapF was observed. When using cysteamine as an acyl acceptor, βhGly-cysteamine was synthesized only in the reaction using S237C BapF. In contrast, S237C BapF was unable to synthesize βhGly-cystamine when using cystamine as an acyl acceptor, although it was synthesized by wild-type BapF. Such a dynamic change in the acyl acceptor by the mutation of catalytic Ser with Cys is regarded as a unique feature of family P1 peptidases.

  11. Structural definition of the active site and catalytic mechanism of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Zheng, Y.-J.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-08

    X-ray crystal structures of L-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase from Magnaporthe grisea are reported for the E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, E-{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Mg{sup 2+}, E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Mn{sup 2+}, E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Mn{sup 2+}-glycerol, and E-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Zn{sup 2+} complexes with resolutions that extend to 1.55, 0.98, 1.60, 1.16, and 1.00 {angstrom}, respectively. Active-site residues of the homodimer are fully defined. The structures were used to model the substrate ribulose 5-phosphate in the active site with the phosphate group anchored at the sulfate site and the placement of the ribulose group guided by the glycerol site. The model includes two Mg{sup 2+} cations that bind to the oxygen substituents of the C2, C3, C4, and phosphate groups of the substrate, the side chains of Glu37 and His153, and water molecules. The position of the metal cofactors and the substrate's phosphate group are further stabilized by an extensive hydrogen-bond and salt-bridge network. On the basis of their proximity to the substrate's reaction participants, the imidazole of an Asp99-His136 dyad from one subunit, the side chains of the Asp41, Cys66, and Glu174 residues from the other subunit, and Mg{sup 2+}-activated water molecules are proposed to serve specific roles in the catalytic cycle as general acid-base functionalities. The model suggests that during the 1,2-shift step of the reaction, the substrate's C3 and C4 hydroxyl groups are cis to each other. A cis transition state is calculated to have an activation barrier that is 2 kcal/mol greater than that of the trans transition state in the absence of the enzyme.

  12. Inhibition and site modification of human hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S.H.; Park, Y.H.; Kim, I.S.; Woo, K.

    1987-05-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate(PLP) modification of human hepatitis B virus (H3V) DNA polymerase was attempted in order to characterize the nature of the enzyme. Dane particle cores isolated from serum of a chronic HBV carrier by sucrose density gradient centrifugation contained DNA polymerase activity, and the enzyme activity was inhibited specifically by PLP in noncompetitive fashion with respective to dNTP. Kinetic study indicates that HBV DNA polymerase has a Km of 0.31..mu..M for dTTP and an apparent Ki of 2mM for PLP. Sodium borohydride reduction of PLP-HEV core particles caused almost complete inhibition of HBV DNA polymerase activity. Reduction of PLP-HBV core particles by /sup 3/H labeled NaBH4 followed by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out, and the fluorography of the SDS polyacrylamide gel revealed 3 major bands corresponding to molecular weights of 21,000, 80,000 and > 100,000. Dane particle associated DNA polymerase inhibition by PLP is mediated through Schiff's base formation with a free amino group present at catalytic site of the enzyme. A core protein having an approximate molecular weight of 80,000 is considered as HBV DNA polymerase.

  13. Alteration of the Donor/Acceptor Spectrum of the (S)-Amine Transaminase from Vibrio fluvialis

    PubMed Central

    Genz, Maika; Vickers, Clare; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Dörr, Mark; Höhne, Matthias; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.

    2015-01-01

    To alter the amine donor/acceptor spectrum of an (S)-selective amine transaminase (ATA), a library based on the Vibrio fluvialis ATA targeting four residues close to the active site (L56, W57, R415 and L417) was created. A 3DM-derived alignment comprising fold class I pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes allowed identification of positions, which were assumed to determine substrate specificity. These positions were targeted for mutagenesis with a focused alphabet of hydrophobic amino acids to convert an amine:α-keto acid transferase into an amine:aldehyde transferase. Screening of 1200 variants revealed three hits, which showed a shifted amine donor/acceptor spectrum towards aliphatic aldehydes (mainly pentanal), as well as an altered pH profile. Interestingly, all three hits, although found independently, contained the same mutation R415L and additional W57F and L417V substitutions. PMID:26569229

  14. Alteration of the Donor/Acceptor Spectrum of the (S)-Amine Transaminase from Vibrio fluvialis.

    PubMed

    Genz, Maika; Vickers, Clare; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Dörr, Mark; Höhne, Matthias; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2015-01-01

    To alter the amine donor/acceptor spectrum of an (S)-selective amine transaminase (ATA), a library based on the Vibrio fluvialis ATA targeting four residues close to the active site (L56, W57, R415 and L417) was created. A 3DM-derived alignment comprising fold class I pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes allowed identification of positions, which were assumed to determine substrate specificity. These positions were targeted for mutagenesis with a focused alphabet of hydrophobic amino acids to convert an amine:α-keto acid transferase into an amine:aldehyde transferase. Screening of 1200 variants revealed three hits, which showed a shifted amine donor/acceptor spectrum towards aliphatic aldehydes (mainly pentanal), as well as an altered pH profile. Interestingly, all three hits, although found independently, contained the same mutation R415L and additional W57F and L417V substitutions. PMID:26569229

  15. Identification of a low affinity mannose 6-phosphate-binding site in domain 5 of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sreelatha T; Chai, Wengang; Childs, Robert A; Page, Jimmy D; Feizi, Ten; Dahms, Nancy M

    2004-09-10

    The 300-kDa cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) and the 46-kDa cation-dependent MPR (CD-MPR) are type I integral membrane glycoproteins that play a critical role in the intracellular delivery of newly synthesized mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P)-containing acid hydrolases to the lysosome. The extracytoplasmic region of the CI-MPR contains 15 contiguous domains, and the two high affinity ( approximately 1 nm) Man-6-P-binding sites have been mapped to domains 1-3 and 9, with essential residues localized to domains 3 and 9. Domain 5 of the CI-MPR exhibits significant sequence homology to domains 3 and 9 as well as to the CD-MPR. A structure-based sequence alignment was performed that predicts that domain 5 contains the four conserved key residues (Gln, Arg, Glu, and Tyr) identified as essential for carbohydrate recognition by the CD-MPR and domains 3 and 9 of the CI-MPR, but lacks two cysteine residues predicted to form a disulfide bond within the binding pocket. To determine whether domain 5 harbors a carbohydrate-binding site, a construct that encodes domain 5 alone (Dom5His) was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Microarray analysis using 30 different oligosaccharides demonstrated that Dom5His bound specifically to a Man-6-P-containing oligosaccharide (pentamannosyl 6-phosphate). Frontal affinity chromatography showed that the affinity of Dom5His for Man-6-P was approximately 300-fold lower (K(i) = 5.3 mm) than that observed for domains 1-3 and 9. The interaction affinity for the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase was also much lower (K(d) = 54 microm) as determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the CI-MPR contains a third Man-6-P recognition site that is located in domain 5 and that exhibits lower affinity than the carbohydrate-binding sites present in domains 1-3 and 9. PMID:15252023

  16. Photolabeling of the phosphate binding site of mitochondrial F1-ATPase by (/sup 32/P)azidonitrophenyl phosphate. Identification of the photolabeled amino acid residues

    SciTech Connect

    Garin, J.; Michel, L.; Dupuis, A.; Issartel, J.P.; Lunardi, J.; Hoppe, J.; Vignais, P.

    1989-02-21

    (/sup 32/P)Azidonitrophenyl phosphate ((/sup 32/P)ANPP) is a photoactivatable analogue of Pi. It competes efficiently with Pi for binding to the F1 sector of beef heart mitochondrial ATPase and photolabels the Pi binding site located in the beta subunit of F1. By cleavage of the photolabeled beta subunit of F1 with cyanogen bromide, trypsin, and chymotrypsin, bound (/sup 32/P)ANPP was localized in a fragment spanning Thr 299-Phe 326. By Edman degradation of the radiolabeled tryptic peptide spanning Ile 296-Arg 337, (/sup 32/P)ANPP was found to be attached covalently by its photoreactive group to Ile 304, Gln 308, and Tyr 311. These results are discussed in terms of a model in which the phosphate group of (/sup 32/P)ANPP interacts with a glycine-rich sequence of the beta subunit, spanning Gly 156-Lys 162, which is spatially close to the photolabeled Ile 304-Tyr 311 segment of the same subunit.

  17. Substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site of a clostridial alcohol dehydrogenase lead to unexpected changes in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Danielle J; Patrick, Wayne M; Gerth, Monica L

    2015-08-01

    Changing the cofactor specificity of an enzyme from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2'-phosphate (NADPH) to the more abundant NADH is a common strategy for increasing overall enzyme efficiency in microbial metabolic engineering. The aim of this study was to switch the cofactor specificity of the primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium autoethanogenum, a bacterium with considerable promise for the bio-manufacturing of fuels and other petrochemicals, from strictly NADPH-dependent to NADH-dependent. We used insights from a homology model to build a site-saturation library focussed on residue S199, the position deemed most likely to disrupt binding of the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. Although the CaADH(S199X) library did not yield any NADH-dependent enzymes, it did reveal that substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site can cause unanticipated changes in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Using consensus-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to create an enzyme that was stringently NADH-dependent, albeit with a concomitant reduction in activity. This study highlights the role that distal residues play in substrate specificity and the complexity of enzyme-cofactor interactions.

  18. Structural Diversity Within the Mononuclear and Binuclear Active Sites of N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Deacetylase

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,R.; Brown, S.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Xu, C.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Raushel, F.

    2007-01-01

    NagA catalyzes the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate to D-glucosamine-6-phosphate and acetate. X-ray crystal structures of NagA from Escherichia coli were determined to establish the number and ligation scheme for the binding of zinc to the active site and to elucidate the molecular interactions between the protein and substrate. The three-dimensional structures of the apo-NagA, Zn-NagA, and the D273N mutant enzyme in the presence of a tight-binding N-methylhydroxyphosphinyl-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate inhibitor were determined. The structure of the Zn-NagA confirms that this enzyme binds a single divalent cation at the beta-position in the active site via ligation to Glu-131, His-195, and His-216. A water molecule completes the ligation shell, which is also in position to be hydrogen bonded to Asp-273. In the structure of NagA bound to the tight binding inhibitor that mimics the tetrahedral intermediate, the methyl phosphonate moiety has displaced the hydrolytic water molecule and is directly coordinated to the zinc within the active site. The side chain of Asp-273 is positioned to activate the hydrolytic water molecule via general base catalysis and to deliver this proton to the amino group upon cleavage of the amide bond of the substrate. His-143 is positioned to help polarize the carbonyl group of the substrate in conjunction with Lewis acid catalysis by the bound zinc. The inhibitor is bound in the {alpha}-configuration at the anomeric carbon through a hydrogen bonding interaction of the hydroxyl group at C-1 with the side chain of His-251. The phosphate group of the inhibitor attached to the hydroxyl at C-6 is ion paired with Arg-227 from the adjacent subunit. NagA from Thermotoga maritima was shown to require a single divalent cation for full catalytic activity.

  19. The acceptor and site specificity of alpha 3-fucosyltransferase V. High reactivity of the proximal and low of the distal galbeta 1-4GlcNAc unit in i-type polylactosamines.

    PubMed

    Pykäri, M; Toivonen, S; Natunen, J; Niemela, R; Salminen, H; Aitio, O; Ekström, M; Parmanne, P; Välimäki, M; Alais, J; Augé, C; Lowe, J B; Renkonen, O; Renkonen, R

    2000-12-22

    We report here on in vitro acceptor and site specificity of recombinant alpha3-fucosyltransferase V (Fuc-TV) with 40 oligosaccharide acceptors. Galbeta1-4GlcNAc (LN) and GalNAcbeta1-4GlcNAc (LDN) reacted rapidly; Galbeta1-3GlcNAc (LNB) reacted moderately, and GlcNAcbeta1-4GlcNAc (N, N'-diacetyl-chitobiose) reacted slowly yet distinctly. In neutral and terminally alpha3-sialylated polylactosamines of i-type, the reducing end LN unit reacted rapidly and the distal (sialyl)LN group very slowly; the midchain LNs revealed intermediate reactivities. The data suggest that a distal LN neighbor enhances but a proximal LN neighbor reduces the reactivity of the midchain LNs. This implies that Fuc-TV may bind preferably the tetrasaccharide sequence Galbeta1-4GlcNAcbeta1-3Galbeta1-4GlcNAc for transfer at the underlined monosaccharide. Terminal alpha3-sialylation of i-type polylactosamines almost doubled the reactivities of the LN units at all positions of the chains. We conclude that, in comparison with human Fuc-TIV and Fuc-TIX, Fuc-TV reacted with a highly distinct site specificity with i-type polylactosamines. The Fuc-TV reactivity of free LNB resembled that of LNBbeta1-3'R of a polylactosamine, contrasting strongly with the dissimilarity of the reactivities of the analogous pair of LN and LNbeta1-3'R. This observation supports the notion that LN and LNB may be functionally bound at distinct sites on Fuc-TV surface. Our data show that Fuc-TV worked well with a very wide range of LN-glycans, showing weak reactivity only with distal (sialyl)LN units of i-type polylactosamines, biantennary N-glycans, and I branches of polylactosamines.

  20. Dehydration of lactic acid to acrylic acid over lanthanum phosphate catalysts: the role of Lewis acid sites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Theng, De Sheng; Tang, Karen Yuanting; Zhang, Lili; Huang, Lin; Borgna, Armando; Wang, Chuan

    2016-09-14

    Lanthanum phosphate (LaP) nano-rods were synthesized using n-butylamine as a shape-directing agent (SDA). The resulting catalysts were applied in the dehydration of lactic acid to acrylic acid. Aiming to understand the nature of the active sites, the chemical and physical properties of LaP materials were studied using a variety of characterization techniques. This study showed that the SDA not only affected the porosity of the LaP materials but also modified the acid-base properties. Clearly, the modification of the acid-base properties played a more critical role in determining the catalytic performance than porosity. An optimized catalytic performance was obtained on the LaP catalyst with a higher concentration of Lewis acid sites. Basic sites showed negative effects on the stability of the catalysts. Good stability was achieved when the catalyst was prepared using the appropriate SDA/La ratio. PMID:27514871

  1. Dehydration of lactic acid to acrylic acid over lanthanum phosphate catalysts: the role of Lewis acid sites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Theng, De Sheng; Tang, Karen Yuanting; Zhang, Lili; Huang, Lin; Borgna, Armando; Wang, Chuan

    2016-09-14

    Lanthanum phosphate (LaP) nano-rods were synthesized using n-butylamine as a shape-directing agent (SDA). The resulting catalysts were applied in the dehydration of lactic acid to acrylic acid. Aiming to understand the nature of the active sites, the chemical and physical properties of LaP materials were studied using a variety of characterization techniques. This study showed that the SDA not only affected the porosity of the LaP materials but also modified the acid-base properties. Clearly, the modification of the acid-base properties played a more critical role in determining the catalytic performance than porosity. An optimized catalytic performance was obtained on the LaP catalyst with a higher concentration of Lewis acid sites. Basic sites showed negative effects on the stability of the catalysts. Good stability was achieved when the catalyst was prepared using the appropriate SDA/La ratio.

  2. Mutagenesis of the Glucose-1-Phosphate-Binding Site of Potato Tuber ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase1

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingbin; Ballicora, Miguel A.; Preiss, Jack

    1998-01-01

    Lysine (Lys)-195 in the homotetrameric ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPGlc PPase) from Escherichia coli was shown previously to be involved in the binding of the substrate glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P). This residue is highly conserved in the ADPGlc PPase family. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to investigate the function of this conserved Lys residue in the large and small subunits of the heterotetrameric potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber enzyme. The apparent affinity for Glc-1-P of the wild-type enzyme decreased 135- to 550-fold by changing Lys-198 of the small subunit to arginine, alanine, or glutamic acid, suggesting that both the charge and the size of this residue influence Glc-1-P binding. These mutations had little effect on the kinetic constants for the other substrates (ATP and Mg2+ or ADP-Glc and inorganic phosphate), activator (3-phosphoglycerate), inhibitor (inorganic phosphate), or on the thermal stability. Mutagenesis of the corresponding Lys (Lys-213) in the large subunit had no effect on the apparent affinity for Glc-1-P by substitution with arginine, alanine, or glutamic acid. A double mutant, SK198RLK213R, was also obtained that had a 100-fold reduction of the apparent affinity for Glc-1-P. The data indicate that Lys-198 in the small subunit is directly involved in the binding of Glc-1-P, whereas they appear to exclude a direct role of Lys-213 in the large subunit in the interaction with this substrate. PMID:9662541

  3. Crystal Structures of Aspergillus japonicus Fructosyltransferase Complex with Donor/Acceptor Substrates Reveal Complete Subsites in the Active Site for Catalysis*

    PubMed Central

    Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Hsieh, Chih-Yu; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Hsieh, Yi-You; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Tien, Yueh-Chu; Chen, Chung-De; Chiang, Chien-Min; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Fructosyltransferases catalyze the transfer of a fructose unit from one sucrose/fructan to another and are engaged in the production of fructooligosaccharide/fructan. The enzymes belong to the glycoside hydrolase family 32 (GH32) with a retaining catalytic mechanism. Here we describe the crystal structures of recombinant fructosyltransferase (AjFT) from Aspergillus japonicus CB05 and its mutant D191A complexes with various donor/acceptor substrates, including sucrose, 1-kestose, nystose, and raffinose. This is the first structure of fructosyltransferase of the GH32 with a high transfructosylation activity. The structure of AjFT comprises two domains with an N-terminal catalytic domain containing a five-blade β-propeller fold linked to a C-terminal β-sandwich domain. Structures of various mutant AjFT-substrate complexes reveal complete four substrate-binding subsites (−1 to +3) in the catalytic pocket with shapes and characters distinct from those of clan GH-J enzymes. Residues Asp-60, Asp-191, and Glu-292 that are proposed for nucleophile, transition-state stabilizer, and general acid/base catalyst, respectively, govern the binding of the terminal fructose at the −1 subsite and the catalytic reaction. Mutants D60A, D191A, and E292A completely lost their activities. Residues Ile-143, Arg-190, Glu-292, Glu-318, and His-332 combine the hydrophobic Phe-118 and Tyr-369 to define the +1 subsite for its preference of fructosyl and glucosyl moieties. Ile-143 and Gln-327 define the +2 subsite for raffinose, whereas Tyr-404 and Glu-405 define the +2 and +3 subsites for inulin-type substrates with higher structural flexibilities. Structural geometries of 1-kestose, nystose and raffinose are different from previous data. All results shed light on the catalytic mechanism and substrate recognition of AjFT and other clan GH-J fructosyltransferases. PMID:20466731

  4. Cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase activity and pyridoxal phosphate binding site of onion alliin lyase.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, N; Shimomura, N; Iseki, J; Honma, M; Chiba, S; Tahara, S; Mizutani, J

    1997-08-01

    Purification of onion alliin lyase gave two fractions by cation exchange chromatography. Both fractions showed the comparable high catalytic activity of cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase with that of alliin lyase using S-(2-chloro-6-nitrophenyl)-L-cysteine and alliin, S-allyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide as substrates. All the active substrates tested with onion alliin lyase were also active to the cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase of Mucor javanicus, but the catalytic activity of the Mucor enzyme was lower for all the substrates. The pyridoxal phosphate binding site of the onion alliin lyase was identified as Lys 285 in the amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA which has been reported. This lysine was conserved in all the sequences from the alliin lyase cDNAs, while similarity was not found between the sequences around pyridoxal phosphate binding sites of both the onion alliin lyase and the Mucor cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase. PMID:9301115

  5. Site-specific Protein Bioconjugation via a Pyridoxal 5′-Phosphate-Mediated N-Terminal Transamination Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Witus, LS; Francis, M.

    2015-01-01

    The covalent attachment of chemical groups to proteins is a critically important tool for the study of protein function and the creation of protein-based materials. Methods of site-specific protein modification are necessary for the generation of well-defined bioconjugates possessing a new functional group in a single position in the amino acid sequence. This paper describes a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) mediated transamination reaction that is specific for the N-terminus of a protein. The reaction oxidizes the N-terminal amine to a ketone or an aldehyde, which can form a stable oxime linkage with an alkoxyamine reagent of choice. Screening studies have identified the most reactive N-terminal residues, facilitating the use of site-directed mutagenesis to achieve high levels of conversion. Additionally, this reaction has been shown to work on a number of targets that are not easily accessed through heterologous expression, such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:23836553

  6. Does phosphate enhance the natural attenuation of crude oil in groundwater under defined redox conditions?

    PubMed

    Ponsin, Violaine; Mouloubou, Olsen Raïnness; Prudent, Pascale; Höhener, Patrick

    2014-11-15

    After a crude oil spill caused by a broken pipeline in 2009 to a gravel aquifer in southern France, degradation processes under various redox conditions progressively established, but at rates that predict a long life-time of the source under natural attenuation after partial source removal. In this study, we aimed at identifying the rate-limiting factors for each redox condition, with special emphasis on phosphate as limiting nutrient. The study was conducted in laboratory microcosms assembled with material collected on site: sediments, water from monitoring wells, oil and microbial sludge. Redox conditions were promoted by adding electron acceptors (either oxygen, nitrate, limonite (FeO(OH)), cryptomelane (K(Mn(4+),Mn(2+))8O16), or sulfate). For each condition, the role of phosphate was studied by repeated additions for up to 290days. The results showed a very strong stimulation of aerobic and denitrifying rates of oil degradation by phosphate, provided that oxygen and nitrate were repeatedly supplied. Phosphate caused also a marked stimulation of methanogenic degradation, and a relatively small stimulation of metal reduction. These anaerobic processes started only after marked lag phases, and phosphate shortened the lag phase for methanogenic degradation. Degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with less than 8 carbons, including benzene, was confirmed even under unstimulated conditions. It is concluded that degradation rates at the site are limited by both, availability of electron acceptors and availability of phosphate needed for promoting microbial growth. PMID:24795042

  7. Does phosphate enhance the natural attenuation of crude oil in groundwater under defined redox conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsin, Violaine; Mouloubou, Olsen Raïnness; Prudent, Pascale; Höhener, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    After a crude oil spill caused by a broken pipeline in 2009 to a gravel aquifer in southern France, degradation processes under various redox conditions progressively established, but at rates that predict a long life-time of the source under natural attenuation after partial source removal. In this study, we aimed at identifying the rate-limiting factors for each redox condition, with special emphasis on phosphate as limiting nutrient. The study was conducted in laboratory microcosms assembled with material collected on site: sediments, water from monitoring wells, oil and microbial sludge. Redox conditions were promoted by adding electron acceptors (either oxygen, nitrate, limonite (FeO(OH)), cryptomelane (K(Mn4 +,Mn2 +)8O16), or sulfate). For each condition, the role of phosphate was studied by repeated additions for up to 290 days. The results showed a very strong stimulation of aerobic and denitrifying rates of oil degradation by phosphate, provided that oxygen and nitrate were repeatedly supplied. Phosphate caused also a marked stimulation of methanogenic degradation, and a relatively small stimulation of metal reduction. These anaerobic processes started only after marked lag phases, and phosphate shortened the lag phase for methanogenic degradation. Degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with less than 8 carbons, including benzene, was confirmed even under unstimulated conditions. It is concluded that degradation rates at the site are limited by both, availability of electron acceptors and availability of phosphate needed for promoting microbial growth.

  8. Does phosphate enhance the natural attenuation of crude oil in groundwater under defined redox conditions?

    PubMed

    Ponsin, Violaine; Mouloubou, Olsen Raïnness; Prudent, Pascale; Höhener, Patrick

    2014-11-15

    After a crude oil spill caused by a broken pipeline in 2009 to a gravel aquifer in southern France, degradation processes under various redox conditions progressively established, but at rates that predict a long life-time of the source under natural attenuation after partial source removal. In this study, we aimed at identifying the rate-limiting factors for each redox condition, with special emphasis on phosphate as limiting nutrient. The study was conducted in laboratory microcosms assembled with material collected on site: sediments, water from monitoring wells, oil and microbial sludge. Redox conditions were promoted by adding electron acceptors (either oxygen, nitrate, limonite (FeO(OH)), cryptomelane (K(Mn(4+),Mn(2+))8O16), or sulfate). For each condition, the role of phosphate was studied by repeated additions for up to 290days. The results showed a very strong stimulation of aerobic and denitrifying rates of oil degradation by phosphate, provided that oxygen and nitrate were repeatedly supplied. Phosphate caused also a marked stimulation of methanogenic degradation, and a relatively small stimulation of metal reduction. These anaerobic processes started only after marked lag phases, and phosphate shortened the lag phase for methanogenic degradation. Degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with less than 8 carbons, including benzene, was confirmed even under unstimulated conditions. It is concluded that degradation rates at the site are limited by both, availability of electron acceptors and availability of phosphate needed for promoting microbial growth.

  9. Aspirin inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F.; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin-mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT-29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin-acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  10. The homing of bone marrow MSCs to non-osseous sites for ectopic bone formation induced by osteoinductive calcium phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guodong; Habibovic, Pamela; Bao, Chongyun; Hu, Jing; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Yuan, Huipin; Chen, Wenchuan; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoinductive biomaterials are promising for bone repair. There is no direct proof that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) home to non-osseous sites and participate in ectopic bone formation induced by osteoinductive bioceramics. The objective of this study was to use a sex-mismatched beagle dog model to investigate BMSC homing via blood circulation to participate in ectopic bone formation via osteoinductive biomaterial. BMSCs of male dogs were injected into female femoral marrow cavity. The survival and stable chimerism of donor BMSCs in recipients were confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) granules were implanted in dorsal muscles of female dogs. Y chromosomes were detected in samples harvested from female dogs which had received male BMSCs. At 4 weeks, cells with Y-chromosomes were distributed in the new bone matrix throughout the BCP granule implant. At 6 weeks, cells with Y chromosomes were present in newly mineralized woven bone. TRAP positive osteoclast-like cells were observed in 4-week implants, and the number of such cells decreased from 4 to 6 weeks. These results show that osteoprogenitors were recruited from bone marrow and homed to ectopic site to serve as a cell source for calcium phosphate-induced bone formation. In conclusion, BMSCs were demonstrated to migrate from bone marrow through blood circulation to non-osseous bioceramic implant site to contribute to ectopic bone formation in a canine model. BCP induced new bone in muscles without growth factor delivery, showing excellent osteoinductivity that could be useful for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23298780

  11. A{sup -2} {yields} G transition at the 3{prime} acceptor splice site of IVS17 characterizes the COL2A1 gene mutation in the original Stickler syndrome kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.J.; Ganguly, A.; Considine, E.

    1996-06-14

    Hereditary progressive arthro-ophthalmopathy, or {open_quotes}Stickler syndrome,{close_quotes} is an autosomal dominant osteochondrodysplasia characterized by a variety of ocular and skeletal anomalies which frequently lead to retinal detachment and precocious osteoarthritis. A variety of mutations in the COL2A1 gene have been identified in {open_quotes}Stickler{close_quotes} families; in most cases studied thus far, the consequence of mutation is the premature generation of a stop codon. We report here the characterization of a COL2A1 gene mutation in the original kindred described by Stickler et al. Conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) was used to screen for mutations in the entire COL2A1 gene in an affected member from the kindred. A prominent heteroduplex species was noted in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product from a region of the gene including exons 17 to 20. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA resulted in the identification of a base substitution at the A{sup -2} position of the 3{prime} splice acceptor site of IVS17. Sequencing of DNA from affected and unaffected family members confirmed that the mutation segregated with the disease phenotype. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis of poly A+ RNA demonstrated that the mutant allele utilized a cryptic splice site in exon 18 of the gene, eliminating 16 bp at the start of exon 18. This frameshift eventually results in a premature termination codon. These findings are the first report of a splice site mutation in classical Stickler syndrome and they provide a satisfying historical context in which to view COL2A1 mutations in this dysplasia. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The interactions of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a potential site for toxic actions.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Chester E; Fukuto, Jon M; Taguchi, Keiko; Froines, John; Cho, Arthur K

    2005-06-30

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to 1,3-diphosphoglycerate, one of the precursors for glycolytic ATP biosynthesis. The enzyme contains an active site cysteine thiolate, which is critical for its catalytic function. As part of a continuing study of the interactions of quinones with biological systems, we have examined the susceptibility of GAPDH to inactivation by 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ). In a previous study of quinone toxicity, this quinone, whose actions have been exclusively attributed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caused a reduction in the glycolytic activity of GAPDH under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, indicating indirect and possible direct actions on this enzyme. In this study, the effects of 9,10-PQ on GAPDH were examined in detail under aerobic and anaerobic conditions so that the role of oxygen could be distinguished from the direct effects of the quinone. The results indicate that, in the presence of the reducing agent DTT, GAPDH inhibition by 9,10-PQ under aerobic conditions was mostly indirect and comparable to the direct actions of exogenously-added H2O2 on this enzyme. GAPDH was also inhibited by 9,10-PQ anaerobically, but in a somewhat more complex manner. This quinone, which is not considered an electrophile, inhibited GAPDH in a time-dependent manner, consistent with irreversible modification and comparable to the electrophilic actions of 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ). Analysis of the anaerobic inactivation kinetics for the two quinones revealed comparable inactivation rate constants (k(inac)), but a much lower inhibitor binding constant (K(i)) for 1,4-BQ. Protection and thiol titration studies suggest that these quinones bind to the NAD+ binding site and modify the catalytic thiol from this site. Thus, 9,10-PQ inhibits GAPDH by two distinct mechanisms: through ROS generation that results in the oxidization of GAPDH thiols, and by an

  13. Neurospora tryptophan synthase: N-terminal analysis and the sequence of the pyridoxal phosphate active site peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, M.L.; Hsu, P.Y.; DeMoss, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Tryptophan synthase (TS), which catalyzes the final step of tryptophan biosynthesis, is a multifunctional protein requiring pyridoxal phosphate (B6P) for two of its three distinct enzyme activities. TS from Neurospora has a blocked N-terminal, is a homodimer of 150 KDa and binds one mole of B6P per mole of subunit. The authors shown the N-terminal residue to be acyl-serine. The B6P-active site of holoenzyme was labelled by reduction of the B6P-Schiff base with (/sup 3/H)-NaBH/sub 4/, and resulted in a proportionate loss of activity in the two B6P-requiring reactions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CNBr-generated peptides showed the labelled, active site peptide to be 6 KDa. The sequence of this peptide, purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of C-18 reversed phase and TSK gel filtration HPLC is: gly-arg-pro-gly-gln-leu-his-lys-ala-glu-arg-leu-thr-glu-tyr-ala-gly-gly-ala-gln-ile-xxx-leu-lys-arg-glu-asp-leu-asn-his-xxx-gly-xxx-his-/sub ***/-ile-asn-asn-ala-leu. Although four residues (xxx, /sub ***/) are unidentified, this peptide is minimally 78% homologous with the corresponding peptide from yeast TS, in which residue (/sub ***/) is the lysine that binds B6P.

  14. Total Phosphate Influences the Rate of Hydrocarbon Degradation but Phosphate Mineralogy Shapes Microbial Community Composition in Cold-Region Calcareous Soils.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Steven D; Chen, Tingting; Phillips, Courtney; Hamilton, Jordan; Hilger, David; Chartrand, Blaine; Grosskleg, Jay; Bradshaw, Kris; Carlson, Trevor; Peak, Derek

    2016-05-17

    Managing phosphorus bioaccessibility is critical for the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in calcareous soils. This paper explores how soil mineralogy interacts with a novel biostimulatory solution to both control phosphorus bioavailability and influence bioremediation. Two large bore infiltrators (1 m diameter) were installed at a PHC contaminated site and continuously supplied with a solution containing nutrients and an electron acceptor. Soils from eight contaminated sites were prepared and pretreated, analyzed pretrial, spiked with diesel, placed into nylon bags into the infiltrators, and removed after 3 months. From XAS, we learned that three principal phosphate phases had formed: adsorbed phosphate, brushite, and newberyite. All measures of biodegradation in the samples (in situ degradation estimates, mineralization assays, culturable bacteria, catabolic genes) varied depending upon the soil's phosphate speciation. Notably, adsorbed phosphate increased anaerobic phenanthrene degradation and bzdN catabolic gene prevalence. The dominant mineralogical constraints on community composition were the relative amounts of adsorbed phosphate, brushite, and newberyite. Overall, this study finds that total phosphate influences microbial community phenotypes whereas relative percentages of phosphate minerals influences microbial community genotype composition. PMID:27082646

  15. Novel mode of inhibition by D-tagatose 6-phosphate through a Heyns rearrangement in the active site of transaldolase B variants.

    PubMed

    Stellmacher, Lena; Sandalova, Tatyana; Schneider, Sarah; Schneider, Gunter; Sprenger, Georg A; Samland, Anne K

    2016-04-01

    Transaldolase B (TalB) and D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolase A (FSAA) from Escherichia coli are C-C bond-forming enzymes. Using kinetic inhibition studies and mass spectrometry, it is shown that enzyme variants of FSAA and TalB that exhibit D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolase activity are inhibited covalently and irreversibly by D-tagatose 6-phosphate (D-T6P), whereas no inhibition was observed for wild-type transaldolase B from E. coli. The crystal structure of the variant TalB(F178Y) with bound sugar phosphate was solved to a resolution of 1.46 Å and revealed a novel mode of covalent inhibition. The sugar is bound covalently via its C2 atom to the ℇ-NH2 group of the active-site residue Lys132. It is neither bound in the open-chain form nor as the closed-ring form of D-T6P, but has been converted to β-D-galactofuranose 6-phosphate (D-G6P), a five-membered ring structure. The furanose ring of the covalent adduct is formed via a Heyns rearrangement and subsequent hemiacetal formation. This reaction is facilitated by Tyr178, which is proposed to act as acid-base catalyst. The crystal structure of the inhibitor complex is compared with the structure of the Schiff-base intermediate of TalB(E96Q) formed with the substrate D-fructose 6-phosphate determined to a resolution of 2.20 Å. This comparison highlights the differences in stereochemistry at the C4 atom of the ligand as an essential determinant for the formation of the inhibitor adduct in the active site of the enzyme. PMID:27050126

  16. Novel mode of inhibition by D-tagatose 6-phosphate through a Heyns rearrangement in the active site of transaldolase B variants.

    PubMed

    Stellmacher, Lena; Sandalova, Tatyana; Schneider, Sarah; Schneider, Gunter; Sprenger, Georg A; Samland, Anne K

    2016-04-01

    Transaldolase B (TalB) and D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolase A (FSAA) from Escherichia coli are C-C bond-forming enzymes. Using kinetic inhibition studies and mass spectrometry, it is shown that enzyme variants of FSAA and TalB that exhibit D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolase activity are inhibited covalently and irreversibly by D-tagatose 6-phosphate (D-T6P), whereas no inhibition was observed for wild-type transaldolase B from E. coli. The crystal structure of the variant TalB(F178Y) with bound sugar phosphate was solved to a resolution of 1.46 Å and revealed a novel mode of covalent inhibition. The sugar is bound covalently via its C2 atom to the ℇ-NH2 group of the active-site residue Lys132. It is neither bound in the open-chain form nor as the closed-ring form of D-T6P, but has been converted to β-D-galactofuranose 6-phosphate (D-G6P), a five-membered ring structure. The furanose ring of the covalent adduct is formed via a Heyns rearrangement and subsequent hemiacetal formation. This reaction is facilitated by Tyr178, which is proposed to act as acid-base catalyst. The crystal structure of the inhibitor complex is compared with the structure of the Schiff-base intermediate of TalB(E96Q) formed with the substrate D-fructose 6-phosphate determined to a resolution of 2.20 Å. This comparison highlights the differences in stereochemistry at the C4 atom of the ligand as an essential determinant for the formation of the inhibitor adduct in the active site of the enzyme.

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis of serine 158 demonstrates its role in spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; McMichael, R. Jr; Krause, K. P.; Kurreck, J.; Sonnewald, U.; Stitt, M.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) was performed to investigate the role of Ser158 in the modulation of spinach leaf SPS. Tobacco plants expressing the spinach wild-type (WT), S158A, S158T and S157F/S158E SPS transgenes were produced. Expression of transgenes appeared not to reduce expression of the tobacco host SPS. SPS activity in the WT and the S158T SPS transgenics showed light/dark modulation, whereas the S158A and S157F/S158E mutants were not similarly light/dark modulated: the S158A mutant enzyme was not inactivated in the dark, and the S157F/S158E was not activated in the light. The inability to modulate the activity of the S158A mutant enzyme by protein phosphorylation was demonstrated in vitro. The WT spinach enzyme immunopurified from dark transgenic tobacco leaves had a low initial activation state, and could be activated by PP2A and subsequently inactivated by SPS-kinase plus ATP. Rapid purification of the S158A mutant enzyme from dark leaves of transgenic plants using spinach-specific monoclonal antibodies yielded enzyme that had a high initial activation state, and pre-incubation with leaf PP2A or ATP plus SPS-kinase (the PKIII enzyme) caused little modulation of activity. The results demonstrate the regulatory significance of Ser158 as the major site responsible for dark inactivation of spinach SPS in vivo, and indicate that the significance of phosphorylation is the introduction of a negative charge at the Ser158 position.

  18. Probing the location and function of the conserved histidine residue of phosphoglucose isomerase by using an active site directed inhibitor N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, M.; Chane, T. L.; Sun, Y. J.; Hsiao, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) catalyzes the interconversion of D-glucopyranose-6-phosphate and D-fructofuranose-6-phosphate by promoting an intrahydrogen transfer between C1 and C2. A conserved histidine exists throughout all phosphoglucose isomerases and was hypothesized to be the base catalyzing the isomerization reaction. In the present study, this conserved histidine, His311, of the enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus was subjected to mutational analysis, and the mutational effect on the inactivation kinetics by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate was investigated. The substitution of His311 with alanine, asparagine, or glutamine resulted in the decrease of activity, in k(cat)/K(M), by a factor of 10(3), indicating the importance of this residue. N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate inactivated irreversibly the activity of wild-type phosphoglucose isomerase; however, His311 --> Ala became resistant to this inhibitor, indicating that His311 is located in the active site and is responsible for the inactivation of the enzyme by this active site-directed inhibitor. The pKa of His311 was estimated to be 6.31 according to the pH dependence of the inactivation. The proximity of this value with the pKa value of 6.35, determined from the pH dependence of k(cat)/K(M), supports a role of His311 as a general base in the catalysis. PMID:10595547

  19. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Corolewski, Caleb; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. G.; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su Y.

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence shows that these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.5, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO2 contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals has been attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a zinc vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g = 2.0033 and g = 2.0075, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0053.

  20. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, Matthew D. Corolewski, Caleb D.; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. Grant; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence indicates these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.4, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO{sub 2} contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals is attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a Zn vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g{sub ⊥} = 2.0015 and g{sub //} = 2.0056, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0035.

  1. What is the role of the second "structural" NADP+-binding site in human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase?

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Tao; Chan, Ting Fai; Lam, Veronica M S; Engel, Paul C

    2008-08-01

    Human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, purified after overexpression in E. coli, was shown to contain one molecule/subunit of acid-extractable "structural" NADP+ and no NADPH. This tightly bound NADP+ was reduced by G6P, presumably following migration to the catalytic site. Gel-filtration yielded apoenzyme, devoid of bound NADP+ but, surprisingly, still fully active. Mr of the main component of "stripped" enzyme by gel filtration was approximately 100,000, suggesting a dimeric apoenzyme (subunit Mr = 59,000). Holoenzyme also contained tetramer molecules and, at high protein concentration, a dynamic equilibrium gave an apparent intermediate Mr of 150 kDa. Fluorescence titration of the stripped enzyme gave the K d for structural NADP+ as 37 nM, 200-fold lower than for "catalytic" NADP+. Structural NADP+ quenches 91% of protein fluorescence. At 37 degrees C, stripped enzyme, much less stable than holoenzyme, inactivated irreversibly within 2 d. Inactivation at 4 degrees C was partially reversed at room temperature, especially with added NADP+. Apoenzyme was immediately active, without any visible lag, in rapid-reaction studies. Human G6PD thus forms active dimer without structural NADP+. Apparently, the true role of the second, tightly bound NADP+ is to secure long-term stability. This fits the clinical pattern, G6PD deficiency affecting the long-lived non-nucleate erythrocyte. The Kd values for two class I mutants, G488S and G488V, were 273 nM and 480 nM, respectively (seven- and 13-fold elevated), matching the structural prediction of weakened structural NADP+ binding, which would explain decreased stability and consequent disease. Preparation of native apoenzyme and measurement of Kd constant for structural NADP+ will now allow quantitative assessment of this defect in clinical G6PD mutations.

  2. Active site cysteine-null glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) rescues nitric oxide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takeya; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Nakatsuji, Masatoshi; Itakura, Masanori; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Inui, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2016-02-29

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a homotetrameric enzyme involved in a key step of glycolysis, also has a role in mediating cell death under nitrosative stress. Our previous reports suggest that nitric oxide-induced intramolecular disulfide-bonding GAPDH aggregation, which occurs through oxidation of the active site cysteine (Cys-152), participates in a mechanism to account for nitric oxide-induced death signaling in some neurodegenerative/neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we demonstrate a rescue strategy for nitric oxide-induced cell death accompanied by GAPDH aggregation in a mutant with a substitution of Cys-152 to alanine (C152A-GAPDH). Pre-incubation of purified wild-type GAPDH with C152A-GAPDH under exposure to nitric oxide inhibited wild-type GAPDH aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Several lines of structural analysis revealed that C152A-GAPDH extensively interfered with nitric oxide-induced GAPDH-amyloidogenesis. Overexpression of doxycycline-inducible C152A-GAPDH in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma significantly rescued nitric oxide-induced death, concomitant with the decreased formation of GAPDH aggregates. Further, both co-immunoprecipitation assays and simulation models revealed a heterotetramer composed of one dimer each of wild-type GAPDH and C152A-GAPDH. These results suggest that the C152A-GAPDH mutant acts as a dominant-negative molecule against GAPDH aggregation via the formation of this GAPDH heterotetramer. This study may contribute to a new therapeutic approach utilizing C152A-GAPDH against brain damage in nitrosative stress-related disorders.

  3. GlmU (N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase) bound to three magnesium ions and ATP at the active site

    PubMed Central

    Vithani, Neha; Bais, Vaibhav; Prakash, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU), a bifunctional enzyme exclusive to prokaryotes, belongs to the family of sugar nucleotidyltransferases (SNTs). The enzyme binds GlcNAc-1-P and UTP, and catalyzes a uridyltransfer reaction to synthesize UDP-GlcNAc, an important precursor for cell-wall biosynthesis. As many SNTs are known to utilize a broad range of substrates, substrate specificity in GlmU was probed using biochemical and structural studies. The enzymatic assays reported here demonstrate that GlmU is specific for its natural substrates UTP and GlcNAc-1-P. The crystal structure of GlmU bound to ATP and GlcNAc-1-P provides molecular details for the inability of the enzyme to utilize ATP for the nucleotidyltransfer reaction. ATP binding results in an inactive pre-catalytic enzyme–substrate complex, where it adopts an unusual conformation such that the reaction cannot be catalyzed; here, ATP is shown to be bound together with three Mg2+ ions. Overall, this structure represents the binding of an inhibitory molecule at the active site and can potentially be used to develop new inhibitors of the enzyme. Further, similar to DNA/RNA polymerases, GlmU was recently recognized to utilize two metal ions, MgA 2+ and MgB 2+, to catalyze the uridyltransfer reaction. Interestingly, displacement of MgB 2+ from its usual catalytically competent position, as noted in the crystal structure of RNA polymerase in an inactive state, was considered to be a key factor inhibiting the reaction. Surprisingly, in the current structure of GlmU MgB 2+ is similarly displaced; this raises the possibility that an analogous inhibitory mechanism may be operative in GlmU. PMID:24915076

  4. Sites for phosphates and iron-sulfur thiolates in the first membranes: 3 to 6 residue anion-binding motifs (nests).

    PubMed

    Milner-White, E James; Russell, Michael J

    2005-02-01

    Nests are common three to six amino acid residue motifs in proteins where successive main chain NH groups bind anionic atoms or groups. On average 8% of residues in proteins belong to nests. Nests form a key part of a number of phosphate binding sites, notably the P-loop, which is the commonest of the binding sites for the phosphates of ATP and GTP. They also occur regularly in sites that bind [Fe2S2](RS)4 [Fe3S4](RS)3and [Fe4S4](RS)4 iron-sulfur centers, which are also anionic groups. Both phosphates and iron-sulfur complexes would have occurred in the precipitates within hydrothermal vents of moderate temperature as key components of the earliest metabolism and it is likely existing organisms emerging in this milieu would have benefited from evolving molecules binding such anions. The nest conformation is favored by high proportions of glycine residues and there is evidence for glycine being the commonest amino acid during the stage of evolution when proteins were evolving so it is likely nests would have been common features in peptides occupying the membranes at the dawn of life.

  5. Sites for Phosphates and Iron-Sulfur Thiolates in the First Membranes: 3 to 6 Residue Anion-Binding Motifs (Nests)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner-White, E. James; Russell, Michael J.

    2005-02-01

    Nests are common three to six amino acid residue motifs in proteins where successive main chain NH groups bind anionic atoms or groups. On average 8% of residues in proteins belong to nests. Nests form a key part of a number of phosphate binding sites, notably the P-loop, which is the commonest of the binding sites for the phosphates of ATP and GTP. They also occur regularly in sites that bind [Fe2S2](RS)4 [Fe3S4](RS)3 and [Fe4S4](RS)4 iron-sulfur centers, which are also anionic groups. Both phosphates and iron-sulfur complexes would have occurred in the precipitates within hydrothermal vents of moderate temperature as key components of the earliest metabolism and it is likely existing organisms emerging in this milieu would have benefited from evolving molecules binding such anions. The nest conformation is favored by high proportions of glycine residues and there is evidence for glycine being the commonest amino acid during the stage of evolution when proteins were evolving so it is likely nests would have been common features in peptides occupying the membranes at the dawn of life.

  6. RNA polymerase II CTD phospho-sites Ser5 and Ser7 govern phosphate homeostasis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Schwer, Beate; Sanchez, Ana M; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorylation of the tandem YSPTSPS repeats of the RNA polymerase II CTD inscribes an informational code that orchestrates eukaryal mRNA synthesis. Here we interrogate the role of the CTD in phosphate homeostasis in fission yeast. Expression of Pho1 acid phosphatase, which is repressed during growth in phosphate-rich medium and induced by phosphate starvation, is governed strongly by CTD phosphorylation status, but not by CTD repeat length. Inability to place a Ser7-PO4 mark (as in S7A) results in constitutive derepression of Pho1 expression in phosphate-replete medium. In contrast, indelible installation of a Ser7-PO4 mimetic (as in S7E) hyper-represses Pho1 in phosphate-replete cells and inhibits Pho1 induction during starvation. Pho1 phosphatase is derepressed by ablation of the CTD Ser5-PO4 mark, achieved either by mutating Ser5 in all consensus heptads to alanine, or replacing all Pro6 residues with alanine. We find that Ser5 status is a tunable determinant of Pho1 regulation, i.e., serial decrements in the number of consensus Ser5 heptads from seven to two elicits a progressive increase in Pho1 expression in phosphate-replete medium. Pho1 is also derepressed by hypomorphic mutations of the CTD kinase Cdk9. Inactivation of the CTD phosphatase Ssu72 attenuates Pho1 induction in wild-type cells and blocks Pho1 derepression in S7A cells. These experiments implicate Ser5, Pro6, and Ser7 as component letters of a CTD coding "word" that transduces a repressive transcriptional signal via serine phosphorylation.

  7. The structure and bonding of iron-acceptor pairs in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Assali, L.V.C.; Kimerling, L.C.

    1995-08-01

    The highly mobile interstitial iron and Group III impurities (B, Al, Ga, In) form iron-acceptor pairs in silicon. Based on the migration kinetics and taking host silicon as a dielectric medium, we have simulated the pairing process in a static silicon lattice. Different from the conventional point charge ionic model, our phenomenological calculations include (1) a correction that takes into account valence electron cloud polarization which adds a short range, attractive interaction in the iron-acceptor pair bonding; and (2) silicon lattice relaxation due to the atomic size difference which causes a local strain field. Our model explains qualitatively (1) trends among the iron-acceptor pairs revealing an increase of the electronic state hole emission energy with increasing principal quantum number of acceptor and decreasing pair separation distance; and (2) the stable and metastable sites and configurational symmetries of the iron-acceptor pairs. The iron-acceptor pairing and bonding mechanism is also discussed.

  8. Production of L-ribose from L-ribulose by a triple-site variant of mannose-6-phosphate isomerase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yu-Ri; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2012-06-01

    A triple-site variant (W17Q N90A L129F) of mannose-6-phosphate isomerase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans was obtained by combining variants with residue substitutions at different positions after random and site-directed mutagenesis. The specific activity and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) for L-ribulose isomerization of this variant were 3.1- and 7.1-fold higher, respectively, than those of the wild-type enzyme at pH 7.0 and 70°C in the presence of 1 mM Co(2+). The triple-site variant produced 213 g/liter l-ribose from 300 g/liter L-ribulose for 60 min, with a volumetric productivity of 213 g liter(-1) h(-1), which was 4.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. The k(cat)/K(m) and productivity of the triple-site variant were approximately 2-fold higher than those of the Thermus thermophilus R142N variant of mannose-6-phosphate isomerase, which exhibited the highest values previously reported.

  9. Physical location of the site for N-acetyl-L-glutamate, the allosteric activator of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, in the 20-kilodalton COOH-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Aparicio, L B; Guadalajara, A M; Rubio, V

    1989-04-01

    Mammalian liver mitochondrial carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, a polypeptide of 160 kDa, is activated allosterically by N-acetyl-L-glutamate. The analogue of this activator N-(chloroacetyl)-L-[14C]glutamate has been found to serve as a photoaffinity label for this enzyme. The specificity was demonstrated by the drastic reduction in the radioactivity bound to the protein when (a) an excess of unlabeled acetylglutamate was present during the irradiation and (b) the enzyme was replaced by pyruvate kinase, an enzyme that is not affected by acetylglutamate. The labeling was due to the photoactivation of the chloroacetyl group since there was no labeling under equal conditions with acetyl[14C]glutamate. To localize the binding site, limited proteolysis was used. Trypsin cleaves carbamoyl phosphate synthetase into complementary NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments of about 140 and 20 kDa, respectively [Powers-Lee, S. G., & Corina, K. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 15349-15352], but only the latter was found to be labeled. Similarly, of the various fragments generated by elastase, only two, of 20 and 120 kDa, contain the COOH terminus [see Powers-Lee and Corina (1986) above] and were found to be labeled. Thus, the binding site for acetylglutamate is within 20 kDa from the COOH terminus. This excludes the possibility that the acetylglutamate binding site evolved from an ancestral substrate site for glutamine: this substrate binds to the small subunit of the Escherichia coli enzyme, which is homologous to the NH2-terminal domain of the rat liver enzyme. Exhaustive tryptic digestion of photolabeled carbamoyl phosphate synthetase yielded a single radioactive peak, suggesting that the labeling is restricted to a single minimal tryptic peptide. PMID:2742825

  10. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM; PHOSPHATE STABILIZATION OF HEAVY METALS CONTAMINATED MINE WASTE YARD SOILS, JOPLIN, MISSOURI NPL SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Project 22-Phosphate Stabilization of Heavy Metals-Contaminated Mine Waste Yard Soils. Mining, milling, and smelting of ores near Joplin, Missouri, have resulted in heavy metal contamination of the area. The Joplin s...

  11. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention.

  12. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention. PMID:23558182

  13. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken by mouth or used as enemas. Indigestion. Aluminum phosphate and calcium phosphate are FDA-permitted ingredients ... Phosphate salts containing sodium, potassium, aluminum, or calcium are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term, when sodium phosphate is inserted into the ...

  14. Functional analysis of a C. elegans trans-splice acceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, R; Liou, R F; Blumenthal, T

    1993-01-01

    The rol-6 gene is trans-spliced to the 22 nt leader, SL1, 173 nt downstream of the transcription start. We have analyzed splicing in transformants carrying extrachromosomal arrays of rol-6 with mutations in the trans-splice acceptor site. This site is a close match to the consensus, UUUCAG, that is highly conserved in both trans-splice and intron acceptor sites in C. elegans. When the trans-splice site was inactivated by mutating the perfectly-conserved AG, trans-splicing still occurred, but at a cryptic site 20 nt upstream. We tested the frequency with which splicing switched from the normal site to the cryptic site when the pyrimidines at this site were changed to A's. Since most C. elegans 3' splice sites lack an obvious polypyrimidine tract, we hypothesized that these four pyrimidines might play this role, and indeed mutation of these bases caused splicing to switch to the cryptic site. We also demonstrated that a major reason the downstream site is normally favored is because it occurs at a boundary between A+U rich and non-A+U rich RNA. When the RNA between the two splice sites was made less A+U rich, splicing occurred preferentially at the upstream site. Images PMID:8451190

  15. Site-Directed Mutagenesis from Arg195 to His of a Microalgal Putatively Chloroplastidial Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase Causes an Increase in Phospholipid Levels in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Long-Ling; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Ji-Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the contribution of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) to the first acylation of glycerol-3-phosphate (G-3-P), the present study focused on a functional analysis of the GPAT gene from Lobosphaera incisa (designated as LiGPAT). A full-length cDNA of LiGPAT consisting of a 1,305-bp ORF, a 1,652-bp 5′-UTR, and a 354-bp 3′-UTR, was cloned. The ORF encoded a 434-amino acid peptide, of which 63 residues at the N-terminus defined a chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny analysis of GPAT homologs provided the convincible bioinformatics evidence that LiGPAT was localized to chloroplasts. Considering the conservation of His among the G-3-P binding sites from chloroplastidial GPATs and the substitution of His by Arg at position 195 in the LiGPAT mature protein (designated mLiGPAT), we established the heterologous expression of either mLiGPAT or its mutant (Arg195His) (sdmLiGPAT) in the GPAT-deficient yeast mutant gat1Δ. Lipid profile analyses of these transgenic yeasts not only validated the acylation function of LiGPAT but also indicated that the site-directed mutagenesis from Arg195 to His led to an increase in the phospholipid level in yeast. Semi-quantitative analysis of mLiGPAT and sdmLiGPAT, together with the structural superimposition of their G-3-P binding sites, indicated that the increased enzymatic activity was caused by the enlarged accessible surface of the phosphate group binding pocket when Arg195 was mutated to His. Thus, the potential of genetic manipulation of GPAT to increase the glycerolipid level in L. incisa and other microalgae would be of great interest. PMID:27014309

  16. The ferredoxin-dependent conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus represents a novel site of glycolytic regulation.

    PubMed

    van der Oost, J; Schut, G; Kengen, S W; Hagen, W R; Thomm, M; de Vos, W M

    1998-10-23

    The fermentative conversion of glucose in anaerobic hyperthermophilic Archaea is a variant of the classical Embden-Meyerhof pathway found in Bacteria and Eukarya. A major difference of the archaeal glycolytic pathway concerns the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, this reaction is catalyzed by an unique enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (GAPOR). Here, we report the isolation, characterization, and transcriptional analysis of the GAPOR-encoding gene. GAPOR is related to a family of ferredoxin-dependent tungsten enzymes in (hyper)thermophilic Archaea and, in addition, to a hypothetical protein in Escherichia coli. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of the purified P. furiosus GAPOR protein confirms the anticipated involvement of tungsten in catalysis. During glycolysis in P. furiosus, GAPOR gene expression is induced, whereas the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is repressed. It is discussed that this unprecedented unidirectional reaction couple in the pyrococcal glycolysis and gluconeogenesis gives rise to a novel site of glycolytic regulation that might be widespread among Archaea.

  17. Defining critical residues for substrate binding to 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase--active site substitutions stabilize the predecarboxylation intermediate C2α-lactylthiamin diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Brammer Basta, Leighanne A; Patel, Hetalben; Kakalis, Lazaros; Jordan, Frank; Freel Meyers, Caren L

    2014-06-01

    1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) synthase catalyzes the formation of DXP from pyruvate and D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GraP) in a thiamin diphosphate-dependent manner, and is the first step in the essential pathway to isoprenoids in human pathogens. Understanding the mechanism of this unique enzyme is critical for developing new anti-infective agents that selectively target isoprenoid biosynthesis. The present study used mutagenesis and a combination of protein fluorescence, CD and kinetics experiments to investigate the roles of Arg420, Arg478 and Tyr392 in substrate binding and catalysis. The results support a random sequential, preferred order mechanism, and predict that Arg420 and Arg478 are involved in binding of the acceptor substrate, GraP. D-Glyceraldehyde, an alternative acceptor substrate lacking the phosphoryl group predicted to interact with Arg420 and Arg478, also accelerates decarboxylation of the predecarboxylation intermediate C2α-lactylthiamin diphosphate (LThDP) on DXP synthase, indicating that this binding interaction is not absolutely required, and that the hydroxyaldehyde sufficiently triggers decarboxylation. Unexpectedly, Tyr392 contributes to GraP affinity, and is not required for LThDP formation or its GraP-promoted decarboxylation. Time-resolved CD spectroscopy and NMR experiments indicate that LThDP is significantly stabilized on R420A and Y392F variants as compared with wild-type DXP synthase in the absence of acceptor substrate, but these substitutions do not appear to affect the rate of GraP-promoted LThDP decarboxylation in the presence of high levels of GraP, and LThDP formation remains the rate-limiting step. These results suggest a role of these residues in promoting GraP binding, which in turn facilitates decarboxylation, and also highlight interesting differences between DXP synthase and other thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzymes.

  18. Bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase: complete amino acid sequence and localization of phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, J; Uyeda, K

    1990-01-01

    We have shown previously that bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (EC 2.7.1.105/3.1.3.46) is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C; phosphorylation results in activation of kinase. This activation of heart enzyme is in contrast to results with the liver isozyme, in which phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits the kinase activity. As an initial step toward understanding this difference between the isozymes we have determined the DNA sequence of the heart enzyme and analyzed the amino acid sequence with special emphasis on the location of the phosphorylation site. We isolated and sequenced two overlapping cDNA fragments, which together could encode the complete amino acid sequence of bovine heart fructose-6-phosphate 2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, a protein of 530 amino acids, with a calculated molecular weight of 60,679. Since the deduced protein contained amino acid sequences identical to the sequences of four known tryptic peptides from this enzyme we concluded that the deduced protein sequence did represent bovine heart enzyme. In addition, a cDNA fragment hybridized to a 4-kilobase mRNA from bovine heart. The phosphorylation sites of the heart enzyme were located near the C terminus, whereas the phosphorylation site of the liver isozyme is known to be located near the N terminus. These opposite locations of the phosphorylation sites may explain the contrasting effect of the covalent modification on the enzymes' activities. Images PMID:2164212

  19. Absence of substrate channeling between active sites in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens IspDF and IspE enzymes of the methyl erythritol phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Lherbet, Christian; Pojer, Florence; Richard, Stéphane B; Noel, Joseph P; Poulter, C D

    2006-03-21

    The conversion of 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) to 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate (cMEDP) in the MEP entry into the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway occurs in three consecutive steps catalyzed by the IspD, IspE, and IspF enzymes, respectively. In Agrobacterium tumefaciens the ispD and ispF genes are fused to encode a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the first (synthesis of 4-diphosphocytidyl-2-C-methyl d-erythritol) and third (synthesis of 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate) steps. Sedimentation velocity experiments indicate that the bifunctional IspDF enzyme and the IspE protein associate in solution, raising the possibility of substrate channeling among the active sites in these two proteins. Kinetic evidence for substrate channeling was sought by measuring the time courses for product formation during incubations of MEP, CTP, and ATP with the IspDF and IspE proteins with and without an excess of the inactive IspE(D152A) mutant in the presence or absence of 30% (v/v) glycerol. The time dependencies indicate that the enzyme-generated intermediates are not transferred from the IspD active site in IspDF to the active site of IspE or from the active site in IspE to the active site of the IspF module of IspDF.

  20. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  1. Characterization and site-directed mutagenesis of a novel class II 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase from the deep-sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Yi, Licong; Lin, Yongjun; Zhang, Lili; Shao, Zongze; Liu, Ziduo

    2014-09-01

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is a key enzyme in the aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway in microorganisms and plants, which catalyzes the formation of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) from shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). In this study, a novel AroA-encoding gene was identified from the deep sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27 through screening the genomic library and termed as AroAA.sp. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that AroAA.sp (1317 bp and 438 amino acids) is a class II AroA. This enzyme exhibited considerable activity between pH 5.5 and pH 8.0 and notable activity at low temperatures. The KM for PEP and IC50 [glyphosate] values (the concentration of glyphosate that inhibited enzyme activity by 50%) of AroAA.sp were 78 μM and 1.5 mM, respectively. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the G100A mutant had a 30-fold increase in the IC50 [glyphosate] value; while the L105P mutant showed only 20% catalytic activity compared to wild-type AroAA.sp. The specific activity of the wild-type AroAA.sp, the G100A mutant and the L105P mutant were 7.78 U/mg, 7.26 U/mg and 1.76 U/mg, respectively. This is the first report showing that the G100A mutant of AroA displays considerably improved glyphosate resistance and demonstrates that Leu105 is essential for the enzyme's activity.

  2. Aspirin inhibits glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin‑mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT‑29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT‑29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin‑acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  3. Characterization and site-directed mutagenesis of a novel class II 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase from the deep-sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Yi, Licong; Lin, Yongjun; Zhang, Lili; Shao, Zongze; Liu, Ziduo

    2014-09-01

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is a key enzyme in the aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway in microorganisms and plants, which catalyzes the formation of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) from shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). In this study, a novel AroA-encoding gene was identified from the deep sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27 through screening the genomic library and termed as AroAA.sp. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that AroAA.sp (1317 bp and 438 amino acids) is a class II AroA. This enzyme exhibited considerable activity between pH 5.5 and pH 8.0 and notable activity at low temperatures. The KM for PEP and IC50 [glyphosate] values (the concentration of glyphosate that inhibited enzyme activity by 50%) of AroAA.sp were 78 μM and 1.5 mM, respectively. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the G100A mutant had a 30-fold increase in the IC50 [glyphosate] value; while the L105P mutant showed only 20% catalytic activity compared to wild-type AroAA.sp. The specific activity of the wild-type AroAA.sp, the G100A mutant and the L105P mutant were 7.78 U/mg, 7.26 U/mg and 1.76 U/mg, respectively. This is the first report showing that the G100A mutant of AroA displays considerably improved glyphosate resistance and demonstrates that Leu105 is essential for the enzyme's activity. PMID:25039062

  4. Aspirin inhibits glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin‑mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT‑29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT‑29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin‑acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH.

  5. Domain structure of the large subunit of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. Location of the binding site for the allosteric inhibitor UMP in the COOH-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Rubio, V; Cervera, J; Lusty, C J; Bendala, E; Britton, H G

    1991-01-29

    The large subunit of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (a polypeptide of 117.7 kDa that consists of two homologous halves) is responsible for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis from NH3 and for the binding of the allosteric activators ornithine and IMP and of the inhibitor UMP. Elastase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin inactivate the enzyme and cleave the large subunit at a site approximately 15 kDa from the COOH terminus (demonstrated by NH2-terminal sequencing). UMP, IMP, and ornithine prevent this cleavage and the inactivation. Upon irradiation with ultraviolet light in the presence of [14C]UMP, the large subunit is labeled selectively and specifically. The labeling is inhibited by ornithine and IMP. Cleavage of the 15-kDa COOH-terminal region by prior treatment of the enzyme with trypsin prevents the labeling on subsequent irradiation with [14C]UMP. The [14C]UMP-labeled large subunit is resistant to proteolytic cleavage, but if it is treated with SDS the resistance is lost, indicating that UMP is cross-linked to its binding site and that the protection is due to conformational factors. In the presence of SDS, the labeled large subunit is cleaved by trypsin or by V8 staphylococcal protease at a site located 15 or 25 kDa, respectively, from the COOH terminus (shown by NH2-terminal sequencing), and only the 15- or 25-kDa fragments are labeled. Similarly, upon cleavage of the aspartyl-prolyl bonds of the [14C]UMP-labeled enzyme with 70% formic acid, labeling was found only in the 18.5-kDa fragment that contains the COOH terminus of the subunit. Thus, UMP binds to the COOH-terminal domain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1989678

  6. Domain structure of the large subunit of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. Location of the binding site for the allosteric inhibitor UMP in the COOH-terminal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, V.; Cervera, J.; Bendala, E. ); Lusty, C.J. ); Britton, H.G. )

    1991-01-29

    The large subunit of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase is responsible for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis from NH{sub 3} and for the binding of the allosteric activators ornithine and IMP and of the inhibitor UMP. Elastase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin inactivate the enzyme and cleave the large subunit at a site approximately 15 kDa from the COOH terminus UMP, IMP, and ornithine prevent this cleavage and the inactivation. Upon irradiation with ultraviolet light in the presence of ({sup 14}C)UMP, the large subunit is labeled selectively and specifically. The labeling is inhibited by ornithine and IMP. Cleavage of the 15-kDa COOH-terminal region by prior treatment of the enzyme with trypsin prevents the labeling on subsequent irradation with ({sup 14}C)UMP. The ({sup 14}C)UMP-labeled large subunit is resistant to proteolytic cleavage, but if it is treated with SDS the resistance is lost, indicating that UMP is cross-linked to its binding site and that the protection is due to conformational factors. Since the binding sites for IMP and UMP overlap, most probably IMP also binds in this domain. The protection from proteolysis by ornithine suggests that ornithine binds in the same domain. To account for the effects of the allosteric effectors on the binding of ATP, the authors propose a scheme where the two halves of the large subunit form a pseudohomodimer by complementary isologous association, thus placing the NH{sub 2} half, which is involved in the binding of the molecule of ATP that yields P{sub i}, close to the regulatory domain.

  7. Engineering of Recombinant Poplar Deoxy-D-Xylulose-5-Phosphate Synthase (PtDXS) by Site-Directed Mutagenesis Improves Its Activity

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Aparajita; Preiser, Alyssa L.

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) dependent enzyme, plays a regulatory role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), the end products of this pathway, inhibit DXS by competing with ThDP. Feedback inhibition of DXS by IDP and DMADP constitutes a significant metabolic regulation of this pathway. The aim of this work was to experimentally test the effect of key residues of recombinant poplar DXS (PtDXS) in binding both ThDP and IDP. This work also described the engineering of PtDXS to improve the enzymatic activity by reducing its inhibition by IDP and DMADP. We have designed and tested modifications of PtDXS in an attempt to reduce inhibition by IDP. This could possibly be valuable by removing a feedback that limits the usefulness of the MEP pathway in biotechnological applications. Both ThDP and IDP use similar interactions for binding at the active site of the enzyme, however, ThDP being a larger molecule has more anchoring sites at the active site of the enzyme as compared to the inhibitors. A predicted enzyme structure was examined to find ligand-enzyme interactions, which are relatively more important for inhibitor-enzyme binding than ThDP-enzyme binding, followed by their modifications so that the binding of the inhibitors can be selectively affected compared to ThDP. Two alanine residues important for binding ThDP and the inhibitors were mutated to glycine. In two of the cases, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were increased. In another case, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were reduced. This provides proof of concept that it is possible to reduce the feedback from IDP on DXS activity. PMID:27548482

  8. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  9. Bright Solid-State Emission of Disilane-Bridged Donor-Acceptor-Donor and Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masaki; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Sakamoto, Ryota; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-02-24

    The development of disilane-bridged donor-acceptor-donor (D-Si-Si-A-Si-Si-D) and acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-Si-Si-D-Si-Si-A) compounds is described. Both types of compound showed strong emission (λem =ca. 500 and ca. 400 nm, respectively) in the solid state with high quantum yields (Φ: up to 0.85). Compound 4 exhibited aggregation-induced emission enhancement in solution. X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystal structures of 2, 4, and 12 had no intermolecular π-π interactions to suppress the nonradiative transition in the solid state.

  10. Location of the binding site for the allosteric activator IMP in the COOH-terminal domain of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphates synthetase.

    PubMed

    Bueso, J; Lusty, C J; Rubio, V

    1994-09-15

    Using UV-irradiation we cross-linked IMP, the allosteric activator of E. coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase (a heterodimer of 117.7 and 41.4 kDa subunits), to the large subunit of the enzyme. As in the native enzyme-IMP complex, the cross-linked complex was resistant to attack by trypsin. Thus, IMP is attached to its normal site and induces the normal conformational changes. Limited digestion of the [3H]IMP-labeled enzyme with V8 staphylococcal protease or with trypsin in the presence of SDS, and NH2-terminal sequencing, showed that [3H]IMP is cross-linked to the COOH-terminal 20 kDa domain of the large subunit, downstream of residue 912, supporting the proposal that this domain is specialized in effector binding and regulation. PMID:8093025

  11. Pyridine as proton acceptor in the concerted proton electron transfer oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Taking pyridine as a prototypal example of biologically important nitrogen bases involved in proton-coupled electron transfers, it is shown with the example of the photochemically triggered oxidation of phenol by Ru(III)(bpy)(3) that this proton acceptor partakes in a concerted pathway whose kinetic characteristics can be extracted from the overall kinetic response. The treatment of these data, implemented by the results of a parallel study carried out in heavy water, allowed the determination of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of this proton acceptor. Comparison of the reorganization energies and of the pre-exponential factors previously derived for hydrogen phosphate and water (in water) as proton acceptors suggests that, in the case of pyridine, the proton charge is delocalized over a primary shell of water molecules firmly bound to the pyridinium cation. PMID:21499600

  12. Pyridine as proton acceptor in the concerted proton electron transfer oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Taking pyridine as a prototypal example of biologically important nitrogen bases involved in proton-coupled electron transfers, it is shown with the example of the photochemically triggered oxidation of phenol by Ru(III)(bpy)(3) that this proton acceptor partakes in a concerted pathway whose kinetic characteristics can be extracted from the overall kinetic response. The treatment of these data, implemented by the results of a parallel study carried out in heavy water, allowed the determination of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of this proton acceptor. Comparison of the reorganization energies and of the pre-exponential factors previously derived for hydrogen phosphate and water (in water) as proton acceptors suggests that, in the case of pyridine, the proton charge is delocalized over a primary shell of water molecules firmly bound to the pyridinium cation.

  13. [Phosphate binders].

    PubMed

    Heeb, Rita M

    2016-06-01

    Phosphate binders to treat hyperphosphataemia are part of the medication regime of every dialysis patient. Phosphate binders are taken with every meal (three times a day). Generally, the medication adherence rates of phosphate binders are very low. This is due to inconveniences like their bad taste or their size which makes them hard to swallow. Also nephrologists have differing opinions on phosphate binders as they are aware of the dialysis patients' difficulties to deal with the amount of drugs they are prescribed. Still, phosphate binders are important drugs which have shown potential in reducing mortality by regulating the level of serum phosphate. In order to improve adherence rates, pharmacists have to advise the patients on these drugs' side effects versus the risks associated with omitting their intake. PMID:27439258

  14. Differences in gene expression of human xylosyltransferases and determination of acceptor specificities for various proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Roch, Christina; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Goetting, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The xylosyltransferase (XT) isoforms XT-I and XT-II initiate the posttranslational glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis. Here, we determined the relative expression of both isoforms in 33 human cell lines. The majority of tested cell lines showed dominant XYLT2 gene expression, while only in 23132/87, JAR, NCI-H510A and THP-1 was the XT-I mRNA expression higher. Nearly equal expression levels were detected in six cell lines. Additionally, to shed light on putative differences in acceptor specificities the acceptor properties of potential acceptor sequences were determined. Peptides were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing putative or known GAG attachment sites of in vivo proteoglycans. Kinetic analysis showed that K{sub m} and V{sub max} values for XT-I mediated xylosylation were slightly higher than those for XT-II, and that XT-I showed a lesser stringency concerning the acceptor sequence. Mutagenesis of the bikunin peptide sequence in the G-S-G attachment site and flanking regions generated potential acceptor molecules. Here, mutations on the N-terminal side and the attachment site were found to be more susceptible to a loss of acceptor function than mutations in the C-terminus. Altogether the known consensus sequence a-a-a-a-G-S-G-a-a/G-a ('a' representing Asp or Glu) for XT-I mediated xylosylation could be approved and additionally extended to apply to XT-II as well.

  15. Synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S.; Curran, George P.

    1981-08-18

    A synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  16. Transcription of lncRNA prt, clustered prt RNA sites for Mmi1 binding, and RNA polymerase II CTD phospho-sites govern the repression of pho1 gene expression under phosphate-replete conditions in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Sanchez, Ana M; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart; Schwer, Beate

    2016-07-01

    Expression of fission yeast Pho1 acid phosphatase is repressed during growth in phosphate-rich medium. Repression is mediated by transcription of the prt locus upstream of pho1 to produce a long noncoding (lnc) prt RNA. Repression is also governed by RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation status, whereby inability to place a Ser7-PO4 mark (as in S7A) derepresses Pho1 expression, and inability to place a Thr4-PO4 mark (as in T4A) hyper-represses Pho1 in phosphate replete cells. Here we find that basal pho1 expression from the prt-pho1 locus is inversely correlated with the activity of the prt promoter, which resides in a 110-nucleotide DNA segment preceding the prt transcription start site. CTD mutations S7A and T4A had no effect on the activity of the prt promoter or the pho1 promoter, suggesting that S7A and T4A affect post-initiation events in prt lncRNA synthesis that make it less and more repressive of pho1, respectively. prt lncRNA contains clusters of DSR (determinant of selective removal) sequences recognized by the YTH-domain-containing protein Mmi1. Altering the nucleobase sequence of two DSR clusters in the prt lncRNA caused hyper-repression of pho1 in phosphate replete cells, concomitant with increased levels of the prt transcript. The isolated Mmi1 YTH domain binds to RNAs with single or tandem DSR elements, to the latter in a noncooperative fashion. We report the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the Mmi1 YTH domain and provide evidence that Mmi1 recognizes DSR RNA via a binding mode distinct from that of structurally homologous YTH proteins that recognize m(6)A-modified RNA.

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis of the regulatory domain of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase identifies crucial residues for allosteric regulation and for transduction of the regulatory signals.

    PubMed

    Fresquet, V; Mora, P; Rochera, L; Ramón-Maiques, S; Rubio, V; Cervera, J

    2000-06-16

    Carbamoyl phosphate (CP), the essential precursor of pyrimidines and arginine, is made in Escherichia coli by a single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) consisting of 41.4 and 117.7 kDa subunits, which is feed-back inhibited by UMP and activated by IMP and ornithine. The large subunit catalyzes CP synthesis from ammonia in three steps, and binds the effectors in its 15 kDa C-terminal domain. Fifteen site-directed mutations were introduced in 13 residues of this domain to investigate the mechanism of allosteric modulation by UMP and IMP. Two mutations, K993A and V994A, decreased significantly or abolished enzyme activity, apparently by interfering with the step of carbamate synthesis, and one mutation, T974A, negatively affected ornithine activation. S948A, K954A, T974A, K993A and K993W/H995A abolished or greatly hampered IMP activation and UMP inhibition as well as the binding of both effectors, monitored using photoaffinity labeling and ultracentrifugation binding assays. V994A also decreased significantly IMP and UMP binding. L990A, V991A, H995A, G997A and G1008A had more modest effects or affected more the modulation by and the binding of one than of the other nucleotide. K993W, R1020A, R1021A and K1061A were without substantial effects. The results confirm the independence of the regulatory and catalytic centers, and also confirm functional predictions based on the X-ray structure of an IMP-CPS complex. They prove that the inhibitor UMP and the activator IMP bind in the same site, and exclude that the previously observed binding of ornithine and glutamine in this site were relevant for enzyme activation. K993 and V994 appear to be involved in the transmission of the regulatory signals triggered by UMP and IMP binding. These effectors possibly change the position of K993 and V994, and alter the intermolecular contacts mediated by the regulatory domain. PMID:10843852

  18. Inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by a reactive metabolite of acetaminophen and mass spectral characterization of an arylated active site peptide.

    PubMed

    Dietze, E C; Schäfer, A; Omichinski, J G; Nelson, S D

    1997-10-01

    Acetaminophen (4'-hydroxyacetanilide, APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug that can cause hepatic necrosis under some circumstances via cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation to a reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). Although the mechanism of hepatocellular injury caused by APAP is not fully understood, it is known that NAPQI forms covalent adducts with several hepatocellular proteins. Reported here is the identification of one of these proteins as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH, D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12]. Two hours after the administration of hepatotoxic doses of [14C]APAP to mice, at a time prior to overt cell damage, hepatocellular GAPDH activity was significantly decreased concurrent with the formation of a 14C-labeled GAPDH adduct. A nonhepatotoxic regioisomer of APAP, 3'-hydroxyacetanilide (AMAP), was found to decrease GAPDH activity to a lesser extent than APAP, and radiolabel from [14C]AMAP bound to a lesser extent to GAPDH at a time when its overall binding to hepatocellular proteins was almost equivalent to that of APAP. In order to determine the nature of the covalent adduct between GAPDH and APAP, its major reactive and toxic metabolite, NAPQI, was incubated with purified porcine muscle GAPDH. Microsequencing analysis and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) with collision-induced dissociation (CID) were used to characterize one of the adducts as APAP bound to the cysteinyl sulfhydryl group of Cys-149 in the active site peptide of GAPDH. PMID:9348431

  19. Mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization: Implications for simulating anaerobic biodegradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreiber, M.E.; Carey, G.R.; Feinstein, D.T.; Bahr, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of biodegradation reactions within a reactive transport framework requires information on mechanisms of terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs). In initial modeling efforts, TEAPs were approximated as occurring sequentially, with the highest energy-yielding electron acceptors (e.g. oxygen) consumed before those that yield less energy (e.g., sulfate). Within this framework in a steady state plume, sequential electron acceptor utilization would theoretically produce methane at an organic-rich source and Fe(II) further downgradient, resulting in a limited zone of Fe(II) and methane overlap. However, contaminant plumes often display much more extensive zones of overlapping Fe(II) and methane. The extensive overlap could be caused by several abiotic and biotic processes including vertical mixing of byproducts in long-screened monitoring wells, adsorption of Fe(II) onto aquifer solids, or microscale heterogeneity in Fe(III) concentrations. Alternatively, the overlap could be due to simultaneous utilization of terminal electron acceptors. Because biodegradation rates are controlled by TEAPs, evaluating the mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization is critical for improving prediction of contaminant mass losses due to biodegradation. Using BioRedox-MT3DMS, a three-dimensional, multi-species reactive transport code, we simulated the current configurations of a BTEX plume and TEAP zones at a petroleum- contaminated field site in Wisconsin. Simulation results suggest that BTEX mass loss due to biodegradation is greatest under oxygen-reducing conditions, with smaller but similar contributions to mass loss from biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results of sensitivity calculations document that BTEX losses due to biodegradation are most sensitive to the age of the plume, while the shape of the BTEX plume is most sensitive to effective porosity and rate constants for biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing and

  20. Virtual screening of electron acceptor materials for organic photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halls, Mathew D.; Djurovich, Peter J.; Giesen, David J.; Goldberg, Alexander; Sommer, Jonathan; McAnally, Eric; Thompson, Mark E.

    2013-10-01

    Virtual screening involves the generation of structure libraries, automated analysis to predict properties related to application performance and subsequent screening to identify lead systems and estimate critical structure-property limits across a targeted chemical design space. This approach holds great promise for informing experimental discovery and development efforts for next-generation materials, such as organic semiconductors. In this work, the virtual screening approach is illustrated for nitrogen-substituted pentacene molecules to identify systems for development as electron acceptor materials for use in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. A structure library of tetra-azapentacenes (TAPs) was generated by substituting four nitrogens for CH at 12 sites on the pentacene molecular framework. Molecular properties (e.g. ELUMO, Eg and μ) were computed for each candidate structure using hybrid DFT at the B3LYP/6-311G** level of theory. The resulting TAPs library was then analyzed with respect to intrinsic properties associated with OPV acceptor performance. Marcus reorganization energies for charge transport for the most favorable TAP candidates were then calculated to further determine suitability as OPV electron acceptors. The synthesis, characterization and OPV device testing of TAP materials is underway, guided by these results.

  1. Oligosaccharide synthesis by dextransucrase: new unconventional acceptors.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Kristin; Jördening, Hans Joachim; Buchholz, Klaus

    2002-11-01

    The acceptor reactions of dextransucrase offer the potential for a targeted synthesis of a wide range of di-, tri- and higher oligosaccharides by the transfer of a glucosyl group from sucrose to the acceptor. We here report on results which show that the synthetic potential of this enzyme is not restricted to 'normal' saccharides. Additionally functionalized saccharides, such as alditols, aldosuloses, sugar acids, alkyl saccharides, and glycals, and rather unconventional saccharides, such as fructose dianhydride, may also act as acceptors. Some of these acceptors even turned out to be relatively efficient: alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->5)-D-arabinonic acid, alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-glucitol, alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-D-glucitol, alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->6)-D-mannitol, alpha-D-fructofuranosyl-beta-D-fructofuranosyl-(1,2':2,3')-dianhydride, 1,5-anhydro-2-deoxy-D-arabino-hex-1-enitol ('D-glucal'), and may therefore be of interest for future applications of the dextransucrase acceptor reaction.

  2. Polymorphic sites in the African population detected by sequence analysis of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene outline the evolution of the variants A and A-.

    PubMed Central

    Vulliamy, T J; Othman, A; Town, M; Nathwani, A; Falusi, A G; Mason, P J; Luzzatto, L

    1991-01-01

    The human X chromosome-linked gene encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD; EC 1.1.1.49) is known to be highly polymorphic from the biochemical characterization of enzyme variants. The variant A (with enzyme activity in the normal range) and the variant A- (associated with enzyme deficiency) each have a frequency of about 0.2 in several African populations. Two restriction fragment length polymorphisms have also been found in people of African descent, but not in other populations, whereas a silent mutation has been shown to be polymorphic in Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, African, and Indian populations. We report now on two additional polymorphisms that we have detected by sequence analysis, one in intron 7 and one in intron 8. The analysis of 54 African male subjects for the seven polymorphic sites, clustered within 3 kilobases of the G6PD gene, has revealed only 7 of the 128 possible haplotypes, indicating marked linkage disequilibrium. These data have enabled us to suggest an evolutionary pathway for the different mutations, with only a single ambiguity. The mutation underlying the A variant is the most ancient and the mutation underlying the A- variant is the most recent. Since it seems reasonable that the A- allele is subject to positive selection by malaria, whereas the other alleles are neutral, G6PD may lend itself to the analysis of the role of random genetic drift and selection in determining allele frequencies within a single genetic locus in human populations. Images PMID:1924316

  3. A Comparison of the Process of Remodeling of Hydroxyapatite/Poly-D/L-Lactide and Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate in a Loading Site

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, Hiroyuki; Ochi, Hiroki; Soeta, Satoshi; Kanno, Nobuo; Yoshihara, Megumi; Okazaki, Kenshi; Yogo, Takuya; Harada, Yasuji; Amasaki, Hajime; Hara, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the most commonly used bioresorbable scaffold is made of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP); it is hoped that scaffolds made of a mixture of hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly-D/L-lactide (PDLLA) will be able to act as novel bioresorbable scaffolds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of a HA/PDLLA scaffold compared to β-TCP, at a loading site. Dogs underwent surgery to replace a section of tibial bone with a bioresorbable scaffold. After the follow-up period, the scaffold was subjected to histological analysis. The HA/PDLLA scaffold showed similar bone formation and superior cell and tissue infiltration compared to the β-TCP scaffold, as seen after Villanueva Goldner staining. Moreover, silver staining and immunohistochemistry for Von Willebrand factor and cathepsin K demonstrated better cell infiltration in the HA/PDLLA scaffold. The fibrous tissue and cells that had infiltrated into the HA/PDLLA scaffold tested positive for collagen type I and RUNX2, respectively, indicating that the tissue and cells that had infiltrated into the HA/PDLLA scaffold had the potential to differentiate into bone. The HA/PDLLA scaffold is therefore likely to find clinical application as a new bioresorbable scaffold. PMID:26504825

  4. Allosteric communication between the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and heme sites in the H2S generator human cystathionine β-synthase.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Xie, Peter; Banerjee, Ruma

    2012-11-01

    Human cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is a unique pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that has a regulatory heme cofactor. Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of Arg-266, a residue at the heme pocket end of α-helix 8, for communication between the heme and PLP sites. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Thr-257 and Thr-260 residues, located at the other end of α-helix 8 on the heme electronic environment and on activity. The mutations at the two positions destabilize PLP binding, leading to lower PLP content and ~2- to ~500-fold lower activity compared with the wild-type enzyme. Activity is unresponsive to PLP supplementation, consistent with the pyridoxine-nonresponsive phenotype of the T257M mutation in a homocystinuric patient. The H(2)S-producing activities, also impacted by the mutations, show a different pattern of inhibition compared with the canonical transsulfuration reaction. Interestingly, the mutants exhibit contrasting sensitivities to the allosteric effector, S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet); whereas T257M and T257I are inhibited, the other mutants are hyperactivated by AdoMet. All mutants showed an increased propensity of the ferrous heme to form an inactive species with a 424 nm Soret peak and exhibited significantly reduced enzyme activity in the ferrous and ferrous-CO states. Our results provide the first evidence for bidirectional transmission of information between the cofactor binding sites, suggest the additional involvement of this region in allosteric communication with the regulatory AdoMet-binding domain, and reveal the potential for independent modulation of the canonical transsulfuration versus H(2)S-generating reactions catalyzed by CBS.

  5. Donor-acceptor heteroleptic open sandwiches.

    PubMed

    Merino, Gabriel; Beltrán, Hiram I; Vela, Alberto

    2006-02-01

    A series of donor-acceptor heteroleptic open sandwiches with formula CpM-M'Pyl (M = B, Al, Ga; M' = Li, Na; Cp = cyclopentadienyl; Pyl = pentadienyl) has been designed in silico using density functional theory. The most stable complexes are those containing boron as a donor atom. A molecular orbital analysis shows that the s character of the lone pair located at the group 13 element is mainly responsible for the complex stabilization. It is also found that the surrounding medium has a similar effect on these sandwiches such as in the "classical" donor-acceptor complexes, showing a decrement in the group 13 element-alkaline metal bond lengths.

  6. AlF4- reversibly inhibits 'P'-type cation-transport ATPases, possibly by interacting with the phosphate-binding site of the ATPase.

    PubMed

    Missiaen, L; Wuytack, F; De Smedt, H; Vrolix, M; Casteels, R

    1988-08-01

    The only known cellular action of AlF4- is to stimulate the G-proteins. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that AlF4- also inhibits 'P'-type cation-transport ATPases. NaF plus AlCl3 completely and reversibly inhibits the activity of the purified (Na+ + K+)-ATPase (Na+- and K+-activated ATPase) and of the purified plasmalemmal (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase (Ca2+-stimulated and Mg2+-dependent ATPase). It partially inhibits the activity of the sarcoplasmic-reticulum (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase, whereas it does not affect the mitochondrial H+-transporting ATPase. The inhibitory substances are neither F- nor Al3+ but rather fluoroaluminate complexes. Because AlF4- still inhibits the ATPase in the presence of guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate, and because guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate does not inhibit the ATPase, it is unlikely that the inhibition could be due to the activation of an unknown G-protein. The time course of inhibition and the concentrations of NaF and AlCl3 required for this inhibition differ for the different ATPases. AlF4- inhibits the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and the plasmalemmal (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase noncompetitively with respect to ATP and to their respective cationic substrates, Na+ and Ca2+. AlF4- probably binds to the phosphate-binding site of the ATPase, as the Ki for inhibition of the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and of the plasmalemmal (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase is shifted in the presence of respectively 5 and 50 mM-Pi to higher concentrations of NaF. Moreover, AlF4- inhibits the K+-activated p-nitrophenylphosphatase of the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase competitively with respect to p-nitrophenyl phosphate. This AlF4- -induced inhibition of 'P'-type cation-transport ATPases warns us against explaining all the effects of AlF4- on intact cells by an activation of G-proteins.

  7. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  8. Site-specific cell proliferation in renal tubular cells by the renal tubular carcinogen tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, M L; Elwell, M R; Matthews, H B

    1993-01-01

    Our laboratory has been examining the mechanisms whereby chemicals are mutagenic in short-term in-vitro assays yet are not carcinogenic in 2-year rodent bioassays. Previous studies indicated that mutagenic carcinogens increased the amount of cell turnover in the target organ, but that mutagenic noncarcinogens failed to do so. The present study compares the incidence of cell proliferation in specific regions of the kidney, which is the site of carcinogenicity, with cell proliferation induced in a nontarget tissue, the liver, by the mutagenic renal tubular carcinogen tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate (TRIS). Renal tubular adenocarcinoma induced by TRIS was the only tumor type identified in male F344 rats, and it was localized in the outer medulla. Male F344 rats were fed a diet containing 0, 50, or 100 ppm TRIS for 14 days. These doses were identical to the doses given in the National Toxicology Program cancer bioassay. Replicating cells were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine administered by an osmotic minipump and identified in tissue sections from liver and kidney using immunohistochemical techniques. Examination of liver sections showed no chemically related increases in cell proliferation above control for either dose group. However, in the kidney, TRIS induced significant cell proliferation that was localized in the renal outer medulla region, the target area for carcinogenesis. The labeling index (number of labeled cells/total number of cells counted) in the kidneys of TRIS-exposed rats was increased approximately 4-fold in the outer medulla and was not increased in the cortex or inner medulla. The results of this study suggest an association between the chemically-induced renal cell proliferation and the renal carcinogenicity of TRIS. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 2. PMID:8013416

  9. Transmembrane molecules for phylogenetic analyses of pathogenic protists: Leishmania-specific informative sites in hydrophilic loops of trans- endoplasmic reticulum N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate transferase.

    PubMed

    Waki, Kayoko; Dutta, Sujoy; Ray, Debalina; Kolli, Bala Krishna; Akman, Leyla; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Lin, Chung-Ping; Chang, Kwang-Poo

    2007-02-01

    A sequence database was created for the Leishmania N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate transferase (nagt) gene from 193 independent isolates. PCR products of this single-copy gene were analyzed for restriction fragment length polymorphism based on seven nagt sequences initially available. We subsequently sequenced 77 samples and found 19 new variants (genotypes). Alignment of all 26 nagt sequences is gap free, except for a single codon addition or deletion. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequences allow grouping the isolates into three subgenera, each consisting of recognized species complexes, i.e., subgenus Leishmania (L. amazonensis-L. mexicana, L. donovani-L. infantum, L. tropica, L. major, and L. turanica-L. gerbilli), subgenus Viannia (L. braziliensis, L. panamensis), and one unclassified (L. enriettii) species. This hierarchy of grouping is also supported by sequence analyses of selected samples for additional single-copy genes present on different chromosomes. Intraspecies divergence of nagt varies considerably with different species complexes. Interestingly, species complexes with less subspecies divergence are more widely distributed than those that are more divergent. The relevance of this to Leishmania evolutionary adaptation is discussed. Heterozygosity of subspecies variants contributes to intraspecies diversity, which is prominent in L. tropica but not in L. donovani-L. infantum. This disparity is thought to result from the genetic recombination of the respective species at different times as a rare event during their predominantly clonal evolution. Phylogenetically useful sites of nagt are restricted largely to several extended hydrophilic loops predicted from hypothetical models of Leishmania NAGT as an endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein. In silico analyses of nagt from fungi and other protozoa further illustrate the potential value of this and, perhaps, other similar transmembrane molecules for phylogenetic analyses of single-cell eukaryotes.

  10. Transmembrane Molecules for Phylogenetic Analyses of Pathogenic Protists: Leishmania-Specific Informative Sites in Hydrophilic Loops of Trans- Endoplasmic Reticulum N-Acetylglucosamine-1-Phosphate Transferase▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Kayoko; Dutta, Sujoy; Ray, Debalina; Kolli, Bala Krishna; Akman, Leyla; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Lin, Chung-Ping; Chang, Kwang-Poo

    2007-01-01

    A sequence database was created for the Leishmania N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate transferase (nagt) gene from 193 independent isolates. PCR products of this single-copy gene were analyzed for restriction fragment length polymorphism based on seven nagt sequences initially available. We subsequently sequenced 77 samples and found 19 new variants (genotypes). Alignment of all 26 nagt sequences is gap free, except for a single codon addition or deletion. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequences allow grouping the isolates into three subgenera, each consisting of recognized species complexes, i.e., subgenus Leishmania (L. amazonensis-L. mexicana, L. donovani-L. infantum, L. tropica, L. major, and L. turanica-L. gerbilli), subgenus Viannia (L. braziliensis, L. panamensis), and one unclassified (L. enriettii) species. This hierarchy of grouping is also supported by sequence analyses of selected samples for additional single-copy genes present on different chromosomes. Intraspecies divergence of nagt varies considerably with different species complexes. Interestingly, species complexes with less subspecies divergence are more widely distributed than those that are more divergent. The relevance of this to Leishmania evolutionary adaptation is discussed. Heterozygosity of subspecies variants contributes to intraspecies diversity, which is prominent in L. tropica but not in L. donovani-L. infantum. This disparity is thought to result from the genetic recombination of the respective species at different times as a rare event during their predominantly clonal evolution. Phylogenetically useful sites of nagt are restricted largely to several extended hydrophilic loops predicted from hypothetical models of Leishmania NAGT as an endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein. In silico analyses of nagt from fungi and other protozoa further illustrate the potential value of this and, perhaps, other similar transmembrane molecules for phylogenetic analyses of single-cell eukaryotes

  11. The function of phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase γ (PI5P4Kγ) explored using a specific inhibitor that targets the PI5P-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Jonathan H.; Giudici, Maria-Luisa; Burke, John E.; Williams, Roger L.; Maloney, David J.; Marugan, Juan; Irvine, Robin F.

    2014-01-01

    NIH-12848 (NCGC00012848-02), a putative phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase γ (PI5P4Kγ) inhibitor, was explored as a tool for investigating this enigmatic, low activity, lipid kinase. PI5P4K assays in vitro showed that NIH-12848 inhibited PI5P4Kγ with an IC50 of approximately 1 μM but did not inhibit the α and β PI5P4K isoforms at concentrations up to 100 μM. A lack of inhibition of PI5P4Kγ ATPase activity suggested that NIH-12848 does not interact with the enzyme's ATP-binding site and direct exploration of binding using hydrogen–deuterium exchange (HDX)-MS (HDX-MS) revealed the putative PI5P-binding site of PI5P4Kγ to be the likely region of interaction. This was confirmed by a series of mutation experiments which led to the identification of a single PI5P4Kγ amino acid residue that can be mutated to its PI5P4Ks α and β homologue to render PI5P4Kγ resistant NIH-12848 inhibition. NIH-12848 (10 μM) was applied to cultured mouse principal kidney cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD) cells which, we show, express PI5P4Kγ that increases when the cells grow to confluence and polarize. NIH-12848 inhibited the translocation of Na+/K+-ATPase to the plasma membrane that occurs when mpkCCD cells grow to confluence and also prevented reversibly their forming of ‘domes’ on the culture dish. Both these NIH-12848-induced effects were mimicked by specific RNAi knockdown of PI5P4Kγ, but not that of PI5P4Ks α or β. Overall, the data reveal a probable contribution of PI5P4Kγ to the development and maintenance of epithelial cell functional polarity and show that NIH-12848 is a potentially powerful tool for exploring the cell physiology of PI5P4Ks. PMID:25495341

  12. Fundamentals of phosphate transfer.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Anthony J; Nome, Faruk

    2015-07-21

    Historically, the chemistry of phosphate transfer-a class of reactions fundamental to the chemistry of Life-has been discussed almost exclusively in terms of the nucleophile and the leaving group. Reactivity always depends significantly on both factors; but recent results for reactions of phosphate triesters have shown that it can also depend strongly on the nature of the nonleaving or "spectator" groups. The extreme stabilities of fully ionised mono- and dialkyl phosphate esters can be seen as extensions of the same effect, with one or two triester OR groups replaced by O(-). Our chosen lead reaction is hydrolysis-phosphate transfer to water: because water is the medium in which biological chemistry takes place; because the half-life of a system in water is an accepted basic index of stability; and because the typical mechanisms of hydrolysis, with solvent H2O providing specific molecules to act as nucleophiles and as general acids or bases, are models for reactions involving better nucleophiles and stronger general species catalysts. Not least those available in enzyme active sites. Alkyl monoester dianions compete with alkyl diester monoanions for the slowest estimated rates of spontaneous hydrolysis. High stability at physiological pH is a vital factor in the biological roles of organic phosphates, but a significant limitation for experimental investigations. Almost all kinetic measurements of phosphate transfer reactions involving mono- and diesters have been followed by UV-visible spectroscopy using activated systems, conveniently compounds with good leaving groups. (A "good leaving group" OR* is electron-withdrawing, and can be displaced to generate an anion R*O(-) in water near pH 7.) Reactivities at normal temperatures of P-O-alkyl derivatives-better models for typical biological substrates-have typically had to be estimated: by extended extrapolation from linear free energy relationships, or from rate measurements at high temperatures. Calculation is free

  13. An investigation of acceptor-doped grain boundaries in ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, V.; Rodrigues, R. P.; Dravid, V. P.

    1996-07-01

    Grain boundary (GB) doped 0022-3727/29/7/014/img2 exhibits interesting electroceramic phenomena including varistor and barrier layer capacitor behaviour. We present here our investigation of GB acceptor-doped 0022-3727/29/7/014/img2 using analytical electron microscopy including electron holography. Mn was diffused into sintered polycrystalline 0022-3727/29/7/014/img2 to attain GBs which are rich in Mn. The presence and spatial extent of Mn at the GBs were analysed using x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS). The valence state of Mn was determined using PEELS to be predominantly +2. Finally, transmission high-energy electron holography was utilized to directly image and quantify the electrostatic potential and associated space-charge across the GBs directly. The holography results reveal a negatively charged GB with positive space-charge, indicating that Mn with a valence of +2 resides as an acceptor dopant on the Ti site at the GB core. The barrier height and local charge density distribution, including the Debye length, of the double Schottky barrier at the GB are derived from these holography results. This investigation demonstrates the usefulness of electron holography as a bulk-sensitive technique to probe the statics and dynamics of electrostatic field distribution and electrical charge across interfaces in technologically useful materials, and the need to employ diverse analytical techniques for such an investigation.

  14. Observation of selective plasmon-exciton coupling in nonradiative energy transfer: donor-selective versus acceptor-selective plexcitons.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Tuncay; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Mutlugun, Evren; Akin, Onur; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Ozel, Ilkem Ozge; Zhang, Qing; Xiong, Qihua; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-07-10

    We report selectively plasmon-mediated nonradiative energy transfer between quantum dot (QD) emitters interacting with each other via Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) under controlled plasmon coupling either to only the donor QDs (i.e., donor-selective) or to only the acceptor QDs (i.e., acceptor-selective). Using layer-by-layer assembled colloidal QD nanocrystal solids with metal nanoparticles integrated at carefully designed spacing, we demonstrate the ability to enable/disable the coupled plasmon-exciton (plexciton) formation distinctly at the donor (exciton departing) site or at the acceptor (exciton feeding) site of our choice, while not hindering the donor exciton-acceptor exciton interaction but refraining from simultaneous coupling to both sites of the donor and the acceptor in the FRET process. In the case of donor-selective plexciton, we observed a substantial shortening in the donor QD lifetime from 1.33 to 0.29 ns as a result of plasmon-coupling to the donors and the FRET-assisted exciton transfer from the donors to the acceptors, both of which shorten the donor lifetime. This consequently enhanced the acceptor emission by a factor of 1.93. On the other hand, in the complementary case of acceptor-selective plexciton we observed a 2.70-fold emission enhancement in the acceptor QDs, larger than the acceptor emission enhancement of the donor-selective plexciton, as a result of the combined effects of the acceptor plasmon coupling and the FRET-assisted exciton feeding. Here we present the comparative results of theoretical modeling of the donor- and acceptor-selective plexcitons of nonradiative energy transfer developed here for the first time, which are in excellent agreement with the systematic experimental characterization. Such an ability to modify and control energy transfer through mastering plexcitons is of fundamental importance, opening up new applications for quantum dot embedded plexciton devices along with the development of new

  15. Observation of selective plasmon-exciton coupling in nonradiative energy transfer: donor-selective versus acceptor-selective plexcitons.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Tuncay; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Mutlugun, Evren; Akin, Onur; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Ozel, Ilkem Ozge; Zhang, Qing; Xiong, Qihua; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-07-10

    We report selectively plasmon-mediated nonradiative energy transfer between quantum dot (QD) emitters interacting with each other via Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET) under controlled plasmon coupling either to only the donor QDs (i.e., donor-selective) or to only the acceptor QDs (i.e., acceptor-selective). Using layer-by-layer assembled colloidal QD nanocrystal solids with metal nanoparticles integrated at carefully designed spacing, we demonstrate the ability to enable/disable the coupled plasmon-exciton (plexciton) formation distinctly at the donor (exciton departing) site or at the acceptor (exciton feeding) site of our choice, while not hindering the donor exciton-acceptor exciton interaction but refraining from simultaneous coupling to both sites of the donor and the acceptor in the FRET process. In the case of donor-selective plexciton, we observed a substantial shortening in the donor QD lifetime from 1.33 to 0.29 ns as a result of plasmon-coupling to the donors and the FRET-assisted exciton transfer from the donors to the acceptors, both of which shorten the donor lifetime. This consequently enhanced the acceptor emission by a factor of 1.93. On the other hand, in the complementary case of acceptor-selective plexciton we observed a 2.70-fold emission enhancement in the acceptor QDs, larger than the acceptor emission enhancement of the donor-selective plexciton, as a result of the combined effects of the acceptor plasmon coupling and the FRET-assisted exciton feeding. Here we present the comparative results of theoretical modeling of the donor- and acceptor-selective plexcitons of nonradiative energy transfer developed here for the first time, which are in excellent agreement with the systematic experimental characterization. Such an ability to modify and control energy transfer through mastering plexcitons is of fundamental importance, opening up new applications for quantum dot embedded plexciton devices along with the development of new

  16. Cyanomethylbenzoic acid: an acceptor for donor-π-acceptor chromophores used in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wanchun; Gupta, Akhil; Kashif, Muhammad Kalim; Duffy, Noel; Bilic, Ante; Evans, Richard A; Spiccia, Leone; Bach, Udo

    2013-02-01

    Sensing the sun: Incorporation of a cyanomethyl benzoic acid electron acceptor into donor-π-acceptor sensitizers for dye-sensitized-solar cell is shown to lead to devices with improved conversion efficiency when compared with more widely used cyanoacetic acid acceptor.

  17. Enhanced biodegradation of cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) under mixed electron-acceptor condition.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, R

    2001-02-01

    The biodegradation of cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine, commonly known as 'high melting explosive' (HMX), under various electron-acceptor conditions was investigated using enrichment cultures developed from the anaerobic digester sludge of Thibodaux sewage treatment plant. The results indicated that the HMX was biodegraded under sulfate reducing, nitrate reducing, fermenting, methanogenic, and mixed electron accepting conditions. However, the rates of degradation varied among the various conditions studied. The fastest removal of HMX (from 22 ppm on day 0 to < 0.05 ppm on day 11) was observed under mixed electron-acceptor conditions, followed in order by sulfate reducing, fermenting, methanogenic, and nitrate reducing conditions. Under aerobic conditions, HMX was not biodegraded, which indicated that HMX degradation takes place under anaerobic conditions via reduction. HMX was converted to methanol and chloroform under mixed electron-acceptor conditions. This study showed evidence for HMX degradation under anaerobic conditions in a mixed microbial population system similar to any contaminated field sites, where a heterogeneous population exists.

  18. Binomial distribution-based quantitative measurement of multiple-acceptors fluorescence resonance energy transfer by partially photobleaching acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Huaina; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Tongsheng

    2014-06-01

    We report that binomial distribution depending on acceptor photobleaching degree can be used to characterize the proportions of various kinds of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) constructs resulted from partial acceptor photobleaching of multiple-acceptors FRET system. On this basis, we set up a rigorous quantitation theory for multiple-acceptors FRET construct named as Mb-PbFRET which is not affected by the imaging conditions and fluorophore properties. We experimentally validate Mb-PbFRET with FRET constructs consisted of one donor and two or three acceptors inside living cells on confocal and wide-field microscopes.

  19. Imprinting of molecular recognition sites combined with π-donor-acceptor interactions using bis-aniline-crosslinked Au-CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles array on electrodes: Development of electrochemiluminescence sensor for the ultrasensitive and selective detection of 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yukun; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Xiaomin; Liu, Guiyang; Wang, Shuo

    2016-03-15

    A novel strategy is reported for the fabrication of bis-aniline-crosslinked Au nanoparticles (NPs)-CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) array composite by facil one-step co-electropolymerization of thioaniline-functionalized AuNPs and thioaniline-functionalized CdSe/ZnS QDs onto thioaniline-functionalized Au elctrodes (AuE). Stable and enhanced cathodic electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of CdSe/ZnS QDs is observed on the modified electrode in neutral solution, suggesting promising applications in ECL sensing. An advanced ECL sensor is explored for detection of 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) which quenches the ECL signal through electron-transfer pathway. The sensitive determination of MCPA with limit of detection (LOD) of 2.2 nmolL(-1) (S/N=3) is achieved by π-donor-acceptor interactions between MCPA and the bis-aniline bridging units. Impressively, the imprinting of molecular recognition sites into the bis-aniline-crosslinked AuNPs-CdSe/ZnS QDs array yields a functionalized electrode with an extremely sensitive response to MCPA in a linear range of 10 pmolL(-1)-50 μmolL(-1) with a LOD of 4.3 pmolL(-1 ()S/N=3). The proposed ECL sensor with high sensitivity, good selectivity, reproducibility and stability has been successfully applied for the determination of MCPA in real samples with satisfactory recoveries. In this study, ECL sensor combined the merits of QDs-ECL and molecularly imprinting technology is reported for the first time. The developed ECL sensor holds great promise for the fabrication of QDs-based ECL sensors with improved sensitivity and furthermore opens the door to wide applications of QDs-based ECL in food safety and environmental monitoring.

  20. Imprinting of molecular recognition sites combined with π-donor-acceptor interactions using bis-aniline-crosslinked Au-CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles array on electrodes: Development of electrochemiluminescence sensor for the ultrasensitive and selective detection of 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yukun; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Xiaomin; Liu, Guiyang; Wang, Shuo

    2016-03-15

    A novel strategy is reported for the fabrication of bis-aniline-crosslinked Au nanoparticles (NPs)-CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) array composite by facil one-step co-electropolymerization of thioaniline-functionalized AuNPs and thioaniline-functionalized CdSe/ZnS QDs onto thioaniline-functionalized Au elctrodes (AuE). Stable and enhanced cathodic electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of CdSe/ZnS QDs is observed on the modified electrode in neutral solution, suggesting promising applications in ECL sensing. An advanced ECL sensor is explored for detection of 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) which quenches the ECL signal through electron-transfer pathway. The sensitive determination of MCPA with limit of detection (LOD) of 2.2 nmolL(-1) (S/N=3) is achieved by π-donor-acceptor interactions between MCPA and the bis-aniline bridging units. Impressively, the imprinting of molecular recognition sites into the bis-aniline-crosslinked AuNPs-CdSe/ZnS QDs array yields a functionalized electrode with an extremely sensitive response to MCPA in a linear range of 10 pmolL(-1)-50 μmolL(-1) with a LOD of 4.3 pmolL(-1 ()S/N=3). The proposed ECL sensor with high sensitivity, good selectivity, reproducibility and stability has been successfully applied for the determination of MCPA in real samples with satisfactory recoveries. In this study, ECL sensor combined the merits of QDs-ECL and molecularly imprinting technology is reported for the first time. The developed ECL sensor holds great promise for the fabrication of QDs-based ECL sensors with improved sensitivity and furthermore opens the door to wide applications of QDs-based ECL in food safety and environmental monitoring. PMID:26569444

  1. Alkyl Chlorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nadas, Janos I; Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the role of an alkyl chloride as a hydrogen bond acceptor, geometries and interaction energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory for complexes between ethyl chloride and representative hydrogen donor groups. The results establish that these donors, which include hydrogen cyanide, methanol, nitrobenzene, pyrrole, acetamide, and N-methylurea, form X-H {hor_ellipsis} Cl hydrogen bonds (X = C, N, O) of weak to moderate strength, with {Delta}E values ranging from -2.8 to -5.3 kcal/mol.

  2. Growth of polythiophene/perylene tetracarboxydiimide donor/acceptor shish-kebab nanostructures by coupled crystal modification.

    PubMed

    Bu, Laju; Pentzer, Emily; Bokel, Felicia A; Emrick, Todd; Hayward, Ryan C

    2012-12-21

    Self-assembled crystalline organic nanostructures containing electron donor and acceptor materials hold promise as building blocks for photovoltaic devices. We show that coupled crystallization of poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT) and perylene tetracarboxydiimide (PDI) induced by solvent evaporation, wherein both components modify crystallization of the other, gives rise to donor/acceptor "shish-kebabs" with tunable nanostructures. P3HT kinetically stabilizes supersaturated solutions of PDI and modifies the growth of PDI crystals, leading to formation of extended PDI shish nanowires that in turn serve as heterogeneous nucleation sites for fibrillar P3HT kebabs during solvent casting. The dimensions of these nanostructures can be tailored through variations in donor/acceptor ratio or solvent quality, and the method is shown to be general to several other poly(3-alkyl thiophenes) and perylene derivatives, thus providing a simple and robust route to form highly crystalline nanophase separated organic donor/acceptor assemblies.

  3. Electromigration of microbial electron acceptors and nutrients: (I) transport in synthetic media.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Svenja T; Katzoreck, Daniel; Tiehm, Andreas

    2008-07-01

    Microbiological cleanup is a widely used in situ remediation strategy for organic soil and groundwater contaminations. However, often the availability of electron acceptors and nutrients are limiting factors for microbial pollutant degradation in the field. Electromigration represents a new approach for the transport of microbiological agents in soil. In this study, the electrokinetic transport of the microbial electron acceptors nitrate and sulfate and of the nutrients ammonium and phosphate was compared. All experiments were performed under standardized conditions, i.e. with constant voltage in demineralized water and a model sandy soil. Average transport rates for nitrate, sulfate, poly-phosphate, and ammonium were 1.34 cm/h, 1.91 cm/h, 0.48 cm/h, and 0.40 cm/h, respectively, in single compound studies. Transport velocities were dependent on applied voltage gradient but not on the initial ion concentration. Additionally, electrokinetic transport was studied with ion mixtures. The ion distribution in the soil was significantly influenced by the pH profile and the associated voltage gradient.

  4. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-01-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme. PMID:1218095

  5. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-12-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme.

  6. Electronic structure of acceptor-donor complexes in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoro, E.; Ohama, Y.; Hayafuji, Y.

    2003-10-01

    The electronic structure of trimer acceptor-donor complexes in silicon Si clusters is studied using the ab initio discrete variational-Xα molecular-orbital (MO) method. The trimer complexes In2D (D=phosphorus P, arsenic As, antimony Sb, or bismuth Bi) consist of two indium In acceptor elements and a centered donor element D from the group V elements. Calculations are performed under the assumption that the three atoms are arranged in the nearest neighbor substitutional trimer configuration. Results indicate that the trimer complexes act as shallower acceptors having smaller ionization activation energies than In acceptor. The potential of In2D as an acceptor in Si is then discussed and In2D is proposed as a promising acceptor for the formation of channels and source/drains in ultralarge scaled integration.

  7. Preparation of porous lanthanum phosphate with templates

    SciTech Connect

    Onoda, Hiroaki; Ishima, Yuya; Takenaka, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao

    2009-08-05

    Malonic acid, propionic acid, glycine, n-butylamine, and urea were added to the preparation of lanthanum phosphate from lanthanum nitrate and phosphoric acid solutions. All additives were taken into lanthanum phosphate particles. The additives that have a basic site were easy to contain in precipitates. The addition of templates improved the specific surface area of lanthanum phosphate. The amount of pore, with radius smaller than 4 nm, increased with the addition of templates. The remained additives had influence on the acidic properties of lanthanum phosphate.

  8. Ga(III) complexes as models for the M(III) site of purple acid phosphatase: ligand effects on the hydrolytic reactivity toward bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) phosphate.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Fergal; Hynes, Michael J; Erxleben, Andrea

    2010-07-19

    The effects of a series of Ga(III) complexes with tripodal ligands on the hydrolysis rate of the activated phosphate diester bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl)phosphate (BDNPP) have been investigated. In particular, the influence of the nature of the ligand donor sites on the reactivity of Ga(III) which represents a mimic of the Fe(III) ion in purple acid phosphatase has been evaluated. It has been shown that replacing neutral nitrogen donor atoms and carboxylate groups by phenolate groups enhanced the reactivity of the Ga complexes. Bell-shaped pH-rate profiles and the measured solvent deuterium isotope effects are indicative of a mechanism that involves nucleophilic attack on the coordinated substrate by Ga-OH. The trend in reactivity found for the different Ga complexes reveals that of the two effects of the metal, Lewis acid activation of the substrate and nucleophile activation, the latter one is more important in determining the intrinsic reactivity of the metal catalyst. The relevance of the present findings for the modulation of the activity of the M(III) ion in purple acid phosphatase whose active site contains a phenolate (tyrosine side chain) is discussed. PMID:20565083

  9. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-17

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time [Formula: see text] as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si. PMID:27171901

  10. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-17

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time [Formula: see text] as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  11. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-01

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time {T}2* as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  12. Binding characteristics of homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers for acyclovir using an (acceptor-donor-donor)-(donor-acceptor-acceptor) hydrogen-bond strategy, and analytical applications for serum samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suqin; Tan, Lei; Wang, Ganquan; Peng, Guiming; Kang, Chengcheng; Tang, Youwen

    2013-04-12

    This paper demonstrates a novel approach to assembling homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) based on mimicking multiple hydrogen bonds between nucleotide bases by preparing acyclovir (ACV) as a template and using coatings grafted on silica supports. (1)H NMR studies confirmed the AAD-DDA (A for acceptor, D for donor) hydrogen-bond array between template and functional monomer, while the resultant monodisperse molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIMs) were evaluated using a binding experiment, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and solid phase extraction. The Langmuir isothermal model and the Langmuir-Freundlich isothermal model suggest that ACV-MIMs have more homogeneous binding sites than MIPs prepared through normal imprinting. In contrast to previous MIP-HPLC columns, there were no apparent tailings for the ACV peaks, and ACV-MIMs had excellent specific binding properties with a Ka peak of 3.44 × 10(5)M(-1). A complete baseline separation is obtained for ACV and structurally similar compounds. This work also successfully used MIMs as a specific sorbent for capturing ACV from serum samples. The detection limit and mean recovery of ACV was 1.8 ng/mL(-1) and 95.6%, respectively, for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction coupled with HPLC. To our knowledge, this was the first example of MIPs using AAD-DDA hydrogen bonds.

  13. New acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) type copolymers for efficient organic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghomrasni, S.; Ayachi, S.; Alimi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Three new conjugated systems alternating acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) type copolymers have been investigated by means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time-Dependent DFT (TD-DFT) at the 6-31g (d) level of theory. 4,4‧-Dimethoxy-chalcone, also called the 1,3-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (BMP), has been used as a common acceptor moiety. It forced intra-molecular S⋯O interactions through alternating oligo-thiophene derivatives: 4-AlkylThiophenes (4-ATP), 4-AlkylBithiophenes (4-ABTP) and 4-Thienylene Vinylene (4-TEV) as donor moieties. The band gap, HOMO and LUMO electron distributions as well as optical properties were analyzed for each molecule. The fully optimized resulting copolymers showed low band gaps (2.2-2.8 eV) and deep HOMO energy levels ranging from -4.66 to -4.86 eV. A broad absorption [300-900 nm] covering the solar spectrum and absorption maxima ranges from 486 to 604 nm. In addition, organic photovoltaic cells (OPCs) based on alternating copolymers in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) composites with the 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl) propyl-1-phenyl-[6,6]-C61 (PCBM), as an acceptor, have been optimized. Thus, the band gap decreased to 1.62 eV, the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) were about 3-5% and the open circuit voltage Voc of the resulting molecules decreased from 1.50 to 1.27 eV.

  14. Influence of alternative electron acceptors on the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y. )

    1993-04-01

    Methanogeneic conditions can promote the biodegradation of a number of halogenated aromatic compounds. This study, using sediments from freshwater and estuarine sites, is an evaluation of the anaerobic biodegradability of monochlorinated phenols and benzoic acids coupled to denitrification, sulfidogenesis, and methanogenesis. The results indicate that chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids are biodegradable under at least one set of anaerobic conditions. Metabolism depends both on the electron acceptor available and on the position of the chlorine substituent. Presence of alternative electron acceptors, nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate, can affect degradation rates and substrate specificities. Since contaminated sites usually have mixtures of wastes, bioremediation efforts may need to consider the activities of diverse anaerobic communities to carry out effective treatment of all components. 37 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Effects of kinase inhibitors and potassium phosphate (KPi) on site-specific phosphorylation of branched chain. cap alpha. -ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, M.J.; Shimomura, Y.; Ozawa, T.; Harris, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    BCKDH is phosphorylated by a copurifying kinase at two serine residues on the El..cap alpha.. subunit. Phosphorylation of both sites occurs at about the same rate initially, but inactivation is believed associated only with site 1 phosphorylation. The effects of KPi and known inhibitors of BCKDH kinase, ..cap alpha..-chloroisocaproate (CIC) and branched chain ..cap alpha..-ketoacids (BCKA), on the phosphorylation of purified rat liver BCKDH were studied. Site-specific phosphorylation was quantitated by thin-layer electrophoresis of tryptic peptides followed by densitometric scanning of autoradiograms. Addition of 5 mM KPi was found necessary to stabilize the BCKDH activity at 37/sup 0/C. Increasing the KPi to 50 mM dramatically increased the CIC and BCKA inhibition of site 1 and site 2 phosphorylation. The finding of enhanced sensitivity of inhibitors with 50 mM KPi may facilitate identification of physiologically important kinase effectors. Regardless of the KPi concentration, CIC and the BCKA showed much more effective inhibition of site 2 than site 1 phosphorylation. Although site 1 is the primary inactivating site, predominant inhibition of site 2 phosphorylation may provide a means of modulating kinase/phosphatase control of BCKDH activity under steady state conditions.

  16. Aromatic donor-acceptor interactions in non-polar environments.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Giles M; Pascu, Sofia I; Filip, Sorin V; West, Kevin R; Pantoş, G Dan

    2015-05-14

    We have evaluated the strength of aromatic donor-acceptor interactions between dialkyl naphthalenediimide and dialkoxynaphthalene in non-polar environments. (1)H NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to characterise this interaction. We concluded that the strength of donor-acceptor interactions in heptane is sufficient to drive supramolecular assemblies in this and other aliphatic solvents. PMID:25875729

  17. Acceptor impurity activation in III-nitride light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Römer, Friedhard Witzigmann, Bernd

    2015-01-12

    In this work, the role of the acceptor doping and the acceptor activation and its impact on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) based multi-quantum well light emitting diode is studied by microscopic simulation. Acceptor impurities in GaN are subject to a high activation energy which depends on the presence of proximate dopant atoms and the electric field. A combined model for the dopant ionization and activation barrier reduction has been developed and implemented in a semiconductor carrier transport simulator. By model calculations, we demonstrate the impact of the acceptor activation mechanisms on the decay of the IQE at high current densities, which is known as the efficiency droop. A major contributor to the droop is the electron leakage which is largely affected by the acceptor doping.

  18. Ligand-bound structures of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate phosphatase from Moraxella catarrhalis reveal a water channel connecting to the active site for the second step of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dhindwal, Sonali; Priyadarshini, Priyanka; Patil, Dipak N; Tapas, Satya; Kumar, Pramod; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2015-02-01

    KdsC, the third enzyme of the 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes a substrate-specific reaction to hydrolyze 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate to generate a molecule of KDO and phosphate. KdsC is a phosphatase that belongs to the C0 subfamily of the HAD superfamily. To understand the molecular basis for the substrate specificity of this tetrameric enzyme, the crystal structures of KdsC from Moraxella catarrhalis (Mc-KdsC) with several combinations of ligands, namely metal ion, citrate and products, were determined. Various transition states of the enzyme have been captured in these crystal forms. The ligand-free and ligand-bound crystal forms reveal that the binding of ligands does not cause any specific conformational changes in the active site. However, the electron-density maps clearly showed that the conformation of KDO as a substrate is different from the conformation adopted by KDO when it binds as a cleaved product. Furthermore, structural evidence for the existence of an intersubunit tunnel has been reported for the first time in the C0 subfamily of enzymes. A role for this tunnel in transferring water molecules from the interior of the tetrameric structure to the active-site cleft has been proposed. At the active site, water molecules are required for the formation of a water bridge that participates as a proton shuttle during the second step of the two-step phosphoryl-transfer reaction. In addition, as the KDO biosynthesis pathway is a potential antibacterial target, pharmacophore-based virtual screening was employed to identify inhibitor molecules for the Mc-KdsC enzyme.

  19. Ligand-bound structures of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate phosphatase from Moraxella catarrhalis reveal a water channel connecting to the active site for the second step of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dhindwal, Sonali; Priyadarshini, Priyanka; Patil, Dipak N; Tapas, Satya; Kumar, Pramod; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2015-02-01

    KdsC, the third enzyme of the 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes a substrate-specific reaction to hydrolyze 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate to generate a molecule of KDO and phosphate. KdsC is a phosphatase that belongs to the C0 subfamily of the HAD superfamily. To understand the molecular basis for the substrate specificity of this tetrameric enzyme, the crystal structures of KdsC from Moraxella catarrhalis (Mc-KdsC) with several combinations of ligands, namely metal ion, citrate and products, were determined. Various transition states of the enzyme have been captured in these crystal forms. The ligand-free and ligand-bound crystal forms reveal that the binding of ligands does not cause any specific conformational changes in the active site. However, the electron-density maps clearly showed that the conformation of KDO as a substrate is different from the conformation adopted by KDO when it binds as a cleaved product. Furthermore, structural evidence for the existence of an intersubunit tunnel has been reported for the first time in the C0 subfamily of enzymes. A role for this tunnel in transferring water molecules from the interior of the tetrameric structure to the active-site cleft has been proposed. At the active site, water molecules are required for the formation of a water bridge that participates as a proton shuttle during the second step of the two-step phosphoryl-transfer reaction. In addition, as the KDO biosynthesis pathway is a potential antibacterial target, pharmacophore-based virtual screening was employed to identify inhibitor molecules for the Mc-KdsC enzyme. PMID:25664734

  20. The biological performance of calcium phosphate ceramics in an infected implantation site. III: Biological performance of beta-whitlockite in the noninfected and infected rat middle ear.

    PubMed

    van Blitterswijk, C A; Grote, J J; Koerten, H K; Kuijpers, W

    1986-10-01

    The biological performance of macroporous beta-whitlockite implanted in the rat middle ear was evaluated. The material was studied in the non-infected middle ear and in middle ears infected by Staphylococcus aureus. beta-whitlockite was quickly covered by a normal mucosa. One week post-operatively the macropores were filled with exudate, fibrous tissue, and a small quantity of bone. Six months after the operation the greater part of the macropore area was filled with bone (74%); fibrous tissue accounted for 20%, and exudate for 5%. In histological sections, the macropore area of beta-whitlockite had increased by 68% after six months, indicating biodegradation. Macrophages and multinucleated cells were present in the vicinity of the implant and played a role in this biodegradation. Besides cytoplasmic vacuoles containing calcium phosphate, the cells showed smaller granules containing trace elements originally present in the implant material, such as silicon, titanium, aluminum, iron, and magnesium. PMID:3023387

  1. Electronic spectra and hyperpolarizabilities of structurally similar donor-acceptor dyes. A density functional theory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amrita; Das, Mousumi; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2015-12-01

    Studies with density functional theory (DFT) have been done to reinforce our previous experimental findings involving the solvatochromism and the effect of protonation and for three structurally similar donor-acceptor dyes exhibiting intramolecular charge transfer transition. These dyes have similar donor (indole N/amino N) site and similar carbonyl O as the acceptor centre. The dye with an amino N donor site and indanone O as the acceptor centre has the lowest value of the energy gap between HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital) and LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) and highest percentage of charge transfer from the N to the O centre. Time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has been used to calculate the excitation energy to the lowest singlet excited dipole-allowed states of the dyes. Effect of solvation on excitation energy has been studied by the use of polarisable continuum model (PCM). Computational results indicate that the excitation energy of these dyes is sensitive to solvent polarity and exhibits a red shift as polarity increases. The calculated excitation energies are in good agreement with the values of absorption maximum of these dyes in different solvents obtained in experiment. Studies on protonation of the dyes show that the carbonyl O to be the most favourable site of protonation for all the three dyes. Calculations of linear and first hyperpolarizabilities indicate these dyes to be suitable candidates for possible non-linear optical application.

  2. Regulation of serum phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of serum phosphate, an acknowledged risk factor for chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular mortality, is poorly understood. The discovery of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) as a key regulator of renal phosphate handling and activation of vitamin D has revolutionized our comprehension of phosphate homeostasis. Through as yet undetermined mechanisms, circulating and dietary phosphate appear to have a direct effect on FGF23 release by bone cells that, in turn, causes renal phosphate excretion and decreases intestinal phosphate absorption through a decrease in vitamin D production. Thus, the two major phosphaturic hormones, PTH and FGF23, have opposing effects on vitamin D production, placing vitamin D at the nexus of phosphate homeostasis. While our understanding of phosphate homeostasis has advanced, the factors determining regulation of serum phosphate level remain enigmatic. Diet, time of day, season, gender, age and genetics have all been identified as significant contributors to serum phosphate level. The effects of these factors on serum phosphate have major implications for what is understood as ‘normal’ and for studies of phosphate homeostasis and metabolism. Moreover, other hormonal mediators such as dopamine, insulin-like growth factor, and angiotensin II also affect renal handling of phosphate. How the major hormone effects on phosphate handling are regulated and how the effect of these other factors are integrated to yield the measurable serum phosphate are only now beginning to be studied. PMID:24973411

  3. Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent catalytic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gramatikova, Svetlana; Mouratou, Barbara; Stetefeld, Jörg; Mehta, Perdeep K; Christen, Philipp

    2002-11-01

    Strategies for expanding the catalytic scope of antibodies include the incorporation of inorganic or organic cofactors into their binding sites. An obvious choice is pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP), which is probably the most versatile organic cofactor of enzymes. Monoclonal antibodies against the hapten N(alpha)-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)-L-lysine, a stable analog of the covalent coenzyme-substrate adducts were screened by a competition ELISA for binding of the PLP-amino acid Schiff base adduct. The Schiff base with its C4'-N alpha double bond is, in contrast to the hapten, a planar compound and is an obligatory intermediate in all PLP-dependent reactions of amino acids. This highly discriminating screening step eliminated all but 5 of 24 hapten-binding antibodies. The five remaining antibodies were tested for catalysis of the PLP-dependent alpha,beta-elimination reaction of beta-chloroalanine. Antibody 15A9 complied with this selection criterion and catalyzed in addition the cofactor-dependent transamination reaction of hydrophobic D-amino acids and oxo acids (k(cat)'=0.42 min(-1) with D-alanine at 25 degrees C). Homology modeling together with alanine scanning yielded a 3D model of Fab 15A9. The striking analogy between antibody 15A9 and PLP-dependent enzymes includes the following features: (1) The binding sites accommodate the planar coenzyme-amino acid adduct. (2) The bond at C alpha to be broken lies together with the C alpha-N bond in a plane orthogonal to the plane of coenzyme and imine bond. (3) The alpha-carboxylate group of the substrate is bound by an arginine residue. (4) The coenzyme-substrate adduct assumes a cisoid conformation. (5) PLP markedly contributes to catalytic efficiency, being a 10(4) times more efficient amino group acceptor than pyruvate. The protein moiety, however, ensures reaction as well as substrate specificity, and further accelerates the reaction (in 15A9 k(cat (Ab x PLP))'/k(cat (PLP))'=5 x 10(3)). The analogies of antibody 15A9 with

  4. Protonation States of the Tryptophan Synthase Internal Aldimine Active Site from Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Direct Observation of the Protonated Schiff Base Linkage to Pyridoxal-5′-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acid–base chemistry that drives catalysis in pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes has been the subject of intense interest and investigation since the initial identification of PLP’s role as a coenzyme in this extensive class of enzymes. It was first proposed over 50 years ago that the initial step in the catalytic cycle is facilitated by a protonated Schiff base form of the holoenzyme in which the linking lysine ε-imine nitrogen, which covalently binds the coenzyme, is protonated. Here we provide the first 15N NMR chemical shift measurements of such a Schiff base linkage in the resting holoenzyme form, the internal aldimine state of tryptophan synthase. Double-resonance experiments confirm the assignment of the Schiff base nitrogen, and additional 13C, 15N, and 31P chemical shift measurements of sites on the PLP coenzyme allow a detailed model of coenzyme protonation states to be established. PMID:25148001

  5. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, R.D.; Wolfram, J.H.

    1993-10-26

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorus can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution. 6 figures.

  6. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Wolfram, James H.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorous can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution.

  7. Bradykinin-stimulated inositol phosphate production in NG108-15 cells is mediated by a small population of binding sites which rapidly desensitize.

    PubMed

    Wolsing, D H; Rosenbaum, J S

    1991-05-01

    [3H]Bradykinin (BDK) binds to two distinct binding sites (P less than .01, N = 12) in NG108-15 cell membranes; (site 1: Kd1 = 3.09 x 10(-10) M, Bmax1 = 242 +/- 24 fmol/mg protein) and (site 2: Kd2 = 1.94 x 10(-8) M, Bmax2 = 491 +/- 75 fmol/mg protein). Although site 1 comprises only 33 +/- 4% (N = 12) of the total binding site population, comparison of the binding affinity and functional potency for BDK agonist analogs exhibiting differential selectivity for the two sites reveals that this high affinity site is the receptor mediating inositol monophosphate (IP) production in this cell line. BDK-stimulated IP production undergoes a very rapid (5 min) desensitization that is characterized by both a loss in agonist potency (EC50 = 3.57 x 10(-9) M vs. 1.94 x 10(-10) M in controls; P less than .001, N = 12) and a decrease in amplitude of response (fold stimulation = 1.45 +/- 0.06 vs. 1.80 +/- 0.09 in controls; P less than .01, N = 12). Only the decrease in response amplitude is attenuated by down-regulation of protein kinase C by prior long term treatment of the cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), indicating an involvement of protein kinase C activation in the desensitization process. Desensitization is accompanied by down-regulation of site 1 only (Bmax1 = 71 +/- 8 fmol/mg (N = 10; P less than .001 vs. controls)); Bmax2 and the Kd for BDK at both sites remain unchanged, further supporting the contention that site 1 is the functionally relevant receptor. In contrast to the functional data, long term TPA treatment does not attenuate the receptor down-regulation, indicating that the rapid desensitization involves both receptor-related and postreceptor mechanisms. The implications of this property of the BDK receptor for analog design and receptor classification are discussed.

  8. Site-directed substitution of Ser1406 of hamster CAD with glutamic acid alters allosteric regulation of carbamyl phosphate synthetase II.

    PubMed

    Banerjei, L C; Davidson, J N

    1997-01-01

    Ser1406 of the allosteric region of the hamster CAD enzyme, carbamyl phosphate synthetase II (CPSase), is known to be phosphorylated in vitro by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Metabolic labeling experiments described here demonstrate that CAD is phosphorylated in somatic cells in culture. Phosphorylation is stimulated by treating cells with 8-bromo-cAMP, a PKA activator. The stimulation is essentially prevented by pretreatment with H-89, a PKA specific inhibitor. Substitution of Ser1406 with alanine results in an enzyme with kinetics and allosteric regulation indistinguishable from unsubstituted CAD. However, substitution to glutamic acid increases CPSase activity by reducing the apparent Km (ATP). The UTP concentration required to give 50% inhibition is increased rendering this altered enzyme significantly less sensitive to feedback inhibition, but allosteric activation by PRPP is unaffected. While these data do not prove that Ser1406 is phosphorylated in vivo, they do indicate that a specific alteration at this residue can affect allosteric regulation. PMID:9218000

  9. Increased phosphate transport of Arabidopsis thaliana Pht1;1 by site-directed mutagenesis of tyrosine 312 may be attributed to the disruption of homomeric interactions.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Elena B; Ditusa, Sandra Feuer; Kato, Naohiro; Olivier, Danielle M; Dale, Renee; Lin, Wei-Yi; Chiou, Tzyy-Jen; Macnaughtan, Megan A; Smith, Aaron P

    2015-10-01

    Members of the Pht1 family of plant phosphate (Pi) transporters play vital roles in Pi acquisition from soil and in planta Pi translocation to maintain optimal growth and development. The study of the specificities and biochemical properties of Pht1 transporters will contribute to improving the current understanding of plant phosphorus homeostasis and use-efficiency. In this study, we show through split in vivo interaction methods and in vitro analysis of microsomal root tissues that Arabidopsis thaliana Pht1;1 and Pht1;4 form homomeric and heteromeric complexes. Transient and heterologous expression of the Pht1;1 variants, Pht1;1(Y312D), Pht1;1(Y312A) and Pht1;1(Y312F), was used to analyse the role of a putative Pi binding residue (Tyr 312) in Pht1;1 transporter oligomerization and function. The homomeric interaction among Pht1;1 proteins was disrupted by mutation of Tyr 312 to Asp, but not to Ala or Phe. In addition, the Pht1;1(Y312D) variant conferred enhanced Pi transport when expressed in yeast cells. In contrast, mutation of Tyr 312 to Ala or Phe did not affect Pht1;1 transport kinetics. Our study demonstrates that modifications to the Pht1;1 higher-order structure affects Pi transport, suggesting that oligomerization may serve as a regulatory mechanism for modulating Pi uptake. PMID:25754174

  10. Three holes bound to a double acceptor - Be(+) in germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, E. E.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Falicov, L. M.; Haegel, N. M.; Hansen, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A double acceptor binding three holes has been observed for the first time with photoconductive far-infrared spectroscopy in beryllium-doped germanium single crystals. This new center, Be(+), has a hole binding energy of about 5 meV and is only present when free holes are generated by ionization of either neutral shallow acceptors or neutral Be double acceptors. The Be(+) center thermally ionizes above 4 K. It disappears at a uniaxial stress higher than about a billion dyn/sq cm parallel to (111) as a result of the lifting of the valence-band degeneracy.

  11. Elevated NK sensitivity of Raji cells carrying acceptor-bound C3 fragments.

    PubMed

    Kai, C; Sármay, G; Ramos, O; Yefenof, E; Klein, E

    1988-05-01

    The majority of cell lines derived from Burkitt lymphomas carry CR2 on their plasma membrane cell lines of haematopoietic origin can activate C3 present in human serum through the alternative pathway. However, only the lines that carry CR2 were shown to bind C3 fragments. This bond can be either fixation to acceptor sites or attachment to the CR. Our studies with Raji cells showed that when the possibility for the covalent acceptor bond was eliminated by using methylamine (MA)- or zymosan-treated serum, considerably lower amounts of C3 were bound. In the zymosan-treated serum C3 fragments are present that can bind to receptors but their capacity for acceptor bond is absent. These results indicate that when Raji cell are incubated in human serum some of the generated C3 fragments are bound to acceptors and a lower proportion through the specific interaction with complement receptors. Pretreatment of the CR2 carrying cell lines with human serum elevated their sensitivity to the lytic effect of human blood lymphocytes. We showed in this work that MA-treated serum did not induce this elevation. Zymosan-treated serum under conditions that excluded activation of the residual native C3 molecules, i.e., in the presence of EDTA, did not have the enhancing effect either. These results suggest that the increased lytic efficiency imposed by human serum was due to cleavage of C3 molecules by Raji and fixation of the C3 fragments by acceptor sites. Natural killer cells carry CR3; therefore it is likely that the attached C3 fragments bind also to the effector cells. The C3 molecules could elevate thereby the avidity between the target and the lytic lymphocytes. The observation that C3 fragments are not bound to the surface of CR2 negative lines in spite of their capacity to activate C3 suggests that the receptor molecule is either involved in the activation and/or serves also as an acceptor. PMID:3359489

  12. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  13. Uranium from phosphate ores

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant.

  14. Bacterial expression of the phosphodiester-binding site of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor for crystallographic and NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Olson, Linda J; Jensen, Davin R; Volkman, Brian F; Kim, Jung-Ja P; Peterson, Francis C; Gundry, Rebekah L; Dahms, Nancy M

    2015-07-01

    The cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) is a multifunctional protein that interacts with diverse ligands and plays central roles in autophagy, development, and tumor suppression. By delivering newly synthesized phosphomannosyl-containing acid hydrolases from the Golgi to endosomal compartments, CI-MPR is an essential component in the generation of lysosomes that are critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. The ability of CI-MPR to interact with ∼60 different acid hydrolases is facilitated by its large extracellular region, with four out of its 15 domains binding phosphomannosyl residues. Although the glycan specificity of CI-MPR has been elucidated, the molecular basis of carbohydrate binding has not been determined for two out of these four carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD). Here we report expression of CI-MPR's CRD located in domain 5 that preferentially binds phosphodiester-containing glycans. Domain 5 of CI-MPR was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells as a fusion protein containing an N-terminal histidine tag and the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein. The His6-SUMO-CRD construct was recovered from inclusion bodies, refolded in buffer to facilitate disulfide bond formation, and subjected to Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. Surface plasmon resonance analyses demonstrated that the purified protein was active and bound phosphorylated glycans. Characterization by NMR spectroscopy revealed high quality (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Additionally, crystallization conditions were identified and a crystallographic data set of the CRD was collected to 1.8Å resolution. Together, these studies demonstrate the feasibility of producing CI-MPR's CRD suitable for three-dimensional structure determination by NMR spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic approaches. PMID:25863146

  15. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence bandmore » relative to the vacuum level.« less

  16. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence band relative to the vacuum level.

  17. Electron Transfer Rate Maxima at Large Donor-Acceptor Distances.

    PubMed

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-02-01

    Because of their low mass, electrons can transfer rapidly over long (>15 Å) distances, but usually reaction rates decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance. We report here on electron transfer rate maxima at donor-acceptor separations of 30.6 Å, observed for thermal electron transfer between an anthraquinone radical anion and a triarylamine radical cation in three homologous series of rigid-rod-like donor-photosensitizer-acceptor triads with p-xylene bridges. Our experimental observations can be explained by a weak distance dependence of electronic donor-acceptor coupling combined with a strong increase of the (outer-sphere) reorganization energy with increasing distance, as predicted by electron transfer theory more than 30 years ago. The observed effect has important consequences for light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:26800279

  18. EFFECTS OF PH AND PHOSPHATE ON METAL DISTRIBUTION WITH EMPHASIS ON AS SPECIATION AND MOBILIZATION IN SOILS FROM A LEAD SMELTING SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic in soils from the Asarco Lead Smelter in East Helena, Montana was characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). As oxidation state and geochemical speciation were analyzed as a function of depth (two sampling sites) and surface distribution. These results were c...

  19. Synthesis, Properties, and Design Principles of Donor-Acceptor Nanohoops.

    PubMed

    Darzi, Evan R; Hirst, Elizabeth S; Weber, Christopher D; Zakharov, Lev N; Lonergan, Mark C; Jasti, Ramesh

    2015-09-23

    We have synthesized a series of aza[8]cycloparaphenylenes containing one, two, and three nitrogens to probe the impact of nitrogen doping on optoelectronic properties and solid state packing. Alkylation of these azananohoops afforded the first donor-acceptor nanohoops where the phenylene backbone acts as the donor and the pyridinium units act as the acceptor. The impact on the optoelectronic properties was then studied experimentally and computationally to provide new insight into the effect of functionalization on nanohoops properties. PMID:27162989

  20. Synthesis, Properties, and Design Principles of Donor–Acceptor Nanohoops

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized a series of aza[8]cycloparaphenylenes containing one, two, and three nitrogens to probe the impact of nitrogen doping on optoelectronic properties and solid state packing. Alkylation of these azananohoops afforded the first donor–acceptor nanohoops where the phenylene backbone acts as the donor and the pyridinium units act as the acceptor. The impact on the optoelectronic properties was then studied experimentally and computationally to provide new insight into the effect of functionalization on nanohoops properties. PMID:27162989

  1. 2. PHOSPHATE UNLOADING BUILDING. VIEW IS TO THE NORTH. THIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PHOSPHATE UNLOADING BUILDING. VIEW IS TO THE NORTH. THIS STRUCTURE WAS RELOCATED TO THE SOUTH OF ITS ORIGINAL SITE IN 1993 FOR USE AS A DECONTAMINATION FACILITY WITHIN THE BUNKER HILL SUPERFUND SITE. - North Idaho Phosphate Company, Silver King Community, Kellogg, Shoshone County, ID

  2. Orally active 7-substituted (4-benzylphthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylpiperazin-1-yl]nicotinonitriles as active-site inhibitors of sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Sven; Braendlin, Nadine; Beerli, Christian; Bergsdorf, Christian; Schubart, Anna; Srinivas, Honnappa; Oberhauser, Berndt; Billich, Andreas

    2014-06-26

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) lyase has recently been implicated as a therapeutic target for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), based on studies in a genetic mouse model. Potent active site directed inhibitors of the enzyme are not known so far. Here we describe the discovery of (4-benzylphthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylpiperazin-1-yl]nicotinonitrile 5 in a high-throughput screen using a biochemical assay, and its further optimization. This class of compounds was found to inhibit catalytic activity of S1PL by binding to the active site of the enzyme, as seen in the cocrystal structure of derivative 31 with the homodimeric human S1P lyase. 31 induces profound reduction of peripheral T cell numbers after oral dosage and confers pronounced protection in a rat model of multiple sclerosis. In conclusion, this novel class of direct S1P lyase inhibitors provides excellent tools to further explore the therapeutic potential of T cell-targeted therapies in multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  3. Structure of the catalytic chain of Methanococcus jannaschii aspartate transcarbamoylase in a hexagonal crystal form: Insights into the path of carbamoyl phosphate to the active site of the enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali J.; Soares A.; Singh, A. K.; Colaneri, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    Crystals of the catalytic chain of Methanococcus jannaschii aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) grew in the presence of the regulatory chain in the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}22, with one monomer per asymmetric unit. This is the first time that crystals with only one monomer in the asymmetric unit have been obtained; all known structures of the catalytic subunit contain several crystallographically independent monomers. The symmetry-related chains form the staggered dimer of trimers observed in the other known structures of the catalytic subunit. The central channel of the catalytic subunit contains a sulfate ion and a K{sup +} ion as well as a glycerol molecule at its entrance. It is possible that it is involved in channeling carbamoyl phosphate (CP) to the active site of the enzyme. A second sulfate ion near Arg164 is near the second CP position in the wild-type Escherichia coli ATCase structure complexed with CP. It is suggested that this position may also be in the path that CP takes when binding to the active site in a partial diffusion process at 310 K. Additional biochemical studies of carbamoylation and the molecular organization of this enzyme in M. jannaschii will provide further insight into these points.

  4. Identification of nitrogen acceptor in Cu2O: First-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T-Thienprasert, Jiraroj; Limpijumnong, Sukit

    2015-11-01

    The source of p-type carriers observed in nitrogen-doped Cu2O samples [Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 1060 (2003)] was identified by using accurate hybrid density functional calculations. Similar to the case of ZnO, we found that N is a deep acceptor when substituting for O in Cu2O and cannot be the source of the observed p-type carriers. Detailed investigation of other N-related defects in Cu2O reveals that N2 substitution for Cu, i.e., (N2)Cu, is a shallow acceptor and can give hole carriers in N-doped Cu2O samples. (N2)Cu is not only a shallow acceptor but it also has a lower formation energy than NO in some growth conditions. The calculated emission photo luminescence (PL) peak at 1.89 eV associated with (N2)Cu is also in good agreement with the observed N-related PL peak at ˜1.82 eV in N-doped Cu2O sample. To aid future identification by Raman spectroscopy techniques, the vibrational frequencies of N2 on both Cu and O sites were calculated.

  5. Compartmental absorption modeling and site of absorption studies to determine feasibility of an extended-release formulation of an HIV-1 attachment inhibitor phosphate ester prodrug.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jonathan; Chien, Caly; Timmins, Peter; Dennis, Andrew; Doll, Walter; Sandefer, Erik; Page, Richard; Nettles, Richard E; Zhu, Li; Grasela, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    BMS-663068 is a phosphonooxymethyl ester prodrug under development for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. The prodrug is designed to overcome the solubility-limited bioavailability of the active moiety, BMS-626529. BMS-663068 is not absorbed from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and requires enzymatic conversion by alkaline phosphatase to BMS-626529 immediately before absorption. In the light of the known short in vivo half-life of BMS-626529, compartmental absorption modeling was used to predict the potential feasibility of extended-release (ER) delivery to achieve target Cmax :Cmin ratios. To further refine the model with respect to colonic absorption, the regional absorption of BMS-626529 following delivery of BMS-663068 to upper and lower GI sites was characterized through a site of absorption study in human subjects. A refined model was subsequently applied to guide the development of ER tablet formulations. Comparisons of results from the refined model to the in vivo human pharmacokinetic data for three selected ER formulations demonstrate the utility of the model in predicting feasibility of ER delivery and in directing formulation development.

  6. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Energy Transfer Measurements Between Site-Specific Probes On The Ca-Atpase Of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum In Different Enzymatic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Garcia de Ancos, Jorge; Bishop, James E.; Inesi, Giuseppe

    1988-06-01

    We have measured resonance energy transfer between two donor-acceptor pairs localized on different domains of the Ca-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum in order to determine whether changes in tertiary structure accompany active calcium transport. Energy transfer was determined from both steady state intensities and time-resolved lifetimes of 5-(2-((acety1)- amino)ethyDaminonaphthalene-l-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS), specifically bound to the B tryptic fragment, using two acceptors: (1) fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate (FITC), covalently bound at the nucleotide site, also on the B fragment, and (2) 4-dimethylaminophenylazopheny1-4'- maleimide (DABMI), bound on the Al subfragment. Neither binding of calcium to the high affinity sites nor phosphorylation by inorganic phosphate is accompanied by detectable changes in the distance between IAEDANS and FITC, suggesting that the B fragment does not undergo any large-scale (>1 A) physical distortion under these conditions. On the other hand, measurements of energy transfer from IAEDANS to the acceptor DABMI, on the Al subfragment, demonstrate that phosphorylation with inorganic phosphate or addition of pM VO4 results in increased energy transfer, that is reversible with subsequent addition of calcium. Addition of calcium to the nonphosphorylated enzyme results in no detectable change in energy transfer. The presence of the detergent lysolecithin prevents the phosphate dependent increase in fluorescence energy transfer, suggesting that protein-protein interactions may contribute to the observed change in energy transfer. A direct relationship between an increased degree of protein-protein interactions and phosphoenzyme formation is confirmed by investigations using a reconstituted preparation containing a mixed popu Lation of Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains labeled either with IAEDANS or with DABMI. These results suggest a phosphorylation dependent change in either the affinity or orientation of Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains with respect

  7. Electron acceptor-dependent respiratory and physiological stratifications in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Sun, Guoping; Wu, Wei-Min; Xu, Meiying

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial respiration is an essential driving force in biogeochemical cycling and bioremediation processes. Electron acceptors respired by bacteria often have solid and soluble forms that typically coexist in the environment. It is important to understand how sessile bacteria attached to solid electron acceptors respond to ambient soluble alternative electron acceptors. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) provide a useful tool to investigate this interaction. In MFCs with Shewanella decolorationis, azo dye was used as an alternative electron acceptor in the anode chamber. Different respiration patterns were observed for biofilm and planktonic cells, with planktonic cells preferred to respire with azo dye while biofilm cells respired with both the anode and azo dye. The additional azo respiration dissipated the proton accumulation within the anode biofilm. There was a large redox potential gap between the biofilms and anode surface. Changing cathodic conditions caused immediate effects on the anode potential but not on the biofilm potential. Biofilm viability showed an inverse and respiration-dependent profile when respiring with only the anode or azo dye and was enhanced when respiring with both simultaneously. These results provide new insights into the bacterial respiration strategies in environments containing multiple electron acceptors and support an electron-hopping mechanism within Shewanella electrode-respiring biofilms.

  8. Structural basis for acceptor-substrate recognition of UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase from Clitoria ternatea.

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Takeshi; Honjo, Eijiro; Noda, Naonobu; Tamada, Taro; Kazuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Masahiko; Blaber, Michael; Kuroki, Ryota

    2015-03-01

    UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UGT78K6) from Clitoria ternatea catalyzes the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose to anthocyanidins such as delphinidin. After the acylation of the 3-O-glucosyl residue, the 3'- and 5'-hydroxyl groups of the product are further glucosylated by a glucosyltransferase in the biosynthesis of ternatins, which are anthocyanin pigments. To understand the acceptor-recognition scheme of UGT78K6, the crystal structure of UGT78K6 and its complex forms with anthocyanidin delphinidin and petunidin, and flavonol kaempferol were determined to resolutions of 1.85 Å, 2.55 Å, 2.70 Å, and 1.75 Å, respectively. The enzyme recognition of unstable anthocyanidin aglycones was initially observed in this structural determination. The anthocyanidin- and flavonol-acceptor binding details are almost identical in each complex structure, although the glucosylation activities against each acceptor were significantly different. The 3-hydroxyl groups of the acceptor substrates were located at hydrogen-bonding distances to the Nε2 atom of the His17 catalytic residue, supporting a role for glucosyl transfer to the 3-hydroxyl groups of anthocyanidins and flavonols. However, the molecular orientations of these three acceptors are different from those of the known flavonoid glycosyltransferases, VvGT1 and UGT78G1. The acceptor substrates in UGT78K6 are reversely bound to its binding site by a 180° rotation about the O1-O3 axis of the flavonoid backbones observed in VvGT1 and UGT78G1; consequently, the 5- and 7-hydroxyl groups are protected from glucosylation. These substrate recognition schemes are useful to understand the unique reaction mechanism of UGT78K6 for the ternatin biosynthesis, and suggest the potential for controlled synthesis of natural pigments. PMID:25556637

  9. Structural basis for acceptor-substrate recognition of UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase from Clitoria ternatea

    PubMed Central

    Hiromoto, Takeshi; Honjo, Eijiro; Noda, Naonobu; Tamada, Taro; Kazuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Masahiko; Blaber, Michael; Kuroki, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UGT78K6) from Clitoria ternatea catalyzes the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose to anthocyanidins such as delphinidin. After the acylation of the 3-O-glucosyl residue, the 3′- and 5′-hydroxyl groups of the product are further glucosylated by a glucosyltransferase in the biosynthesis of ternatins, which are anthocyanin pigments. To understand the acceptor-recognition scheme of UGT78K6, the crystal structure of UGT78K6 and its complex forms with anthocyanidin delphinidin and petunidin, and flavonol kaempferol were determined to resolutions of 1.85 Å, 2.55 Å, 2.70 Å, and 1.75 Å, respectively. The enzyme recognition of unstable anthocyanidin aglycones was initially observed in this structural determination. The anthocyanidin- and flavonol-acceptor binding details are almost identical in each complex structure, although the glucosylation activities against each acceptor were significantly different. The 3-hydroxyl groups of the acceptor substrates were located at hydrogen-bonding distances to the Nε2 atom of the His17 catalytic residue, supporting a role for glucosyl transfer to the 3-hydroxyl groups of anthocyanidins and flavonols. However, the molecular orientations of these three acceptors are different from those of the known flavonoid glycosyltransferases, VvGT1 and UGT78G1. The acceptor substrates in UGT78K6 are reversely bound to its binding site by a 180° rotation about the O1–O3 axis of the flavonoid backbones observed in VvGT1 and UGT78G1; consequently, the 5- and 7-hydroxyl groups are protected from glucosylation. These substrate recognition schemes are useful to understand the unique reaction mechanism of UGT78K6 for the ternatin biosynthesis, and suggest the potential for controlled synthesis of natural pigments. PMID:25556637

  10. Transition dynamics for Mu acceptor states in Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jayarathna, G.; Lichti, R. L.; Mengyan, P. W.; Baker, B. B.; Celebi, Y. G.; Carroll, B. R.; Yonenaga, I.

    2014-02-21

    We use the longitudinal field muon spin relaxation technique to observe charge-state and site-change transitions of muonium in Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} alloys. In this project, we examine the temperature and magnetic field dependences of the relaxation rates for Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} samples (x = 0.77, 0.81, and 0.84), in the composition range where the acceptor level lies within the band gap. This study particularly focuses on the relaxation rates for Si{sub 0.19}Ge{sub 0.81} to identify various cyclic charge-state and site-change processes as a function of both temperature and magnetic field. We extract the paramagnetic hyperfine constant and the relevant transition rate parameters for site changes and charge-state transitions involving Mu acceptor states for this sample. At small x, a site change dominates the transition out of the neutral T-site acceptor state, while in higher Ge content alloys hole ionization becomes the dominant transition out of the Mu{sub T}{sup 0}.

  11. Organic solar cells based on acceptor-functionalized diketopyrrolopyrrole derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sanjay S.; Serrano, Luis A.; Ebenhoch, Bernd; Rotello, Vincent M.; Cooke, Graeme; Samuel, Ifor D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of three solution processable diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) derivatives featuring acceptor units attached to the core by alkyne linker units is reported. Cyclic voltammetry and density functional theory calculations indicate that the DPP derivatives possess similar HOMO and LUMO energies. Solar cells were fabricated by blending the synthesized DPP derivatives with [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyrate methyl ester. The influence of donor:acceptor blend ratio, film thickness, annealing temperature, and annealing time on device performance was studied. Differences in device performance were related to atomic force microscopy measurements of the films. The highest power conversion efficiency of 1.76% was achieved for the DPP derivative functionalized with an aldehyde electron-withdrawing group with a 1∶0.7 donor:acceptor ratio when the active layer was annealed for 10 min at 110°C.

  12. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N. V.; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-01

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally.

  13. Site-specific mutations of conserved residues in the phosphate-binding loop of the Arabidopsis UMP/CMP kinase alter ATP and UMP binding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Thornburg, R

    1998-10-15

    All eukaryotic UMP/CMP kinases contain a glycine-rich sequence GGPG(S/A)GK at the N-terminus. This sequence is homologous to the conserved sequence GXXGXGK found in other ATP-binding proteins. To study the role of this conserved sequence in Arabidopsis UMP/CMP kinase, five conserved residues were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to generate seven mutant enzymes: G21A, G22A, G24A, G26A, K27R, K27M, and K27E. The G21A and G26A mutants were degraded during the purification phase and were thus unable to be purified. Kinetic studies on the other mutants, when compared to studies on the wild-type enzyme, revealed that this sequence is important for ATP binding and enzyme catalysis. All mutants had a decreased kcat/KATPm value. The G22A and G24A mutants had about half of the kcat value of wildtype and 3.9-fold and 3.3-fold increases in KATPm values, respectively. The kcat/KATPm values in the K27M and K27E mutants were changed significantly and decreased by 1000-fold and 2600-fold, respectively. The removal of the terminal positive charge of Lys27 in the K27M and K27E mutants resulted in 20% of the kcat value of wildtype. However, both mutants had a remarkable increase in KATPm value by 241-fold and 552-fold, respectively. Therefore, the positive charge of Lys27 plays an important role on both ATP binding and enzyme catalysis. Interestingly, the results also showed that the mutations that affected ATP binding also had an effect on UMP binding. PMID:9784243

  14. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  15. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  16. Phosphorus, phosphorous, and phosphate.

    PubMed

    Iheagwara, O Susan; Ing, Todd S; Kjellstrand, Carl M; Lew, Susie Q

    2013-10-01

    This article distinguishes the terms "phosphorus, phosphorous, and phosphate" which are frequently used interchangeably. We point out the difference between phosphorus and phosphate, with an emphasis on the unit of measure. Expressing a value without the proper name or unit of measure may lead to misunderstanding and erroneous conclusions. We indicate why phosphate must be expressed as milligrams per deciliter or millimoles per liter and not as milliequivalents per liter. Therefore, we elucidate the distinction among the terms "phosphorus, phosphorous, and phosphate" and the importance of saying precisely what one really means.

  17. Characterization of the Dynamics in the Protonic Conductor CsH2PO4 by 17O Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations: Correlating Phosphate and Protonic Motion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    17O NMR spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations was employed to understand the local structure and dynamics of the phosphate ions and protons in the paraelectric phase of the proton conductor CsH2PO4. For the room-temperature structure, the results confirm that one proton (H1) is localized in an asymmetric H-bond (between O1 donor and O2 acceptor oxygen atoms), whereas the H2 proton undergoes rapid exchange between two sites in a hydrogen bond with a symmetric double potential well at a rate ≥107 Hz. Variable-temperature 17O NMR spectra recorded from 22 to 214 °C were interpreted by considering different models for the rotation of the phosphate anions. At least two distinct rate constants for rotations about four pseudo C3 axes of the phosphate ion were required in order to achieve good agreement with the experimental data. An activation energy of 0.21 ± 0.06 eV was observed for rotation about the P–O1 axis, with a higher activation energy of 0.50 ± 0.07 eV being obtained for rotation about the P–O2, P–O3d, and P–O3a axes, with the superscripts denoting, respectively, dynamic donor and acceptor oxygen atoms of the H-bond. The higher activation energy of the second process is most likely associated with the cost of breaking an O1–H1 bond. The activation energy of this process is slightly lower than that obtained from the 1H exchange process (0.70 ± 0.07 eV) (Kim, G.; Blanc, F.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Grey, C. P. J. Phys. Chem. C2013, 117, 6504−6515) associated with the translational motion of the protons. The relationship between proton jumps and phosphate rotation was analyzed in detail by considering uncorrelated motion, motion of individual PO4 ions and the four connected/H-bonded protons, and concerted motions of adjacent phosphate units, mediated by proton hops. We conclude that, while phosphate rotations aid proton motion, not all phosphate rotations result in proton jumps. PMID:25732257

  18. Higher excited states of acceptors in cubic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, M.; Kanehisa, M. A.; Balkanski, M.

    1986-02-01

    For the first time, higher excited states of shallow acceptors up to the 3s and 4s states are calculated based on the Balderschi and Lipari theory including the cubic correction. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the effective mass Hamiltonian for shallow acceptor states were obtained by the finite element method. The resultant sparse matrix is diagonalized by a newly developed Saad's method based on Arnoldi's algorithm. Comparison with experimental spectra on ZnTe:Li and ZnTe:P gives best valence band parameters for ZnTe; μ = 0.60 and δ = 0.12.

  19. Donor-acceptor chemistry in the main group.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Eric

    2014-06-21

    This Perspective article summarizes recent progress from our laboratory in the isolation of reactive main group species using a general donor-acceptor protocol. A highlight of this program is the use of carbon-based donors in combination with suitable Lewis acidic acceptors to yield stable complexes of parent Group 14 element hydrides (e.g. GeH2 and H2SiGeH2). It is anticipated that this strategy could be extended to include new synthetic targets from throughout the Periodic Table with possible applications in bottom-up materials synthesis and main group element catalysis envisioned. PMID:24788390

  20. Acceptors in bulk and nanoscale ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, M. D.

    2012-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor that emits bright UV light, with little wasted heat. This intrinsic feature makes it a promising material for energy-efficient white lighting, nano-lasers, and other optical applications. For devices to be competitive, however, it is necessary to develop reliable p-type doping. Although substitutional nitrogen has been considered as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO, theoretical and experimental work indicates that nitrogen is a deep acceptor and will not lead to p-type conductivity. This talk will highlight recent experiments on ZnO:N at low temperatures. A red/near-IR photoluminescence (PL) band is correlated with the presence of deep nitrogen acceptors. PL excitation (PLE) measurements show an absorption threshold of 2.26 eV, in good agreement with theory. Magnetic resonance experiments provide further evidence for this assignment. The results of these studies seem to rule out group-V elements as shallow acceptors in ZnO, contradicting numerous reports in the literature. If these acceptors do not work as advertised, is there a viable alternative? Optical studies on ZnO nanocrystals show some intriguing leads. At liquid-helium temperatures, a series of sharp IR absorption peaks arise from an unknown acceptor impurity. The data are consistent with a hydrogenic acceptor 0.46 eV above the valence band edge. While this binding energy is still too deep for many practical applications, it represents a significant improvement over the ˜ 1.3 eV binding energy for nitrogen acceptors. Nanocrystals present another twist. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, surface states are especially important. Specifically, electron-hole recombination at the surface give rises to a red luminescence band. From our PL and IR experiments, we have developed a ``unified'' model that attempts to explain acceptor and surface states in ZnO nanocrystals. This model could provide a useful framework for designing future nanoscale ZnO devices.

  1. Optical Spectroscopy of Acceptors in Semiconductors: I. Acceptor Complexes in Neutron Transmutation-Doped Silicon. I. Piezospectroscopy of Beryllium Double Acceptors in Germanium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrec, Charles Raymond

    Substitutional group III impurities in group IV elemental semiconductors bind a hole from the valence band and are solid-state analogs of the hydrogen atom; likewise, group II impurities bind two holes and are analogs of the helium atom. In these materials, the electronic transitions from the acceptor s-like ground state to the p-like excited states are infrared active. A high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer, and a liquid-helium cooled germanium bolometer and glass sample cryostat are ideally suited to study these effects. When silicon is exposed to neutron radiation, a fraction of the atoms are converted to phosphorus. After annealing, these impurity atoms occupy substitutional locations and are thus donors. When the initial crystal is p-type and the final phosphorus concentration is less than that of the acceptor, the sample is left p-type but highly compensated. This results in broadening of the transition lines. However, before complete annealing, it is discovered that a new, extremely shallow acceptor is formed, with an ionization energy of 28.24 meV, which is far shallower than any previously known. Neutral Be in Ge is known to be a double acceptor. Under uniaxial stress, the single hole (1s)^2 to (1s)(np) excitation spectrum shows splittings and polarization effects. These piezospectroscopic effects were observed for a compressive force vec F | (111) and vec F | (100). The phenomenological shear deformation potential constants have been deduced for the ground and excited states of the D transition.

  2. Dual mechanism of ion permeation through VDAC revealed with inorganic phosphate ions and phosphate metabolites.

    PubMed

    Krammer, Eva-Maria; Vu, Giang Thi; Homblé, Fabrice; Prévost, Martine

    2015-01-01

    In the exchange of metabolites and ions between the mitochondrion and the cytosol, the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is a key element, as it forms the major transport pathway for these compounds through the mitochondrial outer membrane. Numerous experimental studies have promoted the idea that VDAC acts as a regulator of essential mitochondrial functions. In this study, using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, free-energy calculations, and electrophysiological measurements, we investigated the transport of ions through VDAC, with a focus on phosphate ions and metabolites. We showed that selectivity of VDAC towards small anions including monovalent phosphates arises from short-lived interactions with positively charged residues scattered throughout the pore. In dramatic contrast, permeation of divalent phosphate ions and phosphate metabolites (AMP and ATP) involves binding sites along a specific translocation pathway. This permeation mechanism offers an explanation for the decrease in VDAC conductance measured in the presence of ATP or AMP at physiological salt concentration. The binding sites occur at similar locations for the divalent phosphate ions, AMP and ATP, and contain identical basic residues. ATP features a marked affinity for a central region of the pore lined by two lysines and one arginine of the N-terminal helix. This cluster of residues together with a few other basic amino acids forms a "charged brush" which facilitates the passage of the anionic metabolites through the pore. All of this reveals that VDAC controls the transport of the inorganic phosphates and phosphate metabolites studied here through two different mechanisms.

  3. Tetrathiafulvalene-based mixed-valence acceptor-donor-acceptor triads: a joint theoretical and experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Calbo, Joaquín; Aragó, Juan; Otón, Francisco; Lloveras, Vega; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Vidal-Gancedo, José; Veciana, Jaume; Rovira, Concepció; Ortí, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    This work presents a joint theoretical and experimental characterisation of the structural and electronic properties of two tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)-based acceptor-donor-acceptor triads (BQ-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ; BQ is naphthoquinone and BTCNQ is benzotetracyano-p-quinodimethane) in their neutral and reduced states. The study is performed with the use of electrochemical, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and UV/Vis/NIR spectroelectrochemical techniques guided by quantum-chemical calculations. Emphasis is placed on the mixed-valence properties of both triads in their radical anion states. The electrochemical and EPR results reveal that both BQ-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ triads in their radical anion states behave as class-II mixed-valence compounds with significant electronic communication between the acceptor moieties. Density functional theory calculations (BLYP35/cc-pVTZ), taking into account the solvent effects, predict charge-localised species (BQ(.-)-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ(.-)-TTF-BTCNQ) as the most stable structures for the radical anion states of both triads. A stronger localisation is found both experimentally and theoretically for the BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ anion, in accordance with the more electron-withdrawing character of the BTCNQ acceptor. CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations suggest that the low-energy, broad absorption bands observed experimentally for the BQ-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ radical anions are associated with the intervalence charge transfer (IV-CT) electronic transition and two nearby donor-to-acceptor CT excitations. The study highlights the molecular efficiency of the electron-donor TTF unit as a molecular wire connecting two acceptor redox centres.

  4. [Removal of Phosphate by Calcite in Open-System].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-xuan; Diao, Jia-yong; Huang, Li-dong; Chen, Yan-fan; Liu, Da-gang; Xu, Zheng-wen

    2015-12-01

    Batch methods were deployed to study the removal of phosphate by calcite in an open-system. Results showed that: (1) The pre-equilibrium process of calcite in open system could be achieved within 24 hours (2) The kinetic results showed that, at initial concentration of 0.5 mg · L⁻¹, the phosphate removal was almost completed within 10 hours of the first phase. The observation may be attributed to surface adsorption. At initial concentration of 2.5 mg · L⁻¹, the phosphate removal was mainly carried out by the precipitation of phosphate at later stage of the process; (3) At initial concentration of ≤ 2.5 mg · L⁻¹ setting 10 h as reaction time, the phosphate removal process was described well by the Langmuir model. It is hypothesized that surface adsorption was the principal removal way of phosphate; (4) With the addition of phthalate, at initial concentration of < 2.5 mg · L⁻¹, the phosphate removal rate experienced a small decrease. That was because phosphate was mainly removed by surface adsorption, and thus, phthalate was a competitor to phosphate for the same adsorption site. The phosphate removal rate increased a little at initial concentration of > 2.5 mg · L⁻¹, this was because the phosphate precipitation was reinforced by the increase of calcium concentration, which was caused by phthalate addition. PMID:27011989

  5. Three Redox States of a Diradical Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Triad: Gating the Magnetic Coupling and the Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Souto, Manuel; Lloveras, Vega; Vela, Sergi; Fumanal, Maria; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume

    2016-06-16

    The diradical acceptor-donor-acceptor triad 1(••), based on two polychlorotriphenylmethyl (PTM) radicals connected through a tetrathiafulvalene(TTF)-vinylene bridge, has been synthesized. The generation of the mixed-valence radical anion, 1(•-), and triradical cation species, 1(•••+), obtained upon electrochemical reduction and oxidation, respectively, was monitored by optical and ESR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the modification of electron delocalization and magnetic coupling was observed when the charged species were generated and the changes have been rationalized by theoretical calculations.

  6. CADMIUM PHOSPHATE GLASS

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, H.W.; Johnson, P.D.

    1963-04-01

    A method of preparing a cadmium phosphate glass that comprises providing a mixture of solid inorganic compounds of cadmuim and phosphate having vaporizable components and heating the resulting composition to a temperature of at least 850 un. Concent 85% C is presented. (AEC)

  7. Covalent non-fused tetrathiafulvalene-acceptor systems.

    PubMed

    Pop, Flavia; Avarvari, Narcis

    2016-06-28

    Covalent donor-acceptor (D-A) systems have significantly contributed to the development of many organic materials and to molecular electronics. Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) represents one of the most widely studied donor precursors and has been incorporated into the structure of many D-A derivatives with the objective of obtaining redox control and modulation of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), in order to address switchable emissive systems and to take advantage of its propensity to form regular stacks in the solid state. In this review, we focus on the main families of non-fused TTF-acceptors, which are classified according to the nature of the acceptor: nitrogen-containing heterocycles, BODIPY, perylenes and electron poor unsaturated hydrocarbons, as well as radical acceptors. We describe herein the most representative members of each family with a brief mention of their synthesis and a special focus on their D-A characteristics. Special attention is given to ICT and its modulation, fluorescence quenching and switching, photoconductivity, bistability and spin distribution by discussing and comparing spectroscopic and electrochemical features, photophysical properties, solid-state properties and theoretical calculations. PMID:27193500

  8. Fine structure of the Mn acceptor in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, I. V.; Debus, J.; Averkiev, N. S.; Dimitriev, G. S.; Sapega, V. F.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-06-01

    We reveal the electronic level structure of the Mn acceptor, which consists of a valence-band hole bound to an Mn2 + ion, in presence of applied uniaxial stress and an external magnetic field in bulk GaAs. Resonant spin-flip Raman scattering is used to measure the g factor of the AMn0 center in the ground and excited states with the total angular momenta F =1 and F =2 and characterize the optical selection rules of the spin-flip transitions between these Mn-acceptor states. We determine the random stress fields near the Mn acceptor, the constant of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between the valence-band holes and the electrons of the inner Mn2 + shell as well as the deformation potential for the exchange energy. The p -d exchange energy, in particular, decreases significantly with increasing compressive stress. By combining the experimental Raman study with the developed theoretical model on the scattering efficiency, in which also the random local and external uniaxial stresses and magnetic field are considered, the fine structure of the Mn acceptor is determined in full detail.

  9. Development of imide- and imidazole-containing electron acceptors for use in donor-acceptor conjugated compounds and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo

    Conjugated organic compounds and polymers have attracted significant attention due to their potential application in electronic devices as semiconducting materials, such as organic solar cells (OSCs). In order to tune band gaps, donor-acceptor (D-A) structure is widely used, which has been proved to be one of the most effective strategies. This thesis consists of three parts: 1) design, syntheses and characterization of new weak acceptors based on imides and the systematic study of the structure-property relationship; (2) introduction of weak and strong acceptors in one polymer to achieve a broad coverage of light absorption and improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE); (3) modification of benzothiadiazole (BT) acceptor in order to increase the electron withdrawing ability. Imide-based electron acceptors, 4-(5-bromothiophen-2-y1)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-9- phenyl- 1H-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione (BIDO-1) and 4,9-bis(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3-dione (BIDO-2), were designed and synthesized. In this design, naphthalene is selected as its main core to maintain a planar structure, and thienyl groups are able to facilitate the bromination reaction and lower the band gap. BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 were successfully coupled with different donors by both Suzuki cross-coupling and Stille cross-coupling reactions. Based on the energy levels and band gaps of the BIDO-containing compounds and polymers, BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 are proved to be weak electron acceptors. Pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) was also studied and found to be a stronger electron acceptor than BIDO . In order to obtain broad absorption coverage, both weak acceptor ( BIDO-2) and strong acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) were introduced in the same polymer. The resulting polymers show two absorption bands at 400 and 600 nm and two emission peaks at 500 and 680 nm. The band gaps of the polymers are around 1.6 eV, which is ideal for OSC application. The PCE of 1.17% was achieved. Finally

  10. Anaerobic methanotrophy in tidal wetland: Effects of electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hung; Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands have been considered to represent the largest natural source of methane emission, contributing substantially to intensify greenhouse effect. Despite in situ methanogenesis fueled by organic degradation, methanotrophy also plays a vital role in controlling the exact quantity of methane release across the air-sediment interface. As wetlands constantly experience various disturbances of anthropogenic activities, biological burrowing, tidal inundation, and plant development, rapid elemental turnover would enable various electron acceptors available for anaerobic methanotrophy. The effects of electron acceptors on stimulating anaerobic methanotrophy and the population compositions involved in carbon transformation in wetland sediments are poorly explored. In this study, sediments recovered from tidally influenced, mangrove covered wetland in northern Taiwan were incubated under the static conditions to investigate whether anaerobic methanotrophy could be stimulated by the presence of individual electron acceptors. Our results demonstrated that anaerobic methanotrophy was clearly stimulated in incubations amended with no electron acceptor, sulfate, or Fe-oxyhydroxide. No apparent methane consumption was observed in incubations with nitrate, citrate, fumarate or Mn-oxides. Anaerobic methanotrophy in incubations with no exogenous electron acceptor appears to proceed at the greatest rates, being sequentially followed by incubations with sulfate and Fe-oxyhydroxide. The presence of basal salt solution stimulated methane oxidation by a factor of 2 to 3. In addition to the direct impact of electron acceptor and basal salts, incubations with sediments retrieved from low tide period yielded a lower rate of methane oxidation than from high tide period. Overall, this study demonstrates that anaerobic methanotrophy in wetland sediments could proceed under various treatments of electron acceptors. Low sulfate content is not a critical factor in inhibiting methane

  11. Acceptor conductivity in bulk zinc oxide (0001) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekore, Bababunmi Tolu

    ZnO is a promising wide bandgap semiconductor. Its renowned and prominent properties as its bandgap of 3.37eV at 4.2K; its very high excitonic binding energy, 60meV; its high melting temperature, 2248K constitute the basis for the recently renewed and sustained scientific interests in the material. In addition to the foregoing, the availability of bulk substrates of industrially relevant sizes provides important opportunities such as homoepitaxial deposition of the material which is a technological asset in the production of efficient optoelectronic and electronic devices. The nemesis of wide bandgap materials cannot be more exemplified than in ZnO. The notorious limitation of asymmetric doping and the haunting plague of electrically active point defects dim the bright future of the material. In this case, the search for reliable and consistent acceptor conductivity in bulk substrates has been hitherto, unsuccessful. In the dissertation that now follows, our efforts have been concerted in the search for a reliable acceptor. We have carefully investigated the science of point defects in the material, especially those responsible for the high donor conductivity. We also investigated and herein report variety of techniques of introducing acceptors into the material. We employ the most relevant and informative characterization techniques in verifying both the intended conductivity and the response of intrinsic crystals to variation in temperature and strain. And finally we explain deviations, where they exist, from ideal acceptor characteristics. Our work on reliable acceptor has been articulated in four papers. The first establishing capacitance based methods of monitoring electrically active donor defects. The second investigates the nature of anion acceptors on the oxygen sublattice. A study similar to the preceding study was conducted for cation acceptors on the zinc sublattice and reported in the third paper. Finally, an analysis of the response of the crystal to

  12. The Crystal Structure of a Ternary Complex of Betaine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provides New Insight Into the Reaction Mechansim and Shows A Novel Binding Mode of the 2'-Phosphate of NADP+ and A Novel Cation Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Segura, L.; Rudino-Pinera, E; Munoz-Clares, R; Horjales, E

    2009-01-01

    In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the NAD(P)+-dependent betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (PaBADH) may play the dual role of assimilating carbon and nitrogen from choline or choline precursors-abundant at infection sites-and producing glycine betaine and NADPH, potentially protective against the high-osmolarity and oxidative stresses prevalent in the infected tissues. Disruption of the PaBADH gene negatively affects the growth of bacteria, suggesting that this enzyme could be a target for antibiotic design. PaBADH is one of the few ALDHs that efficiently use NADP+ and one of the even fewer that require K+ ions for stability. Crystals of PaBADH were obtained under aerobic conditions in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, glycerol, NADP+ and K+ ions. The three-dimensional structure was determined at 2.1-A resolution. The catalytic cysteine (C286, corresponding to C302 of ALDH2) is oxidized to sulfenic acid or forms a mixed disulfide with 2-mercaptoethanol. The glutamyl residue involved in the deacylation step (E252, corresponding to E268 of ALDH2) is in two conformations, suggesting a proton relay system formed by two well-conserved residues (E464 and K162, corresponding to E476 and K178, respectively, of ALDH2) that connects E252 with the bulk water. In some active sites, a bound glycerol molecule mimics the thiohemiacetal intermediate; its hydroxyl oxygen is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen of the amide groups of the side chain of the conserved N153 (N169 of ALDH2) and those of the main chain of C286, which form the 'oxyanion hole.' The nicotinamide moiety of the nucleotide is not observed in the crystal, and the adenine moiety binds in the usual way. A salt bridge between E179 (E195 of ALDH2) and R40 (E53 of ALDH2) moves the carboxylate group of the former away from the 2?-phosphate of the NADP+, thus avoiding steric clashes and/or electrostatic repulsion between the two groups. Finally, the crystal shows two K+ binding sites per subunit. One is in an

  13. The crystal structure of a ternary complex of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provides new insight into the reaction mechanism and shows a novel binding mode of the 2'-phosphate of NADP+ and a novel cation binding site.

    PubMed

    González-Segura, Lilian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A; Horjales, Eduardo

    2009-01-16

    In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the NAD(P)(+)-dependent betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (PaBADH) may play the dual role of assimilating carbon and nitrogen from choline or choline precursors--abundant at infection sites--and producing glycine betaine and NADPH, potentially protective against the high-osmolarity and oxidative stresses prevalent in the infected tissues. Disruption of the PaBADH gene negatively affects the growth of bacteria, suggesting that this enzyme could be a target for antibiotic design. PaBADH is one of the few ALDHs that efficiently use NADP(+) and one of the even fewer that require K(+) ions for stability. Crystals of PaBADH were obtained under aerobic conditions in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, glycerol, NADP(+) and K(+) ions. The three-dimensional structure was determined at 2.1-A resolution. The catalytic cysteine (C286, corresponding to C302 of ALDH2) is oxidized to sulfenic acid or forms a mixed disulfide with 2-mercaptoethanol. The glutamyl residue involved in the deacylation step (E252, corresponding to E268 of ALDH2) is in two conformations, suggesting a proton relay system formed by two well-conserved residues (E464 and K162, corresponding to E476 and K178, respectively, of ALDH2) that connects E252 with the bulk water. In some active sites, a bound glycerol molecule mimics the thiohemiacetal intermediate; its hydroxyl oxygen is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen of the amide groups of the side chain of the conserved N153 (N169 of ALDH2) and those of the main chain of C286, which form the "oxyanion hole." The nicotinamide moiety of the nucleotide is not observed in the crystal, and the adenine moiety binds in the usual way. A salt bridge between E179 (E195 of ALDH2) and R40 (E53 of ALDH2) moves the carboxylate group of the former away from the 2'-phosphate of the NADP(+), thus avoiding steric clashes and/or electrostatic repulsion between the two groups. Finally, the crystal shows two K(+) binding sites per subunit

  14. Intramolecular electron transfer in fullerene/ferrocene based donor-bridge-acceptor dyads

    SciTech Connect

    Guldi, D.M.; Maggini, M.; Scorrano, G.; Prato, M.

    1997-02-05

    A systematic steady-state fluorescence and time-resolved flash photolytic investigation of a series of covalently linked fullerene/ferrocene based donor-bridge-acceptor dyads is reported as a function of the nature of the spacer between the donor site (ferrocene) and acceptor site (fullerene) and the dielectric constant of the medium. The fluorescence of the investigated dyads 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 in methylcyclohexane at 77 K were substantially quenched, relative to N-methylfulleropyrrolidine 1, indicating intramolecular quenching of the fullerene excited singlet state. Excitation of N-methylfulleropyrrolidine revealed the immediate formation of the excited singlet state, with {lambda}{sub max} around 886 nm. A rapid intersystem crossing ({tau}{sub 1/2} = 1.2 ps ) to the excited triplet state was observed with characteristic absorption around 705 nm. Picosecond resolved photolysis of dyads 2-6 in toluene showed light-induced formation of the excited singlet state which undergoes rapid intramolecular quenching. Nanosecond-resolved photolysis of dyads 3 and 4 in degassed benzonitrile revealed long-lived charge separated states with characteristic fullerene radical-anion bands at {lambda}{sub max} = 1055 nm. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; King, W.

    2011-04-04

    The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

  16. Fragment charge difference method for estimating donor-acceptor electronic coupling: Application to DNA π-stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.; Rösch, Notker

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this communication is two-fold. We introduce the fragment charge difference (FCD) method to estimate the electron transfer matrix element HDA between a donor D and an acceptor A, and we apply this method to several aspects of hole transfer electronic couplings in π-stacks of DNA, including systems with several donor-acceptor sites. Within the two-state model, our scheme can be simplified to recover a convenient estimate of the electron transfer matrix element HDA=(1-Δq2)1/2(E2-E1)/2 based on the vertical excitation energy E2-E1 and the charge difference Δq between donor and acceptor. For systems with strong charge separation, Δq≳0.95, one should resort to the FCD method. As favorable feature, we demonstrate the stability of the FCD approach for systems which require an approach beyond the two-state model. On the basis of ab initio calculations of various DNA related systems, we compared three approaches for estimating the electronic coupling: the minimum splitting method, the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) scheme, and the FCD approach. We studied the sensitivity of FCD and GMH couplings to the donor-acceptor energy gap and found both schemes to be quite robust; they are applicable also in cases where donor and acceptor states are off resonance. In the application to π-stacks of DNA, we demonstrated for the Watson-Crick pair dimer [(GC),(GC)] how structural changes considerably affect the coupling strength of electron hole transfer. For models of three Watson-Crick pairs, we showed that the two-state model significantly overestimates the hole transfer coupling whereas simultaneous treatment of several states leads to satisfactory results.

  17. Metal-phosphate binders

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Beth Ann; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  18. Phosphate control in dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Gallieni, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Caria, Stefania; Meola, Mario; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD) management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive–convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P) mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200–300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source. Finally, boiling should be the preferred cooking procedure, because it induces food demineralization, including phosphate loss. The integrated approach outlined in this article should be actively adapted as a therapeutic alliance by clinicians, dieticians, and patients for an effective control of phosphate balance in dialysis patients. PMID:24133374

  19. Interface effects on acceptor qubits in silicon and germanium.

    PubMed

    Abadillo-Uriel, J C; Calderón, M J

    2016-01-15

    Dopant-based quantum computing implementations often require the dopants to be situated close to an interface to facilitate qubit manipulation with local gates. Interfaces not only modify the energies of the bound states but also affect their symmetry. Making use of the successful effective mass theory we study the energy spectra of acceptors in Si or Ge taking into account the quantum confinement, the dielectric mismatch and the central cell effects. The presence of an interface puts constraints to the allowed symmetries and leads to the splitting of the ground state in two Kramers doublets (Mol et al 2015 Appl. Phys. Lett. 106 203110). Inversion symmetry breaking also implies parity mixing which affects the allowed optical transitions. Consequences for acceptor qubits are discussed. PMID:26618443

  20. Photoconductivity in donor-acceptor heterojunction organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, C. K.; Zimmerman, J. D.; Lassiter, B. E.; Forrest, S. R.

    2012-08-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) differ from ideal inorganic solar cells due to their pronounced voltage dependence under reverse bias. This feature is commonly modeled in an ad hoc fashion by including a parallel junction resistance (Rp) that bypasses the heterojunction energy barrier between donor and acceptor. The existence of a finite Rp has variously been attributed to rough interfaces, pinhole defects, or to the electric field dependence of the dissociation of polaron pairs that are bound at the heterojunction. Here we show that the voltage dependence of the photocurrent can also arise from photoconductivity resulting from exciton generation followed by dissociation into free polarons within the bulk of the donor and acceptor layers. The presence of photoconductivity of the active layers does not result in an increase in power conversion efficiency, and places a constraint on the maximum fill factor that can be achieved in an OPV cell.

  1. Free Carrier Generation in Organic Photovoltaic Bulk Heterojunctions of Conjugated Polymers with Molecular Acceptors: Planar versus Spherical Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nardes, Alexandre M.; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-03-05

    We present a comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85 % of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. Here, we propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  2. Free carrier generation in organic photovoltaic bulk heterojunctions of conjugated polymers with molecular acceptors: planar versus spherical acceptors.

    PubMed

    Nardes, Alexandre M; Ferguson, Andrew J; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-06-01

    A comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device is presented. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85% of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. We propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  3. Free carrier generation in organic photovoltaic bulk heterojunctions of conjugated polymers with molecular acceptors: planar versus spherical acceptors.

    PubMed

    Nardes, Alexandre M; Ferguson, Andrew J; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-06-01

    A comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device is presented. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85% of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. We propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  4. Quantum confined acceptors and donors in InSe nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Mudd, G. W.; Patanè, A. Makarovsky, O.; Eaves, L.; Kudrynskyi, Z. R.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.; Fay, M. W.; Zólyomi, V.; Falko, V.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the radiative recombination of photo-excited carriers bound at native donors and acceptors in exfoliated nanoflakes of nominally undoped rhombohedral γ-polytype InSe. The binding energies of these states are found to increase with the decrease in flake thickness, L. We model their dependence on L using a two-dimensional hydrogenic model for impurities and show that they are strongly sensitive to the position of the impurities within the nanolayer.

  5. 2012 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    McCusker, James

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  6. An extended Foerster-Dexter model for correlated donor-acceptor placement in solid state materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, S. R.; Hartmann, F. X.

    1987-09-01

    The current theory of donor-acceptor interactions in solid-state materials is based on a random distribution of donors and acceptors through the crystal. In this paper, we present a model to calculate the observable transfer rates for the correlated positioning of donors and acceptors in laser materials. Chemical effects leading to such correlations are discussed.

  7. The glucose 6-phosphate shunt around the Calvin-Benson cycle.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Weise, Sean E

    2016-07-01

    It is just over 60 years since a cycle for the regeneration of the CO2-acceptor used in photosynthesis was proposed. In this opinion paper, we revisit the origins of the Calvin-Benson cycle that occurred at the time that the hexose monophosphate shunt, now called the pentose phosphate pathway, was being worked out. Eventually the pentose phosphate pathway was separated into two branches, an oxidative branch and a non-oxidative branch. It is generally thought that the Calvin-Benson cycle is the reverse of the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway but we describe crucial differences and also propose that some carbon routinely passes through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. This creates a futile cycle but may help to stabilize photosynthesis. If it occurs it could explain a number of enigmas including the lack of complete labelling of the Calvin-Benson cycle intermediates when carbon isotopes are fed to photosynthesizing leaves.

  8. Income-generating activities for family planning acceptors.

    PubMed

    1989-07-01

    The Income Generating Activities program for Family Planning Acceptors was introduced in Indonesia in 1979. Capital input by the Indonesian National Family Planning Coordination Board and the UN Fund for Population Activities was used to set up small businesses by family planning acceptors. In 2 years, when the businesses become self-sufficient, the loans are repaid, and the money is used to set up new family planning acceptors in business. The program strengthens family planning acceptance, improves the status of women, and enhances community self-reliance. The increase in household income generated by the program raises the standards of child nutrition, encourages reliance on the survival of children, and decreases the value of large families. Approximately 18,000 Family Planning-Income Generating Activities groups are now functioning all over Indonesia, with financial assistance from the central and local governments, the World Bank, the US Agency for International Development, the UN Population Fund, the Government of the Netherlands, and the Government of Australia through the Association of South East Asian Nations.

  9. Design directed self-assembly of donor-acceptor polymers.

    PubMed

    Marszalek, Tomasz; Li, Mengmeng; Pisula, Wojciech

    2016-09-21

    Donor-acceptor polymers with an alternating array of donor and acceptor moieties have gained particular attention during recent years as active components of organic electronics. By implementation of suitable subunits within the conjugated backbone, these polymers can be made either electron-deficient or -rich. Additionally, their band gap and light absorption can be precisely tuned for improved light-harvesting in solar cells. On the other hand, the polymer design can also be modified to encode the desired supramolecular self-assembly in the solid-state that is essential for an unhindered transport of charge carriers. This review focuses on three major factors playing a role in the assembly of donor-acceptor polymers on surfaces which are (1) nature, geometry and substitution position of solubilizing alkyl side chains, (2) shape of the conjugated polymer defined by the backbone curvature, and (3) molecular weight which determines the conjugation length of the polymer. These factors adjust the fine balance between attractive and repulsive forces and ensure a close polymer packing important for an efficient charge hopping between neighboring chains. On the microscopic scale, an appropriate domain formation with a low density of structural defects in the solution deposited thin film is crucial for the charge transport. The charge carrier transport through such thin films is characterized by field-effect transistors as basic electronic elements. PMID:27440174

  10. Fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Mi, Dongbo; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hee Un; Xu, Fei; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Energy is currently one of the most important problems humankind faces. Depletion of traditional energy sources such as coal and oil results in the need to develop new ways to create, transport, and store electricity. In this regard, the sun, which can be considered as a giant nuclear fusion reactor, represents the most powerful source of energy available in our solar system. For photovoltaic cells to gain widespread acceptance as a source of clean and renewable energy, the cost per watt of solar energy must be decreased. Organic photovoltaic cells, developed in the past two decades, have potential as alternatives to traditional inorganic semiconductor photovoltaic cells, which suffer from high environmental pollution and energy consumption during production. Organic photovoltaic cells are composed of a blended film of a conjugated-polymer donor and a soluble fullerene-derivative acceptor sandwiched between a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)-coated indium tin oxide positive electrode and a low-work-function metal negative electrode. Considerable research efforts aim at designing and synthesizing novel fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors with up-raised lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, better light-harvesting properties, higher electron mobility, and better miscibility with the polymer donor for improving the power conversion efficiency of the organic photovoltaic cells. In this paper, we systematically review novel fullerene acceptors synthesized through chemical modification for enhancing the photovoltaic performance by increasing open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, and fill factor, which determine the performance of organic photovoltaic cells.

  11. Spectral, thermal and kinetic studies of charge-transfer complexes formed between the highly effective antibiotic drug metronidazole and two types of acceptors: σ- and π-acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Saad, Hosam A.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the interaction between drugs and small inorganic or organic molecules is critical in being able to interpret the drug-receptor interactions and acting mechanism of these drugs. A combined solution and solid state study was performed to describe the complexation chemistry of drug metronidazole (MZ) which has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity with two types of acceptors. The acceptors include, σ-acceptor (i.e., iodine) and π-acceptors (i.e., dichlorodicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ), chloranil (CHL) and picric acid (PA)). The molecular structure, spectroscopic characteristics, the binding modes as well as the thermal stability were deduced from IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and thermal studies. The binding ratio of complexation (MZ: acceptor) was determined to be 1:2 for the iodine acceptor and 1:1 for the DDQ, CHL or PA acceptor, according to the CHN elemental analyses and spectrophotometric titrations. It has been found that the complexation with CHL and PA acceptors increases the values of enthalpy and entropy, while the complexation with DDQ and iodine acceptors decreases the values of these parameters compared with the free MZ donor.

  12. Biological nitrogen removal with enhanced phosphate uptake in a sequencing batch reactor using single sludge system.

    PubMed

    Lee, D S; Jeon, C O; Park, J M

    2001-11-01

    Simultaneous biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal with enhanced anoxic phosphate uptake was investigated in an anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor ((AO)2 SBR). Significant amounts of phosphorus-accumulation organisms (PAOs) capable of denitrification could be accumulated in a single sludge system coexisting with nitrifiers. The ratio of the anoxic phosphate uptake to the aerobic phosphate uptake capacity was increased from 11% to 64% by introducing an anoxic phase in an anaerobic aerobic SBR. The (AO)2 SBR system showed stable phosphorus and nitrogen removal performance. Average removal efficiencies of TOC, total nitrogen, and phosphorus were 92%, 88%, and 100%, respectively. It was found that nitrite (up to 10 mg NO2(-)-N/l) was not detrimental to the anoxic phosphate uptake and could serve as an electron acceptor like nitrate. In fact, the phosphate uptake rate was even faster in the presence of nitrite as an electron acceptor compared to the presence of nitrate. It was found that on-line sensor values of pH, ORP, and DO were somehow related with the dynamic behaviours of nutrient concentrations (NH4+, NO3-, and PO4(3-)) in the SBR. These on-line sensor values were used as real-time control parameters to adjust the duration of each operational phase in the (AO)2 SBR. The real-time controlled SBR exhibited better performance in the removal of phosphorus and nitrogen than the SBR with fixed-time operation. PMID:12230180

  13. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-01-01

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis. PMID:26559132

  14. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-11-01

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis.

  15. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-01-01

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis. PMID:26559132

  16. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-11-12

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis.

  17. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S [Pittsburgh, PA; Curran, George P [Pittsburgh, PA; Gorin, Everett [San Rafael, CA

    1982-01-01

    A method for producing a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor.

  18. Method for producing and regenerating a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, M. S.; Curran, G. P.; Gorin, E.

    1982-05-18

    A method is described for producing a synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor by feeding a mixture of finely divided silica and at least one finely divided calcium compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate to a fluidized bed; operating the fluidized bed at suitable conditions to produce pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor and recovering the pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor from the fluidized bed. Optionally, spent synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor can be charged to the fluidized bed to produce regenerated pellets of synthetic CO[sub 2] acceptor. 1 fig.

  19. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F.; Möller, C.; Lauer, K.

    2013-11-11

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  20. Using oxygen isotopes of phosphate to investigate phosphate release from sediments and phosphate input from waste water treatment plants into Lake Erie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, K.; Klass, T.; Watson, S.; Mah, B.; Paytan, A.

    2010-12-01

    Phosphorus is often a limiting nutrient in freshwater systems; however increased inputs have been promoting eutrophication in many of these systems. Phosphate is one of the more bio-available forms of phosphate and it has been suggested by Elsbury et al., (2009) that in addition to riverin input some other yet unidentified phosphate source contributes to the phosphorous loading in Lake Erie. We are using the oxygen isotope of phosphate to identify two potential sources of phosphorus into Lake Erie. Specifically we determine the isotopic composition of oxygen in phosphate which is associated with various sedimentary phases at two sites in Lake Erie. The distinct sedimentary phases have different phosphate mobility and thus release potential to the lake. In addition we determine the isotopic signature of phosphate that is released into the lake from treated waste water effluent throughout the year. Results will be compared to the isotopic signature of phosphate in Lake water to evaluate the potential contribution form each of these sources.

  1. Phosphate Mines, Jordan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Jordan's leading industry and export commodities are phosphate and potash, ranked in the top three in the world. These are used to make fertilizer. The Jordan Phosphate Mines Company is the sole producer, having started operations in 1935. In addition to mining activities, the company produces phosphoric acid (for fertilizers, detergents, pharmaceuticals), diammonium phosphate (for fertilizer), sulphuric acid (many uses), and aluminum fluoride (a catalyst to make aluminum and magnesium).

    The image covers an area of 27.5 x 49.4 km, was acquired on September 17, 2005, and is located near 30.8 degrees north latitude, 36.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  2. Glycochenodeoxycholic acid inhibits calcium phosphate precipitation in vitro by preventing the transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate to calcium hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, S M; Wen, G; Hirakawa, N; Soloway, R D; Hong, N K; Crowther, R S

    1991-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite can be a significant component of black pigment gallstones. Diverse molecules that bind calcium phosphate inhibit hydroxyapatite precipitation. Because glycine-conjugated bile acids, but not their taurine counterparts, bind calcium phosphate, we studied whether glycochenodeoxycholic acid inhibits calcium hydroxyapatite formation. Glycochenodeoxycholic acid (2 mM) totally inhibited transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate microprecipitates to macroscopic crystalline calcium hydroxyapatite. This inhibition was not mediated by decreased Ca2+ activity. Taurocholic acid (2-12 mM) did not affect hydroxyapatite formation, but antagonized glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Both amorphous and crystalline precipitates contained a surface fraction relatively rich in phosphate. The surface phosphate content was diminish by increasing glycochenodeoxycholic acid concentrations, and this relationship was interpreted as competition between bile acid and HPO4(-4) for binding sites on the calcium phosphate surface. A phosphate-rich crystal surface was associated with rapid transition from amorphous to crystalline states. These results indicate that glycochenodeoxycholic acid prevents transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate to crystalline hydroxyapatite by competitively inhibiting the accumulation of phosphate on the crystal embryo surface. PMID:1655828

  3. Photoaffinity labelling of methyltransferase enzymes with S-adenosylmethionine: effects of methyl acceptor substrates.

    PubMed

    Hurst, J H; Billingsley, M L; Lovenberg, W

    1984-07-31

    Radioactivity from 3H-[methyl]-S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) was covalently bound to protein-O-carboxylmethyltransferase and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase following 10-15 min irradiation by short-wave ultraviolet light. This photoaffinity binding of 3H-[methyl]-AdoMet was blocked by S-adenosylhomocysteine and sinefungin, but was not affected by 5 mM dithiothreitol. The binding was also inhibited by including methyl acceptors such as calmodulin (protein-O-carboxylmethyltransferase) or phenylethanolamine (phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase) in the photoaffinity incubation. Staphlococcus V8 protease digests of 3H-[methyl]-AdoMet/enzyme complexes revealed that the primary structure around the AdoMet binding site is different in these two enzymes. Thus, protein-O-carboxylmethyltransferase, a large molecule methyltransferase, can covalently bind 3H-[methyl]-AdoMet in a manner similar to that of phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase.

  4. Effects of strain on carbon donors and acceptors in hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka; Saito, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    We present first-principles density functional calculations that clarify the electronic properties of carbon defects in hexagonal boron nitride (h -BN) monolayers under biaxially applied strains. We find that strain can control the ionization energies of both donor and acceptor states. Furthermore, we also find that strain can lead to the dramatic change in conduction channel properties of donor states due to the interchange of the conduction-band-minimum state with the nearly-free-electron state. We also report the simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of carbon defects in h -BN monolayers for experimental identification of those defects. We show that the STM images strongly reflect distinctive spatial distributions of local density of states around carbon defects depending on the substitution sites and thereby they could be identified by using STM experiments.

  5. Chemopreventive Agents from Physalis minima Function as Michael Reaction Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Men, Ruizhi; Li, Ning; Ding, Chihong; Tang, Yingzhan; Xing, Yachao; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fruits of some varieties of genus Physalis have been used as delicious fruits and functional food in the Northeast of China. Materials and Methods: To reveal the functional material basis, we performed bioactivity-guided phytochemical research and chemopreventive effect assay of the constituents from Physalis minima. Results: It was demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract of P. minima L. (EEPM) had potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with induction ratio (IR, QR induction activity) value of 1.47 ± 0.24, and glutathione binding property as potential Michael reaction acceptors (with an α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety). Furthermore, bioactivity-guided phytochemical research led eight compounds (1–8), which were elucidated as 3-isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (1), isophysalin B (2), physalin G (3), physalin D (4), physalin I (5), physordinose B (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) and 5α-6β-dihydroxyphysalin R (8) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses and HRESIMS. Then, isophysalin B (2) and physordinose B (6) showed significant QR inducing activity with IR value of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46, respectively. SUMMARY An ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method with glutathione as the substrate was used to detect the Michael reaction acceptors in extracts of Physalis minima (EPM)We investigated the chemical constituents of EPM guided by biological activity methodIsophysalin B (1) and physordinose B (6) showed strong quinone reductase inducing activity with induction ratio values of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46This study generated useful information for consumers and many encourage researchers to utilize edible fruits from Physalis as a source of phytochemicals Abbreviations used: EPM: Extracts of Physalis minima, EEPM: Ethyl acetate extract of Physalis minima L., GSH: Glutathione, MRAs: Michael reaction acceptors, QR: Quinone reductase. PMID:27279713

  6. Nanostructured donor-acceptor self assembly with improved photoconductivity.

    PubMed

    Saibal, B; Ashar, A Z; Devi, R Nandini; Narayan, K S; Asha, S K

    2014-11-12

    Nanostructured supramolecular donor-acceptor assemblies were formed when an unsymmetrical N-substituted pyridine functionalized perylenebisimide (UPBI-Py) was complexed with oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (OPVM-OH) complementarily functionalized with hydroxyl unit and polymerizable methacrylamide unit at the two termini. The resulting supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 upon polymerization by irradiation in the presence of photoinitiator formed well-defined supramolecular polymeric nanostructures. Self-assembly studies using fluorescence emission from thin film samples showed that subtle structural changes occurred on the OPV donor moiety following polymerization. The 1:1 supramolecular complex showed red-shifted aggregate emission from both OPV (∼500 nm) and PBI (∼640 nm) units, whereas the OPV aggregate emission was replaced by intense monomeric emission (∼430 nm) upon polymerizing the methacrylamide units on the OPVM-OH. The bulk structure was studied using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD). Complex formation resulted in distinct changes in the cell parameters of OPVM-OH. In contrast, a physical mixture of 1 mol each of OPVM-OH and UPBI-Py prepared by mixing the powdered solid samples together showed only a combination of reflections from both parent molecules. Thin film morphology of the 1:1 molecular complex as well as the supramolecular polymer complex showed uniform lamellar structures in the domain range <10 nm. The donor-acceptor supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 exhibited space charge limited current (SCLC) with a bulk mobility estimate of an order of magnitude higher accompanied by a higher photoconductivity yield compared to the pristine UPBI-Py. This is a very versatile method to obtain spatially defined organization of n and p-type semiconductor materials based on suitably functionalized donor and acceptor molecules resulting in improved photocurrent response using self-assembly.

  7. Nanostructured donor-acceptor self assembly with improved photoconductivity.

    PubMed

    Saibal, B; Ashar, A Z; Devi, R Nandini; Narayan, K S; Asha, S K

    2014-11-12

    Nanostructured supramolecular donor-acceptor assemblies were formed when an unsymmetrical N-substituted pyridine functionalized perylenebisimide (UPBI-Py) was complexed with oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (OPVM-OH) complementarily functionalized with hydroxyl unit and polymerizable methacrylamide unit at the two termini. The resulting supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 upon polymerization by irradiation in the presence of photoinitiator formed well-defined supramolecular polymeric nanostructures. Self-assembly studies using fluorescence emission from thin film samples showed that subtle structural changes occurred on the OPV donor moiety following polymerization. The 1:1 supramolecular complex showed red-shifted aggregate emission from both OPV (∼500 nm) and PBI (∼640 nm) units, whereas the OPV aggregate emission was replaced by intense monomeric emission (∼430 nm) upon polymerizing the methacrylamide units on the OPVM-OH. The bulk structure was studied using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD). Complex formation resulted in distinct changes in the cell parameters of OPVM-OH. In contrast, a physical mixture of 1 mol each of OPVM-OH and UPBI-Py prepared by mixing the powdered solid samples together showed only a combination of reflections from both parent molecules. Thin film morphology of the 1:1 molecular complex as well as the supramolecular polymer complex showed uniform lamellar structures in the domain range <10 nm. The donor-acceptor supramolecular complex [UPBI-Py (OPVM-OH)]1.0 exhibited space charge limited current (SCLC) with a bulk mobility estimate of an order of magnitude higher accompanied by a higher photoconductivity yield compared to the pristine UPBI-Py. This is a very versatile method to obtain spatially defined organization of n and p-type semiconductor materials based on suitably functionalized donor and acceptor molecules resulting in improved photocurrent response using self-assembly. PMID:25283356

  8. Incorporation of Cu Acceptors in ZnO Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Oo, W.M.H.; Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Huso, Jesse; Morrison, J.; Bergman, Leah; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2010-09-16

    Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals is an important problem in nanomaterials research. Using infrared (IR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we have observed Cu acceptor dopants that were intentionally introduced into ZnO nanocrystals. The incorporation of Cu2+ dopants increased as the diameter of the nanocrystals was increased from ~3 to 5 nm. Etching the nanocrystals with acetic acid revealed a core-shell structure, where a 2-nm lightly doped core is surrounded by a heavily doped shell. These observations are consistent with the trapped dopant model, in which dopant atoms stick to the surface of the core and are overgrown by the nanocrystal material.

  9. Dual Mechanism of Ion Permeation through VDAC Revealed with Inorganic Phosphate Ions and Phosphate Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Krammer, Eva-Maria; Vu, Giang Thi; Homblé, Fabrice; Prévost, Martine

    2015-01-01

    In the exchange of metabolites and ions between the mitochondrion and the cytosol, the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is a key element, as it forms the major transport pathway for these compounds through the mitochondrial outer membrane. Numerous experimental studies have promoted the idea that VDAC acts as a regulator of essential mitochondrial functions. In this study, using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, free-energy calculations, and electrophysiological measurements, we investigated the transport of ions through VDAC, with a focus on phosphate ions and metabolites. We showed that selectivity of VDAC towards small anions including monovalent phosphates arises from short-lived interactions with positively charged residues scattered throughout the pore. In dramatic contrast, permeation of divalent phosphate ions and phosphate metabolites (AMP and ATP) involves binding sites along a specific translocation pathway. This permeation mechanism offers an explanation for the decrease in VDAC conductance measured in the presence of ATP or AMP at physiological salt concentration. The binding sites occur at similar locations for the divalent phosphate ions, AMP and ATP, and contain identical basic residues. ATP features a marked affinity for a central region of the pore lined by two lysines and one arginine of the N-terminal helix. This cluster of residues together with a few other basic amino acids forms a “charged brush” which facilitates the passage of the anionic metabolites through the pore. All of this reveals that VDAC controls the transport of the inorganic phosphates and phosphate metabolites studied here through two different mechanisms. PMID:25860993

  10. Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase show apparent specificity for a specific ribulose 5-phosphate species.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L E

    1987-02-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase appear to show specificity for a particular ribulose 5-phosphate species. The effect of this specificity will be channeling of ribulose 5-phosphate from the isomerase to the kinase during photosynthesis.

  11. Domestic phosphate deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKelvey, V.E.; Cathcart, J.B.; Altschuler, Z.S.; Swanson, R.W.; Lutz, Katherine

    1953-01-01

    Most of the worlds phosphate deposits can be grouped into six types: 1) igneous apatite deposits; 2) marine phosphorites; 3) residual phosphorites; 4) river pebble deposits; 5) phosphatized rock; and 6) guano. The igneous apatites and marine phosphorites form deposits measurable in millions or billions of tons; the residual deposits are measurable in thousands or millions; and the other types generally only in thousands of tons. Igneous apatite deposits have been mined on a small scale in New York, New Jersey, and Virginia. Marine phosphorites have been mined in Montana, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Residual phosphorites have been mined in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Florida. River pebble has been produced in South Carolina and Florida; phosphatized rock in Tennessee and Florida; and guano in New Mexico and Texas. Present production is limited almost entirely to Florida, Tennessee, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Incomplete but recently partly revised estimates indicate the presence of about 5 billion tons of phosphate deposits in the United States that is minable under present economic conditions. Deposits too lean in quality or thickness to compete with those in the western and southeastern fields probably contain tens of billions of tons.

  12. Assessment of structural, optical and conduction properties of ZnO thin films in the presence of acceptor impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plugaru, R.; Plugaru, N.

    2016-06-01

    The structural, optical and electrical conduction properties of (Li/Cu,N):ZnO codoped thin films synthesized by the sol-gel method were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission and absorption, photoluminescence (PL) and I-V measurements in order to bring evidence of the formation of acceptor centers by dual-acceptor codoping processes. The (Li 3%,N 5%):ZnO films consist of crystallites with average size of 15 nm, show 95% transmission in the visible region, and an optical band gap of 3.22 eV. The PL spectra show emission maxima at 3.21 and 2.96 eV which are related to the emission of acceptor centers and the presence of defects, respectively. Li occupies interstitial sites and may form Lii-N(O) defect complexes that act as acceptor centers. The (Cu 3%,N 5%):ZnO films consist of crystallites with average size of 12 nm, and exhibit 90% transmission in the visible region. The PL spectra reveal band edge emission at 3.23 eV and defect related emission at 2.74 eV. In the (Cu,N) codoped films, copper substitutes zinc and adopts mainly the Cu1+ state. A possible defect complex involving Cu and N determines the transition from n- to p-type conductivity. These findings are in agreement with results of electronic structure calculations at the GGA-PBE level.

  13. Dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors in anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Schicklberger, Marcus; Gescher, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    An extension of the respiratory chain to the cell surface is necessary to reduce extracellular electron acceptors like ferric iron or manganese oxides. In the past few years, more and more compounds were revealed to be reduced at the surface of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and the list does not seem to have an end so far. Shewanella as well as Geobacter strains are model organisms to discover the biochemistry that enables the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors. In both cases, c-type cytochromes are essential electron-transferring proteins. They make the journey of respiratory electrons from the cytoplasmic membrane through periplasm and over the outer membrane possible. Outer membrane cytochromes have the ability to catalyze the last step of the respiratory chains. Still, recent discoveries provided evidence that they are accompanied by further factors that allow or at least facilitate extracellular reduction. This review gives a condensed overview of our current knowledge of extracellular respiration, highlights recent discoveries, and discusses critically the influence of different strategies for terminal electron transfer reactions.

  14. Dissimilatory Reduction of Extracellular Electron Acceptors in Anaerobic Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Katrin; Schicklberger, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    An extension of the respiratory chain to the cell surface is necessary to reduce extracellular electron acceptors like ferric iron or manganese oxides. In the past few years, more and more compounds were revealed to be reduced at the surface of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and the list does not seem to have an end so far. Shewanella as well as Geobacter strains are model organisms to discover the biochemistry that enables the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors. In both cases, c-type cytochromes are essential electron-transferring proteins. They make the journey of respiratory electrons from the cytoplasmic membrane through periplasm and over the outer membrane possible. Outer membrane cytochromes have the ability to catalyze the last step of the respiratory chains. Still, recent discoveries provided evidence that they are accompanied by further factors that allow or at least facilitate extracellular reduction. This review gives a condensed overview of our current knowledge of extracellular respiration, highlights recent discoveries, and discusses critically the influence of different strategies for terminal electron transfer reactions. PMID:22179232

  15. Donor-acceptor complexation and dehydrogenation chemistry of aminoboranes.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Adam C; Sabourin, Kyle J; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J; Rivard, Eric

    2012-12-01

    A series of formal donor-acceptor adducts of aminoborane (H(2)BNH(2)) and its N-substituted analogues (H(2)BNRR') were prepared: LB-H(2)BNRR'(2)-BH(3) (LB = DMAP, IPr, IPrCH(2) and PCy(3); R and R' = H, Me or tBu; IPr = [(HCNDipp)(2)C:] and Dipp = 2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)). To potentially access complexes of molecular boron nitride, LB-BN-LA (LA = Lewis acid), preliminary dehydrogenation chemistry involving the parent aminoborane adducts LB-H(2)BNH(2)-BH(3) was investigated using [Rh(COD)Cl](2), CuBr, and NiBr(2) as dehydrogenation catalysts. In place of isolating the intended dehydrogenated BN donor-acceptor complexes, the formation of borazine was noted as a major product. Attempts to prepare the fluoroarylborane-capped aminoborane complexes, LB-H(2)BNH(2)-B(C(6)F(5))(3), are also described. PMID:23153209

  16. Inhibition of microbial arsenate reduction by phosphate.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Deanne C; Macur, Richard E; Inskeep, William P

    2012-03-20

    The ratio of arsenite (As(III)) to arsenate (As(V)) in soils and natural waters is often controlled by the activity of As-transforming microorganisms. Phosphate is a chemical analog to As(V) and, consequently, may competitively inhibit microbial uptake and enzymatic binding of As(V), thus preventing its reduction to the more toxic, mobile, and bioavailable form - As(III). Five As-transforming bacteria isolated either from As-treated soil columns or from As-impacted soils were used to evaluate the effects of phosphate on As(V) reduction and As(III) oxidation. Cultures were initially spiked with various P:As ratios, incubated for approximately 48 h, and analyzed periodically for As(V) and As(III) concentration. Arsenate reduction was inhibited at high P:As ratios and completely suppressed at elevated levels of phosphate (500 and 1,000 μM; P inhibition constant (K(i))∼20-100 μM). While high P:As ratios effectively shut down microbial As(V) reduction, the expression of the arsenate reductase gene (arsC) was not inhibited under these conditions in the As(V)-reducing isolate, Agrobacterium tumefaciens str. 5B. Further, high phosphate ameliorated As(V)-induced cell growth inhibition caused by high (1mM) As pressure. These results indicate that phosphate may inhibit As(V) reduction by impeding As(V) uptake by the cell via phosphate transport systems or by competitively binding to the active site of ArsC. PMID:21741807

  17. Phosphate Bonded Solidification of Radioactive Incinerator Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B. W.

    1999-04-13

    The incinerator at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site burns low level radioactive and hazardous waste. Ash and scrubber system waste streams are generated during the incineration process. Phosphate Ceramic technology is being tested to verify the ash and scrubber waste streams can be stabilized using this solidification method. Acceptance criteria for the solid waste forms include leachability, bleed water, compression testing, and permeability. Other testing on the waste forms include x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Biotemplate synthesis of monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Li, Dongxu

    2010-03-01

    Monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres with a high degree of crystallization were prepared through a facile in situ deposition method using rape pollen grains as a biotemplate. The functional group on the surface of the pollen grains could adsorb Fe(3+), which provided the nucleation sites for growth of iron phosphate nanoparticles. After being sintered at 600 degrees C for 10 h, the pollen grains were removed and iron phosphate hollow microspheres were obtained. A scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction were applied to characterize the morphology and crystalline structure of the pollen grains, iron phosphate-coated pollen grains and iron phosphate hollow microspheres. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravity analyses were performed to investigate the thermal behavior of the iron phosphate-coated pollen grains during the calcinations. Energy dispersive spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to investigate the interaction between the pollen grains and iron phosphate. The effect of the pollen wall on the surface morphology of these iron phosphate hollow microspheres was also proven in this work.

  19. Characterization of the phosphorylation sites of the squid (Loligo pealei) high-molecular-weight neurofilament protein from giant axon axoplasm.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H; Sharma, P; Grant, P; Pant, H

    2001-02-01

    Axonal caliber in vertebrates is attributed, in part, to the extensive phosphorylation of NFM and NFH C-terminal tail domain KSP repeats by proline-directed kinases. The squid giant axon, primarily involved in rapid impulse conduction during jet propulsion motility, is enriched in squid-specific neurofilaments, particularly the highly phosphorylated NF-220. Of the 228 serine-threonine candidate phosphate acceptor sites in the NF-220 tail domain (residues 401-1220), 82 are found in numerous repeats of three different motifs SAR/K, SEK/R, K/RSP, with 62 of these tightly clustered in the C-terminal repeat segment (residues 840-1160). Characterization of the in vivo NF-220 phosphorylated sites should provide clues as to the relevant kinases. To characterize these sites, proteolytic digests of NF-220 were analyzed by a combination of HPLC, electrospray tandem mass spectrometry and database searching. A total of 53 phosphorylation sites were characterized, with 47 clustered in the C-terminal repeat segment (residues 840-1160), representing 76% (47/62) of the total acceptor sites in the region. As in mammalian NFH, approximately 64% of the K/RSP sites (14/22) in this region were found to be phosphorylated implicating proline-directed kinases. Significantly, 78% of serines (31/40) in the KAES*EK and EKS*ARSP motifs were also phosphorylated suggesting that non proline-directed kinases such as CKI may also be involved. This is consistent with previous studies showing that CKI is the principal kinase associated with axoplasmic NF preparations. It also suggests that phosphorylation of large macromolecules with multiple phospho-sites requires sequential phosphorylation by several kinases.

  20. Donor-Acceptor-Type Semiconducting Polymers Consisting of Benzothiadiazole Derivatives as Electron-Acceptor Units for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Su; Park, Jong Baek; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2015-11-01

    We synthesized two fused pentacyclic donor-acceptor structures, where the two different outer electron rich thiophene (DTPBT) and electron poor benzene (ICTh) moieties are covalently bonded to the central electron-deficient benzothiadiazole core by two nitrogen bridges. These new electron-acceptor DTPBT and ICTh building blocks were copolymerized with fluorene, as the electron donor group, via Suzuki coupling polymerization, to produce two new alternating copolymers, PFDTPBT and PFICTh, respectively. The average molecular weights of the synthesized polymers were determined by GPC. The number-average molecular weights of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were 19,000 (PDI = 2.5) and 20,000 (PDI = 4.0), respectively. The optical bandgap energies of the polymers were measured from their absorption onsets to be 2.15 and 2.55 eV, depending on the polymer structure. The HOMO energy levels of the polymers were determined, by measuring the oxidation onsets of the polymer films by cyclic voltammetry. The measured HOMO energy levels of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were -5.10 and -5.57 eV, respectively. When the polymers were blended with PC71BM, as the active layer for bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic devices, power conversion efficiencies were 2.08% and 0.34%, respectively, under AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)) conditions.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic (MgHPO4·3H2O, CAS Reg. No....

  5. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic...

  6. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli ABC transport receptor phosphate-binding protein at the Protein Crystallography Station

    PubMed Central

    Sippel, K. H.; Bacik, J.; Quiocho, F. A.; Fisher, S. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential molecule for all known life. Organisms have developed many mechanisms to ensure an adequate supply, even in low-phosphate conditions. In prokaryotes phosphate transport is instigated by the phosphate-binding protein (PBP), the initial receptor for the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) phosphate transporter. In the crystal structure of the PBP–phosphate complex, the phosphate is completely desolvated and sequestered in a deep cleft and is bound by 13 hydrogen bonds: 12 to protein NH and OH donor groups and one to a carboxylate acceptor group. The carboxylate plays a key recognition role by accepting a phosphate hydrogen. PBP phosphate affinity is relatively consistent across a broad pH range, indicating the capacity to bind monobasic (H2PO4 −) and dibasic (HPO4 2−) phosphate; however, the mechanism by which it might accommodate the second hydrogen of monobasic phosphate is unclear. To answer this question, neutron diffraction studies were initiated. Large single crystals with a volume of 8 mm3 were grown and subjected to hydrogen/deuterium exchange. A 2.5 Å resolution data set was collected on the Protein Crystallography Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Initial refinement of the neutron data shows significant nuclear density, and refinement is ongoing. This is the first report of a neutron study from this superfamily. PMID:24915101

  7. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Alan H.; Rogers, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

  8. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, A.H.; Rogers, R.D.

    1999-06-15

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed. 13 figs.

  9. Generation of Nitrogen Acceptors in ZnO using Pulse Thermal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jun; Ott, Ronald D; Sabau, Adrian S; Pan, Zhengwei; Xiu, Faxian; Liu, Jilin; Erie, Jean-Marie; Norton, David P

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar doping in wide bandgap semiconductors is difficult to achieve under equilibrium conditions because of the spontaneous formation of compensating defects and unfavorable energetics for dopant substitution. In this work, we explored the use of rapid pulse thermal processing for activating nitrogen dopants into acceptor states in ZnO. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectra revealed both acceptor-bound exciton (A{sup 0}X) and donor-acceptor pair emissions, which present direct evidence for acceptors generated after pulse thermal processing of nitrogen-doped ZnO. This work suggests that pulse thermal processing is potentially an effective method for p-type doping of ZnO.

  10. Conformation-selective coordination-driven self-assembly of a ditopic donor with Pd(II) acceptors.

    PubMed

    Howlader, Prodip; Mukherjee, Sandip; Saha, Rajat; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2015-12-21

    Coordination-driven self-assembly of 3-(5-(pyridin-3-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)pyridine (L) was investigated with 90°cis-blocked Pd(II) acceptors and tetratopic Pd(NO3)2. Although the ligand is capable of binding in several different conformations (acting as a ditopic donor through the pyridyl nitrogens), the experimental results (including X-ray structures) showed that it adopts a particular conformation when it binds with 90°cis-blocked Pd(II) acceptors (two available sites) to yield [2 + 2] self-assembled macrocycles. On the other hand, with Pd(NO3)2 (where four available sites are present) a different conformer of the same donor was selectively bound to form a molecular cubic cage. The experimental findings were corroborated well with the density functional theory (B3LYP) calculations. The tetratopic Pd(NO3)2 yielded a [6 + 12] self-assembled Pd6L12 molecular cube, which contains a potential void occupied by nitrate and perchlorate ions. Being a triazole based ligand, the free space inside the cage is enriched with several sp(2) hybridised nitrogen atoms with lone pairs of electrons to act as Lewis basic sites. Knoevenagel condensation reactions of several aromatic aldehydes with active methylene compounds were successfully performed in reasonably high yields in the presence of the cage. PMID:26544720

  11. Influence of Coherent Tunneling and Incoherent Hopping on the Charge Transfer Mechanism in Linear Donor-Bridge-Acceptor Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangqi; Govind, Niranjan; Ratner, Mark A; Cramer, Christopher J; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-12-17

    The mechanism of charge transfer has been observed to change from tunneling to hopping with increasing numbers of DNA base pairs in polynucleotides and with the length of molecular wires. The aim of this paper is to investigate this transition by examining the population dynamics using a tight-binding Hamiltonian with model parameters to describe a linear donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) system. The model includes a primary vibration and an electron-vibration coupling at each site. A further coupling of the primary vibration with a secondary phonon bath allows the system to dissipate energy to the environment and reach a steady state. We apply the quantum master equation (QME) approach, based on second-order perturbation theory in a quantum dissipative system, to examine the dynamical processes involved in charge-transfer and follow the population transfer rate at the acceptor, ka, to shed light on the transition from tunneling to hopping. With a small tunneling parameter, V, the on-site population tends to localize and form polarons, and the hopping mechanism dominates the transfer process. With increasing V, the population tends to be delocalized and the tunneling mechanism dominates. The competition between incoherent hopping and coherent tunneling governs the mechanism of charge transfer. By varying V and the total number of sites, we also examine the onset of the transition from tunneling to hopping with increasing length.

  12. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Bohlke, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrate has become an increasingly abundant potential electron acceptor for Fe(II) oxidation in groundwater, but this redox couple has not been well characterized within aquifer settings. To investigate this reaction and some of its implications for redox-sensitive groundwater contaminants, we conducted an in situ field study in a wastewater-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod. Long-term (15 year) geochemical monitoring within the contaminant plume indicated interacting zones with variable nitrate-, Fe(II)-, phosphate-, As(V)-, and As(III)-containing groundwater. Nitrate and phosphate were derived predominantly from wastewater disposal, whereas Fe(II), As(III), and As(V) were mobilized from the aquifer sediments. Multiple natural gradient, anoxic tracer tests were conducted in which nitrate and bromide were injected into nitrate-free, Fe(II)-containing groundwater. Prior to injection, aqueous Fe(II) concentrations were approximately 175 μM, but sorbed Fe(II) accounted for greater than 90% of the total reactive Fe(II) in the aquifer. Nitrate reduction was stimulated within 1 m of transport for 100 μM and 1000 μM nitrate additions, initially producing stoichiometric quantities of nitrous oxide (>300 μM N). In subsequent injections at the same site, nitrate was reduced even more rapidly and produced less nitrous oxide, especially over longer transport distances. Fe(II) and nitrate concentrations decreased together and were accompanied by Fe(III) oxyhydroxide precipitation and decreases in dissolved phosphate, As(III), and As(V) concentrations. Nitrate N and O isotope fractionation effects during nitrate reduction were approximately equal (ε15N/ε18O = 1.11) and were similar to those reported for laboratory studies of biological nitrate reduction, including denitrification, but unlike some reported effects on nitrate by denitrification in aquifers. All constituents affected by the in situ tracer experiments returned to pre-injection levels after several

  13. Dysregulation of phosphate metabolism and conditions associated with phosphate toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ronald B; Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is coordinated and regulated by complex cross-organ talk through delicate hormonal networks. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), secreted in response to low serum calcium, has an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis by influencing renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thereby increasing intestinal phosphate absorption. Moreover, PTH can increase phosphate efflux from bone and contribute to renal phosphate homeostasis through phosphaturic effects. In addition, PTH can induce skeletal synthesis of another potent phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which is able to inhibit renal tubular phosphate reabsorption, thereby increasing urinary phosphate excretion. FGF23 can also fine-tune vitamin D homeostasis by suppressing renal expression of 1-alpha hydroxylase (1α(OH)ase). This review briefly discusses how FGF23, by forming a bone–kidney axis, regulates phosphate homeostasis, and how its dysregulation can lead to phosphate toxicity that induces widespread tissue injury. We also provide evidence to explain how phosphate toxicity related to dietary phosphorus overload may facilitate incidence of noncommunicable diseases including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, cancers and skeletal disorders. PMID:26131357

  14. Dysregulation of phosphate metabolism and conditions associated with phosphate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ronald B; Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is coordinated and regulated by complex cross-organ talk through delicate hormonal networks. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), secreted in response to low serum calcium, has an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis by influencing renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thereby increasing intestinal phosphate absorption. Moreover, PTH can increase phosphate efflux from bone and contribute to renal phosphate homeostasis through phosphaturic effects. In addition, PTH can induce skeletal synthesis of another potent phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which is able to inhibit renal tubular phosphate reabsorption, thereby increasing urinary phosphate excretion. FGF23 can also fine-tune vitamin D homeostasis by suppressing renal expression of 1-alpha hydroxylase (1α(OH)ase). This review briefly discusses how FGF23, by forming a bone-kidney axis, regulates phosphate homeostasis, and how its dysregulation can lead to phosphate toxicity that induces widespread tissue injury. We also provide evidence to explain how phosphate toxicity related to dietary phosphorus overload may facilitate incidence of noncommunicable diseases including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, cancers and skeletal disorders. PMID:26131357

  15. Quantum information processing using acceptors in silicon and phonon entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Susan; Reinke, Charles; McGuinness, Hayden; El-Kady, Ihab

    2014-03-01

    Quantum computing with large numbers of qubits remains challenging due to the decoherence and complexity that arise as more qubits are added to a system. Here I propose a new platform for semiconductor quantum computing which may be robust to common sources of decoherence and may not be difficult to fabricate repeatedly. This system consists of a hole bound to an acceptor in silicon which has been implanted in the center of a mechanical cavity (similar to a photonic crystal cavity) and connected to other cavities by a system of waveguides. I will outline a basic entangling gate and calculations showing the promise of this platform as the ideal qubit. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Biostimulation by Glycerol Phosphate to Precipitate Recalcitrant Uranium(IV) Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Trivedi, Divyesh; Bewsher, Alastair; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-09-15

    Stimulating the microbial reduction of aqueous uranium(VI) to insoluble U(IV) via electron donor addition has been proposed as a strategy to remediate uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. However, concerns have been raised regarding the longevity of microbially precipitated U(IV) in the subsurface, particularly given that it may become remobilized if the conditions change to become oxidizing. An alternative mechanism is to stimulate the precipitation of poorly soluble uranium phosphates via the addition of an organophosphate and promote the development of reducing conditions. Here, we selected a sediment sample from a U.K. nuclear site and stimulated the microbial community with glycerol phosphate under anaerobic conditions to assess whether uranium phosphate precipitation was a viable bioremediation strategy. Results showed that U(VI) was rapidly removed from solution and precipitated as a reduced crystalline U(IV) phosphate mineral similar to ningyoite. This mineral was considerably more recalcitrant to oxidative remobilization than the products of microbial U(VI) reduction. Bacteria closely related to Pelosinus species may have played a key role in uranium removal in these experiments. This work has implications for the stewardship of uranium-contaminated groundwater, with the formation of U(IV) phosphates potentially offering a more effective strategy for maintaining low concentrations of uranium in groundwater over long time periods. PMID:26292021

  17. Beyond fullerenes: design of nonfullerene acceptors for efficient organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Earmme, Taeshik; Ren, Guoqiang; Saeki, Akinori; Yoshikawa, Saya; Murari, Nishit M; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Crane, Matthew J; Seki, Shu; Jenekhe, Samson A

    2014-10-15

    New electron-acceptor materials are long sought to overcome the small photovoltage, high-cost, poor photochemical stability, and other limitations of fullerene-based organic photovoltaics. However, all known nonfullerene acceptors have so far shown inferior photovoltaic properties compared to fullerene benchmark [6,6]-phenyl-C60-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60BM), and there are as yet no established design principles for realizing improved materials. Herein we report a design strategy that has produced a novel multichromophoric, large size, nonplanar three-dimensional (3D) organic molecule, DBFI-T, whose π-conjugated framework occupies space comparable to an aggregate of 9 [C60]-fullerene molecules. Comparative studies of DBFI-T with its planar monomeric analogue (BFI-P2) and PC60BM in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, by using a common thiazolothiazole-dithienosilole copolymer donor (PSEHTT), showed that DBFI-T has superior charge photogeneration and photovoltaic properties; PSEHTT:DBFI-T solar cells combined a high short-circuit current (10.14 mA/cm(2)) with a high open-circuit voltage (0.86 V) to give a power conversion efficiency of 5.0%. The external quantum efficiency spectrum of PSEHTT:DBFI-T devices had peaks of 60-65% in the 380-620 nm range, demonstrating that both hole transfer from photoexcited DBFI-T to PSEHTT and electron transfer from photoexcited PSEHTT to DBFI-T contribute substantially to charge photogeneration. The superior charge photogeneration and electron-accepting properties of DBFI-T were further confirmed by independent Xenon-flash time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements, which correctly predict the relative magnitudes of the conversion efficiencies of the BHJ solar cells: PSEHTT:DBFI-T > PSEHTT:PC60BM > PSEHTT:BFI-P2. The results demonstrate that the large size, multichromophoric, nonplanar 3D molecular design is a promising approach to more efficient organic photovoltaic materials.

  18. Recent advances in photoinduced donor/acceptor copolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, S.; Viswanathan, K.; Hoyle, C. E.; Clark, S. C.; Miller, C.; Morel, F.; Decker, C.

    1999-05-01

    Photoinitiated free radical polymerization of donor (D)/acceptor (A) type monomers has gained considerable interest due to the possibility to efficiently photopolymerize non-acrylate based systems. Furthermore, this photoinduced alternating copolymerization can be accomplished without the presence of a conventional free radical generating photoinitiator. In the past, we have shown that the structural influences in the direct photolysis of N-Alkyl and N-Arylmaleimides as well as their corresponding ground state charge transfer complexes (CTC) with suitable donors have carefully been investigated. For certain combinations of A and D type monomers, a direct photolysis of the ground state complex or the excitation of the acceptor, followed by the formation of an exciplex, has been shown to initiate the copolymerization. Herein, we show that the main route of initiation is based on inter or intra molecular H-abstraction from an excited state maleimide, whereby no exciplex formation takes place. H-abstraction will predominantly take place in systems where easily abstractable hydrogens are present. Our laser flash photolysis investigation, ESR [1] (A. Hiroshi, I. Takasi, T. Nosi, Macromol. Chem. 190 (1989) 2821) and phosphorescence emissions [2,3] (K.S. Chen, T. Foster, J.K.S. Wan, J. Phys. Chem. 84 (1980) 2473; C.J. Seliskar, S.P. McGlynn, J. Chem. Phys. 55 (1971) 4337) studies show that triplet excited states of N-alkyl substituted maleimides (RMI), which are well known strong precursors for direct H-abstractions from aliphatic ethers and secondary alcohols, are formed upon excitation. Rates of copolymerization and degrees of conversion for copolymerization of maleimide/vinyl ether pairs in air and nitrogen have been measured as a function of hydrogen abstractability of the excited triplet state MI as well as the influence of concentration and hydrogen donating effect of the hydrogen donor.

  19. Ultrafast photoinduced charge transport in Pt(II) donor-acceptor assembly bearing naphthalimide electron acceptor and phenothiazine electron donor.

    PubMed

    Sazanovich, Igor V; Best, Jonathan; Scattergood, Paul A; Towrie, Michael; Tikhomirov, Sergei A; Bouganov, Oleg V; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Weinstein, Julia A

    2014-12-21

    Visible light-induced charge transfer dynamics were investigated in a novel transition metal triad acceptor-chromophore-donor, (NDI-phen)Pt(II)(-C≡C-Ph-CH2-PTZ)2 (1), designed for photoinduced charge separation using a combination of time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and femtosecond electronic transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. In 1, the electron acceptor is 1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimide (NDI), and the electron donor is phenothiazine (PTZ), and [(phen)Pt(-C≡C-Ph-)], where phen is 1,10-phenanthroline, represents the chromophoric core. The first excited state observed in 1 is a (3)MLCT/LL'CT, with {Pt(II)-acetylide}-to-phen character. Following that, charge transfer from the phen-anion onto the NDI subunit to form NDI(-)-phen-[Pt-(C≡C)2](+)-PTZ2 occurs with a time constant of 2.3 ps. This transition is characterised by appearance of the prominent NDI-anion features in both TRIR and TA spectra. The final step of the charge separation in 1 proceeds with a time constant of ∼15 ps during which the hole migrates from the [Pt-(C≡C)2] subunit to one of the PTZ groups. Charge recombination in 1 then occurs with two distinct time constants of 36 ns and 107 ns, corresponding to the back electron transfer to each of the two donor groups; a rather rare occurrence which manifests that the hole in the final charge-separated state is localised on one of the two donor PTZ groups. The assignment of the nature of the excited states and dynamics in 1 was assisted by TRIR investigations of the analogous previously reported ((COOEt)2bpy)Pt(C≡C-Ph-CH2-PTZ)2 (2), (J. E. McGarrah and R. Eisenberg, Inorg. Chem., 2003, 42, 4355; J. E. McGarrah, J. T. Hupp and S. N. Smirnov, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2009, 113, 6430) as well as (bpy)Pt(C≡C-Ph-C7H15)2, which represent the acceptor-free dyad, and the chromophoric core, respectively. Thus, the step-wise formation of the full charge-separated state on the picosecond time scale and charge recombination via tunnelling have been established; and

  20. Comparison of the computed structures for the phosphate-binding loop of the p21 protein containing the oncogenic site Gly 12 with the X-ray crystallographic structures for this region in the p21 protein and EFtu. A model for the structure of the p21 protein in its oncogenic form.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Lee, G; Murphy, R B; Carty, R P; Brandt-Rauf, P W; Friedman, E; Pincus, M R

    1989-04-01

    the p21 protein to the corresponding position of the homologous region in EFtu. In this new conformation, a large site becomes available for the binding of phosphate residues. In addition, such phenomena as autophosphorylation of the p21 protein by GTP can be explained with this new model structure for the activated protein which cannot be explained by the structure for the non-activated protein.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of peptidyl Michael acceptors that inactivate human rhinovirus 3C protease and inhibit virus replication.

    PubMed

    Kong, J S; Venkatraman, S; Furness, K; Nimkar, S; Shepherd, T A; Wang, Q M; Aubé, J; Hanzlik, R P

    1998-07-01

    Human rhinovirus, the chief cause of the common cold, contains a positive-sense strand of RNA which is translated into a large polyprotein in infected cells. Cleavage of the latter to produce the mature viral proteins required for replication is catalyzed in large part by a virally encoded cysteine proteinase (3Cpro) which is highly selective for -Q approximately GP- cleavage sites. We synthesized peptidyl derivatives of vinylogous glutamine or methionine sulfone esters (e.g., Boc-Val-Leu-Phe-vGln-OR: R = Me, 1; R = Et, 2) and evaluated them as inhibitors of HRV-14 3C protease (3Cpro). Compounds 1 and 2 and several related tetra- and pentapeptide analogues rapidly inactivated 3Cpro with submicromolar IC50 values. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the expected 1:1 stoichiometry of 3Cpro inactivation by 1, 2, and several other analogues. Compound 2 also proved to be useful for active site titration of 3Cpro, which has not been possible heretofore because of the lack of a suitable reagent. In contrast to 1, 2, and congeners, peptidyl Michael acceptors lacking a P4 residue have greatly reduced or negligible activity against 3Cpro, consistent with previously established structure-activity relationships for 3Cpro substrates. Hydrolysis of the P1 vinylogous glutamine ester to a carboxylic acid also decreased inhibitory activity considerably, consistent with the decreased reactivity of acrylic acids vs acrylic esters as Michael acceptors. Incorporating a vinylogous methionine sulfone ester in place of the corresponding glutamine derivative in 1 also reduced activity substantially. Compounds 1 and 2 and several of their analogues inhibited HRV replication in cell culture by 50% at low micromolar concentrations while showing little or no evidence of cytotoxicity at 10-fold higher concentrations. Peptidyl Michael acceptors and their analogues may prove useful as therapeutic agents for pathologies involving cysteine proteinase enzymes.

  2. Contrasting performance of donor-acceptor copolymer pairs in ternary blend solar cells and two-acceptor copolymers in binary blend solar cells.

    PubMed

    Khlyabich, Petr P; Rudenko, Andrey E; Burkhart, Beate; Thompson, Barry C

    2015-02-01

    Here two contrasting approaches to polymer-fullerene solar cells are compared. In the first approach, two distinct semi-random donor-acceptor copolymers are blended with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) to form ternary blend solar cells. The two poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based polymers contain either the acceptor thienopyrroledione (TPD) or diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP). In the second approach, semi-random donor-acceptor copolymers containing both TPD and DPP acceptors in the same polymer backbone, termed two-acceptor polymers, are blended with PC61BM to give binary blend solar cells. The two approaches result in bulk heterojunction solar cells that have the same molecular active-layer components but differ in the manner in which these molecular components are mixed, either by physical mixing (ternary blend) or chemical "mixing" in the two-acceptor (binary blend) case. Optical properties and photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies of the binary and ternary blends were found to have similar features and were described as a linear combination of the individual components. At the same time, significant differences were observed in the open-circuit voltage (Voc) behaviors of binary and ternary blend solar cells. While in case of two-acceptor polymers, the Voc was found to be in the range of 0.495-0.552 V, ternary blend solar cells showed behavior inherent to organic alloy formation, displaying an intermediate, composition-dependent and tunable Voc in the range from 0.582 to 0.684 V, significantly exceeding the values achieved in the two-acceptor containing binary blend solar cells. Despite the differences between the physical and chemical mixing approaches, both pathways provided solar cells with similar power conversion efficiencies, highlighting the advantages of both pathways toward highly efficient organic solar cells.

  3. Electrochemical response of a biofilm community to changes in electron-acceptor redox potential elucidated using microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbour, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Mullin, S. W.; Luef, B.; Gilbert, B.; Banfield, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Currently, we have limited insight into how mineral properties affect dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) or the microbial communities that contain them. Advances in our understanding of DMRB metabolism have been achieved using microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which exploit the ability of these organisms to transfer electrons extracellularly. By replacing the mineral electron acceptor with a conductive electrode under potentiostat control, the activity of microorganisms capable of interfacial electron transfer can be quantified by the current flowing through the electrode and related to the thermodynamics of respiration. We seek to understand how communities and their individual members respond to changes in mineralogy, and expect mineral redox potential to be a primary control. The ability to precisely control the redox potential of the electron-accepting anodic electrode is our primary motivation for using MFCs. We inoculated duplicate MFCs containing 10 mM acetate in phosphate buffered media with a slurry of subsurface sediment and groundwater obtained from the Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site at Rifle, CO. Electroactive biofilms were established on graphite anodes poised at a favorable potential (0.0 V vs. SHE) before poising at -0.2 V—a potential representative of natural iron reduction. The current was stable across both anodes over more than 100 days of operation, and the percentage of the electrons in acetate recovered as current ("Coulombic efficiency") was typically 70 to >90%. Current density reached 0.4 A/m2 at -0.2 V, to a max of over 1.0 A/m2 at or above ~0.0 V (based on geometric electrode surface area). Media exchanges and biofilm cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments indicate that electrode-attached microbial communities were responsible for primary electron transfer. Cryo-electron and confocal fluorescence microscopies of the biofilm reveal numerous morphologies of viable microorganisms that are currently being characterized

  4. Method for phosphate-accelerated bioremediation

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Lombard, Kenneth H.; Hazen, Terry C.; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Borthen, James W.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for supplying a vapor-phase nutrient to contaminated soil for in situ bioremediation. The apparatus includes a housing adapted for containing a quantity of the liquid nutrient, a conduit in fluid communication with the interior of the housing, means for causing a gas to flow through the conduit, and means for contacting the gas with the liquid so that a portion thereof evaporates and mixes with the gas. The mixture of gas and nutrient vapor is delivered to the contaminated site via a system of injection and extraction wells configured to the site. The mixture has a partial pressure of vaporized nutrient that is no greater than the vapor pressure of the liquid. If desired, the nutrient and/or the gas may be heated to increase the vapor pressure and the nutrient concentration of the mixture. Preferably, the nutrient is a volatile, substantially nontoxic and nonflammable organic phosphate that is a liquid at environmental temperatures, such as triethyl phosphate or tributyl phosphate.

  5. Solubilization of insoluble phosphates by thermophilic fungi.

    PubMed

    Singh, C P; Mishra, M M; Yadav, K S

    1980-01-01

    The solubilization of tricalcium phosphate and rock phosphate and assimilation of solubilized P by thermophilic fungi isolated from compost were studied. The solubilization of tricalcium phosphate was greater than that of rock phosphate on inoculation with fungi in liquid medium, but growth of most of the fungi was greater in rock phosphate. Torula thermophila solubilized tricalcium phosphate maximally. There was solubilization of rock phosphate in semi-solid lignocellulose medium by Aspergillus fumigatus.

  6. Revegetation of serpentine substrates: Response to phosphate application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Roger T.; Mooney, Harold A.

    1987-08-01

    Revegetation was studied on stockpiled serpentine substrate. The native vegetation surrounding the revegetation site is annual grassland. The seed mixture applied to both subsoil and topsoil plots was largely ineffective for revegetation. No growth occurred in the subsoil plots and most of the growth in the topsoil plots was from indigenous seed. Phosphate application (100 kg P ha-1 as NaH2PO4 · H2O) to the topsoil plots resulted in a significant increase in total above-ground productivity. Annual legumes (mostly Lotus subpinnatus Lag.) and, to a lesser degree, Plantago erecta Morris responded to the added phosphate with an increased above-ground productivity. Other annual forbs and annual grasses showed no significant response. The legumes also increased in abundance. Mycorrhizal root colonization for Plantago was not significantly affected by phosphate application, but was lower in this disturbed serpentine site compared to other undisturbed serpentine annual grassland sites nearby.

  7. Cation Effects on the Electron-Acceptor Side of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sahr; Sun, Jennifer S; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-06-18

    The normal pathway of electron transfer on the electron-acceptor side of photosystem II (PSII) involves electron transfer from quinone A, QA, to quinone B, QB. It is possible to redirect electrons from QA(-) to water-soluble Co(III) complexes, which opens a new avenue for harvesting electrons from water oxidation by immobilization of PSII on electrode surfaces. Herein, the kinetics of electron transfer from QA(-) to [Co(III)(terpy)2](3+) (terpy = 2,2';6',2″-terpyridine) are investigated with a spectrophotometric assay revealing that the reaction follows Michaelis-Menten saturation kinetics, is inhibited by cations, and is not affected by variation of the QA reduction potential. A negatively charged site on the stromal surface of the PSII protein complex, composed of glutamic acid residues near QA, is hypothesized to bind cations, especially divalent cations. The cations are proposed to tune the redox properties of QA through electrostatic interactions. These observations may thus explain the molecular basis of the effect of divalent cations like Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+) on the redox properties of the quinones in PSII, which has previously been attributed to long-range conformational changes propagated from divalent cations binding to the Ca(II)-binding site in the oxygen-evolving complex on the lumenal side of the PSII complex.

  8. Phthalimides as exceptionally efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reductive coupling reactions promoted by samarium diiodide.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Tatiana; Alvarez, Eleuterio; Chiara, Jose Luis

    2007-12-20

    Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that phthalimides are highly efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reactions promoted by samarium diiodide, affording ketyl radical anion intermediates, which participate in high-yielding inter- and intramolecular reductive coupling processes with different radicophiles including imides, oxime ethers, nitrones, and Michael acceptors.

  9. The transfer of mannose from guanosine diphosphate mannose to dolichol phosphate and protein by pig liver endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Richards, J. B.; Hemming, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    When pig liver microsomal preparations were incubated with GDP-[14C]mannose, 10–40% of the 14C was transferred to mannolipid and 1–3% to mannoprotein. The transfer to mannolipid was readily reversible and GDP was one of the products of the reaction. It was possible to reverse the reaction by adding excess of GDP and to show the incorporation of [14C]GDP into GDP-mannose. When excess of unlabelled GDP-mannose was added to a partially completed incubation there was a rapid transfer back of [14C]mannose from the mannolipid to GDP-mannose. The other product of the reaction, the mannolipid, had the properties of a prenol phosphate mannose. This was illustrated by its lability to dilute acid but stability to dilute alkali, and by its chromatographic properties. Dolichol phosphate stimulated the incorporation of [14C]mannose into both mannolipid and into protein, although the former effect was larger and more consistent than the latter. The incorporation of exogenous [3H]dolichol phosphate into the mannolipid, and its release, accompanied by mannose, on treatment of the mannolipid with dilute acid, confirmed that exogenous dolichol phosphate can act as an acceptor of mannose in this system. It was shown that other exogenous polyprenol phosphates (but not farnesol phosphate or cetyl phosphate) can substitute for dolichol phosphate in this respect but that they are much less efficient than dolichol phosphate in stimulating the transfer of mannose to protein. Since pig liver contained substances with the chromatographic properties of both dolichol phosphate and dolichol phosphate mannose, which caused an increase in transfer of [14C]mannose from GDP-[14C]mannose to mannolipid, it was concluded that endogenous dolichol phosphate acts as an acceptor of mannose in the microsomal preparation. The results indicate that the mannolipid is an intermediate in the transfer of mannose from GDP-mannose to protein. Some 4% of the mannose of a sample of mannolipid added to an

  10. The effect of intermolecular donor?acceptor energy transfer on emission anisotropy in uniaxially oriented polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadownik, M.; Bojarski, Piotr

    2004-10-01

    Excitation energy transport between donors and acceptors is studied for uniaxially stretched and unstretched poly(vinyl) alcohol films. Donor emission anisotropy courses versus acceptor concentration as well as donor-acceptor emission anisotropy spectra occurred quite different in stretched and unstretched films. Upon donor excitation the total emission anisotropy rapidly decreases when passing from the donor to the acceptor fluorescence band in disordered systems. However, such a pronounced effect has not been found in partly ordered films. Donors and acceptors exhibit highly preferential mutual orientation in strongly ordered films resulting in the preservation of acceptor emission anisotropy.

  11. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrels: D-Allulose 6-Phosphate 3-Epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12

    SciTech Connect

    Chan,K.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes that share the ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrel fold catalyze a diverse range of reactions. Many utilize phosphorylated substrates and share a conserved C-terminal ({beta}/a)2-quarter barrel subdomain that provides a binding motif for the dianionic phosphate group. We recently reported functional and structural studies of d-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE) from Streptococcus pyogenes that catalyzes the equilibration of the pentulose 5-phosphates d-ribulose 5-phosphate and d-xylulose 5-phosphate in the pentose phosphate pathway [J. Akana, A. A. Fedorov, E. Fedorov, W. R. P. Novack, P. C. Babbitt, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2006) Biochemistry 45, 2493-2503]. We now report functional and structural studies of d-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase (ALSE) from Escherichia coli K-12 that catalyzes the equilibration of the hexulose 6-phosphates d-allulose 6-phosphate and d-fructose 6-phosphate in a catabolic pathway for d-allose. ALSE and RPE prefer their physiological substrates but are promiscuous for each other's substrate. The active sites (RPE complexed with d-xylitol 5-phosphate and ALSE complexed with d-glucitol 6-phosphate) are superimposable (as expected from their 39% sequence identity), with the exception of the phosphate binding motif. The loop following the eighth {beta}-strand in ALSE is one residue longer than the homologous loop in RPE, so the binding site for the hexulose 6-phosphate substrate/product in ALSE is elongated relative to that for the pentulose 5-phosphate substrate/product in RPE. We constructed three single-residue deletion mutants of the loop in ALSE, ?T196, ?S197 and ?G198, to investigate the structural bases for the differing substrate specificities; for each, the promiscuity is altered so that d-ribulose 5-phosphate is the preferred substrate. The changes in kcat/Km are dominated by changes in kcat, suggesting that substrate discrimination results from differential transition state stabilization. In both ALSE and RPE, the phosphate

  12. Crystal Structure of Baculovirus RNA Triphosphatase Complexed with Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Changela, Anita; Martin, Alexandra; Shuman, Stewart; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-03-05

    Baculovirus RNA 5'-triphosphatase (BVP) exemplifies a family of RNA-specific cysteine phosphatases that includes the RNA triphosphatase domains of metazoan and plant mRNA capping enzymes. Here we report the crystal structure of BVP in a phosphate-bound state at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. BVP adopts the characteristic cysteine-phosphatase {alpha}/{beta} fold and binds two phosphate ions in the active site region, one of which is proposed to mimic the phosphate of the product complex after hydrolysis of the covalent phosphoenzyme intermediate. The crystal structure highlights the role of backbone amides and side chains of the P-loop motif {sup 118}HCTHGXNRT{sup 126} in binding the cleavable phosphate and stabilizing the transition state. Comparison of the BVP structure to the apoenzyme of mammalian RNA triphosphatase reveals a concerted movement of the Arg-125 side chain (to engage the phosphate directly) and closure of an associated surface loop over the phosphate in the active site. The structure highlights a direct catalytic role of Asn-124, which is the signature P-loop residue of the RNA triphosphatase family and a likely determinant of the specificity of BVP for hydrolysis of phosphoanhydride linkages.

  13. Physiological and electrochemical effects of different electron acceptors on bacterial anode respiration in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Xia, Chunyu; Wu, Wei-Min; Sun, Guoping; Xu, Meiying

    2014-07-01

    To understand the interactions between bacterial electrode respiration and the other ambient bacterial electron acceptor reductions, alternative electron acceptors (nitrate, Fe2O3, fumarate, azo dye MB17) were added singly or multiply into Shewanella decolorationis microbial fuel cells (MFCs). All the added electron acceptors were reduced simultaneously with current generation. Adding nitrate or MB17 resulted in more rapid cell growth, higher flavin concentration and higher biofilm metabolic viability, but lower columbic efficiency (CE) and normalized energy recovery (NER) while the CE and NER were enhanced by Fe2O3 or fumarate. The added electron acceptors also significantly influenced the cyclic voltammetry profile of anode biofilm probably via altering the cytochrome c expression. The highest power density was observed in MFCs added with MB17 due to the electron shuttle role of the naphthols from MB17 reduction. The results provided important information for MFCs applied in practical environments where contains various electron acceptors.

  14. Excitation energy transfer in partly ordered polymer films differing in donor and acceptor transition moments orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synak, A.; Bojarski, P.; Sadownik, M.; Kułak, L.; Gryczynski, I.; Grobelna, B.; Rangełowa-Jankowska, S.; Jankowski, D.; Kubicki, A.

    2016-09-01

    Based on spectroscopic measurements selected properties of nonradiative Förster energy transport are studied in uniaxially stretched polyvinyl alcohol thin films for three systems differing in donor and acceptor transition moments orientation relative to the axis of stretching. In particular, donor - acceptor emission anisotropy spectra yield completely different regularities for these systems in uniaxially stretched films, whereas they are similar in unstretched films. In particular it is shown that acceptor fluorescence can be either strongly polarized after nonradiative energy transfer in stretched films or depolarized depending on the angular distribution of acceptor transition moments in the matrix. Donor and acceptor emission anisotropy decays exhibit similar regularities to those of steady-state measurements. The obtained results are analyzed with the help of Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Ultrasound-modulated fluorescence based on donor-acceptor-labeled microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Feshitan, Jameel A.; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Borden, Mark A.; Yuan, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based microbubble contrast agent system was designed to experimentally demonstrate the concept of ultrasound-modulated fluorescence (UMF). Microbubbles were simultaneously labeled with donor and acceptor fluorophores on the surface to minimize self-quenching and maximize FRET. In response to ultrasound, the quenching efficiency was greatly modulated by changing the distance between the donor and acceptor molecules through microbubble size oscillations. Both donors and acceptors exhibited UMF on individual microbubbles. The UMF strength of the donor was more significant compared to that of the acceptor. Furthermore, the UMF of the donor was observed from a microbubble solution in a turbid media. This study exploits the feasibility of donor–acceptor labeled microbubbles as UMF contrast agents. PMID:25789423

  16. Phosphate Barriers for Immobilization of Uranium Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Peter C.

    2005-06-01

    Uranium contamination of the subsurface has remained a persistent problem plaguing remedial design at sites across the U.S. that were involved with production, handling, storage, milling, and reprocessing of fissile uranium for both civilian and defense related purposes. Remediation efforts to date have relied upon excavation, pump-and-treat, or passive remediation barriers (PRB?s) to remove or attenuate uranium mobility. Documented cases convincingly demonstrate that excavation and pump-and-treat methods are ineffective for a number of highly contaminated sites. There is growing concern that use of conventional PRB?s, such as zero-valent iron, are a temporary solution to a problem that will persist for thousands of years. Alternatives to the standard treatment methods are therefore warranted. The core objective of our research is to demonstrate that a phosphorous amendment strategy will result in a reduction of dissolved uranium to below the proposed drinking water standard. Our hypothesis is that long-chain polyphosphate compounds forestall precipitation of sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate compounds, which is key to preventing fouling of wells at the point of injection. Our other fundamental objective is to synthesize and correctly characterize the uranyl phosphate phases that form in the geochemical conditions under consideration. This report summarizes work conducted at the University of Notre Dame through November of 2003 under DOE grant DE-FG07-02ER63489, which has been funded since September, 2002. The objectives at Notre Dame are development of synthesis techniques for uranyl phosphate phases, together with detailed structural and chemical characterization of the myriad of uranyl phosphate phases that may form under geochemical conditions under consideration.

  17. Phosphate Barriers for Immobilization of Uranium Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Peter C.

    2005-06-01

    Uranium contamination of the subsurface has remained a persistent problem plaguing remedial design at sites across the U.S. that were involved with production, handling, storage, milling, and reprocessing of fissile uranium for both civilian and defense related purposes. Remediation efforts to date have relied upon excavation, pump-and-treat, or passive remediation barriers (PRB's) to remove or attenuate uranium mobility. Documented cases convincingly demonstrate that excavation and pump-and-treat methods are ineffective for a number of highly contaminated sites. There is growing concern that use of conventional PRB?s, such as zero-valent iron, are a temporary solution to a problem that will persist for thousands of years. Alternatives to the standard treatment methods are therefore warranted. The core objective of our research is to demonstrate that a phosphorus amendment strategy will result in a reduction of dissolved uranium to below the proposed drinking water standard. Our hypothesis is that long-chain polyphosphate compounds forestall precipitation of sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate compounds, which is key to preventing fouling of wells at the point of injection. Our other fundamental objective is to synthesize and correctly characterize the uranyl phosphate phases that form in the geochemical conditions under consideration. This report summarizes work conducted at the University of Notre Dame through November of 2003 under DOE grant DE-FG07-02ER63489, which has been funded since September, 2002. The objectives at Notre Dame are development of synthesis techniques for uranyl phosphate phases, together with detailed structural and chemical characterization of the myriad of uranyl phosphate phases that may form under geochemical conditions under consideration.

  18. Regulation of human dihydrodiol dehydrogenase by Michael acceptor xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, P J; Jaiswal, A K; Tew, K D

    1994-06-01

    A human oxidoreductase (H-37) that is overexpressed in ethacrynic acid-resistant HT29 colon cells (Ciaccio, P. J., Stuart, J.E., and Tew, K.D. (1993) Mol. Pharmacol. 43, 845-853) has been identified as a dihydrodiol dehydrogenase. Translated protein from a dihydrodiol dehydrogenase cDNA isolated from a library prepared from ethacrynic acid-resistant HT29 cell poly(A+) RNA was recognized by anti-H-37 IgG and was identical in molecular weight with H-37. The isolated cDNA was identical in both nucleotide and amino acid sequences with the recently cloned liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (Stolz, A., Hammond, L., Lou, H., Takikawa, H., Ronk, M., and Shively, J.E. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 10448-10457). Using this cDNA as probe, we have examined its induction by Michael acceptors. The steady state dihydrodiol dehydrogenase mRNA level in the ethacrynic acid-resistant line was increased 30-fold relative to that of wild-type cells. Twenty-four hour treatment of wild-type cells with ethacrynic acid or dimethyl maleate increased mRNA 10-fold and 5-fold, respectively. These changes are accompanied by both increased protein expression and increased NADP-dependent 1-acenaphthenol oxidative activity in cell cytosol. In gel shift assays, compared to wild type controls, increased binding of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase human antioxidant response element (hARE) DNA to redox labile protein complexes present in treated and resistant cell nuclear extract was observed. Ethacrynic acid induced CAT activity 2-fold in Hepa1 cells stably transfected with NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase hARE-tk-CAT chimeric gene construct. Thus, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase protein is inducible by de novo synthesis from mRNA by structurally related monofunctional inducer Michael acceptors. Altered in vitro binding of nuclear protein to the hARE is indirect evidence for the involvement of an element similar to hARE in the regulation of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase by these agents. PMID:7515059

  19. Crystal structure of 4-sulfamoylanilinium di­hydrogen phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Muthuselvi, C.; Mala, N.; Srinivasan, N.; Pandiarajan, S.; Krishnakumar, R. V.

    2014-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title mol­ecular salt, C6H9N2O2S+·H2PO4 −, the sulfomylalinium cations and the di­hydrogen phosphate anions form independent [100] chains through Ns—H⋯O (s = sulfamo­yl) and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, respectively. The chains are cross-linked by Na—H⋯O (a = amine) hydrogen bonds, generating (010) sheets. Two C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds involving diametrically opposite C atoms in the benzene ring of the cation as donors form chains parallel to [202] in which P=O and P—OH groups are acceptors. Together, these inter­actions lead to a three-dimensional network. PMID:25309301

  20. Potassium acceptor doping of ZnO crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Parmar, Narendra S. Lynn, K. G.; Corolewski, Caleb D.; McCluskey, Matthew D.

    2015-05-15

    ZnO bulk single crystals were doped with potassium by diffusion at 950°C. Positron annihilation spectroscopy confirms the filling of zinc vacancies and a different trapping center for positrons. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show the diffusion of potassium up to 10 μm with concentration ∼1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}. IR measurements show a local vibrational mode (LVM) at 3226 cm{sup −1}, at a temperature of 9 K, in a potassium doped sample that was subsequently hydrogenated. The LVM is attributed to an O–H bond-stretching mode adjacent to a potassium acceptor. When deuterium substitutes for hydrogen, a peak is observed at 2378 cm{sup −1}. The O-H peak is much broader than the O-D peak, perhaps due to an unusually low vibrational lifetime. The isotopic frequency ratio is similar to values found in other hydrogen complexes. Potassium doping increases the resistivity up to 3 orders of magnitude at room temperature. The doped sample has a donor level at 0.30 eV.

  1. Molecular insights into the terminal energy acceptor in cyanobacterial phycobilisome.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Nan; Xie, Bin-Bin; Su, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wu, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-09-01

    The linker protein L(CM) (ApcE) is postulated as the major component of the phycobilisome terminal energy acceptor (TEA) transferring excitation energy from the phycobilisome to photosystem II. L(CM) is the only phycobilin-attached linker protein in the cyanobacterial phycobilisome through auto-chromophorylation. However, the underlying mechanism for the auto-chromophorylation of L(CM) and the detailed molecular architecture of TEA is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the N-terminal phycobiliprotein-like domain of L(CM) (Pfam00502, LP502) can specifically recognize phycocyanobilin (PCB) by itself. Biochemical assays indicated that PCB binds into the same pocket in LP502 as that in the allophycocyanin α-subunit and that Ser152 and Asp155 play a vital role in LP502 auto-chromophorylation. By carefully conducting computational simulations, we arrived at a rational model of the PCB-LP502 complex structure that was supported by extensive mutational studies. In the PCB-LP502 complex, PCB binds into a deep pocket of LP502 with a distorted conformation, and Ser152 and Asp155 form several hydrogen bonds to PCB fixing the PCB Ring A and Ring D. Finally, based on our results, the dipoles and dipole-dipole interactions in TEA are analysed and a molecular structure for TEA is proposed, which gives new insights into the energy transformation mechanism of cyanobacterial phycobilisome. PMID:22758351

  2. Swift Electrofluorochromism of Donor-Acceptor Conjugated Polytriphenylamines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingwei; Liang, Ziqi

    2016-07-20

    Electrofluorochromic (EFC) materials, which exhibit electrochemically controllable fluorescence, hold great promise in optoelectronic devices and biological analysis. Here we design such donor-acceptor (D-A) conjugated polymers-P(TPACO) and P(TCEC)-that contain the same electron-rich and oxidizable polytriphenylamine (PTPA) as π-backbone, yet with different electron-deficient ketone and cyano units as pendant groups, respectively. They both exhibit solvatochromic effects due to intrinsic characteristics of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). Compared to P(TPACO), P(TCEC) shows stronger ICT, which leads to higher electrochemical oxidation potential and lower ion diffusion coefficient. Moreover, both polymers present simultaneous electrochromic (EC) and EFC behaviors with multistate display and remarkably rapid fluorescence response. The response time of P(TPACO) is as short as 0.19 s, nearly 4-fold faster than that of P(TCEC) (0.92 s). Such rapid response is found to be determined by the ion diffusion coefficient which is associated with the ICT nature. Finally, the EFC display device based on P(TPACO) is successfully demonstrated, which shows green fluorescence ON/OFF switching upon applied potentials. This work has successfully demonstrated that swift EFCs can be achieved by rational modulation of the ICT effect in such D-A conjugated polymers. PMID:27347724

  3. Poly(trifluoromethyl)azulenes: structures and acceptor properties

    SciTech Connect

    Clikeman, Tyler T.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Kuvychko, Igor V.; San, Long K.; Deng, Shihu; Wang, Xue B.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.

    2014-07-10

    Azulene is a non-alternant, non-benzenoid aromatic hydrocarbon with an intense blue colour, a dipole moment of 1.0 D,1 positive electron affinity, and an “anomalous” emission from the second excited state in violation of Kasha’s rule.2,3 Azulene’s unique properties have potential uses in molecular switches,4,5 molecular diodes,6 organic photovoltaics,7 and charge transfer complexes.8-12 Introduction of electron-withdrawing groups to the azulenic core, such as CN,8,13,14 halogens,15-19 and CF3,20,21 can enhance certain electrical and photophysical properties. In this work, we report six new trifluoromethyl derivatives of azulene (AZUL), three isomers of AZUL(CF3)3 and three isomers of AZUL(CF3)4, and the first X-ray structure of a π-stacked donor-acceptor complex of a trifluoromethyl azulene with donor pyrene.

  4. Analysis of nonlinear optical properties in donor–acceptor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Paul N.; Pachter, Ruth; Nguyen, Kiet A.

    2014-05-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory has been used to calculate nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, including the first and second hyperpolarizabilities as well as the two-photon absorption cross-section, for the donor-acceptor molecules p-nitroaniline and dimethylamino nitrostilbene, and for respective materials attached to a gold dimer. The CAMB3LYP, B3LYP, PBE0, and PBE exchange-correlation functionals all had fair but variable performance when compared to higher-level theory and to experiment. The CAMB3LYP functional had the best performance on these compounds of the functionals tested. However, our comprehensive analysis has shown that quantitative prediction of hyperpolarizabilities is still a challenge, hampered by inadequate functionals, basis sets, and solvation models, requiring further experimental characterization. Attachment of the Au{sub 2}S group to molecules already known for their relatively large NLO properties was found to further enhance the response. While our calculations show a modest enhancement for the first hyperpolarizability, the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability is predicted to be more than an order of magnitude.

  5. Structure of Escherichia coli Ribose-5-Phosphate Isomerase: A Ubiquitous Enzyme of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway and the Calvin Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong-guang; Andersson, C. Evalena; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Evdokimova, Elena; Beasley, Steven; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Edwards, Aled M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mowbray, Sherry L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase A (RpiA; EC 5.3.1.6) interconverts ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. This enzyme plays essential roles in carbohydrate anabolism and catabolism; it is ubiquitous and highly conserved. The structure of RpiA from Escherichia coli was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing, and refined to 1.5 Å resolution (R factor 22.4%, Rfree 23.7%). RpiA exhibits an α/β/(α/β)/β/α fold, some portions of which are similar to proteins of the alcohol dehydrogenase family. The two subunits of the dimer in the asymmetric unit have different conformations, representing the opening/closing of a cleft. Active site residues were identified in the cleft using sequence conservation, as well as the structure of a complex with the inhibitor arabinose-5-phosphate at 1.25 Å resolution. A mechanism for acid-base catalysis is proposed. PMID:12517338

  6. Structure of escherichia coli ribose-5-phosphate isomerase : a ubiquitous enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Andersson, C. E.; Savchenko, A.; Skarina, T.; Evdokimova, E.; Beasley, S.; Arrowsmith, C. H.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Mowbray, S. L.; Biosciences Division; Uppsala Univ.; Univ. Health Network; Univ. of Toronto; Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences

    2003-01-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase A (RpiA; EC 5.3.1.6) interconverts ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. This enzyme plays essential roles in carbohydrate anabolism and catabolism; it is ubiquitous and highly conserved. The structure of RpiA from Escherichia coli was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing, and refined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution (R factor 22.4%, R{sub free} 23.7%). RpiA exhibits an {alpha}/{beta}/({alpha}/{beta})/{beta}/{alpha} fold, some portions of which are similar to proteins of the alcohol dehydrogenase family. The two subunits of the dimer in the asymmetric unit have different conformations, representing the opening/closing of a cleft. Active site residues were identified in the cleft using sequence conservation, as well as the structure of a complex with the inhibitor arabinose-5-phosphate at 1.25 A resolution. A mechanism for acid-base catalysis is proposed.

  7. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: a crooked path from substrates to products.

    PubMed

    Raushel, F M; Thoden, J B; Reinhart, G D; Holden, H M

    1998-10-01

    The formation of carbamoyl phosphate is catalyzed by a single enzyme using glutamine, bicarbonate and two molecules of ATP via a reaction mechanism that requires a minimum of four consecutive reactions and three unstable intermediates. The recently determined X-ray crystal structure of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase has revealed the location of three separate active sites connected by two molecular tunnels that run through the interior of the protein. It has been demonstrated that the amidotransferase domain within the small subunit of the enzyme from Escherichia coli hydrolyzes glutamine to ammonia via a thioester intermediate with Cys269. The ammonia migrates through the interior of the protein, where it reacts with carboxy phosphate to produce the carbamate intermediate. The carboxy phosphate intermediate is formed by the phosphorylation of bicarbonate by ATP at a site contained within the amino-terminal half of the large subunit. The carbamate intermediate is transported through the interior of the protein to a second site within the carboxy-terminal half of the large subunit, where it is phosphorylated by another ATP to yield the final product, carbamoyl phosphate. The entire journey from substrate to product covers a distance of nearly 100 A. PMID:9818189

  8. Rates of primary electron transfer reactions in the photosystem I reaction center reconstituted with different quinones as the secondary acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Kandori, Hideki; Yoshihara, Keitaro ); Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru ); Ikegamu, Isamu )

    1994-10-27

    Rates of sequential electron transfer reactions from the primary electron donor chlorophyll dimer (P700) to the electron acceptor chlorophyll a-686 (A[sub 0]) and to the secondary acceptor quinone (Q[sub [phi

  9. Inositol phosphates in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Benjamin L; Papházy, Michael J; Haygarth, Philip M; McKelvie, Ian D

    2002-01-01

    The inositol phosphates are a group of organic phosphorus compounds found widely in the natural environment, but that represent the greatest gap in our understanding of the global phosphorus cycle. They exist as inositols in various states of phosphorylation (bound to between one and six phosphate groups) and isomeric forms (e.g. myo, D-chiro, scyllo, neo), although myo-inositol hexakisphosphate is by far the most prevalent form in nature. In terrestrial environments, inositol phosphates are principally derived from plants and accumulate in soils to become the dominant class of organic phosphorus compounds. Inositol phosphates are also present in large amounts in aquatic environments, where they may contribute to eutrophication. Despite the prevalence of inositol phosphates in the environment, their cycling, mobility and bioavailability are poorly understood. This is largely related to analytical difficulties associated with the extraction, separation and detection of inositol phosphates in environmental samples. This review summarizes the current knowledge of inositol phosphates in the environment and the analytical techniques currently available for their detection in environmental samples. Recent advances in technology, such as the development of suitable chromatographic and capillary electrophoresis separation techniques, should help to elucidate some of the more pertinent questions regarding inositol phosphates in the natural environment. PMID:12028785

  10. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O'Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  11. Light weight phosphate cements

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Natarajan, Ramkumar,; Kahn, David

    2010-03-09

    A sealant having a specific gravity in the range of from about 0.7 to about 1.6 for heavy oil and/or coal bed methane fields is disclosed. The sealant has a binder including an oxide or hydroxide of Al or of Fe and a phosphoric acid solution. The binder may have MgO or an oxide of Fe and/or an acid phosphate. The binder is present from about 20 to about 50% by weight of the sealant with a lightweight additive present in the range of from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said sealant, a filler, and water sufficient to provide chemically bound water present in the range of from about 9 to about 36% by weight of the sealant when set. A porous ceramic is also disclosed.

  12. Templated, layered manganese phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.; Bonhomme, Francois R.

    2004-08-17

    A new crystalline maganese phosphate composition having an empirical formula: O). The compound was determined to crystallize in the trigonal space group P-3c1 with a=8.8706(4) .ANG., c=26.1580(2) .ANG., and V (volume)=1783 .ANG..sup.3. The structure consists of sheets of corner sharing Mn(II)O.sub.4 and PO.sub.4 tetrahedra with layers of (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N and water molecules in-between. The pronated (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N molecules provide charge balancing for the inorganic sheets. A network of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and the inorganic sheets holds the structure together.

  13. Phosphate nutrition: improving low-phosphate tolerance in crops.

    PubMed

    López-Arredondo, Damar Lizbeth; Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; González-Morales, Sandra Isabel; López-Bucio, José; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient that is required for all major developmental processes and reproduction in plants. It is also a major constituent of the fertilizers required to sustain high-yield agriculture. Levels of phosphate--the only form of phosphorus that can be assimilated by plants--are suboptimal in most natural and agricultural ecosystems, and when phosphate is applied as fertilizer in soils, it is rapidly immobilized owing to fixation and microbial activity. Thus, cultivated plants use only approximately 20-30% of the applied phosphate, and the rest is lost, eventually causing water eutrophication. Recent advances in the understanding of mechanisms by which wild and cultivated species adapt to low-phosphate stress and the implementation of alternative bacterial pathways for phosphorus metabolism have started to allow the design of more effective breeding and genetic engineering strategies to produce highly phosphate-efficient crops, optimize fertilizer use, and reach agricultural sustainability with a lower environmental cost. In this review, we outline the current advances in research on the complex network of plant responses to low-phosphorus stress and discuss some strategies used to manipulate genes involved in phosphate uptake, remobilization, and metabolism to develop low-phosphate-tolerant crops, which could help in designing more efficient crops.

  14. Pyrimidone-based series of glucokinase activators with alternative donor-acceptor motif.

    PubMed

    Filipski, Kevin J; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Bian, Jianwei; Perreault, Christian; Aspnes, Gary E; Didiuk, Mary T; Dow, Robert L; Hank, Richard F; Jones, Christopher S; Maguire, Robert J; Tu, Meihua; Zeng, Dongxiang; Liu, Shenping; Knafels, John D; Litchfield, John; Atkinson, Karen; Derksen, David R; Bourbonais, Francis; Gajiwala, Ketan S; Hickey, Michael; Johnson, Theodore O; Humphries, Paul S; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A

    2013-08-15

    Glucokinase activators are a class of experimental agents under investigation as a therapy for Type 2 diabetes mellitus. An X-ray crystal structure of a modestly potent agent revealed the potential to substitute the common heterocyclic amide donor-acceptor motif for a pyridone moiety. We have successfully demonstrated that both pyridone and pyrimidone heterocycles can be used as a potent donor-acceptor substituent. Several sub-micromolar analogs that possess the desired partial activator profile were synthesized and characterized. Unfortunately, the most potent activators suffered from sub-optimal pharmacokinetic properties. Nonetheless, these donor-acceptor motifs may find utility in other glucokinase activator series or beyond.

  15. Bacterial manganese reduction and growth with manganese oxide as the sole electron acceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Microbes that couple growth to the reduction of manganese could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of certain anaerobic environments. Such a bacterium, Alteromonas putrefaciens MR-1, couples its growth to the reduction of manganese oxides only under anaerobic conditions. The characteristics of this reduction are consistent with a biological, and not an indirect chemical, reduction of manganese, which suggest that this bacterium uses manganic oxide as a terminal electron acceptor. It can also utilize a large number of other compounds as terminal electron acceptors; this versatility could provide a distinct advantage in environments where electron-acceptor concentrations may vary.

  16. Laboratory comparison of four iron-based filter materials for drainage water phosphate treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphate released with agricultural subsurface drainage water can cause environmental degradation of downstream water bodies. On-site filter treatment with iron-based filter materials could potentially remove phosphate from drainage waters before these waters are discharged into local streams. Th...

  17. Evaluation of several commercially available caitionic polymer flocculants for phosphate sorption in water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although inorganic phosphate is an essential plant nutrient, elevated levels in surface waters may lead to adverse effects in the environment. These effects are attributed to runoff from rain or irrigation events that may cause the sorbed phosphate to be transported from the application sites and mo...

  18. The Effects of Locations of Wetlands on Phosphate-Level Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston, C. N.

    2002-05-01

    : The purpose of this experiment is to test different locations of a wetland for phosphate content to see whether the wetland is effective in lowering nutrient levels in Reedy Creek. After researching information on phosphates and its effect on wetlands, the researcher hypothesized that if the water from downstream of the Jefferson Village Wetland Mitigation Site is tested, then the phosphate content level will be lower then the upstream location. With the use of the LaMotte Phosphate Kit, the Jefferson Village Mitigation Site was tested upstream and downstream to determine its phosphate-level content. With the Phosphate Acid Reagent and Phosphate Reducing Agent, the test tubes filled with the water sample were shaken to determine whether the solution was contaminated by the solution turning blue. As the shade of blue becomes darker, the contamination level of that site increases. The axial reader was used to determine the actual level of phosphate-content. After the water samples were tested, the results show that the downstream mitigation site of the Jefferson Village Wetland had the highest phosphate content level. With an average content level of 0.133 ppm, the Jefferson Village Mitigation site has remained within the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency standards of 0.1 to 0.3 ppm to be considered uncontaminated by algal blooms. A t-test was performed on the data to determine whether the data was statistically significant. In conclusion, the downstream mitigation site of the Jefferson Village Wetland, having the highest phosphate content level, proved the researcher's hypothesis incorrect.

  19. A KAP study on MTP acceptors and their contraceptive practice.

    PubMed

    Roy, M; Lahiri, B C; Ghosh, B N

    1978-01-01

    From the point of view of the family planning program, it is necessary to determine whether a medical termination of pregnancy has a learning effect on a woman's subsequent fertility control behavior. In order to determine the knowledge and attitude of medical termination of pregnancy (MTP) acceptors towards abortion and their pre and post abortion contraceptive practices, a study was conducted during January to December 1975 in a family planning clinic in North Calcutta. 300 consecutive cases admitted to the hospital for abortions were the study subjects - the MTP group. They were subjected to repeated interviews in the ward before and after the abortion and were followed up at home within 6-10 months after the discharge from the hospital. 300 women who attended the antenatal clinic of the same hospital during the same period were selected for comparison by systematic sampling. There is no statistically significant difference in the social characteristics of the 2 groups except that the MTP group was from a comparatively poorer economic class. 13.3% of the MTP group had "good" knowledge of physiology of reproduction in contrast to only 5.0% in the comparison group. Only 52% of the MTP group and 63% in the comparison group failed to have even an "average" knowledge of this area. Nearly 55% of the MTP group and 65% of the comparison group had never practiced family planning. Over 55% of the MTP group had poor knowledge about abortion; the most important soruce of their knowledge was their neighbors. 78.7% of the cases considered MTP to be a sinful act. The primary reason for deciding to have an abortion was socioeconomic. Over 27.6% of the cases were using contraceptives to avoid the present pregnancy. The difference is statistically significant suggesting a positive learning effect of MTP on contraceptive behavior of women seeking abortions.

  20. Theory and computational modeling: Medium reorganization and donor/acceptor coupling in electron transfer processes

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.D.; Feldberg, S.W.; Smalley, J.F.

    1998-03-01

    The continuing goal is to convert the rapidly accumulating mechanistic information about electron transfer (et) kinetics (often representable in terms of simple rate constants) into precise tools for fine-tuned control of the kinetics and for design of molecular-based systems which meet specified et characteristics. The present treatment will be limited to the kinetic framework defined by the assumption of transition state theory (TST). The primary objective of this paper is to report recent advances in the theoretical formulation, calculation, and analysis of energetics and electronic coupling pertinent to et in complex molecular aggregates. The control of et kinetics (i.e., enhancing desired processes, while inhibiting others) involves, of course, both system energetics (especially reorganization energies (E{sub r}) and free energy changes ({Delta}G{sup 0})) and electronic coupling of local D and A sites, which for thermal processes is most directly relevant only after the system has reached the appropriate point (or region) along the reaction coordinate (i.e., the transition state). The authors first discuss TST rate constant models, emphasizing genetic features, but also noting some special features arising when metal electrodes are involved. They then turn to a consideration of detailed aspects of medium reorganization and donor/acceptor coupling. With these theoretical tools in hand, they examine the results of recent applications to complex molecular systems using the techniques of computational quantum chemistry and electrostatics, together with detailed analysis of the numerical results and comparison with recent electrochemical kinetic data.

  1. Enzymatic and regulatory properties of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanyan; Jiang, Ying; Liu, Qiulei; Wang, Ruiming; Liu, Xinli; Liu, Bo

    2014-06-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate synthase plays an important role in trehalose metabolism. It catalyzes the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose (UDPG) to glucose 6-phosphate to produce trehalose-6-phosphate. Herein we describe the characterization of a trehalose-6-phosphate synthase from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. The dimeric enzyme could utilize UDPG, ADP-Glucose (ADPG) and GDP-Glucose (GDPG) as glycosyl donors and various phosphorylated monosaccharides as glycosyl acceptors. The optimal temperature and pH were found to be 60 °C and pH 6, and the enzyme exhibited notable pH and thermal stability. The enzymatic activity could be stimulated by divalent metal ions and polyanions heparin and chondroitin sulfate. Moreover, the protein was considerably resistant to additives ethanol, EDTA, urea, DTT, SDS, β-mercaptoethanol, methanol, isopropanol and n-butanol. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis analysis revealed that the N-loop region was important for the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme, indicating different roles of N-loop sequences in different trehalose-6-phosphate synthases. PMID:24508535

  2. Specificity of acceptor binding to Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512F dextransucrase: binding and acceptor-product structure of alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside analogs modified at C-2, C-3, and C-4 by inversion of the hydroxyl and by replacement of the hydroxyl with hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Fu, D T; Slodki, M E; Robyt, J F

    1990-02-01

    The specificity of acceptor binding to the active site of dextransucrase was studied by using alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside analogs modified at C-2, C-3, and C-4 positions by (a) inversion of the hydroxyl group and (b) replacement of the hydroxyl group with hydrogen. 2-Deoxy-alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside was synthesized from 2-deoxyglucose; 3- and 4-deoxy-alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranosides were synthesized from alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside; and alpha-methyl-D-allopyranoside was synthesized from D-glucose. The analogs were incubated with [14C]sucrose and dextransucrase, and the products were separated by thin-layer chromatography and quantitated by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Structures of the acceptor products were determined by methylation analyses and optical rotation. The relative effectiveness of the acceptor analogs in decreasing order were 2-deoxy, 2-inverted, 3-deoxy, 3-inverted, 4-inverted, and 4-deoxy. The enzyme transfers D-glucopyranose to the C-6 hydroxyl of analogs modified at C-2 and C-3, to the C-4 hydroxyl of 4-inverted, and to the C-3 hydroxyl of 4-deoxy analogs of alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside. The data indicate that the hydroxyl group at C-2 is not as important for acceptor binding as the hydroxyl groups at C-3 and C-4. The hydroxyl group at C-4 is particularly important as it determines the binding orientation of the alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside ring.

  3. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  4. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  5. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  6. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  7. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  8. Examining the role of phosphate in glycosyl transfer reactions of Cellulomonas uda cellobiose phosphorylase using D-glucal as donor substrate.

    PubMed

    Wildberger, Patricia; Brecker, Lothar; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-07-15

    Cellobiose phosphorylase from Cellulomonas uda (CuCPase) is shown to utilize D-glucal as slow alternative donor substrate for stereospecific glycosyl transfer to inorganic phosphate, giving 2-deoxy-α-D-glucose 1-phosphate as the product. When performed in D(2)O, enzymatic phosphorolysis of D-glucal proceeds with incorporation of deuterium in equatorial position at C-2, implying a stereochemical course of reaction where substrate becomes protonated from below its six-membered ring through stereoselective re side attack at C-2. The proposed catalytic mechanism, which is supported by results of docking studies, involves direct protonation of D-glucal by the enzyme-bound phosphate, which then performs nucleophilic attack on the reactive C-1 of donor substrate. When offered D-glucose next to D-glucal and phosphate, CuCPase produces 2-deoxy-β-D-glucosyl-(1→4)-D-glucose and 2-deoxy-α-D-glucose 1-phosphate in a ratio governed by mass action of the two acceptor substrates present. Enzymatic synthesis of 2-deoxy-β-D-glucosyl-(1→4)-D-glucose is effectively promoted by catalytic concentrations of phosphate, suggesting that catalytic reaction proceeds through a quaternary complex of CuCPase, D-glucal, phosphate, and D-glucose. Conversion of D-glucal and phosphate presents a convenient single-step synthesis of 2-deoxy-α-D-glucose 1-phosphate that is difficult to prepare chemically.

  9. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source of Electron Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Michael E.; Jaisi, Deb P.; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Ji, Junfeng

    2010-08-01

    A quantitative study was conducted to understand if Fe (III) in loess sediments is available for microbial respiration by using a common metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, CN32. The loess samples were collected from three different sites: St. Louis (Peoria), Missouri, USA; Huanxia (HX) and Yanchang (YCH), Shanxi Province of China. Wet chemical analyses indicated that the total Fe concentration for the three samples was 1.69%, 2.76%, and 3.29%, respectively, of which 0.48%, 0.67%, and 1.27% was Fe(III). All unreduced loess sediments contained iron oxides and phyllosilicates (smectite, illite, chlorite, vermiculite), in addition to common minerals such as quartz, feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, and dolomite. Bioreduction experiments were performed at a loess concentration of 20 mg/mL using lactate as the sole electron donor, Fe(III) in loess as the sole electron acceptor in the presence and absence of anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) as an electron shuttle. Experiments were performed in non-growth (bicarbonate buffer) and growth (M1) media with a cell concentration of ~2.8 x 107 and 2.1 x 107 cells/mL, respectively. The unreduced and bioreduced solids were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy, diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS), and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) methods. Despite many similarities among the three loess samples, the extent and rate of Fe (III) reduction varied significantly. For example, in presence of AQDS the extent of reduction in the non-growth experiment was 25% in HX, 34% in Peoria, and 38% in YCH. The extent of reduction in the growth experiment was 72% in HX, 94% in Peoria, and 56% in YCH. The extent of bioreduction was lower in absence of AQDS. Overall, AQDS and the M1 growth medium significantly enhanced the rate and extent of bioreduction. Fe(III) in iron oxides and Fe(III)-containing phyllosilicates was bioreduced. Biogenic illite, siderite, and

  10. Quality control in production of suspensions from solid ammonium phosphates (monoammonium phosphate and diammonium phosphate). [Monoammonium phosphate; diammonium phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Achorn, F.P.; Balay, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    Suspensions of good quality can be produced from MAP and DAP. Suspension quality depends on the amount of impurities in the ammonium phosphate solids used. Tests have shown that adding ammonium fluoride helps lower viscosity of suspensions containing a considerable amount of impurities. Also, adding polyphosphates (such as 10-34-0, 9-32-0, and 11-37-0) as a source of part of the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ (6 to 15% polyphosphate in the product) helps to produce a suspension that has excellent storage characteristics. When the polyphosphate content of the product (11-33-0 suspension) is between 10 and 15% it usually will not solidify during cold weather storage. Freight and production costs of granular ammonium phosphates are relatively low compared to other sources of P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ for the fluid fertilizer market; therefore, using MAP and DAP to produce suspensions is expected to continue to grow in popularity. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Fluorescence quenching in an organic donor-acceptor dyad: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Körzdörfer, T; Tretiak, S; Kümmel, S

    2009-07-21

    Perylene bisimide and triphenyl diamine are prototypical organic dyes frequently used in organic solar cells and light emitting devices. Recent Forster-resonant-energy-transfer experiments on a bridged organic dyad consisting of triphenyl diamine as an energy-donor and perylene bisimide as an energy-acceptor revealed a strong fluorescence quenching on the perylene bisimide. This quenching is absent in a solution of free donors and acceptors and thus attributed to the presence of the saturated CH(2)O(CH(2))(12)-bridge. We investigate the cause of the fluorescence quenching as well as the special role of the covalently bound bridge by means of time dependent density functional theory and molecular dynamics. The conformational dynamics of the bridged system leads to a charge transfer process between donor and acceptor that causes the acceptor fluorescence quenching. PMID:19624200

  12. Interface-induced heavy-hole/light-hole splitting of acceptors in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J. A.; Salfi, J.; Simmons, M. Y.; Rogge, S.; Rahman, R.; Hsueh, Y.; Klimeck, G.; Miwa, J. A.

    2015-05-18

    The energy spectrum of spin-orbit coupled states of individual sub-surface boron acceptor dopants in silicon have been investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. The spatially resolved tunnel spectra show two resonances, which we ascribe to the heavy- and light-hole Kramers doublets. This type of broken degeneracy has recently been argued to be advantageous for the lifetime of acceptor-based qubits [R. Ruskov and C. Tahan, Phys. Rev. B 88, 064308 (2013)]. The depth dependent energy splitting between the heavy- and light-hole Kramers doublets is consistent with tight binding calculations, and is in excess of 1 meV for all acceptors within the experimentally accessible depth range (<2 nm from the surface). These results will aid the development of tunable acceptor-based qubits in silicon with long coherence times and the possibility for electrical manipulation.

  13. Dinitrogen extrusion from enoldiazo compounds under thermal conditions: synthesis of donor-acceptor cyclopropenes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongming; Jing, Changcheng; Doyle, Michael P

    2015-08-21

    Donor-acceptor cyclopropenes are formed quantitatively or in high yield from enoldiazoacetates and enoldiazoacetamides under moderate thermal conditions. They are more versatile than their corresponding enoldiazocarbonyl compounds as carbene precursors.

  14. Preparation and spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer complexes of 2-hydroxypyridine with electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.

    2013-07-01

    The CT-interactions of electron acceptors such as iodine (I2), chloranilic acid (H2CA) and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) with 2-hydroxypyridine (HPyO) have been investigated in the defined solvent. The data indicate the formation of CT-complexes with the general formula [(HPyO)(acceptor)]. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the (HPyO)-acceptors were based on elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis of the solid CT-complexes along with the photometric titration measurements for the reactions. The formation constants (KCT) for the CT-complexes are shown to be strongly dependent on the type and structure of the electron acceptors. Factors affecting the CT-processes are discussed.

  15. Preparation and spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer complexes of famciclovir drug with different electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.; Teleb, Said M.; Nour, El-Metwally

    2012-09-01

    The CT-interaction of electron acceptors such as chloranilic acid (H2CA), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) and and 7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) with the antiviral drug famciclovir (FCV) have been investigated spectrophotometrically in the defined solvent. The data indicate the formation of CT-complexes with the general formula [(FCV)(acceptor)]. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the (FCV)-acceptors were based on elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis of the solid CT-complexes along with the photometric titration measurements for the reactions. The formation constants (KCT) for the CT-complexes are shown to be strongly dependent on the type and structure of the electron acceptor. Factors affecting the CT-processes such as redox potentials and steric hinderance of reactants are discussed.

  16. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    PubMed

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-01

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects.

  17. The structure of an archaeal ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MJ1603).

    PubMed

    Strange, Richard W; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Ellis, Mark J; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hasnain, S Samar

    2009-12-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase is a ubiquitous intracellular enzyme of bacterial, plant and animal origin that is involved in the pentose phosphate cycle, an essential component of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Specifically, the enzyme catalyses the reversible conversion of ribose 5-phosphate to ribulose 5-phosphate. The structure of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii has been solved in space group P2(1) to 1.78 A resolution using molecular replacement with one homotetramer in the asymmetric unit and refined to an R factor of 14.8%. The active site in each subunit was occupied by two molecules of propylene glycol in different orientations, one of which corresponds to the location of the phosphate moiety and the other to the location of the furanose ring of the inhibitor.

  18. Effect of phosphate on U(VI) sorption to montmorillonite: Ternary complexation and precipitation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Wang, Zimeng; Mehta, Vrajesh S.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-02-01

    reveals that ternary complexation may occur without a macroscopic signature, which is attributed to phosphate not appreciably binding to smectite in the absence of U(VI), with U(VI) surface complexes serving as the sole reactive surface sites for phosphate. This study shows that phosphate does not enhance U(VI) adsorption to smectite clay minerals, unlike oxide phases, and that a barrier to homogeneous nucleation of U(VI) phosphates was not affected by the presence of the smectite surface.

  19. Curved Oligophenylenes as Donors in Shape-Persistent Donor-Acceptor Macrocycles with Solvatofluorochromic Properties.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Takuya; Orii, Jun; Segawa, Yasutomo; Itami, Kenichiro

    2015-08-10

    Many optoelectronic organic materials are based on donor-acceptor (D-A) systems with heteroatom-containing electron donors. Herein, we introduce a new molecular design for all-carbon curved oligoparaphenylenes as donors, which results in the generation of unique shape-persistent D-A macrocycles. Two types of acceptor-inserted cycloparaphenylenes were synthesized. These macrocycles display positive solvatofluorochromic properties owing to their D-A characteristics, which were confirmed by theoretical and electrochemical studies. PMID:26140706

  20. Experiments probing the viability of donor-acceptor norbornenes for (5 + 2)-annulation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Morgan M; Goodman, C Guy; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2014-10-01

    This Note details experiments that probe the mechanism by which donor-acceptor norbornene systems epimerize. A number of mechanistic studies indicate that epimerization in these systems occurs via a Lewis acid catalyzed retro-Diels-Alder/Diels-Alder sequence, rather than bond rotation in an intimate ion pair. These results suggest that, under the reaction conditions examined, the ring strain present in norbornene is inadequate to induce zwitterion formation analogous to that observed with donor-acceptor cyclopropanes.

  1. New acceptor centers of the background impurities in p-CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Plyatsko, S. V. Rashkovetskyi, L. V.

    2013-07-15

    Low-temperature photoluminescence data are used to study the redistribution of the background impurities and host components of p-CdZnTe single crystals with a resistivity of 1-50 {Omega} cm upon their interaction with infrared laser radiation. The effect of widening of the band gap and the formation of new acceptor centers in response to laser-stimulated changes in the system of intrinsic defects are established. The activation energy of the new acceptor centers is determined.

  2. Process for gasification using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor

    DOEpatents

    Lancet, Michael S.; Curran, George P.

    1980-01-01

    A gasification process is disclosed using a synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor consisting essentially of at least one compound selected from the group consisting of calcium oxide and calcium carbonate supported in a refractory carrier matrix, the carrier having the general formula Ca.sub.5 (SiO.sub.4).sub.2 CO.sub.3. A method for producing the synthetic CO.sub.2 acceptor is also disclosed.

  3. Fast Carrier Formation from Acceptor Exciton in Low-Gap Organic Photovotalic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Kouhei; Kamioka, Hayato; Yasuda, Takeshi; Han, Liyuan; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2012-04-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) based on a donor (D) polymer and an acceptor (A) fullerene derivative is a promising organic photovoltaic. Here, we investigated the femtosecond charge dynamics after acceptor excitation in poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b '] dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b] thiophenediyl

  4. Effects of size restriction on donor-acceptor recombination in AgBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Paul J.; Marchetti, Alfred P.; Fauchet, Philippe M.

    2000-08-01

    The behavior of donor-acceptor (DA) recombination luminescence in quantum confined AgBr has been investigated. The DA luminescence decay, after pulsed excitation, became longer lived as the nanocluster size decreased. This result differs from theoretical expectations and from observations with AgI nanoclusters. The DA lifetime increase with decreasing size is due to an increase in yield and lifetime of ``free'' excitons that slowly dissociate into ``close'' donor-acceptor pairs, giving rise to an ``exciton dribbling'' effect.

  5. Benzodipyrrole-based Donor-Acceptor-type Boron Complexes as Tunable Near-infrared-Absorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoya; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2016-07-20

    Benzodipyrrole-based donor-acceptor boron complexes were designed and synthesized as near-infrared-absorbing materials. The electron-rich organic framework combined with the Lewis acidic boron co-ordination enabled us to tune the LUMO energy level and the HOMO-LUMO gap (i.e.,the absorption wavelength) by changing the organic acceptor units, the number of boron atoms, and the substituents on the boron atoms.

  6. Nanosecond intersystem crossing times in fullerene acceptors: implications for organic photovoltaic diodes.

    PubMed

    Chow, Philip C Y; Albert-Seifried, Sebastian; Gélinas, Simon; Friend, Richard H

    2014-07-23

    Triplet-exciton formation through intersystem crossing of photogenerated singlet excitons in fullerene acceptors can compete with charge generation in organic photovoltaic diodes. This article reports the intersystem crossing timescale (τISC ) of the most commonly used fullerene acceptors, PC60 BM and PC70 BM, in solutions and in spin-coated films. These times are on the nanosecond timescale, and are longer than the characteristic times for charge generation (τd ).

  7. Site-directed deep electronic tunneling through a molecular network

    SciTech Connect

    Caspary, Maytal; Peskin, Uri

    2005-10-15

    Electronic tunneling in a complex molecular network of N(>2) donor/acceptor sites, connected by molecular bridges, is analyzed. The 'deep' tunneling dynamics is formulated using a recursive perturbation expansion, yielding a McConnell-type reduced N-level model Hamiltonian. Applications to models of molecular junctions demonstrate that the donor-bridge contact parameters can be tuned in order to control the tunneling dynamics and particularly to direct the tunneling pathway to either one of the various acceptors.

  8. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X.-Y.; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor−acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells. PMID:26382113

  9. Beyond Fullerenes: Designing Alternative Molecular Electron Acceptors for Solution-Processable Bulk Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Geneviève; Fernando, Roshan

    2015-09-17

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are promising candidates for providing a low cost, widespread energy source by converting sunlight into electricity. Solution-processable active layers have predominantly consisted of a conjugated polymer donor blended with a fullerene derivative as the acceptor. Although fullerene derivatives have been the acceptor of choice, they have drawbacks such as weak visible light absorption and poor energy tuning that limit overall efficiencies. This has recently fueled new research to explore alternative acceptors that would overcome those limitations. During this exploration, one question arises: what are the important design principles for developing nonfullerene acceptors? It is generally accepted that acceptors should have high electron affinity, electron mobility, and absorption coefficient in the visible and near-IR region of the spectra. In this Perspective, we argue that alternative molecular acceptors, when blended with a conjugated polymer donor, should also have large nonplanar structures to promote nanoscale phase separation, charge separation and charge transport in blend films. Additionally, new material design should address the low dielectric constant of organic semiconductors that have so far limited their widespread application.

  10. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu M. Zhong; Nam, Chang -Yong; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; et al

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealedmore » both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor–acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. As a result, this study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.« less

  11. A new classification of the amino acid side chains based on doublet acceptor energy levels.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, S F; Morgan, R S; Brooks, C L

    1988-01-01

    We describe a new classification of the amino acid side chains based on the potential energy level at which each will accept an extra (doublet) electron. The doublet acceptor energy level, and the doublet acceptor orbital were calculated using semiempirical INDO/2-UHF molecular orbital theory. The results of these calculations show that the side chains fall into four groups. We have termed these groups repulsive, insulating, semiconducting, and attractive in accordance with where each lies on the relative energy scale. We use this classification to examine the role of residues between the donor and acceptor in modulating the rate and mechanism of electron transfer in proteins. With the calculated acceptor levels, we construct a potential barrier for those residues between the donor and acceptor. It is the area beneath this barrier that determines the decay of electronic coupling between donor and acceptor, and thus the transfer rate. We have used this schematic approach to characterize the four electron transfer pathways in myoglobin recently studied by Mayo et al. (Mayo, S.L., W.R. Ellis, R.J. Crutchley, and H.B. Gray. 1986. Science [Wash. DC]. 233:948-952). PMID:3342271

  12. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu M. Zhong; Nam, Chang -Yong; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Loo, Yueh -Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X. -Y.; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor–acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. As a result, this study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.

  13. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E; Khlyabich, Petr P; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Black, Charles T; Steigerwald, Michael L; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X-Y; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.

  14. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E; Khlyabich, Petr P; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Black, Charles T; Steigerwald, Michael L; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X-Y; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells. PMID:26382113

  15. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis clades enriched under cyclic anaerobic and microaerobic conditions simultaneously use different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Camejo, Pamela Y; Owen, Brian R; Martirano, Joseph; Ma, Juan; Kapoor, Vikram; Santo Domingo, Jorge; McMahon, Katherine D; Noguera, Daniel R

    2016-10-01

    Lab- and pilot-scale simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal-sequencing batch reactors were operated under cyclic anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions. The use of oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate as electron acceptors by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis during the micro-aerobic stage was investigated. A complete clade-level characterization of Accumulibacter in both reactors was performed using newly designed qPCR primers targeting the polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk1). In the lab-scale reactor, limited-oxygen conditions led to an alternated dominance of Clade IID and IC over the other clades. Results from batch tests when Clade IC was dominant (i.e., >92% of Accumulibacter) showed that this clade was capable of using oxygen, nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors for P uptake. A more heterogeneous distribution of clades was found in the pilot-scale system (Clades IIA, IIB, IIC, IID, IA, and IC), and in this reactor, oxygen, nitrite and nitrate were also used as electron acceptors coupled to phosphorus uptake. However, nitrite was not an efficient electron acceptor in either reactor, and nitrate allowed only partial P removal. The results from the Clade IC dominated reactor indicated that either organisms in this clade can simultaneously use multiple electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions, or that the use of multiple electron acceptors by Clade IC is due to significant microdiversity within the Accumulibacter clades defined using the ppk1 gene. PMID:27340814

  16. Enhanced natural attenuation of BTEX in the nitrate-reducing environment by different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongsheng; Qu, Dan; Hou, Zhimin; Zhou, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing natural attenuation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) in groundwater is a potential remediation technology. This study focused on selecting appropriate electron acceptors to promote BTEX degradation in a nitrate-reducing environment. Nitrate-reducing soil was obtained from simulated BTEX-contaminated column. Enhancing experiments were conducted in the microcosm with nitrate-reducing material and simulated BTEX-polluted groundwater to investigate the promoting feasibility of adding dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate, chelated Fe(III), and sulphate as electron acceptors. The concentrations of BTEX, electron acceptors, and their reducing products were measured. The order of promoting BTEX degradation with four electron acceptors was nitrate>sulphate>chelated Fe(III)>DO, and the first-order decay coefficients were 0.0432, 0.0333, 0.0240, and 0.0155, respectively. Nitrate, sulphate, and chelated Fe(III) enhanced attenuation. Nitrate was the most effective electron acceptor under nitrate-reducing conditions. Selecting proper electron acceptor is significant in promoting BTEX degradation according to the biogeochemical characteristics of local underground environment.

  17. The role of anaerobic respiration in the immobilization of uranium through biomineralization of phosphate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salome, Kathleen R.; Green, Stefan J.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Webb, Samuel M.; Kostka, Joel E.; Taillefert, Martial

    2013-04-01

    Although bioreduction of uranyl ions (U(VI)) and biomineralization of U(VI)-phosphate minerals are both able to immobilize uranium in contaminated sediments, the competition between these processes and the role of anaerobic respiration in the biomineralization of U(VI)-phosphate minerals has yet to be investigated. In this study, contaminated sediments incubated anaerobically in static microcosms at pH 5.5 and 7.0 were amended with the organophosphate glycerol-2-phosphate (G2P) as sole phosphorus and external carbon source and iron oxides, sulfate, or nitrate as terminal electron acceptors to determine the most favorable geochemical conditions to these two processes. While sulfate reduction was not observed even in the presence of G2P at both pHs, iron reduction was more significant at circumneutral pH irrespective of the addition of G2P. In turn, nitrate reduction was stimulated by G2P at both pH 5.5 and 7.0, suggesting nitrate-reducing bacteria provided the main source of inorganic phosphate in these sediments. U(VI) was rapidly removed from solution in all treatments but was not reduced as determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Simultaneously, wet chemical extractions and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy of these sediments indicated the presence of U-P species in reactors amended with G2P at both pHs. The rapid removal of dissolved U(VI), the simultaneous production of inorganic phosphate, and the existence of U-P species in the solid phase indicate that uranium was precipitated as U(VI)-phosphate minerals in sediments amended with G2P. Thus, under reducing conditions and in the presence of G2P, bioreduction of U(VI) was outcompeted by the biomineralization of U(VI)-phosphate minerals and U(VI) sorption at both pHs.

  18. Toxicological review of inorganic phosphates.

    PubMed

    Weiner, M L; Salminen, W F; Larson, P R; Barter, R A; Kranetz, J L; Simon, G S

    2001-08-01

    Inorganic phosphate salts are widely used as food ingredients and in a variety of commercial applications. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers inorganic phosphates "Generally Recognized As Safe" (GRAS) (FDA, 1973a, 1979) [FDA: Food and Drug Administration 1973a. GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) food ingredients-phosphates. NTIS PB-221-224, FDA, Food and Drug Administration, 1979. Phosphates; Proposed Affirmation of and Deletion From GRAS Status as Direct and Human Food Ingredients. Federal Register 44 (244). 74845-74857, 18 December (1979)] and the European Union (EU) allows inorganic phosphates to be added directly to food (EU Directive 95/2/EC as amended by 98/72/EC). In this review, data on the acute, subchronic and chronic toxicity, genotoxicity, teratogenicity and reproductive toxicity from the published literature and from unpublished studies by the manufacturers are reviewed. Based on the toxicity data and similar chemistry, the inorganic phosphates can be separated into four major classes, consisting of monovalent salts, divalent salts, ammonium salts and aluminum salts. The proposed classification scheme supports the use of toxicity data from one compound to assess the toxicity of another compound in the same class. However, in the case of eye and skin irritation, the proposed classification scheme cannot be used because a wide range of responses exists within each class. Therefore, the eye and skin hazards associated with an individual inorganic phosphate should be assessed on a chemical-by-chemical basis. A large amount of toxicity data exists for all four classes of inorganic phosphates. The large and comprehensive database allows an accurate assessment of the toxicity of each class of inorganic phosphate. Overall, all four classes of inorganic phosphates exhibit low oral, inhalation and dermal toxicities. Based on these data, humans are unlikely to experience adverse effects when the daily phosphorus consumption remains

  19. Role of inorganic phosphate during electron transfer in the redox system NADH+flavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozinova, T. A.; Brzhevskaya, O. N.; Kisin, A. V.; Nosova, V. M.; Rykov, S. V.; Tychinskaya, L. Yu.

    2006-05-01

    We have used 31P NMR and EPR to study the effect of inorganic phosphate (Pi) on the process of electron transfer in oxidation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by flavin in aqueous solutions. Observation of a significant (up to 40%) drop in the integrated intensity of the 31P NMR signal for the inorganic phosphate over the course of the reaction is interpreted as a manifestation of the effect of chemically induced polarization of the phosphorus nuclei during singlet-triplet conversion in charge-transfer complexes [NADH…Pi], and is evidence for a possible catalytic role for Pi in processes involving transfer of an electron (hydrogen atom) from NADH to appropriate acceptors. The results presented support the possibility of direct involvement of Pi in a chain of one-electron conversions in chemical systems.

  20. Localization of dolichyl phosphate- and pyrophosphate-dependent glycosyl transfer reactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, M; Tanner, W

    1979-01-01

    Membranes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae protoplasts were fractionated on a continuous sucrose gradient. Six bands were obtained, which contained altogether about 15% of the total cell protein. From their densitites, their behavior in the presence and absence of Mg2+ ions, and the distribution of marker enzymes, it was possible to identify fractions enriched in rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum and in mitochondria. All glycosyl transfer reactions investigated where dolichyl phosphates served as glycosyl acceptors or where dolichyl phosphate- and pyrophosphate-activated sugars served as glycosyl donors showed the highest specific activity and up to 75% of the total activity in the endoplasmic reticulum. This was the case for the reactions involved in the formation of O-glycosidic as well as N-glycosidic linkages in yeast glycoprotein biosynthesis. Membrane fractions enriched in plasmalemma contained less than 3% of the corresponding activities. PMID:222737

  1. Arabinose 5-phosphate covalently inhibits transaldolase.

    PubMed

    Light, Samuel H; Anderson, Wayne F

    2014-03-01

    Arabinose 5-phosphate (A5P) is the aldopentose version of the ketohexose fructose 6-phosphate (F6P), having identical stereochemistry but lacking atoms corresponding to the 1-carbon and 1-hydroxyl. Despite structural similarity and conservation of the reactive portion of F6P, F6P acts as a substrate whereas A5P is reported to be an inhibitor of transaldolase. To address the lack of A5P reactivity we determined a crystal structure of the Francisella tularensis transaldolase in complex with A5P. This structure reveals that like F6P, A5P forms a covalent Schiff base with active site Lys135. Unlike F6P, A5P binding fails to displace an ordered active site water molecule. Retaining this water necessitates conformational changes at the A5P-protein linkage that possibly hinder reactivity. The findings presented here show the basis of A5P inhibition and suggest an unusual mechanism of competitive, reversible-covalent transaldolase regulation.

  2. Effect of biogenic photochromic electron acceptors on chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. V.; Klimenko, I. V.; Nevrova, O. V.; Zhuravleva, T. S.

    2014-05-01

    It is shown that the photophysical properties of chlorophyll a (Chl) depend on the nature and relative amounts of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (MNQ) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Photoinduced charge separation occurs in aqueous ethanol solutions of Chl (1 × 10-5 M) and NADP (5 × 10-6-5 × 10-4 M), resulting in the dynamic quenching of Chl fluorescence. Coordination interaction between Chl and NADP is established at an NADP concentration of ≥5 × 10-4 M. The nonlinear Stern-Volmer dependence in this range is due to the input from static quenching. It is shown that the quenching of Chl fluorescence in an MNQ solution at Chl and MNQ concentrations of 1 × 10-5 M and 6.7 × 10-5-1 × 10-4 M, respectively, is described by a linear dependence in the Stern-Volmer coordinates; no complex formation is observed for Chl and MNQ under these conditions, and electron transfer is of the dynamic type. Static or mixed-type energy transfer from MNQ to Chl dominates at elevated MNQ concentrations.

  3. Novel highly biodegradable biphasic tricalcium phosphates composed of alpha-tricalcium phosphate and beta-tricalcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbao; Weng, Wenjian; Tam, Kim Chiu

    2007-03-01

    Novel biodegradable biphasic tricalcium phosphates (BTCP) composed of alpha-tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) were successfully synthesized by heating amorphous calcium phosphate precursors with different structures at 800 degrees C for 3 h. The ratio of alpha-TCP and beta-TCP in the calcium phosphate particle can be controlled by aging time and pH value during synthesis of the amorphous precursor.

  4. Characterization of coenzyme binding and selectivity determinants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis flavoprotein reductase A: analysis of Arg(199) and Arg(200) mutants at the NADP(H) 2'-phosphate binding site.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Muna; Dunford, Adrian J; McLean, Kirsty J; Neeli, Rajasekhar; Scrutton, Nigel S; Leys, David; Munro, Andrew W

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis FprA (flavoprotein reductase A) is an NAD(P)H- and FAD-binding reductase that is structurally/evolutionarily related to adrenodoxin reductase. Structural analysis implicates Arg(199) and Arg(200) in interactions with the NADP(H) 2'-phosphate group. R199A, R200A and R199A/R200A mutants were characterized to explore the roles of these basic residues. All mutations abolished neutral FAD semiquinone stabilization in the NADPH-reduced enzyme, owing to weakened NADPH affinity. Instead, FAD hydroquinone was formed in all mutants, and each displayed substantially enhanced autooxidation rates (20-40-fold) compared with NADPH-reduced WT (wild-type) FprA. Steady-state ferricyanide reduction studies revealed diminished NADPH affinity (higher K(m) values), but lower NADH K(m) values. Despite a lowered k(cat), the R199A/R200A mutant exhibited a 200-fold coenzyme specificity switch towards NADH, although substrate inhibition was observed at high NADH concentrations (K(i)=250 microM). Stopped-flow FAD reduction studies confirmed substantially increased NADPH K(d) values, although the limiting flavin reduction rate constant was similar in all mutants. The R199A mutation abolished electron transfer between hydroquinone FprA and NADP+, while this reaction progressed (via an FADH(2)-NADP+ charge-transfer intermediate) for R200A FprA, albeit more slowly (k(lim)=58.1 s(-1) compared with >300 s(-1)) than in WT. All mutations caused positive shifts in FAD potential (approximately 40-65 mV). Binding of an NADPH analogue (tetrahydro-NADP) induced negative shifts in potential ( approximately 30-40 mV) only for variants with the R200A mutation, indicating distinctive effects of Arg(199)/Arg(200) on coenzyme binding mode and FAD potential. Collectively, these data reveal important roles for the phylogenetically conserved arginines in controlling FprA FAD environment, thermodynamics, coenzyme selectivity and reactivity.

  5. Isolation of 3-phosphohistidine from phosphorylated pyruvate, phosphate dikinase.

    PubMed Central

    Spronk, A M; Yoshida, H; Wood, H G

    1976-01-01

    Pyruvate, phosphate dikinase (EC 2-7-9-1) catalyzes formation of phosphoenolpyruvate, AMP, and inorganic pyrophosphate from pyruvate, ATP, and orthophosphate. A pyrophosphoryl and phosphoryl form of the enzyme is involved in this transfer. The [32P]phosphoryl form of pyruvate, phosphate dikinase was prepared with enzyme isolated from Bacteroides symbiosus. The [32P]phosphoryl enzyme was found to have properties corresponding to a phosphoramidate linkage and this was confirmed by isolation of 3-[32P]phosphohistidine from alkaline hydrolysates of the enzyme. The histidyl residue is considered to be the pyrophosphoryl- and phosphoryl-carrier between the three substrate sites of this enzyme. PMID:12506

  6. Conduction electrons in acceptor-doped GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Wlodek; Raymond, Andre; Kubisa, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    We review magneto-optical and magneto-transport effects in GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures doped in GaAlAs barriers with donors, providing two-dimensional (2D) electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs quantum wells (QWS), and additionally doped with smaller amounts of acceptors (mostly Be atoms) in the vicinity of 2DEG. One may also deal with residual acceptors (mostly C atoms). The behavior of such systems in the presence of a magnetic field differs appreciably from those doped in the vicinity of 2DEG with donors. Three subjects related to the acceptor-doped heterostructures are considered. First is the problem of bound states of conduction electrons confined to the vicinity of negatively charged acceptors by the joint effect of a QW and an external magnetic field parallel to the growth direction. A variational theory of such states is presented, demonstrating that an electron turning around a repulsive center has discrete energies above the corresponding Landau levels. Experimental evidence for the discrete electron energies comes from the work on interband photo-magneto-luminescence, intraband cyclotron resonance and quantum magneto-transport (the Quantum Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas effects). An electron rain-down effect at weak electric fields and a boil-off effect at strong electric fields are introduced. It is demonstrated, both theoretically and experimentally, that a negatively charged acceptor can localize more than one electron. The second subject describes experiment and theory of asymmetric quantized Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas plateaus in acceptor-doped GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures. It is shown that the main features of the plateau asymmetry can be attributed to asymmetric density of Landau states in the presence of acceptors. However, at high magnetic fields, the rain-down effect is also at work. The third subject deals with the so-called disorder modes (DMs) in the cyclotron resonance of conduction electrons. The DMs originate from random distributions of negatively

  7. Impact of donor-acceptor geometry and metal chelation on photophysical properties and applications of triarylboranes.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Zachary M; Wang, Suning

    2009-10-20

    Three-coordinate organoboron compounds have recently found a wide range of applications in materials chemistry as nonlinear optical materials, chemical sensors, and emitters for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). These compounds are excellent electron acceptors due to the empty p(pi) orbital on the boron center. When accompanied by electron donors such as amines, these molecules possess large electronic dipoles, which promote donor-acceptor charge-transfer upon excitation with light. Because of this, donor-acceptor triarylboranes are often highly luminescent both in the solid state and in solution. In this Account, we describe our research to develop donor-acceptor triarylboranes as efficient blue emitters for OLEDs. Through the use of hole-transporting donor groups such as 1-napthylphenylamines, we have prepared multifunctional triarylboranes that can act as the emissive, electron transport, or hole transport layers in OLEDs. We have also examined donor-acceptor compounds based on 2,2'-dipyridylamine or 7-azaindolyl donors, several of which have fluorescent quantum efficiencies approaching 100%. We are also investigating the chemistry of metal-containing triarylboranes. Our studies show that the electron-deficient boryl group can greatly facilitate metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions and phosphorescence. In addition, electronegative linker groups such as 2,2'-bipyridine can act in synergy with metal chelation to greatly improve the electron-accepting ability and Lewis acidity of triarylboranes. Donor-acceptor triarylboranes developed in our laboratory can also serve as a series of "switch-on" sensors for fluoride ions. When the donor and acceptor are linked by rigid naphthyl or nonrigid silane linkers, donor-acceptor conjugation is disrupted and charge transfer occurs primarily through space. The binding of fluoride ions to the boron center disrupts this charge transfer, activating alternative pi --> pi* transitions in the molecule and changing the

  8. Multi-spectral characterization & effect of metal ions on the binding of bovine serum albumin upon interaction with a lincosamide antibiotic drug, clindamycin phosphate.

    PubMed

    Meti, Manjunath D; Byadagi, Kirthi S; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A

    2014-09-01

    The interaction of clindamycin phosphate (CP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) is studied by using fluorescence spectra, UV-visible absorption, synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS), CD, 3D fluorescence spectra and lifetime measurements under simulated physiological conditions. CP effectively quenched intrinsic fluorescence of BSA. The binding constants KA values are 2.540×10(5), 4.960×10(5), 7.207×10(5) L mol(-1), the number of binding sites n and corresponding thermodynamic parameters ΔG(o), ΔH(o) and ΔS(o) between CP and BSA were calculated at different temperatures. The interaction between CP and BSA occurs through dynamic quenching and the effect of CP on the conformation of BSA was also analyzed using SFS. The average binding distance r between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (CP) was determined based on Förster's theory. The results of fluorescence spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra and SFS show that the secondary structure of the protein has been changed in the presence of CP.

  9. Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Wykoff, D D; O'Shea, E K

    2001-01-01

    Cellular metabolism depends on the appropriate concentration of intracellular inorganic phosphate; however, little is known about how phosphate concentrations are sensed. The similarity of Pho84p, a high-affinity phosphate transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to the glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p has led to the hypothesis that Pho84p is an inorganic phosphate sensor. Furthermore, pho84Delta strains have defects in phosphate signaling; they constitutively express PHO5, a phosphate starvation-inducible gene. We began these studies to determine the role of phosphate transporters in signaling phosphate starvation. Previous experiments demonstrated a defect in phosphate uptake in phosphate-starved pho84Delta cells; however, the pho84Delta strain expresses PHO5 constitutively when grown in phosphate-replete media. We determined that pho84Delta cells have a significant defect in phosphate uptake even when grown in high phosphate media. Overexpression of unrelated phosphate transporters or a glycerophosphoinositol transporter in the pho84Delta strain suppresses the PHO5 constitutive phenotype. These data suggest that PHO84 is not required for sensing phosphate. We further characterized putative phosphate transporters, identifying two new phosphate transporters, PHO90 and PHO91. A synthetic lethal phenotype was observed when five phosphate transporters were inactivated, and the contribution of each transporter to uptake in high phosphate conditions was determined. Finally, a PHO84-dependent compensation response was identified; the abundance of Pho84p at the plasma membrane increases in cells that are defective in other phosphate transporters. PMID:11779791

  10. Thioredoxin binding site of phosphoribulokinase overlaps the catalytic site. [R

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, M.A.; Hartman, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    The ATP-regulatory binding site of phosphoribulokinase was studied using bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate (BrAcNHEtOP). BrAcNHEtOP binds to the active-regulatory binding site of the protein. Following trypsin degradation of the labeled protein, fragments were separated by HPLC and sequenced. (DT)

  11. Description of electron transfer in the ground and excited states of organic donor–acceptor systems by single-reference and multi-reference density functional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael

    2014-09-28

    Electron transfer in the ground and excited states of a model donor–acceptor (D–A) system is investigated using the single-reference and multi-reference density functional theory (DFT) methods. To analyze the results of the calculations, a simple two-site multi-reference model was derived that predicts a stepwise electron transfer in the S{sub 0} state and a wave-like dependence of the S{sub 1} electron transfer on the external stimulus. The standard single-reference Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT approach and the time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) method failed to describe the correct dependence of the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} electron transfer on the external electric field applied along the donor–acceptor system. The multi-reference DFT approach, the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced KS (REKS) method, was able to successfully reproduce the correct behavior of the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} electron transfer on the applied field. The REKS method was benchmarked against experimentally measured gas phase charge transfer excitations in a series of organic donor–acceptor complexes and displayed its ability to describe this type of electronic transitions with a very high accuracy, mean absolute error of 0.05 eV with the use of the standard range separated density functionals. On the basis of the calculations undertaken in this work, it is suggested that the non-adiabatic coupling between the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} states may interfere with the electron transfer in a weakly coupled donor–acceptor system. It is also suggested that the electronic excitation of a D{sup +}–A{sup −} system may play a dual role by assisting the further electron transfer at certain magnitudes of the applied electric field and causing the backward transfer at lower electric field strengths.

  12. Bioreduction of U(VI) in the presence of phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanov, M. I.; Mishra, B.; Latta, D. E.; Rui, X.; Kwon, M.-J.; Fletcher, K. E.; Loeffler, F. E.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Kemner, K. M.

    2012-04-01

    Phosphate/phosphoryl moieties are ubiquitous in biological and environmental systems and can potentially affect the speciation of uranium during natural attenuation or stimulated bioremediation processes. The reactivity between U(VI) and phosphate has been studied extensively, but the significant influence of phosphate groups on the formation of reduced U(IV) species has only recently been recognized. We will compare and contrast the bioreduction of dissolved and solid-phase U(VI) by Gram-positive and Gram-negative metal-reducing bacteria (Shewanella, Anaeromyxobacter, Geobacter, and Desulfitobacterium) in the presence and absence of phosphate, from the perspective of solid-phase U speciation as determined by U L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS). In all cases examined, the presence of phosphate at concentrations of P/U > 1 led to the formation of reduced, inner-sphere complexed U(IV)-phosphate species that prevented the lowest-solubility U(IV) mineral uraninite (UO2) from forming over at least several months. In the absence of phosphate, nanoparticulate uraninite or complexed non-uraninite U(IV) species were observed (depending on the system and conditions), suggesting that the interplay between the chemical conditions at the location of electron transfer to U(VI) control the U(IV) product and subsequently the stability of reduced U. The importance of non-uraninite U(IV) species will be discussed in the context of their predominance in biostimulated sediments from the Oak Ridge field site in the United States.

  13. Analytical study for the charge-transfer complexes of rosuvastatin calcium with π-acceptors.

    PubMed

    Alzoman, Nourah Z; Sultan, Maha A; Maher, Hadir M; Alshehri, Mona M; Wani, Tanveer A; Darwish, Ibrahim A

    2013-07-03

    Studies were carried out to investigate the charge-transfer (CT) reaction of ROS-Ca, as a n-electron donor with various p-acceptors: tetracyanoethylene, p-chloranilic acid, 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone, 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-1,4-benzoquinone, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone, 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-quinodimethane, and 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone. Different colored CT complexes were obtained. The reaction mechanism and site of interaction were determined by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometric techniques and computational molecular modeling. The formation of the colored complexes was utilized in the development of simple, rapid and accurate spectrophotometric methods for the determination of ROS-Ca. Under the optimum reaction conditions, linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (0.9984-0.9995) were found between the absorbances and the concentrations of ROS-Ca in the range of 2-200 mg mL⁻¹. The limits of detection ranged from 0.41 to 12.24 mg mL⁻¹. No interference could be observed from the additives commonly present in the tablets or from the drugs that are co-formulated with ROS-Ca in its combined formulations. The methods were successfully applied to the analysis of tablets with good accuracy and precision; the recovery percentages ranged from 99.54-100.46 ± 1.58-1.82%. The results were compared favorably with the reported method. The proposed methods are practical and valuable for routine application in quality control laboratories for determination of ROS-Ca in its bulk form and tablets.

  14. Structural basis for glucose-6-phosphate activation of glycogen synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Roach, Peter J.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2010-11-22

    Regulation of the storage of glycogen, one of the major energy reserves, is of utmost metabolic importance. In eukaryotes, this regulation is accomplished through glucose-6-phosphate levels and protein phosphorylation. Glycogen synthase homologs in bacteria and archaea lack regulation, while the eukaryotic enzymes are inhibited by protein kinase mediated phosphorylation and activated by protein phosphatases and glucose-6-phosphate binding. We determined the crystal structures corresponding to the basal activity state and glucose-6-phosphate activated state of yeast glycogen synthase-2. The enzyme is assembled into an unusual tetramer by an insertion unique to the eukaryotic enzymes, and this subunit interface is rearranged by the binding of glucose-6-phosphate, which frees the active site cleft and facilitates catalysis. Using both mutagenesis and intein-mediated phospho-peptide ligation experiments, we demonstrate that the enzyme's response to glucose-6-phosphate is controlled by Arg583 and Arg587, while four additional arginine residues present within the same regulatory helix regulate the response to phosphorylation.

  15. Non-fullerene electron acceptors for use in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian B; Holliday, Sarah; Chen, Hung-Yang; Cryer, Samuel J; McCulloch, Iain

    2015-11-17

    The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted to optimize the absorbing, energetic, and transport properties of the donor material, fullerenes remain as the exclusive electron acceptor in all high performance devices. Very recently, some new non-fullerene acceptors have been demonstrated to outperform fullerenes in comparative devices. This Account describes this progress, discussing molecular design considerations and the structure-property relationships that are emerging. The motivation to replace fullerene acceptors stems from their synthetic inflexibility, leading to constraints in manipulating frontier energy levels, as well as poor absorption in the solar spectrum range, and an inherent tendency to undergo postfabrication crystallization, resulting in device instability. New acceptors have to address these limitations, providing tunable absorption with high extinction coefficients, thus contributing to device photocurrent. The ability to vary and optimize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level for a specific donor polymer is also an important requirement, ensuring minimal energy loss on electron transfer and as high an internal voltage as possible. Initially perylene diimide acceptors were evaluated as promising acceptor materials. These electron deficient aromatic molecules can exhibit good electron transport, facilitated by close packed herringbone crystal motifs, and their energy levels can be synthetically tuned. The principal drawback of this class of materials, their tendency to crystallize on too large a length scale for an optimal heterojunction nanostructure, has been shown to be overcome through introduction of conformation twisting through steric effects. This has been primarily achieved by coupling two units together, forming dimers with

  16. Non-fullerene electron acceptors for use in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian B; Holliday, Sarah; Chen, Hung-Yang; Cryer, Samuel J; McCulloch, Iain

    2015-11-17

    The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted to optimize the absorbing, energetic, and transport properties of the donor material, fullerenes remain as the exclusive electron acceptor in all high performance devices. Very recently, some new non-fullerene acceptors have been demonstrated to outperform fullerenes in comparative devices. This Account describes this progress, discussing molecular design considerations and the structure-property relationships that are emerging. The motivation to replace fullerene acceptors stems from their synthetic inflexibility, leading to constraints in manipulating frontier energy levels, as well as poor absorption in the solar spectrum range, and an inherent tendency to undergo postfabrication crystallization, resulting in device instability. New acceptors have to address these limitations, providing tunable absorption with high extinction coefficients, thus contributing to device photocurrent. The ability to vary and optimize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level for a specific donor polymer is also an important requirement, ensuring minimal energy loss on electron transfer and as high an internal voltage as possible. Initially perylene diimide acceptors were evaluated as promising acceptor materials. These electron deficient aromatic molecules can exhibit good electron transport, facilitated by close packed herringbone crystal motifs, and their energy levels can be synthetically tuned. The principal drawback of this class of materials, their tendency to crystallize on too large a length scale for an optimal heterojunction nanostructure, has been shown to be overcome through introduction of conformation twisting through steric effects. This has been primarily achieved by coupling two units together, forming dimers with

  17. Non-Fullerene Electron Acceptors for Use in Organic Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted to optimize the absorbing, energetic, and transport properties of the donor material, fullerenes remain as the exclusive electron acceptor in all high performance devices. Very recently, some new non-fullerene acceptors have been demonstrated to outperform fullerenes in comparative devices. This Account describes this progress, discussing molecular design considerations and the structure–property relationships that are emerging. The motivation to replace fullerene acceptors stems from their synthetic inflexibility, leading to constraints in manipulating frontier energy levels, as well as poor absorption in the solar spectrum range, and an inherent tendency to undergo postfabrication crystallization, resulting in device instability. New acceptors have to address these limitations, providing tunable absorption with high extinction coefficients, thus contributing to device photocurrent. The ability to vary and optimize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level for a specific donor polymer is also an important requirement, ensuring minimal energy loss on electron transfer and as high an internal voltage as possible. Initially perylene diimide acceptors were evaluated as promising acceptor materials. These electron deficient aromatic molecules can exhibit good electron transport, facilitated by close packed herringbone crystal motifs, and their energy levels can be synthetically tuned. The principal drawback of this class of materials, their tendency to crystallize on too large a length scale for an optimal heterojunction nanostructure, has been shown to be overcome through introduction of conformation twisting through steric effects. This has been primarily achieved by coupling two units together

  18. Insights on the design and electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The development of conjugated organic materials has become a rapidly evolving field of research, particularly with a view toward practical applications in so-called organic electronics that encompass a variety of device types, such as OLEDs, OPVs, and OFETs. Almost all of these devices minimally require the presence of electron-donor and -acceptor components that act as p- and n-type semiconductors, respectively. Research over the past two decades has shown that while there is an abundant resource of organic p-type materials, suitable n-type species are few and far between. To overcome this severe bottleneck for the further development of organic electronics, researchers have identified organo-main-group avenues as valuable alternatives toward organic electron-acceptor materials that may ultimately be used as n-type components in practical devices. One particular element of interest in this context is phosphorus, which at first glance may not necessarily suggest such properties. In this Account, I provide detailed insights on the origin of the electron-acceptor properties of organophosphorus-based conjugated materials and include an overview of important molecular species that have been developed by my group and others. To this end, I explain that the electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials originate from an interaction known as negative hyperconjugation. While this particular interaction creates a simply inductively withdrawing phosphoryl substituent for π-conjugated scaffolds, incorporation of a phosphorus atom as an integral part of a cyclic substructure within a π-conjugated system provides a much more complex, versatile, and consequently highly valuable tool for the tuning of the electron-acceptor properties of the materials. Notably, the degree of negative hyperconjugation can effectively be tailored in various ways via simple substitution at the phosphorus center. This is now well established for phosphole-based molecular

  19. Insights on the design and electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The development of conjugated organic materials has become a rapidly evolving field of research, particularly with a view toward practical applications in so-called organic electronics that encompass a variety of device types, such as OLEDs, OPVs, and OFETs. Almost all of these devices minimally require the presence of electron-donor and -acceptor components that act as p- and n-type semiconductors, respectively. Research over the past two decades has shown that while there is an abundant resource of organic p-type materials, suitable n-type species are few and far between. To overcome this severe bottleneck for the further development of organic electronics, researchers have identified organo-main-group avenues as valuable alternatives toward organic electron-acceptor materials that may ultimately be used as n-type components in practical devices. One particular element of interest in this context is phosphorus, which at first glance may not necessarily suggest such properties. In this Account, I provide detailed insights on the origin of the electron-acceptor properties of organophosphorus-based conjugated materials and include an overview of important molecular species that have been developed by my group and others. To this end, I explain that the electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials originate from an interaction known as negative hyperconjugation. While this particular interaction creates a simply inductively withdrawing phosphoryl substituent for π-conjugated scaffolds, incorporation of a phosphorus atom as an integral part of a cyclic substructure within a π-conjugated system provides a much more complex, versatile, and consequently highly valuable tool for the tuning of the electron-acceptor properties of the materials. Notably, the degree of negative hyperconjugation can effectively be tailored in various ways via simple substitution at the phosphorus center. This is now well established for phosphole-based molecular

  20. Uranium endowments in phosphate rock.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Andrea E; Schnug, Ewald; Prasser, Horst-Michael; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2014-04-15

    This study seeks to identify and specify the components that make up the prospects of U recovery from phosphate rock. A systems approach is taken. The assessment includes i) reviewing past recovery experience and lessons learned; ii) identifying factors that determine recovery; and iii) establishing a contemporary evaluation of U endowments in phosphate rock reserves, as well as the available and recoverable amounts from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production. We find that in the past, recovery did not fulfill its potential and that the breakup of the Soviet Union worsened then-favorable recovery market conditions in the 1990s. We find that an estimated 5.7 million tU may be recoverable from phosphate rock reserves. In 2010, the recoverable tU from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production may have been 15,000 tU and 11,000 tU, respectively. This could have filled the world U supply-demand gap for nuclear energy production. The results suggest that the U.S., Morocco, Tunisia, and Russia would be particularly well-suited to recover U, taking infrastructural considerations into account. We demonstrate future research needs, as well as sustainability orientations. We conclude that in order to promote investment and production, it seems necessary to establish long-term contracts at guaranteed prices, ensuring profitability for phosphoric acid producers. PMID:24556272

  1. Uranium endowments in phosphate rock.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Andrea E; Schnug, Ewald; Prasser, Horst-Michael; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2014-04-15

    This study seeks to identify and specify the components that make up the prospects of U recovery from phosphate rock. A systems approach is taken. The assessment includes i) reviewing past recovery experience and lessons learned; ii) identifying factors that determine recovery; and iii) establishing a contemporary evaluation of U endowments in phosphate rock reserves, as well as the available and recoverable amounts from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production. We find that in the past, recovery did not fulfill its potential and that the breakup of the Soviet Union worsened then-favorable recovery market conditions in the 1990s. We find that an estimated 5.7 million tU may be recoverable from phosphate rock reserves. In 2010, the recoverable tU from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production may have been 15,000 tU and 11,000 tU, respectively. This could have filled the world U supply-demand gap for nuclear energy production. The results suggest that the U.S., Morocco, Tunisia, and Russia would be particularly well-suited to recover U, taking infrastructural considerations into account. We demonstrate future research needs, as well as sustainability orientations. We conclude that in order to promote investment and production, it seems necessary to establish long-term contracts at guaranteed prices, ensuring profitability for phosphoric acid producers.

  2. Studies on the inhibition of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase by stabilized reaction intermediates and stereodefined azido phosphates.

    PubMed

    Sanllehí, Pol; Abad, José-Luís; Bujons, Jordi; Casas, Josefina; Delgado, Antonio

    2016-11-10

    Two kinds of inhibitors of the PLP-dependent enzyme sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase have been designed and tested on the bacterial (StS1PL) and the human (hS1PL) enzymes. Amino phosphates 1, 12, and 32, mimicking the intermediate aldimines of the catalytic process, were weak inhibitors on both enzyme sources. On the other hand, a series of stereodefined azido phosphates, resulting from the replacement of the amino group of the natural substrates with an azido group, afforded competitive inhibitors in the low micromolar range on both enzyme sources. This similar behavior represents an experimental evidence of the reported structural similarities for both enzymes at their active site level. Interestingly, the anti-isomers of the non-natural enantiomeric series where the most potent inhibitors on hS1PL.

  3. Simulation of phosphate transport in sewage-contaminated groundwater, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1996-01-01

    Sewage-contaminated groundwater currently discharges to Ashumet Pond, located on Cape Cod, Massachusetts Phosphate concentrations as high as 60 ??mol l-1 have been measured in groundwater entering Ashumet Pond, and there is concern that the rate of eutrophication could increase. Phosphate in the sewage plume is sorbed by aquifer sediment; the amount is a function of phosphate concentration and pH. A nonelectrostatic surface-complexation model coupled with a one-dimensional solute-transport code was used to simulate sorption and desorption of phosphate in laboratory column experiments. The model simulated sorption of phosphate reasonably well, although the slow rate of approach to complete breakthrough indicated a nonequilibrium process that was not accounted for in the solute-transport model The rate of phosphate desorption in the column experiments was relatively slow Phosphate could still be measured in effluent after 160 pore volumes of uncontaminated groundwater had been flushed through the columns. Desorption was partly a function of the slowly decreasing pH in the columns and could be modeled quantitatively. Disposal of sewage at this site is scheduled to stop in 1995; however, a large reservoir of sorbed phosphate exists on aquifer sediment upgradient from Ashumet Pond. Computer simulations predict that desorption of phosphate could result in contamination of Ashumet Pond for decades.

  4. Characterization of Thiamin Phosphate Kinase in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Maria; Nosaka, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate is an essential cofactor in all living systems. In its biosynthesis, the thiamin structure is initially formed as thiamin phosphate from a thiazole and a pyrimidine moiety, and then thiamin pyrophosphate is synthesized from thiamin phosphate. Many eubacterial cells directly synthesize thiamin pyrophosphate by the phosphorylation of thiamin phosphate by thiamin phosphate kinase (ThiL), whereas this final step occurs in two stages in eukaryotic cells and some eubacterial cells: hydrolysis of thiamin phosphate to free thiamin and its pyrophosphorylation by thiamin pyrophosphokinase. In addition, some eubacteria have thiamin kinase, a salvage enzyme that converts the incorporated thiamin from the environment to thiamin phosphate. This final step in thiamin biosynthesis has never been experimentally investigated in archaea, although the putative thiL genes are found in their genome database. In this study, we observed thiamin phosphate kinase activity in the soluble fraction of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis. On the other hand, neither thiamin pyrophosphokinase nor thiamin kinase activity was detected, suggesting that in this archaeon the phosphorylation of thiamin phosphate is only way to synthesize thiamin pyrophosphate and it cannot use exogenous thiamin for the salvage synthesis of thiamin pyrophosphate. We also investigated the kinetic properties of thiamin phosphate kinase activity using the recombinant ThiL protein from P. calidifontis. Furthermore, the results obtained by site-directed mutagenesis suggest that the Ser196 of ThiL protein plays a pivotal role in the catalytic process.

  5. Dissolution of phosphate matrices based on the thorium phosphate diphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacheux, N.; Thomas, A. C.; Brandel, V.; Genet, M.

    2000-07-01

    Several authors have reported the use of phosphate matrices like apatites, monazites or NZP for the immobilization of actinides coming from an advanced reprocessing or for the final disposal of the excess plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons. The thorium phosphate diphosphate Th4(PO4)4P2O7 (namely TPD) was also proposed for this purpose. Indeed, its structure allows the replacement of large amounts of tetravalent actinides like uranium, neptunium or plutonium leading to the obtention of solid solutions. The maximum weight loading was estimated to be equal to about 48% for uranium, 33% for neptunium and 26% for plutonium.

  6. A broadly applicable NHC-Cu-catalyzed approach for efficient, site-, and enantioselective coupling of readily accessible (pinacolato)alkenylboron compounds to allylic phosphates and applications to natural product synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fang; Carr, James L; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2014-02-01

    A set of protocols for catalytic enantioselective allylic substitution (EAS) reactions that allow for additions of alkenyl units to readily accessible allylic electrophiles is disclosed. Transformations afford 1,4-dienes that contain a tertiary carbon stereogenic site and are promoted by 1.0-5.0 mol % of a copper complex of an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC). Aryl- as well as alkyl-substituted electrophiles bearing a di- or trisubstituted alkene may be employed. Reactions can involve a variety of robust alkenyl-(pinacolatoboron) [alkenyl-B(pin)] compounds that can be either purchased or prepared by various efficient, site-, and/or stereoselective catalytic reactions, such as cross-metathesis or proto-boryl additions to terminal alkynes. Vinyl-, E-, or Z-disubstituted alkenyl-, 1,1-disubstituted alkenyl-, acyclic, or heterocyclic trisubstituted alkenyl groups may be added in up to >98% yield, >98:2 SN2':SN2, and 99:1 enantiomeric ratio (er). NHC-Cu-catalyzed EAS with alkenyl-B(pin) reagents containing a conjugated carboxylic ester or aldehyde group proceed to provide the desired 1,4-diene products in good yield and with high enantioselectivity despite the presence of a sensitive stereogenic tertiary carbon center that could be considered prone to epimerization. In most instances, the alternative approach of utilizing an alkenylmetal reagent (e.g., an Al-based species) represents an incompatible option. The utility of the approach is illustrated through applications to enantioselective synthesis of natural products such as santolina alcohol, semburin, nyasol, heliespirone A, and heliannuol E. PMID:24467274

  7. Catalytic reaction of cytokinin dehydrogenase: preference for quinones as electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Fraaije, Marco W; Galuszka, Petr; Sebela, Marek; Pec, Pavel; Hrbác, Jan; Novák, Ondrej; Bilyeu, Kristin D; English, James T; Frébort, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.99.12) was studied in detail using the recombinant flavoenzyme from maize. Determination of the redox potential of the covalently linked flavin cofactor revealed a relatively high potential dictating the type of electron acceptor that can be used by the enzyme. Using 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone or 1,4-naphthoquinone as electron acceptor, turnover rates with N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine of approx. 150 s(-1) could be obtained. This suggests that the natural electron acceptor of the enzyme is quite probably a p-quinone or similar compound. By using the stopped-flow technique, it was found that the enzyme is rapidly reduced by N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine (k(red)=950 s(-1)). Re-oxidation of the reduced enzyme by molecular oxygen is too slow to be of physiological relevance, confirming its classification as a dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was established for the first time that the enzyme is capable of degrading aromatic cytokinins, although at low reaction rates. As a result, the enzyme displays a dual catalytic mode for oxidative degradation of cytokinins: a low-rate and low-substrate specificity reaction with oxygen as the electron acceptor, and high activity and strict specificity for isopentenyladenine and analogous cytokinins with some specific electron acceptors. PMID:14965342

  8. Nature of the attractive interaction between proton acceptors and organic ring systems.

    PubMed

    Arras, Emmanuel; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo; Klappenberger, Florian; Barth, Johannes V

    2012-12-14

    Systematic ab initio calculations are combined with a deconvolution of electrostatic contributions to analyze the interplay between potential hydrogen bond acceptors and organic rings with C(sp(2))-H groups (benzene, pyridine and cyclopentadiene). A distinct anisotropic interaction between the ring systems and the electron lone pairs of cyanide, water and other acceptor species is revealed that favors the in-plane orientation of the proton acceptor group. In the attractive regime this interaction carries a pronounced electrostatic signature. By decomposing the electrostatic contribution into parts attributed to different subunits of the ring systems we demonstrate that a major proportion of the interaction energy gain is originating from the non-adjacent moieties, that are not in close contact with. This behavior holds equally for homocyclic, heterocyclic and non-aromatic rings but contrasts that of the ethyne molecule, taken as reference for a weak hydrogen bond donor clearly exhibiting the expected localized character. The ring interaction requires the presence of π-electron clouds and typically results in an interaction energy gain of 40 to 80 meV. Our findings suggest the proton acceptor-ring interaction as a new category of intermolecular non-covalent interactions.

  9. Experimental investigation of donor-acceptor electron transfer and back transfer in solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, R.C.; Lin, Y.; Fayer, M.D. )

    1989-08-24

    Electron transfer from an optically excited donor (rubrene) to randomly distributed acceptors (duroquinone) followed by electron back transfer in a rigid solution (sucrose octaacetate) has been studied experimentally. The forward electron-transfer process was observed by time-dependent fluorescence quenching measurements, while the electron back transfer from the radical anion to the radical cation was monitored by use of the picosecond transient grating technique. A statistical mechanics theory is used to describe the time-dependent dynamics of the system and to extract the forward- and back-transfer parameters from the data. The theory includes donor-acceptor and acceptor-acceptor excluded volume. It is found that the inclusion of excluded volume is necessary to obtain accurate transfer parameters. These parameters enable a detailed description of the electron transfer and recombination dynamics to be given. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent. A variety of time-dependent properties of the system are calculated. These include the time-dependent ion populations and the probability that the ith acceptor is an ion as a function of time and distance. In addition, (R(t)) and ({tau}(t)), which are the average ion separation as a function of time and the average ion existence time as a function of ion separation, respectively, are calculated.

  10. Phosphate-a poison for humans?

    PubMed

    Komaba, Hirotaka; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2016-10-01

    Maintenance of phosphate balance is essential for life, and mammals have developed a sophisticated system to regulate phosphate homeostasis over the course of evolution. However, due to the dependence of phosphate elimination on the kidney, humans with decreased kidney function are likely to be in a positive phosphate balance. Phosphate excess has been well recognized as a critical factor in the pathogenesis of mineral and bone disorders associated with chronic kidney disease, but recent investigations have also uncovered toxic effects of phosphate on the cardiovascular system and the aging process. Compelling evidence also suggests that increased fibroblastic growth factor 23 and parathyroid hormone levels in response to a positive phosphate balance contribute to adverse clinical outcomes. These insights support the current practice of managing serum phosphate in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, although definitive evidence of these effects is lacking. Given the potential toxicity of excess phosphate, the general population may also be viewed as a target for phosphate management. However, the widespread implementation of dietary phosphate intervention in the general population may not be warranted due to the limited impact of increased phosphate intake on mineral metabolism and clinical outcomes. Nonetheless, the increasing incidence of kidney disease or injury in our aging society emphasizes the potential importance of this issue. Further work is needed to more completely characterize phosphate toxicity and to establish the optimal therapeutic strategy for managing phosphate in patients with chronic kidney disease and in the general population. PMID:27282935

  11. Process for producing granular diammonium phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, W.D.

    1988-05-17

    A process for the production of solid granular diammonium phosphate is described comprising: reacting anhydrous ammonia with phosphoric acid in a reactor to form a partially reacted slurry of monoammonium phosphate and diammonium phosphate; pumping the slurry to a granulator-reactor and further reacting the slurry with anhydrous ammonia to form a solid granular diammonium phosphate mixture having a particle range size consisting of undersize, oversize and product; drying the solid granular diammonium phosphate mixture in a dryer; dividing the dried solid granular diammonium phosphate mixture being discharged from the dryer into a first portion and a second portion; diverting and feeding the first portion of the dried granular diammonium phosphate mixture back to the granulator-reactor; feeding the second portion of dried granular diammonium phosphate mixture to a classifying means consisting of a set of screens including an oversize screen and a product screen set to a narrow size separation to separate the mixture of the solid granular diammonium phosphate into undersize, oversize and product solid granular diammonium phosphate; milling the oversize granular diammonium phosphate; recycling to the granular-reactor the milled oversized granular diammonium phosphate and the undersized granular particles obtained during the classifying of the solid granular diammonium phosphate mixture; and collecting the desired product granular particle thereby enhancing the production of a narrow range of granular diammonium phosphate particle size distribution within a broad range of particle size distribution.

  12. Effect of acceptor (Mg) concentration on the electrical resistance at room and high (200 deg. C) temperatures of acceptor (Mg)-doped BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Seok-Hyun; Hong, Min-Hee; Hong, Jeong-Oh; Kim, Young-Tae; Hur, Kang-Heon

    2007-09-01

    The behaviors of the electrical resistance at room and high (200 deg. C) temperatures of acceptor (Mg)-doped BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics with the increase of acceptor concentration were investigated. A series of coarse-grained specimens with different acceptor concentrations that were sintered at various oxygen partial pressures was prepared. The critical acceptor concentrations, beyond which the room temperature resistance increases abruptly, were experimentally evaluated and they were found to increase with a decrease in oxygen partial pressure during sintering. Each defect and electron concentrations at sintering and room temperature as a function of acceptor concentration were theoretically calculated. The results calculated could explain the experimentally observed behavior of the resistance versus acceptor concentration. The high (200 deg. C) temperature resistances under high electric field showed resistance degradation critically depending on acceptor concentration in the very small concentration range below {approx}0.1 mol %, which occurred easily with the increase of acceptor concentration. It was explained that such behavior was caused by the variation of potential barrier of grain boundaries for the migration of oxygen vacancies as a function of acceptor concentration.

  13. Hydrogen bonding mediated by key orbital interactions determines hydration enthalpy differences of phosphate water clusters.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Eliza A; Chapman, Michael S; Evanseck, Jeffrey D

    2007-10-25

    Electronic structure calculations have been carried out to provide a molecular interpretation for dihydrogen phosphate stability in water relative to that of metaphosphate. Specifically, hydration enthalpies of biologically important metaphosphate and dihydrogen phosphate with one to three waters have been computed with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation and density functional theory (B3LYP) with up to the aug-cc-pvtz basis set and compared to experiment. The inclusion of basis set superposition error corrections and supplemental diffuse functions are necessary to predict hydration enthalpies within experimental uncertainty. Natural bond orbital analysis is used to rationalize underlying hydrogen bond configurations and key orbital interactions responsible for the experimentally reported difference in hydration enthalpies between metaphosphate and dihydrogen phosphate. In general, dihydrogen phosphate forms stronger hydrogen bonds compared to metaphosphate due to a greater charge transfer or enhanced orbital overlap between the phosphoryl oxygen lone pairs, n(O), and the antibonding O-H bond of water. Intramolecular distal lone pair repulsion with the donor n(O) orbital of dihydrogen phosphate distorts symmetric conformations, which improves n(O) and sigma*(O-H) overlap and ultimately the hydrogen bond strength. Unlike metaphosphate, water complexed to dihydrogen phosphate can serve as both a hydrogen bond donor and a hydrogen bond acceptor, which results in cooperative charge transfer and a reduction of the energy gap between n(O) and sigma*(O-H), leading to stronger hydrogen bonds. This study offers insight into how orbital interactions mediate hydrogen bond strengths with potential implications on the understanding of the kinetics and mechanism in enzymatic phosphoryl transfer reactions.

  14. Phosphoryl transfer from α-d-glucose 1-phosphate catalyzed by Escherichia coli sugar-phosphate phosphatases of two protein superfamily types.

    PubMed

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s(-1)) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys(189) and Cys(195). Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H2 (18)O solvent proceeded with complete (18)O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1-P, but not C-1-O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  15. Detergent phosphate bans and eutrophication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.F.; Jones, R.A.

    1986-04-01

    The Vollenweider-OECD eutrophication model has been expanded to approximately 400 lakes. It is possible to make a quantitative prediction of the effects of a detergent phosphate ban and thereby to ascertain the potential benefits of such a ban. In order to assess the effect of a detergent phosphate ban on water quality it is necessary to know the percentage of phosphorus in the domestic waste water that enters the water body, either directly or indirectly, and the percentage of the total phosphorus load that is derived from domestic wastewater. Although detergent phosphate bans generally will not result in an overall improvement to water quality, there may be some situations in which eutrophication-related water quality would be improved by a ban. 8 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  16. Preparation, mechanical property and cytocompatibility of freeze-cast porous calcium phosphate ceramics reinforced by phosphate-based glass.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqiu; He, Fupo; Ye, Jiandong

    2016-12-01

    In this study, phosphate-based glass (PG) was used as a sintering aid for freeze-cast porous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic, which was sintered under a lower temperature (1000°C). The phase composition, pore structure, compressive strength, and cytocompatibility of calcium phosphate composite ceramics (PG-BCP) were evaluated. The results indicated that PG additive reacted with calcium phosphate during the sintering process, forming β-Ca2P2O7; the ions of sodium and magnesium from PG partially substituted the calcium sites of β-calcium phosphate in BCP. The PG-BCP showed good cytocompatibility. The pore width of the porous PG-BCP ceramics was around 50μm, regardless of the amount of PG sintering aid. As the content of PG increased from 0wt.% to 15wt.%, the compressive strength of PG-BCP increased from 0.02 MP to 0.28MPa. When the PG additive was 17.5wt.%, the compressive strength of PG-BCP dramatically increased to 5.66MPa. Addition of 15wt.% PG was the critical point for the properties of PG-BCP. PG is considered as an effective sintering aid for freeze-cast porous bioceramics. PMID:27612796

  17. Proficiency of acceptor-donor-acceptor organic dye with spiro-MeOTAD HTM on the photovoltaic performance of dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramavenkateswari, K.; Venkatachalam, P.

    2016-08-01

    This work investigates the proficiency of acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) organic dye Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate (DIAC) as photosensitizer on the photovoltaic parameters of silver (Ag) doped TiO2 photoanode dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with quasi-solid state electrolyte/hole transport material (HTM) spiro-MeOTAD. TNSs (TiO2 nanosticks) photoanodes are prepared through sol-gel method and hydrothermal technique. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET measurement were used to characterize the structure and morphology of TiO2 nanostructures. The Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate organic dye with TNPs-Ag@TNSs composite photoanode structure and spiro-MeOTAD HTM exhibited better power conversion efficiency (PCE). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Proficiency of acceptor-donor-acceptor organic dye with spiro-MeOTAD HTM on the photovoltaic performance of dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramavenkateswari, K.; Venkatachalam, P.

    2016-09-01

    This work investigates the proficiency of acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) organic dye Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate (DIAC) as photosensitizer on the photovoltaic parameters of silver (Ag) doped TiO2 photoanode dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with quasi-solid state electrolyte/hole transport material (HTM) spiro-MeOTAD. TNSs (TiO2 nanosticks) photoanodes are prepared through sol-gel method and hydrothermal technique. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET measurement were used to characterize the structure and morphology of TiO2 nanostructures. The Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate organic dye with TNPs-Ag@TNSs composite photoanode structure and spiro-MeOTAD HTM exhibited better power conversion efficiency (PCE).

  19. Allosteric dominance in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Braxton, B L; Mullins, L S; Raushel, F M; Reinhart, G D

    1999-02-01

    A linked-function analysis of the allosteric responsiveness of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) from E. coli was performed by following the ATP synthesis reaction at low carbamoyl phosphate concentration. All three allosteric ligands, ornithine, UMP, and IMP, act by modifying the affinity of CPS for the substrate MgADP. Individually ornithine strongly promotes, and UMP strongly antagonizes, the binding of MgADP. IMP causes only a slight inhibition at 25 degreesC. When both ornithine and UMP were varied, models which presume a mutually exclusive binding relationship between these ligands do not fit the data as well as does one which allows both ligands (and substrate) to bind simultaneously. The same result was obtained with ornithine and IMP. By contrast, the actions of UMP and IMP together must be explained with a competitive model, consistent with previous reports that UMP and IMP bind to the same site. When ornithine is bound to the enzyme, its activation dominates the effects when either UMP or IMP is also bound. The relationship of this observation to the structure of CPS is discussed. PMID:9931004

  20. An alpha-glucose-1-phosphate phosphodiesterase is present in rat liver cytosol

    SciTech Connect

    Srisomsap, C.; Richardson, K.L.; Jay, J.C.; Marchase, R.B. )

    1989-12-05

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucose-1-phosphotransferase (Glc-phosphotransferase) catalyzes the transfer of alpha-Glc-1-P from UDP-Glc to mannose residues on acceptor glycoproteins. The predominant acceptor for this transfer in both mammalian cells and Paramecium is a cytoplasmic glycoprotein of 62-63 kDa. When cytoplasmic proteins from rat liver were fractionated by preparative isoelectric focusing following incubation of a liver homogenate with the 35S-labeled phosphorothioate analogue of UDP-Glc ((beta-35S)UDP-Glc), the acceptor was found to have a pI of about 6.0. This fraction, when not labeled prior to the focusing, became very heavily labeled when mixed with (beta-35S). UDP-Glc and intact liver microsomes, a rich source of the Glc-phosphotransferase. In addition, it was observed that the isoelectric fractions of the cytosol having pI values of 2-3.2 contained a degradative activity, alpha-Glc-1-P phosphodiesterase, that was capable of removing alpha-Glc-1-P, monitored through radioactive labeling both in the sugar and the phosphate, as an intact unit from the 62-kDa acceptor. Identification of the product of this cleavage was substantiated by its partial transformation to UDP-Glc in the presence of UTP and UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase. The alpha-Glc-1-P phosphodiesterase had a pH optimum of 7.5 and was not effectively inhibited by any of the potential biochemical inhibitors that were tested. Specificity for the Glc-alpha-1-P-6-Man diester was suggested by the diesterase's inability to degrade UDP-Glc or glucosylphosphoryldolichol. This enzyme may be important in the regulation of secretion since the alpha-Glc-1-P present on the 62-kDa phosphoglycoprotein appears to be removed and then rapidly replaced in response to secretagogue.

  1. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  2. Growth of strain SES-3 with arsenate and other diverse electron acceptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laverman, A.M.; Blum, J.S.; Schaefer, J.K.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The selenate-respiring bacterial strain SES-3 was able to use a variety of inorganic electron acceptors to sustain growth. SES-3 grew with the reduction of arsenate to arsenite, Fe(III) to Fe(II), or thiosulfate to sulfide. It also grew in medium in which elemental sulfur, Mn(IV), nitrite, trimethylamine N-oxide, or fumarate was provided as an electron acceptor. Growth on oxygen was microaerophilic. There was no growth with arsenite or chromate. Washed suspensions of cells grown on selenate or nitrate had a constitutive ability to reduce arsenate but were unable to reduce arsenite. These results suggest that strain SES-3 may occupy a niche as an environmental opportunist by being able to take advantage of a diversity of electron acceptors.

  3. Effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation reports the effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Potassium permanganate and potassium ferricyanide were common cathode electron acceptors and evaluated for substrate removal and electricity generation. The abiotic MFCs produced electricity through spontaneous electrochemical oxidation of sulfide. In comparison with abiotic MFC, the biotic MFC showed better ability for simultaneous nitrate and sulfide removal along with electricity generation. Keeping external resistance of 1,000 Ω, both MFCs showed good capacities for substrate removal where nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The steady voltage with potassium permanganate electrodes was nearly twice that of with potassium ferricyanide. Cyclic voltammetry curves confirmed that the potassium permanganate had higher catalytic activity than potassium ferricyanide. The potassium permanganate may be a suitable choice as cathode electron acceptor for enhanced electricity generation during simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate in MFCs. PMID:26901739

  4. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Quantum Dot Donors and Quantum Dot Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Kenny F.; Dennis, Allison M.

    2015-01-01

    Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer amongst semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is reviewed, with particular interest in biosensing applications. The unique optical properties of QDs provide certain advantages and also specific challenges with regards to sensor design, compared to other FRET systems. The brightness and photostability of QDs make them attractive for highly sensitive sensing and long-term, repetitive imaging applications, respectively, but the overlapping donor and acceptor excitation signals that arise when QDs serve as both the donor and acceptor lead to high background signals from direct excitation of the acceptor. The fundamentals of FRET within a nominally homogeneous QD population as well as energy transfer between two distinct colors of QDs are discussed. Examples of successful sensors are highlighted, as is cascading FRET, which can be used for solar harvesting. PMID:26057041

  5. Photovoltaic enhancement of organic solar cells by a bridged donor-acceptor block copolymer approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sam-Shajing; Zhang, Cheng; Ledbetter, Abram; Choi, Soobum; Seo, Kang; Bonner, Carl E.; Drees, Martin; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2007-01-01

    The authors show that a photovoltaic device composed of a -donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge- type block copolymer thin film exhibits a significant performance improvement over its corresponding donor/acceptor blend (Voc increased from 0.14to1.10V and Jsc increased from 0.017 to 0.058mA/cm2) under identical conditions, where donor is an alkyl derivatized poly-p-phenylenevinylene (PPV) conjugated block, acceptor is a sulfone-alkyl derivatized PPV conjugated block, and bridge is a nonconjugated and flexible unit. The authors attribute such improvement to the block copolymer intrinsic nanophase separation and molecular self-assembly that results in the reduction of the exciton and carrier losses.

  6. Mg acceptors in GaN: Dependence of the /g-anisotropy on the doping concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Detlev M.; Burkhardt, Wolfgang; Leiter, Frank; Walter von Förster; Alves, Helder; Hofstaetter, Albrecht; Meyer, Bruno K.; Romanov, Nikolai G.; Amano, Hiroshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    1999-12-01

    Mg acceptors in GaN epitaxial layers grown by metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy were investigated by optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) spectroscopy. The magnetic resonances were detected on the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of the acceptor bound exciton (Mg0X) in the near bandgap region, and in the infrared spectral range on the MCD of the hole ionisation transition Mg0+hν→Mg-+hVB. The observed g-values of the Mg0 acceptors range for g|| from 2.102 to 2.065 and for g⊥ from 1.94 to 2.00, respectively. These variations depend on the Mg doping concentration.

  7. Rational design of two-dimensional molecular donor-acceptor nanostructure arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Shu; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Niu, Tian Chao; Hu, Wen Ping; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Chen, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The construction of long-range ordered organic donor-acceptor nanostructure arrays over microscopic areas supported on solid substrates is one of the most challenging tasks towards the realization of molecular nanodevices. They can also be used as ideal model systems to understand light induced charge transfer, charge separation and energy conversion processes and mechanisms at the nanometer scale. The aim of this paper is to highlight recent advances and progress in this topic. Special attention is given to two different strategies for the construction of organic donor-acceptor nanostructure arrays, namely (i) molecular self-assembly on artificially patterned or pre-defined molecular surface nanotemplates and (ii) molecular nanostructure formation steered via directional and selective intermolecular interactions. The interfacial charge transfer and the energy level alignment of these donor-acceptor nanostructures are also discussed.

  8. Spectroscopic studies of charge transfer complexes between colchicine and some π acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Mustafa; Duymus, Hulya

    2007-07-01

    Charge transfer complexes between colchicine as donor and π acceptors such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano- p-benzoquinone (DDQ), p-chloranil ( p-CHL) have been studied spectrophotometrically in dichloromethane at 21 °C. The stoichiometry of the complexes was found to be 1:1 ratio by the Job method between donor and acceptors with the maximum absorption band at a wavelength of 535, 585 and 515 nm. The equilibrium constant and thermodynamic parameters of the complexes were determined by Benesi-Hildebrand and van't Hoff equations. Colchicine in pure form and in dosage form was applied in this study. The formation constants for the complexes were shown to be dependent on the structure of the electron acceptors used.

  9. Design of reversible, cysteine-targeted Michael acceptors guided by kinetic and computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Shyam; Miller, Rand M; Tian, Boxue; Mullins, R Dyche; Jacobson, Matthew P; Taunton, Jack

    2014-09-10

    Electrophilic probes that covalently modify a cysteine thiol often show enhanced pharmacological potency and selectivity. Although reversible Michael acceptors have been reported, the structural requirements for reversibility are poorly understood. Here, we report a novel class of acrylonitrile-based Michael acceptors, activated by aryl or heteroaryl electron-withdrawing groups. We demonstrate that thiol adducts of these acrylonitriles undergo β-elimination at rates that span more than 3 orders of magnitude. These rates correlate inversely with the computed proton affinity of the corresponding carbanions, enabling the intrinsic reversibility of the thiol-Michael reaction to be tuned in a predictable manner. We apply these principles to the design of new reversible covalent kinase inhibitors with improved properties. A cocrystal structure of one such inhibitor reveals specific noncovalent interactions between the 1,2,4-triazole activating group and the kinase. Our experimental and computational study enables the design of new Michael acceptors, expanding the palette of reversible, cysteine-targeted electrophiles.

  10. Donor-Acceptor Heterojunction Configurations Based on DNA-Multichromophore Arrays.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsunobu; Tsuto, Koji; Jomura, Ayumi; Takada, Tadao; Yamana, Kazushige

    2015-08-10

    Multichromophore arrays of bis(2-thienyl)diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) and naphthalenediimide (NDI) with two Zn(II) -cyclens were constructed using thymidine DNA as a scaffold through the binding of the Zn(II) -cyclens with thymine bases. We demonstrate photocurrent generation in a donor-acceptor heterojunction configuration consisting of the DPP (donor) and NDI (acceptor) arrays co-immobilized on an Au electrode. The co-immobilized electrode exhibited good photocurrent responses because of the efficient charge separation between the DPP and NDI arrays. In contrast, an immobilized electrode consisting of randomly assembled DPP-NDI arrays generated no photocurrent response because DPP formed ground-state charge-transfer complexes with NDI in the randomly assembled arrays. Therefore, our approach to generate donor-acceptor heterojunctions based on DNA-multichromophore arrays is a useful method to efficiently generate photocurrent. PMID:26179473

  11. Competition between Methane and Alkylbenzenes for Electron Acceptors during Natural Attenuation of Crude Oil in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Amos, R. T.; Cozzarelli, I.; Voytek, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    At a crude-oil spill site near the town of Bemidji, MN, entrapped oil is present at residual saturations exceeding 10% in the vadose zone and floating at the water table at saturations of 30-60%. The degradable fraction of the light crude oil includes n-alkanes, aromatics, and alkyl-cyclohexanes. Together these compounds constitute a reduced carbon concentration at least 500 times greater than is present in the dissolved hydrocarbon groundwater plume comprised mainly of aromatics. Methanogenic degradation of the stationary oil body has been occurring for at least 20 years providing a continuous supply of methane emanating from the oil. Transport of methane away from the oil body occurs in both the vapor phase through the vadose zone and in the dissolved phase with the groundwater flow. Within the vadose zone the supply of oxygen and other electron acceptors from the surface is completely consumed by the process of methane oxidation in a zone 2-3 meters above the water table. In the groundwater, the 1 ppm contour of the methane plume extends beyond the 0.5 ppb contour for benzene, which is located at the aerobic/anaerobic boundary in the plume approximately 120 m downgradient of the oil body. Between 75 m and 120 m downgradient, methane concentrations decrease steadily from >0.6 mmol/L to <0.06 mmol/L, accompanied by increases in the δ13C-CH4 indicating that methane attenuation occurs through microbially-mediated oxidation. Anaerobic methane oxidation under iron-reducing conditions has recently been demonstrated by Beal et al. (Science, 325, 184, 2009) and is indicated at this site by several lines of evidence. In the methane oxidation zone, values of bioavailable Fe(III) extracted from the sediments averaged 8 mmol/kg (n=16), or >8 times the amount required to degrade 0.5 mmol methane, while all other electron acceptors together can account for complete oxidation of only 0.07 mmol (sulfate <0.06 mmol/L, dissolved oxygen <3 µmol/L, and nitrate <0.02 mmol

  12. Adsorption of phosphate from seawater on calcined MgMn-layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Chitrakar, Ramesh; Tezuka, Satoko; Sonoda, Akinari; Sakane, Kohji; Ooi, Kenta; Hirotsu, Takahiro

    2005-10-01

    Adsorptive properties of MgMn-3-300 (MgMn-type layered double hydroxide with Mg/Mn mole ratio of 3, calcined at 300 degrees C) for phosphate were investigated in phosphate-enriched seawater with a concentration of 0.30 mg-P/dm3. It showed the highest phosphate uptake from the seawater among the inorganic adsorbents studied (hydrotalcite, calcined hydrotalcite, activated magnesia, hydrous aluminum oxide, manganese oxide (delta-MnO2)). The phosphate uptake by MgMn-3-300 reached 7.3 mg-P/g at an adsorbent/solution ratio of 0.05 g/2 dm3. The analyses of the uptakes of other constituents (Na+, K+, Ca(+, Cl-, and SO(2-)4) of seawater showed that the adsorbent had a markedly high selectivity for the adsorption of phosphate ions. Effects of initial phosphate concentration, temperature, pH, and salinity on phosphate uptake were investigated in detail by a batch method. The phosphate uptake increased slightly with an increase in the adsorption temperature. The adsorption isotherm followed Freundlich's equation with constants of logK(F)=1.25 and 1/n=0.65, indicating that it could effectively remove phosphate even from a solution of markedly low phosphate concentration as well as with large numbers of coexisting ions. The pH dependence showed a maximum phosphate uptake around pH 8.5. The pH dependence curve suggested that selective phosphate adsorption progresses mainly by the ion exchange of HPO(2-)4. The study on the effect of salinity suggested the presence of two kinds of adsorption sites in the adsorbent: one nonspecific site with weak interaction and one specific site with strong interaction. The effective desorption of phosphate could be achieved using a mixed solution of 5 M NaCl + 0.1 M NaOH (1 M = 1 mol/dm3), with negligible dissolution of adsorbent. The adsorbent had high chemical stability against the adsorption/desorption cycle; it kept a good phosphate uptake even after the repetition of the seventh cycle.

  13. Hybrid coconut seedlings, scholarships, and discount cards for family planning acceptors.

    PubMed

    Sumarsono

    1989-10-01

    Having learned from failed family planning (FP) incentive schemes in other countries, Indonesia implemented a reward system designed to popularize FP in the community. In order to overcome cultural opposition to FP, many countries in the 1970s opted to give incentives--money, materials, etc.--to new contraceptive acceptors and the FP workers who successfully recruited them. These countries, which oftentimes spent up to 1/4 of their program budget on incentives, saw rapid increases in the number of new acceptors. The results, however, only reflected a superficial acceptance of FP. When the incentives stopped, the number of acceptors dropped considerably. Recognizing this, the Indonesian government set out to increase FP acceptance by making the small family the norm in the community. And one of the approaches for doing so was a reward system. The goals of the reward program were: 1) to raise awareness of the recognition given to individuals or groups that have accepted FP; 2) to create pride among FP workers and new acceptors; and 3) to generate leadership in the community. Villages with high FP acceptance receive rewards such as deep-wells that provide clean water or income generating projects. Individuals also receive rewards that sometimes include hybrid coconut seedlings which, after 3 years, can yield up to 700 coconuts, which can provide a family with a significant supplemental income. The government also gives scholarships to children of FP acceptors. Also, the president of Indonesia publicly recognized family planning acceptors. In 1989, over 800,000 couples received awards for practicing contraception over the past 5-16 years. PMID:12315968

  14. Molecular origin of photovoltaic performance in donor-block-acceptor all-conjugated block copolymers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Kendall A.; Lin, Yen -Hao; Mok, Jorge W.; Yager, Kevin G.; Strzalka, Joseph; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Verduzco, Rafael

    2015-11-03

    All-conjugated block copolymers may be an effective route to self-assembled photovoltaic devices, but we lack basic information on the relationship between molecular characteristics and photovoltaic performance. Here, we synthesize a library of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) block poly((9,9-dialkylfluorene)-2,7-diyl-alt-[4,7-bis(alkylthiophen-5-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole]-2',2''-diyl) (PFTBT) donor-block-acceptor all-conjugated block copolymers and carry out a comprehensive study of processing conditions, crystallinity, domain sizes, and side-chain structure on photovoltaic device performance. We find that all block copolymers studied exhibit an out-of-plane crystal orientation after deposition, and on thermal annealing at high temperatures the crystal orientation flips to an in-plane orientation. By varying processing conditions on polymer photovoltaic devices, we show thatmore » the crystal orientation has only a modest effect (15-20%) on photovoltaic performance. The addition of side-chains to the PFTBT block is found to decrease photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies by at least an order of magnitude. Through grazing-incidence X-ray measurements we find that the addition of side-chains to the PFTBT acceptor block results in weak segregation and small (< 10 nm) block copolymer self-assembled donor and acceptor domains. This work is the most comprehensive to date on all-conjugated block copolymer systems and suggests that photovoltaic performance of block copolymers depends strongly on the miscibility of donor and acceptor blocks, which impacts donor and acceptor domain sizes and purity. Lastly, strategies for improving the device performance of block copolymer photovoltaics should seek to increase segregation between donor and acceptor polymer domains.« less

  15. Hybrid coconut seedlings, scholarships, and discount cards for family planning acceptors.

    PubMed

    Sumarsono

    1989-10-01

    Having learned from failed family planning (FP) incentive schemes in other countries, Indonesia implemented a reward system designed to popularize FP in the community. In order to overcome cultural opposition to FP, many countries in the 1970s opted to give incentives--money, materials, etc.--to new contraceptive acceptors and the FP workers who successfully recruited them. These countries, which oftentimes spent up to 1/4 of their program budget on incentives, saw rapid increases in the number of new acceptors. The results, however, only reflected a superficial acceptance of FP. When the incentives stopped, the number of acceptors dropped considerably. Recognizing this, the Indonesian government set out to increase FP acceptance by making the small family the norm in the community. And one of the approaches for doing so was a reward system. The goals of the reward program were: 1) to raise awareness of the recognition given to individuals or groups that have accepted FP; 2) to create pride among FP workers and new acceptors; and 3) to generate leadership in the community. Villages with high FP acceptance receive rewards such as deep-wells that provide clean water or income generating projects. Individuals also receive rewards that sometimes include hybrid coconut seedlings which, after 3 years, can yield up to 700 coconuts, which can provide a family with a significant supplemental income. The government also gives scholarships to children of FP acceptors. Also, the president of Indonesia publicly recognized family planning acceptors. In 1989, over 800,000 couples received awards for practicing contraception over the past 5-16 years.

  16. Threshold-like complexation of conjugated polymers with small molecule acceptors in solution within the neighbor-effect model.

    PubMed

    Sosorev, Andrey Yu; Parashchuk, Olga D; Zapunidi, Sergey A; Kashtanov, Grigoriy S; Golovnin, Ilya V; Kommanaboyina, Srikanth; Perepichka, Igor F; Paraschuk, Dmitry Yu

    2016-02-14

    In some donor-acceptor blends based on conjugated polymers, a pronounced charge-transfer complex (CTC) forms in the electronic ground state. In contrast to small-molecule donor-acceptor blends, the CTC concentration in polymer:acceptor solution can increase with the acceptor content in a threshold-like way. This threshold-like behavior was earlier attributed to the neighbor effect (NE) in the polymer complexation, i.e., next CTCs are preferentially formed near the existing ones; however, the NE origin is unknown. To address the factors affecting the NE, we record the optical absorption data for blends of the most studied conjugated polymers, poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), with electron acceptors of fluorene series, 1,8-dinitro-9,10-antraquinone (), and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane () in different solvents, and then analyze the data within the NE model. We have found that the NE depends on the polymer and acceptor molecular skeletons and solvent, while it does not depend on the acceptor electron affinity and polymer concentration. We conclude that the NE operates within a single macromolecule and stems from planarization of the polymer chain involved in the CTC with an acceptor molecule; as a result, the probability of further complexation with the next acceptor molecules at the adjacent repeat units increases. The steric and electronic microscopic mechanisms of NE are discussed.

  17. Comprehensive dielectric performance of bismuth acceptor doped BaTiO3 based nanocrystal thin film capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, SY; Zhang, HN; Sviridov, L; Huang, LM; Liu, XH; Samson, J; Akins, D; Li, J; O'Brien, S

    2012-11-07

    We present a novel approach to preparing bismuth acceptor doped barium titanate nanocrystal formulations that can be deposited in conjunction with polymers in order to prepare a thin film nanocomposite dielectric that exhibits desirable capacitor characteristics. Exploring the limits of dielectric function in nanocomposites is an important avenue of materials research, while paying strict attention to the overall device quality, namely permittivity, loss and equivalent series resistance (ESR). Pushing capacitor function to higher frequencies, a desirable goal from an electrical engineering point of view, presents a new set of challenges in terms of minimizing interfacial, space charge and polarization effects within the dielectric. We show the ability to synthesize BaTi0.96Bi0.04O3 or BaTi0.97Bi0.03O3 depending on nominal molar concentrations of bismuth at the onset. The low temperature solvothermal route allows for substitution at the titanium site (strongly supported by Rietveld and Raman analysis). Characterization is performed by XRD with Rietveld refinement, Raman Spectroscopy, SEM and HRTEM. A mechanism is proposed for bismuth acceptor substitution, based on the chemical reaction of the alkoxy-metal precursors involving nucleophilic addition. Dielectric analysis of the nanocrystal thin films is performed by preparing nanocrystal/PVP 2-2 nanocomposites (no annealing) and comparing BaTi0.96Bi0.04O3 and BaTi0.97Bi0.03O3 with undoped BaTiO3. Improvements of up to 25% in capacitance (permittivity) are observed, with lower loss and dramatically improved ESR, all to very high frequency ranges (>10 MHz).

  18. Photorelease of phosphates: Mild methods for protecting phosphate derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Senadheera, Sanjeewa N; Yousef, Abraham L

    2014-01-01

    Summary We have developed a new photoremovable protecting group for caging phosphates in the near UV. Diethyl 2-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)-2-oxoethyl phosphate (14a) quantitatively releases diethyl phosphate upon irradiation in aq MeOH or aq MeCN at 350 nm, with quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.021 to 0.067 depending on the solvent composition. The deprotection reactions originate from the triplet excited state, are robust under ambient conditions and can be carried on to 100% conversion. Similar results were found with diethyl 2-(4-methoxy-1-naphthyl)-2-oxoethyl phosphate (14b), although it was significantly less efficient compared with 14a. A key step in the deprotection reaction in aq MeOH is considered to be a Favorskii rearrangement of the naphthyl ketone motif of 14a,b to naphthylacetate esters 25 and 26. Disruption of the ketone-naphthyl ring conjugation significantly shifts the photoproduct absorption away from the effective incident wavelength for decaging of 14, driving the reaction to completion. The Favorskii rearrangement does not occur in aqueous acetonitrile although diethyl phosphate is released. Other substitution patterns on the naphthyl or quinolin-5-yl core, such as the 2,6-naphthyl 10 or 8-benzyloxyquinolin-5-yl 24 platforms, also do not rearrange by aryl migration upon photolysis and, therefore, do not proceed to completion. The 2,6-naphthyl ketone platform instead remains intact whereas the quinolin-5-yl ketone fragments to a much more complex, highly absorbing reaction mixture that competes for the incident light. PMID:25246963

  19. Structural control of donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules and supramolecular complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Douglas Cary

    aided the structural analysis, are described. The final chapter describes how to control the secondary structure of donor-acceptor oligorotaxanes in which electron-poor tetracationic cyclophanes encircle electron-rich aromatic recognition sites linked by polyether chains. Design aspects, including built-in [pi···pi] stacking and [C--H···O] and [C--H···pi] interactions, are critical to ensure the discrete, extended secondary structures envisioned in the design and which are evidenced by comprehensive 1H NMR spectroscopic analyses.

  20. Effect of Electronic Acceptor Segments on Photophysical Properties of Low-Band-Gap Ambipolar Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanzuo; Cui, Jingang; Zhao, Jianing; Liu, Jinglin; Song, Peng; Ma, Fengcai

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated by a recent experimental report, charge transfer and photophysical properties of donor-acceptor ambipolar polymer were studied with the quantum chemistry calculation and the developed 3D charge difference density method. The effects of electronic acceptor strength on the structure, energy levels, electron density distribution, ionization potentials, and electron affinities were also obtained to estimate the transporting ability of hole and electron. With the developed 3D charge difference density, one visualizes the charge transfer process, distinguishes the role of molecular units, and finds the relationship between the role of DPP and excitation energy for the three polymers during photo-excitation. PMID:23365549

  1. Modular supramolecular approach for co-crystallization of donors and acceptors into ordered networks

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Shveyd, Alex K.; Tayi, Alok S.; Sue, Andrew C. H.; Narayanan, Ashwin

    2016-09-20

    Organic charge-transfer (CT) co-crystals in a mixed stack system are disclosed, wherein a donor molecule (D) and an acceptor molecule (A) occupy alternating positions (DADADA) along the CT axis. A platform is provided which amplifies the molecular recognition of donors and acceptors and produces co-crystals at ambient conditions, wherein the platform comprises (i) a molecular design of the first constituent (.alpha.-complement), (ii) a molecular design of the second compound (.beta.-complement), and (iii) a solvent system that promotes co-crystallization.

  2. Assessing the regioselectivity of OleD-catalyzed glycosylation with a diverse set of acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Maoquan; Hamza, Adel; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Thorson, Jon S

    2013-02-22

    To explore the acceptor regioselectivity of OleD-catalyzed glucosylation, the products of OleD-catalyzed reactions with six structurally diverse acceptors flavones- (daidzein), isoflavones (flavopiridol), stilbenes (resveratrol), indole alkaloids (10-hydroxycamptothecin), and steroids (2-methoxyestradiol)-were determined. This study highlights the first synthesis of flavopiridol and 2-methoxyestradiol glucosides and confirms the ability of OleD to glucosylate both aromatic and aliphatic nucleophiles. In all cases, molecular dynamics simulations were consistent with the determined product distribution and suggest the potential to develop a virtual screening model to identify additional OleD substrates.

  3. Doping of germanium and silicon crystals with non-hydrogenic acceptors for far infrared lasers

    DOEpatents

    Haller, Eugene E.; Brundermann, Erik

    2000-01-01

    A method for doping semiconductors used for far infrared lasers with non-hydrogenic acceptors having binding energies larger than the energy of the laser photons. Doping of germanium or silicon crystals with beryllium, zinc or copper. A far infrared laser comprising germanium crystals doped with double or triple acceptor dopants permitting the doped laser to be tuned continuously from 1 to 4 terahertz and to operate in continuous mode. A method for operating semiconductor hole population inversion lasers with a closed cycle refrigerator.

  4. Hexachloroiridate IV as an Electron Acceptor for a Plasmalemma Redox System in Maize Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Lüthen, Hartwig; Böttger, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Hexachloroiridate IV, a new artificial electron acceptor for the constitutive plant plasma membrane redox system has been investigated. It appeared not to permeate through biological membranes. Due to its higher redox potential, it is a more powerful electron acceptor than hexacyanoferrate III (ferricyanide) and even micromolar concentrations are rapidly reduced. Hexachloroiridate IV increased H+ efflux over a concentration range of 0.05 to 0.1 millimolar. Lower concentrations slightly inhibited proton extrusion. Calcium stimulated both proton and electron transfer rates. Like hexacyanoferrate III-reduction, irridate reduction was inhibited by auxin. PMID:16666029

  5. Through-Solvent Tunneling in Donor-Bridge-Acceptor Molecules Containing a Molecular Cleft.

    PubMed

    Graff, B M; Lamont, D N; Parker, M F L; Bloom, B P; Schafmeister, C E; Waldeck, D H

    2016-08-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is used to investigate the solvent-mediated electron tunneling between electron donor and acceptor groups in polar solvents. Bis-peptide scaffolds are used to control the spatial positioning of electron donor and acceptor groups and create a molecular cleft. The photoinduced electron transfer is studied for two different cleft sizes, and the electronic coupling is found to be controlled by the nature of the solvent and the ability of the molecular cleft to accommodate it, as well as interact directly with it. These studies demonstrate the importance of electron tunneling through nonbonded contacts and reveal a strategy for examining such tunneling pathways in polar solvents. PMID:27401503

  6. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition of organometallic reagents to extended Michael acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Thibault E; Drissi-Amraoui, Sammy; Crévisy, Christophe; Baslé, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Summary The copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition (ACA) of nucleophiles onto polyenic Michael acceptors represents an attractive and powerful methodology for the synthesis of relevant chiral molecules, as it enables in a straightforward manner the sequential generation of two or more stereogenic centers. In the last decade, various chiral copper-based catalysts were evaluated in combination with different nucleophiles and Michael acceptors, and have unambiguously demonstrated their usefulness in the control of the regio- and enantioselectivity of the addition. The aim of this review is to report recent breakthroughs achieved in this challenging field. PMID:26734090

  7. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition of organometallic reagents to extended Michael acceptors.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Thibault E; Drissi-Amraoui, Sammy; Crévisy, Christophe; Baslé, Olivier; Mauduit, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The copper-catalyzed asymmetric conjugate addition (ACA) of nucleophiles onto polyenic Michael acceptors represents an attractive and powerful methodology for the synthesis of relevant chiral molecules, as it enables in a straightforward manner the sequential generation of two or more stereogenic centers. In the last decade, various chiral copper-based catalysts were evaluated in combination with different nucleophiles and Michael acceptors, and have unambiguously demonstrated their usefulness in the control of the regio- and enantioselectivity of the addition. The aim of this review is to report recent breakthroughs achieved in this challenging field.

  8. Magnetic field effect on the Coulomb interaction of acceptors in semimagnetic quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpana, P.; Merwyn, A.; Nithiananthi, P.; Jayakumar, K.; Reuben, Jasper D.

    2015-06-24

    The Coulomb interaction of holes in a Semimagnetic Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te / CdTe Spherical and Cubical Quantum Dot (SMQD) in a magnetic field is studied using variational approach in the effective mass approximation. Since these holes in QD show a pronounced collective behavior, while distinct single particle phenomena is suppressed, their interaction in confined potential becomes very significant. It has been observed that acceptor-acceptor interaction is more in cubical QD than in spherical QD which can be controlled by the magnetic field. The results are presented and discussed.

  9. Controlling reaction specificity in pyridoxal phosphate enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Toney, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate enzymes are ubiquitous in the nitrogen metabolism of all organisms. They catalyze a wide variety of reactions including racemization, transamination, decarboxylation, elimination, retro-aldol cleavage, Claisen condensation, and others on substrates containing an amino group, most commonly α-amino acids. The wide variety of reactions catalyzed by PLP enzymes is enabled by the ability of the covalent aldimine intermediate formed between substrate and PLP to stabilize carbanionic intermediates at Cα of the substrate. This review attempts to summarize the mechanisms by which reaction specificity can be achieved in PLP enzymes by focusing on three aspects of these reactions: stereoelectronic effects, protonation state of the external aldimine intermediate, and interaction of the carbanionic intermediate with the protein side chains present in the active site. PMID:21664990

  10. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  1. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  2. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  3. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  4. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  8. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder ...

  9. Phosphate bonding to goethite and pyrolusite surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiner, Eugene R.; Goldberg, M.C.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were obtained from pure and phosphated goethite (??-FeOOH), and pyrolusite (MnO2). The nature of the phosphate-surface bond was determined to be binuclear for goethite and bidentate for pyrolusite.

  10. Splitting of type-I (N-B, P-Al) and type-II (N-Al, N-Ga) donor-acceptor pair spectra in 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. W.; Ivanov, I. G.; Juillaguet, S.; Camassel, J.

    2011-05-01

    Discrete series of lines have been observed for many years in donor-acceptor pair (DAP) spectra in 3C-SiC. In this work, the splitting of both type-I (N-B, P-Al) and type-II (N-Al, N-Ga) DAP spectra in 3C-SiC has been systematically investigated by considering the multipole terms. For type-I spectra, in which either N or B substitutes on C sites or P and Al replace Si, the splitting energy of the substructure for a given shell is almost the same for both pairs. For type-II spectra, in which N is on the C site while Al and Ga acceptors replace Si, we find that, when compared with literature data, the splitting energy for a given shell is almost independent of the identity of the acceptor. For both type-I and type-II spectra, this splitting energy can be successfully explained by the octupole term V3 alone with k3 = -2 × 105 Å4 meV. Comparing the experimental donor and acceptor binding energies with the values calculated by the effective-mass model, this suggests that the shallow donor (N,P) ions can be treated as point charges while the charge distribution of the acceptor ions (Al,Ga,B) is distorted in accord with the Td point group symmetry, resulting in a considerable value for k3. This gives a reasonable explanation for the observed splitting energies for both type-I and type-II DAP spectra.

  11. Beef-heart mitochondrial F1-ATPase can use endogenous bound phosphate to synthesize ATP in dimethyl sulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Beharry, S; Bragg, P D

    1991-10-21

    Beef-heart mitochondrial F1-ATPase contained 5 mol of inorganic phosphate bound per mol of F1, following pretreatment with ATP. A portion of the phosphate, bound most likely at a catalytic site, reacted in dimethylsulfoxide with endogenous adenine nucleotide to form ATP.

  12. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301...

  13. Sintering of calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Champion, E

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics have become of prime importance for biological applications in the field of bone tissue engineering. This paper reviews the sintering behaviour of these bioceramics. Conventional pressureless sintering of hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, a reference compound, has been extensively studied. Its physico-chemistry is detailed. It can be seen as a competition between two thermally activated phenomena that proceed by solid-state diffusion of matter: densification and grain growth. Usually, the objective is to promote the first and prevent the second. Literature data are analysed from sintering maps (i.e. grain growth vs. densification). Sintering trajectories of hydroxyapatite produced by conventional pressureless sintering and non-conventional techniques, including two-step sintering, liquid phase sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, ultrahigh pressure, microwave and spark plasma sintering, are presented. Whatever the sintering technique may be, grain growth occurs mainly during the last step of sintering, when the relative bulk density reaches 95% of the maximum value. Though often considered very advantageous, most assisted sintering techniques do not appear very superior to conventional pressureless sintering. Sintering of tricalcium phosphate or biphasic calcium phosphates is also discussed. The chemical composition of calcium phosphate influences the behaviour. Similarly, ionic substitutions in hydroxyapatite or in tricalcium phosphate create lattice defects that modify the sintering rate. Depending on their nature, they can either accelerate or slow down the sintering rate. The thermal stability of compounds at the sintering temperature must also be taken into account. Controlled atmospheres may be required to prevent thermal decomposition, and flash sintering techniques, which allow consolidation at low temperature, can be helpful. PMID:23212081

  14. Enzymatic and structural characterization of an archaeal thiamin phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Maria; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Esaki, Hiroyoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki; Akaji, Kenichi; Tazuya, Keiko; Yamada, Kazuko; Nakabayashi, Toshikatsu; Nosaka, Kazuto

    2014-04-01

    Studies on thiamin biosynthesis have so far been achieved in eubacteria, yeast and plants, in which the thiamin structure is formed as thiamin phosphate from a thiazole and a pyrimidine moiety. This condensation reaction is catalyzed by thiamin phosphate synthase, which is encoded by the thiE gene or its orthologs. On the other hand, most archaea do not seem to have the thiE gene, but instead their thiD gene, coding for a 2-methyl-4-amino-5-hydroxymethylpyrimidine (HMP) kinase/HMP phosphate kinase, possesses an additional C-terminal domain designated thiN. These two proteins, ThiE and ThiN, do not share sequence similarity. In this study, using recombinant protein from the hyperthermophile archaea Pyrobaculum calidifontis, we demonstrated that the ThiN protein is an analog of the ThiE protein, catalyzing the formation of thiamin phosphate with the release of inorganic pyrophosphate from HMP pyrophosphate and 4-methyl-5-β-hydroxyethylthiazole phosphate (HET-P). In addition, we found that the ThiN protein can liberate an inorganic pyrophosphate from HMP pyrophosphate in the absence of HET-P. A structure model of the enzyme-product complex of P. calidifontis ThiN domain was proposed on the basis of the known three-dimensional structure of the ortholog of Pyrococcus furiosus. The significance of Arg320 and His341 residues for thiN-coded thiamin phosphate synthase activity was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. This is the first report of the experimental analysis of an archaeal thiamin synthesis enzyme.

  15. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Regulating sst3 Somatostatin Receptor Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Günther, Thomas; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The human somatostatin receptor 3 (sst3) is expressed in about 50% of all neuroendocrine tumors and hence a promising target for multireceptor somatostatin analogs. The sst3 receptor is unique among ssts in that it exhibits a very long intracellular C-terminal tail containing a huge number of potential phosphate acceptor sites. Consequently, our knowledge about the functional role of the C-terminal tail in sst3 receptor regulation is very limited. Here, we have generated a series of phosphorylation-deficient mutants that enabled us to determine crucial sites for its agonist-induced β-arrestin mobilization, internalization, and down-regulation. Based on this information, we generated phosphosite-specific antibodies for C-terminal Ser(337)/Thr(341), Thr(348), and Ser(361) that enabled us to investigate the temporal patterns of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We found that the endogenous ligand somatostatin induced a rapid and robust phosphorylation that was completely blocked by the sst3 antagonist NVP-ACQ090. The stable somatostatin analogs pasireotide and octreotide promoted clearly less phosphorylation compared with somatostatin. We also show that sst3 phosphorylation occurred within seconds to minutes, whereas dephosphorylation of the sst3 receptor occurred at a considerable slower rate. In addition, we also identified G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3 and protein phosphatase 1α and 1β as key regulators of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively. Thus, we here define the C-terminal phosphorylation motif of the human sst3 receptor that regulates its agonist-promoted phosphorylation, β-arrestin recruitment, and internalization of this clinically relevant receptor.

  16. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  17. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  18. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-,...

  19. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  3. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  5. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  8. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  9. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  10. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  12. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.5778 Section 582.5778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  15. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  16. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 1 § 182.6778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  18. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.5778 Section 582.5778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  20. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  2. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  3. Urea phosphate as granular or fluid fertilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Blouin, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Studies are being conducted of the production and agronomic characteristics of the phosphoric acid-urea adduct, urea phosphate, and of the various granular and fluid fertilizers that can be produced from it. Flowsheets are given for the production of urea phosphate. Characteristics of unpurified and purified urea phosphate are also given. (DLC)

  4. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  5. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  8. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  9. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  10. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  11. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  12. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate...

  13. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  15. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  16. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  17. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  18. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 182.6290 - Disodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Disodium phosphate. 182.6290 Section 182.6290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Disodium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...