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Sample records for phosphate composites bonded

  1. Phosphate-bonded ceramic–wood composites : R&D project overview and invitation to participate

    Treesearch

    Theodore L. Laufenberg; Matt Aro

    2004-01-01

    We are developing chemically bonded ceramic phosphate binders for the production of biofiber-based composite materials. These binders promise to have better processing and properties than some current cement and polymer resin binder systems. The ceramic phosphate binders (termed Ceramicrete), if used in place of cement and polymers, will significantly reduce the...

  2. AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE COMPOSITES AND THEIR EFFECT ON COMPOSITE-ADHESIVE-DENTIN BONDING

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, J.M.; O’Donnell, J.N.R.; Schumacher, G.E.; Skrtic, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the bond strength and related properties of photo-polymerizable, remineralizing amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) polymeric composite-adhesive systems to dentin after various periods of aqueous aging at 37 °C. An experimental ACP base and lining composite was made from a photo-activated resin comprising 2,2-bis[p-(2’-hydroxy-3’-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and zirconyl dimethacrylate (ZrDMA); designated BTHZ. An experimental orthodontic composite was formulated from a photo-activated resin comprising ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA), TEGDMA, HEMA and methacryloxyethyl phthalate (MEP); designated ETHM. In both composite series three fillers were compared: 1) freshly precipitated zirconium-modified ACP freshly precipitated (as-prepared Zr-ACP), 2) milled Zr-ACP and 3) an ion-leachable fluoride glass. In addition to the shear bond strength (SBS), work to fracture and failure modes of the orthodontic composites were determined. The SBS of the base and lining ACP composites appeared unaffected by filler type or immersion time. In the orthodontic ACP composite series, milled ACP composites showed initial mechanical advantages over as-prepared ACP composites, and produced higher incidence of a failure mode consistent with stronger adhesion. After six months of aqueous exposure, 80 % of specimens failed at the dentin-primer interface, with a 42 % overall reduction in bond strength. BTHZ and ETHM based ACP composites are potentially effective anti-demineralizing-remineralizing agents with possible clinical utility as protective base-liners and orthodontic cements, respectively. The analysis of the bond strength and failure modalities suggests that milled ACP composites may offer greater potential in clinical applications. PMID:19696914

  3. ADHESION OF AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE COMPOSITES BONDED TO DENTIN: A STUDY IN FAILURE MODALITY

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, J.N.R.; Schumacher, G.E.; Antonucci, J.M.; Skrtic, D.

    2009-01-01

    Aims As a bioactive filler capable of remineralizing tooth structures, the main disadvantage of as-made amorphous calcium phosphate (am-ACP) are its large agglomerates. The objective of this study was to mill ACP, and compare the adhesive strength to dentin, work to fracture, and failure modes of both groups to glass-filled composites and one commercial compomer after 24 h, 1 week, 1, 3 and 6 months of exposure to simulated saliva solution (SLS). Flat dentin surfaces were acid-etched, primed, and photopolymerized. Composites were applied, photo-cured, and debonded in shear. The resin used in each composite was identical: ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methacryloxyethyl phthalate. Fillers consisted of am-ACP and milled ACP (m-ACP), and a strontium-containing glass (Sr-glass) at respective mass fractions of (40, 60, and 75) %. Findings 90 % of the fracture surfaces in this study showed adhesive failure, with most of these occurring at the dentin/primer interface. 52 % of failures after 24 h immersion occurred at the primer/composite interface. After six months of SLS exposure, 80 % of specimens failed at the dentin/primer interface, with a 42 % overall reduction in bond strength. Conclusions Milled ACP composites showed initial mechanical advantages over am-ACP composites and the compomer, and produced a higher incidence of a failure mode consistent with stronger adhesion. Evidence is provided which suggests that milled ACP composites may offer enhanced potential in clinical bonding applications. PMID:19107798

  4. The Effect of 3% Phosphate Ascorbyl Gel on Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Enamel treated with 35% Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Milena de Fátima Schalcher; Silva, Alice Carvalho; Franco, Marcela Mayana Pereira; Silva, Ana Paula Brito; Bramante, Fausto da Silva; da Silva, Monica Barros; Lima, Darlon Martins; Pereira, Adriana de Fátima Vasconcelos

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel (PA) in different times onto the microshear bond strength of composite resin (CR) to bovine enamel treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP). Thirty enamel blocks of bovine incisors were made and divided into 5 groups (n = 6) with three specimens per group (n = 18), according to treatment: G1= No bleaching + CR; G2 = HP + CR after 15d; G3 = HP + CR after 24 hours; G4 = HP + PA (15 min) + CR after 24 hours; G5 = HP + PA (2 hours) + CR after 24 hours. The resin cylinders were made by Tygon matrices. Microshear bond strength test was performed using universal testing machine with a 50N load at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fracture modes were assessed by a stereomicroscope 40 ×. Microshear bond strength values were submitted to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) one-way and Tukey test (p < 0.05). G1 had significant results when compared to G3 and G5 (p < 0.01). However, G2, G3, G4 and G5 have showed no significant differences among groups (p > 0.05). Failure modes were categorized into adhesive (90%) and mixed (10%). The use of 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel for 15 minutes was able to improve bond strength of composite resin to bleached bovine enamel, but when 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel was applied during 40 minutes it negatively interfered in the adhesion of the resin to bleached bovine enamel.

  5. Composition and application of novel sprayable phosphate cement (grancrete) that bonds to styrofoam

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Paul, Jr., James W.

    2007-01-09

    A dry mix particulate composition of a calcined oxide of Mg and/or Ca, an acid phosphate, and fly ash or equivalent, wherein the calcined oxide is present in the range of from about 17% to about 40% by weight and the acid phosphate is present in the range of from about 29% to about 52% by weight and the fly ash or equivalent is present in the range of from about 24% to about 39% by weight when sand is added to the dry mix, it is present in the range of from about 39% to about 61% by weight of the combined dry mix and sand. A method of forming a structural member is also disclosed wherein an aqueous slurry of about 8 12 pounds of water is added to dry mix and sand.

  6. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1993-09-21

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

  7. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120.degree. C. to about 300.degree. C. to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate.

  8. Critical surface energy of composite cement containing MDP (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate) and chemical bonding to hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Dabsie, Firas; Grégoire, Geneviève; Sharrock, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Self-adhesive composite cements are increasingly used for cementing inlays/onlays, intraradicular posts, crowns and laminate veneers. Wider clinical acceptance is driven by simpler and faster handling procedures, much like observed for self-etching adhesives. 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) is a bi-functional monomer incorporated as the reactive ingredient in a contemporary self-adhesive cement. We have examined the surface free energy parameters of this cement and studied the mode of action of the cement on dentine substrate by contact angle measurements to determine the critical surface energy of the cement. Retention of the infrared absorption bands characteristic of the acrylate moieties on the surface of hydroxyapatite particles suggests that MDP contributes to the overall bonding to dentine by forming ionic chemical bonds with surface calcium ions in dentine crystalites.

  9. The effect of different etching times of acidulated phosphate fluoride gel on the shear bond strength of high-leucite ceramics bonded to composite resin.

    PubMed

    Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Thammasitboon, Kewalin

    2007-07-01

    A 10-minute treatment with acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel has been used as an alternative in ceramic surface etching before repairing with composite resin. However, the optimal etching time for APF gel is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the in vitro shear bond strengths of composite resin on high-leucite ceramics after APF gel treatment over different time periods. One hundred and twenty high-leucite ceramic (Empress 1) specimens (12 mm in diameter and 1.5 mm thick) were prepared and divided into 12 groups (n=10). Ten experimental groups were surface treated with 1.23% APF gel, each group receiving 1 to 10 minutes of etching time in 1 minute increments. One group was treated with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid for 4 minutes and the final group received no treatment and served as a control. The surface condition of the treated specimens was analyzed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). All specimens received a silane application and were bonded to a composite resin Filtek (Z250) cylinder with an adhesive system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus adhesive) and then stored in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C for 24 hours before shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine. Mean bond strengths (MPa) were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). Hydrofluoric acid etching produced the highest mean shear bond strength (SD) between composite resin and the ceramic (17.64 (1.48) MPa). Overall, APF gel etching produced lower bond strengths. No significant difference in mean bond strength (SD) was observed between etching with hydrofluoric acid and etching with APF gel for 7 to 10 minutes (15.21 (1.93) to 17.33 (1.43)). The lowest mean shear bond strengths (SD) were recorded in the untreated group (7.61 (1.03) MPa) (P<.05). Within the limitations of this study, shear bond strength values between composite resin and high-leucite ceramics after etching with 1.23% APF gel for 7 to 10 minutes were not significantly

  10. Phosphate-Bonded Fly Ash.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-09

    FCODE OC ______________ ARLINGTON VA 22217-5660 - dis~bu~i.19~ 3 B Navy Case No. 75,787 PATENTS PHOSPHATE -BONDED FLY ASH IN’NA G. TALMY DEBORAH A. HAUGHT...2 3 , CaO. MgO, etc. with which the H.PO4 reacts to form the polymer-like phosphate bonds which hold the fly ash particles together. In the second...conventional means. The moisture (water) content of the aqueous HP0 4 /fly ash mixture is preferably from about 3 to about 5 weight percent for semidry

  11. Ultrasonic phosphate bonding of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bassett, David C; Merle, Geraldine; Lennox, Bruce; Rabiei, Reza; Barthelat, François; Grover, Liam M; Barralet, Jake E

    2013-11-06

    Low intensity ultrasound-induced radicals interact with surface adsorbed orthophosphate to bond nanoparticles with high mechanical strength and surface area. Dissimilar materials could be bonded to form robust metallic, ceramic, and organic composite microparticles. 3D nanostructures of a hydrated and amorphous electrocatalyst with carbon nanotubes were also constructed which exceeded the resistance-limited efficiency of 2D electrodes.

  12. Effects of sandblasting, H2SO4/HCl etching, and phosphate primer application on bond strength of veneering resin composite to commercially pure titanium grade 4.

    PubMed

    Egoshi, Takafumi; Taira, Yohsuke; Soeno, Kohyoh; Sawase, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of surface treatments on the bond strength of a resin composite to a commercially pure titanium. The bonding surfaces of all titanium specimens were ground with 1,000-grit silicon carbide paper and then subjected to one or more of these surface treatments: sandblasting with alumina (sand), etching with 45wt% H2SO4 and 15wt% HCl (SH-etchant) at 70°C for 10 min, and/or phosphate primer (MDP-primer) application. Specimens not subjected to any surface treatment were used as controls. After resin composite veneer placement and 24-h water immersion, the shear bond strengths of the specimens in descending order were: sand/SH-etchant/MDP-primer, sand/SH-etchant/no primer, no sand/SH-etchant/MDP-primer, sand/no etch/MDP-primer, no sand/SH-etchant/no primer, sand/no etch/no primer, no sand/no etch/MDP-primer, no sand/no etch/no primer. Scanning electron microscope observations revealed that sandblasting and SH-etchant created many micro- and nanoscale cavities on the titanium surface. Results showed that a combined use of sandblasting, SH-etchant, and MDP-primer application had a cooperative effect on titanium bonding.

  13. Pumpable/injectable phosphate-bonded ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Perry, Lamar; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2001-01-01

    A pumpable ceramic composition is provided comprising an inorganic oxide, potassium phosphate, and an oxide coating material. Also provided is a method for preparing pumpable ceramic-based waste forms comprising selecting inorganic oxides based on solubility, surface area and morphology criteria; mixing the selected oxides with phosphate solution and waste to form a first mixture; combining an additive to the first mixture to create a second mixture; adding water to the second mixture to create a reactive mixture; homogenizing the reactive mixture; and allowing the reactive mixture to cure.

  14. Antimicrobial properties and dentin bonding strength of magnesium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Mestres, G; Abdolhosseini, M; Bowles, W; Huang, S-H; Aparicio, C; Gorr, S-U; Ginebra, M-P

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this work was to assess the antimicrobial properties and the dentin-bonding strength of novel magnesium phosphate cements (MPC). Three formulations of MPC, consisting of magnesium oxide and a phosphate salt, NH4H2PO4, NaH2PO4 or a mixture of both, were evaluated. As a result of the setting reaction, MPC transformed into either struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) when NH4H2PO4 was used or an amorphous magnesium sodium phosphate when NaH2PO4 was used. The MPC had appropriate setting times for hard tissue applications, high early compressive strengths and higher strength of bonding to dentin than commercial mineral trioxide aggregate cement. Bacteriological studies were performed with fresh and aged cements against three bacterial strains, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (planktonic and in biofilm) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. These bacteria have been associated with infected implants, as well as other frequent hard tissue related infections. Extracts of different compositions of MPC had bactericidal or bacteriostatic properties against the three bacterial strains tested. This was associated mainly with a synergistic effect between the high osmolarity and alkaline pH of the MPC. These intrinsic antimicrobial properties make MPC preferential candidates for applications in dentistry, such as root fillers, pulp capping agents and cavity liners.

  15. Rapid Adhesive Bonding of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Fox, R. L.; Sterling, S. Elmo, Jr.; Buckley, J. D.; Inge, Spencer V., Jr.; Burcher, L. G.; Wright, Robert E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Strong bonds created in less time and with less power than use of conventional bonding methods. Rapid adhesive bonding (RAB) technique for composites uses high-frequency induction heating toroids to quickly heat metallic susceptor impregnated with thermoplastic adhesive or sandwiched between thermoset or thermoplastic adhesive cloths or films. Susceptor steel screen or perforated steel foil.

  16. Rapid Adhesive Bonding of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Fox, R. L.; Sterling, S. Elmo, Jr.; Buckley, J. D.; Inge, Spencer V., Jr.; Burcher, L. G.; Wright, Robert E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Strong bonds created in less time and with less power than use of conventional bonding methods. Rapid adhesive bonding (RAB) technique for composites uses high-frequency induction heating toroids to quickly heat metallic susceptor impregnated with thermoplastic adhesive or sandwiched between thermoset or thermoplastic adhesive cloths or films. Susceptor steel screen or perforated steel foil.

  17. Evaluation of composite bonded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, H.A.; Othieno, M.; Yin, S.W.

    1995-12-31

    The present investigation evaluates the influence of joining technique on the static and fatigue behavior of composite bonded joints. Specimens used in this investigation were LDF AS4/PEKK graphite/thermoplastic composites and IM6/3501-6 graphite/poxy composite laminates. Joints were made by either adhesive bonding or fusing bonding. For the adhesive bonded joints, in some cases specimens were bonded without any surface pretreatment while in other cases the surfaces were either grit blast or corona. treated prior to bonding. For the fusion bonded joints, joints were prepared by either induction welding or thermabonding. In addition, some specimens were conditioned in a wet environment for thirty days in order to observe the influence of moisture on the static strengths. During fatigue testing, the residual stiffness was continually monitored in order to assess the extent of fatigue damage development.

  18. Surface analysis in composite bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messick, D. L.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    X ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements on graphite fiber composites pretreated in a number of different ways including mechanical, chemical, and light irradiation were analyzed. Data acquired on surface contamination as a result of fabrication techniques provides answers to the strength and durability of adhesively bonded composites. These techniques were shown to provide valuable information on surface analysis of pretreated composites prior to adhesive bonding and following lap shear fracture.

  19. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  20. Effect of fluoride in phosphate buffer solution on bonding to artificially carious enamel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Shimada, Yasushi; Tagami, Junji

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of fluoride on resin bonding to artificially carious enamel. Specimens from demineralized human enamel sections were prepared using two commercially available adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray; Single Bond, 3M) and a composite resin (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray) according to manufacturers' instructions. They were then immersed in phosphate buffered saline solution with varied fluoride concentrations at 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 10 ppm. After immersion in each solution for one, three, or seven days, microshear bond strength was measured. The bond strengths of both adhesive systems to artificially carious enamel significantly increased after immersion in fluoride-phosphate buffer solution. Based on the findings obtained, we thus proposed not to remove the white enamel lesions for bonding in the clinic. They might be preserved and treated using fluoride applications.

  1. Phosphate Bonded Solidification of Radioactive Incinerator Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B. W.

    1999-04-13

    The incinerator at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site burns low level radioactive and hazardous waste. Ash and scrubber system waste streams are generated during the incineration process. Phosphate Ceramic technology is being tested to verify the ash and scrubber waste streams can be stabilized using this solidification method. Acceptance criteria for the solid waste forms include leachability, bleed water, compression testing, and permeability. Other testing on the waste forms include x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Dipentaerythritol penta-acrylate phosphate - an alternative phosphate ester monomer for bonding of methacrylates to zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Tay, Franklin R.; Lu, Zhicen; Chen, Chen; Qian, Mengke; Zhang, Huaiqin; Tian, Fucong; Xie, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    The present work examined the effects of dipentaerythritol penta-acrylate phosphate (PENTA) as an alternative phosphate ester monomer for bonding of methacrylate-based resins to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) and further investigated the potential bonding mechanism involved. Shear bond strength testing was performed to evaluate the efficacy of experimental PENTA-containing primers (5, 10, 15, 20 or 30 wt% PENTA in acetone) in improving resin-Y-TZP bond strength. Bonding without the use of a PENTA-containing served as the negative control, and a Methacryloyloxidecyl dihydrogenphosphate(MDP)-containing primer was used as the positive control. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to investigate the potential existence of chemical affinity between PENTA and Y-TZP. Shear bond strengths were significant higher in the 15 and 20 wt% PENTA groups. The ICP-MS, XPS and FTIR data indicated that the P content on the Y-TZP surface increased as the concentration of PENTA increased in the experimental primers, via the formation of Zr–O–P bond. Taken together, the results attest that PENTA improves resin bonding of Y-TZP through chemical reaction with Y-TZP. Increasing the concentration of PENTA augments its binding affinity but not its bonding efficacy with zirconia. PMID:28000765

  3. Dipentaerythritol penta-acrylate phosphate - an alternative phosphate ester monomer for bonding of methacrylates to zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Tay, Franklin R.; Lu, Zhicen; Chen, Chen; Qian, Mengke; Zhang, Huaiqin; Tian, Fucong; Xie, Haifeng

    2016-12-01

    The present work examined the effects of dipentaerythritol penta-acrylate phosphate (PENTA) as an alternative phosphate ester monomer for bonding of methacrylate-based resins to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) and further investigated the potential bonding mechanism involved. Shear bond strength testing was performed to evaluate the efficacy of experimental PENTA-containing primers (5, 10, 15, 20 or 30 wt% PENTA in acetone) in improving resin-Y-TZP bond strength. Bonding without the use of a PENTA-containing served as the negative control, and a Methacryloyloxidecyl dihydrogenphosphate(MDP)-containing primer was used as the positive control. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to investigate the potential existence of chemical affinity between PENTA and Y-TZP. Shear bond strengths were significant higher in the 15 and 20 wt% PENTA groups. The ICP-MS, XPS and FTIR data indicated that the P content on the Y-TZP surface increased as the concentration of PENTA increased in the experimental primers, via the formation of Zr–O–P bond. Taken together, the results attest that PENTA improves resin bonding of Y-TZP through chemical reaction with Y-TZP. Increasing the concentration of PENTA augments its binding affinity but not its bonding efficacy with zirconia.

  4. Porcelain laminate veneer restorations bonded with a three-liquid silane bonding agent and a dual-activated luting composite.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hideo; Aida, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Yumi; Tanoue, Naomi

    2006-12-01

    This clinical report describes the fabrication and bonding of porcelain laminate veneer restorations in a patient with anterior open spaces. Laminate veneer restorations made of feldspathic porcelain were etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid, rinsed under tap water, ultrasonically cleaned with methanol, and primed with a chemically activated three-liquid silane bonding agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond). The enamel surfaces were etched with 40% phosphoric acid, rinsed with water, and primed with a two-liquid bonding agent (Clearfil New Bond) that contained a hydrophobic phosphate (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate; MDP). The restorations were bonded with a dual-activated luting composite (Clapearl DC). The veneers have been functioning satisfactorily for an observation period of one year. Combined use of the Clearfil bonding agents and Clapearl DC luting composite is an alternative to conventional materials for seating porcelain laminate veneer restorations, although the system is inapplicable to dentin bonding.

  5. Vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for immobilization of radioisotopes

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-04-05

    A method of immobilizing a radioisotope and vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) articles formed by the method are described. The method comprises combining a radioisotope-containing material, MgO, a source of phosphate, and optionally, a reducing agent, in water at a temperature of less than 100.degree. C. to form a slurry; curing the slurry to form a solid intermediate CBPC article comprising the radioisotope therefrom; comminuting the intermediate CBPC article, mixing the comminuted material with glass frits, and heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of about 900 to about 1500.degree. C. to form a vitrified CBPC article comprising the radioisotope immobilized therein.

  6. Bonded composite repair of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Mary A.

    Repair and maintenance cost drives a large percentage of the lifetime cost of aircraft structures. Understanding repair issues can lead to a structure that significantly lowers the lifetime cost. Advanced composite materials, while offering the potential to increase aircraft capabilities with minimum weight, are more susceptible to repairable damage than conventional aircraft materials. Improved inspection and repair methods are required to ensure structural integrity and aircraft readiness in the existing operational environment. Many of today's innovative composite designs may result in aircraft structures that are unreasonably difficult to repair. As a first step, technical issues associated with bonded composite repair of composite structures were investigated. An extensive literature review identified many areas where real world composite repairs are being used successfully. An electronic database was developed summarizing the publications found during the literature review. The database includes publication, experimental test results and analytical results of advanced composite bonded repairs. The current analysis of repair does not account for the variations that exist in repair. To facilitate the analysis, a finite element interface was developed to provide analysts with a tool that would create complete finite element models of repaired structures efficiently and in a 3-dimensional view. The finite element models created by the developed interface were successfully correlated to test data for accuracy of the results. Parametric studies were performed using the interface to evaluate effects of repair variables. Thermal impact of repair on the repair panel is one area lacking attention in the repair literature. To understand the impact of heat and thermal gradients of the repair, an analytical investigation was performed to evaluate. the parameters affected by heat. For a solid laminate, the temperature at the adhesive bondline was investigated. The primary

  7. Oligomerization reactions of deoxyribonucleotides on montmorillonite clay - The effect of mononucleotide structure, phosphate activation and montmorillonite composition on phosphodiester bond formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; KAMALUDDIN; Ertem, Gozen

    1990-01-01

    The 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-GMP and 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-AMP bind 2 times more strongly to montmorillonite 22A than do 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-CMP and 5(prime)-TMP. The dinucleotide d(pG)2 forms in 9.2 percent yield and the cyclic dinucleotide c(dpG)2 in 5.4 percent yield in the reaction of 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-GMP with EDAC in the presence of montmorillonite 22A. The yield of dimers which contain the phosphodiester bond decreases as the reaction medium is changed from 0.2 M NaCl to a mixture of 0.2 M NaCl and 0.075 M MgCl2. A low yield of d(pA)2 was observed in the condensation reaction of 5(prime)-ImdpA on montmorillonite 22A. The yield of d(pA)2 obtained when EDAC is used as the condensing agent increases with increasing iron content of the Na(+)-montmorillonite used as catalyst. Evidence is presented which shows that the acidity of the Na(+)-montmorillonite is a necessary but not sufficient factor for the montmorillonite catalysis of phosphodiester bond formation.

  8. Oligomerization reactions of deoxyribonucleotides on montmorillonite clay - The effect of mononucleotide structure, phosphate activation and montmorillonite composition on phosphodiester bond formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; KAMALUDDIN; Ertem, Gozen

    1990-01-01

    The 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-GMP and 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-AMP bind 2 times more strongly to montmorillonite 22A than do 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-CMP and 5(prime)-TMP. The dinucleotide d(pG)2 forms in 9.2 percent yield and the cyclic dinucleotide c(dpG)2 in 5.4 percent yield in the reaction of 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-GMP with EDAC in the presence of montmorillonite 22A. The yield of dimers which contain the phosphodiester bond decreases as the reaction medium is changed from 0.2 M NaCl to a mixture of 0.2 M NaCl and 0.075 M MgCl2. A low yield of d(pA)2 was observed in the condensation reaction of 5(prime)-ImdpA on montmorillonite 22A. The yield of d(pA)2 obtained when EDAC is used as the condensing agent increases with increasing iron content of the Na(+)-montmorillonite used as catalyst. Evidence is presented which shows that the acidity of the Na(+)-montmorillonite is a necessary but not sufficient factor for the montmorillonite catalysis of phosphodiester bond formation.

  9. Recycling of used commercial phosphate-bonded investments with additional mono-ammonium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zutai; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2005-03-01

    Industrial waste is on the increase, resulting in severe environmental contamination. Against this background, this study sought to investigate the possibility of recycling used phosphate-bonded investments. Commercial phosphate-bonded investment was mixed and heated according to manufacturer's instructions, then powdered with a ball mill machine to be used as recycled investment (Code: R). Mono-ammonium phosphate (NH4H2PO4) of 2, 5, 8, 11, and 14 g were added to 100 g of R because of residual MgO, and coded as Ra, Rb, Rc, Rd, and Re respectively. Investment properties were then examined. Particle size of R was 50.66 microm and close to the original investment. It was found that more NH4H2PO4 led to larger setting expansion, smaller thermal expansion, and lower fired strength. The data of Re in these three aspects were 1.42 +/- 0.09%, 0.78 +/- 0.21%, and 8.85 +/- 0.88 MPa respectively, and differences against the original investment were significant. Ra showed significantly longer setting time than other investments. Based on the results of this study, we concluded that it was possible to set used phosphate-bonded investments by adding NH4H2PO4; in particular, Rd showed suitable expansion and acceptable mechanical properties.

  10. Leaching behavior of phosphate-bonded ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Jeong, S.Y.; Dorf, M.

    1996-04-01

    Over the last few years, Argonne National Laboratory has been developing room-temperature-setting chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for solidifying and stabilizing low-level mixed wastes. This technology is crucial for stabilizing waste streams that contain volatile species and off-gas secondary waste streams generated by high-temperature treatment of such wastes. We have developed a magnesium phosphate ceramic to treat mixed wastes such as ash, salts, and cement sludges. Waste forms of surrogate waste streams were fabricated by acid-base reactions between the mixtures of magnesium oxide powders and the wastes, and phosphoric acid or acid phosphate solutions. Dense and hard ceramic waste forms are produced in this process. The principal advantage of this technology is that the contaminants are immobilized by both chemical stabilization and subsequent microencapsulation of the reaction products. This paper reports the results of durability studies conducted on waste forms made with ash waste streams spiked with hazardous and radioactive surrogates. Standard leaching tests such as ANS 16.1 and TCLP were conducted on the final waste forms. Fates of the contaminants in the final waste forms were established by electron microscopy. In addition, stability of the waste forms in aqueous environments was evaluated with long-term water-immersion tests.

  11. Compositional dependence of calcium phosphate layer formation in fluoride Bioglasses.

    PubMed

    Kim, C Y; Clark, A E; Hench, L L

    1992-09-01

    Bioglasses form a double layer composed of apatite and a silica-rich layer when placed in a simulated physiological solution as well as in living tissue [A.E. Clark, C.G. Pantano, and L. L. Hench, "Auger spectroscopic analysis of bioglass corrosion films," J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 59(1-2), 37-39 (1976).]. In the present work, the mechanisms of the calcium phosphate layer and the silica-rich layer formation of fluoride Bioglasses in Tris-buffer solution are studied as a function of the SiO2 content. Fourier Transform Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy (FTIRS) is used to investigate the mechanism of formation of calcium phosphate and silica-rich layers on the glass surface. Ion concentration in reacted solution and elemental depth profiles are obtained by Induced Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), respectively. Si--O bonds with one nonbridging oxygen and Si--O--Si bonds form at the early stage of reaction. Strong phosphorus ion uptake occurs when an amorphous calcium phosphate layer crystallizes. Glasses with high silica content (conventional glass) form the silica-rich layer first followed by a calcium phosphate layer on top. However, glasses with low silica content (invert glass) form both layers simultaneously. The rate of apatite formation decreases with increasing SiO2 content, especially in the region of conventional glass compositions. Ion release rates decreases as SiO2 content increases, with a significant change occurring at the compositional boundary between invert and conventional glasses.

  12. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Shear Bond Strength of Adhesives to Primary Teeth Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Farokh Gisovar, Elham; Hedayati, Nassim; Shadman, Niloofar; Shafiee, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: CPP-ACP (Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate) has an important role in caries prevention in pediatric patients. This study was done, because of the great use of CPP-ACP and the need for restoration for teeth treated with CPP-ACP as well as the importance of shear bond strength of adhesives in the success of restorations. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel of primary teeth molars. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 180 extracted primary molars. They were randomly divided into 6 groups and each group was divided into 2 subgroups (treated with CPP-ACP and untreated). In subgroups with CPP-ACP, enamel was treated with CPP-ACP paste 1 h/d for 5 days. Types of adhesives that were evaluated in this study were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE, AdheSE One F, single Bond 2, SE Bond, and Adper Prompt L-Pop. Shear bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine and mode of failure was evaluated under stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by T test, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey and Fisher exact test using SPSS18. P < 0.05 was considered as significance level. Results: Shear bond strengths of different adhesive systems to enamel of primary teeth treated and untreated with CPP-ACP showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Mode of failure in all groups regardless of CPP-ACP administration was mainly adhesive type. Our results indicated that CPP-ACP did not affect shear bond strength of studied adhesives to primary teeth enamel. Conclusions: To have a successful and durable composite restoration, having a high strength bonding is essential. Considering the wide use of CPP-ACP in preventing tooth decay and the role of adhesive shear bond strength (SBS) in success of composite restoration, we conducted the present study to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP on the SBS of adhesives to primary teeth

  13. Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate and shear bond strength of adhesives to primary teeth enamel.

    PubMed

    Farokh Gisovar, Elham; Hedayati, Nassim; Shadman, Niloofar; Shafiee, Leila

    2015-02-01

    CPP-ACP (Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate) has an important role in caries prevention in pediatric patients. This study was done, because of the great use of CPP-ACP and the need for restoration for teeth treated with CPP-ACP as well as the importance of shear bond strength of adhesives in the success of restorations. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel of primary teeth molars. This in vitro study was conducted on 180 extracted primary molars. They were randomly divided into 6 groups and each group was divided into 2 subgroups (treated with CPP-ACP and untreated). In subgroups with CPP-ACP, enamel was treated with CPP-ACP paste 1 h/d for 5 days. Types of adhesives that were evaluated in this study were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE, AdheSE One F, single Bond 2, SE Bond, and Adper Prompt L-Pop. Shear bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine and mode of failure was evaluated under stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by T test, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey and Fisher exact test using SPSS18. P < 0.05 was considered as significance level. Shear bond strengths of different adhesive systems to enamel of primary teeth treated and untreated with CPP-ACP showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Mode of failure in all groups regardless of CPP-ACP administration was mainly adhesive type. Our results indicated that CPP-ACP did not affect shear bond strength of studied adhesives to primary teeth enamel. To have a successful and durable composite restoration, having a high strength bonding is essential. Considering the wide use of CPP-ACP in preventing tooth decay and the role of adhesive shear bond strength (SBS) in success of composite restoration, we conducted the present study to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP on the SBS of adhesives to primary teeth enamel.

  14. Method of waste stabilization with dewatered chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D.

    2010-06-29

    A method of stabilizing a waste in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC). The method consists of preparing a slurry including the waste, water, an oxide binder, and a phosphate binder. The slurry is then allowed to cure to a solid, hydrated CBPC matrix. Next, bound water within the solid, hydrated CBPC matrix is removed. Typically, the bound water is removed by applying heat to the cured CBPC matrix. Preferably, the quantity of heat applied to the cured CBPC matrix is sufficient to drive off water bound within the hydrated CBPC matrix, but not to volatalize other non-water components of the matrix, such as metals and radioactive components. Typically, a temperature range of between 100.degree. C.-200.degree. C. will be sufficient. In another embodiment of the invention wherein the waste and water have been mixed prior to the preparation of the slurry, a select amount of water may be evaporated from the waste and water mixture prior to preparation of the slurry. Another aspect of the invention is a direct anyhydrous CBPC fabrication method wherein water is removed from the slurry by heating and mixing the slurry while allowing the slurry to cure. Additional aspects of the invention are ceramic matrix waste forms prepared by the methods disclosed above.

  15. [Adsorption of Phosphate by Lanthanum Hydroxide/Natural Zeolite Composites from Low Concentration Phosphate Solution].

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-wei; Wang, Hong; Zhan, Yan-hui; Chen, Dong-mei

    2016-01-15

    A series of composites of lanthanum hydroxide/natural zeolite ( La( OH) 3/NZ composites) were prepared by co-precipitation method, and these composites were used as adsorbents to remove phosphate from aqueous solution. The phosphate adsorption capacities of different composites prepared with different precipitated pH values were compared in batch mode. The adsorption characteristics of phosphate from aqueous solution on the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11 was investigated using batch experiments. The results showed that the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH values of 5-7 and 13 had a low adsorption capacity for phosphate in aqueous solution, while the La( OH) 3/NZ composites prepared with the precipitated pH values of 9-12 exhibited much higher phosphate adsorption capacity. The phosphate adsorption capacity of the La (OH)3/NZ composite increased with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 9 to 11, but remained basically unchanged with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 11 to 12. The equilibrium adsorption data of phosphate from aqueous solution on the La ( OH ) 3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11 could be described by the Langmuir isotherm model with the predicted maximum phosphate adsorption of 44 mg x g(-1) (phosphate solution pH 7 and 30 degrees C). The kinetic data of phosphate adsorption from low concentration phosphate solution on the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11 well followed a pseudo-second-order model. The presence of Cl- and SO4(2-) in low concentration phosphate solution had no negative effect on phosphate adsorption onto the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11, while the presence of HCO3- slightly inhibited the adsorption of phosphate. Coexisting humic acid had a negative effect on the adsorption of phosphate at low concentration on the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the

  16. Effect of raw material ratios on the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-juan; Yuan, Zhi-long; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Lin-tao; Li, Jun-ming; Liu, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics is important in biomedical field. In this work, the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics was investigated with different liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios. X-ray diffractometer was applied to characterize its phase composition. The microstructure was imaged using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the compressive strength of the chemically bonded ceramics increased with the decrease of liquid-to-solid ratio due to the change of the packing density and the crystallinity of hydrated product. However, with the increase of MgO-to-KH2PO4 weight ratio, its compressive strength increased firstly and then decreased. The low compressive strength in lower MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be explained by the existence of the weak phase KH2PO4. However, the low value of compressive strength with the higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be caused by lack of the joined phase in the hydrated product. Besides, it has been found that the microstructures were different in these two cases by the scanning electron microscope. Colloidal structure appeared for the samples with lower liquid-to-solid and higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios possibly because of the existence of amorphous hydrated products. The optimization of both liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios was important to improve the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics.

  17. Ultrasonic Characterization of Interfaces in Composite Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Lobkis, O. I.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Cantrell, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The inverse determination of imperfect interfaces from reflection spectra of normal and oblique incident ultrasonic waves in adhesive bonds of multidirectional composites is investigated. The oblique measurements are complicated by the highly dispersed nature of oblique wave spectra at frequencies above 3MHz. Different strategies for bond property reconstruction, including a modulation method, are discussed. The relation of measured interfacial spring density to the physico-chemical model of a composite interface described by polymer molecular bonds to emulate loss of molecular strength on an adhesive composite interface is discussed. This potentially relates the interfacial (adhesion) strength (number of bonds at the adhesive substrate interface) to the spring constant (stiffness) area density (flux), which is an ultrasonically measurable parameter.

  18. Ultrasonic characterization of interfaces in composite bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, N.; Lobkis, O. I.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Cantrell, J. H.

    2011-06-23

    The inverse determination of imperfect interfaces from reflection spectra of normal and oblique incident ultrasonic waves in adhesive bonds of multidirectional composites is investigated. The oblique measurements are complicated by the highly dispersed nature of oblique wave spectra at frequencies above 3MHz. Different strategies for bond property reconstruction, including a modulation method, are discussed. The relation of measured interfacial spring density to the physico-chemical model of a composite interface described by polymer molecular bonds to emulate loss of molecular strength on an adhesive composite interface is discussed. This potentially relates the interfacial (adhesion) strength (number of bonds at the adhesive substrate interface) to the spring constant (stiffness) area density (flux), which is an ultrasonically measurable parameter.

  19. Wollastonite based-Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics with lead oxide contents under gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colorado, H. A.; Pleitt, J.; Hiel, C.; Yang, J. M.; Hahn, H. T.; Castano, C. H.

    2012-06-01

    The shielding properties to gamma rays as well as the effect of lead concentration incorporated into Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics (CBPCs) composites are presented. The Wollastonite-based CBPC was fabricated by mixing a patented aqueous phosphoric acid formulation with Wollastonite powder. CBPC has been proved to be good structural material, with excellent thermal resistant properties, and research already showed their potential for radiation shielding applications. Wollastonite-based CBPC is a composite material itself with several crystalline and amorphous phases. Irradiation experiments were conducted on different Wollastonite-based CBPCs with lead oxide. Radiation shielding potential, attenuation coefficients in a broad range of energies pertinent to engineering applications and density experiments showing the effect of the PbO additions (to improve gamma shielding capabilities) are also presented. Microstructure was identified by using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  20. Syntactic foam composites and bonding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, R.J.

    1980-09-01

    A manufacturing process has been developed to produce billets molded from a composite of carbon microspheres, a polyimide resin, and carbon fibers. The billets then are machined to configuration which results in extremely sharp and fragile edges on one part. To strengthen these parts, a parylene coating is applied, after which the parts are assembled with other parts by bonding. Bonding and assembly problems are discussed in detail; other problems encountered are summarized, and several are referenced to previous reports.

  1. Mechanisms of Bond Cleavage during Manganese Oxide and UV Degradation of Glyphosate: Results from Phosphate Oxygen Isotopes and Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Jaisi, Deb P; Li, Hui; Wallace, Adam F; Paudel, Prajwal; Sun, Mingjing; Balakrishna, Avula; Lerch, Robert N

    2016-11-16

    Degradation of glyphosate in the presence of manganese oxide and UV light was analyzed using phosphate oxygen isotope ratios and density function theory (DFT). The preference of C-P or C-N bond cleavage was found to vary with changing glyphosate/manganese oxide ratios, indicating the potential role of sorption-induced conformational changes on the composition of intermediate degradation products. Isotope data confirmed that one oxygen atom derived solely from water was incorporated into the released phosphate during glyphosate degradation, and this might suggest similar nucleophilic substitution at P centers and C-P bond cleavage both in manganese oxide- and UV light-mediated degradation. The DFT results reveal that the C-P bond could be cleaved by water, OH(-) or (•)OH, with the energy barrier opposing bond dissociation being lowest in the presence of the radical species, and that C-N bond cleavage is favored by the formation of both nitrogen- and carbon-centered radicals. Overall, these results highlight the factors controlling the dominance of C-P or C-N bond cleavage that determines the composition of intermediate/final products and ultimately the degradation pathway.

  2. Stabilization of hazardous ash waste with newberyite-rich chemically bonded magnesium phosphate ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Jeong, S.Y.

    1995-11-01

    A novel newberyite-rich magnesium-phosphate ceramic, intended for the stabilization of the US Department of Energy`s low-level mixed-waste streams, has been developed by an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and a phosphoric acid solution. The reaction slurry, formed at room temperature, sets rapidly and forms a lightweight hard ceramic with low open porosity and a high compression strength of {approx} 6,200 psi. It is a composite of stable mineral phases of newberyite, luenebergite, and residual Mg oxide. Using this matrix, the authors developed superior waste forms for a surrogate ash waste stream. The final waste form is a low-permeability structural-quality ceramic, in which hazardous contaminants are chemically fixed and physically encapsulated. The compression strength of the waste form is an order of magnitude higher than the land disposal requirement, even at high waste loading. The high compression strength is attributed to stronger bonds in the waste form that result from participation of ash waste in the setting reactions. Long-term leaching studies show that the waste form is stable in an aqueous environment. The chemically bonded phosphate ceramic approach in this study may be a simple, inexpensive, and efficient method for fabricating high-performance waste forms either for stabilizing waste streams or for developing value-added construction materials from high-volume benign waste streams.

  3. Mechanical properties of magnesium ammonium phosphate cements and their zeolite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Subhan, W.; Chawla, N.

    1993-04-01

    Phosphate-bonded cements have been proposed as candidates for solidification and stabilization of mixed wastes. Magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) has been investigated as a candidate material. Detailed physical and mechanical properties of MAP cement are reported. It is synthesized by the route of reaction of calcined MgO and ammonium phosphate solution. Samples are made by setting the cement at room temperature and slight pressure. The porosity is reduced to {approximately}11% by impregnation of ammonium phosphate solution. Detailed mechanical properties such as flexural strength, fracture toughness and compression strength are reported and fracture mechanical analyses supported with scanning electron microscopy are provided. Properties of composites of these cements with zeolites, which may be used for containment of radioactive as well as chemical waste are studied. We demonstrate that the strengths of these composites compare well with portland cement even after 50% loading of zeolites. Fracture mechanical implications of such loadings are given.

  4. Method for Producing Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics and for Stabilizing Contaminants Encapsulated therein Utilizing Reducing Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    1999-05-05

    Known phosphate ceramic formulations are improved and the ability to produce iron-based phosphate ceramic systems is enabled by the addition of an oxidizing or reducing step during the acid-base reactions that form the phosphate ceramic products. The additives allow control of the rate of the acid-base reactions and concomitant heat generation. In an alternate embodiment, waste containing metal anions is stabilized in phosphate ceramic products by the addition of a reducing agent to the phosphate ceramic mixture. The reduced metal ions are more stable and/or reactive with the phosphate ions, resulting in the formation of insoluble metal species within the phosphate ceramic matrix, such that the resulting chemically bonded phosphate ceramic product has greater leach resistance.

  5. Method for producing chemically bonded phosphate ceramics and for stabilizing contaminants encapsulated therein utilizing reducing agents

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2000-01-01

    Known phosphate ceramic formulations are improved and the ability to produce iron-based phosphate ceramic systems is enabled by the addition of an oxidizing or reducing step during the acid-base reactions that form the phosphate ceramic products. The additives allow control of the rate of the acid-base reactions and concomitant heat generation. In an alternate embodiment, waste containing metal anions are stabilized in phosphate ceramic products by the addition of a reducing agent to the phosphate ceramic mixture. The reduced metal ions are more stable and/or reactive with the phosphate ions, resulting in the formation of insoluble metal species within the phosphate ceramic matrix, such that the resulting chemically bonded phosphate ceramic product has greater leach resistance.

  6. EVALUATION OF CHEMICALLY BONDED PHOSPHATE CERAMICS FOR MERCURY STABILIZATION OF A MIXED SYNTHETIC WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This experimental study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization and encapsulation technique developed by Argonne National Laboratory, called the Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics technology for Hg- and HgCl2-contaminated synthetic waste materials. Leachability ...

  7. EVALUATION OF CHEMICALLY BONDED PHOSPHATE CERAMICS FOR MERCURY STABILIZATION OF A MIXED SYNTHETIC WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This experimental study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization and encapsulation technique developed by Argonne National Laboratory, called the Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics technology for Hg- and HgCl2-contaminated synthetic waste materials. Leachability ...

  8. Polyimide adhesives for titanium and composite bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    Approach results in synthesis of addition polyimide adhesives with exceptional high temperature capabilities that show excellent potential for bonding titanium metal, polyimide/graphite composites, and combinations of these materials. Adhesives compatible with materials used in high performance aircraft and spacecraft structures also prove highly desirable in many other applications involving similar adherents.

  9. Production of biopolymer composites by particle bonding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article describes a new process, particle-bonding technology, to produce biopolymer composites from agricultural commodities. In this technology, matrix-protein complexes are formed by the interaction of micrometer-scale matrix material with an adhesive protein, zein. This spontaneous process m...

  10. Biomimetic chitosan-calcium phosphate composites with potential applications as bone substitutes: preparation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Constantin E; Popa, Marcel I; Verestiuc, Liliana

    2012-04-01

    A novel biomimetic technique for obtaining chitosan-calcium phosphates (Cs-CP) scaffolds are presented: calcium phosphates are precipitated from its precursors, CaCl(2) and NaH(2) PO(4) on the Cs matrix, under physiological conditions (human body temperature and body fluid pH; 37°C and pH = 7.2, respectively). Materials composition and structure have been confirmed by various techniques: elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). FTIR and SEM data have shown the arrangement of the calcium phosphates-hydroxyapatite (CP-Hap) onto Cs matrix. In this case the polymer is acting as glue, bonding the calcium phosphates crystals. Behavior in biological simulated fluids (phosphate buffer solution-PBS and PBS-albumin) revealed an important contribution of the chelation between -NH3(+) and Ca(2+) on the scaffold interaction with aqueous mediums; increased quantities of chitosan in composites permit the interaction with human albumin and improve the retention of fluid. The composites are slightly degraded by the lysozyme which facilitates an in vivo degradation control of bone substitutes. Modulus of elasticity is strongly dependent of the ratio chitosan/calcium phosphates and recommends the obtained biomimetic composites as promising materials for a prospective bone application. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Analysis of bolted and bonded composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Seng C.

    1992-09-01

    In the analysis and design of bonded and bolted composite joints, certain input data are required that are not readily available. Many engineering hours at the depots are expended in obtaining the required information. Even when the data are obtained, the accuracy of it is sometimes questionable. The availability of this information in a computerized database would greatly facilitate composite joint analysis and design. The work described in this report involved an extensive search of the technical literature for adhesive and composite material property data as well as bonded and bolted joint properties. The data collected in the literature search were tabulated into a user friendly format for ready retrieval. The data in this tabulation include, in addition to material properties, discussions of fastener and joint design parameters, loading and environmental effects, and test methods.

  12. Seam bonding of graphite reinforced composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D.; Fox, Robert L.; Tyeryar, James R.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the design features and operating characteristics of a method for the joining of composite parts, at a rate of 2 to 6 inches/min, in which the heating process responsible for adhesive flow at 800 F is focused upon the overlapped seam. The heating element is a self-tuning solid state power oscillator whose ferrite's toroid geometry generates a uniform, concentrated magnetic flux in the component to be bonded. Specimens cut from graphite/epoxy panels bonded with epoxy-phenolic adhesive by this process have exhibited average lap-shear strengths of the order of 3400 lbs/sq in.

  13. Effective solidification/stabilisation of mercury-contaminated wastes using zeolites and chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xinyan; Xiong, Ya; Wang, Guoping; Zheng, Na

    2015-02-01

    In this study, two kinds of zeolites materials (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) were added to the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic processes to treat mercury-contaminated wastes. Strong promotion effects of zeolites (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) on the stability of mercury in the wastes were obtained and these technologies showed promising advantages toward the traditional Portland cement process, i.e. using Portland cement as a solidification agent and natural or thiol-functionalised zeolite as a stabilisation agent. Not only is a high stabilisation efficiency (lowered the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Hg by above 10%) obtained, but also a lower dosage of solidification (for thiol-functionalised zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.5 g g(-1) and 0.7 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) and stabilisation agents (for natural zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.35 g g(-1) and 0.4 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) were used compared with the Portland cement process. Treated by thiol-functionalised zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic under optimum parameters, the waste containing 1500 mg Hg kg(-1) passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test. Moreover, stabilisation/solidification technology using natural zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic also passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test (the mercury waste containing 625 mg Hg kg(-1)). Moreover, the presence of chloride and phosphate did not have a negative effect on the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic/thiol-functionalised zeolite treatment process; thus, showing potential for future application in treatment of 'difficult-to-manage' mercury-contaminated wastes or landfill disposal with high phosphate and chloride content. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Dental Composites with Calcium / Strontium Phosphates and Polylysine.

    PubMed

    Panpisut, Piyaphong; Liaqat, Saad; Zacharaki, Eleni; Xia, Wendy; Petridis, Haralampos; Young, Anne Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This study developed light cured dental composites with added monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), tristrontium phosphate (TSrP) and antimicrobial polylysine (PLS). The aim was to produce composites that have enhanced water sorption induced expansion, can promote apatite precipitation and release polylysine. Experimental composite formulations consisted of light activated dimethacrylate monomers combined with 80 wt% powder. The powder phase contained a dental glass with and without PLS (2.5 wt%) and/or reactive phosphate fillers (15 wt% TSrP and 10 wt% MCPM). The commercial composite, Z250, was used as a control. Monomer conversion and calculated polymerization shrinkage were assessed using FTIR. Subsequent mass or volume changes in water versus simulated body fluid (SBF) were quantified using gravimetric studies. These were used, along with Raman and SEM, to assess apatite precipitation on the composite surface. PLS release was determined using UV spectroscopy. Furthermore, biaxial flexural strengths after 24 hours of SBF immersion were obtained. Monomer conversion of the composites decreased upon the addition of phosphate fillers (from 76 to 64%) but was always higher than that of Z250 (54%). Phosphate addition increased water sorption induced expansion from 2 to 4% helping to balance the calculated polymerization shrinkage of ~ 3.4%. Phosphate addition promoted apatite precipitation from SBF. Polylysine increased the apatite layer thickness from ~ 10 to 20 μm after 4 weeks. The novel composites showed a burst release of PLS (3.7%) followed by diffusion-controlled release irrespective of phosphate addition. PLS and phosphates decreased strength from 154 MPa on average by 17% and 18%, respectively. All formulations, however, had greater strength than the ISO 4049 requirement of > 80 MPa. The addition of MCPM with TSrP promoted hygroscopic expansion, and apatite formation. These properties are expected to help compensate polymerization shrinkage and help

  15. Dental Composites with Calcium / Strontium Phosphates and Polylysine

    PubMed Central

    Panpisut, Piyaphong; Liaqat, Saad; Zacharaki, Eleni; Xia, Wendy; Petridis, Haralampos; Young, Anne Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study developed light cured dental composites with added monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), tristrontium phosphate (TSrP) and antimicrobial polylysine (PLS). The aim was to produce composites that have enhanced water sorption induced expansion, can promote apatite precipitation and release polylysine. Materials and Methods Experimental composite formulations consisted of light activated dimethacrylate monomers combined with 80 wt% powder. The powder phase contained a dental glass with and without PLS (2.5 wt%) and/or reactive phosphate fillers (15 wt% TSrP and 10 wt% MCPM). The commercial composite, Z250, was used as a control. Monomer conversion and calculated polymerization shrinkage were assessed using FTIR. Subsequent mass or volume changes in water versus simulated body fluid (SBF) were quantified using gravimetric studies. These were used, along with Raman and SEM, to assess apatite precipitation on the composite surface. PLS release was determined using UV spectroscopy. Furthermore, biaxial flexural strengths after 24 hours of SBF immersion were obtained. Results Monomer conversion of the composites decreased upon the addition of phosphate fillers (from 76 to 64%) but was always higher than that of Z250 (54%). Phosphate addition increased water sorption induced expansion from 2 to 4% helping to balance the calculated polymerization shrinkage of ~ 3.4%. Phosphate addition promoted apatite precipitation from SBF. Polylysine increased the apatite layer thickness from ~ 10 to 20 μm after 4 weeks. The novel composites showed a burst release of PLS (3.7%) followed by diffusion-controlled release irrespective of phosphate addition. PLS and phosphates decreased strength from 154 MPa on average by 17% and 18%, respectively. All formulations, however, had greater strength than the ISO 4049 requirement of > 80 MPa. Conclusion The addition of MCPM with TSrP promoted hygroscopic expansion, and apatite formation. These properties are expected to help

  16. How Bonding in Manganous Phosphates Affects their Mn(II)-(31)P Hyperfine Interactions.

    PubMed

    Un, Sun; Bruch, Eduardo M

    2015-11-02

    Manganous phosphates have been postulated to play an important role in cells as antioxidants. In situ Mn(II) electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy has been used to measure their speciation in cells. The analyses of such ENDOR spectra and the quantification of cellular Mn(II) phosphates has been based on comparisons to in vitro model complexes and heuristic modeling. In order to put such analyses on a more physical and theoretical footing, the Mn(II)-(31)P hyperfine interactions of various Mn(II) phosphate complexes have been measured by 95 GHz ENDOR spectroscopy. The dipolar components of these interactions remained relatively constant as a function of pH, esterification, and phosphate chain length, while the isotropic contributions were significantly affected. Counterintuitively, although the manganese-phosphate bonds are weakened by protonation and esterification, they lead to larger isotropic values, indicating higher unpaired-electron spin densities at the phosphorus nuclei. By comparison, extending the phosphate chain with additional phosphate groups lowers the spin density. Density functional theory calculations of model complexes quantitatively reproduced the measured hyperfine couplings and provided detailed insights into how bonding in Mn(II) phosphate complexes modulates the electron-spin polarization and consequently their isotropic hyperfine couplings. These results show that various classes of phosphates can be identified by their ENDOR spectra and provide a theoretical framework for understanding the in situ (31)P ENDOR spectra of cellular Mn(II) complexes.

  17. Phosphate-intercalated Ca-Fe-layered double hydroxides: Crystal structure, bonding character, and release kinetics of phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Myong A.; Woo Kim, Tae; Paek, Mi-Jeong; Ha, Hyung-Wook; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2011-01-15

    The nitrate-form of Ca-Fe-layered double hydroxide (Ca-Fe-LDH) was synthesized via co-precipitation method, and its phosphate-intercalates were prepared by ion-exchange reaction. According to X-ray diffraction analysis, the Ca-Fe-LDH-NO{sub 3}{sup -} compound and its H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -}-intercalate showed hexagonal layered structures, whereas the ion-exchange reaction with HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} caused a frustration of the layer ordering of LDH. Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy clearly demonstrated that the Ca-Fe-LDH lattice with trivalent iron ions was well-maintained after the ion-exchange with HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -}. Under acidic conditions, phosphate ions were slowly released from the Ca-Fe-LDH lattice and the simultaneous release of hydroxide caused the neutralization of acidic media. Fitting analysis based on kinetic models indicated a heterogeneous diffusion process of phosphates and a distinct dependence of release rate on the charge of phosphates. This study strongly suggested that Ca-Fe-LDH is applicable as bifunctional vector for slow release of phosphate fertilizer and for the neutralization of acid soil. -- Graphical abstract: We synthesized phosphate-intercalated Ca-Fe-LDH materials that can act as bifunctional inorganic vectors for the slow release of phosphate fertilizer and also the neutralization of acid soil. Fitting analysis based on kinetic models indicated a heterogeneous diffusion process of phosphates and a distinct dependence of release rate on the charge of phosphates. Display Omitted Research Highlights: {yields} The phosphate forms of Ca-Fe-layered double hydroxide (Ca-Fe-LDH) were synthesized via co-precipitation method. The crystal structure, bonding character, and release kinetics of phosphate of the phosphate-intercalates were investigated. These Ca-Fe-LDH materials are applicable as bifunctional vector for slow release of phosphate fertilizer and for the neutralization of acid soil.

  18. Failure analysis of resin composite bonded to ceramic.

    PubMed

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Mecholsky, John J

    2003-12-01

    To use fractographic principles to classify the mode of failure of resin composite bonded to ceramic specimens after microtensile testing. A leucite-based ceramic (IPS Empress)-E1) and a lithia disilicate-based ceramic (IPS Empress2)-E2) were selected for the study. Fifteen blocks of E1 and E2 were polished through 1 microm alumina abrasive. The following ceramic surface treatments were applied to three blocks of each ceramic: (1) 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HF) for 2 min; (2) 4% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 2 min; (3) Silane coating (S); (4) HF+S; (5) APF+S. An adhesive resin and a resin composite were applied to all treated surfaces and light cured. Twenty bar specimens for each group were prepared from the composite-ceramic blocks and stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 30 days before loading to failure under tension in an Instron testing machine. Fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray dot mapping. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA, Duncan's multiple range test, and Weibull analyses. Similar surface treatments were associated with significantly different bond strengths and modes of failures for E1 and E2. All fractures occurred within the adhesion zone. The microstructural difference between etched E1 and E2 ceramics was a major controlling factor on adhesion. The quality of the bond should not be assessed based on bond strength data alone. Mode of failure and fractographic analyses should provide important information leading to predictions of clinical performance limits.

  19. The oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate in Elkhorn Slough, California: A tracer for phosphate sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Karen; Cade-Menun, Barbara J.; Paytan, Adina

    2006-11-01

    Elkhorn Slough, a small seasonal estuary in central California, has been subjected to increased nutrient loading from agricultural and other non-point sources. However, because nutrients do not behave conservatively, tracing nutrient sources and cycling in ecosystems like Elkhorn Slough has been difficult to assess. This is particularly true of phosphorus (P), which has only one stable isotope and cannot be used as an isotopic tracer. However, isotopic fractionation of oxygen in phosphate at surface water temperatures only occurs as a result of enzyme-mediated, biochemical reactions. Thus, if phosphate demand is low relative to input and is not heavily cycled within the ecosystem, the δ18O of phosphate will reflect the isotopic composition of phosphate sources to the system. We utilized the δ18O of dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) within the main channel of the slough and nearby Moss Landing Harbor and the δ18O of reactive phosphate from sediment and soil samples collected within the watershed to understand phosphate sources and cycling within Elkhorn Slough. Trends in the δ18O of DIP were seasonally consistent with high values near the mouth reflecting oceanic phosphate (19.1‰-20.3‰), dropping to a minimum value near Hummingbird Island in the central slough (point source, 14.1‰-14.4‰), and increasing again near the head of the slough, reflecting fertilizer input (18.9‰-19.3‰). Reactive phosphate δ18O values extracted from sediments and soils in the watershed range from 10.6‰ in a drainage ditch to 22.3‰ in creek sediments near agriculture fields. The wide range in phosphate δ18O values reflects the variations in land use and application of different fertilizers in this agriculturally dominated landscape. These data suggest that phosphate δ18O can be an effective tool for identifying P sources and understanding phosphate dynamics in estuarine ecosystems.

  20. Mechanical properties of tricalcium phosphate-alumina composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakka, S.; Ben Ayed, F.; Bouaziz, J.

    2012-02-01

    Tricalcium phosphate and alumina powder were mixed in order to elaborate biphasic ceramics composites. This study deals to produce bioceramics composites sintered at various temperatures for differents times. The characterization of samples, before and after the sintering process was investigated, using X-Ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, 31P and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance and differential thermal analysis. Mechanical properties of biphasic composites were studied using Brazilian test. The tricalcium phosphate - 75 wt% alumina composites mechanical resistance increased with sintered temperature. The mechanical resistance reach it's optimum value (8.6 MPa) at 1550°C for two hours.

  1. Reactivity of zirconia with phosphate-bonded investments for hot-pressing.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Kentaro; Nakamura, Yoshinori; Ban, Seiji; Kawai, Tatsushi; Tanaka, Yoshinobu

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the reactivity of zirconia to phosphate-bonded investment on the process of hot-pressing technique. Disc-shaped specimens, 16 mm diameter and 0.4mm thick were prepared by cutting and grinding. These specimens were finally sintered. Half of them were sandblasted. The non-sandblasted specimens were used for controls. Both of zirconia discs with and without sandblasting were invested into the three kinds of phosphate-bonded investment. The investments were fired and broken to take out specimens. The biaxial strengths were measured in the way of the biaxial flexural tests according to ISO-6872. The biaxial strengths were ranged 762-1200 MPa at the average. The biaxial strengths of sandblasted zirconia discs heated with phosphate-bonded investment were decreased significantly (p < 0.01). SEM and EPMA revealed that the various compounds were observed on the sandblasted specimens. XRD revealed that surfaces of specimens heated with the phosphate-bonded investment showed the formation of phosphate compounds. The phosphate compounds inhibit stress-induction phase transformation of zirconia and decrease the biaxial strength. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative strength of metal-ceramic and metal-composite bonds after extended thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Shimoe, S; Tanoue, N; Yanagida, H; Atsuta, M; Koizumi, H; Matsumura, H

    2004-07-01

    The relative strengths of ceramic-to-metal and composite-to-metal bonds were compared after prolonged thermocycling. A total of 104 cast discs were produced from a gold alloy (Pontor LFC). A ceramic material (Duceragold) was fused to 24 discs to assess the strength of the metal-ceramic bond. An indirect composite material (New Metacolor Infis) was bonded to the remaining discs after surface preparation by Rocatec tribochemical coating, tin plating and priming with a phosphate conditioner [10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), Cesead II], priming with a thione conditioner (V-Primer) or no treatment (unprimed control). Shear bond strengths were determined before and after thermocycling at 20,000 and 100,000 cycles. Pre-thermocycling bond strengths were ranked in the order: metal-ceramic (40.5 MPa); Rocatec treatment (33.1 MPa) and tin plating-MDP (31.0 MPa); V-Primer (20.9 MPa); and control (11.9 MPa). The bond strengths of the first three groups were not significantly different after 20,000 thermocycles, whereas those of the V-Primer and control groups were significantly reduced. After extended thermocycling (100,000 cycles) the metal-ceramic group had the highest mean shear bond strength (28.5 MPa; P < 0.05), followed by the Rocatec (23.9 MPa) and tin plating-MDP (22.1 MPa) groups. The metal-ceramic bond was the most durable, although its strength was reduced by 29.6% after extended thermocycling. On the basis of these results, we recommend the Rocatec and tin plating-MDP systems for composite-to-metal bonding. Metal-ceramic bonding, however, is superior to metal-composite bonding within the limitation of the current experiment.

  3. Formation of chemically bonded ceramics with magnesium dihydrogen phosphate binder

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young

    2004-08-17

    A new method for combining magnesium oxide, MgO, and magnesium dihydrogen phosphate to form an inexpensive compactible ceramic to stabilize very low solubility metal oxides, ashes, swarfs, and other iron or metal-based additives, to create products and waste forms which can be poured or dye cast, and to reinforce and strengthen the ceramics formed by the addition of fibers to the initial ceramic mixture.

  4. Criterion for mixed mode fracture in composite bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A study was undertaken to characterize the debond growth mechanism of adhesively bonded composite joints under mode I, mixed mode I-II, and mode II static loadings. The bonded system consisted of graphite-epoxy composite adherends bonded with a toughened epoxy adhesive. The mode I, mode II and mixed mode I-II fracture energies of the tested adhesives were found to be equal to each other. The criterion for mixed mode fracture in composite bonded joints was found.

  5. Porosity of dental phosphate-bonded investments after setting and heating processes.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Kenzo; Bae, Ji-Young; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2012-01-01

    Porosities of set and burnout compacts of phosphate-bonded investments were determined. A gas pycnometer was used to measure the volumes, and hence the densities, of fine powders and porous compacts. Porosities of set and burnout compacts were then obtained from these data for as-received powders and dry set compacts by a numerical simulation method, subsequently leading on to the estimated compositions of conventional and rapid-heating investments used in this study. Excess water content in the hardening investment compact was evaluated as a function of setting time elapsed from the start of mixing. Porosities were about 24-32% for set compacts and 43% for burnout compacts, which well agreed with the numerically computed results. It was concluded that the functional composition of investment powder needed to achieve the optimal porosity as well as process parameters such as water-powder (W/P) ratio and keeping time of mixed investment casting slurry before heat treatment could be determined using the numerical simulation method developed in this study.

  6. Equipment and techniques for rapid bonding of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D.; Fox, Robert L.; Johnston, David F.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid adhesive bonding concepts have been developed at NASA Langley which employ induction heating of thermoplastic composite matrices directly along the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, the supports, and the fixtures of the bonding assembly. Short term thermal cycling and water boil exposures have shown encouraging environmental stability for these rapid bonds. These bonding techniques have been extended to continuous seam bonding of metallic and composite panels with promising results for the bonding of both like and unlike adherends; the portability of the apparatus suggests that field repairs of damaged structures are possible.

  7. Effect of surface treatments and bonding agents on the bond strength of repaired composites.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega; De Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Peris, Alessandra Rezende; Mitsui, Fabio Hiroyuki Ogata; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2007-01-01

    An adequate repair procedure depends on high bond strength between the existing composite and the new composite. To evaluate the effect of surface treatments and bonding procedures on the bond strength of repairs performed 24 hours after composite polymerization. Composite specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Specimens were allocated into 12 groups (N=10) according to the combination of surface treatment (none, air abrasion, diamond bur) and bonding procedure (none, Single Bond after H(3)PO(4) cleansing, Clearfil SE Bond after H(3)PO(4) cleansing, Clearfil SE Bond without H(3)PO(4) cleansing). The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the composite was tested in nonrepaired specimens. Twenty-four hours after repair, specimens were sectioned into three slabs and trimmed to an hourglass shape (1 mm(2) area). Slabs were tested under tension and mean bond strengths analyzed with two-way analysis of variance/Tukey and Dunnett tests (alpha=5%). Two groups resulted in repair bond strengths similar to composite UTS: air abrasion combined with Clearfil SE Bond after H(3)PO(4) cleansing, and air abrasion combined with Clearfil SE Bond without H(3)PO(4) cleansing. Combinations of surface treatments and bonding procedures were not statistically different. When repair procedure was performed 24 hours after composite polymerization, different combinations of surface treatments and bonding procedures affected repair bond strength similarly. There was no statistical difference between the repair bond strength of groups air-abraded and bonded with the self-etching system and composite UTS. Only air abrasion associated with a self-etching system provided repair bond strength comparable to composite UTS.

  8. Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.; Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented durable redundant joint. Both designs involve honeycomb sandwich structures with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined using adhesively bonded doublers.Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage within a structure. For structures that include multiple material systems, such as the joint designs under consideration, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be accounted for drastically increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, intraply matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The bonded joints were modeled using highly parametric, explicitly solved finite element models, with damage modeling implemented via custom user-written subroutines. Each ply was discretely meshed using three-dimensional solid elements. Layers of cohesive elements were included between each ply to account for the possibility of delaminations and were used to model the adhesive layers forming the joint. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and the predicted failure mechanism(s).

  9. Rapid adhesive bonding of advanced composites and titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryart, J. R.; Hodgest, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid adhesive bonding (RAB) concepts utilize a toroid induction technique to heat the adhesive bond line directly. This technique was used to bond titanium overlap shear specimens with 3 advanced thermoplastic adhesives and APC-2 (graphite/PEEK) composites with PEEK film. Bond strengths equivalent to standard heated-platen press bonds were produced with large reductions in process time. RAB produced very strong bonds in APC-2 adherend specimens; the APC-2 adherends were highly resistant to delamination. Thermal cycling did not significantly affect the shear strengths of RAB titanium bonds with polyimide adhesives. A simple ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation process was found promising for evaluating bond quality.

  10. Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Dissolved Inorganic Phosphate in the Monterey Bay and California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, K.; Paytan, A.; Kendall, C.

    2001-12-01

    The marine biogeochemical cycle of phosphorus (P) is intricately linked to the atmospheric abundance of CO2 through its role as an important major nutrient. Phosphorus is considered to be a limiting nutrient in some oceanic systems (Cotner et al., 1997; Karl et al., 1995; Michaels et al., 1996; Wu et al., 2000) and is possibly the ultimate limiting macronutrient for marine productivity (Broecker and Peng, 1982; Delaney, 1998; Toggweiler, 1999; Tyrrell, 1999). Despite the recognition of the important role P plays in regulating marine productivity and thus the "biological pump" relatively little is known about P cycling within the ocean. We have mapped spatial and temporal variations in the oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate within the Monterey Bay and along a transect in the California Current. The P-O bond is resistant to inorganic hydrolysis and, in the temperature range of the ocean, is only broken by enzyme mediated reactions. Therefore, the d18O of inorganic phosphate should reflect the degree of recycling of phosphate within the ecosystem where greater recycling corresponds to increased equilibration with d18O of seawater. We have applied a method for extraction of dissolved inorganic phosphate from seawater and purification to silver phosphate for oxygen isotopic analysis (McLaughlin et al., 2000). These results are the first step in determining how phosphate recycling varies spatially and throughout the water column.

  11. Bench-Scale Evaluation Of Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Technology To Stabilize Mercury Waste Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    This bench-scale study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization of mercury (Hg) and mercuric chloride-containing surrogate test materials by the chemically bonded phosphate ceramics technology. This study was performed as part of a U.S. EPA program to evaluate treatment and d...

  12. Bench-Scale Evaluation Of Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Technology To Stabilize Mercury Waste Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    This bench-scale study was conducted to evaluate the stabilization of mercury (Hg) and mercuric chloride-containing surrogate test materials by the chemically bonded phosphate ceramics technology. This study was performed as part of a U.S. EPA program to evaluate treatment and d...

  13. Effect of temporary filling materials on repair bond strengths of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Ali; Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi; Belli, Sema

    2008-08-01

    Endodontic access cavities sometimes can be prepared through a permanent composite restoration. Between the appointments, temporary cements are used to seal access cavities and may have negative effect on bonding of further composite restoration. The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength of composite to composite which had been in contact with various temporary filling materials. Standard cavities were prepared on 160 acrylic resin blocks, obturated with composite resin (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray, Japan) and randomly divided into eight groups (n = 20). Group 1 received no treatment. From group 2-8, composite surfaces were covered with the following cements temporarily: Zinc-oxide/calcium-sulphate (Cavit-G, ESPE, Germany), two different Zinc-Oxide-Eugenol materials (ZnOE, Cavex, Holland and IRM, Dentsply, USA), Zinc-phosphate cement (Adhesor, Spofa-Dental, Germany), Zinc-polycarboxylate cement (Adhesor-Carbofine, Spofa-Dental, Germany), Glass-Ionomer-Cement (Argion-Molar, Voco, Germany), or light curing temporary material (Clip, Voco, Germany). The cements were removed mechanically after 1 week storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C and composite surfaces were treated with a self-etch adhesive system (SE-Bond, Kuraray, Japan). Composite resin build-ups were created on composite surfaces. Shear bond strength values were measured using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data was calculated in MPa and statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Eugenol-containing cements significantly reduced shear bond strengths of composite to composite (p < 0.05), while the other temporary materials had no adverse effect on shear bond strength (p > 0.05). These findings suggested that temporary filling materials except eugenol-containing materials have no negative effect on composite repair bond strengths.

  14. Development of chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seung-Young

    1997-11-01

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramics have been developed by acid-base reactions between magnesium oxide and an acid phosphate at room temperature for stabilizing U.S. Department of Energy's low-level mixed waste streams that include hazardous chemicals and radioactive elements. Newberyite (MgHPOsb4.3Hsb2O)-rich magnesium phosphate ceramic was formed by an acid-base reaction between phosphoric acid and magnesium oxide. The reaction slurry, formed at room-temperature, sets rapidly and forms stable mineral phases of newberyite, lunebergite, and residual MgO. Rapid setting also generates heat due to exothermic acid-base reaction. The reaction was retarded by partially neutralizing the phosphoric acid solution by adding sodium or potassium hydroxide. This reduced the rate of reaction and heat generation and led to a practical way of producing novel magnesium potassium phosphate ceramic. This ceramic was formed by reacting stoichiometric amount of monopotassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals, MgO, and water, forming pure-phase of MgKPOsb4.6Hsb2O (MKP) with moderate exothermic reaction. Using this chemically bonded phosphate ceramic matrix, low-level mixed waste streams were stabilized, and superior waste forms in a monolithic structure were developed. The final waste forms showed low open porosity and permeability, and higher compression strength than the Land Disposal Requirements (LDRs). The novel MKP ceramic technology allowed us to develop operational size waste forms of 55 gal with good physical integrity. In this improved waste form, the hazardous contaminants such as RCRA heavy metals (Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, etc) were chemically fixed by their conversion into insoluble phosphate forms and physically encapsulated by the phosphate ceramic. In addition, chemically bonded phosphate ceramics stabilized radioactive elements such U and Pu. This was demonstrated with a detailed stabilization study on cerium used as a surrogate (chemically equivalent but nonradioactive

  15. Debonding defect detection of metal and composite bonding structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yuke; Wang, Xinjun; Li, Ping; Yang, Nengjun

    2017-06-01

    Metal and composite bonding structures are widely used in many industrial fields. But in the material production and processing and bond- ing process, the adhered surface is not clean, is between the two surface bonding with adhesive is not strict, the existence of gas, dust and other rea- sons, the adhesive structure foaming, deboning, bonding strength decrease- e, durability and reliability reduce etc. In this paper, a kind of typical metal and composite bonding structure was studied by electromagnetic ultrasonic testing. The results show that the results are obvious. The electromagnetic ultrasonic can be used to test the adhesion of metal and composite materials.

  16. Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers as Bonding Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-02

    59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 2 MAR 20 16 l. Your paper, entitl ed Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin ...Vandewalle /Civ/SGDTG (59th CSPG/SGVU) DECS I 5-009 PROTOCOL TITLE Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin -modified Glass lonomers as...Bonding Agents 1. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED B ond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin -modified Glass lonomers 2. IS THIS

  17. Shear bond strength between an indirect composite veneering material and zirconia ceramics after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Komine, Futoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuhisa; Saito, Ayako; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2009-12-01

    The present study evaluated the shear bond strength between an indirect composite material and zirconium dioxide (zirconia) ceramics after thermocycling. A total of 80 zirconia (Katana) discs were divided into five groups and primed with one of following agents: All Bond 2 Primer B (ABB), Alloy Primer (ALP), AZ Primer (AZP), Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP), and Porcelain Liner M Liquid A (PLA). An indirect composite material (Estenia C&B) was then bonded to the primed zirconia. One-half of the specimens (n = 8) in each group were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, and the remaining eight specimens were thermocycled 5,000 times before shear bond strength testing. Mean bond strengths before thermocycling varied from 10.1 to 15.6 MPa; bond strengths after thermocycling ranged from 4.3 to 17.6 MPa. The ALP group had the highest strengths after thermocycling; there were no significant differences among the PLA, AZP, and EOP groups. The bond strength values for PLA, AZP, EOP, and ALP did not decrease with thermocycling. The application of an acidic functional monomer containing carboxylic anhydride (4-META), phosphonic acid (6-MHPA), or phosphate monomer (MDP) provided durable bond strength between Estenia C&B indirect composite and Katana zirconia.

  18. Biomimetic synthesis of poly(propylene-fumarate)-calcium phosphate composites for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakimi Mehr, Dorna

    A novel in-situ co-precipitation process for the synthesis of poly(propylene-fumarate)-calcium phosphate composites was developed. In this process the calcium phosphate phase nucleates and grows in the presence of poly(propylene-fumarate) (PPF), in a novel two-solvent system including tetrahydrofuran (THF) and water. It was found that the presence of the organic solvent (THF) does not affect the phase evolution of the calcium phosphate. Both in the presence and absence of THF crystalline dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD, brushite) and poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAp) form, and transform to crystalline HAp after 24 hours of synthesis time. Contrary to the organic solvent, PPF has a significant influence on the calcium phosphate phase that forms in its presence. It is found that PPF provides a template for the formation of the calcium phosphate phase through a coordination bond between the calcium ion and the carbonyl group of the polymer. As a result of this templating, hydroxyapatite can form in a significantly shorter period of time (˜1 hr) compared to the system where PPF is not present (24 hrs). The nature of the calcium phosphate phase that forms in the presence of PPF depends on the molecular weight and concentration of PPF. High concentration of PPF in the composite (e.g. 80%) stabilizes an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) phase and hinders its transformation to crystalline apatite, while low concentration of PPF (e.g. 5%) promotes the formation of crystalline apatite. Higher molecular weight PPF (Mw = 4500) is found to be more efficient in stabilizing the amorphous phase compared to lower molecular weight PPF (Mw = 1800). While high molecular weight PPF stabilizes ACP, low molecular weight PPF promotes its conversion to crystalline apatite. TEM observations revealed that flake-like hydroxyapatite crystals form in the absence of PPF while spherical ACP particles form in a composite containing 80% PPF. The ACP nano-particles (50-100 nm in diameter

  19. Bond strengths of lingual orthodontic brackets bonded with light-cured composite resins cured by transillumination.

    PubMed

    King, L; Smith, R T; Wendt, S L; Behrents, R G

    1987-04-01

    A method of curing light-cured composite resins by transillumination to cement acid-etched fixed partial dentures was adapted to bond solid mesh-backed lingual orthodontic brackets. Results of this investigation showed that the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets bonded with light-cured composite resins were significantly less (P less than 0.05) than the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets cemented with traditional adhesives and orthodontic composite resins. Notwithstanding, the bond strengths achieved with the transilluminated light-cured composite resins should be adequate to withstand the forces of mastication and orthodontic movements. There was no correlation of bond strengths of the brackets cemented with the transilluminated light-cured composite resins when compared to the faciolingual widths of the teeth.

  20. Chemically bonded phosphate ceramic sealant formulations for oil field applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung-Young; McDaniel, Richard

    2008-10-21

    A sealant for an oil or geothermal well capable of setting within about 3 to about 6 hours at temperatures less than about 250.degree. F. for shallow wells less than about 10,000 feet and deep wells greater than about 10,000 feet having MgO present in the range of from about 9.9 to about 14.5%, KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 present in the range of from about 29.7 to about 27.2%, class C fly ash present in the range of from about 19.8 to about 36.3%, class F fly ash present in the range of from about 19.8 to about 0%, boric acid or borax present in the range of from about 0.39 to about 1.45%, and water present in the range of from about 20.3 to about 21.86% by weight of the sealant.A method of sealing wells is disclosed as are compositions for very high temperature wells is disclosed as is a composition for treating oil field wastes.

  1. Intramolecular general acid catalysis of the hydrolysis of 2-(2'-imidazolium)phenyl phosphate, and bond length-reactivity correlations for reactions of phosphate monoester monoanions.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Tiago A S; Orth, Elisa S; Rocha, Willian R; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Bunton, Clifford A; Nome, Faruk

    2007-05-11

    Rate constants for the hydrolysis of 2-(2'-imidazolium)phenyl hydrogen phosphate (IMPP) in water at pH<6 indicate that activation by the imidazolium moiety disappears with the deprotonation of the phosphate group, and the reaction involves the hydrogen-bonding of the imidazolium NH with the aryl oxygen leaving group. The reaction should involve a near-planar conformation of the imidazolium and the phenyl groups in the activated complex, which favors proton-transfer. The crystal structure of IMPP was solved, and a bond length-reactivity correlation for reactions of phosphate monoester monoanions is described.

  2. Bonding of strain gages to fiber reinforced composite plastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hanson, M. P.; Serafini, T. T.

    1970-01-01

    Strain gage is installed during molding of composite and utilizes the adhesive properties of the matrix resin in the composite to bond the strain gage in place. Gages thus embedded provide data at all temperatures that the matrix can withstand.

  3. Laser Surface Preparation and Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.

    2009-01-01

    A Nd:YAG laser was used to etch patterns conducive to adhesive bonding onto CFRP surfaces. These were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply. Laser treated composites were then subjected to optical microscopy, contact angle measurements, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  4. Evaluation of composite adhesive bonds using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Shashi Shekhar

    Advanced composite materials are widely used for many structural applications in the aerospace/aircraft industries today. Joining of composite structures using adhesive bonding offers several advantages over traditional fastening methods. However, this technique is not yet employed for fastening the primary structures of aircrafts or space vehicles. There are several reasons for this: There are not any reliable non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods that can quantify the strength of the bonds, and there are no certifications of quality assurance for inspecting the bond quality. Therefore, there is a significant need for an effective, reliable, easy to use NDE method for the analysis of composite adhesive joints. This research aimed to investigate an adhesively bonded composite-aluminum joints of variable bond strength using digital image correlation (DIC). There are many future possibilities in continuing this research work. As the application of composite materials and adhesive bond are increasing rapidly, the reliability of the composite structures using adhesive bond should quantified. Hence a lot of similar research using various adhesive bonds and materials can be conducted for characterizing the behavior of adhesive bond. The results obtained from this research will set the foundation for the development of ultrasonic DIC as a nondestructive approach for the evaluation of adhesive bond line.

  5. Low-temperature anodic bonding using thin films of lithium-niobate-phosphate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woetzel, S.; Kessler, E.; Diegel, M.; Schultze, V.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of a low-temperature anodic bonding process with layers of a lithium-niobate-phosphate glass on chip level. The glass layers are deposited by means of rf sputtering. The applied glass is characterised by its high ion conductivity, enabling anodic bonding at room temperature. Results of the optimisation process concerning the intrinsic stress of the glass layers and the thermal exposure of the substrates through the deposition process are presented. The stoichiometry of the glass layers is verified through Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The bonding strength is measured by tensile tests. Microfabricated atomic vapour cells are used for hermeticity tests of the bonding by absorption measurements of the caesium D1 line.

  6. Criterion for mixed mode fracture in composite bonded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A study was undertaken to characterize the debond growth mechanism of adhesively bonded composite joints under mode I, mixed mode I-II, and mode II static loadings. The bonded system consisted of graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) composite adherends bonded with a toughened epoxy (EC 3445) adhesive. The mode I, mode II and mixed-mode I-II fracture energies of the tested adhesive were found to be equal to each other. Furthermore, the criterion for mixed mode fracture in composite bonded joints was determined.

  7. Effect of bond thickness on fracture and fatigue strength of adhesively bonded composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Ramamurthy, G.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of composite to composite bonded joints was undertaken to study the effect of bond thickness on debond growth rate under cyclic loading and critical strain energy release rate under static loading. Double cantilever beam specimens of graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 were tested under mode I loading. A different behavior of fracture and fatigue strength was observed with variation of bondline thickness.

  8. Critical hydrogen bonds and protonation states of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate revealed by NMR.

    PubMed

    Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Chan-Huot, Monique; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M; Shenderovich, Ilya G; Denisov, Gleb S; Toney, Michael D

    2011-11-01

    In this contribution we review recent NMR studies of protonation and hydrogen bond states of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and PLP model Schiff bases in different environments, starting from aqueous solution, the organic solid state to polar organic solution and finally to enzyme environments. We have established hydrogen bond correlations that allow one to estimate hydrogen bond geometries from (15)N chemical shifts. It is shown that protonation of the pyridine ring of PLP in aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) is achieved by (i) an intermolecular OHN hydrogen bond with an aspartate residue, assisted by the imidazole group of a histidine side chain and (ii) a local polarity as found for related model systems in a polar organic solvent exhibiting a dielectric constant of about 30. Model studies indicate that protonation of the pyridine ring of PLP leads to a dominance of the ketoenamine form, where the intramolecular OHN hydrogen bond of PLP exhibits a zwitterionic state. Thus, the PLP moiety in AspAT carries a net positive charge considered as a pre-requisite to initiate the enzyme reaction. However, it is shown that the ketoenamine form dominates in the absence of ring protonation when PLP is solvated by polar groups such as water. Finally, the differences between acid-base interactions in aqueous solution and in the interior of proteins are discussed. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Pyridoxal Phosphate Enzymology. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Yassaei, Soghra; Davari, Abdolrahim; Goldani Moghadam, Mahjobeh; Kamaei, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22). In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT), respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan). After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°). The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA. Results: RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (P<0.001) with more adhesive remaining on the teeth bonded with composite resin. Conclusion: RMGIs have significantly lower SBS compared to composite resin for orthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range. PMID:25628663

  10. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding.

    PubMed

    Yassaei, Soghra; Davari, Abdolrahim; Goldani Moghadam, Mahjobeh; Kamaei, Ahmad

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets. Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22). In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT), respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan). After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°). The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA. RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (P<0.001) with more adhesive remaining on the teeth bonded with composite resin. RMGIs have significantly lower SBS compared to composite resin for orthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range.

  11. Calcium phosphate porous composites and ceramics prospective as bone implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabadjieva, D.; Tepavitcharova, S.; Gergulova, R.; Sezanova, K.; Ilieva, R.; Gabrashanska, M.; Alexandrov, M.

    2013-12-01

    Two types of calcium phosphate materials prospective as bone implants were prepared in the shape of granules and their biochemical behavior was tested by in vivo studies: (i) composite materials consisting of gelatin and bi-phase ion modified calcium phosphate Mg,Zn-(HA + β-TCP); and (ii) ceramics of ion modified calcium phosphate Mg,Zn-(HA + β-TCP). The starting fine powders were prepared by the method of biomimetic precipitation of the precursors followed by hightemperature treatment. Then granules were prepared by dispersion in liquid paraffin of a thick suspension containing 20% of gelatin gel and thus prepared calcium phosphate powders (1:1 ratios). The composite granules were obtained by subsequent hardening in a glutaraldehyde solution, while the highly porous ceramic granules - by further sintering at 1100°C. The in vivo behavior of both types of granules was tested in experimental rat models. Bone defects were created in rat tibia and were filled with the implants. Biochemical studies were performed. Three months after operation both bio-materials displayed analogous behavior.

  12. Secondary waste form testing : ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramics.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Ganga, R.; Gaviria, J.; Yusufoglu, Y.

    2011-06-21

    binder components from the waste form surface. Waste forms for ANS 16.1 leach testing contained appropriate amounts of rhenium and iodine as radionuclide surrogates, along with the additives silver-loaded zeolite and tin chloride. The leachability index for Re was found to range from 7.9 to 9.0 for all the samples evaluated. Iodine was below detection limit (5 ppb) for all the leachate samples. Further, leaching of sodium was low, as indicated by the leachability index ranging from 7.6-10.4, indicative of chemical binding of the various chemical species. Target leachability indices for Re, I, and Na were 9, 11, and 6, respectively. Degradation was observed in some of the samples post 90-day ANS 16.1 tests. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that all the hazardous contaminants were contained in the waste, and the hazardous metal concentrations were below the Universal Treatment Standard limits. Preliminary scale-up (2-gal waste forms) was conducted to demonstrate the scalability of the Ceramicrete process. Use of minimal amounts of boric acid as a set retarder was used to control the working time for the slurry. Flexibility in treating waste streams with wide ranging compositional make-ups and ease of process scale-up are attractive attributes of Ceramicrete technology.

  13. Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Pulp Capping Biomaterials after Application of Three Different Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi-Ansari, Zahra; Mahdilou, Maryam; Ahmadyar, Maryam; Asgary, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Bonding of composite resin filling materials to pulp protecting agents produces an adhesive joint which is important for the quality of filling as well as success of restoration. We aimed to assess the bond strength of composite resin to three pulp capping biomaterials: Pro Root mineral trioxide aggregate (PMTA), Root MTA (RMTA) and calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, using three bonding systems [a total-etch (Single Bond) and two self-etch systems (Protect bond and SE Bond)]. Materials and methods. Ninety acrylic molds, each containing a 6×2-mm hole, were divided into 3 groups and filled with PMTA, RMTA and CEM cements. The samples in each experimental group were then randomly divided into 3 sub-groups; Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond bonding systems were applied to the tested materials. Cylindrical forms of composite resin (Z100, 2×2 mm) were placed onto the samples and cured. Shear bond strength values were measured for 9 subgroups using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. The average shear bond strengths of Z100 composite resin after application of Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond systems were as follows; PMTA: 5.1±2.42, 4.56±1.96 and 4.52±1.7; RMTA: 4.71±1.77, 4.31±0.56 and 4.79±1.88; and CEM cement: 4.75±1.1, 4.54±1.59 and 4.64±1.78 MPa, respectively. The type of pulp capping material, bonding system and their interacting effects did not have a significant effect on the bond strengths of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this in vitrostudy, bond strength of composite resin to two types of MTA as well as CEM cement were similar following application of the total-etch or self-etch bonding systems. PMID:24082986

  14. Bond strength of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials after application of three different bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Jaberi-Ansari, Zahra; Mahdilou, Maryam; Ahmadyar, Maryam; Asgary, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Bonding of composite resin filling materials to pulp protecting agents produces an adhesive joint which is important for the quality of filling as well as success of restoration. We aimed to assess the bond strength of composite resin to three pulp capping biomaterials: Pro Root mineral trioxide aggregate (PMTA), Root MTA (RMTA) and calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, using three bonding systems [a total-etch (Single Bond) and two self-etch systems (Protect bond and SE Bond)]. Materials and methods. Ninety acrylic molds, each containing a 6×2-mm hole, were divided into 3 groups and filled with PMTA, RMTA and CEM cements. The samples in each experimental group were then randomly divided into 3 sub-groups; Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond bonding systems were applied to the tested materials. Cylindrical forms of composite resin (Z100, 2×2 mm) were placed onto the samples and cured. Shear bond strength values were measured for 9 subgroups using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. The average shear bond strengths of Z100 composite resin after application of Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond systems were as follows; PMTA: 5.1±2.42, 4.56±1.96 and 4.52±1.7; RMTA: 4.71±1.77, 4.31±0.56 and 4.79±1.88; and CEM cement: 4.75±1.1, 4.54±1.59 and 4.64±1.78 MPa, respectively. The type of pulp capping material, bonding system and their interacting effects did not have a significant effect on the bond strengths of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this in vitrostudy, bond strength of composite resin to two types of MTA as well as CEM cement were similar following application of the total-etch or self-etch bonding systems.

  15. Tetracalcium phosphate composite containing quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate with antibacterial properties

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D.; Limkangwalmongkol, Penwadee; Hack, Gary D.; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Chen, Qianming; Zhou, Xuedong

    2012-01-01

    Tooth caries is a carbohydrate-modified bacterial infectious disease, and recurrent caries is a frequent reason for restoration failure. The objective of this study was to develop a novel antibacterial composite using tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) fillers and bis(2-methacryloyloxy-ethyl) dimethyl-ammonium bromide, which is a quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM). QADM was synthesized using 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and 2-bromoethyl methacrylate and incorporated into a resin. The resin was filled with 40% TTCP and 30% glass particles. The following QADM mass fractions in the composite were tested: 0%, 6%, 12%, and 18%. Streptococcus mutans biofilms were formed on the composites and the colony-forming units (CFUs), metabolic activity, and lactic acid production were measured. The TTCP-QADM composite had flexural strength and elastic modulus similar to those of two commercial composites (p > 0.1). Increasing the QADM content in TTCP composite greatly decreased the bacteria growth and biofilm matrix production. There were significantly more dead bacteria with increasing QADM content. TTCP composite containing 18% QADM had biofilm CFU, metabolic activity, and acid production about half of those without QADM. Inversely linear relationships were established between QADM mass fraction and S. mutans biofilm CFU, metabolic activity, and acid production, with correlation coefficients R2 ≥ 0.98. In conclusion, TTCP-QADM composites were developed and the effect of QADM mass fraction on the antibacterial properties of the composite was determined for the first time. The novel TTCP-QADM composites possessing a strong antibacterial capability, together with calcium phosphate ion release and good mechanical properties, are promising for dental restorations to reduce biofilm growth and recurrent caries. PMID:22190356

  16. Rapid induction bonding of composites, plastics, and metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D.; Fox, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The Toroid Bonding Gun is and induction heating device. It is a self contained, portable, low powered induction welding system developed for bonding or joining plastic, ceramic, or metallic parts. Structures can be bonded in a factory or in a the field. This type of equipment allows for applying heat directly to the bond lines and/or to the adhesives without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. The induction heating gun originally developed for use in the fabrication of space Gangs of bonders are now used to rapidly join composite sheet and structural components. Other NASA-developed applications of this bonding technique include the joining of thermoplastic composites, thermosetting composites, metals, and combinations of these materials.

  17. Effect of phase composition of calcium silicate phosphate component on properties of brushite based composite cements

    SciTech Connect

    Sopcak, T.; Medvecky, L.; Giretova, M.; Stulajterova, R.; Durisin, J.; Girman, V.; Faberova, M.

    2016-07-15

    The composite cement mixtures were prepared by mixing brushite (B) with, the amorphous hydrated calcium silicate phosphate (CSPH) or annealed calcium silicate phosphate (CSP composed of Si-saturated hydroxyapatite, wollastonite and silica) phases and water as liquid component. The contents of the silicate-phosphate phase in composites were 10.30 and 50 wt%. The significant effect of both the Ca/P ratio and different solubility of calcium silicate phosphate component in starting cement systems on setting time and phase composition of the final composite cements was demonstrated. The compressive strength of the set cements increased with the filler addition and the highest value (~ 48 MPa) exhibited the 50CSP/B cement composite. The final setting times of the composite cements decreased with the CSPH addition from about 25 to 17 min in 50CSHP/B and setting time of CSP/B composites was around 30 min. The higher content of silica in cements caused the precipitation of fine hydroxyapatite particles in the form of nanoneedles or thin plates perpendicularly oriented to sample surface. The analysis of in vitro cement cytotoxicity demonstrated the strong reduction in cytotoxicity of 10CSPH/B composite with time of cultivation (a low cytotoxicity after 9 days of culture) contrary to cements with higher calcium silicate-phosphate content. These results were attributed to the different surface topography of composite substrates and possible stimulation of cell proliferation by the slow continuously release of ions from 10CSPH/B cement. - Highlights: • Ca/P ratio and solubility of calcium silicate-phosphate components affect the self-setting properties of cements. • Strong relationship between the composite in vitro cytotoxicity and surface microtopography was demonstrated. • Plate-like morphology of coarser particles allowed cells to better adhere and proliferate as compared with nanoneedles.

  18. Twelve-month bracket failure rate with amorphous calcium phosphate bonding system.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Shaza M; El Banna, Mai S; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the survival rate of orthodontic brackets over a 12-month period using amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) bonding system with a conventional adhesive (CA). In 30 patients with a mean age of 15 years 7 months, one operator bonded 138 brackets with a split-mouth design, using a resin-based CA and ACP-containing adhesive. The survival rate of the brackets was estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Bracket survival distributions with respect to bonding procedure, dental arch, type of tooth (incisor, canine, and premolar), and patients' gender were compared using the log-rank test. The bond failure interface was determined using the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). The bond failure rates of the CA and ACP-containing adhesive were 2.67 and 3.8 per cent, respectively. There was no significant difference between the failure rates of ACP and CA-bonded systems (P > 0.05). Survival rates did not show significant differences between the upper and lower dental arches (P > 0.05). Lower survival rates were found for canine and premolar teeth than incisors (P < 0.05). Bond failure rates were higher for males than females (P < 0.05). There was a significant difference for ARI scores between the adhesive materials (P = 0.028); more of the ACP-based adhesive was left on the tooth at debond. ACP-containing adhesive can be effectively used to bond orthodontic brackets and can serve as a practicable alternative to the conventional bonding adhesives.

  19. Marginal adaptation of dentin bonded ceramic inlays: effects of bonding systems and luting resin composites.

    PubMed

    Haller, Bernd; Hässner, Katrin; Moll, Karlheinz

    2003-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the marginal adaptation of bonded inlays of lucite-reinforced glass ceramic (Empress) to dentin as influenced by different bonding systems and by luting resin composites (LRCs) with different curing modes. Forty-eight Empress inlays etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid and treated with a silane-coupling agent (Monobond-S) were bonded to two-surface Class II cavities. Two total-etch bonding systems (OptiBond FL, Nexus) and one bonding system with selective enamel etching and a self-conditioning dentin primer (ART Bond) were included in the study. ART Bond was tested with and without the pre-curing of a first layer of adhesive resin selectively applied to the cervical cavity floor (selective double-bond technique). Each bonding system was used in combination with a light-cured resin composite (Prodigy) and a dual-cured LRC (Nexus or Vita Cerec Duo Cement). Marginal integrity was evaluated before and after thermocycling (TC) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Dye penetration tests were performed after TC was completed. The median percentages of continuous margin in dentin ranged from 80% to 100% before TC and from 53.5% to 96.1 % after TC. After TC, the influence of the bonding system was more pronounced than that of the LRC. In combination with the LC resin composite, ART Bond with precuring was significantly higher and the Nexus bonding system had significantly lower proportions of continuous margin than all the other bonding systems investigated. Swelling of the adhesive along the gingival margins was frequently found with the Nexus bonding system and with ART Bond without pre-curing. Microleakage was detected with all bonding system/LRC combinations, with somewhat lower rates in specimens completed using the selective double-bond technique. With the exception of the Nexus bonding system, post-TC marginal integrity was not influenced by the curing mode of the LRC (LC vs DC). In conclusion, the marginal quality of dentin bonded

  20. Shear bond strength of a new low-shrinkage flowable composite for orthodontic bracket bonding.

    PubMed

    Cantekin, Kenan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmis

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) value a new generation low-shrinkage flowable composite compared to a conventional bonding adhesive and several flowable composites. One hundred and fifty sound human premolars extracted for orthodontic treatment were randomly divided into five groups of 30 teeth each. Brackets were bonded to the teeth in each group with a conventional bonding composite, three flowable composites, and a new generation flowable composite. SBS values of these brackets were recorded via an Instron testing machine. ARI scores were determined after the failure of brackets. There was a statistically significant difference between flowable composites (P<.01). The mean bond strength for the conventional bonding composite group was significantly greater than that of each of the other four groups (P<.001). There were significant differences (chi-square=29.02; P=.00) among the groups. The demineralization and microleakage-inhibiting effects and simple application of the new low polymerization shrinking flowable composite indicate that it might be considered for clinical use in orthodontic patients, especially those with inadequate oral hygiene.

  1. Examination of P-OR bridging bond orders in phosphate monoesters using (18)O isotope shifts in 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Sorensen-Stowell, Kerensa; Hengge, Alvan C

    2005-06-10

    Evidence indicates that phosphate monoesters undergo hydrolysis by a loose transition state with extensive bond fission to the leaving group. It has been proposed that part of the high dependence of the rate on the leaving group pKa (betalg = -1.23) arises from weaker ester bonds in the reactants as the pKa of the leaving group decreases, on the basis of X-ray structures and calculations. In contrast, IR and Raman studies suggest that the leaving group has little effect on the length of the P-OR bridging bond in solution. To gather additional data on this issue, we have used (18)O isotopic shifts in 31P NMR to monitor the bond order of P-O bonds in a range of phosphate esters with different leaving groups. Using this technique, we have been able to evaluate whether significant changes are observed in the P-O bond orders for the bridging and nonbridging positions of methyl, ethyl, phenethyl, propargyl, phenyl, and p-nitrophenyl phosphate using [(16)O(18)O] labeled species in deuterium oxide. The results indicate that the bridging and nonbridging bond orders to phosphorus in phosphate monoesters are not significantly altered by differences in the pKa of the leaving group or by the counterion of the phosphate ester dianion.

  2. Review of methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Benatar, A.; Gutowski, T.G.

    1987-02-01

    Bonding of thermoplastic composites is a critical step in the manufacture of aerospace structures. The objective of this project is to investigate different methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites quickly, with a good bond strength, and without warping and deconsolidation. This is best accomplished by heating and melting the thermoplastic on the bond surface only, and then pressing the parts together for a fusion bond. For this purpose, a variety of surface heating techniques were examined for bonding of PEEK and J Polymer composites. These included: resistance heating, infrared heating, induction heating, dielectric/microwave heating, and ultrasonic welding. In resistance heating, a single prepreg ply was placed between the composites and heated by passing electric current through the graphite fibers. With induction heating, a single ply of nickel coated graphite fibers was placed between the composites and heated. Ultrasonic welding was done by molding thermoplastic-only energy directors into the composites; the ultrasonic vibration melted these energy directors thereby fusion bonding the parts. 20 references.

  3. Antibacterial activity and ion release of bonding agent containing amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Weir, Michael D.; Cheng, Lei; Lin, Nancy; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Chow, Laurence C.; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries at the margins is a primary reason for restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop bonding agent with the double benefits of antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, to investigate the effects of NACP filler level and solution pH on Ca and P ion release from adhesive, and to examine the antibacterial and dentin bond properties. Methods Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM) were synthesized. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) primer and adhesive served as control. DMADDM was incorporated into primer and adhesive at 5% by mass. NACP was incorporated into adhesive at filler mass fractions of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial bonding agents. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases from the cured adhesive samples were measured vs. filler level and solution pH of 7, 5.5 and 4. Results Adding 5% DMADDM and 10–40% NACP into bonding agent, and water-aging for 28 days, did not affect dentin bond strength, compared to SBMP control at 1 day (p > 0.1). Adding DMADDM into bonding agent substantially decreased the biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production. Total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci were greatly reduced for bonding agents containing DMADDM. Increasing NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive increased the Ca and P ion release by an order of magnitude. Decreasing solution pH from 7 to 4 increased the ion release from adhesive by 6–10 folds. Significance Bonding agents containing antibacterial DMADDM and remineralizer NACP were formulated to have Ca and P ion release, which increased with NACP filler level from 10% to 40% in adhesive. NACP adhesive was “smart” and dramatically increased the ion release at cariogenic pH 4, when these ions would be most-needed to inhibit caries. Therefore, bonding agent

  4. Effects of different cavity-disinfectants and potassium titanyl phosphate laser on microtensile bond strength to primary dentin.

    PubMed

    Oznurhan, F; Ozturk, C; Ekci, E Sungurtekin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of different cavity-disinfectants and potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser on microtensile bond strength to primary dentin. Chlorhexidine (CHX), propolis (PRO), ozonated water (OW), gaseous ozone (OG) and KTP laser were used for this purpose. Twelve primary molar teeth were used in this study. One-third of the teeth (from coronal portion) were removed to obtain flat surfaces. After applying the cavity-disinfectants, an adhesive (prime and bond NT) was applied to dentin surfaces, and composite crowns were built up. One group received no pretreatment and was set as a control (CONT). Ten sticks were obtained from these samples and were stressed in tension until failure using a universal testing machine and the data were recorded. The mean strength values (in MPa) of the sticks were OW (11.12) > KTP (9.58) > CHX (7.58) > PRO (7.42) > CONT (6.38) > OG (5.84) and OW showed significantly higher results than the other groups, except KTP group (P < 0.05). OW and KTP might be used safely without compromising the bond strength of restorative materials.

  5. The Effect of Hydrogen Bonding in Enhancing the Ionic Affinities of Immobilized Monoprotic Phosphate Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Zhu, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    Environmental remediation requires ion-selective polymers that operate under a wide range of solution conditions. In one example, removal of trivalent and divalent metal ions from waste streams resulting from mining operations before they enter the environment requires treatment at acidic pH. The monoethyl ester phosphate ligands developed in this report operate from acidic solutions. They have been prepared on polystyrene-bound ethylene glycol, glycerol, and pentaerythritol, and it is found that intra-ligand hydrogen bonding affects their metal ion affinities. The affinity for a set of trivalent (Fe(III), Al(III), La(III), and Lu(III)) and divalent (Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II)) ions is greater than that of corresponding neutral diethyl esters and phosphonic acid. In an earlier study, hydrogen bonding was found important in determining the metal ion affinities of immobilized phosphorylated polyol diethyl ester coordinating ligands; their Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) band shifts indicated that the basicity of the phosphoryl oxygen increased by hydrogen bonding to auxiliary –OH groups on the neighboring polyol. The same mechanism is operative with the monoprotic resins along with hydrogen bonding to the P–OH acid site. This is reflected in the FTIR spectra: the neutral phosphate diethyl ester resins have the P=O band at 1265 cm−1 while the monoethyl ester resins have the band shifted to 1230 cm−1; hydrogen bonding is further indicated by the broadness of this region down to 900 cm−1. The monoprotic pentaerythritol has the highest metal ion affinities of the polymers studied. PMID:28820489

  6. Characterization of Dentine to Assess Bond Strength of Dental Composites

    PubMed Central

    Liaqat, Saad; Aljabo, Anas; Khan, Muhammad Adnan; Ben Nuba, Hesham; Bozec, Laurent; Ashley, Paul; Young, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. Furthermore, micro gap formation after restoration of 3 mm diameter cavities in dentine was assessed by SEM. Initial hydroxyapatite level in ivory was half that in human dentine. Surface hydroxyapatites decreased by approximately half with every 23 s of acid etch. The human dentine strength (56 MPa) was approximately double that of ivory, while the modulus was almost comparable to that of ivory. With adhesive use, average shear bond strengths were 30 and 26 MPa with and without acid etching. With no adhesive, average bond strength was 6 MPa for conventional composites. This, however, increased to 14 MPa with a commercial flowable “self–bonding” composite or upon addition of low levels of an acidic monomer to the experimental composite. The acidic monomer additionally reduced micro-gap formation with the experimental composite. Improved bonding and mechanical properties should reduce composite failures due to recurrent caries or fracture respectively.

  7. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, Suri A.; Pemsler, J. Paul; Cooke, Richard A.; Litchfield, John K.; Smith, Mark B.

    1996-01-01

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates.

  8. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, S.A.; Pemsler, J.P.; Cooke, R.A.; Litchfield, J.K.; Smith, M.B.

    1996-03-05

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates. 2 figs.

  9. Composite bonding to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding and single-bottle systems.

    PubMed

    Hattan, Mohammad Ali; Pani, Sharat Chandra; Alomari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80) stainless steel crowns (SSCs) were divided into four groups (20 each). Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group), Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength (P < 0.05) to composite than the groups that utilized bonding agents. Conclusion. Composites bonding to stainless steel crowns using the new universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems.

  10. Composite Bonding to Stainless Steel Crowns Using a New Universal Bonding and Single-Bottle Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hattan, Mohammad Ali; Pani, Sharat Chandra; AlOmari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80) stainless steel crowns (SSCs) were divided into four groups (20 each). Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group), Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength (P < 0.05) to composite than the groups that utilized bonding agents. Conclusion. Composites bonding to stainless steel crowns using the new universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems. PMID:23606844

  11. Fatigue of boron-aluminum composites bonds and joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Study examines effects of boron filament diameter on bonds and joints in boron-aluminum composite. Data include static strength, fatigue, and dynamic moduli of elasticity. Manson-Coffin analyses and metallurgical and fracture surface evaluation were also performed.

  12. Selective Sensing of Phosphates by a New Bis-heteroleptic Ru(II) Complex through Halogen Bonding: A Superior Sensor over Its Hydrogen-Bonding Analogue.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Bijit; Sinha, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Pradyut

    2016-12-12

    The selective phosphate-sensing property of a bis-heteroleptic Ru(II) complex, 1[PF6 ]2 , which has a halogen-bonding iodotriazole unit, is demonstrated and is shown to be superior to its hydrogen-bonding analogue, 2[PF6 ]2 . Complex 1[PF6 ]2 , exploiting halogen-bonding interactions, shows enhanced phosphate recognition in both acetonitrile and aqueous acetonitrile compared with its hydrogen-bonding analogue, owing to considerable amplification of the Ru(II) -center-based metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) emission response and luminescence lifetime. Detailed solution-state studies reveal a higher association constant, lower limit of detection, and greater change in lifetime for complex 1 in the presence of phosphates compared with its hydrogen-bonding analogue, complex 2. The (1) H NMR titration study with H2 PO4(-) ascertains that the binding of H2 PO4(-) occurs exclusively through halogen-bonding or hydrogen-bonding interactions in complexes 1[PF6 ]2 and 2[PF6 ]2 , respectively. Importantly, the single-crystal X-ray structure confirms the first ever report on metal-assisted second-sphere recognition of H2 PO4(-) and H2 P2 O7(2-) with 1 through a solitary C-I⋅⋅⋅anion halogen-bonding interaction.

  13. Bonded composite resin crowns for primary incisors: technique update.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1990-02-01

    A technique for restoration of carious primary maxillary incisors with a hybrid visible light-curing composite resin and a dentinal bonding agent is described. Careful use of this technique and the new materials can provide a restoration that is esthetic and resistant to fracture and displacement. The technique requires careful preparation of the operative field and precise handling of the restorative materials. The method is illustrated by the placement of bonded composite resin crowns in a 3-year-old boy.

  14. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, K.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.

    1999-05-18

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite. 2 figs.

  15. Dry electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for NDE of bonded composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Mark J.

    2002-05-01

    This paper discusses electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as an NDE approach to analyze bonds in joined composites for moisture and corrosion levels. Electrical circuit models are investigated and simulations are shown for metals, graphite epoxy and honeycomb composites as electrical circuit parameters change as functions of bond moisture content and corrosion state. Electrochemical impedance instrumentation is proposed using dry contact sensors to eliminate the traditional requirement of submerging test samples in an electrolytic solution.

  16. The Effect of Phytase on the Oxygen Isotope Composition of Phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Sperber, C.; Tamburini, F.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2013-12-01

    Plants and microorganisms under phosphorus (P) stress release extracellular phosphatases as a strategy to acquire inorganic phosphate (Pi) (1-2). These enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphoesters leading to a release of Pi. The enzymatic hydrolysis leads, via a nucleophilic attack, to the incorporation of one oxygen atom from the water into the newly formed Pi molecule. During the incorporation, an isotopic fractionation occurs, which might be used to identify the origin of Pi in the environment (3-6). While the effect of phosphomonoesterases and phosphodiesterases on the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate has been examined, there are, so far, no studies dealing with the effect of phytases (4-6). Phytases catalyze the hydrolysis of myo-inositol-hexakis-phosphate (IP6), which is an important component of organic P in many ecosystems (7). Enzymatic assays with phytase from wheat germ and Aspergillus niger were prepared under sterile and temperature controlled conditions in order to determine the effect of phytases on the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate, which has been liberated from IP6 via enzymatic hydrolysis. Assays with phytase from wheat germ lead to a turnover of the substrate close to 100%, while assays with phytase from Aspergillus niger lead to a turnover of the substrate close to 80%. In the case of the assays with phytase from wheat germ, our results indicate that one sixth of the total 24 oxygen which are associated to the phosphates in IP6 are exchanged with oxygen from water. From this we conclude that the incorporation of one oxygen atom from water occurs only at four phosphate molecules of IP6, while two phosphate molecules do not experience an incorporation of oxygen. This suggests that during the enzymatic hydrolysis, four P-O bonds and two C-O bonds are broken. Provided that, the isotopic fractionation can be calculated with an isotopic mass balance resulting in -8.4‰ (×3.6 SD). This is a value very similar to those reported

  17. [Bonding compatibility between adhesive systems and composite resins].

    PubMed

    Giachetti, L; Scaminaci Russo, D; Landi, D

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse bonding compatibility between photo- and self-polymerising composite resins ad two-step total-etch (one component) adhesive systems with a different activation method. Thirty healthy extracted molars were cut transversally to obtain sixty flat dentin surfaces. The acid conditioned surfaces were bonded with Scotchbond 1 (3M), Excite (Vivadent) or Excite DSC (Vivadent). A cylinder of composite resin (3 mm diameter and 4 mm height) was constructed on each adhesive layer using photopolymerised Tetric Ceram (Vivadend) and dual Luxacore (DMG) but activated only chemically. The samples were subjected to the shear bond test. The fracture surfaces obtained were classified by type and site in the stereomicroscope. Twelve samples representing each group were further prepared for the SEM. The data obtained from the test, the microscopic investigation and statistical analysis (ANOVA and Bonferroni) seem to confirm the presence of a reduced bonding compatibility between one-component adhesive systems and self-polymerising composites. This incompatibility is evident for the adhesive Scotchbond 1 and limited for Excite, while it seems to be overcome by Excite DSC which appears to bond well with both Tetric Ceram and Luxacore. Adhesive-composite incompatibility seems to depend on the activation method of the composite as well as on that of the adhesive system. The chemical compatibility bet-ween these two materials is influenced not only by the chemical composition of the adhesive, but also by that of the composite.

  18. Tensile bond strength of composite to air-abraded dentin.

    PubMed

    Geitel, Birgit; Wischnewski, Regine; Jahn, Klaus-Roland; Barthel, R Claudia; Zimmer, Stefan; Roulet, Jean-François

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of air abrasive treatment of dentin surfaces on the tensile bond strength between dentin and two different composite-adhesive-systems Multi-Purpose/Z100 and OptiBond FL/Herculite XR). The crowns of 200 maxillary central incisors were embedded in resin and then ground to expose a dentin surface 5 mm in diameter. The surfaces were etched or abraded by using a KCP 1000 device with different treatment conditions. Adhesive systems were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and composite cylinders were bonded to the conditioned dentinal surface using a split mold. Tensile bond strength values and failure modes were then determined. Tensile bond strength values of the acid-etched dentin-composite-interface were significantly higher than for the interface between air-abraded dentin and composite, independent of the composite-adhesive-system used. The light microscopic evaluation showed mainly adhesive and combined adhesive-cohesive fractures. Significantly more adhesive fractures could be observed between abraded dentin and composite than between etched dentin and composite.

  19. Structure of selected basic zinc/copper (II) phosphate minerals based upon near-infrared spectroscopy - Implications for hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Reddy, B. Jagannadha; Palmer, Sara J.; Keeffe, Eloise C.

    2011-03-01

    The NIR spectra of reichenbachite, scholzite and parascholzite have been studied at 298 K. The spectra of the minerals are different, in line with composition and crystal structural variations. Cation substitution effects are significant in their electronic spectra and three distinctly different electronic transition bands are observed in the near-infrared spectra at high wavenumbers in the 12,000-7600 cm -1 spectral region. Reichenbachite electronic spectrum is characterised by Cu(II) transition bands at 9755 and 7520 cm -1. A broad spectral feature observed for ferrous ion in the 12,000-9000 cm -1 region both in scholzite and parascholzite. Some what similarities in the vibrational spectra of the three phosphate minerals are observed particularly in the OH stretching region. The observation of strong band at 5090 cm -1 indicates strong hydrogen bonding in the structure of the dimorphs, scholzite and parascholzite. The three phosphates exhibit overlapping bands in the 4800-4000 cm -1 region resulting from the combinations of vibrational modes of (PO 4) 3- units.

  20. Bond-coating in plasma-sprayed calcium-phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    Oktar, F N; Yetmez, M; Agathopoulos, S; Lopez Goerne, T M; Goller, G; Peker, I; Ipeker, I; Ferreira, J M F

    2006-11-01

    The influence of bond-coating on the mechanical properties of plasma-spray coatings of hydroxyatite on Ti was investigated. Plasma-spray powder was produced from human teeth enamel and dentine. Before processing the main apatite coating, a very thin layer of Al2O3/TiO2 was applied on super clean and roughened, by Al2O3 blasting, Ti surface as bond-coating. The experimental results showed that bond-coating caused significant increase of the mechanical properties of the coating layer: In the case of the enamel powder from 6.66 MPa of the simple coating to 9.71 MPa for the bond-coating and in the case of the dentine powder from 6.27 MPa to 7.84 MPa, respectively. Both tooth derived powders feature high thermal stability likely due to their relatively high content of fluorine. Therefore, F-rich apatites, such those investigated in this study, emerge themselves as superior candidate materials for calcium phosphate coatings of producing medical devices. The methods of apatite powder production and shaping optimization of powder particles are both key factors of a successful coating. The methods used in this study can be adopted as handy, inexpensive and reliable ways to produce high quality of powders for plasma spray purposes.

  1. Laser Surface Preparation and Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical prebonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  2. Mechanical properties of tricalcium phosphate-fluorapatite-alumina composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouslama, N.; Ben Ayed, F.; Bouaziz, J.

    2009-11-01

    This study deals to produce tricalcium phosphate - fluorapatite composites sintering at various temperatures (1300∘ C, 1350∘ C and 1400∘ C) and with different alumina additives amounts (2.5 wt%, 5 wt%, 7.5 wt%, 10 wt% and 20 wt%). The characterization of samples before and after sintering was investigated, using X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy and by analysis using 31P and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance. Mechanical properties have been measured by Brazilian test. The evolution of composite rupture strength was studied as a function of sintering temperature. The effect of sintering on the mechanical properties was measured with the change in composition and microstructure of the composite. The mechanical resistances of composites were increased with the temperatures and with concentrations of alumina. At 1350∘ C, the mechanical resistance reaches its maximum value with 5 wt% Al2O3 (13.6 MPa) whereas the optimum density is about 90% with 2.5 wt% Al2O3.

  3. Light transmittance and polymerization kinetics of amorphous calcium phosphate composites.

    PubMed

    Par, Matej; Marovic, Danijela; Skenderovic, Hrvoje; Gamulin, Ozren; Klaric, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated light transmittance and polymerization kinetics of experimental remineralizing composite materials based on amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), reinforced with inert fillers. Light-curable composites were composed of Bis-EMA-TEGDMA-HEMA resin and ACP, barium glass, and silica fillers. Additionally, a commercial composite Tetric EvoCeram was used as a reference. Light transmittance was recorded in real-time during curing, and transmittance curves were used to assess polymerization kinetics. To obtain additional information on polymerization kinetics, temperature rise was monitored in real-time during curing and degree of conversion was measured immediately and 24 h post-cure. Light transmittance values of 2-mm thick samples of uncured ACP composites (2.3-2.9 %) were significantly lower than those of the commercial composite (3.8 %). The ACP composites presented a considerable transmittance rise during curing, resulting in post-cure transmittance values similar to or higher than those of the commercial composite (5.5-7.9 vs. 5.4 %). The initial part of light transmittance curves of experimental composites showed a linear rise that lasted for 7-20 s. Linear fitting was performed to obtain a function whose slope was assessed as a measure of polymerization rate. Comparison of transmittance and temperature curves showed that the linear transmittance rise lasted throughout the most part of the pre-vitrification period. The linear rise of light transmittance during curing has not been reported in previous studies and may indicate a unique kinetic behavior, characterized by a long period of nearly constant polymerization rate. The observed kinetic behavior may result in slower development of polymerization shrinkage stress but also inferior mechanical properties.

  4. Impedance changes during setting of amorphous calcium phosphate composites.

    PubMed

    Par, Matej; Šantić, Ana; Gamulin, Ozren; Marovic, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Tarle, Zrinka

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the electrical properties of experimental light-curable composite materials based on amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) with the admixture of silanized barium glass and silica fillers. Short-term setting was investigated by impedance measurements at a frequency of 1kHz, while for the long-term setting the impedance spectra were measured consecutively over a frequency range of 0.05Hz to 1MHz for 24h. The analysis of electrical resistivity changes during curing allowed the extraction of relevant kinetic parameters. The impedance results were correlated to the degree of conversion assessed by Raman spectroscopy, water content determined by gravimetry, light transmittance measured by CCD spectrometer and microstructural features observed by scanning electron microscopy. ACP-based composites have shown higher immediate degree of conversion and less post-cure polymerization than the control composites, but lower polymerization rate. The polymerization rate assessed by impedance measurements correlated well with the light transmittance. The differences in the electrical conductivity values observed among the materials were correlated to the amount of water introduced into composites by the ACP filler. High correlation was found between the degree of conversion and electrical resistivity. Equivalent circuit modeling revealed two electrical contributions for the ACP-based composites and a single contribution for the control composites. The impedance spectroscopy has proven a valuable method for gaining insight into various features of ACP-based composites. Better understanding of the properties of ACP-based composites should further the development of these promising bioactive materials. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnesia-ammonium phosphate-bonded cordierite refractory castables: Phase evolution on heating and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hipedinger, Nora E.; Scian, Alberto N.; Aglietti, Esteban F

    2004-01-01

    A cordierite refractory castable was developed using the MgO-NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} reaction. This castable was made with cordierite-mullite aggregates from scrap refractory material and a cement paste based on magnesia, calcined alumina, silica fume, and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, which forms cordierite (2MgO{center_dot}2Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}5SiO{sub 2}) during heating at high temperature. The mix with water was cast into steel molds; the cold setting occurs within 30 min. The set castables were thermally treated and the evolution of the phases was observed. Struvite (NH{sub 4}{center_dot}MgPO{sub 4}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O) was identified at room temperature; between 110 and 750 deg. C, the present phosphates were amorphous to X-ray diffraction (XRD). At 1100 deg. C, magnesium orthophosphate (Mg{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}) and aluminum orthophosphate (AlPO{sub 4}) were present. At 1350 deg. C, the main crystalline phases were cordierite and mullite. Cold and hot flexural strength, thermal shock resistance, and physical properties were measured. The properties of magnesia-phosphate-bonded cordierite castables were compared with cordierite material obtained by conventional slip-casting method from aggregates, clay, talc, and calcined alumina.

  6. Stabilization of lead-rich low-level mixed wastes in chemically bonded phosphate ceramic.

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S.-Y.

    1999-08-10

    A chemically bonded magnesium potassium phosphate ceramic has been developed by an acid-base reaction at room temperature, for use in stabilizing U.S. Department of Energy low-level mixed waste streams that include hazardous metals and low-level radioactive elements. Using this ceramic, we solidified, in monolithic waste forms, low-level mixed waste streams containing various levels of PbCl{sub 2} and PbCO{sub 3}. These final waste forms were evaluated for their land disposal suitability. The results showed low open porosity (1.48-4.61 vol.%); hence, low permeability, and higher compression strengths (4310-6734 psi) that were one order of magnitude above that required. The level of lead in the leachate following the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test was reduced from 50,000 to <0.1 ppm. Leachability indexes from the long-term leaching test (ANS 16.1 test) were between 11.9 and 13.6. This excellent lead retention is due to its chemical fixation as insoluble lead phosphate and to physical encapsulation by the phosphate matrix.

  7. Effects of aqueous environment on long-term durability of phosphate-bonded ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Jeong, S.Y.

    1996-03-01

    Over the last few years, Argonne National Laboratory has been developing room-temperature-setting chemically-bonded phosphate ceramics for solidifying and stabilizing low-level mixed wastes. This technology is crucial for stabilizing waste streams that contain volatile species and off-gas secondary waste streams generated by high-temperature treatment of such wastes. Magnesium phosphate ceramic has been developed to treat mixed wastes such as ash, salts, and cement sludges. Waste forms of surrogate waste streams were fabricated by acid-base reactions between the mixtures of magnesium oxide powders and the wastes, and phosphoric acid or acid phosphate solutions. Dense and hard ceramic waste forms are produced in this process. The principal advantage of this technology is that the contaminants are immobilized by both chemical stabilization and subsequent microencapsulation of the reaction products. This paper reports the results of durability studies conducted on waste forms made with ash waste streams spiked with hazardous and radioactive surrogates. Standard leaching tests such as ANS 16.1 and TCLP were conducted on the final waste forms. Fates of the contaminants in the final waste forms were established by electron microscopy. In addition, stability of the waste forms in aqueous environments was evaluated with long-term water-immersion tests.

  8. Adhesive Bonding Characterization of Composite Joints for Cryogenic Usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Neil A.; Schieleit, Gregory F.; Biggs, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite cryogenic tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future reusable launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW). This weight reduction is possible due to the large reduction in weight that composite materials can provide over current aluminum technology. In addition to composite technology, adhesively bonded joints potentially have several benefits over mechanically fastened joints, such as weight savings and cryogenic fluid containment. Adhesively bonded joints may be used in several areas of these cryogenic tanks, such as in lobe-to-lobe joints (in a multi-lobe concept), skirt-to-tank joint, strut-to-tank joint, and for attaching stringers and ring frames. The bonds, and the tanks themselves, must be able to withstand liquid cryogenic fuel temperatures that they contain. However, the use of adhesively bonded composite joints at liquid oxygen and hydrogen temperatures is largely unknown and must be characterized. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Michoud Operations performed coupon-level tests to determine effects of material selection, cure process parameters, substrate surface preparation, and other factors on the strength of these composite joints at cryogenic temperatures. This led to the selection of a material and process that would be suitable for a cryogenic tank. KEY WORDS: Composites, Adhesive Bonding, Cryogenics

  9. Repair Bond Strength of Aged Resin Composite after Different Surface and Bonding Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wendler, Michael; Belli, Renan; Panzer, Reinhard; Skibbe, Daniel; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different mechanical surface treatments and chemical bonding protocols on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of aged composite. Bar specimens were produced using a nanohybrid resin composite and aged in distilled water for 30 days. Different surface treatments (diamond bur, phosphoric acid, silane, and sandblasting with Al2O3 or CoJet Sand), as well as bonding protocols (Primer/Adhesive) were used prior to application of the repair composite. TBS of the specimens was measured and the results were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Student–Newman–Keuls test (α = 0.05). Mechanically treated surfaces were characterized under SEM and by profilometry. The effect of water aging on the degree of conversion was measured by means of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. An important increase in the degree of conversion was observed after aging. No significant differences in TBS were observed among the mechanical surface treatments, despite variations in surface roughness profiles. Phosphoric acid etching significantly improved repair bond strength values. The cohesive TBS of the material was only reached using resin bonding agents. Application of an intermediate bonding system plays a key role in achieving reliable repair bond strengths, whereas the kind of mechanical surface treatment appears to play a secondary role. PMID:28773669

  10. Demonstration of packaging of Fernald Silo I waste in chemically bonded phosphate ceramic.

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A. S.

    1999-01-27

    This paper summarizes our experience in bench-scale packaging of Fernald Silo I waste in chemically bonded phosphate ceramics. The waste was received from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and its treatability was studied in our laboratory. This waste contained As{sup 5+}, Ba, Cr{sup 6+}, Ni, Pb, Se{sup 4+}, and Zn as the hazardous contaminants. In addition, the total specific activity of all the radioactive isotopes in the waste was 3.85 {micro}Ci/g, of which that of radium alone was 0.477 {micro}Ci/g. This indicated that radon (a daughter product of the radium) in the waste could present a serious handling problem during this study. For this reason, the waste was handled and stored in a flowing-air glovebox. We made waste form samples with an actual waste loading of 66.05 wt.% and subjected them to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The results showed excellent stabilization of all contaminants. Actual levels detected in the leachate were well below the EPA's most stringent Universal Treatment Standards and in almost all cases were one order of magnitude below this limit. Radioactivity in the leachate was also very low. Alpha activity was 25 {+-} 2.5 pCi/mL, while beta activity was 9.81 {+-} 0.98 pCi/mL. This very low activity was attributed to the efficient stabilization of radium as insoluble radium phosphate in the waste form, thus prohibiting its leaching. This study indicates that the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic process may be a very suitable way to package Silo I waste for transportation and storage or disposal.

  11. Weak bond detection in composites using highly nonlinear solitary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Taru; Kim, Eunho; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Yang, Jinkyu

    2017-05-01

    We experimentally investigate a diagnostic technique for identifying a weak bond in composites using highly nonlinear solitary waves (HNSWs). We set up a one-dimensional chain of granular crystals, consisting of spherical particles with nonlinear interactions, to generate HNSWs. These solitary wave packets are transmitted into an inspection area of composites by making a direct contact with the chain. We demonstrate that a strong type of solitary waves injected to the weak bond area can break the weak bond of laminates, thereby causing delamination. Then, to identify the creation of the delamination, we transmit a weak type of solitary waves by employing the same apparatus, and measure the solitary waves reflected from the specimens. By analyzing these reflected solitary waves, we differentiate the weak bond samples with the pristine bond ones in an efficient and fast manner. The diagnostic results based on the proposed method are compared with the strength and energy release rate at bond interfaces, which are measured via standard testing methods such as three point bending and end notched flexure tests. This study shows the potential of solitary wave-based detection of weak bonds for hot spot monitoring of composite-based structures.

  12. Degree of vinyl conversion in experimental amorphous calcium phosphate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarle, Z.; Knežević, A.; Matošević, D.; Škrtić, D.; Ristić, M.; Prskalo, K.; Musić, S.

    2009-04-01

    An experimental dental composite, based on amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) with the potential to arrest caries development and regenerate mineral-deficient tooth structures has recently been developed. The aim of this study was to assess the degree of vinyl conversion (DVC) attained in experimental composites based on zirconia-modified ACP. Photo-activated resins were based on ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA) [ETHM series with varying EBPADMA/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) molar ratios assigned 0.5-ETHM I, 0.85-ETHM II and 1.35-ETHM III], or 2,2-bis[p-(2'-hydroxy-3'-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]-propane (Bis-GMA) [BTHZ series]. To asses a possible effect of filler particle size on DVC, composites containing 60 mass % resin and 40 mass % of either milled ACP (mACP; median diameter d m = 0.9 μm) or coarse ACP (cACP; d m = 6.0 μm) were prepared, and irradiated with LED curing unit for 40 s. The DVC was calculated as the % change in the ratio of the integrated peak areas between the aliphatic and aromatic absorption bands determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The highest DVCs values were attained in mACP-BTHZ, cACP-BTHZ and mACP-ETHM III formulations. DVC of tested ACP composites (on average (76.76 ± 4.43)%) compares well with or exceeds DVCs values reported for the majority of commercial materials.

  13. Effect of biofilm on the repair bond strengths of composites.

    PubMed

    Rinastiti, M; Özcan, M; Siswomihardjo, W; Busscher, H J; van der Mei, H C

    2010-12-01

    Composite restorations degrade during wear, but it is unknown how wear affects the composite surface and influences composite-to-composite bonding in minimally invasive repair. Here, it is hypothesized that in vitro exposure of composites to oral biofilm yields clinically relevant degradation of composite surfaces, and its influence on composite-to-composite bonding is determined. Biofilms on composite surfaces in vitro increased their roughness and decreased filler particle exposure, except for a microhybrid composite, similar to effects of clinical wear in palatal appliances. Failure shear stresses after intermediate-adhesive-resin application were significantly lower after aging by in vitro exposure to biofilms, while silica-coating maintained the same failure stress levels as in non-aged composites. Failure modes were predominantly cohesive after silica-coating, while intermediate-adhesive-resin application yielded more adhesive failure. It is concluded that in vitro exposure to oral biofilm is a clinically relevant aging condition, and that silica-coating is to be preferred for the repair of aged composites.

  14. Disinfectant storage media and composite/metal bond strength.

    PubMed

    Williams, V D; Díaz-Arnold, A M; Fotos, P G

    1994-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of three disinfection procedures on the tensile bond strength of Panavia resin composite cement. Alloy cylinders were bonded and stored in: (1) 0.2% chlorhexidine; (2) 2% activated glutaraldehyde; (3) distilled water and sterilized with ethylene oxide; and (4) distilled water. Solutions were monitored for bacterial cultures and pH changes regularly for 90 days after which all samples were tested to tensile failure. ANOVA showed no significant difference between mean group bond strengths. A direct positive correlation was demonstrated between solution pH and bond strengths (r = 0.98). All groups were found to represent effective methods for preventing bacterial growth in storage solutions during long term cement bonding studies.

  15. Quantitative Percussion Diagnostics For Evaluating Bond Integrity Between Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveromo, Scott Leonard

    Conventional nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques used to detect defects in composites are not able to determine intact bond integrity within a composite structure and are costly to use on large and complex shaped surfaces. To overcome current NDT limitations, a new technology was utilized based on quantitative percussion diagnostics (QPD) to better quantify bond quality in fiber reinforced composite materials. Experimental results indicate that this technology is capable of detecting 'kiss' bonds (very low adhesive shear strength), caused by the application of release agents on the bonding surfaces, between flat composite laminates bonded together with epoxy adhesive. Specifically, the local value of the loss coefficient determined from quantitative percussion testing was found to be significantly greater for a release coated panel compared to that for a well bonded sample. Also, the local value of the probe force or force returned to the probe after impact was observed to be lower for the release coated panels. The increase in loss coefficient and decrease in probe force are thought to be due to greater internal friction during the percussion event for poorly bonded specimens. NDT standards were also fabricated by varying the cure parameters of an epoxy film adhesive. Results from QPD for the variable cure NDT standards and lap shear strength measurements taken of mechanical test specimens were compared and analyzed. Finally, experimental results have been compared to a finite element analysis to understand the visco-elastic behavior of the laminates during percussion testing. This comparison shows how a lower quality bond leads to a reduction in the percussion force by biasing strain in the percussion tested side of the panel.

  16. Adhesive bonding of super-elastic titanium-nickel alloy castings with a phosphate metal conditioner and an acrylic adhesive.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, H; Tanoue, N; Yanagida, H; Atsuta, M; Koike, M; Yoneyama, T

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the bonding characteristics of super-elastic titanium-nickel (Ti-Ni) alloy castings. Disk specimens were cast from a Ti-Ni alloy (Ti-50.85Ni mol%) using an arc centrifugal casting machine. High-purity titanium and nickel specimens were also prepared as experimental references. The specimens were air-abraded with alumina, and bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond C & B). A metal conditioner containing a phosphate monomer (Cesead II Opaque Primer) was also used for priming the specimens. Post-thermocycling average bond strengths (MPa) of the primed groups were 41.5 for Ti-Ni, 30.4 for Ti and 19.5 for Ni, whereas those of the unprimed groups were 21.6 for Ti, 19.3 for Ti-Ni and 9.3 for Ni. Application of the phosphate conditioner elevated the bond strengths of all alloy/metals (P < 0.05). X-ray fluorescence analysis revealed that nickel was attached to the debonded resin surface of the resin-to-nickel bonded specimen, indicating that corrosion of high-purity nickel occurred at the resin-nickel interface. Durable bonding to super-elastic Ti-Ni alloy castings can be achieved with a combination of a phosphate metal conditioner and a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

  17. Calcium phosphate glasses: silanation process and effect on the bioactivity behavior of glass-PMMA composites.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Lizette Morejón; García-Menocal, José Ángel Delgado; Aymerich, Mariona Tarragó; Guichard, Julio Ándrés Álvarez; García-Vallés, Maite; Manent, Salvador Martínez; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2014-02-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the efficiency of silanation process of calcium phosphate glasses particles and its effect on the bioactivity behavior of glass- poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) composites. Two different calcium phosphate glasses: 44.5CaO-44.5P2 O5 -11Na2 O (BV11) and 44.5CaO-44.5P2 O5 -6Na2 O-5TiO2 (G5) were synthesized and treated with silane coupling agent. The glasses obtained were characterized by Microprobe and BET while the efficiency of silanation process was determined using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Thermal Analysis (DTA and TG) techniques. The content of coupling agent chemically tightly bond to the silanated glasses ascended to 1.69 ± 0.02 wt % for BV11sil glass and 0.93 ± 0.01 wt % for G5sil glass. The in vitro bioactivity test carried out in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) revealed certain bioactive performance with the use of both silanated glasses in a 30% (by weight) as filler of the PMMA composites because of a superficial deposition of an apatite-like layer with low content of CO3 (2-) and HPO4 (2-) in its structure after soaking for 30 days occurred.

  18. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  19. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Laura Alves; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; Drubi-Filho, Brahim; Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Materials and Methods Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE), the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE) was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Silorane and Silorane groups). Teeth restored with methacrylate based-composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) were hybridized with the two-step self-etching system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray), with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Methacrylate and Methacrylate groups), or three-step adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE) (Three-step/Methacrylate group) (n = 6). The restored teeth were sectioned into stick-shaped test specimens (1.0 × 1.0 mm), and coupled to a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min) to perform microtensile testing. Results Pre-etching/Methacrylate group presented the highest bond strength values, with significant difference from Silorane and Three-step/Methacrylate groups (p < 0.05). However, it was not significantly different from Preetching/Silorane and Methacrylate groups. Conclusions Pre-etching increased bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. PMID:25671209

  20. The oxygen isotope composition of dissolved anthropogenic phosphates: a new tool for eutrophication research?

    PubMed

    Gruau, Gérard; Legeas, Michèle; Riou, Christine; Gallacier, Eve; Martineau, François; Hénin, O

    2005-01-01

    High-precision oxygen isotope analyses were carried out on dissolved phosphate extracted from discharge waters from three wastewater treatment plants (WTP) located in western France, as well as on the different phosphate-based fertilizers applied by farmers in the same region. Measured delta(18)O values of phosphate from chemical fertilizers range from 19.6 to 23.1 per thousand, while those of phosphate from WTP discharge waters are more tightly grouped between 17.7 and 18.1 per thousand. The variability in delta(18)O values of phosphate fertilizers is attributed to oxygen isotope variations of the phosphorite deposits from which France's fertilizers are manufactured. The significance of the delta(18)O values of phosphate from WTP discharge waters is less straightforward. At present, it is not clear whether these values are primary isotopic compositions corresponding, e.g., to the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate builders included in detergents (delta(18)O(P)=17.9 per thousand), or represent secondary values reflecting biological recycling of the phosphate in equilibrium with ambient WTP water The restricted difference in isotopic composition obtained between phosphate from fertilizers and phosphate from WTP discharge waters (<2 per thousand), as well as the fairly large internal isotopic variability observed in both end-members (>/=1.5 per thousand), cast doubt about the possibility that the oxygen isotope composition could serve as a tracer for the source of anthropogenic phosphates in waters.

  1. Production of biopolymer composites by particle bonding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This report describes a new technology to produce biopolymer composites at room temperature. During the process, micrometer-scale raw material is coated with zein that has strong adhesive property, which is then compressed to form a rigid material. Since this technology does not require purificati...

  2. In vitro evaluation of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate effect on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Niloofar; Ebrahimi, Shahram Farzin; Shoul, Maryam Azizi; Sattari, Hasti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) is applied for remineralization of early caries lesions or tooth sensitivity conditions and may affect subsequent resin bonding. This in vitro study investigated the effect of CPP-ACP on the shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human molar teeth were selected and randomly divided into three groups and six subgroups. Buccal or lingual surfaces of teeth were prepared to create a flat enamel surface. Adhesives used were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE and AdheSE One F. In three subgroups, before applying adhesives, enamel surfaces were treated with Tooth Mousse CPP-ACP for one hour, rinsed and stored in 37°C temperature with 100% humidity. This procedure was repeated for 5 days and then adhesives were applied and Tetric N-Ceram composite was adhered to the enamel. This procedure was also fulfilled for the other three subgroups without CPP-ACP treatment. After 24 hour water storage, samples were tested for shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Failure modes were determined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by t-test and one-way analysis of variance with P < 0.05 as the level of significance. Results: In comparison between applied and non-applied CPP-ACP subgroups, there was no significant decrease in the shear bond strength to enamel only in Tetric N-Bond (P > 0.05). In non-applied CPP-ACP subgroups, there were statistically significant differences among all subgroups. Tetric N-Bond had the highest and AdheSE One F had the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusion: CPP-ACP application reduces the shear bond strength of AdheSE and AdheSE One F to enamel but not Tetric N-Bond. PMID:25878683

  3. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia.

    PubMed

    Sari, Fatih; Secilmis, Asli; Simsek, Irfan; Ozsevik, Semih

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (P<.05). No difference between the glaze layer and hydrofluoric acid application treated groups were observed. However, bond strength for these groups were significantly higher as compared with the other two groups (P<.05). Combined use of glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application and silanization are reliable for strong and durable bonding between indirect composite material and monolithic zirconia.

  4. Shear bond strength of indirect composite material to monolithic zirconia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of indirect composite material (Tescera Indirect Composite System) to monolithic zirconia (inCoris TZI). MATERIALS AND METHODS Partially stabilized monolithic zirconia blocks were cut into with 2.0 mm thickness. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into different surface treatment groups: no treatment (control), sandblasting, glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application, and sandblasting + glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application. The indirect composite material was applied to the surface of the monolithic zirconia specimens. Shear bond strength value of each specimen was evaluated after thermocycling. The fractured surface of each specimen was examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope to assess the failure types. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey LSD tests (α=.05). RESULTS Bond strength was significantly lower in untreated specimens than in sandblasted specimens (P<.05). No difference between the glaze layer and hydrofluoric acid application treated groups were observed. However, bond strength for these groups were significantly higher as compared with the other two groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION Combined use of glaze layer & hydrofluoric acid application and silanization are reliable for strong and durable bonding between indirect composite material and monolithic zirconia. PMID:27555895

  5. Progress in the Reliability of Bonded Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Robert; Dillingham, Giles; Oakley, Brietta

    2017-02-01

    This paper reviews recent research progress in the detection of contamination on composites surfaces before bonding. Results to date indicate that it is possible to use a simple handheld instrument to determine if a composite surface is in such a state that a durable bond can be achieved. This study examined both airborne and contact contamination and found that contact contaminants can originate from unexpected sources. Monitoring of airborne contaminants in various manufacturing locations indicated that discrete contamination events can occur that are potentially detrimental to adhesion.

  6. Novel Chemically-Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Borehole Sealants (Ceramicretes) for Arctic Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Godwin A. Chukwu; Gang Chen; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramic borehole sealant, i.e. Ceramicrete, has many advantages over conventionally used permafrost cement at Alaska North Slope (ANS). However, in normal field practices when Ceramicrete is mixed with water in blenders, it has a chance of being contaminated with leftover Portland cement. In order to identify the effect of Portland cement contamination, recent tests have been conducted at BJ services in Tomball, TX as well as at the University of Alaska Fairbanks with Ceramicrete formulations proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory. The tests conducted at BJ Services with proposed Ceramicrete formulations and Portland cement contamination have shown significant drawbacks which has caused these formulations to be rejected. However, the newly developed Ceramicrete formulation at the University of Alaska Fairbanks has shown positive results with Portland cement contamination as well as without Portland cement contamination for its effective use in oil well cementing operations at ANS.

  7. The Adhesive Bonding of Thermoplastic Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-19

    contact angle analyses results , since both of these experimental methods attempt to assess the surface intermolecular forces . Secondly, the data from...TPFC) materials will be presented. The materials used in the present research work will then be described. Finally, the surface pretreatment...composite interface. It was precisely for the above reason that the current research work was undertaken. In the last year or two there has been some

  8. Laser ablation assisted adhesive bonding of automotive structural composites

    SciTech Connect

    Boeman, R.G.; Paulauskas, F.L.; Warren, C.D.

    1999-07-03

    Laser ablation has been evaluated as a surface pretreatment prior to adhesive bonding. In prior experimental work, it was observed that when adhesively bonded, composite, single lap shear samples fail, the fracture often occurs at either the adhesive/adherend interface or in the resin rich surface layer of the composite. These two areas represent the weakest portion of the joint. Laser ablation pretreatment generates areas where the resin on the composite surface is selectively removed leaving behind exposed reinforcing fibers which are the major load bearing members of the composite. In a subsequent adhesive bonding operation, this allows portions of the fibers to be encapsulated in the adhesive while other portions of the fiber remain in the composite resin. This type of pretreatment permits fibers to bridge and reinforce the interface between adhesive and adherend. A secondary benefit is the removal of surface contaminantes by pyrolysis. Microscopic observation of laser ablated surfaces indicates a prominent, fiber rich area. Results of the mechanical evaluation indicated that the lap shear strength for laser ablated samples was significantly higher than specimens with no pretreatment or with solvent cleaning only, but were slightly lower than specimens that were mechanically roughened and cleaned with solvents prior to bonding.

  9. Microtensile bond strength of repaired indirect resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Suputtamongkol, Kallaya; Angkoonsit, Duangjai; Kaewthong, Sunattha; Charoonanan, Piyanan

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatments on microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs) of two types of indirect resin composites bonded to a conventional direct resin composite. MATERIALS AND METHODS Indirect resin composite blocks of Ceramage and SR Nexco were prepared in a plastic mold having a dimension of 10 × 10 × 4 mm. These composite blocks were divided into three groups according to their surface treatments: Group1: Sandblast (SB); Group2: Sandblast and ultrasonically clean (SB+UL); Group3: Sandblast plus silane (SB+SI). After bonding with direct resin composite, indirect-direct resin composite blocks were kept in distilled water for 24 hours at 37℃ and cut into microbars with the dimension of 1 × 1 × 8 mm. Microbar specimens (n = 40 per group) were loaded using a universal testing machine. Failure modes and compositions were evaluated by SEM. The statistical analyses of MTBS were performed by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test at α = .05. RESULTS Surface treatments and brands had effects on the MTBS without an interaction between these two factors. For SR Nexco, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI group were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. For Ceramage, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. The mean MTBS of the Ceramage specimens was significantly higher than that of SR Nexco for all surface treatments. CONCLUSION Sandblasting with or without silane application could improve the bond strengths of repaired indirect resin composites to a conventional direct resin composite. PMID:28243390

  10. Microtensile bond strength of repaired indirect resin composite.

    PubMed

    Visuttiwattanakorn, Porntida; Suputtamongkol, Kallaya; Angkoonsit, Duangjai; Kaewthong, Sunattha; Charoonanan, Piyanan

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surface treatments on microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs) of two types of indirect resin composites bonded to a conventional direct resin composite. Indirect resin composite blocks of Ceramage and SR Nexco were prepared in a plastic mold having a dimension of 10 × 10 × 4 mm. These composite blocks were divided into three groups according to their surface treatments: Group1: Sandblast (SB); Group2: Sandblast and ultrasonically clean (SB+UL); Group3: Sandblast plus silane (SB+SI). After bonding with direct resin composite, indirect-direct resin composite blocks were kept in distilled water for 24 hours at 37℃ and cut into microbars with the dimension of 1 × 1 × 8 mm. Microbar specimens (n = 40 per group) were loaded using a universal testing machine. Failure modes and compositions were evaluated by SEM. The statistical analyses of MTBS were performed by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test at α = .05. Surface treatments and brands had effects on the MTBS without an interaction between these two factors. For SR Nexco, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI group were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. For Ceramage, the MTBSs of SB and SB+SI were significantly higher than that of SB+UL. The mean MTBS of the Ceramage specimens was significantly higher than that of SR Nexco for all surface treatments. Sandblasting with or without silane application could improve the bond strengths of repaired indirect resin composites to a conventional direct resin composite.

  11. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of chemically-bonded phosphate ceramics containing TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Monize Aparecida; de Lima, Bruna de Oliveira; Ferreira, Leticia Patrício; Colonetti, Emerson; Feltrin, Jucilene; De Noni, Agenor

    2017-05-01

    Titanium dioxide was incorporated into chemically-bonded phosphate ceramic for use as photocatalytic inorganic coating. The coatings obtained were applied to unglazed ceramic tiles and cured at 350 °C. The surfaces were characterized by photocatalytic activity, determined in aqueous medium, based on the degradation of methylene blue dye. The effects of the percentage of TiO2 and the thickness of the layer on the photocatalytic efficiency were evaluated. The influence of the incorporation of TiO2 on the consolidation of the phosphate matrix coating was investigated using the wear resistance test. The crystalline phases of the coatings obtained were determined by XRD. The microstructure of the surfaces was analyzed by SEM. The thermal curing treatment did not cause a phase transition from anatase to rutile. An increase in the photocatalytic activity of the coating was observed with an increase in the TiO2 content. The dye degradation indices ranged from 14.9 to 44.0%. The photocatalytic efficiency was not correlated with the thickness of the coating layer deposited. The resistance to wear decreased with an increase in the TiO2 content. Comparison with a commercial photocatalytic ceramic coating indicated that there is a range of values for the TiO2 contents which offer potential for photocatalytic applications.

  12. Probing potential medium effects on phosphate ester bonds using 18O isotope shifts on 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Sorensen-Stowell, Kerensa; Hengge, Alvan C

    2005-10-14

    Dipolar aprotic cosolvents, such as DMSO and acetonitrile, accelerate the rates of hydrolysis of phosphate monoester dianions. It has been speculated that the rate acceleration arises from the disruption of hydrogen bonding to the phosphoryl group. An aqueous solvation shell can stabilize the dianionic phosphoryl group by forming hydrogen bonds to the phosphoryl oxygens, whereas solvents such as DMSO are incapable of forming such bonds. It has been proposed that the loss of stabilization could result in a weakened P-OR ester bond, contributing to the observed faster rate of hydrolysis. Computational results support this notion. We have used the 18O-induced perturbation to the 31P chemical shift to ascertain whether solvent changes result in alterations to the P-O(R) bond. We have studied 16O18O-labeled methyl, ethyl, phenyl, p-nitrophenyl, diethyl p-nitrophenyl, triphenyl, and di-tert-butyl ethyl phosphate in the solvents water, methanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, dioxane, and DMSO. The results suggest no significant solvent-induced weakening of the phosphate ester bonds in any of the solvents tested, and this is unlikely to be a significant source for the acceleration of hydrolysis in mixed solvents.

  13. NMR Scalar Couplings across Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds between Zinc-Finger Histidine Side Chains and DNA Phosphate Groups.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Abhijnan; Esadze, Alexandre; Roy, Sourav; Iwahara, Junji

    2016-10-10

    NMR scalar couplings across hydrogen bonds represent direct evidence for the partial covalent nature of hydrogen bonds and provide structural and dynamic information on hydrogen bonding. In this article, we report heteronuclear (15)N-(31)P and (1)H-(31)P scalar couplings across the intermolecular hydrogen bonds between protein histidine (His) imidazole and DNA phosphate groups. These hydrogen-bond scalar couplings were observed for the Egr-1 zinc-finger-DNA complex. Although His side-chain NH protons are typically undetectable in heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N correlation spectra due to rapid hydrogen exchange, this complex exhibited two His side-chain NH signals around (1)H 14.3 ppm and (15)N 178 ppm at 35 °C. Through various heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments, these signals were assigned to two zinc-coordinating His side chains in contact with DNA phosphate groups. The data show that the Nδ1 atoms of these His side chains are protonated and exhibit the (1)H-(15)N cross-peaks. Using heteronuclear (1)H, (15)N, and (31)P NMR experiments, we observed the hydrogen-bond scalar couplings between the His (15)Nδ1/(1)Hδ1 and DNA phosphate (31)P nuclei. These results demonstrate the direct involvement of the zinc-coordinating His side chains in the recognition of DNA by the Cys2His2-class zinc fingers in solution.

  14. Analysis of Bolted and Bonded Composite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3 . REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED I September 1992 Interim; May 1991-June 1992 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS C - F33615-89...Unannounced DI justification ....................... B y ................. Distribution I Availability Codes Iodes iDis 1.01 iiir,(TFT 3 TABLE OF...CONTENTS Chapter Page I Bolted Joints in Laminated Composites 1 1.1 INTRODUCTION 1 1.2 MAJOR PARAMETERS 2 1.3 JOINT CONFIGURATIONS 3 1.4 FAILURE MODES 4 1.5

  15. [Microtensile strength of composite-composite bonding: an in vitro study].

    PubMed

    Lin, Fei; Liu, Wei; Yan, Peng; Yue, Lin

    2015-02-18

    To investigate the bonding strength of different resin composites. Methacrylate-based resin APX and silorane-based resin composite P90 were chosen in this study, with their corresponding adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Filtek P90 System Adhesive (SA). The specimens were divided into three groups: (1) bulk group, filling each block with the same composite, then curing; (2) direct filling group, curing and polishing one composite, then filling a new composite directly; (3) bonding group, after curing and polishing one composite, conditioning the surface with adhesives, then filling a new composite. Cut each resin blocks into 1 mm×1 mm×14 mm each piece, detecting the microtensile strength, and analyzing by One-Way ANOVA and LSD. (1) The microtensile strength of the bulk group was the highest. (2) In direct filling group, the microtensile strength of 4 subgroups showed no statistical significance with each other but lower than that of the bulk group. (3) In bonding group, the microtensile strength of repairing with APX was higher than that with P90. When repairing with same composite, the microtensile strength was higher if the resin type of substrates was same with restorations than that was different. The microtensile strength of adhesives SE was higher than that of SA. (4) The sorting of the microtensile strength: bulk>SE bonding APX>SA bonding APX>SE bonding P90=direct filling>SA bonding P90. Retention force is higher when substrates are repaired with Methacrylate-based resins and corresponding adhesives. Retention force is lower when repaired with silorane-based composites and corresponding adhesives. Types of the substrate composites show no influence on the bonding strength.

  16. Prediction of fracture toughness and durability of adhesively bonded composite joints with undesirable bonding conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musaramthota, Vishal

    Advanced composite materials have enabled the conventional aircraft structures to reduce weight, improve fuel efficiency and offer superior mechanical properties. In the past, materials such as aluminum, steel or titanium have been used to manufacture aircraft structures for support of heavy loads. Within the last decade or so, demand for advanced composite materials have been emerging that offer significant advantages over the traditional metallic materials. Of particular interest in the recent years, there has been an upsurge in scientific significance in the usage of adhesively bonded composite joints (ABCJ's). ABCJ's negate the introduction of stress risers that are associated with riveting or other classical techniques. In today's aircraft transportation market, there is a push to increase structural efficiency by promoting adhesive bonding to primary joining of aircraft structures. This research is focused on the issues associated with the durability and related failures in bonded composite joints that continue to be a critical hindrance to the universal acceptance of ABCJ's. Of particular interest are the short term strength, contamination and long term durability of ABCJ's. One of the factors that influence bond performance is contamination and in this study the influence of contamination on composite-adhesive bond quality was investigated through the development of a repeatable and scalable surface contamination procedure. Results showed an increase in the contaminant coverage area decreases the overall bond strength significantly. A direct correlation between the contaminant coverage area and the fracture toughness of the bonded joint was established. Another factor that influences bond performance during an aircraft's service life is its long term strength upon exposure to harsh environmental conditions or when subjected to severe mechanical loading. A test procedure was successfully developed in order to evaluate durability of ABCJ's comprising severe

  17. Bonding of resin composites to resin-modified glass ionomers.

    PubMed

    Fortin, D; Vargas, M A; Swift, E J

    1995-08-01

    To evaluate the bonding between resin composites and resin-modified glass ionomer restorative materials. Bar-shaped specimens of Fuji II LC, Photac-Fil, and Vitremer were fabricated in a mold. After application of unfilled resin, resin composite (either Silux Plus or Restorative Z100) was condensed into the mold against the glass ionomer substrate and was light-cured. These bonded specimens, as well as intact specimens of each material, were placed on a three-point bending apparatus and were loaded until failure using a Zwick testing machine. The transverse strength of each specimen was calculated. Mean transverse strengths of bonded specimens ranged from 50% to 78% of the transverse strength of the intact glass ionomer materials. The lowest transverse strength was 18.1 MPa, for Photac-Fil/Z100, and the highest was 29.6 MPa, for Fuji II LC/Silux. Statistical analysis indicated that the type of composite used had no significant effect on transverse strength. However, the type of resin-modified glass ionomer used was significant. Although there was much overlap between materials, bonded specimens made with Fuji II LC had the highest absolute strength, and those made with Photac-Fil had the lowest absolute strength. Bonded Vitremer specimens had the highest transverse strength relative to the cohesive strength of the material.

  18. Evaluation of adhesively bonded composites by nondestructive techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Paweł H.; Ecault, Romain; Wandowski, Tomasz; Ostachowicz, Wiesław M.

    2017-04-01

    Composite materials are commonly used in many branches of industry. One method to join or repair CFRP parts is by the use adhesive bonding. There is a search of effective methods for pre-bond assessment of bonded parts and post-bond inspection. Research reported here focuses on post-bond inspection of bonded CFRP plates. In this paper we reported results of two methods. We used noncontact ultrasonic testing (UT) technique as reference method. Ultrasonic testing was made in an immersion tank using phased-array probes. The second method was the electromechanical impedance (EMI). A piezoelectric sensors were surface mounted on each of the samples. Due to piezoelectric effect the electrical response of the sensor is related to mechanical response of the structure to which the sensors is bonded to. Measurements were conducted using HIOKI Impedance Analyzer IM3570. In order to perform a detailed study three samples of each kind were tested. There were three reference samples. The samples with modified adhesive bonds had three levels of severity, so there were three samples with each level of modification. The ultrasonic testing was focused on C-scan analysis taking into consideration the amplitude and time of flight (TOF). Two probes were used, one with 5 MHz frequency, second with 10 MHz. The EMI spectra were gathered up to 5 MHz and they were processed with signal processing algorithms in order to extract differences between reference samples and samples with modified bonds. The UT results provided relevant information about the investigated samples, while the EMI showed sensitivity to the level of adhesive bond modification.

  19. Design of adhesive bonded composite-to-titanium cylindrical joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depasquale, F.; Ciranna, M.; Ciavatta, G.; Vittori, A.

    1993-02-01

    The ASTER composite-case solid-rocket motor (SRM) development program has addressed the problem posed by the requirement of adhesively bonding a metallic dome attach ring to the filament-wound composite case. An account is given of the numerical and experimental activities undertaken to optimize and verify the design solution, whose full opening at the aft end of the motor case facilitates mandrel extraction and propellant grain shape flexibility.

  20. Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Enamel: Assessment of Two Ethanol Wet-Bonding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Rafizadeh, Mojgan; Samimi, Pouran

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ethanol wet-bonding (EWB) technique has been stated to decrease degradation of resin-dentin bond. This study evaluated the effect of two EWB techniques on composite resin-to-enamel bond strength. Materials and Methods: Silicon carbide papers were used to produce flat enamel surfaces on the buccal faces of forty-five molars. OptiBond FL (OFL) adhesive was applied on enamel surfaces in three groups of 15 namely: Enamel surface and OFL (control);Protocol 1 of the EWB technique: absolute ethanol was applied to water-saturated acid-etched enamel surfaces for 1 minute before the application of ethanol-solvated hydrophobic adhesive resin of OFL 3 times;Protocol 2: progressive ethanol replacement; water was gradually removed from the enamel matrix using ascending ethanol concentrations before OFL application. Composite build-ups were made and the specimens were stored for 24 hours at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Fracture patterns were evaluated microscopically. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05). Results: There were no significant differences in bond strength between the groups (P=0.73). However, regarding failure patterns, the highest cohesive enamel fractures were recorded in groups 2 and 3. Conclusion: In this study, although both methods of EWB did not influence immediate bond strength of composite resin to enamel, the majority of failure patterns occurred cohesively in enamel. PMID:24910690

  1. An evaluation and comparison of shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin, using newer dentin bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Mithra N; Bhandary, Shruti

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the shear bond strength of Total etch Prime and Bond NT and self etch newer dentin bonding agents Clearfil S3, Xeno III Bond, Clearfil Protect Bond and G Bond used to bond composite resin to dentin, and to compare the difference in the shear bond strengths of the self etch newer dentin bonding agents. Hundred freshly extracted noncarious human maxillary premolar teeth were selected. The occlusal surfaces of each tooth were ground to prepare flat dentin surfaces at a depth of 1.5 mm and were randomly grouped, with twenty specimens in each: Group I - Prime and Bond NT, Group II - Clearfil Protect Bond, Group III - Xeno III Bond, Group IV - Clearfil S3 Bond, Group V - G Bond. Each group was treated with its respective bonding agents, as per the manufacturers' instructions Clearfill – Kuraray, Japan, G bond – GC Tokyo, Japan, Xeno- De Trey Densply, Germany. Blocks or Cylinders of composite resin were built up using Teflon mold and cured. Shear bond strengths were tested using Instron Universal testing machine and recorded in Mpa. The results were statistically analyzed using One-way anova and Tukeys HSD test. The total etch adhesive showed higher shear bond strength than self etching adhesives (P < 0.001). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that all the adhesive agents evaluated showed optimal shear bond strength 17-20 Mpa, except G bond. However, shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin is better with one bottle total etch adhesive than with the newer self etching bonding agents. PMID:20142888

  2. Debonding characteristics of adhesively bonded woven Kevlar composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fatigue damage mechanism of an adhesively bonded joint between fabric reinforced composite adherends was investigated with cracked-lap-shear specimens. Two bonded systems were studied: fabric Kevlar 49/5208 epoxy adherends bonded together with either EC 3445 or FM-300 adhesive. For each bonded system, two specimen geometries were tested. In all specimens tested, fatigue damage occurred in the form of cyclic debonding; however, the woven Kevlar specimens gave significantly slower debond growth rates and higher fracture toughness than previously found in the nonwoven adherend specimens. The surfaces for the woven adherends were not smooth; rather, they had regular crests (high spots) and troughs (low spots) due to the weave pattern. Radiographs of the specimens and examination of their failure surfaces revealed that fiber bridging occurred between the crests of the two adherends in the debonded region. The observed improvements in debond growth resistance and static fracture toughness are attributed to this bridging.

  3. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  4. Fracture surface analysis in composite and titanium bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite materials, it is necessary to understand the mechanical properties of the matrix materials and of the reinforcing fibers. Another factor that can affect the mechanical properties of a composite material is the interaction between the fiber and the matrix. In general, composites with strong fiber matrix bonding will give higher modulus, lower toughness composites. Composites with weak bonding will have a lower modulus and more ductility. The situation becomes a bit more complex when all possibilities are examined. To be considered are the following: the properties of the surface layer on the fiber, the interactive forces between polymer and matrix, the surface roughness and porosity of the fiber, and the morphology of the matrix polymer at the fiber surface. In practice, the surface of the fibers is treated to enhance the mechanical properties of a composite. These treatments include anodization, acid etching, high temperature oxidation, and plasma oxidation, to name a few. The goal is to be able to predict the surface properties of carbon fibers treated in various ways, and then to relate surface properties to fiber matrix bonding.

  5. Production of composites by using gliadin as a bonding material

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In our previous papers, a new technology that produces biopolymer composites by particle-bonding was introduced. During the manufacturing process, micrometer-scale raw material was coated with a corn protein, zein, which is then processed to form a rigid material. The coating of raw-material particl...

  6. Fatigue Life Methodology for Bonded Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the fatigue life of bonded composite skin/stringer structures based on delamination fatigue characterization data and geometric nonlinear finite element analyses. Results were compared to fatigue tests on stringer flange/skin specimens to verify the approach.

  7. Bonded and Bolted Graphite/Polyimide Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoumal, D. E.; Cushman, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Four types of high-temperature joints designed for control surfaces. Design, analysis, and testing performed to develop four types of graphite/polyimide bonded and bolted composite joints for lightly loaded control surfaces on advanced transportation systems that operate at temperatures up to 550 degrees F (288 degrees C).

  8. Alternation and tunable composition in hydrogen bonded supramolecular copolymers.

    PubMed

    Felder, Thorsten; de Greef, Tom F A; Nieuwenhuizen, Marko M L; Sijbesma, Rint P

    2014-03-07

    Sequence control in supramolecular copolymers is limited by the selectivity of the associating monomer end groups. Here we introduce the use of monomers with aminopyrimidinone and aminohydroxynaphthyridine quadruple hydrogen bonding end groups, which both homodimerize, but form even stronger heterodimers. These features allow the formation of supramolecular copolymers with a tunable composition and a preference for alternating sequences.

  9. The effect of surface treatments and bonding regimens on microtensile bond strengths of repaired composite: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Gouri Smita; Manjunath, MK

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess the microtensile bond strength of repaired composite resin that was surface treated by diamond point or silicon carbide followed by bonding using either only total- etch bonding regimen or silane coupling agent with adhesive resin. Materials and Methods: Fourteen composite blocks were aged under deionized water for 14 days. The bonding surface was prepared with coarse diamond point or silicon carbide. Two blocks with no surface treatment were used as control groups. The bonding regimen was either total-etch bonding regimen or silane coupling agent and bonding agent. The aged samples were then bonded to new composite. Five sections per block (each 1mm thick) were prepared; cut to obtain an adhesive zone of approximately 1mm2 and subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. Results: The highest bond strength was obtained by surface treatment by coarse diamond point and total etch bonding regimen and least by silicon carbide and silane. A statistically significant difference was seen in all the four groups. Conclusions: Surface treatment by a coarse diamond point and total-etch bonding regimen provides highest bond strength. Thus, a simpler treatment regimen can contribute to a better bond strength in repaired composites. PMID:23112489

  10. Effect of fluorapatite additive on the mechanical properties of tricalcium phosphate-zirconia composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallemi, I.; Ben Ayed, F.; Bouaziz, J.

    2012-02-01

    The effect of fluorapatite addition on the mechanical properties of tricalcium phosphate - 50 wt% zirconia composites was investigated during the sintering process. The Brazilian test was used to measure the mechanical resistance of bioceramics. The mechanical properties of composites increase with the sintering temperature and with fluorapatite additive. At 1400°C, the fluorapatite additive ameliorates the densification and the mechanical resistance of tricalcium phosphate - 50 wt% zirconia composites. The 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of tricalcium phosphate - zirconia composites sintered with fluorapatite additives reveals the presence of tetrahedral P sites.

  11. Polyelectrolyte multilayer-calcium phosphate composite coatings for metal implants.

    PubMed

    Elyada, Alon; Garti, Nissim; Füredi-Milhofer, Helga

    2014-10-13

    The preparation of organic-inorganic composite coatings with the purpose to increase the bioactivity of bioinert metal implants was investigated. As substrates, glass plates and rough titanium surfaces (Ti-SLA) were employed. The method comprises the deposition of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMLs) followed by immersion of the coated substrate into a calcifying solution of low supersaturation (MCS). Single or mixed PEMLs were constructed from poly-L-lysine (PLL) alternating with poly-L-glutamate, (PGA), poly-L-aspartate (PAA), and/or chondroitin sulfate (CS). ATR-FTIR spectra reveal that (PLL/PGA)10 multilayers and mixed multilayers with a (PLL/PGA)5 base contain intermolecular β-sheet structures, which are absent in pure (PLL/PAA)10 and (PLL/CS)10 assemblies. All PEML coatings had a grainy topography with aggregate sizes and size distributions increasing in the order: (PLL/PGA)n < (PLL/PAA)n < (PLL/CS)n. In mixed multilayers with a (PLL/PGA)n base and a (PLL/PAA)n or (PLL/CS)n top, the aggregate sizes were greatly reduced. The PEMLs promoted calcium phosphate nucleation and early crystal growth, the intensity of the effect depending on the composition of the terminal layer(s) of the polymer. In contrast, crystal morphology and structure depended on the supersaturation, pH, and ionic strength of the MCS, rather than on the composition of the organic matrix. Crystals grown on both uncoated and coated substrates were mostly platelets of calcium deficient carbonate apatite, with the Ca/P ratio depending on the precipitation conditions.

  12. Structure, properties and animal study of a calcium phosphate/calcium sulfate composite cement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Luen; Chen, Chang-Keng; Lee, Jing-Wei; Lee, Yu-Ling; Ju, Chien-Ping; Lin, Jiin-Huey Chern

    2014-04-01

    In-vitro and in-vivo studies have been conducted on an in-house-developed tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP)/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA)/calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH)-derived composite cement. Unlike most commercial calcium-based cement pastes, the investigated cement paste can be directly injected into water and harden without dispersion. The viability value of cells incubated with a conditioned medium of cement extraction is >90% that of Al2O3 control and >80% that of blank medium. Histological examination reveals excellent bonding between host bone and cement without interposition of fibrous tissues. At 12 weeks-post implantation, significant remodeling activities are found and a new bone network is developed within the femoral defect. The 26-week samples show that the newly formed bone becomes more mature, while the interface between residual cement and the new bone appears less identifiable. Image analysis indicates that the resorption rate of the present cement is much higher than that of TTCP or TTCP/DCPA-derived cement under similar implantation conditions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bond durability of self-adhesive composite cements to dentine.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Yuji; de Munck, Jan; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Yamada, Toshimoto; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2013-10-01

    Clinically, the most easy-to-use composite cements are the so-called self-adhesive composite cements (SAC's). Hardly any data is however today available on the long-term bonding effectiveness of such luting composites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond durability of different composite cements used to lute feldspathic ceramic blocks onto dentine. Four SAC's (Clearfil SA Cement, Kuraray; G-CEM, GC; SmartCem2, Dentsply; Unicem 3M ESPE), one 'self-etch' (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) and one 'etch-and-rinse' (Variolink ll, Ivoclar-Vivadent) multi-step composite cement were used to lute feldspathic ceramic blocks (Vita Mark II, Vita) onto dentine surfaces. Teeth were distributed randomly in 24 experimental groups according to two different surface-preparation techniques ('SMEAR-COVERED' versus 'SMEAR-FREE') and storage conditions ('IMMEDIATE' versus 'AGED'). Failure patterns were evaluated with a stereomicroscope, and afterwards imaged using Feg-SEM. Two additional specimens were processed for cement-dentine interfacial analysis using TEM. A linear mixed effects statistical model revealed significant differences for the variables 'composite cement', 'surface preparation' and 'ageing'. All self-adhesive composite cements, except Unicem (3M ESPE), did bond less favourably to fractured dentine. TEM revealed an ultra-structurally different interaction of the composite cements with 'SMEAR-COVERED' and 'SMEAR-FREE' dentine. All SAC's suffered most when luted to 'SMEAR-FREE' (fractured) dentine, fortunately of no clinical relevance and most likely due to enhanced water sorption through the open tubules. When luted to 'SMEAR-COVERED' dentine, all SACs appeared equally effective and durable as the 'etch-and-rinse' and 'self-etch' multi-step composite cements. Solely the SAC SmartCem2 (Dentsply) appeared clearly less favourable and consistent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The source of phosphate in the oxidation zone of ore deposits: Evidence from oxygen isotope compositions of pyromorphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmann, Fabian; Keim, Maximilian F.; Oelmann, Yvonne; Teiber, Holger; Marks, Michael A. W.; Markl, Gregor

    2013-12-01

    , toothpaste and as a release of waste water treatment plants (Young et al., 2009). Anthropogenic effects will not be discussed further in the following. On this basis, we consider three different cases of pyromorphite formation as illustrated on the conceptual scheme of Fig. 1. Case 1: Pyromorphite grown recently (within the last hundreds of years) on rock surfaces in former mines. Both, phosphate released geochemically from igneous rocks and phosphate released biologically during leaching from litter/lysis of microbial cells and soil organic matter decomposition are possible sources. Case 2: Pyromorphite formation on mine dumps, below vegetation (recent, during tens to hundreds of years). Based on the specific setting of these samples investigated here (they were found exclusively below a large fern; see more details in the section on sample description), biologically-mediated P release provides the phosphate for pyromorphite growth. Case 3: Pyromorphite growth in the oxidized zones of ore bodies prior to human interference. Most samples of our study belong to this case.Phosphorus generally forms very strong covalent bonds (Huminicki and Hawthorne, 2002) and there is only negligible exchange of oxygen isotopes between phosphate and ambient water under most near-surface conditions without biological activity (Winter et al., 1940; Longinelli, 1965). The only important exchange of oxygen isotopes between phosphate and ambient water involves biological activity and the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate (δ18OP) may be modified by different enzymatic/cellular processes. Once phosphate is taken up by organisms, intracellular pyrophosphatase mediates internal P cycling. This is associated with a temperature-dependent equilibrium isotope fractionation due to the reversible exchange of O atoms between the phosphate molecule and cell water. As a result the δ18OP is equilibrated with the ambient water, and the equilibrium temperature can be calculated following the revised

  15. Hysteresis heating based induction bonding of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwanwatana, Witchuda

    The viability of using magnetic particulate susceptor materials for induction heating during bonding of polymer matrix composites is well established in this work. The unique ability to offer localized heating, geometric flexibility, and self-controlled temperature is the major advantage of this technique. Hysteresis heating is tailored through careful design of the microstructure of nickel particulate polymer films (Ni/PSU). An excellent heating rate can be attained in the frequency range of 1 to 10 MHz for particle volume fraction below percolation of 0.26. The diameter of nickel particle should be kept between 65 nm to 10 mum to ensure multi-domain heating, Curie temperature control, negligible shielding effect, minimum eddy current, and slight particle oxidation. The hysteresis heating behavior of the Ni/PSU films is found to be volumetric in nature and proportional to the cube of applied magnetic field. On the other hand, heat generation is inversely proportional to the size of the multi-domain particles. The frequency effect; however, provide maximum heat generation at the domain wall resonance frequency. Curie temperature control is observed when sufficiently high magnetic fields (˜138 Oe) are applied. The master curves of AC heat generation in Ni/PSU films are established and show a strong particle size effect. Hysteresis fusion bonding of glass/polyphenylene sulfide thermoplastic composites using a magnetic film as the thermoplastic adhesive shows that the bond strength of hysteresis-welded materials is comparable to that of autoclave-welded materials while offering an order of magnitude reduction in cycle time. The relative contribution of the intimate contact and healing mechanisms to the fusion bonding process indicates that hysteresis bonding is controlled by intimate contact. The macroscopic failure modes vary from mostly adhesive composite/film (low bond strength) to a combination of adhesive composite/film, cohesive film, cohesive composite and

  16. Behavior of Plastic Bonded Composite Explosives During High Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Y.

    1998-03-01

    The mechanical behavior of plastic bonded composite explosives has been studied during high acceleration in an ultracentrifuge. The pressed explosives studied include LX-14 [95% HMX (cyclotetramethylene- tetranitramine), 5% Estane], Composition A3 type II [91% RDX (cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine), 99% BDNPF (bis-dinitropropyl acetal formal), 6% CAB (cellulose acetate butyrate)], and PAX-3 (85% HMX, 9% BDNPF, 6% CAB/25% Aluminum). The fracture strength of LX-14 is greater than all pressed explosives studied to date. The fracture strength of Composition A3 type II is smaller than all pressed explosives studied to date.

  17. Fracture surface analysis in composite and titanium bonding: Part 1: Titanium bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, K. A.; Wightman, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Fractured lap shear Ti 6-4 adherends bonded with polyphenyquinoxaline (PPQ) and polysulfone were analyzed. The effects of adherend pretreatment, stress level, thermal aging, anodizing voltage, and modified adhesive of Ti 6-4 adherend bonded with PPQ on lap shear strength were studied. The effect of adherend pretreatment on lap shear strength was investigated for PS samples. Results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) used to study the surface topography and surface composition are also discussed.

  18. Magnetic microparticle-polydimethylsiloxane composite for reversible microchannel bonding.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Chia-Wen; Lee, Yueh-Pu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an iron oxide magnetic microparticles and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (MMPs-PDMS) composite material was employed to demonstrate a simple high-strength reversible magnetic bonding method. This paper presents the casting of opaque-view (where optical inspection through the microchannels was impossible) and clear-view (where optical inspection through the microchannel was possible) MMPs-PDMS. The influence of the microchannel geometries on the casting of the opaque-view casting was limited, which is similar to standard PDMS casting. Clear-view casting performance was highly associated with the microchannel geometries. The effects of the microchannel layout and the gap between the PDMS cover layer and the micromold substrate were thoroughly investigated. Compared with the native PDMS bonding strength of 31 kPa, the MMPs-PDMS magnetic bonding experiments showed that the thin PDMS film with an MMPs-PDMS layer effectively reduced the surface roughness and enhanced MMPs-PDMS reversible magnetic bonding strength. A thin PDMS film-coated opaque-view MMPs-PDMS device exhibited the greatest bonding strength of 110 kPa, and a clear-view MMPs-PDMS device with a thin PDMS film attained a magnetic bonding strength of 81 kPa.

  19. Bond Strength of Composite CFRP Reinforcing Bars in Timber.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Marco; Righetti, Luca; Borri, Antonio

    2015-07-03

    The use of near-surface mounted (NSM) fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars is an interesting method for increasing the shear and flexural strength of existing timber members. This article examines the behaviour of carbon FRP (CFRP) bars in timber under direct pull-out conditions. The objective of this experimental program is to investigate the bond strength between composite bars and timber: bars were epoxied into small notches made into chestnut and fir wood members using a commercially-available epoxy system. Bonded lengths varied from 150 to 300 mm. Failure modes, stress and strain distributions and the bond strength of CFRP bars have been evaluated and discussed. The pull-out capacity in NSM CFRP bars at the onset of debonding increased with bonded length up to a length of 250 mm. While CFRP bar's pull-out was achieved only for specimens with bonded lengths of 150 and 200 mm, bar tensile failure was mainly recorded for bonded lengths of 250 and 300 mm.

  20. Bond Strength of Composite CFRP Reinforcing Bars in Timber

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Marco; Righetti, Luca; Borri, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The use of near-surface mounted (NSM) fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars is an interesting method for increasing the shear and flexural strength of existing timber members. This article examines the behaviour of carbon FRP (CFRP) bars in timber under direct pull-out conditions. The objective of this experimental program is to investigate the bond strength between composite bars and timber: bars were epoxied into small notches made into chestnut and fir wood members using a commercially-available epoxy system. Bonded lengths varied from 150 to 300 mm. Failure modes, stress and strain distributions and the bond strength of CFRP bars have been evaluated and discussed. The pull-out capacity in NSM CFRP bars at the onset of debonding increased with bonded length up to a length of 250 mm. While CFRP bar’s pull-out was achieved only for specimens with bonded lengths of 150 and 200 mm, bar tensile failure was mainly recorded for bonded lengths of 250 and 300 mm. PMID:28793423

  1. Magnetic microparticle-polydimethylsiloxane composite for reversible microchannel bonding

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Chia-Wen; Lee, Yueh-Pu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, an iron oxide magnetic microparticles and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (MMPs-PDMS) composite material was employed to demonstrate a simple high-strength reversible magnetic bonding method. This paper presents the casting of opaque-view (where optical inspection through the microchannels was impossible) and clear-view (where optical inspection through the microchannel was possible) MMPs-PDMS. The influence of the microchannel geometries on the casting of the opaque-view casting was limited, which is similar to standard PDMS casting. Clear-view casting performance was highly associated with the microchannel geometries. The effects of the microchannel layout and the gap between the PDMS cover layer and the micromold substrate were thoroughly investigated. Compared with the native PDMS bonding strength of 31 kPa, the MMPs-PDMS magnetic bonding experiments showed that the thin PDMS film with an MMPs-PDMS layer effectively reduced the surface roughness and enhanced MMPs-PDMS reversible magnetic bonding strength. A thin PDMS film-coated opaque-view MMPs-PDMS device exhibited the greatest bonding strength of 110 kPa, and a clear-view MMPs-PDMS device with a thin PDMS film attained a magnetic bonding strength of 81 kPa. PMID:27877852

  2. Hydroxyapatite-alumina composites and bone-bonding.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Fartash, B; Hermansson, L

    1995-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite-alumina (HA/Al2O3) composites, with HA contents of 15, 25, 30 and 70, and pure HA as well as pure Al2O3, were densified at 1275 degrees C at a top pressure of 200 MPa for 2 h, using glass-encapsulated hot isostatic pressing. From the sintered ceramics, cylinders 2.8 x 6 mm2 were prepared by ultrasonic machining and implanted into the femoral cortical bones of 12 New Zealand White rabbits for 3 months. After killing the animals, the femur was dissected out and cut into three sections, each containing one cylinder. The specimens were mounted in a push-out device and force was applied along the long axis of the cylinder. The maximum force required to loosen the implant was recorded and the fracture surface of the bone implant was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicate the important role of HA in new bone apposition to the implants, reflected by increasing bonding strength with increasing HA content in the composites. However, the relationship between HA content and the bonding strength was not linear. The composite with 70% HA and the pure HA ceramic had the same level of bonding strength and similar fracture interfaces in SEM, which supports the high bonding strength detected (about 15 MPa). Fractures occurred both in the bone and in the implant, indicating the stress transfer ability of the contact zone. This study presents qualitatively and quantitatively HA-dependent characteristics in bone-bonding. The mechanical strength of the composites was measured by a three-point bending test. The bending strength of the materials decreases with increasing HA content.

  3. Electrochemically assisted co-deposition of calcium phosphate/collagen coatings on carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xueni; Hu, Tao; Li, Hejun; Chen, Mengdi; Cao, Sheng; Zhang, Leilei; Hou, Xianghui

    2011-02-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP)/collagen coatings were prepared on the surface of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by electrochemically assisted co-deposition technique. The effects of collagen concentration in the electrolyte on morphology, structure and composition of the coatings were systematically investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adhesive strength of the coatings was also evaluated by scratch tests and tensile bond tests. It was demonstrated that the coatings of three-dimensional collagen network structure was formed on the C/C composites from the electrolyte containing collagen. The surface of the collagen network was covered by uniform CaP aggregates. The coatings were actually composites of CaP and collagen. Hydroxyapatite (HA) was a favorable composition in the coatings with the increase of the collagen concentration in the electrolyte. The formed collagen network increased the cohesive and adhesive strength of the coatings. The adhesive strength between the coatings and substrates increased as the collagen concentration in the electrolyte increased. The coatings prepared at the collagen concentration of 500 mg/L in the electrolyte were not scraped off until the applied load reached 32.0 ± 2.2 N and the average tensile adhesive strength of the coatings was 4.83 ± 0.71 MPa. After C/C coated with composite coatings (500 mg/L) being immersed in a 10-3 M Ca (OH)2 solution at 30-33 °C for 96 h, nano-structured HA/collagen coatings similar to the natural human bone were obtained on the C/C.

  4. The effects of internal tooth bleaching regimens on composite-to-composite bond strength.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Raphael; Attin, Thomas; Wegehaupt, Florian J; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Tauböck, Tobias T

    2012-12-01

    The authors conducted an in vitro study to investigate the influence of several internal bleaching regimens on the composite-to-composite shear bond strength of a dental core buildup material. The authors fabricated 72 specimens from a resin-based composite core buildup and assigned them randomly to six groups (four experimental and two control groups) (n = 12 per group), according to the following bleaching agents: sodium perborate mixed with distilled water (SP/W); sodium perborate mixed with 3 percent hydrogen peroxide (SP/HP-3); sodium perborate mixed with 30 percent hydrogen peroxide (SP/HP-30); 35 percent hydrogen peroxide (HP-35). After the 12-day bleaching procedures, the authors applied a calcium hydroxide dressing for two weeks. The two control groups consisted of unbleached specimens that either did not receive (C1) or did receive (C2) the calcium hydroxide dressing. The authors cleaned and silanized the resin-based composite specimens and coated them with an intermediate adhesive resin before applying fresh composite material. They measured composite surface roughness and shear bond strength and performed statistical analyses of the data. Unbleached specimens in groups C1 and C2 exhibited significantly lower composite-to-composite bond strength and significantly lower surface roughness than did specimens in groups SP/W and SP/HP-3. Bond strength in group HP-35 was significantly lower than that in group SP/W. Internal bleaching regimens that involve the use of sodium perborate mixed with water or 3 percent hydrogen peroxide might increase the composite-to-composite interfacial bond strength. None of the internal bleaching regimens in this study had an adverse effect on the composite-to-composite interfacial bond strength.

  5. Current application of β-tricalcium phosphate composites in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Lun, Deng-xing

    2012-08-01

    Presently, bioceramic materials have been extensively used in spinal surgery as bone grafts; however, there are some limitations for bioceramic materials. Calcium sulfate is rapidly absorbed in vivo, the degradation of which often occurs prior to the formation of new bones. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is hardly absorbed, which blocks the formation of new bones and remodeling, and results in poor local stability or permanent stress concentration. Only β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is relatively balanced between scaffold absorption and bone formation. And it is a good biodegradable ceramic material that could supply a large quantity of calcium ion and sulfate ion as well as scaffold structure for bone regeneration. However, the problem of single β-TCP is lack of osteoinductivity and osteogenicity, which restricts its application. Therefore β-TCP composite materials have been used in the field of orthopaedics in recent decades, which fully use excellent properties of other bone repairing materials, such as biodegradability, osteoinductivity, osteogenicity and osteoconductivity. These materials make up for the deficiencies of single β-TCP and endow β-TCP with more biological and physical properties. © 2012 Tianjin Hospital and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. In-situ polymerisation of fully bioresorbable polycaprolactone/phosphate glass fibre composites: In vitro degradation and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Menghao; Parsons, Andrew J; Felfel, Reda M; Rudd, Christopher D; Irvine, Derek J; Ahmed, Ifty

    2016-06-01

    Fully bioresorbable composites have been investigated in order to replace metal implant plates used for hard tissue repair. Retention of the composite mechanical properties within a physiological environment has been shown to be significantly affected due to loss of the integrity of the fibre/matrix interface. This study investigated phosphate based glass fibre (PGF) reinforced polycaprolactone (PCL) composites with 20%, 35% and 50% fibre volume fractions (Vf) manufactured via an in-situ polymerisation (ISP) process and a conventional laminate stacking (LS) followed by compression moulding. Reinforcing efficiency between the LS and ISP manufacturing process was compared, and the ISP composites revealed significant improvements in mechanical properties when compared to LS composites. The degradation profiles and mechanical properties were monitored in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C for 28 days. ISP composites revealed significantly less media uptake and mass loss (p<0.001) throughout the degradation period. The initial flexural properties of ISP composites were substantially higher (p<0.0001) than those of the LS composites, which showed that the ISP manufacturing process provided a significantly enhanced reinforcement effect than the LS process. During the degradation study, statistically higher flexural property retention profiles were also seen for the ISP composites compared to LS composites. SEM micrographs of fracture surfaces for the LS composites revealed dry fibre bundles and poor fibre dispersion with polymer rich zones, which indicated poor interfacial bonding, distribution and adhesion. In contrast, evenly distributed fibres without dry fibre bundles or polymer rich zones, were clearly observed for the ISP composite samples, which showed that a superior fibre/matrix interface was achieved with highly improved adhesion.

  7. Phosphate-intercalated Ca-Fe-layered double hydroxides: Crystal structure, bonding character, and release kinetics of phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Myong A.; Woo Kim, Tae; Paek, Mi-Jeong; Ha, Hyung-Wook; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2011-01-01

    The nitrate-form of Ca-Fe-layered double hydroxide (Ca-Fe-LDH) was synthesized via co-precipitation method, and its phosphate-intercalates were prepared by ion-exchange reaction. According to X-ray diffraction analysis, the Ca-Fe-LDH-NO 3- compound and its H 2PO 4--intercalate showed hexagonal layered structures, whereas the ion-exchange reaction with HPO 42- caused a frustration of the layer ordering of LDH. Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy clearly demonstrated that the Ca-Fe-LDH lattice with trivalent iron ions was well-maintained after the ion-exchange with HPO 42- and H 2PO 4-. Under acidic conditions, phosphate ions were slowly released from the Ca-Fe-LDH lattice and the simultaneous release of hydroxide caused the neutralization of acidic media. Fitting analysis based on kinetic models indicated a heterogeneous diffusion process of phosphates and a distinct dependence of release rate on the charge of phosphates. This study strongly suggested that Ca-Fe-LDH is applicable as bifunctional vector for slow release of phosphate fertilizer and for the neutralization of acid soil.

  8. [Influence of primers ' chemical composition on shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic].

    PubMed

    Łagodzińska, Paulina; Bociong, Kinga; Dejak, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Resin cements establish a strong durable bond between zirconia ceramic and hard tissues of teeth. It is essential to use primers with proper chemical composition before cementation. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of primer's chemical composition on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to resin cements. 132 zirconia specimens were randomly assigned to four groups. There were four resin systems used. They included resin cement and respective primer, dedicated to zirconia: Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F2.0, Monobond Plus/Multilink Automix, AZ - Primer/ResiCem, Z - Prime Plus/Duo-Link. In each group the protocol of cementation was as follows: application of primer to the zirconia surface and application of the respective resin cement in cylindric mold (dimensions: 3.0 mm height and 3.0 mm diameter). Then, the shear bond strength was evaluated and the failure type was assessed in lupes (×2.5 magnification), also random specimens under SEM. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the data, the level of significance was α = 0.05. Finally, the known chemical composition of each primer was analysed in reference to probable chemical bonds, which may occure between primers and zirconia. The mean shear bond strength between resin cements and zirconia was the highest for Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link (8.24 ± 3,21 MPa) and lowest for Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 (4.60 ± 2.21 MPa). The analysis revealed significant difference between all groups, except pair Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem. The failure type in groups of Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem was mainly adhesive, in groups Monobond Plus/ /Multilink Automix and Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link mainly mixed. The chemical composition of primers affects different bond mechanisms between resin cements and zirconia. The highest shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia can be obtained for the primer composed of 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen

  9. Zirconia-composite bonding after plasma of argon treatment.

    PubMed

    Canullo, Luigi; Micarelli, Costanza; Bettazzoni, Laura; Koçi, Brunilda; Baldissara, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To compare the shear bond strength (SBS) values of resin cement to zirconia treated with a new activating method. Forty-five zirconia specimens were divided into three groups: no treatment (group 1), plasma of argon cleaning for 375 seconds (group 2), and plasma of argon cleaning for 750 seconds (group 3). Composite cylinders were bonded with a self-adhesive cement. After 40 days of water storage, specimens were subjected to the SBS test. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and the Neuman-Keuls multiple comparison test. Test groups obtained SBS values significantly higher (101% for group 2 and 81% for group 3) than controls. Plasma of argon appeared to improve bonding between zirconia and resin cement.

  10. Deoxyguanosine phosphate mediated sacrificial bonds promote synergistic mechanical properties in nacre-mimetic nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Lahja; Walther, Andreas; Seitsonen, Jani; Berglund, Lars; Ikkala, Olli

    2013-08-12

    We show that functionalizing polymer-coated colloidal nanoplatelets with guanosine groups allows synergistic increase of mechanical properties in nacre-mimetic lamellar self-assemblies. Anionic montmorillonite (MTM) was first coated using cationic poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) to prepare core-shell colloidal platelets, and subsequently the remaining chloride counterions allowed exchange to functional anionic 2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate (dGMP) counterions, containing hydrogen bonding donors and acceptors. The compositions were studied using elemental analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, wide-angle X-ray scattering, and tensile testing. The lamellar spacing between the clays increases from 1.85 to 2.14 nm upon addition of the dGMP. Adding dGMP increases the elastic modulus, tensile strength, and strain 33.0%, 40.9%, and 5.6%, respectively, to 13.5 GPa, 67 MPa, and 1.24%, at 50% relative humidity. This leads to an improved toughness seen as a ca. 50% increase of the work-to-failure. This is noteworthy, as previously it has been observed that connecting the core-shell nanoclay platelets covalently or ionically leads to increase of the stiffness but to reduced strain. We suggest that the dynamic supramolecular bonds allow slippage and sacrificial bonds between the self-assembling nanoplatelets, thus promoting toughness, still providing dynamic interactions between the platelets.

  11. Molecular bonding characteristics of Self-plasticized bamboo composites.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qiu; Peng, Wanxi; Ohkoshi, Makoto

    2014-07-01

    Bamboo biomass fibers were gradually separated, prepared, and then self-plasticized for immune composites. The molecular bonding characteristics of the self-plasticized bamboo composites were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and thermo gravimetric analysis (TG). The important results were as follows. (1) During self-plasticizing of bamboo biomass, the cross-linking between celluloses mainly depended on carboxylic acid anhydrides and carboxylic acid esters, that between cellulose and lignin depended on carboxylic acid esters and C=O groups of aliphatic hydrocarbons, and that of hemi cellulose had a ether bond and ester bond bridging effect between lignin and cellulose. The cross-linking effects of hemi cellulose, lignin, and cellulose could be stacked and coupled. (2) After self-plasticization, the crystallinity of the lingo cellulosic biomass, lignin cellulose, and cellulose were increased by 5.8%, 2.28%, and 11.67%, respectively. While the TG curves of all samples were basically similar in shape, the weight loss rate turning points of the self-plasticized samples were delayed compared with those of the bamboo biomass fibers. This result demonstrated that the molecular integration of the bamboo biomass was increased after self-plasticization, and confirmed that bond cross-linking between the hemi cellulose, lignin and cellulose of the bamboo biomass had occurred.

  12. Nondestructive inspection of bonded composite doublers for aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Moore, David; Walkington, Phillip D.

    1996-11-01

    One of the major thrusts established under the FAA's National Aging Aircraft Research Program is to foster new technologies associated with civil aircraft maintenance. Recent DOD and other government developments in the use of bonded composite doublers on metal structures has supported the need for research and validation of such doubler applications on US certificated airplanes. Composite doubler technology is rapidly maturing and shows promise of cost savings on aging aircraft. While there have been numerous studies and military aircraft installations of composite doublers, the technology has not been certified for use on commercial aircraft. Before the use of composite doublers can be accepted by the civil aviation industry, it is imperative that methods be developed which can quickly and reliably assess the integrity of the doubler. In this study, a specific composite application was chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Primary among inspection requirements for these doublers is the identification of disbonds, between the composite laminate and aluminum parent material, and delaminations in the composite laminate. Surveillance of cracks or corrosion in the inspection (NDI) method can inspect for every flaw type, therefore it is important to be aware of available NDI techniques and to properly address their capabilities and limitations. This paper reports on a series of NDI tests which have been conducted on laboratory test structures and on a fuselage section cut from a retired L-1011 aircraft. Specific challenges, unique to bonded composite doubler applications, will be highlighted. In order to quickly integrate this technology into existing aircraft maintenance depots, the use of conventional NDI, ultrasonics, x-ray, and eddy current, is stressed. The application of these NDI technique to composite doublers and the results from test specimens, which were loaded to provide a changing flaw profile, are

  13. Evaluating resin-enamel bonds by microshear and microtensile bond strength tests: effects of composite resin

    PubMed Central

    de ANDRADE, Andrea Mello; MOURA, Sandra Kiss; REIS, Alessandra; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; GARCIA, Eugenio Jose; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of resin composite (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Flow Z350) and adhesive system [(Solobond Plus, Futurabond NR (VOCO) and Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE)] on the microtensile (µTBS) and microshear bond strength (µSBS) tests on enamel, and to correlate the bond strength means between them. Material and methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were sectioned to obtain two tooth halves: one for µTBS and the other one for µSBS. Adhesive systems and resin composites were applied to the enamel ground surfaces and light-cured. After storage (37ºC/24 h) specimens were stressed (0.5 mm/ min). Fracture modes were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results The correlation between tests was estimated with Pearson's product-moment correlation statistics (α =0.05). For both tests only the main factor resin composite was statistically significant (p<0.05). The correlation test detected a positive (r=0.91) and significant (p=0.01) correlation between the tests. Conclusions The results were more influenced by the resin type than by the adhesives. Both microbond tests seem to be positive and linearly correlated and can therefore lead to similar conclusions. PMID:21308290

  14. A new method for casting discrepancy: some results for a phosphate-bonded investment.

    PubMed

    Ho, E K; Darvell, B W

    1998-01-01

    An accurate and realistic casting discrepancy method applicable to base metal alloys has hitherto been lacking. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for determining casting discrepancy free of interference from oxide, slag and surface defects, working under realistic conditions. In addition, a variable was sought that could be used for calibrating the casting process to allow for local errors. A crown pattern was designed to incorporate circular V-grooves on the margin and the inside surface of the occlusal part for determination of the 'groove root diameter' (GRD) with a measuring microscope. Castings using a phosphate-bonded investment were made to test the effects of 'hygroscopic' expansion, burn-out temperature, powder/liquid ratio and groove location. The tested investment variables showed the expected effects, but the distortion between marginal and pulpal regions was clearly shown, as were interactions between some variables. 'Special liquid' proportion appears to be a good candidate variable for process calibration. The GRD method was shown to be sensitive and reproducible. It is also applicable to many other casting systems, and in particular to monitoring overall process discrepancy, i.e. from tooth preparation to casting, which is suggested as being the key issue.

  15. Effect of Intermediate Agents and Preheated Composites on Repair Bond Strength of Silorane-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Daryadar, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Repairing composite restorations is a challenging procedure especially when two different types of composites are used. This study aimed to compare the repair strength of silorane-based composite (SC) (Filtek P90) with that of preheated SC, methacrylate composite (MC)(Z250), flowable MC (Filtek Supreme Plus) and different adhesive/composite combinations. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four SC specimens were fabricated and randomly divided into seven groups (G). In the control group (G7), SC was bonded immediately to SC. The other specimens were water-aged for two months and were then roughened, etched and repaired with the following materials: G1) Silorane Adhesive Bond (SAB)/SC; G2) Preheated SC; G3) SAB/MC; G4) Adper Single Bond (SB)/MC; G5) Flowable MC/MC; G6) Preheated MC. After water storage and thermocycling, the repaired specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Preheated SC and MC, flowable MC and SAB/SC resulted in bond strength comparable to that of the control group. Preheated SC showed significantly higher bond strength when compared to SAB/MC (P=0.04) and SB/MC (P<0.001). Bond strength of SB/MC was significantly lower than that of the other groups (P<0.05), except for SAB/SC and SAB/MC. Conclusion: All repairing materials except for SB/MC resulted in bond strength values comparable to that of the control group. Repair with preheated SC yielded the highest bond strength. PMID:27148378

  16. Decreased stone-free rates after percutaneous nephrolithotomy for high calcium phosphate composition kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Kacker, Ravi; Meeks, Joshua J; Zhao, Lee; Nadler, Robert B

    2008-09-01

    To our knowledge the most effective treatment in patients with renal stones containing calcium phosphate remains unknown. An inverse correlation exists between calcium phosphate stone composition and the stone-free rate of shock wave lithotripsy. It is unknown whether this is due to treatment type (shock wave lithotripsy) or to a feature unique to calcium phosphate stones. We determined whether calcium phosphate stone composition affects the stone-free rate of percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy was performed in 111 patients between 2001 and 2006 and stone fragments were analyzed for calcium phosphate composition. Patients were categorized into groups based on calcium phosphate content. All patients underwent preoperative computerized tomography. Patients were considered stone-free after percutaneous nephrolithotomy when fragments were 2 mm or less on noncontrast computerized tomography. A total of 213 percutaneous nephrolithotomies were performed. An increased percent of calcium phosphate was related to a decreased percutaneous nephrolithotomy success rate (p = 0.005), independent of preoperative stone burden (p = 0.8). Patients with greater than 60% calcium phosphate stones were significantly less likely to be stone-free after percutaneous nephrolithotomy than those with less calcium phosphate (60%, OR 2.45, 95% CI 1.103-5.4401 vs 80%, OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.33-10.44). High calcium phosphate renal stone content leads to a decreased stone-free rate. Further study is required to determine the mechanism of stone resilience as well as the most appropriate treatment modality in patients with high calcium phosphate composition kidney stones.

  17. Development of explosively bonded TZM wire reinforced Columbian sheet composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, H. E.; Carpenter, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of producing TZM molybdenum wire reinforced C129Y columbium alloy composites by explosive welding were studied. Layers of TZM molybdenum wire were wound on frames with alternate layers of C129Y columbium alloy foil between the wire layers. The frames held both the wire and foils in place for the explosive bonding process. A goal of 33 volume percent molybdenum wire was achieved for some of the composites. Variables included wire diameter, foil thickness, wire separation, standoff distance between foils and types and amounts of explosive. The program was divided into two phases: (1) development of basic welding parameters using 5 x 10-inch composites, and (2) scaleup to 10 x 20-inch composites.

  18. Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-amorphous Calcium Phosphate Treatment on Microtensile Bond Strength to Carious Affected Dentin Using Two Adhesive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Farhadi, Farrokh; Norouzi, Marouf

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim was to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to carious affected dentin (CAD) using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and methods. The occlusal surface of 32 human molars with moderate occlusal caries was removed. Infected dentin was removed until reaching CAD and the teeth were randomly divided into two groups based on the Single Bond (SB) and Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) adhesive systems. Before composite resin bonding, each group was subdivided into three subgroups of ND, CAD and CPP-ACP-treated CAD (CAD-CPP) based on the dentin substrate. After dissecting samples to l-mm-thick cross-sections (each subgroup: n = 13), μTBS was measured at a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analyzed using two-way ANOVA, independent samples t-test and post-hoc Tukey tests (α=0.05). Results. Bond strength of both adhesive systems to ND was significantly higher than that to CAD (P <0.001) and CAD/CPP (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between the μTBS of SB to CAD and CAD-CPP (P > 0.05).μTBS of CSE to CAD-CPP was higher than that to CAD; however, the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). Significant differences were found between SB and CSE systems only with CAD substrate (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Regardless of the adhesive system used, surface treatment of CAD with CPP-ACP did not have a significant effect on bond strength. However, bond strength to CAD was higher with SB rather than with CSE. PMID:25346832

  19. Installation of adhesively bonded composites to repair carbon steel structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Dunn, Dennis P.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2003-02-01

    In the past decade, an advanced composite repair technology has made great strides in commercial aviation use. Extensive testing and analysis, through joint programs between the Sandia Labs FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center and the aviation industry, have proven that composite materials can be used to repair damaged aluminum structure. Successful pilot programs have produced flight performance history to establish the viability and durability of bonded composite patches as a permanent repair on commercial aircraft structures. With this foundation in place, efforts are underway to adapt bonded composite repair technology to civil structures. This paper presents a study in the application of composite patches on large trucks and hydraulic shovels typically used in mining operations. Extreme fatigue, temperature, erosive, and corrosive environments induce an array of equipment damage. The current weld repair techniques for these structures provide a fatigue life that is inferior to that of the original plate. Subsequent cracking must be revisited on a regular basis. It is believed that the use of composite doublers, which do not have brittle fracture problems such as those inherent in welds, will help extend the structure's fatigue life and reduce the equipment downtime. Two of the main issues for adapting aircraft composite repairs to civil applications are developing an installation technique for carbon steel structure and accommodating large repairs on extremely thick structures. This paper will focus on the first phase of this study which evaluated the performance of different mechanical and chemical surface preparation techniques. The factors influencing the durability of composite patches in severe field environments will be discussed along with related laminate design and installation issues.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Ca, Mg, La- PMMA Polymer Composites for Phosphate Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study calcium, magnesium and lanthanum- PMMA polymer composites were synthesized, characterized and investigated for phosphate removal from wastewater using rapid small scale column tests. Theoretical and experimental capacity of the media was determined and unused and sp...

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Ca, Mg, La- PMMA Polymer Composites for Phosphate Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study calcium, magnesium and lanthanum- PMMA polymer composites were synthesized, characterized and investigated for phosphate removal from wastewater using rapid small scale column tests. Theoretical and experimental capacity of the media was determined and unused and sp...

  2. 31 CFR 359.15 - When is the composite rate applied to Series I savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When is the composite rate applied to... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.15 When is the composite rate applied to Series I savings bonds? The most recently announced composite rate applies to a bond during its...

  3. 31 CFR 359.15 - When is the composite rate applied to Series I savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When is the composite rate applied to... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.15 When is the composite rate applied to Series I savings bonds? The most recently announced composite rate applies to a bond during its...

  4. 31 CFR 359.15 - When is the composite rate applied to Series I savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When is the composite rate applied to... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.15 When is the composite rate applied to Series I savings bonds? The most recently announced composite rate applies to a bond during its...

  5. 31 CFR 359.15 - When is the composite rate applied to Series I savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false When is the composite rate applied to... OFFERING OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.15 When is the composite rate applied to Series I savings bonds? The most recently announced composite rate applies to a bond during its...

  6. 31 CFR 359.15 - When is the composite rate applied to Series I savings bonds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When is the composite rate applied to... OF UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.15 When is the composite rate applied to Series I savings bonds? The most recently announced composite rate applies to a bond during its...

  7. Catalysis of hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution at the P-N bond of phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleotides in phosphate buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide-activated derivatives of guanosine and cytidine 5'-monophosphates, henceforth called ImpN's, exhibit enhanced rates of degradation in the presence of aqueous inorganic phosphate in the range 4.0 < or = pH < or = 8.6. This degradation is been attributed to (i) nucleophilic substitution of the imidazolide and (ii) catalysis of the P-N bond hydrolysis by phosphate. The first reaction results in the formation of nucleoside 5'-diphosphate and the second in nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Analysis of the observed rates as well as the product ratios as a function of pH and phosphate concentration allow distinction between various mechanistic possibilities. The results show that both H2PO4- and HPO4(2-) participate in both hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution. Statistically corrected biomolecular rate constants indicate that the dianion is 4 times more effective as a general base than the monoanion, and 8 times more effective as nucleophile. The low Bronsted value beta = 0.15 calculated for these phosphate species, presumed to act as general bases in facilitating water attack, is consistent with the fact that catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's has not been detected before. The beta nuc = 0.35 calculated for water, H2PO4-, HPO4(2-), and hydroxide acting as nucleophiles indicates a more associative transition state for nucleotidyl (O2POR- with R = nucleoside) transfers than that observed for phosphoryl (PO3(2-)) transfers (beta nuc = 0.25). With respect to the stability/reactivity of ImpN's under prebiotic conditions, our study shows that these materials would not suffer additional degradation due to inorganic phosphate, assuming the concentrations of phosphate, Pi, on prebiotic Earth were similar to those in the present oceans ([Pi] approximately 2.25 micromoles).

  8. Catalysis of hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution at the P-N bond of phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleotides in phosphate buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide-activated derivatives of guanosine and cytidine 5'-monophosphates, henceforth called ImpN's, exhibit enhanced rates of degradation in the presence of aqueous inorganic phosphate in the range 4.0 < or = pH < or = 8.6. This degradation is been attributed to (i) nucleophilic substitution of the imidazolide and (ii) catalysis of the P-N bond hydrolysis by phosphate. The first reaction results in the formation of nucleoside 5'-diphosphate and the second in nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Analysis of the observed rates as well as the product ratios as a function of pH and phosphate concentration allow distinction between various mechanistic possibilities. The results show that both H2PO4- and HPO4(2-) participate in both hydrolysis and nucleophilic substitution. Statistically corrected biomolecular rate constants indicate that the dianion is 4 times more effective as a general base than the monoanion, and 8 times more effective as nucleophile. The low Bronsted value beta = 0.15 calculated for these phosphate species, presumed to act as general bases in facilitating water attack, is consistent with the fact that catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's has not been detected before. The beta nuc = 0.35 calculated for water, H2PO4-, HPO4(2-), and hydroxide acting as nucleophiles indicates a more associative transition state for nucleotidyl (O2POR- with R = nucleoside) transfers than that observed for phosphoryl (PO3(2-)) transfers (beta nuc = 0.25). With respect to the stability/reactivity of ImpN's under prebiotic conditions, our study shows that these materials would not suffer additional degradation due to inorganic phosphate, assuming the concentrations of phosphate, Pi, on prebiotic Earth were similar to those in the present oceans ([Pi] approximately 2.25 micromoles).

  9. A novel injectable calcium phosphate cement-bioactive glass composite for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Long; Li, Yang; Zhao, Kang; Tang, Yufei; Cheng, Zhe; Chen, Jun; Zang, Yuan; Wu, Jianwei; Kong, Liang; Liu, Shuai; Lei, Wei; Wu, Zixiang

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) can be molded or injected to form a scaffold in situ, which intimately conforms to complex bone defects. Bioactive glass (BG) is known for its unique ability to bond to living bone and promote bone growth. However, it was not until recently that literature was available regarding CPC-BG applied as an injectable graft. In this paper, we reported a novel injectable CPC-BG composite with improved properties caused by the incorporation of BG into CPC. The novel injectable bioactive cement was evaluated to determine its composition, microstructure, setting time, injectability, compressive strength and behavior in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The in vitro cellular responses of osteoblasts and in vivo tissue responses after the implantation of CPC-BG in femoral condyle defects of rabbits were also investigated. CPC-BG possessed a retarded setting time and markedly better injectability and mechanical properties than CPC. Moreover, a new Ca-deficient apatite layer was deposited on the composite surface after immersing immersion in SBF for 7 days. CPC-BG samples showed significantly improved degradability and bioactivity compared to CPC in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, the degrees of cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation on CPC-BG were higher than those on CPC. Macroscopic evaluation, histological evaluation, and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis showed that CPC-BG enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation in comparison with CPC. A novel CPC-BG composite has been synthesized with improved properties exhibiting promising prospects for bone regeneration.

  10. A Novel Injectable Calcium Phosphate Cement-Bioactive Glass Composite for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kang; Tang, Yufei; Cheng, Zhe; Chen, Jun; Zang, Yuan; Wu, Jianwei; Kong, Liang; Liu, Shuai; Lei, Wei; Wu, Zixiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) can be molded or injected to form a scaffold in situ, which intimately conforms to complex bone defects. Bioactive glass (BG) is known for its unique ability to bond to living bone and promote bone growth. However, it was not until recently that literature was available regarding CPC-BG applied as an injectable graft. In this paper, we reported a novel injectable CPC-BG composite with improved properties caused by the incorporation of BG into CPC. Materials and Methods The novel injectable bioactive cement was evaluated to determine its composition, microstructure, setting time, injectability, compressive strength and behavior in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The in vitro cellular responses of osteoblasts and in vivo tissue responses after the implantation of CPC-BG in femoral condyle defects of rabbits were also investigated. Results CPC-BG possessed a retarded setting time and markedly better injectability and mechanical properties than CPC. Moreover, a new Ca-deficient apatite layer was deposited on the composite surface after immersing immersion in SBF for 7 days. CPC-BG samples showed significantly improved degradability and bioactivity compared to CPC in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, the degrees of cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation on CPC-BG were higher than those on CPC. Macroscopic evaluation, histological evaluation, and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis showed that CPC-BG enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation in comparison with CPC. Conclusions A novel CPC-BG composite has been synthesized with improved properties exhibiting promising prospects for bone regeneration. PMID:23638115

  11. Evaluation of micro-shear bond strength of resin modified glass-ionomer to composite resins using various bonding systems

    PubMed Central

    Kasraie, Shahin; Shokripour, Mohadese; Safari, Mahin

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to compare the micro-shear bond strength between composite and resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) by different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 discs of RMGI with a diameter of 15 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4). Four cylinders of composite resin (z250) were bonded to the RMGI discs with Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond in Groups 1-3, respectively. The fourth group was the control. Samples were tested by a mechanical testing machine with a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed under a stereo-microscope. Results: The means of micro-shear bond strength values for Groups 1-4 were 14.45, 23.49, 16.23 and 5.46 MPa, respectively. Using a bonding agent significantly increased micro-shear bond strength (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of RMGI to composite increased significantly with the use of adhesive resin. The bond strength of RMGI to composite resin could vary depending upon the type of adhesive system used. PMID:24347892

  12. Sintering and mechanical properties of the alumina-tricalcium phosphate-titania composites.

    PubMed

    Sakka, Siwar; Bouaziz, Jamel; Ben Ayed, Foued

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the content of titania and the sintering process on the transformation phase, the densification, the rupture strength and the microstructures of the alumina-10 wt.% tricalcium phosphate composites. After the sintering process, the samples were examined by using (31)P and (27)Al magic angle scanning nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The Brazilian test was used to measure the rupture strength of the samples. The present results provide new information about solid-state reactivity in the ternary system α-alumina-β-tricalcium phosphate-anatase-titania. The differential thermal analysis of the α-alumina-β-tricalcium phosphate-titania composites shows two endothermic peaks, at 1360 °C and at 1405 °C, which are caused by the reactions between titania/alumina and titania/tricalcium phosphate, respectively. Thus, the presence of titania in the alumina-10 wt.% tricalcium phosphate leads to the formation of β-Al2TiO5 at 1360 °C. At 1600 °C, the alumina-10 wt.% tricalcium phosphate-5 wt.% titania composites displayed the highest rupture strength (74 MPa), compared to the alumina-10 wt.% tricalcium phosphate composites (13.5 MPa). Accordingly, the increase of the rupture strength is due to the formation of the new β-Al2TiO5 phase.

  13. Experimental ammonia-free phosphate-bonded investments using Mg(H2PO4)2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Tamaki, Y; Miyazaki, T

    2001-12-01

    In previous study, we found that Mg(H2PO4)2 instead of NH4H2PO4 was available as a binder material for phosphate-bonded investments and possibly could be used to develop the phosphate-bonded investment without ammonia gas release. The purpose of the present study was to develop the experimental ammonia-free phosphate-bonded investments by investigating suitable refractories. Mg(H2PO4)2.nH2O and MgO were prepared as a binder. Cristobalite and quartz were selected as refractories. The power ratio of MgO/Mg(H2PO4)2.nH2O was set constant at 1.2 according to our previous findings. Fundamental properties of dental investment such as strength, manipulation and expansion were evaluated. Using cristobalite as the refractory material, further investigations were performed. The refractory/binder ratio was definitely effective. The increase of this ratio led to low mold strength and large mold expansion. The present findings suggested that C5 was desirable for dental investment.

  14. Damage tolerance of bonded composite aircraft repairs for metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Randal John

    This thesis describes the development and validation of methods for damage tolerance substantiation of bonded composite repairs applied to cracked plates. This technology is used to repair metal aircraft structures, offering improvements in fatigue life, cost, manufacturability, and inspectability when compared to riveted repairs. The work focuses on the effects of plate thickness and bending on repair life, and covers fundamental aspects of fracture and fatigue of cracked plates and bonded joints. This project falls under the UBC Bonded Composite Repair Program, which has the goal of certification and widespread use of bonded repairs in civilian air transportation. This thesis analyses the plate thickness and transverse stress effects on fracture of repaired plates and the related problem of induced geometrically nonlinear bending in unbalanced (single-sided) repairs. The author begins by developing a classification scheme for assigning repair damage tolerance substantiation requirements based upon stress-based adhesive fracture/fatigue criteria and the residual strength of the original structure. The governing equations for bending of cracked plates are then reformulated and line-spring models are developed for linear and nonlinear coupled bending and extension of reinforced cracks. The line-spring models were used to correct the Wang and Rose energy method for the determination of the long-crack limit stress intensity, and to develop a new interpolation model for repaired cracks of arbitrary length. The analysis was validated using finite element models and data from mechanical tests performed on hybrid bonded joints and repair specimens that are representative of an in-service repair. This work will allow designers to evaluate the damage tolerance of the repaired plate, the adhesive, and the composite patch, which is an airworthiness requirement under FAR (Federal Aviation Regulations) 25.571. The thesis concludes by assessing the remaining barriers to

  15. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    PubMed

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p < 0.01). Belle-Glass® had the highest mean shear bond strength when bonded to StickNet substrate using both Prime & Bond NT and OptiBond Solo Plus. Sinfony® composite resin exhibited the lowest shear bond strength values when used with the same adhesive resins. The adhesive mode of failure was higher than cohesive with all laboratory composite resins bonded to the StickNet substructure at both storage times. Water storage had a tendency to lower the bond strengths of all laboratory composites, although the statistical differences were not significant. Within the limitations of this study, it was found that bonding of the veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Numerical Characterization of a Composite Bonded Wing-Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar

    2008-01-01

    The development of composite wing structures has focused on the use of mechanical fasteners to join heavily-loaded areas, while bonded joints have been used only for select locations. The focus of this paper is the examination of the adhesive layer in a generic bonded wing box that represents a "fastenerless" or unitized structure in order to characterize the general behavior and failure mechanisms. A global/local approach was applied to study the response of the adhesive layer using a global shell model and a local shell/solid model. The wing box was analyzed under load to represent a high-g up-bending condition such that the strains in the composite sandwich face sheets are comparable to an expected design allowable. The global/local analysis indicates that at these wing load levels the strains in the adhesive layer are well within the adhesive's elastic region, such that yielding would not be expected in the adhesive layer. The global/local methodology appears to be a promising approach to evaluate the structural integrity of the adhesively bonded structures.

  17. Bond strength of dental nanocomposites repaired with a bulkfill composite

    PubMed Central

    Kerimova, Leyla; Baltacioglu, İsmail H.; Kiremitçi, Arlin

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the bond strength of aged resin based nanocomposites repaired with the same and bulk fill composites. Material and Methods Seventy-two disc shaped resin composites consisted of three different nanocomposite resins (Filtek Ultimate/FU, Herculite XRV Ultra/HXRV, and Reflectys/R) were produced. After storing the samples for 8 weeks in distilled water, each material was combined with the same material or the bulk-fill composite resin system (Filtek Ultimate+Filtek Ultimate/Group-1; Filtek Ultimate+Tetric BF/Group-2; Herculite XRV+Herculite XRV/Group-3; Herculite XRV+Tetric BF/ Group-4; Reflectys+Reflectys/Group 5; Reflectys+Tetric BF/Group-6), for repair. Then specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing(SBS), and the debonded surfaces were examined. Results There was a significant difference among three materials(repaired with itself+bulk fill) for SBS testing values (p=0.001). FU and R were found to be similar, while HXRV was significantly different from them. A significant difference between group-1 and 2 (p=0.006) was detected, while there were no differences between group 3 and 4 (p= 0.142), and 5 and 6 (p=0.346). Among the six groups, repair SBS testing values with TBF were higher than repair with itself except for FU. Conclusions The bulk-fill repaired materials showed higher bond strength except for FU, which showed the highest SBS value when repaired with itself. An increased incidence of adhesive fracture was observed at low strengths. Key words:Resin-based composites, nanofillers, surface treatment, macro-shear, repair. PMID:28298988

  18. Implications of protonation and substituent effects for C-O and O-P bond cleavage in phosphate monoesters.

    PubMed

    Loncke, Paul G; Berti, Paul J

    2006-05-10

    A recent study of phosphate monoesters that broke down exclusively through C-O bond cleavage and whose reactivity was unaffected by protonation of the nonbridging oxygens (Byczynski et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 12541) raised several questions about the reactivity of phosphate monoesters, R-O-P(i). Potential catalytic strategies, particularly with regard to selectively promoting C-O or O-P bond cleavage, were investigated computationally through simple alkyl and aryl phosphate monoesters. Both C-O and O-P bonds lengthened upon protonating the bridging oxygen, R-O(H(+))-P(i), and heterolytic bond dissociation energies, DeltaH(C)(-)(O) and DeltaH(O)(-)(P), decreased. Which bond will break depends on the protonation state of the phosphoryl moiety, P(i), and the identity of the organosubstituent, R. Protonating the bridging oxygen when the nonbridging oxygens were already protonated favored C-O cleavage, while protonating the bridging oxygen of the dianion form, R-O-PO(3)(2)(-), favored O-P cleavage. Alkyl R groups capable of forming stable cations were more prone to C-O bond cleavage, with tBu > iPr > F(2)iPr > Me. The lack of effect on the C-O cleavage rate from protonating nonbridging oxygens could arise from two precisely offsetting effects: Protonating nonbridging oxygens lengthens the C-O bond, making it more reactive, but also decreases the bridging oxygen proton affinity, making it less likely to be protonated and, therefore, less reactive. The lack of effect could also arise without bridging oxygen protonation if the ratio of rate constants with different protonation states precisely matched the ratio of acidity constants, K(a). Calculations used hybrid density functional theory (B3PW91/6-31++G) methods with a conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) of solvation. Calculations on Me-phosphate using MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ and PBE0/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory, and variations on the solvation model, confirmed the reproducibility with different

  19. Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, María; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Rubén A.; Solá-Ruiz, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (α=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-W<0.001). The worst techniques were Lava TM + sandblasting + Silane + Rely X; Lava TM + sandblasting + Silane + Multilink and Lava TM + CoJet + silane + Multilink. Adhesive failure (separation of cement and ceramic) was produced at a lesser force than cohesive failure (fracture of cement) (p-value M-W<0.001). Electron microscopy confirmed that the surface treatments modified the zirconium-oxide ceramic, creating a more rough and retentive surface, thus providing an improved micromechanical interlocking between the cement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

  20. Shear bond strength of new self-adhesive flowable composite resins.

    PubMed

    Wajdowicz, Michael N; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Means, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Recently, new self-adhesive flowable composite resin systems have been introduced to the market. These new composite resin systems reportedly bond to dentin and enamel without the application of an adhesive bonding agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength to enamel of two new self-adhesive flowable composites with and without the use of an etch-and-rinse bonding agent. The new self-adhesive flowable composites had significantly lower bond strengths to enamel compared to a traditional adhesively bonded flowable composite. Both self-adhesive flowable composites had a significant increase in bond strength to enamel with the use of a phosphoric acid-etch and adhesive bonding agent.

  1. Influence of repair procedure on composite-to-composite microtensile bond strength.

    PubMed

    Baena, Eugenia; Vignolo, Valeria; Fuentes, Maria Victoria; Ceballos, Laura

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effect of different repair procedures and storage time on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of a resin composite to an older one from a simulated previous restoration. Composite disks were made by layering 2 mm-thick increments of a nanohybrid composite (Grandio) shade A1 in a Teflon mold (4 x 8 mm). Afterwards, they were light-cured and stored (37 degrees C/7 days) in a saline solution. Specimens were randomly divided into groups according to the surface treatment applied: (1) Composite surface was roughened with a bur (Cimara) and Solobond Plus adhesive was applied; (2) Sandblasting with 27 μm aluminum oxide particles (KaVo Rondoflex), and adhesive application; (3) Air-abrasion with 30 μm alumina particles coated with silica (CoJet Sand), silane (Monobond-S) and adhesive application; (4) Negative control group with only adhesive application. Afterwards, Grandio composite (shade A3.5) was packed incrementally on the treated surface obtaining another disk (4 x 8 mm). Repaired blocks were stored (24 hours or 6 months) and afterwards μTBS test was performed and failure mode was evaluated. Also, beams obtained from 8 mm-high composite blocks without any surface treatment were immediately submitted to μTBS test to determine Grandio composite cohesive bond strength (positive control group). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). The repair procedure affected μTBS values (P < 0.001) while neither storage time nor interactions did (P > 0.05). All repair procedures achieved bond strength values higher than the negative control group but they did not reach the composite's cohesive bond strength. The overall conclusion was that an increased superficial roughness by means of a bur, silica coating or alumina sandblasting improved μTBS of the repaired composite and bond strength remained stable after 6 months.

  2. The Surface Structure and Thermal Properties of Novel Polymer Composite Films Based on Partially Phosphorylated Poly(vinyl alcohol) with Aluminum Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed Saat, Asmalina

    2014-01-01

    Partially phosphorylated polyvinyl alcohol (PPVA) with aluminum phosphate (ALPO4) composites was synthesized by solution casting technique to produce (PPVA)100−y − (ALPO4)y (y = 0, 1, and 2). The surface structure and thermal properties of the films were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the films have higher thermal stability with strong bonding between PPVA and ALPO4. PMID:25506069

  3. A composite coating by electrolysis-induced collagen self-assembly and calcium phosphate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuwei; Duan, Ke; Wang, Rizhi

    2005-05-01

    A composite coating that is composed of collagen protein and calcium phosphate minerals is considered to be bioactive and may enhance bone growth and fixation of metallic orthopedic implants. In this study, we have successfully developed a uniform collagen fibril/octacalcium phosphate composite coating on silicon substrate by electrolytic deposition (ELD). The coating deposition was done through applying a constant potential to the cathode in a three-electrode electrochemistry cell that contain a mild acidic (pH 4.8-5.3) aqueous solution of collagen molecules, calcium and phosphate ions. The coating process involved self-assembly of collagen fibrils and the deposition of calcium phosphate minerals as a result of cathode reaction and local pH increase. The two steps could be synchronized to form a bone-like composite at nanometer scale through proper adjustment of the solution and deposition parameters. Coating morphology, crystal structure and compositions were analyzed by optical and fluorescence microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, inductively coupled argon plasma optical emission spectrophotometry, and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. Under typical deposition conditions, the cathode (Si) surface formed a thin (100 nm) layer of calcium phosphate coating, on top of which a thick (approximately 100 microm) composite layer formed. The porous composite layer consists of a collagen fibril network on which clusters of octacalcium phosphate crystals nucleate and grow. By combining photolithography and ELD, we were also able to pattern the composite coating into regular arrays of squares. Preliminary results by nanoindentation tests showed that properly prepared composite coating may have higher elastic modulus and scratch resistance than monolithic porous calcium phosphate coating. The results not only provide a novel bioactive coating for biomedical implants, but also establish a new experimental

  4. Stress-strain and thermal expansion characteristics of a phosphate-bonded investment mould material for dental super plastic forming.

    PubMed

    Curtis, R V

    1998-03-01

    The stress-strain and thermal expansion characteristics of a phosphate-bonded investment material were measured to determine its suitability as a die material for superplastic forming of dental appliances. Titanium alloy denture bases and implant superstructures have been fabricated successfully using this investment material, but a greater understanding of its properties was sought to optimize the forming technique before exploitation could proceed. The effect of a boron nitride powder on the properties of phosphate-bonded investment was also investigated. Three-point bend test specimens were cast in the phosphate-bonded investment material. Four groups of test samples were produced at specified water-to-powder ratios (w/p ratios). For one group 5 wt.% boron nitride powder was added to the investment powder before mixing with water. For stress-strain measurements specimens were heated to 920 degrees C and held for 30 min prior to the application of load. For thermal expansion measurements specimen length was measured for the entire heating and cooling cycle. Curves of stress versus strain and thermal expansion were recorded for all four test groups. For increasing initial w/p ratio failure stress decreased with lowest failure stresses for specimens containing boron nitride. Strain to failure also decreased with increasing initial w/p ratio, except for the group containing boron nitride which showed relatively large elongations to fracture. Specimen surfaces with higher initial w/p ratios were observed to have larger surface porosity. Thermal expansion curves for three groups were very similar, but differed considerably from the group containing boron nitride. The lowest initial w/p ratio should be used for highest hot strength. Hot deformation of phosphate-bonded investment dies for superplastic forming is an issue that requires further investigation because of potential die deformation and the resulting loss of fit between the superplastic superstructure and

  5. Fracture-mechanics parameters of the composite-enamel bond.

    PubMed

    de Groot, R; van Elst, H C; Peters, M C

    1990-01-01

    In a previous study, the critical values of the opening mode stress intensity factor (K1), its equivalent, the strain energy-release rate (G1), and the J integral (J1) (in the elastic case being equal to that of G1) were determined for resin composite. In this study, the strength of the composite-tooth interface was investigated. The critical values of K1 and J1 were measured with single-edge notched-bend (SENB) specimens of resin composite bonded to enamel, with the notch at midspan at the bonded interface. Due to enamel's anisotropy, the values of Klc and Jlc to be used in a fracture-mechanics application for failure prediction of a structure depend on the enamel prism orientation relative to the adhesive interface. Where interfacial failure is to be expected, the following values for Jlc and Klc can be used: Silux, Jlc = 145 +/- 35 Jm-2 and Klc = 0.84 +/- 0.16 MNm-3/2; P-30, Jlc = 163 +/- 13 Jm-2 and Klc = 1.02 +/- 0.07 MNm-3/2. Where enamel failure is expected or where the failure mode cannot be predicted, the following values can be applied: Silux, Jlc = 89 +/- 15 Jm-2 and Klc = 0.84 +/- 0.16 MNm-3/2; P-30, Jlc = 89 +/- 15 Jm-2 and Klc = 0.75 +/- 0.10 MNm-3/2.

  6. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Day, Delbert E.

    1998-01-01

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

  7. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Day, D.E.

    1998-05-12

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe{sup 3+} provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided. 21 figs.

  8. Preparation of in situ hardening composite microcarriers: calcium phosphate cement combined with alginate for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hui; Lee, Eun-Jung; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-03-01

    Novel microcarriers consisting of calcium phosphate cement and alginate were prepared for use as three-dimensional scaffolds for the culture and expansion of cells that are effective for bone tissue engineering. The calcium phosphate cement-alginate composite microcarriers were produced by an emulsification of the composite aqueous solutions mixed at varying ratios (calcium phosphate cement powder/alginate solution = 0.8-1.2) in an oil bath and the subsequent in situ hardening of the compositions during spherodization. Moreover, a porous structure could be easily created in the solid microcarriers by soaking the produced microcarriers in water and a subsequent freeze-drying process. Bone mineral-like apatite nanocrystallites were shown to rapidly develop on the calcium phosphate cement-alginate microcarriers under moist conditions due to the conversion of the α-tricalcium phosphate phase in the calcium phosphate cement into a carbonate-hydroxyapatite. Osteoblastic cells cultured on the microspherical scaffolds were proven to be viable, with an active proliferative potential during 14 days of culture, and their osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity. The in situ hardening calcium phosphate cement-alginate microcarriers developed herein may be used as potential three-dimensional scaffolds for cell delivery and tissue engineering of bone.

  9. Preparation of in situ hardening composite microcarriers: Calcium phosphate cement combined with alginate for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Hui; Lee, Eun-Jung; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Novel microcarriers consisting of calcium phosphate cement and alginate were prepared for use as three-dimensional scaffolds for the culture and expansion of cells that are effective for bone tissue engineering. The calcium phosphate cement-alginate composite microcarriers were produced by an emulsification of the composite aqueous solutions mixed at varying ratios (calcium phosphate cement powder/alginate solution = 0.8–1.2) in an oil bath and the subsequent in situ hardening of the compositions during spherodization. Moreover, a porous structure could be easily created in the solid microcarriers by soaking the produced microcarriers in water and a subsequent freeze-drying process. Bone mineral-like apatite nanocrystallites were shown to rapidly develop on the calcium phosphate cement–alginate microcarriers under moist conditions due to the conversion of the α-tricalcium phosphate phase in the calcium phosphate cement into a carbonate–hydroxyapatite. Osteoblastic cells cultured on the microspherical scaffolds were proven to be viable, with an active proliferative potential during 14 days of culture, and their osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity. The in situ hardening calcium phosphate cement–alginate microcarriers developed herein may be used as potential three-dimensional scaffolds for cell delivery and tissue engineering of bone. PMID:23836845

  10. Effect of calcium phosphate-based fillers on the structure and bonding strength of novel gelatin-alginate bioadhesives.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Benny; Panker, Maoz; Zuckerman, Eyal; Foox, Maytal; Zilberman, Meital

    2014-05-01

    Interest in soft and hard tissue adhesives as alternatives for conventional wound closing and bone fixation applications has increased in recent decades as a result of numerous possible advantages such as better comfort and lower cost. A novel bioadhesive based on the natural polymers GA has recently been developed and studied in our laboratory. Hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate are two bioactive ceramics known for their ability to enhance bone regeneration. In the current study, these two bioactive fillers were incorporated into the bioadhesive at concentrations of 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5% w/v, and their effects on the resulting adherence properties to soft and hard tissues were studied. Porcine skin and cortical portions of bovine femurs were used as soft and hard tissue specimens, respectively. The bonding strength was evaluated using an Instron universal testing machine in tensile mode, and the microstructure analysis was based on environmental scanning electron microscope observations. Both bioactive fillers were found to have a reinforcing effect on the adhesives, significantly improving their adhesion to soft tissues in certain concentrations. The best bonding strength results were obtained for 0.25% hydroxyapatite and 0.5% w/v tricalcium phosphate-18.1 ± 4.0 and 15.2 ± 2.6 kPa, respectively, compared with 8.4 ± 2.3 kPa for adhesive with no fillers. The improved adherence is probably related to the stiffness of the insoluble hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate particles which reinforce the adhesive. These particles can clearly be observed in the environmental scanning electron microscope analysis. The potential of these fillers to increase the bonding strength of the adhesive to hard tissues was also demonstrated. Hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate thus improve our new gelatin-alginate bioadhesives, which can be used for both soft and hard tissue adhesive applications.

  11. Stress Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Repairs to Fibre Composite Structures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    which is bonded to a thin sheet of fibre composite material. The x and y axes are taken in a plane parallel to the midsurface of the sheet with the z...SHEET vI X1 FIG. 1 AXIS SYSTEM IN PATCH related to the displacements at the midsurface of the patch, which we will denote by uo, vo and w, and the...displacements at the midsurface of the sheet, which we will denote by u, vs and w, by the following expression: T ( =uo - us +f7 ’ f/fg + (VO - v, +f 7 3)f4

  12. The behavior of bonded doubler splices for composite sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, T. A.; Weisahaar, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the behavior of adhesively bonded doubler splices of two composite material sandwich panels are presented. The splices are studied from three approaches: analytical; numerical (finite elements); and experimental. Several parameters that characterize the splice are developed to determine their influence upon joint strength. These parameters are: doubler overlap length; core stiffness; laminate bending stiffness; the size of the gap between the spliced sandwich panels; and room and elevated temperatures. Similarities and contrasts between these splices and the physically similar single and double lap joints are discussed. The results of this investigation suggest several possible approaches to improving the strength of the sandwich splices.

  13. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    PubMed

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  14. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in epoxy-bonded magnetocaloric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Bruno; Sellschopp, Kai; Bierdel, Marius; Funk, Alexander; Bobeth, Manfred; Krautz, Maria; Waske, Anja

    2016-09-01

    Thermal management is one of the crucial issues in the development of magnetocaloric refrigeration technology for application. In order to ensure optimal exploitation of the materials "primary" properties, such as entropy change and temperature lift, thermal properties (and other "secondary" properties) play an important role. In magnetocaloric composites, which show an increased cycling stability in comparison to their bulk counterparts, thermal properties are strongly determined by the geometric arrangement of the corresponding components. In the first part of this paper, the inner structure of a polymer-bonded La(Fe, Co, Si)13-composite was studied by X-ray computed tomography. Based on this 3D data, a numerical study along all three spatial directions revealed anisotropic thermal conductivity of the composite: Due to the preparation process, the long-axis of the magnetocaloric particles is aligned along the xy plane which is why the in-plane thermal conductivity is larger than the thermal conductivity along the z-axis. Further, the study is expanded to a second aspect devoted to the influence of particle distribution and alignment within the polymer matrix. Based on an equivalent ellipsoids model to describe the inner structure of the composite, numerical simulation of the thermal conductivity in different particle arrangements and orientation distributions were performed. This paper evaluates the possibilities of microstructural design for inducing and adjusting anisotropic thermal conductivity in magnetocaloric composites.

  15. Nondestructive inspection of bonded composite doublers for aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.; Moore, D.; Walkington, P.

    1996-12-31

    One major thrust in FAA`s National Aging Aircraft Research Program is to foster new technologies in civil aircraft maintenance. Recent DOD and other government developments in using bonded composite doublers on metal structures support the need for validation of such doubler applications on US certificated airplanes. In this study, a specific composite application was chosen on an L-1011 aircraft. Primary inspection requirements for these doublers include identifying disbonds between composite laminate and aluminum parent material, and delaminations in the composite laminate. Surveillance of cracks or corrosion in the parent aluminum material beneath the double is also a concern. No single NDI method can inspect for every flaw type, therefore we need to know NDI capabilities and limitations. This paper reports on a series of NDI tests conducted on laboratory test structures and on a fuselage section from a retired L-1011. Application of ultrasonics, x-ray, and eddy current to composite doublers and results from test specimens loaded to provide a changing flaw profile, are presented in this paper. Development of appropriate inspection calibration standards are also discussed.

  16. Promising aquivion composite membranes based on fluoroalkyl zirconium phosphate for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Donnadio, Anna; Pica, Monica; Subianto, Surya; Jones, Deborah J; Cojocaru, Paula; Casciola, Mario

    2014-08-01

    Layered zirconium phosphate (ZP) that bears fluorinated alkyl chains bonded covalently to the layers (ZPR) was used as a nanofiller in membranes based on a short-side-chain perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) to mechanically reinforce the PFSA hydrophobic component. Compared to the pristine PFSA, membranes with a ZPR loading up to 30 wt% show enhanced mechanical properties, and the largest improvement of elastic modulus (E) and yield stress (σY ) are observed for the 10 wt% ZPR membrane: ΔE/E up to 90% and ΔσY /σY up 70% at 70°C and 80% relative humidity (RH). In the RH range 50-95%, the in-plane conductivity of the composite membranes reaches 0.43 S cm(-1) for 10 wt% ZPR at 110°C and is on average 30% higher than the conductivity of the pristine PFSA. The 10 wt % ZPR membrane is as hydrated as the neat PFSA membrane at 50% RH but becomes progressively less hydrated with increasing RH both at 80 and 110°C. The fuel cell performance of this membrane, at 80°C and 30% RH, is better than that of the unmodified PFSA.

  17. Bond strength of composite luting cement to zirconia ceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Derand, Tore; Molin, Margareta; Kvam, Ketil

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of dental resin agent to zirconia ceramic after surface pre-treatment with different techniques. Specimens of hot isostatic pressed yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks (ZF) were fabricated (Procera Zircon, Nobel Biocare, Sweden) and compared to glossy dense zirconia blocks (ZG). Four groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. Group I: ZF (n = 5) and ZG (n = 5) without any pre-treatment, Group II: ZF-s (n = 5) and ZG-s (n = 5) treated with silane solution, Group III: ZF-P (n = 10) and ZG-P (n = 10) treated with RF plasma spraying (hexamethyldisiloxane) using a reactor (Plasma Electronic, Germany), Group IV: ZF-p (n = 10) and ZG-p (n = 10) treated with micro pearls of low fusing porcelain (720 degrees C) on the surfaces. Composite cylinders (Charisma, Hereus Kulzer, Dormagen, Germany) were luted with Variolink II (Ivoclar-Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) to the test specimens. The specimens were then stored in air for 1 h before shear loading in a universal testing machine (LRX, Lloyd Instruments, Farnham, England) until failure. No statistical difference was found between the untreated ZF and ZG specimens (Group I) neither between the specimens treated with silane (Group II). Plasma spraying treatment improved bond strength by a factor of three (p < 0.001). Treatment with low fusing porcelain micro pearls increased the bond strength by a factor of 10 compared to untreated surfaces (p < 0.001). No significant difference was seen between the surfaces treated ZF-p and ZG-p specimens. The thickness of the glass pearls layer did not exceed 5 microm. SEM showed dense grain borders of ZF and a flat glossy texture of ZG. Treatment of zirconia ceramic surfaces with plasma spraying or a low fusing porcelain pearl layer significantly increased the bond strength of resin cement to the ceramic surface.

  18. Fatigue Life Methodology for Bonded Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2001-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the fatigue life of composite structures based on fatigue characterization data and geometric nonlinear finite element (FE) analyses. To demonstrate the approach, predicted results were compared to fatigue tests performed on specimens which represented a tapered composite flange bonded onto a composite skin. In a first step, tension tests were performed to evaluate the debonding mechanisms between the flange and the skin. In a second step, a 2D FE model was developed to analyze the tests. To predict matrix cracking onset, the relationship between the tension load and the maximum principal stresses transverse to the fiber direction was determined through FE analysis. Transverse tension fatigue life data were used to -enerate an onset fatigue life P-N curve for matrix cracking. The resulting prediction was in good agreement with data from the fatigue tests. In a third step, a fracture mechanics approach based on FE analysis was used to determine the relationship between the tension load and the critical energy release rate. Mixed mode energy release rate fatigue life data were used to create a fatigue life onset G-N curve for delamination. The resulting prediction was in good agreement with data from the fatigue tests. Further, the prediction curve for cumulative life to failure was generated from the previous onset fatigue life curves. The results showed that the methodology offers a significant potential to Predict cumulative fatigue life of composite structures.

  19. Polyorganosilazane preceramic binder development for reaction bonded silicon nitride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.L.; Starr, T.L.

    1992-11-01

    This study has examined the use of two commercially available polyorganosilazanes for application as preceramic binders in a composite composed of silicon carbide fibers in a reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix. Ceramic monolithic and composite samples were produced. Density of monolithic and whisker reinforced RBSN samples containing the polysilazane binder was increased. Mercury intrusion porosimetry revealed a significant decrease in the pore sizes of samples containing a polyorganosilazane binder. Electron micrographs of samples containing the preceramic binder looked similar to control samples containing no precursor. Overall, incorporation of the polysilazane into monolithic and whisker reinforced samples resulted in significantly increased density and decreased porosity. Nitriding of the RBSN was slightly retarded by addition of the polysilazane binder. Samples with the preceramic binders contained increased contents of {alpha} versus {beta}-silicon nitride which may be due to interaction of hydrogen evolved from polysilazane pyrolysis with the nitriding process. Initial efforts to produce continuous fiber reinforced composites via this method have not realized the same improvements in density and porosity which have been observed for monolithic and whisker reinforced samples. Further, the addition of perceramic binder resulted in a more brittle fracture morphology as compared to similar composites made without the binder.

  20. Polyorganosilazane preceramic binder development for reaction bonded silicon nitride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.L.; Starr, T.L. )

    1992-11-01

    This study has examined the use of two commercially available polyorganosilazanes for application as preceramic binders in a composite composed of silicon carbide fibers in a reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix. Ceramic monolithic and composite samples were produced. Density of monolithic and whisker reinforced RBSN samples containing the polysilazane binder was increased. Mercury intrusion porosimetry revealed a significant decrease in the pore sizes of samples containing a polyorganosilazane binder. Electron micrographs of samples containing the preceramic binder looked similar to control samples containing no precursor. Overall, incorporation of the polysilazane into monolithic and whisker reinforced samples resulted in significantly increased density and decreased porosity. Nitriding of the RBSN was slightly retarded by addition of the polysilazane binder. Samples with the preceramic binders contained increased contents of [alpha] versus [beta]-silicon nitride which may be due to interaction of hydrogen evolved from polysilazane pyrolysis with the nitriding process. Initial efforts to produce continuous fiber reinforced composites via this method have not realized the same improvements in density and porosity which have been observed for monolithic and whisker reinforced samples. Further, the addition of perceramic binder resulted in a more brittle fracture morphology as compared to similar composites made without the binder.

  1. Shear bond strength of composite bonded with three adhesives to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-prepared enamel.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Cafer; Sazak-Oveçoğlu, Hesna; Günday, Mahir; Güngör, Gülşad; Durkan, Meral; Oksüz, Mustafa

    2010-06-01

    To assess in vitro the shear bond strength of a nanohybrid composite resin bonded with three adhesive systems to enamel surfaces prepared with acid and Er,Cr:YSGG laser etching. Sixty extracted caries- and restoration-free human maxillary central incisors were used. The teeth were sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The crowns were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin with the labial surfaces facing up. The labial surfaces were prepared with 0.5-mm reduction to receive composite veneers. Thirty specimens were etched with Er,Cr:YSGG laser. This group was also divided into three subgroups, and the following three bonding systems were then applied on the laser groups and the other three unlased groups: (1) 37% phosphoric acid etch + Bond 1 primer/adhesive (Pentron); (2) Nano-bond self-etch primer (Pentron) + Nano-bond adhesive (Pentron); and (3) all-in-one adhesive-single dose (Futurabond NR, Voco). All of the groups were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin (Smile, Pentron). Shear bond strength was measured with a Zwick universal test device with a knife-edge loading head. The data were analyzed with two-factor ANOVA. There were no significant differences in shear bond strength between self-etch primer + adhesive and all-in-one adhesive systems for nonetched and laser-etched enamel groups (P > .05). However, bond strength values for the laser-etched + Bond 1 primer/adhesive group (48.00 +/- 13.86 MPa) were significantly higher than the 37% phosphoric acid + Bond 1 primer/adhesive group (38.95 +/- 20.07 MPa) (P < .05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser-powered hydrokinetic system etched the enamel surface more effectively than 37% phosphoric acid for subsequent attachment of composite material.

  2. Calcium phosphate/microgel composites for 3D powderbed printing of ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Mandy-Nicole; Agrawal, Garima; Bergmann, Christian; Schröder, Ricarda; Lechner, Sebastian J; Pich, Andrij; Fischer, Horst

    2016-06-01

    Composites of microgels and calcium phosphates are promising as drug delivery systems and basic components for bone substitute implants. In this study, we synthesized novel composite materials consisting of pure β-tricalcium phosphate and stimuli-responsive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam-co-acetoacetoxyethyl methacrylate-co-vinylimidazole) microgels. The chemical composition, thermal properties and morphology for obtained composites were extensively characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, IGAsorp moisture sorption analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, granulometric analysis, ESEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and TEM. Mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated by ball-on-three-balls test to determine the biaxial strength. Furthermore, initial 3D powderbed-based printing tests were conducted with spray-dried composites and diluted 2-propanol as a binder to evaluate a new binding concept for β-tricalcium phosphate-based granulates. The printed ceramic bodies were characterized before and after a sintering step by ESEM. The hypothesis that the microgels act as polymer adhesive agents by efficient chemical interactions with the β-tricalcium phosphate particles was confirmed. The obtained composites can be used for the development of new scaffolds.

  3. Mechanical Behavior and Thermal Stability of Acid-Base Phosphate Cements and Composites Fabricated at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colorado Lopera, Henry Alonso

    This dissertation presents the study of the mechanical behavior and thermal stability of acid-base phosphate cements (PCs) and composites fabricated at ambient temperature. These materials are also known as chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). Among other advantages of using PCs when compared with traditional cements are the better mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strength), lower density, ultra-fast (controllable) setting time, controllable pH, and an environmentally benign process. Several PCs based on wollastonite and calcium and alumino phosphates after thermal exposure up to 1000°C have been investigated. First, the thermo-mechanical and chemical stability of wollastonite-based PC (Wo-PC) exposed to temperatures up to 1000°C in air environment were studied. The effects of processing conditions on the curing and shrinkage of the wollastonite-based PC were studied. The chemical reactions and phase transformations during the fabrication and during the thermal exposure are analyzed in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA Then, the thermo-mechanical and chemical stability of glass, carbon and basalt fiber reinforced Wo-PC composites, were studied using SEM, XRD, TGA. The flexural strength and Weibull statistics were analyzed. A significant strength degradation in the composites were found after the thermal exposure at elevated temperatures due to the interdifusion and chemical reactions across the fibers and the matrix at temperatures over 600°C. To overcome this barrier, we have developed a new PC based on calcium and alumino-phosphates (Ca-Al PCs). The Ca-Al PCs were studied in detail using SEM, XRD, TGA, curing, shrinkage, Weibull statistics, and compression tests. Our study has confirmed that this new composite material is chemically and mechanically stable at temperatures up to 1000°C. Moreover, the compression strength increases after exposure to 1000

  4. Composite resin bond strength to primary dentin prepared with Er, Cr:YSSG laser.

    PubMed

    Sung, Eric C; Chenard, Torin; Caputo, Angelo A; Amodeo, Michael; Chung, Evelyn M; Rizoiu, Ioana M

    2005-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength of a hybrid composite resin bonded to primary dentin prepared with an Er, Cr:YSGG hydrokinetic laser compared to conventional bur prepared primary dentin. The results suggest that primary dentin surfaces treated with the Er, Cr:YSGG laser, with or without etching, may provide comparable or increased composite resin bond strengths depending upon bonding agent used.

  5. Oxygen isotope compositions of phosphate from arvicoline teeth and Quaternary climatic changes, Gigny, French Jura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Nicolas; Lécuyer, Christophe; Montuire, Sophie; Langlois, Cyril; Martineau, François

    2004-09-01

    Oxygen isotope compositions of biogenic phosphates from mammals are widely used as proxies of the isotopic compositions of meteoric waters that are roughly linearly related to the air temperature at high- and mid-latitudes. An oxygen isotope fractionation equation was determined by using present-day European arvicoline (rodents) tooth phosphate: δ18O p = 20.98(±0.59) + 0.572(±0.065) δ18O w. This fractionation equation was applied to the Late Pleistocene karstic sequence of Gigny, French Jura. Comparison between the oxygen isotope compositions of arvicoline tooth phosphate and Greenland ice core records suggests to reconsider the previously established hypothetical chronology of the sequence. According to the δ18O value of meteoric water-mean air temperature relationships, the δ18O value of arvicoline teeth records variations in mean air temperatures that range from 0° to 15°C.

  6. Macroporous Calcium Phosphate/Chitosan Composites Prepared via Unidirectional Ice Segregation and Subsequent Freeze-Drying.

    PubMed

    Aranaz, Inmaculada; Martínez-Campos, Enrique; Moreno-Vicente, Carolina; Civantos, Ana; García-Arguelles, Sara; Del Monte, Francisco

    2017-05-08

    Calcium phosphate chitosan-based composites have gained much interest in recent years for biomedical purposes. In this paper, three-dimensional calcium phosphate chitosan-based composites with different mineral contents were produced using a green method called ice segregation induced self-assembly (ISISA). In this methodology, ice crystals were used as a template to produce porous structures from an aqueous solution of chitosan (CS) and hydroxyapatite (Hap) also containing acetic acid (pH = 4.5). For better characterization of the nature of the inorganic matter entrapped within the resulting composite, we performed either oxygen plasma or calcination processes to remove the organic matter. The nature of the phosphate salts was studied by XRD and NMR studies. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) was identified as the mineral phase in the composites submitted to oxygen plasma, whereas crystalline Hap was obtained after calcination. SEM microscopy revealed the formation of porous structures (porosity around 80-85%) in the original composites, as well as in the inorganic matrices obtained after calcination, with porous channels of up to 50 µm in diameter in the former case and of up to 20 µm in the latter. The biocompatibility of the composites was assessed using two different cell lines: C2C12GFP premyoblastic cells and MC3T3 preosteoblastic cells.

  7. Macroporous Calcium Phosphate/Chitosan Composites Prepared via Unidirectional Ice Segregation and Subsequent Freeze-Drying

    PubMed Central

    Aranaz, Inmaculada; Martínez-Campos, Enrique; Moreno-Vicente, Carolina; Civantos, Ana; García-Arguelles, Sara; del Monte, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Calcium phosphate chitosan-based composites have gained much interest in recent years for biomedical purposes. In this paper, three-dimensional calcium phosphate chitosan-based composites with different mineral contents were produced using a green method called ice segregation induced self-assembly (ISISA). In this methodology, ice crystals were used as a template to produce porous structures from an aqueous solution of chitosan (CS) and hydroxyapatite (Hap) also containing acetic acid (pH = 4.5). For better characterization of the nature of the inorganic matter entrapped within the resulting composite, we performed either oxygen plasma or calcination processes to remove the organic matter. The nature of the phosphate salts was studied by XRD and NMR studies. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) was identified as the mineral phase in the composites submitted to oxygen plasma, whereas crystalline Hap was obtained after calcination. SEM microscopy revealed the formation of porous structures (porosity around 80–85%) in the original composites, as well as in the inorganic matrices obtained after calcination, with porous channels of up to 50 µm in diameter in the former case and of up to 20 µm in the latter. The biocompatibility of the composites was assessed using two different cell lines: C2C12GFP premyoblastic cells and MC3T3 preosteoblastic cells. PMID:28772874

  8. Effect of antioxidant treatment on the shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Kunt, Göknil Ergün; Yılmaz, Nergiz; Sen, Selma; Dede, Doğu Ömür

    2011-09-01

    This study examined the antioxidant treatment on the shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel after bleaching with two different bleaching systems. Seventy flat enamel surfaces were prepared from freshly extracted human molars using a low speed diamond saw. Then the specimens were divided into seven random groups (n = 10) to apply different procedures; namely, bleaching with White Smile and bonding with composite resin (G1), bleaching with White Smile, treatment with ascorbic acid and bonding with composite resin (G2), bleaching with White Smile, immersing in artificial saliva for 2 weeks and bonding with composite resin (G3), bleaching with Opalesence and bonding with composite resin (G4), bleaching with Opalesence, treatment with ascorbic acid and bonding with composite resin (G5) and bleaching with Opalesence, immersing in artificial saliva for 2 weeks and bonding with composite resin (G6). Another group was used as a control group. Shear bond test was performed on all specimens and data were analyzed using one way ANOVA and Bonferroni's test (p < 0.05). Bond strengths of bleached specimens were significantly lower than those of non-bleached specimens. No statistical difference was found in bond strength between the bleached and non-bleached groups when the antioxidant treatment was carried out. Ten per cent ascorbic acid treatment was found to be an effective method to reverse the compromised bond strength.

  9. Caul and method for bonding and curing intricate composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willden, Kurtis S. (Inventor); Goodno, Kenneth N. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention disclosed here is a method for forming and curing an intricate structure of criss-crossing composite stringers and frames that are bonded to a skin panel. A structure constructed in accordance with the invention would be well-suited for use as a portion of an aircraft fuselage, a boat hull, or the like. The method is preferably practiced by applying uncured composite stringers to an uncured composite sheet panel. This is followed by placing cured frames crosswise over the stringers. The frames have openings at the locations where they intersect with the stringers which enables the frames to come into direct contact with the skin along most of their length. During the forming and curing process, the stringers are covered with a plurality of cauls, and the entire assembly of skin panel, stringers, frames and cauls is subjected to a vacuum bagging and curing process. The cauls serve to maintain both part shape and to control the flow of resin within the stringers as they are cured. Further, they probably eliminate the need for intermediate protective materials between the vacuum bag and the stringers.

  10. Bonding of glass ceramic and indirect composite to non-aged and aged resin composite.

    PubMed

    Gresnigt, Marco; Özcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-02-01

    Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged resin composite to an indirect resin composite and pressed glass ceramic using two resin cements. Disk-shaped specimens (diameter: 3.5, thickness: 3 mm) (N = 160) produced from a microhybrid resin composite (Quadrant Anterior Shine) were randomly divided into eight groups. While half of the specimens were kept dry at 37°C for 24 h, the other half was aged by means of thermocycling (6000 times, 5°C to 55°C). The non-aged and aged resin composites were bonded to a highly filled indirect composite (Estenia) and a pressed glass ceramic (IPS Empress II) using either a photopolymerizing (Variolink Veneer) or a dual-polymerizing (Panavia F2.0) resin cement. While cementation surfaces of both the direct and indirect composite materials were silica coated (30 µm SiO2, CoJet-Sand) and silanized (ESPE-Sil), ceramic surfaces were conditioned with hydrofluoric acid (20 s), neutralized, and silanized prior to cementation. All specimens were cemented under a load of 750 g. Shear force was applied to the adhesive interface in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure types of the specimens were identified after debonding. Significant effects of aging (p < 0.05), restorative material (p < 0.05), and cement type (p < 0.05) were observed on the bond strength (3-way ANOVA). Interaction terms were also significant (p < 0.05) (Tukey's test). After aging, in terms of bond strength, indirect composite and pressed glass ceramic in combination with both cements showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). Both indirect composite (24.3 ± 5.1 MPa) and glass ceramic in combination with Variolink (22 ± 9 MPa) showed the highest results on non-aged composites, but were not significantly different

  11. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N=84) were condensed into acrylic and randomly assigned to one of the following treatments (N=6): (1) Alloy primer + opaquer, (2) Air-particle abrasion (50 micro m Al(2)O(3)) + alloy primer + opaquer, (3) Silica coating (30 micro m SiO(x)) + silanization + opaquer, (4) Opaquer + pre-impregnated continuous bidirectional E-glass fibre sheets, (5) Silica coating + silanization + fibre sheets, (6) Silica coating + silanization + opaquer + fibre sheet application. Non-conditioned amalgam surfaces were considered as control group (7). The mean surface roughness depth (R(Z)) was measured from the control group and air-abraded amalgam surfaces. The resin composite was bonded to the conditioned amalgam specimens using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested under dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of resin composite to amalgam substrates was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Surface roughness values for the non-conditioned control group (R(Z) approximately 0.14 micro m) and for air-particle abraded surfaces with either Al(2)O(3) or SiO(x) (R(Z) approximately 0.19 micro m and R(Z) approximately 0.16 micro m, respectively) did not show significant differences (p=0.23) (One-way ANOVA). In dry conditions, silica coating and silanization followed by fibre sheet application exhibited significantly higher results (14.8+/-5.6 MPa) than those of the groups conditioned with alloy primer (2.2+/-0.7 MPa) (p<0.001), air-particle abrasion+alloy primer (4.4+/-2.0 MPa, p<0.001), silica coating+silanization alone (6.2+/-0.8 MPa, p=0.009) or non-conditioned group (1.4+/-0.6, p<0.001). Silica coating and silanization followed

  12. Nonlinear Analysis of Bonded Composite Tubular Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Madenci, E.; Smeltzer, S. S., III; Ambur, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    The present study describes a semi-analytical solution method for predicting the geometrically nonlinear response of a bonded composite tubular single-lap joint subjected to general loading conditions. The transverse shear and normal stresses in the adhesive as well as membrane stress resultants and bending moments in the adherends are determined using this method. The method utilizes the principle of virtual work in conjunction with nonlinear thin-shell theory to model the adherends and a cylindrical shear lag model to represent the kinematics of the thin adhesive layer between the adherends. The kinematic boundary conditions are imposed by employing the Lagrange multiplier method. In the solution procedure, the displacement components for the tubular joint are approximated in terms of non-periodic and periodic B-Spline functions in the longitudinal and circumferential directions, respectively. The approach presented herein represents a rapid-solution alternative to the finite element method. The solution method was validated by comparison against a previously considered tubular single-lap joint. The steep variation of both peeling and shearing stresses near the adhesive edges was successfully captured. The applicability of the present method was also demonstrated by considering tubular bonded lap-joints subjected to pure bending and torsion.

  13. Nonlinear Analysis of Bonded Composite Tubular Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Madenci, E.; Smeltzer, S. S., III; Ambur, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    The present study describes a semi-analytical solution method for predicting the geometrically nonlinear response of a bonded composite tubular single-lap joint subjected to general loading conditions. The transverse shear and normal stresses in the adhesive as well as membrane stress resultants and bending moments in the adherends are determined using this method. The method utilizes the principle of virtual work in conjunction with nonlinear thin-shell theory to model the adherends and a cylindrical shear lag model to represent the kinematics of the thin adhesive layer between the adherends. The kinematic boundary conditions are imposed by employing the Lagrange multiplier method. In the solution procedure, the displacement components for the tubular joint are approximated in terms of non-periodic and periodic B-Spline functions in the longitudinal and circumferential directions, respectively. The approach presented herein represents a rapid-solution alternative to the finite element method. The solution method was validated by comparison against a previously considered tubular single-lap joint. The steep variation of both peeling and shearing stresses near the adhesive edges was successfully captured. The applicability of the present method was also demonstrated by considering tubular bonded lap-joints subjected to pure bending and torsion.

  14. The effect of surface roughness on repair bond strength of light-curing composite resin to polymer composite substrate.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Timo T; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the shear bond strength of a new composite resin to polymer-based composite substrates using various surface roughnesses and two kinds of polymer matrices. Particulate filler composite resin with cross-linked polymer matrix and fiber-reinforced composite with semi-interpenetrating polymer matrix were used as bonding substrates after being ground to different roughnesses. Substrates were aged in water for one week before bonding to new resin composites. Twelve specimens in the substrate groups were ground with grinding papers of four grits; 320, 800, 1200 and 2400. Corresponding values of surface roughness (Ra) varied from 0.09 to 0.40 for the particulate filler composite resin and 0.07 to 0.96 for the fiber-reinforced composite resin. Characteristic shear bond strength between the new resin and particulate filler composite resin was highest (27.8 MPa) with the roughest surface (Weibull modulus: 2.085). Fiber-reinforced composite showed the highest bond strength (20.8 MPa) with the smoothest surface (Weibull modulus: 4.713). We concluded that surface roughness did not increase the bonding of new resin to the substrate of IPN based fiber-reinforced composite, whereas the roughness contributed to bonding the new resin to the particulate filler composite resin with a cross-linked polymer matrix.

  15. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  16. Strong and tough magnesium wire reinforced phosphate cement composites for load-bearing bone replacement.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Reinhard; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Ewald, Andrea; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Groll, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cements are brittle biomaterials of low bending strength. One promising approach to improve their mechanical properties is reinforcement with fibers. State of the art degradable reinforced composites contain fibers made of polymers, resorbable glass or whiskers of calcium minerals. We introduce a new class of composite that is reinforced with degradable magnesium alloy wires. Bending strength and ductility of the composites increased with aspect ratio and volume content of the reinforcements up to a maximal bending strength of 139±41MPa. Hybrid reinforcement with metal and polymer fibers (PLA) further improved the qualitative fracture behavior and gave indication of enhanced strength and ductility. Immersion tests of composites in SBF for seven weeks showed high corrosion stability of ZEK100 wires and slow degradation of the magnesium calcium phosphate cement by struvite dissolution. Finally, in vitro tests with the osteoblast-like cell line MG63 demonstrate cytocompatibility of the composite materials.

  17. Barium hydrogen phosphate/gelatin composites versus gelatin-free barium hydrogen phosphate: synthesis and characterization of properties.

    PubMed

    Gashti, Mazeyar Parvinzadeh; Burgener, Matthias; Stir, Manuela; Hulliger, Jürg

    2014-10-01

    Recently, attention has been spent on crystal growth of phosphate compounds in gels for studying the mechanism of in vitro crystallization processes. Here, we present a gel-based approach for the synthesis of barium hydrogen phosphate (BHP) crystals using single and double diffusion techniques in gelatin. The composite crystals were compared with analytical grade BHP powder, single and polycrystalline BHP materials using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning pyroelectric microscopy (SPEM), optical microscopy (OM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). FTIR spectra showed surface adsorption of gelatin molecules by using BHP stacked sheets due to CH2 stretching, CH2 bending and amide I vibrations are found in a gelatin content of about 2% determined by dissolution. SEM shows various crystal morphologies of the BHP/gelatin composites forming bundled micro-flakes to irregular bundled needles and spheres different from gel-free crystals. The variety in morphology depends on the ion concentration, pH of gel as well as the method of crystal growth. SPEM investigation of BHP/gelatin aggregates revealed polar domains showing alteration of the polarization. Moreover, BHP/gelatin composite crystals showed a higher thermal stability in comparison with analytical grade BHP or/and BHP single crystals due to strong interactions between gelatin and BHP. The XRD diffraction analysis demonstrated that the single and double diffusion techniques in gelatin led to the formation of orthorhombic BHP. This study demonstrates that gelatin is a useful high molecular weight biomacromolecule for controlling the crystallization of a composite material by producing a variety of morphological forms.

  18. Cytocompatibility and Mechanical Properties of Short Phosphate Glass Fibre Reinforced Polylactic Acid (PLA) Composites: Effect of Coupling Agent Mediated Interface

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Muhammad Sami; Ahmed, Ifty; Parsons, Andrew; Walker, Gavin; Scotchford, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In this study three chemical agents Amino-propyl-triethoxy-silane (APS), sorbitol ended PLA oligomer (SPLA) and Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) were identified to be used as coupling agents to react with the phosphate glass fibre (PGF) reinforcement and the polylactic acid (PLA) polymer matrix of the composite. Composites were prepared with short chopped strand fibres (l = 20 mm, ϕ = 20 µm) in a random arrangement within PLA matrix. Improved, initial composite flexural strength (~20 MPa) was observed for APS treated fibres, which was suggested to be due to enhanced bonding between the fibres and polymer matrix. Both APS and HDI treated fibres were suggested to be covalently linked with the PLA matrix. The hydrophobicity induced by these coupling agents (HDI, APS) helped to resist hydrolysis of the interface and thus retained their mechanical properties for an extended period of time as compared to non-treated control. Approximately 70% of initial strength and 65% of initial modulus was retained by HDI treated fibre composites in contrast to the control, where only ~50% of strength and modulus was retained after 28 days of immersion in PBS at 37 °C. All coupling agent treated and control composites demonstrated good cytocompatibility which was comparable to the tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) control, supporting the use of these materials as coupling agent’s within medical implant devices. PMID:24955744

  19. Structure of selected basic zinc/copper (II) phosphate minerals based upon near-infrared spectroscopy--implications for hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Reddy, B Jagannadha; Palmer, Sara J; Keeffe, Eloise C

    2011-03-01

    The NIR spectra of reichenbachite, scholzite and parascholzite have been studied at 298 K. The spectra of the minerals are different, in line with composition and crystal structural variations. Cation substitution effects are significant in their electronic spectra and three distinctly different electronic transition bands are observed in the near-infrared spectra at high wavenumbers in the 12,000-7600 cm(-1) spectral region. Reichenbachite electronic spectrum is characterised by Cu(II) transition bands at 9755 and 7520 cm(-1). A broad spectral feature observed for ferrous ion in the 12,000-9000 cm(-1) region both in scholzite and parascholzite. Some what similarities in the vibrational spectra of the three phosphate minerals are observed particularly in the OH stretching region. The observation of strong band at 5090 cm(-1) indicates strong hydrogen bonding in the structure of the dimorphs, scholzite and parascholzite. The three phosphates exhibit overlapping bands in the 4800-4000 cm(-1) region resulting from the combinations of vibrational modes of (PO(4))(3-) units. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Lysine Decarboxylase with an Enhanced Affinity for Pyridoxal 5-Phosphate by Disulfide Bond-Mediated Spatial Reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Sagong, Hye-Young; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Lysine decarboxylase (LDC) catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-lysine to produce cadaverine, an important industrial platform chemical for bio-based polyamides. However, due to high flexibility at the pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) binding site, use of the enzyme for cadaverine production requires continuous supplement of large amounts of PLP. In order to develop an LDC enzyme from Selenomonas ruminantium (SrLDC) with an enhanced affinity for PLP, we introduced an internal disulfide bond between Ala225 and Thr302 residues with a desire to retain the PLP binding site in a closed conformation. The SrLDCA225C/T302C mutant showed a yellow color and the characteristic UV/Vis absorption peaks for enzymes with bound PLP, and exhibited three-fold enhanced PLP affinity compared with the wild-type SrLDC. The mutant also exhibited a dramatically enhanced LDC activity and cadaverine conversion particularly under no or low PLP concentrations. Moreover, introduction of the disulfide bond rendered SrLDC more resistant to high pH and temperature. The formation of the introduced disulfide bond and the maintenance of the PLP binding site in the closed conformation were confirmed by determination of the crystal structure of the mutant. This study shows that disulfide bond-mediated spatial reconstitution can be a platform technology for development of enzymes with enhanced PLP affinity. PMID:28095457

  1. Retention of Resin Composite CAM Crowns Following Different Bonding Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat, Amir Hossein

    Objectives: Resin composite CAM materials offer more efficient milling, however, there is a high incidence of clinical debonding when this material is used for full-coverage crowns. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of different surface treat-ments and primers on the crown retention of a new resin composite CAM material. Methods: 120 molars were prepared with a 24 degree taper, 1.5mm height, and axial walls in dentin. Surface area was measured by digital microscopy and preparations were scanned with an intraoral scanner. Crowns were milled from an experimental com-posite material with 4mm occlusal height. Teeth were randomly allocated to 12 groups (n= 10) based on the possible combinations of three surface treatments (Control, Alumina air abrasion [50mum Al2O3 at 0.28MPa], Hydrofluoric acid etch [5% HF acid for 20 sec]), silane application (with or without Kerr Silane), and adhesive application (with or without Optibond XTR adhesive). Optibond XTR adhesive was applied to the tooth preparations and crowns were bonded with MaxCem Elite. Crowns were fatigued for 100,000 cycles at 100N in water. Crowns were debonded in tension in a universal testing machine at 1mm/min. Crown retention strength (maximum load/area of preparation) was analyzed using a three-way ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc tests. Results: Surface treatment, silane and adhesive applications independently affect the retention force (p<0.05). All interactions were not statistically significant. Alumina airborne abrasion surface treatment, silane and adhesive applications all boost retention strength. Conclusions: Resin composite crowns should be alumina particle abraded and coated with silane and adhesive.

  2. Coupling of functional hydrogen bonds in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-enzyme model systems observed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Shasad; Schagen, David; Toney, Michael D; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2007-04-11

    We present a novel series of hydrogen-bonded, polycrystalline 1:1 complexes of Schiff base models of the cofactor pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) with carboxylic acids that mimic the cofactor in a variety of enzyme active sites. These systems contain an intramolecular OHN hydrogen bond characterized by a fast proton tautomerism as well as a strong intermolecular OHN hydrogen bond between the pyridine ring of the cofactor and the carboxylic acid. In particular, the aldenamine and aldimine Schiff bases N-(pyridoxylidene)tolylamine and N-(pyridoxylidene)methylamine, as well as their adducts, were synthesized and studied using 15N CP and 1H NMR techniques under static and/or MAS conditions. The geometries of the hydrogen bonds were obtained from X-ray structures, 1H and 15N chemical shift correlations, secondary H/D isotope effects on the 15N chemical shifts, or directly by measuring the dipolar 2H-15N couplings of static samples of the deuterated compounds. An interesting coupling of the two "functional" OHN hydrogen bonds was observed. When the Schiff base nitrogen atoms of the adducts carry an aliphatic substituent such as in the internal and external aldimines of PLP in the enzymatic environment, protonation of the ring nitrogen shifts the proton in the intramolecular OHN hydrogen bond from the oxygen to the Schiff base nitrogen. This effect, which increases the positive charge on the nitrogen atom, has been discussed as a prerequisite for cofactor activity. This coupled proton transfer does not occur if the Schiff base nitrogen atom carries an aromatic substituent.

  3. Tricalcium Phosphate and Tricalcium Phosphate/ Polycaprolactone Particulate Composite for Controlled Release of Protein

    PubMed Central

    Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Edgington, Joe; Bose, Susmita

    2013-01-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with three different particle size ranges was used to study the effects of particle size and surface area on protein adsorption and release. Polycaprolactone (PCL) coating was applied on the particle systems to investigate its effect on particulate systems properties from both structural and application aspects. The maximum loading of 27 mg/g was achieved for 100 nm particles. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) loading amount was controlled by varying the BSA loading solution concentration, as well as the sample powder’s surface area. Increasing the surface area of the delivery powder significantly increased loading and release yield. Unlike the samples with low surface area, the lowest particle size samples showed sigmoidal release profile. This indicated that release was governed by different mechanism for particles with different sizes. While the majority of samples showed no more than 50% release, the 550nm particles demonstrated 100% release. PCL-coating showed no significant ability to attenuate burst release in PBS. However, it led to a steadier release profile as compared to the bare TCP particles. FTIR analysis also proved that the secondary structure of BSA did not change significantly during the adsorption; however, minor denaturation was found during the release. The same results were found when PCL coating was applied on the TCP particles. We envision potential use of TCP and TCP+PCL systems in bone growth factor or orthopedic drug delivery applications in future bone tissue engineering application. PMID:23910252

  4. Stabilization Using Phosphate Bonded Ceramics. Salt Containing Mixed Waste Treatment. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference No. 117

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex there are large inventories of homogeneous mixed waste solids, such as wastewater treatment residues, fly ashes, and sludges that contain relatively high concentrations (greater than 15% by weight) of salts. The inherent solubility of salts (e.g., nitrates, chlorides, and sulfates) makes traditional treatment of these waste streams difficult, expensive, and challenging. One alternative is low-temperature stabilization by chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). The process involves reacting magnesium oxide with monopotassium phosphate with the salt waste to produce a dense monolith. The ceramic makes a strong environmental barrier, and the metals are converted to insoluble, low-leaching phosphate salts. The process has been tested on a variety of surrogates and actual mixed waste streams, including soils, wastewater, flyashes, and crushed debris. It has also been demonstrated at scales ranging from 5 to 55 gallons. In some applications, the CBPC technology provides higher waste loadings and a more durable salt waste form than the baseline method of cementitious grouting. Waste form test specimens were subjected to a variety of performance tests. Results of waste form performance testing concluded that CBPC forms made with salt wastes meet or exceed both RCRA and recommended Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) low-level waste (LLW) disposal criteria. Application of a polymer coating to the CBPC may decrease the leaching of salt anions, but continued waste form evaluations are needed to fully assess the deteriorating effects of this leaching, if any, over time.

  5. Mechanical, degradation and cytocompatibility properties of magnesium coated phosphate glass fibre reinforced polycaprolactone composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoling; Hasan, Muhammad S; Grant, David M; Harper, Lee T; Parsons, Andrew J; Palmer, Graham; Rudd, Chris D; Ahmed, Ifty

    2014-11-01

    Retention of mechanical properties of phosphate glass fibre reinforced degradable polyesters such as polycaprolactone and polylactic acid in aqueous media has been shown to be strongly influenced by the integrity of the fibre/polymer interface. A previous study utilising 'single fibre' fragmentation tests found that coating with magnesium improved the fibre and matrix interfacial shear strength. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a magnesium coating on the manufacture and characterisation of a random chopped fibre reinforced polycaprolactone composite. Short chopped strand non-woven phosphate glass fibre mats were sputter coated with degradable magnesium to manufacture phosphate glass fibre/polycaprolactone composites. The degradation behaviour (water uptake, mass loss and pH change of the media) of these polycaprolactone composites as well as of pure polycaprolactone was investigated in phosphate buffered saline. The Mg coated fibre reinforced composites revealed less water uptake and mass loss during degradation compared to the non-coated composites. The cations released were also explored and a lower ion release profile for all three cations investigated (namely Na(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)) was seen for the Mg coated composite samples. An increase of 17% in tensile strength and 47% in tensile modulus was obtained for the Mg coated composite samples. Both flexural and tensile properties were investigated and a higher retention of mechanical properties was obtained for the Mg coated fibre reinforced composite samples up to 10 days immersion in PBS. Cytocompatibility study showed both composite samples (coated and non-coated) had good cytocompatibility with human osteosarcoma cell line.

  6. NMR studies of coupled low- and high-barrier hydrogen bonds in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate model systems in polar solution.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Shasad; Denisov, Gleb S; Toney, Michael D; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2007-05-16

    The 1H and 15N NMR spectra of several 15N-labeled pyridoxal-5'-phosphate model systems have been measured at low temperature in various aprotic and protic solvents of different polarity, i.e., dichloromethane-d2, acetonitrile-d3, tetrahydrofuran-d8, freon mixture CDF3/CDClF2, and methanol. In particular, the 15N-labeled 5'-triisopropyl-silyl ether of N-(pyridoxylidene)-tolylamine (1a), N-(pyridoxylidene)-methylamine (2a), and the Schiff base with 15N-2-methylaspartic acid (3a) and their complexes with proton donors such as triphenylmethanol, phenol, and carboxylic acids of increasing strength were studied. With the use of hydrogen bond correlation techniques, the 1H/15N chemical shift and scalar coupling data could be associated with the geometries of the intermolecular O1H1N1 (pyridine nitrogen) and the intramolecular O2H2N2 (Schiff base) hydrogen bonds. Whereas O1H1N1 is characterized by a series of asymmetric low-barrier hydrogen bonds, the proton in O2H2N2 faces a barrier for proton transfer of medium height. When the substituent on the Schiff base nitrogen is an aromatic ring, the shift of the proton in O1H1N1 from oxygen to nitrogen has little effect on the position of the proton in the O2H2N2 hydrogen bond. By contrast, when the substituent on the Schiff base nitrogen is a methyl group, a proton shift from O to N in O1H1N1 drives the tautomeric equilibrium in O2H2N2 from the neutral O2-H2...N2 to the zwitterionic O2-...H2-N(2+) form. This coupling is lost in aqueous solution where the intramolecular O2H2N2 hydrogen bond is broken by solute-solvent interactions. However, in methanol, which mimics hydrogen bonds to the Schiff base in the enzyme active site, the coupling is preserved. Therefore, the reactivity of Schiff base intermediates in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate enzymes can likely be tuned to the requirements of the reaction being catalyzed by differential protonation of the pyridine nitrogen.

  7. Further understanding of aged composite and adhesively bonded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslehurst, Rikard B.; Baird, John P.

    1996-11-01

    As the application of advanced composite materials and adhesively bonded components becomes increasingly numerous in aircraft structures, so is the number of aircraft containing such structures that can be classified in the aging aircraft category. The effect of environmental and in- service aging of such structures is not well known or understood, neither have NDE techniques been able to satisfactorily qualify and quantify the loss of structural integrity due to the aging process. This paper will present the latest developments in the practical use of a field portable holographic interferometric testing system. The system results, known as holographic interferograms, provide a better understanding of how a structure is behaving under realistic loads in the presence of defects, damage and material property aging. The system has been applied to a variety of defects in composite and adhesive bondlines, as well as artificial environmental aging of these materials. The holographic interferograms produced form these investigations will be briefly reviewed and their impact on structural integrity of the component discussed.

  8. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen profiles on the bond strength of repaired composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Mossa, Hossam; ElKhatat, Essam; Hassan, Ahmed M.; Baroudi, Kusai; Beshr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of repaired three types of composite resins under various hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) profiles with various session numbers. Materials and Methods: Sixty specimens of three types of composite resin (nanofilled composite, nanohybrid composite and microfilled composite) each type of composite was divided into four group according to various profiles of HBO treatment (control, 2bar, 3 bar and 5 bar). Then, the specimens were repaired; thermocycled, the tensile bond strength were measured. Then the data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). Results: The highest bond strength was obtained for the repaired nanofilled composite resin specimens while; the lowest bond strength was obtained for the repaired microfilled composite resin specimens. The highest tensile bond strength was recorded for the specimens who treated with the highest pressure of HBO. Conclusion: The bond strength of repaired nanofilled composite resins is better than the other types of composite resin. The highest pressure of HBO, the highest bond strength of repaired composite resins. PMID:27195232

  9. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen profiles on the bond strength of repaired composite resin.

    PubMed

    Mossa, Hossam; ElKhatat, Essam; Hassan, Ahmed M; Baroudi, Kusai; Beshr, Khaled

    2016-04-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of repaired three types of composite resins under various hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) profiles with various session numbers. Sixty specimens of three types of composite resin (nanofilled composite, nanohybrid composite and microfilled composite) each type of composite was divided into four group according to various profiles of HBO treatment (control, 2bar, 3 bar and 5 bar). Then, the specimens were repaired; thermocycled, the tensile bond strength were measured. Then the data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). The highest bond strength was obtained for the repaired nanofilled composite resin specimens while; the lowest bond strength was obtained for the repaired microfilled composite resin specimens. The highest tensile bond strength was recorded for the specimens who treated with the highest pressure of HBO. The bond strength of repaired nanofilled composite resins is better than the other types of composite resin. The highest pressure of HBO, the highest bond strength of repaired composite resins.

  10. On the hydrates of codeine phosphate: the remarkable influence of hydrogen bonding on the crystal size.

    PubMed

    Runčevski, Tomče; Petruševski, Gjorgji; Makreski, Petre; Ugarkovic, Sonja; Dinnebier, Robert E

    2014-07-07

    Codeine phosphate forms three hydrates and two anhydrates. The sesquihydrate and hemihydrate, which differ by one water molecule, are stable at room temperature. The influence of this molecule on the internal crystal structure and how it translates into the external crystal shape are reported.

  11. Injectable Hydrogel Composite Based Gelatin-PEG and Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles for Bone Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van, Thuy Duong; Tran, Ngoc Quyen; Nguyen, Dai Hai; Nguyen, Cuu Khoa; Tran, Dai Lam; Nguyen, Phuong Thi

    2016-05-01

    Gelatin hydrogels have recently attracted much attention for tissue regeneration because of their biocompatibility. In this study, we introduce poly-ethylene glycol (PEG)—grafted gelatin containing tyramine moieties which have been utilized for in situ enzyme-mediated hydrogel preparation. The hydrogel can be used to load nanoparticles of biphasic calcium phosphate, a mixture of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate, and forming injectable bio-composites. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra indicated that tyramine-functionalized polyethylene glycol-nitrophenyl carbonate ester was conjugated to the gelatin. The hydrogel composite was rapidly formed in situ (within a few seconds) in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide. In vitro experiments with bio-mineralization on the hydrogel composite surfaces was well-observed after 2 weeks soaking in simulated body fluid solution. The obtained results indicated that the hydrogel composite could be a potential injectable material for bone regeneration.

  12. Evaluation of a thermoplastic polyimide (422) for bonding GR/PI composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A hot-melt processable copolyimide previously studied and characterized as an adhesive for bonding Ti-6Al-4V was used to bond Celion 6000/LARC-160 composite. Comparisons are made for the two adherend systems. A bonding cycle was determined for the composite bonding and lap shear specimens were prepared which were thermally exposed in a forced-air oven for up to 5000 h at 204 C. The lap shear strengths (LSSs) were determined at RT, 177, and 204 C. After thermal exposure at RT, 177, and 204 C the LSS decreased significantly; however, a slight increase was noted for the 204 C tests. Initially the LSS values are higher for the bonded Ti-6Al-4V than for the bonded composite, however, the LSS decreases dramatically between 5000 and 10,000 h of 204 C thermal exposure. Longer periods of thermal exposure up to 20,000 h results in further decreases in the LSSs. Although the bonded composite retained useful strengths for exposures up to 5000 h, based on the poor results of the bonded Ti-6Al-4V beyond 5000 h, the 422 adhesive bonded composites would most likely also produce poor strengths beyond 5000 h exposure. Adhesive bonded composite lap shear specimens exposed to boiling water for 72 h exhibited greatly reduced strengths at all test temperatures. The percent retained after water boil for each test temperature was essentially the same for both systems.

  13. Evaluation of a thermoplastic polyimide (422) for bonding GR/PI composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A hot-melt processable copolyimide previously studied and characterized as an adhesive for bonding Ti-6Al-4V was used to bond Celion 6000/LARC-160 composite. Comparisons are made for the two adherend systems. A bonding cycle was determined for the composite bonding and lap shear specimens were prepared which were thermally exposed in a forced-air oven for up to 5000 h at 204 C. The lap shear strengths (LSSs) were determined at RT, 177, and 204 C. After thermal exposure at RT, 177, and 204 C the LSS decreased significantly; however, a slight increase was noted for the 204 C tests. Initially the LSS values are higher for the bonded Ti-6Al-4V than for the bonded composite, however, the LSS decreases dramatically between 5000 and 10,000 h of 204 C thermal exposure. Longer periods of thermal exposure up to 20,000 h results in further decreases in the LSSs. Although the bonded composite retained useful strengths for exposures up to 5000 h, based on the por results of the bonded Ti-6Al-4V beyond 5000 h, the 422 adhesive bonded composites would most likely also produce poor strengths beyond 5000 h exposure. Adhesive bonded composite lap shear specimens exposed to boiling water for 72 h exhibited greatly reduced strengths at all test temperatures. The percent retained after water boil for each test temperature was essentially the same for both systems.

  14. Evaluation of a thermoplastic polyimide (422) for bonding GR/PI composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A hot-melt processable copolyimide previously studied and characterized as an adhesive for bonding Ti-6Al-4V was used to bond Celion 6000/LARC-160 composite. Comparisons are made for the two adherend systems. A bonding cycle was determined for the composite bonding and lap shear specimens were prepared which were thermally exposed in a forced-air oven for up to 5000 h at 204 C. The lap shear strengths (LSSs) were determined at RT, 177, and 204 C. After thermal exposure at RT, 177, and 204 C the LSS decreased significantly; however, a slight increase was noted for the 204 C tests. Initially the LSS values are higher for the bonded Ti-6Al-4V than for the bonded composite, however, the LSS decreases dramatically between 5000 and 10,000 h of 204 C thermal exposure. Longer periods of thermal exposure up to 20,000 h results in further decreases in the LSSs. Although the bonded composite retained useful strengths for exposures up to 5000 h, based on the por results of the bonded Ti-6Al-4V beyond 5000 h, the 422 adhesive bonded composites would most likely also produce poor strengths beyond 5000 h exposure. Adhesive bonded composite lap shear specimens exposed to boiling water for 72 h exhibited greatly reduced strengths at all test temperatures. The percent retained after water boil for each test temperature was essentially the same for both systems.

  15. Mechanical behaviour of degradable phosphate glass fibres and composites-a review.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, R; Tanner, K E

    2015-12-23

    Biodegradable materials are potentially an advantageous alternative to the traditional metallic fracture fixation devices used in the reconstruction of bone tissue defects. This is due to the occurrence of stress shielding in the surrounding bone tissue that arises from the absence of mechanical stimulus to the regenerating bone due to the mismatch between the elastic modulus of bone and the metal implant. However although degradable polymers may alleviate such issues, these inert materials possess insufficient mechanical properties to be considered as a suitable alternative to current metallic devices at sites of sufficient mechanical loading. Phosphate based glasses are an advantageous group of materials for tissue regenerative applications due to their ability to completely degrade in vivo at highly controllable rates based on the specific glass composition. Furthermore the release of the glass's constituent ions can evoke a therapeutic stimulus in vivo (i.e. osteoinduction) whilst also generating a bioactive response. The processing of these materials into fibres subsequently allows them to act as reinforcing agents in degradable polymers to simultaneously increase its mechanical properties and enhance its in vivo response. However despite the various review articles relating to the compositional influences of different phosphate glass systems, there has been limited work summarising the mechanical properties of different phosphate based glass fibres and their subsequent incorporation as a reinforcing agent in degradable composite materials. As a result, this review article examines the compositional influences behind the development of different phosphate based glass fibre compositions intended as composite reinforcing agents along with an analysis of different potential composite configurations. This includes variations in the fibre content, matrix material and fibre architecture as well as other novel composites designs.

  16. Compositions containing amino acids, phosphate and manganese and their uses

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.

    2017-09-12

    The invention provides methods of producing vaccines directed against microorganisms, with the methods comprising culturing, harvesting and/or suspending the microorganism in the presence of a radiation-protective composition and irradiating the bacteria or viruses with a dose of radiation sufficient to render the microorganism replication-deficient and/or non-infective. The radiation-protective compositions used in the methods of the present invention comprise at least one nucleoside, at least one antioxidant and at least one small peptide. The invention also provides methods of rendering bacteria in culture resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), with these methods comprising culturing the bacteria in the presence of a radiation-protective composition.

  17. Compositions containing amino acids, phosphate and manganese and their uses

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.

    2016-01-12

    The invention provides methods of producing vaccines directed against microorganisms, with the methods comprising culturing, harvesting and/or suspending the microorganism in the presence of a radiation-protective composition and irradiating the bacteria or viruses with a dose of radiation sufficient to render the microorganism replication-deficient and/or non-infective. The radiation-protective compositions used in the methods of the present invention comprise at least one nucleoside, at least one antioxidant and at least one small peptide. The invention also provides methods of rendering bacteria in culture resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), with these methods comprising culturing the bacteria in the presence of a radiation-protective composition.

  18. Ultrasonic guided wave monitoring of composite bonded joints using macro fiber composite transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Howard; Bartoli, Ivan; Coccia, Stefano; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Oliver, Joseph; Kosmatka, John; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles

    2006-03-01

    The monitoring of adhesively-bonded joints through the use of ultrasonic guided waves is the general topic of this paper. Specifically, composite-to-composite joints representative of the wing skin-to-spar bonds of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are examined. This research is the first step towards the development of an on-board structural health monitoring system for UAV wings based on integrated ultrasonic sensors. The study investigates two different lay-ups for the wing skin and two different types of bond defects, namely poorly-cured adhesive and disbonded interfaces. The guided wave propagation problem is studied numerically by a semi-analytical finite element method that accounts for viscoelastic damping, and experimentally by utilizing macro fiber composite (MFC) transducers which are inexpensive, flexible, highly robust, and viable candidates for application in on-board monitoring systems. Based upon change in energy transmission, the presence of damage is successfully identified through features extracted in both the time domain and discrete wavelet transform domain. A unique "passive" version of the diagnostic system is also demonstrated experimentally, whereby MFC sensors are utilized for detecting and locating simulated active damage in an aluminum plate. By exploiting the directivity behavior of MFC sensors, a damage location algorithm which is independent of wave speed is developed. Application of this approach in CFRP components may alleviate difficulties associated with damage location in highly anisotropic systems.

  19. Shear bond strengths of composite to dentin using six dental adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Triolo, P T; Swift, E J; Barkmeier, W W

    1995-01-01

    The development of adhesive agents for bonding composite to dentin has rapidly evolved in recent years. It is postulated that dentin bond strengths in the range of 17 MPa are sufficient to resist the polymerization shrinkage of composite resins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strengths of the following dentin adhesive systems: All-Bond 2 (Bisco), Imperva Bond (Shofu), Optibond (Kerr), Permagen (Ultradent), ProBond (Caulk/Dentsply), and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (3M). Sixty human molars (10 per group) were mounted in phenolic rings, and the occlusal surfaces were flat ground in dentin to 600 grit. The prepared dentin bonding sites were treated according to the directions for each of the systems evaluated. A gelatin capsule technique was used to bond Bis-Fil composite cylinders to the teeth. The specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Mean shear bond strengths were as follows: Scotchbond Multi-Purpose: 23.1 +/- 2.6 MPa, All-Bond 2: 21.4 +/- 7.8 MPa, Imperva Bond: 19.8 +/- 6.1 MPa, Optibond: 19.7 +/- 3.6 MPa, ProBond: 16.3 +/- 4.5 MPa, and Permagen: 16.2 +/- 3.0 MPa. There was not a significant difference (P<0.05) in the bond strengths of Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, All-Bond 2, Imperva Bond, and Optibond. The bond strengths of Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and All-Bond 2 were significantly greater (P<0.05) than ProBond and Permagen. Current-generation dentin adhesive systems have approached or exceeded the theoretical threshold value to resist contraction stresses during polymerization of resin materials.

  20. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Composite to Stainless Steel Crowns Using Two Mechanical Surface Treatments and Two Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ghadimi, Sara; Heidari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to stainless steel crowns (SSC) using two mechanical surface treatments (MSTs) and two bonding systems. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four SSCs were divided into six groups of 14; Group1: No MST+Scotchbond Universal adhesive (N+U), Group 2: Surface roughening by a diamond bur+Scotchbond Universal adhesive (R+U), Group 3: Sandblasting+Scotchbond Universal adhesive (S+U), Group 4: No MST+Alloy Primer+Clearfil SE Primer and Bond (N+A), Group 5: Surface roughening by a diamond bur+Alloy Primer+Clearfil SE Primer and Bond (R+A), Group 6: Sandblasting+Alloy Primer+Clearfil SE Primer and Bond (S+A). After MST and bonding procedure, composite cylinders were bonded to the lingual surface of SSCs, then the SBS of composite to SSCs was measured using a universal testing machine following thermocycling. Results: The SBS of groups R+U and S+U was significantly higher than that of group N+U. No significant difference was noted in SBS of groups R+U and S+U. The SBS of group S+A was significantly higher than that of groups N+A and R+A. No significant difference was noted in the SBS of groups N+A and R+A (P>0.05). Conclusions: In Scotchbond Universal adhesive groups, sandblasting and surface roughening by diamond bur significantly increased the SBS of composite to SSCs compared to no MST. In Alloy Primer groups, sandblasting significantly increased the SBS of composite to SSC compared to surface roughening with diamond bur and no MST. PMID:27536330

  1. RBS and XPS analyses of the composite calcium phosphate coatings for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Yamaguchi, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Yoshikazu

    2005-12-01

    The calcium phosphate coatings on metallic implants are widely used for biomedical applications. The calcium phosphate coatings require mechanical strength, strong adhesion to the metallic implants, chemical stability and low dissolution into the human body fluid for stable functioning in the corrosive environment of the human body. In this study, a novel approach for improving the calcium phosphate coatings is utilized by adding trace metallic element into the coatings. We focused on teeth enamel, which is the hardest calcium phosphate tissue in the human body. Zn concentration increases exponentially from the interior to the surface of the enamel. As the Zn concentration increases, so the local hardness increases. Our previous studies suggest that Zn has influence on the hardness and other properties of enamel, calcium phosphate tissue. Calcium phosphate coatings doped with Zn was fabricated and characterized. The atomic composition and chemical state were investigated by using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), respectively. Scratch test was also carried out for measuring the adhesion of the coatings.

  2. Characterizing the oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate sources to aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Young, Megan B; McLaughlin, Karen; Kendall, Carol; Stringfellow, William; Rollog, Mark; Elsbury, Katy; Donald, Elizabeth; Paytan, Adina

    2009-07-15

    The oxygen isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic phosphate (delta18Op) in many aquatic ecosystems is not in isotopic equilibrium with ambient water and, therefore, may reflect the source delta18Op. Identification of phosphate sources to water bodies is critical for designing best management practices for phosphate load reduction to control eutrophication. In order for delta18Op to be a useful tool for source tracking, the delta18Op of phosphate sources must be distinguishable from one another; however, the delta18Op of potential sources has not been well characterized. We measured the delta18Op of a variety of known phosphate sources, including fertilizers, semiprocessed phosphorite ore, particulate aerosols, detergents, leachates of vegetation, soil, animal feces, and wastewater treatment plant effluent. We found a considerable range of delta18Op, values (from +8.4 to +24.9 per thousand) for the various sources, and statistically significant differences were found between several of the source types. delta18Op measured in three different fresh water systems was generally not in equilibrium with ambient water. Although there is overlap in delta18Op values among the groups of samples, our results indicate that some sources are isotopically distinct and delta18Op can be used for identifying phosphate sources to aquatic systems.

  3. Characterizing the oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate sources to aquatic ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, M.B.; McLaughlin, K.; Kendall, C.; Stringfellow, W.; Rollog, M.; Elsbury, K.; Donald, E.; Paytan, A.

    2009-01-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic phosphate (δ18Op) in many aquatic ecosystems is not in isotopic equilibrium with ambient water and, therefore, may reflect the source δ18Op. Identification of phosphate sources to water bodies is critical for designing best management practices for phosphate load reduction to control eutrophication. In order for δ18O p to be a useful tool for source tracking, the δ18Op of phosphate sources must be distinguishable from one another; however, the δ18Op of potential sources has not been well characterized. We measured the δ18O p of a variety of known phosphate sources, including fertilizers, semiprocessed phosphorite ore, particulate aerosols, detergents, leachates of vegetation, soil, animal feces, and wastewater treatment plant effluent. We found a considerable range of δ18Op values (from +8.4 to +24.9‰) for the various sources, and statistically significant differences were found between several of the source types. δ18Op measured in three different fresh water systems was generally not in equilibrium with ambient water. Although there is overlap in δ18Op values among the groups of samples, our results indicate that some sources are isotopically distinct and δ18Op can be used for identifying phosphate sources to aquatic systems.

  4. Bonding and nondestructive evaluation of graphite/PEEK composite and titanium adherends with thermoplastic adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Berry, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bonded single overlap shear specimens were fabricated from Graphite/PEEK (Polyetheretherketone) composite adherends and titanium adherends. Six advanced thermoplastic adhesives were used for the bonding. The specimens were bonded by an electromagnetic induction technique producing high heating rates and high-strength bonds in a few minutes. This contrasts with conventionally heated presses or autoclaves that take hours to process comparable quality bonds. The Graphite/PEEK composites were highly resistant to delamination during the testing. This allowed the specimen to fail exclusively through the bondline, even at very high shear loads. Nondestructive evaluation of bonded specimens was performed ultrasonically by energizing the entire thickness of the material through the bondline and measuring acoustic impedance parameters. Destructive testing confirmed the unique ultrasonic profiles of strong and weak bonds, establishing a standard for predicting relative bond strength in subsequent specimens.

  5. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Results: Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3rd year, overall “Bravo” rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3rd year evaluation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Within the limitation of this study, both resin composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities. PMID:27011734

  6. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite.

    PubMed

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3(rd) year, overall "Bravo" rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3(rd) year evaluation (P < 0.05). Within the limitation of this study, both resin composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities.

  7. Effects of cyclic stressing on attachment bond strength using glass ionomer cement and composite resin.

    PubMed

    Moseley, H C; Horrocks, E N; Pearson, G J; Davies, E H

    1995-02-01

    Bonded orthodontic brackets were subjected to cyclic loading in order to simulate the effect of occlusal forces. The subsequent effect on bond strength was determined. Stainless steel, mesh-based brackets were bonded to extracted teeth with either composite resin or glass ionomer cement. A jig was designed to subject each bracket to a preselected loading level and the 24-hour shear/peel bond strength of both stressed and unstressed brackets was subsequently measured. Cyclic loading brought about a comparative decrease in bond strength when using both types of material. The potential implications of selecting these different types of bonding material for clinical use are discussed.

  8. Conducting and non-conducting biopolymer composites produced by particle bonding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this report, we introduce two types of processes for the production of biopolymer composites: one is fabricated by bonding biopolymers with corn protein or wheat protein and the other by bonding starch with a synthetic polymer. These two types of biopolymer composites make use of the strong bon...

  9. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Brugger, Ronald P.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  10. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Brassell, G.W.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  11. Acid Gradient across Plasma Membrane Can Drive Phosphate Bond Synthesis in Cancer Cells: Acidic Tumor Milieu as a Potential Energy Source

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Gautam; Sen, Suvajit; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive cancers exhibit an efficient conversion of high amounts of glucose to lactate accompanied by acid secretion, a phenomenon popularly known as the Warburg effect. The acidic microenvironment and the alkaline cytosol create a proton-gradient (acid gradient) across the plasma membrane that represents proton-motive energy. Increasing experimental data from physiological relevant models suggest that acid gradient stimulates tumor proliferation, and can also support its energy needs. However, direct biochemical evidence linking extracellular acid gradient to generation of intracellular ATP are missing. In this work, we demonstrate that cancer cells can synthesize significant amounts of phosphate-bonds from phosphate in response to acid gradient across plasma membrane. The noted phenomenon exists in absence of glycolysis and mitochondrial ATP synthesis, and is unique to cancer. Biochemical assays using viable cancer cells, and purified plasma membrane vesicles utilizing radioactive phosphate, confirmed phosphate-bond synthesis from free phosphate (Pi), and also localization of this activity to the plasma membrane. In addition to ATP, predominant formation of pyrophosphate (PPi) from Pi was also observed when plasma membrane vesicles from cancer cells were subjected to trans-membrane acid gradient. Cancer cytosols were found capable of converting PPi to ATP, and also stimulate ATP synthesis from Pi from the vesicles. Acid gradient created through glucose metabolism by cancer cells, as observed in tumors, also proved critical for phosphate-bond synthesis. In brief, these observations reveal a role of acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source and may offer a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25874623

  12. ILLUMINATING THE ROLE OF AGGLOMERATES ON CRITICAL PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF AMORPHOUS CALCIUM PHOSPHATE COMPOSITES

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, J.N.R.; Antonucci, J.M.; Skrtic, D.

    2009-01-01

    Water sorption (WS), mechanical strength, and ion release of polymeric composites formulated with 40 % as-made or milled amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) are compared after 1, 2 and 3 months of aqueous exposure. Ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methacryloxyethyl phthalate comprised the resin. The WS (mass %) peaked at 3 months. WS of as-made ACP composites was significantly higher than WS of milled ACP composites and copolymers. Both composite groups experienced decreases in biaxial flexural strength (BFS) with water aging, with milled ACP composites retaining a significantly higher BFS throughout immersion. Ion release was moderately reduced in milled ACP composites, though they remained superior to as-made ACP composites due to significantly lower WS and higher BFS after prolonged aqueous exposure. PMID:19774100

  13. Bond strength of adhesive/composite combinations to dentin involving total- and self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Molla, Karlheinz; Park, Hyun-Jung; Haller, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    To compare the bonding potential to human dentin of adhesive/composite combinations including five 2-step and two 3-step total-etch (TE) bonding systems, two systems with self-conditioning (SC) primers, and one SC all-in-one adhesive by use of the microtensile bond test. Hybrid resin composites were bonded to the occlusal dentin of 50 extracted human molars. After water storage (37 degrees C, 24 h), 31-mm-thick slabs were cut from the middle of the teeth perpendicular to their long axis. Microtensile bond strength was determined and debonded surfaces were examined under the SEM for mode of failure. GLM multivariate procedure for repeated measurements, Student-Newman-Keuls test (SPSS version 10.0; p = 0.05). Mean bond strengths of the simplified (2-step) TE systems (OptiBond Solo, Gluma One Bond, Solobond M, Prime&Bond NT, One Coat Bond; 19.9 MPa to 39.9 MPa) were not significantly lower than that of the traditional 3-step TE systems (EBS Multi: 26.0 MPa; OptiBond FL: 32.7 MPa), and not related to phosphoric acid concentration. Dentin treatment with SC primers (Clearfil Liner Bond 2: 22.0 MPa; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V: 22.4 MPa) was as effective as etching with phosphoric acid. The SC all-in-one adhesive (Etch&Prime 3.0: 10.1 MPa) produced significantly lower bond strength than all other systems evaluated. The use of adhesive/composite combinations including simplified bonding systems does not necessarily result in reduced bond strength to dentin. SC primers offer a promising alternative to phosphoric acid etching as far as bonding to dentin is concerned. In contrast, the SC all-in-one adhesive evaluated needs to be improved.

  14. Bonding between CAD/CAM resin and resin composite cements dependent on bonding agents: three different in vitro test methods.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Simona; Keul, Christine; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the bonding properties between CAD/CAM resin and three resin composite cements combined with different bonding agents using three test methods. Four hundred twenty CAD/CAM resin substrates were fabricated and divided into three test methods (shear bond strength (SBS, n = 180), tensile bond strength (TBS, n = 180) and work of adhesion (WA, n = 60)), further into four pretreatment methods (VP connect (VP), visio.link (VL), Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CP) and no pretreatment (CG)) and three cements (RelyX ARC, Variolink II and Clearfil SA Cement). Each subgroup contained 15 specimens. SBS and TBS were measured after 24 h H2O/37 °C + 5000 thermal-cycles (5/55 °C) and failure types were assessed. WA was determined for pretreated CAD/CAM resin and non-polymerized resin composite cements. Data were analysed with Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis H, Chi(2) and Spearman's Rho tests. Within SBS and TBS tests, CGs and groups pretreated with CP (regardless of resin composite cements), and VP pretreated with Clearfil SA Cement showed no bond. However, CG combined with RelyX ARC showed a TBS of 5.6 ± 1.3 MPa. In general, highest bond strength was observed for groups treated with VL. CG and groups pretreated using VL showed lower WA than the groups treated with VP or CP. Measured TBS values were higher than SBS ones. In general, SBS and TBS showed similar trends for the ranges of the values for the groups. WA results were not comparable with SBS/TBS results and admitted, therefore, no conclusions on it. For a clinical use of XHIP-CAD/CAM resin, the bond surface should be additionally pretreated with visio.link as bonding agent.

  15. Protein-adsorption and Ca-phosphate formation on chitosan-bioactive glass composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, V.; Boccaccini, A. R.; Virtanen, S.

    2017-09-01

    In the last years, chitosan-bioactive glass (BG) composites have been developed and investigated as bioactive coatings for orthopedic applications. The increase of bioactivity occurs due to the stimulation of calcium-phosphate/hydroxyapatite formation on the surface while the coating is degrading. In the present work, protein adsorption and its influence on calcium-phosphate precipitation was studied for the first time on such composite coatings. The experiments involved coating of 316L stainless steel substrates with chitosan (Ch) and chitosan-bioactive glass (Ch-BG) and immersion of the coated samples in two different bovine serum albumin (BSA) containing solutions, namely DI H2O (with pH adjusted to about 7.2 with diluted NaOH) and simulated body fluid (SBF). In order to investigate the influence of protein adsorption on calcium-phosphate precipitation, samples were also immersed in DI H2O and in SBF without BSA. Samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Surface analysis revealed that adsorption of BSA takes place on all studied samples and that protein adsorption is influenced by the presence of Ca2+ and PO43- ions. Bioactivity in the form of hydroxyapatite pre-stage formation is significantly increased on Ch-BG composite coating as compared with bare stainless steel surface. However, calcium-phosphate precipitation in SBF is reduced by the presence of BSA.

  16. Total Phosphate Influences the Rate of Hydrocarbon Degradation but Phosphate Mineralogy Shapes Microbial Community Composition in Cold-Region Calcareous Soils.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Steven D; Chen, Tingting; Phillips, Courtney; Hamilton, Jordan; Hilger, David; Chartrand, Blaine; Grosskleg, Jay; Bradshaw, Kris; Carlson, Trevor; Peak, Derek

    2016-05-17

    Managing phosphorus bioaccessibility is critical for the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in calcareous soils. This paper explores how soil mineralogy interacts with a novel biostimulatory solution to both control phosphorus bioavailability and influence bioremediation. Two large bore infiltrators (1 m diameter) were installed at a PHC contaminated site and continuously supplied with a solution containing nutrients and an electron acceptor. Soils from eight contaminated sites were prepared and pretreated, analyzed pretrial, spiked with diesel, placed into nylon bags into the infiltrators, and removed after 3 months. From XAS, we learned that three principal phosphate phases had formed: adsorbed phosphate, brushite, and newberyite. All measures of biodegradation in the samples (in situ degradation estimates, mineralization assays, culturable bacteria, catabolic genes) varied depending upon the soil's phosphate speciation. Notably, adsorbed phosphate increased anaerobic phenanthrene degradation and bzdN catabolic gene prevalence. The dominant mineralogical constraints on community composition were the relative amounts of adsorbed phosphate, brushite, and newberyite. Overall, this study finds that total phosphate influences microbial community phenotypes whereas relative percentages of phosphate minerals influences microbial community genotype composition.

  17. Formation of titanium phosphate composites during phosphoric acid decomposition of natural sphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslova, Marina V.; Rusanova, Daniela; Naydenov, Valeri; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Gerasimova, Lidia G.

    2008-12-01

    Decomposition of mineral sphene, CaTiOSiO 4, by H 3PO 4 is investigated in detail. During the dissolution process, simultaneous calcium leaching and formation of titanium phosphate (TiP) take place. The main product of decomposition is a solid titanium phosphate-silica composite. The XRD, solid-sate NMR, IR, TGA, SEM and BET data were used to identify and characterize the composite as a mixture of crystalline Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O and silica. When 80% phosphoric acid is used the decomposition degree is higher than 98% and calcium is completely transferred into the liquid phase. Formation of Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O proceeds via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases, Ti(H 2PO 4)(PO 4)·2H 2O and Ti(H 2PO 4)(PO 4). The sorption affinities of TiP composites were examined in relation to caesium and strontium ions. A decrease of H 3PO 4 concentration leads to formation of composites with greater sorption properties. The maximum sorption capacity of TiP is observed when 60% H 3PO 4 is used in sphene decomposition. The work demonstrates a valuable option within the Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O-SiO 2 composite synthesis scheme, to use phosphoric acid flows for isolation of CaHPO 4·2H 2O fertilizer.

  18. A novel biodegradable nicotinic acid/calcium phosphate composite coating on Mg-3Zn alloy.

    PubMed

    Song, Yingwei; Shan, Dayong; Han, En-Hou

    2013-01-01

    A novel biodegradable composite coating is prepared to reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg-3Zn alloy. The Mg-3Zn substrate is first immersed into 0.02 mol L(-1) nicotinic acid (NA) solution, named as vitamin B3, to obtain a pretreatment film, and then the electrodeposition of calcium phosphate coating with ultrasonic agitation is carried out on the NA pretreatment film to obtain a NA/calcium phosphate composite coating. Surface morphology is observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition is determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and EDX. Protection property of the coatings is evaluated by electrochemical tests. The biodegradable behavior is investigated by immersion tests. The results indicate that a thin but compact bottom layer can be obtained by NA pretreatment. The electrodeposition calcium phosphate coating consists of many flake particles and ultrasonic agitation can greatly improve the compactness of the coating. The composite coating is biodegradable and can reduce the biodegradation rate of Mg alloys in stimulated body fluid (SBF) for twenty times. The biodegradation process of the composite coating can be attributed to the gradual dissolution of the flake particles into chippings.

  19. Nonlinear Analysis of Bonded Composite Single-LAP Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Barut, A.; Madenci, E.; Smeltzer, S. S.; Ambur, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a semi-analytical solution method to analyze the geometrically nonlinear response of bonded composite single-lap joints with tapered adherend edges under uniaxial tension. The solution method provides the transverse shear and normal stresses in the adhesive and in-plane stress resultants and bending moments in the adherends. The method utilizes the principle of virtual work in conjunction with von Karman s nonlinear plate theory to model the adherends and the shear lag model to represent the kinematics of the thin adhesive layer between the adherends. Furthermore, the method accounts for the bilinear elastic material behavior of the adhesive while maintaining a linear stress-strain relationship in the adherends. In order to account for the stiffness changes due to thickness variation of the adherends along the tapered edges, their in-plane and bending stiffness matrices are varied as a function of thickness along the tapered region. The combination of these complexities results in a system of nonlinear governing equilibrium equations. This approach represents a computationally efficient alternative to finite element method. Comparisons are made with corresponding results obtained from finite-element analysis. The results confirm the validity of the solution method. The numerical results present the effects of taper angle, adherend overlap length, and the bilinear adhesive material on the stress fields in the adherends, as well as the adhesive, of a single-lap joint

  20. Shear bond strengths of composite resin and giomer to mineral trioxide aggregate at different time intervals.

    PubMed

    Ajami, Amir-Ahmad; Bahari, Mahmoud; Hassanpour-Kashani, Arezoo; Abed-Kahnamoui, Mehdi; Savadi-Oskoee, Ayda; Azadi-Oskoee, Farhad

    2017-07-01

    The efficacy of the bond between the restorative materials and the pulp capping materials has an important role in the success of vital pulp therapy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of composite resin and giomer to MTA at different time intervals after mixing of MTA. Ninety cylindrical MTA samples were prepared and assigned to two groups (n=45) based on the restorative materials used (composite resin or giomer). Each group was subdivided into 3 subgroups (n=15) based on the evaluation intervals (immediately, 2.45 hours and 3 days after mixing MTA). After the bonding procedures, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured in MPa at a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed with repeated-measures ANOVA, post hoc tests and t-test (P<0.05). Bond strength of composite resin was minimum at baseline but it increased significantly 2.45 hours after mixing MTA (P=0.002), with no significant changes in bond strength up to three days (P=0.08). Bond strength of giomer did not exhibit any significant changes from baseline to 2.45 hours after mixing MTA (P=078); however, at 3 days it reached a minimum (P=0.000). In addition, the means of bond strength of composite resin 2.45 hours and 3 days after mixing were significantly higher than those of giomer (P=0.001 and P=0.000, respectively). Bond strengths of composite resin 2.45 hours and also 3 days after mixing were significantly higher than those of giomer. In addition, the shear bond strength of giomer decreased over time; however, the shear bond strength of composite resin increased. Key words:Composite resin, Giomer, Shear bond strength, Vital pulp therapy.

  1. Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-Based Bioactive Polymeric Composites for Mineralized Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Skrtic, D.; Antonucci, J. M.; Eanes, E. D.

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), a postulated precursor in the formation of biological hydroxyapatite, has been evaluated as a filler phase in bioactive polymeric composites that utilize dental monomers to form the matrix phase on polymerization. In addition to excellent biocompatibility, these composites provided sustained release of calcium and phosphate ions into simulated saliva milieus. In an effort to enhance the physicochemical and mechanical properties and extend the utility of remineralizing ACP composites to a greater variety of dental applications, we have focused on: a) hybridizing ACP by introducing silica and/or zirconia, b) assessing the efficacy of potential coupling agents, c) investigating the effects of chemical structure and compositional variation of the resin matrices on the mechanical strength and ion-releasing properties of the composites, and d) improving the intrinsic adhesiveness of composites by using bifunctional monomers with an affinity for tooth structure in resin formulations. Si- and Zr-modified ACPs along with several monomer systems are found useful in formulating composites with improved mechanical and remineralizing properties. Structure-property studies have proven helpful in advancing our understanding of the remineralizing behavior of these bioactive composites. It is expected that this knowledge base will direct future research and lead to clinically valuable products, especially therapeutic materials appropriate for the healing or even regeneration of defective teeth and bone structures. PMID:27413603

  2. [Temperature loading of resin-bonded bridges and its effect on the composite strength of the adhesive bond].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, P; Marx, R

    1989-01-01

    Acid-etched prostheses are exposed in the oral cavity to pressure of mastication, to corrosion due to oral fluids, to changes in temperature due to ingestion, and to iatrogenic influences. The changes in temperature which were measured in the adhesive layer were up to +/- 40 degrees C within a range from -2 degrees C up to about 80 degrees C. The bonding agents, which had a high softening temperature and little thermal expansion showed the least influence of temperature after the in-vitro tests. The fact that the tested bonding agents are different in chemistry influenced significantly the adhesive and cohesive characteristics. The thermal tests lead to the conclusion that for clinical use the following adhesives are to be preferred: Bis-GMA modified by monomeric phosphate (e.g. Panavia) and Bis-GMA (e.g. Microfill pontic).

  3. The Effects of Cavity Preparation and Composite Resin on Bond Strength and Stress Distribution Using the Microtensile Bond Test.

    PubMed

    Braga, Ssl; Oliveira, Lrs; Rodrigues, R B; Bicalho, A A; Novais, V R; Armstrong, S; Soares, C J

    2017-10-04

    To evaluate the effect of flowable bulk-fill or conventional composite resin on bond strength and stress distribution in flat or mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity preparations using the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) test. Forty human molars were divided into two groups and received either standardized MOD or flat cavity preparations. Restorations were made using the conventional composite resin Z350 (Filtek Z350XT, 3M-ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) or flowable bulk-fill (FBF) composite resin (Filtek Bulk Fill Flowable, 3M-ESPE). Postgel shrinkage was measured using the strain gauge technique (n=10). The Z350 buildup was made in two increments of 2.0 mm, and the FBF was made in a single increment of 4.0 mm. Six rectangular sticks were obtained for each tooth, and each section was used for μTBS testing at 1.0 mm/min. Polymerization shrinkage was modeled using postgel shrinkage data. The μTBS data were analyzed statistically using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the postgel shrinkage data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc test. The failure modes were analyzed using a chi-square test (α=0.05). Our results show that both the type of cavity preparation and the composite resin used affect the bond strength and stress distribution. The Z350 composite resin had a higher postgel shrinkage than the FBF composite resin. The μTBS of the MOD preparation was influenced by the type of composite resin used. Irrespective of composite resin, flat cavity preparations resulted in higher μTBS than MOD preparations (p<0.001). Specifically, in flat-prepared cavities, FBF composite resin had a similar μTBS relative to Z350 composite resin. However, in MOD-prepared cavities, those with FBF composite resin had higher μTBS values than those with Z350 composite resin. Adhesive failure was prevalent for all tested groups. The MOD preparation resulted in higher shrinkage stress than the flat preparation, irrespective of composite resin. For MOD

  4. Cross-linked PEG via degradable phosphate ester bond: synthesis, water-swelling, and application as drug carrier.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoxing; Wang, Lei; Bao, Chunyan; Li, Xinxin; Cao, Lei; Dai, Kerong; Zhu, Linyong

    2011-06-13

    A new series of degradable and water-swellable cross-linked PEG phosphoester polymers (CPPs) based on a facile cross-linked reaction between diphosphoesters of polyethylene glycol (P-PEG-P) and diglycidyl ether of polyethylene glycol (E-PEG-E) has been prepared and characterized. The molecular weights and ratios of the prepolymers played an important role for the properties of CPPs polymers, such as mechanical property, swelling, and degradation rates. In the curing process, the glycidyl ether was consumed by both hydroxyl of the phosphoester (P-OH) and hydroxyl generated from the opened glycidyl ethers (C-OH) with the presence of acid, which generated degradable phosphate esters as cross-linked points and ether bonds as the short branches, respectively. Drug entrapment and release test and biological cytotoxicity studies in vitro suggested that the polymers and generated hydrogels have great potential applications in drug delivery system and biological materials.

  5. Effects of colloidal silica suspension mixing on porosity of phosphate-bonded investments after setting and heating processes.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji-Young; Asaoka, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    A numerical simulation model, which was based on the setting and heating reactions of the binder phase of phosphate-bonded investment compacts, was developed to compute the porosities of set and burnout compacts. Densities and concentrations of microsilica particles in dilute suspension were measured and input into the simulation model. Validity of the model was confirmed by experimental results, that is, colloidal silica suspensions were prepared using different silica concentrations and mixed with investment powders. Porosities of these set and burnout compacts were experimentally measured. Effects of these factors on the porosity of compacts were examined using the developed simulation model: liquid/powder (L/P) ratio, concentration of microsilica particles in colloidal silica suspension, and ratio of binder component (NH₄H₂PO₄) in investment powder. It was concluded that numerical simulation is a viable tool for dental materials research.

  6. Shear bond strengths produced by composite and compomer light cured orthodontic adhesives.

    PubMed

    Rock, W P; Abdullah, M S

    1997-01-01

    To test the shear bond strengths obtained when orthodontic brackets were bonded ex vivo using a composite resin and a compomer orthodontic adhesive. Specimens were tested in a special jig made to fit an Instron testing machine. After debonding, the adhesive remaining on bracket bases and enamel surfaces was mapped. Bond strengths ranged from 8 to 23 MPa with the composite resin producing higher strengths than the compomer for similar combinations of variables. Bond strength was increased by longer curing and a longer debond interval and was higher for brackets with mesh bases than undercut bases. More compomer remained on the enamel surface after debonding than did the composite resin. The compomer produced bond strengths within the range considered to be clinically acceptable in other studies. If it was clinically successful as an orthodontic adhesive a compomer would confer the advantage that fluoride release would help to minimize the onset of early caries around bonded brackets.

  7. Aminoalcohol functionalized zirconium phosphate as versatile filler for starch-based composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Pica, Monica; Donnadio, Anna; Bianchi, Valentina; Fop, Sacha; Casciola, Mario

    2013-08-14

    Microcrystalline zirconium phosphate was exfoliated by treatment with aqueous solutions of α,ω-alkylaminoalcohols and employed for the fabrication of potato starch composite membranes. Glycerol-based and glycerol-free composite membranes, containing 5 wt% of filler, were prepared from gelatinized starch and characterized for their physico-chemical properties. Despite of a partial filler reaggregation, as revealed by XRD and SEM analysis, all the composites exhibited a significant increase in the Young's modulus with respect to the glycerol-starch membrane, up to 80% and 190% for the glycerol-based and the glycerol-free composites, respectively. For both kinds of membranes the filler delays to a large extent the starch decomposition above about 300°C. A significant reduction in the water uptake of the composites was also observed with respect to the neat glycerol-based membrane, up to about 70% for the glycerol-free composites.

  8. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  9. A Novel Multiscale Design of Interfaces for Polymeric Composites and Bonded Joints using Additive Manufacturing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0317 A Novel Multiscale Design of Interfaces for Polymeric Composites and Bonded Joints using Additive Manufacturing Pavana... Composites and Bonded Joints using Additive Manufacturing AWARD NO.: FA9550-15-1-0216 AGENCY NAME: The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), Ar...interactive computational framework for designing struc- tural interfaces for layered composites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.3.2 Task 4

  10. Microtensile Bond Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    34Microtensile Bond Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin " 7. Intended publication/meeting: General Dentistry 8...Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin Maj Stephen S. Potter APPROVED: Lt Col Clifton W. Bailey I Col Villa l...Microtensile Bond Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin Abstract The new millable ceramic/polymer block materials

  11. Shear bond strength of resin composite bonded with two adhesives: Influence of Er: YAG laser irradiation distance

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Farzaneh; Birang, Reza; Malekipour, Mohammad Reza; Hourmehr, Zahra; Kazemi, Shantia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental surfaces prepared with different Er:YAG laser distance may have different characteristics compared with those prepared with conventional instruments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation distance from enamel and dentin surfaces on the shear bond strength of composite with self-etch and etch and rinse bonding systems compared with conventional preparation method. Materials and Methods: Two hundred caries-free human third molars were randomly divided into twenty groups (n = 10). Ten groups were designated for enamel surface (E1-E10) and ten for dentin surface (D1-D10). Er: YAG laser (2940 nm) was used on the E1-E8 (240 mJ, 25 Hz) and D1-D8 (140 mJ, 30 Hz) groups at four different distances of 0.5 (standard), 2, 4 and 11 mm. Control groups (E9, E10, D9 and D10) were ground with medium grit diamond bur. The enamel and dentin specimens were divided into two subgroups that were bonded with either Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond. Resin composite (Z100) was dispensed on prepared dentin and enamel. The shear bond strengths were tested using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by SPSS12 statistical software using three way analysis of variance, Tukey and independent t-test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was a significant difference between enamel and dentin substrates (P < 0.001) and between lased and un-lased groups; the un-lased group had significantly higher bond strength (P < 0.001). Shear bond strength increased significantly with an increase in the laser irradiation distance (P < 0.05) on enamel surfaces (in both bonding agent subgroups) and on dentin surfaces (in the Single Bond subgroup). Conclusion: Laser irradiation decreases shear bond strength. Irradiation distance affects shear bond strength and increasing the distance would decrease the negative effects of laser irradiation. PMID:25540665

  12. The effect of porosity on drug release kinetics from vancomycin microsphere/calcium phosphate cement composites.

    PubMed

    Schnieders, Julia; Gbureck, Uwe; Vorndran, Elke; Schossig, Michael; Kissel, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    The influence of porosity on release profiles of antibiotics from calcium phosphate composites was investigated to optimize the duration of treatment. We hypothesized, that by the encapsulation of vancomycin-HCl into biodegradable microspheres prior admixing to calcium phosphate bone cement, the influence of porosity of the cement matrix on vancomycin release could be reduced. Encapsulation of vancomycin into a biodegradable poly(lactic co-glycolic acid) copolymer (PLGA) was performed by spray drying; drug-loaded microparticles were added to calcium phosphate cement (CPC) at different powder to liquid ratios (P/L), resulting in different porosities of the cement composites. The effect of differences in P/L ratio on drug release kinetics was compared for both the direct addition of vancomycin-HCl to the cement liquid and for cement composites modified with vancomycin-HCl-loaded microspheres. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualize surface and cross section morphology of the different composites. Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller-plots (BET) was used to determine the specific surface area and pore size distribution of these matrices. It could be clearly shown, that variations in P/L ratio influenced both the porosity of cement and vancomycin release profiles. Antibiotic activity during release study was successfully measured using an agar diffusion assay. However, vancomycin-HCl encapsulation into PLGA polymer microspheres decreased porosity influence of cement on drug release while maintaining antibiotic activity of the embedded substance.

  13. Injectable thermosensitive hydrogel composite with surface-functionalized calcium phosphate as raw materials

    PubMed Central

    Fan, RangRang; Deng, XiaoHui; Zhou, LiangXue; Gao, Xiang; Fan, Min; Wang, YueLong; Guo, Gang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, L-lactide was used to modify the tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) surface which can form functionalized poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA)-grafted β-TCP (g-β-TCP) and PLLA-grafted TTCP (g-TTCP) particles. The g-β-TCP and g-TTCP obtained were incorporated into a PEG-PCL-PEG (PECE) matrix to prepare injectable thermosensitive hydrogel composites. The morphology of the hydrogel composites showed that the g-β-TCP and g-TTCP particles dispersed homogeneously into the polymer matrix, and each hydrogel composite had a three-dimensional network structure. Rheologic analysis showed that the composite had good thermosensitivity. Changes in calcium concentration and pH in simulated body fluid solutions confirmed the feasibility of surface-functionalized calcium phosphate for controlled release of calcium. All the results indicate that g-β-TCP/PECE and g-TTCP/PECE hydrogels might be a promising protocol for tissue engineering. PMID:24489468

  14. [Preparation and properties of calcium silicate-phosphate composite bone cements].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Jilin; Liu, Xiaolei; Chen, Xiaoxu; Lü, Bingling

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, alpha-tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP) and tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) respectively were chosen as basic compositions of phosphate bone cements. Other auxiliary materials such as hydroxyapatite (HAP), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), calcium carbonate (CaCO3), calcium oxide (CaO) and amorphous calcium silicate (CaSiO3) were added in the cements. Six kinds of composite bone cements were decided with 1.50 as their Ca/P ratio. Then the primary properties of them were studied. Ringer's simulated body fluid (SBF) tests were carried out for the samples. The changes of pH value in SBF and the compressive strength of the samples with the immersion time were studied. The results showed: the mixing liquid 0.25 M K2HPO4/KH2PO4 and amorphous CaSiO3 were effective for accelerating the setting of the cements; the initial setting time (It) was about 4-5.5 min and the final setting time (Ft) was about 18-19. 5 min. Amorphous calcium silicate can increase the compressive strength of the bone cements remarkably; the compressive strength of the alpha-TCP bone cement with the addition of suitable amount amorphous CaSiO3 reached 45.3 MPa after immersion in SBF for 14 days.

  15. In vivo degradation of a poly(propylene fumarate)/beta-tricalcium phosphate injectable composite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Peter, S J; Miller, S T; Zhu, G; Yasko, A W; Mikos, A G

    1998-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the in vivo biodegration and biocompatibility of a poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF)-based orthopedic biomaterial. The effects of varying the PPF to N-vinyl pyrrolidinone ratio and PPF to beta-tricalcium phosphate content were studied. The composite mechanical properties and local tissue interactions were analyzed over 12 weeks. An initial increase in both compressive modulus and strength was seen for composite formulations that incorporated beta-tricalcium phosphate. The samples incorporating a higher PPF to N-vinyl pyrrolidinone ratio reached a maximal compressive strength of 7.7 MPa and a maximal compressive modulus of 191.4 MPa at 3 weeks. The lower PPF to N-vinyl pyrrolidinone ratio samples gained a maximum compressive strength of 7.5 MPa initially and a compressive modulus of 134.0 MPa at 1 week. At 6 weeks, all samples for formulations incorporating beta-tricalcium phosphate crumbled upon removal and were not mechanically tested. Samples that did not incorporate beta-tricalcium phosphate were very weak and insufficient for bone replacement at the 4-day time point and beyond. Tissue interactions resulted in a mild inflammatory response at the initial time points and mature fibrous encapsulation by 12 weeks.

  16. Reconstructing Cambro-Ordovician Seawater Composition using Clumped Isotope Paleothermometry on Calcitic and Phosphatic Brachiopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, K.; Robles, M.; Finnegan, S.; Hughes, N. C.; Eiler, J. M.; Fischer, W. W.

    2012-12-01

    A secular increase in δ18O values of marine fossils through early Phanerozoic time raises questions about the evolution of climate and the water cycle. This pattern suggests two end-member hypotheses 1) surface temperatures during early Paleozoic time were very warm, in excess of 40°C (tropical MAT), or 2) the isotopic composition of seawater increased by up to 7-8‰. It has been difficult to evaluate these hypotheses because the δ18O composition of fossils depends on both temperature and the δ18O of water. Furthermore, primary isotopic signatures can be overprinted by diagenetic processes that modify geological materials. This too could explain the decrease in δ18O values of marine fossils with age. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry can constrain this problem by providing an independent measure of crystallization temperature and, when paired with classical δ18O paleothermometry, can determine the isotopic composition of the fluid the mineral last equilibrated with. Combined with traditional tools, this method has the potential to untangle primary isotopic signatures from diagenetic signals. We measured the isotopic ordering of CO3 groups (Δ47) substituted into the phosphate lattice of phosphatic brachiopods in Cambrian strata. Phosphatic fossils are generally less soluble than carbonates in surface and diagenetic environments, and so are hypothesized to provide a more robust record of primary growth conditions. They also provide an archive prior to the rise of thick shelled calcitic fossils during the Ordovician Radiation. Additionally, measurements of the δ18O of the CO3 groups can be compared with the δ18O of PO4 groups to test whether their mutual fractionation is consistent with primary growth and the apparent temperature recorded by carbonate clumped isotope measurements. We are constructing a phosphatic brachiopod calibration for carbonate clumped isotope thermometry, and Δ47 values of CO2 extracted from modern phosphatic brachiopods suggest

  17. The engineering of construction specifications for externally bonded FRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinbao

    This dissertation, consisting of six technical papers, presents the results of research on the theme of developing engineering and the construction specifications for externally bonded FRP composites. For particular, the work focuses on three critical aspects of the performance of FRP systems: fiber misalignment, corner radius, and lap splice length. Based on both experimental and theoretical investigations, the main contribution of this work is the development of recommendations on fiber misalignment limit, minimum corner radius, lap splice length to be used as guidance in the construction practice of FRP strengthening of concrete structures. The first three papers focus on the strength and stiffness degradation of CFRP laminates from fiber misalignment. It was concluded that misalignment affects strength more than stiffness. In practice, when all fibers in a laminate can be regarded as through fibers, it is recommended to use a reduction factor for strength and no reduction factor for stiffness to account for fiber misalignment. Findings from concrete beams strengthened with misaligned CFRP laminates verified these recommendations. The fourth and fifth papers investigate the effect of corner radius on the mechanical properties of CFRP laminates wrapped around a rectangular cross section. A unique reusable test device was fabricated to determine fiber stress and radial stress of CFRP laminates with different corner radii. Comparison performed with finite element analyses shows that the test method and the reusable device were viable and the stress concentration needs to be considered in FRP laminate wrapped corners. A minimum of 1.0 in. corner radius was recommended for practice. The sixth paper summarizes the research on the lap splice length of FRP laminates under static and repeated loads. Although a lap splice length of 1.5 in. is sufficient for CFRP laminates to develop the ultimate static tensile strength, a minimum of 4.0 in. is recommended in order to

  18. Permeability testing of composite material and adhesive bonds for the DC-XA composite feedline program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    Hercules IM7/8552 carbon/epoxy and Hysol EA 9394 epoxy adhesive bonded between composite/titanium were tested for permeability after various numbers of thermal cycles between 100 C and liquid nitrogen (-196 C). The specimens were quenched from the 100 C temperature into liquid nitrogen to induce thermal shock into the material. Results showed that the carbon/epoxy system was practically impermeable even after 12 thermal cycles. The EA 9394 adhesive bondline was more permeable than the carbon/epoxy, but vacuum mixing minimized the permeability and kept it within allowable limits. Thermal cycling had little effect on the permeability values of the bondline specimens.

  19. Delamination Arrestment in Bonded-Bolted Composite Structures by Fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Chi Ho Eric

    Laminated composites have exceptional in-plane strengths and fatigue properties. However, they are susceptible to the interlaminar mode of failure, namely disbond and delamination. This failure mode challenges the edges of structural interface, such as the skin-stringer flange and run-out, where interlaminar tension, shear, and opening moment are concentrated. The fasteners provide a substantiation path for the FAA damage tolerance requirement for composite bonded joints (FAR 23.573). A comprehensive understanding of delamination arrestment by fasteners was developed. The fastener provides crack arrest capability by three main mechanisms: 1) mode I suppression, 2) crack-face friction, and 3) fastener joint shear stiffness. The fastener mechanically closes the crack tip, suppressing mode I fracture and forcing the crack to propagate in pure mode II with higher fracture toughness. Fastener preload generates significant friction force on the cracked surfaces which reduces crack-tip forces and moments. The fastener shear joint provides an alternate load path around the crack tip that becomes more effective as crack length increases. The three mechanisms work in concert to provide various degrees of crack arrestment and retardation capability. A novel test technique was developed to quantify the delamination arrestment capability by fasteners under in-plane dominated loading, i.e. mode II propagation. The test results show that the fastener is highly capable of delamination arrestment and retardation. The test also demonstrates that fastener installation preload, which is directly related to crack-face friction, is an important factor in delamination arrestment. A computationally efficient analytical method was developed to capture the behavior and efficacy of delamination arrestment by fasteners. The solution method is based on the principle of minimum potential energy and beam-column modeling of the delaminating structure. The fastener flexibility approach is used to

  20. Effect of glass composition on the degradation properties and ion release characteristics of phosphate glass--polycaprolactone composites.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Roopa L; Brocchini, Steve; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2005-05-01

    A series of polycaprolactone and ternary-based (Na(2)O)(0.55-x)(CaO)(x)(P(2)O(5))(0.45) glass composites were created, each containing 20% volume percentage of glass with various calcium compositions. A short-term degradation study was carried out to investigate the physical and ion release behaviour of these composites, utilising analytical techniques such as dynamical mechanical analysis, and ion chromatography. All the composites experienced significant loss of weight and stiffness throughout the study, with the 24 mol% calcium composites losing the greatest amount of weight and stiffness. The pH profile of the aqueous solutions in which the composites were placed were initially acidic, but began to neutralise mid-way through the study, with the 36 mol% solution achieving the most acidic conditions. The ion release behaviour mirrored the mass loss behaviour of the glass component of the composites. The cations (sodium and calcium ions) release was comparable with the initial stages of composite mass degradation, both of which exhibited almost immediate release when placed into solution. The 24 mol% composites underwent rapid rates of cation release, while the 36 mol% experienced the slowest rates of release. By contrast, anion (phosphates and polyphosphates) release showed a dissimilar trend, with rapid release of the P(2)O(7) and P(3)O(10) occurring during the first few hours in solution, whilst the P(3)O(9) structure released steadily during the first 48 h in solution. Finally, PO(4) release was at a constant rate over the duration of the study, releasing up to 300 ppm from the 32 and 36 mol% samples by the end of 200 h. To summarise, these results show that by combining phosphate glasses with biodegradable polymer, it is possible to create composites whose rate of degradation can be controlled to meet the needs of their end application.

  1. Formation of titanium phosphate composites during phosphoric acid decomposition of natural sphene

    SciTech Connect

    Maslova, Marina V.; Rusanova, Daniela Naydenov, Valeri; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Gerasimova, Lidia G.

    2008-12-15

    Decomposition of mineral sphene, CaTiOSiO{sub 4}, by H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is investigated in detail. During the dissolution process, simultaneous calcium leaching and formation of titanium phosphate (TiP) take place. The main product of decomposition is a solid titanium phosphate-silica composite. The XRD, solid-sate NMR, IR, TGA, SEM and BET data were used to identify and characterize the composite as a mixture of crystalline Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O and silica. When 80% phosphoric acid is used the decomposition degree is higher than 98% and calcium is completely transferred into the liquid phase. Formation of Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O proceeds via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases, Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}).2H{sub 2}O and Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}). The sorption affinities of TiP composites were examined in relation to caesium and strontium ions. A decrease of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} concentration leads to formation of composites with greater sorption properties. The maximum sorption capacity of TiP is observed when 60% H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is used in sphene decomposition. The work demonstrates a valuable option within the Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} composite synthesis scheme, to use phosphoric acid flows for isolation of CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O fertilizer. - Graphical abstract: A new synthesis scheme for preparation of composite titanium phosphate (TiP) ion-exchangers upon one-stage decomposition process of natural sphene with phosphoric acid is presented. Syntheses of {alpha}-TiP-silica composites proceed via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases. The concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} determines the porosity of final products and their sorption affinities.

  2. Supramolecular open-framework based on 1-D iron phosphate-diphosphate chains assembled through hydrogen bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Salvado, Miguel A.; Pertierra, Pilar; Trobajo, Camino; Garcia, Jose R.

    2008-05-15

    Fe(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}).C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N, a new iron(III) phosphate with an open-framework has been synthesized hydrothermally using pyridine as organic template. The crystal structure was solved ab initio using conventional powder X-ray diffraction data. The unit cell is orthorhombic, a=9.5075(2), b=10.1079(1), c=13.3195(2) A, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, Z=4. The structure consists of FeO{sub 6} octahedra joined by H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} groups forming linear chains interconnected by hydrogen bonding to give rise to a supramolecular framework enclosing tunnels in which the pyridine molecules reside. - Graphical abstract: The low temperature hydrothermal synthesis offers many possibilities in the preparation of new materials with mixed octahedral-tetrahedral open-frameworks. Fe(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}).C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N is constituted by linear chains of FeO{sub 6} octahedra joined through of both dihydrogenphosphate and dihydrogendiphosphate bridges, interconnected by hydrogen bonds, originating channels where the pyridine molecules are located.

  3. Shear bond strength between alumina substrate and prosthodontic resin composites with various adhesive resin systems.

    PubMed

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-05-02

    With the increase in demand for cosmetics and esthetics, resin composite restorations and all-ceramic restorations have become an important treatment alternative. Taking into consideration the large number of prosthodontic and adhesive resins currently available, the strength and durability of these materials needs to be evaluated. This laboratory study presents the shear bond strengths of a range of veneering resin composites bonded to all-ceramic core material using different adhesive resins. Alumina ceramic specimens (Techceram Ltd, Shipley, UK) were assigned to three groups. Three types of commercially available prosthodontic resin composites [BelleGlass®, (BG, Kerr, CA, USA), Sinfony® (SF, 3 M ESPE, Dental Products, Germany), and GC Gradia® (GCG, GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan)] were bonded to the alumina substrate using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group (N = 40) were stored dry for 24 hours, the remaining were stored for 30 days in water. The bonding strength, so-called shear bond strengths between composite resin and alumina substrate were measured. Data were analysed statistically and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Bond strengths were influenced by the brand of prosthodontic resin composites. Shear bond strengths of material combinations varied from 24.17 ± 3.72-10.15 ± 3.69 MPa and 21.20 ± 4.64-7.50 ± 4.22 at 24 h and 30 days, respectively. BG resin composite compared with the other resin composites provided the strongest bond with alumina substrate (p < 0.01). SF resin composite was found to have a lower bond strength than the other composites. The Weibull moduli were highest for BG, which was bonded by using Optibond Solo Plus adhesive resin at 24 h and 30 days. There was no effect of storage time and adhesive brand on bond strength. Within the limitations of this study, the shear bond strengths of composite resins to alumina substrate are related to

  4. Cold spray and presureless sintering of zirconium phosphate bonded silicon nitride ceramics with porous gradient structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Li, Feiyu; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Lianmeng

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, silicon nitride (Si3N4) electromagnetic wave transparent ceramics with high porosity and porous gradient structure are prepared by cold spray and pressureless sintering technique. Zirconium phosphate solution is used as a binder material instead of the traditional organic materials, in order to prevent the residual carbon which is severe to the dielectric properties of the Si3N4 porous ceramics. Firstly, Si3N4 ceramic slurries with different phosphorus acid and pore-forming agent contents are prepared. Then the Si3N4 slurries are cold sprayed layer by layer to achieve a porous gradient structure, and finally the samples are presurelessly sintered at 1000 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere. The results show that the porosity of the obtained Si3N4 ceramics is 20~70 % and the Si3N4 ceramics exhibits a good porous graded structure from high to low porosity.

  5. A novel squid pen chitosan/hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate composite for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shavandi, Amin; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Sun, Zhifa; Ali, Azam; Gould, Maree

    2015-10-01

    Squid pen chitosan was used in the fabrication of biocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Hydroxyapatite (HA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) obtained from waste mussel shells were used as the calcium phosphate source. The composite was prepared using 2.5% tripolyphosphate (TPP) and 1% glycerol as a cross-linker and plasticizer, respectively. The weight percent (wt.%) ratios of the ceramic components in the composite were 20/10/70, 30/20/50 and 40/30/30 (HA/β-TCP/Chi). The biodegradation rate and structural properties of the scaffolds were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microCT(μCT) results indicated that the composites have a well defined lamellar structure with an average pore size of 200 μm. The porosity of the composites decreased from 88 to 56% by increasing the ratio of HA/β-TCP from 30 to 70%. After 28 days of incubation in a physiological solution, the scaffolds were degraded by approximately 30%. In vitro investigations showed that the composites were cytocompatible and supported the growth of L929 and Saos-2 cells. The obtained data suggests that the squid pen chitosan composites are potential candidates for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Amorphous calcium phosphate/urethane methacrylate resin composites. I. Physicochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Regnault, William F; Icenogle, Tonya B; Antonucci, Joseph M; Skrtic, Drago

    2008-02-01

    Urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), an oligomeric poly(ethylene glycol) extended UDMA (PEG-U) and a blend of UDMA/PEG-U were chosen as model systems for introducing both hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments and a range of compliances in their derived polymers. Experimental composites based on these three resins with amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) as the filler phase were polymerized and evaluated for mechanical strength and ion release profiles in different aqueous media. Strength of all composites decreased upon immersion in saline (pH = 7.4). Both polymer matrix composition and the pH of the liquid environment strongly affected the ion release kinetics. In saline, the UDMA/PEG-U composite showed a sustained release for at least 350 h. The initially high ion release of the PEG-U composites decreased after 72 h, seemingly due to the mineral re-deposition at the composite surface. Internal conversion from ACP to poorly crystallized apatite could be observed by X-ray diffraction. In various lactic acid (LA) environments (initial pH = 5.1) ion release kinetics was much more complex. In LA medium without thymol and/or carboxymethylcellulose, as a result of unfavorable changes in the internal calcium/phosphate ion stoichiometry, the ion release rate greatly increased but without observable conversion of ACP to apatite.

  7. Amorphous calcium phosphate/urethane methacrylate resin composites. I. Physicochemical characterization

    PubMed Central

    Regnault, W.F.; Icenogle, T.B.; Antonucci, J.M.; Skrtic, D.

    2008-01-01

    Urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), an oligomeric poly(ethylene glycol) extended UDMA (PEG-U) and a blend of UDMA/PEG-U were chosen as model systems for introducing both hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments and a range of compliances in their derived polymers. Experimental composites based on these three resins with amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) as the filler phase were polymerized and evaluated for mechanical strength and ion release profiles in different aqueous media. Strength of all composites decreased upon immersion in saline (pH = 7.4). Both polymer matrix composition and the pH of the liquid environment strongly affected the ion release kinetics. In saline, the UDMA/PEG-U composite showed a sustained release for at least 350 h. The initially high ion release of the PEG-U composites decreased after 72 h, seemingly due to the mineral re-deposition at the composite surface. Internal conversion from ACP to poorly crystallized apatite could be observed by X-ray diffraction. In various lactic acid (LA) environments (initial pH = 5.1) ion release kinetics was much more complex. In LA medium without thymol and/or carboxymethylcellulose, as a result of unfavorable changes in the internal calcium/phosphate ion stoichiometry, the ion release rate greatly increased but without observable conversion of ACP to apatite. PMID:17619969

  8. Magnesium coated phosphate glass fibers for unidirectional reinforcement of polycaprolactone composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoling; Grant, David M; Palmer, Graham; Parsons, Andrew J; Rudd, Chris D; Ahmed, Ifty

    2015-10-01

    Bioresorbable composites have shown much potential for bone repair applications, as they have the ability to degrade completely over time and their degradation and mechanical properties can be tailored to suit the end application. In this study, phosphate glass fiber (from the system 45% P2 O5-16% CaO-24% MgO-11% Na2 O-4% Fe2 O3 (given in mol%)) were used to reinforce polycaprolactone (PCL) with approximately 20% fiber volume fraction. The glass fiber surfaces were coated with magnesium (Mg) through magnetron sputtering to improve the fiber-matrix interfacial properties. The Mg coating provided a rough fiber surface (roughness (Ra) of about 44nm). Both noncoated and Mg-coated fiber-reinforced composites were assessed. The water uptake and mass loss properties for the composites were assessed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C for up to 28 days, and ion release profiles were also investigated in both water and PBS media. Inhibition of media influx was observed for the Mg-coated composites. The composite mechanical properties were characterized on the basis of both tensile and flexural tests and their retention in PBS media at 37°C was also investigated. A higher retention of the mechanical properties was observed for the Mg-coated composites over the 28 days degradation period.

  9. Data on granulometric composition of calcium phosphate obtained by dispersion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Chikanova, E. S.; Malyshev, A. V.; Mylnikova, T. S.

    2015-04-01

    The kinetics of calcium phosphate crystallization from model solutions of saliva and liquid phase of dental plaque has been studied by the dispersion method. It was found that the composition of the saliva model system is favorable for the growth of larger crystals. The size of the particles in crystallization varies nonlinearly. As supersaturation grows, the amount of formed particles increases, however, the average rate of crystallite growth decreases.

  10. Fiberglass goes green: Developing phosphate glass for use in biodegradable composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, Christina Lee

    Composite materials, such as the glass fiber reinforced polyester thermosets known as "fiberglass," are used in many applications. However, recycling processes for these materials are inefficient and not widely available. Specially engineered degradable polymers offer an opportunity to redesign these composites. Additionally, the composite could be tailored to be multi-use, such that upon degradation, the resulting products could be used as part of a zeoponic substrate (artificial soil) for growing plants. Such a material would be beneficial for long-duration space missions, terraforming, or in other agricultural applications. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on developing phosphate glass for use as the fiber reinforcement for such a composite. Due to the under-utilization of phosphate systems, there is a lack of thermodynamic data on these systems. The modified associate species method of phase diagram calculation was used in an attempt to gain more information about the desired system, as it is a good predictor of the phase relations in oxide melts, slags, and glasses and requires less data than other methods. Further research into the thermodynamic properties of phosphates is still needed to develop accurate phase diagrams and melting temperatures for this system. Seventeen glass formulations were developed and melted. Six of these formulations were chosen for dissolution testing. Of these six, Glass 17 was chosen for intensive testing and characterization. This glass was tested in water, hydrochloric acid solutions, and citric acid solutions. The weight loss was measured and ICP-OES was performed on the leachate solution. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction were performed on the tested specimens. Shrinking-core models were fit to the dissolution data. Fibers were drawn from the glass and characterized using SEM. The data shows that this glass is not dissolving congruently, as is expected of phosphate glasses. Instead

  11. Direct evidence that an extended hydrogen-bonding network influences activation of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate in aspartate aminotransferase

    DOE PAGES

    Dajnowicz, Steven; Parks, Jerry M.; Hu, Xiche; ...

    2017-02-23

    We used pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) is a fundamental, multifunctional enzyme cofactor to catalyze a wide variety of chemical reactions involved in amino acid metabolism. PLP-dependent enzymes optimize specific chemical reactions by modulating the electronic states of PLP through distinct active site environments. In aspartate aminotransferase (AAT), an extended hydrogen bond network is coupled to the pyridinyl nitrogen of the PLP, influencing the electrophilicity of the cofactor. This network, which involves residues Asp-222, His-143, Thr-139, His-189, and structural waters, is located at the edge of PLP opposite the reactive Schiff base. We demonstrate that this hydrogen bond network directly influences themore » protonation state of the pyridine nitrogen of PLP, which affects the rates of catalysis. We analyzed perturbations caused by single- and double-mutant variants using steady-state kinetics, high resolution X-ray crystallography, and quantum chemical calculations. Protonation of the pyridinyl nitrogen to form a pyridinium cation induces electronic delocalization in the PLP, which correlates with the enhancement in catalytic rate in AAT. Therefore, PLP activation is controlled by the proximity of the pyridinyl nitrogen to the hydrogen bond microenvironment. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that Asp-222, which is directly coupled to the pyridinyl nitrogen, increases the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen and stabilizes the pyridinium cation. His-143 and His-189 also increase the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen but, more significantly, influence the position of the proton that resides between Asp-222 and the pyridinyl nitrogen. Our findings indicate that the second shell residues directly enhance the rate of catalysis in AAT.« less

  12. Osteogenic activity of cyclodextrin-encapsulated doxycycline in a calcium phosphate PCL and PLGA composite.

    PubMed

    Trajano, V C C; Costa, K J R; Lanza, C R M; Sinisterra, R D; Cortés, M E

    2016-07-01

    Composites of biodegradable polymers and calcium phosphate are bioactive and flexible, and have been proposed for use in tissue engineering and bone regeneration. When associated with the broad-spectrum antibiotic doxycycline (DOX), they could favor antimicrobial action and enhance the action of osteogenic composites. Composites of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and a bioceramic of biphasic calcium phosphate Osteosynt® (BCP) were loaded with DOX encapsulated in β-cyclodextrin (βCD) and were evaluated for effects on osteoblastic cell cultures. The DOX/βCD composite was prepared with a double mixing method. Osteoblast viability was assessed with methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays after 1day, 7day, and 14days of composite exposure; alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity and collagen production were evaluated after 7days and 14days, and mineral nodule formation after 14days. Composite structures were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Osteoblasts exposed to the composite containing 25μg/mL DOX/βCD had increased cell proliferation (p<0.05) compared to control osteoblast cultures at all experimental time points, reaching a maximum in the second week. AP activity and collagen secretion levels were also elevated in osteoblasts exposed to the DOX/βCD composite (p<0.05 vs. controls) and reached a maximum after 14days. These results were corroborated by Von Kossa test results, which showed strong formation of mineralization nodules during the same time period. SEM of the composite material revealed a surface topography with pore sizes suitable for growing osteoblasts. Together, these results suggest that osteoblasts are viable, proliferative, and osteogenic in the presence of a DOX/βCD-containing BCP ceramic composite.

  13. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76 North...

  14. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76 North...

  15. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76 North...

  16. 40 CFR Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of... - Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Default Chemical Composition of Phosphate Rock by Origin Z Table Z-1 to Subpart Z of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Phosphate Rock by Origin Origin Total carbon(percent by weight) Central Florida 1.6 North Florida 1.76 North...

  17. Effect of boron and phosphate compounds on physical, mechanical, and fire properties of wood-polypropylene composites

    Treesearch

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Turgay Akbulut; Turker Dundar; Robert H. White; Fatih Mengeloglu; Umit Buyuksari; Zeki Candan; Erkan Avci

    2012-01-01

    Physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the injection-molded wood flour/polypropylene composites incorporated with different contents of boron compounds; borax/boric acid and zinc borate, and phosphate compounds; mono and diammonium phosphates were investigated. The effect of the coupling agent content, maleic anhydride-grafted polypropylene, on the properties of...

  18. Effect of thermocycling and surface treatment on repair bond strength of composite

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Saburian, Pardis; Chiniforush, Nasim; Karazifard, Mohammad-Javd

    2017-01-01

    Background Repair of composite restorations is a conservative method that can increase the longevity and durability of restorations while preserving the tooth structure. Achieving a suitable bond between the old and new composite is difficult. To overcome this problem, some methods have been recommended to increase the repair bond strength of composite.This study aimed to assess the effect of aging by thermocycling (5,000 and 10,000 cycles) and mechanical surface treatments (Er,Cr:YSGG laser and bur) on repair shear bond strength of composite resin. Material and Methods Totally, 120 composite blocks measuring 6x4x4 mm were fabricated of Filtek Z250 composite and were randomly divided into three groups (n=40) based on initial aging protocol: (a) no aging: storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, (b) 5,000 thermal cycles, (c) 10,000 thermal cycles. Each group was then randomly divided into two subgroups (n=20) based on mechanical surface treatment (laser and bur). The laser and bur-prepared surfaces were silanized and Adper Single Bond 2 was then applied. The repair composite was bonded to surfaces. Half of the samples in each subgroup (n=10) were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles to assess durability of bond. The remaining half were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and all samples were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data (in megapascals) were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P=0.05). Mode of failure was determined under a stereomicroscope. Results Bur preparation significantly improved the bond strength compared to laser (P<0.001). Aging by 10,000 thermal cycles significantly decreased the repair bond strength of composite (P<0.001). No significant difference was noted in this regard between distilled water and 5,000 thermal cycles groups (P=0.699). Primary bond strength and bond strength after 5,000 thermal cycles in the same subgroups were not

  19. Porous composite scaffolds based on gelatin and partially hydrolyzed alpha-tricalcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Panzavolta, S; Fini, M; Nicoletti, A; Bracci, B; Rubini, K; Giardino, R; Bigi, A

    2009-02-01

    Porous composite scaffolds of varying compositions were prepared by freeze-drying gelatin foams containing increasing amounts of alpha-tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP), up to about 40 wt.%. Due to the presence of gelatin, a partial hydrolysis of alpha-TCP into octacalcium phosphate (OCP) occurs during foaming. As a consequence, the scaffolds contain both alpha-TCP and OCP, in relative amounts of about 74% and 26%, respectively, independent of the initial composition. In physiological conditions the inorganic component of the scaffolds undergoes a further hydrolysis as shown by the finding that after immersion in phosphate-buffered saline at 37 degrees C for 1 week the scaffolds contain poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite together with OCP. The scaffolds display a porous interconnected microstructure. The mean dimensions of the pores decrease from about 350 to about 170 microm as the inorganic phase content increases. Simultaneously, the mean values of the compression strength and Young's modulus increase. Stabilization of the scaffolds was obtained by using a natural, non-toxic, crosslinking agent, genipin, which significantly improves their mechanical properties.

  20. Hydrogen bonds of sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijun; Guo, Jing; Yu, Yue; An, Qingda; Wang, Liyan; Li, Shenglin; Huang, Xuelin; Mu, Siyang; Qi, Shanwei

    2016-05-20

    Sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material (SA/AKP) was successfully obtained by blending method. The hydrogen bonds of SA/AKP composite material were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Nuclear magnetic resonance hydrogen spectrum (HNMR). Experiment manifested the existence of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds in SA/AKP system; strength of intermolecular hydrogen bond enhanced with the increase of AKP in the composite material and the interaction strength of hydrogen bonding followed the order: OH…Ether O>OH…π>OH…N. The percentage of intermolecular hydrogen bond decreased with increase of pH. At the same time, the effect of hydrogen bonds on properties of the composite material was discussed. The increase of intermolecular hydrogen bonding led to the decrease of crystallinity, increase of apparent viscosity and surface tension, as well as obvious decrease of heat resistance of SA/AKP composite material. SA/AKP fiber SEM images and energy spectrum showed that crystallized salt was separated from the fiber, which possibly led to the fibrillation of the composite fibers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of a New Surface Treatment Solution on the Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    along with composite - resin restorative materials (Meharry et al., 2013). Since then, seven generations of adhesives has been introduced. Adhesive...annual failure rate of non-carious cervical lesions bonded with different dental adhesives and restored with composite resin . The mild two-step self... Composite Resin Bisphenol A polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate Diurethane dimethacrylate Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether dimethacrylate

  2. Chaotic insonification for health monitoring of an adhesively bonded composite stiffened panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, T. R.; Todd, M. D.

    2010-07-01

    Time series prediction algorithms combined with ultrasonic chaotic excitations have shown the ability to locate and identify loss of preload in a bolted aluminum joint in previous research [1,2]. This study examines the ability of this method to classify various bond state damage conditions of a composite bonded joint, including various disbond sizes and poorly cured bonds. The stiffened panel test structure is intended to be a simplification of a wing skin-to-spar bonded joint. An active excitation signal is imparted to the structure through a macro-fiber composite (MFC) patch on one side of the bonded joint and sensed using an equivalent MFC patch on the opposite side of the joint. There is an MFC actuator/sensor pair for each bond condition to be identified. A novel statistical classification feature is developed from information theory concepts of cross-prediction and interdependence.

  3. An in vitro investigation of bond strength of veneering composite resin to glass fibre veil reinforced composite.

    PubMed

    Keski-Nikkola, M S; Lassila, L V J; Vallittu, P K

    2004-06-01

    Experimental light-curing polymer-monomer-gel-impregnated E-glass-fibre veil reinforced composite (i.e. a composite with randomly oriented fibres) was used as an adhesional substrate for veneering composite resin (VCR). Continuous unidirectional glass fibre composite was used as a control substrate. Both the fibre-reinforced composite substrate surfaces were ground or, optionally, the substrate surface was left untreated (containing oxygen-inhibited resin layer) before attaching to the VCR. No adhesive resin was used between the composites. Shear bond strength of VCR to the substrate was determined for dry and thermocycled specimens. The results of this study suggested that the VCR can better be bonded to the randomly oriented veil fibre-reinforced composite substrate than to the continuous unidirectional fibre-reinforced composite substrate.

  4. Structure-Composition-Property Relationships in Polymeric Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-Based Dental Composites†

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Justin N.R.; Schumacher, Gary E.; Antonucci, Joseph M.; Skrtic, Drago

    2009-01-01

    Our studies of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)-based materials over the last decade have yielded bioactive polymeric composites capable of protecting teeth from demineralization or even regenerating lost tooth mineral. The anti-cariogenic/re-mineralizing potential of these ACP composites originates from their propensity, when exposed to the oral environment, to release in a sustained manner sufficient levels of mineral-forming calcium and phosphate ions to promote formation of stable apatitic tooth mineral. However, the less than optimal ACP filler/resin matrix cohesion, excessive polymerization shrinkage and water sorption of these experimental materials can adversely affect their physicochemical and mechanical properties, and, ultimately, limit their lifespan. This study demonstrates the effects of chemical structure and composition of the methacrylate monomers used to form the matrix phase of composites on degree of vinyl conversion (DVC) and water sorption of both copolymers and composites and the release of mineral ions from the composites. Modification of ACP surface via introducing cations and/or polymers ab initio during filler synthesis failed to yield mechanically improved composites. However, moderate improvement in composite’s mechanical stability without compromising its remineralization potential was achieved by silanization and/or milling of ACP filler. Using ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate or urethane dimethacrylate as base monomers and adding moderate amounts of hydrophilic 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate or its isomer ethyl-α-hydroxymethacrylate appears to be a promising route to maximize the remineralizing ability of the filler while maintaining high DVC. Exploration of the structure/composition/property relationships of ACP fillers and polymer matrices is complex but essential for achieving a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that govern dissolution/re-precipitation of bioactive ACP fillers, and, ultimately, the

  5. Poly (amido amine) and nano-calcium phosphate bonding agent to remineralize tooth dentin in cyclic artificial saliva/lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kunneng; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Zhou, Xuedong; Li, Jiyao; Xu, Hockin H K

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a novel method to remineralize dentin lesions, and investigate the remineralization effects of poly (amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer plus a bonding agent with nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) in a cyclic artificial saliva/lactic acid environment for the first time. Dentin lesions were produced via phosphoric acid. Four groups were tested: (1) dentin control, (2) dentin with PAMAM, (3) dentin with NACP bonding agent, and (4) dentin with PAMAM plus NACP bonding agent. Specimens were treated with cyclic artificial saliva/lactic acid. The remineralized dentin was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), hardness and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). NACP bonding agent yielded a dentin shear bond strength similar to commercial controls (Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply; Scotchbond Multi-purpose, 3M) (p>0.1). Increasing NACP in bonding agent from 0 to 40% did not affect bond strength. NACP bonding agent neutralized the acid and released Ca ions with concentrations of 4 to 20mmol/L, and P ions of 2 to 9mmol/L. PAMAM or NACP bonding agent alone achieved slight remineralization. The PAMAM+NACP group achieved the greatest dentin remineralization p<0.05). At 20days, PAMAM+NACP increased the hardness of pre-demineralized dentin to reach the normal dentin hardness (p>0.1). In conclusion, superior remineralization of PAMAM+NACP bonding agent was demonstrated for the first time. PAMAM+NACP bonding agent induced dentin remineralization under acid challenge, when conventional remineralization methods such as PAMAM alone did not work well. The novel PAMAM+NACP bonding agent method is promising to improve the longevity of resin-dentin bonds, inhibit caries, and protect teeth.

  6. Promotion of osteogenic differentiation of stem cells and increase of bone-bonding ability in vivo using urease-treated titanium coated with calcium phosphate and gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhong-Ming; Qi, Yi-Ying; Du, Shao-Hua; Feng, Gang; Unuma, Hidero; Yan, Wei-Qi

    2013-10-01

    Because of its excellent biocompatibility and low allergenicity, titanium has been widely used for bone replacement and tissue engineering. To produce a desirable composite with enhanced bone response and mechanical strength, in this study bioactive calcium phosphate (CaP) and gelatin composites were coated onto titanium (Ti) via a novel urease technique. The cellular responses to the CaP/gelatin/Ti (CaP/gel/Ti) and bone bonding ability were evaluated with proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on CaP/gel/Ti and CaP/Ti in vitro. The results showed that the optical density values, alkaline phosphatase expression and genes expression of MSCs on CaP/gel/Ti were similar to those on CaP/Ti, yet significantly higher than those on pure Ti (p < 0.05). CaP/gel/Ti and CaP/Ti rods (2 mm in diameter, 10 mm in length) were also implanted into femoral shaft of rabbits and pure Ti rods served as control (n = 10). Histological examination, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements were performed at 4 and 8 weeks after the operation. The histological and SEM observations demonstrated clearly that more new bone formed on the surface of CaP/gel/Ti than in the other two groups at each time point. The CaP/gel/Ti bonded to the surrounding bone directly with no intervening soft tissue layer. An interfacial layer, containing Ti, Ca and P, was found to form at the interface between bone and the implant on all three groups by EDS analysis. However, the content of Ca, P in the surface of CaP/gel/Ti implants was more than in the other two groups at each time point. The CaP/gel/Ti modified by the urease method was not only beneficial for MSCs proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, but also favorable for bone bonding ability on Ti implants in vivo, suggesting that Ti functionalized with CaP and gelatin might have a great potential in clinical joint replacement or dental implants.

  7. Contamination and Surface Preparation Effects on Composite Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutscha, Eileen O.; Vahey, Paul G.; Belcher, Marcus A.; VanVoast, Peter J.; Grace, William B.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Connell, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Results presented here demonstrate the effect of several prebond surface contaminants (hydrocarbon, machining fluid, latex, silicone, peel ply residue, release film) on bond quality, as measured by fracture toughness and failure modes of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy substrates bonded in secondary and co-bond configurations with paste and film adhesives. Additionally, the capability of various prebond surface property measurement tools to detect contaminants and potentially predict subsequent bond performance of three different adhesives is also shown. Surface measurement methods included water contact angle, Dyne solution wettability, optically stimulated electron emission spectroscopy, surface free energy, inverse gas chromatography, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with chemometrics analysis. Information will also be provided on the effectiveness of mechanical and energetic surface treatments to recover a bondable surface after contamination. The benefits and drawbacks of the various surface analysis tools to detect contaminants and evaluate prebond surfaces after surface treatment were assessed as well as their ability to correlate to bond performance. Surface analysis tools were also evaluated for their potential use as in-line quality control of adhesive bonding parameters in the manufacturing environment.

  8. Effect of prebonding procedures on shear bond strength of resin composite to pressable ceramic.

    PubMed

    Estafan, D; Dussetschleger, F; Estafan, A; Jia, W

    2000-01-01

    Low bond strength between tooth structure and restorative ceramic material is a major cause of ceramic fractures or failures. Prebonding measures performed on pressable ceramic material were evaluated and the different shear bond strengths obtained by each method were tabulated. The three individual groups were subjected to 9% hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel for 0, 1, and 5 minutes. The different acid-etched time groups were chemically treated with silane coupler alone, silane coupling agent with bonding agent, and bonding agent alone. The silane coupling agent produced the highest bond strength between the composite structure and the pressable ceramic restorative material. High bond values were achieved by etching the porcelain for one minute. The use of the silane coupling agent with a one minute 9% HF acid etch yielded the greatest bond strength.

  9. Factors associated with shear bond strength of composite resin to human enamel.

    PubMed

    Gray, G B; MacMillan, S; Payne, A P; McGadey, J

    1996-12-01

    The preparation of enamel surfaces before etching by removing 0.5 mm of surface tooth structure is common-place in modern restorative dentistry. This study was designed to measure and compare the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to prepared and unprepared enamel using various proprietary bonding systems. The analysed results failed to show significant differences between the shear bond strengths of the prepared and unprepared enamel specimens. Conditioning enamel surfaces for 60 seconds using 2.5% nitric acid where the solution was allowed to desiccate, resulted in significantly lower bond strengths compared to the other regimes. A correlation of the etchant pH with the mean shear bond strength of the adhesive systems to enamel was observed. The surface topography of the etched enamel surfaces correlated moderately well with the bond strengths obtained.

  10. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by pulsed laser and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, R.; Boustie, M.; Touchard, F.; Arrigoni, M.; Berthe, L.

    2014-05-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims to the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bonds. The resulting damage has been quantified using different methods such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test because of often fixed settings. That is why mechanical impacts on bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the generated tensile stresses by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The made observations prove that the technique optimization is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock waves have been identified.

  11. Development of a shock wave adhesion test for composite bonds by laser pulsed and mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecault, Romain; Boustie, Michel; Touchard, Fabienne; Arrigoni, Michel; Berthe, Laurent; CNRS Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims the development of a technique using shock wave, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bond without any mechanical contact. The resulting damage has been quantified using different method such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test since it has often fixed parameters. That is why mechanical impacts bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the tensile stresses generated by the shock wave propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The observations made prove that the optimization of the technique is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock wave have been identified.

  12. Polymeric-Calcium Phosphate Cement Composites-Material Properties: In Vitro and In Vivo Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Khashaba, Rania M.; Moussa, Mervet M.; Mettenburg, Donald J.; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Chutkan, Norman B.; Borke, James L.

    2010-01-01

    New polymeric calcium phosphate cement composites (CPCs) were developed. Cement powder consisting of 60 wt% tetracalcium phosphate, 30 wt% dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, and 10 wt% tricalcium phosphate was combined with either 35% w/w poly methyl vinyl ether maleic acid or polyacrylic acid to obtain CPC-1 and CPC-2. The setting time and compressive and diametral tensile strength of the CPCs were evaluated and compared with that of a commercial hydroxyapatite cement. In vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility of the two CPCs and hydroxyapatite cement were assessed. The setting time of the cements was 5–15 min. CPC-1 and CPC-2 showed significantly higher compressive and diametral strength values compared to hydroxyapatite cement. CPC-1 and CPC-2 were equivalent to Teflon controls after 1 week. CPC-1, CPC-2, and hydroxyapatite cement elicited a moderate to intense inflammatory reaction at 7 days which decreased over time. CPC-1 and CPC-2 show promise for orthopedic applications. PMID:20811498

  13. Optimizing and evaluating the biocompatibility of fiber composites with calcium phosphate additives.

    PubMed

    Suchý, Tomáš; Balík, Karel; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Sochor, Miroslav; Lapčíková, Monika; Sedláček, Radek

    2011-10-01

    Composite materials based on a polyamide fabric (aramid) and a polydymethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix were designed for application in bone surgery. In order to increase the bioactivity, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 vol.% of nano/micro hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were added. We studied the effect of the additives on the biocompatibility of the composite. It appears that nano additives have a more favorable effect on mechanical properties than microparticles. 15 vol.% of nano hydroxyapatite additive is an optimum amount for final application of the composites as substitutes for bone tissue: in this case both the mechanical properties and the biological properties are optimized without distinct changes in the inner structure of the composite.

  14. Influence of a cellulosic ether carrier on the structure of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic particles in an injectable composite material.

    PubMed

    Dupraz, A; Nguyen, T P; Richard, M; Daculsi, G; Passuti, N

    1999-04-01

    An injectable composite material based on biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) and a nonionic cellulose ether has been elaborated for use in percutaneous surgery for spine fusion. This paper reports the characterization results of this material by spectroscopic techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fitted with an energy dispersive X-Ray analysis system and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). From FTIR and XPS results, it was observed that the adhesion between the polymer and the ceramic might be insured by oxygen bridging developed through an ionic bonding between calcium ions and (C-O) groups of the polymer. Moreover, XPS showed attraction of Ca2+ ions in the polymer matrix, while the ceramic surface was modified in a HPO4(2-) -rich layer. These results suggest a possible dissolution/precipitation process at the interface ceramic/polymer. HR-TEM observations supported this hypothesis, showing a light contrasted fringe at the surface of the ceramic grains in the composite paste. As well, changes in the XRD spectra could indicate a small decrease in the crystal size of the BCP powder through the contact to polymer solution. In addition, SEM observation showed a decrease of the initial BCP granulometry. Aggregates of 80-200 microm seemed to be mostly dissociated in micrograins. The ceramic grains were coated with and bonded between each other by the polymer matrix, which acted as spacer in between the ceramic grains, creating a macroporous-like material structure.

  15. Results from FAA program to validate bonded composite doublers for commercial aviation use

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.

    1997-09-01

    The number of commercial airframes exceeding twenty years of service continues to grow. In addition, Service Life Extension Programs are attempting to extend the {open_quotes}economic{close_quotes} service life of commercial airframes to thirty years. The use of bonded composites may offer the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to extend the lives of their aircraft. The Federal Aviation Administration Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to validate the use of bonded composite doublers on commercial aircraft.

  16. Cytocompatibility, degradation, mechanical property retention and ion release profiles for phosphate glass fibre reinforced composite rods.

    PubMed

    Felfel, R M; Ahmed, I; Parsons, A J; Palmer, G; Sottile, V; Rudd, C D

    2013-05-01

    Fibre reinforced composites have recently received much attention as potential bone fracture fixation applications. Bioresorbable composites based on poly lactic acid (PLA) and phosphate based glass fibre were investigated according to ion release, degradation, biocompatibility and mechanical retention profiles. The phosphate based glass fibres used in this study had the composition of 40P2O5-24MgO-16CaO-16Na2O-4Fe2O3 in mol% (P40). The degradation and ion release profiles for the composites showed similar trends with the amount of sodium and orthophosphate ions released being greater than the other cations and anions investigated. This was attributed to low Dietzal's field strength for the Na(+) in comparison with Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) and breakdown of longer chain polyphosphates into orthophosphate ions. P40 composites exhibited good biocompatibility to human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which was suggested to be due to the low degradation rate of P40 fibres. After 63 days immersion in PBS at 37 °C, the P40 composite rods lost ~1.1% of mass. The wet flexural, shear and compressive strengths for P40 UD rods were ~70%, ~80% and ~50% of their initial dry values after 3 days of degradation, whereas the flexural modulus, shear and compressive strengths were ~70%, ~80%, and ~65% respectively. Subsequently, the mechanical properties remained stable for the duration of the study at 63 days. The initial decrease in mechanical properties was attributed to a combination of the plasticisation effect of water and degradation of the fibre-matrix interface, with the subsequent linear behaviour being attributed to the chemical durability of P40 fibres. P40 composite rods showed low degradation and ion release rates, good biocompatibility and maintained mechanical properties similar to cortical bone for the duration of the study. Therefore, P40 composite rods have huge potential as resorbable intramedullary nails or rods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Immediate repair bond strengths of microhybrid, nanohybrid and nanofilled composites after different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Rinastiti, Margareta; Ozcan, Mutlu; Siswomihardjo, Widowati; Busscher, Henk J

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate immediate repair bond strengths and failure types of resin composites with and without surface conditioning and characterize the interacting composite surfaces by their surface composition and roughness. Microhybrid, nanohybrid and nanofilled resin composites were photo-polymerized and assigned to four groups: (1) no conditioning (Control), (2) no conditioning, polymerized against a Mylar strip (Control, with strip), (3) intermediate adhesive resin (IAR) application, and (4) chair-side silica coating, silanization and intermediate resin application (SC). Resin composites, similar as their substrates, were adhered onto the substrates. Shear force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine and failure types were evaluated under light microscopy. Surface characterization was done by contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Significant effects of the resin composite type and surface conditioning were observed. Conditioning the composites with their IARs does not result in significant improvements in bond strength compared to the control with strip (bond strengths between 14.5 and 20.0 MPa). SC increased the bond strength in all composites except TE by an average 8.9 MPa, while in all composites the surface roughness increased from 7 to 384 microm. Failure types in this group were exclusively cohesive. Physico-chemical modelling of the composite surfaces showed that the surfaces were dominated by the resin matrix, with a major increase in silica-coverage after SC for all composites. Intermediate adhesive resin conditioning did not improve the composite-to-composite immediate repair strength. Silica coating and silanization followed by its corresponding IAR, strongly increased repair bond strengths and provided exclusively cohesive failures in the substrate in all composites.

  18. Involvement of disulphide bonds in the renal sodium/phosphate co-transporter NaPi-2.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Y; Boyer, C J; Vincent, E; Dugré, A; Vachon, V; Potier, M; Béliveau, R

    1997-01-01

    The rat renal brush border membrane sodium/phosphate co-transporter NaPi-2 was analysed in Western blots with polyclonal antibodies raised against its N-terminal and C-terminal segments. Under reducing conditions, proteins of 45-49 and 70-90 kDa (p45 and p70) were detected with N-terminal antibodies, and proteins of 40 and 70-90 kDa (p40 and p70) were detected with C-terminal antibodies. p40 and p45 apparently result from a post-translational cleavage of NaPi-2 but remain linked through one or more disulphide bonds. Glycosidase digestion showed that both polypeptides are glycosylated; the cleavage site could thus be located between Asn-298 and Asn-328, which have been shown to constitute the only two N-glycosylated residues in NaPi-2. In the absence of reducing agents, both N-terminal and C-terminal antibodies detected p70 and a protein of 180 kDa (p180), suggesting the presence of p70 dimers. Much higher concentrations of beta-mercaptoethanol were required to produce a given effect in intact membrane vesicles than in solubilized proteins, indicating that the affected disulphide bonds are not exposed at the surface of the co-transporter. Phosphate transport activity decreased with increasing concentrations of reducing agents [beta-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol and tris-(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine] and was linearly correlated with the amount of p180 detected. The target sizes estimated from the radiation-induced loss of intensity of p40, p70 and p180 were all approx. 190 kDa, suggesting that NaPi-2 exists as an oligomeric protein in which the subunits are sufficiently close to one another to allow substantial energy transfer between the monomers. When protein samples were pretreated with beta-mercaptoethanol [2.5% and 5% (v/v) to optimize the detection of p40 and p70] before irradiation, target sizes estimated from the radiation-induced loss of intensity of p40 and p70 were 74 and 92 kDa respectively, showing the presence of disulphide bridges in the molecular

  19. Degradation and drug release of phosphate glass/polycaprolactone biological composites for hard-tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jun, In-Kook; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2005-10-01

    Phosphate-based glass (P-glass) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) composites were fabricated in a sheet form by solvent extraction and thermal pressing methods, and the antibiotic drug Vancomycin was loaded within the composites for use as a hard-tissue regenerative. The degradation and drug-release rate of the composites in vitro were tailored by modifying the glass composition: 0.45 P(2)O(5)-x CaO-(0.55-x)Na(2)O, where x=0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5. Compared to pure PCL, all the P-glass/PCL composites degraded to a higher degree, and the composite with lower-CaO glass showed a higher material loss. This was attributed mainly to the dissolution of the glass component. The glass dissolution also increased the degradation of PCL component in the composites. The Vancomycin release from the composites was strongly dependent on the glass composition. Drug release in pure PCL was initially abrupt and flattened out over a prolonged period. However, glass/PCL composites (particularly in the glass containing higher-CaO) exhibited a reduced initial burst and a higher release rate later. Preliminary cell tests on the extracts from the glass/PCL composites showed favorable cell proliferation, but the level was dependent on the ionic concentration of the extracts. The cell proliferation on the diluted extracts from the composite with higher-CaO glass was significantly higher than that on the blank culture dish. These observations confirmed that the P-glass/PCL composites are potentially applicable for use as hard-tissue regeneration and wound-healing materials because of their controlled degradation and drug-release profile as well as enhanced cell viability.

  20. Properties of concretes and wood composites using a phosphate-based binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Luong Thanh

    Magnesium potassium phosphate ceramics are from the family of phosphate-based cements which can be used as alternatives to Portland cements. In this study, concretes and wood composites were produced using magnesium potassium phosphate ceramic binders and supplementary materials including fly ash, sand, silica fume and sawdust. Bentonite, Delvo Stabilizer and baking soda were used as additives to increase the workability and the setting time of the fresh mixutres and decrease the density of the hardened products. The materials were then reinforced with chopped glass-fibers or textile glass-fabrics to increase their hardened properties. At 50% fly ash by total mass of the binder, the concretes had compressive strength and density of 33 MPa and 2170 kg/m3, respectively, after 90 days of simple curing. At 20% fly ash by total mass of the binder, the wood composites had compressive strength and density of 13 MPa and 1320 kg/m3, respectively, after 90 days. The flexural strengths were about 10% to 47% of the corresponding cylinder compressive strengths for these mixes. Increases in both compressive and flexural strengths for these mixes were observed with the addition of chopped glass-fibers or textile glass-fabrics.

  1. Compositional changes of a dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cement after implantation in sheep.

    PubMed

    Bohner, M; Theiss, F; Apelt, D; Hirsiger, W; Houriet, R; Rizzoli, G; Gnos, E; Frei, C; Auer, J A; von Rechenberg, B

    2003-09-01

    A hydraulic calcium phosphate cement having dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) as end-product of the setting reaction was implanted in a cylindrical defect in the diaphysis of sheep for up to 6 months. The composition of the cement was investigated as a function of time. After setting, the cement composition consisted essentially of a mixture of DCPD and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP). In the first few weeks of implantation, the edges of the cement samples became depleted in DCPD, suggesting a selective dissolution of DCPD, possibly due to low pH conditions. The cement resorption at this stage was high. After 8 weeks, the resorption rate slowed down. Simultaneously, a change of the color and density of the cement center was observed. These changes were due to the conversion of DCPD into a poorly crystalline apatite. Precipitation started after 6-8 weeks and progressed rapidly. At 9 weeks, the colored central zone reached its maximal size. The fraction of beta-TCP in the cement was constant at all time. Therefore, this study demonstrates that the resorption rate of DCPD cement is more pronounced as long as DCPD is not transformed in vivo.

  2. Effect of silorane-based adhesive system on bond strength between composite and dentin substrate

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Júnior, Lindomar Corrêa; de Souza Almeida, Mauro; do Valle, Accácio Lins; Honório, Heitor Marques; Vidotti, Hugo Alberto; De Souza, Grace Mendonca

    2015-01-01

    Context: The complexities of the oral environment, the dentin substrate, and the different bond and composite resin systems represent a challenge to the maintenance of reasonable bond between the composite resin and the tooth structure. Aims: To evaluate the effect of the adhesive system on bond strength between silorane-based composite resin and dentin. Materials and Methods: Fourteen human molars extracted were selected and vertically cut into 3 dentin fragments, randomly divided among the experimental groups and restored with Z250 and P90 composite resin using different adhesive protocols (Adper Single Bond 2, Silorano primer, Adper SE Plus, and Scotchbond Multiuse). Two composite resin cylinders were built up on each dentin surface (n = 10) and subjected to a micro-shear bond strength test. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P = 0.05). Results: According to the results, Kruskal–Wallis test evidenced at least one statistical significant difference (P = 0.001). The Tukey test showed statistically significant differences among the group (P < 0.05). Group PSM8 (P90 + SM) showed statically significant higher results when compared with groups PSP4 (P90 + SP), PSB2 (P90 + SB), and ZSE5 (Z250 + SE). Conclusion: The results evidenced that the monomer of the adhesive system has an effect on bond strength between the composite resin and dentin. PMID:26752846

  3. Evaluation of the bond strength between aged composite cores and luting agent

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of different surface treatment methods on the bond strength between aged composite-resin core and luting agent. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy-five resin composites and also seventy-five zirconia ceramic discs were prepared. 60 composite samples were exposed to thermal aging (10,000 cycles, 5 to 55℃) and different surface treatment. All specimens were separated into 5 groups (n=15): 1) Intact specimens 2) Thermal aging-air polishing 3) Thermal aging- Er:YAG laser irradiation 4) Thermal aging- acid etching 5) Thermal-aging. All specimens were bonded to the zirconia discs with resin cement and fixed to universal testing machine and bond strength testing loaded to failure with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The fractured surface was classified as adhesive failure, cohesive failure and adhesive-cohesive failure. The bond strength data was statistically compared by the Kruskal-Wallis method complemented by the Bonferroni correction Mann-Whitney U test. The probability level for statistical significance was set at α=.05. RESULTS Thermal aging and different surface treatment methods have significant effect on the bond strength between composite-resin cores and luting-agent (P<.05). The mean baseline bond strength values ranged between 7.07 ± 2.11 and 26.05 ± 6.53 N. The highest bond strength of 26.05 ± 6.53 N was obtained with Group 3. Group 5 showed the lowest value of bond strength. CONCLUSION Appropriate surface treatment method should be applied to aged composite resin cores or aged-composites restorations should be replaced for the optimal bond strength and the clinical success. PMID:25932308

  4. Microshear bond strength of composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates utilizing unfilled versus filled resins

    PubMed Central

    Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Siamak; Ghasemi, Amir; Kotick, Philip G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Failures such as marginal discoloration and composite chipping are still the problems of tooth-colored restorations on the substrate of enamel and porcelain, which some of these problems are consequently as a result of failures in the bonding layer. Using filled resin has been recently introduced to increase the bond strength of this layer. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins to enamel incubated in periods of 24 h and 9 months and porcelain with unfilled resin and flowable composites (filled resin). Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, two groups of 75 enamel samples with different storage times (24 h and 9 months) and a group of 75 porcelain samples were used. They were divided into 5 experimental groups of 15 samples in each. Composite cylinders in tygon tubes were bonded on the surface of acid-etched enamel and pretreated porcelain. Wave, Wave MV, Wave HV, Grandioflow and Margin Bond were used as bonding agents. The μ-SBS was measured at the speed of 1.0 mm/min. The bond strengths were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey test. P < 0.05 was selected as the level of statistical significance in this study. Results: The results showed that for enamel (24 h), the μ-SBS of the Wave MV and Wave HV groups were significantly lower than the Margin Bond group. Tukey test indicated the absence of a significant difference between the μ-SBS of the Wave group and the Margin Bond group. However, the μ-SBS of the Grandioflow group was significantly higher than the one for the Margin Bond as a bonding agent. In enamel (9 months), there was a significant difference between the Grandioflow and Margin Bond groups. Regarding bonding to the porcelain the one-way ANOVA test did not show a significant difference among the groups. Conclusion: This study revealed that flowable composites (filled resins) can be used instead of unfilled resins in bonding composite

  5. Sintering and the mechanical properties of the tricalcium phosphate-titania composites.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, Ibticem; Ben Ayed, Foued

    2015-09-01

    The sintering of the tricalcium phosphate with different percentages of titania was investigated. The samples were characterized by differential thermal analysis, dilatometry analysis, X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, magic angle scanning nuclear magnetic resonance and scanning electronic microscopy measurements. The samples were examined by using the mechanical properties such as rupture strength, Vickers hardness and elastic modulus. The sintering of the tricalcium phosphate-titania composites indicates the evolution of the microstructure, the densification and the mechanical properties. The performances of the composites increase with both the sintering temperature and the addition of the titania. The highest values of the composites of rupture strength (33 MPa), Vickers hardness (270 Hv), Young׳s modulus (33.1GPa) and shear modulus (15.7 GPa) were obtained after the sintering process with 40 wt% titania at 1200 °C. The increase of these performances is due to the formation of the liquid-phase which helps to fill the pores in the microstructure. Above 40 wt% TiO2, the mechanical properties of the composites are hindered by the exaggerated grain growth formation.

  6. Development of a degradable cement of calcium phosphate and calcium sulfate composite for bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Wei, J; Liu, C S

    2006-12-01

    A new type of composite bone cement was prepared and investigated by adding calcium sulfate (CS) to calcium phosphate cement (CPC). This composite cement can be handled as a paste and easily shaped into any contour, which can set within 5-20 min, the setting time largely depending on the liquid-solid (L/S) ratio; adding CS to CPC had little effect on the setting time of the composite cements. No obvious temperature increase and pH change were observed during setting and immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The compressive strength of the cement decreased with an increase in the content of CS. The degradation rate of the composite cements increased with time when the CS content was more than 20 wt%. Calcium deficient apatite could form on the surface of the composite cement because the release of calcium into SBF from the dissolution of CS and the apatite of the cement induced the new apatite formation; increasing the content of CS in the composite could improve the bioactivity of the composite cements. The results suggested that composite cement has a reasonable setting time, excellent degradability and suitable mechanical strength and bioactivity, which shows promising prospects for development as a clinical cement.

  7. Ultrasonic characterization of the fiber-matrix interfacial bond in aerospace composites.

    PubMed

    Aggelis, D G; Kleitsa, D; Matikas, T E

    2013-01-01

    The properties of advanced composites rely on the quality of the fiber-matrix bonding. Service-induced damage results in deterioration of bonding quality, seriously compromising the load-bearing capacity of the structure. While traditional methods to assess bonding are destructive, herein a nondestructive methodology based on shear wave reflection is numerically investigated. Reflection relies on the bonding quality and results in discernable changes in the received waveform. The key element is the "interphase" model material with varying stiffness. The study is an example of how computational methods enhance the understanding of delicate features concerning the nondestructive evaluation of materials used in advanced structures.

  8. Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to Carbon-Carbon Composites for Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerny, Jennifer; Morscher, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    High temperature adhesives with good thermal conductivity, mechanical performance, and long term durability are crucial for the assembly of heat rejection system components for space exploration missions. In the present study, commercially available adhesives were used to bond high conductivity carbon-carbon composites to titanium sheets. Bonded pieces were also exposed to high (530 to 600 Kelvin for 24 hours) and low (liquid nitrogen 77K for 15 minutes) temperatures to evaluate the integrity of the bonds. Results of the microstructural characterization and tensile shear strengths of bonded specimens will be reported. The effect of titanium surface roughness on the interface microstructure will also be discussed.

  9. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Fiber-Matrix Interfacial Bond in Aerospace Composites

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, D. G.; Kleitsa, D.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    The properties of advanced composites rely on the quality of the fiber-matrix bonding. Service-induced damage results in deterioration of bonding quality, seriously compromising the load-bearing capacity of the structure. While traditional methods to assess bonding are destructive, herein a nondestructive methodology based on shear wave reflection is numerically investigated. Reflection relies on the bonding quality and results in discernable changes in the received waveform. The key element is the “interphase” model material with varying stiffness. The study is an example of how computational methods enhance the understanding of delicate features concerning the nondestructive evaluation of materials used in advanced structures. PMID:23935408

  10. Reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Behrendt, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    A development status evaluation is presented for the reaction-bonded SiC- and Si3N4-matrix types of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite (FRCMC). A variety of reaction-bonding methods are being pursued for FRCMC fabrication: CVI, CVD, directed metal oxidation, and self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. Due to their high specific modulus and strength, toughness, and fabricability, reaction-bonded FRCMC are important candidate materials for such heat-engine components as combustor liners, nozzles, and turbine and stator blading. The improvement of long-term oxidative stability in these composites is a major goal of current research.

  11. Dental glass-reinforced composite for caries inhibition: calcium phosphate ion release and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hockin H K; Moreau, Jennifer L

    2010-02-01

    The two main challenges facing dental composite restorations are secondary caries and bulk fracture. Previous studies developed whisker-reinforced Ca-PO(4) composites that were relatively opaque. The objective of this study was to develop an esthetic glass particle-reinforced, photo-cured calcium phosphate composite. Tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) particles were incorporated into a resin for Ca and PO(4) release, while glass particles provided reinforcement. Ion release and mechanical properties were measured after immersion in solutions with pH of 7, 5.5, and 4. For the composite containing 40% mass fraction of TTCP, incorporating glass fillers increased the strength (p < 0.05). Flexural strength (Mean +/- SD; n = 6) at 30% glass was 99 +/- 18 MPa, higher than 54 +/- 20 MPa at 0% glass (p < 0.05). Elastic modulus was 11 GPa at 30% glass, compared to 2 GPa without glass. At 28 days, the released Ca ion concentration was 4.61 +/- 0.18 mmol/L at pH of 4, much higher than 1.14 +/- 0.07 at pH of 5.5, and 0.27 +/- 0.01 at pH of 7 (p < 0.05). PO(4) release was also dramatically increased at cariogenic, acidic pH. The TTCP-glass composite had strength 2-3 fold that of a resin-modified glass ionomer control. In conclusion, the photo-cured TTCP-glass composite was "smart" and substantially increased the Ca and PO(4) release when the pH was reduced from neutral to a cariogenic pH of 4, when these ions are most needed to inhibit tooth caries. Its mechanical properties were significantly higher than previous Ca, PO(4), and fluoride releasing restoratives. Hence, the photo-cured TTCP-glass composite may have potential to provide the necessary combination of load-bearing and caries-inhibiting capabilities.

  12. In-vitro comparison of the effect of different bonding strategies on the micro-shear bond strength of a silorane-based composite resin to dentin.

    PubMed

    Samimi, Pouran; Alizadeh, Vahid; Fathpour, Kamyar; Mazaheri, Hamid; Mortazavi, Vajihosadat

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluated the micro-shear bond strengths of a new low-shrinkage composite resin to dentin. In this in-vitro study, 70 extracted premolars were assigned to one of seven groups (n = 10): Group 1: OptiBond Solo Plus (Opt; Kerr); Group 2: SE Bond (SE; Kuraray); Group 3: Silorane System Adhesive (SSA; 3M ESPE); Group 4: OptiBond Solo Plus + LS Bond (Opt LS); Group 5: SE Bond + LS Bond (SE LS); Group 6: OptiBond Solo Plus (Opt Po); and Group 7: SE Bond (SE Po). Occlusal dentin was exposed and restored with Filtek LS (3M ESPE) in groups 1 to 5 and Point 4 (Kerr) in groups 6 and 7. After thermocycling (1000 cycles at 5/55΀C), micro-shear bond test was carried out to measure the bond strengths. The results were submitted to analysis of variance and post hoc Tukeytests (P < 0.05). Two-way ANOVA showed no significant differences between the two types of composite resin (P = 0.187), between bonding agents (P = 0.06) and between composite resin and bonding agents (P = 0.894). Because P value of bonding agents was near the significance level, one-way ANOVA was used separately between the two composite groups. This analysis showed significant differences between silorane composite resin groups (P = 0.045) and Tukey test showed a significant difference between Groups 4 and 5 (P = 0.03). The application of total-etch and self-etch methacrylate-based adhesives with and without use of a hydrophobic resin coating resulted in acceptable bond strengths.

  13. In-vitro comparison of the effect of different bonding strategies on the micro-shear bond strength of a silorane-based composite resin to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Pouran; Alizadeh, Vahid; Fathpour, Kamyar; Mazaheri, Hamid; Mortazavi, Vajihosadat

    2016-01-01

    Background: The current study evaluated the micro-shear bond strengths of a new low-shrinkage composite resin to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 70 extracted premolars were assigned to one of seven groups (n = 10): Group 1: OptiBond Solo Plus (Opt; Kerr); Group 2: SE Bond (SE; Kuraray); Group 3: Silorane System Adhesive (SSA; 3M ESPE); Group 4: OptiBond Solo Plus + LS Bond (Opt LS); Group 5: SE Bond + LS Bond (SE LS); Group 6: OptiBond Solo Plus (Opt Po); and Group 7: SE Bond (SE Po). Occlusal dentin was exposed and restored with Filtek LS (3M ESPE) in groups 1 to 5 and Point 4 (Kerr) in groups 6 and 7. After thermocycling (1000 cycles at 5/55΀C), micro-shear bond test was carried out to measure the bond strengths. The results were submitted to analysis of variance and post hoc Tukeytests (P < 0.05). Results: Two-way ANOVA showed no significant differences between the two types of composite resin (P = 0.187), between bonding agents (P = 0.06) and between composite resin and bonding agents (P = 0.894). Because P value of bonding agents was near the significance level, one-way ANOVA was used separately between the two composite groups. This analysis showed significant differences between silorane composite resin groups (P = 0.045) and Tukey test showed a significant difference between Groups 4 and 5 (P = 0.03). Conclusion: The application of total-etch and self-etch methacrylate-based adhesives with and without use of a hydrophobic resin coating resulted in acceptable bond strengths. PMID:27076826

  14. Test and analysis of Celion 3000/PMR-15, graphite/polyimide bonded composite joints: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, J. B.; Mccleskey, S. F.; Ward, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    Standard single lap, double lap and symmetric step lap bonded joints of Celion 3000/PMR-15 graphite/polyimide composite were evaluated. Composite to composite and composite to titanium joints were tested at 116K (-250 F), 294K (70 F) and 561K (550 F). Joint parameters evaluated were lap length, adherend thickness, adherend axial stiffness, lamina stacking sequence and adherend tapering. Tests of advanced joint concepts were also conducted to establish the change in performance of preformed adherends, scalloped adherends and hybrid systems. Special tests were conducted to establish material properties of the high temperature adhesive, designated A7F, used for bonding. Most of the bonded joint tests resulted in interlaminar shear or peel failures of the composite. There were very few adhesive failures. Average test results agree with expected performance trends for the various test parameters. Results of finite element analyses and of test/analysis correlations are also presented.

  15. Test and analysis of Celion 3000/PMR-15, graphite/polyimide bonded composite joints: Data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, J. B.; Mccleskey, S. F.; Ward, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Standard single lap, double lap and symmetric step lap bonded joints of Celion 3000/PMR-15 graphite/polyimide composite were evaluated. Composite to composite and composite to titanium joints were tested at 116 K (-250 F), 294 K (70 F) and 561 K (550 F). Joint parameters evaluated are lap length, adherend thickness, adherend axial stiffness, lamina stacking sequence and adherend tapering. Advanced joint concepts were examined to establish the change in performance of preformed adherends, scalloped adherends and hybrid systems. The material properties of the high temperature adhesive, designated A7F, used for bonding were established. The bonded joint tests resulted in interlaminar shear or peel failures of the composite and there were very few adhesive failures. Average test results agree with expected performance trends for the various test parameters. Results of finite element analyses and of test/analysis correlations are also presented.

  16. The Effect of Different Disinfecting Agents on Bond Strength of Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed Hassan, Ahmed; Ali Goda, Ahmed; Baroudi, Kusai

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different disinfectant agents on bond strength of two types of resin composite materials. Methods. A total of 80 sound posterior teeth were used. They were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the dentin surface pretreatment (no treatment, chlorhexidine gluconate 2%, sodium hypochlorite 4%, and EDTA 19%). Each group was divided into two subgroups according to the type of adhesive (prime and bond 2.1 and Adper easy one). Each subgroup was further divided into two subgroups according to the type of resin composite (TPH spectrum and Tetric EvoCeram). Shear bond strength between dentin and resin composite was measured using Universal Testing Machine. Data collected were statistically analyzed by t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results. It was found that dentin treated with EDTA recorded the highest shear bond strength values followed by sodium hypochlorite and then chlorhexidine groups while the control group showed the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusions. The surface treatment of dentin before bonding application has a great effect on shear bond strength between resin composite and dentin surface. PMID:25477961

  17. Bond Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Teeth Using Visible Light Cure Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Muhsin, Saja Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although bonding to denture teeth after surface treatment with chemical agents is desirable, there is little information on the use of Visible Light Cure composite resin (VLC) as bonding denture materials. Objectives: To determine the effect of various surface treatments on shear bond strength between Visible Light Cure composite resin and the acrylic denture teeth interface. Methods: Forty cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were implemented upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into four groups (n = 10). Light-cured composite resin (LC) was applied over all treated and untreated surfaces of tested groups. The shear bond was tested using a universal tensile testing apparatus with the knife-edge of a 0.8mm shear tester. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA performed at a confidence level of 95% and significant P-value of (P ≤ 0.05). Results: Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between treated and untreated teeth surfaces. The treated surfaces exhibited various levels of bond strength depending on the type of treatment. Conclusion: Application of VLC bonding agent with prior treatment of methylmethacrylate (MMA) on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin. PMID:28400865

  18. Bond Strength of Repaired Acrylic Denture Teeth Using Visible Light Cure Composite Resin.

    PubMed

    Muhsin, Saja Ali

    2017-01-01

    Although bonding to denture teeth after surface treatment with chemical agents is desirable, there is little information on the use of Visible Light Cure composite resin (VLC) as bonding denture materials. To determine the effect of various surface treatments on shear bond strength between Visible Light Cure composite resin and the acrylic denture teeth interface. Forty cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were implemented upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into four groups (n = 10). Light-cured composite resin (LC) was applied over all treated and untreated surfaces of tested groups. The shear bond was tested using a universal tensile testing apparatus with the knife-edge of a 0.8mm shear tester. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA performed at a confidence level of 95% and significant P-value of (P ≤ 0.05). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between treated and untreated teeth surfaces. The treated surfaces exhibited various levels of bond strength depending on the type of treatment. Application of VLC bonding agent with prior treatment of methylmethacrylate (MMA) on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  19. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, María-Victoria; Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-02-01

    No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite.

  20. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond

  1. Bonding strength of the apatite layer formed on glass-ceramic apatite-wollastonite-polyethylene composites.

    PubMed

    Juhasz, J A; Best, S M; Kawashita, M; Miyata, N; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T; Bonfield, W

    2003-12-01

    Bioactive glass-ceramic apatite-wollastonite (A-W) has been incorporated into polyethylene in particulate form to create new bioactive composites for potential maxillofacial applications. The effects of varying the volume fraction of glass-ceramic A-W filler and the glass-ceramic A-W particle size were investigated by measuring the bonding strength of the bonelike apatite layer formed on the surface of glass-ceramic A-W-polyethylene composites. The bonding strength was evaluated via a modified ASTM C-333 standard in which a tensile stress was applied to the substrate and the strength of the bioactive layer was compared with that formed on commercially available hydroxyapatite-polyethylene composite samples, HAPEX. The composites demonstrated greater bonding strength with increased filler content and reduced filler particle size (maximum 6.9 +/- 0.5 MPa) and a marginally greater bonding strength as compared with HAPEX (2.8 +/- 0.5 MPa), when glass-ceramic A-W-polyethylene composite samples with the same filler content were tested. The higher bonding strength of the apatite layer formed on the A-W-polyethylene composite samples suggests that, in addition to maxillofacial applications, these composites might also be utilized in applications involving higher levels of load bearing.

  2. Hydrolytic degradation of composites of poly(L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) 70/30 and β-tricalcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Ahola, Niina; Veiranto, Minna; Rich, Jaana; Efimov, Alexander; Hannula, Markus; Seppälä, Jukka; Kellomäki, Minna

    2013-11-01

    There is an increasing need for synthetic bone substitute materials that decrease the need for allografts and autografts. In this study, composites of β-tricalcium phosphate and a biodegradable poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) were manufactured using extrusion to form biodegradable composites with high β-tricalcium phosphate contents for osteoconductivity. The hydrolytic degradation of the composites containing 0, 10, 20, 35 and 50% of β-tricalcium phosphate was studied in vitro for 52 weeks. During the study, it was observed that β-tricalcium phosphate did not have an effect on the degradation rate of the polymer matrix. However, the crystallinity of the materials increased throughout the test series and changes in glass transition temperatures were also observed as the comonomer ratio of the polymer matrix changed as the degradation proceeded. The results show that the materials have desirable degradation properties and, thus, possess great potential as bioabsorbable and osteoconductive bone filling materials.

  3. Dentin-Composite Bond Strength Measurement Using the Brazilian Disk Test

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Carola A.; Chen, Yung-Chung; Li, Yuping; Rudney, Joel; Aparicio, Conrado; Fok, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study presents a variant of the Brazilian disk test (BDT) for assessing the bond strength between composite resins and dentin. Methods Dentin-composite disks (φ 5 mm × 2 mm) were prepared using either Z100 or Z250 (3M ESPE) in combination with one of three adhesives, Adper Easy Bond (EB), Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (MP) and Adper Single Bond (SB), and tested under diametral compression. Acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation (DIC) were used to monitor debonding of the composite from the dentin ring. A finite element (FE) model was created to calculate the bond strengths using the failure loads. Fracture modes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results Most specimens fractured along the dentin-resin composite interface. DIC and AE confirmed interfacial debonding immediately before fracture of the dentin ring. Results showed that the mean bond strength with EB (14.9±1.9 MPa) was significantly higher than with MP (13.2±2.4 MPa) or SB (12.9±3.0 MPa) (p<0.05); no significant difference was found between MP and SB (p>0.05). Z100 (14.5±2.3 MPa) showed higher bond strength than Z250 (12.7±2.5 MPa) (p<0.05). Majority of specimens (91.3%) showed an adhesive failure mode. EB failed mostly at the dentin-adhesive interface, whereas MP at the composite-adhesive interface; specimens with SB failed at the composite-adhesive interface and cohesively in the adhesive. Conclusions The BDT variant showed to be a suitable alternative for measuring the bond strength between dentin and composite, with zero premature failure, reduced variability in the measurements, and consistent failure at the dentin-composite interface. PMID:27395367

  4. Composite resin bond strength to caries-affected dentin contaminated with 3 different hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Hosseini-Shirazi, Moeen; Farahbod, Foroozan; Keshani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Bonding of composite resins to sound and caries-affected dentin in cervical areas may necessitate the use of hemostatic agents to control sulcular fluid and hemorrhage. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive system to sound and caries-affected dentin after the use of 3 different hemostatic agents. Composite resin cylinders were bonded to 48 caries-affected and 48 sound dentin surfaces in 8 groups. Groups 1-4 utilized caries-affected dentin: group 1, uncontaminated control; 2, ViscoStat; 3, ViscoStat Clear; and 4, trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Groups 5-8 utilized sound dentin: group 5, uncontaminated control; 6, ViscoStat; 7, ViscoStat Clear; and 8, TCA. The hemostatic agents were applied for 2 minutes and rinsed. After 500 rounds of thermocycling, shear bond strength tests were carried out. Data were analyzed with 1- and 2-way analyses of variance, t test, and post hoc Tukey tests at a significance level of P < 0.05. Bond strength was significantly influenced by dentin type (F = 38.23; P = 0.0001) and hemostatic agent (F = 6.32; P = 0.001). Furthermore, groups 2 and 6 (ViscoStat) showed significantly lower bond strength values than the control groups (groups 1 and 5) in both affected and sound dentin (P = 0.043 and P = 0.009, respectively). Within the limitations of this study, the bond strength of composite resin to caries-affected dentin was significantly reduced compared to that with sound dentin. Among the studied hemostatic agents, ViscoStat resulted in a greater decrease in dentin bond strength. Contamination of both sound and caries-affected dentin with hemostatic agents decreased composite resin bond strength. Of the 3 hemostatic agents used, ViscoStat Clear appeared to have the least detrimental effect on bond strength.

  5. In Vitro Investigation of Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Composites Based on Biogenic Hydroxyapatite or Synthetic Calcium Phosphates.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Nataliia; Parkhomey, Oleksandr; Sych, Olena

    2017-12-01

    This in vitro investigation of the behavior of two types of calcium phosphate glass ceramics on the basis of phosphates of biogenic or synthetic origin prepared from initial mixtures with different particle size has revealed that some different factors affect the behavior, namely the phase composition of composite, fraction of open porosity, and average diameter of pore channels. It was established that the solubility of the composites on the basis of synthetic calcium phosphates and glass after 2 and 7 days contact with saline composites is the highest among the materials under study. First of all, this fact is related to the peculiarities of their phase composition, high fraction of open porosity, and high permeability. As for biogenic hydroxyapatite/glass materials, their solubility is several times lower in spite of close total porosity. The particle size of initial mixture practically does not affect the material solubility; the latter is only slightly lower for smaller particles.

  6. In Vitro Investigation of Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Composites Based on Biogenic Hydroxyapatite or Synthetic Calcium Phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinchuk, Nataliia; Parkhomey, Oleksandr; Sych, Olena

    2017-02-01

    This in vitro investigation of the behavior of two types of calcium phosphate glass ceramics on the basis of phosphates of biogenic or synthetic origin prepared from initial mixtures with different particle size has revealed that some different factors affect the behavior, namely the phase composition of composite, fraction of open porosity, and average diameter of pore channels. It was established that the solubility of the composites on the basis of synthetic calcium phosphates and glass after 2 and 7 days contact with saline composites is the highest among the materials under study. First of all, this fact is related to the peculiarities of their phase composition, high fraction of open porosity, and high permeability. As for biogenic hydroxyapatite/glass materials, their solubility is several times lower in spite of close total porosity. The particle size of initial mixture practically does not affect the material solubility; the latter is only slightly lower for smaller particles.

  7. Experimental ammonia-free phosphate-bonded investments using Mg(H2PO4)2 solution.

    PubMed

    Takashiba, Shigeyuki; Zhang, Zutai; Tamaki, Yukimichi

    2002-12-01

    In our previous study, we investigated ammonia-free phosphate-bonded investments using Mg (H2PO4)2 powder. The purpose of the present study was to attempt usage of 50 wt% Mg (H2PO4)2 solution instead of powder. Magnesium oxide (MgO) was prepared as a binder and cristobalite was selected as a refractory. After arranging six kinds of experimental investments (A-F) with different cristobalite/MgO ratios, the fundamental properties of the dental investments were examined. The properties of the molds were influenced by the amount of MgO. Decreases in MgO showed lower mold strengths, longer setting time and larger setting expansion. According to XRD analysis, the peaks of MgH(PO4)3 x 3H2O newly formed, cristobalite and MgO were detected in the A set, but MgO peaks in F set were reduced. On the other hand, the surface of F was entirely covered by phosphorus. From these results, it was found that the usage of Mg(H2PO4)2 solution was possible for ammonia-free investments.

  8. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  9. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  10. Evaluating Resin-Dentin Bond by Microtensile Bond Strength Test: Effects of Various Resin Composites and Placement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Maleknejad, Fatemeh; Forghani, Maryam; Afshari, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of a methacrylate-based compared to a silorane-based resin composite in Class I cavity using different placement techniques. Materials and Methods: Class I cavities with dimension of (4 mm long, 4 mm wide, 3 mm deep) were prepared in extracted sound human molars. The teeth were randomly divided into six groups. The first three groups were filled with Filtek P90 using three methods of insertion; bulk, incremental and snow-plow, and the remaining three groups were filled with Clearfil AP-X using the same three placement techniques. After 24 hours of storage in water at 37°C, the specimens were thermocycled to 1000 cycles. Specimens were prepared for MTBS testing by creating bonded beams obtained from the pulpal floor. Statistical analysis used: Statistical analyses of data were performed by two-way ANOVA/Tukey (α=.05). Results: The experiment showed significant differences between the two resin composites with regard to filling techniques (P<0.05). The MTBS was significantly higher in each of Filtek P90 subgroup compared to Clearfil AP-X ones (P<0.05). With respect to filling technique in both resin composites, bulk insertion showed the significantly lowest MTBS (P<0.05), while no significant difference was found between the outcome of incremental and snow-plow techniques (P>0.05). Conclusion: Silorane-based resin composite as opposed to methacrylate based resin composite and layering placements in contrast to bulk filling method had higher microtensile bond strength. PMID:26966466

  11. The effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of PEEK composite materials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Qian, Yuetong; Zhu, Ye; Liu, Hong; Gan, Kang; Guo, Jing

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength between polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composite materials and each of two different luting cements. One hundred specimens were randomly divided into five groups (n=20/group) as follows: (A) no treatment, (B) 98% sulfuric acid, (C) 9.5% hydrofluoric acid, (D) argon plasma treatment, and (E) sandblast with 50μm Al2O3 particles. Each group was divided into two subgroups of different cements: RelyX™ Unicem and SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X™. The cements were bonded onto the specimens. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37° for 24h. Bond strength was measured in a shear test, and failure modes were assessed by stereomicroscopy. The surfaces were observed by SEM after the different pretreatments. Etching with 98% sulfuric acid and argon plasma treatment can significantly enforce the bond strength of RelyX™ Unicem or SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X™ to PEEK composite materials in comparison to the group of no treatment, hydrofluoric acid or sandblasting (p<0.05). No adhesion was established on the groups of no treatment and hydrofluoric acid when RelyX™ Unicem was used. Applying the SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X™ system, no statistical differences were found whether hydrofluoric acid was applied or not (p>0.05). The shear bond strength value of using SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X™ was higher than that of using RelyX™ Unicem with the same surface conditioning method (p<0.05). The use of SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X™ after the surface of PEEK composite material treated with sulfuric acid or argon plasma can be recommended as an effective bonding method. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Polymerization shrinkage and stress development in amorphous calcium phosphate/urethane dimethacrylate polymeric composites

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, J.M.; Regnault, W. F.; Skrtic, D.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how substituting a new high molecular mass oligomeric poly(ethylene glycol) extended urethane dimethacrylate (PEG-U) for 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in photo-activated urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) resins affects degree of vinyl conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage (PS), stress development (PSSD) and biaxial flexure strength (BFS) of their amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) composites. The composites were prepared from four types of resins (UDMA, PEG-U, UDMA/HEMA and UDMA/PEG-U) and zirconia-hybridized ACP. Introducing PEG-U improved DC while not adversely affecting PS, PSSD and the BFS of composites. This improvement in DC is attributed to the long, more flexible structure between the vinyl groups of PEG-U and its higher molecular mass compared to poly(HEMA). The results imply that PEG-U has the potential to serve as an alternative to HEMA in dental and other biomedical applications. PMID:20169007

  13. Preparation, characterization, biological activity, and transport study of polystyrene based calcium-barium phosphate composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Mujahid Ali; Rafiuddin

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-barium phosphate (CBP) composite membrane with 25% polystyrene was prepared by co-precipitation method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the membrane. The membrane was found to be crystalline in nature with consistent arrangement of particles and no indication of visible cracks. The electrical potentials measured across the composite membrane in contact with univalent electrolytes (KCl, NaCl and LiCl), have been found to increase with decrease in concentrations. Thus the membrane was found to be cation-selective. Transport properties of developed membranes may be utilized for the efficient desalination of saline water and more importantly demineralization process. The antibacterial study of this composite membrane shows good results for killing the disease causing bacteria along with waste water treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Silicon, iron and titanium doped calcium phosphate-based glass reinforced biodegradable polyester composites as bone analogous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah Mohammadi, Maziar

    Bone defects resulting from disease or traumatic injury is a major health care problem worldwide. Tissue engineering offers an alternative approach to repair and regenerate bone through the use of a cell-scaffold construct. The scaffold should be biodegradable, biocompatible, porous with an open pore structure, and should be able to withstand the applied forces. Phosphate-based glasses (PGs) may be used as reinforcing agents in degradable composites since their degradation can be predicted and controlled through their chemistry. This doctoral dissertation describes the development and evaluation of PGs reinforced biodegradable polyesters for intended applications in bone augmentation and regeneration. This research was divided into three main objectives: 1) Investigating the composition dependent properties of novel PG formulations by doping a sodium-free calcium phosphate-based glass with SiO2, Fe2O3, and TiO2. Accordingly, (50P2 O5-40CaO- xSiO2-(10-x)Fe2O3, where x = 10, 5 and 0 mol.%) and (50P2O5-40CaO-xSiO 2-(10-x)TiO2 where x = 10, 7, 5, 3 and 0 mol.%) formulations were developed and characterised. SiO2 incorporation led to increased solubility, ion release, pH reduction, as well as hydrophilicity, surface energy, and surface polarity. In contrast, doping with Fe2O 3 or TiO2 resulted in more durable glasses, and improved cell attachment and viability. It was hypothesised that the presence of SiO 2 in the TiO2-doped formulations could up-regulate the ionic release from the PG leading to higher alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells. 2) Incorporating Si, Fe, and Ti doped PGs as fillers, either as particulates (PGPs) or fibres (PGFs), into biodegradable polyesters (polycaprolactone (PCL) and semi-crystalline and amorphous poly(lactic acid) (PLA and PDLLA)) with the aim of developing degradable bone analogous composites. It was found that PG composition and geometry dictated the weight loss, ionic release, and mechanical properties of the composites. It

  15. Microstructure and biocompatibility of composite biomaterials fabricated from titanium and tricalcium phosphate by spark plasma sintering.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Dibakar; Nguyen, Linh; Oh, Ik-Hyun; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2013-05-01

    Important issues in developing hydroxyapatite (HAp)- and titanium (Ti)-based composite biomaterials for orthopedic or dental devices include the dissociation of HAp during fabrication and its influences in the microstructure and biocompatibility of the final composite. During the densification by sintering of HAp/Ti composites, Ti reacts with -OH freed from HAp to form TiO2 thus dissociated HAp into Ca3(PO4)2, CaO, CaTiO3, TiP, and so forth. To inhibit this reaction, composites were fabricated with Ti and 30, 50, and 70 vol % β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) instead of HAp by spark plasma sintering at 1200°C. It has been observed that after sintering at 1200°C, Ti also reacted with TCP, but unlike HAp/Ti composites, the final TCP/Ti composites contained significant amounts of unreacted TCP and Ti phases. The initial 70 vol % TCP/Ti composite showed compressive strength of 388.5 MPa, Young's modulus of 3.23 GPa, and Vickers hardness of 361.9 HV after sintering. The in vitro cytotoxicity and proliferation of osteoblast cells on the composites surfaces showed that the addition of a higher amount of TCP with Ti was beneficial by increasing cell viability, cell-composite attachment and proliferation. Osteopontin and collagen type II protein expression from osteoblasts cultured onto the 70% TCP-Ti composite was also higher than other composites and pure Ti. In vivo study verified that within 3 months of implantation in an animal body, 70% TCP-Ti had an excellent bone-implant interface compared with a pure Ti metal implant.

  16. Micro-tensile bond testing of resin cements to dentin and an indirect resin composite.

    PubMed

    Mak, Yiu-Fai; Lai, Shirley C N; Cheung, Gary S P; Chan, Alex W K; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2002-12-01

    Micro-tensile bond strength (microTBS) evaluation and fractographic analysis were used to compare four resin cement systems (AC: All-Bond 2/Choice; RX: Single Bond/RelyX ARC; SB: Super-Bond C & B; and PF: Panavia F) in indirect composite/dentin adhesive joints. Flat dentin surfaces were created on extracted human third molars. The resin cements were used according to the manufacturers' instructions for bonding silanized composite overlays to deep coronal dentin. 0.9x0.9 composite-dentin beams prepared from the luted specimens were stressed to failure in tension. Dentin sides of all fractured specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the failure modes. In group PF, morphologic features that could not be resolved at the SEM level were further validated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of the SEM specimens. Statistical analyses revealed significant difference (p<0.05) among microTBS and failure modes in the resin cement groups. The two groups (AC and RX) with highest microTBS failed predominantly along the composite overlay/cement interface. Cohesive failure in resin cement was primarily observed in group SB that exhibited intermediate microTBS values. In group PF with the lowest microTBS, failure occurred mostly along the dentin surface. Globular resin agglomerates seen by SEM on PF-treated dentin were distinguished from silica fillers by TEM. The bond between the processed composite and the luting resin cement was the weak link in indirect composite restorations cemented with AC or RX. Super-Bond C&B exhibited intermediate tensile strength and Panavia F is less reliable when used in conjunction with a self-etching primer for bonding indirect restorations to dentin.

  17. Calcium phosphate formation and ion dissolution rates in silica gel-PDLLA composites.

    PubMed

    Korventausta, Joni; Jokinen, Mika; Rosling, Ari; Peltola, Timo; Yli-Urpo, Antti

    2003-12-01

    Sol-gel derived silicas are potential biomaterials both for tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications. In this study, both SiO(2) and calcium and phosphate-containing SiO(2) (CaPSiO(2)) are combined with poly-(DL-lactide) to form a composite. The main properties studied are the ion release rates of biologically important ions (soluble SiO(2) and Ca(2+)) and the formation of bone mineral-like calcium phosphate (CaP) on the composite surface. These properties are studied by varying the quality, content and granule size of silica gel in the composite, and porosity of the polymer. The results indicate that release rates of SiO(2) and Ca(2+) depend mostly on the formed CaP layer, but in some extent also on the granule size of silicas and polymer porosity. The formation of the bone mineral-like CaP is suggested to be induced by a thin SiO(-) layer on the composite surface. However, due to absence of active SiO(2) or CaPSiO(2) granules on the outermost surface, the suitable nanoscale dimensions do not contribute the nucleation and growth and an extra source for calcium is needed instead. The result show also that all composites with varying amount of CaPSiO(2) (10-60 wt%) formed bone mineral-like CaP on their surfaces, which provides possibilities to optimise the mechanical properties of composites.

  18. Calcium and phosphate ion releasing composite: Effect of pH on release and mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hockin H. K.; Weir, Michael D.; Sun, Limin

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Secondary caries and restoration fracture are the two main challenges facing tooth cavity restorations. The objective of this study was to develop a composite using tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) fillers and whiskers to be stress-bearing, and to be “smart” to increase the calcium (Ca) and phosphate (PO4) ion release at cariogenic pH. Methods TTCP was ball-milled to obtain four different particle sizes: 16.2 μm, 2.4 μm, 1.3 μm, and 0.97 μm. Whiskers fused with nano-sized silica were combined with TTCP as fillers in a resin. Filler level mass fractions varied from 0% to 75%. Ca and PO4 ion release were measured vs. time at pH of 7.4, 6, and 4. Composite mechanical properties were measured via three-point flexure before and after immersion in solutions at the three pH. Results TTCP composite without whiskers had flexural strength similar to a resin-modified glass ionomer (Vitremer) and previous Ca-PO4 composites. With whiskers, the TTCP composite had a flexural strength (mean ± sd; n = 5) of (116 ± 9) MPa, similar to (112 ± 14) MPa of a stress-bearing, non-releasing hybrid composite (TPH) (p > 0.1). The Ca release was (1.22 ± 0.16) mmol/L at pH of 4, higher than (0.54 ± 0.09) at pH of 6, and (0.22 ± 0.06) at pH of 7.4 (p < 0.05). PO4 release was also dramatically increased at acidic pH. After immersion, the TTCP-whisker composite matched the strength of TPH at all three pH (p > 0.1); both TTCP-whisker composite and TPH had strengths about 3-fold that of a releasing control. Significance The new TTCP-whisker composite was “smart” and increased the Ca and PO4 release dramatically when the pH was reduced from neutral to a cariogenic pH of 4, when these ions are most needed to inhibit caries. Its strength was 2–3 fold higher than previously-known Ca-PO4 composites and resin-modified glass ionomer. This composite may have the potential to provide the necessary combination of load-bearing and caries-inhibiting capabilities. PMID:19101026

  19. Collector surface for a microwave tube comprising a carbon-bonded carbon-fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Johnson, A.C.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1998-07-28

    In a microwave tube, an improved collector surface coating comprises a porous carbon composite material, preferably a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite having a bulk density less than about 2 g/cc. Installation of the coating is readily adaptable as part of the tube manufacturing process. 4 figs.

  20. Collector surface for a microwave tube comprising a carbon-bonded carbon-fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1998-01-01

    In a microwave tube, an improved collector surface coating comprises a porous carbon composite material, preferably a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite having a bulk density less than about 2 g/cc. Installation of the coating is readily adaptable as part of the tube manufacturing process.

  1. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. Materials and Methods Composite discs were subject to one of six different surface pretreatments: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm2 diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Results Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Conclusions Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate. PMID:24516824

  2. Bonding of resin composite to caries-affected dentin after Carisolv(®) treatment.

    PubMed

    Zawaideh, Feda; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Louise B

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Carisolv(®) on resin composite adhesion on caries-affected dentin. Carious lesion specimens (N =46) were prepared from 45 extracted primary molars: Group 1 (N =23)-chemomechanical (Carisolv(®)) treatment; Group 2 (N =23)-rotary instrumentation; and Group 3 (N =23)-caries-free specimens from 20 noncarious primary molars. After caries removal (Groups 1 and 2) or washing and drying (Group 3), a resin composite rod (2-mm high, 0.975-mm diameter) was bonded vertically to dentin. Specimens were stressed at constant displacement (1.0 mm/minute) to failure; treated surfaces were examined under a scanning electron microscope. The mean (±SD) microshear bond strengths of resin composite to dentin were: Group 1=6.69 (±4.08) MPa; Group 2=10.31 (±5.47) MPa; and Group 3=7.16 (±6.64) MPa. The mean bond strength of resin composite of Group 2 significantly exceeded that of Groups 1 (P=.02) and 3 (P=.01); Groups 1 and 3 did not differ significantly. There was no significant association between failure mode and treatment type (P=.22) or mean bond strength (P=.44). Carisolv(®) removed the smear layer or limited its formation, producing demineralization incompletely infiltrated by resin composite. Chemomechanical treatment of caries-affected dentin of primary teeth did not adversely affect resin composite bonding.

  3. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to composite submitted to different surface pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Victor Hugo; Griza, Sandro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis

    2014-02-01

    Extensively destroyed teeth are commonly restored with composite resin before cavity preparation for indirect restorations. The longevity of the restoration can be related to the proper bonding of the resin cement to the composite. This study aimed to evaluate the microshear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements to composite resin. COMPOSITE DISCS WERE SUBJECT TO ONE OF SIX DIFFERENT SURFACE PRETREATMENTS: none (control), 35% phosphoric acid etching for 30 seconds (PA), application of silane (silane), PA + silane, PA + adhesive, or PA + silane + adhesive (n = 6). A silicone mold containing a cylindrical orifice (1 mm(2) diameter) was placed over the composite resin. RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) or BisCem (Bisco Inc.) self-adhesive resin cement was inserted into the orifices and light-cured. Self-adhesive cement cylinders were submitted to shear loading. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Independent of the cement used, the PA + Silane + Adhesive group showed higher microshear bond strength than those of the PA and PA + Silane groups. There was no difference among the other treatments. Unicem presented higher bond strength than BisCem for all experimental conditions. Pretreatments of the composite resin surface might have an effect on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to this substrate.

  4. Evaluation of the Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Wet and Dry Enamel Using Dentin Bonding Agents Containing Various Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Ramarao, Sathyanarayanan; John, Bindu Meera; Rajesh, Praveen; Swatha, S

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Bonding of composite resin to dentin mandates a wet substrate whereas, enamel should be dry. This may not be easily achievable in intracoronal preparations where enamel and dentin are closely placed to each other. Therefore, Dentin Bonding Agents (DBA) are recommended for enamel and dentinal bonding, where enamel is also left moist. A research question was raised if the “enamel-only” preparations will also benefit from wet enamel bonding and contemporary DBA. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths of composite resin, bonded to dry and wet enamel using fifth generation DBA (etch and rinse system) containing various solvents such as ethanol/water, acetone and ethanol. Materials and Methods The crowns of 120 maxillary premolars were split into buccal and lingual halves. They were randomly allocated into four groups of DBA: Group 1-water/ethanol based, Group 2-acetone based, Group 3-ethanol based, Group 4-universal bonding agent (control group). The buccal halves and lingual halves were bonded using the wet bonding and dry bonding technique respectively. After application of the DBAs and composite resin build up, shear bond strength testing was done. Results Group 1 (ethanol/water based ESPE 3M, Adper Single Bond) showed highest bond strength of (23.15 MPa) in dry enamel. Group 2 (acetone based Denstply, Prime and Bond NT, showed equal bond strength in wet and dry enamel condition (18.87 MPa and 18.02 MPa respectively). Conclusion Dry enamel bonding and ethanol/water based etch and rinse DBA can be recommended for “enamel-only” tooth preparations. PMID:28274042

  5. Comparision of shear bond strength of stainless steel and ceramic brackets at 24 hours after etching enamel with different proportions of acidulated phosphate fluoride.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Ramachandhra; Abinaya; Karthikeyan; Sarvanan; Vikram, Raj

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of stainless steel brackets and ceramic brackets at 24h after etching the enamel with acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (1.23% APF) at different proportions (40%,30%,20%) incorporated in conventional etchant (37% phosphoric acid). Eighty premolars (maxillary and mandibular first and second premolars) extracted for orthodontic purpose has been selected for the study and samples were divided into 4 groups containing 10 teeth each. Comprised of teeth etched Group 1 with 40% of APF gel etchant is Group 2 teeth etched with 30% of APF gel in Group 3 teeth etched with 20% of APF gel etchant and Group 4 teeth were etched with conventional etchant (37% phosphoric acid). The experimental group of Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride (APF) at different proportion (40%, 30%, 20%) incorporated with etchant application for 40s on the enamel surface at 24h indicated that group 4 showed the higher bond strength of all other remaining groups and the groups 1, 2 and 3 showed satisfactory bond strength. The statistical evaluation also revealed that the bond strength of control group (37% phosphoric acid) was greater than those of experimental groups. The present study results shows that the ceramic brackets have higher bond strength than stainless steel brackets (material wise).

  6. Development of novel self-healing and antibacterial dental composite containing calcium phosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junling; Weir, Michael D.; Melo, Mary Anne S.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Fracture and secondary caries are the primary reasons for dental restoration failure. The objective of this study was to develop a self-healing composite to heal cracks, while containing dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) for antibacterial function and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) for remineralization. Methods Microcapsules were synthesized with poly(urea-formaldehyde) (PUF) shells containing triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and N,N-dihydroxyethyl-p-toluidine (DHEPT) as healing liquid. Composite contained 20 mass% of NACP and 35% glass fillers. In addition, composite contained 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, or 10% of microcapsules. A single edge V-notched beam method measured fracture toughness (KIC) and self-healing efficiency. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial properties. Results Incorporation of microcapsules up to 7.5% into the composite did not adversely affect the mechanical properties (p > 0.1). Successful self-healing was achieved, with KIC recovery of 65–81% (mean ± sd; n = 6) to regain the load-bearing capability after composite fracture. The self-healing DMAHDM-NACP composite displayed a strong antibacterial potency, inhibiting biofilm viability and lactic acid production, and reducing colony-forming units by 3–4 orders of magnitude, compared to control composite without DMAHDM. Conclusions A dental composite was developed with triple benefits of self-healing after fracture, antibacterial activity, and remineralization capability for the first time. Clinical significance The self-healing, antibacterial and remineralizing composite may be promising for tooth cavity restorations to combat bulk fracture and secondary caries. The method of using triple agents (self-healing microcapsules, DMAHDM, and NACP) may have wide applicability to other dental composites, adhesives, sealants and cements. PMID:25625674

  7. Development of novel self-healing and antibacterial dental composite containing calcium phosphate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junling; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-03-01

    Fracture and secondary caries are the primary reasons for dental restoration failure. The objective of this study was to develop a self-healing composite to heal cracks, while containing dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) for antibacterial function and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) for remineralization. Microcapsules were synthesized with poly(urea-formaldehyde) (PUF) shells containing triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and N,N-dihydroxyethyl-p-toluidine (DHEPT) as healing liquid. Composite contained 20 mass% of NACP and 35% glass fillers. In addition, composite contained 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, or 10% of microcapsules. A single edge V-notched beam method measured fracture toughness (KIC) and self-healing efficiency. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was used to test the antibacterial properties. Incorporation of microcapsules up to 7.5% into the composite did not adversely affect the mechanical properties (p > 0.1). Successful self-healing was achieved, with KIC recovery of 65-81% (mean ± sd; n = 6) to regain the load-bearing capability after composite fracture. The self-healing DMAHDM-NACP composite displayed a strong antibacterial potency, inhibiting biofilm viability and lactic acid production, and reducing colony-forming units by 3-4 orders of magnitude, compared to control composite without DMAHDM. A dental composite was developed with triple benefits of self-healing after fracture, antibacterial activity, and remineralization capability for the first time. The self-healing, antibacterial and remineralizing composite may be promising for tooth cavity restorations to combat bulk fracture and secondary caries. The method of using triple agents (self-healing microcapsules, DMAHDM, and NACP) may have wide applicability to other dental composites, adhesives, sealants and cements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analytical approach to peel stresses in bonded composite stiffened panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkey, Derek A.; Madan, Ram C.; Sutton, Jason O.

    1987-01-01

    A closed-form solution was obtained for the stresses and displacements of two bonded beams. A system of two fourth-order and two second-order differential equations with the associated boundary equations was determined using a variational work approach. A FORTRAN computer program was devised to solve for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of this system and to calculate the coefficients from the boundary conditions. The results were then compared with NASTRAN finite-element solutions and shown to agree closely.

  9. Structural Performance Evaluation of Composite-To-Steel Weld Bonded Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Bhavesh; Frame, Barbara J; Dove, Caroline; Fuchs, Hannes

    2010-01-01

    The Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC), a collaboration of Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, and the US Department of Energy is conducting a focal project to demonstrate the use of composite materials in high volume structural applications such as an underbody capable of carrying crash loads. One of the critical challenges is to attach the composite part to the steel structure in a high-volume automotive manufacturing environment and meet the complex requirements for crash. Weld-bonding, a combination of adhesive bonding and spot welding, was selected as the primary joining method. A novel concept of bonding doubler steel strips to composite enabled the spot welding to the steel structure, ensuring the compability with the OEM assembly processes. The structural performance of the joint, including durability, was assessed via analytical and physical testing under quasi-static loading at various temperatures. This paper discusses the results of the experiments designed to generate key modeling parameters for Finite Element Analysis of the joint.

  10. 3D Printing of Composite Calcium Phosphate and Collagen Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, Jason A.; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Kates, Stephen L.; Awad, Hani A.

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1–2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing. PMID:24529628

  11. 3D printing of composite calcium phosphate and collagen scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Inzana, Jason A; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M; Kelly, James P; Graeve, Olivia A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2014-04-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1-2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing.

  12. Electromagnetic properties of phosphate composite materials with boron-containing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushch, A. O.; Sokol, A. A.; Lapko, K. N.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Fedoseeva, Yu. V.; Romanenko, A. I.; Anikeeva, O. B.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of developing electromagnetic composite materials based on unfired heat-resistant mechanically strong phosphate ceramics has been studied. Boron-containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes and onion-like particles (B-MWCNTs) synthesized by electric-arc evaporation of a graphite rod enriched with boron are used as a functional additive to the phosphate matrix. According to transmission electron microscopy, the average nanoparticle length is ˜100 nm. According to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, the boron content in B-MWCNT walls is less than 1 at %, and substitution of carbon atoms with boron leads to the formation of acceptor states in the conduction band. An increase in the electromagnetic response of phosphate ceramics by ˜53 and ˜13-15% for 1.5 wt % B-MWCNT additive is detected in quasi-static and gigahertz ranges, respectively. It is assumed that a stronger effect can be achieved using longer B-MWCNTs than those formed under electric arc conditions.

  13. Microtensile bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite with semi-interpenetrating polymer matrix to dentin using various bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) to dentin using various adhesive systems. Forty eight (n = 8/group) human molars were flattened to expose dentin. A layer of preimpregnated unidirectional FRC (everStick) was applied on the dentin surface after treatment with either a single-step self-etching adhesive, two-step self-etching system, or a conventional three-step adhesive system. For the control, particulate filler composite (PFC) (Filtek Z250) layering without FRC was used. After 24-hour water storage at 37 degrees C, the specimens were sectioned, further water-stored at 37 degrees C for 30 days and then tested. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test, and reliability was analyzed with Weibull distribution. microTBS values differed significantly according to the adhesive material used (p < 0.05). Single-step self-etching adhesive showed the lowest bond reliability and microTBS values with both FRC and PFC, whereas conventional three-step and two-step self-etching systems showed higher bond reliability and microTBS with both materials.

  14. Synthesis of cryptocrystalline magnesite/bentonite clay composite and its application for removal of phosphate from municipal wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Masindi, V; Gitari, W M; Pindihama, K G

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, nanocomposite of cryptocrystalline magnesite-bentonite clay was used as a novel technology for removal of phosphates from municipal effluents. Vibratory ball miller was used for fabrication of the composite. Removal of phosphate from an aqueous solution was achieved using batch experimental procedures. The parameters optimized include time, dosage, concentration and pH. An optimization experiment revealed that 30 mins of shaking time, 1 g of composite, 100 mg L(-1) of phosphate, 1: 100 S/L ratios, 250 rpm, pH 10 and room temperature are the optimum conditions for removal of phosphate. Adsorption data fitted well to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm than Freundlich adsorption isotherms, thus confirming monolayer adsorption. Adsorption kinetics data fitted well to pseudo second-order kinetics than first-order kinetics, thus suggesting chemisorption. This comparative study showed better adsorption of the composite as compared to conventional methods of phosphate removal. The results suggest that the fabricated composite has the potential for remediation of phosphate-contaminated waters.

  15. Role of enamel deminerlization and remineralization on microtensile bond strength of resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Abbas; Zafar, Muhammad S.; Al-Wasifi, Yasser; Fareed, Wamiq; Khurshid, Zohaib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed to establish the microtensile bond strength of enamel following exposure to an aerated drink at various time intervals with/without application of remineralization agent. In addition, degree of remineralization and demineralization of tooth enamel has been assessed using polarized light microscopy. Materials and Methods: Seventy extracted human incisors split into two halves were immersed in aerated beverage (cola drink) for 5 min and stored in saliva until the time of microtensile bond testing. Prepared specimens were divided randomly into two study groups; remineralizing group (n = 70): specimens were treated for remineralization using casein phosphopeptides and amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) remineralization agent (Recaldent™; GC Europe) and control group (n = 70): no remineralization treatment; specimens were kept in artificial saliva. All specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength at regular intervals (1 h, 1 days, 2 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks) using a universal testing machine. The results statistically analyzed (P = 0.05) using two-way ANOVA test. Results: Results showed statistically significant increase in bond strength in CPP-ACP tested group (P < 0.05) at all-time intervals. The bond strength of remineralizing group samples at 2 days (~13.64 megapascals [MPa]) is comparable to that of control group after 1 week (~12.44 MPa). Conclusions: CPP-ACP treatment of teeth exposed to an aerated drink provided significant increase in bond strength at a shorter interval compared to teeth exposed to saliva alone. PMID:27403057

  16. Effects of modifying the adhesive composition on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Samir E; Ajlouni, Raed; Laffoon, John; Warren, John

    2002-10-01

    In an attempt to save chair time during bonding, metal brackets have been precoated with the adhesive material. Although the adhesive used on the precoated brackets is basically similar in composition to that used for bonding uncoated brackets, there are differences in the percentages of the various ingredients incorporated in the material. These changes are intended to enhance specific clinical properties. The purpose of this study was to determine whether modifications in the composition of the adhesives, used on precoated and uncoated metal brackets, affect their shear bond strengths during the first half hour after bonding. This is the time span when the initial arch wires are ligated. Sixty freshly extracted human molars were bonded with three different compositions of the same basic adhesive. The teeth were mounted in phenolic rings. An occlusogingival load was applied to the brackets producing a shear force at the bracket-tooth interface utilizing a Zwick Universal Test Machine. Analysis of variance was used to compare the three adhesives. Significance was predetermined at < or =.05 level of confidence. The present findings indicated that the shear bond strengths of the various modifications of the adhesive used on two different precoated metal brackets were not significantly different (F-ratio = .729 and P = .407) from those obtained with the conventional adhesive used on uncoated brackets. The mean values for the shear bond strengths of the two precoated brackets were: APC = 5.1+/-1.7 MPa and APC II = 4.9+/-2.1 MPa. The shear bond strength for the conventional adhesive used on the uncoated brackets was = 5.7+/-2.4 MPa. All bracket/adhesive combinations tested provided clinically acceptable shear bond forces within the first 30 minutes after initial bonding.

  17. Effect of various intraoral repair systems on the shear bond strength of composite resin to zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Han, In-Hae; Kang, Dong-Wan; Chung, Chae-Heon; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study compared the effect of three intraoral repair systems on the bond strength between composite resin and zirconia core. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty zirconia specimens were divided into three groups according to the repair method: Group I- CoJet™ Repair System (3M ESPE) [chairside silica coating with 30 µm SiO2 + silanization + adhesive]; Group II- Ceramic Repair System (Ivoclar Vivadent) [etching with 37% phosphoric acid + Zirconia primer + adhesive]; Group III- Signum Zirconia Bond (Heraus) [Signum Zirconia Bond I + Signum Zirconia Bond II]. Composite resin was polymerized on each conditioned specimen. The shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine, and fracture sites were examined with FE-SEM. Surface morphology and wettability after surface treatments were examined additionally. The data of bond strengths were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tamhane post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS Increased surface roughness and the highest wettability value were observed in the CoJet sand treated specimens. The specimens treated with 37% phosphoric acid and Signum Zirconia Bond I did not show any improvement of surface irregularity, and the lowest wettability value were found in 37% phosphoric acid treated specimens. There was no significant difference in the bond strengths between Group I (7.80 ± 0.76 MPa) and III (8.98 ± 1.39 MPa). Group II (3.21 ± 0.78 MPa) showed a significant difference from other groups (P<.05). CONCLUSION The use of Intraoral silica coating system and the application of Signum Zirconia Bond are effective for increasing the bond strength of composite resin to zirconia. PMID:24049565

  18. Adhesive bond strength evaluation in composite materials by laser-generated high amplitude ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perton, M.; Blouin, A.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composites laminates is highly efficient but is not used for joining primary aircraft structures, since there is presently no nondestructive inspection technique to ensure the quality of the bond. We are developing a technique based on the propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves to evaluate the adhesive bond strength. Large amplitude compression waves are generated by a short pulse powerful laser under water confinement and are converted after reflection by the assembly back surface into tensile waves. The resulting tensile stresses can cause a delamination inside the laminates or at the bond interfaces. The adhesion strength is evaluated by increasing the laser pulse energy until disbond. A good bond is unaffected by a certain level of stress whereas a weaker one is damaged. The method is shown completely non invasive throughout the whole composite assembly. The sample back surface velocity is measured by an optical interferometer and used to estimate stress history inside the sample. The depth and size of the disbonds are revealed by a post-test inspection by the well established laser-ultrasonic technique. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to differentiate weak bond from strong bonds and to estimate quantitatively their bond strength.

  19. Finite Element Analysis of Quantitative Percussion Diagnostics for Evaluating the Strength of Bonds Between Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveromo, Scott; Malcolm, Doug; Earthman, James

    Conventional nondestructive (NDT) techniques used to detect defects in composites are not able to determine intact bond integrity within a composite structure and are costly to use on large and complex shaped surfaces. To overcome current NDT limitations, a new technology was adopted based on quantitative percussion diagnostics (QPD) to better quantify bond quality in fiber reinforced composite materials. Results indicate that this technology is capable of detecting weak (`kiss') bonds between flat composite laminates. Specifically, the local value of the probe force determined from quantitative percussion testing was predicted to be significantly lower for a laminate that contained a `kiss' bond compared to that for a well-bonded sample, which is in agreement with experimental findings. Experimental results were compared to a finite element analysis (FEA) using MSC PATRAN/NASTRAN to understand the visco-elastic behavior of the laminates during percussion testing. The dynamic FEA models were used to directly predict changes in the probe force, as well as effective stress distributions across the bonded panels as a function of time.

  20. Adjusting the Chemical Bonding of SnO2 @CNT Composite for Enhanced Conversion Reaction Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yayi; Huang, Jianfeng; Qi, Hui; Cao, Liyun; Yang, Jun; Xi, Qiao; Luo, Xiaomin; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Li, Jiayin

    2017-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with excellent electron conductivity are widely used to improve the electrochemical performance of the SnO2 anode. However, the chemical bonding between SnO2 and CNTs is not clearly elucidated despite it may affect the lithiation/delithiation behavior greatly. In this work, an SnO2 @CNT composite with SnC and SnOC bonds as a linkage bridge is reported and the influence of the SnC and SnOC bonds on the lithium storage properties is revealed. It is found that the SnC bond can act as an ultrafast electron transfer path, facilitating the reversible conversion reaction between Sn and Li2 O to form SnO2 . Therefore, the SnO2 @CNT composite with more SnC bond shows high reversible capacity and nearly half capacity contributes from conversion reaction. It is opposite for the SnO2 @CNT composite with more SnOC bond that the electrons cannot be transferred directly to CNTs, resulting in depressed conversion reaction kinetics. Consequently, this work can provide new insight for exploration and design of metal oxide/carbon composite anode materials in lithium-ion battery. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The effect of coating patterns with spinel-based investment on the castability and porosity of titanium cast into three phosphate-bonded investments.

    PubMed

    Pieralini, Anelise R F; Benjamin, Camila M; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Scaf, Gulnara; Adabo, Gelson Luis

    2010-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of pattern coating with spinel-based investment Rematitan Ultra (RU) on the castability and internal porosity of commercially pure (CP) titanium invested into phosphate-bonded investments. The apparent porosity of the investment was also measured. Square patterns (15 × 15 × 0.3 mm(3)) were either coated with RU, or not and invested into the phosphate-bonded investments: Rematitan Plus (RP), Rema Exakt (RE), Castorit Super C (CA), and RU (control group). The castings were made in an Ar-arc vacuum-pressure machine. The castability area (mm(2) ) was measured by an image-analysis system (n = 10). For internal porosity, the casting (12 × 12 × 2 mm(3) ) was studied by the X-ray method, and the projected porous area percentage was measured by an image-analysis system (n = 10). The apparent porosity of the investment (n = 10) was measured in accordance with the ASTM C373-88 standard. Analysis of variance (One-way ANOVA) of castability was significant, and the Tukey test indicated that RU had the highest mean but the investing technique with coating increased the castability for all phosphate-bonded investments. The analysis of the internal porosity of the cast by the nonparametric test demonstrated that the RP, RE, and CA with coating and RP without coating did not differ from the control group (RU), while the CA and RE casts without coating were more porous. The one-way ANOVA of apparent porosity of the investment was significant, and the Tukey test showed that the means of RU (36.10%) and CA (37.22%) were higher than those of RP (25.91%) and RE (26.02%). Pattern coating with spinel-based material prior to phosphate-bonded investments can influence the castability and the internal porosity of CP Ti. © 2010 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. Observation of calcium phosphate powder mixed with an adhesive monomer experimentally developed for direct pulp capping and as a bonding agent.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yoshiroh; Suzuki, Masaya; Kato, Chikage; Shinkai, Koichi; Ogawa, Masaaki; Yamauchi, Junichi

    2010-01-01

    In this study, morphological shape, elemental distribution and elution properties of Ca, P, Mg in four types of calcium phosphate powder were investigated using SEM, EPMA and ICP-AES. Calcium phosphate powder: OHAp, DCPD, beta-TCP and OCP were observed in the white powder form and in the photopolymerized adhesive monomer they scattered like dispersed fillers in resin composite. In elemental analysis, CaKalpha showed a relatively high concentration in relation to PKalpha. In elution analysis, each calcium phosphate showed different elution of Ca and P. But Mg was almost equal to the detection limit of ICP-AES. Namely it was suggested that reparative dentin formation was effectively promoted under the following conditions: a calcification promoting effect by direct contact of the calcium phosphate powder, an ionic effect of Ca and P eluted from the powder located in the vicinity of the exposed pulp and environmental pH change of the surface in exposed pulp.

  3. In vitro evaluation of the bond strength of composite resin foundation materials to dentin.

    PubMed

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; Baba, Nadim Z

    2015-10-01

    Achieving adequate bonding of composite resin foundation materials to dentin can be a challenge. Bonding can be affected by the type of bonding material and method used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to test the bond strengths of selected dual-polymerizing composite resin foundation materials to dentin using light, chemical, or dual-polymerized adhesive systems. Eighty freshly extracted human third molars were sectioned vertically into mesial and distal halves and embedded in acrylic resin using a copper cylinder. Specimens were divided into 16 groups. Each group received a resin foundation that was bonded to dentin according to each manufacturer's instructions. All tested foundations were dual polymerized except Tetric Ceram, which was light polymerized. BisCore, Build-it, CompCore, CoreRestore, and FluoroCore resin foundation materials were bonded to dentin with the use of the corresponding adhesives in 3 different bonding methods: adhesive was light polymerized; adhesive was chemically polymerized; and adhesive was dual polymerized. Each specimen was seated in a custom shear test device, and a load was applied with the descending rod of the jig from a mechanical testing machine with a perpendicular force to the dentin-adhesive interface. Statistical analysis was performed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc pairwise comparison with Tukey test when statistically significant differences were found (α=.05). Resin foundation materials bonded to dentin with light-polymerized adhesives produced significantly higher bond strengths than when bonded with chemically or dual-polymerized adhesives. No significant difference was found between the single-component and multiple-components adhesives used with Tetric Ceram and BisCore foundations (P=.083). However, BisCore used with All-Bond 2 adhesive (multiple components) produced significantly lower bond strengths than when used with One-Step (P=.024). Adhesive failure was the most common failure location. Cohesive

  4. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Rodrigo Vieira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Kaneshima, Edmilson Nobumitu; Barbosa, Aline Silvestre; Picolotto, Cassiana Pedrotti; Lima, Ana Eliza de Souza; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED). Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10) followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were submitted to Student's t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x). Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites. PMID:26457322

  5. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites.

    PubMed

    Caixeta, Rodrigo Vieira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Kaneshima, Edmilson Nobumitu; Barbosa, Aline Silvestre; Picolotto, Cassiana Pedrotti; Lima, Ana Eliza de Souza; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED). Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10) followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were submitted to Student's t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x). Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites.

  6. Influence of Different Bonding Agents and Composite Resins on Fracture Resistance of Reattached Incisal Tooth Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Davari, AR.; Sadeghi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Reattachment of the fractured tooth fragment should be considered as a conservative treatment and valid alternative to a composite restoration. Purpose: This in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different adhesives and composite resins on fracture resistance of dental fragment reattached to the sectioned incisal edges. Materials and Method: 120 sound human maxillary central incisors were selected under standard conditions and randomly divided into 3 groups, 12 sound teeth were used as a control group and the remaining teeth were assigned to 3 groups (n=36) and each group into three subgroups (n=12). The incisal third of the samples was sectioned using a diamond disk and the respective fragments were then reattached utilizing different intermediate restorative materials, namely: i) adhesive materials alone (OptiBond S or OptiBond XTR or OptiBond All-in-One; ii) Premise flowable composite and iii) Point 4 composite in the one of the mentioned adhesive interface. After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling; shear bond strength (SBS) was recorded in kilogram force (kgf) by applying a load in the middle incisal third with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD (p< 0.05). Results: The control group had a significantly higher SBS than other groups (p= 0.001); the highest SBS values were obtained using the Premise flowable composite and OptiBond S adhesive (112.44±30.46 MPa); and the lowest with OptiBond All-in-One alone (33.97± 15.63 MPa). Conclusion: Although, none of the tested materials provided fracture resistance similar to that found with the intact maxillary central incisors; utilizing the Premise flowable composite and OptiBond S adhesive improved the SBS of the reattached fragment than other materials. PMID:24738084

  7. Bonding Effectiveness of Luting Composites to Different CAD/CAM Materials.

    PubMed

    Peumans, Marleen; Valjakova, Emilija Bajraktarova; De Munck, Jan; Mishevska, Cece Bajraktarova; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    To evaluate the influence of different surface treatments of six novel CAD/CAM materials on the bonding effectiveness of two luting composites. Six different CAD/CAM materials were tested: four ceramics - Vita Mark II; IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD; Celtra Duo - one hybrid ceramic, Vita Enamic, and one composite CAD/CAM block, Lava Ultimate. A total of 60 blocks (10 per material) received various mechanical surface treatments: 1. 600-grit SiC paper; 2. sandblasting with 30-μm Al2O3; 3. tribochemical silica coating (CoJet). Subsequent chemical surface treatments involved either no further treatment (control), HF acid etching (HF), silanization (S, or HF acid etching followed by silanization (HF+S). Two specimens with the same surface treatment were bonded together using two dual-curing luting composites: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (self-etching) or Panavia SA Cement (self-adhesive). After 1 week of water storage, the microtensile bond strength of the sectioned microspecimens was measured and the failure mode was evaluated. The bonding performance of the six CAD/CAM materials was significantly influenced by surface treatment (linear mixed models, p < 0.05). The luting cement had a significant influence on bond strength for Celtra Duo and Lava Ultimate (linear mixed models, p < 0.05). Mechanical surface treatment significantly influenced the bond strength for Celtra Duo (p = 0.0117), IPS e.max CAD (p = 0.0115), and Lava Ultimate (p < 0.0001). Different chemical surface treatments resulted in the highest bond strengths for the six CAD/CAM materials: Vita Mark II and IPS Empress CAD: S, HF+S; Celtra Duo: HF, HF+S; IPS e.max CAD: HF+S; Vita Enamic: HF+S, S. For Lava Ultimate, the highest bond strengths were obtained with HF, S, HF+S. Failure analysis showed a relation between bond strength and failure type: more mixed failures were observed with higher bond strengths. Mainly adhesive failures were noticed if no further surface treatment was done. The percentage of

  8. Bonding procedures for intraoral repair of exposed metal with resin composite.

    PubMed

    Kiatsirirote, K; Northeast, S E; van Noort, R

    1999-01-01

    To determine if tin plating can be recommended for intraoral repair of ceramic veneered cast restorations where metal of unknown composition is exposed by loss of ceramic. This study investigated the effectiveness of surface treatments incorporating tin plating and unfilled resin to enhance the tensile bond strength of a resin composite restorative to three different metal ceramic casting alloys. Gold-platinum, palladium-tin and nickel-chromium alloys were used to fabricate 120 rods of each alloy, 4 x 15 mm. The end of each rod was ground perpendicular on 600-grit SiC paper and grit blasted with 50-micron alumina. Rods from each alloy were divided into four groups of 30 to receive one of the following treatments before bonding pairs end to end with a visible light-polymerized resin composite (Herculite XRV): 1) direct bonding with the resin composite; 2) tin plating (Micro-Tin) and bonding; 3) application of unfilled resin (Chameleon) and bonding; 4) tin plated, application of unfilled resin and bonding. The bonded samples were stored in distilled water, incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and tested for tensile bond strength at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min in a Lloyd 1000R machine. The mode of failure was examined using a stereo zoom microscope. A statistically significant increase in tensile bond strength was demonstrated between the control (group 1) and both the gold and palladium alloy treated with tin plating and unfilled resin (group 4). Tin plating, or tin plating with the application of unfilled resin had no statistically significant effect on the tensile bond strength of resin composite to the nickel-chromium alloy. The results demonstrate that tin plating, in conjunction with the application of a low-viscosity unfilled resin, optimizes the tensile bond of a resin composite to the three alloys used in the study. This procedure can be recommended for intraoral repair of exposed metal when the type of alloy belongs to one of the investigated alloy

  9. Immediate vs delayed repair bond strength of a nanohybrid resin composite.

    PubMed

    El-Askary, Farid S; El-Banna, Ahmed H; van Noort, Richard

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate both the immediate and water-stored repair tensile bond strength (TBS) of a nanohybrid resin composite using different bonding protocols. One hundred sixty half hourglass-shaped slabs were prepared. Eighty half-slabs were wet ground immediately after light curing using high-speed abrasive burs, while the other half-slabs were stored in water for one month (delayed) and then wet ground for repair. Each set of the 80 repaired slabs was split into two groups to be tested for TBS after 24 h or 1 month of water storage. For all repaired slabs, either immediate or delayed, four bonding procedures were used involving wet and dry bonding with a 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive with or without silane pretreatment. TBS tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. To determine the cohesive strength of the resin composite itself, which served as the reference, additional whole slabs were prepared and tested in tension after a 24-h (n = 10) and a 1-month storage period (n = 10). Failure modes were evaluated using a stereomicroscope at 40X magnification. Three-way ANOVA was run to test the effect of water storage, testing time, bonding protocols, and their interactions on the repair TBS, which was given as a percentage of the reference values. For the immediate repair groups, the repair TBS ranged from 40% to 61.9% after 24-h storage and from 26% to 53.1% after 1-month water storage compared to the TBS of the whole slabs. For the delayed repair group, the repaired TBS ranged from 47.2% to 63.6% for the 24-h repairs and from 32.2% to 44.2% for the test groups stored in water for 1 month. Three-way ANOVA revealed that water storage had no significant effect on the repair TBS (p = 0.619). Both testing time and bonding protocols had a significant effect on the repair TBS (p = 0.001). The interactions between the independent variables (water storage, testing time, and bonding protocols) had no significant effect (p = 0.067). The repair bond strength was

  10. The effect of additional etching and curing mechanism of composite resin on the dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Su; Son, Sung-Ae; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of additional acid etching and curing mechanism (light-curing or self-curing) of a composite resin on the dentin bond strength and compatibility of one-step self-etching adhesives. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen human permanent molars were randomly divided into eight groups according to the adhesives used (All-Bond Universal: ABU, Clearfil S3 Bond: CS3), additional acid etching (additional acid etching performed: EO, no additional acid etching performed: EX), and composite resins (Filtek Z-250: Z250, Clearfil FII New Bond: CFNB). Group 1: ABU-EO-Z250, Group 2: ABU-EO-CFNB, Group 3: ABU-EX-Z250, Group 4: ABU-EX-CFNB, Group 5: CS3-EO-Z250, Group 6: CS3-EO-CFNB, Group 7: CS3-EX-Z250, Group 8: CS3-EX-CFNB. After bonding procedures, composite resins were built up on dentin surfaces. After 24-hour water storage, the teeth were sectioned to make 10 specimens for each group. The microtensile bond strength test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The failure mode of the fractured specimens was examined by means of an optical microscope at ×20 magnification. The data was analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's post-hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS Additional etching groups showed significantly higher values than the no additional etching group when using All-Bond Universal. The light-cured composite resin groups showed significantly higher values than the self-cured composite resin groups in the Clearfil S3 Bond. CONCLUSION The additional acid etching is beneficial for the dentin bond strength when using low acidic one-step self-etch adhesives, and low acidic one-step self-etch adhesives are compatible with self-cured composite resin. The acidity of the one-step self-etch adhesives is an influencing factor in terms of the dentin bonding strength and incompatibility with a self-cured composite resin. PMID:24353889

  11. Effect of dentin primer on shear bond strength of composite resin to moist and dry enamel.

    PubMed

    Jain, P; Stewart, G P

    2000-01-01

    The etched enamel-composite resin bond is the most reliable bond known to us. Moisture and dentin primers are the two most important variables that can interfere with this bond. This study investigated the effect of dentin primer on bond strengths of composite resin to moist and dry enamel. One hundred freshly extracted molar teeth were used for shear bond strength testing. The teeth were mounted in phenolic rings with an approximal enamel surface exposed. The exposed enamel surface on each tooth was flattened using 320- 400- and 600-grit silicon carbide papers and etched using 34-38% phosphoric acid gel. The teeth were then divided into 10 groups (n = 10). Four groups were assigned to each of the two dentin bonding systems, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and OptiBond FL. Two groups were assigned to the single-bottle bonding agent (Single Bond). Each bonding system was tested on moist and dry enamel. OptiBond FL and Scotchbond MP were tested with and without the use of primer. All samples were thermocycled and tested in shear. Fracture analysis was performed using a binocular microscope. For scanning electron microscopy, approximal samples of enamel (1 mm thick) were flattened, etched, and bonded with and without primer on moist and dry enamel. A 1 mm-thick layer of Z100 was bonded to the specimens, which were then immersed in 10% HCl for 24 hours to dissolve the enamel. The specimens were viewed under a scanning electron microscope. Results indicated that the use of primer on dry enamel did not significantly affect (P > 0.05) shear bond strengths for the two bonding systems, Scotchbond MP (primed 24.10 +/- 4.83 MPa, unprimed 29.57 +/- 7.49 MPa) and OptiBond FL (primed 26.82 +/- 4.44, unprimed 25.66 +/- 2.95). However, the use of primer was found to be essential on moist enamel to obtain acceptable bond strengths with both Scotchbond MP (primed 25.61 +/- 10.29 MPa, unprimed 3.26 +/- 0.95 MPa) and OptiBond FL (primed 30.28 +/- 3.49 MPa, unprimed 8.37 +/- 3.31 MPa

  12. Effect of composition of experimental fluorinated soft lining materials on bond strength to denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoshihito; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Akiba, Norihisa; Hibino, Yasushi; Nagasawa, Yuko; Sumi, Yasunori; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of the composition of experimental fluorinated soft lining materials on bond strength to denture base resin. Vinylidene fluoride/hexafluoro propylene copolymer (2-6F), tridecafluorooctyl methacrylate (13FMA), methoxy diethylene glycol methacrylate (MDGMA), and silica (as filler) were used for fabrication of the experimental soft lining materials. Nine experimental soft lining materials having various compositions of 2-6F, 13FMA, and MDGMA were prepared. Shear and tensile bond strength tests were performed before and after immersion in water. The water sorption for the materials was also measured. An increase in the content of acrylic monomer, MDGMA, in the experimental materials increased the bond strength before immersion in water but reduced the bond strength after immersion in water as compared to that before immersion in water. The inclusion of fluorinated monomer (13FMA) in the materials appeared to affect water sorption.

  13. Effect of preliminary irradiation on the bond strength between a veneering composite and alloy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Furuchi, Mika; Oshima, Akiko; Tanoue, Naomi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    The shear bond strength of a veneering composite (Solidex) and silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy (Castwell M.C.12) was evaluated for different duration times and irradiance for preliminary photo-polymerization. A veneering composite was applied onto a cast disk. Preliminary photo irradiation was performed using different duration times or irradiance. After final polymerization, the bond strength and the spectral distribution of each curing unit were determined. Shear bond strength was significantly higher for 90 s (12.4 MPa), than that for 0 s (8.3 MPa). With regard to the effect of irradiance, that from Solidilite (11.4 MPa) was significantly higher than that from Sublite S at 3 cm (8.7 MPa). The irradiance of Hyper LII and Sublite S at 3 cm was higher than Sublite S at 15 cm or Solidilite unit. Long time irradiation and low intensity is effective for preliminary irradiation in order to enhance the bond strength.

  14. Interfacial effects on the behavior of partially bonded metal matrix composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    A novel computational method developed at NASA-Lewis in order to predict the behavior of unidirectional composites has been used to explore the effects of partial debonding and fiber fracture on the behavior of room temperature and high temperature metal-matrix composites. Attention is presently given to the influence of disbonding, which occurs with fractured fibers, on the ply properties of metal-matrix composites with orthotropic fibers, in the case of a graphite fiber-reinforced copper-matrix composite. It is shown that, for small amounts of partial bonding on fractured fibers, composite material properties are not significantly affected.

  15. Clinical safety and efficacy of implantation of octacalcium phosphate collagen composites in tooth extraction sockets and cyst holes.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Tadashi; Tanuma, Yuji; Matsui, Keiko; Suzuki, Osamu; Takahashi, Tetsu; Kamakura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    It was demonstrated that octacalcium phosphate collagen composite achieved notable bone regeneration in bone defects in preclinical studies. On the basis of the research results, an investigator-initiated exploratory clinical trial was conducted after approval from a local Institutional Review Board. This clinical study was performed as a single-arm non-randomized intervention study. Octacalcium phosphate collagen composite was implanted into a total of 10 cases of alveolar bone defects after tooth extractions and cystectomy. Safety assessment was performed in terms of the clinical course and several consecutive laboratory examinations, and sequential radiographs were used for efficacy assessment. All participants uneventfully completed the clinical trial without major problems in their general condition. Postoperative wound swelling was observed, as also commonly seen in tooth extraction or cystectomy. Although no serious liver dysfunction, renal dysfunction, electrolyte imbalance, or abnormal urinalysis results were recognized, the number of white blood cells and C-reactive protein level temporarily increased after the operation. An increase in radiopacity in the octacalcium phosphate collagen composite-implanted site was observed in all cases. Finally, the border between the original bone and the octacalcium phosphate collagen composite-implanted site became indistinguishable. These results suggest that octacalcium phosphate collagen composite could be utilized safely in clinical situations in the future.

  16. Fabrication of novel calcium phosphate/poly(lactic acid) fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R; Shaw, Montgomery T; Olson, James R; Wei, Mei

    2008-01-01

    Composites using high-modulus polylactic acid (PLA) fibers coated with calcium phosphate (CaP) were prepared using a cyclic precipitation technique. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that small nuclei of CaP formed after the first soaking cycle, while large quantities of CaP particles were observed after the sixth cycle. The amount of CaP deposited on the PLA yarn increased with deposition time in Ca(2+) and PO(4) (3-) solutions and number of cycles, and decreased with stirring rate during washing cycles. It was observed that around 35 wt % of CaP was deposited on the yarn surface after six cycles of cyclic-soaking. Based on the results, a heterogeneous nucleation and growth mechanism was proposed for the CaP deposition on the surface of hydrolyzed polyester. Composites comprising the coated fibers in a poly(caprolactone) matrix exhibited flexural moduli within the range of that of the cortical bone.

  17. The influence of coupling agents on mechanical property retention and long-term cytocompatibility of phosphate glass fibre reinforced PLA composites.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M S; Ahmed, I; Parsons, A J; Walker, G S; Scotchford, C A

    2013-12-01

    Completely resorbable composites are an attractive alternative for metallic bone-fracture fixation devices. However, failure of their interfacial integrity within aqueous environments, which can lead to a rapid loss of overall mechanical properties, has been reported in the literature. In this study coupling agents were investigated for phosphate glass fibre reinforced poly(lactic acid) composites. Three coupling agents with varying wettability were employed to improve initial mechanical properties and their retention in vitro via improvement of the interfacial bond between polymer matrix and fibres. Coupling agents were grafted onto the glass fibres by dip-coating in coupling agent solution at optimised concentrations. Three-aminopropyltriethoxy silane and sorbitol ended PLA oligomer treatments improved the initial flexural properties (27% strength with APS and 17% modulus via SPLA treatment) of the composites and 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) treatments also decreased the loss of flexural strength and modulus during degradation. HDI treated samples retained 57.2% and 64.7% of their initial strength and modulus, respectively compared to control where only 34% of initial strength and 52% of initial modulus was retained after 28 days of degradation in PBS solution. Initial improvements in flexural properties were associated with improved shear bond strength at the interface due to covalent bonding between the glass fibres and polymer matrix provided by the coupling agents. Delay in mechanical property loss with degradation was suggested to be due to the hydrophobicity at the interface, which could have hindered the interfacial integrity loss and consequently loss of mechanical integrity of the composites. All coupling agent treated and control composites were tested for cytocompatibility using a primary human osteoblast cell line. A comparable response to the control, in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation

  18. Amorphous vanadyl phosphate/graphene composites for high performance supercapacitor electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ningna; Zhou, Jinhua; Kang, Qi; Ji, Hongmei; Zhu, Guoyin; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Shanyong; Chen, Jing; Feng, Xiaomiao; Hou, Wenhua

    2017-03-01

    Amorphous vanadyl phosphate/graphene nanohybrids is successfully synthesized by first exfoliating bulk layered vanadyl phosphate (VOPO4·2H2O) into nanosheets, and then hydrothermal treatment with graphene oxide (GO). The electrochemical properties of the resulted materials are systematically investigated. It is found that a phase transformation from crystalline to amorphous is occurred to VOPO4·2H2O. As supercapacitor electrode material, the amorphous VOPO4/graphene composite exhibits a high specific capacitance (508 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1), an excellent rate capability (359 F g-1 at 10 A g-1), and a good cycling stability (retention 80% after 5000 cycles at 2 A g-1). Particularly, it simultaneously has a greatly enhanced energy density of 70.6 Wh·kg-1 with a power density of 250 W kg-1. The outstanding energy storage performance mainly originates from the generation of amorphous VOPO4 phase that facilitates ion transport by shortening ion diffusion paths and provides more reversible and fast faradic reaction sites, the hybridization with graphene that greatly improves the electric conductivity and structure stability, and the unique layer-on-sheet nanohybrid structure that effectively enhances the structure integrity. This work not only provides a facile method for the preparation of amorphous VOPO4/graphene composites, but also demonstrates the enhanced energy density and rate capability of amorphous VOPO4-based materials for potential application in supercapacitors.

  19. The effect of phosphomonoesterases on the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Sperber, Christian; Kries, Hajo; Tamburini, Federica; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Frossard, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Plants and microorganisms under phosphorus (P) stress release extracellular phosphatases as a strategy to acquire inorganic phosphate (Pi). These enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphoesters leading to a release of Pi. During the enzymatic hydrolysis an isotopic fractionation (ε) occurs leaving an imprint on the oxygen isotope composition of the released Pi which might be used to trace phosphorus in the environment. Therefore, enzymatic assays with acid phosphatases from wheat germ and potato tuber and alkaline phosphatase from Escherichia coli were prepared in order to determine the oxygen isotope fractionation caused by these enzymes. Adenosine 5‧ monophosphate and glycerol phosphate were used as substrates. The oxygen isotope fractionation caused by acid phosphatases is 20-30‰ smaller than for alkaline phosphatases, resulting in a difference of 5-7.5‰ in δ18O of Pi depending on the enzyme. We attribute the enzyme dependence of the isotopic fractionation to distinct reaction mechanisms of the two types of phosphatases. The observed difference is large enough to distinguish between the two enzymatic processes in environmental samples. These findings show that the oxygen isotope composition of Pi can be used to trace different enzymatic processes, offering an analytical tool that might contribute to a better understanding of the P-cycle in the environment.

  20. Ac-conductivity and dielectric response of new zinc-phosphate glass/metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaroufi, A.; Oabi, O.; Lucas, B.

    2016-07-01

    The ac-conductivity and dielectric response of new composites based on zinc-phosphate glass with composition 45 mol%ZnO-55 mol%P2O5, filled with metallic powder of nickel (ZP/Ni) were investigated by impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz at room temperature. A high percolating jump of seven times has been observed in the conductivity behavior from low volume fraction of filler to the higher fractions, indicating an insulator - semiconductor phase transition. The measured conductivity at higher filler volume fraction is about 10-1 S/cm and is frequency independent, while, the obtained conductivity for low filler volume fraction is around 10-8 S/cm and is frequency dependent. Moreover, the elaborated composites are characterized by high dielectric constants in the range of 105 for conductive composites at low frequencies (100 Hz). In addition, the distribution of the relaxation processes was also evaluated. The Debye, Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole and Havriliak-Negami models in electric modulus formalism were used to model the observed relaxation phenomena in ZP/Ni composites. The observed relaxation phenomena are fairly simulated by Davidson-Cole model, and an account of the interpretation of results is given.

  1. Enhanced cathode performance of nano-sized lithium iron phosphate composite using polytetrafluoroethylene as carbon precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Ercan

    2014-12-01

    Herein we report a facile and efficient solid state synthesis of carbon coated lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4/C) cathode material achieved through the pyrolysis of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The current investigation is comparatively analyzed with the results of the composites of LiFePO4/C (LFP/C) synthesized using polystyrene-block-polybutadiene (PS-b-PBD), polyethyhylene (PE) and sucrose as carbon precursors. The optimized LFP/CPTFE composite is synthesized at 700 °C using 10 wt.% PTFE. The composite exhibits remarkable improvement in capacity, cyclability and rate capability compared to those of LFP/C synthesized using (PS-b-PBD), PE and sucrose. The specific discharge capacities as high as 166 mA h g-1 (theoretical capacity: 170 mA h g-1) at 0.2 C and 114 mA h g-1 at 10 C rates were achieved with LFP/CPTFE. In addition, the composite exhibits a long-term cycling stability with the capacity loss of only 11.4% after 1000 cycles. PTFE shifts the size distribution of the composite to nanometer scale (approximately 120 nm), however the addition of sucrose and other polymers do not have such an effect. According to TEM and XPS analysis, LFP/CPTFE particles are mostly coated with a few nanometers thick carbon layer forming a core-shell structure. Residual carbon does not contain fluorine.

  2. Effects of calcium phosphate nanoparticles on Ca-PO4 composite.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H K; Weir, M D; Sun, L; Takagi, S; Chow, L C

    2007-04-01

    Nano-particles of dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) were synthesized for the first time. The objectives of this study were to incorporate DCPA nano-particles into resin for Ca-PO(4) release to combat dental caries, and to investigate the filler level effects. Nano-DCPA and nano-silica-fused silicon nitride whiskers at a 1:1 ratio were used at filler mass fractions of 0-75%. The flexural strengths in MPa (mean +/- SD; n = 6) of DCPA-whisker composites ranged from (106 +/- 39) at 0% fillers to (114 +/- 23) at 75% fillers, similar to (112 +/- 22) of a non-releasing composite (TPH) (p > 0.1). The composite with 75% fillers in a NaCl solution (133 mmol/L, pH = 7.4, 37 degrees C) yielded a Ca concentration of (0.65 +/- 0.02) mmol/L and PO(4) of (2.29 +/- 0.07) mmol/L. Relationships were established between ion-release and DCPA volume fraction V(DCPA): Ca = 4.46 V(DCPA)(1.6,) and = 66.9 V(DCPA)(2.6). Nano-DCPA-whisker PO(4) composites had high strength and released high levels of Ca-PO(4) requisite for remineralization. These new nano-composites could provide the needed combination of stress-bearing and caries-inhibiting capabilities.

  3. Effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride solution on veneering particulate filler composite.

    PubMed

    Soeno, K; Matsumura, P H; Atsuta, P M; Kawasaki, K

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the surface morphologic characteristics of prosthodontic composite materials treated with an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) agent. Seven composite materials (Artglass, Axis, Belleglass, Cesead II, Dentacolor, Solidex, and Targis) were examined. Each material was packed into a split plastic mold and was polymerized with a laboratory photo-curing unit. Half of each composite disk surface was coated with a varnish, and the entire surface of the sample was treated with an APF agent. After removal of the varnish, surface roughness values (Ra) for the treated and untreated (ie, previously varnish coated) sides of all specimens were recorded with a surface analyzer and observed with a scanning electron microscope. Ra values for Cesead II, Solidex, and Targis showed a significant increase as a result of treatment with the APF solution. Microphotographs demonstrated that the macroinorganic fillers in the Cesead II and Solidex materials showed substantial dissolution caused by the APF agent. There were no significant statistical differences in the Ra values between the treated and untreated halves for any of the materials containing inorganic fillers composed entirely of diameters up to 1.0 microm. In particular, microphotographs of prepolymerized silica composite (classified as microfilled materials in Axis and Dentacolor) did not reveal any change of the specimen surfaces. The APF agent attacked inorganic fillers in the composite materials. Microfilled material surfaces were insensitive to the agent in comparison with macroinorganic filled material surfaces.

  4. [Effects of different surface conditioning agents on the bond strength of resin-opaque porcelain composite].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjia; Fu, Jing; Liao, Shuang; Su, Naichuan; Wang, Hang; Liao, Yunmao

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the effects of different silane coupling agents on the bond strength between Ceramco3 opaque porcelain and indirect composite resin. Five groups of Co-Cr metal alloy substrates were fabricated according to manufacturer's instruction. The surface of metal alloy with a layer of dental opaque porcelain was heated by fire. After the surface of opaque porcelain was etched, five different surface treatments, i.e. RelyX Ceramic Primer (RCP), Porcelain Bond Activator and SE Bond Primer (mixed with a proportion of 1:1) (PBA), Shofu Porcelain Primer (SPP), SE bond primer (SEP), and no primer treatment (as a control group), were used to combine P60 and opaque porcelain along with resin cement. Shear bond strength of specimens was tested in a universal testing machine. The failure modes of specimens in all groups were observed and classified into four types. Selected specimens were subjected to scanning electron microscope and energy disperse spectroscopy to reveal the relief of the fracture surface and to confirm the failure mode of different types. The experimental results showed that the values of the tested items in all the tested groups were higher than that in the control group. Group PBA exhibited the highest value [(37.52 +/- 2.14) MPa] and this suggested a fact that all of the specimens in group PBA revealed combined failures (failure occurred in metal-porcelain combined surface and within opaque porcelain). Group SPP and RCP showed higher values than SEP (P < 0.05) and most specimens of SPP and RCP performed combined failures (failure occurred in bond surface and within opaque porcelain or composite resin) while all the specimens in group SEP and control group revealed adhesive failures. Conclusions could be drawn that silane coupling agents could reinforce the bond strength of dental composite resin to metal-opaque porcelain substrate. The bond strength between dental composite resin and dental opaque porcelain could

  5. Effects of three surface conditioning techniques on repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composites

    PubMed Central

    Nassoohi, Negin; Kazemi, Haleh; Sadaghiani, Morad; Mansouri, Mona; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Repair bond strength of different composite resins has been assessed in few studies. In addition, reports on the efficacy of surface treatments are debated. Therefore, this in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the effect of three surface treatments on two nanocomposites versus a microhybrid composite. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 135 composite blocks (45 specimens per composite) of microhybrid (Filtek Supreme Z250, 3M ESPE, USA), nanohybrid (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE), and nanofilled (Filtek Supreme Z350, 3M ESPE) were thermocycled (5000 rounds) and then surface roughened (except in a control group of 9 specimens of three composite types). Each composite type was divided into three subgroups of surface treatments: (1) Bur abrading and phosphoric acid (PA) etching, (2) sandblasting and PA etching, and (3) hydrofluoric etching and silane application (n = 15 × 9, complying with ISO TR11405). Composite blocks were repaired with the same composite type but of a different color. Microtensile bond strength and modes of failure were analyzed statistically using two-way analyses of variance, Tukey and Chi-square tests (α = 0.05). Results: There were significant differences between three composite resins (P < 0.0001) and treatment techniques (P < 0.0001). Their interaction was nonsignificant (P = 0.228). The difference between nanofilled and nanohybrid was not significant. However, the microhybrid composite showed a significantly higher bond strength (Tukey P < 0.05). Sandblasting was significantly superior to the other two methods, which were not different from each other. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it seems that microhybrid composite might have higher repair strengths than two evaluated nanocomposites. Among the assessed preparation techniques, sandblasting followed by PA etching might produce the highest bond strength. PMID:26759592

  6. “Evaluation of shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate with three different bonding systems”-An in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anand C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a biomaterial that has been investigated for endodontic applications. With the increased use of MTA in pulp capping, pulpotomy, perforation repair, apexification and obturation, the material that would be placed over MTA as a final restoration is an important matter. As composite resins are one of the most widely used final restorative materials, this study was conducted to evaluate the shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) using three different bonding systems namely the two-step etch and rinse adhesive, the self-etching primer and the All-in-one system. Material and Methods Forty five specimens of white MTA (Angelus) were prepared and randomly divided into three groups of 15 specimens each depending on the bonding systems used respectively. In Group A, a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive or ‘total-etch adhesive’, Adper Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE) and Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) were placed over WMTA. In group B, a Two-step self-etching primer system, Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Medical Inc) and Filtek Z350 were used. In Group C, an All-in-one system, G Bond (GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and Filtek Z350 were used. The shear bond strength was measured for all the specimens. The data obtained was subjected to One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe’s post hoc test. Results The results suggested that the Two-step etch and rinse adhesive when used to bond a composite resin to white MTA gave better bond strength values and the All-in-one exhibited the least bond strength values. Conclusions The placement of composite used with a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive over WMTA as a final restoration may be appropriate. Key words:Composite resins, dentin bonding agents, mineral trioxide aggregate, shear bond strength. PMID:27398177

  7. Calcium phosphate cement - gelatin powder composite testing in canine models: Clinical implications for treatment of bone defects.

    PubMed

    Yomoda, Mitsuhiro; Sobajima, Satoshi; Kasuya, Akihiro; Neo, Masashi

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported the excellent biocompatibility of calcium phosphate cement. However, calcium phosphate cement needs further improvement in order for it to promote bone replacement and eventual bone substitution, as it exhibits slow biodegradability and thus remains in the body over an extended period of time. In this study, we mixed calcium phosphate cement with gelatin powder in order to create a composite containing macropores with interconnectivity, and we then implanted it into canine femurs from the diaphysis to the distal metaphysis. Eight dogs were divided into the sham group, the control (C0) group with 100 wt% calcium phosphate cement, the C10 group with 90 wt% calcium phosphate cement and 10 wt% gelatin powder, and the C15 group with 85 wt% calcium phosphate cement and 15 wt% gelatin powder. Bone replaceability in C10 and C15 at 3 and 6 months was evaluated by radiography, micro-CT, histomorphometry, and mineral apposition rate. New bone formation was seen in C10 and C15 although that was not seen in C0 at six months. The mineral apposition rate was significantly higher in C15 than in C10 in both the diaphysis and metaphysis, and the composite was found to have excellent biodegradability and bone replaceability in canine subjects. As the composite is easily and rapidly prepared, it is likely to become a new bone substitute for use in clinical settings.

  8. Performance analysis of bonded composite doublers on aircraft structures

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.

    1995-08-01

    Researchers contend that composite repairs (or structural reinforcement doublers) offer numerous advantages over metallic patches including corrosion resistance, light weight, high strength, elimination of rivets, and time savings in installation. Their use in commercial aviation has been stifled by uncertainties surrounding their application, subsequent inspection and long-term endurance. The process of repairing or reinforcing airplane structures is time consuming and the design is dependent upon an accompanying stress and fatigue analysis. A repair that is too stiff may result in a loss of fatigue life, continued growth of the crack being repaired, and the initiation of a new flaw in the undesirable high stress field around the patch. Uncertainties in load spectrums used to design repairs exacerbates these problems as does the use of rivets to apply conventional doublers. Many of these repair or structural reinforcement difficulties can be addressed through the use of composite doublers. Primary among unknown entities are the effects of non-optimum installations and the certification of adequate inspection procedures. This paper presents on overview of a program intended to introduce composite doubler technology to the US commercial aircraft fleet. In this project, a specific composite application has been chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Through the use of laboratory test structures and flight demonstrations on an in-service L-1011 airplane, this study is investigating composite doubler design, fabrication, installation, structural integrity, and non-destructive evaluation. In addition to providing an overview of the L-1011 project, this paper focuses on a series of fatigue and strength tests which have been conducted in order to study the damage tolerance of composite doublers. Test results to-date are presented.

  9. Effect of different surface treatments on the repair bond strength of indirect composites.

    PubMed

    Souza, Evelise M; Francischone, Carlos E; Powers, John M; Rached, Rodrigo N; Vieira, Sergio

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the tensile bond strength of indirect composites repaired with different surface treatments and direct composites. 180 specimens were prepared with Targis, belleGlass HP and Sculpture indirect composites, light-activated and post-cured according to the manufacturers' recommendations. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37 degrees C. The bonding surfaces were prepared with air abrasion, hydrofluoric acid or hydrofluoric acid followed by a neutralizing solution. All the treated surfaces were subject to the application of a silane and a bonding agent before the repair procedures with Tetric Ceram and Tetric Flow for the Targis specimens, Herculite XRV and Revolution for the belleGlass HP specimens and Sculp-It and Flow-It for Sculpture specimens. The tensile bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine at cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The type of fracture was observed under a light microscope at x40 magnification. Data were analyzed by a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (P < 0.05). Targis showed a statistically higher repair bond strength than belleGlass HP and Sculpture, which were not significantly different from each other. Air abrasion increased the repair bond strength of belleGlass HP and Sculpture. For Targis, all the surface treatments resulted in similar repair bond strength. The different viscosity of repair composites did not affect the repair of indirect composites. Fractured surfaces showed mostly adhesive failures, mainly with hydrofluoric acid treatment.

  10. In vitro marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restorations bonded to dentin cavities.

    PubMed

    Rahiotis, Christos; Tzoutzas, John; Kakaboura, Afrodite

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restoratives bonded to dentin in a cylindrical cavity model. The buccal enamel of 64 human premolars was removed and cylindrical cavities 3 mm in diameter and 1.3 mm in depth were prepared on each dentin surface. The cavities were divided into 8 groups of 8 cavities each and restored according to the manufacturers' instructions with the following adhesive/composite systems: Bond 1/Alert, Stae/Glacier, OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable, One-Step/Pyramid, Solidbond/Solitaire, Prime&Bond NT/Surefil, One Coat Bond/Synergy, and Scotchbond 1/Z250. The composite surfaces were pressed against mylar strips, covered with cover slips, and photopolymerized in a single increment for 40 s. The restorations were polished with wet SiC papers of 320 to 1000 grit size to expose dentin margins. The marginal adaptation was evaluated immediately after photopolymerization and again after 1 week of storage in water at 37 +/- 1 degrees C. Evaluation was performed under a metallographic microscope at 200X magnification by recording the frequency of gap-free restorations (GF), the percentage length of the debonded margins relative to the cavity periphery (DM), the width of the maximum marginal gap (MG), and the marginal index (MI = MG x DM / 100). The results were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U-test at alpha = 0.05. No incidence of gaps was found in 62.5% of One Coat Bond/Synergy and 37.5% of OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable restorations. All the other restorative systems exhibited restorations with gaps. One Coat Bond/Synergy, Scotchbond 1/Z250, and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable were the groups with the lowest DM values, while Stae/Glacier showed the highest DM values. One Coat Bond/Synergy and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable revealed the lowest MI values and Stae/Glacier the highest. No statistically significant differences were recorded between

  11. Effect of Chemical Structure and Composition of the Resin Phase on Vinyl Conversion of Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-filled Composites

    PubMed Central

    Skrtic, D.; Antonucci, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the effect of chemical structure and composition of the polymer matrix on the degree of vinyl conversion (DC) of copolymers (unfilled resins) and their amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) composites attained upon photo-polymerization. The DC can also be an indicator of the relative potential of these polymeric materials to leach out into the oral environment un-reacted monomers that could adversely affect their biocompatibility. The following resins were examined: 1) 2,2-bis[p-(2′-hydroxy-3′-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (1:1 mass ratio; BT resin) combined with hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA; BTH resin) and with HEMA and zirconyl dimethacrylate (BTHZ resin), 2) urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA)/HEMA resins, and 3) pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDMA)/TEGDMA (PT resin). To make composite specimens, resins were mixed with a mass fraction of 40 % zirconia-hybridized ACP. Copolymers and their composites were evaluated by near infra-red spectroscopy for DC after 1 d and 28 d post-cure at 23 °C. Inclusion of HEMA into the BT and UDMA resins yielded copolymers and composites with the highest DCs. The significantly lower DCs of PT copolymers and their composites are attributed to the rigid aromatic core structure, tetra-vinyl functionality and limited methacrylate side-chain flexibility of the surface-active PMGDMA monomer. There was, however, an increase in the 28 d DC for the PT materials as there was for the BTHZ system. Surprisingly, the usual decrease observed in DC in going from unfilled polymer to composite was reversed for the PT system. PMID:18714369

  12. Effect of warm air on the shear bond strength of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Allen, J D; Breeding, L C; Pashley, D H

    1992-04-01

    This investigation evaluated the operating characteristics of a recently introduced tooth dryer and its effect on the bond strength of three composite resins to etched enamel. The effect of varying air pressure, distance from the tip of the tooth dryer, and distance laterally from mid-air stream on temperature were measured using a rapid-response thermocouple. Specimens were subjected to shear forces either immediately after bonding or after 5 days of water storage. The air stream required from 32 to 41 seconds to reach maximal temperature; however, more than 90% of the maximal temperature was obtained in 20 seconds. There was an increase in temperature with increased air pressure and a decrease in temperature with increasing distance from the tip. The temperature dropped rapidly laterally from the center of the air stream. The shear bond strength measurements were significantly higher for the specimens prepared using the tooth dryer for one composite resin tested immediately after bonding; there was no statistically significant difference for the other resins. The effect of warm air on the shear bond strength of composite resins to etched enamel may be dependent on the resin used and the time between bonding and testing.

  13. Effect of postoperative peroxide bleaching on the stability of composite to enamel and dentin bonds.

    PubMed

    Dudek, M; Roubickova, A; Comba, L; Housova, D; Bradna, P

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of peroxide bleaching gel on the durability of the adhesive bond between composite material, enamel, and dentin created with the etch-and-rinse adhesive Gluma Comfort Bond (GLU) and with the self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (CLE), Adper Prompt (ADP), and iBond (IBO). The adhesives were applied to flattened enamel and dentin of extracted human molars and built up with a microhybrid composite (Charisma). After 25 eight-hour cycles of bleaching with a 20% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel (Opalescence PF 20), the shear bond strength was measured and compared with one-day and two-month control specimens stored in water. The data were analyzed using nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis statistics (p<0.05). Detailed fractographic analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy. The bleaching gel significantly decreased the bond strength on both enamel and dentin for the simplified single-step self-etch adhesives ADP and IBO and markedly affected a fracture pattern of ADP specimens at the periphery of their bonded area. The results of our study indicate that the durability of adhesive restorations can be detrimentally influenced by carbamide peroxide bleaching and that different adhesives show varying sensitivity levels to the bleaching gel.

  14. Mixed-mode cyclic debonding of adhesively bonded composite joints. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezaizadeh, M. A.; Mall, S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental-analytical investigation to characterize the cyclic failure mechanism of a simple composite-to-composite bonded joint is conducted. The cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens of graphite/epoxy adherend bonded with EC-3445 adhesive are tested under combined mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, fatigue failure occurs in the form of cyclic debonding. The cyclic debond growth rates are measured. The finite element analysis is employed to compute the mode 1, mode 2, and total strain energy release rates (i.e., GI, GII, and GT). A wide range of mixed-mode loading, i.e., GI/GII ranging from 0.03 to 0.38, is obtained. The total strain energy release rate, G sub T, appeared to be the driving parameter for cyclic debonding in the tested composite bonded system.

  15. Bio-inspired carbon nanotube-polymer composite yarns with hydrogen bond-mediated lateral interactions.

    PubMed

    Beese, Allison M; Sarkar, Sourangsu; Nair, Arun; Naraghi, Mohammad; An, Zhi; Moravsky, Alexander; Loutfy, Raouf O; Buehler, Markus J; Nguyen, SonBinh T; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2013-04-23

    Polymer composite yarns containing a high loading of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) have been developed in which the inherent acrylate-based organic coating on the surface of the DWNT bundles interacts strongly with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) through an extensive hydrogen-bond network. This design takes advantage of a toughening mechanism seen in spider silk and collagen, which contain an abundance of hydrogen bonds that can break and reform, allowing for large deformation while maintaining structural stability. Similar to that observed in natural materials, unfolding of the polymeric matrix at large deformations increases ductility without sacrificing stiffness. As the PVA content in the composite increases, the stiffness and energy to failure of the composite also increases up to an optimal point, beyond which mechanical performance in tension decreases. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations confirm this trend, showing the dominance of nonproductive hydrogen bonding between PVA molecules at high PVA contents, which lubricates the interface between DWNTs.