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Sample records for phosphate backbone conformation

  1. A sampling approach for protein backbone fragment conformations.

    PubMed

    Yu, J Y; Zhang, W

    2013-01-01

    In protein structure prediction, backbone fragment bias information can narrow down the conformational space of the whole polypeptide chain significantly. Unlike existing methods that use fragments as building blocks, the paper presents a probabilistic sampling approach for protein backbone torsion angles by modelling angular correlation of (phi, psi) with a directional statistics distribution. Given a protein sequence and secondary structure information, this method samples backbone fragments conformations by using a backtrack sampling algorithm for the hidden Markov model with multiple inputs and a single output. The proposed approach is applied to a fragment library, and some well-known structural motifs are sampled very well on the optimal path. Computational results show that the method can help to obtain native-like backbone fragments conformations. PMID:23777175

  2. Electron-impact total ionization cross sections of DNA sugar-phosphate backbone and an additivity principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    The improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model [W.M. Huo, Phys. Rev. A64, 042719-1 (2001)l is used to study the total ionization cross sections of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone by electron impact. Calculations using neutral fragments found that the total ionization cross sections of C3' - and C5', -deoxyribose-phospate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3' - and C5" -deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 10%. The result implies that certain properties of the-DNA, like the total singly ionization cross section, are localized properties and a building-up or additivity principle may apply. This allows us to obtain accurate properties of larger molecular systems built up from the results of smaller subsystem fragments. Calculations are underway using a negatively charged sugar-phosphate backbone with a metal counter-ion.

  3. Attosecond Electron Delocalization in the Conduction Band through the Phosphate Backbone of Genomic DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, Hiromi; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro

    2007-11-01

    Partial density of states in the empty conduction band of the phosphate backbone sites in DNA was probed using energy-dependent resonant Auger spectroscopy. Results show that genomic DNA with periodic backbones exhibits an extended state despite separation of each phosphate group by an insulating sugar group. In antisense DNA with an aperiodic backbone, the equivalent state is localized. Remarkably rapid electron delocalization occurs at ca. 740 attoseconds for wet DNA, as estimated using the core-hole clock method. Such delocalization is comparable to the Fermi velocity of carbon nanotubes.

  4. 8-Oxoguanine Affects DNA Backbone Conformation in the EcoRI Recognition Site and Inhibits Its Cleavage by the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kiryutin, Alexey S.; Kasymov, Rustem D.; Petrova, Darya V.; Endutkin, Anton V.; Popov, Alexander V.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Fedechkin, Stanislav O.; Brockerman, Jacob A.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Smirnov, Serge L.

    2016-01-01

    8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant and impactful oxidative DNA lesions. However, the reasons underlying its effects, especially those not directly explained by the altered base pairing ability, are poorly understood. We report the effect of the lesion on the action of EcoRI, a widely used restriction endonuclease. Introduction of 8-oxoguanine inside, or adjacent to, the GAATTC recognition site embedded within the Drew—Dickerson dodecamer sequence notably reduced the EcoRI activity. Solution NMR revealed that 8-oxoguanine in the DNA duplex causes substantial alterations in the sugar—phosphate backbone conformation, inducing a BI→BII transition. Moreover, molecular dynamics of the complex suggested that 8-oxoguanine, although does not disrupt the sequence-specific contacts formed by the enzyme with DNA, shifts the distribution of BI/BII backbone conformers. Based on our data, we propose that the disruption of enzymatic cleavage can be linked with the altered backbone conformation and dynamics in the free oxidized DNA substrate and, possibly, at the protein—DNA interface. PMID:27749894

  5. Synthesis and properties of a novel molecular beacon containing a benzene-phosphate backbone at its stem moiety.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshihito; Kawamura, Akihiro; Takasu, Keiji; Komatsuzaki, Shinji; Kato, Takumi; Kuboe, Satoru; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Kitade, Yukio

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of a novel molecular beacon (MB) containing a benzene-phosphate backbone at its stem moiety. The fluorescence intensity of MBs was found to stabilize by the introduction of the benzene-phosphate backbone at its stem moiety. Furthermore, an MB containing the benzene-phosphate backbone was more resistant to DNase I (endonuclease) than an MB comprising natural DNA and 2'-O-methyl-RNA. These results indicate that the MB with the benzene-phosphate backbone is superior as a molecular beacon as compared to the MB composed of natural DNA and 2'-O-methyl-RNA.

  6. Exposing Hidden Alternative Backbone Conformations in X-ray Crystallography Using qFit

    PubMed Central

    Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; van den Bedem, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Proteins must move between different conformations of their native ensemble to perform their functions. Crystal structures obtained from high-resolution X-ray diffraction data reflect this heterogeneity as a spatial and temporal conformational average. Although movement between natively populated alternative conformations can be critical for characterizing molecular mechanisms, it is challenging to identify these conformations within electron density maps. Alternative side chain conformations are generally well separated into distinct rotameric conformations, but alternative backbone conformations can overlap at several atomic positions. Our model building program qFit uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) to evaluate an extremely large number of combinations of sidechain conformers and backbone fragments to locally explain the electron density. Here, we describe two major modeling enhancements to qFit: peptide flips and alternative glycine conformations. We find that peptide flips fall into four stereotypical clusters and are enriched in glycine residues at the n+1 position. The potential for insights uncovered by new peptide flips and glycine conformations is exemplified by HIV protease, where different inhibitors are associated with peptide flips in the “flap” regions adjacent to the inhibitor binding site. Our results paint a picture of peptide flips as conformational switches, often enabled by glycine flexibility, that result in dramatic local rearrangements. Our results furthermore demonstrate the power of large-scale computational analysis to provide new insights into conformational heterogeneity. Overall, improved modeling of backbone heterogeneity with high-resolution X-ray data will connect dynamics to the structure-function relationship and help drive new design strategies for inhibitors of biomedically important systems. PMID:26506617

  7. Exposing hidden alternative backbone conformations in X-ray crystallography using qFit

    SciTech Connect

    Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; van den Bedem, Henry; Shehu, Amarda

    2015-10-27

    Proteins must move between different conformations of their native ensemble to perform their functions. Crystal structures obtained from high-resolution X-ray diffraction data reflect this heterogeneity as a spatial and temporal conformational average. Although movement between natively populated alternative conformations can be critical for characterizing molecular mechanisms, it is challenging to identify these conformations within electron density maps. Alternative side chain conformations are generally well separated into distinct rotameric conformations, but alternative backbone conformations can overlap at several atomic positions. Our model building program qFit uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) to evaluate an extremely large number of combinations of sidechain conformers and backbone fragments to locally explain the electron density. Here, we describe two major modeling enhancements to qFit: peptide flips and alternative glycine conformations. We find that peptide flips fall into four stereotypical clusters and are enriched in glycine residues at the n+1 position. The potential for insights uncovered by new peptide flips and glycine conformations is exemplified by HIV protease, where different inhibitors are associated with peptide flips in the “flap” regions adjacent to the inhibitor binding site. Our results paint a picture of peptide flips as conformational switches, often enabled by glycine flexibility, that result in dramatic local rearrangements. Our results furthermore demonstrate the power of large-scale computational analysis to provide new insights into conformational heterogeneity. Furthermore, improved modeling of backbone heterogeneity with high-resolution X-ray data will connect dynamics to the structure-function relationship and help drive new design strategies for inhibitors of biomedically important systems.

  8. Exposing hidden alternative backbone conformations in X-ray crystallography using qFit

    DOE PAGES

    Keedy, Daniel A.; Fraser, James S.; van den Bedem, Henry; Shehu, Amarda

    2015-10-27

    Proteins must move between different conformations of their native ensemble to perform their functions. Crystal structures obtained from high-resolution X-ray diffraction data reflect this heterogeneity as a spatial and temporal conformational average. Although movement between natively populated alternative conformations can be critical for characterizing molecular mechanisms, it is challenging to identify these conformations within electron density maps. Alternative side chain conformations are generally well separated into distinct rotameric conformations, but alternative backbone conformations can overlap at several atomic positions. Our model building program qFit uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) to evaluate an extremely large number of combinations of sidechainmore » conformers and backbone fragments to locally explain the electron density. Here, we describe two major modeling enhancements to qFit: peptide flips and alternative glycine conformations. We find that peptide flips fall into four stereotypical clusters and are enriched in glycine residues at the n+1 position. The potential for insights uncovered by new peptide flips and glycine conformations is exemplified by HIV protease, where different inhibitors are associated with peptide flips in the “flap” regions adjacent to the inhibitor binding site. Our results paint a picture of peptide flips as conformational switches, often enabled by glycine flexibility, that result in dramatic local rearrangements. Our results furthermore demonstrate the power of large-scale computational analysis to provide new insights into conformational heterogeneity. Furthermore, improved modeling of backbone heterogeneity with high-resolution X-ray data will connect dynamics to the structure-function relationship and help drive new design strategies for inhibitors of biomedically important systems.« less

  9. The role of molecular structure of sugar-phosphate backbone and nucleic acid bases in the formation of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Poltev, Valeri; Anisimov, Victor M; Danilov, Victor I; Garcia, Dolores; Sanchez, Carolina; Deriabina, Alexandra; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Rivas, Francisco; Polteva, Nina

    2014-06-01

    Our previous DFT computations of deoxydinucleoside monophosphate complexes with Na(+)-ions (dDMPs) have demonstrated that the main characteristics of Watson-Crick (WC) right-handed duplex families are predefined in the local energy minima of dDMPs. In this work, we study the mechanisms of contribution of chemically monotonous sugar-phosphate backbone and the bases into the double helix irregularity. Geometry optimization of sugar-phosphate backbone produces energy minima matching the WC DNA conformations. Studying the conformational variability of dDMPs in response to sequence permutation, we found that simple replacement of bases in the previously fully optimized dDMPs, e.g. by constructing Pyr-Pur from Pur-Pyr, and Pur-Pyr from Pyr-Pur sequences, while retaining the backbone geometry, automatically produces the mutual base position characteristic of the target sequence. Based on that, we infer that the directionality and the preferable regions of the sugar-phosphate torsions, combined with the difference of purines from pyrimidines in ring shape, determines the sequence dependence of the structure of WC DNA. No such sequence dependence exists in dDMPs corresponding to other DNA conformations (e.g., Z-family and Hoogsteen duplexes). Unlike other duplexes, WC helix is unique by its ability to match the local energy minima of the free single strand to the preferable conformations of the duplex.

  10. Synthesis and properties of a novel molecular beacon containing a benzene-phosphate backbone at a stem moiety.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshihito; Kawamura, Akihiro; Kato, Takumi; Kitade, Yukio

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of a novel molecular beacon (MB) containing a benzene-phosphate backbone at the stem moieties. Fluorescent intensity of MBs was found to be stabilized by introducing a benzene-phosphate backbone at stem moieties.

  11. Flexible backbone sampling methods to model and design protein alternative conformations.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Noah; Smith, Colin A; Fraser, James S; Kortemme, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Sampling alternative conformations is key to understanding how proteins work and engineering them for new functions. However, accurately characterizing and modeling protein conformational ensembles remain experimentally and computationally challenging. These challenges must be met before protein conformational heterogeneity can be exploited in protein engineering and design. Here, as a stepping stone, we describe methods to detect alternative conformations in proteins and strategies to model these near-native conformational changes based on backrub-type Monte Carlo moves in Rosetta. We illustrate how Rosetta simulations that apply backrub moves improve modeling of point mutant side-chain conformations, native side-chain conformational heterogeneity, functional conformational changes, tolerated sequence space, protein interaction specificity, and amino acid covariation across protein-protein interfaces. We include relevant Rosetta command lines and RosettaScripts to encourage the application of these types of simulations to other systems. Our work highlights that critical scoring and sampling improvements will be necessary to approximate conformational landscapes. Challenges for the future development of these methods include modeling conformational changes that propagate away from designed mutation sites and modulating backbone flexibility to predictively design functionally important conformational heterogeneity.

  12. Backbone dependency further improves side chain prediction efficiency in the Energy-based Conformer Library (bEBL).

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sabareesh; Senes, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Side chain optimization is an integral component of many protein modeling applications. In these applications, the conformational freedom of the side chains is often explored using libraries of discrete, frequently occurring conformations. Because side chain optimization can pose a computationally intensive combinatorial problem, the nature of these conformer libraries is important for ensuring efficiency and accuracy in side chain prediction. We have previously developed an innovative method to create a conformer library with enhanced performance. The Energy-based Library (EBL) was obtained by analyzing the energetic interactions between conformers and a large number of natural protein environments from crystal structures. This process guided the selection of conformers with the highest propensity to fit into spaces that should accommodate a side chain. Because the method requires a large crystallographic data-set, the EBL was created in a backbone-independent fashion. However, it is well established that side chain conformation is strongly dependent on the local backbone geometry, and that backbone-dependent libraries are more efficient in side chain optimization. Here we present the backbone-dependent EBL (bEBL), whose conformers are independently sorted for each populated region of Ramachandran space. The resulting library closely mirrors the local backbone-dependent distribution of side chain conformation. Compared to the EBL, we demonstrate that the bEBL uses fewer conformers to produce similar side chain prediction outcomes, thus further improving performance with respect to the already efficient backbone-independent version of the library.

  13. RNA backbone: Consensus all-angle conformers and modular string nomenclature (an RNA Ontology Consortium contribution)

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jane S.; Schneider, Bohdan; Murray, Laura W.; Kapral, Gary J.; Immormino, Robert M.; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Richardson, David C.; Ham, Daniela; Hershkovits, Eli; Williams, Loren Dean; Keating, Kevin S.; Pyle, Anna Marie; Micallef, David; Westbrook, John; Berman, Helen M.

    2008-01-01

    A consensus classification and nomenclature are defined for RNA backbone structure using all of the backbone torsion angles. By a consensus of several independent analysis methods, 46 discrete conformers are identified as suitably clustered in a quality-filtered, multidimensional dihedral angle distribution. Most of these conformers represent identifiable features or roles within RNA structures. The conformers are given two-character names that reflect the seven-angle δεζαβγδ combinations empirically found favorable for the sugar-to-sugar “suite” unit within which the angle correlations are strongest (e.g., 1a for A-form, 5z for the start of S-motifs). Since the half-nucleotides are specified by a number for δεζ and a lowercase letter for αβγδ, this modular system can also be parsed to describe traditional nucleotide units (e.g., a1) or the dinucleotides (e.g., a1a1) that are especially useful at the level of crystallographic map fitting. This nomenclature can also be written as a string with two-character suite names between the uppercase letters of the base sequence (N1aG1gN1aR1aA1cN1a for a GNRA tetraloop), facilitating bioinformatic comparisons. Cluster means, standard deviations, coordinates, and examples are made available, as well as the Suitename software that assigns suite conformer names and conformer match quality (suiteness) from atomic coordinates. The RNA Ontology Consortium will combine this new backbone system with others that define base pairs, base-stacking, and hydrogen-bond relationships to provide a full description of RNA structural motifs. PMID:18192612

  14. Refinement of the Sugar-Phosphate Backbone Torsion Beta for AMBER Force Fields Improves the Description of Z- and B-DNA.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Cheatham, Thomas E; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-12-01

    Z-DNA duplexes are a particularly complicated test case for current force fields. We performed a set of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with various AMBER force field parametrizations including our recent refinements of the ε/ζ and glycosidic torsions. None of these force fields described the ZI/ZII and other backbone substates correctly, and all of them underpredicted the population of the important ZI substate. We show that this underprediction can be attributed to an inaccurate potential for the sugar-phosphate backbone torsion angle β. We suggest a refinement of this potential, β(OL1), which was derived using our recently introduced methodology that includes conformation-dependent solvation effects. The new potential significantly increases the stability of the dominant ZI backbone substate and improves the overall description of the Z-DNA backbone. It also has a positive (albeit small) impact on another important DNA form, the antiparallel guanine quadruplex (G-DNA), and improves the description of the canonical B-DNA backbone by increasing the population of BII backbone substates, providing a better agreement with experiment. We recommend using β(OL1) in combination with our previously introduced corrections, εζ(OL1) and χ(OL4), (the combination being named OL15) as a possible alternative to the current β torsion potential for more accurate modeling of nucleic acids. PMID:26588601

  15. Refinement of the Sugar-Phosphate Backbone Torsion Beta for AMBER Force Fields Improves the Description of Z- and B-DNA.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Cheatham, Thomas E; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-12-01

    Z-DNA duplexes are a particularly complicated test case for current force fields. We performed a set of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with various AMBER force field parametrizations including our recent refinements of the ε/ζ and glycosidic torsions. None of these force fields described the ZI/ZII and other backbone substates correctly, and all of them underpredicted the population of the important ZI substate. We show that this underprediction can be attributed to an inaccurate potential for the sugar-phosphate backbone torsion angle β. We suggest a refinement of this potential, β(OL1), which was derived using our recently introduced methodology that includes conformation-dependent solvation effects. The new potential significantly increases the stability of the dominant ZI backbone substate and improves the overall description of the Z-DNA backbone. It also has a positive (albeit small) impact on another important DNA form, the antiparallel guanine quadruplex (G-DNA), and improves the description of the canonical B-DNA backbone by increasing the population of BII backbone substates, providing a better agreement with experiment. We recommend using β(OL1) in combination with our previously introduced corrections, εζ(OL1) and χ(OL4), (the combination being named OL15) as a possible alternative to the current β torsion potential for more accurate modeling of nucleic acids.

  16. Direct Formation of the C5′-Radical in the Sugar-Phosphate Backbone of DNA by High Energy Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Becker, David; Palmer, Brian J.; Heizer, Alicia N.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Neutral sugar radicals formed in DNA sugar-phosphate backbone are well-established as precursors of biologically important damage such as DNA-strand scission and crosslinking. In this work, we present electron spin resonance (ESR) evidence showing that the sugar radical at C5′ (C5′•) is one of the most abundant (ca. 30%) sugar radicals formed by γ- and Ar ion-beam irradiated hydrated DNA samples. Taking dimethyl phosphate as a model of sugar-phosphate backbone, ESR and theoretical (DFT) studies of γ-irradiated dimethyl phosphate were carried out. CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• is formed via deprotonation from the methyl group of directly ionized dimethyl phosphate at 77 K. Formation of CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• is independent of dimethyl phosphate concentration (neat or in aqueous solution) or pH. ESR spectra of C5′• found in DNA and of CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• do not show an observable β-phosphorous hyperfine coupling (HFC). Further, C5′• found in DNA does not show a significant C4′-H β–proton HFC. Applying the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d) method, a study of conformational dependence of the phosphorous HFC in CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• shows that in its minimum energy conformation, CH3OP(O2−)OCH2• has a negligible β-phosphorous HFC. Based on these results, formation of radiation-induced C5′• is proposed to occur via a very rapid deprotonation from the directly ionized sugar-phosphate backbone and rate of this deprotonation must be faster than that of energetically downhill transfer of the unpaired spin (hole) from ionized sugar-phosphate backbone to the DNA bases. Moreover, C5′• in irradiated DNA is found to be in a conformation that does not exhibit β proton or β phosphorous HFCs. PMID:22553971

  17. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    DOE PAGES

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-06-17

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL)more » of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy.« less

  18. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-06-17

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL) of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy.

  19. Benchmark quantum-chemical calculations on a complete set of rotameric families of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone and their comparison with modern density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Mládek, Arnošt; Krepl, Miroslav; Svozil, Daniel; Cech, Petr; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel; Zgarbová, Marie; Jurečka, Petr; Sponer, Jiří

    2013-05-21

    The DNA sugar-phosphate backbone has a substantial influence on the DNA structural dynamics. Structural biology and bioinformatics studies revealed that the DNA backbone in experimental structures samples a wide range of distinct conformational substates, known as rotameric DNA backbone conformational families. Their correct description is essential for methods used to model nucleic acids and is known to be the Achilles heel of force field computations. In this study we report the benchmark database of MP2 calculations extrapolated to the complete basis set of atomic orbitals with aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets, MP2(T,Q), augmented by ΔCCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ corrections. The calculations are performed in the gas phase as well as using a COSMO solvent model. This study includes a complete set of 18 established and biochemically most important families of DNA backbone conformations and several other salient conformations that we identified in experimental structures. We utilize an electronically sufficiently complete DNA sugar-phosphate-sugar (SPS) backbone model system truncated to prevent undesired intramolecular interactions. The calculations are then compared with other QM methods. The BLYP and TPSS functionals supplemented with Grimme's D3(BJ) dispersion term provide the best tradeoff between computational demands and accuracy and can be recommended for preliminary conformational searches as well as calculations on large model systems. Among the tested methods, the best agreement with the benchmark database has been obtained for the double-hybrid DSD-BLYP functional in combination with a quadruple-ζ basis set, which is, however, computationally very demanding. The new hybrid density functionals PW6B95-D3 and MPW1B95-D3 yield outstanding results and even slightly outperform the computationally more demanding PWPB95 double-hybrid functional. B3LYP-D3 is somewhat less accurate compared to the other hybrids. Extrapolated MP2(D,T) calculations are not as

  20. Photomodulation of conformational states. II. Mono- and bicyclic peptides with (4-aminomethyl)phenylazobenzoic acid as backbone constituent.

    PubMed

    Renner, C; Cramer, J; Behrendt, R; Moroder, L

    2000-12-01

    It has been reported that backbone cyclization of octapeptides with the photoresponsive (4-aminomethyl)phenylazobenzoic acid imparts sufficient restraints to induce and stabilize ordered conformations of the peptide backbone in both the cis- and trans-azo-isomers (L. Ulysse, J. Cubillos, and J. Chmielewski, Journal of the American Chemical Society, 1995, Vol. 117, pp. 8466-8467). Correspondingly, the active-site octapeptide fragment H-Ala-Cys-Ala-Thr-Cys-Asp-Gly-Phe-OH [134-141] of thioredoxin reductase, with its high preference for a 3(10)-helix turn conformation centered on the Thr-Cys sequence, was backbone cyclized with this azobenzene moiety in the attempt to design a photoresponsive system where the conformational states of the peptide backbone are dictated by the configuration of the azobenzene and can be further modulated by the disulfide bridge. Nuclear magnetic resonance conformational analysis of the monocyclic compound clearly revealed the presence of two conformational families in both the cis- and trans-azo configuration. Of the higher populated conformational families, the structure of the trans-isomer seems like a pretzel-like folding, while the cis-isomer relaxes into a significantly less defined conformational state that does not exhibit any regular structural elements. Further restrictions imparted by disulfide bridging of the peptide moiety leads to an even better defined conformation for the trans-azo-isomer, whereas the cis-isomer can be described as a frustrated system without pronounced energy minima and thus with little conformational preferences. Our findings would suggest that this photoresponsive peptide template may not be of general usefulness for light-induced conformational transitions between two well-defined conformational states at least under the experimental conditions employed, even in the bicyclic form. However, trans --> cis isomerization of the bicyclic peptide is accompanied by a switch from a well-defined conformation to

  1. Conformational transitions of the phosphodiester backbone in native DNA: two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning 31P-NMR of DNA fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Song, Z; Antzutkin, O N; Lee, Y K; Shekar, S C; Rupprecht, A; Levitt, M H

    1997-01-01

    Solid-state 31P-NMR is used to investigate the orientation of the phosphodiester backbone in NaDNA-, LiDNA-, MgDNA-, and NaDNA-netropsin fibers. The results for A- and B-DNA agree with previous interpretations. We verify that the binding of netropsin to NaDNA stabilizes the B form, and find that in NaDNA, most of the phosphate groups adopt a conformation typical of the A form, although there are minor components with phosphate orientations close to the B form. For LiDNA and MgDNA samples, on the other hand, we find phosphate conformations that are in variance with previous models. These samples display x-ray diffraction patterns that correspond to C-DNA. However, we find two distinct phosphate orientations in these samples, one resembling that in B-DNA, and one displaying a twist of the PO4 groups about the O3-P-O4 bisectors. The latter conformation is not in accordance with previous models of C-DNA structure. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 14 PMID:9284321

  2. The Inherent Conformational Preferences of Glutamine-Containing Peptides: the Role for Side-Chain Backbone Hydrogen Bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; McBurney, Carl; Gellman, Samuel H.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-06-01

    Glutamine is widely known to be found in critical regions of peptides which readily fold into amyloid fibrils, the structures commonly associated with Alzheimer's disease and glutamine repeat diseases such as Huntington's disease. Building on previous single-conformation data on Gln-containing peptides containing an aromatic cap on the N-terminus (Z-Gln-OH and Z-Gln-NHMe), we present here single-conformation UV and IR spectra of Ac-Gln-NHBn and Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn, with its C-terminal benzyl cap. These results point towards side-chain to backbone hydrogen bonds dominating the structures observed in the cold, isolated environment of a molecular beam. We have identified and assigned three main conformers for Ac-Gln-NHBn all involving primary side-chain to backbone interactions. Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn extends the peptide chain by one amino acid, but affords an improvement in the conformational flexibility. Despite this increase in the flexibility, only a single conformation is observed in the gas-phase: a structure which makes use of both side-chain-to-backbone and backbone-to-backbone hydrogen bonds.

  3. Molecular Data for a Biochemical Model of DNA Radiation Damage: Electron Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of DNA Bases and Sugar-Phosphate Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the database for building up a biochemical model of DNA radiation damage, electron impact ionization cross sections of sugar-phosphate backbone and DNA bases have been calculated using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. It is found that the total ionization cross sections of C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 10%. Of the four DNA bases, the ionization cross section of guanine is the largest, then in decreasing order, adenine, thymine, and cytosine. The order is in accordance with the known propensity of oxidation of the bases by ionizing radiation. Dissociative ionization (DI), a process that both ionizes and dissociates a molecule, is investigated for cytosine. The DI cross section for the formation of H and (cytosine-Hl)(+), with the cytosine ion losing H at the 1 position, is also reported. The threshold of this process is calculated to be 17.1 eV. Detailed analysis of ionization products such as in DI is important to trace the sequential steps in the biochemical process of DNA damage.

  4. Influence of backbone rigidness on single chain conformation of thiophene-based conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhongjian; Liu, Jianhua; Simón-Bower, Lauren; Zhai, Lei; Gesquiere, Andre J

    2013-04-25

    Structural order of conjugated polymers at different length scales directs the optoelectronic properties of the corresponding materials; thus it is of critical importance to understand and control conjugated polymer morphology for successful application of these materials in organic optoelectronics. Herein, with the aim of probing the dependence of single chain folding properties on the chemical structure and rigidness of the polymer backbones, single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was applied to four thiophene-based conjugated polymers. These include regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT), poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT-14), poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thiophene-2-yl)thiophen-2-ylthiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole) (PTzQT-12), and poly(3,3-didodecylquaterthiophene)] (PQT-12). Our previous work has shown that RR-P3HT and PBTTT-14 polymer chains fold in their nanostructures, whereas PQT-12 and PTzQT-12 do not fold in their nanostructures. At the single molecule level, it was found that RR-P3HT single chains almost exclusively fold into loosely and strongly aggregated conformations, analogous to the folding properties in nanostructures. PQT-12 displays significant chain folding as well, but only into loosely aggregated conformations, showing an absence of strongly aggregated polymer chains. PBTTT-14 exhibits a significant fraction of rigid polymer chain. The findings made for single molecules of PQT-12 and PBTTT-14 are thus in contrast with the observations made in their corresponding nanostructures. PTzQT-12 appears to be the most rigid and planar conjugated polymer of these four polymers. However, although the presumably nonfolding polymers PQT-12 and PTzQT-12 exhibit less folding than RR-P3HT, there is still a significant occurrence of chain folding for these polymers at the single molecule level. These results suggest that the folding properties of conjugated polymers can be influenced by the architecture of the

  5. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of the DNA Sugar-Phosphate Backbone by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher; Huo, Winifred M.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in living cells are not caused by the highly energetic incident radiation, but rather are induced by less energetic secondary species generated, the most abundant of which are free electrons.' The secondary electrons will further react to cause DNA damage via indirect and direct mechanisms. Detailed knowledge of these mechanisms is ultimately important for the development of global models of cellular radiation damage. We are studying one possible mechanism for the formation cf DNA strand breaks involving dissociative ionization of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone induced by secondary electron co!lisions. We will present ionization cross sections at electron collision energies between threshold and 10 KeV using the improved binary encounter dipole (iBED) formulation' Preliminary results of the possible dissociative ionization pathways will be presented. It is speculated that radical fragments produced from the dissociative ionization can further react, providing a possible mechanism for double strand breaks and base damage.

  6. A new default restraint library for the protein backbone in Phenix: a conformation-dependent geometry goes mainstream

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Chemical restraints are a fundamental part of crystallographic protein structure refinement. In response to mounting evidence that conventional restraints have shortcomings, it has previously been documented that using backbone restraints that depend on the protein backbone conformation helps to address these shortcomings and improves the performance of refinements [Moriarty et al. (2014 ▸), FEBS J. 281, 4061–4071]. It is important that these improvements be made available to all in the protein crystallography community. Toward this end, a change in the default geometry library used by Phenix is described here. Tests are presented showing that this change will not generate increased numbers of outliers during validation, or deposition in the Protein Data Bank, during the transition period in which some validation tools still use the conventional restraint libraries. PMID:26894545

  7. An Unusual Conformational Isomer of Verrucosidin Backbone from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus, Penicillium sp. Y-50-10

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chengqian; Shi, Yutong; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Xuegang; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Tao, Xinyi; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A new verrucosidin derivative, methyl isoverrucosidinol (1), was isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. Y-50-10, dwelling in sulfur rich sediment in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The structure was established by spectroscopic means including HRMS and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration was defined mainly by comparison of quantum chemical TDDFT calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among hitherto known compounds with a verrucosidine backbone isolated from natural resource, compound 1 represents the first example of a new conformational isomer of its skeleton, exhibiting antibiotic activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC value 32 μg/mL. PMID:27548192

  8. Conformation-specific spectroscopy of capped glutamine-containing peptides: role of a single glutamine residue on peptide backbone preferences.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Patrick S; Dean, Jacob C; McBurney, Carl; Kang, Hyuk; Gellman, Samuel H; Zwier, Timothy S

    2016-04-28

    The conformational preferences of a series of short, aromatic-capped, glutamine-containing peptides have been studied under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. This work seeks a bottom-up understanding of the role played by glutamine residues in directing peptide structures that lead to neurodegenerative diseases. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy is used to record single-conformation infrared spectra in the NH stretch, amide I and amide II regions. Comparison of the experimental spectra with the predictions of calculations carried out at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory lead to firm assignments for the H-bonding architectures of a total of eight conformers of four molecules, including three in Z-Gln-OH, one in Z-Gln-NHMe, three in Ac-Gln-NHBn, and one in Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn. The Gln side chain engages actively in forming H-bonds with nearest-neighbor amide groups, forming C8 H-bonds to the C-terminal side, C9 H-bonds to the N-terminal side, and an amide-stacked geometry, all with an extended (C5) peptide backbone about the Gln residue. The Gln side chain also stabilizes an inverse γ-turn in the peptide backbone by forming a pair of H-bonds that bridge the γ-turn and stabilize it. Finally, the entire conformer population of Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn is funneled into a single structure that incorporates the peptide backbone in a type I β-turn, stabilized by the Gln side chain forming a C7 H-bond to the central amide group in the β-turn not otherwise involved in a hydrogen bond. This β-turn backbone structure is nearly identical to that observed in a series of X-(AQ)-Y β-turns in the protein data bank, demonstrating that the gas-phase structure is robust to perturbations imposed by the crystalline protein environment.

  9. An Unusual Conformational Isomer of Verrucosidin Backbone from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus, Penicillium sp. Y-50-10.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chengqian; Shi, Yutong; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Xuegang; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Tao, Xinyi; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A new verrucosidin derivative, methyl isoverrucosidinol (1), was isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. Y-50-10, dwelling in sulfur rich sediment in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The structure was established by spectroscopic means including HRMS and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration was defined mainly by comparison of quantum chemical TDDFT calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among hitherto known compounds with a verrucosidine backbone isolated from natural resource, compound 1 represents the first example of a new conformational isomer of its skeleton, exhibiting antibiotic activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC value 32 μg/mL. PMID:27548192

  10. The DNA and RNA sugar-phosphate backbone emerges as the key player. An overview of quantum-chemical, structural biology and simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Šponer, Jiří; Mládek, Arnošt; Šponer, Judit E; Svozil, Daniel; Zgarbová, Marie; Banáš, Pavel; Jurečka, Petr; Otyepka, Michal

    2012-11-28

    Knowledge of geometrical and physico-chemical properties of the sugar-phosphate backbone substantially contributes to the comprehension of the structural dynamics, function and evolution of nucleic acids. We provide a side by side overview of structural biology/bioinformatics, quantum chemical and molecular mechanical/simulation studies of the nucleic acids backbone. We highlight main features, advantages and limitations of these techniques, with a special emphasis given to their synergy. The present status of the research is then illustrated by selected examples which include classification of DNA and RNA backbone families, benchmark structure-energy quantum chemical calculations, parameterization of the dihedral space of simulation force fields, incorporation of arsenate into DNA, sugar-phosphate backbone self-cleavage in small RNA enzymes, and intricate geometries of the backbone in recurrent RNA building blocks. Although not apparent from the current literature showing limited overlaps between the QM, simulation and bioinformatics studies of the nucleic acids backbone, there in fact should be a major cooperative interaction between these three approaches in studies of the sugar-phosphate backbone.

  11. Assessing the Impact of Backbone Length and Capping Agent on the Conformational Preferences of a Model Peptide: Conformation Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy of 2-AMINOISOBUTYRIC Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gord, Joseph R.; Hewett, Daniel M.; Kubasik, Matthew A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-06-01

    2-Aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) is an achiral, α-amino acid having two equivalent methyl groups attached to C_α. Extended Aib oligomers are known to have a strong preference for the adoption of a 310-helical structure in the condensed phase. Here, we have taken a simplifying step and focused on the intrinsic folding propensities of Aib by looking at a series of capped Aib oligomers in the gas phase, free from the influence of solvent molecules and cooled in a supersonic expansion. Resonant two-photon ionization and IR-UV holeburning have been used to record single-conformation UV spectra using the Z-cap as the UV chromophore. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy provides single-conformation IR spectra in the OH stretch and NH stretch regions. Data have been collected on a set of Z-(Aib)n-X oligomers with n = 1, 2, 4, 6 and X = -OH and -OMethyl. The impacts of these capping groups and differences in backbone length have been found to dramatically influence the conformational space accessed by the molecules studied here. Oligomers of n=4 have sufficient backbone length for a full turn of the 310-helix to be formed. Early interpretation of the data collected shows clear spectroscopic markers signaling the onset of 310-helix formation as well as evidence of structures incorporating C7 and C14 hydrogen bonded rings. Toniolo, C.; Bonora, G. M.; Barone, V.; Bavoso, A.; Benedetti, E.; Di Blasio, B.; Grimaldi, P.; Lelj, F.; Pavone, V.; Pedone, C., Conformation of Pleionomers of α-Aminoisobutyric Acid. Macromolecules 1985, 18, 895-902.

  12. The backbone and side chain conformations of the cyclic tetrapeptide HC-toxin.

    PubMed

    Mascagni, P; Pope, M; Gibbons, W A; Ciuffetti, L M; Knoche, H W

    1983-05-31

    A study of the conformational parameters of HC-toxin and its diacetyl derivative in chloroform solution has been carried out. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and the nuclear Overhauser effect have been used in order to determine connectivities (assignments and sequence) and approximate torsion angles and interproton distances. The results are consistent with a bis-gamma-turn conformation previously reported for dihydrochlamydocin. Model building based upon NMR data supports a D configuration for Ala2 and Pro4 residues. PMID:6860326

  13. Electron impact cross sections for surrogates of DNA sugar phosphate backbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Pooja; Joshipura, K. N.; Pandya, Siddharth

    2012-11-01

    Ionization and elastic cross sections by electron impact on H3PO4 and OP(OCH3)3 which are substitutes for the components of DNA phosphate group. We have employed the Complex Scattering Potential-ionization contribution (CSP-ic) formalism to calculate the cross sections in the energy range from ionization threshold to 2000 eV.

  14. Direct Observation of Aggregation-Induced Backbone Conformational Changes in Tau Peptides.

    PubMed

    Jiji, A C; Shine, A; Vijayan, Vinesh

    2016-09-12

    In tau proteins, the hexapeptides in the R2 and R3 repeats are known to initiate tau fibril formation, which causes a class of neurodegenerative diseases called the taupathies. We show that in R3, in addition to the presence of the hexapeptides, the correct turn conformation upstream to it is also essential for producing prion-like fibrils that are capable of propagation. A time-dependent NMR aggregation assay of a slow fibril forming R3-S316P peptide revealed a trans to cis equilibrium shift in the peptide-bond conformation preceding P316 during the growth phase of the aggregation process. S316 was identified as the key residue in the turn that confers templating capacity on R3 fibrils to accelerate the aggregation of the R3-S316P peptide. These results on the specific interactions and conformational changes responsible for tau aggregation could prove useful for developing an efficient therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27513615

  15. Role of the backbone conformation at position 7 in the structure and activity of marinostatin, an ester-linked serine protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Taichi, Misako; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Nishiuchi, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    Rational design of inhibitors: The cis-amide backbone at position 7 in the serine protease inhibitor marinostatin was replaced with an E or Z olefin. The E olefin analogue was not active, but the Z analogue was. The cis conformation might play a critical role in organizing a canonical structure for binding to proteases.

  16. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Conformation of Oligo(ethylene glycol) Grafted Polystyrene in Dilute Solutions: Effect of the Backbone Length

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Hong, Kunlun; Hua, Fengjun; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Wignall, George D; Mays, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    The conformation and clusterization of comb like polymers of polystyrene densely grafted with oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) side chains in 1.0 wt% solutions of D2O, toluene-d8 and methanol-d4 was investigated as a function of the degree of polymerization (DP) of the backbone by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Each side chain had four EG repeat units and the DP of the polystyrene backbone was varied from 8 to 85. The global conformation of the polymers in toluene and methanol was shown to assume ellipsoidal, cylindrical or worm-like chain morphologies with increasing DP of the polystyrene backbone. At the same time, in D2O, the polymer conformation was described by the form factor of rigid cylinders. The second viral coefficient was measured for the polymer with a DP of 85 in all three solvents and the solvent quality of toluene, methanol and D2O was identified as good, marginal and poor for this polymer. Due to a poor solvent quality, the PS backbone (DP = 85) is partially collapsed in D2O whereas it is moderately expanded in toluene and methanol. Polymers with the DP of 8 were found to aggregate into clusters in all three solvents, with the characteristic size between 100 and 200 ?and a fractal dimension of 2. With increase of the DP, the clusters diminished in D2O and completely disappeared in toluene and methanol. This observation suggests that the clusterization of these short side-chain polymers is caused by end group and hydrogen bonding interactions between different chains.

  17. Multiple N-methylation of MT-II backbone amide bonds leads to melanocortin receptor subtype hMC1R selectivity; pharmacological and conformational studies

    PubMed Central

    Doedens, Lucas; Opperer, Florian; Cai, Minying; Beck, Johannes G.; Dedek, Matt; Palmer, Erin; Hruby, Victor J.; Kessler, Horst

    2010-01-01

    Multiple N-methylation is a novel technology to improve bioavailability of peptides and increase receptor subtype selectivity. This technique has been applied here to the superpotent but non-selective cyclic peptide MT-II. A library of all possible 31 backbone N-methylated derivatives has been synthesized and tested for binding and activation at melanocortin receptor subtypes 1, 3, 4 and 5. It turned out that selectivity is improved with every introduced N-methyl group, resulting in several N-methylated selective and potent agonists for the hMC1R. The most potent of these derivatives is N-methylated on four out of five amide bonds in the cyclic structure. Its solution structure indicates a strongly preferred backbone conformation which resembles other a-MSH analogs but possesses much less flexibility and in addition distinct differences in the spatial arrangement of individual amino acid side chains. PMID:20496895

  18. S-Shaped Conformation of the Quaterthiophene Molecular Backbone in Two-Dimensional Bisterpyridine-Derivative Self-Assembled Nanoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Kervella, Yann; Shilova, Ekaterina; Latil, Sylvain; Jousselme, Bruno; Silly, Fabien

    2015-12-15

    The conformation and the two-dimensional self-assembly of 4'-(3',4″-dihexyloxy-5,2':5',2″:5″,2‴-quaterthien-2,5‴-diyl)-bis(2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) molecules are theoretically and experimentally investigated. This molecular building block forms a hydrogen-bonded chiral supramolecular nanoarchitecture on graphite at the solid/liquid interface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) shows that the molecule adopts an S-shaped conformation in this structure. DFTB+ calculations reveal that this conformation is not the lowest-energy conformation. The molecular nanoarchitecture appears to be stabilized by hydrogen bonding as well as van der Waals interactions. I-, L-, and D-shaped molecular conformations are, however, locally observed at the domain boundary, but these conformations do not self-assemble into organized 2D structures. PMID:26624809

  19. Preferred conformation and dynamics of the glycerol backbone in phospholipids. An NMR and X-ray single-crystal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, H.; Pascher, I.; Sundell, S. )

    1988-12-27

    The conformation of the glycerol group of a number of diacyl and monoacyl (lyso) phospholipids differing in the chemical nature of the head group was studied by {sup 1}H high-resolution NMR and X-ray crystallography. The NMR measurements were carried out with solutions or micellar dispersions of the lipids in deuteriated organic solvents or {sup 2}H{sub 2}O. Both solutions, in which the lipid is present as monomers, and lipid micelles give rise to good high-resolution NMR spectra exhibiting spin coupling hyperfine interactions. From {sup 1}H spin coupling it is concluded that there are two stable conformations about the glycerol C(2)-C(3) bond of phospholipids. By comparison of NMR and single-crystal X-ray data it is obvious that both conformations are minimum free energy conformations. Rotamer A is the conformation prevailing in phospholipid single-crystal structures. The conformation of rotamer B is also found in phospholipid single-crystal structures though to a lesser extent. NMR measurements indicate that in liquid crystals the diacylglycerol part of phospholipids fluctuates between the two stable staggered conformations of rotamers A and B. The transition between rotamers A and B is fast on the NMR time scale and must be accompanied by appropriate changes in the torsion angles {beta}{sub 1} to {beta}{sub 4} and {gamma}{sub 1} to {gamma}{sub 4} of the two fatty acyl chains. It is clear from the data presented that the parallel alignment of the hydrocarbon chains or chain stacking in phospholipid aggregates such as bilayers or micelles is the fundamental principle governing the conformation of the C(2)-C(3) glycerol bond.

  20. Temperature dependence of the 31P chemical shifts of nucleic acids. A prode of phosphate ester torsional conformations.

    PubMed

    Gorenstein, D G; Findlay, J B; Momii, R K; Luxon, B A; Kar, D

    1976-08-24

    The temperature dependence of the 31P chemical shifts of the ribodinucleoside monophosphates, ApA, GpC, CpC, UpU, and ApU, of the deoxyribonucleic acids, d-ApT, TpT, d-ApA, and d-pApT, and of the homopolyribonucleic acids poly(G), poly(U), poly(A) is shown to provide information on the helix-coli transition in nucleic acids. The base stacked, helical structure with a gauche,gauche phosphate ester torsional conformation is 0.2-0.6 ppm upfield from the random coil conformation. In contrast, the 31P chemical shifts of dimethyl and diethyl phosphate do not change significantly with temperature. These results support our earlier hypothesis that 31P shifts are sensitive probes of torsional conformations with phosphate esters in gauche,gauche conformations having 31P shifts upfield from nongauche conformations.

  1. Intra-residue interactions in proteins: interplay between serine or cysteine side chains and backbone conformations, revealed by laser spectroscopy of isolated model peptides.

    PubMed

    Alauddin, Mohammad; Biswal, Himansu S; Gloaguen, Eric; Mons, Michel

    2015-01-21

    Intra-residue interactions play an important role in proteins by influencing local folding of the backbone. Taking advantage of the capability of gas phase experiments to provide relevant information on the intrinsic H-bonding pattern of isolated peptide chains, the intra-residue interactions of serine and cysteine residues, i.e., OH/SH···OC(i) C6 and NH(i···)O/S C5 interactions in Ser/Cys residues, are probed by laser spectroscopy of isolated peptides. The strength of these local side chain-main chain interactions, elegantly documented from their IR spectral features for well-defined conformations of the main chain, demonstrates that a subtle competition exists between the two types of intra-residue bond: the C6 H-bond is the major interaction with Ser, in contrast to Cys where C5 interaction takes over. The restricted number of conformers observed in the gas phase experiment with Ser compared to Cys (where both extended and folded forms are observed) also suggests a significant mediation role of these intra-residue interactions on the competition between the several main chain folding patterns. PMID:25482851

  2. Observations of a Flattened Helical Backbone Conformation in Regularly Twisted POLY(m-PHENYLENE Diisophthalamide) (mpdi) Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuebel, Christian; Lawrence, Dan; Martin, David

    2001-03-01

    Poly(m-phenylene diisophthalamide) (MPDI) is a polyaramide used to manufacture thermally stable high strength fibers (Nomex® by DuPont). When MPDI dissolved in N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) is crystallized over several weeks by exposure to a non-solvent (H2O), the polymer precipitates into uniform, regularly twisted crystalline bundles. Low dose HREM of the 0.38 nm lattice fringes perpendicular to the fiber axis are visible everywhere in the fiber whereas the lattice planes parallel to the fiber axis are only visible over a distance of 10-20 nm. The different sets of fringes appear periodically in agreement with regularly twisted fibers. The lattice spacings can be explained well by a hexagonal unit cell with a = b = 1.65 nm, c=0.38 nm. Molecular modeling showed that a flattened helical molecular structure explained the intensity distribution of the electron diffraction pattern as well as the high-resolution data. This helical molecular conformation is similar that seen in the topologically related meta-phenylene ethynylenes. The three-dimensional translational symmetry of a perfect crystal is geometrically incompatible with uniform twisting. The high-resolution images reveal that the twisted crystals accommodate this distortion by lateral shift-disorder of the helices parallel to the twist axis. This results in an overall symmetry similar to an ordered hexagonal columnar liquid crystal, resolving the geometrical incompatibility.

  3. Mimicking the first turn of an α-helix with an unnatural backbone: conformation-specific IR and UV spectroscopy of cyclically constrained β/γ-peptides.

    PubMed

    Gord, Joseph R; Walsh, Patrick S; Fisher, Brian F; Gellman, Samuel H; Zwier, Timothy S

    2014-07-17

    The folding preferences of two capped, constrained β/γ-dipeptide isomers, Ac-βACPC-γACHC-NHBn and Ac-γACHC-βACPC-NHBn, (designated βγ and γβ, respectively), have been investigated using single- and double-resonance ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy in the gas phase. These capped β/γ-dipeptides have the same number of backbone atoms between their N- and C-termini as a capped α-tripeptide and thus serve as a minimal structural unit on which to test their ability to mimic the formation of the first turn of an α-helix. Resonant two-photon ionization and UV-UV hole-burning spectroscopy were performed in the S0-S1 region, revealing the presence of three unique conformations of βγ and a single conformation of γβ. Resonant ion-dip infrared spectra were obtained in the NH stretch region from 3300 to 3500 cm(-1) and in both the amide I and amide II regions from 1400 to 1800 cm(-1). These infrared spectra were compared to computational predictions from density functional theory calculations at the M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level, leading to assignments for the observed conformations. Two unique bifurcated C8/C13 H-bonded ring structures for βγ and a single bifurcated C9/C13 H-bonded ring structure for γβ were observed. In all cases, the H-bonding patterns faithfully mimic the first full turn of an α-helix, most notably by containing a 13-membered H-bonded cycle but also by orienting the interior amide group so that it is poised to engage in a second C13 H-bond as the β/γ-peptide lengthens in size. The structural characteristics of the β/γ-peptide version of the 13-helix turn are compared with the α-helix counterpart and with a reported crystal structure for a longer β/γ-peptide oligomer.

  4. Resolving the fluorescence response of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: mapping intra- and intersubunit conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jason L; West, Joseph K; Nelson, Andrew D L; Reinhart, Gregory D

    2007-01-16

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) from Escherichia coli is potentially overlaid with a network of allosterism, interconnecting active sites, effector binding sites, and aggregate interfaces to control its mechanisms of catalytic synchronization, regulation, and oligomerization, respectively. To characterize these conformational changes, a tryptophan-free variant of CPS was genetically engineered by substituting six native tryptophans with tyrosines. Each tryptophan was then reinserted, singly, as a specific fluorescence probe of its corresponding microenvironment. The amino acid substitutions themselves result in little apparent disruption of the protein; variants maintain catalytic and allosteric functionality, and the fluorescence properties of each tryptophan, while unique, are additive to wild-type CPS. Whereas the collective, intrinsic fluorescence response of E. coli CPS is largely insensitive to ligand binding, changes of the individual probes in intensity, lifetime, anisotropy, and accessibility to acrylamide quenching highlight the dynamic interplay between several protein domains, as well as between subunits. W213 within the carboxy phosphate domain, for example, exhibits an almost 40% increase in intensity upon saturation with ATP; W437 of the oligomerization domain, in contrast, is essentially silent in its fluorescence to the binding of ligands. Nucleotide and bicarbonate association within the large subunit induces fluorescence changes in both W170 and W175 of the small subunit, indicative of the type of long-range interactions purportedly synchronizing the carboxy phosphate and amidotransferase domains of the enzyme to initiate catalysis. ATP and ADP engender different fluorescence responses in most tryptophans, perhaps reflecting coordinating, conformational changes accompanying the cycling of reactants and products during catalysis. PMID:17209549

  5. Improvement of the treatment of loop structures in the UNRES force field by inclusion of coupling between backbone- and side-chain-local conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Maciej; Ołldziej, Stanisław; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam; Czaplewski, Cezary

    2013-01-01

    The UNited RESidue (UNRES) coarse-grained model of polypeptide chains, developed in our laboratory, enables us to carry out millisecond-scale molecular-dynamics simulations of large proteins effectively. It performs well in ab initio predictions of protein structure, as demonstrated in the last Community Wide Experiment on the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP10). However, the resolution of the simulated structure is too coarse, especially in loop regions, which results from insufficient specificity of the model of local interactions. To improve the representation of local interactions, in this work we introduced new side-chain-backbone correlation potentials, derived from a statistical analysis of loop regions of 4585 proteins. To obtain sufficient statistics, we reduced the set of amino-acid-residue types to five groups, derived in our earlier work on structurally optimized reduced alphabets, based on a statistical analysis of the properties of amino-acid structures. The new correlation potentials are expressed as one-dimensional Fourier series in the virtual-bond-dihedral angles involving side-chain centroids. The weight of these new terms was determined by a trial-and-error method, in which Multiplexed Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (MREMD) simulations were run on selected test proteins. The best average root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) of the calculated structures from the experimental structures below the folding-transition temperatures were obtained with the weight of the new side-chain-backbone correlation potentials equal to 0.57. The resulting conformational ensembles were analyzed in detail by using the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM) and Ward's minimum-variance clustering. This analysis showed that the RMSDs from the experimental structures dropped by 0.5 Å on average, compared to simulations without the new terms, and the deviation of individual residues in the loop region of the computed

  6. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  7. A conformational sampling model for radical catalysis in pyridoxal phosphate- and cobalamin-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Menon, Binuraj R K; Fisher, Karl; Rigby, Stephen E J; Scrutton, Nigel S; Leys, David

    2014-12-01

    Cobalamin-dependent enzymes enhance the rate of C-Co bond cleavage by up to ∼10(12)-fold to generate cob(II)alamin and a transient adenosyl radical. In the case of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and cobalamin-dependent enzymes lysine 5,6-aminomutase and ornithine 4,5 aminomutase (OAM), it has been proposed that a large scale domain reorientation of the cobalamin-binding domain is linked to radical catalysis. Here, OAM variants were designed to perturb the interface between the cobalamin-binding domain and the PLP-binding TIM barrel domain. Steady-state and single turnover kinetic studies of these variants, combined with pulsed electron-electron double resonance measurements of spin-labeled OAM were used to provide direct evidence for a dynamic interface between the cobalamin and PLP-binding domains. Our data suggest that following ligand binding-induced cleavage of the Lys(629)-PLP covalent bond, dynamic motion of the cobalamin-binding domain leads to conformational sampling of the available space. This supports radical catalysis through transient formation of a catalytically competent active state. Crucially, it appears that the formation of the state containing both a substrate/product radical and Co(II) does not restrict cobalamin domain motion. A similar conformational sampling mechanism has been proposed to support rapid electron transfer in a number of dynamic redox systems.

  8. Differential Deformability of the DNA Minor Groove and Altered BI/BII Backbone Conformational Equilibrium by the Monovalent Ions Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+ via Water-Mediated Hydrogen Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the differential impact of the monovalent cations Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+ on DNA conformational properties. These were identified from variations in the calculated solution-state X-ray DNA spectra as a function of the ion type in the solvation buffer in MD simulations using our recently developed polarizable force field based on the classical Drude oscillator. Changes in the DNA structure were found to mainly involve variations in the minor groove width. Because minor groove dimensions vary significantly in protein-DNA complexes and have been shown to play a critical role in both specific and nonspecific DNA readout, understanding the origins of the observed differential DNA modulation by the first-group monovalent ions is of great biological importance. In the present study we show that the primary microscopic mechanism for the phenomenon is the formation of the water-mediated hydrogen bonds between solvated cations located inside the minor groove and simultaneously to two DNA strands, a process whose intensity and impact on DNA structure depends on both the type of the ion and DNA sequence. Additionally, it is shown that formation of such ion-DNA hydrogen bond complexes appreciably modulates the conformation of the backbone by increasing the population of the BII substate. Notably, the differential impact of the ions on DNA conformational behavior is only predicted by the Drude polarizable model for DNA, with virtually no effect observed from MD simulations utilizing the additive CHARMM36 model. Analysis of dipole moments of the water shows the Drude SWM4 model to possess high sensitivity to changes in the local environment, which indicates the important role of electronic polarization in the salt-dependent conformational properties. This also suggests that inclusion of polarization effects is required to model even relatively simple biological systems such as DNA in various ionic solutions. PMID:26575937

  9. Differential Deformability of the DNA Minor Groove and Altered BI/BII Backbone Conformational Equilibrium by the Monovalent Ions Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Rb(+) via Water-Mediated Hydrogen Bonding.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-09-01

    Recently, we reported the differential impact of the monovalent cations Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Rb(+) on DNA conformational properties. These were identified from variations in the calculated solution-state X-ray DNA spectra as a function of the ion type in solvation buffer in MD simulations using our recently developed polarizable force field based on the classical Drude oscillator. Changes in the DNA structure were found to mainly involve variations in the minor groove width. Because minor groove dimensions vary significantly in protein-DNA complexes and have been shown to play a critical role in both specific and nonspecific DNA readout, understanding the origins of the observed differential DNA modulation by the first-group monovalent ions is of great biological importance. In the present study, we show that the primary microscopic mechanism for the phenomenon is the formation of water-mediated hydrogen bonds between solvated cations located inside the minor groove and simultaneously to two DNA strands, a process whose intensity and impact on DNA structure depends on both the type of ion and the DNA sequence. Additionally, it is shown that the formation of such ion-DNA hydrogen bond complexes appreciably modulates the conformation of the backbone by increasing the population of the BII substate. Notably, the differential impact of the ions on DNA conformational behavior is only predicted by the Drude polarizable model for DNA with virtually no effect observed from MD simulations utilizing the additive CHARMM36 model. Analysis of dipole moments of the water shows the Drude SWM4 model to possess high sensitivity to changes in the local environment, which indicates the important role of electronic polarization in the salt-dependent conformational properties. This also suggests that inclusion of polarization effects is required to model even relatively simple biological systems, such as DNA, in various ionic solutions. PMID:26575937

  10. Physics-based potentials for the coupling between backbone- and side-chain-local conformational states in the united residue (UNRES) force field for protein simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sieradzan, Adam K.; Krupa, Paweł; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam; Czaplewski, Cezary

    2015-01-01

    The UNited RESidue (UNRES) model of polypeptide chains is a coarse-grained model in which each amino-acid residue is reduced to two interaction sites, namely a united peptide group (p) located halfway between the two neighboring α-carbon atoms (Cαs), which serve only as geometrical points, and a united side chain (SC) attached to the respective Cα. Owing to this simplification, millisecond Molecular Dynamics simulations of large systems can be performed. While UNRES predicts overall folds well, it reproduces the details of local chain conformation with lower accuracy. Recently, we implemented new knowledge-based torsional potentials (Krupa et. al. J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2013, 9, 4620–4632) that depend on the virtual-bond dihedral angles involving side chains: Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ SC (τ(1)), SC ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα (τ(2)), and SC ⋯ Cα ⋯ Cα ⋯ SC (τ(3)) in the UNRES force field. These potentials resulted in significant improvement of the simulated structures, especially in the loop regions. In this work, we introduce the physics-based counterparts of these potentials, which we derived from the all-atom energy surfaces of terminally-blocked amino-acid residues by Boltzmann integration over the angles λ(1) and λ(2) for rotation about the Cα ⋯ Cα virtual-bond angles and over the side-chain angles χ. The energy surfaces were, in turn, calculated by using the semiempirical AM1 method of molecular quantum mechanics. Entropy contribution was evaluated with use of the harmonic approximation from Hessian matrices. One-dimensional Fourier series in the respective virtual-bond-dihedral angles were fitted to the calculated potentials, and these expressions have been implemented in the UNRES force field. Basic calibration of the UNRES force field with the new potentials was carried out with eight training proteins, by selecting the optimal weight of the new energy terms and reducing the weight of the regular torsional terms. The force field was

  11. 5-Substituents in the uridine moiety and their effect on the conformation of ApU-type dinucleoside phosphates.

    PubMed

    Hillen, W; Gassen, G

    1978-03-29

    The ApU analogues ApT, Apcl5U, Apbr5U, Apa5U and Apno5(2)U were synthesized with the aid of ribonuclease U2 starting from 2',3'-cyclic Ap and the respective uridine derivatives. For these compounds the ultraviolet data, the difference spectra, the hypochromism and the temperature dependence of the CD spectra are reported. The dimerisation shifts of the pyrimidine protons which were obtained from the 100 MHz PMR spectra confirm the optical results. The influence of the substituents in the 5 position of the uracil ring on base-base interaction and the conformation of the dinucleoside phosphates is discussed with respect to the van der Waals radii and the electronic effects of these groups. As calculated from the hypochromism the dinucleoside phosphates can be arranged according to decreasing base-base interaction: Apno5(2)U greater than Apbr5U approximately ApT greater than Apcl5U greater than ApU greater than Apa5U.

  12. Probabilistic model-based methodology for the conformational study of cyclic systems: application to copper complexes double-bridged by phosphate and related ligands.

    PubMed

    Kessler, M; Pérez, J; Bueso, M C; García, L; Pérez, E; Serrano, J L; Carrascosa, R

    2007-12-01

    A methodology for the conformational study of cyclic systems through the statistical analysis of torsion angles is presented. It relies on a combination of different methods based on a probabilistic model which takes into account the topological symmetry of the structures. This methodology is applied to copper complexes double-bridged by phosphate and related ligands. Structures from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) are analyzed and the chair, boat-chair and boat conformations are identified as the most frequent conformations. The output of the methodology also provides information about distortions from the ideal conformations, the most frequent being: chair <--> twist-chair, chair <--> twist-boat-chair and boat <--> twist-boat. Molecular mechanics calculations identify these distortions as energetically accessible pathways.

  13. Antibodies to inactive conformations of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase inactivate the apo- and holoforms of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Arutiunova, E I; Pleten, A P; Nagradova, N K; Muronetz, V I

    2006-06-01

    Polyclonal antibodies produced after the immunization of a rabbit with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Bacillus stearothermophilus were used to isolate two types of antibodies interacting with different non-native forms of the antigen. Type I antibodies were purified using Sepharose-bound apo-GAPDH that was treated with glutaraldehyde to stabilize the enzyme in the tetrameric form. Type II antibodies were isolated using immobilized denatured monomers of the enzyme. It was shown that the type I antibodies bound to the native holo- and apoforms of the enzyme with the ratio of one antibody molecule per GAPDH tetramer. While interacting with the native holoenzyme, the type I antibodies induce a time-dependent decrease in its activity by 80-90%. In the case of the apoenzyme, the decrease in the activity constitutes only 25%, this indicating that only one subunit of the tetramer is inactivated. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments showed that the formation of the complex between both forms of the enzyme and the type I antibodies resulted in a shift of the maximum of the thermal capacity curves (T(m) value) to lower temperatures. The extremely stable holoenzyme was affected to the greatest extent, the shift of the T(m) value constituting approximately 20 degrees C. We assume that the formation of the complex between the holo- or apo-GAPDH and the type I antibody results in time-dependent conformational changes in the enzyme molecule. Thus, the antibodies induce the structural rearrangements yielding the conformation that is identical to the structure of the antigen used for the selection of the antibodies (i.e., inactive). The interaction of the antibodies with the apo-GAPDH results in the inactivation of the subunit directly bound to the antibody. Virtually complete inactivation of the holoenzyme by the antibodies is likely due to the transmission of the conformational changes through the intersubunit contacts. The type II antibodies, which

  14. Genetic heterogeneity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency revealed by single-strand conformation and sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Calabro, V.; Mason, P.J.; Luzzatto, L. ); Filosa, S.; Martini, G. ); Civitelli, D.; Cittadella, R.; Brancati, C. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors have carried out a systematic study of the molecular basis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency on a sample of 53 male subjects from Calabria, in southern Italy. Their sequential approach consisted of the following steps: (1) Partial biochemical characterization was used to pinpoint candidate known variants. The identity of these was then varified by restriction-enzyme or allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis of the appropriate PCR-amplified fragment. (2) On samples for which there was no obvious candidate mutation, they proceeded to amplify the entire coding region in eight fragments, followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of each fragment. (3) The next step was M13 phage cloning and sequencing of those individual fragments that were found to be abnormal by SSCP. Through this approach they have identified the molecular lesion in 51 of the 53 samples. In these they found a total of nine different G6PD-deficient variants, five of which (G6PD Mediterranean, G6PD A[sup [minus

  15. Preparation and structural characterization of cDHAP-cyclic form of dihydroxyacetone phosphate-revealing chair and skew conformations of 1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinane ring.

    PubMed

    Slepokura, Katarzyna

    2013-03-01

    A cyclic form of dihydroxyacetone phosphate, cDHAP, was obtained by the acidic hydrolysis of its dimethyl acetal (MeO)(2)cDHAP, and was crystallized in the hydrate, cDHAP-H (gem-diol; 1,3,2-dioxaphosphinane-2,5,5-triol 2-oxide) and the ketone, cDHAP-K (2-hydroxy-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-5-one 2-oxide) forms. The synthesis, MS and NMR analyses, crystallization and solid state structures determined by X-ray crystallography are described. The equilibrium state between the hydrate and ketone was established, revealing ∼86% of cDHAP-H in aqueous solution at room temperature. The striking structural feature of the ketone and hydrate forms of the same cyclic phosphate diester in the crystalline state is different conformations of the six-membered P/O/C/C/C/O 1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinane ring, namely chair (C) in cDHAP-H·H2O (9a-H) and skew (S) in cDHAP-K (9a-K). Apart from one previous report on the non-chair-puckered, disordered [(MeO)2cDHAP]- anion in the crystal of its ammonium salt (Ślepokura, K. Carbohydr. Res. 2008, 343, 113-131), this is the unique example of the cyclic phosphate diester in skew conformation. Both 9a-H and 9a-K crystallize with the phosphate group protonated, which has been so far rarely observed in the cyclic phosphates. Deformation of the phosphate group and flattening of the chair-puckered ring in 9a-H is typical of protonated P/O/C/C/C/O rings. However, the skew-puckered 9a-K shows different values of O-P-O angles versus the same lengths of P-O(endo) and P-O(exo) bonds. PMID:23353635

  16. Genetic heterogeneity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency revealed by single-strand conformation and sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Calabrò, V; Mason, P J; Filosa, S; Civitelli, D; Cittadella, R; Tagarelli, A; Martini, G; Brancati, C; Luzzatto, L

    1993-01-01

    We have carried out a systematic study of the molecular basis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency on a sample of 53 male subjects from Calabria, in southern Italy. Our sequential approach consisted of the following steps: (1) Partial biochemical characterization was used to pinpoint candidate known variants. The identity of these was then verified by restriction-enzyme or allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis of the appropriate PCR-amplified fragment. (2) On samples for which there was no obvious candidate mutation, we proceeded to amplify the entire coding region in eight fragments, followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of each fragment. (3) The next step was M13 phage cloning and sequencing of those individual fragments that were found to be abnormal by SSCP. Through this approach we have identified the molecular lesion in 51 of the 53 samples. In these we found a total of nine different G6PD-deficient variants, five of which (G6PD Mediterranean, G6PD A-, G6PD Coimbra, G6PD Seattle, and G6PD Montalbano) were already known, whereas four are new (G6PD Cassano, G6PD Cosenza, G6PD Sibari, and G6PD Maewo). G6PD Mediterranean is the commonest variant, followed by G6PD Seattle. At least seven of the variants are present, at polymorphic frequencies, in the Calabria region, and some have a nonrandom distribution within the region. This study shows that the genetic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency in Calabria, when analyzed at the DNA level, is even greater than had been anticipated from biochemical characterization. The sequential approach that we have followed is fast and efficient and could be applied to other populations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8447319

  17. Conformational Changes in Orotidine 5’-Monophosphate Decarboxylase: A Structure-Based Explanation for How the 5’-Phosphate Group Activates the Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Bijoy J.; Wood, McKay; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Goryanova, Bogdana; Amyes, Tina L.; Richard, John P.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The binding of a ligand to orotidine 5’-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) is accompanied by a conformational change from an open, inactive conformation (Eo) to a closed, active conformation (Ec). As the substrate traverses the reaction coordinate to form the stabilized vinyl carbanion/carbene intermediate, interactions are enforced that destabilize the carboxylate group of the substrate as well as stabilize the intermediate (in the Ec•S‡ complex). Focusing on the OMPDC from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, the “remote” 5’-phosphate group of the substrate activates the enzyme 2.4 × 108-fold; the activation is equivalently described by an intrinsic binding energy (IBE) of 11.4 kcal/mol. We studied residues in the activation that 1) directly contact the 5’-phosphate group; 2) participate in a hydrophobic cluster near the base of the active site loop that sequesters the bound substrate from solvent; and 3) form hydrogen-bonding interactions across the interface between the “mobile” and “fixed” half-barrel domains of the (β/α8-barrel structure. Our data support a model in which the IBE provided by the 5’-phosphate group is used to enable interactions both near the N-terminus of the active site loop and across the domain interface that stabilize both the Ec•S and Ec•S‡ complexes relative to the Eo•S complex. The conclusion that the IBE of the 5’-phosphate group provides stabilization of both the Ec•S and Ec•S‡ complexes, not just the Ec•S‡ complex, is central to understanding the structural origins of enzymatic catalysis as well as the requirements for the de novo design of enzymes that catalyze novel reactions. PMID:23030629

  18. The Tertiary Origin of the Allosteric Activation of E. coli Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Deaminase Studied by Sol-Gel Nanoencapsulation of Its T Conformer

    PubMed Central

    Zonszein, Sergio; Álvarez-Añorve, Laura I.; Vázquez-Núñez, Roberto J.; Calcagno, Mario L.

    2014-01-01

    The role of tertiary conformational changes associated to ligand binding was explored using the allosteric enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) deaminase from Escherichia coli (EcGNPDA) as an experimental model. This is an enzyme of amino sugar catabolism that deaminates GlcN6P, giving fructose 6-phosphate and ammonia, and is allosterically activated by N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate (GlcNAc6P). We resorted to the nanoencapsulation of this enzyme in wet silica sol-gels for studying the role of intrasubunit local mobility in its allosteric activation under the suppression of quaternary transition. The gel-trapped enzyme lost its characteristic homotropic cooperativity while keeping its catalytic properties and the allosteric activation by GlcNAc6P. The nanoencapsulation keeps the enzyme in the T quaternary conformation, making possible the study of its allosteric activation under a condition that is not possible to attain in a soluble phase. The involved local transition was slowed down by nanoencapsulation, thus easing the fluorometric analysis of its relaxation kinetics, which revealed an induced-fit mechanism. The absence of cooperativity produced allosterically activated transitory states displaying velocity against substrate concentration curves with apparent negative cooperativity, due to the simultaneous presence of subunits with different substrate affinities. Reaction kinetics experiments performed at different tertiary conformational relaxation times also reveal the sequential nature of the allosteric activation. We assumed as a minimal model the existence of two tertiary states, t and r, of low and high affinity, respectively, for the substrate and the activator. By fitting the velocity-substrate curves as a linear combination of two hyperbolic functions with Kt and Kr as KM values, we obtained comparable values to those reported for the quaternary conformers in solution fitted to MWC model. These results are discussed in the background of the known

  19. Conformation-selective inhibitors reveal differences in the activation and phosphate-binding loops of the tyrosine kinases Abl and Src.

    PubMed

    Hari, Sanjay B; Perera, B Gayani K; Ranjitkar, Pratistha; Seeliger, Markus A; Maly, Dustin J

    2013-12-20

    Over the past decade, an increasingly diverse array of potent and selective inhibitors that target the ATP-binding sites of protein kinases have been developed. Many of these inhibitors, like the clinically approved drug imatinib (Gleevec), stabilize a specific catalytically inactive ATP-binding site conformation of their kinases targets. Imatinib is notable in that it is highly selective for its kinase target, Abl, over other closely related tyrosine kinases, such as Src. In addition, imatinib is highly sensitive to the phosphorylation state of Abl's activation loop, which is believed to be a general characteristic of all inhibitors that stabilize a similar inactive ATP-binding site conformation. In this report, we perform a systematic analysis of a diverse series of ATP-competitive inhibitors that stabilize a similar inactive ATP-binding site conformation as imatinib with the tyrosine kinases Src and Abl. In contrast to imatinib, many of these inhibitors have very similar potencies against Src and Abl. Furthermore, only a subset of this class of inhibitors is sensitive to the phosphorylation state of the activation loop of these kinases. In attempting to explain this observation, we have uncovered an unexpected correlation between Abl's activation loop and another flexible active site feature, called the phosphate-binding loop (p-loop). These studies shed light on how imatinib is able to obtain its high target selectivity and reveal how the conformational preference of flexible active site regions can vary between closely related kinases.

  20. pH-induced bistable dynamic behaviour in the reaction catalysed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and conformational hysteresis of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Aon, M A; Cortassa, S; Hervagault, J F; Thomas, D

    1989-01-01

    1. Bistable (multiple stationary states) dynamic behaviour in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase that was subjected to successive pH change was demonstrated in an open continuously stirred tank reactor. Although the enzyme under study did not exhibit an autocatalytic effect and was homogeneously distributed, bistability was shown to occur. 2. The successive pH changes of the enzyme solution corresponded to a pH transition (8.3 in equilibrium 2), i.e. an acidification (forward direction) and an alkalinization (reverse direction). By use of intrinsic protein fluorescence methods, a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase conformational hysteresis was shown to exist concomitant with the pH transition before and after enzyme injection into the reactor. 3. The results obtained suggest that the enzyme behaves, conformationally, as a memory device that stores information about its pH history (i.e. the enzyme records information in its structure about the environment to which it was previously exposed) and transduces it in a non-linear dynamic fashion, producing the bistable behaviour observed in the open reactor. PMID:2590166

  1. Crystal structure of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima for insights into the coordination of conformational changes and an inhibitor binding.

    PubMed

    Takenoya, Mihoko; Ohtaki, Akashi; Noguchi, Keiichi; Endo, Kiwamu; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Ohsawa, Kanju; Yajima, Shunsuke; Yohda, Masafumi

    2010-06-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate is a precursor of various isoprenoids and is produced by the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway in plastids of plants, protozoa and many eubacteria. A key enzyme in the MEP pathway, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), has been shown to be the target of fosmidomycin, which works as an antimalarial, antibacterial and herbicidal compound. In this paper, we report studies of kinetics and the crystal structures of the thermostable DXR from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima. Unlike the mesophilic DXRs, Thermotoga DXR (tDXR) showed activity only with Mg(2+) at its growth temperature. We solved the crystal structures of tDXR with and without fosmidomycin. The structure without fosmidomycin but unexpectedly bound with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD), revealing a new extra space available for potential drug design. This structure adopted the closed form by rigid domain rotation but without the flexible loop over the active site, which was considered as a novel conformation. Further, the conserved Asp residue responsible for cation binding seemed to play an important role in adjusting the position of fosmidomycin. Taken together, our kinetic and the crystal structures illustrate the binding mode of fosmidomycin that leads to its slow, tight binding according to the conformational changes of DXR.

  2. Assembly of the ligand-binding conformation of Mr 46,000 mannose 6- phosphate-specific receptor takes place before reaching the Golgi complex

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The early steps in the biosynthesis of Mr 46,000 mannose 6-phosphate- specific receptor (MPR 46) have been studied by in vivo labeling of transfected BHK cells. The acquisition of phosphomannan-binding activity was compared with changes in protein structure and posttranslational modifications of MPR 46. Intramolecular disulfide bonds were formed before MPR 46 acquired a ligand-binding conformation. A conformational change that resulted in increased trypsin resistance, formation of highly immunogenic epitopes and assembly to noncovalently linked homodimers was observed almost simultaneously with the acquisition of ligand-binding activity. MPR 46 was shown to acquire ligand-binding activity before N-linked oligosaccharides were processed to complex-type forms. Maturation of the ligand-binding conformation was observed under conditions where transport to the Golgi was blocked by lowering the temperature to 16 degrees C, or by addition of brefeldin A or dinitrophenol to the medium at 37 degrees C. This suggests that receptor maturation and assembly take place before reaching the Golgi complex. The affinity towards phosphomannan- containing ligands was shown to be similar for the high-mannose and complex-glycosylated forms of MPR 46. PMID:2157722

  3. Conformational change in cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at a Au(110)—phosphate buffer interface induced by interaction with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. I.; Convery, J. H.; Harrison, P.; Khara, B.; Scrutton, N. S.; Weightman, P.

    2014-08-01

    Changes observed in the reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) profiles of monolayers of cytochrome P450 reductase adsorbed at Au(110)-electrolyte interfaces at 0.056 V following the addition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+) are explained in terms of a simple model as arising from changes in the orientation of an isoalloxazine ring located in the flavin mononucleotide binding domain of the protein. The model also accounts for the changes observed in the RAS as the potential applied to the Au(110) surface is varied and suggests that differences in the dependence of the RAS profile of the adsorbed protein on the potential applied to the electrode in the absence and presence of NADP+ are explicable as arising from a competition between the applied potential acting to reduce the protein and the NADP+ to oxidize it.

  4. Backbone dynamics in collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.

    2004-11-01

    Peptide backbone motions of collagen have been extensively studied in the past. The experimental results were interpreted using a model of a collagen rod librating about its helix axis. Considering the size of the collagen molecule and the presence of cross-linked molecules, motional amplitudes derived for the helix axis libration were unusually high. Using solid-state NMR 13C chemical shift anisotropy and 2H quadrupolar lineshape analysis for five different isotope labelled collagens we show that motional averaging of the NMR interactions occurs primarily via small-angle librations about internal bond directions. This type of dynamics is compatible with both the presence of cross-links in collagen and the X-ray data, as well as dynamic models used for other proteins.

  5. A Density Functional Theory Examination of the Local Conformational Energetics of Normal and Epigenetically Modified Duplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir; Olson, Wilma

    2013-03-01

    We report density functional theory calculations of various local regions of duplex DNA, including hydrogen bonded base pairs, stacked nearest-neighbor bases, and sugar-phosphate backbones. Special attention is given to the methylation of 5-cytosine, an epigenetic modification believed to play a key role in eukaryotic gene regulation. Energetically stable molecular conformations are identified and their elastic properties analyzed. Our results are compared with previous ab initio studies and high-resolution crystalline structural data.

  6. Mutational and Structural Analysis of Conserved Residues in Ribose-5-Phosphate Isomerase B from Leishmania donovani: Role in Substrate Recognition and Conformational Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Preet Kamal; Tripathi, Neha; Desale, Jayesh; Neelagiri, Soumya; Yadav, Shailendra; Bharatam, Prasad V.; Singh, Sushma

    2016-01-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase B from Leishmania donovani (LdRpiB) is one of the potential drug targets against visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study, we have targeted several conserved amino acids for mutational analysis (i.e. Cys69, His11, His102, His138, Asp45, Tyr46, Pro47 and Glu149) to gain crucial insights into their role in substrate binding, catalysis and conformational stability of the enzyme. All the eight LdRpiB variants were cloned, sequenced, expressed and purified. C69S, H102N, D45N and E149A mutants exhibited complete loss of enzyme activity indicating that they are indispensable for the enzyme activity. Kinetic parameters were altered in case of H138N, H11N and P47A variants; however Y46F exhibited similar kinetic behaviour as wild type. All the mutants except H138N exhibited altered protein structure as determined by CD and fluorescence spectral analysis. This data was supported by the atomic level details of the conformational changes and substrate binding using molecular dynamic simulations. LdRpiB also exhibited activity with D-form of various aldose substrates in the order of D-ribose > D-talose > D-allose > D-arabinose. Our study provides insights for better understanding of substrate enzyme interactions which can rationalize the process of drug design against parasite RpiB. PMID:26953696

  7. Retrieving backbone string neighbors provides insights into structural modeling of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiang-Ming; Li, Tong-Hua; Cong, Pei-Sheng; Tang, Sheng-Nan; Xiong, Wen-Wei

    2012-07-01

    Identification of protein structural neighbors to a query is fundamental in structure and function prediction. Here we present BS-align, a systematic method to retrieve backbone string neighbors from primary sequences as templates for protein modeling. The backbone conformation of a protein is represented by the backbone string, as defined in Ramachandran space. The backbone string of a query can be accurately predicted by two innovative technologies: a knowledge-driven sequence alignment and encoding of a backbone string element profile. Then, the predicted backbone string is employed to align against a backbone string database and retrieve a set of backbone string neighbors. The backbone string neighbors were shown to be close to native structures of query proteins. BS-align was successfully employed to predict models of 10 membrane proteins with lengths ranging between 229 and 595 residues, and whose high-resolution structural determinations were difficult to elucidate both by experiment and prediction. The obtained TM-scores and root mean square deviations of the models confirmed that the models based on the backbone string neighbors retrieved by the BS-align were very close to the native membrane structures although the query and the neighbor shared a very low sequence identity. The backbone string system represents a new road for the prediction of protein structure from sequence, and suggests that the similarity of the backbone string would be more informative than describing a protein as belonging to a fold.

  8. Adding Diverse Noncanonical Backbones to Rosetta: Enabling Peptidomimetic Design

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Timothy W.; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Lyskov, Sergey; Bullock, Brooke N.; Watkins, Andrew; Labonte, Jason W.; Pacella, Michael; Kilambi, Krishna Praneeth; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Kuhlman, Brian; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Bradley, Philip; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Arora, Paramjit S.; Das, Rhiju; Bonneau, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Peptidomimetics are classes of molecules that mimic structural and functional attributes of polypeptides. Peptidomimetic oligomers can frequently be synthesized using efficient solid phase synthesis procedures similar to peptide synthesis. Conformationally ordered peptidomimetic oligomers are finding broad applications for molecular recognition and for inhibiting protein-protein interactions. One critical limitation is the limited set of design tools for identifying oligomer sequences that can adopt desired conformations. Here, we present expansions to the ROSETTA platform that enable structure prediction and design of five non-peptidic oligomer scaffolds (noncanonical backbones), oligooxopiperazines, oligo-peptoids, -peptides, hydrogen bond surrogate helices and oligosaccharides. This work is complementary to prior additions to model noncanonical protein side chains in ROSETTA. The main purpose of our manuscript is to give a detailed description to current and future developers of how each of these noncanonical backbones was implemented. Furthermore, we provide a general outline for implementation of new backbone types not discussed here. To illustrate the utility of this approach, we describe the first tests of the ROSETTA molecular mechanics energy function in the context of oligooxopiperazines, using quantum mechanical calculations as comparison points, scanning through backbone and side chain torsion angles for a model peptidomimetic. Finally, as an example of a novel design application, we describe the automated design of an oligooxopiperazine that inhibits the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction. For the general biological and bioengineering community, several noncanonical backbones have been incorporated into web applications that allow users to freely and rapidly test the presented protocols (http://rosie.rosettacommons.org). This work helps address the peptidomimetic community's need for an automated and expandable modeling tool for noncanonical

  9. Free backbone carbonyls mediate rhodopsin activation.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Sanchez-Reyes, Omar B; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A; Ziliox, Martine; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2016-08-01

    Conserved prolines in the transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are often considered to function as hinges that divide the helix into two segments capable of independent motion. Depending on their potential to hydrogen-bond, the free C=O groups associated with these prolines can facilitate conformational flexibility, conformational switching or stabilization of the receptor structure. To address the role of conserved prolines in family A GPCRs through solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we focus on bovine rhodopsin, a GPCR in the visual receptor subfamily. The free backbone C=O groups on helices H5 and H7 stabilize the inactive rhodopsin structure through hydrogen-bonds to residues on adjacent helices. In response to light-induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore, hydrogen-bonding interactions involving these C=O groups are released, thus facilitating repacking of H5 and H7 onto the transmembrane core of the receptor. These results provide insights into the multiple structural and functional roles of prolines in membrane proteins. PMID:27376589

  10. ANSS Backbone Station Quality Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeds, A.; McNamara, D.; Benz, H.; Gee, L.

    2006-12-01

    In this study we assess the ambient noise levels of the broadband seismic stations within the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) backbone network. The backbone consists of stations operated by the USGS as well as several regional network stations operated by universities. We also assess the improved detection capability of the network due to the installation of 13 additional backbone stations and the upgrade of 26 existing stations funded by the Earthscope initiative. This assessment makes use of probability density functions (PDF) of power spectral densities (PSD) (after McNamara and Buland, 2004) computed by a continuous noise monitoring system developed by the USGS- ANSS and the Incorporated Research Institutions in Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC). We compute the median and mode of the PDF distribution and rank the stations relative to the Peterson Low noise model (LNM) (Peterson, 1993) for 11 different period bands. The power of the method lies in the fact that there is no need to screen the data for system transients, earthquakes or general data artifacts since they map into a background probability level. Previous studies have shown that most regional stations, instrumented with short period or extended short period instruments, have a higher noise level in all period bands while stations in the US network have lower noise levels at short periods (0.0625-8.0 seconds), high frequencies (8.0- 0.125Hz). The overall network is evaluated with respect to accomplishing the design goals set for the USArray/ANSS backbone project which were intended to increase broadband performance for the national monitoring network.

  11. Statistical Analysis of RNA Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Hershkovitz, Eli; Sapiro, Guillermo; Tannenbaum, Allen; Williams, Loren Dean

    2009-01-01

    Local conformation is an important determinant of RNA catalysis and binding. The analysis of RNA conformation is particularly difficult due to the large number of degrees of freedom (torsion angles) per residue. Proteins, by comparison, have many fewer degrees of freedom per residue. In this work, we use and extend classical tools from statistics and signal processing to search for clusters in RNA conformational space. Results are reported both for scalar analysis, where each torsion angle is separately studied, and for vectorial analysis, where several angles are simultaneously clustered. Adapting techniques from vector quantization and clustering to the RNA structure, we find torsion angle clusters and RNA conformational motifs. We validate the technique using well-known conformational motifs, showing that the simultaneous study of the total torsion angle space leads to results consistent with known motifs reported in the literature and also to the finding of new ones. PMID:17048391

  12. Determination of backbone nitrogen-nitrogen J correlations in proteins.

    PubMed

    Theis, K; Dingley, A J; Hoffmann, A; Omichinski, J G; Grzesiek, S

    1997-12-01

    Recently, a quantitative J correlation technique has been presented which makes use of homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn cross-polarization (TOCSY) to measure (3)J(C)'(C)' in proteins isotopically enriched with (13)C [Grzesiek, S. and Bax, A. (1997) J. Biomol. NMR, 9, 207-211]. Since homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn is twice as fast as conventional COSY transfer, this method is much less sensitive to transverse relaxation, which is the principal limiting factor in achieving long-range J-coupling correlations in macromolecules. Here we describe a similar experiment which is used to measure(3) J(NN) coupling constants between sequential amide(15) N nuclei in the backbone of ubiquitin. As expected from the low magnetic moment of (15)N, the (3)J(NN) coupling constants are exceedingly small, with values between 0.14 and 0.36 Hz for residues in β-conformations and values below 0.15 Hz for residues in α-conformations. In contrast to what is expected from a Karplus-type dependence on the backbone angle ψ, large differences in the values of(3) J(NN) are observed for a number of residues with very similar backbone ψ angles. A quantitative description of statistical and systematic errors, in particular of relaxation effects during the TOCSY transfer, shows that these differences are highly significant. PMID:20859784

  13. A Native to Amyloidogenic Transition Regulated by a Backbone Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin,C.; Berman, A.; Miranker, A.

    2006-01-01

    Many polypeptides can self-associate into linear, aggregated assemblies termed amyloid fibers. High-resolution structural insights into the mechanism of fibrillogenesis are elusive owing to the transient and mixed oligomeric nature of assembly intermediates. Here, we report the conformational changes that initiate fiber formation by beta-2-microglobulin (beta2m) in dialysis-related amyloidosis. Access of beta2m to amyloidogenic conformations is catalyzed by selective binding of divalent cations. The chemical basis of this process was determined to be backbone isomerization of a conserved proline. On the basis of this finding, we designed a beta2m variant that closely adopts this intermediate state. The variant has kinetic, thermodynamic and catalytic properties consistent with its being a fibrillogenic intermediate of wild-type beta2m. Furthermore, it is stable and folded, enabling us to unambiguously determine the initiating conformational changes for amyloid assembly at atomic resolution.

  14. The backbone of a city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scellato, S.; Cardillo, A.; Latora, V.; Porta, S.

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed the importance of centrality measures to analyze various spatial factors affecting human life in cities. Here we show how it is possible to extract the backbone of a city by deriving spanning trees based on edge betweenness and edge information. By using as sample cases the cities of Bologna and San Francisco, we show how the obtained trees are radically different from those based on edge lengths, and allow an extended comprehension of the “skeleton” of most important routes that so much affects pedestrian/vehicular flows, retail commerce vitality, land-use separation, urban crime and collective dynamical behaviours.

  15. Different models for phosphate anion shielding in DNA duplexes: An elaboration with ab initio and molecular mechanics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Henk

    In an effort to overcome a significant difference between high-level ab initio calculations and X-ray data of DNA duplexes, Fonseca Guerra et al. 9-11 studied a number of model systems for A-T and G-C basepairs at various levels of nonlocal Density Functional Theory. There was an excellent agreement with the gas-phase experimental bond enthalpies for the A-T and G-C basepairs. On the other hand the hydrogen bond lengths between the bases differ from the X-ray results. After introduction of a molecular environment as local water and Na+ ions, the agreement between theory and experiment was excellent. However, careful analysis shows that this picture is far from correct. In fact, the model was constructed as a backbone-modified DNA duplex in which the nonbonding oxygens of the phosphate linkages are completely shielded by proton addition. Experimental results with respect to backbone-modified DNAs clearly show that changes in the backbone focused on phosphate shielding result in DNA duplexes with a variety in conformational behavior. In addition to an analysis of the aforementioned contradiction, we also give molecular mechanics calculations which show that the A-T and G-C bond enthalpies are of the same order as the corresponding results of Fonseca Guerra et al. under the condition of complete anionic shielding of the nonbonded oxygens in the phosphate linkages.

  16. Changing the topology of protein backbone: the effect of backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a SH3 domain

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Frank H.; Varadan, Ranjani; Tayakuniyil, Praveen P.; Grossman, Jennifer H.; Camarero, Julio A.; Fushman, David

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the effects of the backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a protein is essential for using protein topology engineering to alter protein stability and function. Here we have determined, for the first time, the structure and dynamics of the linear and various circular constructs of the N-SH3 domain from protein c-Crk. These constructs differ in the length and amino acid composition of the cyclization region. The backbone cyclization was carried out using intein-mediated intramolecular chemical ligation between the juxtaposed N- and the C-termini. The structure and backbone dynamics studies were performed using solution NMR. Our data suggest that the backbone cyclization has little effect on the overall three-dimensional structure of the SH3 domain: besides the termini, only minor structural changes were found in the proximity of the cyclization region. In contrast to the structure, backbone dynamics are significantly affected by the cyclization. On the subnanosecond time scale, the backbone of all circular constructs on average appears more rigid than that of the linear SH3 domain; this effect is observed over the entire backbone and is not limited to the cyclization site. The backbone mobility of the circular constructs becomes less restricted with increasing length of the circularization loop. In addition, significant conformational exchange motions (on the sub-millisecond time scale) were found in the N-Src loop and in the adjacent β-strands in all circular constructs studied in this work. These effects of backbone cyclization on protein dynamics have potential implications for the stability of the protein fold and for ligand binding. PMID:25905098

  17. The "universal polymer backbone" concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollino, Joel Matthew

    This thesis begins with a brief analysis of the synthetic methodologies utilized in polymer science. A conclusion is drawn inferring that upper limits in molecular design are inevitable, arising as a direct consequence of the predominance of covalent strategies in the field. To address these concerns, the 'universal polymer backbone' (UPB) concept has been hypothesized. A UPB has been defined as any copolymer, side-chain functionalized with multiple recognition elements that are individually capable of forming strong, directional, and reversible non-covalent bonds. Non-covalent functionalization of these scaffolds can lead to the formation of a multitude of new polymer structures, each stemming from a single parent or 'universal polymer backbone'. To prepare such a UPB, isomerically pure exo-norbornene esters containing either a PdII SCS pincer complex or a diaminopyridine residue were synthesized, polymerized, and copolymerized via ROMP. All polymerizations were living under mild reaction conditions. Kinetic studies showed that the kp values are highly dependent upon the isomeric purity but completely independent of the terminal recognition units. Non-covalent functionalization of these copolymers was accomplished via (1) directed self-assembly, (2) multi-step self-assembly , and (3) one-step orthogonal self-assembly. This system shows complete specificity of each recognition motif for its complementary unit with no observable changes in the association constant upon functionalization. To explore potential applications of this UPB concept, random terpolymers possessing high concentrations of pendant alkyl chains and small amounts of recognition units were synthesized. Non-covalent crosslinking using a directed functionalization strategy resulted in dramatic increases in solution viscosities for metal crosslinked polymers with only minor changes in viscosity for hydrogen bonding motifs. The crosslinked materials were further functionalized via self-assembly by

  18. Design and synthesis of conformationally constrained 3-(N-alkylamino)propylphosphonic acids as potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Hale, Jeffrey J; Lynch, Christopher L; Budhu, Richard; Gentry, Amy; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol Ann; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Rosen, Hugh; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2004-10-01

    A series of conformationally constrained 3-(N-alkylamino)propylphosphonic acids were systematically synthesized and their activities as S1P receptor agonists were evaluated. Several pyrrolidine and cyclohexane analogs had S1P receptor profiles comparable to the acyclic lead compound, 3-(N-tetradecylamino)propylphosphonic acid (3), lowered circulating lymphocytes in mice after iv administration and were thus identified as being suitable for further investigations.

  19. Relaxation of backbone bond geometry improves protein energy landscape modeling.

    PubMed

    Conway, Patrick; Tyka, Michael D; DiMaio, Frank; Konerding, David E; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    A key issue in macromolecular structure modeling is the granularity of the molecular representation. A fine-grained representation can approximate the actual structure more accurately, but may require many more degrees of freedom than a coarse-grained representation and hence make conformational search more challenging. We investigate this tradeoff between the accuracy and the size of protein conformational search space for two frequently used representations: one with fixed bond angles and lengths and one that has full flexibility. We performed large-scale explorations of the energy landscapes of 82 protein domains under each model, and find that the introduction of bond angle flexibility significantly increases the average energy gap between native and non-native structures. We also find that incorporating bonded geometry flexibility improves low resolution X-ray crystallographic refinement. These results suggest that backbone bond angle relaxation makes an important contribution to native structure energetics, that current energy functions are sufficiently accurate to capture the energetic gain associated with subtle deformations from chain ideality, and more speculatively, that backbone geometry distortions occur late in protein folding to optimize packing in the native state.

  20. External Tank - The Structure Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welzyn, Kenneth; Pilet, Jeffrey C.; Diecidue-Conners, Dawn; Worden, Michelle; Guillot, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The External Tank forms the structural backbone of the Space Shuttle in the launch configuration. Because the tank flies to orbital velocity with the Space Shuttle Orbiter, minimization of weight is mandatory, to maximize payload performance. Choice of lightweight materials both for structure and thermal conditioning was necessary. The tank is large, and unique manufacturing facilities, tooling, handling, and transportation operations were required. Weld processes and tooling evolved with the design as it matured through several block changes, to reduce weight. Non Destructive Evaluation methods were used to assure integrity of welds and thermal protection system materials. The aluminum-lithium alloy was used near the end of the program and weld processes and weld repair techniques had to be refined. Development and implementation of friction stir welding was a substantial technology development incorporated during the Program. Automated thermal protection system application processes were developed for the majority of the tank surface. Material obsolescence was an issue throughout the 40 year program. The final configuration and tank weight enabled international space station assembly in a high inclination orbit allowing international cooperation with the Russian Federal Space Agency. Numerous process controls were implemented to assure product quality, and innovative proof testing was accomplished prior to delivery. Process controls were implemented to assure cleanliness in the production environment, to control contaminants, and to preclude corrosion. Each tank was accepted via rigorous inspections, including non-destructive evaluation techniques, proof testing, and all systems testing. In the post STS-107 era, the project focused on ascent debris risk reduction. This was accomplished via stringent process controls, post flight assessment using substantially improved imagery, and selective redesigns. These efforts were supported with a number of test programs to

  1. Structural characterization of the full-length response regulator spr1814 in complex with a phosphate analogue reveals a novel conformational plasticity of the linker region.

    PubMed

    Park, Ae Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hye; Chi, Young Min; Park, Hyun

    2016-04-29

    Spr1814 of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a response regulator (RR) that belongs to the NarL/FixJ subfamily and has a four-helix helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of the full-length spr1814 in complex with a phosphate analogue beryllium fluoride (BeF3(-)) was determined at 2.0 Å. This allows for a structural comparison with the previously reported full-length unphosphorylated spr1814. The phosphorylation of conserved aspartic acid residue of N-terminal receiver domain triggers a structural perturbation at the α4-β5-α5 interface, leading to the domain reorganization of spr1814, and this is achieved by a rotational change in the C-terminal DNA-binding domain. PMID:27038544

  2. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back About Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can ...

  3. Asymmetric Synthesis of Conformationally Constrained Fingolimod Analogues—Discovery of an Orally Active Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Type-1 Agonist and Receptor Type-3 Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ran; Snyder, Ashley H.; Kharel, Yugesh; Schaffter, Lisa; Sun, Qin; Kennedy, Perry C.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    Compound 1 (FTY720, Fingolimod) represents a new generation of immunosuppressant that modulates lymphocyte trafficking by interacting with the S1P1 receptor. Compound 1 also provides a template molecule for studying the molecular biology of S1P receptors and related enzymes (kinases and phosphatases). In this study, two conformationally constrained analogues of 1 (3a and 3c) were asymmetrically synthesized in high optical purity. In vitro assessment documented that both analogues are Sphk2 substrates, their phosphorylated species are potent S1P1 receptor agonists, and 3a-P is a potent S1P3 antagonist. After oral administration in mice, both compounds evoked lymphopenia, but their duration of action differed markedly. PMID:17994678

  4. New Insights into Active Site Conformation Dynamics of E. coli PNP Revealed by Combined H/D Exchange Approach and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazazić, Saša; Bertoša, Branimir; Luić, Marija; Mikleušević, Goran; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Dadlez, Michal; Narczyk, Marta; Bzowska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The biologically active form of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Escherichia coli (EC 2.4.2.1) is a homohexamer unit, assembled as a trimer of dimers. Upon binding of phosphate, neighboring monomers adopt different active site conformations, described as open and closed. To get insight into the functions of the two distinctive active site conformations, virtually inactive Arg24Ala mutant is complexed with phosphate; all active sites are found to be in the open conformation. To understand how the sites of neighboring monomers communicate with each other, we have combined H/D exchange (H/DX) experiments with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both methods point to the mobility of the enzyme, associated with a few flexible regions situated at the surface and within the dimer interface. Although H/DX provides an average extent of deuterium uptake for all six hexamer active sites, it was able to indicate the dynamic mechanism of cross-talk between monomers, allostery. Using this technique, it was found that phosphate binding to the wild type (WT) causes arrest of the molecular motion in backbone fragments that are flexible in a ligand-free state. This was not the case for the Arg24Ala mutant. Upon nucleoside substrate/inhibitor binding, some release of the phosphate-induced arrest is observed for the WT, whereas the opposite effects occur for the Arg24Ala mutant. MD simulations confirmed that phosphate is bound tightly in the closed active sites of the WT; conversely, in the open conformation of the active site of the WT phosphate is bound loosely moving towards the exit of the active site. In Arg24Ala mutant binary complex Pi is bound loosely, too.

  5. Polarized Raman spectra of oriented fibers of A DNA and B DNA: anisotropic and isotropic local Raman tensors of base and backbone vibrations.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G J; Benevides, J M; Overman, S A; Ueda, T; Ushizawa, K; Saitoh, M; Tsuboi, M

    1995-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectra of oriented fibers of calf thymus DNA in the A and B conformations have been obtained by use of a Raman microscope operating in the 180 degrees back-scattering geometry. The following polarized Raman intensities in the spectral interval 200-1800 cm-1 were measured with both 514.5 and 488.0 nm laser excitations: (1) Icc, in which the incident and scattered light are polarized parallel to the DNA helical axis (c axis); (2) Ibb, in which the incident and scattered light are polarized perpendicular to c; and (3) Ibc and Icb, in which the incident and scattered light are polarized in mutually perpendicular directions. High degrees of structural homogeneity and unidirectional orientation were confirmed for both the A and B form fibers, as judged by comparison of the observed Raman markers and intensity anisotropies with measurements reported previously for oligonucleotide single crystals of known three-dimensional structures. The fiber Raman anisotropies have been combined with solution Raman depolarization ratios to evaluate the local tensors corresponding to key conformation-sensitive Raman bands of the DNA bases and sugar-phosphate backbone. The present study yields novel vibrational assignments for both A DNA and BDNA conformers and also confirms many previously proposed Raman vibrational assignments. Among the significant new findings are the demonstration of complex patterns of A form and B form indicator bands in the spectral intervals 750-900 and 1050-1100 cm-1, the identification of highly anisotropic tensors corresponding to vibrations of base, deoxyribose, and phosphate moieties, and the determination of relatively isotropic Raman tensors for the symmetrical stretching mode of phosphodioxy groups in A and B DNA. The present fiber results provide a basis for exploitation of polarized Raman spectroscopy to determine DNA helix orientation as well as to probe specific nucleotide residue orientations in nucleoproteins, viruses, and other

  6. DNA with adenine tracts contains poly(dA).poly(dT) conformational features in solution.

    PubMed

    Brahms, S; Brahms, J G

    1990-03-25

    The conformation of DNA's with adenine-thymine tracts exhibiting retardation in electrophoretic migration and considered as curved were investigated in solution by CD and RAMAN spectroscopy. The following curved multimers with adenine tracts but of different flanking sequences d(CA5TGCC)n, d(TCTCTA6TATATA5)n, d(GA4T4C)n yield CD spectroscopic features indicating a non-B structure of the dA.dT tract with similarities to polyd(A).polyd(T). We suggest that adenine-thymine bases in these multimers contain some of the distinctive conformational features of poly(A).polyd(T) probably with large propeller twist found by NMR (Behling and Kearns, 1987) and by X-ray diffraction on oligonucleotides containing a tract of adenines (Nelson et al. 1987, Coll et al; 1987; DiGabriele et al. 1989). Some elements of distinctive CD features of the contiguous adenines run are also observed in the straight multi-9-mer d(CA5GCC)n which lacks in-phase relation to the helical repeat. Despite the presence of the TpA step in the straight multimer d(GT4A4)n, the altered dA.dT conformation is not completely destroyed. Interruption of adenine tract by a guanine in d(CAAGAATGCC)n leads to a B-like conformation and to a normal electrophoretic mobility. The Raman spectra reveal a rearrangement of the sugar-phosphate backbone of dA.dT tract in the multimer d(CA5TGCC)n with respect to that of polydA.polydT. This is reflected in the presence of an unique Raman band associated to C2'-endo sugar with a predominant contribution of C1'-exo puckering which is exhibited by the multimer whereas two distinct Raman bands characterize poly(dA).poly(dT) backbone conformation.

  7. RosettaBackrub—a web server for flexible backbone protein structure modeling and design

    PubMed Central

    Lauck, Florian; Smith, Colin A.; Friedland, Gregory F.; Humphris, Elisabeth L.; Kortemme, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    The RosettaBackrub server (http://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/backrub) implements the Backrub method, derived from observations of alternative conformations in high-resolution protein crystal structures, for flexible backbone protein modeling. Backrub modeling is applied to three related applications using the Rosetta program for structure prediction and design: (I) modeling of structures of point mutations, (II) generating protein conformational ensembles and designing sequences consistent with these conformations and (III) predicting tolerated sequences at protein–protein interfaces. The three protocols have been validated on experimental data. Starting from a user-provided single input protein structure in PDB format, the server generates near-native conformational ensembles. The predicted conformations and sequences can be used for different applications, such as to guide mutagenesis experiments, for ensemble-docking approaches or to generate sequence libraries for protein design. PMID:20462859

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of six different fully hydrated monomeric conformers of Escherichia coli re-lipopolysaccharide in the presence and absence of Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Obst, S; Kastowsky, M; Bradaczek, H

    1997-01-01

    Six previously published conformational models of Escherichia coli Re lipopolysaccharide (ReLPS) were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations using the CHARMM force field. The monomers of ReLPS were completely immersed in a water box. The dynamic behavior of the solvated models in the presence and absence of calcium cations was compared. The structure of the solvent shell was analyzed in terms of radial distribution functions. Diffusion coefficients and mean residence times were analyzed to characterize the dynamic behavior of the solvent. Order parameters and number of gauche defects were used for the description of the dynamics of the acyl chains. The cations are preferentially located between the carboxylate and phosphate groups of the headgroup. Their presence leads to a rigidification of the headgroup structure and alters the conformation of the backbone, thus influencing the structure and flexibility of the hydrophobic region as well. The effect of calcium on the backbone flexibility was measured in terms of glycosidic torsion angles. The six fatty acid chains of each ReLPS monomer adopt a highly ordered micromembrane structure. The packing parameter indicates that aggregation of these ReLPS monomers will lead to lamellar structures. Evaluation of all data enables us to present one conformation, C, which is thought to best represent the average structure of the ReLPS conformers. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:9138554

  9. Understanding traffic dynamics at a backbone POP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taft, Nina; Bhattacharyya, Supratik; Jetcheva, Jorjeta; Diot, Christophe

    2001-07-01

    Spatial and temporal information about traffic dynamics is central to the design of effective traffic engineering practices for IP backbones. In this paper we study backbone traffic dynamics using data collected at a major POP on a tier-1 IP backbone. We develop a methodology that combines packet-level traces from access links in the POP and BGP routing information to build components of POP-to-POP traffic matrices. Our results show that there is wide disparity in the volume of traffic headed towards different egress POPs. At the same time, we find that current routing practices in the backbone tend to constrain traffic between ingress-egress POP pairs to a small number of paths. As a result, there is a wide variation in the utilization level of links in the backbone. Frequent capacity upgrades of the heavily used links are expensive; the need for such upgrades can be reduced by designing load balancing policies that will route more traffic over less utilized links. We identify traffic aggregates based on destination address prefixes and find that this set of criteria isolates a few aggregates that account for an overwhelmingly large portion of inter-POP traffic. We also demonstrate that these aggregates exhibit stability throughout the day on per-hour time scales, and thus they form a natural basis for splitting traffic over multiple paths in order to improve load balancing.

  10. Modeling conformational changes in cyclosporin A.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donohue, M. F.; Burgess, A. W.; Walkinshaw, M. D.; Treutlein, H. R.

    1995-01-01

    NMR and X-ray structures for the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA) reveal a remarkable difference between the unbound (free) conformation in organic solvents and the conformation bound to cyclophilin. We have performed computer simulations of the molecular dynamics of CsA under a variety of conditions and confirmed the stability of these two conformations at room temperature in water and in vacuum. However, when the free conformation was modeled in vacuum at 600 K, a transition pathway leading to the bound conformation was observed. This involved a change in the cis MeLeu-9 peptide bond to a trans conformation and the movement of the side chains forming the dominant hydrophobic cluster (residues MeBmt-1, MeLeu-4, MeLeu-6, and MeLeu-10) to the opposite side of the plane formed by the backbone atoms in the molecular ring. The final conformation had a backbone RMS deviation from the bound conformation of 0.53 A and was as stable in dynamics simulations as the bound conformation. Our calculations allowed us to make a detailed analysis of a transition pathway between the free and the bound conformations of CsA and to identify two distinct regions of coordinated movement in CsA, both of which underwent transitions independently. PMID:8535256

  11. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken by mouth or used as enemas. Indigestion. Aluminum phosphate and calcium phosphate are FDA-permitted ingredients ... Phosphate salts containing sodium, potassium, aluminum, or calcium are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term, when sodium phosphate is inserted into the ...

  12. On the relationship between NMR-derived amide order parameters and protein backbone entropy changes.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Kim A; O'Brien, Evan; Kasinath, Vignesh; Wand, A Joshua

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to analyze the relationship between NMR-derived squared generalized order parameters of amide NH groups and backbone entropy. Amide order parameters (O(2) NH ) are largely determined by the secondary structure and average values appear unrelated to the overall flexibility of the protein. However, analysis of the more flexible subset (O(2) NH  < 0.8) shows that these report both on the local flexibility of the protein and on a different component of the conformational entropy than that reported by the side chain methyl axis order parameters, O(2) axis . A calibration curve for backbone entropy vs. O(2) NH is developed, which accounts for both correlations between amide group motions of different residues, and correlations between backbone and side chain motions. This calibration curve can be used with experimental values of O(2) NH changes obtained by NMR relaxation measurements to extract backbone entropy changes, for example, upon ligand binding. In conjunction with our previous calibration for side chain entropy derived from measured O(2) axis values this provides a prescription for determination of the total protein conformational entropy changes from NMR relaxation measurements.

  13. On the relationship between NMR-derived amide order parameters and protein backbone entropy changes

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Kim A.; O’Brien, Evan; Kasinath, Vignesh; Wand, A. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to analyze the relationship between NMR-derived squared generalized order parameters of amide NH groups and backbone entropy. Amide order parameters (O2NH) are largely determined by the secondary structure and average values appear unrelated to the overall flexibility of the protein. However, analysis of the more flexible subset (O2NH < 0.8) shows that these report both on the local flexibility of the protein and on a different component of the conformational entropy than that reported by the side chain methyl axis order parameters, O2axis. A calibration curve for backbone entropy vs. O2NH is developed which accounts for both correlations between amide group motions of different residues, and correlations between backbone and side chain motions. This calibration curve can be used with experimental values of O2NH changes obtained by NMR relaxation measurements to extract backbone entropy changes, e.g. upon ligand binding. In conjunction with our previous calibration for side chain entropy derived from measured O2axis values this provides a prescription for determination of the total protein conformational entropy changes from NMR relaxation measurements. PMID:25739366

  14. WDM backbone network with guaranteed performance planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Peng; Sheng, Wang; Zhong, Xusi; Li, Lemin

    2005-11-01

    Wavelength-Division multiplexing (WDM), which allows a single fibre to carry multiple signals simultaneously, has been widely used to increase link capacity and is a promising technology in backbone transport network. But designing such WDM backbone network is hard for two reasons, one is the uncertainty of future traffic demand, the other is difficulty of planning of the backup resource for failure conditions. As a result, enormous amount of link capacity for the network has to be provided for the network. Recently, a new approach called Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme (VLBS) has been proposed to design the WDM backbone network. The network planned by Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is insensitive to the traffic and continues to guarantee performance under a user defined number of link or node failures. In this paper, the Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme (VLBS) for backbone network planning has been studied and a new Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme has been proposed. Compared with the early work, the new Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is much more general and can be used for the computation of the link capacity of both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks. The abbreviation for the general Valiant Load-Balanced Scheme is GVLBS. After a brief description of the VLBS, we will give the detail derivation of the GVLBS. The central concept of the derivation of GVLBS is transforming the heterogeneous network into a homogeneous network, and taking advantage of VLBS to get GVLBS. Such transformation process is described and the derivation and analysis of GVLBS for link capacity under normal and failure conditions is also given. The numerical results show that GVLBS can compute the minimum link capacity required for the heterogeneous backbone network under different conditions (normal or failure).

  15. Short-chain phosphatidylinositol conformation and its relevance to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Zhou, C; Garigapati, V; Roberts, M F

    1997-12-16

    The solution conformation of chiral diheptanoylphosphatidylinositol (D- and L-inositol isomers) has been characterized by NMR spectroscopy. A positive NOE between the inositol C2 proton and an sn-3 glycerol CH2 proton has been observed in the D- but not in the L-inositol isomer of diheptanoylphosphatidylinositol (PI). Computer modeling using QUANTA constrained by this NOE and ring coupling constants suggests that the inositol ring is nearly parallel to the chain packing direction, leaving the phosphate ester accessible to attack by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C enzymes. In this model, the hydroxyl groups in the 2- and 6-positions of inositol form hydrogen bonds with the pro-R and ester oxygens, respectively. Chemical shifts and 13C spin-lattice relaxation times were also used to assess conformation and lipid dynamics in monomer and micelle states. The 13C T1's of inositol C2 and C6 in monomeric phosphatidylinositol were markedly less than for other inositol ring carbons. These results are consistent with the hydrogen bonds to the phosphate constraining the motions of C2 and C6. Diheptanoylphosphatidyl-2-O-methylinositol is a good inhibitor of PI-specific phospholipase C because it blocks the initial phosphotransferase step in PI hydrolysis. Introduction of the methyl group on the C-2 hydroxyl group lowers the CMC of the derivative compared to diheptanoylphosphatidylinositol. However, an NOE between an sn-3 glycerol proton and the inositol C2 proton constrains the orientation of the inositol ring with respect to the glycerol backbone in a conformation similar to diheptanoylphosphatidylinositol. Modeling of the 2-O-methylinositol derivative suggests that the methyl group blocks one side of the phosphate, consistent with the observation that nonspecific phospholipase C enzymes which are able to hydrolyze PI, albeit poorly, are unable to hydrolyze diheptanoylphosphatidyl-2-O-methylinositol.

  16. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  17. RNABC: forward kinematics to reduce all-atom steric clashes in RNA backbone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueyi; Kapral, Gary; Murray, Laura; Richardson, David; Richardson, Jane; Snoeyink, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Although accurate details in RNA structure are of great importance for understanding RNA function, the backbone conformation is difficult to determine, and most existing RNA structures show serious steric clashes (>or= 0.4 A overlap) when hydrogen atoms are taken into account. We have developed a program called RNABC (RNA Backbone Correction) that performs local perturbations to search for alternative conformations that avoid those steric clashes or other local geometry problems. Its input is an all-atom coordinate file for an RNA crystal structure (usually from the MolProbity web service), with problem areas specified. RNABC rebuilds a suite (the unit from sugar to sugar) by anchoring the phosphorus and base positions, which are clearest in crystallographic electron density, and reconstructing the other atoms using forward kinematics. Geometric parameters are constrained within user-specified tolerance of canonical or original values, and torsion angles are constrained to ranges defined through empirical database analyses. Several optimizations reduce the time required to search the many possible conformations. The output results are clustered and presented to the user, who can choose whether to accept one of the alternative conformations. Two test evaluations show the effectiveness of RNABC, first on the S-motifs from 42 RNA structures, and second on the worst problem suites (clusters of bad clashes, or serious sugar pucker outliers) in 25 unrelated RNA structures. Among the 101 S-motifs, 88 had diagnosed problems, and RNABC produced clash-free conformations with acceptable geometry for 71 of those (about 80%). For the 154 worst problem suites, RNABC proposed alternative conformations for 72. All but 8 of those were judged acceptable after examining electron density (where available) and local conformation. Thus, even for these worst cases, nearly half the time RNABC suggested corrections suitable to initiate further crystallographic refinement. The program is

  18. New Helical Foldamers: Heterogeneous Backbones with 1:2 and 2:1 [alpha]:[superscript beta]-Amino Acid Residue Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Margaret A.; Choi, SooHyuk; Guzei, Ilia A.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2008-10-03

    Foldamers, oligomers with strong folding propensities, are subjects of growing interest because such compounds offer unique scaffolds for the development of molecular function. We report two new foldamer classes, oligopeptides with regular 1:2 or 2:1 patterns of {alpha}- and {beta}-amino acid residues. Two distinct helical conformations are detected via 2D NMR in methanol for each backbone. One of the helices for each backbone is characterized via X-ray crystallography.

  19. Theoretical study of the conformation and energy of supercoiled DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, N. G.

    1992-01-01

    The two sugar-phosphate backbones of the DNA molecule wind about each other in helical paths. For circular DNA molecules, or for linear pieces of DNA with the ends anchored, the two strands have a well-defined linking number, Lk. If Lk differs from the equilibrium linking number Lk{sub 0}, the molecule is supercoiled. The linking difference {Delta}Lk = Lk-Lk{sub 0} is partitioned between torsional deformation of the DNA, or twist ({Delta}Tw), and a winding of the DNA axis about itself known as writhe (Wr). In this dissertation, the conformation and energy of supercoiled DNA are examined by treating DNA as an elastic cylinder. Finite-length and entropic effects are ignored, and all extensive quantities are treated as linear densities. Two classes of conformation are considered: the plectonemic or interwound form, in which the axis of the DNA double helix winds about itself in a double superhelix, and the toroidal shape in which the axis is wrapped around a torus. Minimum energy conformation are found. For biologically relevant values of specific linking differences, the plectonemic DNA, the superhelical pitch angle {alpha} is in the range 45{degree} < {alpha} {le} 90{degree}. For low values of specific linking difference {vert_bar}{sigma}{vert_bar} ({sigma} = {Delta}Lk/Lk{sub 0}), most linking difference is in writhe. As {vert_bar}{sigma}{vert_bar} increases, a greater proportion of linking difference is in twist. Interaction between DNA strands is treated first as a hard-body excluded volume and then as a screened electrostatic repulsion. Ionic strength is found to have a large effect, resulting in significantly greater torsional stress in supercoiled DNA at low ionic strength.

  20. Phosphates in the Z-DNA dodecamer are flexible, but their P-SAD signal is sufficient for structure solution

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhipu; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    A large number of Z-DNA hexamer duplex structures and a few oligomers of different lengths are available, but here the first crystal structure of the d(CGCGCGCGCGCG)2 dodecameric duplex is presented. Two synchrotron data sets were collected; one was used to solve the structure by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) approach based on the anomalous signal of P atoms, the other set, extending to an ultrahigh resolution of 0.75 Å, served to refine the atomic model to an R factor of 12.2% and an R free of 13.4%. The structure consists of parallel duplexes arranged into practically infinitely long helices packed in a hexagonal fashion, analogous to all other known structures of Z-DNA oligomers. However, the dodecamer molecule shows a high level of flexibility, especially of the backbone phosphate groups, with six out of 11 phosphates modeled in double orientations corresponding to the two previously observed Z-DNA conformations: ZI, with the phosphate groups inclined towards the inside of the helix, and ZII, with the phosphate groups rotated towards the outside of the helix. PMID:25004957

  1. Side chain conformational averaging in human dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, Lisa M; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2014-02-25

    The three-dimensional structures of the dihydrofolate reductase enzymes from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR or ecE) and Homo sapiens (hDHFR or hE) are very similar, despite a rather low level of sequence identity. Whereas the active site loops of ecDHFR undergo major conformational rearrangements during progression through the reaction cycle, hDHFR remains fixed in a closed loop conformation in all of its catalytic intermediates. To elucidate the structural and dynamic differences between the human and E. coli enzymes, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of side chain flexibility and dynamics in complexes of hDHFR that represent intermediates in the major catalytic cycle. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation dispersion experiments show that, in marked contrast to the functionally important motions that feature prominently in the catalytic intermediates of ecDHFR, millisecond time scale fluctuations cannot be detected for hDHFR side chains. Ligand flux in hDHFR is thought to be mediated by conformational changes between a hinge-open state when the substrate/product-binding pocket is vacant and a hinge-closed state when this pocket is occupied. Comparison of X-ray structures of hinge-open and hinge-closed states shows that helix αF changes position by sliding between the two states. Analysis of χ1 rotamer populations derived from measurements of (3)JCγCO and (3)JCγN couplings indicates that many of the side chains that contact helix αF exhibit rotamer averaging that may facilitate the conformational change. The χ1 rotamer adopted by the Phe31 side chain depends upon whether the active site contains the substrate or product. In the holoenzyme (the binary complex of hDHFR with reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate), a combination of hinge opening and a change in the Phe31 χ1 rotamer opens the active site to facilitate entry of the substrate. Overall, the data suggest that, unlike ecDHFR, hDHFR requires minimal backbone conformational rearrangement as

  2. [Phosphate binders].

    PubMed

    Heeb, Rita M

    2016-06-01

    Phosphate binders to treat hyperphosphataemia are part of the medication regime of every dialysis patient. Phosphate binders are taken with every meal (three times a day). Generally, the medication adherence rates of phosphate binders are very low. This is due to inconveniences like their bad taste or their size which makes them hard to swallow. Also nephrologists have differing opinions on phosphate binders as they are aware of the dialysis patients' difficulties to deal with the amount of drugs they are prescribed. Still, phosphate binders are important drugs which have shown potential in reducing mortality by regulating the level of serum phosphate. In order to improve adherence rates, pharmacists have to advise the patients on these drugs' side effects versus the risks associated with omitting their intake. PMID:27439258

  3. Telephone wire is backbone of security system

    SciTech Connect

    Brede, K.; Rackson, L.T.

    1995-09-01

    Video provides a variety of low-cost, high-quality solutions in today`s security environment. Cost-conscious managers of power generation stations, casinos, prison facilities, military bases and office buildings are considering using regular telephone wire (unshielded twisted pair-UTP) within their existing systems as the backbone of a video to the PC, personal and video-conferencing and training are other areas where phone wire in a building can save money and provide an alternative to coax or fiber for video. More and more, businesses and government agencies are meeting their needs efficiently by using telephone wires for more than just telephones.

  4. Nonlinear backbone torsional pair correlations in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Long, Shiyang; Tian, Pu

    2016-01-01

    Protein allostery requires dynamical structural correlations. Physical origin of which, however, remain elusive despite intensive studies during last two and half decades. Based on analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories for ten proteins with different sizes and folds, we found that nonlinear backbone torsional pair (BTP) correlations, which are mainly spatially long-ranged and are dominantly executed by loop residues, exist extensively in most analyzed proteins. Examination of torsional motion for correlated BTPs suggested that such nonlinear correlations are mainly associated aharmonic torsional state transitions and in some cases strongly anisotropic local torsional motion of participating torsions, and occur on widely different and relatively longer time scales. In contrast, correlations between backbone torsions in stable α helices and β strands are mainly linear and spatially short-ranged, and are more likely to associate with harmonic local torsional motion. Further analysis revealed that the direct cause of nonlinear contributions are heterogeneous linear correlations. These findings implicate a general search strategy for novel allosteric modulation sites of protein activities. PMID:27708342

  5. Nonlinear backbone torsional pair correlations in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Shiyang; Tian, Pu

    2016-10-01

    Protein allostery requires dynamical structural correlations. Physical origin of which, however, remain elusive despite intensive studies during last two and half decades. Based on analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories for ten proteins with different sizes and folds, we found that nonlinear backbone torsional pair (BTP) correlations, which are mainly spatially long-ranged and are dominantly executed by loop residues, exist extensively in most analyzed proteins. Examination of torsional motion for correlated BTPs suggested that such nonlinear correlations are mainly associated aharmonic torsional state transitions and in some cases strongly anisotropic local torsional motion of participating torsions, and occur on widely different and relatively longer time scales. In contrast, correlations between backbone torsions in stable α helices and β strands are mainly linear and spatially short-ranged, and are more likely to associate with harmonic local torsional motion. Further analysis revealed that the direct cause of nonlinear contributions are heterogeneous linear correlations. These findings implicate a general search strategy for novel allosteric modulation sites of protein activities.

  6. The determinants of bond angle variability in protein/peptide backbones: A comprehensive statistical/quantum mechanics analysis.

    PubMed

    Improta, Roberto; Vitagliano, Luigi; Esposito, Luciana

    2015-11-01

    The elucidation of the mutual influence between peptide bond geometry and local conformation has important implications for protein structure refinement, validation, and prediction. To gain insights into the structural determinants and the energetic contributions associated with protein/peptide backbone plasticity, we here report an extensive analysis of the variability of the peptide bond angles by combining statistical analyses of protein structures and quantum mechanics calculations on small model peptide systems. Our analyses demonstrate that all the backbone bond angles strongly depend on the peptide conformation and unveil the existence of regular trends as function of ψ and/or φ. The excellent agreement of the quantum mechanics calculations with the statistical surveys of protein structures validates the computational scheme here employed and demonstrates that the valence geometry of protein/peptide backbone is primarily dictated by local interactions. Notably, for the first time we show that the position of the H(α) hydrogen atom, which is an important parameter in NMR structural studies, is also dependent on the local conformation. Most of the trends observed may be satisfactorily explained by invoking steric repulsive interactions; in some specific cases the valence bond variability is also influenced by hydrogen-bond like interactions. Moreover, we can provide a reliable estimate of the energies involved in the interplay between geometry and conformations.

  7. Toward Improved Description of DNA Backbone: Revisiting Epsilon and Zeta Torsion Force Field Parameters.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Luque, F Javier; Sponer, Jiří; Cheatham, Thomas E; Otyepka, Michal; Jurečka, Petr

    2013-05-14

    We present a refinement of the backbone torsion parameters ε and ζ of the Cornell et al. AMBER force field for DNA simulations. The new parameters, denoted as εζOL1, were derived from quantum-mechanical calculations with inclusion of conformation-dependent solvation effects according to the recently reported methodology (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 7(9), 2886-2902). The performance of the refined parameters was analyzed by means of extended molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for several representative systems. The results showed that the εζOL1 refinement improves the backbone description of B-DNA double helices and G-DNA stem. In B-DNA simulations, we observed an average increase of the helical twist and narrowing of the major groove, thus achieving better agreement with X-ray and solution NMR data. The balance between populations of BI and BII backbone substates was shifted towards the BII state, in better agreement with ensemble-refined solution experimental results. Furthermore, the refined parameters decreased the backbone RMS deviations in B-DNA MD simulations. In the antiparallel guanine quadruplex (G-DNA) the εζOL1 modification improved the description of non-canonical α/γ backbone substates, which were shown to be coupled to the ε/ζ torsion potential. Thus, the refinement is suggested as a possible alternative to the current ε/ζ torsion potential, which may enable more accurate modeling of nucleic acids. However, long-term testing is recommended before its routine application in DNA simulations.

  8. Sofosbuvir as backbone of interferon free treatments.

    PubMed

    Bourlière, Marc; Oules, Valèrie; Ansaldi, Christelle; Adhoute, Xavier; Castellani, Paul

    2014-12-15

    Sofosbuvir is the first-in-class NS5B nucleotide analogues to be launched for hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment. Its viral potency, pangenotypic activity and high barrier to resistance make it the ideal candidate to become a backbone for several IFN-free regimens. Recent data demonstrated that sofosbuvir either with ribavirin alone or in combination with other direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) as daclatasvir, ledipasvir or simeprevir are able to cure HCV in at least 90% or over of patients. Treatment experienced genotype 3 population may remain the most difficult to treat population, but ongoing DAA combination studies will help to fill this gap. Safety profile of sofosbuvir or combination with other DAAs is good. Resistance to sofosbuvir did not appear as a significant issue. The rationale for using this class of drug and the available clinical data are reviewed.

  9. Extracting the information backbone in online system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency.

  10. Polarized Raman spectroscopy of double-stranded RNA from bacteriophage phi6: local Raman tensors of base and backbone vibrations.

    PubMed Central

    Benevides, J M; Tsuboi, M; Bamford, J K; Thomas, G J

    1997-01-01

    Raman tensors for localized vibrations of base (A, U, G, and C), ribose and phosphate groups of double-stranded RNA have been determined from polarized Raman measurements on oriented fibers of the genomic RNA of bacteriophage phi6. Polarized Raman intensities for which electric vectors of both the incident and scattered light are polarized either perpendicular (I[bb]) or parallel (I[cc]) to the RNA fiber axis have been obtained by Raman microspectroscopy using 514.5-nm excitation. Similarly, the polarized Raman components, I(bc) and I(cb), for which incident and scattered vectors are mutually perpendicular, have been obtained. Spectra collected from fibers maintained at constant relative humidity in both H2O and D2O environments indicate the effects of hydrogen-isotopic shifts on the Raman polarizations and tensors. Novel findings are the following: 1) the intense Raman band at 813 cm(-1), which is assigned to phosphodiester (OPO) symmetrical stretching and represents the key marker of the A conformation of double-stranded RNA, is characterized by a moderately anisotropic Raman tensor; 2) the prominent RNA band at 1101 cm(-1), which is assigned to phosphodioxy (PO2-) symmetrical stretching, also exhibits a moderately anisotropic Raman tensor. Comparison with results obtained previously on A, B, and Z DNA suggests that tensors for localized vibrations of backbone phosphodiester and phosphodioxy groups are sensitive to helix secondary structure and local phosphate group environment; and 3) highly anisotropic Raman tensors have been found for prominent and well-resolved Raman markers of all four bases of the RNA duplex. These enable the use of polarized Raman spectroscopy for the determination of purine and pyrimidine base residue orientations in ribonucleoprotein assemblies. The present determination of Raman tensors for dsRNA is comprehensive and accurate. Unambiguous tensors have been deduced for virtually all local vibrational modes of the 300-1800 cm(-1) spectral

  11. Computational Study of Phosphate Vibrations as Reporters of DNA Hydration.

    PubMed

    Floisand, D J; Corcelli, S A

    2015-10-15

    The sensitivity of the phosphate asymmetric stretch vibrational frequency to DNA hydration was investigated with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a spectroscopic map relating the vibrational frequency to the electrostatics of its environment. 95% of the phosphate vibrational frequency shift in fully hydrated DNA was due to water within two hydration layers. The phosphate vibration was relatively insensitive to water in the major and minor grooves and to the sodium counterions but was enormously sensitive to water interacting with the DNA backbone. Comparisons to experimental measurements on DNA as a function of relative humidity suggest that one water molecule per phosphate group likely persists at the lowest values of the relative humidity. Finally, the calculated spectral diffusion dynamics show that water in the vicinity of the DNA backbone is slowed by a factor of ∼5, in agreement with NMR and solvation dynamics experiments, as well as previous MD simulations. PMID:26722770

  12. Slow dynamics of a protein backbone in molecular dynamics simulation revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2013-12-01

    We recently proposed the method of time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA) to examine the slow dynamics involved in conformational fluctuations of a protein as estimated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation [Y. Naritomi and S. Fuchigami, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 065101 (2011)]. Our previous study focused on domain motions of the protein and examined its dynamics by using rigid-body domain analysis and tICA. However, the protein changes its conformation not only through domain motions but also by various types of motions involving its backbone and side chains. Some of these motions might occur on a slow time scale: we hypothesize that if so, we could effectively detect and characterize them using tICA. In the present study, we investigated slow dynamics of the protein backbone using MD simulation and tICA. The selected target protein was lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO), which comprises two domains and undergoes large domain motions. MD simulation of LAO in explicit water was performed for 1 μs, and the obtained trajectory of Cα atoms in the backbone was analyzed by tICA. This analysis successfully provided us with slow modes for LAO that represented either domain motions or local movements of the backbone. Further analysis elucidated the atomic details of the suggested local motions and confirmed that these motions truly occurred on the expected slow time scale.

  13. Slow dynamics of a protein backbone in molecular dynamics simulation revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2013-12-07

    We recently proposed the method of time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA) to examine the slow dynamics involved in conformational fluctuations of a protein as estimated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation [Y. Naritomi and S. Fuchigami, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 065101 (2011)]. Our previous study focused on domain motions of the protein and examined its dynamics by using rigid-body domain analysis and tICA. However, the protein changes its conformation not only through domain motions but also by various types of motions involving its backbone and side chains. Some of these motions might occur on a slow time scale: we hypothesize that if so, we could effectively detect and characterize them using tICA. In the present study, we investigated slow dynamics of the protein backbone using MD simulation and tICA. The selected target protein was lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO), which comprises two domains and undergoes large domain motions. MD simulation of LAO in explicit water was performed for 1 μs, and the obtained trajectory of C{sub α} atoms in the backbone was analyzed by tICA. This analysis successfully provided us with slow modes for LAO that represented either domain motions or local movements of the backbone. Further analysis elucidated the atomic details of the suggested local motions and confirmed that these motions truly occurred on the expected slow time scale.

  14. Slow dynamics of a protein backbone in molecular dynamics simulation revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2013-12-01

    We recently proposed the method of time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA) to examine the slow dynamics involved in conformational fluctuations of a protein as estimated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation [Y. Naritomi and S. Fuchigami, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 065101 (2011)]. Our previous study focused on domain motions of the protein and examined its dynamics by using rigid-body domain analysis and tICA. However, the protein changes its conformation not only through domain motions but also by various types of motions involving its backbone and side chains. Some of these motions might occur on a slow time scale: we hypothesize that if so, we could effectively detect and characterize them using tICA. In the present study, we investigated slow dynamics of the protein backbone using MD simulation and tICA. The selected target protein was lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO), which comprises two domains and undergoes large domain motions. MD simulation of LAO in explicit water was performed for 1 μs, and the obtained trajectory of C(α) atoms in the backbone was analyzed by tICA. This analysis successfully provided us with slow modes for LAO that represented either domain motions or local movements of the backbone. Further analysis elucidated the atomic details of the suggested local motions and confirmed that these motions truly occurred on the expected slow time scale.

  15. Conformation-dependent restraints for polynucleotides: I. Clustering of the geometry of the phosphodiester group.

    PubMed

    Kowiel, Marcin; Brzezinski, Dariusz; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2016-09-30

    The refinement of macromolecular structures is usually aided by prior stereochemical knowledge in the form of geometrical restraints. Such restraints are also used for the flexible sugar-phosphate backbones of nucleic acids. However, recent highly accurate structural studies of DNA suggest that the phosphate bond angles may have inadequate description in the existing stereochemical dictionaries. In this paper, we analyze the bonding deformations of the phosphodiester groups in the Cambridge Structural Database, cluster the studied fragments into six conformation-related categories and propose a revised set of restraints for the O-P-O bond angles and distances. The proposed restraints have been positively validated against data from the Nucleic Acid Database and an ultrahigh-resolution Z-DNA structure in the Protein Data Bank. Additionally, the manual classification of PO4 geometry is compared with geometrical clusters automatically discovered by machine learning methods. The machine learning cluster analysis provides useful insights and a practical example for general applications of clustering algorithms for automatic discovery of hidden patterns of molecular geometry. Finally, we describe the implementation and application of a public-domain web server for automatic generation of the proposed restraints.

  16. Conformation-dependent restraints for polynucleotides: I. Clustering of the geometry of the phosphodiester group

    PubMed Central

    Kowiel, Marcin; Brzezinski, Dariusz; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The refinement of macromolecular structures is usually aided by prior stereochemical knowledge in the form of geometrical restraints. Such restraints are also used for the flexible sugar-phosphate backbones of nucleic acids. However, recent highly accurate structural studies of DNA suggest that the phosphate bond angles may have inadequate description in the existing stereochemical dictionaries. In this paper, we analyze the bonding deformations of the phosphodiester groups in the Cambridge Structural Database, cluster the studied fragments into six conformation-related categories and propose a revised set of restraints for the O-P-O bond angles and distances. The proposed restraints have been positively validated against data from the Nucleic Acid Database and an ultrahigh-resolution Z-DNA structure in the Protein Data Bank. Additionally, the manual classification of PO4 geometry is compared with geometrical clusters automatically discovered by machine learning methods. The machine learning cluster analysis provides useful insights and a practical example for general applications of clustering algorithms for automatic discovery of hidden patterns of molecular geometry. Finally, we describe the implementation and application of a public-domain web server for automatic generation of the proposed restraints. PMID:27521371

  17. Conformation-dependent restraints for polynucleotides: I. Clustering of the geometry of the phosphodiester group.

    PubMed

    Kowiel, Marcin; Brzezinski, Dariusz; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2016-09-30

    The refinement of macromolecular structures is usually aided by prior stereochemical knowledge in the form of geometrical restraints. Such restraints are also used for the flexible sugar-phosphate backbones of nucleic acids. However, recent highly accurate structural studies of DNA suggest that the phosphate bond angles may have inadequate description in the existing stereochemical dictionaries. In this paper, we analyze the bonding deformations of the phosphodiester groups in the Cambridge Structural Database, cluster the studied fragments into six conformation-related categories and propose a revised set of restraints for the O-P-O bond angles and distances. The proposed restraints have been positively validated against data from the Nucleic Acid Database and an ultrahigh-resolution Z-DNA structure in the Protein Data Bank. Additionally, the manual classification of PO4 geometry is compared with geometrical clusters automatically discovered by machine learning methods. The machine learning cluster analysis provides useful insights and a practical example for general applications of clustering algorithms for automatic discovery of hidden patterns of molecular geometry. Finally, we describe the implementation and application of a public-domain web server for automatic generation of the proposed restraints. PMID:27521371

  18. Protein backbone angle restraints from searching a database for chemical shift and sequence homology.

    PubMed

    Cornilescu, G; Delaglio, F; Bax, A

    1999-03-01

    Chemical shifts of backbone atoms in proteins are exquisitely sensitive to local conformation, and homologous proteins show quite similar patterns of secondary chemical shifts. The inverse of this relation is used to search a database for triplets of adjacent residues with secondary chemical shifts and sequence similarity which provide the best match to the query triplet of interest. The database contains 13C alpha, 13C beta, 13C', 1H alpha and 15N chemical shifts for 20 proteins for which a high resolution X-ray structure is available. The computer program TALOS was developed to search this database for strings of residues with chemical shift and residue type homology. The relative importance of the weighting factors attached to the secondary chemical shifts of the five types of resonances relative to that of sequence similarity was optimized empirically. TALOS yields the 10 triplets which have the closest similarity in secondary chemical shift and amino acid sequence to those of the query sequence. If the central residues in these 10 triplets exhibit similar phi and psi backbone angles, their averages can reliably be used as angular restraints for the protein whose structure is being studied. Tests carried out for proteins of known structure indicate that the root-mean-square difference (rmsd) between the output of TALOS and the X-ray derived backbone angles is about 15 degrees. Approximately 3% of the predictions made by TALOS are found to be in error.

  19. NMR Structure Determination for Larger Proteins Using Backbone-Only Data

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Srivatsan; Lange, Oliver F.; Rossi, Paolo; Tyka, Michael; Wang, Xu; Aramini, James; Liu, Gaohua; Ramelot, Theresa; Eletsky, Alexander; Szyperski, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael; Prestegard, James; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2010-01-01

    Conventional protein structure determination from nuclear magnetic resonance data relies heavily on side-chain proton-proton distances. The necessary side-chain resonance assignment, however, is labor intensive and prone to error. Here we show that structures can be accurately determined without NMR information on the sidechains for proteins up to 25 kDa by incorporating backbone chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, and amide proton distances into the Rosetta protein structure modelling methodology. These data, which are too sparse for conventional methods, serve only to guide conformational search towards the lowest energy conformations in the folding landscape; the details of the computed models are determined by the physical chemistry implicit in the Rosetta all atom energy function. The new method is not hindered by the deuteration required to suppress nuclear relaxation processes for proteins greater than 15 kDa, and should enable routine NMR structure determination for larger proteins. PMID:20133520

  20. NHC Backbone Configuration in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Veronica; Costabile, Chiara; Grisi, Fabia

    2016-01-20

    The catalytic properties of olefin metathesis ruthenium complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with stereogenic centers on the backbone are described. Differences in catalytic behavior depending on the backbone configurations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical NHCs are discussed. In addition, an overview on asymmetric olefin metathesis promoted by chiral catalysts bearing C₂-symmetric and C₁-symmetric NHCs is provided.

  1. NHC Backbone Configuration in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Veronica; Costabile, Chiara; Grisi, Fabia

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic properties of olefin metathesis ruthenium complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with stereogenic centers on the backbone are described. Differences in catalytic behavior depending on the backbone configurations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical NHCs are discussed. In addition, an overview on asymmetric olefin metathesis promoted by chiral catalysts bearing C₂-symmetric and C₁-symmetric NHCs is provided. PMID:26805793

  2. Extracting the Information Backbone in Online System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such “less can be more” feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23690946

  3. Modeling of a possible conformational change associated with the catalytic mechanism in the hammerhead ribozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlik, R. F.; Shibata, M.; Sarma, R. H.; Sarma, M. H.; Kazim, A. L.; Ornstein, R. L.; Tomasi, T. B.; Rein, R.

    1995-01-01

    Here we describe a possible model of the cleavage mechanism in the hammerhead ribozyme. In this model, the 2' hydroxyl of C17 is moved into an appropriate orientation for an in-line attack on the G1.1 phosphate through a change in its sugar pucker from C3' endo to C2' endo. This conformational change in the active site is caused by a change in the uridine turn placing the N2 and N3 atoms of G5 of the conserved core in hydrogen bonding geometry with the N3 and N2 atoms on the conserved G16.2 residue. The observed conformational change in the uridine turn suggests an explanation for the conservation of G5. In the crystal structure of H.M. Pley et al., Nature 372, 68-74 (1994), G5 is situated 5.3A away from G16.2. However, the uridine turn is sufficiently flexible to allow this conformational change with relatively modest changes in the backbone torsion angles (average change of 14.2 degrees). Two magnesium ions were modeled into the active site with positions analogous to those described in the functionally similar Klenow fragment 3'-5' exonuclease (L.S. Beese and T.A. Steitz, EMBO J. 10, 25-33 (1991)), the Group I intron (T.A. Steitz and J.A. Steitz, P.N.A.S. U.S.A. 90, 6498-6502 (1993); R.F. Setlik et al., J. Biomol. Str. Dyn. 10, 945-972 (1993)) and other phosphotransferases. Comparison of this model with one in which the uridine turn conformation was not changed showed that although the changes in the C17 sugar pucker could be modeled, insufficient space existed for the magnesium ions in the active site.

  4. Molecular dynamics studies of the conformation of sorbitol

    PubMed Central

    Lerbret, A.; Mason, P.E.; Venable, R.M.; Cesàro, A.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Pastor, R.W.; Brady, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a 3 m aqueous solution of D-sorbitol (also called D-glucitol) have been performed at 300 K, as well as at two elevated temperatures to promote conformational transitions. In principle, sorbitol is more flexible than glucose since it does not contain a constraining ring. However, a conformational analysis revealed that the sorbitol chain remains extended in solution, in contrast to the bent conformation found experimentally in the crystalline form. While there are 243 staggered conformations of the backbone possible for this open-chain polyol, only a very limited number were found to be stable in the simulations. Although many conformers were briefly sampled, only eight were significantly populated in the simulation. The carbon backbones of all but two of these eight conformers were completely extended, unlike the bent crystal conformation. These extended conformers were stabilized by a quite persistent intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl groups of carbon C-2 and C-4. The conformational populations were found to be in good agreement with the limited available NMR data except for the C-2–C-3 torsion (spanned by the O-2–O-4 hydrogen bond), where the NMR data supports a more bent structure. PMID:19744646

  5. RNA-Redesign: a web server for fixed-backbone 3D design of RNA.

    PubMed

    Yesselman, Joseph D; Das, Rhiju

    2015-07-01

    RNA is rising in importance as a design medium for interrogating fundamental biology and for developing therapeutic and bioengineering applications. While there are several online servers for design of RNA secondary structure, there are no tools available for the rational design of 3D RNA structure. Here we present RNA-Redesign (http://rnaredesign.stanford.edu), an online 3D design tool for RNA. This resource utilizes fixed-backbone design to optimize the sequence identity and nucleobase conformations of an RNA to match a desired backbone, analogous to fundamental tools that underlie rational protein engineering. The resulting sequences suggest thermostabilizing mutations that can be experimentally verified. Further, sequence preferences that differ between natural and computationally designed sequences can suggest whether natural sequences possess functional constraints besides folding stability, such as cofactor binding or conformational switching. Finally, for biochemical studies, the designed sequences can suggest experimental tests of 3D models, including concomitant mutation of base triples. In addition to the designs generated, detailed graphical analysis is presented through an integrated and user-friendly environment.

  6. RNA-Redesign: a web server for fixed-backbone 3D design of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yesselman, Joseph D.; Das, Rhiju

    2015-01-01

    RNA is rising in importance as a design medium for interrogating fundamental biology and for developing therapeutic and bioengineering applications. While there are several online servers for design of RNA secondary structure, there are no tools available for the rational design of 3D RNA structure. Here we present RNA-Redesign (http://rnaredesign.stanford.edu), an online 3D design tool for RNA. This resource utilizes fixed-backbone design to optimize the sequence identity and nucleobase conformations of an RNA to match a desired backbone, analogous to fundamental tools that underlie rational protein engineering. The resulting sequences suggest thermostabilizing mutations that can be experimentally verified. Further, sequence preferences that differ between natural and computationally designed sequences can suggest whether natural sequences possess functional constraints besides folding stability, such as cofactor binding or conformational switching. Finally, for biochemical studies, the designed sequences can suggest experimental tests of 3D models, including concomitant mutation of base triples. In addition to the designs generated, detailed graphical analysis is presented through an integrated and user-friendly environment. PMID:25964298

  7. On the role of thermal backbone fluctuations in myoglobin ligand gate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Niemi, Antti J.; Peng, Xubiao

    2013-05-01

    We construct an energy function that describes the crystallographic structure of sperm whale myoglobin backbone. As a model in our construction, we use the Protein Data Bank entry 1ABS that has been measured at liquid helium temperature. Consequently, the thermal B-factor fluctuations are very small, which is an advantage in our construction. The energy function that we utilize resembles that of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Likewise, ours supports topological solitons as local minimum energy configurations. We describe the 1ABS backbone in terms of topological solitons with a precision that deviates from 1ABS by an average root-mean-square distance, which is less than the experimentally observed Debye-Waller B-factor fluctuation distance. We then subject the topological multi-soliton solution to extensive numerical heating and cooling experiments, over a very wide range of temperatures. We concentrate in particular to temperatures above 300 K and below the Θ-point unfolding temperature, which is around 348 K. We confirm that the behavior of the topological multi-soliton is fully consistent with Anfinsen's thermodynamic principle, up to very high temperatures. We observe that the structure responds to an increase of temperature consistently in a very similar manner. This enables us to characterize the onset of thermally induced conformational changes in terms of three distinct backbone ligand gates. One of the gates is made of the helix F and the helix E. The two other gates are chosen similarly, when open they provide a direct access route for a ligand to reach the heme. We find that out of the three gates we investigate, the one which is formed by helices B and G is the most sensitive to thermally induced conformational changes. Our approach provides a novel perspective to the important problem of ligand entry and exit.

  8. On the role of thermal backbone fluctuations in myoglobin ligand gate dynamics.

    PubMed

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Niemi, Antti J; Peng, Xubiao

    2013-05-01

    We construct an energy function that describes the crystallographic structure of sperm whale myoglobin backbone. As a model in our construction, we use the Protein Data Bank entry 1ABS that has been measured at liquid helium temperature. Consequently, the thermal B-factor fluctuations are very small, which is an advantage in our construction. The energy function that we utilize resembles that of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Likewise, ours supports topological solitons as local minimum energy configurations. We describe the 1ABS backbone in terms of topological solitons with a precision that deviates from 1ABS by an average root-mean-square distance, which is less than the experimentally observed Debye-Waller B-factor fluctuation distance. We then subject the topological multi-soliton solution to extensive numerical heating and cooling experiments, over a very wide range of temperatures. We concentrate in particular to temperatures above 300 K and below the Θ-point unfolding temperature, which is around 348 K. We confirm that the behavior of the topological multi-soliton is fully consistent with Anfinsen's thermodynamic principle, up to very high temperatures. We observe that the structure responds to an increase of temperature consistently in a very similar manner. This enables us to characterize the onset of thermally induced conformational changes in terms of three distinct backbone ligand gates. One of the gates is made of the helix F and the helix E. The two other gates are chosen similarly, when open they provide a direct access route for a ligand to reach the heme. We find that out of the three gates we investigate, the one which is formed by helices B and G is the most sensitive to thermally induced conformational changes. Our approach provides a novel perspective to the important problem of ligand entry and exit. PMID:23656161

  9. Polar order in folded backbone polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, G.A.; Stenger-Smith, J.A.; Henry, R.A.; Chafin, A.P.; Herman, W.N.; Hayden, L.M.

    1993-12-31

    The synthesis of cis-1,2-diamidocyclohexyl-bridged {alpha}-cyano-cinnamoyl nonlinear optical polymers is reported. Molecular orbital calculations on model compounds containing the cis- and trans-1,2-diamidocyclohexyl groups were performed. The low energy conformations, their molecular dipole moments and hyperpolarizabilities are discussed in terms of the degree of macroscopic polar order attainable in polymeric films poled in an electric field. The second-order nonlinear optical coefficients, d{sub 33}, for the cis- and trans-polymers are compared.

  10. Are Polyphosphates or Phosphate Esters Prebiotic Reagents?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, Anthony D.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1995-01-01

    It is widely held that there was a phosphate compound in prebiotic chemistry that played the role of adenosine triphosphate and that the first living organisms had ribose-phosphate in the backbone of their genetic material. However, there are no known efficient prebiotic synthesis of high-energy phosphates or phosphate esters. We review the occurrence of phosphates in nature, the efficiency of the volcanic synthesis of P4O10, the efficiency of polyphosphate synthesis by heating phosphate minerals under geological conditions, and the use of high-energy organic compounds such as cyanamide or hydrogen cyanide. These are shown to be inefficient processes especially when the hydrolysis of the polyphosphates is taken into account. For example, if a whole atmosphere of methane or carbon monoxide were converted to cyanide which somehow synthesized polyphosphates quantitatively, the polyphosphate concentration in the ocean would still have been insignificant. We also attempted to find more efficient high-energy polymerizing agents by spark discharge syntheses, but without success. There may still be undiscovered robust prebiotic syntheses of polyphosphates, or mechanisms for concentrating them, but we conclude that phosphate esters may not have been constituents of the first genetic material. Phosphoanhydrides are also unlikely as prebiotic energy sources.

  11. The myosin filament XIV backbone structure.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, F T; Weisel, J; Pepe, F A

    1992-01-01

    The substructure of the thick filaments of chemically skinned chicken pectoralis muscle was investigated by electron microscopy. Images of transverse sections of the myosin filaments were determined to have threefold symmetry by cross-correlation analysis, which gives an unbiased determination of the rotational symmetry of the images. Resolution, using the phase residual test (Frank et al. 1981. Science [Wash. DC]. 214:1353-1355), was found to be between 3.2 and 3.6 nm. Three arrangements of nine subfilaments in the backbone were found in all regions of the filament at ionic strengths of 20 and 200 mM. In the average images of two of these, there were three dense central subfilaments and three pairs of subfilaments on the surface of the thick filament. In the average image of the third arrangement, all of the protein mass of the nine subfilaments was on the surface of the filament with three of them showing less variation in position than the others. A fourth arrangement appearing to be transitional between two of these was seen often at 200 mM ionic strength and only rarely at 20 mM. On average, the myosin subfilaments were parallel to the long axis of the filament. The different arrangements of subfilaments appear to be randomly distributed among the filaments in a transverse section of the A-band. Relative rotational orientations with respect to the hexagonal filament lattice, using the three densest subfilaments as reference showed a major clustering (32%) of filaments within one 10 degrees spread, a lesser clustering (15%) at 90 degrees to the first, and the remainder scattered thinly over the rest of the 120 degrees range. There was no obvious pattern of distribution of the two predominant orientations that could define a superlattice in the filament lattice. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 PMID:1617136

  12. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J. E.; Sturrock, J. C.; Gallegos, F. R.

    1998-12-10

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  13. Radiation safety system (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) Backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system insuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS Backbones control the safety fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low energy beam transport. The Backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the Backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two Linac Backbone segments and experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3,500 feet from beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The Backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  14. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication, and installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmarth, J. E.; Sturrock, J. C.; Gallegos, F. R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system ensuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS backbones control the safety-fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low-energy beam transport. The backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two linac backbone segments and the experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3500 feet from the beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  16. Conformable seal

    DOEpatents

    Neef, W.S.; Lambert, D.R.

    1982-08-10

    Sealing apparatus and method, comprising first and second surfaces or membranes, at least one of which surfaces is deformable, placed in proximity to one another. Urging means cause these surfaces to contact one another in a manner such that the deformable surface deforms to conform to the geometry of the other surface, thereby creating a seal. The seal is capable of undergoing multiple cycles of sealing and unsealing.

  17. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Ollikainen, Noah; de Jong, René M.; Kortemme, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein–ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i) prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii) prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art “fixed backbone” design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new “coupled moves” design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein – ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution. PMID:26397464

  18. A backbone lever-arm effect enhances polymer mechanochemistry.

    PubMed

    Klukovich, Hope M; Kouznetsova, Tatiana B; Kean, Zachary S; Lenhardt, Jeremy M; Craig, Stephen L

    2013-02-01

    Mechanical forces along a polymer backbone can be used to bring about remarkable reactivity in embedded mechanically active functional groups, but little attention has been paid to how a given polymer backbone delivers that force to the reactant. Here, single-molecule force spectroscopy was used to directly quantify and compare the forces associated with the ring opening of gem-dibromo and gem-dichlorocyclopropanes affixed along the backbone of cis-polynorbornene and cis-polybutadiene. The critical force for isomerization drops by about one-third in the polynorbornene scaffold relative to polybutadiene. The root of the effect lies in more efficient chemomechanical coupling through the polynorbornene backbone, which acts as a phenomenological lever with greater mechanical advantage than polybutadiene. The experimental results are supported computationally and provide the foundation for a new strategy by which to engineer mechanochemical reactivity. PMID:23344431

  19. A backbone lever-arm effect enhances polymer mechanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klukovich, Hope M.; Kouznetsova, Tatiana B.; Kean, Zachary S.; Lenhardt, Jeremy M.; Craig, Stephen L.

    2013-02-01

    Mechanical forces along a polymer backbone can be used to bring about remarkable reactivity in embedded mechanically active functional groups, but little attention has been paid to how a given polymer backbone delivers that force to the reactant. Here, single-molecule force spectroscopy was used to directly quantify and compare the forces associated with the ring opening of gem-dibromo and gem-dichlorocyclopropanes affixed along the backbone of cis-polynorbornene and cis-polybutadiene. The critical force for isomerization drops by about one-third in the polynorbornene scaffold relative to polybutadiene. The root of the effect lies in more efficient chemomechanical coupling through the polynorbornene backbone, which acts as a phenomenological lever with greater mechanical advantage than polybutadiene. The experimental results are supported computationally and provide the foundation for a new strategy by which to engineer mechanochemical reactivity.

  20. Synthesis and biological activities of new side chain and backbone cyclic bradykinin analogues.

    PubMed

    Schumann, C; Seyfarth, L; Greiner, G; Paegelow, I; Reissmann, S

    2002-08-01

    A series of conformationally constrained cyclic analogues of the peptide hormone bradykinin (BK, Arg-Pro-Pro-Gly-Phe-Ser-Pro-Phe-Arg) was synthesized to check different turned structures proposed for the bioactive conformation of BK agonists and antagonists. Cycles differing in the size and direction of the lactam bridge were performed at the C- and N-terminal sequences of the molecule. Glutamic acid and lysine were introduced into the native BK sequence at different positions for cyclization through their side chains. Backbone cyclic analogues were synthesized by incorporation of N-carboxy alkylated and N-amino alkylated amino acids into the peptide chain. Although the coupling of Fmoc-glycine to the N-alkylated phenylalanine derivatives was effected with DIC/HOAt in SPPS, the dipeptide building units with more bulky amino acids were pre-built in solution. For backbone cyclization at the C-terminus an alternative building unit with an acylated reduced peptide bond was preformed in solution. Both types of building units were handled in the SPPS in the same manner as amino acids. The agonistic and antagonistic activities of the cyclic BK analogues were determined in rat uterus (RUT) and guinea-pig ileum (GPI) assays. Additionally, the potentiation of the BK-induced effects was examined. Among the series of cyclic BK agonists only compound 3 with backbone cyclization between positions 2 and 5 shows a significant agonistic activity on RUT. To study the influence of intramolecular ring closure we used an antagonistic analogue with weak activity, [D-Phe7]-BK. Side chain as well as backbone cyclization in the N-terminus of [D-Phe7]-BK resulted in analogues with moderate antagonistic activity on RUT. Also, compound 18 in which a lactam bridge between positions 6 and 9 was achieved via an acylated reduced peptide bond has moderate antagonistic activity on RUT. These results support the hypothesis of turn structures in both parts of the molecule as a requirement for BK

  1. Molecular mechanical studies of DNA flexibility: coupled backbone torsion angles and base-pair openings.

    PubMed

    Keepers, J W; Kollman, P A; Weiner, P K; James, T L

    1982-09-01

    Molecular mechanics studies have been carried out on "B-DNA-like" structures of [d(C-G-C-G-A-A-T-T-C-G-C-G)](2) and [d(A)](12).[d(T)](12). Each of the backbone torsion angles (psi, phi, omega, omega', phi') has been "forced" to alternative values from the normal B-DNA values (g(+), t, g(-), g(-), t conformations). Compensating torsion angle changes preserve most of the base stacking energy in the double helix. In a second part of the study, one purine N3-pyrimidine N1 distance at a time has been forced to a value of 6 A in an attempt to simulate the base opening motions required to rationalize proton exchange data for DNA. When the 6-A constraint is removed, many of the structures revert to the normal Watson-Crick hydrogen-bonded structure, but a number are trapped in structures approximately 5 kcal/mol higher in energy than the starting B-DNA structure. The relative energy of these structures, some of which involve a non-Watson-Crick thymine C2(carbonyl)[unk]adenine 6NH(2) hydrogen bond, are qualitatively consistent with the DeltaH for a "base pair-open state" suggested by Mandal et al. of 4-6 kcal/mol [Mandal, C., Kallenbach, N. R. & Englander, S. W. (1979) J. Mol. Biol. 135, 391-411]. The picture of DNA flexibility emerging from this study depicts the backbone as undergoing rapid motion between local torsional minima on a nanosecond time scale. Backbone motion is mainly localized within a dinucleoside segment and generally not conformationally coupled along the chain or across the base pairs. Base motions are much smaller in magnitude than backbone motions. Base sliding allows imino N-H exchange, but it is localized, and only a small fraction of the N-H groups is exposed at any one time. Stacking and hydrogen bonding cause a rigid core of bases in the center of the molecule accounting for the hydrodynamic properties of DNA.

  2. Photocleavage of the Polypeptide Backbone by 2-Nitrophenylalanine

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Francis B.; Brock, Ansgar; Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Photocleavage of the polypeptide backbone is potentially a powerful and general method to activate or deactivate functional peptides and proteins with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here we show that 2-nitrophenylalanine is able to photochemically cleave the polypeptide backbone by an unusual cinnoline forming reaction. This unnatural amino acid was genetically encoded in E. coli, and protein containing 2-nitrophenylalanine was expressed and site specifically photocleaved. PMID:19246005

  3. Side-Chain Conformational Preferences Govern Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Andrew M; Bonneau, Richard; Arora, Paramjit S

    2016-08-24

    Protein secondary structures serve as geometrically constrained scaffolds for the display of key interacting residues at protein interfaces. Given the critical role of secondary structures in protein folding and the dependence of folding propensities on backbone dihedrals, secondary structure is expected to influence the identity of residues that are important for complex formation. Counter to this expectation, we find that a narrow set of residues dominates the binding energy in protein-protein complexes independent of backbone conformation. This finding suggests that the binding epitope may instead be substantially influenced by the side-chain conformations adopted. We analyzed side-chain conformational preferences in residues that contribute significantly to binding. This analysis suggests that preferred rotamers contribute directly to specificity in protein complex formation and provides guidelines for peptidomimetic inhibitor design.

  4. Gas-phase models of γ turns: Effect of side-chain/backbone interactions investigated by IR/UV spectroscopy and quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Wutharath; Piuzzi, François; Dognon, Jean-Pierre; Dimicoli, Iliana; Mons, Michel

    2005-08-01

    The conformations of laser-desorbed jet-cooled short peptide chains Ac -Phe-Xxx-NH2 (Xxx =Gly, Ala, Val, and Pro) have been investigated by IR/UV double resonance spectroscopy and density-functional-theory (DFT) quantum chemistry calculations. Singly γ-folded backbone conformations (βL-γ) are systematically observed as the most stable conformers, showing that in these two-residue peptide chains, the local conformational preference of each residue is retained (βL for Phe and γ turn for Xxx). Besides, β turns are also spontaneously formed but appear as minor conformers. The theoretical analysis suggests negligible inter-residue interactions of the main conformers, which enables us to consider these species as good models of γ turns. In the case of valine, two similar types of γ turns, differing by the strength of their hydrogen bond, have been found both experimentally and theoretically. This observation provides evidence for a strong flexibility of the peptide chain, whose minimum-energy structures are controlled by side-chain/backbone interactions. The qualitative conformational difference between the present species and the reversed sequence Ac -Xxx-Phe-NH2 is also discussed.

  5. Triazine-Based Sequence-Defined Polymers with Side-Chain Diversity and Backbone-Backbone Interaction Motifs.

    PubMed

    Grate, Jay W; Mo, Kai-For; Daily, Michael D

    2016-03-14

    Sequence control in polymers, well-known in nature, encodes structure and functionality. Here we introduce a new architecture, based on the nucleophilic aromatic substitution chemistry of cyanuric chloride, that creates a new class of sequence-defined polymers dubbed TZPs. Proof of concept is demonstrated with two synthesized hexamers, having neutral and ionizable side chains. Molecular dynamics simulations show backbone-backbone interactions, including H-bonding motifs and pi-pi interactions. This architecture is arguably biomimetic while differing from sequence-defined polymers having peptide bonds. The synthetic methodology supports the structural diversity of side chains known in peptides, as well as backbone-backbone hydrogen-bonding motifs, and will thus enable new macromolecules and materials with useful functions. PMID:26865312

  6. Orientation and conformation of lipids in crystals of transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Derek; Páli, Tibor

    2013-03-01

    Orientational order parameters and individual dihedral torsion angles are evaluated for phospholipid and glycolipid molecules that are resolved in X-ray structures of integral transmembrane proteins in crystals. The order parameters of the lipid chains and glycerol backbones in protein crystals are characterised by a much wider distribution of orientational order than is found in fluid lipid bilayers and reconstituted lipid-protein membranes. This indicates that the lipids that are resolved in crystals of membrane proteins are mostly not representative of the entire lipid-protein interface. Much of the chain configurational disorder of the membrane-bound lipids in crystals arises from C-C bonds in energetically disallowed skew conformations. This suggests configurational heterogeneity of the lipids at a single binding site: eclipsed conformations occur also in the glycerol backbone torsion angles and the C-C torsion angles of the lipid head groups. Conformations of the lipid glycerol backbone in protein crystals are not restricted to the gauche C1-C2 rotamers found invariably in phospholipid bilayer crystals. Lipid head-group conformations in the protein crystals also do not conform solely to the bent-down conformation, with gauche-gauche configuration of the phosphodiester, that is characteristic of phospholipid bilayer membranes. Stereochemical violations in the protein-bound lipids are evidenced by ester carboxyl groups in non-planar configurations, and even in the cis configuration. Some lipids have the incorrect enantiomeric configuration of the glycerol backbone, and many of the branched methyl groups in the phytanyl chains associated with bacteriorhodopsin have the incorrect S configuration. PMID:22644500

  7. Structural mimicry of the α-helix in aqueous solution with an isoatomic α/β/γ-peptide backbone.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tomohisa; Gellman, Samuel H

    2011-05-18

    Artificial mimicry of α-helices offers a basis for development of protein-protein interaction antagonists. Here we report a new type of unnatural peptidic backbone, containing α-, β-, and γ-amino acid residues in an αγααβα repeat pattern, for this purpose. This unnatural hexad has the same number of backbone atoms as a heptad of α residues. Two-dimensional NMR data clearly establish the formation of an α-helix-like conformation in aqueous solution. The helix formed by our 12-mer α/β/γ-peptide is considerably more stable than the α-helix formed by an analogous 14-mer α-peptide, presumably because of the preorganized β and γ residues employed.

  8. Marburg virus VP35 can both fully coat the backbone and cap the ends of dsRNA for interferon antagonism.

    PubMed

    Bale, Shridhar; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Kimberlin, Christopher R; Halfmann, Peter; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Kunert, John; Kroon, Gerard J A; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; MacRae, Ian J; Wilson, Ian A; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2012-09-01

    Filoviruses, including Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus (EBOV), cause fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. All filoviruses encode a unique multi-functional protein termed VP35. The C-terminal double-stranded (ds)RNA-binding domain (RBD) of VP35 has been implicated in interferon antagonism and immune evasion. Crystal structures of the VP35 RBD from two ebolaviruses have previously demonstrated that the viral protein caps the ends of dsRNA. However, it is not yet understood how the expanses of dsRNA backbone, between the ends, are masked from immune surveillance during filovirus infection. Here, we report the crystal structure of MARV VP35 RBD bound to dsRNA. In the crystal structure, molecules of dsRNA stack end-to-end to form a pseudo-continuous oligonucleotide. This oligonucleotide is continuously and completely coated along its sugar-phosphate backbone by the MARV VP35 RBD. Analysis of dsRNA binding by dot-blot and isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that multiple copies of MARV VP35 RBD can indeed bind the dsRNA sugar-phosphate backbone in a cooperative manner in solution. Further, MARV VP35 RBD can also cap the ends of the dsRNA in solution, although this arrangement was not captured in crystals. Together, these studies suggest that MARV VP35 can both coat the backbone and cap the ends, and that for MARV, coating of the dsRNA backbone may be an essential mechanism by which dsRNA is masked from backbone-sensing immune surveillance molecules.

  9. Peptide Amphiphile Nanofibers with Conjugated Polydiacetylene Backbones in Their Core

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lorraine; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling of electronic and biological functionality through self-assembly is an interesting target in supramolecular chemistry. We report here on a set of diacetylene-derivatized peptide amphiphiles (PAs) that react to form conjugated polydiacetylene backbones following self-assembly into cylindrical nanofibers. The polymerization reaction yields highly conjugated backbones when the peptidic segment of the PAs has a linear, as opposed to a branched, architecture. Given the topotactic nature of the polymerization, these results suggest that a high degree of internal order exists in the supramolecular nanofibers formed by the linear PA. On the basis of microscopy, the formation of a polydiacetylene backbone to covalently connect the β-sheets that help form the fibers does not disrupt the fiber shape. Interestingly, we observe the appearance of a polydiacetylene (PDA) circular dichroism band at 547 nm in linear PA nanofibers suggesting the conjugated backbone in the core of the nanostructures is twisted. We believe this CD signal is due to chiral induction by the β-sheets, which are normally twisted in helical fashion. Heating and cooling shows simultaneous changes in β-sheet and conjugated backbone structure, indicating they are both correlated. At the same time, poor polymerization in nanofibers formed by branched PAs indicates that less internal order exists in these nanostructures and, as expected, then a circular dichroism signal is not observed for the conjugated backbone. The general variety of materials investigated here has the obvious potential to couple electronic properties and in vitro bioactivity. Furthermore, the polymerization of monomers in peptide amphiphile assemblies by a rigid conjugated backbone also leads to mechanical robustness and insolubility, two properties that may be important for the patterning of these materials at the cellular scale. PMID:18314978

  10. Molecular contacts of ribose-phosphate backbone of mRNA with human ribosome.

    PubMed

    Sharifulin, Dmitri E; Grosheva, Anastasia S; Bartuli, Yulia S; Malygin, Alexey A; Meschaninova, Maria I; Ven'yaminova, Aliya G; Stahl, Joachim; Graifer, Dmitri M; Karpova, Galina G

    2015-08-01

    In this work, intimate contacts of riboses of mRNA stretch from nucleotides in positions +3 to +12 with respect to the first nucleotide of the P site codon were studied using cross-linking of short mRNA analogs with oxidized 3'-terminal riboses bound to human ribosomes in the complexes stabilized by codon-anticodon interactions and in the binary complexes. It was shown that in all types of complexes cross-links of the mRNA analogs to ribosomal protein (rp) uS3 occur and the yield of these cross-links does not depend on the presence of tRNA and on sequences of the mRNA analogs. Site of the mRNA analogs cross-linking in rp uS3 was mapped to the peptide in positions 55-64 that is located away from the mRNA binding site. Additionally, in complexes with P site-bound tRNA, riboses of mRNA nucleotides in positions +4 to +7 cross-linked to the C-terminal tail of rp uS19 displaying a contact specific to the decoding site of the mammalian ribosome, and tRNA bound at the A site completely blocked this cross-linking. Remarkably, rps uS3 and uS19 were also able to cross-link to the fragment of HCV IRES containing unstructured 3'-terminal part restricted by the AUGC tetraplet with oxidized 3'-terminal ribose. However, no cross-linking to rp uS3 was observed in the 48S preinitiation complex assembled in reticulocyte lysate with this HCV IRES derivative. The results obtained show an ability of rp uS3 to interact with single-stranded RNAs. Possible roles of rp uS3 region 55-64 in the functioning of ribosomes are discussed.

  11. [Analysis of Conformational Features of Watson-Crick Duplex Fragments by Molecular Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics Methods].

    PubMed

    Poltev, V I; Anisimov, V M; Sanchez, C; Deriabina, A; Gonzalez, E; Garcia, D; Rivas, F; Polteva, N A

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the important characteristic features of the Watson-Crick duplex originate from the molecular structure of its subunits. However, it still remains to elucidate what properties of each subunit are responsible for the significant characteristic features of the DNA structure. The computations of desoxydinucleoside monophosphates complexes with Na-ions using density functional theory revealed a pivotal role of DNA conformational properties of single-chain minimal fragments in the development of unique features of the Watson-Crick duplex. We found that directionality of the sugar-phosphate backbone and the preferable ranges of its torsion angles, combined with the difference between purines and pyrimidines. in ring bases, define the dependence of three-dimensional structure of the Watson-Crick duplex on nucleotide base sequence. In this work, we extended these density functional theory computations to the minimal' fragments of DNA duplex, complementary desoxydinucleoside monophosphates complexes with Na-ions. Using several computational methods and various functionals, we performed a search for energy minima of BI-conformation for complementary desoxydinucleoside monophosphates complexes with different nucleoside sequences. Two sequences are optimized using ab initio method at the MP2/6-31++G** level of theory. The analysis of torsion angles, sugar ring puckering and mutual base positions of optimized structures demonstrates that the conformational characteristic features of complementary desoxydinucleoside monophosphates complexes with Na-ions remain within BI ranges and become closer to the corresponding characteristic features of the Watson-Crick duplex crystals. Qualitatively, the main characteristic features of each studied complementary desoxydinucleoside monophosphates complex remain invariant when different computational methods are used, although the quantitative values of some conformational parameters could vary lying within the

  12. Insights on FlaI Functions in Archaeal Motor Assembly and Motility from Structures, Conformations and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Reindl, Sophia; Ghosh, Abhrajyoti; Williams, Gareth J.; Lassak, Kerstin; Neiner, Tomasz; Henche, Anna-Lena; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Tainer, John A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Superfamily ATPases in Type IV pili (T4P), Type 2 secretion (T2S), and archaella (formerly archaeal flagella) employ similar sequences for distinct biological processes. Here we structurally and functionally characterize prototypical superfamily ATPase FlaI from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius showing FlaI activities in archaeal swimming organelle assembly and movement. FlaI solution X-ray scattering and crystal structures with and without nucleotide reveal a hexameric crown assembly with key cross-subunit interactions: rigid building blocks form between N-terminal domains (points) and neighboring subunit C-terminal domains (crown ring). Upon nucleotide binding, these six cross-subunit blocks move with respect to each other distinctly from secretion and pilus ATPases. Crown interactions and conformations regulate assembly, motility and force direction by a basic-clamp switching mechanism driving conformational changes between stable, backbone-interconnected moving blocks. Collective structural and mutational results identify in vivo functional components for assembly and motility, phosphate triggered rearrangements by ATP-hydrolysis, and molecular predictors for distinct ATPase superfamily functions. PMID:23416110

  13. Di-Isocyanate Crosslinked Aerogels with 1, 6-Bis (Trimethoxysilyl) Hexane Incorporated in Silica Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivod, Stephanie L.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; Quade, Derek; Randall, Jason; Perry, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Silica aerogels are desirable materials for many applications that take advantage of their light weight and low thermal conductivity. Addition of a conformal polymer coating which bonds with the amine decorated surface of the silica network improves the strength of the aerogels by as much as 200 times. Even with vast improvement in strength they still tend to undergo brittle failure due to the rigid silica backbone. We hope to increase the flexibility and elastic recovery of the silica based aerogel by altering the silica back-bone by incorporation of more flexible hexane links. To this end, we investigated the use of 1,6-bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane (BTMSH), a polysilsesquioxane precursor3, as an additional co-reactant to prepare silica gels which were subsequently cross-linked with di-isocyanate. Previously, this approach of adding flexibility by BTMSH incorporation was demonstrated with styrene cross-linked aerogels. In our study, we varied silane concentration, mol % of silicon from BTMSH and di-isocyanate concentration by weight percent to attempt to optimize both the flexibility and the strength of the aerogels.

  14. Conformation of ionizable poly Para phenylene ethynylene in dilute solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Wijesinghe, Sidath; Maskey, Sabina; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-11-03

    The conformation of dinonyl poly para phenylene ethynylenes (PPEs) with carboxylate side chains, equilibrated in solvents of different quality is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. PPEs are of interest because of their tunable electro-optical properties, chemical diversity, and functionality which are essential in wide range of applications. The polymer conformation determines the conjugation length and their assembly mode and affects electro-optical properties which are critical in their current and potential uses. The current study investigates the effect of carboxylate fraction on PPEs side chains on the conformation of chains in the dilute limit, in solvents of different quality. The dinonylmore » PPE chains are modeled atomistically, where the solvents are modeled both implicitly and explicitly. Dinonyl PPEs maintained a stretched out conformation up to a carboxylate fraction f of 0.7 in all solvents studied. The nonyl side chains are extended and oriented away from the PPE backbone in toluene and in implicit good solvent whereas in water and implicit poor solvent, the nonyl side chains are collapsed towards the PPE backbone. Thus, rotation around the aromatic ring is fast and no long range correlations are seen within the backbone.« less

  15. Structural dependencies of protein backbone 2JNC' couplings.

    PubMed

    Juranić, Nenad; Dannenberg, J J; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Salvador, Pedro; Atanasova, Elena; Ahn, Hee-Chul; Macura, Slobodan; Markley, John L; Prendergast, Franklyn G

    2008-04-01

    Protein folding can introduce strain in peptide covalent geometry, including deviations from planarity that are difficult to detect, especially for a protein in solution. We have found dependencies in protein backbone (2)J(NC') couplings on the planarity and the relative orientation of the sequential peptide planes. These dependences were observed in experimental (2)J(NC') couplings from seven proteins, and also were supported by DFT calculations for a model tripeptide. Findings indicate that elevated (2)J(NC') couplings may serve as reporters of structural strain in the protein backbone imposed by protein folds. Such information, supplemented with the H-bond strengths derived from (h3)J(NC') couplings, provides useful insight into the overall energy profile of the protein backbone in solution.

  16. 4'-Epi-DNA: A DNA Mimic Containing 4'-hydroxymethyl-α-l-Xylo-Thymidine with Compact Backbone like RNA.

    PubMed

    Bagmare, Seema; Puranik, Vedavati G; Fernandes, Moneesha; Kumar, Vaijayanti A

    2016-09-01

    Synthesis of C4'-epi-DNA containing 3'→ 5″ linkages is reported for the first time. Crystal structure study of the monomer indicated that though the dihedral angle O3'-C3'-C4'-C5″ in this case would be like in RNA, the sugar conformation would remain like that in DNA. The study of the effect of this backbone configuration in DNA with respect to its binding to cDNA and RNA is reported in this note. PMID:27556783

  17. Conformational mapping of the N-terminal segment of surfactant protein B in lipid using 13C-enhanced Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gordon, L M; Lee, K Y; Lipp, M M; Zasadzinski, J A; Walther, F J; Sherman, M A; Waring, A J

    2000-04-01

    Synthetic peptides based on the N-terminal domain of human surfactant protein B (SP-B1-25; 25 amino acid residues; NH2-FPIPLPYCWLCRALIKRIQAMIPKG) retain important lung activities of the full-length, 79-residue protein. Here, we used physical techniques to examine the secondary conformation of SP-B1-25 in aqueous, lipid and structure-promoting environments. Circular dichroism and conventional, 12C-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy each indicated a predominate alpha-helical conformation for SP-B1-25 in phosphate-buffered saline, liposomes of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol and the structure-promoting solvent hexafluoroisopropanol; FTIR spectra also showed significant beta- and random conformations for peptide in these three environments. In further experiments designed to map secondary structure to specific residues, isotope-enhanced FTIR spectroscopy was performed with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol liposomes and a suite of SP-B1-25 peptides labeled with 13C-carbonyl groups at either single or multiple sites. Combining these 13C-enhanced FTIR results with energy minimizations and molecular simulations indicated the following model for SP-B1-25 in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol: beta-sheet (residues 1-6), alpha-helix (residues 8-22) and random (residues 23-25) conformations. Analogous structural motifs are observed in the corresponding homologous N-terminal regions of several proteins that also share the 'saposin-like' (i.e. 5-helix bundle) folding pattern of full-length, human SP-B. In future studies, 13C-enhanced FTIR spectroscopy and energy minimizations may be of general use in defining backbone conformations at amino acid resolution, particularly for peptides or proteins in membrane environments.

  18. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  19. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-07-03

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory's isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method.

  20. Backbone Additivity in the Transfer Model of Protein Solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Char Y.; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C.; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2010-05-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of –54 cal/mol/Mcompares quite favorably with –43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally.

  1. Increasing protein production by directed vector backbone evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms was a key enabling technology for the rapid development of industrial and molecular biotechnology. However, despite all progress the improvement of protein production is an ongoing challenge and of high importance for cost-effective enzyme production. With the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for vector backbone optimization we report a novel directed evolution based approach to increase protein production levels by randomly introducing mutations in the vector backbone. In the current study we validate the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for three different expression systems. The latter demonstrated the general applicability of the epMEGAWHOP method. Cellulase and lipase production was doubled in one round of directed evolution by random mutagenesis of pET28a(+) and pET22b(+) vector backbones. Protease production using the vector pHY300PLK was increased ~4-times with an average of ~1.25 mutations per kb vector backbone. The epMEGAWHOP does not require any rational understanding of the expression machinery and can generally be applied to enzymes, expression vectors and related hosts. epMEGAWHOP is therefore from our point of view a robust, rapid and straight forward alternative for increasing protein production in general and for biotechnological applications. PMID:23890095

  2. The Graphical Representation of the Digital Astronaut Physiology Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briers, Demarcus

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes my internship project with the NASA Digital Astronaut Project to analyze the Digital Astronaut (DA) physiology backbone model. The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) applies integrated physiology models to support space biomedical operations, and to assist NASA researchers in closing knowledge gaps related to human physiologic responses to space flight. The DA physiology backbone is a set of integrated physiological equations and functions that model the interacting systems of the human body. The current release of the model is HumMod (Human Model) version 1.5 and was developed over forty years at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC). The physiology equations and functions are scripted in an XML schema specifically designed for physiology modeling by Dr. Thomas G. Coleman at UMMC. Currently it is difficult to examine the physiology backbone without being knowledgeable of the XML schema. While investigating and documenting the tags and algorithms used in the XML schema, I proposed a standard methodology for a graphical representation. This standard methodology may be used to transcribe graphical representations from the DA physiology backbone. In turn, the graphical representations can allow examination of the physiological functions and equations without the need to be familiar with the computer programming languages or markup languages used by DA modeling software.

  3. Cooperative UAV-Based Communications Backbone for Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R S

    2001-10-07

    The objective of this project is to investigate the use of unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) as mobile, adaptive communications backbones for ground-based sensor networks. In this type of network, the UAVs provide communication connectivity to sensors that cannot communicate with each other because of terrain, distance, or other geographical constraints. In these situations, UAVs provide a vertical communication path for the sensors, thereby mitigating geographic obstacles often imposed on networks. With the proper use of UAVs, connectivity to a widely disbursed sensor network in rugged terrain is readily achieved. Our investigation has focused on networks where multiple cooperating UAVs are used to form a network backbone. The advantage of using multiple UAVs to form the network backbone is parallelization of sensor connectivity. Many widely spaced or isolated sensors can be connected to the network at once using this approach. In these networks, the UAVs logically partition the sensor network into sub-networks (subnets), with one UAV assigned per subnet. Partitioning the network into subnets allows the UAVs to service sensors in parallel thereby decreasing the sensor-to-network connectivity. A UAV services sensors in its subnet by flying a route (path) through the subnet, uplinking data collected by the sensors, and forwarding the data to a ground station. An additional advantage of using multiple UAVs in the network is that they provide redundancy in the communications backbone, so that the failure of a single UAV does not necessarily imply the loss of the network.

  4. Protein-Backbone Thermodynamics across the Membrane Interface.

    PubMed

    Bereau, Tristan; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    The thermodynamics of insertion of a protein in a membrane depends on the fine interplay between backbone and side-chain contributions interacting with the lipid environment. Using computer simulations, we probe how different descriptions of the backbone glycyl unit affect the thermodynamics of insertion of individual residues, dipeptides, and entire transmembrane helices. Due to the lack of reference data, we first introduce an efficient methodology to estimate atomistic potential of mean force (PMF) curves from a series of representative and uncorrelated coarse-grained (CG) snapshots. We find strong discrepancies between two CG models, Martini and PLUM, against reference atomistic PMFs and experiments. Atomistic simulations suggest a weak free energy of insertion between water and a POPC membrane for the glycyl unit, in overall agreement with experimental results despite severe assumptions in our calculations. We show that refining the backbone contribution in PLUM significantly improves the PMF of insertion of the WALP16 transmembrane peptide. An improper balance between the glycyl backbone and the attached side chain will lead to energetic artifacts, rationalizing Martini's overstabilization of WALP's adsorbed interfacial state. It illustrates difficulties associated with free-energy-based parametrizations of single-residue models, as the relevant free energy of partitioning used for force-field parametrization does not arise from the entire residue but rather the solvent-accessible chemical groups. PMID:27138459

  5. Deformation of redox-active polymer gel based on polysiloxane backbone and bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ohtake, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Hideki; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Ohta, Akira; Kimura, Mutsumi

    2014-12-01

    Redox-active polymer gels consisting of polysiloxane backbone and bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl units have been designed and synthesized. The bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl units, which undergo interconversion between cyclic form and opened dicationic form, have been incorporated into polysiloxane backbone via hydrosilylation of vinyl-terminated bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl derivative and poly(methylhydrosiloxane) (PMHS) or poly(dimethylsiloxane-co-hydrogenmethylsiloxane) (PDMS-co-PMHS), resulting in polymer gels cross-linked with bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl units. After the incorporation of M1 into polysiloxane backbone, these polymer gels (P1 and P2) also exhibit redox responses associated with the electrochemical interconversion of the bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl moieties. The polymer gels show swelling behavior upon chemical oxidization, and bending behavior has been observed for the polymer gel immobilized poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVdF) film. These results provide a useful perspective for fabricating redox-triggered polymer gel actuators based on the conformational change of the functional molecular unit. PMID:25400032

  6. Effect of Backbone Design on Hybridization Thermodynamics of Oligo-nucleic Acids: A Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Jayaraman, Arthi

    DNA hybridization is the basis of various bio-nano technologies, such as DNA origami and assembly of DNA-functionalized nanoparticles. A hybridized double stranded (ds) DNA is formed when complementary nucleobases on hybridizing strands exhibit specific and directional hydrogen bonds through canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions. In recent years, the need for cheaper alternatives and significant synthetic advances have driven design of DNA mimics with new backbone chemistries. However, a fundamental understanding of how these backbone modifications in the oligo-nucleic acids impact the hybridization and melting behavior of the duplex is still lacking. In this talk, we present our recent findings on impact of varying backbone chemistry on hybridization of oligo-nucleic acid duplexes. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to isolate the effect of strand flexibility, electrostatic interactions and nucleobase spacing on the melting curves for duplexes with various strand sequences and concentrations. Since conjugation of oligo-nucleic acids with polymers serve as building blocks for thermo-responsive polymer networks and gels, we also present the effect of such conjugation on hybridization thermodynamics and polymer conformation.

  7. Predicting protein backbone chemical shifts from Cα coordinates: extracting high resolution experimental observables from low resolution models.

    PubMed

    Frank, Aaron T; Law, Sean M; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Brooks, Charles L

    2015-01-13

    Given the demonstrated utility of coarse-grained modeling and simulations approaches in studying protein structure and dynamics, developing methods that allow experimental observables to be directly recovered from coarse-grained models is of great importance. In this work, we develop one such method that enables protein backbone chemical shifts (1HN, 1Hα, 13Cα, 13C, 13Cβ, and 15N) to be predicted from Cα coordinates. We show that our Cα-based method, LARMORCα, predicts backbone chemical shifts with comparable accuracy to some all-atom approaches. More importantly, we demonstrate that LARMORCα predicted chemical shifts are able to resolve native structure from decoy pools that contain both native and non-native models, and so it is sensitive to protein structure. As an application, we use LARMORCα to characterize the transient state of the fast-folding protein gpW using recently published NMR relaxation dispersion derived backbone chemical shifts. The model we obtain is consistent with the previously proposed model based on independent analysis of the chemical shift dispersion pattern of the transient state. We anticipate that LARMORCα will find utility as a tool that enables important protein conformational substates to be identified by “parsing” trajectories and ensembles generated using coarse-grained modeling and simulations.

  8. Conformal operators in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Makeenko, Y.M.

    1981-03-01

    Utilizing the properties of the representations of the conformal group, we obtain new expressions for the conformal operators composed of spinor or scalar fields of arbitrary dimension in terms of Jacobi polynomials. These expressions generalize the known formulas in terms of Gegenbauer polynomials. Using the conformal Ward identities, we prove the multiplicative renormalizability of conformal operators in the leading logarithmic approximation.

  9. A Bayesian-probability-based method for assigning protein backbone dihedral angles based on chemical shifts and local sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Haiyan

    2007-01-01

    Chemical shifts contain substantial information about protein local conformations. We present a method to assign individual protein backbone dihedral angles into specific regions on the Ramachandran map based on the amino acid sequences and the chemical shifts of backbone atoms of tripeptide segments. The method uses a scoring function derived from the Bayesian probability for the central residue of a query tripeptide segment to have a particular conformation. The Ramachandran map is partitioned into representative regions at two levels of resolution. The lower resolution partitioning is equivalent to the conventional definitions of different secondary structure regions on the map. At the higher resolution level, the alpha and beta regions are further divided into subregions. Predictions are attempted at both levels of resolution. We compared our method with TALOS using the original TALOS database, and obtained comparable results. Although TALOS may produce the best results with currently available databases which are much enlarged, the Bayesian-probability-based approach can provide a quantitative measure for the reliability of predictions.

  10. Regulation of serum phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of serum phosphate, an acknowledged risk factor for chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular mortality, is poorly understood. The discovery of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) as a key regulator of renal phosphate handling and activation of vitamin D has revolutionized our comprehension of phosphate homeostasis. Through as yet undetermined mechanisms, circulating and dietary phosphate appear to have a direct effect on FGF23 release by bone cells that, in turn, causes renal phosphate excretion and decreases intestinal phosphate absorption through a decrease in vitamin D production. Thus, the two major phosphaturic hormones, PTH and FGF23, have opposing effects on vitamin D production, placing vitamin D at the nexus of phosphate homeostasis. While our understanding of phosphate homeostasis has advanced, the factors determining regulation of serum phosphate level remain enigmatic. Diet, time of day, season, gender, age and genetics have all been identified as significant contributors to serum phosphate level. The effects of these factors on serum phosphate have major implications for what is understood as ‘normal’ and for studies of phosphate homeostasis and metabolism. Moreover, other hormonal mediators such as dopamine, insulin-like growth factor, and angiotensin II also affect renal handling of phosphate. How the major hormone effects on phosphate handling are regulated and how the effect of these other factors are integrated to yield the measurable serum phosphate are only now beginning to be studied. PMID:24973411

  11. Extracting the multiscale backbone of complex weighted networks

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, M. Ángeles; Boguñá, Marián; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    A large number of complex systems find a natural abstraction in the form of weighted networks whose nodes represent the elements of the system and the weighted edges identify the presence of an interaction and its relative strength. In recent years, the study of an increasing number of large-scale networks has highlighted the statistical heterogeneity of their interaction pattern, with degree and weight distributions that vary over many orders of magnitude. These features, along with the large number of elements and links, make the extraction of the truly relevant connections forming the network's backbone a very challenging problem. More specifically, coarse-graining approaches and filtering techniques come into conflict with the multiscale nature of large-scale systems. Here, we define a filtering method that offers a practical procedure to extract the relevant connection backbone in complex multiscale networks, preserving the edges that represent statistically significant deviations with respect to a null model for the local assignment of weights to edges. An important aspect of the method is that it does not belittle small-scale interactions and operates at all scales defined by the weight distribution. We apply our method to real-world network instances and compare the obtained results with alternative backbone extraction techniques. PMID:19357301

  12. Conformational Interconversions of Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kaminský, Jakub; Jensen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Exhaustive conformational interconversions including transition structure analyses of N-acetyl-l-glycine-N-methylamide as well as its alanine, serine, and cysteine analogues have been investigated at the MP2/6-31G** level, yielding a total of 142 transition states. Improved estimates of relative energies were obtained by separately extrapolating the Hartree-Fock and MP2 energies to the basis set limit and adding the difference between CCSD(T) and MP2 results with the cc-pVDZ basis set to the extrapolated MP2 results. The performance of eight empirical force fields (AMBER94, AMBER14SB, MM2, MM3, MMFFs, CHARMM22_CMAP, OPLS_2005, and AMOEBAPRO13) in reproducing ab initio energies of transition states was tested. Our results indicate that commonly used class I force fields employing a fixed partial charge model for the electrostatic interaction provide mean errors in the ∼10 kJ/mol range for energies of conformational transition states for amino acid conformers. Modern reparametrized versions, such as CHARMM22_CMAP, and polarizable force fields, such as AMOEBAPRO13, have slightly lower mean errors, but maximal errors are still in the 35 kJ/mol range. There are differences between the force fields in their ability for reproducing conformational transitions classified according to backbone/side-chain or regions in the Ramachandran angles, but the data set is likely too small to draw any general conclusions. Errors in conformational interconversion barriers by ∼10 kJ/mol suggest that the commonly used force field may bias certain types of transitions by several orders of magnitude in rate and thus lead to incorrect dynamics in simulations. It is therefore suggested that information for conformational transition states should be included in parametrizations of new force fields. PMID:26691979

  13. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, R.D.; Wolfram, J.H.

    1993-10-26

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorus can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution. 6 figures.

  14. Microbial solubilization of phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Wolfram, James H.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for solubilizing phosphate from phosphate containing ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of phosphate ore, microorganisms operable for solubilizing phosphate from the phosphate ore and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the microbial solubilization process. An aqueous solution containing soluble phosphorous can be separated from the reacted mixture by precipitation, solvent extraction, selective membrane, exchange resin or gravity methods to recover phosphate from the aqueous solution.

  15. Independent Metrics for Protein Backbone and Side-Chain Flexibility: Time Scales and Effects of Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; Waldner, Birgit J; Huber, Roland G; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2015-03-10

    Conformational dynamics are central for understanding biomolecular structure and function, since biological macromolecules are inherently flexible at room temperature and in solution. Computational methods are nowadays capable of providing valuable information on the conformational ensembles of biomolecules. However, analysis tools and intuitive metrics that capture dynamic information from in silico generated structural ensembles are limited. In standard work-flows, flexibility in a conformational ensemble is represented through residue-wise root-mean-square fluctuations or B-factors following a global alignment. Consequently, these approaches relying on global alignments discard valuable information on local dynamics. Results inherently depend on global flexibility, residue size, and connectivity. In this study we present a novel approach for capturing positional fluctuations based on multiple local alignments instead of one single global alignment. The method captures local dynamics within a structural ensemble independent of residue type by splitting individual local and global degrees of freedom of protein backbone and side-chains. Dependence on residue type and size in the side-chains is removed via normalization with the B-factors of the isolated residue. As a test case, we demonstrate its application to a molecular dynamics simulation of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) on the millisecond time scale. This allows for illustrating different time scales of backbone and side-chain flexibility. Additionally, we demonstrate the effects of ligand binding on side-chain flexibility of three serine proteases. We expect our new methodology for quantifying local flexibility to be helpful in unraveling local changes in biomolecular dynamics.

  16. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of the defunct domain of calcium vector protein.

    PubMed

    Théret, I; Baladi, S; Cox, J A; Gallay, J; Sakamoto, H; Craescu, C T

    2001-11-20

    CaVP (calcium vector protein) is a Ca(2+) sensor of the EF-hand protein family which is highly abundant in the muscle of Amphioxus. Its three-dimensional structure is not known, but according to the sequence analysis, the protein is composed of two domains, each containing a pair of EF-hand motifs. We determined recently the solution structure of the C-terminal domain (Trp81-Ser161) and characterized the large conformational and dynamic changes induced by Ca(2+) binding. In contrast, the N-terminal domain (Ala1-Asp86) has lost the capacity to bind the metal ion due to critical mutations and insertions in the two calcium loops. In this paper, we report the solution structure of the N-terminal domain and its backbone dynamics based on NMR spectroscopy, nuclear relaxation, and molecular modeling. The well-resolved three-dimensional structure is typical of a pair of EF-hand motifs, joined together by a short antiparallel beta-sheet. The tertiary arrangement of the two EF-hands results in a closed-type conformation, with near-antiparallel alpha-helices, similar to other EF-hand pairs in the absence of calcium ions. To characterize the internal dynamics of the protein, we measured the (15)N nuclear relaxation rates and the heteronuclear NOE effect in (15)N-labeled N-CaVP at a magnetic field of 11.74 T and 298 K. The domain is mainly monomeric in solution and undergoes an isotropic Brownian rotational diffusion with a correlation time of 7.1 ns, in good agreement with the fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements. Data analysis using a model-free procedure showed that the amide backbone groups in the alpha-helices and beta-strands undergo highly restricted movements on a picosecond to nanosecond time scale. The amide groups in Ca(2+) binding loops and in the linker fragment also display rapid fluctuations with slightly increased amplitudes. PMID:11705378

  17. Populations of the Minor α-Conformation in AcGXGNH2 and the α-Helical Nucleation Propensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanjun; He, Liu; Zhang, Wenwen; Hu, Jingjing; Shi, Zhengshuang

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsic backbone conformational preferences of different amino acids are important for understanding the local structure of unfolded protein chains. Recent evidence suggests α-structure is relatively minor among three major backbone conformations for unfolded proteins. The α-helices are the dominant structures in many proteins. For these proteins, how could the α-structures occur from the least in unfolded to the most in folded states? Populations of the minor α-conformation in model peptides provide vital information. Reliable determination of populations of the α-conformers in these peptides that exist in multiple equilibriums of different conformations remains a challenge. Combined analyses on data from AcGXPNH2 and AcGXGNH2 peptides allow us to derive the populations of PII, β and α in AcGXGNH2. Our results show that on average residue X in AcGXGNH2 adopt PII, β, and α 44.7%, 44.5% and 10.8% of time, respectively. The contents of α-conformations for different amino acids define an α-helix nucleation propensity scale. With derived PII, β and α-contents, we can construct a free energy-conformation diagram on each AcGXGNH2 in aqueous solution for the three major backbone conformations. Our results would have broad implications on early-stage events of protein folding.

  18. Populations of the Minor α-Conformation in AcGXGNH2 and the α-Helical Nucleation Propensities

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanjun; He, Liu; Zhang, Wenwen; Hu, Jingjing; Shi, Zhengshuang

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic backbone conformational preferences of different amino acids are important for understanding the local structure of unfolded protein chains. Recent evidence suggests α-structure is relatively minor among three major backbone conformations for unfolded proteins. The α-helices are the dominant structures in many proteins. For these proteins, how could the α-structures occur from the least in unfolded to the most in folded states? Populations of the minor α-conformation in model peptides provide vital information. Reliable determination of populations of the α-conformers in these peptides that exist in multiple equilibriums of different conformations remains a challenge. Combined analyses on data from AcGXPNH2 and AcGXGNH2 peptides allow us to derive the populations of PII, β and α in AcGXGNH2. Our results show that on average residue X in AcGXGNH2 adopt PII, β, and α 44.7%, 44.5% and 10.8% of time, respectively. The contents of α-conformations for different amino acids define an α-helix nucleation propensity scale. With derived PII, β and α-contents, we can construct a free energy-conformation diagram on each AcGXGNH2 in aqueous solution for the three major backbone conformations. Our results would have broad implications on early-stage events of protein folding. PMID:27256621

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  20. Uranium from phosphate ores

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant.

  1. Resistance of Feynman diagrams and the percolation backbone dimension.

    PubMed

    Janssen, H K; Stenull, O; Oerding, K

    1999-06-01

    We present an alternative view of Feynman diagrams for the field theory of random resistor networks, in which the diagrams are interpreted as being resistor networks themselves. This simplifies the field theory considerably as we demonstrate by calculating the fractal dimension D(B) of the percolation backbone to three loop order. Using renormalization group methods we obtain D(B)=2+epsilon/21-172epsilon(2)/9261+2epsilon(3)[-74 639+22 680zeta(3)]/4 084 101, where epsilon=6-d with d being the spatial dimension and zeta(3)=1.202 057... .

  2. Probing Adenine Rings and Backbone Linkages Using Base Specific Isotope-Edited Raman Spectroscopy: Application to Group II Intron Ribozyme Domain V†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Eldho, Nadukkudy V.

    2010-01-01

    Raman difference spectroscopy is used to probe the properties of a 36-nt RNA molecule, “D5”, which lies at the heart of the catalytic apparatus in group II introns. For D5 that has all its adenine residues labeled with 13C and 15N, and utilizing Raman difference spectroscopy, we identify the conformational sensitive -C-O-P-O-C- stretching modes of the unlabeled bonds adjacent to adenine bases, as well as the adenine ring modes themselves. The phosphodiester modes can be assigned to individual adenine residues based on earlier NMR data. The effect of Mg2+ binding was explored by analyzing the Raman difference spectra for [D5 + Mg2+] minus [D5 no Mg2+], for D5 unlabeled, or D5 labeled with 13C/15N-enriched adenine. In both sets of data we assign differential features to G ring modes perturbed by Mg2+ binding at the N7 position. In the A labeled spectra we attribute a Raman differential near 1450 cm−1 and changes of intensity at 1296 cm−1 to Mg binding at the N7 position of adenine bases. The A and G bases involved in Mg2+ binding again can be identified using earlier NMR results. For the unlabeled D5, a change in the C-O-P-O-C stretch profile at 811 cm−1 upon magnesium binding is due to a “tightening up” (in the sense of a more rigid molecule with less dynamic interchange among competing ribose conformers) of the D5 structure. For adenine labeled D5, small changes in the adenine backbone bond signatures in the 810 – 830 cm−1 region suggest small conformational changes occur in the tetraloop and bulge regions upon binding of Mg2+. The PO2− stretching vibration, near 1100 cm−1, from the non-bridging phosphate groups, probes the effect of Mg2+-hydrate inner-sphere interactions that cause an up-shift. In turn, the up-shift is modulated by the presence of monovalent cations since in the presence of Na+ and Li+ the up-shift is (23±2 cm−1) while in the presence of K+ and Cs+ it is (13±3 cm−1), a finding that correlates with the differences in

  3. Novel dosage forms and regimens for sevelamer-based phosphate binders.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Ajay; Hanus, Martin; Zhorov, Eugene; Dagher, Rafif; Plone, Melissa A; Goldberg, Jeffrey; Burke, Steven K

    2006-07-01

    Sevelamer, a nonabsorbed, calcium- and metal-free dietary phosphate binder, consists of a polyallylamine polymer backbone with a cationic charge that shows a high capacity for binding anionically charged compounds such as phosphate. The currently licensed form of sevelamer, Renagel, exists as sevelamer hydrochloride, which disassociates in the acidic environment of the stomach and early gastrointestinal tract, exchanging the chloride ions attached to the polymer backbone for phosphate ions. The resulting absorption of these chloride ions has been reported to be accompanied by a reduction in serum levels of bicarbonate in some patients. To minimize the possibility of this effect, a new salt form of sevelamer has been developed in which carbonate replaces the chloride counter ion, thereby providing a source of buffer. The majority of phosphate binders exist only in tablet form and are dosed three times per day with meals. Genzyme has developed sevelamer carbonate in tablet form and also as a powder formulation that can be taken after mixing with water. This allows for an alternate and potentially more palatable way of dosing. Preliminary data exist suggesting that once daily dosing with sevelamer hydrochloride tablets provides similar phosphate control to three times daily dosing. By providing novel dosage forms and regimens for sevelamer-based phosphate binders, Genzyme will be providing patients and health care providers additional choices and flexibility in controlling phosphorus levels in chronic kidney disease. This should translate to increased compliance and improved rates of phosphate control. PMID:16825030

  4. Uranyl mediated photofootprinting reveals strong E. coli RNA polymerase--DNA backbone contacts in the +10 region of the DeoP1 promoter open complex.

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, C; Nielsen, P E

    1989-01-01

    Employing a newly developed uranyl photofootprinting technique (Nielsen et al. (1988) FEBS Lett. 235, 122), we have analyzed the structure of the E. coli RNA polymerase deoP1 promoter open complex. The results show strong polymerase DNA backbone contacts in the -40, -10, and most notably in the +10 region. These results suggest that unwinding of the -12 to +3 region of the promoter in the open complex is mediated through polymerase DNA backbone contacts on both sides of this region. The pattern of bases that are hyperreactive towards KMnO4 or uranyl within the -12 to +3 region furthermore argues against a model in which this region is simply unwound and/or single stranded. The results indicate specific protein contacts and/or a fixed DNA conformation within the -12 to +3 region. Images PMID:2503811

  5. Characterizing Aciniform Silk Repetitive Domain Backbone Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Modularity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Xu, Lingling; Sarker, Muzaddid; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2016-01-01

    Spider aciniform (wrapping) silk is a remarkable fibrillar biomaterial with outstanding mechanical properties. It is a modular protein consisting, in Argiope trifasciata, of a core repetitive domain of 200 amino acid units (W units). In solution, the W units comprise a globular folded core, with five α-helices, and disordered tails that are linked to form a ~63-residue intrinsically disordered linker in concatemers. Herein, we present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based (15)N spin relaxation analysis, allowing characterization of backbone dynamics as a function of residue on the ps-ns timescale in the context of the single W unit (W₁) and the two unit concatemer (W₂). Unambiguous mapping of backbone dynamics throughout W₂ was made possible by segmental NMR active isotope-enrichment through split intein-mediated trans-splicing. Spectral density mapping for W₁ and W₂ reveals a striking disparity in dynamics between the folded core and the disordered linker and tail regions. These data are also consistent with rotational diffusion behaviour where each globular domain tumbles almost independently of its neighbour. At a localized level, helix 5 exhibits elevated high frequency dynamics relative to the proximal helix 4, supporting a model of fibrillogenesis where this helix unfolds as part of the transition to a mixed α-helix/β-sheet fibre. PMID:27517921

  6. Error tolerant NMR backbone resonance assignment and automated structure generation.

    PubMed

    Alipanahi, Babak; Gao, Xin; Karakoc, Emre; Li, Shuai Cheng; Balbach, Frank; Feng, Guangyu; Donaldson, Logan; Li, Ming

    2011-02-01

    Error tolerant backbone resonance assignment is the cornerstone of the NMR structure determination process. Although a variety of assignment approaches have been developed, none works sufficiently well on noisy fully automatically picked peaks to enable the subsequent automatic structure determination steps. We have designed an integer linear programming (ILP) based assignment system (IPASS) that has enabled fully automatic protein structure determination for four test proteins. IPASS employs probabilistic spin system typing based on chemical shifts and secondary structure predictions. Furthermore, IPASS extracts connectivity information from the inter-residue information and the (automatically picked) (15)N-edited NOESY peaks which are then used to fix reliable fragments. When applied to automatically picked peaks for real proteins, IPASS achieves an average precision and recall of 82% and 63%, respectively. In contrast, the next best method, MARS, achieves an average precision and recall of 77% and 36%, respectively. The assignments generated by IPASS are then fed into our protein structure calculation system, FALCON-NMR, to determine the 3D structures without human intervention. The final models have backbone RMSDs of 1.25Å, 0.88Å, 1.49Å, and 0.67Å to the reference native structures for proteins TM1112, CASKIN, VRAR, and HACS1, respectively. The web server is publicly available at http://monod.uwaterloo.ca/nmr/ipass.

  7. A phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia: an RNA-seq approach.

    PubMed

    González, Vanessa L; Andrade, Sónia C S; Bieler, Rüdiger; Collins, Timothy M; Dunn, Casey W; Mikkelsen, Paula M; Taylor, John D; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2015-02-22

    Bivalves are an ancient and ubiquitous group of aquatic invertebrates with an estimated 10 000-20 000 living species. They are economically significant as a human food source, and ecologically important given their biomass and effects on communities. Their phylogenetic relationships have been studied for decades, and their unparalleled fossil record extends from the Cambrian to the Recent. Nevertheless, a robustly supported phylogeny of the deepest nodes, needed to fully exploit the bivalves as a model for testing macroevolutionary theories, is lacking. Here, we present the first phylogenomic approach for this important group of molluscs, including novel transcriptomic data for 31 bivalves obtained through an RNA-seq approach, and analyse these data with published genomes and transcriptomes of other bivalves plus outgroups. Our results provide a well-resolved, robust phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia with all major lineages delineated, addressing long-standing questions about the monophyly of Protobranchia and Heterodonta, and resolving the position of particular groups such as Palaeoheterodonta, Archiheterodonta and Anomalodesmata. This now fully resolved backbone demonstrates that genomic approaches using hundreds of genes are feasible for resolving phylogenetic questions in bivalves and other animals.

  8. Characterizing Aciniform Silk Repetitive Domain Backbone Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Modularity

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Xu, Lingling; Sarker, Muzaddid; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K.

    2016-01-01

    Spider aciniform (wrapping) silk is a remarkable fibrillar biomaterial with outstanding mechanical properties. It is a modular protein consisting, in Argiope trifasciata, of a core repetitive domain of 200 amino acid units (W units). In solution, the W units comprise a globular folded core, with five α-helices, and disordered tails that are linked to form a ~63-residue intrinsically disordered linker in concatemers. Herein, we present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based 15N spin relaxation analysis, allowing characterization of backbone dynamics as a function of residue on the ps–ns timescale in the context of the single W unit (W1) and the two unit concatemer (W2). Unambiguous mapping of backbone dynamics throughout W2 was made possible by segmental NMR active isotope-enrichment through split intein-mediated trans-splicing. Spectral density mapping for W1 and W2 reveals a striking disparity in dynamics between the folded core and the disordered linker and tail regions. These data are also consistent with rotational diffusion behaviour where each globular domain tumbles almost independently of its neighbour. At a localized level, helix 5 exhibits elevated high frequency dynamics relative to the proximal helix 4, supporting a model of fibrillogenesis where this helix unfolds as part of the transition to a mixed α-helix/β-sheet fibre. PMID:27517921

  9. Long-term forecasting of internet backbone traffic.

    PubMed

    Papagiannaki, Konstantina; Taft, Nina; Zhang, Zhi-Li; Diot, Christophe

    2005-09-01

    We introduce a methodology to predict when and where link additions/upgrades have to take place in an Internet protocol (IP) backbone network. Using simple network management protocol (SNMP) statistics, collected continuously since 1999, we compute aggregate demand between any two adjacent points of presence (PoPs) and look at its evolution at time scales larger than 1 h. We show that IP backbone traffic exhibits visible long term trends, strong periodicities, and variability at multiple time scales. Our methodology relies on the wavelet multiresolution analysis (MRA) and linear time series models. Using wavelet MRA, we smooth the collected measurements until we identify the overall long-term trend. The fluctuations around the obtained trend are further analyzed at multiple time scales. We show that the largest amount of variability in the original signal is due to its fluctuations at the 12-h time scale. We model inter-PoP aggregate demand as a multiple linear regression model, consisting of the two identified components. We show that this model accounts for 98% of the total energy in the original signal, while explaining 90% of its variance. Weekly approximations of those components can be accurately modeled with low-order autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models. We show that forecasting the long term trend and the fluctuations of the traffic at the 12-h time scale yields accurate estimates for at least 6 months in the future.

  10. A phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia: an RNA-seq approach

    PubMed Central

    González, Vanessa L.; Andrade, Sónia C. S.; Bieler, Rüdiger; Collins, Timothy M.; Dunn, Casey W.; Mikkelsen, Paula M.; Taylor, John D.; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Bivalves are an ancient and ubiquitous group of aquatic invertebrates with an estimated 10 000–20 000 living species. They are economically significant as a human food source, and ecologically important given their biomass and effects on communities. Their phylogenetic relationships have been studied for decades, and their unparalleled fossil record extends from the Cambrian to the Recent. Nevertheless, a robustly supported phylogeny of the deepest nodes, needed to fully exploit the bivalves as a model for testing macroevolutionary theories, is lacking. Here, we present the first phylogenomic approach for this important group of molluscs, including novel transcriptomic data for 31 bivalves obtained through an RNA-seq approach, and analyse these data with published genomes and transcriptomes of other bivalves plus outgroups. Our results provide a well-resolved, robust phylogenetic backbone for Bivalvia with all major lineages delineated, addressing long-standing questions about the monophyly of Protobranchia and Heterodonta, and resolving the position of particular groups such as Palaeoheterodonta, Archiheterodonta and Anomalodesmata. This now fully resolved backbone demonstrates that genomic approaches using hundreds of genes are feasible for resolving phylogenetic questions in bivalves and other animals. PMID:25589608

  11. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  12. OLIGOMERIZATION OF A RETROVIRAL MATRIX PROTEIN IS FACILITATED BY BACKBONE FLEXIBILITY ON NS TIMESCALE

    PubMed Central

    Srb, Pavel; Vlach, Jiří; Prchal, Jan; Grocký, Marián; Ruml, Tomáš; Lang, Jan; Hrabal, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Oligomerization capacity of the retroviral matrix protein is an important feature that affects assembly of immature virions and their interaction with cellular membrane. A combination of NMR relaxation measurements and advanced analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectory provided an unprecedentedly detailed insight into internal mobility of matrix proteins of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. Strong evidences have been obtained that the oligomerization capacity of the wild type matrix protein is closely related to the enhanced dynamics of several parts of its backbone on ns timescale. Increased flexibility has been observed for two regions: the loop between α-helices α2 and α3 and the C-terminal half of α-helix α3 which accommodate amino acid residues that form the oligomerization interface. On the other hand, matrix mutant R55F that has changed structure and does not exhibit any specific oligomerization in solution was found considerably more rigid. Our results document that conformational selection mechanism together with induced fit and favorable structural pre-organization play an important role in the control of the oligomerization process. PMID:21366213

  13. Crystal Structure of Baculovirus RNA Triphosphatase Complexed with Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Changela, Anita; Martin, Alexandra; Shuman, Stewart; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-03-05

    Baculovirus RNA 5'-triphosphatase (BVP) exemplifies a family of RNA-specific cysteine phosphatases that includes the RNA triphosphatase domains of metazoan and plant mRNA capping enzymes. Here we report the crystal structure of BVP in a phosphate-bound state at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. BVP adopts the characteristic cysteine-phosphatase {alpha}/{beta} fold and binds two phosphate ions in the active site region, one of which is proposed to mimic the phosphate of the product complex after hydrolysis of the covalent phosphoenzyme intermediate. The crystal structure highlights the role of backbone amides and side chains of the P-loop motif {sup 118}HCTHGXNRT{sup 126} in binding the cleavable phosphate and stabilizing the transition state. Comparison of the BVP structure to the apoenzyme of mammalian RNA triphosphatase reveals a concerted movement of the Arg-125 side chain (to engage the phosphate directly) and closure of an associated surface loop over the phosphate in the active site. The structure highlights a direct catalytic role of Asn-124, which is the signature P-loop residue of the RNA triphosphatase family and a likely determinant of the specificity of BVP for hydrolysis of phosphoanhydride linkages.

  14. Conformational study of a single molecule of poly para phenylene ethynylenes in dilute solutions.

    PubMed

    Maskey, Sabina; Pierce, Flint; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S

    2011-06-28

    The conformation of single molecules of dialkyl poly para phenylene ethynylenes (PPEs), electro-active polymers, is studied in solutions using molecular dynamics simulations. The conformation of conjugated polymers affects their electro-optical properties and therefore is critical to their current and potential uses, though only limited theoretical knowledge is available regarding the factors that control their configuration. The present study investigates the affects of molecular parameters including molecular weight of the polymer and chemical structure of the side chains of PPEs in different solvents on the conformation of the polymers. The PPEs are modeled atomistically where the solvents are modeled both implicitly and explicitly. The study finds that PPEs assume extended configuration which is affected by the length of the polymer backbone and the nature and length of substituting side chains. While the polymer remains extended, local dynamics is retained and no long range correlations are observed within the backbone. The results are compared with scattering experiments.

  15. Predicting backbone Cα angles and dihedrals from protein sequences by stacked sparse auto-encoder deep neural network.

    PubMed

    Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Heffernan, Rhys; Sharma, Alok; Paliwal, Kuldip; Sattar, Abdul; Zhou, Yaoqi; Yang, Yuedong

    2014-10-30

    Because a nearly constant distance between two neighbouring Cα atoms, local backbone structure of proteins can be represented accurately by the angle between C(αi-1)-C(αi)-C(αi+1) (θ) and a dihedral angle rotated about the C(αi)-C(αi+1) bond (τ). θ and τ angles, as the representative of structural properties of three to four amino-acid residues, offer a description of backbone conformations that is complementary to φ and ψ angles (single residue) and secondary structures (>3 residues). Here, we report the first machine-learning technique for sequence-based prediction of θ and τ angles. Predicted angles based on an independent test have a mean absolute error of 9° for θ and 34° for τ with a distribution on the θ-τ plane close to that of native values. The average root-mean-square distance of 10-residue fragment structures constructed from predicted θ and τ angles is only 1.9Å from their corresponding native structures. Predicted θ and τ angles are expected to be complementary to predicted ϕ and ψ angles and secondary structures for using in model validation and template-based as well as template-free structure prediction. The deep neural network learning technique is available as an on-line server called Structural Property prediction with Integrated DEep neuRal network (SPIDER) at http://sparks-lab.org.

  16. Determination of peptide backbone torsion angles using double-quantum dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Manish A; Eddy, Matthew T; McNeill, Seth A; Mills, Frank D; Long, Joanna R

    2008-02-20

    Several approaches for utilizing dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR (ssNMR) techniques to determine local structure at high resolution in peptides and proteins have been developed. However, many of these techniques measure only one torsion angle or are accurate for only certain classes of secondary structure. Additionally, the efficiency with which these dipolar recoupling experiments suppress the deleterious effects of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) at high magnetic field strengths varies. Dipolar recoupling with a windowless sequence (DRAWS) has proven to be an effective pulse sequence for exciting double-quantum (DQ) coherences between adjacent carbonyl carbons along the peptide backbone. By allowing this DQ coherence to evolve, it is possible to measure the relative orientations of the CSA tensors and subsequently use this information to determine the Ramachandran torsion angles phi and psi. Here, we explore the accuracies of the assumptions made in interpreting DQ-DRAWS data and demonstrate their fidelity in measuring torsion angles corresponding to a variety of secondary structures irrespective of hydrogen-bonding patterns. It is shown how a simple choice of isotopic labels and experimental conditions allows accurate measurement of backbone secondary structures without any prior knowledge. This approach is considerably more sensitive for determining structure in helices and has comparable accuracy for beta-sheet and extended conformations relative to other methods. We also illustrate the ability of DQ-DRAWS to distinguish between structures in heterogeneous samples.

  17. [Protein conformational dynamics of crambin in crystal, solution and in the trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations].

    PubMed

    Abaturov, L V; Nosova, N G

    2013-01-01

    Atomic displacement parameters--B factors of the eight crambin crystal structures obtained at 0.54-1.5 angstroms resolution and temperatures of 100-293K have been analyzed. The comparable contributions to the B factor values are the intramolecular motions which are modeled by the harmonic vibration calculations and derived from the molecular dynamics simulation (MD) as well as rigid body changes in the position of a protein molecule as a whole. In solution for the average NMR structure of crambin the amplitudes of the backbone atomic fluctuations of the most residues of the segments with the regular backbone conformations are close to the amplitudes of the small scale harmonic vibrations. For the same residues the probability of the medium scale fluctuations fixed by the hydrogen exchange method is very low. The restricted conformational mobility of those segments is coupled with the depressed amplitudes of the fluctuation changes of the tertiary structure registered by the residue accessibility changes in an ensemble of NMR structures that forms the average NMR structure of crambin. The amplitudes of temperature fluctuations of backbone atoms and the tertiary structure raise in the segment with the irregular conformations, turn and loops. In the same segments the amplitudes of the calculated harmonic vibrations also increase, but to a lesser extent and especially in the interhelical loop with the most strong and complicated fluctuation changes of the backbone conformation. In solution for the NMR structure in this loop the conformational transitions occur between the conformational substates separated by the energy barriers, but they are not observed even in the long 100 ns trajectories from the MD simulation of crambin. These strong local fluctuation changes of the structure may play a key role in the protein functioning and modern performance improvements in the MD simulation techniques are oriented to increase the probability of protein appearance in the

  18. The backbone structure of the thermophilic Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein is essentially identical to its mesophilic E. coli homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Tian, Yaji; Allert, Malin; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2008-10-27

    We report the X-ray crystal structure of a Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ribose binding protein (tteRBP) determined to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. We find that tteRBP is significantly more stable ({sup app}T{sub m} value {approx} 102 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli ribose binding protein (ecRBP) ({sup app}T{sub m} value {approx} 56 C). The tteRBP has essentially the identical backbone conformation (0.41 {angstrom} RMSD of 235/271 C{sub {alpha}} positions and 0.65 {angstrom} RMSD of 270/271 C{sub {alpha}} positions) as ecRBP. Classification of the amino acid substitutions as a function of structure therefore allows the identification of amino acids which potentially contribute to the observed thermal stability of tteRBP in the absence of large structural heterogeneities.

  19. Chemical characteristics and antithrombotic effect of chondroitin sulfates from sturgeon skull and sturgeon backbone.

    PubMed

    Gui, Meng; Song, Juyi; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Shun; Wu, Ruiyun; Ma, Changwei; Li, Pinglan

    2015-06-01

    Chondroitin sulfates (CSs) were extracted from sturgeon skull and backbone, and their chemical composition, anticoagulant, anti-platelet and thrombolysis activities were evaluated. The average molecular weights of CS from sturgeon skull and backbone were 38.5kDa and 49.2kDa, respectively. Disaccharide analysis indicated that the sturgeon backbone CS was primarily composed of disaccharide monosulfated in position four of the GalNAc (37.8%) and disaccharide monosulfated in position six of the GalNAc (59.6%) while sturgeon skull CS was primarily composed of nonsulfated disaccharide (74.2%). Sturgeon backbone CS showed stronger antithrombotic effect than sturgeon skull CS. Sturgeon backbone CS could significantly prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and thrombin time (TT), inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation and dissolved platelet plasma clots in vitro. The results suggested that sturgeon backbone CS can be explored as a functional food with antithrombotic function.

  20. Engineering the polymer backbone to strengthen nonfouling sulfobetaine hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Carr, Louisa; Cheng, Gang; Xue, Hong; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2010-09-21

    We have demonstrated that molecularly engineering the chemical structure of a monomer can lead to hydrogels with improved mechanical strength. In this case, hydrogels from zwitterionic sulfobetaine methacrylate monomers were compared to sulfobetaine vinylimidazole (pSBVI) hydrogels. We show that the introduction of the vinylimidazole backbone improves the tensile and compressive mechanical properties of the sulfobetaine hydrogel by an order of magnitude over the same properties of a methacrylate hydrogel. Zwitterionic groups have been shown to create surface coating materials with ultralow fouling properties, and we demonstrate here that the presence of the imidazole group does not compromise the nonfouling properties attributed to the zwitterionic sulfobetaine: surfaces coated with pSBVI exhibited exceptionally low nonspecific protein adsorption, and cell adhesion was reduced by 97% relative to low-fouling poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) hydrogels. PMID:20731337

  1. Backbones of evolutionary history test biodiversity theory for microbes.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, James P; Kembel, Steven W; Sharpton, Thomas J

    2015-07-01

    Identifying the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that determine biological diversity is a central question in ecology. In microbial ecology, phylogenetic diversity is an increasingly common and relevant means of quantifying community diversity, particularly given the challenges in defining unambiguous species units from environmental sequence data. We explore patterns of phylogenetic diversity across multiple bacterial communities drawn from different habitats and compare these data to evolutionary trees generated using theoretical models of biodiversity. We have two central findings. First, although on finer scales the empirical trees are highly idiosyncratic, on coarse scales the backbone of these trees is simple and robust, consistent across habitats, and displays bursts of diversification dotted throughout. Second, we find that these data demonstrate a clear departure from the predictions of standard neutral theories of biodiversity and that an alternative family of generalized models provides a qualitatively better description. Together, these results lay the groundwork for a theoretical framework to connect ecological mechanisms to observed phylogenetic patterns in microbial communities.

  2. Transforming plastic surfaces with electrophilic backbones from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

    PubMed

    Kim, Samuel; Bowen, Raffick A R; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-28

    We demonstrate a simple nonaqueous reaction scheme for transforming the surface of plastics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. The chemical modification is achieved by base-catalyzed trans-esterification with polyols. It is permanent, does not release contaminants, and causes no optical or mechanical distortion of the plastic. We present contact angle measurements to show successful modification of several types of plastics including poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polycarbonate (PC). Its applicability to blood analysis is explored using chemically modified PET blood collection tubes and found to be quite satisfactory. We expect this approach will reduce the cost of manufacturing plastic devices with optimized wettability and can be generalized to other types of plastic materials having an electrophilic linkage as its backbone.

  3. Carbon backbone topology of the metabolome of a cell.

    PubMed

    Bingol, Kerem; Zhang, Fengli; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2012-05-30

    The complex metabolic makeup of a biological system, such as a cell, is a key determinant of its biological state providing unique insights into its function. Here we characterize the metabolome of a cell by a novel homonuclear (13)C 2D NMR approach applied to a nonfractionated uniformly (13)C-enriched lysate of E. coli cells and determine de novo their carbon backbone topologies that constitute the "topolome". A protocol was developed, which first identifies traces in a constant-time (13)C-(13)C TOCSY NMR spectrum that are unique for individual mixture components and then assembles for each trace the corresponding carbon-bond topology network by consensus clustering. This led to the determination of 112 topologies of unique metabolites from a single sample. The topolome is dominated by carbon topologies of carbohydrates (34.8%) and amino acids (45.5%) that can constitute building blocks of more complex structures. PMID:22540339

  4. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε < ε(*) , however, ε dependence of their overall conformation is significantly differentiated from each other. PγDLGA tends to aggregate intramolecularly and/or intermolecularly with decreasing ε, but PγLGA still behaves as expanded random-coil. It is speculated that spatial arrangement of adjacent carboxyl groups along the backbone chain essentially affects the overall conformation of PγGA in acidic media.

  5. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y.; Kaluarachchi, K.; Giedroc, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid proteins (NCPs) are CCHC-type zinc finger proteins that mediate virion RNA binding activities associated with retrovirus assembly and genomic RNA encapsidation. Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), a type D retrovirus, encodes a 96-amino acid nucleocapsid protein, which contains two Cys-X2-Cys-X4-His-X4-Cys (CCHC) zinc fingers connected by an unusually long 15-amino acid linker. Homonuclear, two-dimensional sensitivity-enhanced 15N-1H, three-dimensional 15N-1H, and triple resonance NMR spectroscopy have been used to determine the solution structure and residue-specific backbone dynamics of the structured core domain of MPMV NCP containing residues 21-80. Structure calculations and spectral density mapping of N-H bond vector mobility reveal that MPMV NCP 21-80 is best described as two independently folded, rotationally uncorrelated globular domains connected by a seven-residue flexible linker consisting of residues 42-48. The N-terminal CCHC zinc finger domain (residues 24-37) appears to adopt a fold like that described previously for HIV-1 NCP; however, residues within this domain and the immediately adjacent linker region (residues 38-41) are characterized by extensive conformational averaging on the micros-ms time scale at 25 degrees C. In contrast to other NCPs, residues 49-77, which includes the C-terminal CCHC zinc-finger (residues 53-66), comprise a well-folded globular domain with the Val49-Pro-Gly-Leu52 sequence and C-terminal tail residues 67-77 characterized by amide proton exchange properties and 15N R1, R2, and (1H-15N) NOE values indistinguishable to residues in the core C-terminal finger. Twelve refined structural models of MPMV NCP residues 49-80 (pairwise backbone RMSD of 0.77 A) reveal that the side chains of the conserved Pro50 and Trp62 are in van der Waals contact with one another. Residues 70-73 in the C-terminal tail adopt a reverse turn-like structure. Ile77 is involved in extensive van der Waals contact with the core

  6. Chemical footprinting reveals conformational changes of 18S and 28S rRNAs at different steps of translation termination on the human ribosome.

    PubMed

    Bulygin, Konstantin N; Bartuli, Yulia S; Malygin, Alexey A; Graifer, Dmitri M; Frolova, Ludmila Yu; Karpova, Galina G

    2016-02-01

    Translation termination in eukaryotes is mediated by release factors: eRF1, which is responsible for stop codon recognition and peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis, and GTPase eRF3, which stimulates peptide release. Here, we have utilized ribose-specific probes to investigate accessibility of rRNA backbone in complexes formed by association of mRNA- and tRNA-bound human ribosomes with eRF1•eRF3•GMPPNP, eRF1•eRF3•GTP, or eRF1 alone as compared with complexes where the A site is vacant or occupied by tRNA. Our data show which rRNA ribose moieties are protected from attack by the probes in the complexes with release factors and reveal the rRNA regions increasing their accessibility to the probes after the factors bind. These regions in 28S rRNA are helices 43 and 44 in the GTPase associated center, the apical loop of helix 71, and helices 89, 92, and 94 as well as 18S rRNA helices 18 and 34. Additionally, the obtained data suggest that eRF3 neither interacts with the rRNA ribose-phosphate backbone nor dissociates from the complex after GTP hydrolysis. Taken together, our findings provide new information on architecture of the eRF1 binding site on mammalian ribosome at various translation termination steps and on conformational rearrangements induced by binding of the release factors.

  7. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  8. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  9. Phosphorus, phosphorous, and phosphate.

    PubMed

    Iheagwara, O Susan; Ing, Todd S; Kjellstrand, Carl M; Lew, Susie Q

    2013-10-01

    This article distinguishes the terms "phosphorus, phosphorous, and phosphate" which are frequently used interchangeably. We point out the difference between phosphorus and phosphate, with an emphasis on the unit of measure. Expressing a value without the proper name or unit of measure may lead to misunderstanding and erroneous conclusions. We indicate why phosphate must be expressed as milligrams per deciliter or millimoles per liter and not as milliequivalents per liter. Therefore, we elucidate the distinction among the terms "phosphorus, phosphorous, and phosphate" and the importance of saying precisely what one really means.

  10. Side-chain conformational entropy in protein unfolded states.

    PubMed

    Creamer, T P

    2000-08-15

    The largest force disfavoring the folding of a protein is the loss of conformational entropy. A large contribution to this entropy loss is due to the side-chains, which are restricted, although not immobilized, in the folded protein. In order to accurately estimate the loss of side-chain conformational entropy that occurs upon folding it is necessary to have accurate estimates of the amount of entropy possessed by side-chains in the ensemble of unfolded states. A new scale of side-chain conformational entropies is presented here. This scale was derived from Monte Carlo computer simulations of small peptide models. It is demonstrated that the entropies are independent of host peptide length. This new scale has the advantage over previous scales of being more precise with low standard errors. Better estimates are obtained for long (e.g., Arg and Lys) and rare (e.g., Trp and Met) side-chains. Excellent agreement with previous side-chain entropy scales is achieved, indicating that further advancements in accuracy are likely to be small at best. Strikingly, longer side-chains are found to possess a smaller fraction of the theoretical maximum entropy available than short side-chains. This indicates that rotations about torsions after chi(2) are significantly affected by side-chain interactions with the polypeptide backbone. This finding invalidates previous assumptions about side-chain-backbone interactions. Proteins 2000;40:443-450.

  11. Statistics of knots, geometry of conformations, and evolution of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lua, Rhonald C; Grosberg, Alexander Y

    2006-05-01

    Like shoelaces, the backbones of proteins may get entangled and form knots. However, only a few knots in native proteins have been identified so far. To more quantitatively assess the rarity of knots in proteins, we make an explicit comparison between the knotting probabilities in native proteins and in random compact loops. We identify knots in proteins statistically, applying the mathematics of knot invariants to the loops obtained by complementing the protein backbone with an ensemble of random closures, and assigning a certain knot type to a given protein if and only if this knot dominates the closure statistics (which tells us that the knot is determined by the protein and not by a particular method of closure). We also examine the local fractal or geometrical properties of proteins via computational measurements of the end-to-end distance and the degree of interpenetration of its subchains. Although we did identify some rather complex knots, we show that native conformations of proteins have statistically fewer knots than random compact loops, and that the local geometrical properties, such as the crumpled character of the conformations at a certain range of scales, are consistent with the rarity of knots. From these, we may conclude that the known "protein universe" (set of native conformations) avoids knots. However, the precise reason for this is unknown--for instance, if knots were removed by evolution due to their unfavorable effect on protein folding or function or due to some other unidentified property of protein evolution.

  12. Statistics of knots, geometry of conformations, and evolution of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lua, Rhonald C; Grosberg, Alexander Y

    2006-05-01

    Like shoelaces, the backbones of proteins may get entangled and form knots. However, only a few knots in native proteins have been identified so far. To more quantitatively assess the rarity of knots in proteins, we make an explicit comparison between the knotting probabilities in native proteins and in random compact loops. We identify knots in proteins statistically, applying the mathematics of knot invariants to the loops obtained by complementing the protein backbone with an ensemble of random closures, and assigning a certain knot type to a given protein if and only if this knot dominates the closure statistics (which tells us that the knot is determined by the protein and not by a particular method of closure). We also examine the local fractal or geometrical properties of proteins via computational measurements of the end-to-end distance and the degree of interpenetration of its subchains. Although we did identify some rather complex knots, we show that native conformations of proteins have statistically fewer knots than random compact loops, and that the local geometrical properties, such as the crumpled character of the conformations at a certain range of scales, are consistent with the rarity of knots. From these, we may conclude that the known "protein universe" (set of native conformations) avoids knots. However, the precise reason for this is unknown--for instance, if knots were removed by evolution due to their unfavorable effect on protein folding or function or due to some other unidentified property of protein evolution. PMID:16710448

  13. Thin Films Formed from Conjugated Polymers with Ionic, Water-Soluble Backbones.

    PubMed

    Voortman, Thomas P; Chiechi, Ryan C

    2015-12-30

    This paper compares the morphologies of films of conjugated polymers in which the backbone (main chain) and pendant groups are varied between ionic/hydrophilic and aliphatic/hydrophobic. We observe that conjugated polymers in which the pendant groups and backbone are matched, either ionic-ionic or hydrophobic-hydrophobic, form smooth, structured, homogeneous films from water (ionic) or tetrahydrofuran (hydrophobic). Mismatched conjugated polymers, by contrast, form inhomogeneous films with rough topologies. The polymers with ionic backbone chains are conjugated polyions (conjugated polymers with closed-shell charges in the backbone), which are semiconducting materials with tunable bad-gaps, not unlike uncharged conjugated polymers.

  14. CONSENSUS AND CONFORMITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALLEN, VERNON L.; LEVINE, JOHN M.

    IN THIS STUDY, PROFESSOR ALLEN EMPLOYS TWO METHODS OF BREAKING GROUP CONSENSUS, AND HE MEASURES THE EFFECTS ON THE RESPONSES OF COLLEGE SUBJECTS TO BOTH OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE STIMULI. THE RESULTS SUGGEST THE NEED FOR MODIFICATION OF EXISTING THEORIES OF CONFORMITY BEHAVIOR. IN ADDITION, THESE RESULTS EMPHASIZE THE DIFFERENCES IN CONFORMITY OF…

  15. Nature versus design: the conformational propensities of D-amino acids and the importance of side chain chirality.

    PubMed

    Towse, Clare-Louise; Hopping, Gene; Vulovic, Ivan; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-11-01

    D-amino acids are useful building blocks for de novo peptide design and they play a role in aging-related diseases associated with gradual protein racemization. For amino acids with achiral side chains, one should be able to presume that the conformational propensities of L- and D-amino acids are a reflection of one another due to the straightforward geometric inversion at the Cα atom. However, this presumption does not account for the directionality of the backbone dipole and the inverted propensities have never been definitively confirmed in this context. Furthermore, there is little known of how alternative side chain chirality affects the backbone conformations of isoleucine and threonine. Using a GGXGG host-guest pentapeptide system, we have completed exhaustive sampling of the conformational propensities of the D-amino acids, including D-allo-isoleucine and D-allo-threonine, using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Comparison of these simulations with the same systems hosting the cognate L-amino acids verifies that the intrinsic backbone conformational propensities of the D-amino acids are the inverse of their cognate L-enantiomers. Where amino acids have a chiral center in their side chain (Thr, Ile) the β-configuration affects the backbone sampling, which in turn can confer different biological properties.

  16. Conformation of ionizable poly Para phenylene ethynylene in dilute solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesinghe, Sidath; Maskey, Sabina; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-11-03

    The conformation of dinonyl poly para phenylene ethynylenes (PPEs) with carboxylate side chains, equilibrated in solvents of different quality is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. PPEs are of interest because of their tunable electro-optical properties, chemical diversity, and functionality which are essential in wide range of applications. The polymer conformation determines the conjugation length and their assembly mode and affects electro-optical properties which are critical in their current and potential uses. The current study investigates the effect of carboxylate fraction on PPEs side chains on the conformation of chains in the dilute limit, in solvents of different quality. The dinonyl PPE chains are modeled atomistically, where the solvents are modeled both implicitly and explicitly. Dinonyl PPEs maintained a stretched out conformation up to a carboxylate fraction f of 0.7 in all solvents studied. The nonyl side chains are extended and oriented away from the PPE backbone in toluene and in implicit good solvent whereas in water and implicit poor solvent, the nonyl side chains are collapsed towards the PPE backbone. Thus, rotation around the aromatic ring is fast and no long range correlations are seen within the backbone.

  17. Conformations of Gly(n)H+ and Ala(n)H+ peptides in the gas phase.

    PubMed Central

    Hudgins, R R; Mao, Y; Ratner, M A; Jarrold, M F

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution ion mobility measurements and molecular dynamics simulations have been used to probe the conformations of protonated polyglycine and polyalanine (Gly(n)H and Ala(n)H+, n = 3-20) in the gas phase. The measured collision integrals for both the polyglycine and the polyalanine peptides are consistent with a self-solvated globule conformation, where the peptide chain wraps around and solvates the charge located on the terminal amine. The conformations of the small peptides are governed entirely by self-solvation, whereas the larger ones have additional backbone hydrogen bonds. Helical conformations, which are stable for neutral Alan peptides, were not observed in the experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations for Ala(n)H+ peptides suggest that the charge destabilizes the helix, although several of the low energy conformations found in the simulations for the larger Ala(n)H+ peptides have small helical regions. PMID:10049339

  18. CADMIUM PHOSPHATE GLASS

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, H.W.; Johnson, P.D.

    1963-04-01

    A method of preparing a cadmium phosphate glass that comprises providing a mixture of solid inorganic compounds of cadmuim and phosphate having vaporizable components and heating the resulting composition to a temperature of at least 850 un. Concent 85% C is presented. (AEC)

  19. In Sup35p filaments (the [PSI+] prion), the globular C-terminal domains are widely offset from the amyloid fibril backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Baxa, U.; Wall, J.; Keller, P. W.; Cheng, N.; Steven, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    In yeast cells infected with the [PSI+] prion, Sup35p forms aggregates and its activity in translation termination is downregulated. Transfection experiments have shown that Sup35p filaments assembled in vitro are infectious, suggesting that they reproduce or closely resemble the prion. We have used several EM techniques to study the molecular architecture of filaments, seeking clues as to the mechanism of downregulation. Sup35p has an N-terminal 'prion' domain; a highly charged middle (M-)domain; and a C-terminal domain with the translation termination activity. By negative staining, cryo-EM and scanning transmission EM (STEM), filaments of full-length Sup35p show a thin backbone fibril surrounded by a diffuse 65-nm-wide cloud of globular C-domains. In diameter ({approx}8 nm) and appearance, the backbones resemble amyloid fibrils of N-domains alone. STEM mass-per-unit-length data yield -1 subunit per 0.47 nm for N-fibrils, NM-filaments and Sup35p filaments, further supporting the fibril backbone model. The 30 nm radial span of decorating C-domains indicates that the M-domains assume highly extended conformations, offering an explanation for the residual Sup35p activity in infected cells, whereby the C-domains remain free enough to interact with ribosomes.

  20. Conformational transitions of a weak polyampholyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan Nair, Arun Kumar; Uyaver, Sahin; Sun, Shuyu

    2014-10-01

    Using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a flexible polyelectrolyte where the charges are in contact with a reservoir of constant chemical potential given by the solution pH, we study the behavior of weak polyelectrolytes in poor and good solvent conditions for polymer backbone. We address the titration behavior and conformational properties of a flexible diblock polyampholyte chain formed of two oppositely charged weak polyelectrolyte blocks, each containing equal number of identical monomers. The change of solution pH induces charge asymmetry in a diblock polyampholyte. For diblock polyampholyte chains in poor solvents, we demonstrate that a discontinuous transition between extended (tadpole) and collapsed (globular) conformational states is attainable by varying the solution pH. The double-minima structure in the probability distribution of the free energy provides direct evidence for the first-order like nature of this transition. At the isoelectric point electrostatically driven coil-globule transition of diblock polyampholytes in good solvents is found to consist of different regimes identified with increasing electrostatic interaction strength. At pH values above or below the isoelectric point diblock chains are found to have polyelectrolyte-like behavior due to repulsion between uncompensated charges along the chain.

  1. Protein Conformational Entropy is Independent of Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucci, Nathaniel; Moorman, Veronica; Gledhill, John; Valentine, Kathleen; Wand, A. Joshua

    Proteins exhibit most of their conformational entropy in individual bond vector motions on the ps-ns timescale. These motions can be examined through determination of the Lipari-Szabo generalized squared order parameter (O2) using NMR spin relaxation measurements. It is often argued that most protein motions are intimately dependent on the nature of the solvating environment. Here the solvent dependence of the fast protein dynamics is directly assessed. Using the model protein ubiquitin, the order parameters of the backbone and methyl groups are shown to be generally unaffected by up to a six-fold increase in bulk viscosity or by encapsulation in the nanoscale interior of a reverse micelle. In addition, the reverse micelle condition permits direct comparison of protein dynamics to the mobility of the hydration layer; no correlation is observed. The dynamics of aromatic side chains are also assessed and provide an estimate of the length- and timescale of protein motions where solvent dependence is seen. These data demonstrate the solvent independence of conformational entropy, clarifying a long-held misconception in the fundamental behavior of biological macromolecules. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  2. Pendant Dynamics of Ethylene-Oxide Containing Polymers with Diverse Backbones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Joshua; Wang, Jing-Han Helen; Chen, Quan; Runt, James; Colby, Ralph

    In the last twenty years, a wide variety of ion conducting polymers have used ether oxygens to facilitate ion conduction, and it is therefore important to understand the dynamics of ether oxygens (EOs) when attached to different polymer backbones. Four different EO-containing polymer architectures are studied by dielectric spectroscopy to understand the backbone effect on the EO dipoles. Polysiloxanes, polyphosphazenes, polymethylmethacrylates, and a polyester ether are compared, with different EO pendant lengths for the siloxane and methylmethacrylate backbones. The flexible polysiloxanes and polyphosphazene backbones impart superior segmental mobility with a glass transition temperature 15 K lower than that of the organic backbone polymers. Short EO pendants are found to impart a lower static dielectric constant at comparable EO content as compared to longer EO pendants of either inorganic or organic backbones. The long-pendant polymethylmethacrylate polymers show two relaxations corresponding to fast EOs near the pendant tail end and slow EOs close to the slower backbone, whereas the long-pendant polysiloxane shows a single relaxation due to the siloxane backbone relaxing faster than the EO pendant. Supported by the NSF Division of Materials Research Polymers Program through Grants DMR-1404586 (RHC) and DMR-1505953 (JR).

  3. Net charge per residue modulates conformational ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Albert H.; Crick, Scott L.; Vitalis, Andreas; Chicoine, Caitlin L.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) adopt heterogeneous ensembles of conformations under physiological conditions. Understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and conformational ensembles of IDPs can help clarify the role of disorder in physiological function. Recent studies revealed that polar IDPs favor collapsed ensembles in water despite the absence of hydrophobic groups—a result that holds for polypeptide backbones as well. By studying highly charged polypeptides, a different archetype of IDPs, we assess how charge content modulates the intrinsic preference of polypeptide backbones for collapsed structures. We characterized conformational ensembles for a set of protamines in aqueous milieus using molecular simulations and fluorescence measurements. Protamines are arginine-rich IDPs involved in the condensation of chromatin during spermatogenesis. Simulations based on the ABSINTH implicit solvation model predict the existence of a globule-to-coil transition, with net charge per residue serving as the discriminating order parameter. The transition is supported by quantitative agreement between simulation and experiment. Local conformational preferences partially explain the observed trends of polymeric properties. Our results lead to the proposal of a schematic protein phase diagram that should enable prediction of polymeric attributes for IDP conformational ensembles using easily calculated physicochemical properties of amino acid sequences. Although sequence composition allows the prediction of polymeric properties, interresidue contact preferences of protamines with similar polymeric attributes suggest that certain details of conformational ensembles depend on the sequence. This provides a plausible mechanism for specificity in the functions of IDPs. PMID:20404210

  4. Hierarchical Conformational Analysis of Native Lysozyme Based on Sub-Millisecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Long, Shiyang; Tian, Pu

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical organization of free energy landscape (FEL) for native globular proteins has been widely accepted by the biophysics community. However, FEL of native proteins is usually projected onto one or a few dimensions. Here we generated collectively 0.2 milli-second molecular dynamics simulation trajectories in explicit solvent for hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), and carried out detailed conformational analysis based on backbone torsional degrees of freedom (DOF). Our results demonstrated that at micro-second and coarser temporal resolutions, FEL of HEWL exhibits hub-like topology with crystal structures occupying the dominant structural ensemble that serves as the hub of conformational transitions. However, at 100ns and finer temporal resolutions, conformational substates of HEWL exhibit network-like topology, crystal structures are associated with kinetic traps that are important but not dominant ensembles. Backbone torsional state transitions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to beyond microseconds were found to be associated with various types of molecular interactions. Even at nanoseconds temporal resolution, the number of conformational substates that are of statistical significance is quite limited. These observations suggest that detailed analysis of conformational substates at multiple temporal resolutions is both important and feasible. Transition state ensembles among various conformational substates at microsecond temporal resolution were observed to be considerably disordered. Life times of these transition state ensembles are found to be nearly independent of the time scales of the participating torsional DOFs. PMID:26057625

  5. PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; King, W.

    2011-04-04

    The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

  6. The dominant folding route minimizes backbone distortion in SH3.

    PubMed

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K; Onuchic, José N

    2012-01-01

    Energetic frustration in protein folding is minimized by evolution to create a smooth and robust energy landscape. As a result the geometry of the native structure provides key constraints that shape protein folding mechanisms. Chain connectivity in particular has been identified as an essential component for realistic behavior of protein folding models. We study the quantitative balance of energetic and geometrical influences on the folding of SH3 in a structure-based model with minimal energetic frustration. A decomposition of the two-dimensional free energy landscape for the folding reaction into relevant energy and entropy contributions reveals that the entropy of the chain is not responsible for the folding mechanism. Instead the preferred folding route through the transition state arises from a cooperative energetic effect. Off-pathway structures are penalized by excess distortion in local backbone configurations and contact pair distances. This energy cost is a new ingredient in the malleable balance of interactions that controls the choice of routes during protein folding.

  7. Data Acquisition Backbone Core DABC release v1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Essel, H. G.; Kurz, N.; Linev, S.

    2010-04-01

    The Data Acquisition Backbone Core (DABC) is a general purpose software framework designed for the implementation of a wide-range of data acquisition systems - from various small detector test beds to high performance systems. DABC consists of a compact data-flow kernel and a number of plug-ins for various functional components like data inputs, device drivers, user functional modules and applications. DABC provides configurable components for implementing event building over fast networks like InfiniBand or Gigabit Ethernet. A generic Java GUI provides the dynamic control and visualization of control parameters and commands, provided by DIM servers. A first set of application plug-ins has been implemented to use DABC as event builder for the front-end components of the GSI standard DAQ system MBS (Multi Branch System). Another application covers the connection to DAQ readout chains from detector front-end boards (N-XYTER) linked to read-out controller boards (ROC) over UDP into DABC for event building, archiving and data serving. This was applied for data taking in the September 2008 test beamtime for the CBM experiment at GSI. DABC version 1.0 is released and available from the website.

  8. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure–function relationship. PMID:26978354

  9. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the 15N/13C/1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins. PMID:26788853

  10. Self-similarity of biopolymer backbones in the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Yong

    2008-08-01

    Self-similar properties of the biopolymer backbones in the ribosome are investigated in terms of the fractal dimension. We especially estimate the chain fractal and capacity dimensions of the ribosomal RNAs and proteins, which are constituents of the ribosome. The fractal dimensions of both biopolymers are compared with that of the self-avoiding walk, which is a typical model of a polymer without interaction between monomers. We demonstrate that the fractality found in the ribosomal RNAs is pertinent to explain their structural characteristics: local helix formation and long-range tertiary interaction forming three-dimensional structures. The fractal dimension of the ribosomal protein supports the existence of the long and extended domain, which is hardly seen in the globular protein. The self-similarity also upholds the fact that the ribosomal proteins function primarily to stabilize the structure of the ribosome by both the long-extended domain of the protein penetrating into the inside of the RNA, and the globular domain interacting with the RNA on the exterior of it. These results partially, if not whole, unravel the structural characteristics of the biopolymers in the ribosome.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of PMLA Nanoconjugate Components after Backbone Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hui; Patil, Rameshwar; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Black, Keith L.; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Holler, Eggehard

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional polymer nanoconjugates containing multiple components show great promise in cancer therapy, but in most cases complete analysis of each component is difficult. Polymalic acid (PMLA) based nanoconjugates have demonstrated successful brain and breast cancer treatment. They consist of multiple components including targeting antibodies, Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), and endosome escape moieties. The component analysis of PMLA nanoconjugates is extremely difficult using conventional spectrometry and HPLC method. Taking advantage of the nature of polyester of PMLA, which can be cleaved by ammonium hydroxide, we describe a method to analyze the content of antibody and AON within nanoconjugates simultaneously using SEC-HPLC by selectively cleaving the PMLA backbone. The selected cleavage conditions only degrade PMLA without affecting the integrity and biological activity of the antibody. Although the amount of antibody could also be determined using the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method, our selective cleavage method gives more reliable results and is more powerful. Our approach provides a new direction for the component analysis of polymer nanoconjugates and nanoparticles. PMID:25894227

  12. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: The flow of control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glattfelder, J. B.; Battiston, S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  13. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: the flow of control.

    PubMed

    Glattfelder, J B; Battiston, S

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  14. Assemblies of Conformal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

  15. Unraveling the Interplay of Backbone Rigidity and Electron Rich Side-Chains on Electron Transfer in Peptides: The Realization of Tunable Molecular Wires

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical studies are reported on a series of peptides constrained into either a 310-helix (1–6) or β-strand (7–9) conformation, with variable numbers of electron rich alkene containing side chains. Peptides (1 and 2) and (7 and 8) are further constrained into these geometries with a suitable side chain tether introduced by ring closing metathesis (RCM). Peptides 1, 4 and 5, each containing a single alkene side chain reveal a direct link between backbone rigidity and electron transfer, in isolation from any effects due to the electronic properties of the electron rich side-chains. Further studies on the linear peptides 3–6 confirm the ability of the alkene to facilitate electron transfer through the peptide. A comparison of the electrochemical data for the unsaturated tethered peptides (1 and 7) and saturated tethered peptides (2 and 8) reveals an interplay between backbone rigidity and effects arising from the electron rich alkene side-chains on electron transfer. Theoretical calculations on β-strand models analogous to 7, 8 and 9 provide further insights into the relative roles of backbone rigidity and electron rich side-chains on intramolecular electron transfer. Furthermore, electron population analysis confirms the role of the alkene as a “stepping stone” for electron transfer. These findings provide a new approach for fine-tuning the electronic properties of peptides by controlling backbone rigidity, and through the inclusion of electron rich side-chains. This allows for manipulation of energy barriers and hence conductance in peptides, a crucial step in the design and fabrication of molecular-based electronic devices. PMID:25122122

  16. The amide III vibrational circular dichroism band as a probe to detect conformational preferences of alanine dipeptide in water.

    PubMed

    Mirtič, Andreja; Merzel, Franci; Grdadolnik, Jože

    2014-07-01

    The conformational preferences of blocked alanine dipeptide (ADP), Ac-Ala-NHMe, in aqueous solution were studied using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) together with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations of three most representative conformations of ADP surrounded by six explicit water molecules immersed in a dielectric continuum have proven high sensitivity of amide III VCD band shape that is characteristic for each conformation of the peptide backbone. The polyproline II (PII ) and αR conformation of ADP are associated with a positive VCD band while β conformation has a negative VCD band in amide III region. Knowing this spectral characteristic of each conformation allows us to assign the experimental amide III VCD spectrum of ADP. Moreover, the amide III region of the VCD spectrum was used to determine the relative populations of conformations of ADP in water. Based on the interpretation of the amide III region of VCD spectrum we have shown that dominant conformation of ADP in water is PII which is stabilized by hydrogen bonded water molecules between CO and NH groups on the peptide backbone.

  17. Structure of Escherichia coli Ribose-5-Phosphate Isomerase: A Ubiquitous Enzyme of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway and the Calvin Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong-guang; Andersson, C. Evalena; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Evdokimova, Elena; Beasley, Steven; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Edwards, Aled M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mowbray, Sherry L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase A (RpiA; EC 5.3.1.6) interconverts ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. This enzyme plays essential roles in carbohydrate anabolism and catabolism; it is ubiquitous and highly conserved. The structure of RpiA from Escherichia coli was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing, and refined to 1.5 Å resolution (R factor 22.4%, Rfree 23.7%). RpiA exhibits an α/β/(α/β)/β/α fold, some portions of which are similar to proteins of the alcohol dehydrogenase family. The two subunits of the dimer in the asymmetric unit have different conformations, representing the opening/closing of a cleft. Active site residues were identified in the cleft using sequence conservation, as well as the structure of a complex with the inhibitor arabinose-5-phosphate at 1.25 Å resolution. A mechanism for acid-base catalysis is proposed. PMID:12517338

  18. Structure of escherichia coli ribose-5-phosphate isomerase : a ubiquitous enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Andersson, C. E.; Savchenko, A.; Skarina, T.; Evdokimova, E.; Beasley, S.; Arrowsmith, C. H.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Mowbray, S. L.; Biosciences Division; Uppsala Univ.; Univ. Health Network; Univ. of Toronto; Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences

    2003-01-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase A (RpiA; EC 5.3.1.6) interconverts ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. This enzyme plays essential roles in carbohydrate anabolism and catabolism; it is ubiquitous and highly conserved. The structure of RpiA from Escherichia coli was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing, and refined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution (R factor 22.4%, R{sub free} 23.7%). RpiA exhibits an {alpha}/{beta}/({alpha}/{beta})/{beta}/{alpha} fold, some portions of which are similar to proteins of the alcohol dehydrogenase family. The two subunits of the dimer in the asymmetric unit have different conformations, representing the opening/closing of a cleft. Active site residues were identified in the cleft using sequence conservation, as well as the structure of a complex with the inhibitor arabinose-5-phosphate at 1.25 A resolution. A mechanism for acid-base catalysis is proposed.

  19. Conformation dependent electronic transport in a DNA double-helix

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Sourav Karmakar, S. N.

    2015-10-15

    We present a tight-binding study of conformation dependent electronic transport properties of DNA double-helix including its helical symmetry. We have studied the changes in the localization properties of DNA as we alter the number of stacked bases within every pitch of the double-helix keeping fixed the total number of nitrogen bases within the DNA molecule. We take three DNA sequences, two of them are periodic and one is random and observe that in all the cases localization length increases as we increase the radius of DNA double-helix i.e., number of nucleobases within a pitch. We have also investigated the effect of backbone energetic on the I-V response of the system and found that in presence of helical symmetry, depending on the interplay of conformal variation and disorder, DNA can be found in either metallic, semiconducting and insulating phases, as observed experimentally.

  20. The Role of Select Subtype Polymorphisms on HIV-1 Protease Conformational Sampling and Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xi; Britto, Manuel D.; Kear-Scott, Jamie L.; Boone, Christopher D.; Rocca, James R.; Simmerling, Carlos; Mckenna, Robert; Bieri, Michael; Gooley, Paul R.; Dunn, Ben M.; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 protease is an essential enzyme for viral particle maturation and is a target in the fight against HIV-1 infection worldwide. Several natural polymorphisms are also associated with drug resistance. Here, we utilized both pulsed electron double resonance, also called double electron-electron resonance, and NMR 15N relaxation measurements to characterize equilibrium conformational sampling and backbone dynamics of an HIV-1 protease construct containing four specific natural polymorphisms commonly found in subtypes A, F, and CRF_01 A/E. Results show enhanced backbone dynamics, particularly in the flap region, and the persistence of a novel conformational ensemble that we hypothesize is an alternative flap orientation of a curled open state or an asymmetric configuration when interacting with inhibitors. PMID:24742668

  1. Evolutionary conservation of a functionally important backbone phosphate group critical for aminoacylation of histidine tRNAs.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Abbey E; Brooks, Bonnie S; Guth, Ethan; Francklyn, Christopher S; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2006-07-01

    All histidine tRNA molecules have an extra nucleotide, G-1, at the 5' end of the acceptor stem. In bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotic organelles, G-1 base pairs with C73, while in eukaryotic cytoplasmic tRNAHis, G-1 is opposite A73. Previous studies of Escherichia coli histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS) have demonstrated the importance of the G-1:C73 base pair to tRNAHis identity. Specifically, the 5'-monophosphate of G-1 and the major groove amine of C73 are recognized by E. coli HisRS; these individual atomic groups each contribute approximately 4 kcal/mol to transition state stabilization. In this study, two chemically synthesized 24-nucleotide RNA microhelices, each of which recapitulates the acceptor stem of either E. coli or Saccharomyces cervisiae tRNAHis, were used to facilitate an atomic group "mutagenesis" study of the -1:73 base pair recognition by S. cerevisiae HisRS. Compared with E. coli HisRS, microhelixHis is a much poorer substrate relative to full-length tRNAHis for the yeast enzyme. However, the data presented here suggest that, similar to the E. coli system, the 5' monophosphate of yeast tRNA(His) is critical for aminoacylation by yeast HisRS and contributes approximately 3 kcal/mol to transition state stability. The primary role of the unique -1:73 base pair of yeast tRNAHis appears to be to properly position the critical 5' monophosphate for interaction with the yeast enzyme. Our data also suggest that the eukaryotic HisRS/tRNAHis interaction has coevolved to rely less on specific major groove interactions with base atomic groups than the bacterial system. PMID:16741232

  2. Metal-phosphate binders

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Beth Ann; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  3. Arginine-phosphate salt bridges between histones and DNA: intermolecular actuators that control nucleosome architecture.

    PubMed

    Yusufaly, Tahir I; Li, Yun; Singh, Gautam; Olson, Wilma K

    2014-10-28

    Structural bioinformatics and van der Waals density functional theory are combined to investigate the mechanochemical impact of a major class of histone-DNA interactions, namely, the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. Principal component analysis reveals that the configurational fluctuations of the sugar-phosphate backbone display sequence-specific directionality and variability, and clustering of nucleosome crystal structures identifies two major salt-bridge configurations: a monodentate form in which the arginine end-group guanidinium only forms one hydrogen bond with the phosphate, and a bidentate form in which it forms two. Density functional theory calculations highlight that the combination of sequence, denticity, and salt-bridge positioning enables the histones to apply a tunable mechanochemical stress to the DNA via precise and specific activation of backbone deformations. The results suggest that selection for specific placements of van der Waals contacts, with high-precision control of the spatial distribution of intermolecular forces, may serve as an underlying evolutionary design principle for the structure and function of nucleosomes, a conjecture that is corroborated by previous experimental studies.

  4. Arginine-phosphate salt bridges between histones and DNA: Intermolecular actuators that control nucleosome architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Li, Yun; Singh, Gautam; Olson, Wilma K.

    2014-10-01

    Structural bioinformatics and van der Waals density functional theory are combined to investigate the mechanochemical impact of a major class of histone-DNA interactions, namely, the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. Principal component analysis reveals that the configurational fluctuations of the sugar-phosphate backbone display sequence-specific directionality and variability, and clustering of nucleosome crystal structures identifies two major salt-bridge configurations: a monodentate form in which the arginine end-group guanidinium only forms one hydrogen bond with the phosphate, and a bidentate form in which it forms two. Density functional theory calculations highlight that the combination of sequence, denticity, and salt-bridge positioning enables the histones to apply a tunable mechanochemical stress to the DNA via precise and specific activation of backbone deformations. The results suggest that selection for specific placements of van der Waals contacts, with high-precision control of the spatial distribution of intermolecular forces, may serve as an underlying evolutionary design principle for the structure and function of nucleosomes, a conjecture that is corroborated by previous experimental studies.

  5. Radical-driven peptide backbone dissociation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oh, Han Bin; Moon, Bongjin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of novel tandem mass spectrometry approaches utilizing radical-driven peptide gas-phase fragmentation chemistry have been developed. These approaches show a peptide fragmentation pattern quite different from that of collision-induced dissociation (CID). The peptide fragmentation features of these approaches share some in common with electron capture dissociation (ECD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD) without the use of sophisticated equipment such as a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. For example, Siu and coworkers showed that CID of transition metal (ligand)-peptide ternary complexes led to the formation of peptide radical ions through dissociative electron transfer (Chu et al., 2000. J Phys Chem B 104:3393-3397). The subsequent collisional activation of the generated radical ions resulted in a number of characteristic product ions, including a, c, x, z-type fragments and notable side-chain losses. Another example is the free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) approach, in which Porter et al. and Beauchamp et al. independently introduced a free radical initiator to the primary amine group of the lysine side chain or N-terminus of peptides (Masterson et al., 2004. J Am Chem Soc 126:720-721; Hodyss et al., 2005 J Am Chem Soc 127: 12436-12437). Photodetachment of gaseous multiply charged peptide anions (Joly et al., 2008. J Am Chem Soc 130:13832-13833) and UV photodissociation of photolabile radical precursors including a C-I bond (Ly & Julian, 2008. J Am Chem Soc 130:351-358; Ly & Julian, 2009. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 20:1148-1158) also provide another route to generate radical ions. In this review, we provide a brief summary of recent results obtained through the radical-driven peptide backbone dissociation tandem mass spectrometry approach.

  6. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N experiment to facilitate the assignment of backbone resonances in proteins exhibiting high backbone shift degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Raikwal, Nisha; Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish; Guleria, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three-dimensional NMR experiments involving amide 1H/15N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high-degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced-dimensionality (RD) experiment -(5, 3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate/validate the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide 15N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. HiNi and Hi-1Ni-1) for overlapping amide-NH peaks. The experiment -in combination with routine triple resonance 3D-NMR experiments involving backbone amide (1H/15N) and carbon (13Cα/13C‧) chemical shifts- will serve as a powerful complementary tool to achieve the nearly complete assignment of protein backbone resonances in a time efficient manner.

  7. Phosphate control in dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Gallieni, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Caria, Stefania; Meola, Mario; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD) management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive–convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P) mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200–300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source. Finally, boiling should be the preferred cooking procedure, because it induces food demineralization, including phosphate loss. The integrated approach outlined in this article should be actively adapted as a therapeutic alliance by clinicians, dieticians, and patients for an effective control of phosphate balance in dialysis patients. PMID:24133374

  8. Facilitated diffusion framework for transcription factor search with conformational changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartailler, Jérôme; Reingruber, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Cellular responses often require the fast activation or repression of specific genes, which depends on transcription factors (TFs) that have to quickly find the promoters of these genes within a large genome. TFs search for their DNA promoter target by alternating between bulk diffusion and sliding along the DNA, a mechanism known as facilitated diffusion. We study a facilitated diffusion framework with switching between three search modes: a bulk mode and two sliding modes triggered by conformational changes between two protein conformations. In one conformation (search mode) the TF interacts unspecifically with the DNA backbone resulting in fast sliding. In the other conformation (recognition mode) it interacts specifically and strongly with DNA base pairs leading to slow displacement. From the bulk, a TF associates with the DNA at a random position that is correlated with the previous dissociation point, which implicitly is a function of the DNA structure. The target affinity depends on the conformation. We derive exact expressions for the mean first passage time (MFPT) to bind to the promoter and the conditional probability to bind before detaching when arriving at the promoter site. We systematically explore the parameter space and compare various search scenarios. We compare our results with experimental data for the dimeric Lac repressor search in E. coli bacteria. We find that a coiled DNA conformation is absolutely necessary for a fast MFPT. With frequent spontaneous conformational changes, a fast search time is achieved even when a TF becomes immobilized in the recognition state due to the specific bindings. We find a MFPT compatible with experimental data in presence of a specific TF-DNA interaction energy that has a Gaussian distribution with a large variance.

  9. Ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis accelerated by the steric effect of the backbone substituent in cyclic (alkyl)(amino) carbenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Song, Shangfei; Wang, Xiao; Jiao, Jiajun; Shi, Min

    2013-10-21

    Three ruthenium complexes bearing backbone-monosubstituted CAACs were prepared and displayed dramatic improvement in catalytic efficiency not only in RCM reaction but also in the ethenolysis of methyl oleate, compared to those bearing backbone-disubstituted CAACs. PMID:24013192

  10. Ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis accelerated by the steric effect of the backbone substituent in cyclic (alkyl)(amino) carbenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Song, Shangfei; Wang, Xiao; Jiao, Jiajun; Shi, Min

    2013-10-21

    Three ruthenium complexes bearing backbone-monosubstituted CAACs were prepared and displayed dramatic improvement in catalytic efficiency not only in RCM reaction but also in the ethenolysis of methyl oleate, compared to those bearing backbone-disubstituted CAACs.

  11. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  12. Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in short peptides probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the 10A domain.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Harekrushna; Nau, Werner M

    2007-03-26

    Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in short polypeptides were probed by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method by employing a short-distance FRET pair (R(0) approximately 10 A) based on tryptophan as natural donor and a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine (Dbo) as synthetic acceptor. Two substrates for kinases, LeuArgArgTrpSerLeuGly-Dbo (peptide I) and TrpLysArgThrLeuArgArg-Dbo (peptide II), were investigated, with serine and threonine, respectively, as phosphorylation sites. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments in H(2)O revealed a decrease in FRET efficiency for peptide I and an increase for peptide II; this suggested that the effective distances between donor and acceptor increased and decreased, respectively. The same trends and similar absolute variations in effective donor-acceptor distances were observed in propylene glycol, a less polar and highly viscous solvent; this suggested that the variations are due to intrinsic structural preferences. Fitting of the time-resolved decay traces according to a distribution function model (Gaussian distribution) provided the mean donor-acceptor distances, which showed an increase upon phosphorylation for peptide I (from 9.7 to 10.5 A) and a decrease for peptide II (from 10.9 to 9.3 A) in H(2)O. The broadness (half-width) of the distributions, which provides a measure of the rigidity of the peptides, remained similar upon phosphorylation of peptide I (3.0 versus 3.1 A), but decreased for peptide II (from 3.1 to 0.73 A in H(2)O); this suggests a more compact, structured conformation upon phosphorylation of the latter peptide. The elongation of the peptide backbone (by ca. 0.7 A) for peptide I is attributed to an increase in steric demand upon phosphorylation, which favors an extended conformation. The contraction (by ca. 1.4 A) and structural rigidification of peptide II is attributed to attractive Coulombic interactions and hydrogen bonding between the

  13. Uganda's National Transmission Backbone Infrastructure Project: Technical Challenges and the Way Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulega, T.; Kyeyune, A.; Onek, P.; Sseguya, R.; Mbabazi, D.; Katwiremu, E.

    2011-10-01

    Several publications have identified technical challenges facing Uganda's National Transmission Backbone Infrastructure project. This research addresses the technical limitations of the National Transmission Backbone Infrastructure project, evaluates the goals of the project, and compares the results against the technical capability of the backbone. The findings of the study indicate a bandwidth deficit, which will be addressed by using dense wave division multiplexing repeaters, leasing bandwidth from private companies. Microwave links for redundancy, a Network Operation Center for operation and maintenance, and deployment of wireless interoperability for microwave access as a last-mile solution are also suggested.

  14. Computation-Guided Backbone Grafting of a Discontinuous Motif onto a Protein Scaffold

    SciTech Connect

    Azoitei, Mihai L.; Correia, Bruno E.; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Carrico, Chris; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Chen, Lei; Schroeter, Alexandria; Huang, Po-Ssu; McLellan, Jason S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Schief, William R.

    2012-02-07

    The manipulation of protein backbone structure to control interaction and function is a challenge for protein engineering. We integrated computational design with experimental selection for grafting the backbone and side chains of a two-segment HIV gp120 epitope, targeted by the cross-neutralizing antibody b12, onto an unrelated scaffold protein. The final scaffolds bound b12 with high specificity and with affinity similar to that of gp120, and crystallographic analysis of a scaffold bound to b12 revealed high structural mimicry of the gp120-b12 complex structure. The method can be generalized to design other functional proteins through backbone grafting.

  15. Vibrational modes and changing molecular conformation of perfluororubrene in thin films and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, F.; Scholz, R.; Gerlach, A.; Schreiber, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the vibrational properties of perfluororubrene (PF-RUB) in thin films on silicon wafers with a native oxide layer as well as on silicon wafers covered with a self-assembled monolayer and in dichloromethane solution. In comparison with computed Raman and IR spectra, we can assign the molecular modes and identify two molecular conformations with twisted and planar tetracene backbones of the molecule. Moreover, we employ Raman imaging techniques to study the morphology and distribution of the molecular conformation in PF-RUB thin films.

  16. A Novel Method for Sampling Alpha-Helical Protein Backbones

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fain, Boris; Levitt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel technique of sampling the configurations of helical proteins. Assuming knowledge of native secondary structure, we employ assembly rules gathered from a database of existing structures to enumerate the geometrically possible 3-D arrangements of the constituent helices. We produce a library of possible folds for 25 helical protein cores. In each case the method finds significant numbers of conformations close to the native structure. In addition we assign coordinates to all atoms for 4 of the 25 proteins. In the context of database driven exhaustive enumeration our method performs extremely well, yielding significant percentages of structures (0.02%--82%) within 6A of the native structure. The method's speed and efficiency make it a valuable contribution towards the goal of predicting protein structure.

  17. Real-space visualization of conformation-independent oligothiophene electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taber, Benjamen N.; Kislitsyn, Dmitry A.; Gervasi, Christian F.; Mills, Jon M.; Rosenfield, Ariel E.; Zhang, Lei; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Prell, James S.; Briseno, Alejandro L.; Nazin, George V.

    2016-05-01

    We present scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) investigations of the electronic structures of different alkyl-substituted oligothiophenes on the Au(111) surface. STM imaging showed that on Au(111), oligothiophenes adopted distinct straight and bent conformations. By combining STS maps with STM images, we visualize, in real space, particle-in-a-box-like oligothiophene molecular orbitals. We demonstrate that different planar conformers with significant geometrical distortions of oligothiophene backbones surprisingly exhibit very similar electronic structures, indicating a low degree of conformation-induced electronic disorder. The agreement of these results with gas-phase density functional theory calculations implies that the oligothiophene interaction with the Au(111) surface is generally insensitive to molecular conformation.

  18. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  19. A complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein AI on a 38 kDa preβHDL (Lp1-AI) particle

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xuefeng; Yang, Yunhuang; Neville, T.; Hoyt, David W.; Sparks, Daniel L.; Wang, Jianjun

    2007-06-12

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoAI, 243-residues) is the major protein component of the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) that has been a hot subject of interests because of its anti-atherogenic properties. This important property of apoAI is related to its roles in reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Upon lipid-binding, apoAI undergoes conformational changes from lipid-free to several different HDL-associated states (1). These different conformational states regulate HDL formation, maturation and transportation. Two initial conformational states of apoAI are lipid-free apoAI and apoAI/preβHDL that recruit phospholipids and cholesterol to form HDL particles. In particular, lipid-free apoAI specifically binds to phospholipids to form lipid-poor apoAI, including apoAI/preβ-HDL (~37 kDa). As a unique class of lipid poor HDL, both in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that apoAI/preβ-HDLs are the most effective acceptors specifically for free cholesterol in human plasma and serves as the precursor of HDL particles (2). Here we report a complete backbone spectral assignment of human apoAI/preβHDL. Secondary structure prediction using backbone NMR parameters indicates that apoAI/preβHDL displays a two-domain structure: the N-terminal four helix-bundle domain (residues 1-186) and the C-terminal flexible domain (residues 187-243). A structure of apoAI/preβ-HDL is the first lipid-associated structure of apoAI and is critical for us to understand how apoAI recruits cholesterol to initialize HDL formation. BMRB deposit with accession number: 15093.

  20. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  1. Modeling (15)N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure.

    PubMed

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-28

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence. PMID:27586953

  2. Modeling 15N NMR chemical shift changes in protein backbone with pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Penna, Giovanni; Mori, Yoshiharu; Kitahara, Ryo; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yuko

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen chemical shift is a useful parameter for determining the backbone three-dimensional structure of proteins. Empirical models for fast calculation of N chemical shift are improving their reliability, but there are subtle effects that cannot be easily interpreted. Among these, the effects of slight changes in hydrogen bonds, both intramolecular and with water molecules in the solvent, are particularly difficult to predict. On the other hand, these hydrogen bonds are sensitive to changes in protein environment. In this work, the change of N chemical shift with pressure for backbone segments in the protein ubiquitin is correlated with the change in the population of hydrogen bonds involving the backbone amide group. The different extent of interaction of protein backbone with the water molecules in the solvent is put in evidence.

  3. In a changing environment, network backbone upgrades emerge as a wise investment.

    PubMed

    Cupito, M C

    1997-05-01

    The numbers, locations and needs of users change constantly, but they'll always want more bandwidth. Many experts say that upgrading to higher-speed backbones seems to be the smart investment for unsettled times.

  4. Extended conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Anne

    1990-08-01

    Some extended conformal field theories are briefly reviewed. They illustrate how non minimal models of the Virasoro algebra (c≥1) can become minimal with respect to a larger algebra. The accent is put on N-extended superconformal algebras, which are relevant in superstring compactification.

  5. Conformational changes in biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vassili

    2005-12-01

    Biopolymer conformational changes are involved in many biological processes. This thesis summarizes some theoretical and experimental approaches which I have taken at UCLA to explore conformational changes in biopolymers. The reversible thermal denaturation of the DNA double helix is, perhaps, the simplest example of biopolymer conformational change. I have developed a statistical mechanics model of DNA melting with reduced degrees of freedom, which allows base stacking interaction to be taken into account and treat base pairing and stacking separately. Unlike previous models, this model describes both the unpairing and unstacking parts of the experimental melting curves and explains the observed temperature dependence of the effective thermodynamic parameters used in models of the nearest neighbor type. I developed a basic kinetic model for irreversible thermal denaturation of F-actin, which incorporates depolymerization of F-actin from the ends and breaking of F-actin fiber in the middle. The model explains the cooperativity of F-actin thermal denaturation observed by D. Pavlov et al. in differential calorimetry measurements. CG-rich DNA sequences form left-handed Z-DNA at high ionic strength or upon binding of polyvalent ions and some proteins. I studied experimentally the B-to-Z transition of the (CG)6 dodecamer. Improvement of the locally linearized model used to interpret the data gives evidence for an intermediate state in the B-to-Z transition of DNA, contrary to previous research on this subject. In the past 15 years it has become possible to study the conformational changes of biomolecules using single-molecule techniques. In collaboration with other lab members I performed a single-molecule experiment, where we monitored the displacement of a micrometer-size bead tethered to a surface by a DNA probe undergoing the conformational change. This technique allows probing of conformational changes with subnanometer accuracy. We applied the method to detect

  6. Quantifying polypeptide conformational space: sensitivity to conformation and ensemble definition.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, David C; Lim, Carmay

    2006-08-24

    Quantifying the density of conformations over phase space (the conformational distribution) is needed to model important macromolecular processes such as protein folding. In this work, we quantify the conformational distribution for a simple polypeptide (N-mer polyalanine) using the cumulative distribution function (CDF), which gives the probability that two randomly selected conformations are separated by less than a "conformational" distance and whose inverse gives conformation counts as a function of conformational radius. An important finding is that the conformation counts obtained by the CDF inverse depend critically on the assignment of a conformation's distance span and the ensemble (e.g., unfolded state model): varying ensemble and conformation definition (1 --> 2 A) varies the CDF-based conformation counts for Ala(50) from 10(11) to 10(69). In particular, relatively short molecular dynamics (MD) relaxation of Ala(50)'s random-walk ensemble reduces the number of conformers from 10(55) to 10(14) (using a 1 A root-mean-square-deviation radius conformation definition) pointing to potential disconnections in comparing the results from simplified models of unfolded proteins with those from all-atom MD simulations. Explicit waters are found to roughen the landscape considerably. Under some common conformation definitions, the results herein provide (i) an upper limit to the number of accessible conformations that compose unfolded states of proteins, (ii) the optimal clustering radius/conformation radius for counting conformations for a given energy and solvent model, (iii) a means of comparing various studies, and (iv) an assessment of the applicability of random search in protein folding.

  7. Phosphate Mines, Jordan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Jordan's leading industry and export commodities are phosphate and potash, ranked in the top three in the world. These are used to make fertilizer. The Jordan Phosphate Mines Company is the sole producer, having started operations in 1935. In addition to mining activities, the company produces phosphoric acid (for fertilizers, detergents, pharmaceuticals), diammonium phosphate (for fertilizer), sulphuric acid (many uses), and aluminum fluoride (a catalyst to make aluminum and magnesium).

    The image covers an area of 27.5 x 49.4 km, was acquired on September 17, 2005, and is located near 30.8 degrees north latitude, 36.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins.

  9. Intramolecular general acid catalysis of the hydrolysis of 2-(2'-imidazolium)phenyl phosphate, and bond length-reactivity correlations for reactions of phosphate monoester monoanions.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Tiago A S; Orth, Elisa S; Rocha, Willian R; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Bunton, Clifford A; Nome, Faruk

    2007-05-11

    Rate constants for the hydrolysis of 2-(2'-imidazolium)phenyl hydrogen phosphate (IMPP) in water at pH<6 indicate that activation by the imidazolium moiety disappears with the deprotonation of the phosphate group, and the reaction involves the hydrogen-bonding of the imidazolium NH with the aryl oxygen leaving group. The reaction should involve a near-planar conformation of the imidazolium and the phenyl groups in the activated complex, which favors proton-transfer. The crystal structure of IMPP was solved, and a bond length-reactivity correlation for reactions of phosphate monoester monoanions is described.

  10. Transport properties of a single-molecular diode with one backbone, and two backbones in parallel: Frontier orbital analysis and NEGF-DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Ehsan

    2015-05-01

    The conductance and electronic transport properties of a single-molecular diode with one backbone ( 1), and two backbones in parallel ( 2) have been investigated using frontier orbital analysis, and the NEGF formalism combined with DFT. The frontier orbital analysis results demonstrate that the electron transport from one end of the studied molecules to other end is symmetrically allowed and the conductance of the molecule with two parallel backbones is more than the molecule with a single backbone. Transmission spectra study based on the NEGF-DFT of the selected molecules sandwiched between two gold (1 1 1) electrodes showed that, due to a higher coupling between the two electrodes and the molecule 2, the zero-bias conductance is more than twice that of the other molecular junction. Transmission spectra under different biases showed that the maximum constructive interference exists at the bias voltage 0.2, while in some of the biases destructive effects are observed. I- V curves showed that the rectifying directions of molecular junctions 1 and 2 are opposite.

  11. Fundamentals of phosphate transfer.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Anthony J; Nome, Faruk

    2015-07-21

    Historically, the chemistry of phosphate transfer-a class of reactions fundamental to the chemistry of Life-has been discussed almost exclusively in terms of the nucleophile and the leaving group. Reactivity always depends significantly on both factors; but recent results for reactions of phosphate triesters have shown that it can also depend strongly on the nature of the nonleaving or "spectator" groups. The extreme stabilities of fully ionised mono- and dialkyl phosphate esters can be seen as extensions of the same effect, with one or two triester OR groups replaced by O(-). Our chosen lead reaction is hydrolysis-phosphate transfer to water: because water is the medium in which biological chemistry takes place; because the half-life of a system in water is an accepted basic index of stability; and because the typical mechanisms of hydrolysis, with solvent H2O providing specific molecules to act as nucleophiles and as general acids or bases, are models for reactions involving better nucleophiles and stronger general species catalysts. Not least those available in enzyme active sites. Alkyl monoester dianions compete with alkyl diester monoanions for the slowest estimated rates of spontaneous hydrolysis. High stability at physiological pH is a vital factor in the biological roles of organic phosphates, but a significant limitation for experimental investigations. Almost all kinetic measurements of phosphate transfer reactions involving mono- and diesters have been followed by UV-visible spectroscopy using activated systems, conveniently compounds with good leaving groups. (A "good leaving group" OR* is electron-withdrawing, and can be displaced to generate an anion R*O(-) in water near pH 7.) Reactivities at normal temperatures of P-O-alkyl derivatives-better models for typical biological substrates-have typically had to be estimated: by extended extrapolation from linear free energy relationships, or from rate measurements at high temperatures. Calculation is free

  12. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins. PMID:27166805

  13. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins.

  14. Cross-backbone templating; ribodinucleotides made on poly(C)

    PubMed Central

    Majerfeld, Irene; Puthenvedu, Deepa; Yarus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G5′pp5′G synthesis from pG and chemically activated 2MeImpG is accelerated by the addition of complementary poly(C), but affected only slightly by poly(G) and not at all by poly(U) and poly(A). This suggests that 3′–5′ poly(C) is a template for uncatalyzed synthesis of 5′–5′ GppG, as was poly(U) for AppA synthesis, previously. The reaction occurs at 50 mM mono- and divalent ion concentrations, at moderate temperatures, and near pH 7. The reactive complex at the site of enhanced synthesis of 5′–5′ GppG seems to contain a single pG, a single phosphate-activated nucleotide 2MeImpG, and a single strand of poly(C). Most likely this structure is base-paired, as the poly(C)-enhanced reaction is completely disrupted between 30 and 37°C, whereas slower, untemplated synthesis of GppG accelerates. More specifically, the reactive center acts as would be expected for short, isolated G nucleotide stacks expanded and ordered by added poly(C). For example, poly(C)-mediated GppG production is very nonlinear in overall nucleotide concentration. Uncatalyzed NppN synthesis is now known for two polymers and their complementary free nucleotides. These data suggest that varied, simple, primordial 3′–5′ RNA sequences could express a specific chemical phenotype by encoding synthesis of complementary, reactive, coenzyme-like 5′–5′ ribodinucleotides. PMID:26759450

  15. Conformations and structural transitions in polydeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Pilet, J; Blicharski, J; Brahms, J

    1975-05-01

    Polydeoxynucleotides of different base sequence, the alternating poly[d(A-T)]-poly[d(A-T)], crab satellite DNA, on the one hand, and double-stranded homopolymer complexes poly[d(A)]-poly[d(T)], poly[d(I)]-poly[d(C)], on the other, display significant differences in their conformation and conformational transitions. Infrared linear dichroism investigations indicate that the alternating poly[d(A-T)]-poly[d(A-T)], enzymatically synthesized, adopts a lower humidity a well-expressed A* form in which stability is relatively small,i.e., restricted to limited relative humidity. This A form is characterized by the orientation of the bisector of the phosphate OPO group at 34 degrees with respect to the helical axis, which is slightly lower than that of DNA. In contrast, for the homopolynucleotide double-stranded complex poly(dA)-poly(dT) and also for poly(dI)-poly(dC), the B yields A conformational change is not observed. Instead poly(dA)-poly(dT) exists at lower humidity in a stable modified B form. Thus the present results indicate that homo(dA)-homo(dT) double-stranded sequences prevent the B yields A structural transition. All AT-containing polydeoxynucleotides and crab satellite DNA adopt a high humidity a modified B form characterized by the orientation of the bisector of the phosphate group OPO at 64 degrees with respect to the helical axis which is significantly lower than 68-74 degrees observed in DNAs. The base pairing geometry in poly(dA)-poly(dT), poly[d(A-T)]-poly[d(A-T)], and also in poly(dI)-poly(dC) is apparently a Watson and Crick type. Thus the observed differences in conformation are not due to different base pairing scheme. It is suggested that in DNAs of high AT content the presence of homo(dT)-homo(dA) sequences and the relatively low stability of the A form of d(A-T) alternating sequences may inhibit the change to the A form. A possible role of these sequences in DNA recognition by protein is suggested.

  16. Conformational heterogeneity and low-frequency vibrational modes of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Balog, E; Smith, Jeremy C; Perahia, David

    2006-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation and normal mode analysis are used to calculate the vibrational density of states of dihydrofolate reductase complexed with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate at 120 K and the results are compared with the experimental spectrum derived from inelastic neutron scattering. The simulation results indicate that the experimental spectrum arises from an average over proteins trapped in different conformations with structural differences mainly in the loop regions, and that these conformations have significantly different low-frequency (<20 cm-1) spectra. Thus, the experimentally measured spectrum is an average over the vibrational modes of different protein conformations and is thus inhomogeneously broadened. The implications of this broadening for future neutron scattering experiments and ligand binding calculations are discussed.

  17. Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase show apparent specificity for a specific ribulose 5-phosphate species.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L E

    1987-02-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase appear to show specificity for a particular ribulose 5-phosphate species. The effect of this specificity will be channeling of ribulose 5-phosphate from the isomerase to the kinase during photosynthesis.

  18. Domestic phosphate deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKelvey, V.E.; Cathcart, J.B.; Altschuler, Z.S.; Swanson, R.W.; Lutz, Katherine

    1953-01-01

    Most of the worlds phosphate deposits can be grouped into six types: 1) igneous apatite deposits; 2) marine phosphorites; 3) residual phosphorites; 4) river pebble deposits; 5) phosphatized rock; and 6) guano. The igneous apatites and marine phosphorites form deposits measurable in millions or billions of tons; the residual deposits are measurable in thousands or millions; and the other types generally only in thousands of tons. Igneous apatite deposits have been mined on a small scale in New York, New Jersey, and Virginia. Marine phosphorites have been mined in Montana, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Residual phosphorites have been mined in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Florida. River pebble has been produced in South Carolina and Florida; phosphatized rock in Tennessee and Florida; and guano in New Mexico and Texas. Present production is limited almost entirely to Florida, Tennessee, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Incomplete but recently partly revised estimates indicate the presence of about 5 billion tons of phosphate deposits in the United States that is minable under present economic conditions. Deposits too lean in quality or thickness to compete with those in the western and southeastern fields probably contain tens of billions of tons.

  19. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016. PMID:27038223

  20. Conformal complementarity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbón, José L. F.; Rabinovici, Eliezer

    2013-12-01

    We study quantum cosmological models for certain classes of bang/crunch singularities, using the duality between expanding bubbles in AdS with a FRW interior cosmology and perturbed CFTs on de Sitter space-time. It is pointed out that horizon complementarity in the AdS bulk geometries is realized as a conformal transformation in the dual deformed CFT. The quantum version of this map is described in full detail in a toy model involving conformal quantum mechanics. In this system the complementarity map acts as an exact duality between eternal and apocalyptic Hamiltonian evolutions. We calculate the commutation relation between the Hamiltonians corresponding to the different frames. It vanishes only on scale invariant states.

  1. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer.

    PubMed

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  2. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  3. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics.

  4. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016.

  5. Conformal scalar field wormholes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Jonathan J.; Laflamme, Raymond

    1989-01-01

    The Euclidian Einstein equations with a cosmological constant and a conformally coupled scalar field are solved, taking the metric to be of the Robertson-Walker type. In the case Lambda = 0, solutions are found which represent a wormhole connecting two asymptotically flat Euclidian regions. In the case Lambda greater than 0, the solutions represent tunneling from a small Tolman-like universe to a large Robertson-Walker universe.

  6. The conformal bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, David; Simmons-Duffin, David

    2016-06-01

    The conformal bootstrap was proposed in the 1970s as a strategy for calculating the properties of second-order phase transitions. After spectacular success elucidating two-dimensional systems, little progress was made on systems in higher dimensions until a recent renaissance beginning in 2008. We report on some of the main results and ideas from this renaissance, focusing on new determinations of critical exponents and correlation functions in the three-dimensional Ising and O(N) models.

  7. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 force field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.

  8. Conformational stability of apoflavodoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Genzor, C. G.; Beldarraín, A.; Gómez-Moreno, C.; López-Lacomba, J. L.; Cortijo, M.; Sancho, J.

    1996-01-01

    Flavodoxins are alpha/beta proteins that mediate electron transfer reactions. The conformational stability of apoflavodoxin from Anaboena PCC 7119 has been studied by calorimetry and urea denaturation as a function of pH and ionic strength. At pH > 12, the protein is unfolded. Between pH 11 and pH 6, the apoprotein is folded properly as judged from near-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD) and high-field 1H NMR spectra. In this pH interval, apoflavodoxin is a monomer and its unfolding by urea or temperature follows a simple two-state mechanism. The specific heat capacity of unfolding for this native conformation is unusually low. Near its isoelectric point (3.9), the protein is highly insoluble. At lower pH values (pH 3.5-2.0), apoflavodoxin adopts a conformation with the properties of a molten globule. Although apoflavodoxin at pH 2 unfolds cooperatively with urea in a reversible fashion and the fluorescence and far-UV CD unfolding curves coincide, the transition midpoint depends on the concentration of protein, ruling out a simple two-state process at acidic pH. Apoflavodoxin constitutes a promising system for the analysis of the stability and folding of alpha/beta proteins and for the study of the interaction between apoflavoproteins and their corresponding redox cofactors. PMID:8819170

  9. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    DOE PAGES

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 forcemore » field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.« less

  10. a Proposal for a General Method for Determining Semi-Experimental Equilibrium Structures of Carbon Atom Backbones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.

    2010-06-01

    Semi-experimental equilibrium structures are determined from ground state rotational constants derived from the analysis of rotational transitions in high-resolution spectra and from the quantum chemical calculation of spectroscopic alphas. In the full application of this method, spectra of numerous isotopic species must be investigated. Most of these isotopic species require specialized synthesis. We now propose focusing on the carbon atoms, for which microwave spectroscopy routinely yields spectra for polar molecules with 13C substitution in natural abundance. Needed spectroscopic alphas can be computed with Gaussian software. Application of the Kraitchman substitution relationships gives Cartesian coordinates for the carbon atoms and thence bond parameters for the carbon backbone. This method will be evaluated with ethylene, 1,1-difluoroethylene, 1,1-difluorocyclopropane, propene, and butadiene. The method will then be applied to cis-hexatriene and the two conformers of glycidol. R. D. Suenram, B. H. Pate, A. Lessari, J. L. Neill, S. Shipman, R. A. Holmes, M. C. Leyden, and N. C. Craig, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 1864-1868 (2009). A. R. Conrad, N. H. Teumelsan, P. E. Wang, and M. J. Tubergen, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 336-342 (2010).

  11. Entropy reduction in unfolded peptides (and proteins) due to conformational preferences of amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Toal, Siobhan E

    2014-11-01

    As established by several groups over the last 20 years, amino acid residues in unfolded peptides and proteins do not exhibit the unspecific random distribution as assumed by the classical random coil model. Individual amino acid residues in small peptides were found to exhibit different conformational preferences. Here, we utilize recently obtained conformational distributions of guest amino acid residues in GxG peptides to estimate their conformational entropy, which we find to be significantly lower than the entropy of an assumed random coil like distribution. Only at high temperature do backbone entropies approach random coil like values. We utilized the obtained backbone entropies of the investigated amino acid residues to estimate the loss of conformational entropy caused by a coil → helix transition and identified two subsets of amino acid residues for which the thus calculated entropy losses correlate well with the respective Gibbs energy of helix formation obtained for alanine based host-guest systems. Calculated and experimentally derived entropic losses were found to be in good agreement. For most of the amino acid residues investigated entropic losses derived from our GxG distributions correlate very well with corresponding values recently obtained from MD simulations biased by conformational propensities derived from truncated coil libraries. Both, conformational entropy and the entropy of solvation exhibit a strong, residue specific temperature dependence, which can be expected to substantially affect the stability of unfolded states. Altogether, our results provide strong evidence for the notion that conformational preferences of amino acid residues matter with regard to the thermodynamics of peptide and protein folding.

  12. The paradox of conformational constraint in the design of Cbl(TKB)-binding peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Eric A.; Chen, Qianyi; Kizhake, Smitha; Kolar, Carol; Kang, Myungshim; Chang, Chia-en A.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2013-01-01

    Solving the crystal structure of Cbl(TKB) in complex with a pentapeptide, pYTPEP, revealed that the PEP region adopted a poly-L-proline type II (PPII) helix. An unnatural amino acid termed a proline-templated glutamic acid (ptE) that constrained both the backbone and sidechain to the bound conformation was synthesized and incorporated into the pYTPXP peptide. We estimated imposing structural constraints onto the backbone and sidechain of the peptide and preorganize it to the bound conformation in solution will yield nearly an order of magnitude improvement in activity. NMR studies confirmed that the ptE-containing peptide adopts the PPII conformation, however, competitive binding studies showed an order of magnitude loss of activity. Given the emphasis that is placed on imposing structural constraints, we provide an example to support the contrary. These results point to conformational flexibility at the interface, which have implications in the design of potent Cbl(TKB)-binding peptides. PMID:23572190

  13. Folding a protein by discretizing its backbone torsional dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a coarse codification of local conformational constraints associated with each folding motif of a peptide chain in order to obtain a rough solution to the protein folding problem. This is accomplished by implementing a discretized version of the soft-mode dynamics on a personal computer (PC). Our algorithm mimics a parallel process as it evaluates concurrent folding possibilities by pattern recognition. It may be implemented in a PC as a sequence of perturbation-translation-renormalization (p-t-r) cycles performed on a matrix of local topological constraints (LTM). This requires suitable representational tools and a periodic quenching of the dynamics required for renormalization. We introduce a description of the peptide chain based on a local discrete variable the values of which label the basins of attraction of the Ramachandran map for each residue. Thus, the local variable indicates the basin in which the torsional coordinates of each residue lie at a given time. In addition, a coding of local topological constraints associated with each secondary and tertiary structural motif is introduced. Our treatment enables us to adopt a computation time step of 81 ps, a value far larger than hydrodynamic drag time scales. Folding pathways are resolved as transitions between patterns of locally encoded structural signals that change within the 10 μs-100 ms time scale range. These coarse folding pathways are generated by the periodic search for structural patterns in the time-evolving LTM. Each pattern is recorded as a contact matrix, an operation subject to a renormalization feedback loop. The validity of our approach is tested vis-a-vis experimentally-probed folding pathways eventually generating tertiary interactions in proteins which recover their active structure under in vitro renaturation conditions. As an illustration, we focus on determining significant folding intermediates and late kinetic bottlenecks that occur within the

  14. Solution conformation of C-linked antifreeze glycoprotein analogues and modulation of ice recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Tam, Roger Y; Rowley, Christopher N; Petrov, Ivan; Zhang, Tianyi; Afagh, Nicholas A; Woo, Tom K; Ben, Robert N

    2009-11-01

    Antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) are a unique class of proteins that are found in many organisms inhabiting subzero environments and ensure their survival by preventing ice growth in vivo. During the last several years, our laboratory has synthesized functional C-linked AFGP analogues (3 and 5) that possess custom-tailored antifreeze activity suitable for medical, commercial, and industrial applications. These compounds are potent inhibitors of ice recrystallization and do not exhibit thermal hysteresis. The current study explores how changes in the length of the amide-containing side chain between the carbohydrate moiety and the polypeptide backbone in 5 influences ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. Analogue 5 (n = 3, where n is the number of carbons in the side chain) was a potent inhibitor of ice recrystallization, while 4, 6, and 7 (n = 4, 2, and 1, respectively) exhibited no IRI activity. The solution conformation of the polypeptide backbone in C-linked AFGP analogues 4-7 was examined using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The results suggested that all of the analogues exhibit a random coil conformation in solution and that the dramatic increase in IRI activity observed with 5 is not due to a change in long-range solution conformation. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR studies on truncated analogues 26-28 failed to elucidate the presence of persistent intramolecular bonds between the amide in the side chain and the peptide backbone. Molecular dynamics simulations performed on these analogues also failed to show persistent intramolecular hydrogen bonds. However, the simulations did indicate that the side chain of IRI-active analogue 26 (n = 3) adopts a unique short-range solution conformation in which it is folded back onto the peptide backbone, orienting the more hydrophilic face of the carbohydrate moiety away from the bulk solvent. In contrast, the solution conformation of IRI-inactive analogues 25, 27, and 28 had fully extended side chains

  15. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate,...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434... GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic (MgHPO4·3H2O, CAS Reg. No....

  19. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic...

  20. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  1. Conformation and hydration of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y K

    1991-07-01

    Conformational free energy calculations using an empirical potential (ECEPP/2) and the hydration shell model were carried out on the neutral, acidic, zwitterionic, and basic forms of aspartame in the hydrated state. The results indicate that as the molecule becomes more charged, the number of low energy conformations becomes smaller and the molecule becomes less flexible. The calculated free energies of hydration of charged aspartames show that hydration has a significant effect on the conformation in solution. Only two feasible conformations were found for the zwitterionic form, and these are consistent with the conformations deduced from NMR and X-ray diffraction experiments. The calculated free energy difference between these two conformations was 1.25 kcal/mol. The less favored of the two solvated conformations can be expected to be stabilized by hydrophobic interaction of the phenyl groups in the crystal.

  2. Conformal superalgebras via tractor calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-01

    We use the manifestly conformally invariant description of a Lorentzian conformal structure in terms of a parabolic Cartan geometry in order to introduce a superalgebra structure on the space of twistor spinors and normal conformal vector fields formulated in purely algebraic terms on parallel sections in tractor bundles. Via a fixed metric in the conformal class, one reproduces a conformal superalgebra structure that has been considered in the literature before. The tractor approach, however, makes clear that the failure of this object to be a Lie superalgebra in certain cases is due to purely algebraic identities on the spinor module and to special properties of the conformal holonomy representation. Moreover, it naturally generalizes to higher signatures. This yields new formulas for constructing new twistor spinors and higher order normal conformal Killing forms out of existing ones, generalizing the well-known spinorial Lie derivative. Moreover, we derive restrictions on the possible dimension of the space of twistor spinors in any metric signature.

  3. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Alan H.; Rogers, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

  4. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, A.H.; Rogers, R.D.

    1999-06-15

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed. 13 figs.

  5. Crystal structure and conformation of polypeptides: L-leucylglycylglycylglycine.

    PubMed

    Srikrishnan, T; Parthasarathy, R

    1987-10-01

    Crystals of L-leucylglycylglycylglycine, LGGG (C12H22N4O5), grown from an ethanol-water solution, are orthorhombic, space groups P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit cell dimensions (at 22 +/- 3 degrees) a = 9.337(1), b = 10.995(1), c = 15.235(1)A, v = 1563.4 A3, Z = 4 with a density of Dobs = 1.29 g.cm-3 and Dcalc = 1.279 g.cm-3. The crystal structure was solved by the application of direct methods and refined to an R value of 0.029 for 1018 reflections with I greater than or equal to 2 sigma. The molecule exists as a zwitterion in the crystal. The trans peptide backbone takes up a folded conformation at the middle glycylglycyl link accompanied by a significant nonplanarity up to delta omega of 8 degrees at the middle peptide and is relatively more extended at the two ends. The molecules are linked together intermolecularly in an infinite sequence of head to tail 1-4' hydrogen bonds, as is typical of charged peptides. It is interesting to note that while glycylglycylglycine takes up an extended beta-sheet conformation, addition of Leu to the N-terminal results in a bent conformation.

  6. Leaf growth is conformal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I.; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-10-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour.

  7. Leaf growth is conformal.

    PubMed

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour. PMID:27597439

  8. Dysregulation of phosphate metabolism and conditions associated with phosphate toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ronald B; Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is coordinated and regulated by complex cross-organ talk through delicate hormonal networks. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), secreted in response to low serum calcium, has an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis by influencing renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thereby increasing intestinal phosphate absorption. Moreover, PTH can increase phosphate efflux from bone and contribute to renal phosphate homeostasis through phosphaturic effects. In addition, PTH can induce skeletal synthesis of another potent phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which is able to inhibit renal tubular phosphate reabsorption, thereby increasing urinary phosphate excretion. FGF23 can also fine-tune vitamin D homeostasis by suppressing renal expression of 1-alpha hydroxylase (1α(OH)ase). This review briefly discusses how FGF23, by forming a bone–kidney axis, regulates phosphate homeostasis, and how its dysregulation can lead to phosphate toxicity that induces widespread tissue injury. We also provide evidence to explain how phosphate toxicity related to dietary phosphorus overload may facilitate incidence of noncommunicable diseases including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, cancers and skeletal disorders. PMID:26131357

  9. Dysregulation of phosphate metabolism and conditions associated with phosphate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ronald B; Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is coordinated and regulated by complex cross-organ talk through delicate hormonal networks. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), secreted in response to low serum calcium, has an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis by influencing renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thereby increasing intestinal phosphate absorption. Moreover, PTH can increase phosphate efflux from bone and contribute to renal phosphate homeostasis through phosphaturic effects. In addition, PTH can induce skeletal synthesis of another potent phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which is able to inhibit renal tubular phosphate reabsorption, thereby increasing urinary phosphate excretion. FGF23 can also fine-tune vitamin D homeostasis by suppressing renal expression of 1-alpha hydroxylase (1α(OH)ase). This review briefly discusses how FGF23, by forming a bone-kidney axis, regulates phosphate homeostasis, and how its dysregulation can lead to phosphate toxicity that induces widespread tissue injury. We also provide evidence to explain how phosphate toxicity related to dietary phosphorus overload may facilitate incidence of noncommunicable diseases including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, cancers and skeletal disorders. PMID:26131357

  10. OSI Conformance Testing for Bibliographic Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbez, Gilbert; Swain, Leigh

    1990-01-01

    Describes the development of Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) conformance testing sites, conformance testing tools, and conformance testing services. Discusses related topics such as interoperability testing, arbitration testing, and international harmonization of conformance testing. A glossary is included. (24 references) (SD)

  11. Structural flexibility, an essential component of the allosteric activation in Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Rudiño-Piñera, E; Morales-Arrieta, S; Rojas-Trejo, S P; Horjales, E

    2002-01-01

    A new crystallographic structure of the free active-site R conformer of the allosteric enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli, coupled with previously reported structures of the T and R conformers, generates a detailed description of the heterotropic allosteric transition in which structural flexibility plays a central role. The T conformer's external zone [Horjales et al. (1999), Structure, 7, 527-536] presents higher B values than in the R conformers. The ligand-free enzyme (T conformer) undergoes an allosteric transition to the free active-site R conformer upon binding of the allosteric activator. This structure shows three alternate conformations of the mobile section of the active-site lid (residues 163-182), in comparison to the high B values for the unique conformation of the T conformer. One of these alternate R conformations corresponds to the active-site lid found when the substrate is bound. The disorder associated with the three alternate conformations can be related to the biological regulation of the K(m) of the enzyme for the reaction, which is metabolically required to maintain adequate concentrations of the activator, which holds the enzyme in its R state. Seven alternate conformations for the active-site lid and three for the C-terminus were refined for the T structure using isotropic B factors. Some of these conformers approach that of the R conformer in geometry. Furthermore, the direction of the atomic vibrations obtained with anisotropic B refinement supports the hypothesis of an oscillating rather than a tense T state. The concerted character of the allosteric transition is also analysed in view of the apparent dynamics of the conformers.

  12. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation.

  13. Selection of conformational states in self-assembled surface structures formed from an oligo(naphthylene-ethynylene) 3-bit binary switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Y.; Cramer, J. R.; Nuermaimaiti, A.; Svane, K.; Yu, M.; Lægsgaard, E.; Besenbacher, F.; Xue, Q.-K.; Ma, X.; Hammer, B.; Gothelf, K. V.; Linderoth, T. R.

    2015-03-01

    Supra-molecular self-assembly on surfaces often involves molecular conformational flexibility which may act to enrich the variation and complexity of the structures formed. However, systematic and explicit investigations of how molecular conformational states are selected in surface self-assembly processes are relatively scarce. Here, we use a combination of high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to investigate self-assembly for a custom-designed molecule capable of assuming eight distinct surface conformations (four enantiomeric pairs). The conformations result from binary positions of n = 3 naphtalene units on a linear oligo(naphthylene-ethynylene) backbone. On Au(111), inter-molecular interactions involving carboxyl and bulky tert-butyl-phenyl functional groups induce the molecules to form two ordered phases with brick-wall and lamella structure, respectively. These structures each involve molecules in two conformational states, and there is a clear separation between the conformers involved in the two types of structures. On Cu(111), individual molecules isolated by carboxylate-substrate binding show a distribution involving all possible conformational states. Together these observations imply selection and adaptation of conformational states upon molecular self-assembly. From DFT modeling and statistical analysis of the molecular conformations, the observed selection of conformational states is attributed to steric interaction between the naphthalene units. The present study enhances our understanding of how ordering and selection of molecular conformations is controlled by intermolecular interactions in a complex situation with many distinct conformational states for the participating molecules.

  14. Protein conformational stability in the hydrofluoroalkane propellants tetrafluoroethane and heptafluoropropane analysed by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Quinn, E A; Forbes, R T; Williams, A C; Oliver, M J; McKenzie, L; Purewal, T S

    1999-09-10

    Due to the inherent structural instability of proteins, development of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) free metered dose inhalers (MDIs) containing these biomolecules is beset with numerous challenges. In assessing the conformation of proteins in any medium, both secondary and tertiary structures need to be elucidated. This study uses Fourier transform (FT-) Raman spectroscopy to probe protein conformational stability in hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellants. Assignments of molecular modes for lysozyme as a solid and in aqueous solution, and for the first time, HFAs tetrafluoroethane (HFA 134a) and heptafluoropropane (HFA 227) are given. The Raman spectra provided molecular structural information on the peptide backbone, disulfide bonds and C-C stretching vibrations of hen egg lysozyme, enabling the secondary conformation of protein in HFA propellants to be determined; structural integrity of this robust model protein was maintained in both propellants. These results demonstrate that FT-Raman may be a useful tool for the optimisation of protein MDI formulations.

  15. Conformational flexibility of PPII-helix: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ping; Lei, Xiaoling; Gao, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Poly-proline fragments form the distinctive PPII-helix in a high percentage in proteins and peptides, which plays an important role in signal transduction and protein complex assembly. But why and how this helical structure works is still unknown. In this work, we applied the density functional calculations to investigate the different preferences of prolines on Cγ-endo and Cγ-exo conformers, in which non-covalent interactions play important roles. As a result, Cγ-exo conformers are favored for short-oligomers with stronger n → π* interaction formed by the backbone, while Cγ-endo conformers are favored for longer oligomers with stronger dipole interactions between side groups.

  16. Infrared spectroscopic studies on reaction induced conformational changes in the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Petra; Kriegel, Sébastien; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Redox-dependent conformational changes are currently discussed to be a crucial part of the reaction mechanism of the respiratory complex I. Specialized difference Fourier transform infrared techniques allow the detection of side-chain movements and minute secondary structure changes. For complex I, (1)H/(2)H exchange kinetics of the amide modes revealed a better accessibility of the backbone in the presence of NADH and quinone. Interestingly, the presence of phospholipids, that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the isolated enzyme complex, changes the overall conformation. When comparing complex I samples from different species, very similar electrochemically induced FTIR difference spectra and very similar rearrangements are reported. Finally, the information obtained with variants and from Zn(2+) inhibited samples for the conformational reorganization of complex I upon electron transfer are discussed in this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  17. Improved Atomistic Monte Carlo Simulations Demonstrate that Poly-L-Proline Adopts Heterogeneous Ensembles of Conformations of Semi-Rigid Segments Interrupted by Kinks

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Vitalis, Andreas; Mao, Albert H.; Steffen, Adam T.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2012-01-01

    Poly-L-proline (PLP) polymers are useful mimics of biologically relevant proline-rich sequences. Biophysical and computational studies of PLP polymers in aqueous solutions are challenging because of the diversity of length scales and the slow time scales for conformational conversions. We describe an atomistic simulation approach that combines an improved ABSINTH implicit solvation model, with conformational sampling based on standard and novel Metropolis Monte Carlo moves. Refinements to forcefield parameters were guided by published experimental data for proline-rich systems. We assessed the validity of our simulation results through quantitative comparisons to experimental data that were not used in refining the forcefield parameters. Our analysis shows that PLP polymers form heterogeneous ensembles of conformations characterized by semi-rigid, rod-like segments interrupted by kinks, which result from a combination of internal cis peptide bonds, flexible backbone ψ-angles, and the coupling between ring puckering and backbone degrees of freedom. PMID:22329658

  18. Targeting Inactive Enzyme Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sijiu; Zeng, Li-Fan; Wu, Li; Yu, Xiao; Xue, Ting; Gunawan, Andrea M.; Ya-Qiu, Long; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2009-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a therapeutic target for diabetes, obesity, as well as cancer. Identifying inhibitory compounds with good bioavailability is a major challenge of drug discovery programs targeted toward PTPs. Most current PTP active site-directed pharmacophores are negatively charged pTyr mimetics which cannot readily enter the cell. This lack of cell permeability limits the utility of such compounds in signaling studies and further therapeutic development. We identify aryl diketoacids as novel pTyr surrogates and show that neutral amide-linked aryl diketoacid dimers also exhibit excellent PTP inhibitory activity. Kinetic studies establish that these aryl diketoacid derivatives act as noncompetitive inhibitors of PTP1B. Crystal structures of ligand-bound PTP1B reveal that both the aryl diketoacid and its dimeric derivative bind PTP1B at the active site, albeit with distinct modes of interaction, in the catalytically inactive, WPD loop open conformation. Furthermore, dimeric aryl diketoacids are cell permeable and enhance insulin signaling in hepatoma cells, suggesting that targeting the inactive conformation may provide a unique opportunity for creating active site-directed PTP1B inhibitors with improved pharmacological properties. PMID:19012396

  19. Conformally symmetric traversable wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2007-10-15

    Exact solutions of traversable wormholes are found under the assumption of spherical symmetry and the existence of a nonstatic conformal symmetry, which presents a more systematic approach in searching for exact wormhole solutions. In this work, a wide variety of solutions are deduced by considering choices for the form function, a specific linear equation of state relating the energy density and the pressure anisotropy, and various phantom wormhole geometries are explored. A large class of solutions impose that the spatial distribution of the exotic matter is restricted to the throat neighborhood, with a cutoff of the stress-energy tensor at a finite junction interface, although asymptotically flat exact solutions are also found. Using the 'volume integral quantifier', it is found that the conformally symmetric phantom wormhole geometries may, in principle, be constructed by infinitesimally small amounts of averaged null energy condition violating matter. Considering the tidal acceleration traversability conditions for the phantom wormhole geometry, specific wormhole dimensions and the traversal velocity are also deduced.

  20. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T] also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock space exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.

  1. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T]ℓ also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock spacemore » exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.« less

  2. Backbone and side-chain resonance assignments of the membrane localization domain from Pasteurella multocida toxin.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Michael C; Geissler, Brett; Hisao, Grant S; Satchell, Karla J F; Wilson, Brenda A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2014-04-01

    (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments are presented for the isolated four-helical bundle membrane localization domain (MLD) from Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) in its solution state. We have assigned 99% of all backbone and side-chain carbon atoms, including 99% of all backbone residues excluding proline amide nitrogens. Secondary chemical shift analysis using TALOS+ demonstrates four helices, which align with those observed within the MLD in the crystal structure of the C-terminus of PMT (PDB 2EBF) and confirm the use of the available crystal structures as templates for the isolated MLDs.

  3. Electric field induced localization phenomena in a ladder network with superlattice configuration: Effect of backbone environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Paramita; Karmakar, S. N.; Maiti, Santanu K.

    2014-09-15

    Electric field induced localization properties of a tight-binding ladder network in presence of backbone sites are investigated. Based on Green's function formalism we numerically calculate two-terminal transport together with density of states for different arrangements of atomic sites in the ladder and its backbone. Our results lead to a possibility of getting multiple mobility edges which essentially plays a switching action between a completely opaque to fully or partly conducting region upon the variation of system Fermi energy, and thus, support in fabricating mesoscopic or DNA-based switching devices.

  4. Polyboramines for Hydrogen Release: Polymers Containing Lewis Pairs in their Backbone.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, Audrey; Larini, Paolo; Boisson, Christophe; Monteil, Vincent; Raynaud, Jean; Lacôte, Emmanuel

    2015-12-21

    The one-step polycondensation of diamines and diboranes triggered by the in situ deprotonation of the diammonium salts and concomitant reduction of bisboronic acids leads to the assembly of polymer chains through multiple Lewis pairing in their backbone. These new polyboramines are dihydrogen reservoirs that can be used for the hydrogenation of imines and carbonyl compounds. They also display a unique dihydrogen thermal release profile that is a direct consequence of the insertion of the amine-borane linkages in the polymeric backbone. PMID:26563914

  5. Using Excel To Study The Relation Between Protein Dihedral Angle Omega And Backbone Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Christopher; Evans, Samari; Tao, Xiuping

    How to involve the uninitiated undergraduate students in computational biophysics research? We made use of Microsoft Excel to carry out calculations of bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles of proteins. Specifically, we studied protein backbone dihedral angle omega by examining how its distribution varies with the length of the backbone length. It turns out Excel is a respectable tool for this task. An ordinary current-day desktop or laptop can handle the calculations for midsized proteins in just seconds. Care has to be taken to enter the formulas for the spreadsheet column after column to minimize the computing load. Supported in part by NSF Grant #1238795.

  6. Solvation thermodynamics of amino acid side chains on a short peptide backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Hajari, Timir; Vegt, Nico F. A. van der

    2015-04-14

    The hydration process of side chain analogue molecules differs from that of the actual amino acid side chains in peptides and proteins owing to the effects of the peptide backbone on the aqueous solvent environment. A recent molecular simulation study has provided evidence that all nonpolar side chains, attached to a short peptide backbone, are considerably less hydrophobic than the free side chain analogue molecules. In contrast to this, the hydrophilicity of the polar side chains is hardly affected by the backbone. To analyze the origin of these observations, we here present a molecular simulation study on temperature dependent solvation free energies of nonpolar and polar side chains attached to a short peptide backbone. The estimated solvation entropies and enthalpies of the various amino acid side chains are compared with existing side chain analogue data. The solvation entropies and enthalpies of the polar side chains are negative, but in absolute magnitude smaller compared with the corresponding analogue data. The observed differences are large; however, owing to a nearly perfect enthalpy-entropy compensation, the solvation free energies of polar side chains remain largely unaffected by the peptide backbone. We find that a similar compensation does not apply to the nonpolar side chains; while the backbone greatly reduces the unfavorable solvation entropies, the solvation enthalpies are either more favorable or only marginally affected. This results in a very small unfavorable free energy cost, or even free energy gain, of solvating the nonpolar side chains in strong contrast to solvation of small hydrophobic or nonpolar molecules in bulk water. The solvation free energies of nonpolar side chains have been furthermore decomposed into a repulsive cavity formation contribution and an attractive dispersion free energy contribution. We find that cavity formation next to the peptide backbone is entropically favored over formation of similar sized nonpolar side

  7. Use of 1–4 interaction scaling factors to control the conformational equilibrium between α-helix and β-strand

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • 1–4 interaction scaling factors are used to adjust conformational energy. • This article reports the effects of these factors on protein conformations. • Reducing these factors changes a helix to a strand in molecular dynamics simulation. • Increasing these factors causes the reverse conformational change. • These factors control the conformational equilibrium between helix and strand. - Abstract: 1–4 interaction scaling factors are used in AMBER forcefields to reduce the exaggeration of short-range repulsion caused by the 6–12 Lennard-Jones potential and a nonpolarizable charge model and to obtain better agreements of small-molecule conformational energies with experimental data. However, the effects of these scaling factors on protein secondary structure conformations have not been investigated until now. This article reports the finding that the 1–4 interactions among the protein backbone atoms separated by three consecutive covalent bonds are more repulsive in the α-helix conformation than in two β-strand conformations. Therefore, the 1–4 interaction scaling factors of protein backbone torsions ϕ and ψ control the conformational equilibrium between α-helix and β-strand. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that reducing the ϕ and ψ scaling factors readily converts the α-helix conformation of AcO-(AAQAA){sub 3}-NH{sub 2} to a β-strand conformation, and the reverse occurs when these scaling factors are increased. These results suggest that the ϕ and ψ scaling factors can be used to generate the α-helix or β-strand conformation in situ and to control the propensities of a forcefield for adopting secondary structure elements.

  8. Role of Conformation in - Interactions and Polymer/Fullerene Miscibility

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Bucknall, David G.; Thio, Yonathan S; Gurun, Bilge; Campbell, Katie

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the miscibility between C60 fullerene and a series of phenylic vinyl polymers has been investigate using a combination of wide-angle x-ray (WAXS) and neutron (WANS) scattering and density functional theory (DFT) computational modeling. The solubility limit of the C60 in the polymers was found to increase non-linearly with increasing phenylic groups in the side-chain from 1 wt% in polystyrene (PS) to 12 wt% in poly(9-vinyl phenanthrene) (P9VPh). The DFT calculations showed that the polymer interacts with the fullerene preferentially with the phenylic groups in these vinyl polymers. However, due to the backbone these phenyl groups are unable to form the energetically favorable T-junction or planar - stacks with the fullerene, and are randomly oriented to the cage. The non-linear increase in solubility is believed to be associated with shape conformity of the three ring phenanthrene to the curvature of the fullerene.

  9. Conformation-independent structural comparison of macromolecules with ProSMART

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, Robert A.; Fischer, Marcus; McNicholas, Stuart; Murshudov, Garib N.

    2014-09-01

    The Procrustes Structural Matching Alignment and Restraints Tool (ProSMART) has been developed to allow local comparative structural analyses independent of the global conformations and sequence homology of the compared macromolecules. This allows quick and intuitive visualization of the conservation of backbone and side-chain conformations, providing complementary information to existing methods. The identification and exploration of (dis)similarities between macromolecular structures can help to gain biological insight, for instance when visualizing or quantifying the response of a protein to ligand binding. Obtaining a residue alignment between compared structures is often a prerequisite for such comparative analysis. If the conformational change of the protein is dramatic, conventional alignment methods may struggle to provide an intuitive solution for straightforward analysis. To make such analyses more accessible, the Procrustes Structural Matching Alignment and Restraints Tool (ProSMART) has been developed, which achieves a conformation-independent structural alignment, as well as providing such additional functionalities as the generation of restraints for use in the refinement of macromolecular models. Sensible comparison of protein (or DNA/RNA) structures in the presence of conformational changes is achieved by enforcing neither chain nor domain rigidity. The visualization of results is facilitated by popular molecular-graphics software such as CCP4mg and PyMOL, providing intuitive feedback regarding structural conservation and subtle dissimilarities between close homologues that can otherwise be hard to identify. Automatically generated colour schemes corresponding to various residue-based scores are provided, which allow the assessment of the conservation of backbone and side-chain conformations relative to the local coordinate frame. Structural comparison tools such as ProSMART can help to break the complexity that accompanies the constantly growing

  10. Arabinose 5-phosphate covalently inhibits transaldolase.

    PubMed

    Light, Samuel H; Anderson, Wayne F

    2014-03-01

    Arabinose 5-phosphate (A5P) is the aldopentose version of the ketohexose fructose 6-phosphate (F6P), having identical stereochemistry but lacking atoms corresponding to the 1-carbon and 1-hydroxyl. Despite structural similarity and conservation of the reactive portion of F6P, F6P acts as a substrate whereas A5P is reported to be an inhibitor of transaldolase. To address the lack of A5P reactivity we determined a crystal structure of the Francisella tularensis transaldolase in complex with A5P. This structure reveals that like F6P, A5P forms a covalent Schiff base with active site Lys135. Unlike F6P, A5P binding fails to displace an ordered active site water molecule. Retaining this water necessitates conformational changes at the A5P-protein linkage that possibly hinder reactivity. The findings presented here show the basis of A5P inhibition and suggest an unusual mechanism of competitive, reversible-covalent transaldolase regulation.

  11. Recent Advances in Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James; Chaykov, Spasen

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in alternative gravitational theories. Although MOND remains the leading candidate among the alternative models, Conformal Gravity has been studied by Mannheim and O'Brien to solve the rotation curve problem without the need for dark matter. Recently, Mannheim, O'Brien and Chaykov have begun solving other gravitational questions in Conformal Gravity. In this presentation, we highlight the new work of Conformal Gravity's application to random motions of clusters (the original Zwicky problem), gravitational bending of light, gravitational lensing and a very recent survey of dwarf galaxy rotation curves. We will show in each case that Conformal Gravity can provide an accurate explanation and prediction of the data without the need for dark matter. Coupled with the fact that Conformal Gravity is a fully re-normalizable metric theory of gravity, these results help to push Conformal Gravity onto a competitive stage against other alternative models.

  12. Conformation of Oligo(Ethylene Glycol) grafted Poly(Norbornene) in solutions: A Small Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Hua, Fengjun; Hong, Kunlun; Wignall, George D; Hammouda, B.; Mays, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    The structure of thermo sensitive poly(methoxyoligo(ethylene glycol) norbornenyl esters) homopolymers in dilute solution was investigated by Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS). The homopolymers consist of a polynorbornene (PNB) backbone with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 50, and each backbone monomer has a grafted Ethylene Glycol (EG) side chain with an average DP of 6.6. The hydrophobic backbone and hydrophilic side chains interact differently with solvents depending on their polarity, which makes the conformation very sensitive to the solvent quality. The polymer conformation was studied in two solvents, d-toluene and D2O, with the aim of understanding the influence of solvent/polymer interactions on the resulting structures. It was found that in a 0.5 wt. % solution in d-toluene the polymers assume wormlike chains and gradually contract with increasing polymer concentration. In a 0.5 wt. % solution in D2O, the polymers are partially contracted at room temperature and their conformation can be described by the form factor of a rigid cylinder. The volume of the cylinder shows no concentration dependence. Furthermore, the polymers in D2O collapse at higher temperatures due to decreasing solubility of the side chains in water.

  13. Solubilization of insoluble phosphates by thermophilic fungi.

    PubMed

    Singh, C P; Mishra, M M; Yadav, K S

    1980-01-01

    The solubilization of tricalcium phosphate and rock phosphate and assimilation of solubilized P by thermophilic fungi isolated from compost were studied. The solubilization of tricalcium phosphate was greater than that of rock phosphate on inoculation with fungi in liquid medium, but growth of most of the fungi was greater in rock phosphate. Torula thermophila solubilized tricalcium phosphate maximally. There was solubilization of rock phosphate in semi-solid lignocellulose medium by Aspergillus fumigatus.

  14. Gas Phase Spectra and Structural Determination of Glucose 6 Phosphate Using Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kregel, Steven J.; Voss, Jonathan; Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate (G6P) is one member of a class of simple phosphorylated sugars that are relevant in biological processes. We have acquired a gas phase infrared spectrum of G6P- using cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) in a home-built spectrometer. The experimental spectrum was compared with calculated vibrational spectra from a systematic conformer search. For both of the α and β anomers, results show that only the lowest energy conformers are present in the gas phase. If spectral signatures for similar sugars could be cataloged, it would allow for conformer-specific determination of mixture composition, for example, for glycolyzation processes.

  15. Modification of the 1-Phosphate Group during Biosynthesis of Capnocytophaga canimorsus Lipid A.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Francesco; Zähringer, Ulrich; Chandler, Courtney E; Ernst, Robert K; Cornelis, Guy R; Ittig, Simon J

    2015-12-07

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a commensal bacterium of dog's mouth flora causing severe infections in humans after dog bites or scratches, has a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (endotoxin) with low-inflammatory lipid A. In particular, it contains a phosphoethanolamine (P-Etn) instead of a free phosphate group at the C-1 position of the lipid A backbone, usually present in highly toxic enterobacterial Gram-negative lipid A. Here we show that the C. canimorsus genome comprises a single operon encoding a lipid A 1-phosphatase (LpxE) and a lipid A 1 P-Etn transferase (EptA). This suggests that lipid A is modified during biosynthesis after completing acylation of the backbone by removal of the 1-phosphate and subsequent addition of an P-Etn group. As endotoxicity of lipid A is known to depend largely on the degree of unsubstituted or unmodified phosphate residues, deletion of lpxE or eptA led to mutants lacking the P-Etn group, with consequently increased endotoxicity and decreased resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP). Consistent with the proposed sequential biosynthetic mechanism, the endotoxicity and CAMP resistance of a double deletion mutant of lpxE-eptA was similar to that of a single lpxE mutant. Finally, the proposed enzymatic activities of LpxE and EptA based on sequence similarity could be successfully validated by mass spectrometry (MS)-based analysis of lipid A isolated from the corresponding deletion mutant strains.

  16. Modification of the 1-Phosphate Group during Biosynthesis of Capnocytophaga canimorsus Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Francesco; Zähringer, Ulrich; Chandler, Courtney E.; Ernst, Robert K.; Cornelis, Guy R.

    2015-01-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a commensal bacterium of dog's mouth flora causing severe infections in humans after dog bites or scratches, has a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (endotoxin) with low-inflammatory lipid A. In particular, it contains a phosphoethanolamine (P-Etn) instead of a free phosphate group at the C-1 position of the lipid A backbone, usually present in highly toxic enterobacterial Gram-negative lipid A. Here we show that the C. canimorsus genome comprises a single operon encoding a lipid A 1-phosphatase (LpxE) and a lipid A 1 P-Etn transferase (EptA). This suggests that lipid A is modified during biosynthesis after completing acylation of the backbone by removal of the 1-phosphate and subsequent addition of an P-Etn group. As endotoxicity of lipid A is known to depend largely on the degree of unsubstituted or unmodified phosphate residues, deletion of lpxE or eptA led to mutants lacking the P-Etn group, with consequently increased endotoxicity and decreased resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP). Consistent with the proposed sequential biosynthetic mechanism, the endotoxicity and CAMP resistance of a double deletion mutant of lpxE-eptA was similar to that of a single lpxE mutant. Finally, the proposed enzymatic activities of LpxE and EptA based on sequence similarity could be successfully validated by mass spectrometry (MS)-based analysis of lipid A isolated from the corresponding deletion mutant strains. PMID:26644381

  17. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  18. Killing and conformal Killing tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Konstantin; Moroianu, Andrei; Semmelmann, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    We introduce an appropriate formalism in order to study conformal Killing (symmetric) tensors on Riemannian manifolds. We reprove in a simple way some known results in the field and obtain several new results, like the classification of conformal Killing 2-tensors on Riemannian products of compact manifolds, Weitzenböck formulas leading to non-existence results, and construct various examples of manifolds with conformal Killing tensors.

  19. Reflections on conformal spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungrok; Kravchuk, Petr; Ooguri, Hirosi

    2016-04-01

    We use modular invariance and crossing symmetry of conformal field theory to reveal approximate reflection symmetries in the spectral decompositions of the partition function in two dimensions in the limit of large central charge and of the four-point function in any dimension in the limit of large scaling dimensions Δ0 of external operators. We use these symmetries to motivate universal upper bounds on the spectrum and the operator product expansion coefficients, which we then derive by independent techniques. Some of the bounds for four-point functions are valid for finite Δ0 as well as for large Δ0. We discuss a similar symmetry in a large spacetime dimension limit. Finally, we comment on the analogue of the Cardy formula and sparse light spectrum condition for the four-point function.

  20. Capturing Chromosome Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Job; Rippe, Karsten; Dekker, Martijn; Kleckner, Nancy

    2002-02-01

    We describe an approach to detect the frequency of interaction between any two genomic loci. Generation of a matrix of interaction frequencies between sites on the same or different chromosomes reveals their relative spatial disposition and provides information about the physical properties of the chromatin fiber. This methodology can be applied to the spatial organization of entire genomes in organisms from bacteria to human. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we could confirm known qualitative features of chromosome organization within the nucleus and dynamic changes in that organization during meiosis. We also analyzed yeast chromosome III at the G1 stage of the cell cycle. We found that chromatin is highly flexible throughout. Furthermore, functionally distinct AT- and GC-rich domains were found to exhibit different conformations, and a population-average 3D model of chromosome III could be determined. Chromosome III emerges as a contorted ring.

  1. Effects of Protein Stabilizing Agents on Thermal Backbone Motions: A Disulfide Trapping Study†

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Scott L.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical stabilizers are widely used to enhance protein stability, both in nature and in the laboratory. Here, the molecular mechanism of chemical stabilizers is studied using a disulfide trapping assay to measure the effects of stabilizers on thermal backbone dynamics in the Escherichia coli galactose/glucose binding protein. Two types of backbone fluctuations are examined: (a) relative movements of adjacent surface α-helices within the same domain and (b) interdomain twisting motions. Both types of fluctuations are significantly reduced by all six stabilizers tested (glycerol, sucrose, trehalose, l-glucose, d-glucose, and d-galactose), and in each case larger amplitude motions are inhibited more than smaller ones. Motional inhibition does not require a high-affinity stabilizer binding site, indicating that the effects of stabilizers are nonspecific. Overall, the results support the theory that effective stabilizing agents act by favoring the most compact structure of a protein, thereby reducing local backbone fluctuations away from the fully folded state. Such inhibition of protein backbone dynamics may be a general mechanism of protein stabilization in extreme thermal or chemical environments. PMID:8718847

  2. Animals without Backbones: The Invertebrate Story. Grade Level 5-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerome, Brian; Fuqua, Paul

    This guide, when used in tandem with the videotape "Animals Without Backbones," helps students learn about invertebrates. These materials promote hands-on discovery and learning. The guide is composed of six curriculum-based teaching units: (1) "Getting Started"; (2) "Porifera"; (3) "Cnidarians"; (4) "Worms"; (5) "Mollusks"; (6) "Arthropods"; and…

  3. Graduate Education in Kinesiology: Are We Part of "America's Backbone for Competitiveness and Innovation"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2008-01-01

    Graduate education in the United States has been identified as being the backbone of American competitiveness and innovation in a recent report by the Council of Graduate Schools. The report provides a framework for examining the role of graduate education in partnership with business and government to advance an action agenda for achieving…

  4. Computer simulation of bottle-brush polymers with flexible backbone: Good solvent versus theta solvent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakis, Panagiotis E.; Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Paul, Wolfgang; Binder, Kurt

    2011-10-01

    By molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained bead-spring-type model for a cylindrical molecular brush with a backbone chain of Nb effective monomers to which with grafting density σ side chains with N effective monomers are tethered, several characteristic length scales are studied for variable solvent quality. Side chain lengths are in the range 5 ⩽ N ⩽ 40, backbone chain lengths are in the range 50 ⩽ Nb ⩽ 200, and we perform a comparison to results for the bond fluctuation model on the simple cubic lattice (for which much longer chains are accessible, Nb ⩽ 1027, and which corresponds to an athermal, very good, solvent). We obtain linear dimensions of the side chains and the backbone chain and discuss their N-dependence in terms of power laws and the associated effective exponents. We show that even at the theta point the side chains are considerably stretched, their linear dimension depending on the solvent quality only weakly. Effective persistence lengths are extracted both from the orientational correlations and from the backbone end-to-end distance; it is shown that different measures of the persistence length (which would all agree for Gaussian chains) are not mutually consistent with each other and depend distinctly both on Nb and the solvent quality. A brief discussion of pertinent experiments is given.

  5. Side chain chemistry mediates backbone fragmentation in hydrogen deficient peptide radicals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingyu; Nelson, Hosea; Ly, Tony; Stoltz, Brian M; Julian, Ryan R

    2009-02-01

    A crown ether based, photolabile radical precursor which forms noncovalent complexes with peptides has been prepared. The peptide/precursor complexes can be electrosprayed, isolated in an ion trap, and then subjected to laser photolysis and collision induced dissociation to generate hydrogen deficient peptide radicals. It is demonstrated that these peptide radicals behave very differently from the hydrogen rich peptide radicals generated by electron capture methods. In fact, it is shown that side chain chemistry dictates both the occurrence and relative abundance of backbone fragments that are observed. Fragmentation at aromatic residues occurs preferentially over most other amino acids. The origin of this selectivity relates to the mechanism by which backbone dissociation is initiated. The first step is abstraction of a beta-hydrogen from the side chain, followed by beta-elimination to yield primarily a-type fragment ions. Calculations reveal that those side chains which can easily lose a beta-hydrogen correlate well with experimentally favored sites for backbone fragmentation. In addition, radical mediated side chain losses from the parent peptide are frequently observed. Eleven amino acids exhibit unique mass losses from side chains which positively identify that particular amino acid as part of the parent peptide. Therefore, side chain losses allow one to unambiguously narrow the possible sequences for a parent peptide, which when combined with predictable backbone fragmentation should lead to greatly increased confidence in peptide identification.

  6. Locally accessible conformations of proteins: multiple molecular dynamics simulations of crambin.

    PubMed Central

    Caves, L. S.; Evanseck, J. D.; Karplus, M.

    1998-01-01

    Multiple molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of crambin with different initial atomic velocities are used to sample conformations in the vicinity of the native structure. Individual trajectories of length up to 5 ns sample only a fraction of the conformational distribution generated by ten independent 120 ps trajectories at 300 K. The backbone atom conformational space distribution is analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA). Four different major conformational regions are found. In general, a trajectory samples only one region and few transitions between the regions are observed. Consequently, the averages of structural and dynamic properties over the ten trajectories differ significantly from those obtained from individual trajectories. The nature of the conformational sampling has important consequences for the utilization of MD simulations for a wide range of problems, such as comparisons with X-ray or NMR data. The overall average structure is significantly closer to the X-ray structure than any of the individual trajectory average structures. The high frequency (less than 10 ps) atomic fluctuations from the ten trajectories tend to be similar, but the lower frequency (100 ps) motions are different. To improve conformational sampling in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins, as in nucleic acids, multiple trajectories with different initial conditions should be used rather than a single long trajectory. PMID:9541397

  7. A unified NMR strategy for high-throughput determination of backbone fold of small proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Gautam, Anmol; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2012-12-01

    An efficient semi-automated strategy called PFBD (i.e. Protein Fold from Backbone Data only) has been presented for rapid backbone fold determination of small proteins. It makes use of NMR parameters involving backbone atoms only. These include chemical shifts, amide-amide NOEs and H-bonds. The backbone chemical shifts are obtained in an automated manner from the orthogonal 2D projections of variants of HNN and HN(C)N experiments (Kumar et al., in Magn Reson Chem 50(5):357-363, 2012) using AUTOBA (Borkar et al. in J Biomol NMR 50(3):285-297, 2011); backbone H-bonds are manually derived from constant time long-range 2D-HnCO spectrum (Cordier and Grzesiek in J Am Chem Soc 121:1601-1602, 1999); and amide-amide NOEs are derived from 3D HNCO NOESY experiment which provides NOEs along the direct (1)H dimension that has maximum resolution (Lohr and Ruterjans in J Biomol NMR 9(1):371-388, 1997). All the experiments needed for the execution of PFBD can be recorded and analyzed in about 24-48 h depending upon the concentration of the protein and dispersion of amide cross-peaks in the (1)H-(15)N correlation spectrum. Thus, we believe that the strategy, because of its speed and simplicity will be very valuable in Biomolecular NMR community for high-throughput structural proteomics of small folded proteins of MW < 10-12 kDa, the regime where NMR is generally preferred over X-ray crystallography. The strategy has been validated and demonstrated here on two small globular proteins: human ubiquitin (76 aa) and chicken SH3 domain (62 aa). PMID:23054485

  8. Replacement between conformity and counter-conformity in consumption decisions.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ting-Jui; Chang, En-Chung; Dai, Qi; Wong, Veronica

    2013-02-01

    This study assessed, in a Chinese context, how self-esteem interacts with perceived similarity and uniqueness to yield cognitive dissonance, and whether the dissonance leads to self-reported conformity or counter-conformity behavior. Participants were 408 respondents from 4 major Chinese cities (M age = 33.0 yr., SD = 4.3; 48% men). Self-perceptions of uniqueness, similarity, cognitive dissonance, self-esteem and need to behave in conformity or counter-conformity were measured. A theoretical model was assessed in four situations, relating the ratings of self-esteem and perceived similarity/uniqueness to the way other people at a wedding were dressed, and the resultant cognitive dissonance and conformity/ counter-conformity behavior. Regardless of high or low self-esteem, all participants reported cognitive dissonance when they were told that they were dressed extremely similarly to or extremely differently from the other people attending the wedding. However, the conforming/counter-conforming strategies used by participants to resolve the cognitive dissonance differed. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme uniqueness of dress, participants with low self-esteem tended to say they would dress next time so as to conform with the way others were dressed, while those with high self-esteem indicated they would continue their counter-conformity in attire. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme similarity to others, both those with high and low self-esteem tended to say they would dress in an unorthodox manner to surprise other people in the future. PMID:23654033

  9. Replacement between conformity and counter-conformity in consumption decisions.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ting-Jui; Chang, En-Chung; Dai, Qi; Wong, Veronica

    2013-02-01

    This study assessed, in a Chinese context, how self-esteem interacts with perceived similarity and uniqueness to yield cognitive dissonance, and whether the dissonance leads to self-reported conformity or counter-conformity behavior. Participants were 408 respondents from 4 major Chinese cities (M age = 33.0 yr., SD = 4.3; 48% men). Self-perceptions of uniqueness, similarity, cognitive dissonance, self-esteem and need to behave in conformity or counter-conformity were measured. A theoretical model was assessed in four situations, relating the ratings of self-esteem and perceived similarity/uniqueness to the way other people at a wedding were dressed, and the resultant cognitive dissonance and conformity/ counter-conformity behavior. Regardless of high or low self-esteem, all participants reported cognitive dissonance when they were told that they were dressed extremely similarly to or extremely differently from the other people attending the wedding. However, the conforming/counter-conforming strategies used by participants to resolve the cognitive dissonance differed. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme uniqueness of dress, participants with low self-esteem tended to say they would dress next time so as to conform with the way others were dressed, while those with high self-esteem indicated they would continue their counter-conformity in attire. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme similarity to others, both those with high and low self-esteem tended to say they would dress in an unorthodox manner to surprise other people in the future.

  10. Structural Flexibility and Conformation Features of Cyclic Dinucleotides in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Che, Xing; Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Yanyu; Yang, Lijiang; Quan, Hui; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-17

    Cyclic dinucleotides are able to trigger the innate immune system by activating STING. It was found that the binding affinity of asymmetric 2'3'-cGAMP to symmetric dimer of STING is 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of the symmetric 3'3'-cyclic dinucleotides. Such a phenomenon has not been understood yet. Here we show that the subtle changes in phosphodiester linkage of CDNs lead to their distinct structural properties which correspond to the varied binding affinities. 2'-5' and/or 3'-5' linked CDNs adopt specific while different types of ribose puckers and backbone conformations. That ribose conformations and base types have different propensities for anti or syn glycosidic conformations further affects the overall flexibility of CDNs. The counterbalance between backbone ring tension and electrostatic repulsion, both affected by the ring size, also contributes to the different flexibility of CDNs. Our calculations reveal that the free energy cost for 2'3'-cGAMP to adopt the STING-bound structure is smaller than that for 3'3'-cGAMP and cyclic-di-GMP. These findings may serve as a reference for design of CDN-analogues as vaccine adjuvants. Moreover, the cyclization pattern of CDNs closely related to their physiological roles suggests the importance of understanding structural properties in the study of protein-ligand interactions.

  11. Conformal gravity and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazboun, Jeffrey Shafiq

    2014-10-01

    Cartan geometry provides a rich formalism from which to look at various geometrically motivated extensions to general relativity. In this manuscript, we start by motivating reasons to extend the theory of general relativity. We then introduce the reader to our technique, called the quotient manifold method, for extending the geometry of spacetime. We will specifically look at the class of theories formed from the various quotients of the conformal group. Starting with the conformal symmetries of Euclidean space, we construct a manifold where time manifests as a part of the geometry. Though there is no matter present in the geome- try studied here, geometric terms analogous to dark energy and dark matter appear when we write down the Einstein tensor. Specifically, the quotient of the conformal group of Euclidean four-space by its Weyl subgroup results in a geometry possessing many of the properties of relativistic phase space, including both a natural symplectic form and nondegenerate Killing metric. We show the general solution possesses orthogonal Lagrangian submanifolds, with the induced metric and the spin connection on the submanifolds necessarily Lorentzian, despite the Euclidean starting point. By examining the structure equations of the biconformal space in an orthonormal frame adapted to its phase space properties, we also find two new tensor fields exist in this geometry, not present in Riemannian geometry. The first is a combination of the Weyl vector with the scale factor on the metric, and determines the time-like directions on the submanifolds. The second comes from the components of the spin connection, symmetric with respect to the new metric. Though this field comes from the spin connection, it transforms ho- mogeneously. Finally, we show in the absence of Cartan curvature or sources, the configuration space has geometric terms equivalent to a perfect fluid and a cosmological constant. We complete the analysis of this homogeneous space by

  12. Conformal Transformations and Space Travel.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S N

    1961-10-27

    Conformal transformations are applied to the motion of a space ship experiencing a constant acceleration. The role of proper time is interpreted in terms of atomic periods, and the relationship between the conformal transformations and the general theory of relativity is clarified.

  13. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  14. [Conformal radiotherapy: principles and classification].

    PubMed

    Rosenwald, J C; Gaboriaud, G; Pontvert, D

    1999-01-01

    'Conformal radiotherapy' is the name fixed by usage and given to a new form of radiotherapy resulting from the technological improvements observed during, the last ten years. While this terminology is now widely used, no precise definition can be found in the literature. Conformal radiotherapy refers to an approach in which the dose distribution is more closely 'conformed' or adapted to the actual shape of the target volume. However, the achievement of a consensus on a more specific definition is hampered by various difficulties, namely in characterizing the degree of 'conformality'. We have therefore suggested a classification scheme be established on the basis of the tools and the procedures actually used for all steps of the process, i.e., from prescription to treatment completion. Our classification consists of four levels: schematically, at level 0, there is no conformation (rectangular fields); at level 1, a simple conformation takes place, on the basis of conventional 2D imaging; at level 2, a 3D reconstruction of the structures is used for a more accurate conformation; and level 3 includes research and advanced dynamic techniques. We have used our personal experience, contacts with colleagues and data from the literature to analyze all the steps of the planning process, and to define the tools and procedures relevant to a given level. The corresponding tables have been discussed and approved at the European level within the Dynarad concerted action. It is proposed that the term 'conformal radiotherapy' be restricted to procedures where all steps are at least at level 2.

  15. Backbone dynamics of the human CC chemokine eotaxin: fast motions, slow motions, and implications for receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Crump, M. P.; Spyracopoulos, L.; Lavigne, P.; Kim, K. S.; Clark-lewis, I.; Sykes, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    Eotaxin is a member of the chemokine family of about 40 proteins that induce cell migration. Eotaxin binds the CC chemokine receptor CCR3 that is highly expressed by eosinophils, and it is considered important in the pathology of chronic respiratory disorders such as asthma. The high resolution structure of eotaxin is known. The 74 amino acid protein has two disulfide bridges and shows a typical chemokine fold comprised of a core of three antiparallel beta-strands and an overlying alpha-helix. In this paper, we report the backbone dynamics of eotaxin determined through 15N-T1, T2, and [1H]-15N nuclear Overhauser effect heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments. This is the first extensive study of the dynamics of a chemokine derived from 600, 500, and 300 MHz NMR field strengths. From the T1, T2, and NOE relaxation data, parameters that describe the internal motions of eotaxin were derived using the Lipari-Szabo model free analysis. The most ordered regions of the protein correspond to the known secondary structure elements. However, surrounding the core, the regions known to be functionally important in chemokines show a range of motions on varying timescales. These include extensive subnanosecond to picosecond motions in the N-terminus, C-terminus, and the N-loop succeeding the disulfides. Analysis of rotational diffusion anisotropy of eotaxin and chemical exchange terms at multiple fields also allowed the confident identification of slow conformational exchange through the "30s" loop, disulfides, and adjacent residues. In addition, we show that these motions may be attenuated in the dimeric form of a synthetic eotaxin. The structure and dynamical basis for eotaxin receptor binding is discussed in light of the dynamics data. PMID:10548050

  16. Solution NMR analysis of the interaction between the actinoporin sticholysin I and DHPC micelles--correlation with backbone dynamics.

    PubMed

    López-Castilla, Aracelys; Pazos, Fabiola; Schreier, Shirley; Pires, José Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    Sticholysin I (StI), an actinoporin expressed as a water-soluble protein by the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, binds to natural and model membranes, forming oligomeric pores. It is proposed that the first event of a multistep pore formation mechanism consists of the monomeric protein attachment to the lipid bilayer. To date there is no high-resolution structure of the actinoporin pore or other membrane-bound form available. Here we evaluated StI:micelle complexes of variable lipid composition to look for a suitable model for NMR studies. Micelles of pure or mixed lysophospholipids and of dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) were examined. The StI:DHPC micelle was found to be the best system, yielding a stable sample and good quality spectra. A comprehensive chemical shift perturbation analysis was performed to map the StI membrane recognition site in the presence of DHPC micelles. The region mapped (residues F(51), R(52), S(53) in loop 3; F(107), D(108), Y(109), W(111), Y(112), W(115) in loop 7; Q(129), Y(132), D(134), M(135), Y(136), Y(137), G(138) in helix-α2) is in agreement with previously reported data, but additional residues were found to interact, especially residues V(81), A(82), T(83), G(84) in loop 5, and A(85), A(87) in strand-β5. Backbone dynamics measurements of StI free in solution and bound to micelles highlighted the relevance of protein flexibility for membrane binding and suggested that a conformer selection process may take place during protein-membrane interaction. We conclude that the StI:DHPC micelles system is a suitable model for further characterization of an actinoporin membrane-bound form by solution NMR. PMID:24218049

  17. Cyclic AMP Analog Blocks Kinase Activation by Stabilizing Inactive Conformation: Conformational Selection Highlights a New Concept in Allosteric Inhibitor Design*

    PubMed Central

    Badireddy, Suguna; Yunfeng, Gao; Ritchie, Mark; Akamine, Pearl; Wu, Jian; Kim, Choel W.; Taylor, Susan S.; Qingsong, Lin; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory (R) subunit of protein kinase A serves to modulate the activity of protein kinase A in a cAMP-dependent manner and exists in two distinct and structurally dissimilar, end point cAMP-bound “B” and C-subunit-bound “H”-conformations. Here we report mechanistic details of cAMP action as yet unknown through a unique approach combining x-ray crystallography with structural proteomics approaches, amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange and ion mobility mass spectrometry, applied to the study of a stereospecific cAMP phosphorothioate analog and antagonist((Rp)-cAMPS). X-ray crystallography shows cAMP-bound R-subunit in the B form but surprisingly the antagonist Rp-cAMPS-bound R-subunit crystallized in the H conformation, which was previously assumed to be induced only by C-subunit-binding. Apo R-subunit crystallized in the B form as well but amide exchange mass spectrometry showed large differences between apo, agonist and antagonist-bound states of the R-subunit. Further ion mobility reveals the apo R-subunit as an ensemble of multiple conformations with collisional cross-sectional areas spanning both the agonist and antagonist-bound states. Thus contrary to earlier studies that explained the basis for cAMP action through “induced fit” alone, we report evidence for conformational selection, where the ligand-free apo form of the R-subunit exists as an ensemble of both B and H conformations. Although cAMP preferentially binds the B conformation, Rp-cAMPS interestingly binds the H conformation. This reveals the unique importance of the equatorial oxygen of the cyclic phosphate in mediating conformational transitions from H to B forms highlighting a novel approach for rational structure-based drug design. Ideal inhibitors such as Rp-cAMPS are those that preferentially “select” inactive conformations of target proteins by satisfying all “binding” constraints alone without inducing conformational changes necessary for activation. PMID:21081668

  18. Photochemical modulation of DNA conformation by organic dications.

    PubMed

    Zinchenko, Anatoly A; Tanahashi, Mao; Murata, Shizuaki

    2012-01-01

    A group of azobenzene derivatives containing two quaternary ammonium groups with various intercharge distances between them was synthesised and used to control photochemically the conformation of genomic DNA by switching the distance between cationic ammonium groups in the dications. It was found that isomerisation of either dication from the trans form to cis resulted in an increase in the dication's efficiency for DNA compaction; this is associated with a decrease in intercharge distance between ammonium groups and leads to a better match of the binder's cationic groups to adjacent phosphate groups of DNA. Ammonium dications have several important advantages over the photosensitive surfactant type of diazobenzene reported earlier: they can be used at significantly lower (>100-fold) concentrations than photosensitive surfactants, and DNA conformation control can be performed over a broader concentration range of dications. The influence of intercharge distance in photosensitive dications on photo-induced DNA binding discrimination is discussed, and the molecular mechanism is proposed. PMID:22109974

  19. FUS: a system to simulate conformational changes in biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Major, F; Feldmann, R; Lapalme, G; Cedergren, R

    1988-11-01

    In order to study the dynamics of protein and nucleic acid conformations, a molecular folding-unfolding system (FUS written in Lisp) has been developed. Secondary structure features of protein and nucleic acids are graphically represented by cubes in a modified 'Blocks World' paradigm. Modeling of protein and nucleic acid unfolding (denaturation) and folding of their three-dimensional structure is possible by the use of high level 'block' operators which allow displacement of these structural features in space. Due to the flexible nature of this program, FUS is a useful tool for the rapid evaluation of user-defined rules governing conformational changes. The use of FUS to unfold three common proteins (prealbumin, flavodoxin and triose phosphate isomerase) and a tRNA is presented. PMID:3208178

  20. Recursion relations for conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penedones, João; Trevisani, Emilio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-09-01

    In the context of conformal field theories in general space-time dimension, we find all the possible singularities of the conformal blocks as functions of the scaling dimension Δ of the exchanged operator. In particular, we argue, using representation theory of parabolic Verma modules, that in odd spacetime dimension the singularities are only simple poles. We discuss how to use this information to write recursion relations that determine the conformal blocks. We first recover the recursion relation introduced in [1] for conformal blocks of external scalar operators. We then generalize this recursion relation for the conformal blocks associated to the four point function of three scalar and one vector operator. Finally we specialize to the case in which the vector operator is a conserved current.

  1. Theoretical investigations on the interactions of glucokinase regulatory protein with fructose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Ling, Baoping; Yan, Xueyuan; Sun, Min; Bi, Siwei

    2016-02-01

    Glucokinase (GK) plays a critical role in maintaining glucose homeostasis in the human liver and pancreas. In the liver, the activity of GK is modulated by the glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP) which functions as a competitive inhibitor of glucose to bind to GK. Moreover, the inhibitory intensity of GKRP-GK is suppressed by fructose 1-phosphate (F1P), and reinforced by fructose 6-phosphate (F6P). Here, we employed a series of computational techniques to explore the interactions of fructose phosphates with GKRP. Calculation results reveal that F1P and F6P can bind to the same active site of GKRP with different binding modes, and electrostatic interaction provides a major driving force for the ligand binding. The presence of fructose phosphate severely influences the motions of protein and the conformational space, and the structural change of sugar phosphate influences its interactions with GKRP, leading to a large conformational rearrangement of loop2 in the SIS2 domain. In particular, the binding of F6P to GKRP facilitates the protruding loop2 contacting with GK to form the stable GK-GKRP complex. The conserved residues 179-184 of GKRP play a major role in the binding of phosphate group and maintaining the stability of GKRP. These results may provide deep insight into the regulatory mechanism of GKRP to the activity of GK. PMID:26629747

  2. Inositol phosphates in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Benjamin L; Papházy, Michael J; Haygarth, Philip M; McKelvie, Ian D

    2002-01-01

    The inositol phosphates are a group of organic phosphorus compounds found widely in the natural environment, but that represent the greatest gap in our understanding of the global phosphorus cycle. They exist as inositols in various states of phosphorylation (bound to between one and six phosphate groups) and isomeric forms (e.g. myo, D-chiro, scyllo, neo), although myo-inositol hexakisphosphate is by far the most prevalent form in nature. In terrestrial environments, inositol phosphates are principally derived from plants and accumulate in soils to become the dominant class of organic phosphorus compounds. Inositol phosphates are also present in large amounts in aquatic environments, where they may contribute to eutrophication. Despite the prevalence of inositol phosphates in the environment, their cycling, mobility and bioavailability are poorly understood. This is largely related to analytical difficulties associated with the extraction, separation and detection of inositol phosphates in environmental samples. This review summarizes the current knowledge of inositol phosphates in the environment and the analytical techniques currently available for their detection in environmental samples. Recent advances in technology, such as the development of suitable chromatographic and capillary electrophoresis separation techniques, should help to elucidate some of the more pertinent questions regarding inositol phosphates in the natural environment. PMID:12028785

  3. Conformal Fermi Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Liang; Pajer, Enrico; Schmidt, Fabian E-mail: Enrico.pajer@gmail.com

    2015-11-01

    Fermi Normal Coordinates (FNC) are a useful frame for isolating the locally observable, physical effects of a long-wavelength spacetime perturbation. Their cosmological application, however, is hampered by the fact that they are only valid on scales much smaller than the horizon. We introduce a generalization that we call Conformal Fermi Coordinates (CFC). CFC preserve all the advantages of FNC, but in addition are valid outside the horizon. They allow us to calculate the coupling of long- and short-wavelength modes on all scales larger than the sound horizon of the cosmological fluid, starting from the epoch of inflation until today, by removing the complications of the second order Einstein equations to a large extent, and eliminating all gauge ambiguities. As an application, we present a calculation of the effect of long-wavelength tensor modes on small scale density fluctuations. We recover previous results, but clarify the physical content of the individual contributions in terms of locally measurable effects and ''projection'' terms.

  4. Dynamics of protein conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Maria

    2010-10-01

    A novel theoretical methodology is introduced to identify dynamic structural domains and analyze local flexibility in proteins. The methodology employs a multiscale approach combining identification of essential collective coordinates based on the covariance analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories, construction of the Mori projection operator with these essential coordinates, and analysis of the corresponding generalized Langevin equations [M.Stepanova, Phys.Rev.E 76(2007)051918]. Because the approach employs a rigorous theory, the outcomes are physically transparent: the dynamic domains are associated with regions of relative rigidity in the protein, whereas off-domain regions are relatively soft. This also allows scoring the flexibility in the macromolecule with atomic-level resolution [N.Blinov, M.Berjanskii, D.S.Wishart, and M.Stepanova, Biochemistry, 48(2009)1488]. The applications include the domain coarse-graining and characterization of conformational stability in protein G and prion proteins. The results are compared with published NMR experiments. Potential applications for structural biology, bioinformatics, and drug design are discussed.

  5. Membrane-induced helical conformation of an active candidacidal fragment of salivary histatins.

    PubMed

    Raj, P A; Soni, S D; Levine, M J

    1994-04-01

    The conformational preference of the candidacidal C-terminal 16 residue fragment (9-24; G-Y-K-R-K-F-H-E-K-H-H-S-H-R-G-Y) of salivary histatin 5 was examined in water, methanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions using 500 MHz two-dimensional-NMR. Fourier transform infrared and CD spectroscopy were used to delineate its membrane-bound conformation in lipid vesicles. The peptide backbone and side-chain proton resonance assignments were accomplished by two-dimensional total correlated and nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) spectra. The coupling constant (JNH-C alpha H) values determined from the double quantum-filtered correlated spectra, temperature coefficients of NH chemical shifts (d delta/dT), 1H/2H exchange rates on amide resonances, and the set of NOE connectivities were used to delineate backbone conformational features. The high JNH-C alpha H values (> or = 7.4 Hz), absence of any characteristic NH-NH (i, i + 1) or C alpha H-C beta H (i, i + 3) NOE connectivities, high d delta/dT values (> or = 0.004), and the fast 1H/2H amide exchange suggest that the histatin peptide favors unfolded random conformations in aqueous solution at pH 3.8. In contrast, the JNH-C alpha H values (< or = 6.5 Hz), slow 1H/2H exchange, low d delta/dT values (< or = 0.003) observed for amide resonances of residues 5-16, and the characteristic NH-NH (i, i + 1), C alpha H-C beta H (i, i + 3) NOE connectivities, provide evidence for the presence of largely alpha-helical conformations in dimethyl sulfoxide, which mimics the polar aprotic membrane environment. In methanolic solutions, 3(10)-helical conformations could exist as a minor population together with the major alpha-helical conformations. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and CD data indicate that lipid environments such as dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles could induce the peptide to fold into predominantly alpha-helical conformation. The results suggest that in dimethyl sulfoxide and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles

  6. Determination of the solution-bound conformation of an amino acid binding protein by NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement: use of a single flexible paramagnetic probe with improved estimation of its sampling space.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Strub, Marie-Paule; Ho, Chien; Tjandra, Nico

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate the feasibility of elucidating the bound ("closed") conformation of a periplasmic binding protein, the glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP), in solution, using paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) arising from a single paramagnetic group. GlnBP consists of two globular domains connected by a hinge. Using the ligand-free ("open") conformation as a starting point, conjoined rigid-body/torsion-angle simulated annealing calculations were performed using backbone (1)H(N)-PREs as a major source of distance information. Paramagnetic probe flexibility was accounted for via a multiple-conformer representation. A conventional approach where the entire PRE data set is enforced at once during simulated annealing yielded poor results due to inappropriate conformational sampling of the probe. On the other hand, significant improvements in coordinate accuracy were obtained by estimating the probe sampling space prior to structure calculation. Such sampling is achieved by refining the ensemble of probe conformers with intradomain PREs only, keeping the protein backbone fixed in the open form. Subsequently, while constraining the probe to the previously found conformations, the domains are allowed to move relative to each other under the influence of the non-intradomain PREs, giving the hinge region torsional degrees of freedom. Thus, by partitioning the protocol into "probe sampling" and "backbone sampling" stages, structures significantly closer to the X-ray structure of ligand-bound GlnBP were obtained.

  7. Conformation of di-n-propylglycine residues (Dpg) in peptides: crystal structures of a type I' beta-turn forming tetrapeptide and an alpha-helical tetradecapeptide.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Raghurama P; Aravinda, Subrayashastry; Rai, Rajkishor; Kaul, Ramesh; Vijayalakshmi, Sarojini; Rao, R Balaji; Shamala, Narayanaswamy; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structures of two oligopeptides containing di-n-propylglycine (Dpg) residues, Boc-Gly-Dpg-Gly-Leu-OMe (1) and Boc-Val-Ala-Leu-Dpg-Val-Ala-Leu-Val-Ala-Leu-Dpg-Val-Ala-Leu-OMe (2) are presented. Peptide 1 adopts a type I'beta-turn conformation with Dpg(2)-Gly(3) at the corner positions. The 14-residue peptide 2 crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit, both of which adopt alpha-helical conformations stabilized by 11 successive 5 --> 1 hydrogen bonds. In addition, a single 4 --> 1 hydrogen bond is also observed at the N-terminus. All five Dpg residues adopt backbone torsion angles (phi, psi) in the helical region of conformational space. Evaluation of the available structural data on Dpg peptides confirm the correlation between backbone bond angle N-C(alpha)-C' (tau) and the observed backbone phi,psi values. For tau > 106 degrees, helices are observed, while fully extended structures are characterized by tau < 106 degrees. The mean tau values for extended and folded conformations for the Dpg residue are 103.6 degrees +/- 1.7 degrees and 109.9 degrees +/- 2.6 degrees, respectively.

  8. Backbone chemical shift assignments for Xanthomonas campestris peroxiredoxin Q in the reduced and oxidized states: a dramatic change in backbone dynamics.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Perkins, Arden; Parsonage, Derek; Poole, Leslie B; Karplus, P Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are ubiquitous enzymes that reduce peroxides as part of antioxidant defenses and redox signaling. While Prx catalytic activity and sensitivity to hyperoxidative inactivation depend on their dynamic properties, there are few examples where their dynamics has been characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Here, we provide a foundation for studies of the solution properties of peroxiredoxin Q from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (XcPrxQ) by assigning the observable (1)H(N), (15)N, (13)C(α), (13)C(β), and (13)C' chemical shifts for both the reduced (dithiol) and oxidized (disulfide) states. In the reduced state, most of the backbone amide resonances (149/152, 98 %) can be assigned in the XcPrxQ (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum. In contrast, a remarkable 51 % (77) of these amide resonances are not visible in the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectrum of the disulfide state of the enzyme, indicating a substantial change in backbone dynamics associated with the formation of an intramolecular C48-C84 disulfide bond. PMID:26438558

  9. Light weight phosphate cements

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Natarajan, Ramkumar,; Kahn, David

    2010-03-09

    A sealant having a specific gravity in the range of from about 0.7 to about 1.6 for heavy oil and/or coal bed methane fields is disclosed. The sealant has a binder including an oxide or hydroxide of Al or of Fe and a phosphoric acid solution. The binder may have MgO or an oxide of Fe and/or an acid phosphate. The binder is present from about 20 to about 50% by weight of the sealant with a lightweight additive present in the range of from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said sealant, a filler, and water sufficient to provide chemically bound water present in the range of from about 9 to about 36% by weight of the sealant when set. A porous ceramic is also disclosed.

  10. Templated, layered manganese phosphate

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.; Bonhomme, Francois R.

    2004-08-17

    A new crystalline maganese phosphate composition having an empirical formula: O). The compound was determined to crystallize in the trigonal space group P-3c1 with a=8.8706(4) .ANG., c=26.1580(2) .ANG., and V (volume)=1783 .ANG..sup.3. The structure consists of sheets of corner sharing Mn(II)O.sub.4 and PO.sub.4 tetrahedra with layers of (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N and water molecules in-between. The pronated (H.sub.3 NCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.3 N molecules provide charge balancing for the inorganic sheets. A network of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and the inorganic sheets holds the structure together.

  11. Crystal structure and conformational flexibility of the unligated FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Mustafi, Sourajit M.; LeMaster, David M.; Li, Zhong; Héroux, Annie; Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda

    2014-03-01

    Two crystal forms of unligated FKBP12.6 exhibit multiple conformations in the active site and in the 80s loop, the primary site for known protein-recognition interactions. The previously unreported NMR backbone assignment of FKBP12.6 revealed extensive doubling of amide resonances, which reflects a slow conformational transition centered in the 80s loop. The primary known physiological function of FKBP12.6 involves its role in regulating the RyR2 isoform of ryanodine receptor Ca{sup 2+} channels in cardiac muscle, pancreatic β islets and the central nervous system. With only a single previously reported X-ray structure of FKBP12.6, bound to the immunosuppressant rapamycin, structural inferences for this protein have been drawn from the more extensive studies of the homologous FKBP12. X-ray structures at 1.70 and 1.90 Å resolution from P2{sub 1} and P3{sub 1}21 crystal forms are reported for an unligated cysteine-free variant of FKBP12.6 which exhibit a notable diversity of conformations. In one monomer from the P3{sub 1}21 crystal form, the aromatic ring of Phe59 at the base of the active site is rotated perpendicular to its typical orientation, generating a steric conflict for the immunosuppressant-binding mode. The peptide unit linking Gly89 and Val90 at the tip of the protein-recognition ‘80s loop’ is flipped in the P2{sub 1} crystal form. Unlike the >30 reported FKBP12 structures, the backbone conformation of this loop closely follows that of the first FKBP domain of FKBP51. The NMR resonances for 21 backbone amides of FKBP12.6 are doubled, corresponding to a slow conformational transition centered near the tip of the 80s loop, as recently reported for 31 amides of FKBP12. The comparative absence of doubling for residues along the opposite face of the active-site pocket in FKBP12.6 may in part reflect attenuated structural coupling owing to increased conformational plasticity around the Phe59 ring.

  12. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine backbone homologues and their combination with functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinesh, Bhimareddy; Squillaci, Marco A.; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Samorì, Paolo; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    The integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into organized nanostructures is of great interest for applications in materials science and biomedicine. In this work we studied the self-assembly of β and γ homologues of diphenylalanine peptides under different solvent and pH conditions. We aimed to investigate the role of peptide backbone in tuning the formation of different types of nanostructures alone or in combination with carbon nanotubes. In spite of having the same side chain, β and γ peptides formed distinctively different nanofibers, a clear indication of the role played by the backbone homologation on the self-assembly. The variation of the pH allowed to transform the nanofibers into spherical structures. Moreover, the co-assembly of β and γ peptides with carbon nanotubes covalently functionalized with the same peptide generated unique dendritic assemblies. This comparative study on self-assembly using diphenylalanine backbone homologues and of the co-assembly with CNT covalent conjugates is the first example exploring the capacity of β and γ peptides to adopt precise nanostructures, particularly in combination with carbon nanotubes. The dendritic organization obtained by mixing carbon nanotubes and peptides might find interesting applications in tissue engineering and neuronal interfacing.The integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into organized nanostructures is of great interest for applications in materials science and biomedicine. In this work we studied the self-assembly of β and γ homologues of diphenylalanine peptides under different solvent and pH conditions. We aimed to investigate the role of peptide backbone in tuning the formation of different types of nanostructures alone or in combination with carbon nanotubes. In spite of having the same side chain, β and γ peptides formed distinctively different nanofibers, a clear indication of the role played by the backbone homologation on the self-assembly. The variation of the pH allowed to

  13. Phosphate nutrition: improving low-phosphate tolerance in crops.

    PubMed

    López-Arredondo, Damar Lizbeth; Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; González-Morales, Sandra Isabel; López-Bucio, José; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient that is required for all major developmental processes and reproduction in plants. It is also a major constituent of the fertilizers required to sustain high-yield agriculture. Levels of phosphate--the only form of phosphorus that can be assimilated by plants--are suboptimal in most natural and agricultural ecosystems, and when phosphate is applied as fertilizer in soils, it is rapidly immobilized owing to fixation and microbial activity. Thus, cultivated plants use only approximately 20-30% of the applied phosphate, and the rest is lost, eventually causing water eutrophication. Recent advances in the understanding of mechanisms by which wild and cultivated species adapt to low-phosphate stress and the implementation of alternative bacterial pathways for phosphorus metabolism have started to allow the design of more effective breeding and genetic engineering strategies to produce highly phosphate-efficient crops, optimize fertilizer use, and reach agricultural sustainability with a lower environmental cost. In this review, we outline the current advances in research on the complex network of plant responses to low-phosphorus stress and discuss some strategies used to manipulate genes involved in phosphate uptake, remobilization, and metabolism to develop low-phosphate-tolerant crops, which could help in designing more efficient crops.

  14. Determination of statherin N-terminal peptide conformation on hydroxyapatite crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Long, J.R.; Dindot, J.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Stayton, P.S.; Drobny, G.P.

    2000-03-01

    Proteins play an important role in inorganic crystal engineering during the development and growth of hard tissues such as bone and teeth. Although many of these proteins have been studied in the liquid state, there is little direct information describing molecular recognition at the protein-crystal interface. The authors have used {sup 13}C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques to investigate the conformation of an N-terminal peptide of salivary statherin both free and adsorbed on hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals. The torsion angle {var{underscore}phi} was determined at three positions along the backbone of the phosphorylated N-terminal 15 amino acid peptide fragment (DpSpSEEKFLRRIGRFG) by measuring distances between the backbone carbonyls carbons in the indicated adjacent amino acids using dipolar recoupling with a windowless sequence (DRAWS). Global secondary structure was determined by measuring the dipolar coupling between the {sup 13}C backbone carbonyl and the backbone {sup 15}N in the i {r{underscore}arrow} i + 4 residues (DpSpSEEKFLRRIGRFG) using rotational echo double resonance (REDOR). Peptides singly labeled at amino acids pS{sub 3}, L{sub 8}, and G{sub 12} were used for relaxation and line width measurements. The peptides adsorbed to the HAP surface have an average {var{underscore}phi} of {minus}85{degree} at the N-terminus (pSpS), {minus}60{degree} in the middle (FL) and {minus}73{degree} near the C-terminus (IG). The average {var{underscore}phi} angle measured at the pSpS position and the observed high conformational dispersion suggest a random coil conformation at this position. However, the FL position displays an average {var{underscore}phi} that indicates significant {alpha}-helical content, and the long time points in the DRAWS experiment fit best to a relatively narrow distribution of {var{underscore}phi} that falls within the protein data bank {alpha}-helical conformational space. REDOR measurements confirm the presence of helical content, where the

  15. Towards conformal loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H-T Wang, Charles

    2006-03-01

    A discussion is given of recent developments in canonical gravity that assimilates the conformal analysis of gravitational degrees of freedom. The work is motivated by the problem of time in quantum gravity and is carried out at the metric and the triad levels. At the metric level, it is shown that by extending the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) phase space of general relativity (GR), a conformal form of geometrodynamics can be constructed. In addition to the Hamiltonian and Diffeomorphism constraints, an extra first class constraint is introduced to generate conformal transformations. This phase space consists of York's mean extrinsic curvature time, conformal three-metric and their momenta. At the triad level, the phase space of GR is further enlarged by incorporating spin-gauge as well as conformal symmetries. This leads to a canonical formulation of GR using a new set of real spin connection variables. The resulting gravitational constraints are first class, consisting of the Hamiltonian constraint and the canonical generators for spin-gauge and conformorphism transformations. The formulation has a remarkable feature of being parameter-free. Indeed, it is shown that a conformal parameter of the Barbero-Immirzi type can be absorbed by the conformal symmetry of the extended phase space. This gives rise to an alternative approach to loop quantum gravity that addresses both the conceptual problem of time and the technical problem of functional calculus in quantum gravity.

  16. Structural basis for an inositol pyrophosphate kinase surmounting phosphate crowding

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huanchen; Falck, J.R.; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka; Shears, Stephen B.

    2012-01-11

    Inositol pyrophosphates (such as IP7 and IP8) are multifunctional signaling molecules that regulate diverse cellular activities. Inositol pyrophosphates have 'high-energy' phosphoanhydride bonds, so their enzymatic synthesis requires that a substantial energy barrier to the transition state be overcome. Additionally, inositol pyrophosphate kinases can show stringent ligand specificity, despite the need to accommodate the steric bulk and intense electronegativity of nature's most concentrated three-dimensional array of phosphate groups. Here we examine how these catalytic challenges are met by describing the structure and reaction cycle of an inositol pyrophosphate kinase at the atomic level. We obtained crystal structures of the kinase domain of human PPIP5K2 complexed with nucleotide cofactors and either substrates, product or a MgF{sub 3}{sup -} transition-state mimic. We describe the enzyme's conformational dynamics, its unprecedented topological presentation of nucleotide and inositol phosphate, and the charge balance that facilitates partly associative in-line phosphoryl transfer.

  17. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  18. General trends of dihedral conformational transitions in a globular protein

    DOE PAGES

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2016-02-15

    In this paper, dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and adaptive biasing force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions approximately two times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ~3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the bend, coil, and turn flexible regions, followed bymore » the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein side chains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Side chains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. In conclusion, these general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins.« less

  19. General trends of dihedral conformational transitions in a globular protein.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and adaptive biasing force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions approximately two times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ∼ 3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the bend, coil, and turn flexible regions, followed by the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein side chains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Side chains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. These general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins. PMID:26799251

  20. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2002-02-28

    This technical progress report describes work performed from June 20 through December 19, 2001, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels''. Interest has increased in some new polymeric products that purport to substantially reduce permeability to water while causing minimum permeability reduction to oil. In view of this interest, we are currently studying BJ's Aqua Con. Results from six corefloods revealed that the Aqua Con gelant consistently reduced permeability to water more than that to oil. However, the magnitude of the disproportionate permeability reduction varied significantly for the various experiments. Thus, as with most materials tested to date, the issue of reproducibility and control of the disproportionate permeability remains to be resolved. Concern exists about the ability of gels to resist washout after placement in fractures. We examined whether a width constriction in the middle of a fracture would cause different gel washout behavior upstream versus downstream of the constriction. Tests were performed using a formed Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel in a 48-in.-long fracture with three sections of equal length, but with widths of 0.08-, 0.02-, and 0.08-in., respectively. The pressure gradients during gel extrusion (i.e., placement) were similar in the two 0.08-in.-wide fracture sections, even though they were separated by a 0.02-in.-wide fracture section. The constriction associated with the middle fracture section may have inhibited gel washout during the first pulse of brine injection after gel placement. However, during subsequent phases of brine injection, the constriction did not inhibit washout in the upstream fracture section any more than in the downstream section.

  1. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  2. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  3. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  4. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  5. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other...

  6. Dephosphorylation reactions of mono-, di-, and triesters of 2,4-dinitrophenyl phosphate with deferoxamine and benzohydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Michelle; Orth, Elisa S; Manfredi, Alex M; Pavez, Paulina; Micke, Gustavo A; Kirby, Anthony J; Nome, Faruk

    2012-12-01

    This work presents a detailed kinetic and mechanistic study of biologically interesting dephosphorylation reactions involving the exceptionally reactive nucleophilic group, hydroxamate. We compare results for hydroxamate groups anchored on the simple molecular backbone of benzohydroxamate (BHA) and on the more complex structure of the widely used drug, deferoxamine (DFO). BHA shows extraordinary reactivity toward the triester diethyl 2,4-dinitrophenyl phosphate (DEDNPP) and the diester ethyl 2,4-dinitrophenyl phosphate (EDNPP) but reacts very slowly with the monoester 2,4-dinitrophenyl phosphate (DNPP). Nucleophilic attack on phosphorus is confirmed by the detection of the phosphorylated intermediates formed. These undergo Lossen-type rearrangements, resulting in the decomposition of the nucleophile. DFO, which is used therapeutically for the treatment of acute iron intoxication, carries three hydroxamate groups and shows correspondingly high nucleophilic activity toward both triester DEDNPP and diester EDNPP. This result suggests a potential use for DFO in cases of acute poisoning with phosphorus pesticides. PMID:23167539

  7. Quality control in production of suspensions from solid ammonium phosphates (monoammonium phosphate and diammonium phosphate). [Monoammonium phosphate; diammonium phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Achorn, F.P.; Balay, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    Suspensions of good quality can be produced from MAP and DAP. Suspension quality depends on the amount of impurities in the ammonium phosphate solids used. Tests have shown that adding ammonium fluoride helps lower viscosity of suspensions containing a considerable amount of impurities. Also, adding polyphosphates (such as 10-34-0, 9-32-0, and 11-37-0) as a source of part of the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ (6 to 15% polyphosphate in the product) helps to produce a suspension that has excellent storage characteristics. When the polyphosphate content of the product (11-33-0 suspension) is between 10 and 15% it usually will not solidify during cold weather storage. Freight and production costs of granular ammonium phosphates are relatively low compared to other sources of P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ for the fluid fertilizer market; therefore, using MAP and DAP to produce suspensions is expected to continue to grow in popularity. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2013-07-01

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, ≥90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed (ϕ, ψ) torsion angles of ca 12º. TALOS-N also reports sidechain χ(1) rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts.

  9. Backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments of apolipophorin III from Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Crowhurst, Karin A; Horn, James V C; Weers, Paul M M

    2016-04-01

    Apolipophorin III, a 163 residue monomeric protein from the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella (abbreviated as apoLp-IIIGM), has roles in upregulating expression of antimicrobial proteins as well as binding and deforming bacterial membranes. Due to its similarity to vertebrate apolipoproteins there is interest in performing atomic resolution analysis of apoLp-IIIGM as part of an effort to better understand its mechanism of action in innate immunity. In the first step towards structural characterization of apoLp-IIIGM, 99 % of backbone and 88 % of side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts were assigned. TALOS+ analysis of the backbone resonances has predicted that the protein is composed of five long helices, which is consistent with the reported structures of apolipophorins from other insect species. The next stage in the characterization of apoLp-III from G. mellonella will be to utilize these resonance assignments in solving the solution structure of this protein.

  10. Modifications to the Peptidoglycan Backbone Help Bacteria To Establish Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kimberly M.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens that colonize mucosal surfaces have acquired resistance to antimicrobials that are abundant at these sites. One of the main antimicrobials present on mucosal surfaces is lysozyme, a muramidase that hydrolyzes the peptidoglycan backbone of bacteria. Cleavage of the peptidoglycan backbone leads to bacterial cell death and lysis, which releases bacterial fragments, including peptidoglycan, at the site of infection. Peptidoglycan fragments can be recognized by host receptors and initiate an immune response that will aid in clearing infection. Many mucosal pathogens modify the peptidoglycan residues surrounding the cleavage site for lysozyme to avoid peptidoglycan degradation and the release of these proinflammatory fragments. This review will focus specifically on peptidoglycan modifications, their role in lysozyme resistance, and downstream effects on the host immune response to infection. PMID:21041496

  11. Smart-Grid Backbone Network Real-Time Delay Reduction via Integer Programming.

    PubMed

    Pagadrai, Sasikanth; Yilmaz, Muhittin; Valluri, Pratyush

    2016-08-01

    This research investigates an optimal delay-based virtual topology design using integer linear programming (ILP), which is applied to the current backbone networks such as smart-grid real-time communication systems. A network traffic matrix is applied and the corresponding virtual topology problem is solved using the ILP formulations that include a network delay-dependent objective function and lightpath routing, wavelength assignment, wavelength continuity, flow routing, and traffic loss constraints. The proposed optimization approach provides an efficient deterministic integration of intelligent sensing and decision making, and network learning features for superior smart grid operations by adaptively responding the time-varying network traffic data as well as operational constraints to maintain optimal virtual topologies. A representative optical backbone network has been utilized to demonstrate the proposed optimization framework whose simulation results indicate that superior smart-grid network performance can be achieved using commercial networks and integer programming.

  12. Smart-Grid Backbone Network Real-Time Delay Reduction via Integer Programming.

    PubMed

    Pagadrai, Sasikanth; Yilmaz, Muhittin; Valluri, Pratyush

    2016-08-01

    This research investigates an optimal delay-based virtual topology design using integer linear programming (ILP), which is applied to the current backbone networks such as smart-grid real-time communication systems. A network traffic matrix is applied and the corresponding virtual topology problem is solved using the ILP formulations that include a network delay-dependent objective function and lightpath routing, wavelength assignment, wavelength continuity, flow routing, and traffic loss constraints. The proposed optimization approach provides an efficient deterministic integration of intelligent sensing and decision making, and network learning features for superior smart grid operations by adaptively responding the time-varying network traffic data as well as operational constraints to maintain optimal virtual topologies. A representative optical backbone network has been utilized to demonstrate the proposed optimization framework whose simulation results indicate that superior smart-grid network performance can be achieved using commercial networks and integer programming. PMID:25935050

  13. Graft Copolymers with Conducting Polymer Backbones: A Versatile Route to Functional Materials.

    PubMed

    Strover, Lisa T; Malmström, Jenny; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka

    2016-02-01

    Graft copolymers with a conducting polymer backbone are a promising class of materials for diverse applications including, but not limited to, organic electronics, stimuli-responsive surfaces, sensors, and biomedical devices. These materials take advantage of the unique electrochemical and optoelectronic properties of conducting polymers, complemented by chemical and/or physical properties of the grafted sidechains. In this Personal Account, we discuss our work in designing functional surfaces based on graft copolymers with a conducting polymer backbone, in the context of broader developments in the field. We review the synthetic approaches available for the rational design of conducting-polymer-based graft copolymers, and examine the types of functional surfaces and soluble materials that may be engineered using these techniques.

  14. How Sensitive is the Amide I Vibration of the Polypeptide Backbone to Electric Fields?

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Im; Fiorin, Giacomo; Gai, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Site-selective isotopic labeling of amide carbonyls offers a nonperturbative means to introduce a localized infrared probe into proteins. Although this strategy has been widely used to investigate various biological questions, the dependence of the underlying amide I vibrational frequency on electric fields (or Stark tuning rate) has not been fully determined, which prevents it from being used in a quantitative manner in certain applications. Herein, through the use of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, the Stark tuning rate of the amide I vibration of an isotopically labeled backbone carbonyl in a transmembrane α-helix is determined to be approximately 1.4 cm(-1) /(MV/cm). This result provides a quantitative basis for using this vibrational model to assess local electric fields in proteins, among other applications. For instance, by using this value, we are able to show that the backbone region of a dipeptide has a surprisingly low dielectric constant.

  15. An experimental teleradiology transmission system using a high-speed ATM backbone network.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Shimamoto, K; Ishigaki, T; Niimi, R; Ishiguchi, T; Mimura, T; Yamauchi, K; Ikeda, M; Iwata, A

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of an experimental teleradiology system based on a high-speed ATM backbone network. Image acquisition, transmission and the disk-to-display processing times were measured. Computerized tomography (CT) scans printed on 14 inch x 17 inch (36 cm x 43 cm) films were digitized and transferred over the network. The average time for the entire process was 1 min 30 s. Three radiologists interpreted 20 cases. For CT image interpretation, the reading time for one case ranged from 2 to 12 min (mean 6 min 46 s) on a monitor, and from 1 to 3 min (mean 1 min 31 s) with the original film. The ATM backbone network operating at 156 Mbit/s provided sufficient speed for remote consultation. However, further improvements in the operability of the system, especially the image viewing station, are necessary before it will be satisfactory for clinical use.

  16. Nano-Scale Alignment of Proteins on a Flexible DNA Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Tatsuya; Konno, Hiroki; Kodera, Noriyuki; Seio, Kohji; Taguchi, Hideki; Yoshida, Masasuke

    2012-01-01

    Nano-scale alignment of several proteins with freedom of motion is equivalent to an enormous increase in effective local concentration of proteins and will enable otherwise impossible weak and/or cooperative associations between them or with their ligands. For this purpose, a DNA backbone made of six oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) chains is designed in which five double-stranded segments are connected by four single-stranded flexible linkers. A desired protein with an introduced cysteine is connected covalently to the 5′-end of azido-ODN by catalyst-free click chemistry. Then, six protein-ODN conjugates are assembled with their complementary nucleotide sequences into a single multi-protein-DNA complex, and six proteins are aligned along the DNA backbone. Flexible alignment of proteins is directly observed by high-speed AFM imaging, and association of proteins with weak interaction is demonstrated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between aligned proteins. PMID:23300700

  17. Protein backbone torsion angle-based structure comparison and secondary structure database web server.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sunghoon; Bae, Se-Eun; Ahn, Insung; Son, Hyeon S

    2013-09-01

    Structural information has been a major concern for biological and pharmaceutical studies for its intimate relationship to the function of a protein. Three-dimensional representation of the positions of protein atoms is utilized among many structural information repositories that have been published. The reliability of the torsional system, which represents the native processes of structural change in the structural analysis, was partially proven with previous structural alignment studies. Here, a web server providing structural information and analysis based on the backbone torsional representation of a protein structure is newly introduced. The web server offers functions of secondary structure database search, secondary structure calculation, and pair-wise protein structure comparison, based on a backbone torsion angle representation system. Application of the implementation in pair-wise structural alignment showed highly accurate results. The information derived from this web server might be further utilized in the field of ab initio protein structure modeling or protein homology-related analyses.

  18. Conformational Landscape of Nicotinoids: Solving the "conformational - Rity" of Anabasine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Evangelisti, Luca; Suenram, Richard D.; Caminati, Walther; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2010-06-01

    The conformational landscape of the alkaloid anabasine (neonicotine) has been investigated using rotational spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The results allow a detailed comparison of the structural properties of the prototype piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nicotinoids (anabasine vs. nicotine). Anabasine adopts two most stable conformations in isolation conditions, for which we determined accurate rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling parameters. The preferred conformations are characterized by an equatorial pyridine moiety and additional N-H equatorial stereochemistry at the piperidine ring (Eq-Eq). The two rings of anabasine are close to a bisecting arrangement, with the observed conformations differing in a ca. 180° rotation of the pyridine subunit, denoted either Syn or Anti. The preference of anabasine for the Eq-Eq-Syn conformation has been established by relative intensity measurements (Syn/Anti˜5(2)). The conformational preferences of free anabasine are directed by a N\\cdot\\cdot\\cdotH-C weak hydrogen bond interaction between the nitrogen lone pair at piperidine and the closest hydrogen bond in pyridine, with N\\cdot\\cdot\\cdotN distances ranging from 4.750 Å (Syn) to 4.233 Å (Anti). R. J. Lavrich, R. D. Suenram, D. F. Plusquellic and S. Davis, 58^th OSU Int. Symp. on Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2003, Comm. RH13.

  19. Molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics of RNA: conformational and chemical change we can believe in.

    PubMed

    Ditzler, Mark A; Otyepka, Michal; Sponer, Jirì; Walter, Nils G

    2010-01-19

    accuracy of other contributions, such as interactions with monovalent ions, conformational flexibility of the anionic sugar-phosphate backbone, hydrogen bonding, and solute polarization by solvent. Still, despite limitations, MD simulations are a valid tool for analyzing the structural dynamics of existing experimental structures. Careful analysis of MD simulations can identify problematic aspects of an experimental RNA structure, unveil structural characteristics masked by experimental constraints, reveal functionally significant stochastic fluctuations, evaluate the structural role of base ionization, and predict structurally and potentially functionally important details of the solvent behavior, including the presence of tightly bound water molecules. Moreover, combining classical MD simulations with QM calculations in hybrid QM/MM approaches helps in the assessment of the plausibility of chemical mechanisms of catalytic RNAs (ribozymes). In contrast, the reliable prediction of structure from sequence information is beyond the applicability of MD tools. The ultimate utility of computational studies in understanding RNA function thus requires that the results are neither blindly accepted nor flatly rejected, but rather considered in the context of all available experimental data, with great care given to assessing limitations through the available starting structures, force field approximations, and sampling limitations. The examples given in this Account showcase how the judicious use of basic MD simulations has already served as a powerful tool to help evaluate the role of structural dynamics in biological function of RNA.

  20. A polarizable force field for computing the infrared spectra of the polypeptide backbone.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Verena; Reichold, Rudolf; Schropp, Bernhard; Tavan, Paul

    2008-10-01

    The shapes of the amide bands in the infrared (IR) spectra of proteins and peptides are caused by electrostatically coupled vibrations within the polypeptide backbone and code the structures of these biopolymers. A structural decoding of the amide bands has to resort to simplified models because the huge size of these macromolecules prevents the application of accurate quantum mechanical methods such as density functional theory (DFT). Previous models employed transition-dipole coupling methods that are of limited accuracy. Here we propose a concept for the computation of protein IR spectra, which describes the molecular mechanics (MM) of polypeptide backbones by a polarizable force field of "type II". By extending the concepts of conventional polarizable MM force fields, such a PMM/II approach employs field-dependent parameters not only for the electrostatic signatures of the molecular components but also for the local potentials modeling the stiffness of chemical bonds with respect to elongations, angle deformations, and torsions. Using a PMM/II force field, the IR spectra of the polypeptide backbone can be efficiently calculated from the time dependence of the backbone's dipole moment during a short (e.g., 100 ps) MD simulation by Fourier transformation. PMM/II parameters are derived for harmonic bonding potentials of amide groups in polypeptides from a series of DFT calculations on the model molecule N-methylacetamide (NMA) exposed to homogeneous external electric fields. The amide force constants are shown to vary by as much as 20% for relevant field strengths. As a proof of principle, it is shown that the large solvatochromic effects observed in the IR spectra of NMA upon transfer from the gas phase into aqueous solution are not only excellently reproduced by DFT/MM simulations but are also nicely modeled by the PMM/II approach. The tasks remaining for a proof of practice are specified.

  1. Tritium containing polymers having a polymer backbone substantially void of tritium

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, George A.; Nelson, David A.; Molton, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium.

  2. Tritium containing polymers having a polymer backbone substantially void of tritium

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, G.A.; Nelson, D.A.; Molton, P.M.

    1992-03-31

    A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium. 2 figs.

  3. On the satisfaction of backbone-carbonyl lone pairs of electrons in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Gail J; Woolfson, Derek N

    2016-04-01

    Protein structures are stabilized by a variety of noncovalent interactions (NCIs), including the hydrophobic effect, hydrogen bonds, electrostatic forces and van der Waals' interactions. Our knowledge of the contributions of NCIs, and the interplay between them remains incomplete. This has implications for computational modeling of NCIs, and our ability to understand and predict protein structure, stability, and function. One consideration is the satisfaction of the full potential for NCIs made by backbone atoms. Most commonly, backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms located within α-helices and β-sheets are depicted as making a single hydrogen bond. However, there are two lone pairs of electrons to be satisfied for each of these atoms. To explore this, we used operational geometric definitions to generate an inventory of NCIs for backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms from a set of high-resolution protein structures and associated molecular-dynamics simulations in water. We included more-recently appreciated, but weaker NCIs in our analysis, such as n→π* interactions, Cα-H bonds and methyl-H bonds. The data demonstrate balanced, dynamic systems for all proteins, with most backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms being satisfied by two NCIs most of the time. Combinations of NCIs made may correlate with secondary structure type, though in subtly different ways from traditional models of α- and β-structure. In addition, we find examples of under- and over-satisfied carbonyl-oxygen atoms, and we identify both sequence-dependent and sequence-independent secondary-structural motifs in which these reside. Our analysis provides a more-detailed understanding of these contributors to protein structure and stability, which will be of use in protein modeling, engineering and design. PMID:26833776

  4. On the satisfaction of backbone-carbonyl lone pairs of electrons in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Gail J; Woolfson, Derek N

    2016-04-01

    Protein structures are stabilized by a variety of noncovalent interactions (NCIs), including the hydrophobic effect, hydrogen bonds, electrostatic forces and van der Waals' interactions. Our knowledge of the contributions of NCIs, and the interplay between them remains incomplete. This has implications for computational modeling of NCIs, and our ability to understand and predict protein structure, stability, and function. One consideration is the satisfaction of the full potential for NCIs made by backbone atoms. Most commonly, backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms located within α-helices and β-sheets are depicted as making a single hydrogen bond. However, there are two lone pairs of electrons to be satisfied for each of these atoms. To explore this, we used operational geometric definitions to generate an inventory of NCIs for backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms from a set of high-resolution protein structures and associated molecular-dynamics simulations in water. We included more-recently appreciated, but weaker NCIs in our analysis, such as n→π* interactions, Cα-H bonds and methyl-H bonds. The data demonstrate balanced, dynamic systems for all proteins, with most backbone-carbonyl oxygen atoms being satisfied by two NCIs most of the time. Combinations of NCIs made may correlate with secondary structure type, though in subtly different ways from traditional models of α- and β-structure. In addition, we find examples of under- and over-satisfied carbonyl-oxygen atoms, and we identify both sequence-dependent and sequence-independent secondary-structural motifs in which these reside. Our analysis provides a more-detailed understanding of these contributors to protein structure and stability, which will be of use in protein modeling, engineering and design.

  5. Conformation switching of AIM2 PYD domain revealed by NMR relaxation and MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haobo; Yang, Lijiang; Niu, Xiaogang

    2016-04-29

    Protein absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is a double-strand DNA (ds DNA) sensor mainly located in cytoplasm of cell. It includes one N terminal PYD domain and one C terminal HIN domain. When the ds DNA such as DNA viruses and bacteria entered cytoplasm, the HIN domain of AIM2 will recognize and bind to DNA, and the PYD domain will bind to ASC protein which will result in the formation of AIM2 inflammasome. Three AIM2 PYD domain structures have been solved, but every structure yields a unique conformation around the α3 helix region. To understand why different AIM2 PYD structures show different conformations in this region, we use NMR relaxation techniques to study the backbone dynamics of mouse AIM2 PYD domain and perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on both mouse and human AIM2 PYD structures. Our results indicate that this region is highly flexible in both mouse and human AIM2 PYD domains, and the PYD domain may exist as a conformation ensemble in solution. Different environment makes the population vary among pre-existing conformational substrates of the ensemble, which may be the reason why different AIM2 PYD structures were observed under different conditions. Further docking analysis reveals that the conformation switching may be important for the autoinhibition of the AIM2 protein.

  6. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine backbone homologues and their combination with functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Bhimareddy; Squillaci, Marco A; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Samorì, Paolo; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-10-14

    The integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into organized nanostructures is of great interest for applications in materials science and biomedicine. In this work we studied the self-assembly of β and γ homologues of diphenylalanine peptides under different solvent and pH conditions. We aimed to investigate the role of peptide backbone in tuning the formation of different types of nanostructures alone or in combination with carbon nanotubes. In spite of having the same side chain, β and γ peptides formed distinctively different nanofibers, a clear indication of the role played by the backbone homologation on the self-assembly. The variation of the pH allowed to transform the nanofibers into spherical structures. Moreover, the co-assembly of β and γ peptides with carbon nanotubes covalently functionalized with the same peptide generated unique dendritic assemblies. This comparative study on self-assembly using diphenylalanine backbone homologues and of the co-assembly with CNT covalent conjugates is the first example exploring the capacity of β and γ peptides to adopt precise nanostructures, particularly in combination with carbon nanotubes. The dendritic organization obtained by mixing carbon nanotubes and peptides might find interesting applications in tissue engineering and neuronal interfacing.

  7. Efficient backbone cyclization of linear peptides by a recombinant asparaginyl endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Karen S.; Durek, Thomas; Kaas, Quentin; Poth, Aaron G.; Gilding, Edward K.; Conlan, Brendon F.; Saska, Ivana; Daly, Norelle L.; van der Weerden, Nicole L.; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclotides are diverse plant backbone cyclized peptides that have attracted interest as pharmaceutical scaffolds, but fundamentals of their biosynthetic origin remain elusive. Backbone cyclization is a key enzyme-mediated step of cyclotide biosynthesis and confers a measure of stability on the resultant cyclotide. Furthermore, cyclization would be desirable for engineered peptides. Here we report the identification of four asparaginyl endopeptidases (AEPs), proteases implicated in cyclization, from the cyclotide-producing plant Oldenlandia affinis. We recombinantly express OaAEP1b and find it functions preferably as a cyclase by coupling C-terminal cleavage of propeptide substrates with backbone cyclization. Interestingly, OaAEP1b cannot cleave at the N-terminal site of O. affinis cyclotide precursors, implicating additional proteases in cyclotide biosynthesis. Finally, we demonstrate the broad utility of this enzyme by cyclization of peptides unrelated to cyclotides. We propose that recombinant OaAEP1b is a powerful tool for use in peptide engineering applications where increased stability of peptide products is desired. PMID:26680698

  8. Repacking protein cores with backbone freedom: structure prediction for coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Harbury, P B; Tidor, B; Kim, P S

    1995-08-29

    Progress in homology modeling and protein design has generated considerable interest in methods for predicting side-chain packing in the hydrophobic cores of proteins. Present techniques are not practically useful, however, because they are unable to model protein main-chain flexibility. Parameterization of backbone motions may represent a general and efficient method to incorporate backbone relaxation into such fixed main-chain models. To test this notion, we introduce a method for treating explicitly the backbone motions of alpha-helical bundles based on an algebraic parameterization proposed by Francis Crick in 1953 [Crick, F. H. C. (1953) Acta Crystallogr. 6, 685-689]. Given only the core amino acid sequence, a simple calculation can rapidly reproduce the crystallographic main-chain and core side-chain structures of three coiled coils (one dimer, one trimer, and one tetramer) to within 0.6-A root-mean-square deviations. The speed of the predictive method [approximately 3 min per rotamer choice on a Silicon Graphics (Mountain View, CA) 4D/35 computer] permits it to be used as a design tool.

  9. Temperature dependence of fast carbonyl backbone dynamics in chicken villin headpiece subdomain.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry

    2011-06-01

    Temperature-dependence of protein dynamics can provide information on details of the free energy landscape by probing the characteristics of the potential responsible for the fluctuations. We have investigated the temperature-dependence of picosecond to nanosecond backbone dynamics at carbonyl carbon sites in chicken villin headpiece subdomain protein using a combination of three NMR relaxation rates: (13)C' longitudinal rate, and two cross-correlated rates involving dipolar and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) relaxation mechanisms, (13)C'/(13)C'-(13)C(α) CSA/dipolar and (13)C'/(13)C'-(15)N CSA/dipolar. Order parameters have been extracted using the Lipari-Szabo model-free approach assuming a separation of the time scales of internal and molecular motions in the 2-16°C temperature range. There is a gradual deviation from this assumption from lower to higher temperatures, such that above 16°C the separation of the time scales is inconsistent with the experimental data and, thus, the Lipari-Szabo formalism can not be applied. While there are variations among the residues, on the average the order parameters indicate a markedly steeper temperature dependence at backbone carbonyl carbons compared to that probed at amide nitrogens in an earlier study. This strongly advocates for probing sites other than amide nitrogen for accurate characterization of the potential and other thermodynamics characteristics of protein backbone.

  10. Evolution of functional nucleic acids in the presence of nonheritable backbone heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Simon G; Zhang, Na; Elenko, Mark P; Lupták, Andrej; Szostak, Jack W

    2011-08-16

    Multiple lines of evidence support the hypothesis that the early evolution of life was dominated by RNA, which can both transfer information from generation to generation through replication directed by base-pairing, and carry out biochemical activities by folding into functional structures. To understand how life emerged from prebiotic chemistry we must therefore explain the steps that led to the emergence of the RNA world, and in particular, the synthesis of RNA. The generation of pools of highly pure ribonucleotides on the early Earth seems unlikely, but the presence of alternative nucleotides would support the assembly of nucleic acid polymers containing nonheritable backbone heterogeneity. We suggest that homogeneous monomers might not have been necessary if populations of heterogeneous nucleic acid molecules could evolve reproducible function. For such evolution to be possible, function would have to be maintained despite the repeated scrambling of backbone chemistry from generation to generation. We have tested this possibility in a simplified model system, by using a T7 RNA polymerase variant capable of transcribing nucleic acids that contain an approximately 11 mixture of deoxy- and ribonucleotides. We readily isolated nucleotide-binding aptamers by utilizing an in vitro selection process that shuffles the order of deoxy- and ribonucleotides in each round. We describe two such RNA/DNA mosaic nucleic acid aptamers that specifically bind ATP and GTP, respectively. We conclude that nonheritable variations in nucleic acid backbone structure may not have posed an insurmountable barrier to the emergence of functionality in early nucleic acids.

  11. East vergent structure of Backbone Range: Insights from A-Lan-Yi area and sandbox modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Taiwan, including Pingtung peninsula and Taitung, is the incipient oblique collision zone of Eurasian plate and Philippine Sea plate. The Luzon volcanic arc converged toward Taiwan Island and formed Hengchun Ridge south offshore Taiwan. Thus, Taiwan mountain belt developed from north to south as the Backbone Range, so that we can infer the incipient feature structure from the topography and outcrop study of southern Taiwan. Our field survey of this study concentrated at the southeast coastline of Taiwan, also known as A-Lan-Yi Trail. According to previous study, the deformational structures such as faults and folds are consistent with regional kinematic processes, and the preserved transpression structure is the most important evidence of incipient collision. In this study, we use the sedimentary sequences of study area to trace the regional tectonics from north to south. Discovered structures in this area show the similar kinematic history as the eastern flank of Backbone Range, so that we suggest they are at the same series of a tectonic event. To complete the regional structure mapping in this accessible area, besides the field geological data, we also applied the LiDAR-derived DTM which is a 3D visualization technology to improve our topography information. In addition, we use the sandbox modeling to demonstrate the development of structures in the eastern flank of Backbone Range. After combining the results of field observation and regional structure mapping, this study provides a strong evidence of backthrusting and backfolding deformation during the incipient oblique collision stage.

  12. Probing the Backbone Function of Tumor Targeting Peptides by an Amide-to-Triazole Substitution Strategy.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Ibai E; Vomstein, Sandra; Fischer, Christiane A; Mascarin, Alba; Mindt, Thomas L

    2015-09-24

    Novel backbone-modified radiolabeled analogs based on the tumor targeting peptide bombesin were synthesized and fully evaluated in vitro and in vivo. We have recently introduced the use of 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles as metabolically stable trans-amide bond surrogates in radiolabeled peptides in order to improve their tumor targeting. As an extension of our approach, we now report several backbone-modified analogs of the studied bombesin peptide bearing multiple triazole substitutions. We investigated the effect of the modifications on several biological parameters including the internalization of the radiopeptidomimetics into tumor cells, their affinity toward the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPr), metabolic stability in blood plasma, and biodistribution in mice bearing GRPr-expressing xenografts. The backbone-modified radiotracers exhibited a significantly increased resistance to proteolytic degradation. In addition, some of the radiopeptidomimetics retained a nanomolar affinity toward GRPr, resulting in an up to 2-fold increased tumor uptake in vivo in comparison to a (all amide bond) reference compound. PMID:26309061

  13. Efficient backbone cyclization of linear peptides by a recombinant asparaginyl endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Harris, Karen S; Durek, Thomas; Kaas, Quentin; Poth, Aaron G; Gilding, Edward K; Conlan, Brendon F; Saska, Ivana; Daly, Norelle L; van der Weerden, Nicole L; Craik, David J; Anderson, Marilyn A

    2015-01-01

    Cyclotides are diverse plant backbone cyclized peptides that have attracted interest as pharmaceutical scaffolds, but fundamentals of their biosynthetic origin remain elusive. Backbone cyclization is a key enzyme-mediated step of cyclotide biosynthesis and confers a measure of stability on the resultant cyclotide. Furthermore, cyclization would be desirable for engineered peptides. Here we report the identification of four asparaginyl endopeptidases (AEPs), proteases implicated in cyclization, from the cyclotide-producing plant Oldenlandia affinis. We recombinantly express OaAEP1b and find it functions preferably as a cyclase by coupling C-terminal cleavage of propeptide substrates with backbone cyclization. Interestingly, OaAEP1b cannot cleave at the N-terminal site of O. affinis cyclotide precursors, implicating additional proteases in cyclotide biosynthesis. Finally, we demonstrate the broad utility of this enzyme by cyclization of peptides unrelated to cyclotides. We propose that recombinant OaAEP1b is a powerful tool for use in peptide engineering applications where increased stability of peptide products is desired. PMID:26680698

  14. A practical implementation of cross-spectrum in protein backbone resonance assignment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Delaglio, Frank; Tjandra, Nico

    2010-04-01

    The concept of cross-spectrum is applied in protein NMR spectroscopy to assist in the backbone sequential resonance assignment. Cross-spectrum analysis is used routinely to reveal correlations in frequency domains as a means to reveal common features contained in multiple time series. Here the cross-spectrum between related NMR spectra, for example HNCO and HN(CA)CO, can be calculated with point-by-point multiplications along their common C' carbon axis. In the resulting higher order cross-spectrum, an enhanced correlation signal occurs at every common i-1 carbon frequency allowing the amide proton H(N) (and nitrogen N) resonances from residues i and i-1 to be identified. The cross-spectrum approach is demonstrated using 2D spectra H(N)CO, H(NCA)CO, H(NCO)CACB, and H(N)CACB measured on a 15N/13C double-labeled Ubiquitin sample. These 2D spectra are used to calculate two pseudo-3D cross-spectra, H(i)-H(i)(-1)-C'(i)(-1) and H(i)-H(i)(-1)-CA(i)(-1)CB(i)(-1). We show using this approach, backbone resonances of H, C', CA, and CB can be fully assigned without ambiguity. The cross-spectrum principle is expected to offer an easy, practical, and more quantitative approach for heteronuclear backbone resonance assignment. PMID:20053573

  15. RASP: rapid and robust backbone chemical shift assignments from protein structure.

    PubMed

    MacRaild, Christopher A; Norton, Raymond S

    2014-03-01

    Chemical shift prediction has an unappreciated power to guide backbone resonance assignment in cases where protein structure is known. Here we describe Resonance Assignment by chemical Shift Prediction (RASP), a method that exploits this power to derive protein backbone resonance assignments from chemical shift predictions. Robust assignments can be obtained from a minimal set of only the most sensitive triple-resonance experiments, even for spectroscopically challenging proteins. Over a test set of 154 proteins RASP assigns 88 % of residues with an accuracy of 99.7 %, using only information available from HNCO and HNCA spectra. Applied to experimental data from a challenging 34 kDa protein, RASP assigns 90 % of manually assigned residues using only 40 % of the experimental data required for the manual assignment. RASP has the potential to significantly accelerate the backbone assignment process for a wide range of proteins for which structural information is available, including those for which conventional assignment strategies are not feasible. PMID:24445369

  16. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  17. Significant role of the DNA backbone in mediating the transition origin of electronic excitations of B-DNA - implication from long range corrected TDDFT and quantified NTO analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Hao; Chai, Jeng-Da; Guo, Guang-Yu; Hayashi, Michitoshi

    We systematically investigate the possible complex transition origin of electronic excitations of giant molecular systems by using the recently proposed QNTO analysis [J.-H. Li, J.-D. Chai, G. Y. Guo and M. Hayashi, Chem. Phys. Lett., 2011, 514, 362.] combined with long-range corrected TDDFT calculations. Thymine (Thy) related excitations of biomolecule B-DNA are then studied as examples, where the model systems have been constructed extracting from the perfect or a X-ray crystal (PDB code 3BSE) B-DNA structure with at least one Thy included. In the first part, we consider the systems composed of a core molecular segment (e.g. Thy, di-Thy) and a surrounding physical/chemical environment of interest (e.g. backbone, adjacent stacking nucleobases) and examine how the excitation properties of the core vary in response to the environment. We find that the orbitals contributed from DNA backbone and surrounding nucleobases often participate in a transition of Thy-related excitations affecting their composition, absorption energy, and oscillator strength. In the second part, we take into account geometrically induced variation of the excitation properties of various B-DNA segments, e.g. di-Thy, dTpdT etc., obtained from different sources (ideal and 3BSE). It is found that the transition origin of several Thy-related excitations of these segments is sensitive to slight conformational variations, suggesting that DNA with thermal motions in cells may from time to time exhibit very different photo-induced physical and/or chemical processes.

  18. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of D-Galactose-6-Phosphate Isomerase Complexed with Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26), which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD), catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi). Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays. PMID:24015281

  19. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of D-galactose-6-phosphate isomerase complexed with substrates.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Suk; Singh, Raushan Kumar; Lee, Jung-Kul; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26), which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD), catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi). Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays.

  20. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate, (3) using partially formed gels, (4

  1. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-03-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from September 1, 2003, through February 29, 2004, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' We examined the properties of several ''partially formed'' gels that were formulated with a combination of high and low molecular weight HPAM polymers. After placement in 4-mm-wide fractures, these gels required about 25 psi/ft for brine to breach the gel (the best performance to date in fractures this wide). After this breach, stabilized residual resistance factors decreased significantly with increased flow rate. Also, residual resistance factors were up to 9 times greater for water than for oil. Nevertheless, permeability reduction factors were substantial for both water and oil flow. Gel with 2.5% chopped fiberglass effectively plugged 4-mm-wide fractures if a 0.5-mm-wide constriction was present. The ability to screen-out at a constriction appears crucial for particulate incorporation to be useful in plugging fractures. In addition to fiberglass, we examined incorporation of polypropylene fibers into gels. Once dispersed in brine or gelant, the polypropylene fibers exhibited the least gravity segregation of any particulate that we have tested to date. In fractures with widths of at least 2 mm, 24-hr-old gels (0.5% high molecular weight HPAM) with 0.5% fiber did not exhibit progressive plugging during placement and showed extrusion pressure gradients similar to those of gels without the fiber. The presence of the fiber roughly doubled the gel's resistance to first breach by brine flow. The breaching pressure gradients were not as large as for gels made with high and low molecular weight polymers (mentioned above). However, their material requirements and costs (i.e., polymer and/or particulate concentrations) were substantially lower than for those gels. A partially formed gel made with 0.5% HPAM did not enter a 0.052-mm-wide fracture when applying a pressure gradient of 65 psi/ft. This result

  2. Radial coordinates for conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogervorst, Matthijs; Rychkov, Slava

    2013-05-01

    We develop the theory of conformal blocks in CFTd expressing them as power series with Gegenbauer polynomial coefficients. Such series have a clear physical meaning when the conformal block is analyzed in radial quantization: individual terms describe contributions of descendants of a given spin. Convergence of these series can be optimized by a judicious choice of the radial quantization origin. We argue that the best choice is to insert the operators symmetrically. We analyze in detail the resulting “ρ-series” and show that it converges much more rapidly than for the commonly used variable z. We discuss how these conformal block representations can be used in the conformal bootstrap. In particular, we use them to derive analytically some bootstrap bounds whose existence was previously found numerically.

  3. Conformal mapping of rectangular heptagons

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatyrev, Andrei B

    2012-12-31

    A new effective approach to calculating the direct and inverse conformal mapping of rectangular polygons onto a half-plane is put forward; it is based on the use of Riemann theta functions. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  4. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE PAGES

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore » does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  5. Solution NMR conformation of glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been giving a pivotal contribution to the progress of glycomics, mostly by elucidating the structural, dynamical, conformational and intermolecular binding aspects of carbohydrates. Particularly in the field of conformation, NOE resonances, scalar couplings, residual dipolar couplings, and chemical shift anisotropy offsets have been the principal NMR parameters utilized. Molecular dynamics calculations restrained by NMR-data input are usually employed in conjunction to generate glycosidic bond dihedral angles. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are a special class of sulfated polysaccharides extensively studied worldwide. Besides regulating innumerous physiological processes, these glycans are also widely explored in the global market as either clinical or nutraceutical agents. The conformational aspects of GAGs are key regulators to the quality of interactions with the functional proteins involved in biological events. This report discusses the solution conformation of each GAG type analyzed by one or more of the above-mentioned methods.

  6. Scale invariance vs conformal invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2015-03-01

    In this review article, we discuss the distinction and possible equivalence between scale invariance and conformal invariance in relativistic quantum field theories. Under some technical assumptions, we can prove that scale invariant quantum field theories in d = 2 space-time dimensions necessarily possess the enhanced conformal symmetry. The use of the conformal symmetry is well appreciated in the literature, but the fact that all the scale invariant phenomena in d = 2 space-time dimensions enjoy the conformal property relies on the deep structure of the renormalization group. The outstanding question is whether this feature is specific to d = 2 space-time dimensions or it holds in higher dimensions, too. As of January 2014, our consensus is that there is no known example of scale invariant but non-conformal field theories in d = 4 space-time dimensions under the assumptions of (1) unitarity, (2) Poincaré invariance (causality), (3) discrete spectrum in scaling dimensions, (4) existence of scale current and (5) unbroken scale invariance in the vacuum. We have a perturbative proof of the enhancement of conformal invariance from scale invariance based on the higher dimensional analogue of Zamolodchikov's c-theorem, but the non-perturbative proof is yet to come. As a reference we have tried to collect as many interesting examples of scale invariance in relativistic quantum field theories as possible in this article. We give a complementary holographic argument based on the energy-condition of the gravitational system and the space-time diffeomorphism in order to support the claim of the symmetry enhancement. We believe that the possible enhancement of conformal invariance from scale invariance reveals the sublime nature of the renormalization group and space-time with holography. This review is based on a lecture note on scale invariance vs conformal invariance, on which the author gave lectures at Taiwan Central University for the 5th Taiwan School on Strings and

  7. Structural Insights into Conformation Differences between DNA/TNA and RNA/TNA Chimeric Duplexes.

    PubMed

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A; Sisco, Nicholas J; Sau, Sujay; Liao, Jen-Yu; Bala, Saikat; Rozners, Eriks; Egli, Martin; Chaput, John C; Van Horn, Wade D

    2016-09-15

    Threose nucleic acid (TNA) is an artificial genetic polymer capable of heredity and evolution, and is studied in the context of RNA chemical etiology. It has a four-carbon threose backbone in place of the five-carbon ribose of natural nucleic acids, yet forms stable antiparallel complementary Watson-Crick homoduplexes and heteroduplexes with DNA and RNA. TNA base-pairs more favorably with RNA than with DNA but the reason is unknown. Here, we employed NMR, ITC, UV, and CD to probe the structural and dynamic properties of heteroduplexes of RNA/TNA and DNA/TNA. The results indicate that TNA templates the structure of heteroduplexes, thereby forcing an A-like helical geometry. NMR measurement of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for individual base pair opening events reveal unexpected asymmetric "breathing" fluctuations of the DNA/TNA helix. The results suggest that DNA is unable to fully adapt to the conformational constraints of the rigid TNA backbone and that nucleic acid breathing dynamics are determined from both backbone and base contributions. PMID:27347671

  8. Conformational Modeling of Continuum Structures in Robotics and Structural Biology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chirikjian, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    Hyper-redundant (or snakelike) manipulators have many more degrees of freedom than are required to position and orient an object in space. They have been employed in a variety of applications ranging from search-and-rescue to minimally invasive surgical procedures, and recently they even have been proposed as solutions to problems in maintaining civil infrastructure and the repair of satellites. The kinematic and dynamic properties of snakelike robots are captured naturally using a continuum backbone curve equipped with a naturally evolving set of reference frames, stiffness properties, and mass density. When the snakelike robot has a continuum architecture, the backbone curve corresponds with the physical device itself. Interestingly, these same modeling ideas can be used to describe conformational shapes of DNA molecules and filamentous protein structures in solution and in cells. This paper reviews several classes of snakelike robots: (1) hyper-redundant manipulators guided by backbone curves; (2) flexible steerable needles; and (3) concentric tube continuum robots. It is then shown how the same mathematical modeling methods used in these robotics contexts can be used to model molecules such as DNA. All of these problems are treated in the context of a common mathematical framework based on the differential geometry of curves, continuum mechanics, and variational calculus. Both coordinate-dependent Euler-Lagrange formulations and coordinate-free Euler-Poincaré approaches are reviewed. PMID:27030786

  9. Fluctuations between stabilizing and destabilizing electrostatic contributions of ion pairs in conformers of the c-Myc-Max leucine zipper.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Nussinov, R

    2000-12-01

    In solution proteins often exhibit backbone and side-chain flexibility. Yet electrostatic interactions in proteins are sensitive to motions. Hence, here we study the contribution of ion pairs toward protein stability in a range of conformers which sample the conformational space in solution. Specifically, we focus on the electrostatic contributions of ion pairs to the stability of each of the conformers in the NMR ensemble of the c-Myc-Max leucine zipper and to their average energy minimized structure. We compute the electrostatic contributions of inter- and intra-helical ion pairs and of an ion pair network. We find that the electrostatic contributions vary considerably among the 40 NMR conformers. Each ion pair, and the network, fluctuates between being stabilizing and being destabilizing. This fluctation reflects the variability in the location of the ion pairing residues and in the geometric orientation of these residues, both with respect to each other and with respect to other charged groups in the rest of the protein. Ion pair interactions in the c-Myc-Max leucine zipper in solution depend on the protein conformer which is analyzed. Hence, the overall stabilizing (or destabilizing) contribution of an ion pair is conformer population-dependent. This study indicates that free energy calculations performed using the continuum electrostatics methodology are sensitive to protein conformational details.

  10. Crystal Structure Analysis of Human Glutamine : Fructose 6-Phosphate Amidotransferase, a Key Regulator in Type 2 Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaishi, Yuichiro; Bando, Masahiko

    Glutamine : fructose 6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the hexoamine biosythetic pathway and plays an important role in type 2 diabetes. We now report the first structures of the isomerase domain of the human GFAT in the presence of cyclic glucose 6-phosphate and linear glucosamine 6-phosphate. The C-terminal tail including the active site displays a rigid conformation, similar to the corresponding Escherichia coli enzyme. The diversity of the CF helix near the active site suggests the helix is a major target for drug design. Our study provides insights into the development of therapeutic drugs for type 2 diabetes.

  11. Conformation of cyclic octapeptides. VI. Structure of cyclo-bis-(-L-alanyl-glycyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanyl-) tetrahydrate.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, K K; Kopple, K D

    1991-07-15

    C38H48N8O8.4H2O, Mr = 816.9, monoclinic, P21, a = 10.381 (1), b = 13.273 (1), c = 15.742 (1) A. beta = 101.83 (1) degree, V = 2123.1 A3, Z = 2, Dx = 1.278 g cm-3, lambda (Cu K alpha) = 1.5418 A, mu = 7.6 cm-1, F(000) = 872, R = 0.035, wR = 0.045 for 3497 reflections [I greater than 2 sigma (I)], 4552 unique reflections measured. The synthetic cyclic octapeptide crystallizes from water/methanol solution as a tetrahydrate and the crystals are isomorphous to those of the disulfide-bridged cystine analog cyclo-bis(-L-Cys-Gly-L-Pro-L-Phe-) [Kopple, Wang, Cheng & Bhandary (1988). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 110, 4168-4176]. The coordinates of the Cys analog were taken as the starting coordinates for full-matrix least-squares refinement. The cyclic octapeptide ring has two beta turns encompassing the residues Pro-L-Phe, one type I and the other type II, with all peptide links trans. The conformation of the cyclic octapeptide backbone is similar to the Cys analog; all backbone dihedral angles in the two molecules agree to within 6 degrees. This suggests that the disulfide bridge of the Cys analog does not impose any conformational constraint on the octapeptide ring backbone.

  12. Protein side chain conformation predictions with an MMGBSA energy function.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Thomas; Panel, Nicolas; Simonson, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The prediction of protein side chain conformations from backbone coordinates is an important task in structural biology, with applications in structure prediction and protein design. It is a difficult problem due to its combinatorial nature. We study the performance of an "MMGBSA" energy function, implemented in our protein design program Proteus, which combines molecular mechanics terms, a Generalized Born and Surface Area (GBSA) solvent model, with approximations that make the model pairwise additive. Proteus is not a competitor to specialized side chain prediction programs due to its cost, but it allows protein design applications, where side chain prediction is an important step and MMGBSA an effective energy model. We predict the side chain conformations for 18 proteins. The side chains are first predicted individually, with the rest of the protein in its crystallographic conformation. Next, all side chains are predicted together. The contributions of individual energy terms are evaluated and various parameterizations are compared. We find that the GB and SA terms, with an appropriate choice of the dielectric constant and surface energy coefficients, are beneficial for single side chain predictions. For the prediction of all side chains, however, errors due to the pairwise additive approximation overcome the improvement brought by these terms. We also show the crucial contribution of side chain minimization to alleviate the rigid rotamer approximation. Even without GB and SA terms, we obtain accuracies comparable to SCWRL4, a specialized side chain prediction program. In particular, we obtain a better RMSD than SCWRL4 for core residues (at a higher cost), despite our simpler rotamer library. Proteins 2016; 84:803-819. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Controlling conformations of conjugated polymers and small molecules: the role of nonbonding interactions.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Nicholas E; Savoie, Brett M; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Schatz, George C; Chen, Lin X; Ratner, Mark A

    2013-07-17

    The chemical variety present in the organic electronics literature has motivated us to investigate potential nonbonding interactions often incorporated into conformational "locking" schemes. We examine a variety of potential interactions, including oxygen-sulfur, nitrogen-sulfur, and fluorine-sulfur, using accurate quantum-chemical wave function methods and noncovalent interaction (NCI) analysis on a selection of high-performing conjugated polymers and small molecules found in the literature. In addition, we evaluate a set of nonbonding interactions occurring between various heterocyclic and pendant atoms taken from a group of representative π-conjugated molecules. Together with our survey and set of interactions, it is determined that while many nonbonding interactions possess weak binding capabilities, nontraditional hydrogen-bonding interactions, oxygen-hydrogen (CH···O) and nitrogen-hydrogen (CH···N), are alone in inducing conformational control and enhanced planarity along a polymer or small molecule backbone at room temperature.

  14. Inorganic backbone ionomers: Design and dielectric response of single-ion conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Joshua

    Ion-conducting polymers were studied primarily through the use of dielectric spectroscopy. The conclusions drawn from ion conduction models of the dielectric data are corroborated by additional independent experiments, including x-ray scattering, calorimetry, prism coupling, and DFT calculations. The broad concern of this dissertation is to understand and clarify a path forward in ion conducting polymer research. This is achieved by considering low-Tg ionomers and the advantages imparted by siloxane and phosphazene backbones. The most successful dielectric spectroscopy model for the materials studied is the electrode polarization model (EP), whereas other models, such as the Dyre random barrier model, fail to describe the experimental results. Seven nonionic ether oxygen (EO) containing polymers were studied in order to observe the effect that backbone chemistry has on dipole motion. Conventional carboncarbon backbone EO-containing polymers show no distinct advantage over similar EO-pendant polysiloxane or polyphosphazene systems. The mobility and effective backbone Tg imparted by the inorganic backbones are comparable. A short EO pendant results in a lower static dielectric constant due to restricted motion of dipoles close to the chain. The flexibility and chemical versatility of inorganic backbone polymers motivates further study of two ionomer systems. A polypohosphazene iodide conducting system was characterized by dielectric spectroscopy and x-ray scattering. Two end "tail" functionalization of the ammonium ion were used, a tail with two EOs and an alkyl tail of six carbons. This functional group plays an important role in ion dynamics and can wrap around the ion and self-solvate when EOs are present. The iodide-ammonium ionomers are observed to have unusually large high-frequency dielectric constants due to atomic polarization of ions. The strength of the atomic polarization scales with ion content. The aggregation state of ions is able to be determined from

  15. Triazole linkages and backbone branches in nucleic acids for biological and extra-biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Eduardo

    The recently increasing evidence of nucleic acids' alternative roles in biology and potential as useful nanomaterials and therapeutic agents has enabled the development of useful probes, elaborate nanostructures and therapeutic effectors based on nucleic acids. The study of alternative nucleic acid structure and function, particularly RNA, hinges on the ability to introduce site-specific modifications that either provide clues to the nucleic acid structure function relationship or alter the nucleic acid's function. Although the available chemistries allow for the conjugation of useful labels and molecules, their limitations lie in their tedious conjugation conditions or the lability of the installed probes. The development and optimization of click chemistry with RNA now provides the access to a robust and orthogonal conjugation methodology while providing stable conjugates. Our ability to introduce click reactive groups enzymatically, rather than only in the solid-phase, allows for the modification of larger, more cell relevant RNAs. Additionally, ligation of modified RNAs with larger RNA constructs through click chemistry represents an improvement over traditional ligation techniques. We determined that the triazole linkage generated through click chemistry is compatible in diverse nucleic acid based biological systems. Click chemistry has also been developed for extra-biological applications, particularly with DNA. We have expanded its use to generate useful polymer-DNA conjugates which can form controllable soft nanoparticles which take advantage of DNA's properties, i.e. DNA hybridization and computing. Additionally, we have generated protein-DNA conjugates and assembled protein-polymer hybrids mediated by DNA hybridization. The use of click chemistry in these reactions allows for the facile synthesis of these unnatural conjugates. We have also developed backbone branched DNA through click chemistry and showed that these branched DNAs are useful in generating

  16. Toxicological review of inorganic phosphates.

    PubMed

    Weiner, M L; Salminen, W F; Larson, P R; Barter, R A; Kranetz, J L; Simon, G S

    2001-08-01

    Inorganic phosphate salts are widely used as food ingredients and in a variety of commercial applications. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers inorganic phosphates "Generally Recognized As Safe" (GRAS) (FDA, 1973a, 1979) [FDA: Food and Drug Administration 1973a. GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) food ingredients-phosphates. NTIS PB-221-224, FDA, Food and Drug Administration, 1979. Phosphates; Proposed Affirmation of and Deletion From GRAS Status as Direct and Human Food Ingredients. Federal Register 44 (244). 74845-74857, 18 December (1979)] and the European Union (EU) allows inorganic phosphates to be added directly to food (EU Directive 95/2/EC as amended by 98/72/EC). In this review, data on the acute, subchronic and chronic toxicity, genotoxicity, teratogenicity and reproductive toxicity from the published literature and from unpublished studies by the manufacturers are reviewed. Based on the toxicity data and similar chemistry, the inorganic phosphates can be separated into four major classes, consisting of monovalent salts, divalent salts, ammonium salts and aluminum salts. The proposed classification scheme supports the use of toxicity data from one compound to assess the toxicity of another compound in the same class. However, in the case of eye and skin irritation, the proposed classification scheme cannot be used because a wide range of responses exists within each class. Therefore, the eye and skin hazards associated with an individual inorganic phosphate should be assessed on a chemical-by-chemical basis. A large amount of toxicity data exists for all four classes of inorganic phosphates. The large and comprehensive database allows an accurate assessment of the toxicity of each class of inorganic phosphate. Overall, all four classes of inorganic phosphates exhibit low oral, inhalation and dermal toxicities. Based on these data, humans are unlikely to experience adverse effects when the daily phosphorus consumption remains

  17. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2003-09-01

    This report describes work performed during the second year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' The project has two objectives. The first objective is to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective is to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil. Pore-level images from X-ray computed microtomography were re-examined for Berea sandstone and porous polyethylene. This analysis suggests that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than a gel-ripping mechanism. This finding helps to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil. We analyzed a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel treatment in a production well in the Arbuckle formation. The availability of accurate pressure data before, during, and after the treatment was critical for the analysis. After the gel treatment, water productivity was fairly constant at about 20% of the pre-treatment value. However, oil productivity was stimulated by a factor of 18 immediately after the treatment. During the six months after the treatment, oil productivity gradually decreased to approach the pre-treatment value. To explain this behavior, we proposed that the fracture area open to oil flow was increased substantially by the gel treatment, followed by a gradual closing of the fractures during subsequent production. For a conventional Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel, the delay between gelant preparation and injection into a fracture impacts the placement, leakoff, and permeability reduction behavior. Formulations placed as partially formed gels showed relatively low pressure gradients during placement, and yet substantially reduced the flow capacity of

  18. Novel highly biodegradable biphasic tricalcium phosphates composed of alpha-tricalcium phosphate and beta-tricalcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbao; Weng, Wenjian; Tam, Kim Chiu

    2007-03-01

    Novel biodegradable biphasic tricalcium phosphates (BTCP) composed of alpha-tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) were successfully synthesized by heating amorphous calcium phosphate precursors with different structures at 800 degrees C for 3 h. The ratio of alpha-TCP and beta-TCP in the calcium phosphate particle can be controlled by aging time and pH value during synthesis of the amorphous precursor.

  19. Polarizable Multipole-Based Force Field for Dimethyl and Trimethyl Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changsheng; Lu, Chao; Wang, Qiantao; Ponder, Jay W; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-11-10

    Phosphate groups are commonly observed in biomolecules such as nucleic acids and lipids. Due to their highly charged and polarizable nature, modeling these compounds with classical force fields is challenging. Using quantum mechanical studies and liquid-phase simulations, the AMOEBA force field for dimethyl phosphate (DMP) ion and trimethyl phosphate (TMP) has been developed. On the basis of ab initio calculations, it was found that ion binding and the solution environment significantly impact both the molecular geometry and the energy differences between conformations. Atomic multipole moments are derived from MP2/cc-pVQZ calculations of methyl phosphates at several conformations with their chemical environments taken into account. Many-body polarization is handled via a Thole-style induction model using distributed atomic polarizabilities. van der Waals parameters of phosphate and oxygen atoms are determined by fitting to the quantum mechanical interaction energy curves for water with DMP or TMP. Additional stretch-torsion and angle-torsion coupling terms were introduced in order to capture asymmetry in P-O bond lengths and angles due to the generalized anomeric effect. The resulting force field for DMP and TMP is able to accurately describe both the molecular structure and conformational energy surface, including bond and angle variations with conformation, as well as interaction of both species with water and metal ions. The force field was further validated for TMP in the condensed phase by computing hydration free energy, liquid density, and heat of vaporization. The polarization behavior between liquid TMP and TMP in water is drastically different. PMID:26574325

  20. Polarizable Multipole-Based Force Field for Dimethyl and Trimethyl Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate groups are commonly observed in biomolecules such as nucleic acids and lipids. Due to their highly charged and polarizable nature, modeling these compounds with classical force fields is challenging. Using quantum mechanical studies and liquid-phase simulations, the AMOEBA force field for dimethyl phosphate (DMP) ion and trimethyl phosphate (TMP) has been developed. On the basis of ab initio calculations, it was found that ion binding and the solution environment significantly impact both the molecular geometry and the energy differences between conformations. Atomic multipole moments are derived from MP2/cc-pVQZ calculations of methyl phosphates at several conformations with their chemical environments taken into account. Many-body polarization is handled via a Thole-style induction model using distributed atomic polarizabilities. van der Waals parameters of phosphate and oxygen atoms are determined by fitting to the quantum mechanical interaction energy curves for water with DMP or TMP. Additional stretch-torsion and angle-torsion coupling terms were introduced in order to capture asymmetry in P–O bond lengths and angles due to the generalized anomeric effect. The resulting force field for DMP and TMP is able to accurately describe both the molecular structure and conformational energy surface, including bond and angle variations with conformation, as well as interaction of both species with water and metal ions. The force field was further validated for TMP in the condensed phase by computing hydration free energy, liquid density, and heat of vaporization. The polarization behavior between liquid TMP and TMP in water is drastically different. PMID:26574325

  1. Polarizable Multipole-Based Force Field for Dimethyl and Trimethyl Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changsheng; Lu, Chao; Wang, Qiantao; Ponder, Jay W; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-11-10

    Phosphate groups are commonly observed in biomolecules such as nucleic acids and lipids. Due to their highly charged and polarizable nature, modeling these compounds with classical force fields is challenging. Using quantum mechanical studies and liquid-phase simulations, the AMOEBA force field for dimethyl phosphate (DMP) ion and trimethyl phosphate (TMP) has been developed. On the basis of ab initio calculations, it was found that ion binding and the solution environment significantly impact both the molecular geometry and the energy differences between conformations. Atomic multipole moments are derived from MP2/cc-pVQZ calculations of methyl phosphates at several conformations with their chemical environments taken into account. Many-body polarization is handled via a Thole-style induction model using distributed atomic polarizabilities. van der Waals parameters of phosphate and oxygen atoms are determined by fitting to the quantum mechanical interaction energy curves for water with DMP or TMP. Additional stretch-torsion and angle-torsion coupling terms were introduced in order to capture asymmetry in P-O bond lengths and angles due to the generalized anomeric effect. The resulting force field for DMP and TMP is able to accurately describe both the molecular structure and conformational energy surface, including bond and angle variations with conformation, as well as interaction of both species with water and metal ions. The force field was further validated for TMP in the condensed phase by computing hydration free energy, liquid density, and heat of vaporization. The polarization behavior between liquid TMP and TMP in water is drastically different.

  2. To conform or not to conform: spontaneous conformity diminishes the sensitivity to monetary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongjun; Sun, Sai

    2013-01-01

    When people have different opinions in a group, they often adjust their own attitudes and behaviors to match the group opinion, known as social conformity. The affiliation account of normative conformity states that people conform to norms in order to 'fit in', whereas the accuracy account of informative conformity posits that the motive to learn from others produces herding. Here, we test another possibility that following the crowd reduces the experienced negative emotion when the group decision turns out to be a bad one. Using event related potential (ERP) combined with a novel group gambling task, we found that participants were more likely to choose the option that was predominately chosen by other players in previous trials, although there was little explicit normative pressure at the decision stage and group choices were not informative. When individuals' choices were different from others, the feedback related negativity (FRN), an ERP component sensitive to losses and errors, was enhanced, suggesting that being independent is aversive. At the outcome stage, the losses minus wins FRN effect was significantly reduced following conformity choices than following independent choices. Analyses of the P300 revealed similar patterns both in the response and outcome period. Our study suggests that social conformity serves as an emotional buffer that protects individuals from experiencing strong negative emotion when the outcomes are bad.

  3. NMR detection of slow conformational dynamics in an endonuclease toxin.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, S B; Boetzel, R; MacDonald, C; Lian, L Y; Pommer, A J; Reilly, A; James, R; Kleanthous, C; Moore, G R

    1998-07-01

    The cytotoxic activity of the secreted bacterial toxin colicin E9 is due to a non-specific DNase housed in the C-terminus of the protein. Double-resonance and triple-resonance NMR studies of the 134-amino acid 15N- and 13C/15N-labelled DNase domain are presented. Extensive conformational heterogeneity was evident from the presence of far more resonances than expected based on the amino acid sequence of the DNase, and from the appearance of chemical exchange cross-peaks in TOCSY and NOESY spectra. EXSY spectra were recorded to confirm that slow chemical exchange was occurring. Unambiguous sequence-specific resonance assignments are presented for one region of the protein, Pro65-Asn72, which exists in two slowly exchanging conformers based on the identification of chemical exchange cross-peaks in 3D 1H-1H-15N EXSY-HSQC, NOESY-HSQC and TOCSY-HSQC spectra, together with C alpha and C beta chemical shifts measured in triple-resonance spectra and sequential NH NOEs. The rates of conformational exchange for backbone amide resonances in this stretch of amino acids, and for the indole NH of either Trp22 or Trp58, were determined from the intensity variation of the appropriate diagonal and chemical exchange cross-peaks recorded in 3D 1H-1H-15N NOESY-HSQC spectra. The data fitted a model in which this region of the DNase has two conformers, NA and NB, which interchange at 15 degrees C with a forward rate constant of 1.61 +/- 0.5 s-1 and a backward rate constant of 1.05 +/- 0.5 s-1. Demonstration of this conformational equilibrium has led to a reappraisal of a previously proposed kinetic scheme describing the interaction of E9 DNase with immunity proteins [Wallis et al. (1995) Biochemistry, 34, 13743-13750 and 13751-13759]. The revised scheme is consistent with the specific inhibitor protein for the E9 DNase, Im9, associating with both the NA and NB conformers of the DNase and with binding only to the NB conformer detected because the rate of dissociation of the complex of Im9

  4. Deciphering the shape and deformation of secondary structures through local conformation analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein deformation has been extensively analysed through global methods based on RMSD, torsion angles and Principal Components Analysis calculations. Here we use a local approach, able to distinguish among the different backbone conformations within loops, α-helices and β-strands, to address the question of secondary structures' shape variation within proteins and deformation at interface upon complexation. Results Using a structural alphabet, we translated the 3 D structures of large sets of protein-protein complexes into sequences of structural letters. The shape of the secondary structures can be assessed by the structural letters that modeled them in the structural sequences. The distribution analysis of the structural letters in the three protein compartments (surface, core and interface) reveals that secondary structures tend to adopt preferential conformations that differ among the compartments. The local description of secondary structures highlights that curved conformations are preferred on the surface while straight ones are preferred in the core. Interfaces display a mixture of local conformations either preferred in core or surface. The analysis of the structural letters transition occurring between protein-bound and unbound conformations shows that the deformation of secondary structure is tightly linked to the compartment preference of the local conformations. Conclusion The conformation of secondary structures can be further analysed and detailed thanks to a structural alphabet which allows a better description of protein surface, core and interface in terms of secondary structures' shape and deformation. Induced-fit modification tendencies described here should be valuable information to identify and characterize regions under strong structural constraints for functional reasons. PMID:21284872

  5. Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Wykoff, D D; O'Shea, E K

    2001-01-01

    Cellular metabolism depends on the appropriate concentration of intracellular inorganic phosphate; however, little is known about how phosphate concentrations are sensed. The similarity of Pho84p, a high-affinity phosphate transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to the glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p has led to the hypothesis that Pho84p is an inorganic phosphate sensor. Furthermore, pho84Delta strains have defects in phosphate signaling; they constitutively express PHO5, a phosphate starvation-inducible gene. We began these studies to determine the role of phosphate transporters in signaling phosphate starvation. Previous experiments demonstrated a defect in phosphate uptake in phosphate-starved pho84Delta cells; however, the pho84Delta strain expresses PHO5 constitutively when grown in phosphate-replete media. We determined that pho84Delta cells have a significant defect in phosphate uptake even when grown in high phosphate media. Overexpression of unrelated phosphate transporters or a glycerophosphoinositol transporter in the pho84Delta strain suppresses the PHO5 constitutive phenotype. These data suggest that PHO84 is not required for sensing phosphate. We further characterized putative phosphate transporters, identifying two new phosphate transporters, PHO90 and PHO91. A synthetic lethal phenotype was observed when five phosphate transporters were inactivated, and the contribution of each transporter to uptake in high phosphate conditions was determined. Finally, a PHO84-dependent compensation response was identified; the abundance of Pho84p at the plasma membrane increases in cells that are defective in other phosphate transporters. PMID:11779791

  6. SCWRL and MolIDE: computer programs for side-chain conformation prediction and homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Canutescu, Adrian A; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2008-01-01

    SCWRL and MolIDE are software applications for prediction of protein structures. SCWRL is designed specifically for the task of prediction of side-chain conformations given a fixed backbone usually obtained from an experimental structure determined by X-ray crystallography or NMR. SCWRL is a command-line program that typically runs in a few seconds. MolIDE provides a graphical interface for basic comparative (homology) modeling using SCWRL and other programs. MolIDE takes an input target sequence and uses PSI-BLAST to identify and align templates for comparative modeling of the target. The sequence alignment to any template can be manually modified within a graphical window of the target-template alignment and visualization of the alignment on the template structure. MolIDE builds the model of the target structure on the basis of the template backbone, predicted side-chain conformations with SCWRL and a loop-modeling program for insertion-deletion regions with user-selected sequence segments. SCWRL and MolIDE can be obtained at (http://dunbrack.fccc.edu/Software.php).

  7. 40 CFR 93.154 - Conformity analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conformity analysis. 93.154 Section 93...) DETERMINING CONFORMITY OF FEDERAL ACTIONS TO STATE OR FEDERAL IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Determining Conformity of General Federal Actions to State or Federal Implementation Plans § 93.154 Conformity analysis. Any...

  8. Polyelectrolyte Conformation, Interactions and Hydrodynamics as Studied by Light Scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Snehasish

    Polyelectrolyte conformation, interactions and hydrodynamics show a marked dependence on the ionic strength (C_{rm s}) of the medium, the concentration (C_{rm p}) of the polymer itself and their charge density (xi). The apparent electrostatic persistence length obtained from static light scattering varied approximately as the inverse square root of C _{rm s} for highly pure, high molecular weight hyaluronate (HA) as well as for variably ionized acrylamide/sodium acrylate copolymers (NaPAA), and linearly with xi. The experimental values of persistence length and second virial coefficient (A_2) are compared to predictions from theories based on the Debye-Huckel approximation for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and on excluded-volume. Although the mean square radius of gyration (< S^2>) depended strongly on C _{rm s}. < S^2> decreasing with increasing C_{rm s} for both HA and NaPAA indicating clear evidence of polyion expansion, dynamic light scattering values of the translational diffusion coefficient (D) remains constant when extrapolated to infinite polymer concentration for both the polymers. The behavior of D is compared to predictions from coupled mode theory in the linear limit. The effects of NaOH on the conformations, interactions, diffusion and hydrolysis rates of HA are characterized in detail using static, dynamic and time-dependent light scattering supplemented by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). For the HA < S^2>, A_2 and the hydrolysis rates all resemble superposing titration curves, while the D remains independent of both the concentration of NaOH, and the contraction of < S^2>. The indication is that the interactions, conformations and the hydrolysis rates are all controlled by the titration of the HA hydroxyl groups by the NaOH to yield -O ^-, which (i) destroys single strand hydrogen bonds, leading to de-stiffening and contraction of the HA coil and a large decrease in intermolecular interaction, and (ii) slowly depolymerizes HA. The experimental

  9. Universality class in conformal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu

    2013-07-01

    We develop a new class of chaotic inflation models with spontaneously broken conformal invariance. Observational consequences of a broad class of such models are stable with respect to strong deformations of the scalar potential. This universality is a critical phenomenon near the point of enhanced symmetry, SO(1,1), in case of conformal inflation. It appears because of the exponential stretching of the moduli space and the resulting exponential flattening of scalar potentials upon switching from the Jordan frame to the Einstein frame in this class of models. This result resembles stretching and flattening of inhomogeneities during inflationary expansion. It has a simple interpretation in terms of velocity versus rapidity near the Kähler cone in the moduli space, similar to the light cone of special theory of relativity. This effect makes inflation possible even in the models with very steep potentials. We describe conformal and superconformal versions of this cosmological attractor mechanism.

  10. Effect of Liquid-Crystalline Epoxy Backbone Structure on Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy-Alumina Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Thanhkieu; Kim, Jinhwan

    2016-06-01

    In a series of papers published recently, we clearly demonstrated that the most important factor governing the thermal conductivity of epoxy-Al2O3 composites is the backbone structure of the epoxy. In this study, three more epoxies based on diglycidyl ester-terminated liquid-crystalline epoxy (LCE) have been synthesized to draw conclusions regarding the effect of the epoxy backbone structure on the thermal conductivity of epoxy-alumina composites. The synthesized structures were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and optical microscopy were also employed to examine the thermal and optical properties of the synthesized LCEs and the cured composites. All three LCE resins exhibited typical liquid-crystalline behaviors: clear solid crystalline state below the melting temperature (T m), sharp crystalline melting at T m, and transition to nematic phase above T m with consequent isotropic phase above the isotropic temperature (T i). The LCE resins displayed distinct nematic liquid-crystalline phase over a wide temperature range and retained liquid-crystalline phase after curing, with high thermal conductivity of the resulting composite. The thermal conductivity values ranged from 3.09 W/m-K to 3.89 W/m-K for LCE-Al2O3 composites with 50 vol.% filler loading. The steric effect played a governing role in the difference. The neat epoxy resin thermal conductivity was obtained as 0.35 W/m-K to 0.49 W/m-K based on analysis using the Agari-Uno model. The results clearly support the objective of this study in that the thermal conductivity of the LCE-containing networks strongly depended on the epoxy backbone structure and the degree of ordering in the cured network.

  11. ngs_backbone: a pipeline for read cleaning, mapping and SNP calling using Next Generation Sequence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The possibilities offered by next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are revolutionizing biotechnological laboratories. Moreover, the combination of NGS sequencing and affordable high-throughput genotyping technologies is facilitating the rapid discovery and use of SNPs in non-model species. However, this abundance of sequences and polymorphisms creates new software needs. To fulfill these needs, we have developed a powerful, yet easy-to-use application. Results The ngs_backbone software is a parallel pipeline capable of analyzing Sanger, 454, Illumina and SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection) sequence reads. Its main supported analyses are: read cleaning, transcriptome assembly and annotation, read mapping and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling and selection. In order to build a truly useful tool, the software development was paired with a laboratory experiment. All public tomato Sanger EST reads plus 14.2 million Illumina reads were employed to test the tool and predict polymorphism in tomato. The cleaned reads were mapped to the SGN tomato transcriptome obtaining a coverage of 4.2 for Sanger and 8.5 for Illumina. 23,360 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) were predicted. A total of 76 SNVs were experimentally validated, and 85% were found to be real. Conclusions ngs_backbone is a new software package capable of analyzing sequences produced by NGS technologies and predicting SNVs with great accuracy. In our tomato example, we created a highly polymorphic collection of SNVs that will be a useful resource for tomato researchers and breeders. The software developed along with its documentation is freely available under the AGPL license and can be downloaded from http://bioinf.comav.upv.es/ngs_backbone/ or http://github.com/JoseBlanca/franklin. PMID:21635747

  12. Toward Atomistic Resolution Structure of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroup and Glycerol Backbone at Different Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Botan, Alexandru; Favela-Rosales, Fernando; Fuchs, Patrick F J; Javanainen, Matti; Kanduč, Matej; Kulig, Waldemar; Lamberg, Antti; Loison, Claire; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Miettinen, Markus S; Monticelli, Luca; Määttä, Jukka; Ollila, O H Samuli; Retegan, Marius; Róg, Tomasz; Santuz, Hubert; Tynkkynen, Joona

    2015-12-10

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of biological membranes. Despite a vast amount of very accurate experimental data, the atomistic resolution structures sampled by the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup in phoshatidylcholine bilayers are not known. Atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to resolve the structures, and to give an arrestingly intuitive interpretation of the experimental data, but only if the simulations reproduce the data within experimental accuracy. In the present work, we simulated phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers with 13 different atomistic models, and compared simulations with NMR experiments in terms of the highly structurally sensitive C-H bond vector order parameters. Focusing on the glycerol backbone and choline headgroups, we showed that the order parameter comparison can be used to judge the atomistic resolution structural accuracy of the models. Accurate models, in turn, allow molecular dynamics simulations to be used as an interpretation tool that translates these NMR data into a dynamic three-dimensional representation of biomolecules in biologically relevant conditions. In addition to lipid bilayers in fully hydrated conditions, we reviewed previous experimental data for dehydrated bilayers and cholesterol-containing bilayers, and interpreted them with simulations. Although none of the existing models reached experimental accuracy, by critically comparing them we were able to distill relevant chemical information: (1) increase of choline order parameters indicates the P-N vector tilting more parallel to the membrane, and (2) cholesterol induces only minor changes to the PC (glycerol backbone) structure. This work has been done as a fully open collaboration, using nmrlipids.blogspot.fi as a communication platform; all the scientific contributions were made publicly on this blog. During the open research process, the repository holding our simulation trajectories and files ( https

  13. Toward Atomistic Resolution Structure of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroup and Glycerol Backbone at Different Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Botan, Alexandru; Favela-Rosales, Fernando; Fuchs, Patrick F J; Javanainen, Matti; Kanduč, Matej; Kulig, Waldemar; Lamberg, Antti; Loison, Claire; Lyubartsev, Alexander; Miettinen, Markus S; Monticelli, Luca; Määttä, Jukka; Ollila, O H Samuli; Retegan, Marius; Róg, Tomasz; Santuz, Hubert; Tynkkynen, Joona

    2015-12-10

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of biological membranes. Despite a vast amount of very accurate experimental data, the atomistic resolution structures sampled by the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup in phoshatidylcholine bilayers are not known. Atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to resolve the structures, and to give an arrestingly intuitive interpretation of the experimental data, but only if the simulations reproduce the data within experimental accuracy. In the present work, we simulated phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers with 13 different atomistic models, and compared simulations with NMR experiments in terms of the highly structurally sensitive C-H bond vector order parameters. Focusing on the glycerol backbone and choline headgroups, we showed that the order parameter comparison can be used to judge the atomistic resolution structural accuracy of the models. Accurate models, in turn, allow molecular dynamics simulations to be used as an interpretation tool that translates these NMR data into a dynamic three-dimensional representation of biomolecules in biologically relevant conditions. In addition to lipid bilayers in fully hydrated conditions, we reviewed previous experimental data for dehydrated bilayers and cholesterol-containing bilayers, and interpreted them with simulations. Although none of the existing models reached experimental accuracy, by critically comparing them we were able to distill relevant chemical information: (1) increase of choline order parameters indicates the P-N vector tilting more parallel to the membrane, and (2) cholesterol induces only minor changes to the PC (glycerol backbone) structure. This work has been done as a fully open collaboration, using nmrlipids.blogspot.fi as a communication platform; all the scientific contributions were made publicly on this blog. During the open research process, the repository holding our simulation trajectories and files ( https

  14. Toward Atomistic Resolution Structure of Phosphatidylcholine Headgroup and Glycerol Backbone at Different Ambient Conditions†

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids are essential building blocks of biological membranes. Despite a vast amount of very accurate experimental data, the atomistic resolution structures sampled by the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup in phoshatidylcholine bilayers are not known. Atomistic resolution molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to resolve the structures, and to give an arrestingly intuitive interpretation of the experimental data, but only if the simulations reproduce the data within experimental accuracy. In the present work, we simulated phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers with 13 different atomistic models, and compared simulations with NMR experiments in terms of the highly structurally sensitive C–H bond vector order parameters. Focusing on the glycerol backbone and choline headgroups, we showed that the order parameter comparison can be used to judge the atomistic resolution structural accuracy of the models. Accurate models, in turn, allow molecular dynamics simulations to be used as an interpretation tool that translates these NMR data into a dynamic three-dimensional representation of biomolecules in biologically relevant conditions. In addition to lipid bilayers in fully hydrated conditions, we reviewed previous experimental data for dehydrated bilayers and cholesterol-containing bilayers, and interpreted them with simulations. Although none of the existing models reached experimental accuracy, by critically comparing them we were able to distill relevant chemical information: (1) increase of choline order parameters indicates the P–N vector tilting more parallel to the membrane, and (2) cholesterol induces only minor changes to the PC (glycerol backbone) structure. This work has been done as a fully open collaboration, using nmrlipids.blogspot.fi as a communication platform; all the scientific contributions were made publicly on this blog. During the open research process, the repository holding our simulation trajectories and files (https

  15. EF-G Activation by Phosphate Analogs.

    PubMed

    Salsi, Enea; Farah, Elie; Ermolenko, Dmitri N

    2016-05-22

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) is a universally conserved translational GTPase that promotes the translocation of tRNA and mRNA through the ribosome. EF-G binds to the ribosome in a GTP-bound form and subsequently catalyzes GTP hydrolysis. The contribution of the ribosome-stimulated GTP hydrolysis by EF-G to tRNA/mRNA translocation remains debated. Here, we show that while EF-G•GDP does not stably bind to the ribosome and induce translocation, EF-G•GDP in complex with phosphate group analogs BeF3(-) and AlF4(-) promotes the translocation of tRNA and mRNA. Furthermore, the rates of mRNA translocation induced by EF-G in the presence of GTP and a non-hydrolyzable analog of GTP, GDP•BeF3(-) are similar. Our results are consistent with the model suggesting that GTP hydrolysis is not directly coupled to mRNA/tRNA translocation. Hence, GTP binding is required to induce the activated, translocation-competent conformation of EF-G while GTP hydrolysis triggers EF-G release from the ribosome. PMID:27063503

  16. Backbone resonance assignments for the SET domain of the human methyltransferase NSD2.

    PubMed

    Bobby, Romel; Peciak, Karolina; Milbradt, Alexander G

    2016-10-01

    Aberrant NSD2 methyltransferase activity is implicated as the oncogenic driver in multiple myeloma, suggesting opportunities for novel therapeutic intervention. The methyltransferase activity of NSD2 resides in its catalytic SET domain, which is conserved among most lysine methyltransferases. Here we report the backbone [Formula: see text], N, C[Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and side-chain [Formula: see text] assignments of a 25 kDa NSD2 SET domain construct, spanning residues 991-1203. A chemical shift analysis of C[Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] resonances predicts a secondary structural pattern that is in agreement with homology models.

  17. Backbone resonance assignments of the α sub-domain of Brevibacillus thermoruber Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Da; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2014-10-01

    Lon is an ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities protease and belongs to a unique group that binds DNA. The α sub-domain of Lon protease is responsible for DNA-binding, but the structural information for its DNA-recognition mode is still limited. Here, we report (1)H, (15)N and (13)C backbone assignment for the α sub-domain from Brevibacillus thermoruber Lon protease as the basis for the elucidation of its structure and interactions with DNA, necessary for understanding the allosteric regulatory mechanism of the enzymatic function.

  18. Integrating the university medical center. Phase one: providing an information backbone.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, S. J.; Reber, E.; Offeman, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    UCLA School of Medicine represents a diverse computing community where the creation of each individual network has been driven by applications, price/performance and functionality. Indeed, the ability to connect to other computers has had no bearing on selection. Yet, there exists a need to seamlessly connect the individual networks to other minicomputers, mainframes and remote computers. We have created a school wide backbone network that will enable an individual from a single workstation to access a wide variety of services residing on any number of machines. PMID:1807658

  19. Computer assignment of the backbone resonances of labelled proteins using two-dimensional correlation experiments.

    PubMed

    Morelle, N; Brutscher, B; Simorre, J P; Marion, D

    1995-02-01

    We present ALPS (Assignment for Labelled Protein Spectra), a flexible computer program for the automatic assignment of backbone NMR resonances of (15)N/(13)C-labelled proteins. The program constructs pseudoresidues from peak-picking lists of a set of two-dimensional triple resonance experiments and uses either a systematic search or a simulated annealing-based optimization to perform the assignment. This method has been successfully tested on two-dimensional triple resonance spectra of Rhodobacter capsulatus ferrocytochrome c (2) (116 amino acids).

  20. Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Emma Jane

    2011-01-01

    Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis (CSCE) is a rapid, high-throughput screening method that can be applied to any region of a genome for detection of sequence variants. Slab gel-based conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis was first described by Ganguly et al., and the transfer from slab gels to capillaries for higher throughput was reported by Rozycka et al. CSCE is based on the principle that DNA homoduplexes and heteroduplexes migrate at different rates during electrophoresis under mildly denaturing conditions. Fragments showing an altered peak morphology compared to the wild type are then sequenced to determine the precise nature of the sequence variant detected.

  1. Uranium endowments in phosphate rock.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Andrea E; Schnug, Ewald; Prasser, Horst-Michael; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2014-04-15

    This study seeks to identify and specify the components that make up the prospects of U recovery from phosphate rock. A systems approach is taken. The assessment includes i) reviewing past recovery experience and lessons learned; ii) identifying factors that determine recovery; and iii) establishing a contemporary evaluation of U endowments in phosphate rock reserves, as well as the available and recoverable amounts from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production. We find that in the past, recovery did not fulfill its potential and that the breakup of the Soviet Union worsened then-favorable recovery market conditions in the 1990s. We find that an estimated 5.7 million tU may be recoverable from phosphate rock reserves. In 2010, the recoverable tU from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production may have been 15,000 tU and 11,000 tU, respectively. This could have filled the world U supply-demand gap for nuclear energy production. The results suggest that the U.S., Morocco, Tunisia, and Russia would be particularly well-suited to recover U, taking infrastructural considerations into account. We demonstrate future research needs, as well as sustainability orientations. We conclude that in order to promote investment and production, it seems necessary to establish long-term contracts at guaranteed prices, ensuring profitability for phosphoric acid producers. PMID:24556272

  2. Uranium endowments in phosphate rock.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Andrea E; Schnug, Ewald; Prasser, Horst-Michael; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2014-04-15

    This study seeks to identify and specify the components that make up the prospects of U recovery from phosphate rock. A systems approach is taken. The assessment includes i) reviewing past recovery experience and lessons learned; ii) identifying factors that determine recovery; and iii) establishing a contemporary evaluation of U endowments in phosphate rock reserves, as well as the available and recoverable amounts from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production. We find that in the past, recovery did not fulfill its potential and that the breakup of the Soviet Union worsened then-favorable recovery market conditions in the 1990s. We find that an estimated 5.7 million tU may be recoverable from phosphate rock reserves. In 2010, the recoverable tU from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production may have been 15,000 tU and 11,000 tU, respectively. This could have filled the world U supply-demand gap for nuclear energy production. The results suggest that the U.S., Morocco, Tunisia, and Russia would be particularly well-suited to recover U, taking infrastructural considerations into account. We demonstrate future research needs, as well as sustainability orientations. We conclude that in order to promote investment and production, it seems necessary to establish long-term contracts at guaranteed prices, ensuring profitability for phosphoric acid producers.

  3. Dissolution of phosphate matrices based on the thorium phosphate diphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacheux, N.; Thomas, A. C.; Brandel, V.; Genet, M.

    2000-07-01

    Several authors have reported the use of phosphate matrices like apatites, monazites or NZP for the immobilization of actinides coming from an advanced reprocessing or for the final disposal of the excess plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons. The thorium phosphate diphosphate Th4(PO4)4P2O7 (namely TPD) was also proposed for this purpose. Indeed, its structure allows the replacement of large amounts of tetravalent actinides like uranium, neptunium or plutonium leading to the obtention of solid solutions. The maximum weight loading was estimated to be equal to about 48% for uranium, 33% for neptunium and 26% for plutonium.

  4. Phosphate-a poison for humans?

    PubMed

    Komaba, Hirotaka; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2016-10-01

    Maintenance of phosphate balance is essential for life, and mammals have developed a sophisticated system to regulate phosphate homeostasis over the course of evolution. However, due to the dependence of phosphate elimination on the kidney, humans with decreased kidney function are likely to be in a positive phosphate balance. Phosphate excess has been well recognized as a critical factor in the pathogenesis of mineral and bone disorders associated with chronic kidney disease, but recent investigations have also uncovered toxic effects of phosphate on the cardiovascular system and the aging process. Compelling evidence also suggests that increased fibroblastic growth factor 23 and parathyroid hormone levels in response to a positive phosphate balance contribute to adverse clinical outcomes. These insights support the current practice of managing serum phosphate in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, although definitive evidence of these effects is lacking. Given the potential toxicity of excess phosphate, the general population may also be viewed as a target for phosphate management. However, the widespread implementation of dietary phosphate intervention in the general population may not be warranted due to the limited impact of increased phosphate intake on mineral metabolism and clinical outcomes. Nonetheless, the increasing incidence of kidney disease or injury in our aging society emphasizes the potential importance of this issue. Further work is needed to more completely characterize phosphate toxicity and to establish the optimal therapeutic strategy for managing phosphate in patients with chronic kidney disease and in the general population. PMID:27282935

  5. Process for producing granular diammonium phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, W.D.

    1988-05-17

    A process for the production of solid granular diammonium phosphate is described comprising: reacting anhydrous ammonia with phosphoric acid in a reactor to form a partially reacted slurry of monoammonium phosphate and diammonium phosphate; pumping the slurry to a granulator-reactor and further reacting the slurry with anhydrous ammonia to form a solid granular diammonium phosphate mixture having a particle range size consisting of undersize, oversize and product; drying the solid granular diammonium phosphate mixture in a dryer; dividing the dried solid granular diammonium phosphate mixture being discharged from the dryer into a first portion and a second portion; diverting and feeding the first portion of the dried granular diammonium phosphate mixture back to the granulator-reactor; feeding the second portion of dried granular diammonium phosphate mixture to a classifying means consisting of a set of screens including an oversize screen and a product screen set to a narrow size separation to separate the mixture of the solid granular diammonium phosphate into undersize, oversize and product solid granular diammonium phosphate; milling the oversize granular diammonium phosphate; recycling to the granular-reactor the milled oversized granular diammonium phosphate and the undersized granular particles obtained during the classifying of the solid granular diammonium phosphate mixture; and collecting the desired product granular particle thereby enhancing the production of a narrow range of granular diammonium phosphate particle size distribution within a broad range of particle size distribution.

  6. Conformational preferences of 1-amino-2-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a phenylalanine cyclohexane analogue.

    PubMed

    Alemán, Carlos; Jiménez, Ana I; Cativiela, Carlos; Nussinov, Ruth; Casanovas, Jordi

    2009-10-16

    The intrinsic conformational preferences of the restricted phenylalanine analogue generated by including the alpha and beta carbon atoms into a cyclohexane ring (1-amino-2-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid, c(6)Phe) have been determined using quantum mechanical calculations. Specifically, the conformational profile of the N-acetyl-N'-methylamide derivative of the c(6)Phe stereoisomers exhibiting either a cis or a trans relative orientation between the amino and phenyl substituents has been analyzed in different environments (gas phase, chloroform, and aqueous solutions). Calculations were performed using B3LYP, MP2, and HF methods combined with the 6-31+G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets, and a self-consistent reaction-field (SCRF) method was applied to analyze the influence of the solvent. The amino acids investigated can be viewed as constrained phenylalanine analogues with a rigidly oriented aromatic side chain that may interact with the peptide backbone not only sterically but also electronically through the aromatic pi orbitals. Their conformational propensities have been found to be strongly influenced by the specific orientation of the aromatic substituent in each stereoisomer and the conformation adopted by the cyclohexane ring, as well as by the environment.

  7. Using Local States To Drive the Sampling of Global Conformations in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Fornili, Arianna

    2016-03-01

    Conformational changes associated with protein function often occur beyond the time scale currently accessible to unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, so that different approaches have been developed to accelerate their sampling. Here we investigate how the knowledge of backbone conformations preferentially adopted by protein fragments, as contained in precalculated libraries known as structural alphabets (SA), can be used to explore the landscape of protein conformations in MD simulations. We find that (a) enhancing the sampling of native local states in both metadynamics and steered MD simulations allows the recovery of global folded states in small proteins; (b) folded states can still be recovered when the amount of information on the native local states is reduced by using a low-resolution version of the SA, where states are clustered into macrostates; and (c) sequences of SA states derived from collections of structural motifs can be used to sample alternative conformations of preselected protein regions. The present findings have potential impact on several applications, ranging from protein model refinement to protein folding and design. PMID:26808351

  8. Prediction of Protein Loop Conformations using the AGBNP Implicit Solvent Model and Torsion Angle Sampling.

    PubMed

    Felts, Anthony K; Gallicchio, Emilio; Chekmarev, Dmitriy; Paris, Kristina A; Friesner, Richard A; Levy, Ronald M

    2008-01-01

    The OPLS-AA all-atom force field and the Analytical Generalized Born plus Non-Polar (AGBNP) implicit solvent model, in conjunction with torsion angle conformational search protocols based on the Protein Local Optimization Program (PLOP), are shown to be effective in predicting the native conformations of 57 9-residue and 35 13-residue loops of a diverse series of proteins with low sequence identity. The novel nonpolar solvation free energy estimator implemented in AGBNP augmented by correction terms aimed at reducing the occurrence of ion pairing are important to achieve the best prediction accuracy. Extended versions of the previously developed PLOP-based conformational search schemes based on calculations in the crystal environment are reported that are suitable for application to loop homology modeling without the crystal environment. Our results suggest that in general the loop backbone conformation is not strongly influenced by crystal packing. The application of the temperature Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (T-REMD) sampling method for a few examples where PLOP sampling is insufficient are also reported. The results reported indicate that the OPLS-AA/AGBNP effective potential is suitable for high-resolution modeling of proteins in the final stages of homology modeling and/or protein crystallographic refinement.

  9. Observation of persistent α-helical content and discrete types of backbone disorder during a molten globule to ordered peptide transition via deep-UV resonance Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mia C.; Mutter, Andrew; Koder, Ronald L.; JiJi, Renee D.; Cooley, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    The molten globule state can aide in the folding of a protein to a functional structure and is loosely defined as an increase in structural disorder with conservation of the ensemble secondary structure content. Simultaneous observation of persistent secondary structure content with increased disorder has remained experimentally problematic. As a consequence, modeling how the molten globule state remains stable and how it facilitates proper folding remains difficult due to a lack of amenable spectroscopic techniques to characterize this class of partially unfolded proteins. Previously, deep-UV resonance Raman (dUVRR) spectroscopy has proven useful in the resolution of global and local structural fluctuations in the secondary structure of proteins. In this work, dUVRR was employed to study the molten globule to ordered transition of a model four-helix bundle protein, HP7. Both the average ensemble secondary structure and types of local disorder were monitored, without perturbation of the solvent, pH, or temperature. The molten globule to ordered transition is induced by stepwise coordination of two heme molecules. Persistent dUVRR spectral features in the amide III region at 1295–1301 and 1335–1338 cm−1 confirm previous observations that HP7 remains predominantly helical in the molten globule versus the fully ordered state. Additionally, these spectra represent the first demonstration of conserved helical content in a molten globule protein. With successive heme binding significant losses are observed in the spectral intensity of the amide III3 and S regions (1230–1260 and 1390 cm−1, respectively), which are known to be sensitive to local disorder. These observations indicate that there is a decrease in the structural populations able to explore various extended conformations, with successive heme binding events. DUVRR spectra indicate that the first heme coordination between two helical segments diminishes exploration of more elongated backbone structural

  10. Detergent phosphate bans and eutrophication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.F.; Jones, R.A.

    1986-04-01

    The Vollenweider-OECD eutrophication model has been expanded to approximately 400 lakes. It is possible to make a quantitative prediction of the effects of a detergent phosphate ban and thereby to ascertain the potential benefits of such a ban. In order to assess the effect of a detergent phosphate ban on water quality it is necessary to know the percentage of phosphorus in the domestic waste water that enters the water body, either directly or indirectly, and the percentage of the total phosphorus load that is derived from domestic wastewater. Although detergent phosphate bans generally will not result in an overall improvement to water quality, there may be some situations in which eutrophication-related water quality would be improved by a ban. 8 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  11. Temperature: Human Regulating, Ants Conforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clopton, Joe R.

    2007-01-01

    Biological processes speed up as temperature rises. Procedures for demonstrating this with ants traveling on trails, and data gathered by students on the Argentine ant ("Linepithema humile") are presented. The concepts of temperature regulation and conformity are detailed with a focus on the processes rather than on terms that label the organisms.

  12. Conformal coating using parylene polymers.

    PubMed

    Noordegraaf, J

    1997-01-01

    Parylene, a conformal polymer film, is being used increasingly in Europe to provide environmental and dielectric isolation. Application areas include electronic circuitry, sensors, and medical substrates. This article describes the variants of parylene and their characteristics, together with the process and applications of parylene coating. PMID:10167681

  13. Caspase Allostery and Conformational Selection.

    PubMed

    Clark, A Clay

    2016-06-01

    The role of caspase proteases in regulated processes such as apoptosis and inflammation has been studied for more than two decades, and the activation cascades are known in detail. Apoptotic caspases also are utilized in critical developmental processes, although it is not known how cells maintain the exquisite control over caspase activity in order to retain subthreshold levels required for a particular adaptive response while preventing entry into apoptosis. In addition to active site-directed inhibitors, caspase activity is modulated by post-translational modifications or metal binding to allosteric sites on the enzyme, which stabilize inactive states in the conformational ensemble. This review provides a comprehensive global view of the complex conformational landscape of caspases and mechanisms used to select states in the ensemble. The caspase structural database provides considerable detail on the active and inactive conformations in the ensemble, which provide the cell multiple opportunities to fine tune caspase activity. In contrast, the current database on caspase modifications is largely incomplete and thus provides only a low-resolution picture of global allosteric communications and their effects on the conformational landscape. In recent years, allosteric control has been utilized in the design of small drug compounds or other allosteric effectors to modulate caspase activity.

  14. The conformational analysis of 2-halocyclooctanones.

    PubMed

    Rozada, Thiago C; Gauze, Gisele F; Rosa, Fernanda A; Favaro, Denize C; Rittner, Roberto; Pontes, Rodrigo M; Basso, Ernani A

    2015-02-25

    The establishment of the most stable structures of eight membered rings is a challenging task to the field of conformational analysis. In this work, a series of 2-halocyclooctanones were synthesized (including fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine derivatives) and submitted to conformational studies using a combination of theoretical calculation and infrared spectroscopy. For each compound, four conformations were identified as the most important ones. These conformations are derived from the chair-boat conformation of cyclooctanone. The pseudo-equatorial (with respect to the halogen) conformer is preferred in vacuum and in low polarity solvents for chlorine, bromine and iodine derivatives. For 2-fluorocyclooctanone, the preferred conformation in vacuum is pseudo-axial. In acetonitrile, the pseudo-axial conformer becomes the most stable for the chlorine derivative. According to NBO calculations, the conformational preference is not dictated by electron delocalization, but by classical electrostatic repulsions.

  15. Generation of transgenic Drosophila expressing shRNAs in the miR-1 backbone.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kenneth; Marran, Krista; Valentine, Amy; Hannon, Gregory J

    2014-05-01

    In Drosophila, long-term effects of RNA interference (RNAi) must be achieved by integrating into the genome a template from which an RNAi trigger is transcribed by cellular RNA polymerases, generally RNA polymerase II or III. With encoded triggers, not only can essentially permanent silencing be achieved, but control can also be exerted over the level of trigger expression, with a resulting variation in the degree to which the target is silenced. Knockdown can also be controlled in a temporal and cell-type-dependent fashion through the use of well-established transgenic methodologies and well-tested promoters. The forms of encoded triggers vary. Long double-stranded RNAs can be expressed as extended inverted repeats. The nearest equivalent of a small interfering RNA is an artificial microRNA (miRNA) or short hairpin RNA (shRNA), where a natural miRNA backbone (also called a scaffold) is remodeled to produce a different small RNA or a small inverted repeat (<30 nucleotides) is simply expressed. This protocol describes creation of transgenic Drosophila carrying shRNA inserts in a remodeled endogenous miRNA backbone. The protocol applies to the use of miRNA-based shRNAs, but most of the vectors, principles of experimental design, and methods are also applicable to long inverted repeat transgenes. PMID:24786506

  16. BEST-HNN and 2D-(HN) NH experiments for rapid backbone assignment in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Paul, Subhradip; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2010-05-01

    HNN has proven to be an extremely valuable experiment for rapid and unambiguous backbone (H N, 15N) assignment in ( 13C, 15N) labeled proteins. However, low sensitivity of the experiment is often a limiting factor, especially when the transverse relaxation times ( T2) are short. We show here that BEST modification Schanda et al. (2006) [2] increases the sensitivity per unit time by more than a factor of 2.0 and thus substantially increases the speed of data collection; good 3D data can be collected in 8-10 h. Next, we present a simple method for amino-acid type identification based on simple 2D versions of the HNN experiment, labeled here as 2D-(HN) NH. Each of these experiments which produce anchor points for Gly, Ala, Ser/Thr residues, can be recorded in less than an hour. These enable rapid data acquisition, rapid analysis, and consequently rapid assignment of backbone (H N, 15N) resonances. The 2D-(HN) NH experiment does not involve aliphatic/aromatic protons and hence can be applied to deuterated protein samples as well, which is an additional advantage. The experiments have been demonstrated with human ubiquitin (76 aa) and acetic-acid denatured HIV-1 protease (99 aa), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively.

  17. TALOS+: a hybrid method for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Delaglio, Frank; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Bax, Ad

    2009-08-01

    NMR chemical shifts in proteins depend strongly on local structure. The program TALOS establishes an empirical relation between 13C, 15N and 1H chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles phi and psi (Cornilescu et al. J Biomol NMR 13 289-302, 1999). Extension of the original 20-protein database to 200 proteins increased the fraction of residues for which backbone angles could be predicted from 65 to 74%, while reducing the error rate from 3 to 2.5%. Addition of a two-layer neural network filter to the database fragment selection process forms the basis for a new program, TALOS+, which further enhances the prediction rate to 88.5%, without increasing the error rate. Excluding the 2.5% of residues for which TALOS+ makes predictions that strongly differ from those observed in the crystalline state, the accuracy of predicted phi and psi angles, equals +/-13 degrees . Large discrepancies between predictions and crystal structures are primarily limited to loop regions, and for the few cases where multiple X-ray structures are available such residues are often found in different states in the different structures. The TALOS+ output includes predictions for individual residues with missing chemical shifts, and the neural network component of the program also predicts secondary structure with good accuracy.

  18. Optimization of Protein Backbone Dihedral Angles by Means of Hamiltonian Reweighting

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations depend critically on the accuracy of the underlying force fields in properly representing biomolecules. Hence, it is crucial to validate the force-field parameter sets in this respect. In the context of the GROMOS force field, this is usually achieved by comparing simulation data to experimental observables for small molecules. In this study, we develop new amino acid backbone dihedral angle potential energy parameters based on the widely used 54A7 parameter set by matching to experimental J values and secondary structure propensity scales. In order to find the most appropriate backbone parameters, close to 100 000 different combinations of parameters have been screened. However, since the sheer number of combinations considered prohibits actual molecular dynamics simulations for each of them, we instead predicted the values for every combination using Hamiltonian reweighting. While the original 54A7 parameter set fails to reproduce the experimental data, we are able to provide parameters that match significantly better. However, to ensure applicability in the context of larger peptides and full proteins, further studies have to be undertaken. PMID:27559757

  19. The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide of Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Li, Jianjun; Sadovskaya, Irina; Jabbouri, Said; Helander, Ilkka M

    2004-06-22

    The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide from Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104 was analyzed using chemical degradations, NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The LPS contains two major structural variants, differing in the presence or absence of an octasaccharide fragment. The largest structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS, that could be deduced from experimental results, consists of 20 monosaccharides arranged in a nonrepetitive sequence: [carbohydrate structure: see text] where R is H or 4-O-Me-alpha-L-Fuc-(1-2)-4-O-Me-beta-Hep-(1-3)-alpha-GlcNAc-(1-2)-beta-Man-(1-3)-beta-ManNAc-(1-4)-alpha-Gal-(1-4)-beta-Hep-(1-3)-beta-GalNAc-(1- where Hep is a residue of D-glycero-D-galacto-heptose; all monosaccharides have the D-configuration except for 4-O-Me-L-Fuc and L-Ara4N. This structure is architecturally similar to the oligosaccharide system reported previously in P. frisingensis VTT E-82164 LPS, but differs from the latter in composition and also in the size of the outer region.

  20. First-principles study of the effect of functional groups on polyaniline backbone

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X. P.; Jiang, J. K.; Liang, Q. H.; Yang, N.; Ye, H. Y.; Cai, M.; Shen, L.; Yang, D. G.; Ren, T. L.

    2015-01-01

    We present a first-principles density functional theory study focused on how the chemical and electronic properties of polyaniline are adjusted by introducing suitable substituents on a polymer backbone. Analyses of the obtained energy barriers, reaction energies and minimum energy paths indicate that the chemical reactivity of the polyaniline derivatives is significantly enhanced by protonic acid doping of the substituted materials. Further study of the density of states at the Fermi level, band gap, HOMO and LUMO shows that both the unprotonated and protonated states of these polyanilines are altered to different degrees depending on the functional group. We also note that changes in both the chemical and electronic properties are very sensitive to the polarity and size of the functional group. It is worth noting that these changes do not substantially alter the inherent chemical and electronic properties of polyaniline. Our results demonstrate that introducing different functional groups on a polymer backbone is an effective approach to obtain tailored conductive polymers with desirable properties while retaining their intrinsic properties, such as conductivity. PMID:26584671

  1. The Nanomechanical Properties of Lactococcus lactis Pili Are Conditioned by the Polymerized Backbone Pilin

    PubMed Central

    Castelain, Mickaël; Duviau, Marie-Pierre; Canette, Alexis; Schmitz, Philippe; Loubière, Pascal; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Piard, Jean-Christophe; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Pili produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis are putative linear structures consisting of repetitive subunits of the major pilin PilB that forms the backbone, pilin PilA situated at the distal end of the pilus, and an anchoring pilin PilC that tethers the pilus to the peptidoglycan. We determined the nanomechanical properties of pili using optical-tweezers force spectroscopy. Single pili were exposed to optical forces that yielded force-versus-extension spectra fitted using the Worm-Like Chain model. Native pili subjected to a force of 0–200 pN exhibit an inextensible, but highly flexible ultrastructure, reflected by their short persistence length. We tested a panel of derived strains to understand the functional role of the different pilins. First, we found that both the major pilin PilB and sortase C organize the backbone into a full-length organelle and dictate the nanomechanical properties of the pili. Second, we found that both PilA tip pilin and PilC anchoring pilin were not essential for the nanomechanical properties of pili. However, PilC maintains the pilus on the bacterial surface and may play a crucial role in the adhesion- and biofilm-forming properties of L. lactis. PMID:27010408

  2. Colloidal quantum dot lasers built on a passive two-dimensional photonic crystal backbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hojun; Min, Kyungtaek; Lee, Myungjae; Kang, Minsu; Park, Yeonsang; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Roh, Young-Geun; Woo Hwang, Sung; Jeon, Heonsu

    2016-03-01

    We report the room-temperature lasing action from two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) structures composed of a passive Si3N4 backbone with an over-coat of CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) for optical gain. When optically excited, devices lased in dual PC band-edge modes, with the modal dominance governed by the thickness of the CQD over-layer. The demonstrated laser platform should have an impact on future photonic integrated circuits as the on-chip coupling between active and passive components is readily achievable.We report the room-temperature lasing action from two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) structures composed of a passive Si3N4 backbone with an over-coat of CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) for optical gain. When optically excited, devices lased in dual PC band-edge modes, with the modal dominance governed by the thickness of the CQD over-layer. The demonstrated laser platform should have an impact on future photonic integrated circuits as the on-chip coupling between active and passive components is readily achievable. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08544f

  3. A backbone amide protecting group for overcoming difficult sequences and suppressing aspartimide formation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, Abu-Baker M; Papageorgiou, George; Raz, Richard; Quibell, Martin; Burlina, Fabienne; Offer, John

    2016-05-01

    A backbone amide bond protecting group, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-5-nitrobenzyl (Hmnb), improved the synthesis of aggregation and aspartimide-prone peptides. Introduction of Hmnb is automated and carried out during peptide assembly by addition of 4-methoxy-5-nitrosalicylaldehyde to the peptidyl-resin and on-resin reduction to the secondary amine. Acylation of the hindered secondary amine is aided by the formation of an internal nitrophenol ester that undergoes a favourable O,N intramolecular acyl transfer. This activated ester participates in the coupling and generally gives complete reaction with standard coupling conditions. Hmnb is easily available in a single preparative step from commercially available material. Different methods for removing the amide protecting group were explored. The protecting group is labile to acidolysis, following reduction of the nitro group to the aniline. The two main uses of backbone protection of preventing aspartimide formation and of overcoming difficult sequences are demonstrated, first with the synthesis of a challenging aspartimide-prone test sequence and then with the classic difficult sequence ACP (65-74) and a 23-mer homopolymer of polyalanine. PMID:27086749

  4. Supramolecular organization of the repetitive backbone unit of the Streptococcus pneumoniae pilus.

    PubMed

    Spraggon, Glen; Koesema, Eric; Scarselli, Maria; Malito, Enrico; Biagini, Massimiliano; Norais, Nathalie; Emolo, Carla; Barocchi, Michèle Anne; Giusti, Fabiola; Hilleringmann, Markus; Rappuoli, Rino; Lesley, Scott; Covacci, Antonello; Masignani, Vega; Ferlenghi, Ilaria

    2010-06-15

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, like many other Gram-positive bacteria, assembles long filamentous pili on their surface through which they adhere to host cells. Pneumococcal pili are formed by a backbone, consisting of the repetition of the major component RrgB, and two accessory proteins (RrgA and RrgC). Here we reconstruct by transmission electron microscopy and single particle image reconstruction method the three dimensional arrangement of two neighbouring RrgB molecules, which represent the minimal repetitive structural domain of the native pilus. The crystal structure of the D2-D4 domains of RrgB was solved at 1.6 A resolution. Rigid-body fitting of the X-ray coordinates into the electron density map enabled us to define the arrangement of the backbone subunits into the S. pneumoniae native pilus. The quantitative fitting provide evidence that the pneumococcal pilus consists uniquely of RrgB monomers assembled in a head-to-tail organization. The presence of short intra-subunit linker regions connecting neighbouring domains provides the molecular basis for the intrinsic pilus flexibility.

  5. Structure and assembly of group B streptococcus pilus 2b backbone protein.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Roberta; Malito, Enrico; Lazzarin, Maddalena; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Castagnetti, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J; Margarit, Immaculada; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b) at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468) encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization.

  6. Supramolecular Organization of the Repetitive Backbone Unit of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Pilus

    PubMed Central

    Spraggon, Glen; Koesema, Eric; Scarselli, Maria; Malito, Enrico; Biagini, Massimiliano; Norais, Nathalie; Emolo, Carla; Barocchi, Michèle Anne; Giusti, Fabiola; Hilleringmann, Markus; Rappuoli, Rino; Lesley, Scott; Covacci, Antonello; Masignani, Vega; Ferlenghi, Ilaria

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, like many other Gram-positive bacteria, assembles long filamentous pili on their surface through which they adhere to host cells. Pneumococcal pili are formed by a backbone, consisting of the repetition of the major component RrgB, and two accessory proteins (RrgA and RrgC). Here we reconstruct by transmission electron microscopy and single particle image reconstruction method the three dimensional arrangement of two neighbouring RrgB molecules, which represent the minimal repetitive structural domain of the native pilus. The crystal structure of the D2-D4 domains of RrgB was solved at 1.6 Å resolution. Rigid-body fitting of the X-ray coordinates into the electron density map enabled us to define the arrangement of the backbone subunits into the S. pneumoniae native pilus. The quantitative fitting provide evidence that the pneumococcal pilus consists uniquely of RrgB monomers assembled in a head-to-tail organization. The presence of short intra-subunit linker regions connecting neighbouring domains provides the molecular basis for the intrinsic pilus flexibility. PMID:20559564

  7. Structure and Assembly of Group B Streptococcus Pilus 2b Backbone Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi, Roberta; Malito, Enrico; Lazzarin, Maddalena; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Castagnetti, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J.; Margarit, Immaculada; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C. Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b) at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468) encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization. PMID:25942637

  8. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  9. Conformational studies of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, D.A.

    1984-11-01

    Techniques are developed for thorough examinations of the conformational energetics of nucleic acids and their constituents. The first one is a method for modeling the furanose sugar ring in nucleic acids. This method allows the coordinates corresponding to any sugar conformation to be generated rapidly and unambiguously from just the phase angle of pseudorotation. Taking advantage of this simplification, we carry out the first calculations to completely explore the conformational spaces available to the eight commonly occurring nucleosides using experimentally consistent furanose geometries and an appropriate classical potential energy force field. Results are in excellent agreement with experiment. We also develop empirically fit multiple correlation functions between the torsion angles of nucleic acids. This reduces the number of conformations which need to be considered in a thorough energetic survey for a nucleic acid. Such surveys are then carried out for two single-stranded nucleic acid tetramers: d(ApApApA) and ApApApA. We create energy contour maps for each of the 21 possible torsion angle pairs in a nucleotide repeating unit. The maps are quite consistent with the experimental distribution of oligonucleotide data and provide rationalizations for several experimentally observed angle-angle correlations. Complete energy minimization is carried out on all local minima found in the surveys. Both the maps and minimizations indicate DNA and RNA to be highly polymorphic. Conformational changes in DNA upon damage by uv radiation are also studied using energy minimization techniques. Finally, we derive a set of partial charges for a nucleotide (2'-deoxycytidine 5'-monophosphate monohydrate) from high resolution x-ray data.

  10. Examination of the molecular mechanism of SH reagent-induced inhibition of the intestinal brush-border membrane Na+/phosphate cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Peerce, B E; Cedilote, M; Clarke, R D

    1995-10-01

    SH residues on the rabbit intestinal brush-border membrane Na+/phosphate cotransporter were examined using a variety of SH specific reagents, proteolytic digestion and HPLC separation of SH-labeled cotransporter, and partial reaction assays. Of the seven SH-containing peptide fragments on the non-denatured non-reduced cotransporter six peptides were labeled: five SH-containing peptides were labeled with acrylodan or IAF (iodoacetamidofluorescein) and three peptides were labeled with IAEDANS. One SH-containing peptide was labeled with IAEDANS or fluorescein maleimide only. Selective SH labeling conditions employing acrylodan and IAEDANS were used to identify the environments of these SH-containing peptides in the native cotransporter. The nature of SH reagent-induced inhibition of Na(+)-dependent phosphate uptake was examined using substrate-induced conformational changes, and substrate-induced changes in IAEDANS and acrylodan fluorescence of the SH-labeled Na+/phosphate cotransporter. The results indicate that five of the SH-labeled peptides sense the Na(+)-induced conformational change, three peptides sense the Na++ difluorophosphate-induced conformational change, and one peptide senses only the Na++ monofluorophosphate-induced conformational change. Five of the SH-labeled peptides are passive participants in the substrate-induced conformational changes with only SH 51 involved in cotransporter function. Alkylation of SH 51 resulted in a cotransporter conformation which differed from the substrate-mediated conformations and was characterized by increased monofluorophosphate sensitivity.

  11. Probing molecular conformations in momentum space: The case of n-pentane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippenberg, S.; Huang, Y. R.; Hajgató, B.; François, J.-P.; Deng, J. K.; Deleuze, M. S.

    2007-11-01

    A comprehensive study, throughout the valence region, of the electronic structure and electron momentum density distributions of the four conformational isomers of n-pentane is presented. Theoretical (e,2e) valence ionization spectra at high electron impact energies (1200eV+electron binding energy) and at azimuthal angles ranging from 0° to 10° in a noncoplanar symmetric kinematical setup are generated according to the results of large scale one-particle Green's function calculations of Dyson orbitals and related electron binding energies, using the third-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction [ADC(3)] scheme. The results of a focal point analysis (FPA) of relative conformer energies [A. Salam and M. S. Deleuze, J. Chem. Phys. 116, 1296 (2002)] and improved thermodynamical calculations accounting for hindered rotations are also employed in order to quantitatively evaluate the abundance of each conformer in the gas phase at room temperature and reliably predict the outcome of experiments on n-pentane employing high resolution electron momentum spectroscopy. Comparison with available photoelectron measurements confirms the suggestion that, due to entropy effects, the trans-gauche (tg) conformer strongly dominates the conformational mixture characterizing n-pentane at room temperature. Our simulations demonstrate therefore that experimental measurements of (e,2e) valence ionization spectra and electron momentum distributions would very consistently and straightforwardly image the topological changes and energy variations that molecular orbitals undergo due to torsion of the carbon backbone. The strongest fingerprints for the most stable conformer (tt) are found for the electron momentum distributions associated with ionization channels at the top of the inner-valence region, which sensitively image the development of methylenic hyperconjugation in all-staggered n-alkane chains.

  12. Fake conformal symmetry in unimodular gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    We study Weyl symmetry (local conformal symmetry) in unimodular gravity. It is shown that the Noether currents for both Weyl symmetry and global scale symmetry vanish exactly as in conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. We clearly explain why in the class of conformally invariant gravitational theories, the Noether currents vanish by starting with conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. Moreover, we comment on both classical and quantum-mechanical equivalences in Einstein's general relativity, conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity, and the Weyl-transverse gravity. Finally, we discuss the Weyl current in the conformally invariant scalar action and see that it is also vanishing.

  13. Photorelease of phosphates: Mild methods for protecting phosphate derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Senadheera, Sanjeewa N; Yousef, Abraham L

    2014-01-01

    Summary We have developed a new photoremovable protecting group for caging phosphates in the near UV. Diethyl 2-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)-2-oxoethyl phosphate (14a) quantitatively releases diethyl phosphate upon irradiation in aq MeOH or aq MeCN at 350 nm, with quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.021 to 0.067 depending on the solvent composition. The deprotection reactions originate from the triplet excited state, are robust under ambient conditions and can be carried on to 100% conversion. Similar results were found with diethyl 2-(4-methoxy-1-naphthyl)-2-oxoethyl phosphate (14b), although it was significantly less efficient compared with 14a. A key step in the deprotection reaction in aq MeOH is considered to be a Favorskii rearrangement of the naphthyl ketone motif of 14a,b to naphthylacetate esters 25 and 26. Disruption of the ketone-naphthyl ring conjugation significantly shifts the photoproduct absorption away from the effective incident wavelength for decaging of 14, driving the reaction to completion. The Favorskii rearrangement does not occur in aqueous acetonitrile although diethyl phosphate is released. Other substitution patterns on the naphthyl or quinolin-5-yl core, such as the 2,6-naphthyl 10 or 8-benzyloxyquinolin-5-yl 24 platforms, also do not rearrange by aryl migration upon photolysis and, therefore, do not proceed to completion. The 2,6-naphthyl ketone platform instead remains intact whereas the quinolin-5-yl ketone fragments to a much more complex, highly absorbing reaction mixture that competes for the incident light. PMID:25246963

  14. Ligand-induced conformational changes in a thermophilic ribose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2009-05-21

    Members of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP) superfamily are involved in transport and signaling processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Biological responses are typically mediated by ligand-induced conformational changes in which the binding event is coupled to a hinge-bending motion that brings together two domains in a closed form. In all PBP-mediated biological processes, downstream partners recognize the closed form of the protein. This motion has also been exploited in protein engineering experiments to construct biosensors that transduce ligand binding to a variety of physical signals. Understanding the mechanistic details of PBP conformational changes, both global (hinge bending, twisting, shear movements) and local (rotamer changes, backbone motion), therefore is not only important for understanding their biological function but also for protein engineering experiments. Here we present biochemical characterization and crystal structure determination of the periplasmic ribose-binding protein (RBP) from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima in its ribose-bound and unliganded state. The T. maritima RBP (tmRBP) has 39% sequence identity and is considerably more resistant to thermal denaturation (appTm value is 108 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli homolog (ecRBP) (appTm value is 56 C). Polar ligand interactions and ligand-induced global conformational changes are conserved among ecRBP and tmRBP; however local structural rearrangements involving side-chain motions in the ligand-binding site are not conserved. Although the large-scale ligand-induced changes are mediated through similar regions, and are produced by similar backbone movements in tmRBP and ecRBP, the small-scale ligand-induced structural rearrangements differentiate the mesophile and thermophile. This suggests there are mechanistic differences in the manner by which these two proteins bind their ligands and are an example of how two structurally similar proteins utilize different

  15. Tuning backbones and side-chains of cationic conjugated polymers for optical signal amplification of fluorescent DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Qin; Liu, Xing-Fen; Fan, Qu-Li; Wang, Lihua; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lian-Hui; Fan, Chunhai; Huang, Wei

    2009-06-15

    Three cationic conjugated polymers (CCPs) exhibiting different backbone geometries and charge densities were used to investigate how their conjugated backbone and side chain properties, together with the transitions of DNA amphiphilic properties, interplay in the CCP/DNA-C* (DNA-C*: fluorophore-labeled DNA) complexes to influence the optical signal amplification of fluorescent DNA detection based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). By examining the FRET efficiencies to dsDNA-C* (dsDNA: double-stranded DNA) and ssDNA-C* (ssDNA: single-stranded DNA) for each CCP, twisted conjugated backbones and higher charge densities were proved to facilitate electrostatic attraction in CCP/dsDNA-C* complexes, and induced improved sensitivity to DNA hybridization. Especially, by using the CCP with twisted conjugated backbone and the highest charge density, a more than 7-fold higher efficiency of FRET to dsDNA-C* was found than to ssDNA-C*, indicating a high signal amplification for discriminating between dsDNA and ssDNA. By contrast, linear conjugated backbones and lower charge density were demonstrated to favor hydrophobic interactions in CCP/ssDNA-C* complexes. These findings provided guidelines for the design of novel sensitive CCP, which can be useful to recognize many other important DNA activities involving transitions of DNA amphiphilic properties like DNA hybridization, such as specific DNA binding with ions, some secondary or tertiary structural changes of DNA, and so forth.

  16. Conformal Gravity rotation curves with a conformal Higgs halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Keith

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the effect of a conformally coupled Higgs field on conformal gravity (CG) predictions for the rotation curves of galaxies. The Mannheim-Kazanas (MK) metric is a valid vacuum solution of CG's fourth-order Poisson equation if and only if the Higgs field has a particular radial profile, S(r) = S0 a/(r + a), decreasing from S0 at r = 0 with radial scalelength a. Since particle rest masses scale with S(r)/S0, their world lines do not follow time-like geodesics of the MK metric gμν, as previously assumed, but rather those of the Higgs-frame MK metric tilde{g}_{μ ν }=Ω ^2 g_{μ ν }, with the conformal factor Ω(r) = S(r)/S0. We show that the required stretching of the MK metric exactly cancels the linear potential that has been invoked to fit galaxy rotation curves without dark matter. We also formulate, for spherical structures with a Higgs halo S(r), the CG equations that must be solved for viable astrophysical tests of CG using galaxy and cluster dynamics and lensing.

  17. Crystal structure analysis of the exocytosis-sensitive phosphoprotein, pp63/parafusin (phosphoglucomutase), from Paramecium reveals significant conformational variability.

    PubMed

    Müller, Simone; Diederichs, Kay; Breed, Jason; Kissmehl, Roland; Hauser, Karin; Plattner, Helmut; Welte, Wolfram

    2002-01-11

    During exocytosis of dense-core secretory vesicles (trichocysts) in Paramecium, the protein pp63/parafusin (pp63/pf) is transiently dephosphorylated. We report here the structures of two crystal forms of one isoform of this protein which has a high degree of homology with rabbit phosphoglucomutase, whose structure has been reported. As expected, both proteins possess highly similar structures, showing the same four domains forming two lobes with an active-site crevice in between. The two X-ray structures that we report here were determined after crystallization in the presence of sulfate and tartrate, and show the lobes arranged as a closed and an open conformation, respectively. While both conformations possess a bound divalent cation, only the closed (sulfate-bound) conformation shows bound sulfate ions in the "phosphate-transfer site" near the catalytic serine residue and in the "phosphate-binding site". Comparison with the open form shows that the latter dianion is placed in the centre of three arginine residues, one contributed by subunit II and two by subunit IV, suggesting that it causes a contraction of the arginine triangle, which establishes the observed conformational closure of the lobes. It is therefore likely that the closed conformation forms only when a phosphoryl group is bound to the phosphate-binding site. The previously published structure of rabbit phosphoglucomutase is intermediate between these two conformers. Several of the known reversible phosphorylation sites of pp63/pf-1 are at positions critical for transition between the conformations and for binding of the ligands and thus give hints as to possible roles of pp63/pf-1 in the course of exocytosis.

  18. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....