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Sample records for phosphate transport system

  1. Uptake of glycerol 3-phosphate and some of its analogs by the hexose phosphate transport system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Guth, A; Engel, R; Tropp, B E

    1980-01-01

    The hexose phosphate transport system transported glycerol 3-phosphate and its analogs 3,4-dihydroxybutyl-1-phosphonate, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, and 3-hydroxy-4-oxobutyl-1-phosphonate. PMID:6995450

  2. Role of Phosphate Transport System Component PstB1 in Phosphate Internalization by Nostoc punctiforme

    PubMed Central

    Hudek, L.; Premachandra, D.; Webster, W. A. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bacteria, limited phosphate availability promotes the synthesis of active uptake systems, such as the Pst phosphate transport system. To understand the mechanisms that facilitate phosphate accumulation in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme, phosphate transport systems were identified, revealing a redundancy of Pst phosphate uptake systems that exists across three distinct operons. Four separate PstB system components were identified. pstB1 was determined to be a suitable target for creating phenotypic mutations that could result in the accumulation of excessive levels of phosphate through its overexpression or in a reduction of the capacity to accumulate phosphate through its deletion. Using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), it was determined that pstB1 mRNA levels increased significantly over 64 h in cells cultured in 0 mM added phosphate and decreased significantly in cells exposed to high (12.8 mM) phosphate concentrations compared to the level in cells cultured under normal (0.8 mM) conditions. Possible compensation for the loss of PstB1 was observed when pstB2, pstB3, and pstB4 mRNA levels increased, particularly in cells starved of phosphate. The overexpression of pstB1 increased phosphate uptake by N. punctiforme and was shown to functionally complement the loss of PstB in E. coli PstB knockout (PstB−) mutants. The knockout of pstB1 in N. punctiforme did not have a significant effect on cellular phosphate accumulation or growth for the most part, which is attributed to the compensation for the loss of PstB1 by alterations in the pstB2, pstB3, and pstB4 mRNA levels. This study provides novel in vivo evidence that PstB1 plays a functional role in phosphate uptake in N. punctiforme. IMPORTANCE Cyanobacteria have been evolving over 3.5 billion years and have become highly adept at growing under limiting nutrient levels. Phosphate is crucial for the survival and prosperity of all organisms. In bacteria, limited phosphate availability promotes

  3. Ontogenesis of epithelial phosphate transport systems in goats.

    PubMed

    Huber, Korinna; Roesler, Uta; Muscher, Alexandra; Hansen, Kathrin; Widiyono, Irkham; Pfeffer, Ernst; Breves, Gerhard

    2003-02-01

    The rapid development of precocial goats in the first weeks after birth requires an adequate adaptation of phosphate transport systems to maintain the P homeostasis at each developmental stage. Here we examined the age-related development of Na+-Pi transport systems in small intestines, kidneys, and parotid glands of goats. Kinetic parameters were determined by brush-border membrane vesicle uptake studies, and relative expression of NaPi type II mRNA and protein was recorded by molecular biological methods. High intestinal Pi transport capacity was already present on the first day of life. Within the first 3 wk of life there seemed to be a change in the type of Na+-dependent Pi transporter, and NaPi IIb was expressed increasingly up to the fifth month of life. Renal Na+-Pi transport capacity was also high at birth, and this was associated with high expression levels of NaPi IIa mRNA, indicating the important role of this transporter for renal Pi reabsorption. At weaning an increase in both intestinal and renal Na+-Pi transport balanced the increasing requirements for Pi to establish the endogenous Pi cycle. Salivary Pi concentration and parotid NaPi II mRNA rose markedly to guarantee an adequate Pi supply for rumen microbes. We concluded that the high demand for Pi in young goats was assured by high basal Na+-Pi transport capacity of small intestines and kidney expressed continuously during ontogenesis.

  4. Modeling transport kinetics in clinoptilolite-phosphate rock systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. R.; Ming, D. W.; Hossner, L. R.; Henninger, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Nutrient release in clinoptilolite-phosphate rock (Cp-PR) systems occurs through dissolution and cation-exchange reactions. Investigating the kinetics of these reactions expands our understanding of nutrient release processes. Research was conducted to model transport kinetics of nutrient release in Cp-PR systems. The objectives were to identify empirical models that best describe NH4, K, and P release and define diffusion-controlling processes. Materials included a Texas clinoptilolite (Cp) and North Carolina phosphate rock (PR). A continuous-flow thin-disk technique was used. Models evaluated included zero order, first order, second order, parabolic diffusion, simplified Elovich, Elovich, and power function. The power-function, Elovich, and parabolic-diffusion models adequately described NH4, K, and P release. The power-function model was preferred because of its simplicity. Models indicated nutrient release was diffusion controlled. Primary transport processes controlling nutrient release for the time span observed were probably the result of a combination of several interacting transport mechanisms.

  5. Modeling transport kinetics in clinoptilolite-phosphate rock systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. R.; Ming, D. W.; Hossner, L. R.; Henninger, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Nutrient release in clinoptilolite-phosphate rock (Cp-PR) systems occurs through dissolution and cation-exchange reactions. Investigating the kinetics of these reactions expands our understanding of nutrient release processes. Research was conducted to model transport kinetics of nutrient release in Cp-PR systems. The objectives were to identify empirical models that best describe NH4, K, and P release and define diffusion-controlling processes. Materials included a Texas clinoptilolite (Cp) and North Carolina phosphate rock (PR). A continuous-flow thin-disk technique was used. Models evaluated included zero order, first order, second order, parabolic diffusion, simplified Elovich, Elovich, and power function. The power-function, Elovich, and parabolic-diffusion models adequately described NH4, K, and P release. The power-function model was preferred because of its simplicity. Models indicated nutrient release was diffusion controlled. Primary transport processes controlling nutrient release for the time span observed were probably the result of a combination of several interacting transport mechanisms.

  6. Characterization of Two Inducible Phosphate Transport Systems in Rhizobium tropici

    PubMed Central

    Botero, Lina M.; Al-Niemi, Thamir S.; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2000-01-01

    Rhizobium tropici forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Like other legume-Rhizobium symbioses, the bean-R. tropici association is sensitive to the availability of phosphate (Pi). To better understand phosphorus movement between the bacteroid and the host plant, Pi transport was characterized in R. tropici. We observed two Pi transport systems, a high-affinity system and a low-affinity system. To facilitate the study of these transport systems, a Tn5B22 transposon mutant lacking expression of the high-affinity transport system was isolated and used to characterize the low-affinity transport system in the absence of the high-affinity system. The Km and Vmax values for the low-affinity system were estimated to be 34 ± 3 μM Pi and 118 ± 8 nmol of Pi · min−1 · mg (dry weight) of cells−1, respectively, and the Km and Vmax values for the high-affinity system were 0.45 ± 0.01 μM Pi and 86 ± 5 nmol of Pi · min−1 · mg (dry weight) of cells−1, respectively. Both systems were inducible by Pi starvation and were also shock sensitive, which indicated that there was a periplasmic binding-protein component. Neither transport system appeared to be sensitive to the proton motive force dissipator carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, but Pi transport through both systems was eliminated by the ATPase inhibitor N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide; the Pi transport rate was correlated with the intracellular ATP concentration. Also, Pi movement through both systems appeared to be unidirectional, as no efflux or exchange was observed with either the wild-type strain or the mutant. These properties suggest that both Pi transport systems are ABC type systems. Analysis of the transposon insertion site revealed that the interrupted gene exhibited a high level of homology with kdpE, which in several bacteria encodes a cytoplasmic response regulator that governs responses to low potassium contents and/or changes in medium

  7. The Phn system of Mycobacterium smegmatis: a second high-affinity ABC-transporter for phosphate.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Susanne; Tran, Sieu L; Cook, Gregory M

    2006-11-01

    Uptake of inorganic phosphate, an essential but often limiting nutrient, in bacteria is usually accomplished by the high-affinity ABC-transport system Pst. Pathogenic species of mycobacteria contain several copies of the genes encoding the Pst system (pstSCAB), and two of the encoded proteins, PstS1 and PstS2, have been shown to be virulence factors in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The fast-growing Mycobacterium smegmatis contains only a single copy of the pst operon. This study reports the biochemical and molecular characterization of a second high-affinity phosphate transport system, designated Phn. The Phn system is encoded by a three-gene operon that constitutes the components of a putative ABC-type phosphonate/phosphate transport system. Expression studies using phnD- and pstS-lacZ transcriptional fusions showed that both operons were induced when the culture entered phosphate limitation, indicating a role for both systems in phosphate uptake at low extracellular concentrations. Deletion mutants in either phnD or pstS failed to grow in minimal medium with a 10 mM phosphate concentration, while the isogenic wild-type strain mc(2)155 grew at micromolar phosphate concentrations. Analysis of the kinetics of phosphate transport in the wild-type and mutant strains led to the proposal that the Phn and Pst systems are both high-affinity phosphate transporters with similar affinities for phosphate (i.e. apparent K(m) values between 40 and 90 muM P(i)). The Phn system of M. smegmatis appears to be unique in that, unlike previously identified Phn systems, it does not recognize phosphonates or phosphite as substrates.

  8. Characterizing the hexose-6-phosphate transport system of Vibrio cholerae, a utilization system for carbon and phosphate sources.

    PubMed

    Moisi, Manuel; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Tutz, Sarah; Seper, Andrea; Schild, Stefan; Reidl, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    The facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae transits between the gastrointestinal tract of its host and aquatic reservoirs. V. cholerae adapts to different situations by the timely coordinated expression of genes during its life cycle. We recently identified a subclass of genes that are induced at late stages of infection. Initial characterization demonstrated that some of these genes facilitate the transition of V. cholerae from host to environmental conditions. Among these genes are uptake systems lacking detailed characterization or correct annotation. In this study, we comprehensively investigated the function of the VCA0682-to-VCA0687 gene cluster, which was previously identified as in vivo induced. The results presented here demonstrate that the operon encompassing open reading frames VCA0685 to VCA0687 encodes an ABC transport system for hexose-6-phosphates with Km values ranging from 0.275 to 1.273 μM for glucose-6P and fructose-6P, respectively. Expression of the operon is induced by the presence of hexose-6P controlled by the transcriptional activator VCA0682, representing a UhpA homolog. Finally, we provide evidence that the operon is essential for the utilization of hexose-6P as a C and P source. Thereby, a physiological role can be assigned to hexose-6P uptake, which correlates with increased fitness of V. cholerae after a transition from the host into phosphate-limiting environments.

  9. A second transport system for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Argast, M; Ludtke, D; Silhavy, T J; Boos, W

    1978-01-01

    Strains containing phage Mucts inserted into glpT were isolated as fosfomycin-resistant clones. These mutants did not transport sn-glycerol-3-phosphate, and they lacked GLPT, a protein previously shown to be a product of the glpT operon. By plating these mutants on sn-glycerol-3-phosphate at 43 degrees C, we isolated revertants that regained the capacity to grow on G3P. Most of these revertants did not map in glpT and did not regain GLPT. These revertants exhibited a highly efficient uptake system for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate within an apparent Km of 5 micron. In addition, three new proteins (GP 1, 2, and 3) appeared in the periplasm of these revertants. None of these proteins were antigentically related to GLPT. However, like GLPT, GP1 exhibits abnormal behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. GP 2 is an efficient binding protein. The new uptake system showed different characteristics than the system that is coded for by the glpT operon. It was inhibited neither by phosphate nor fosfomycin. So far, none of the systems that transport organic acids in Escherichia coli could be implicated in the new sn-glycerol-3-phosphate uptake activity. The mutation ugp+, which was responsible for the appearance of the new transport system and the appearance of GP 1, 2, and 3 in the periplasm was cotransducible with araD by phage P1 transduction and was recessive in merodiploids. Images PMID:363686

  10. Fate and transport of phosphate from an onsite wastewater system in Beaufort County, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Charles; O'Driscoll, Mike; Deal, Nancy; Lindbo, David

    2014-01-01

    The objectives for the study described in this article were to evaluate the fate and transport of onsite wastewater system (OWS)-derived phosphate from a residential system in Beaufort County, North Carolina, and to determine if current OWS setback regulations are sufficient to prevent elevated phosphate discharge to surface waters. Piezometers were installed in nests at different depths adjacent to drain-field trenches and up- and down-gradient of a residential OWS. Groundwater and septic effluent phosphate concentrations, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and electrical conductivity were monitored every two months from February 2011 to October 2011 (five times). The mean groundwater phosphate concentration beneath the OWS (3.05 +/- 0.74 mg/L) was not significantly different than septic effluent (2.97 +/- 0.76 mg/L) and was elevated relative to background groundwater (0.14 +/- 0.12 mg/L). Groundwater phosphate concentrations were inversely related (r2 = .83) to distance from the system. Onsite system setback regulations may have to be increased (>30 m) in some areas to ensure groundwater phosphate concentrations are reduced to background concentrations before discharge to surface waters.

  11. Periplasmic protein related to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Silhavy, T J; Hartig-Beecken, I; Boos, W

    1976-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of shock fluids of Escherichia coli K-12 revealed the presence of a periplasmic protein related to sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport (GLPT) that is under the regulation of glpR, the regulatory gene of the glp regulon. Mutants selected for their resistance to phosphonomycin and found to be defective in sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport either did not produce GLPT or produced it in reduced amounts. Other mutations exhibited no apparent effect of GLPT. Transductions of glpT+ nalA phage P1 into these mutants and selection for growth on sn-glycerol-3-phosphate revealed a 50% cotransduction frequency to nalA. Reversion of mutants taht did not produce GLPT to growth on sn-glycerol-3-phosphate resulted in strains that produce GLPT. This suggests a close relationship of GLPT to the glpT gene and to sn-glycerol-3-phosphate transport. Attempts to demonstrate binding activity of GLPT in crude shock fluid towards sn-glycerol-3-phosphate have failed so far. However, all shock fluids, independent of their GLPT content, exhibited an enzymatic activity that hydrolyzes under the conditions of the binding assay, 30 to 60% of the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate to glycerol and inorganic orthophosphate. Images PMID:770459

  12. Localization of Phosphoglucose Isomerase in Escherichia coli and Its Relation to the Induction of the Hexose Phosphate Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Ilan

    1972-01-01

    The localization of phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) was studied in relation to the induction of hexose phosphate uptake in Escherichia coli. The uptake system is induced only by extracellular glucose-6-phosphate (G6P); there is no induction by intracellular G6P. Fructose-6-phosphate (F6P) is an indirect inducer, and isomerization of F6P to G6P must occur before induction. PGI has been considered to be an internal enzyme; therefore, uptake of F6P by noninduced cells and leakage of the G6P formed would be required for induction. In this study, it was concluded that part of the PGI activity is located in the cell surface because: (i) uninduced, intact cells are able to convert F6P to G6P, whereas the activity of G6P dehydrogenase is not detectable; (ii) when cells are subjected to osmotic shock, about 10% of the PGI activity is found in the shock fluid; and (iii) sorbitol-6-phosphate (S6P) inhibits both PGI activity of whole cells and the induction of hexose phosphate transport system by F6P. S6P was not taken by intact cells. The data indicate that the isomerization of F6P to G6P can take place on the cell surface, and this explains the indirect induction of hexose phosphate transport by F6P. PMID:4344919

  13. Copper tolerance mediated by polyphosphate degradation and low-affinity inorganic phosphate transport system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Grillo-Puertas, Mariana; Schurig-Briccio, Lici Ariane; Rodríguez-Montelongo, Luisa; Rintoul, María Regina; Rapisarda, Viviana Andrea

    2014-03-19

    Metal tolerance in bacteria has been related to polyP in a model in which heavy metals stimulate the polymer hydrolysis, forming metal-phosphate complexes that are exported. As previously described in our laboratory, Escherichia coli cells grown in media containing a phosphate concentration >37 mM maintained an unusually high polyphosphate (polyP) level in stationary phase. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the influence of polyP levels as the involvement of low-affinity inorganic phosphate transport (Pit) system in E. coli copper tolerance. PolyP levels were modulated by the media phosphate concentration and/or using mutants in polyP metabolism. Stationary phase wild-type cells grown in high phosphate medium were significantly more tolerant to copper than those grown in sufficient phosphate medium. Copper addition to tolerant cells induced polyP degradation by PPX (an exopolyphosphatase), phosphate efflux and membrane polarization. ppk-ppx- (unable to synthesize/degrade polyP), ppx- (unable to degrade polyP) and Pit system mutants were highly sensitive to metal even in high phosphate media. In exponential phase, CopA and polyP-Pit system would act simultaneously to detoxify the metal or one could be sufficient to safeguard the absence of the other. Our results support a mechanism for copper detoxification in exponential and stationary phases of E. coli, involving Pit system and degradation of polyP. Data reflect the importance of the environmental phosphate concentration in the regulation of the microbial physiological state.

  14. The biochemical characterization of two phosphate transport systems in Phytomonas serpens.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Bernardo, Rodrigo; Gomes-Vieira, André Luiz; Carvalho-Kelly, Luiz Fernando; Russo-Abrahão, Thais; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an essential nutrient for all organisms because it is required for a variety of biochemical processes, such as signal transduction and the synthesis of phosphate-containing biomolecules. Assays of (32)Pi uptake performed in the absence or in the presence of Na(+) indicated the existence of a Na(+)-dependent and a Na(+)-independent Pi transporter in Phytomonas serpens. Phylogenetic analysis of two hypothetical protein sequences of Phytomonas (EM1) showed similarities to the high-affinity Pi transporters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Pho84, a Na(+)-independent Pi transporter, and Pho89, a Na(+)-dependent Pi transporter. Plasma membrane depolarization by FCCP, an H(+) ionophore, strongly decreased Pi uptake via both Na(+)-independent and Na(+)-dependent carriers, indicating that a membrane potential is essential for Pi influx. In addition, the furosemide-sensitive Na(+)-pump activity in the cells grown in low Pi conditions was found to be higher than the activity detected in the plasma membrane of cells cultivated at high Pi concentration, suggesting that the up-regulation of the Na(+)-ATPase pump could be related to the increase of Pi uptake by the Pho89p Na(+):Pi symporter. Here we characterize for the first time two inorganic phosphate transporters powered by Na(+) and H(+) gradients and activated by low Pi availability in the phytopathogen P. serpens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Sphingosine-1-phosphate Transporter Spns2 in Immune System Function

    PubMed Central

    Nijnik, Anastasia; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Chen, Jing; Raisen, Claire; Mottram, Lynda; Lucas, Mark; Estabel, Jeanne; Ryder, Edward; Adissu, Hibret; Adams, Niels C.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; White, Jacqueline K.; Steel, Karen P.; Dougan, Gordon; Hancock, Robert E.W.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is lipid messenger involved in the regulation of embryonic development, immune system functions, and many other physiological processes. However the mechanisms of S1P transport across cellular membranes remain poorly understood with several ATP-binding cassette family members and the spinster 2 (Spns2) member of the major facilitator superfamily known to mediate S1P transport in cell culture. Spns2 was also shown to control S1P activities in zebrafish in vivo and to play a critical role in zebrafish cardiovascular development. However the in vivo roles of Spns2 in mammals and its involvement in the different S1P-dependent physiological processes have not been investigated. Here we characterized Spns2-null mouse line carrying the Spns2tm1a(KOMP)Wtsi allele (Spns2tm1a). The Spns2tm1a/tm1a animals were viable, indicating a divergence in Spns2 function from its zebrafish orthologue. However the immunological phenotype of the Spns2tm1a/tm1a mice closely mimicked the phenotypes of partial S1P deficiency and impaired S1P-dependent lymphocyte trafficking, with a depletion of lymphocytes in circulation, an increase in mature single-positive T cells in the thymus, and a selective reduction in mature B cells in the spleen and bone marrow. Spns2 activity in the non-hematopoietic cells was critical for normal lymphocyte development and localization. Overall Spns2tm1a/tm1a resulted in impaired humoral immune responses to immunization. This work thus demonstrated a physiological role for Spns2 in mammalian immune system functions but not in cardiovascular development. Other components of the S1P signaling network are investigated as drug targets for immunosuppressive therapy, but the selective action of Spns2 may present an advantage in this regard. PMID:22664872

  16. Intestinal phosphate absorption is mediated by multiple transport systems in rats.

    PubMed

    Candeal, Eduardo; Caldas, Yupanqui A; Guillén, Natalia; Levi, Moshe; Sorribas, Víctor

    2017-04-01

    Apical inorganic phosphate (Pi) transport in the small intestine seems to be mainly mediated by the sodium/Pi cotransporter NaPi2b. To verify this role, we have studied the combined effects of pH, phosphonoformate, and Pi deprivation on intestinal Pi transport. Rats were fed, ad libitum, three fodders containing 1.2, 0.6, or 0.1% Pi for 1, 5, or 10 days. Pi deprivation (0.1%) increased both sodium-activated and sodium-independent Pi transport in brush-border membrane vesicles from the duodenum and jejunum for all three times. Alkaline pH inhibited Pi transport, despite the increasing concentration of [Formula: see text] (NaPi2b substrate), whereas acidity increased transport when the concentration of the PiT1/PiT2 substrate, [Formula: see text], was at its highest. The effect of Pi deprivation was maximal at acid pH, but both basal and upregulated transport were inhibited (70%) with phosphonoformate, an inhibitor of NaPi2b. PiT2 and NaPi2b protein abundance increased after 24 h of Pi deprivation in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, whereas PiT1 required 5-10 days in the duodenum and jejunum. Therefore, whereas transporter expressions are partially correlated with Pi transport adaptation, the pH effect precludes NaPi2b, and phosphonoformic acid precludes PiT1 and PiT2 as the main transporters. Transport and transporter expression were also inconsistent when feeding was limited to 4 h daily, because the 1.2% Pi diet paradoxically increased Pi transport in the duodenum and jejunum, but NaPi2b and PiT1 expressions only increased with the 0.1% diet. These findings suggest the presence of a major transporter that carries [Formula: see text] and is inhibited by phosphonoformate.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The combined effects of dietary inorganic phosphate (Pi) content, pH, and phosphonoformate inhibition suggest that the resulting apical Pi transport in the small intestine cannot be fully explained by the presence of NaPi2b, PiT1, or PiT2. We provide evidence of the presence of a

  17. Characterization of a Novel Two-Component Regulatory System, HptRS, the Regulator for the Hexose Phosphate Transport System in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo Youn; Kim, Jong Wan; Moon, Bo Youn; Lee, Juyeun; Fortin, Ye Ji; Austin, Frank W.; Yang, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hexose phosphate is an important carbon source within the cytoplasm of host cells. Bacterial pathogens that invade, survive, and multiply within various host epithelial cells exploit hexose phosphates from the host cytoplasm through the hexose phosphate transport (HPT) system to gain energy and synthesize cellular components. In Escherichia coli, the HPT system consists of a two-component regulatory system (UhpAB) and a phosphate sensor protein (UhpC) that tightly regulate expression of a hexose phosphate transporter (UhpT). Although growing evidence suggests that Staphylococcus aureus also can invade, survive, and multiply within various host epithelial cells, the genetic elements involved in the HPT system in S. aureus have not been characterized yet. In this study, we identified and characterized the HPT system in S. aureus that includes the hptRS (a novel two-component regulatory system), the hptA (a putative phosphate sensor), and the uhpT (a hexose phosphate transporter) genes. The hptA, hptRS, and uhpT markerless deletion mutants were generated by an allelic replacement method using a modified pMAD-CM-GFPuv vector system. We demonstrated that both hptA and hptRS are required to positively regulate transcription of uhpT in response to extracellular phosphates, such as glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), and fosfomycin. Mutational studies revealed that disruption of the hptA, hptRS, or uhpT gene impaired the growth of bacteria when the available carbon source was limited to G6P, impaired survival/multiplication within various types of host cells, and increased resistance to fosfomycin. The results of this study suggest that the HPT system plays an important role in adaptation of S. aureus within the host cells and could be an important target for developing novel antistaphylococcal therapies. PMID:25644013

  18. Phosphate transport in membrane vesicles from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Konings, W N; Rosenberg, H

    1978-04-04

    Escherichia coli strain AN710 possesses only the PIT system for phosphate transport. Membrane vesicles from this strain, which contain phosphate internally, perform exchange and active transport of phosphate. The energy for active transport is supplied by the respiratory chain with ascorbate phenazine methosulphate as electron donor. To a lesser extent also the oxidation of D-lactate energizes phosphate transport; the oxidation of succinate is only marginally effective. Phosphate transport is driven by the proton-motive force and in particular by the pH gradient across the membrane. This view is supported by the observation that phosphate transport is stimulated by valinomycin, inhibited by nigericin and abolished by the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Neither inhibitor affects phosphate exchange. The phosphate analogue arsenate inhibits both the exchange reaction and active transport. Both processes are stimulated by K+ and Mg2+, the highest activities being observed with both ions present. Membrane vesicles have also been isolated from Escherichia coli K10, a strain which possesses only a functional PST phosphate transport system. These vesicles perform neither exchange nor active transport of phosphate, although active transport of amino acids is observed in the presence of ascorbate-phenazine methosulphate or D-lactate.

  19. Phosphate-dependent regulation of the low- and high-affinity transport systems in the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Santos-Beneit, Fernando; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Franco-Domínguez, Etelvina; Martín, Juan F

    2008-08-01

    The transport of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) is essential for the growth of all organisms. The metabolism of soil-dwelling Streptomyces species, and their ability to produce antibiotics and other secondary metabolites, are strongly influenced by the availability of phosphate. The transcriptional regulation of the SCO4138 and SCO1845 genes of Streptomyces coelicolor was studied. These genes encode the two putative low-affinity P(i) transporters PitH1 and PitH2, respectively. Expression of these genes and that of the high-affinity transport system pstSCAB follows a sequential pattern in response to phosphate deprivation, as shown by coupling their promoters to a luciferase reporter gene. Expression of pitH2, but not that of pap-pitH1 (a bicistronic transcript), is dependent upon the response regulator PhoP. PhoP binds to specific sequences consisting of direct repeats of 11 nt in the promoter of pitH2, but does not bind to the pap-pitH1 promoter, which lacks these direct repeats for PhoP recognition. The transcription start point of the pitH2 promoter was identified by primer extension analyses, and the structure of the regulatory sequences in the PhoP-protected DNA region was established. It consists of four central direct repeats flanked by two other less conserved repeats. A model for PhoP regulation of this promoter is proposed based on the four promoter DNA-PhoP complexes detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and footprinting studies.

  20. Physiological Roles of the Dual Phosphate Transporter Systems in Low and High Phosphate Conditions and in Capsule Maintenance of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaqi J.; Sinha, Dhriti; Wayne, Kyle J.; Winkler, Malcolm E.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike most bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) has two evolutionarily distinct ABC transporters (Pst1 and Pst2) for inorganic phosphate (Pi) uptake. The genes encoding a two-component regulator (PnpRS) are located immediately upstream of the pst1 operon. Both the pst1 and pst2 operons encode putative PhoU-family regulators (PhoU1 and PhoU2) at their ends. This study addresses why S. pneumoniae contains dual Pi uptake systems and the regulation and contribution of the Pst1 and Pst2 systems in conditions of high (mM) Pi amount and low (μM) Pi amount. We show that in unencapsulated mutants, both pst1 and pst2 can be deleted, and Pi is taken up by a third Na+/Pi co-transporter, designated as NptA. In contrast, either pst1 or pst2 is unexpectedly required for the growth of capsule producing strains. We used a combination of mutational analysis, transcript level determinations by qRT-PCR and RNA-Seq, assays for cellular PnpR~P amounts by SDS-PAGE, and pulse-Pi uptake experiments to study the regulation of Pi uptake. In high Pi medium, PhoU2 serves as the master negative regulator of Pst2 transporter function and PnpR~P levels (post-transcriptionally). ΔphoU2 mutants have high PnpR~P levels and induction of the pst1 operon, poor growth, and sensitivity to antibiotics, possibly due to high Pi accumulation. In low Pi medium, Pst2 is still active, but PnpR~P amount and pst1 operon levels increase. Together, these results support a model in which pneumococcus maintains high Pi transport in high and low Pi conditions that is required for optimal capsule biosynthesis. PMID:27379215

  1. The SPX domain of the yeast low-affinity phosphate transporter Pho90 regulates transport activity

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Hans Caspar; Pinson, Benoît; Stadler-Waibel, Martha; Zeeman, Samuel C; Freimoser, Florian M

    2009-01-01

    Yeast has two phosphate-uptake systems that complement each other: the high-affinity transporters (Pho84 and Pho89) are active under phosphate starvation, whereas Pho87 and Pho90 are low-affinity transporters that function when phosphate is abundant. Here, we report new regulatory functions of the amino-terminal SPX domain of Pho87 and Pho90. By studying truncated versions of Pho87 and Pho90, we show that the SPX domain limits the phosphate-uptake velocity, suppresses phosphate efflux and affects the regulation of the phosphate signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, split-ubiquitin assays and co-immunoprecipitation suggest that the SPX domain of both Pho90 and Pho87 interacts physically with the regulatory protein Spl2. This work suggests that the SPX domain inhibits low-affinity phosphate transport through a physical interaction with Spl2. PMID:19590579

  2. Inorganic Phosphate and Sulfate Transport in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Samyn, D R; Persson, B L

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic ions such as phosphate and sulfate are essential macronutrients required for a broad spectrum of cellular functions and their regulation. In a constantly fluctuating environment microorganisms have for their survival developed specific nutrient sensing and transport systems ensuring that the cellular nutrient needs are met. This chapter focuses on the S. cerevisiae plasma membrane localized transporters, of which some are strongly induced under conditions of nutrient scarcity and facilitate the active uptake of inorganic phosphate and sulfate. Recent advances in studying the properties of the high-affinity phosphate and sulfate transporters by means of site-directed mutagenesis have provided further insight into the molecular mechanisms contributing to substrate selectivity and transporter functionality of this important class of membrane transporters.

  3. A vacuolar phosphate transporter essential for phosphate homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinlong; Yang, Lei; Luan, Mingda; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Jisen; Zhao, Fu-Geng; Lan, Wenzhi; Luan, Sheng

    2015-11-24

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is stored in the vacuole, allowing plants to adapt to variable Pi availability in the soil. The transporters that mediate Pi sequestration into vacuole remain unknown, however. Here we report the functional characterization of Vacuolar Phosphate Transporter 1 (VPT1), an SPX domain protein that transports Pi into the vacuole in Arabidopsis. The vpt1 mutant plants were stunted and consistently retained less Pi than wild type plants, especially when grown in medium containing high levels of Pi. In seedlings, VPT1 was expressed primarily in younger tissues under normal conditions, but was strongly induced by high-Pi conditions in older tissues, suggesting that VPT1 functions in Pi storage in young tissues and in detoxification of high Pi in older tissues. As a result, disruption of VPT1 rendered plants hypersensitive to both low-Pi and high-Pi conditions, reducing the adaptability of plants to changing Pi availability. Patch-clamp analysis of isolated vacuoles showed that the Pi influx current was severely reduced in vpt1 compared with wild type plants. When ectopically expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana mesophyll cells, VPT1 mediates vacuolar influx of anions, including Pi, SO4(2-), NO3(-), Cl(-), and malate with Pi as that preferred anion. The VPT1-mediated Pi current amplitude was dependent on cytosolic phosphate concentration. Single-channel analysis showed that the open probability of VPT1 was increased with the increase in transtonoplast potential. We conclude that VPT1 is a transporter responsible for vacuolar Pi storage and is essential for Pi adaptation in Arabidopsis.

  4. A vacuolar phosphate transporter essential for phosphate homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinlong; Yang, Lei; Luan, Mingda; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Jisen; Zhao, Fu-Geng; Lan, Wenzhi; Luan, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is stored in the vacuole, allowing plants to adapt to variable Pi availability in the soil. The transporters that mediate Pi sequestration into vacuole remain unknown, however. Here we report the functional characterization of Vacuolar Phosphate Transporter 1 (VPT1), an SPX domain protein that transports Pi into the vacuole in Arabidopsis. The vpt1 mutant plants were stunted and consistently retained less Pi than wild type plants, especially when grown in medium containing high levels of Pi. In seedlings, VPT1 was expressed primarily in younger tissues under normal conditions, but was strongly induced by high-Pi conditions in older tissues, suggesting that VPT1 functions in Pi storage in young tissues and in detoxification of high Pi in older tissues. As a result, disruption of VPT1 rendered plants hypersensitive to both low-Pi and high-Pi conditions, reducing the adaptability of plants to changing Pi availability. Patch-clamp analysis of isolated vacuoles showed that the Pi influx current was severely reduced in vpt1 compared with wild type plants. When ectopically expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana mesophyll cells, VPT1 mediates vacuolar influx of anions, including Pi, SO42−, NO3−, Cl−, and malate with Pi as that preferred anion. The VPT1-mediated Pi current amplitude was dependent on cytosolic phosphate concentration. Single-channel analysis showed that the open probability of VPT1 was increased with the increase in transtonoplast potential. We conclude that VPT1 is a transporter responsible for vacuolar Pi storage and is essential for Pi adaptation in Arabidopsis. PMID:26554016

  5. Differential expression of genes encoding phosphate transporters contributes to arsenic accumulation in shrub willow (Salix spp.)

    Treesearch

    Emily E. Puckett; Michelle J. Serpiglia; Alyssa M. DeLeon; Stephanie Long; Rakesh Minocha; Lawrence B. Smart

    2012-01-01

    Studies of arsenate and phosphate uptake by plants in hydroponic and soil systems indicate a common transport mechanism via the phosphate transporters (PHTs) due to structural similarity of the anions. Typically, the presence of phosphate decreases plant uptake and translocation of arsenate in hydroponic solution. This study quantified arsenic (As) uptake related to...

  6. Reducing the Genetic Redundancy of Arabidopsis PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1 Transporters to Study Phosphate Uptake and Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Amal; David, Pascale; Arrighi, Jean-François; Chiarenza, Serge; Thibaud, Marie-Christine; Nussaume, Laurent; Marin, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) absorbs inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the soil through an active transport process mediated by the nine members of the PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1 (PHT1) family. These proteins share a high level of similarity (greater than 61%), with overlapping expression patterns. The resulting genetic and functional redundancy prevents the analysis of their specific roles. To overcome this difficulty, our approach combined several mutations with gene silencing to inactivate multiple members of the PHT1 family, including a cluster of genes localized on chromosome 5 (PHT1;1, PHT1;2, and PHT1;3). Physiological analyses of these lines established that these three genes, along with PHT1;4, are the main contributors to Pi uptake. Furthermore, PHT1;1 plays an important role in translocation from roots to leaves in high phosphate conditions. These genetic tools also revealed that some PHT1 transporters likely exhibit a dual affinity for phosphate, suggesting that their activity is posttranslationally controlled. These lines display significant phosphate deficiency-related phenotypes (e.g. biomass and yield) due to a massive (80%–96%) reduction in phosphate uptake activities. These defects limited the amount of internal Pi pool, inducing compensatory mechanisms triggered by the systemic Pi starvation response. Such reactions have been uncoupled from PHT1 activity, suggesting that systemic Pi sensing is most probably acting downstream of PHT1. PMID:25670816

  7. [Sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate transporters and biomineralization].

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Sawako; Fujii, Osamu; Miyagawa, Atsumi; Miyamoto, Kenichi

    2014-02-01

    Phosphate (Pi), one of most abundant anions in living organisms, plays a crucial role in biomineralization. An adequate plasma Pi concentration is required to maintain the calcium × phosphate ion product within a range sufficient for physiological bone mineralization, but an increase in the calcium × phosphate product in extracellular fluids above a certain threshold can predispose to extraskeletal calcification. Membrane transport systems for Pi transport are key elements in maintaining homeostasis of Pi in organisms. Members of two families of solute carrier (SLC) proteins (SLC20 and SLC34) act as Na⁺ -dependent, secondary-active cotransporters to transport Pi across cell membranes in mammals. This review summarizes the role of SLC20 and SCL34 proteins on biomineralization.

  8. The yeast Aft2 transcription factor determines selenite toxicity by controlling the low affinity phosphate transport system

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sampietro, María; Serra-Cardona, Albert; Canadell, David; Casas, Celia; Ariño, Joaquín; Herrero, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is employed as a model to study the cellular mechanisms of toxicity and defense against selenite, the most frequent environmental selenium form. We show that yeast cells lacking Aft2, a transcription factor that together with Aft1 regulates iron homeostasis, are highly sensitive to selenite but, in contrast to aft1 mutants, this is not rescued by iron supplementation. The absence of Aft2 strongly potentiates the transcriptional responses to selenite, particularly for DNA damage- and oxidative stress-responsive genes, and results in intracellular hyperaccumulation of selenium. Overexpression of PHO4, the transcriptional activator of the PHO regulon under low phosphate conditions, partially reverses sensitivity and hyperaccumulation of selenite in a way that requires the presence of Spl2, a Pho4-controlled protein responsible for post-transcriptional downregulation of the low-affinity phosphate transporters Pho87 and Pho90. SPL2 expression is strongly downregulated in aft2 cells, especially upon selenite treatment. Selenite hypersensitivity of aft2 cells is fully rescued by deletion of PHO90, suggesting a major role for Pho90 in selenite uptake. We propose that the absence of Aft2 leads to enhanced Pho90 function, involving both Spl2-dependent and independent events and resulting in selenite hyperaccumulation and toxicity. PMID:27618952

  9. Transport of 3,4-dihydroxybutyl-1-phosphonate, an analogue of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, Z; Engel, R; Tropp, B E

    1977-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxybutyl-1-phosphonate (DHBP), an analogue of glycerol 3-phosphate, is actively transported by the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate transport system of Escherichia coli strain 8. The Km for the transport of DHBP is 200 microM. PMID:400804

  10. Transcriptional regulation of plant phosphate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Muchhal, Umesh S.; Raghothama, K. G.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphorus is acquired by plant roots primarily via the high-affinity inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. The transcripts for Pi transporters are highly inducible upon Pi starvation, which also results in enhanced Pi uptake when Pi is resupplied. Using antibodies specific to one of the tomato Pi transporters (encoded by LePT1), we show that an increase in the LePT1 transcript under Pi starvation leads to a concurrent increase in the transporter protein, suggesting a transcriptional regulation for Pi acquisition. LePT1 protein accumulates rapidly in tomato roots in response to Pi starvation. The level of transporter protein accumulation depends on the Pi concentration in the medium, and it is reversible upon resupply of Pi. LePT1 protein accumulates all along the roots under Pi starvation and is localized primarily in the plasma membranes. These results clearly demonstrate that plants increase their capacity for Pi uptake during Pi starvation by synthesis of additional transporter molecules. PMID:10318976

  11. Sorbitol production from lactose by engineered Lactobacillus casei deficient in sorbitol transport system and mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Reinout; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Nadal, Inmaculada; Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2010-02-01

    Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol largely used in the food industry as a low-calorie sweetener. We have previously described a sorbitol-producing Lactobacillus casei (strain BL232) in which the gutF gene, encoding a sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, was expressed from the lactose operon. Here, a complete deletion of the ldh1 gene, encoding the main L-lactate dehydrogenase, was performed in strain BL232. In a resting cell system with glucose, the new strain, named BL251, accumulated sorbitol in the medium that was rapidly metabolized after glucose exhaustion. Reutilization of produced sorbitol was prevented by deleting the gutB gene of the phosphoenolpyruvate: sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTS(Gut)) in BL251. These results showed that the PTS(Gut) did not mediate sorbitol excretion from the cells, but it was responsible for uptake and reutilization of the synthesized sorbitol. A further improvement in sorbitol production was achieved by inactivation of the mtlD gene, encoding a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase. The new strain BL300 (lac::gutF Deltaldh1 DeltagutB mtlD) showed an increase in sorbitol production whereas no mannitol synthesis was detected, avoiding thus a polyol mixture. This strain was able to convert lactose, the main sugar from milk, into sorbitol, either using a resting cell system or in growing cells under pH control. A conversion rate of 9.4% of lactose into sorbitol was obtained using an optimized fed-batch system and whey permeate, a waste product of the dairy industry, as substrate.

  12. Characterization of inorganic phosphate transport in osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikiko; Matsuka, Naoko; Izuka, Michiyo; Haito, Sakiko; Sakai, Yuko; Nakamura, Rie; Segawa, Hiroko; Kuwahata, Masashi; Yamamoto, Hironori; Pike, Wesley J; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2005-04-01

    Osteoclasts possess inorganic phosphate (Pi) transport systems to take up external Pi during bone resorption. In the present study, we characterized Pi transport in mouse osteoclast-like cells that were obtained by differentiation of macrophage RAW264.7 cells with receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). In undifferentiated RAW264.7 cells, Pi transport into the cells was Na+ dependent, but after treatment with RANKL, Na+-independent Pi transport was significantly increased. In addition, compared with neutral pH, the activity of the Na+-independent Pi transport system in the osteoclast-like cells was markedly enhanced at pH 5.5. The Na+-independent system consisted of two components with Km of 0.35 mM and 7.5 mM. The inhibitors of Pi transport, phosphonoformic acid, and arsenate substantially decreased Pi transport. The proton ionophores nigericin and carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone as well as a K+ ionophore, valinomycin, significantly suppressed Pi transport activity. Analysis of BCECF fluorescence indicated that Pi transport in osteoclast-like cells is coupled to a proton transport system. In addition, elevation of extracellular K+ ion stimulated Pi transport, suggesting that membrane voltage is involved in the regulation of Pi transport activity. Finally, bone particles significantly increased Na+-independent Pi transport activity in osteoclast-like cells. Thus, osteoclast-like cells have a Pi transport system with characteristics that are different from those of other Na+-dependent Pi transporters. We conclude that stimulation of Pi transport at acidic pH is necessary for bone resorption or for production of the large amounts of energy necessary for acidification of the extracellular environment.

  13. Regulated Expression of Arabidopsis Phosphate Transporters1

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Athikkattuvalasu S.; Varadarajan, Deepa K.; Mukatira, Uthappa T.; D'Urzo, Matilde Paino; Damsz, Barbara; Raghothama, Kashchandra G.

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorus deficiency is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting plant growth. Plants respond to the persistent deficiency of phosphate (Pi) by coordinating the expression of genes involved in alleviation of the stress. The high-affinity Pi transporters are among the major molecular determinants that are activated during Pi stress. In this study, using three reporter genes (green fluorescent protein, luciferase, and β-glucuronidase) regulated by two Pi transporter promoters, we have carried out an extensive analysis of transcriptional and spatial regulation of gene expression. Activation of the genes was rapid, repressible, and specific in response to changes in Pi availability. The phytohormones auxin and cytokinin suppressed the expression of the reporter gene driven by the AtPT1 promoter, and that of the native gene, suggesting that hormones may be involved in regulation of some component(s) of Pi starvation response pathway. These studies also provide molecular evidence for a potential role of high-affinity Pi transporters in mobilizing Pi into reproductive organs. The results suggest that members of the Pi transporter family may have similar but nonredundant functions in plants. PMID:12226502

  14. The Vibrio cholerae Pst2 phosphate transport system is upregulated in biofilms and contributes to biofilm-induced hyperinfectivity.

    PubMed

    Mudrak, Benjamin; Tamayo, Rita

    2012-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the deadly diarrheal disease cholera. As part of its life cycle, V. cholerae persists in marine environments, where it forms surface-attached communities commonly described as biofilms. Evidence indicates that these biofilms constitute the infectious form of the pathogen during outbreaks. Previous work has shown that biofilm-derived V. cholerae cells, even when fully dispersed from the biofilm matrix, are vastly more infectious than planktonic (free-living) cells. Here, we sought to identify factors that contribute to biofilm-induced hyperinfectivity in V. cholerae, and we present evidence for one aspect of the molecular basis of this phenotype. We identified proteins upregulated during growth in biofilms and determined their contributions to the hyperinfectivity phenotype. We found that PstS2, the periplasmic component of the Pst2 phosphate uptake system, was enriched in biofilms. Another gene in the pst2 locus was transcriptionally upregulated in biofilms. Using the infant mouse model, we found that mutation of two pst2 components resulted in impaired colonization. Importantly, deletion of the Pst2 inner membrane complex caused a greater colonization defect after growth in a biofilm compared to shaking culture. Based on these data, we propose that V. cholerae cells in biofilms upregulate the Pst2 system and therefore gain an advantage upon entry into the host. Further characterization of factors contributing to biofilm-induced hyperinfectivity in V. cholerae will improve our understanding of the transmission of the bacteria from natural aquatic habitats to the human host.

  15. sn-Glycerol-3-phosphate transport in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Hengge, R; Larson, T J; Boos, W

    1983-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium contains a transport system for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate that is inducible by growth on glycerol and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate. In fully induced cells, the system exhibited an apparent Km of 50 microM and a Vmax of 2.2 nmol/min . 10(8) cells. The corresponding system in Escherichia coli exhibits, under comparable conditions, a Km of 14 microM and a Vmax of 2.2 nmol/min . 10(8) cells. Transport-defective mutants were isolated by selecting for resistance against the antibiotic fosfomycin. They mapped in glpT at 47 min in the S. typhimurium linkage map, 37% cotransducible with gyrA. In addition to the glpT-dependent system, S. typhimurium LT2 contains, like E. coli, a second, ugp-dependent transport system for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate that was derepressed by phosphate starvation. A S. typhimurium DNA bank containing EcoRI restriction fragments in phage lambda gt7 was used to clone the glpT gene in E. coli. Lysogens that were fully active in the transport of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate with a Km of 33 microM and a Vmax of 2.0 nmol/min . 10(8) cells were isolated in a delta glpT mutant of E. coli. The EcoRI fragment harboring glpT was 3.5 kilobases long and carried only part of glpQ, a gene distal to glpT but on the same operon. The fragment was subcloned in multicopy plasmid pACYC184. Strains carrying this hybrid plasmid produced large amounts of cytoplasmic membrane protein with an apparent molecular weight of 33,000, which was identified as the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate permease. Its properties were similar to the corresponding E. coli permease. The presence of the multicopy glpT hybrid plasmid had a strong influence on the synthesis or assembly of other cell envelope proteins of E. coli. For instance, the periplasmic ribose-binding protein was nearly absent. On the other hand, the quantity of an unidentified E. coli outer membrane protein usually present only in small amounts increased. Images PMID:6408060

  16. The glucose-6-phosphate transport is not mediated by a glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate exchange in liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Marcolongo, Paola; Fulceri, Rosella; Giunti, Roberta; Margittai, Eva; Banhegyi, Gabor; Benedetti, Angelo

    2012-09-21

    A phosphate-linked antiporter activity of the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) has been recently described in liposomes including the reconstituded transporter protein. We directly investigated the mechanism of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) transport in rat liver microsomal vesicles. Pre-loading with inorganic phosphate (Pi) did not stimulate G6P or Pi microsomal inward transport. Pi efflux from pre-loaded microsomes could not be enhanced by G6P or Pi addition. Rapid G6P or Pi influx was registered by light-scattering in microsomes not containing G6P or Pi. The G6PT inhibitor, S3483, blocked G6P transport irrespectively of experimental conditions. We conclude that hepatic G6PT functions as an uniporter.

  17. Dual Mechanisms of Metabolite Acquisition by the Obligate Intracytosolic Pathogen Rickettsia prowazekii Reveal Novel Aspects of Triose Phosphate Transport

    PubMed Central

    Frohlich, Kyla M.

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is an obligate intracytosolic pathogen and the causative agent of epidemic typhus fever in humans. As an evolutionary model of intracellular pathogenesis, rickettsiae are notorious for their use of transport systems that parasitize eukaryotic host cell biochemical pathways. Rickettsial transport systems for substrates found only in eukaryotic cell cytoplasm are uncommon among free-living microorganisms and often possess distinctive mechanisms. We previously reported that R. prowazekii acquires triose phosphates for phospholipid biosynthesis via the coordinated activities of a novel dihydroxyacetone phosphate transport system and an sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (K. M. Frohlich et al., J. Bacteriol. 192:4281–4288, 2010). In the present study, we have determined that R. prowazekii utilizes a second, independent triose phosphate acquisition pathway whereby sn-glycerol-3-phosphate is directly transported and incorporated into phospholipids. Herein we describe the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate transport systems in isolated R. prowazekii with respect to kinetics, energy coupling, transport mechanisms, and substrate specificity. These data suggest the existence of multiple rickettsial triose phosphate transport systems. Furthermore, the R. prowazekii dihydroxyacetone phosphate transport systems displayed unexpected mechanistic properties compared to well-characterized triose phosphate transport systems from plant plastids. Questions regarding possible roles for dual-substrate acquisition pathways as metabolic virulence factors in the context of a pathogen undergoing reductive evolution are discussed. PMID:23772074

  18. Expression of Phosphate Transporters during Dental Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Merametdjian, L; Beck-Cormier, S; Bon, N; Couasnay, G; Sourice, S; Guicheux, J; Gaucher, C; Beck, L

    2017-09-01

    The importance of phosphate (Pi) as an essential component of hydroxyapatite crystals suggests a key role for membrane proteins controlling Pi uptake during mineralization in the tooth. To clarify the involvement of the currently known Pi transporters (Slc17a1, Slc34a1, Slc34a2, Slc34a3, Slc20a1, Slc20a2, and Xpr1) during tooth development and mineralization, we determined their spatiotemporal expression in murine tooth germs from embryonic day 14.5 to postnatal day 15 and in human dental samples from Nolla stages 6 to 9. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and X-gal staining, we showed that the expression of Slc17a1, Slc34a1, and Slc34a3 in tooth germs from C57BL/6 mice were very low. In contrast, Slc34a2, Slc20a1, Slc20a2, and Xpr1 were highly expressed, mostly during the postnatal stages. The expression of Slc20a2 was 2- to 10-fold higher than the other transporters. Comparable results were obtained in human tooth germs. In mice, Slc34a2 and Slc20a1 were predominantly expressed in ameloblasts but not odontoblasts, while Slc20a2 was detected neither in ameloblasts nor in odontoblasts. Rather, Slc20a2 was highly expressed in the stratum intermedium and the subodontoblastic cell layer. Although Slc20a2 knockout mice did not show enamel defects, mutant mice showed a disrupted dentin mineralization, displaying unmerged calcospherites at the mineralization front. This latter phenotypical finding raises the possibility that Slc20a2 may play an indirect role in regulating the extracellular Pi availability for mineralizing cells rather than a direct role in mediating Pi transport through mineralizing plasma cell membranes. By documenting the spatiotemporal expression of Pi transporters in the tooth, our data support the possibility that the currently known Pi transporters may be dispensable for the initiation of dental mineralization and may rather be involved later during the tooth mineralization scheme.

  19. Phosphate transporter mediated lipid accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under phosphate starvation conditions.

    PubMed

    James, Antoni W; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, when phosphate transporters pho88 and pho86 were knocked out they resulted in significant accumulation (84% and 43%) of triacylglycerol (TAG) during phosphate starvation. However in the presence of phosphate, TAG accumulation was only around 45% in both pho88 and pho86 mutant cells. These observations were confirmed by radio-labeling, fluorescent microscope and RT-PCR studies. The TAG synthesizing genes encoding for acyltransferases namely LRO1 and DGA1 were up regulated. This is the first report for accumulation of TAG in pho88Δ and pho86Δ cells under phosphate starvation conditions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Phosphate transport by rat intestinal basolateral-membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ghishan, F K; Kikuchi, K; Arab, N

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of phosphate transport across intestinal basolateral membranes of the rat were determined by using enriched preparations in which uphill Na+-dependent D-glucose transport could not be demonstrated, but ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport was present. Phosphate transport was saturable, Na+-dependent and exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Vmax. was 51.1 +/- 4.2 pmol/10 s per mg of protein and Km was 14 +/- 3.9 microM. The transport process was electroneutral. Tracer-exchange experiments and counter-transport studies confirmed the presence of a Na+-Pi carrier at the basolateral membrane. The presence of inside-positive membrane potential did not enhance phosphate uptake, indicating that the Na+ effect is secondary to the presence of the Na+-Pi carrier rather than an induction of positive membrane potential. The stoichiometry of this carrier at pH 7.4 was 2 Na+:1 phosphate, as shown by direct studies utilizing the static-head method. These studies are the first to determine the presence of a phosphate carrier at the basolateral membrane. PMID:3663094

  1. Stable isotope fractionations during reactive transport of phosphate in packed-bed sediment columns.

    PubMed

    Jaisi, Deb P

    2013-11-01

    Characterizing reactivity and fate of contaminants in subsurface environments that are isolated from direct visualization is a major challenge. Stable isotopes coupled with concentration could be used as a potential tool to quantitatively analyze the chemical variability of the contaminant during reactive transport processes in the subsurface environment. This study was aimed at determining whether abiotic reactions of phosphate during its transport involve fractionation of oxygen isotopes in phosphate (δ(18)Op). It included the effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on δ(18)Op values during phosphate transport through a packed-bed column prepared by using natural sediment collected from the Cape Cod aquifer in Massachusetts. Results show that the isotopic fractionation between effluent and influent phosphate at early stage of transport could be ~1.3‰ at higher flow rates with isotopically-light phosphate (P(16)O4) preferentially retained in the sediment column. This fractionation, however, decreased and became insignificant as more phosphate passed through the column. Mobilization of phosphate initially sorbed onto sediments caused a large kinetic isotopic fractionation with isotopically-light phosphate preferentially remobilized from the sediment column, but over longer time periods, this fractionation decreased and became insignificant as well. These results collectively suggest that abiotic reactive transport processes exert minimal influence on the δ(18)Op composition of subsurface systems. Alternatively, fluctuation in flow rate and subsequent remobilization of phosphate could be detectable through transient changes in δ(18)Op values. These findings extend the burgeoning application of δ(18)Op to identify the different sources and geochemical processes of phosphate in the subsurface environments. © 2013.

  2. Stable isotope fractionations during reactive transport of phosphate in packed-bed sediment columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaisi, Deb P.

    2013-11-01

    Characterizing reactivity and fate of contaminants in subsurface environments that are isolated from direct visualization is a major challenge. Stable isotopes coupled with concentration could be used as a potential tool to quantitatively analyze the chemical variability of the contaminant during reactive transport processes in the subsurface environment. This study was aimed at determining whether abiotic reactions of phosphate during its transport involve fractionation of oxygen isotopes in phosphate (δ18Op). It included the effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on δ18Op values during phosphate transport through a packed-bed column prepared by using natural sediment collected from the Cape Cod aquifer in Massachusetts. Results show that the isotopic fractionation between effluent and influent phosphate at early stage of transport could be ~ 1.3‰ at higher flow rates with isotopically-light phosphate (P16O4) preferentially retained in the sediment column. This fractionation, however, decreased and became insignificant as more phosphate passed through the column. Mobilization of phosphate initially sorbed onto sediments caused a large kinetic isotopic fractionation with isotopically-light phosphate preferentially remobilized from the sediment column, but over longer time periods, this fractionation decreased and became insignificant as well. These results collectively suggest that abiotic reactive transport processes exert minimal influence on the δ18Op composition of subsurface systems. Alternatively, fluctuation in flow rate and subsequent remobilization of phosphate could be detectable through transient changes in δ18Op values. These findings extend the burgeoning application of δ18Op to identify the different sources and geochemical processes of phosphate in the subsurface environments.

  3. Transport of inorganic phosphate in Leishmania infantum and compensatory regulation at low inorganic phosphate concentration.

    PubMed

    Russo-Abrahão, T; Alves-Bezerra, M; Majerowicz, D; Freitas-Mesquita, A L; Dick, C F; Gondim, K C; Meyer-Fernandes, J R

    2013-03-01

    Proliferation of Leishmania infantum depends on exogenous inorganic phosphate (P(i)) but little is known about energy metabolism and transport of P(i) across the plasma membrane in Leishmania sp. We investigated the kinetics of 32P(i) transport, the influence of H+ and K+ ionophores and inhibitors, and expression of the genes for the Na+:P(i) and H+:P(i) cotransporters. The proton ionophore FCCP, bafilomycin A1 (vacuolar ATPase inhibitor), nigericin (K+ ionophore) and SCH28080 (an inhibitor of H+, K(+)-ATPase) all inhibited the transport of P(i). This transport showed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with K0.5 and V(max) values of 0.016 +/- 0.002 mM and 564.9 +/- 18.06 pmol x h(-1) x 10(-7) cells, respectively. These values classify the P(i) transporter of L. infantum among the high-affinity transporters, a group that includes Pho84 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two sequences were identified in the L. infantum genome that code for phosphate transporters. However, transcription of the PHO84 transporter was 10-fold higher than the PHO89 transporter in this parasite. Accordingly, P(i) transport and LiPho84 gene expression were modulated by environmental P(i) variations. These findings confirm the presence of a P(i) transporter in L. infantum, similar to PHO84 in S. cerevisiae, that contributes to the acquisition of inorganic phosphate and could be involved in growth and survival of the promastigote forms of L. infantum. This work provides the first description of a PHO84-like P(i) transporter in a Trypanosomatide parasite of the genus Leishmania, responsible for many infections worldwide.

  4. StMYB44 negatively regulates phosphate transport by suppressing expression of PHOSPHATE1 in potato

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangjun; Zha, Manrong; Huang, Jing; Li, Li; Imran, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Phosphorus is an important macronutrient for plant growth, but often deficient in soil. To understand the molecular basis of the complex responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to phosphate (Pi) deficiency stress, the RNA-Seq approach was taken to identify genes responding to Pi starvation in potato roots. A total of 359 differentially expressed genes were identified, among which the Solanum tuberosum transcription factor gene MYB44 (StMYB44) was found to be down-regulated by Pi starvation. StMYB44 was ubiquitously expressed in potato tissues and organs, and StMYB44 protein was exclusively localized in the nucleus. Overexpression of StMYB44 in potato resulted in lower accumulation of Pi in shoots. Transcriptomic analysis indicated that the abundance of S. tuberosum PHOSPHATE1 (StPHO1), a Pi transport-related gene, was reduced in StMYB44 overexpression lines. In contrast, knock-out of StMYB44 by a CRISPR/Cas9 system failed to increase transcription of StPHO1. Moreover, StMYB44 was found to interact in the nucleus with AtWRKY6, a known Arabidopsis transcription factor directly regulating PHO1 expression, and StWRKY6, indicating that StMYB44 could be a member of the regulatory complex controlling transcription of StPHO1. Taken together, our study demonstrates that StMYB44 negatively regulates Pi transport in potato by suppressing StPHO1 expression. PMID:28338870

  5. An alternative membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides in mitochondria and its possible function

    PubMed Central

    Reynafarje, Baltazar; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the properties and a possible biological role of a transport process across the inner membrane of rat liver mitochondria resulting in the exchange of ATP4- (out) for ADP3- (in) + 0.5 phosphate2- (in). This transmembrane exchange reaction, designated as the ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange, is specific for the ligands shown, electroneutral, insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl, inhibited by atractyloside, and appears to occur only in the direction as written. It is thus distinct from the well-known phosphate-hydroxide and phosphate-dicarboxylate exchange systems, which are inhibited by mersalyl, and from the ATP-ADP exchanger, which does not transport phosphate. During ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria, half of the phosphate formed from ATP passes from the matrix to the medium by the mersalyl-insensitive ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange and the other half by the well-known mersalyl-sensitive phosphate-hydroxide exchange. These and other considerations have led to a hypothesis for the pathway and stoichiometry of ATP-dependent reverse electron transport, characterized by a requirement of 1.33 molecules of ATP per pair of electrons reversed and by the utilization of a different membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides than is taken in forward electron flow and oxidative phosphorylation. The possible occurrence of independent pathways for ATP-forming forward electron flow and ATP-consuming reverse electron flow is consonant with the fact that the opposing degradative and synthetic pathways in the central routes of cell metabolism generally have different pathways that are independently regulated. PMID:283393

  6. An alternative membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides in mitochondria and its possible function.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1978-10-01

    This paper describes the properties and a possible biological role of a transport process across the inner membrane of rat liver mitochondria resulting in the exchange of ATP(4-) (out) for ADP(3-) (in) + 0.5 phosphate(2-) (in). This transmembrane exchange reaction, designated as the ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange, is specific for the ligands shown, electroneutral, insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl, inhibited by atractyloside, and appears to occur only in the direction as written. It is thus distinct from the well-known phosphate-hydroxide and phosphate-dicarboxylate exchange systems, which are inhibited by mersalyl, and from the ATP-ADP exchanger, which does not transport phosphate. During ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria, half of the phosphate formed from ATP passes from the matrix to the medium by the mersalyl-insensitive ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange and the other half by the well-known mersalyl-sensitive phosphate-hydroxide exchange. These and other considerations have led to a hypothesis for the pathway and stoichiometry of ATP-dependent reverse electron transport, characterized by a requirement of 1.33 molecules of ATP per pair of electrons reversed and by the utilization of a different membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides than is taken in forward electron flow and oxidative phosphorylation. The possible occurrence of independent pathways for ATP-forming forward electron flow and ATP-consuming reverse electron flow is consonant with the fact that the opposing degradative and synthetic pathways in the central routes of cell metabolism generally have different pathways that are independently regulated.

  7. Inhibition of hexose transport by glucose in a glucose-6-phosphate isomerase mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Pascual, C; Romay, C; Herrera, L; Kotyk, A

    1989-01-01

    The rate of hexose transport was approximately 60% lower for both the high- and the low-affinity components of hexose uptake when a glucose-6-phosphate isomerase mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was preincubated with glucose, as compared with preincubation with water. Similarly the Jmax value of the high-affinity system of the mutant was 25-35% of the corresponding Jmax value for normal cells incubated with glucose. Accumulation of glucose 6-phosphate or of some other metabolite, such as fructose 6-phosphate or trehalose, may be responsible for this striking inhibition.

  8. Demonstration and characterization of phosphate transport in mammalian peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    It is now well established that the peroxisomal membrane is not freely permeable to small molecules in vivo, which implies the existence of metabolite transporters in the peroxisomal membrane. A few putative peroxisomal metabolite transporters have indeed been identified, but the function of these proteins has remained largely unresolved so far. The only peroxisomal transporter characterized to a significant extent is the adenine nucleotide transporter, which is presumably required to sustain the activity of the intraperoxisomal very-long-chain-acyl-CoA synthetase. In addition to AMP, this acyl-CoA synthetase also produces pyrophosphate, which must be exported from the peroxisome. In the present study, we demonstrate that the peroxisomal membrane contains a transporter activity that facilitates the passage of phosphate and possibly pyrophosphate across the peroxisomal membrane. By reconstitution of peroxisomal membrane proteins in proteoliposomes, some kinetic parameters of the transporter could be established in vitro. The transporter can be distinguished from the mitochondrial phosphate transporter by its different sensitivity to inhibitors. PMID:15727560

  9. Phosphate Import in Plants: Focus on the PHT1 Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Nussaume, Laurent; Kanno, Satomi; Javot, Hélène; Marin, Elena; Pochon, Nathalie; Ayadi, Amal; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Thibaud, Marie-Christine

    2011-01-01

    The main source of phosphorus for plants is inorganic phosphate (Pi), which is characterized by its poor availability and low mobility. Uptake of this element from the soil relies heavily upon the PHT1 transporters, a specific family of plant plasma membrane proteins that were identified by homology with the yeast PHO84 Pi transporter. Since the discovery of PHT1 transporters in 1996, various studies have revealed that their function is controlled by a highly complex network of regulation. This review will summarize the current state of research on plant PHT1 multigenic families, including physiological, biochemical, molecular, cellular, and genetics studies. PMID:22645553

  10. Phosphate Import in Plants: Focus on the PHT1 Transporters.

    PubMed

    Nussaume, Laurent; Kanno, Satomi; Javot, Hélène; Marin, Elena; Pochon, Nathalie; Ayadi, Amal; Nakanishi, Tomoko M; Thibaud, Marie-Christine

    2011-01-01

    The main source of phosphorus for plants is inorganic phosphate (Pi), which is characterized by its poor availability and low mobility. Uptake of this element from the soil relies heavily upon the PHT1 transporters, a specific family of plant plasma membrane proteins that were identified by homology with the yeast PHO84 Pi transporter. Since the discovery of PHT1 transporters in 1996, various studies have revealed that their function is controlled by a highly complex network of regulation. This review will summarize the current state of research on plant PHT1 multigenic families, including physiological, biochemical, molecular, cellular, and genetics studies.

  11. Identification of plant vacuolar transporters mediating phosphate storage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tzu-Yin; Huang, Teng-Kuei; Yang, Shu-Yi; Hong, Yu-Ting; Huang, Sheng-Min; Wang, Fu-Nien; Chiang, Su-Fen; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Lu, Wen-Chien; Chiou, Tzyy-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Plant vacuoles serve as the primary intracellular compartments for inorganic phosphate (Pi) storage. Passage of Pi across vacuolar membranes plays a critical role in buffering the cytoplasmic Pi level against fluctuations of external Pi and metabolic activities. Here we demonstrate that the SPX-MFS proteins, designated as PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER 5 family (PHT5), also named Vacuolar Phosphate Transporter (VPT), function as vacuolar Pi transporters. Based on 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis, Arabidopsis pht5;1 loss-of-function mutants accumulate less Pi and exhibit a lower vacuolar-to-cytoplasmic Pi ratio than controls. Conversely, overexpression of PHT5 leads to massive Pi sequestration into vacuoles and altered regulation of Pi starvation-responsive genes. Furthermore, we show that heterologous expression of the rice homologue OsSPX-MFS1 mediates Pi influx to yeast vacuoles. Our findings show that a group of Pi transporters in vacuolar membranes regulate cytoplasmic Pi homeostasis and are required for fitness and plant growth. PMID:27029856

  12. Atomic-level characterization of transport cycle thermodynamics in the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Enkavi, Giray; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-09-01

    Membrane transporters actively translocate their substrate by undergoing large-scale structural transitions between inward- (IF) and outward-facing (OF) states (`alternating-access' mechanism). Despite extensive structural studies, atomic-level mechanistic details of such structural transitions, and as importantly, their coupling to chemical events supplying the energy, remain amongst the most elusive aspects of the function of these proteins. Here we present a quantitative, atomic-level description of the functional thermodynamic cycle for the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter GlpT by using a novel approach in reconstructing the free energy landscape governing the IF<-->OF transition along a cyclic transition pathway involving both apo and substrate-bound states. Our results provide a fully atomic description of the complete transport process, offering a structural model for the alternating-access mechanism and substantiating the close coupling between global structural transitions and local chemical events.

  13. Atomic-level characterization of transport cycle thermodynamics in the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Enkavi, Giray; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Membrane transporters actively translocate their substrate by undergoing large-scale structural transitions between inward- (IF) and outward-facing (OF) states (‘alternating-access' mechanism). Despite extensive structural studies, atomic-level mechanistic details of such structural transitions, and as importantly, their coupling to chemical events supplying the energy, remain amongst the most elusive aspects of the function of these proteins. Here we present a quantitative, atomic-level description of the functional thermodynamic cycle for the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter GlpT by using a novel approach in reconstructing the free energy landscape governing the IF↔OF transition along a cyclic transition pathway involving both apo and substrate-bound states. Our results provide a fully atomic description of the complete transport process, offering a structural model for the alternating-access mechanism and substantiating the close coupling between global structural transitions and local chemical events. PMID:26417850

  14. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the basic transport properties of phosphate glasses containing various amounts of TIs and to identify and explain any electronic phase transitions which may occur. The P2 O5-V2O5-WO3 (PVW) glass system will be analyzed to find the effect of TI concentration on conduction. In addition, the effect of the relative concentrations of network forming ions (SiO2 and P2O5) on transport will be studied in the P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O 3 (PSF) system. Also presented is a numerical study on a tight-binding model adapted for the purposes of modelling Gaussian traps, mimicking TI's, which are arranged in an extended network. The results of this project will contribute to the development of fundamental theories on the electronic transport in glasses containing mixtures of transition oxides as well as those containing multiple network formers without discernible phase separation. The present study on the PVW follows up on previous investigation into the effect on mixed transition ions in oxide glasses. Past research has focused on glasses containing transition metal ions from the 3d row. The inclusion of tungsten, a 5d transition metal, adds a layer of complexity through the mismatch of the energies of the orbitals contributing to localized states. The data have indicated that a transition reminiscent of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs in this system as the concentration of tungsten increases. As opposed to some other MIT-like transitions found in phosphate glass systems, there seems to be no polaron to bipolaron conversion. Instead, the individual localization parameter for tungsten noticeably decreases dramatically at the transition point as well as the adiabaticity. Another distinctive feature of this project is the study of the PSF system, which contains two true network formers, phosphorous pentoxide (P2O 5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is not usually possible to do a reliable investigation of the conduction properties of

  15. Cereal phosphate transporters associated with the mycorrhizal pathway of phosphate uptake into roots.

    PubMed

    Glassop, Donna; Smith, Sally E; Smith, Frank W

    2005-11-01

    A very large number of plant species are capable of forming symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. The roots of these plants are potentially capable of absorbing P from the soil solution both directly through root epidermis and root hairs, and via the AM fungal pathway that delivers P to the root cortex. A large number of phosphate (P) transporters have been identified in plants; tissue expression patterns and kinetic information supports the roles of some of these in the direct root uptake pathways. Recent work has identified additional P transporters in several unrelated species that are strongly induced, sometimes specifically, in AM roots. The primary aim of the work described in this paper was to determine how mycorrhizal colonisation by different species of AM fungi influenced the expression of members of the Pht1 gene families in the cereals Hordeum vulgare (barley), Triticum aestivum (wheat) and Zea mays (maize). RT-PCR and in-situ hybridisation, showed that the transporters HORvu;Pht1;8 (AY187023), TRIae;Pht1;myc (AJ830009) and ZEAma;Pht1;6 (AJ830010), had increased expression in roots colonised by the AM fungi Glomus intraradices,Glomus sp. WFVAM23 and Scutellospora calospora. These findings add to the increasing body of evidence indicating that plants that form AM associations with members of the Glomeromycota have evolved phosphate transporters that are either specifically or preferentially involved in scavenging phosphate from the apoplast between intracellular AM structures and root cortical cells. Operation of mycorrhiza-inducible P transporters in the AM P uptake pathway appears, at least partially, to replace uptake via different P transporters located in root epidermis and root hairs.

  16. Arsenate transport by sodium/phosphate cotransporter type IIb

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Sorribas, Victor

    2010-08-15

    Arsenic is a metalloid that causes the dysfunction of critical enzymes, oxidative stress, and malignancies. In recent years several transporters of As{sup III} have been identified, including aquaglyceroporins (AQP) and multidrug resistance proteins (MRP). As{sup V} transport, however, has not been sufficiently studied because it has been assumed that arsenate is taken up by mammalian cells through inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. In this paper we have analyzed the role of Pi transporters in the uptake of arsenate by directly using {sup 73}As{sup V} as a radiotracer in phosphate transporter-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes. The affinities of Pi transporters for H{sub 3}AsO{sub 4} were lower than the affinities for Pi. NaPiIIa, NaPiIIc, Pit1, and Pit2 showed a K{sub m} for arsenate that was > 1 mM (i.e., at least ten times lower than the affinities for Pi). The NaPiIIb isoform showed the highest affinity for As{sup V} in mouse (57 {mu}M), rat (51 {mu}M), and human (9.7 {mu}M), which are very similar to the affinities for Pi. Therefore, NaPiIIb can have a prominent role in the toxicokinetics of arsenic following oral exposure to freshwater or food contaminated with As{sup V}.

  17. Electrogenicity of phosphate transport by renal brush-border membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, R; Ibnoul-Khatib, H

    1988-01-01

    Phosphate uptake by rat renal brush-border membrane vesicles was studied under experimental conditions where transmembrane electrical potential (delta psi) could be manipulated. Experiments were performed under initial rate conditions to avoid complications associated with the dissipation of ion gradients. First, phosphate uptake was shown to be strongly affected by the nature of Na+ co-anions, the highest rates of uptake being observed with 100 mM-NaSCN (1.010 +/- 0.086 pmol/5 s per micrograms of protein) and the lowest with 50 mM-Na2SO4 (0.331 +/- 0.046 pmol/5 s per micrograms of protein). Anion substitution studies showed that potency of the effect of the co-anions was in the order thiocyanate greater than nitrate greater than chloride greater than isethionate greater than gluconate greater than sulphate, which correlates with the known permeability of the membrane to these anions and thus to the generation of transmembrane electrical potentials of decreasing magnitude (inside negative). The stimulation by ion-diffusion-induced potential was observed from pH 6.5 to 8.5, indicating that the transport of both monovalent and divalent phosphate was affected. In addition, inside-negative membrane potentials were generated by valinomycin-induced diffusion of K+ from K+-loaded vesicles and showed a 57% stimulation of phosphate uptake, at pH 7.5. Similar experiments with H+-loaded vesicles, in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone gave a 50% stimulation compared with controls. Inside-positive membrane potentials were also induced by reversal of the K+ gradient (outside greater than inside) in the presence of valinomycin and gave 58% inhibition of phosphate uptake. The membrane-potential dependency of phosphate uptake was finally analysed under thermodynamic equilibrium, and a stimulation by inside-negative potential was observed. The transport of phosphate was thus driven against a concentration gradient by a membrane potential, implicating the net

  18. Na+-independent phosphate transport in Caco2BBE cells

    PubMed Central

    Candeal, Eduardo; Caldas, Yupanqui A.; Guillén, Natalia; Levi, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Pi transport in epithelia has both Na+-dependent and Na+-independent components, but so far only Na+-dependent transporters have been characterized in detail and molecularly identified. Consequently, in the present study, we initiated the characterization and analysis of intestinal Na+-independent Pi transport using an in vitro model, Caco2BBE cells. Only Na+-independent Pi uptake was observed in these cells, and Pi uptake was dramatically increased when cells were incubated in high-Pi DMEM (4 mM) from 1 day to several days. No response to low-Pi medium was observed. The increased Pi transport was mainly caused by Vmax changes, and it was prevented by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. Pi transport in cells grown in 1 mM Pi (basal DMEM) decreased at pH > 7.5, and it was inhibited with proton ionophores. Pi transport in cells incubated with 4 mM Pi increased with alkaline pH, suggesting a preference for divalent phosphate. Pi uptake in cells in 1 mM Pi was completely inhibited only by Pi and partially inhibited by phosphonoformate, oxalate, DIDS, SITS, SO42−, HCO3−, and arsenate. This inhibition pattern suggests that more than one Pi transporter is active in cells maintained with 1 mM Pi. Phosphate transport from cells maintained at 4 mM Pi was only partially inhibited by phosphonoformate, oxalate, and arsenate. Attempts to identify the responsible transporters showed that multifunctional anion exchangers of the Slc26 family as well as members of Slc17, Slc20, and Slc37 and the Pi exporter xenotropic and polytropic retrovirus receptor 1 are not involved. PMID:25298422

  19. Na+-independent phosphate transport in Caco2BBE cells.

    PubMed

    Candeal, Eduardo; Caldas, Yupanqui A; Guillén, Natalia; Levi, Moshe; Sorribas, Víctor

    2014-12-15

    Pi transport in epithelia has both Na(+)-dependent and Na(+)-independent components, but so far only Na(+)-dependent transporters have been characterized in detail and molecularly identified. Consequently, in the present study, we initiated the characterization and analysis of intestinal Na(+)-independent Pi transport using an in vitro model, Caco2BBE cells. Only Na(+)-independent Pi uptake was observed in these cells, and Pi uptake was dramatically increased when cells were incubated in high-Pi DMEM (4 mM) from 1 day to several days. No response to low-Pi medium was observed. The increased Pi transport was mainly caused by Vmax changes, and it was prevented by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. Pi transport in cells grown in 1 mM Pi (basal DMEM) decreased at pH > 7.5, and it was inhibited with proton ionophores. Pi transport in cells incubated with 4 mM Pi increased with alkaline pH, suggesting a preference for divalent phosphate. Pi uptake in cells in 1 mM Pi was completely inhibited only by Pi and partially inhibited by phosphonoformate, oxalate, DIDS, SITS, SO4 (2-), HCO3 (-), and arsenate. This inhibition pattern suggests that more than one Pi transporter is active in cells maintained with 1 mM Pi. Phosphate transport from cells maintained at 4 mM Pi was only partially inhibited by phosphonoformate, oxalate, and arsenate. Attempts to identify the responsible transporters showed that multifunctional anion exchangers of the Slc26 family as well as members of Slc17, Slc20, and Slc37 and the Pi exporter xenotropic and polytropic retrovirus receptor 1 are not involved. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. The pst operon of Bacillus subtilis has a phosphate-regulated promoter and is involved in phosphate transport but not in regulation of the pho regulon.

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Y; Kobayashi, Y; Hulett, F M

    1997-01-01

    Genes from Bacillus subtilis predicted to encode a phosphate-specific transport (Pst) system were shown by mutation to affect high-affinity Pi uptake but not arsenate resistance or phosphate (Pho) regulation. The transcription start of the promoter upstream of the pstS gene was defined by primer extension. The promoter contains structural features analogous to the Escherichia coli pst promoter but not sequence similarity. Expression from this promoter was induced >5,000-fold upon phosphate starvation and regulated by the PhoP-PhoR two-component regulatory system. These data indicate that the pst operon is involved in phosphate transport and is a member of the Pho regulon but is not involved in Pi regulation. PMID:9098050

  1. Phosphate transporters: a tale of two solute carrier families.

    PubMed

    Virkki, Leila V; Biber, Jürg; Murer, Heini; Forster, Ian C

    2007-09-01

    Phosphate is an essential component of life and must be actively transported into cells against its electrochemical gradient. In vertebrates, two unrelated families of Na+ -dependent P(i) transporters carry out this task. Remarkably, the two families transport different P(i) species: whereas type II Na+/P(i) cotransporters (SCL34) prefer divalent HPO(4)(2-), type III Na(+)/P(i) cotransporters (SLC20) transport monovalent H2PO(4)(-). The SCL34 family comprises both electrogenic and electroneutral members that are expressed in various epithelia and other polarized cells. Through regulated activity in apical membranes of the gut and kidney, they maintain body P(i) homeostasis, and in salivary and mammary glands, liver, and testes they play a role in modulating the P(i) content of luminal fluids. The two SLC20 family members PiT-1 and PiT-2 are electrogenic and ubiquitously expressed and may serve a housekeeping role for cell P(i) homeostasis; however, also more specific roles are emerging for these transporters in, for example, bone mineralization. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the characterization of the transport kinetics, structure-function relationships, and physiological implications of having two distinct Na+/P(i) cotransporter families.

  2. Regulation of plants' phosphate uptake in common mycorrhizal networks: Role of intraradical fungal phosphate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Walder, Florian; Boller, Thomas; Wiemken, Andres; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have recently identified two genes coding for inorganic phosphate transporters (Pht) in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and flax (Linum usitatissimum) that were induced in roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Mycorrhizal acquisition of inorganic phosphorus (Pi) was strongly affected by the combination of plant and AM fungal species, but the expression level of these genes coding for AM-inducible Pi transporters did not explain differences in plant phosphorus acquisition where flax and sorghum are sharing a common mycorrhizal network. In the present study, we investigated the possible role of fungal Pi transporters in the regulation of mycorrhizal Pi acquisition by measuring their expression in roots of flax and sorghum. One Pi transporter of Rhizophagus irregularis (RiPT5) showed a positive correlation with mycorrhizal Pi acquisition of sorghum. This indicates that a possible involvement in the regulation of mycorrhizal Pi acquisition. In general, expression of AMF Pi transporters was more related to mycorrhizal Pi acquisition of sorghum than of flax, indicating plant species-specific differences in the regulation of mycorrhizal Pi acquisition. PMID:26751110

  3. Inorganic phosphate transport in matrix vesicles from bovine articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Solomon, D H; Browning, J A; Wilkins, R J

    2007-06-01

    In mineralizing tissues such as growth plate cartilage extracellular organelles derived from the chondrocyte membrane are present. These matrix vesicles (MV), possess membrane transporters that accumulate Ca(2+) and inorganic phosphate (P(i)), and initiate the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals. MV are also present in articular cartilage, and hydroxyapatite crystals are believed to promote cartilage degradation in osteoarthritic joints. This study characterizes P(i) transport in MV derived from articular cartilage. Matrix vesicles were harvested from collagenase digests of bovine articular cartilage by serial centrifugation. P(i) uptake by MV was measured using radioactive phosphate ((33)[P]HPO(4)(2-)). The Na(+) dependence, pH sensitivity and effects of P(i) analogues that inhibit P(i) transport were determined. P(i) uptake was temperature-sensitive and comprised Na(+)-dependent and Na(+)-independent components. The Na(+)-dependent component saturated at high extracellular P(i) concentrations, with a K(m) of 0.16 mM. In Na(+)-free solutions, uptake did not fully saturate implying that carrier-mediated uptake is supplemented by a diffusive pathway. Uptake was inhibited by phosphonoacetate and arsenate, although a fraction of Na(+)-independent P(i) uptake persisted. Total P(i) uptake was maximal at pH 6.5, and reduced at more acidic or alkaline values, representing inhibition of both components. These properties are highly similar to those of P(i) uptake by chondrocytes, suggesting that MV inherit P(i) transporters of the chondrocyte membrane from which they are derived. Na(+)-independent P(i) uptake has not previously been described in MV from growth plate cartilage and is relatively uncharacterized, but warrants further attention in articular cartilage, given its likely role in initiating inappropriate mineral formation.

  4. Dual Effect of Phosphate Transport on Mitochondrial Ca2+ Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, An-Chi; Liu, Ting; O'Rourke, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The large inner membrane electrochemical driving force and restricted volume of the matrix confer unique constraints on mitochondrial ion transport. Cation uptake along with anion and water movement induces swelling if not compensated by other processes. For mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, these include activation of countertransporters (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+/H+ exchanger) coupled to the proton gradient, ultimately maintained by the proton pumps of the respiratory chain, and Ca2+ binding to matrix buffers. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is known to affect both the Ca2+ uptake rate and the buffering reaction, but the role of anion transport in determining mitochondrial Ca2+ dynamics is poorly understood. Here we simultaneously monitor extra- and intra-mitochondrial Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) to examine the effects of anion transport on mitochondrial Ca2+ flux and buffering in Pi-depleted guinea pig cardiac mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake proceeded slowly in the absence of Pi but matrix free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]mito) still rose to ∼50 μm. Pi (0.001–1 mm) accelerated Ca2+ uptake but decreased [Ca2+]mito by almost 50% while restoring ΔΨm. Pi-dependent effects on Ca2+ were blocked by inhibiting the phosphate carrier. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate was also increased by vanadate (Vi), acetate, ATP, or a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog (AMP-PNP), with differential effects on matrix Ca2+ buffering and ΔΨm recovery. Interestingly, ATP or AMP-PNP prevented the effects of Pi on Ca2+ uptake. The results show that anion transport imposes an upper limit on mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and modifies the [Ca2+]mito response in a complex manner. PMID:25963147

  5. Maritime Intelligent Transport Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzykowski, Zbigniew

    The concept of intelligent transport systems, developed since 1980s, includes all modes of transport. Relevant developments in road transport are the most advanced. Recently water transport, particularly maritime transport, has gained more attention in this respect, in connection with building and further developments of maritime intelligent transport systems. The present state and directions of development of telematic systems in maritime transport will be discussed, with a focus on marine navigation.

  6. Dietary phosphorus regulates intestinal transport and plasma concentrations of phosphate in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Avila, E M; Tu, H; Basantes, S; Ferraris, R P

    2000-05-01

    Intestinal inorganic phosphate transport and its regulation have not been studied in fish. In this study, we initially characterized the mechanisms of intestinal inorganic phosphate transport in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) then determined the effects of dietary phosphorus concentrations on intestinal inorganic phosphate uptake, plasma inorganic phosphate, and intestinal luminal inorganic phosphate concentrations. In 11-g trout, the saturable mechanism of brushborder inorganic phosphate uptake had a Kt= 1.2 mmol l(-1) and a Vmax = 0.22 nmol mg(-1) min(-1), while the diffusive component had a Kd = 0.012 min(-1). Similar kinetic constants were obtained from 51-g trout, suggesting that development or size had little effect on transport. Tracer inorganic phosphate (1.18 mmol l(-1)) uptake was almost completely inhibited (>95%) by 20 mmol l(-1) unlabeled inorganic phosphate. Inorganic phosphate uptake (0.2 mmol l(-1)) was strongly inhibited (approximately 75% inhibition) by phosphonoformic acid, a competitive inhibitor of mammalian inorganic phosphate transport, as well as by the absence of Na+ (approximately 90% inhibition). Northern blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated that the intestinal inorganic phosphate transporter in trout is not related to the cloned Na+ inorganic phosphate-II transporter of winter flounder. Intestinal luminal and plasma inorganic phosphate concentrations each increased with dietary P concentrations. Intestinal inorganic phosphate, but not proline, absorption rates decreased with dietary phosphorus concentrations. As in mammals and birds, a Na-dependent inorganic phosphate carrier that is tightly regulated by diet is present in trout small intestine.

  7. Development of a label-free assay for sodium-dependent phosphate transporter NaPi-IIb.

    PubMed

    Wong, Soo-Hang; Gao, Alice; Ward, Sabrina; Henley, Charles; Lee, Paul H

    2012-07-01

    The most widely used assay format for characterizing plasma membrane transporter activity measures accumulation of radiolabeled substrates in tissues or cells expressing the transporters. This assay format had limitations and disadvantages; therefore, there was an unmet need for development of a homogeneous, nonradioactive assay for membrane transporter proteins. In this report, the authors describe the development of a label-free homogeneous assay for the sodium-dependent phosphate transporter NaPi-IIb using the Epic system. The addition of phosphate stimulated a dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) profile unique to cells expressing NaPi-IIb but not on parental cells. This DMR profile was phosphate specific because sulfate or buffer alone did not elicit the same response. Furthermore, the DMR response observed was phosphate and sodium dependent, with Km values in the micromolar and millimolar range, respectively. A known NaPi-IIb noncompetitive inhibitor was shown to completely inhibit the phosphate-stimulated DMR response, suggesting that this observed DMR response is an NaPi-IIb-mediated cellular event. The results demonstrate that a novel label-free assay was developed for studying transporter-mediated cellular activity, and this DMR assay platform could be applicable to other membrane transporter proteins.

  8. Crystal structure of the phosphate-binding protein (PBP-1) of an ABC-type phosphate transporter from Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Richez, Magali; Bergonzi, Celine; Chabriere, Eric; Elias, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate limitation is an important environmental stress that affects the metabolism of various organisms and, in particular, can trigger the virulence of numerous bacterial pathogens. Clostridium perfringens, a human pathogen, is one of the most common causes of enteritis necroticans, gas gangrene and food poisoning. Here, we focused on the high affinity phosphate-binding protein (PBP-1) of an ABC-type transporter, responsible for cellular phosphate uptake. We report the crystal structure (1.65 Å resolution) of the protein in complex with phosphate. Interestingly, PBP-1 does not form the short, low-barrier hydrogen bond with phosphate that is typical of previously characterized phosphate-binding proteins, but rather a canonical hydrogen bond. In its unique binding configuration, PBP-1 forms an unusually high number of hydrogen bonds (14) with the phosphate anion. Discrimination experiments reveal that PBP-1 is the least selective PBP characterised so far and is able to discriminate phosphate from its close competing anion, arsenate, by ~150-fold. PMID:25338617

  9. PhoU Allows Rapid Adaptation to High Phosphate Concentrations by Modulating PstSCAB Transport Rate in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    diCenzo, George C; Sharthiya, Harsh; Nanda, Anish; Zamani, Maryam; Finan, Turlough M

    2017-09-15

    Maintenance of cellular phosphate homeostasis is essential for cellular life. The PhoU protein has emerged as a key regulator of this process in bacteria, and it is suggested to modulate phosphate import by PstSCAB and control activation of the phosphate limitation response by the PhoR-PhoB two-component system. However, a proper understanding of PhoU has remained elusive due to numerous complications of mutating phoU, including loss of viability and the genetic instability of the mutants. Here, we developed two sets of strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti that overcame these limitations and allowed a more detailed and comprehensive analysis of the biological and molecular activities of PhoU. The data showed that phoU cannot be deleted in the presence of phosphate unless PstSCAB is inactivated also. However, phoU deletions were readily recovered in phosphate-free media, and characterization of these mutants revealed that addition of phosphate to the environment resulted in toxic levels of PstSCAB-mediated phosphate accumulation. Phosphate uptake experiments indicated that PhoU significantly decreased the PstSCAB transport rate specifically in phosphate-replete cells but not in phosphate-starved cells and that PhoU could rapidly respond to elevated environmental phosphate concentrations and decrease the PstSCAB transport rate. Site-directed mutagenesis results suggested that the ability of PhoU to respond to phosphate levels was independent of the conformation of the PstSCAB transporter. Additionally, PhoU-PhoU and PhoU-PhoR interactions were detected using a bacterial two-hybrid screen. We propose that PhoU modulates PstSCAB and PhoR-PhoB in response to local, internal fluctuations in phosphate concentrations resulting from PstSCAB-mediated phosphate import.IMPORTANCE Correct maintenance of cellular phosphate homeostasis is critical in all kingdoms of life and in bacteria involves the PhoU protein. This work provides novel insights into the role of the Sinorhizobium

  10. The conservation of phosphate-binding residues among PHT1 transporters suggests that distinct transport affinities are unlikely to result from differences in the phosphate-binding site.

    PubMed

    Ceasar, S Antony; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P; Ignacimuthu, S; Baldwin, Stephen A

    2016-10-15

    The plant PHosphate Transporter 1 (PHT1) family of membrane proteins belongs to the major facilitator super family and plays a major role in the acquisition of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the soil and its transport within the plant. These transporters have been well characterized for expression patterns, localization, and in some cases affinity. Furthermore, the crystal structure of a high-affinity eukaryotic phosphate transporter from the fungus Piriformospora indica (PiPT) has revealed important information on the residues involved in Pi transport. Using multiple-sequence alignments and homology modelling, the phosphate-binding site residues were shown to be well conserved between all the plant PHT1 proteins, Saccharomyces cerevisiae PHO84 and PiPT. For example, Asp 324 in PiPT is conserved in the equivalent position in all plant PHT1 and yeast transporters analyzed, and this residue in ScPHO84 was shown by mutagenesis to be important for both the binding and transport of Pi. Moreover, Asp 45 and Asp 149, which are predicted to be involved in proton import, and Lys 459, which is putatively involved in Pi-binding, are all fully conserved in PHT1 and ScPHO84 transporters. The conserved nature of the residues that play a key role in Pi-binding and transport across the PHT1 family suggests that the differing Pi affinities of these transporters do not reside in differences in the Pi-binding site. Recent studies suggest that phosphate transporters could possess dual affinity and that post-translational modifications may be important in regulating affinity for phosphate. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Reconstitution of the renal brush-border membrane sodium/phosphate co-transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Vachon, V; Delisle, M C; Laprade, R; Béliveau, R

    1991-01-01

    A simple and rapid procedure was developed for the reconstitution of Na(+)-dependent phosphate-transport activity from bovine kidney brush-border membranes. The phosphate transporter appears to be particularly sensitive to extraction conditions. To prevent its inactivation, the phosphate carrier was solubilized in a buffer containing its substrates, Na+ and phosphate, CHAPS, dithiothreitol, brush-border membrane lipids and glycerol. The uptake of phosphate by reconstituted vesicles was strongly stimulated by the presence of a transmembrane Na+ gradient. This stimulation was abolished when the Na+ gradient was dissipated by monensin. The affinity of the carrier for phosphate was similar in proteoliposomes and in brush-border membrane vesicles (apparent Kt = 40 microM). The transporter was also stimulated by the presence of a high concentration of phosphate on the trans side of the membrane. The reconstituted transport activity was inhibited by arsenate, a known inhibitor of phosphate transport. However, the bovine phosphate carrier, intact or reconstituted, was much less sensitive to inhibition by phosphonoformic and phosphonoacetic acids than were those of other species studied so far. SDS/PAGE revealed that only a small number of brush-border membrane proteins were incorporated into the proteoliposomes. This reconstitution procedure should be useful for the purification and identification of the carrier protein. Images Fig. 5. PMID:1832858

  12. Mechanism of glucocorticoid effect on renal transport of phosphate.

    PubMed

    Turner, S T; Kiebzak, G M; Dousa, T P

    1982-11-01

    We explored whether glucocorticoid administration, a known stimulus of renal gluconeogenesis (GNG), could decrease avid inorganic phosphate (Pi) reabsorption in rats stabilized on low-phosphorus diet (LPD). Rats adapted to LPD were injected with the glucocorticoid (GCD) triamcinolone acetonide (1.25 or 2.5 mg.100 g body wt-1.day-1 ip) for 2 days; they showed a profound increase in urinary excretion of Pi during the injection period. In clearance studies GCD increased the clearance and fractional excretion of Pi but did not change the filtered load of Pi. Initial "uphill" Na+-gradient (Nao+ greater than Nai+)-dependent uptake of 32Pi by luminal brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles prepared from renal cortex of rats treated with GCD was markedly (greater than 40%) decreased compared with control rats; Na+-gradient-dependent uptake of D-[3H]glucose was not diminished. At the "equilibrium" time interval, measured at 120 min, BBM vesicles from control and GCD-treated rats did not differ in the uptake of 32Pi or D-[3H]glucose. With kinetic analysis, BBM from GCD-treated rats showed a marked decrease (-40%) in the maximum velocity (Vmax) of initial Na+-dependent 32Pi uptake, but the apparent affinity of the BBM transport system for Pi (apparent Km = 0.078 mM Pi) was not different from that of controls. Alkaline phosphatase specific activity was much lower (-40%) in BBM from GCD-treated rats compared with controls, but the activities of three other BBM enzymes (maltase, leucine aminopeptidase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase) were not different. The addition of triamcinolone to BBM in vitro had no effect on either Na+-dependent uptake of 32Pi or alkaline phosphatase activity. The rate of GNG from alpha-ketoglutarate was significantly increased in cortical slices from GCD-treated rats adapted to LPD. Also, the NAD+-to-NADH ratio was higher in the renal cortex of GCD-treated rats, although the total content of NAD [NAD+ + NADH] was not different from controls. Renal excretory

  13. Peritoneal Phosphate Clearance is Influenced by Peritoneal Dialysis Modality, Independent of Peritoneal Transport Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Badve, Sunil V.; Zimmerman, Deborah L.; Knoll, Greg A.; Burns, Kevin D.; McCormick, Brendan B.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hyperphosphatemia is an independent risk factor for mortality in ESRD, but factors regulating phosphate clearance on peritoneal dialysis (PD) are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that peritoneal phosphate clearance is better with continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) as compared with continuous cyclic PD (CCPD) after adjusting for membrane transport status. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: In this cross-sectional and retrospective study, measurements of peritoneal phosphate clearance of 129 prevalent PD patients were reviewed. Patients were divided according to membrane transport status (high, high average, low average-low categories) and PD modality (CAPD or CCPD). Results: Among high transporters, peritoneal phosphate clearances were comparable in both modalities. However, treatment with CAPD was associated with increased peritoneal phosphate clearance compared with CCPD among high-average transporters (42.4 ± 11.4 versus 36.4 ± 8.3 L/wk/1.73 m2, P = 0.01), and low-average-low transporters (35.6 ± 5.9 versus 28.9 ± 11 L/wk/1.73 m2, P = 0.034). On multivariate linear regression, PD modality, membrane transport category, and peritoneal creatinine clearance, but not Kt/V urea, were independently associated with peritoneal phosphate clearance. Conclusions: Peritoneal phosphate clearance is determined by PD modality and membrane transport category, suggesting that PD regimes with longer dwell times may help control hyperphosphatemia in lower transporters. PMID:18815242

  14. Modeling of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter suggests a potential 'tilt' mechanism involved in its function.

    PubMed

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2008-10-01

    Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane alpha-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family--the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY)--have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been suggested that a major conformational "switching" mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible "switch" mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.(23) We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a "tilt" of 9 degrees -10 degrees rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to suggest transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the "tilted" structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while the

  15. Phosphate-limited continuous culture of Rhodotorula rubra: kinetics of transport, leakage, and growth.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, B R; Button, D K

    1979-01-01

    The phosphate-limited growth kinetics of Rhodotorula rubra, a small yeast of marine origin, were examined by analysis of 32P distributions in continuous cultures. Isotope relaxation procedures were used to identify unidirectional flows of Pi and organic phosphate among compartments modeled during growth. The concentrations of phosphates in these compartments at various growth rates were used, together with attendant flows, to produce a mathematical model of growth. Both Pi and phosphate-containing metabolic intermediates leaked from cells during growth. Total leakage ranged from 4 to 10% of influx and was comprised mostly of Pi. Transport capacity was at least 10 times that required for growth at saturating Pi concentrations, so that influx was linear with concentration during growth. This led to the realization that the curvature of Monod plots (Kmu = 12 nM mumax = 0.18/h, and the threshold At = 2.5 nM) is due to change in yield with growth rate. Growth rate related to Pi by the affinity, aA (= 0.43 liter/mg of cells.h) of cells for Pi and the growth rate-dependent yield. It was also specified by a series of kinetic constants that specified flow among the various compartments and equilibrium compartment concentrations as they were set by extracellular Pi. The importance of leakage by healthy cells to the organic chemistry of aquatic systems is noted. PMID:37231

  16. Liver X receptor-activating ligands modulate renal and intestinal sodium–phosphate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Yupanqui A.; Giral, Hector; Cortázar, Michael A.; Sutherland, Eileen; Okamura, Kayo; Blaine, Judith; Sorribas, Victor; Koepsell, Hermann; Levi, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol is pumped out of the cells in different tissues, including the vasculature, intestine, liver, and kidney, by the ATP-binding cassette transporters. Ligands that activate the liver X receptor (LXR) modulate this efflux. Here we determined the effects of LXR agonists on the regulation of phosphate transporters. Phosphate homeostasis is regulated by the coordinated action of the intestinal and renal sodium–phosphate (NaPi) transporters, and the loss of this regulation causes hyperphosphatemia. Mice treated with DMHCA or TO901317, two LXR agonists that prevent atherosclerosis in ApoE or LDLR knockout mice, significantly decreased the activity of intestinal and kidney proximal tubular brush border membrane sodium gradient-dependent phosphate uptake, decreased serum phosphate, and increased urine phosphate excretion. The effects of DMHCA were due to a significant decrease in the abundance of the intestinal and renal NaPi transport proteins. The same effect was also found in opossum kidney cells in culture after treatment with either agonist. There was increased nuclear expression of the endogenous LXR receptor, a reduction in NaPi4 protein abundance (the main type II NaPi transporter in the opossum cells), and a reduction in NaPi co-transport activity. Thus, LXR agonists modulate intestinal and renal NaPi transporters and, in turn, serum phosphate levels. PMID:21677638

  17. Liver X receptor-activating ligands modulate renal and intestinal sodium-phosphate transporters.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Yupanqui A; Giral, Hector; Cortázar, Michael A; Sutherland, Eileen; Okamura, Kayo; Blaine, Judith; Sorribas, Victor; Koepsell, Hermann; Levi, Moshe

    2011-09-01

    Cholesterol is pumped out of the cells in different tissues, including the vasculature, intestine, liver, and kidney, by the ATP-binding cassette transporters. Ligands that activate the liver X receptor (LXR) modulate this efflux. Here we determined the effects of LXR agonists on the regulation of phosphate transporters. Phosphate homeostasis is regulated by the coordinated action of the intestinal and renal sodium-phosphate (NaPi) transporters, and the loss of this regulation causes hyperphosphatemia. Mice treated with DMHCA or TO901317, two LXR agonists that prevent atherosclerosis in ApoE or LDLR knockout mice, significantly decreased the activity of intestinal and kidney proximal tubular brush border membrane sodium gradient-dependent phosphate uptake, decreased serum phosphate, and increased urine phosphate excretion. The effects of DMHCA were due to a significant decrease in the abundance of the intestinal and renal NaPi transport proteins. The same effect was also found in opossum kidney cells in culture after treatment with either agonist. There was increased nuclear expression of the endogenous LXR receptor, a reduction in NaPi4 protein abundance (the main type II NaPi transporter in the opossum cells), and a reduction in NaPi co-transport activity. Thus, LXR agonists modulate intestinal and renal NaPi transporters and, in turn, serum phosphate levels.

  18. 21 CFR 862.1720 - Triose phosphate isomerase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... isomerase test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzyme triose phosphate isomerase in erythrocytes (red blood cells). Triose phosphate isomerase is an enzyme important in glycolysis... this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital triose phosphate isomerase enzyme...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1720 - Triose phosphate isomerase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... isomerase test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzyme triose phosphate isomerase in erythrocytes (red blood cells). Triose phosphate isomerase is an enzyme important in glycolysis... this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital triose phosphate isomerase enzyme...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1720 - Triose phosphate isomerase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... isomerase test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzyme triose phosphate isomerase in erythrocytes (red blood cells). Triose phosphate isomerase is an enzyme important in glycolysis... this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital triose phosphate isomerase enzyme...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1720 - Triose phosphate isomerase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... isomerase test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzyme triose phosphate isomerase in erythrocytes (red blood cells). Triose phosphate isomerase is an enzyme important in glycolysis... this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital triose phosphate isomerase enzyme...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1720 - Triose phosphate isomerase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... isomerase test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzyme triose phosphate isomerase in erythrocytes (red blood cells). Triose phosphate isomerase is an enzyme important in glycolysis... this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital triose phosphate isomerase enzyme...

  3. Autonomous microfluidic system for phosphate detection.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Christina M; Stitzel, Shannon E; Cleary, John; Slater, Conor; Diamond, Dermot

    2007-02-28

    Miniaturization of analytical devices through the advent of microfluidics and micro total analysis systems is an important step forward for applications such as medical diagnostics and environmental monitoring. The development of field-deployable instruments requires that the entire system, including all necessary peripheral components, be miniaturized and packaged in a portable device. A sensor for long-term monitoring of phosphate levels has been developed that incorporates sampling, reagent and waste storage, detection, and wireless communication into a complete, miniaturized system. The device employs a low-power detection and communication system, so the entire instrument can operate autonomously for 7 days on a single rechargeable, 12V battery. In addition, integration of a wireless communication device allows the instrument to be controlled and results to be downloaded remotely. This autonomous system has a limit of detection of 0.3mg/L and a linear dynamic range between 0 and 20mg/L.

  4. H(+)-dependent inorganic phosphate uptake in Trypanosoma brucei is influenced by myo-inositol transporter.

    PubMed

    Russo-Abrahão, Thais; Koeller, Carolina Macedo; Steinmann, Michael E; Silva-Rito, Stephanie; Marins-Lucena, Thaissa; Alves-Bezerra, Michele; Lima-Giarola, Naira Ligia; de-Paula, Iron Francisco; Gonzalez-Salgado, Amaia; Sigel, Erwin; Bütikofer, Peter; Gondim, Katia Calp; Heise, Norton; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is an extracellular protozoan parasite that causes human African trypanosomiasis or "sleeping sickness". During the different phases of its life cycle, T. brucei depends on exogenous inorganic phosphate (Pi), but little is known about the transport of Pi in this organism. In the present study, we showed that the transport of (32)Pi across the plasma membrane follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics and is modulated by pH variation, with higher activity at acidic pH. Bloodstream forms presented lower Pi transport in comparison to procyclic forms, that displayed an apparent K0.5 = 0.093 ± 0.008 mM. Additionally, FCCP (H(+)-ionophore), valinomycin (K(+)-ionophore) and SCH28080 (H(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibitor) inhibited the Pi transport. Gene Tb11.02.3020, previously described to encode the parasite H(+):myo-inositol transporter (TbHMIT), was hypothesized to be potentially involved in the H(+):Pi cotransport because of its similarity with the Pho84 transporter described in S. cerevisiae and other trypanosomatids. Indeed, the RNAi mediated knockdown remarkably reduced TbHMIT gene expression, compromised cell growth and decreased Pi transport by half. In addition, Pi transport was inhibited when parasites were incubated in the presence of concentrations of myo-inositol that are above 300 μM. However, when expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, two-electrode voltage clamp experiments provided direct electrophysiological evidence that the protein encoded by TbHMIT is definitely a myo-inositol transporter that may be only marginally affected by the presence of Pi. These results confirmed the presence of a Pi carrier in T. brucei, similar to the H(+)-dependent inorganic phosphate system described in S. cerevisiae and other trypanosomatids. This transport system contributes to the acquisition of Pi and may be involved in the growth and survival of procyclic forms. In summary, this work presents the first description of a Pi transport system in T. brucei.

  5. Activation by Gene Amplification of pitB, Encoding a Third Phosphate Transporter of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Sally M.; Schoondermark, Paul; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Tommassen, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Two systems for the uptake of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in Escherichia coli, PitA and Pst, have been described. A revertant of a pitA pstS double mutant that could grow on Pi was isolated. We demonstrate that the expression of a new Pi transporter, PitB, is activated in this strain by a gene amplification event. PMID:11443103

  6. Phosphorus: Riverine system transport

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The transport and transformation of phosphorus (P) in riverine systems fundamentally affects the outcome of watershed mitigation strategies aimed at curbing downstream eutrophication. Phosphorus transport and transformations in streams and rivers are mediated by physical (sediment deposition and res...

  7. Transportation System Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

  8. [Role of the type 3 sodium-dependent phosphate transporter in the calcification of growth plate chondrocytes].

    PubMed

    Sugita, Atsushi; Hayashibara, Tetsuyuki; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2006-10-01

    Phosphate is a second most abundant mineral next to calcium. The facts that hypophosphatemia is associated with the retardation of skeletal development and phosphate levels increase during endochondral ossification suggest that phosphate plays a role in cartilage differentiation. The type 3 sodium-dependent phosphate transporter (NPT3) expressed in growth plate chondrocytes transports extracellular phosphates into the cells. These phosphates are utilized for ATP synthesis, which in turn promotes apoptosis of growth plate chondrocytes through activation of the caspase signal pathways. Subsequently, matrix vesicles released from apoptotic chondrocytes accelerate calcification of chondrocytes. Our results suggest that phosphate plays a critical role in terminal differentiation of chondrocytes.

  9. Bioenergetic models for acetate and phosphate transport in bacteria important in enhanced biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Burow, Luke C; Mabbett, Amanda N; McEwan, Alastair G; Bond, Philip L; Blackall, Linda L

    2008-01-01

    Most of our understanding of the physiology of microorganisms is the result of investigations in pure culture. However, in order to understand complex environmental processes, there is a need to investigate mixed microbial communities. This is true for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), an environmental process that results in the enrichment of the polyphosphate-accumulating organism Accumulibacter spp. and the glycogen non-polyphosphate accumulating organism Defluviicoccus spp. We investigated acetate and inorganic phosphate (P(i)) uptake in enrichments of Accumulibacter spp. and acetate uptake in enrichments of Defluviicoccus spp. For both enrichments, anaerobic acetate uptake assays in the presence of the protonophore, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or the membrane potential (Delta psi) uncoupler valinomycin, indicated that acetate is likely to be taken up by a permease-mediated process driven by the Delta psi. Further investigation with the sodium ionophore monensin suggested that anaerobic acetate uptake by Defluviicoccus spp. may in part be dependent on a sodium potential. Results of this study also suggest that Accumulibacter spp. generate a proton motive force (pmf or Delta p) for anaerobic acetate uptake by efflux of protons in symport with P(i) through an inorganic phosphate transport (Pit) system. In contrast, we suggest that the anaerobic Delta p in Defluviicoccus spp. is generated by an efflux of protons across the cell membrane by the fumarate respiratory system, or by extrusion of sodium ions via decarboxylation of methylmalonyl-CoA. Aerobic P(i) uptake by the Accumulibacter spp. enrichment was strongly inhibited in the presence of an ATPase inhibitor, suggesting that the phosphate-specific transport (Pst) system is important even under relatively high concentrations of P(i). Acetate permease activity in these microorganisms may play an important role in the competition for acetate in the often acetate-limited EBPR

  10. Role of rat sodium/phosphate cotransporters in the cell membrane transport of arsenate

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo Sorribas, Victor

    2008-10-01

    Inorganic arsenate (As{sup V}) is a common contaminant of underground water. Following oral exposure, it is assumed that As{sup V} is distributed and crosses cell membranes through inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. We have tested this hypothesis by studying the inhibition of rat Na/Pi cotransporters by As{sup V} in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in several rat tissues. The ubiquitously expressed type III Pi transporters (PiT-1 and PiT-2) showed a low affinity for As{sup V} (K{sub i} {approx} 3.8 mM), similar to the Pi transport system in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (K{sub i} 1.5 mM). The type II renal isoforms, NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIc, were also poorly inhibited by As{sup V} (K{sub i} {approx} 1 mM), similar to the Pi transport from kidney cortex brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles. Conversely, the high-affinity intestinal transporter, NaPi-IIb, was very efficiently inhibited with a K{sub i} of 51 {mu}M, similar to the Pi transport from intestinal BBM vesicles. Taking into account the 1.1 mM Pi in blood and renal ultrafiltrate, and the nanomolar range of As{sup V} exposures, we have determined that the contribution by Na/Pi cotransporters to As{sup V} membrane transport is negligible, given that 10-15 mM As{sup V} would be necessary in these fluids to be significantly transported. Intestinal transport is an exception, because Pi competition is weak, thereby considering that its concentration in lumen mainly depends on low Pi levels from ingested fresh water, and because As{sup V} very efficiently inhibits Pi intestinal transport. Our data agree with current toxicokinetic knowledge, and they explain the asymmetric excretion of trivalent and pentavalent arsenic species into bile and urine.

  11. Role of rat sodium/phosphate cotransporters in the cell membrane transport of arsenate.

    PubMed

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Sorribas, Víctor

    2008-10-01

    Inorganic arsenate (As(V)) is a common contaminant of underground water. Following oral exposure, it is assumed that As(V) is distributed and crosses cell membranes through inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. We have tested this hypothesis by studying the inhibition of rat Na/Pi cotransporters by As(V) in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in several rat tissues. The ubiquitously expressed type III Pi transporters (PiT-1 and PiT-2) showed a low affinity for As(V) (K(i) approximately 3.8 mM), similar to the Pi transport system in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (K(i) 1.5 mM). The type II renal isoforms, NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIc, were also poorly inhibited by As(V) (K(i) approximately 1 mM), similar to the Pi transport from kidney cortex brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles. Conversely, the high-affinity intestinal transporter, NaPi-IIb, was very efficiently inhibited with a K(i) of 51 microM, similar to the Pi transport from intestinal BBM vesicles. Taking into account the 1.1 mM Pi in blood and renal ultrafiltrate, and the nanomolar range of As(V) exposures, we have determined that the contribution by Na/Pi cotransporters to As(V) membrane transport is negligible, given that 10-15 mM As(V) would be necessary in these fluids to be significantly transported. Intestinal transport is an exception, because Pi competition is weak, thereby considering that its concentration in lumen mainly depends on low Pi levels from ingested fresh water, and because As(V) very efficiently inhibits Pi intestinal transport. Our data agree with current toxicokinetic knowledge, and they explain the asymmetric excretion of trivalent and pentavalent arsenic species into bile and urine.

  12. INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT. Phosphatidylserine transport by ORP/Osh proteins is driven by phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Moser von Filseck, Joachim; Čopič, Alenka; Delfosse, Vanessa; Vanni, Stefano; Jackson, Catherine L; Bourguet, William; Drin, Guillaume

    2015-07-24

    In eukaryotic cells, phosphatidylserine (PS) is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but is highly enriched in the plasma membrane (PM), where it contributes negative charge and to specific recruitment of signaling proteins. This distribution relies on transport mechanisms whose nature remains elusive. Here, we found that the PS transporter Osh6p extracted phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) and exchanged PS for PI4P between two membranes. We solved the crystal structure of Osh6p:PI4P complex and demonstrated that the transport of PS by Osh6p depends on PI4P recognition in vivo. Finally, we showed that the PI4P-phosphatase Sac1p, by maintaining a PI4P gradient at the ER/PM interface, drove PS transport. Thus, PS transport by oxysterol-binding protein-related protein (ORP)/oxysterol-binding homology (Osh) proteins is fueled by PI4P metabolism through PS/PI4P exchange cycles.

  13. Molecular mechanism of {alpha}-tocopheryl-phosphate transport across the cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Negis, Yesim; Meydani, Mohsen; Zingg, Jean-Marc; Azzi, Angelo . E-mail: angelo.azzi@tufts.edu

    2007-07-27

    {alpha}-Tocopheryl-phosphate ({alpha}-TP) is synthesized and hydrolyzed in animal cells and tissues where it modulates several functions. {alpha}-TP is more potent than {alpha}-T in inhibiting cell proliferation, down-regulating CD36 transcription, inhibiting atherosclerotic plaque formation. Administration of {alpha}-TP to cells or animals requires its transfer through membranes, via a transporter. We show here that {alpha}-TP is passing the plasma membrane via a system that is inhibited by glibenclamide and probenecid, inhibitors of a number of transporters. Glibenclamide and probenecid prevent dose-dependently {alpha}-TP inhibition of cell proliferation. The two inhibitors act on ATP binding cassette (ABC) and organic anion transporters (OAT). Since ABC transporters function to export solutes and {alpha}-TP is transported into cells, it may be concluded that {alpha}-TP transport may occur via an OAT family member. Due to the protection by glibenclamide and probenecid on the {alpha}-TP induced cell growth inhibition it appears that {alpha}-TP acts after its uptake inside cells.

  14. System-Wide Adaptations of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 to Phosphate-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schubotz, Florence; de Santiago-Torio, Ana; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Carlson, Hans K.; Watson, Nicki; Daye, Mirna; Summons, Roger E.; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of lipids devoid of phosphorus suggests that the availability of phosphorus limits microbial growth and activity in many anoxic, stratified environments. To better understand the response of anaerobic bacteria to phosphate limitation and starvation, this study combines microscopic and lipid analyses with the measurements of fitness of pooled barcoded transposon mutants of the model sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Phosphate-limited G20 has lower growth rates and replaces more than 90% of its membrane phospholipids by a mixture of monoglycosyl diacylglycerol (MGDG), glycuronic acid diacylglycerol (GADG) and ornithine lipids, lacks polyphosphate granules, and synthesizes other cellular inclusions. Analyses of pooled and individual mutants reveal the importance of the high-affinity phosphate transport system (the Pst system), PhoR, and glycolipid and ornithine lipid synthases during phosphate limitation. The phosphate-dependent synthesis of MGDG in G20 and the widespread occurrence of the MGDG/GADG synthase among sulfate reducing ∂-Proteobacteria implicate these microbes in the production of abundant MGDG in anaerobic environments where the concentrations of phosphate are lower than 10 μM. Numerous predicted changes in the composition of the cell envelope and systems involved in transport, maintenance of cytoplasmic redox potential, central metabolism and regulatory pathways also suggest an impact of phosphate limitation on the susceptibility of sulfate reducing bacteria to other anthropogenic or environmental stresses. PMID:28030630

  15. The High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter GmPT5 Regulates Phosphate Transport to Nodules and Nodulation in Soybean1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lu; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Jiang; Chen, Liyu; Sun, Zhaoan; Guo, Yongxiang; Lu, Xing; Gu, Mian; Xu, Guohua; Liao, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Legume biological nitrogen (N) fixation is the most important N source in agroecosystems, but it is also a process requiring a considerable amount of phosphorus (P). Therefore, developing legume varieties with effective N2 fixation under P-limited conditions could have profound significance for improving agricultural sustainability. We show here that inoculation with effective rhizobial strains enhanced soybean (Glycine max) N2 fixation and P nutrition in the field as well as in hydroponics. Furthermore, we identified and characterized a nodule high-affinity phosphate (Pi) transporter gene, GmPT5, whose expression was elevated in response to low P. Yeast heterologous expression verified that GmPT5 was indeed a high-affinity Pi transporter. Localization of GmPT5 expression based on β-glucuronidase staining in soybean composite plants with transgenic roots and nodules showed that GmPT5 expression occurred principally in the junction area between roots and young nodules and in the nodule vascular bundles for juvenile and mature nodules, implying that GmPT5 might function in transporting Pi from the root vascular system into nodules. Overexpression or knockdown of GmPT5 in transgenic composite soybean plants altered nodulation and plant growth performance, which was partially dependent on P supply. Through both in situ and in vitro 33P uptake assays using transgenic soybean roots and nodules, we demonstrated that GmPT5 mainly functions in transporting Pi from roots to nodules, especially under P-limited conditions. We conclude that the high-affinity Pi transporter, GmPT5, controls Pi entry from roots to nodules, is critical for maintaining Pi homeostasis in nodules, and subsequently regulates soybean nodulation and growth performance. PMID:22740613

  16. The characterization of novel mycorrhiza-specific phosphate transporters from Lycopersicon esculentum and Solanum tuberosum uncovers functional redundancy in symbiotic phosphate transport in solanaceous species.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Réka; Karandashov, Vladimir; Chague, Véronique; Kalinkevich, Katsiaryna; Tamasloukht, M'barek; Xu, Guohua; Jakobsen, Iver; Levy, Avraham A; Amrhein, Nikolaus; Bucher, Marcel

    2005-04-01

    Solanaceous species are among the >200 000 plant species worldwide forming a mycorrhiza, that is, a root living in symbiosis with soil-borne arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. An important parameter of this symbiosis, which is vital for ecosystem productivity, agriculture, and horticulture, is the transfer of phosphate (Pi) from the AM fungus to the plant, facilitated by plasma membrane-spanning Pi transporter proteins. The first mycorrhiza-specific plant Pi transporter to be identified, was StPT3 from potato [Nature414 (2004) 462]. Here, we describe novel Pi transporters from the solanaceous species tomato, LePT4, and its orthologue StPT4 from potato, both being members of the Pht1 family of plant Pi transporters. Phylogenetic tree analysis demonstrates clustering of both LePT4 and StPT4 with the mycorrhiza-specific Pi transporter from Medicago truncatula [Plant Cell, 14 (2002) 2413] and rice [Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 99 (2002) 13324], respectively, but not with StPT3, indicating that two non-orthologous mycorrhiza-responsive genes encoding Pi transporters are co-expressed in the Solanaceae. The cloned promoter regions from both genes, LePT4 and StPT4, exhibit a high degree of sequence identity and were shown to direct expression exclusively in colonized cells when fused to the GUS reporter gene, in accordance with the abundance of LePT4 and StPT4 transcripts in mycorrhized roots. Furthermore, extensive sequencing of StPT4-like clones and subsequent expression analysis in potato and tomato revealed the presence of a close paralogue of StPT4 and LePT4, named StPT5 and LePT5, respectively, representing a third Pi transport system in solanaceous species which is upregulated upon AM fungal colonization of roots. Knock out of LePT4 in the tomato cv. MicroTom indicated considerable redundancy between LePT4 and other Pi transporters in tomato.

  17. Evolutionary conservation of a phosphate transporter in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Karandashov, Vladimir; Nagy, Réka; Wegmüller, Sarah; Amrhein, Nikolaus; Bucher, Marcel

    2004-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizae are ancient symbioses that are thought to have originated >400 million years ago in the roots of plants, pioneering the colonization of terrestrial habitats. In these associations, a key process is the transfer of phosphorus as inorganic phosphate to the host plant across the fungus–plant interface. Mycorrhiza-specific phosphate transporter genes and their regulation are conserved in phylogenetically distant plant species, and they are activated selectively by fungal species from the phylum Glomeromycota. The potato phosphate transporter gene StPT3 is expressed in a temporally defined manner in root cells harboring various mycorrhizal structures, including thick-coiled hyphae. The results highlight the role of different symbiotic structures in phosphorus transfer, and they indicate that cell–cell contact between the symbiotic partners is required to induce phosphate transport. PMID:15075387

  18. Payload transportation system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A standard size set of shuttle payload transportation equipment was defined that will substantially reduce the cost of payload transportation and accommodate a wide range of payloads with minimum impact on payload design. The system was designed to accommodate payload shipments between the level 4 payload integration sites and the launch site during the calendar years 1979-1982. In addition to defining transportation multi-use mission support equipment (T-MMSE) the mode of travel, prime movers, and ancillary equipment required in the transportation process were also considered. Consistent with the STS goals of low cost and the use of standardized interfaces, the transportation system was designed to commercial grade standards and uses the payload flight mounting interfaces for transportation. The technical, cost, and programmatic data required to permit selection of a baseline system of MMSE for intersite movement of shuttle payloads were developed.

  19. Dietary P regulates phosphate transporter expression, phosphatase activity, and effluent P partitioning in trout culture.

    PubMed

    Coloso, R M; King, K; Fletcher, J W; Weis, P; Werner, A; Ferraris, R P

    2003-08-01

    Phosphate utilization by fish is an important issue because of its critical roles in fish growth and aquatic environmental pollution. High dietary phosphorus (P) levels typically decrease the efficiency of P utilization, thereby increasing the amount of P excreted as metabolic waste in effluents emanating from rainbow trout aquaculture. In mammals, vitamin D3 is a known regulator of P utilization but in fish, its regulatory role is unclear. Moreover, the effects of dietary P and vitamin D3 on expression of enzymatic and transport systems potentially involved in phosphate utilization are little known. We therefore monitored production of effluent P, levels of plasma vitamin D3 metabolites, as well as expression of phosphatases and the sodium phosphate cotransporter (NaPi2) in trout fed semipu diets that varied in dietary P and vitamin D3 levels. Mean soluble P concentrations varied markedly with dietary P but not with vitamin D3, and constituted 40-70% of total effluent P production by trout. Particulate P concentrations accounted for 25-50% of effluent P production, but did not vary with dietary P or vitamin D3. P in settleable wastes accounted for <10% of effluent P. The stronger effect of dietary P on effluent P levels is paralleled by its striking effects on phosphatases and NaPi2. The mRNA abundance of the intestinal and renal sodium phosphate transporters increased in fish fed low dietary P; vitamin D3 had no effect. Low-P diets reduced plasma phosphate concentrations. Intracellular phytase activity increased but brushborder alkaline phosphatase activity decreased in the intestine, pyloric caeca, and gills of trout fed diets containing low dietary P. Vitamin D3 had no effect on enzyme activities. Moreover, plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 were unaffected by dietary P and vitamin D3 levels. The major regulator of P metabolism, and ultimately of levels of P in the effluent from trout culture, is dietary P.

  20. StMYB44 negatively regulates phosphate transport by suppressing expression of PHOSPHATE1 in potato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phosphorus is an important macronutrient for plant growth, but often deficient in soil. To understand the molecular basis of the complex responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to phosphate (Pi) deficiency stress, the RNA-Seq approach was taken to identify genes responding to Pi starvation in pot...

  1. Space Transportation Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Stewart, Mark E.; Suresh, Ambady; Owen, A. Karl

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the Space Transportation Propulsion Systems for the NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) program. Topics include: 1) a review of Engine/Inlet Coupling Work; 2) Background/Organization of Space Transportation Initiative; 3) Synergy between High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP) and Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP); 4) Status of Space Transportation Effort, including planned deliverables for FY01-FY06, FY00 accomplishments (HPCCP Funded) and FY01 Major Milestones (HPCCP and ASTP); and 5) a review current technical efforts, including a review of the Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC), Scope of Work, RBCC Concept Aerodynamic Analysis and RBCC Concept Multidisciplinary Analysis.

  2. Oral peptide specific egg antibody to intestinal sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter-2b is effective at altering phosphate transport in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bobeck, Elizabeth A; Hellestad, Erica M; Sand, Jordan M; Piccione, Michelle L; Bishop, Jeff W; Helvig, Christian; Petkovich, Martin; Cook, Mark E

    2015-06-01

    Hyperimmunized hens are an effective means of generating large quantities of antigen specific egg antibodies that have use as oral supplements. In this study, we attempted to create a peptide specific antibody that produced outcomes similar to those of the human pharmaceutical, sevelamer HCl, used in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia (a sequela of chronic renal disease). Egg antibodies were generated against 8 different human intestinal sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter 2b (NaPi2b) peptides, and hNaPi2b peptide egg antibodies were screened for their ability to inhibit phosphate transport in human intestinal Caco-2 cell line. Antibody produced against human peptide sequence TSPSLCWT (anti-h16) was specific for its peptide sequence, and significantly reduced phosphate transport in human Caco-2 cells to 25.3±11.5% of control nonspecific antibody, when compared to nicotinamide, a known inhibitor of phosphate transport (P≤0.05). Antibody was then produced against the mouse-specific peptide h16 counterpart (mouse sequence TSPSYCWT, anti-m16) for further analysis in a murine model. When anti-m16 was fed to mice (1% of diet as dried egg yolk powder), egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) was detected using immunohistochemical staining in mouse ileum, and egg anti-m16 IgY colocalized with a commercial goat anti-NaPi2b antibody. The effectiveness of anti-m16 egg antibody in reducing serum phosphate, when compared to sevelamer HCl, was determined in a mouse feeding study. Serum phosphate was reduced 18% (P<0.02) in mice fed anti-m16 (1% as dried egg yolk powder) and 30% (P<0.0001) in mice fed sevelamer HCl (1% of diet) when compared to mice fed nonspecific egg immunoglobulin. The methods described and the findings reported show that oral egg antibodies are useful and easy to prepare reagents for the study and possible treatment of select diseases.

  3. Renal phosphate transport: inhomogeneity of local proximal transport rates and sodium dependence.

    PubMed

    Baumann, K; de Rouffignac, C; Roinel, N; Rumrich, G; Ullrich, K J

    1975-01-01

    The standing droplet method has been used in combination with the peritibular perfusion of blood capillaries to determine the build up of transtubular concentration differences of phosphate (Piota) in the renal proximal convoluted tubule of parathyroidectomized rats. Electron probe analysis was used to estimate Piota. At zero time both the intraluminal and the contraluminal Piota concentration was 2 mM. The time dependent decrease of the intraluminal Piota concentration was approximately 4 times faster in the early than in the late proximal convoluted tubule. After 45 sec an intraluminal steady state concentration of 0.20 mM Piota was achieved in the early part. In the late part the intraluminal Piota concentration approached a steady statevalue of 0.54 mM at 123 sec. When sodium free solutions were used the intaluminal Piota concentration increased to 2.22 mM in the earlier and to 2.76 mM in the late part. The data indicate that in the proximal convoluted tubule 1. the rate of phosphate reabsorption is greater in the early part than in the later part, and 2. phospate reabsorption might occur as co-transport with Na+ ions.

  4. Role of phosphate and other proton-donating anions in respiration-coupled transport of Ca2+ by mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lehninger, A L

    1974-04-01

    Measurements of extra oxygen consumption, (45)Ca(2+) uptake, and the osmotic expansion of the matrix compartment show that not all permeant anions are capable of supporting and accompanying the energy-dependent transport of Ca(2+) from the medium into the matrix in respiring rat-liver mitochondria. Phosphate, arsenate, acetate, butyrate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, lactate, and bicarbonate + CO(2) supported Ca(2+) uptake, whereas the permeant anions, nitrate, thiocyanate, chlorate, and perchlorate, did not. The active anions share a common denominator, the potential ability to donate a proton to the mitochondrial matrix; the inactive anions lack this capacity. Phosphate and the other active permeant anions move into the matrix in response to the alkaline-inside electrochemical gradient of protons generated across the mitochondrial membrane by electron transport, thus forming a negative-inside anion gradient. It is postulated that the latter gradient is the immediate "pulling" force for the influx of Ca(2+) on the electrogenic Ca(2+) carrier in respiring mitochondria under intracellular conditions. Since mitochondria in the cell are normally exposed to an excess of phosphate (and the bicarbonate-CO(2) system), particularly in state 4, inward transport of these proton-yielding anions probably precedes and is necessary for inward transport of Ca(2+) and other cations under biological conditions. These observations indicate that a negative-inside gradient of phosphate generated by electron transport is a common step and provides the immediate motive power not only for (a) the inward transport of dicarboxylates and tricarboxylates and (b) the energy-dependent exchange of external ADP(3-) for internal ATP(4-) during oxidative phosphorylation, as has already been established, but also for (c) the inward transport of Ca(2+), K(+), and other cations.

  5. Role of Phosphate and Other Proton-Donating Anions in Respiration-Coupled Transport of Ca2+ by Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Lehninger, Albert L.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of extra oxygen consumption, 45Ca2+ uptake, and the osmotic expansion of the matrix compartment show that not all permeant anions are capable of supporting and accompanying the energy-dependent transport of Ca2+ from the medium into the matrix in respiring rat-liver mitochondria. Phosphate, arsenate, acetate, butyrate, β-hydroxybutyrate, lactate, and bicarbonate + CO2 supported Ca2+ uptake, whereas the permeant anions, nitrate, thiocyanate, chlorate, and perchlorate, did not. The active anions share a common denominator, the potential ability to donate a proton to the mitochondrial matrix; the inactive anions lack this capacity. Phosphate and the other active permeant anions move into the matrix in response to the alkaline-inside electrochemical gradient of protons generated across the mitochondrial membrane by electron transport, thus forming a negative-inside anion gradient. It is postulated that the latter gradient is the immediate “pulling” force for the influx of Ca2+ on the electrogenic Ca2+ carrier in respiring mitochondria under intracellular conditions. Since mitochondria in the cell are normally exposed to an excess of phosphate (and the bicarbonate-CO2 system), particularly in state 4, inward transport of these proton-yielding anions probably precedes and is necessary for inward transport of Ca2+ and other cations under biological conditions. These observations indicate that a negative-inside gradient of phosphate generated by electron transport is a common step and provides the immediate motive power not only for (a) the inward transport of dicarboxylates and tricarboxylates and (b) the energy-dependent exchange of external ADP3- for internal ATP4- during oxidative phosphorylation, as has already been established, but also for (c) the inward transport of Ca2+, K+, and other cations. PMID:4364542

  6. Tissue specific transcript profiling of wheat phosphate transporter genes and its association with phosphate allocation in grains

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Vishnu; Kaur, Mandeep; Aggarwal, Sipla; Bhati, Kaushal Kumar; Kaur, Jaspreet; Mantri, Shrikant; Pandey, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Approaches enabling efficient phosphorus utilization in crops are of great importance. In cereal crop like wheat, utilization of inorganic phosphate (Pi) is high and mature grains are the major sink for Pi utilization and storage. Research that addresses the importance of the Pi homeostasis in developing grains is limited. In an attempt to understand the Pi homeostasis in developing wheat grains, we identified twelve new phosphate transporters (PHT), these are phyologentically well distributed along with the members reported from Arabidopsis and rice. Enhanced expression of PHT1-subfamily genes was observed in roots subjected to the Pi starvation suggesting their active role in Pi homeostasis. Differential expression patterns of all the PHT genes during grain filling stages suggested their importance in the filial tissues. Additionally, high accumulation of Pi and total P in aleurone correlates well with the expression of TaPHTs and other phosphate starvation related genes. Tissue specific transcript accumulation of TaPHT1.1, TaPHT1.2, TaPHT1.4 in aleurone; TaPHT3.1 in embryo and TaPHT4.2 in the endosperm was observed. Furthermore, their transcript abundance was affected in low phytate wheat grains. Altogether, this study helps in expanding the knowledge and prioritize the candidate wheat Pi-transporters to modulate the Pi homeostasis in cereal grains. PMID:27995999

  7. ESCRT-III-Associated Protein ALIX Mediates High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Trafficking to Maintain Phosphate Homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cardona-López, Ximena; Cuyas, Laura; Marín, Elena; Rajulu, Charukesi; Irigoyen, María Luisa; Gil, Erica; Puga, María Isabel; Bligny, Richard; Nussaume, Laurent; Geldner, Niko; Paz-Ares, Javier; Rubio, Vicente

    2015-09-01

    Prior to the release of their cargoes into the vacuolar lumen, sorting endosomes mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) through the action of ENDOSOMAL COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT) protein complexes. MVB-mediated sorting of high-affinity phosphate transporters (PHT1) to the vacuole limits their plasma membrane levels under phosphate-sufficient conditions, a process that allows plants to maintain phosphate homeostasis. Here, we describe ALIX, a cytosolic protein that associates with MVB by interacting with ESCRT-III subunit SNF7 and mediates PHT1;1 trafficking to the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the partial loss-of-function mutant alix-1 displays reduced vacuolar degradation of PHT1;1. ALIX derivatives containing the alix-1 mutation showed reduced interaction with SNF7, providing a simple molecular explanation for impaired cargo trafficking in alix-1 mutants. In fact, the alix-1 mutation also hampered vacuolar sorting of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1. We also show that alix-1 displays altered vacuole morphogenesis, implying a new role for ALIX proteins in vacuolar biogenesis, likely acting as part of ESCRT-III complexes. In line with a presumed broad target spectrum, the alix-1 mutation is pleiotropic, leading to reduced plant growth and late flowering, with stronger alix mutations being lethal, indicating that ALIX participates in diverse processes in plants essential for their life.

  8. ESCRT-III-Associated Protein ALIX Mediates High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Trafficking to Maintain Phosphate Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-López, Ximena; Cuyas, Laura; Marín, Elena; Irigoyen, María Luisa; Gil, Erica; Puga, María Isabel; Bligny, Richard; Nussaume, Laurent; Geldner, Niko; Paz-Ares, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the release of their cargoes into the vacuolar lumen, sorting endosomes mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) through the action of ENDOSOMAL COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT) protein complexes. MVB-mediated sorting of high-affinity phosphate transporters (PHT1) to the vacuole limits their plasma membrane levels under phosphate-sufficient conditions, a process that allows plants to maintain phosphate homeostasis. Here, we describe ALIX, a cytosolic protein that associates with MVB by interacting with ESCRT-III subunit SNF7 and mediates PHT1;1 trafficking to the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the partial loss-of-function mutant alix-1 displays reduced vacuolar degradation of PHT1;1. ALIX derivatives containing the alix-1 mutation showed reduced interaction with SNF7, providing a simple molecular explanation for impaired cargo trafficking in alix-1 mutants. In fact, the alix-1 mutation also hampered vacuolar sorting of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1. We also show that alix-1 displays altered vacuole morphogenesis, implying a new role for ALIX proteins in vacuolar biogenesis, likely acting as part of ESCRT-III complexes. In line with a presumed broad target spectrum, the alix-1 mutation is pleiotropic, leading to reduced plant growth and late flowering, with stronger alix mutations being lethal, indicating that ALIX participates in diverse processes in plants essential for their life. PMID:26342016

  9. Tomato Phosphate Transporter Genes Are Differentially Regulated in Plant Tissues by Phosphorus1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunming; Muchhal, Umesh S.; Uthappa, Mukatira; Kononowicz, Andrzej K.; Raghothama, Kaschandra G.

    1998-01-01

    Phosphorus is a major nutrient acquired by roots via high-affinity inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. In this paper, we describe the tissue-specific regulation of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) Pi-transporter genes by Pi. The encoded peptides of the LePT1 and LePT2 genes belong to a family of 12 membrane-spanning domain proteins and show a high degree of sequence identity to known high-affinity Pi transporters. Both genes are highly expressed in roots, although there is some expression of LePT1 in leaves. Their expression is markedly induced by Pi starvation but not by starvation of nitrogen, potassium, or iron. The transcripts are primarily localized in root epidermis under Pi starvation. Accumulation of LePT1 message was also observed in palisade parenchyma cells of Pi-starved leaves. Our data suggest that the epidermally localized Pi transporters may play a significant role in acquiring the nutrient under natural conditions. Divided root-system studies support the hypothesis that signal(s) for the Pi-starvation response may arise internally because of the changes in cellular concentration of phosphorus. PMID:9449838

  10. The impact of transport processes on rare earth element patterns in marine authigenic and biogenic phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Gerald; Reuter, Markus; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Piller, Werner E.

    2017-04-01

    frequently observed hat-shaped pattern in biogenic phosphates can result from increased middle REE (Neodymium to Holmium) scavenging during taphonomic processes prior to final deposition. Cluster analysis coupled with sedimentological and previously published geochemical data (bulk carbon isotope and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry) allowed the characterization of REE patterns of phosphates in terms of their formation conditions and depositional history, such as the distinction of phosphates formed in situ from reworked and transported phosphate grains.

  11. Smart vehicular transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.Q.; Wilson, C.W.

    1997-05-01

    This work builds upon established Sandia intelligent systems technology to develop a unique approach for the integration of intelligent system control into the US Highway and urban transportation systems. The Sandia developed concept of the COPILOT controller integrates a human driver with computer control to increase human performance while reducing reliance on detailed driver attention. This research extends Sandia expertise in sensor based, real-time control of robotics systems to high speed transportation systems. Knowledge in the form of maps and performance characteristics of vehicles provides the automatic decision making intelligence needed to plan optimum routes, maintain safe driving speeds and distances, avoid collisions, and conserve fuel.

  12. Polar localization of a symbiosis-specific phosphate transporter is mediated by a transient reorientation of secretion.

    PubMed

    Pumplin, Nathan; Zhang, Xinchun; Noar, Roslyn D; Harrison, Maria J

    2012-03-13

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, formed by land plants and AM fungi, evolved an estimated 400 million years ago and has been maintained in angiosperms, gymnosperms, pteridophytes, and some bryophytes as a strategy for enhancing phosphate acquisition. During AM symbiosis, the AM fungus colonizes the root cortical cells where it forms branched hyphae called arbuscules that function in nutrient exchange with the plant. Each arbuscule is enveloped in a plant membrane, the periarbuscular membrane, that contains a unique set of proteins including phosphate transporters such as Medicago truncatula MtPT4 [Javot et al., (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:1720-1725], which are essential for symbiotic phosphate transport. The periarbuscular membrane is physically continuous with the plasma membrane of the cortical cell, but MtPT4 and other periarbuscular membrane-resident proteins are located only in the domain around the arbuscule branches. Establishing the distinct protein composition of the periarbuscular membrane is critical for AM symbiosis, but currently the mechanism by which this composition is achieved is unknown. Here we investigate the targeting of MtPT4 to the periarbuscular membrane. By expressing MtPT4 and other plasma membrane proteins from promoters active at different phases of the symbiosis, we show that polar targeting of MtPT4 is mediated by precise temporal expression coupled with a transient reorientation of secretion and alterations in the protein cargo entering the secretory system of the colonized root cell. In addition, analysis of phosphate transporter mutants implicates the trans-Golgi network in phosphate transporter secretion.

  13. Differentiating phosphate-dependent and phosphate-independent systemic phosphate-starvation response networks in Arabidopsis thaliana through the application of phosphite.

    PubMed

    Jost, Ricarda; Pharmawati, Made; Lapis-Gaza, Hazel R; Rossig, Claudia; Berkowitz, Oliver; Lambers, Hans; Finnegan, Patrick M

    2015-05-01

    Phosphite is a less oxidized form of phosphorus than phosphate. Phosphite is considered to be taken up by the plant through phosphate transporters. It can mimic phosphate to some extent, but it is not metabolized into organophosphates. Phosphite could therefore interfere with phosphorus signalling networks. Typical physiological and transcriptional responses to low phosphate availability were investigated and the short-term kinetics of their reversion by phosphite, compared with phosphate, were determined in both roots and shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Phosphite treatment resulted in a strong growth arrest. It mimicked phosphate in causing a reduction in leaf anthocyanins and in the expression of a subset of the phosphate-starvation-responsive genes. However, the kinetics of the response were slower than for phosphate, which may be due to discrimination against phosphite by phosphate transporters PHT1;8 and PHT1;9 causing delayed shoot accumulation of phosphite. Transcripts encoding PHT1;7, lipid-remodelling enzymes such as SQD2, and phosphocholine-producing NMT3 were highly responsive to phosphite, suggesting their regulation by a direct phosphate-sensing network. Genes encoding components associated with the 'PHO regulon' in plants, such as At4, IPS1, and PHO1;H1, generally responded more slowly to phosphite than to phosphate, except for SPX1 in roots and MIR399d in shoots. Two uncharacterized phosphate-responsive E3 ligase genes, PUB35 and C3HC4, were also highly phosphite responsive. These results show that phosphite is a valuable tool to identify network components directly responsive to phosphate.

  14. Regulation of phosphate uptake via Pst transporters in Halobacterium salinarum R1.

    PubMed

    Furtwängler, Katarina; Tarasov, Valery; Wende, Andy; Schwarz, Christoph; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2010-04-01

    The genome of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum contains two copies of the pst (phosphate-specific transport) operon, the genes of which are related to well-studied bacterial homologues. Both operons (pst1 and pst2) were shown to be polycistronic and, when under P(i)-limited conditions, transcription initiated 1 bp upstream of the translational starts. Under P(i) saturation, the pst1 operon utilized an additional transcription start site 59 bp upstream of the first one. The leaderless pst1 transcript was found to be more efficiently translated than the leadered transcript. Promoter strengths differed significantly between the two operons and when P(i) levels changed. The basal pst1 promoter activity in P(i)-saturated conditions was minimal while the pst2 promoter was active. In contrast, phosphate limitation induced the pst1 operon threefold more than the pst2 operon. We identified basic and phosphate-dependent cis-acting elements in both promoters. Phosphate-uptake assays conducted with several Pst1 and Pst2 mutant strains revealed differences in the substrate affinities between the two transporters and also suggested that the P(i)-binding proteins PstS1 and PstS2 can interact with either of the two permease subunits of the transporters. The tactic behaviour of wild type and pst-deletion strains showed that the Pst1 transporter plays an important role for phosphate-directed chemotaxis.

  15. Mechanisms controlling the two phosphate uptake systems in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, D J; Beever, R E

    1979-01-01

    The development of the high-affinity and low-affinity phosphate uptake systems of Neurospora crassa has been followed during germination and early growth. The ratio between the activities of the two systems became constant by the time exponential growth began, although the value of this ratio depended on the external phosphate concentration. The regulatory mechanisms controlling the systems were investigated by following the changes that resulted when exponentially growing germlings adapted to one phosphate concentration were shifted to a different concentration. The high-affinity system was derepressed under conditions of phosphate starvation, and inhibited irreversibly by feedback inhibition under conditions of over-supply. The low-affinity system was also derepressed and subject to feedback inhibition under comparable conditions, but, in contrast, inhibition of this system was reversible. A detailed description is given of the interplay between the systems during adaptation to changes in phosphate supply. Changes that occurred in the internal phosphate pool support the hypothesis that this metabolite is responsible for controlling the activities of the systems, either by triggering derepression of new uptake system synthesis or by inhibiting the existing system by feedback. PMID:156717

  16. Investigation of ionic transport in sodium scandium phosphate (NSP) and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Kaustubh; Blügel, Stefan; Lustfeld, Hans

    Sodium ionic conductors offer significant advantages for application in large scale energy storage systems. In this study, we investigate the different pathways available for sodium ion conduction in NSP and calculate energy barriers for ionic transport using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Nudged Elastic Band Method. We identify the structural parameters that reduce the energy barrier, by calculating the influence of positive and negative external pressure on the energy barrier. Lattice strain can be introduced by cation or anion substitution within the NASICON structure. We substitute the scandium atom with other trivalent atoms such as aluminium and yttrium, and calculate the resulting energy barriers. Sodium thiophosphate (Na3PS4) has previously shown about two orders of magnitude higher ionic conductivity than sodium phosphate (Na3PO4). We investigate the effect of substituting oxygen with sulphur in NSP. We acknowledge discussions with our experimental colleagues F. Tietz and M. Guin toward this work

  17. Phosphate Uptake by Phosphate-Starved Euglena

    PubMed Central

    BLUM, J. J.

    1966-01-01

    Phosphate-deprived Euglena acquire the ability to rapidly in-corporate added phosphate and, also, synthesize an induced acid phosphatase localized in the pellicle. The phosphate uptake system is saturated at low concentrations of phosphate and is inhibited by dinitrophenol, by low temperature, by K+, Li+, and Na+ ions, and competitively by arsenate. The orthophosphate incorporated into the cell is rapidly converted into organic forms but enough remains unesterified to suggest that the uptake is an active transport process. The data do not rule out the possibility that the induced phosphatase is involved in the transport process. PMID:5924104

  18. Transport and homeostasis of potassium and phosphate: limiting factors for sustainable crop production.

    PubMed

    Luan, Mingda; Tang, Ren-Jie; Tang, Yumei; Tian, Wang; Hou, Congong; Zhao, Fugeng; Lan, Wenzhi; Luan, Sheng

    2017-06-01

    Potassium (K) and phosphate (Pi) are both macronutrients essential for plant growth and crop production, but the unrenewable resources of phosphorus rock and potash have become limiting factors for food security. One critical measure to help solve this problem is to improve nutrient use efficiency (NUE) in plants by understanding and engineering genetic networks for ion uptake, translocation, and storage. Plants have evolved multiple systems to adapt to various nutrient conditions for growth and production. Within the NUE networks, transport proteins and their regulators are the primary players for maintaining nutrient homeostasis and could be utilized to engineer high NUE traits in crop plants. A large number of publications have detailed K+ and Pi transport proteins in plants over the past three decades. Meanwhile, the discovery and validation of their regulatory mechanisms are fast-track topics for research. Here, we provide an overview of K+ and Pi transport proteins and their regulatory mechanisms, which participate in the uptake, translocation, storage, and recycling of these nutrients in plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Insulin attenuates vascular smooth muscle calcification but increases vascular smooth muscle cell phosphate transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cecilia C Low; Sorribas, Victor; Sharma, Girish; Levi, Moshe; Draznin, Boris

    2007-11-01

    Medial artery vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification increases the risk of cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetes. However, the influence of insulin on VSMC calcification is unclear. We explored the effects of insulin on rat VSMC calcification in vitro and found that in a dose-dependent fashion, insulin attenuates VSMC calcification induced by high phosphate conditions as quantified by the o-cresolphthalein calcium (OCPC) method. In an in vitro model of insulin resistance in which cells are exposed to elevated insulin concentrations and the PI 3-kinase pathway is selectively inhibited, increased VSMC calcification was observed, suggesting that the PI 3-kinase pathway is involved in this attenuating effect of insulin. We postulated that insulin may also have an effect on phosphate or calcium transport in VSMC. We found that insulin increases phosphate transport at 3 and 24 h. This effect was mediated by increased Vmax for phosphate transport but not Km. Because type III sodium-phosphate co-transporters Pit-1 and Pit-2 are found in VSMC, we examined their expression by Western blot and real-time RT-PCR. Insulin stimulates Pit-1 mRNA modestly (*p<0.01 versus control), an effect inhibited by PD98059 but not by wortmannin. Pit-1 protein expression is induced by insulin, an effect also inhibited by PD98059 (*p<0.001 versus insulin alone). Our results suggest a role for insulin in attenuating VSMC calcification which may be disrupted in selective insulin signaling impairment seen in insulin resistance. This effect of insulin contrasts with its effect to induce phosphate transport in VSMC.

  20. The expression of GintPT, the phosphate transporter of Rhizophagus irregularis, depends on the symbiotic status and phosphate availability.

    PubMed

    Fiorilli, Valentina; Lanfranco, Luisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2013-05-01

    The development of mutualistic interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is one of the most important adaptation of terrestrial plants to face mineral nutrition requirements. As an essential plant nutrient, phosphorus uptake is acknowledged as a major benefit of the AM symbiosis, but the molecular mechanisms of its transport as inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the soil to root cells via AM fungi remain poorly known. Here we monitored the expression profile of the high-affinity phosphate transporter (PT) gene (GintPT) of Rhizophagus irregularis (DAOM 197198) in fungal structures (spores, extraradical mycelium and arbuscules), under different Pi availability, and in respect to plant connection. GintPT resulted constitutively expressed along the major steps of the fungal life cycle and the connection with the host plant was crucial to warrant GintPT high expression levels in the extraradical mycelium. The influence of Pi availability on gene expression of the fungal GintPT and the Medicago truncatula symbiosis-specific Pi transporter (MtPT4) was examined by qRT-PCR assay on microdissected arbusculated cells. The expression profiles of both genes revealed that these transporters are sensitive to changing Pi conditions: we observed that MtPT4 mRNA abundance is higher at 320 than at 32 μM suggesting that the flow towards the plant requires high concentrations. Taken on the whole, the findings highlight novel traits for the functioning of the GintPT gene and offer a molecular scenario to the models describing nutrient transfers as a cooperation between the mycorrhizal partners.

  1. Restricted spatial expression of a high-affinity phosphate transporter in potato roots.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Weeks, Ruth; Tong, Yiping; Davies, T G Emyr; Leggewie, Georg

    2003-08-01

    Phosphorus deficiency limits plant growth, and high-affinity phosphate transporters, of the Pht1 family, facilitate phosphate uptake and translocation. The family is subdivided into root specific, phosphate deprivation induced members and those also expressed in leaves. An antibody to StPT2, a potato root specific transporter, detected two bands (52 kDa and 30 kDa) on western blots of root plasma membrane extracts that were most intense in whole extracts from the root tip and slightly increased throughout the root in response to phosphate depletion. RT-PCR, using StPT2 specific primers, confirmed these findings. Low power confocal immunofluorescent images showed StPT2 expression mainly in the elongation zone at the root tip. By contrast, a vacuolar pyrophosphatase and a plasma membrane ATPase antibody labelled the whole root. High power images showed, by comparison with alpha-tubulin, cell wall and plasma membrane ATPase labelling, that StPT2 was in the epidermal plasma membrane and restricted to the apical surface. This is the first evidence of polar plasma membrane localisation of a plant nutrient transporter and is consistent with a role for StPT2 in phosphate capture and uptake.

  2. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae high affinity phosphate transporter encoded by PHO84 also functions in manganese homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Laran T; Ajua-Alemanji, Mispa; Culotta, Valeria Cizewski

    2003-10-24

    In the bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, high affinity manganese uptake and intracellular distribution involve two members of the Nramp family of genes, SMF1 and SMF2. In a search for other genes involved in manganese homeostasis, PHO84 was identified. The PHO84 gene encodes a high affinity inorganic phosphate transporter, and we find that its disruption results in a manganese-resistant phenotype. Resistance to zinc, cobalt, and copper ions was also demonstrated for pho84Delta yeast. When challenged with high concentrations of metals, pho84Delta yeast have reduced metal ion accumulation, suggesting that resistance is due to reduced uptake of metal ions. Pho84p accounted for virtually all the manganese accumulated under metal surplus conditions, demonstrating that this transporter is the major source of excess manganese accumulation. The manganese taken in via Pho84p is indeed biologically active and can not only cause toxicity but can also be incorporated into manganese-requiring enzymes. Pho84p is essential for activating manganese enzymes in smf2Delta mutants that rely on low affinity manganese transport systems. A role for Pho84p in manganese accumulation was also identified in a standard laboratory growth medium when high affinity manganese uptake is active. Under these conditions, cells lacking both Pho84p and the high affinity Smf1p transporter accumulated low levels of manganese, although there was no major effect on activity of manganese-requiring enzymes. We conclude that Pho84p plays a role in manganese homeostasis predominantly under manganese surplus conditions and appears to be functioning as a low affinity metal transporter.

  3. Transportation Systems Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanning, M. L.; Michelson, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A methodology for the analysis of transportation systems consisting of five major interacting elements is reported. The analysis begins with the causes of travel demand: geographic, economic, and demographic characteristics as well as attitudes toward travel. Through the analysis, the interaction of these factors with the physical and economic characteristics of the transportation system is determined. The result is an evaluation of the system from the point of view of both passenger and operator. The methodology is applicable to the intraurban transit systems as well as major airlines. Applications of the technique to analysis of a PRT system and a study of intraurban air travel are given. In the discussion several unique models or techniques are mentioned: i.e., passenger preference modeling, an integrated intraurban transit model, and a series of models to perform airline analysis.

  4. International aspects of minerals transportation: iron ore, coal, and phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, P.J.

    1982-10-01

    Economic evaluation of mining projects cannot stop at the mine or mill. Costs associated with transportation, especially maritime, can be critical in determining project viability. It is important for the mining executive to be aware of factors that control shipping costs so he can effectively analyze projects with true global perspective.

  5. Transportation Anslysis Simulation System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-08-23

    TRANSIMS version 3.1 is an integrated set of analytical and simulation models and supporting databases. The system is designed to create a virtual metropolitan region with representation of each of the region’s individuals, their activities and the transportation infrastructure they use. TRANSIMS puts into practice a new, disaggregate approach to travel demand modeling using agent-based micro-simulation technology. TRANSIMS methodology creates a virtual metropolitan region with representation of the transportation infrastructure and the population, at the level of households and individual travelers. Trips a planned to satisfy the population’s activity pattems at the individual traveler level. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of travelers and vehicles across the transportation network using multiple modes, including car, transit, bike and walk, on a second-by-second basis. Metropolitan planners must plan growth of their cities according to the stringent transportation system planning requirements of the Interniodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other similar laws and regulations. These require each state and its metropotitan regions to work together to develop short and long term transportation improvement plans. The plans must (1) estimate the future transportation needs for travelers and goods movements, (2) evaluate ways to manage and reduce congestion, (3) examine the effectiveness of building new roads and transit systems, and (4) limit the environmental impact of the various strategies. The needed consistent and accurate transportation improvement plans require an analytical capability that properly accounts for travel demand, human behavior, traffic and transit operations, major investments, and environmental effects. Other existing planning tools use aggregated information and representative behavior to predict average response and average use of transportation facilities. They do not account

  6. A lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Due to large amounts of oxygen required for space travel, a method of mining, transporting, and storing this oxygen in space would facilitate further space exploration. The following project deals specifically with the methods for transporting liquid oxygen from the lunar surface to the Lunar Orbit (LO) space station, and then to the Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) space station. Two vehicles were designed for operation between the LEO and LO space stations. The first of these vehicles is an aerobraked design vehicle. The Aerobrake Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) is capable of transporting 5000 lbm of payload to LO while returning to LEO with 60,000 lbm of liquid oxygen, and thus meet mission requirements. The second vehicle can deliver 18,000 lbm of payload to LO and is capable of bringing 60,000 lbm of liquid oxygen back to LEO. A lunar landing vehicle was also designed for operation between LO and the established moon base. The use of an electromagnetic railgun as a method for launching the lunar lander was also investigated. The feasibility of the railgun is doubtful at this time. A system of spheres was also designed for proper storing and transporting of the liquid oxygen. The system assumes a safe means for transferring the liquid oxygen from tank to tank is operational. A sophisticated life support system was developed for both the OTV and the lunar lander. This system focuses on such factors as the vehicle environment, waste management, water requirements, food requirements, and oxygen requirements.

  7. Lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The University Space Research Association (USRA) requested the University of Minnesota Spacecraft Design Team to design a lunar transportation infrastructure. This task was a year long design effort culminating in a complete conceptual design and presentation at Johnson Space Center. The mission objective of the design group was to design a system of vehicles to bring a habitation module, cargo, and crew to the lunar surface from LEO and return either or both crew and cargo safely to LEO while emphasizing component commonality, reusability, and cost effectiveness. During the course of the design, the lunar transportation system (LTS) has taken on many forms. The final design of the system is composed of two vehicles, a lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) and a lunar excursion vehicle (LEV). The LTV serves as an efficient orbital transfer vehicle between the earth and the moon while the LEV carries crew and cargo to the lunar surface. Presented in the report are the mission analysis, systems layout, orbital mechanics, propulsion systems, structural and thermal analysis, and crew systems, avionics, and power systems for this lunar transportation concept.

  8. Lunar transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-07-01

    The University Space Research Association (USRA) requested the University of Minnesota Spacecraft Design Team to design a lunar transportation infrastructure. This task was a year long design effort culminating in a complete conceptual design and presentation at Johnson Space Center. The mission objective of the design group was to design a system of vehicles to bring a habitation module, cargo, and crew to the lunar surface from LEO and return either or both crew and cargo safely to LEO while emphasizing component commonality, reusability, and cost effectiveness. During the course of the design, the lunar transportation system (LTS) has taken on many forms. The final design of the system is composed of two vehicles, a lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) and a lunar excursion vehicle (LEV). The LTV serves as an efficient orbital transfer vehicle between the earth and the moon while the LEV carries crew and cargo to the lunar surface. Presented in the report are the mission analysis, systems layout, orbital mechanics, propulsion systems, structural and thermal analysis, and crew systems, avionics, and power systems for this lunar transportation concept.

  9. Analysis of the Plastidic phosphate translocator Gene Family in Arabidopsis and Identification of New phosphate translocator-Homologous Transporters, Classified by Their Putative Substrate-Binding Site1

    PubMed Central

    Knappe, Silke; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Fischer, Karsten

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of the Arabidopsis genome revealed the complete set of plastidic phosphate translocator (pPT) genes. The Arabidopsis genome contains 16 pPT genes: single copies of genes coding for the triose phosphate/phosphate translocator and the xylulose phosphate/phosphate translocator, and two genes coding for each the phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator and the glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator. A relatively high number of truncated phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator genes (six) and glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator genes (four) could be detected with almost conserved intron/exon structures as compared with the functional genes. In addition, a variety of PT-homologous (PTh) genes could be identified in Arabidopsis and other organisms. They all belong to the drug/metabolite transporter superfamily showing significant similarities to nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs). The pPT, PTh, and NST proteins all possess six to eight transmembrane helices. According to the analysis of conserved motifs in these proteins, the PTh proteins can be divided into (a) the lysine (Lys)/arginine group comprising only non-plant proteins, (b) the Lys-valine/alanine/glycine group of Arabidopsis proteins, (c) the Lys/asparagine group of Arabidopsis proteins, and (d) the Lys/threonine group of plant and non-plant proteins. None of these proteins have been characterized so far. The analysis of the putative substrate-binding sites of the pPT, PTh, and NST proteins led to the suggestion that all these proteins share common substrate-binding sites on either side of the membrane each of which contain a conserved Lys residue. PMID:12644669

  10. Transportation Systems Center

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    The Transportation Systems Center at Sandia Laboratory performs research, development, and implementation of technologies that enhance the safe movement of people, goods, and information. Our focus is on systems engineering. However, we realize that to understand the puzzle, you must also understand the pieces. This brochure describes some of the activities currently underway at the Center and presents the breadth and depth of our capabilities. Please contact the noted, individuals for more, information.

  11. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Bill L.

    1978-01-01

    A heat transport system of small size which can be operated in any orientation consists of a coolant loop containing a vaporizable liquid as working fluid and includes in series a vaporizer, a condenser and two one-way valves and a pressurizer connected to the loop between the two valves. The pressurizer may be divided into two chambers by a flexible diaphragm, an inert gas in one chamber acting as a pneumatic spring for the system.

  12. Genetic diversity for mycorrhizal symbiosis and phosphate transporters in rice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kwanho; Mattes, Nicolas; Catausan, Sheryl; Chin, Joong Hyoun; Paszkowski, Uta; Heuer, Sigrid

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a major plant nutrient and developing crops with higher P-use efficiency is an important breeding goal. In this context we have conducted a comparative study of irrigated and rainfed rice varieties to assess genotypic differences in colonization with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and expression of different P transporter genes. Plants were grown in three different soil samples from a rice farm in the Philippines. The data show that AM symbiosis in all varieties was established after 4 weeks of growth under aerobic conditions and that, in soil derived from a rice paddy, natural AM populations recovered within 6 weeks. The analysis of AM marker genes (AM1, AM3, AM14) and P transporter genes for the direct Pi uptake (PT2, PT6) and AM-mediated pathway (PT11, PT13) were largely in agreement with the observed root AM colonization providing a useful tool for diversity studies. Interestingly, delayed AM colonization was observed in the aus-type rice varieties which might be due to their different root structure and might confer an advantage for weed competition in the field. The data further showed that P-starvation induced root growth and expression of the high-affinity P transporter PT6 was highest in the irrigated variety IR66 which also maintained grain yield under P-deficient field conditions.

  13. Mapping of a genetic locus that affects glycerol 3-phosphate transport in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, V

    1978-01-01

    Two types of fosfomycin-resistant mutants of Bacillus subtilis were isolated. Mutants of the first type (GlpT mutants) were resistant to at least 200 microgram of fosfomycin per ml and failed to take up exogenous glycerol 3-phosphate. Mutants of the second type were resistant to lower concentrations of fosfomycin and transported glycerol-3-phosphate as efficiently as wild-type bacteria. The glpT mutations, but not the mutations in the second type of fosfomycin-resistant mutants, map in the cysA-aroI region of the B. subtilis chromosome. PMID:415047

  14. Influence of calcium on phosphate transport in cultured kidney epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Caverzasio, J.; Bonjour, J.P. )

    1988-02-01

    Renal epithelia cultured from opossum kidney (OK) cell line were exposed to high- and low-Ca media (H{sub Ca}M and L{sub Ca}M, respectively). Changing the extracellular Ca concentration from 2.0 mM to 0.02 mM stimulated sodium-dependent P{sub i} transport (Na{sub P{sub i}}T) of OK epithelia. The effect was detectable after 1 h of L{sub Ca}M exposure and reached a maximal value at 4 h, this difference remaining constant up to 16 h. The Na-dependent transport of both alanine and methyl-{alpha}-D-glucopyranoside, a glucose analogue, were not affect by L{sub Ca}M. Kinetic analysis of Na{sub P{sub i}}T revealed an increase in V{sub max} with no change in the apparent K{sub m}. The cellular adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate production was not affected by L{sub Ca}M. In OK epithelia pretreated with either cycloheximide or actinomycin D the L{sub Ca}M stimulatory effect was completely abolished. In the presence of 10{sup {minus}9} to 10{sup {minus}7} M bovine parathyroid hormone (1-34), the effect of L{sub Ca}M on Na{sub P{sub i}}T was markedly blunted. In conclusion, this study in cultured kidney epithelia demonstrates that the renal Na{sub P}{sub i}T can be directly and selectively stimulated by lowering the extracellular Ca concentration. This effect required the de novo synthesis of proteins. The results also indicate that parathyroid hormone antagonizes the stimulatory effect of extracellular Ca on the renal transport of P{sub i}.

  15. The trehalose pathway and intracellular glucose phosphates as modulators of potassium transport and general cation homeostasis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Mulet, Jose M; Alejandro, Santiago; Romero, Carlos; Serrano, Ramón

    2004-05-01

    Trk, encoded by the partially redundant genes TRK1 and TRK2, is the major potassium transporter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This system is specific for potassium and rubidium but, by reducing the electrical membrane potential of the plasma membrane, Trk decreases the uptake of toxic cations such as lithium, calcium, aminoglycosides and polyamines, which are transported by other systems. Gain- and loss-of-function studies indicate that TPS1, a gene encoding trehalose-6-phosphate synthase and known to modulate glucose metabolism, activates Trk and reduces the sensitivity of yeast cells to many toxic cations. This effect is independent of known regulators of Trk, such as the Hal4 and Hal5 protein kinases and the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Mutants defective in isoform 2 of phosphoglucomutase (pgm2) and mutants defective in isoform 2 of hexokinase (hxk2) exhibit similar phenotypes of reduced Trk activity and increased sensitivity to toxic cations compared with tps1 mutants. In all cases Trk activity was positively correlated with levels of glucose phosphates (glc-1-P and glc-6-P). These results indicate that Tps1, like Pgm2 and Hxk2, increases the levels of glucose phosphates and suggest that these metabolites, directly or indirectly, activate Trk.

  16. Modeling of Glycerol-3-Phosphate Transporter Suggests a Potential ‘Tilt’ Mechanism involved in its Function

    PubMed Central

    Tsigelny, Igor F.; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K.

    2009-01-01

    Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane α-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family — the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY) — have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been suggested that a major conformational “switching” mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible “switch” mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.23 We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a “tilt” of 9°–10° rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to suggest transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the “tilted” structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while

  17. Posttranslational modification of neurofilament proteins by phosphate during axoplasmic transport in retinal ganglion cell neurons.

    PubMed

    Nixon, R A; Lewis, S E; Marotta, C A

    1987-04-01

    The progressive modification of newly synthesized neurofilament proteins (NFPs) during axoplasmic transport in mouse retinal ganglion cell (RGC) neurons was studied after RGC perikarya were pulse-labeled with 32P-orthophosphate or radiolabeled amino acids. The 3 NFP subunits, H(igh), M(iddle), and L(ow), were among a group of axonally transported proteins that incorporated high levels of 32P. Covalent addition of phosphate slowed the electrophoretic mobility of H and M on SDS polyacrylamide gels and shifted the charge of all 3 subunits toward more acidic pH values, thereby providing an index of the phosphorylation state of this radiolabeled population of NFPs. NFPs were extensively phosphorylated before they entered axons at the optic nerve level, and continued to be modified during transport along RGC axons at the optic nerve and tract level. H and M exhibited charge shifts of 0.2-0.6 units toward a more acidic pH during axoplasmic transport. The charge modifications became more prominent when NFPs reached distal axonal levels, which may indicate regional differences in the activity of this modification process along axons. By contrast, the L subunit became more basic in charge, consistent with decreases in the phosphorylation state during transport. Additional observations (Nixon and Lewis, 1986) that a considerable proportion of phosphate groups initially added to L and M were later removed as neurofilaments advanced along RGC axons support the notion that the changing phosphorylation state of NFP subunits during axoplasmic transport reflects a dynamic equilibrium between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events. Topographical remodeling of phosphate groups on NFPs during axoplasmic transport is proposed as a possible mechanism for coordinating interactions between neurofilaments and other constituents, as these elements are transported and integrated into the axonal cytoskeleton.

  18. SUBSURFACE EMPLACEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wilson; R. Novotny

    1999-11-22

    The objective of this analysis is to identify issues and criteria that apply to the design of the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System (SET). The SET consists of the track used by the waste package handling equipment, the conductors and related equipment used to supply electrical power to that equipment, and the instrumentation and controls used to monitor and operate those track and power supply systems. Major considerations of this analysis include: (1) Operational life of the SET; (2) Geometric constraints on the track layout; (3) Operating loads on the track; (4) Environmentally induced loads on the track; (5) Power supply (electrification) requirements; and (6) Instrumentation and control requirements. This analysis will provide the basis for development of the system description document (SDD) for the SET. This analysis also defines the interfaces that need to be considered in the design of the SET. These interfaces include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Waste handling building; (2) Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface site layout; (3) Waste Emplacement System (WES); (4) Waste Retrieval System (WRS); (5) Ground Control System (GCS); (6) Ex-Container System (XCS); (7) Subsurface Electrical Distribution System (SED); (8) MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System (OMC); (9) Subsurface Facility System (SFS); (10) Subsurface Fire Protection System (SFR); (11) Performance Confirmation Emplacement Drift Monitoring System (PCM); and (12) Backfill Emplacement System (BES).

  19. Transport mechanism for succinate and phosphate localized in the plasma membrane of bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Babcock, D F; First, N L; Lardy, H A

    1975-08-25

    Bovine spermatozoa accumulated a small amount of 32Pi during aerobic incubation in vitro. At least 50% of the acquired isotope rapidly entered cellular nucleotides. Both adenosine and guanosine di- and triphosphates were labeled, but contrary to expectations, the specific activity of ADP exceeded that of ATP. The uptake of phosphate and its incorporation into nucleotides were suppressed by respiratory inhibitors and were abolished by treatment with sulfhydryl-directed reagents at 10 to 20 nmol/mg of sperm protein. With fructose as an energy source for motility, glycolysis did not support phosphate uptake. Nucleotide labeling was increased 60 to 80-fold when the cells were treated with the polyene antibiotic filipin, and filipin was able to reverse the inhibition of phosphate (and succinate) entry produced by N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl. Since filipin interacts specifically with the cholesterol-containing plasma membrane of bovine spermatozoa and increases its permeability, it is probable that the plasma membrane normally limits phosphate and succinate transport into these cells. This contention is further supported by the observation that high concentrations of extracellular Pi, the penetration of which was extremely limited under these conditions, protected against inactivation by N-ethylmaleimide. Phosphate uptake was increased 10 to 20-fold, but nucleotide labeling was inhibited, when calcium was present in the incubation medium. Ruthenium red, presumably acting extracellularly, prevented these effects of calcium. Thus, the entry of phosphate and succinate into spermatozoa is controlled by plasma membrane components that resemble the phosphate and succinate exchangers and calcium carrier found in mitochondria isolated from other sources.

  20. Crystal Structure of PhnF, a GntR-Family Transcriptional Regulator of Phosphate Transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Jason N.; Fritz, Georg; Moreland, Nicole J.; Cook, Gregory M.; Lott, J. Shaun; Baker, Edward N.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial uptake of phosphate is usually accomplished via high-affinity transporters that are commonly regulated by two-component systems, which are activated when the concentration of phosphate is low. Mycobacterium smegmatis possesses two such transporters, the widely distributed PstSCAB system and PhnDCE, a transporter that in other bacteria mediates the uptake of alternative phosphorus sources. We previously reported that the transcriptional regulator PhnF controls the production of the Phn system, acting as a repressor under high-phosphate conditions. Here we show that the phnDCE genes are common among environmental mycobacteria, where they are often associated with phnF-like genes. In contrast, pathogenic mycobacteria were not found to encode Phn-like systems but instead were found to possess multiple copies of the pst genes. A detailed biochemical analysis of PhnF binding to its identified binding sites in the phnD-phnF intergenic region of M. smegmatis has allowed us to propose a quantitative model for repressor binding, which shows that a PhnF dimer binds independently to each site. We present the crystal structure of M. smegmatis PhnF at 1.8-Å resolution, showing a homodimer with a helix-turn-helix N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain with a UbiC transcription regulator-associated fold. The C-terminal domain crystallized with a bound sulfate ion instead of the so far unidentified physiological ligand, allowing the identification of residues involved in effector binding. Comparison of the positioning of the DNA binding domains in PhnF with that in homologous proteins suggests that its DNA binding activity is regulated via a conformational change in the linker region, triggering a movement of the N-terminal domains. PMID:25049090

  1. Crystal structure of PhnF, a GntR-family transcriptional regulator of phosphate transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Susanne; Busby, Jason N; Fritz, Georg; Moreland, Nicole J; Cook, Gregory M; Lott, J Shaun; Baker, Edward N; Money, Victoria A

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial uptake of phosphate is usually accomplished via high-affinity transporters that are commonly regulated by two-component systems, which are activated when the concentration of phosphate is low. Mycobacterium smegmatis possesses two such transporters, the widely distributed PstSCAB system and PhnDCE, a transporter that in other bacteria mediates the uptake of alternative phosphorus sources. We previously reported that the transcriptional regulator PhnF controls the production of the Phn system, acting as a repressor under high-phosphate conditions. Here we show that the phnDCE genes are common among environmental mycobacteria, where they are often associated with phnF-like genes. In contrast, pathogenic mycobacteria were not found to encode Phn-like systems but instead were found to possess multiple copies of the pst genes. A detailed biochemical analysis of PhnF binding to its identified binding sites in the phnD-phnF intergenic region of M. smegmatis has allowed us to propose a quantitative model for repressor binding, which shows that a PhnF dimer binds independently to each site. We present the crystal structure of M. smegmatis PhnF at 1.8-Å resolution, showing a homodimer with a helix-turn-helix N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain with a UbiC transcription regulator-associated fold. The C-terminal domain crystallized with a bound sulfate ion instead of the so far unidentified physiological ligand, allowing the identification of residues involved in effector binding. Comparison of the positioning of the DNA binding domains in PhnF with that in homologous proteins suggests that its DNA binding activity is regulated via a conformational change in the linker region, triggering a movement of the N-terminal domains. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Mars Equipment Transport System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorrells, Cindy; Geiger, Michelle; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Brogan, Nick

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical Engineering Senior Design Project 1 (ME4182) is a part of the NASA/University Advanced Design Program. Under this program, NASA allocates money and resources to students to be used in design work for a specified topic. The current topic is the exploration and colonization of Mars. The specific area in which we are to work is the transportation of the modules in which astronauts will live while on Mars. NASA is concerned about the weight of the module transferring system, as the shipping cost to Mars is quite expensive. NASA has specified that the weight of the system is to be minimized in order to reduce the shipping costs.

  3. An off-the-shelf sensing system for physiological phosphates.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Alie M; Liu, Yuanli; Bonizzoni, Marco

    2014-05-21

    An off-the-shelf supramolecular sensing system was designed to discriminate biologically relevant phosphates in neutral water using multivariate data analysis. The system is based on an indicator displacement assay comprising only two unmodified commercially available components: a dendritic poly-electrolyte and a common fluorescent dye. Effective discrimination of nucleotide diphosphates and inorganic diphosphate was achieved through principal component analysis (PCA).

  4. The pattern of Phosphate transporter 1 genes evolutionary divergence in Glycine max L.

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Phosphate transporter 1 (PHT1) gene family has crucial roles in phosphate uptake, translocation, remobilization, and optimization of metabolic processes using of Pi. Gene duplications expand the size of gene families, and subfunctionalization of paralog gene pairs is a predominant tendency after gene duplications. To date, experimental evidence for the evolutionary relationships among different paralog gene pairs of a given gene family in soybean is limited. Results All potential Phosphate transporter 1 genes in Glycine max L. (GmPHT1) were systematically analyzed using both bioinformatics and experimentation. The soybean PHT1 genes originated from four distinct ancestors prior to the Gamma WGT and formed 7 paralog gene pairs and a singleton gene. Six of the paralog gene pairs underwent subfunctionalization, and while GmPHT1;4 paralog gene experienced pseudogenization. Examination of long-term evolutionary changes, six GmPHT1 paralog gene pairs diverged at multiple levels, in aspects of spatio-temporal expression patterns and/or quanta, phosphates affinity properties, subcellular localization, and responses to phosphorus stress. Conclusions These characterized divergences occurred in tissue- and/or development-specific modes, or conditional modes. Moreover, they have synergistically shaped the evolutionary rate of GmPHT1 family, as well as maintained phosphorus homeostasis at cells and in the whole plant. PMID:23510338

  5. Space Transportation Systems Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Jay H.

    2001-01-01

    This document is the final report by the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) on contracted support provided to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under Contract NAS8-99060, 'Space Transportation Systems Technologies'. This contract, initiated by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on February 8, 1999, was focused on space systems technologies that directly support NASA's space flight goals. It was awarded as a Cost-Plus-Incentive-Fee (CPIF) contract to SAIC, following a competitive procurement via NASA Research Announcement, NRA 8-21. This NRA was specifically focused on tasks related to Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs). Through Task Area 3 (TA-3), "Other Related Technology" of this NRA contract, SAIC extensively supported the Space Transportation Directorate of MSFC in effectively directing, integrating, and setting its mission, operations, and safety priorities for future RLV-focused space flight. Following an initially contracted Base Year (February 8, 1999 through September 30, 1999), two option years were added to the contract. These were Option Year 1 (October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2000) and Option Year 2 (October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001). This report overviews SAIC's accomplishments for the Base Year, Option Year 1, and Option Year 2, and summarizes the support provided by SAIC to the Space Transportation Directorate, NASA/MSFC.

  6. Investigating the Contribution of the Phosphate Transport Pathway to Arsenic Accumulation in Rice1[W

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhongchang; Ren, Hongyan; McGrath, Steve P.; Wu, Ping; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic (As) accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa) may pose a significant health risk to consumers. Plants take up different As species using various pathways. Here, we investigated the contribution of the phosphate (Pi) transport pathway to As accumulation in rice grown hydroponically or under flooded soil conditions. In hydroponic experiments, a rice mutant defective in OsPHF1 (for phosphate transporter traffic facilitator1) lost much of the ability to take up Pi and arsenate and to transport them from roots to shoots, whereas transgenic rice overexpressing either the Pi transporter OsPht1;8 (OsPT8) or the transcription factor OsPHR2 (for phosphate starvation response2) had enhanced abilities of Pi and arsenate uptake and translocation. OsPT8 was found to have a high affinity for both Pi and arsenate, and its overexpression increased the maximum influx by 3- to 5-fold. In arsenate-treated plants, both arsenate and arsenite were detected in the xylem sap, with the proportion of the latter increasing with the exposure time. Under the flooded soil conditions, the phf1 mutant took up less Pi whereas the overexpression lines took up more Pi. But there were no similar effects on As accumulation and distribution. Rice grain contained predominantly dimethylarsinic acid and arsenite, with arsenate being a minor species. These results suggest that the Pi transport pathway contributed little to As uptake and transport to grain in rice plants grown in flooded soil. Transgenic approaches to enhance Pi acquisition from paddy soil through the overexpression of Pi transporters may not increase As accumulation in rice grain. PMID:21715673

  7. Mars transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William; Vano, Andrew; Rutherford, Dave

    1992-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Advanced Space Design Program has developed a sample Mars exploration scenario. The purpose of the design project is to enhance NASA and university interaction, to provide fresh ideas to NASA, and to provide real world design problems to engineering students. The Mars Transportation System in this paper is designed to transport a crew of six astronauts to the Martian surface and return them to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) starting in the year 2016. The proposed vehicle features such advanced technologies as nuclear propulsion, nuclear power generation, and aerobraking. Three missions are planned. Orbital trajectories are of the conjunction class with an inbound Venus swingby providing a 60-day surface stay at Mars and an average total trip time of 520 days.

  8. NELL-1 increases pre-osteoblast mineralization using both phosphate transporter Pit1 and Pit2

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Catherine M.; Zhang, Xinli; James, Aaron W.; Mari Kim, T.; Sun, Nichole; Wu, Benjamin; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NELL-1 accelerates extracellular matrix mineralization in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NELL-1 significantly increases intracellular inorganic phosphate levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NELL-1 positively regulates osteogenesis but not proliferation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NELL-1 regulates inorganic phosphate transporter activity. -- Abstract: NELL-1 is a potent osteoinductive molecule that enhances bone formation in multiple animal models through currently unidentified pathways. In the present manuscript, we hypothesized that NELL-1 may regulate osteogenic differentiation accompanied by alteration of inorganic phosphate (Pi) entry into the osteoblast via sodium dependent phosphate (NaPi) transporters. To determine this, MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts were cultured in the presence of recombinant human (rh)NELL-1 or rhBMP-2. Analysis was performed for intracellular Pi levels through malachite green staining, Pit-1 and Pit-2 expression, and forced upregulation of Pit-1 and Pit-2. Results showed rhNELL-1 to increase MC3T3-E1 matrix mineralization and Pi influx associated with activation of both Pit-1 and Pit-2 channels, with significantly increased Pit-2 production. In contrast, Pi transport elicited by rhBMP-2 showed to be associated with increased Pit-1 production only. Next, neutralizing antibodies against Pit-1 and Pit-2 completely abrogated the Pi influx effect of rhNELL-1, suggesting rhNELL-1 is dependent on both transporters. These results identify one potential mechanism of action for rhNELL-1 induced osteogenesis and highlight a fundamental difference between NELL-1 and BMP-2 signaling.

  9. Pneumatic Pellet-Transporting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George; Pugsley, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Pneumatic system transports food pellets to confined animals. Flow of air into venturi assembly entrains round pellets, drawing them from reservoir into venturi for transport by airflow. Pneumatic pellet-transporting system includes venturi assembly, which creates flow of air that draws pellets into system.

  10. Pneumatic Pellet-Transporting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George; Pugsley, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Pneumatic system transports food pellets to confined animals. Flow of air into venturi assembly entrains round pellets, drawing them from reservoir into venturi for transport by airflow. Pneumatic pellet-transporting system includes venturi assembly, which creates flow of air that draws pellets into system.

  11. Phosphate in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: transport properties and regulatory roles.

    PubMed

    Javot, Hélène; Pumplin, Nathan; Harrison, Maria J

    2007-03-01

    In response to the colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, plants reprioritize their phosphate (Pi)-uptake strategies to take advantage of nutrient transfer via the fungus. The mechanisms underlying Pi transport are beginning to be understood, and recently, details of the regulation of plant and fungal Pi transporters in the AM symbiosis have been revealed. This review summarizes recent advances in this area and explores current data and hypotheses of how the plant Pi status affects the symbiosis. Finally, suggestions of an interrelationship of Pi and nitrogen (N) in the AM symbiosis are discussed.

  12. Molecular archeological studies of transmembrane transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saier, Milton H.; Wang, Bin; Sun, Eric I.; Matias, Madeleine; Yen, Ming Ren

    We here review studies concerned with the evolutionary pathways taken for the appearance of complex transport systems. The transmembrane protein constituents of these systems generally arose by (1) intragenic duplications, (2) gene fusions, and (3) the superimposition of enzymes onto carriers. In a few instances, we have documented examples of “reverse” or “retrograde” evolution where complex carriers have apparently lost parts of their polypeptide chains to give rise to simpler channels. Some functional superfamilies of transporters that are energized by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) include several independently evolving permease families. The ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily couples transport to ATP hydrolysis where the ATPases are superimposed on at least three distinct, independently evolving families of permeases. The prokaryotic sugar transporting phosphotransferase system (PTS) uses homologous PEP-dependent general energy-coupling phosphoryl transfer enzymes superimposed on at least three independently arising families of permeases to give rise to complex group translocators that modify their sugar substrates during transport, releasing cytoplasmic sugar phosphates. We suggest that simple carriers evolved independently of the energizing enzymes, and that chemical energization of transport resulted from the physical and functional coupling of the enzymes to the carriers.

  13. Transport of U(VI) through sediments amended with phosphate to induce in situ uranium immobilization.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vrajesh S; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Catalano, Jeffrey G; Giammar, Daniel E

    2015-02-01

    Phosphate amendments can be added to U(VI)-contaminated subsurface environments to promote in situ remediation. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impacts of phosphate addition on the transport of U(VI) through contaminated sediments. In batch experiments using sediments (<2 mm size fraction) from a site in Rifle, Colorado, U(VI) only weakly adsorbed due to the dominance of the aqueous speciation by Ca-U(VI)-carbonate complexes. Column experiments with these sediments were performed with flow rates that correspond to a groundwater velocity of 1.1 m/day. In the absence of phosphate, the sediments took up 1.68-1.98 μg U/g of sediments when the synthetic groundwater influent contained 4 μM U(VI). When U(VI)-free influents were then introduced with and without phosphate, substantially more uranium was retained within the column when phosphate was present in the influent. Sequential extractions of sediments from the columns revealed that uranium was uniformly distributed along the length of the columns and was primarily in forms that could be extracted by ion exchange and contact with a weak acid. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) analysis along with sequential extraction results suggest adsorption as the dominant uranium uptake mechanism. The response of dissolved uranium concentrations to stopped-flow events and the comparison of experimental data with simulations from a simple reactive transport model indicated that uranium adsorption to and desorption from the sediments was not always at local equilibrium.

  14. Functional properties and expression quantitative trait loci for phosphate transporter GmPT1 in soybean.

    PubMed

    Song, Haina; Yin, Zhitong; Chao, Maoni; Ning, Lihua; Zhang, Dan; Yu, Deyue

    2014-02-01

    Phosphate (Pi) remobilization within a plant is critical for plant survival under Pi-limiting conditions. In this paper, a soybean Pi transporter gene, GmPT1, was characterized. A marked induction of GmPT1 transcript was observed in young leaves, mature leaves and lateral roots during long-term Pi starvation. Transgenic tobacco plants containing the GmPT1 gene were obtained using an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system. Compared with wild-type plants, transgenic plants showed significant increases in phosphorus-use efficiency (PUE), photosystem II (PSII) function, total dry weight and seed weight under Pi-deficient conditions. GmPT1 expression levels and PUE were determined in a soybean recombinant inbred line population during a pot experiment that was conducted to measure chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, photosynthetic rate (PN ) and seed yield. Correlation analysis revealed that GmPT1 expression levels had significantly positive correlations with seed yield, PUE, PN and the quantum yield of PSII primary photochemistry (ΦPSII ). Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping for GmPT1 revealed two eQTLs, one of which coincided with both the physical location of GmPT1 and a QTL associated with seed yield. These results suggest that GmPT1 plays a role in Pi remobilization, and it may be possible to improve soybean seed yields under Pi-limiting conditions by modulating GmPT1 expression levels.

  15. Integral habitat transport system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Bill; Frazer, Scott; Higgs, Joey; Huff, Jason; Milam, Tigree

    1994-01-01

    In the 1993 Fall quarter, the ME 4182 design class was sponsored to study various scenarios that needed to be studied for Martian travel. The class was sponsored by NASA and there were several different design projects. The design that group three chose was an integral transport system for a Martian habitat. An integral transport system means the design had to be one that was attached to the habitat. There were several criteria that the design had to meet. Group three performed an in depth study of the Martian environment and looked at several different design ideas. The concept group three developed involved the use of kinematic linkages and the use of Martian gravity to move the habitat. The various design concepts, the criteria matrices and all other aspects that helped group three develop their design can be found in their 1993 ME 4182 design report. Now it is Winter quarter 1994 and group three is faced with another problem. The problem is building a working prototype of their Fall design. The limitations this quarter were the parts. The group had to make the prototype work with existing manufactured parts or make the parts themselves in a machine shop. The prototype was scaled down roughly about twelve times smaller than the original design. The following report describes the actions taken by group three to build a working model.

  16. Chaotic transport in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Stephen

    The subject of chaotic transport in dynamical systems is examined from the viewpoint of problems of phase space transport. The examples considered include uniform elliptical vortices in external linear time-dependent velocity fields; capture and passage through resonance in celestial mechanics; bubble dynamics in straining flows; and photodissociation of molecules. The discussion covers transport in two-dimensional maps; convective mixing and transport problems in fluid mechanics; transport in quasi-periodically forced systems; Markov models; and transport in k-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems.

  17. Responses of phosphate transporter gene and alkaline phosphatase in Thalassiosira pseudonana to phosphine.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mei; Song, Xiuxian; Yu, Zhiming; Liu, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Phosphine, which is released continuously from sediment, can affect the eco-physiological strategies and molecular responses of phytoplankton. To examine the effects of phosphine on phosphorus uptake and utilization in Thalassiosira pseudonana, we examined the transcriptional level of the phosphate transporter gene (TpPHO) and the activity of alkaline phosphatase (AKP) in relation to supplement of various concentrations of phosphine. TpPHO expression was markedly promoted by phosphine in both the phosphate-deficient and phosphate-4 µM culture. However, high phosphine concentrations can inhibit TpPHO transcription in the declining growth phase. AKP activity was also higher in the phosphine treatment groups than that of the control. It increased with increasing phosphine concentration in the range of 0 to 0.056 µM but was inhibited by higher levels of phosphine. These responses revealed that phosphine can affect phosphate uptake and utilization in T. pseudonana. This result was consistent with the effect of phosphine on algal growth, while TpPHO expression and AKP were even more sensitive to phosphine than algal growth. This work provides a basic understanding for further research about how phosphine affects phytoplankton.

  18. Responses of Phosphate Transporter Gene and Alkaline Phosphatase in Thalassiosira pseudonana to Phosphine

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mei; Song, Xiuxian; Yu, Zhiming; Liu, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Phosphine, which is released continuously from sediment, can affect the eco-physiological strategies and molecular responses of phytoplankton. To examine the effects of phosphine on phosphorus uptake and utilization in Thalassiosira pseudonana, we examined the transcriptional level of the phosphate transporter gene (TpPHO) and the activity of alkaline phosphatase (AKP) in relation to supplement of various concentrations of phosphine. TpPHO expression was markedly promoted by phosphine in both the phosphate-deficient and phosphate-4 µM culture. However, high phosphine concentrations can inhibit TpPHO transcription in the declining growth phase. AKP activity was also higher in the phosphine treatment groups than that of the control. It increased with increasing phosphine concentration in the range of 0 to 0.056 µM but was inhibited by higher levels of phosphine. These responses revealed that phosphine can affect phosphate uptake and utilization in T. pseudonana. This result was consistent with the effect of phosphine on algal growth, while TpPHO expression and AKP were even more sensitive to phosphine than algal growth. This work provides a basic understanding for further research about how phosphine affects phytoplankton. PMID:23544096

  19. Laser microdissection reveals that transcripts for five plant and one fungal phosphate transporter genes are contemporaneously present in arbusculated cells.

    PubMed

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Gómez-Ariza, Jorge; Lanfranco, Luisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-09-01

    The establishment of a symbiotic interaction between plant roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi requires both partners to undergo significant morphological and physiological modifications which eventually lead to reciprocal beneficial effects. Extensive changes in gene expression profiles recently have been described in transcriptomic studies that have analyzed the whole mycorrhizal root. However, because root colonization by AM fungi involves different cell types, a cell-specific gene expression pattern is likely to occur. We have applied the laser microdissection (LMD) technology to investigate expression profiles of both plant and fungal genes in Lycopersicon esculentum roots colonized by Glomus mosseae. A protocol to harvest arbuscule-containing cells from paraffin sections of mycorrhizal roots has been developed using a Leica AS LMD system. RNA of satisfactory quantity and quality has been extracted for molecular analysis. Transcripts for plant phosphate transporters (LePTs), selected as molecular markers for a functional symbiosis, have been detected by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays and associated to distinct cell types, leading to novel insights into the distribution of LePT mRNAs. In fact, the transcripts of the five phosphate transporters (PTs) have been detected contemporaneously in the same arbusculated cell population, unlike from the neighboring noncolonized cells. In addition, fungal H(+)ATPase (GmHA5) and phosphate transporter (GmosPT) mRNAs were found exclusively in arbusculated cells. The discovery that five plant and one fungal PT genes are consistently expressed inside the arbusculated cells provides a new scenario for plant-fungus nutrient exchanges.

  20. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level

  1. Arabidopsis WRKY45 transcription factor activates PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1;1 expression in response to phosphate starvation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Xu, Qian; Kong, You-Han; Chen, Yun; Duan, Jun-Ye; Wu, Wei-Hua; Chen, Yi-Fang

    2014-04-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family has more than 70 members in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome, and some of them are involved in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. This study evaluated the role of WRKY45 in regulating phosphate (Pi) uptake in Arabidopsis. WRKY45 was localized in the nucleus and mainly expressed in roots. During Pi starvation, WRKY45 expression was markedly induced, typically in roots. WRKY45 overexpression in Arabidopsis increased Pi content and uptake, while RNA interference suppression of WRKY45 decreased Pi content and uptake. Furthermore, the WRKY45-overexpressing lines were more sensitive to arsenate, the analog of Pi, compared with wild-type seedlings. These results indicate that WRKY45 positively regulates Arabidopsis Pi uptake. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and β-glucuronidase staining assays showed that PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1;1 (PHT1;1) expression was enhanced in the WRKY45-overexpressing lines and slightly repressed in the WRKY45 RNA interference line. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assay results indicated that WRKY45 can bind to two W-boxes within the PHT1;1 promoter, confirming the role of WRKY45 in directly up-regulating PHT1;1 expression. The pht1;1 mutant showed decreased Pi content and uptake, and overexpression of PHT1;1 resulted in enhanced Pi content and uptake. Furthermore, the PHT1;1-overexpressing line was much more sensitive to arsenate than WRKY45-overexpressing and wild-type seedlings, indicating that PHT1;1 overexpression can enhance Arabidopsis Pi uptake. Moreover, the enhanced Pi uptake and the increased arsenate sensitivity of the WRKY45-overexpressing line was impaired by pht1;1 (35S:WRKY45-18::pht1;1), demonstrating an epistatic genetic regulation between WRKY45 and PHT1;1. Together, our results demonstrate that WRKY45 is involved in Arabidopsis response to Pi starvation by direct up-regulation of PHT1;1 expression.

  2. ROMANSE Public Transport Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven

    ROMANSE is multi-million pound pilot project based in Southampton. It aims to use Advanced Transport Telematics (ATT) to develop the city as a model for transport management systems across Europe. ROMANSE achieves this by providing realtime traffic and travel information to influence travel behaviour, increase the use of public transport, maximize the efficiency of the transport system and provide high-quality information for use in strategic policy decisions.

  3. Comprehensive Genomic Identification and Expression Analysis of the Phosphate Transporter (PHT) Gene Family in Apple

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tingting; Li, Mingjun; Shao, Yun; Yu, Lingyan; Ma, Fengwang

    2017-01-01

    Elemental phosphorus (Pi) is essential to plant growth and development. The family of phosphate transporters (PHTs) mediates the uptake and translocation of Pi inside the plants. Members include five sub-cellular phosphate transporters that play different roles in Pi uptake and transport. We searched the Genome Database for Rosaceae and identified five clusters of phosphate transporters in apple (Malus domestica), including 37 putative genes. The MdPHT1 family contains 14 genes while MdPHT2 has two, MdPHT3 has seven, MdPHT4 has 11, and MdPHT5 has three. Our overview of this gene family focused on structure, chromosomal distribution and localization, phylogenies, and motifs. These genes displayed differential expression patterns in various tissues. For example, expression was high for MdPHT1;12, MdPHT3;6, and MdPHT3;7 in the roots, and was also increased in response to low-phosphorus conditions. In contrast, MdPHT4;1, MdPHT4;4, and MdPHT4;10 were expressed only in the leaves while transcript levels of MdPHT1;4, MdPHT1;12, and MdPHT5;3 were highest in flowers. In general, these 37 genes were regulated significantly in either roots or leaves in response to the imposition of phosphorus and/or drought stress. The results suggest that members of the PHT family function in plant adaptations to adverse growing environments. Our study will lay a foundation for better understanding the PHT family evolution and exploring genes of interest for genetic improvement in apple. PMID:28424713

  4. Genomic Identification and Expression Analysis of the Phosphate Transporter Gene Family in Poplar

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunxia; Meng, Sen; Li, Mingjun; Zhao, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate is one of key macronutrients essential for plant growth. The acquisition and distribution of phosphate are mediated by phosphate transporters functioning in various physiological and biochemical processes. In the present study, we comprehensively evaluated the phosphate transporter (PHT) gene family in the latest release of the Populus trichocarpa genome (version 3.0; Phytozome 11.0) and a total of 42 PHT genes were identified which formed five clusters: PHT1, PHT2, PHT3, PHT4, and PHO. Among the 42 PHT genes, 41 were localized to 15 Populus chromosomes. Analysis of these genes led to identification of 5–14 transmembrane segments, most of which were conserved within the same cluster. We identified 234 putative cis elements in the 2-kb upstream regions of the 42 PHT genes, many of which are related to development, stress, or hormone. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the 42 PtPHT genes revealed that 25 were highly expressed in the roots of P. tremula, suggesting that most of them might be involved in Pi uptake. Some PtPHT genes were highly expressed in more than six of the twelve investigated tissues of P. tremula, while the expression of a few of them was very low in all investigated tissues. In addition, the expression of the PtPHT genes was verified by quantitative real-time PCR in four tissues of P. simonii. Transcripts of 7 PtPHT genes were detected in all four tested tissues of P. simonii. Most PtPHT genes were expressed in the roots of P. simonii at high levels. Further, PtPHT1.2 and PtPHO9 expression was increased under drought conditions, irrespective of the phosphate levels. In particular, PtPHT1.2 expression was significantly induced by approximately 90-fold. However, the transcriptional changes of some PtPHT genes under drought stress were highly dependent on the phosphate levels. These results will aid in elucidation of the functions of PtPHT in the growth, development, and stress response of the poplar plant. PMID:27695473

  5. The phosphate transporters LjPT4 and MtPT4 mediate early root responses to phosphate status in non mycorrhizal roots.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Veronica; Giovannetti, Marco; Sun, Xue-Guang; Fiorilli, Valentina; Bonfante, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis improves host plant phosphorous (P) status and elicits the expression of AM-inducible phosphate transporters (PTs) in arbuscule-containing cells, where they control arbuscule morphogenesis and P release. We confirmed such functions for LjPT4 in mycorrhizal Lotus japonicus. Promoter-GUS experiments showed LjPT4 transcription not only in arbusculated cells but also in root tips, in the absence of the fungus: here LjPT4 transcription profile depended on the phosphate level. In addition, quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the expression of Lotus and Medicago truncatula PT4 in the tips of non-mycorrhizal roots. Starting from these observations, we hypothesized that AM-inducible PTs may have a regulatory role in plant development, irrespective of the fungal presence. Firstly, we focused on root development responses to different phosphate treatments in both plants demonstrating that phosphate starvation induced a higher number of lateral roots. By contrast, Lotus PT4i plants and Medicago mtpt4 mutants did not show any differential response to phosphate levels, suggesting that PT4 genes affect early root branching. Phosphate starvation-induced genes and a key auxin receptor, MtTIR1, showed an impaired expression in mtpt4 plants. We suggest PT4 genes as novel components of the P-sensing machinery at the root tip level, independently of AM fungi.

  6. Advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disher, J. H.; Hethcoat, J. P.; Page, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Projected growth in space transportation capabilities beyond the initial Space Shuttle is discussed in terms of earth-to-low-orbit launch vehicles as well as transportation beyond low orbit (orbit transfer vehicles). Growth versions of the Shuttle and heavy-lift derivatives of the Shuttle are shown conceptually. More advanced launch vehicle concepts are also shown, based on rocket propulsion or combinations of rocket and air-breathing propulsion. Orbit transfer vehicle concepts for personnel transport and for cargo transport are discussed, including chemical rocket as well as electric propulsion. Finally, target levels of capability and efficiencies for later time periods are discussed and compared with the prospective vehicle concepts mentioned earlier.

  7. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a) Identification. A galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system is a device intended to measure the activity...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a) Identification. A galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system is a device intended to measure the activity...

  9. Phosphate Concentration and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonisation Influence the Growth, Yield and Expression of Twelve PHT1 Family Phosphate Transporters in Foxtail Millet (Setaria italica)

    PubMed Central

    Ceasar, S. Antony; Hodge, Angela; Baker, Alison; Baldwin, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element which plays several key roles in all living organisms. Setaria italica (foxtail millet) is a model species for panacoid grasses including several millet species widely grown in arid regions of Asia and Africa, and for the bioenergy crop switchgrass. The growth responses of S. italica to different levels of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and to colonisation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae (syn. Glomus mosseae) were studied. Phosphate is taken up from the environment by the PHT1 family of plant phosphate transporters, which have been well characterized in several plant species. Bioinformatic analysis identified 12 members of the PHT1 gene family (SiPHT1;1-1;12) in S. italica, and RT and qPCR analysis showed that most of these transporters displayed specific expression patterns with respect to tissue, phosphate status and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation. SiPHT1;2 was found to be expressed in all tissues and in all growth conditions tested. In contrast, expression of SiPHT1;4 was induced in roots after 15 days growth in hydroponic medium of low Pi concentration. Expression of SiPHT1;8 and SiPHT1;9 in roots was selectively induced by colonisation with F. mosseae. SiPHT1;3 and SiPHT1;4 were found to be predominantly expressed in leaf and root tissues respectively. Several other transporters were expressed in shoots and leaves during growth in low Pi concentrations. This study will form the basis for the further characterization of these transporters, with the long term goal of improving the phosphate use efficiency of foxtail millet. PMID:25251671

  10. Modulation of small intestinal phosphate transporter by dietary supplements of mineral phosphorus and phytase in broilers.

    PubMed

    Huber, Korinna; Zeller, Ellen; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Dietary phosphorus (P) is known as a main modulator of phosphate (Pi) transporter expression. The effect of supplemented mineral P with or without phytase on protein expression of two sodium-dependent Pi (NaPi) transporters and a calcium channel was studied in the small intestine of broilers. Thirty-six broilers were randomly assigned to six different diets at 15 days of age. Two levels of total P (tP, adjusted by monocalcium phosphate (MCP) supplementation), 0.39% (BD-) and 0.47% (BD+) were fed until day 25; and at each tP level, three levels of phytase were used with 0, 500, and 12,500 FTU/kg of an E. coli phytase. Mucosa samples from jejunum and ileum were taken and apical membranes were isolated by MgCl2 precipitation. Protein expression of NaPi IIb, NaPi type III (PiT1) and the calcium channel TRPV6 were semiquantitatively measured by Western blotting and jejunal mucosal phytase activity by measurement of Pi release. The jejunal NaPi IIb transporter was expressed with two distinct bands, which were modulated differently by diet. NaPi IIb Band1 increased (P < 0.05) and Band2 decreased (P < 0.05) with phytase supplementation but was not affected by MCP supplementation. This inverse modulation of Band1 and Band2 was significantly related to the amount of net absorbed P with higher expression of Band1 at higher amounts of net absorbed P. In addition, a second Pi transporter, PiT1, was detected in which ileal expression decreased (P < 0.05) in response to higher phytase supplementation. The expression of the calcium channel TRPV6 was increased in BD+ groups. A trend for an interaction between MCP and phytase supplementation on mucosal phytase activity was observed (P = 0.079) with a decrease in activity when BD+ with 12,500 FTU/kg phytase was fed. Chicken intestinal epithelial cells responded to dietary supplemented phytase and MCP by changing the Pi transporter expression in apical membranes. In conclusion, availability of Pi is most likely the key modulator of

  11. Two differentially regulated phosphate transporters from the symbiotic fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum and phosphorus acquisition by ectomycorrhizal Pinus pinaster.

    PubMed

    Tatry, Marie-Violaine; El Kassis, Elie; Lambilliotte, Raphaël; Corratgé, Claire; van Aarle, Ingrid; Amenc, Laurie K; Alary, Rémi; Zimmermann, Sabine; Sentenac, Hervé; Plassard, Claude

    2009-03-01

    Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis markedly improves plant phosphate uptake, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this benefit are still poorly understood. We identified two ESTs in a cDNA library prepared from the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Hebeloma cylindrosporum with significant similarities to phosphate transporters from the endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus versiforme and from non-mycorrhizal fungi. The full-length cDNAs corresponding to these two ESTs complemented a yeast phosphate transport mutant (Deltapho84). Measurements of (33)P-phosphate influx into yeast expressing either cDNA demonstrated that the encoded proteins, named HcPT1 and HcPT2, were able to mediate Pi:H(+) symport with different affinities for Pi (K(m) values of 55 and 4 mum, respectively). Real-time RT-PCR showed that Pi starvation increased the levels of HcPT1 transcripts in H. cylindrosporum hyphae grown in pure culture. Transcript levels of HcPT2 were less dependent on Pi availability. The two transporters were expressed in H. cylindrosporum associated with its natural host plant, Pinus pinaster, grown under low or high P conditions. The presence of ectomycorrhizae increased net Pi uptake rates into intact Pinus pinaster roots at low or high soil P levels. The expression patterns of HcPT1 and HcPT2 indicate that the two fungal phosphate transporters may be involved in uptake of phosphate from the soil solution under the two soil P availability conditions used.

  12. Carbamate Transport in Carbamoyl Phosphate Synthetase: A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Liliya; Fan, Yubo; Shao, Qiang; Gao, Yi Qin; Raushel, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    The transport of carbamate through the large subunit of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) from Escherichia coli was investigated by molecular dynamics and site-directed mutagenesis. Carbamate, the product of the reaction involving ATP, bicarbonate and ammonia, must be delivered from the site of formation to the site of utilization by travelling nearly 40 Å within the enzyme. Potentials of mean force (PMF) calculations along the entire tunnel for the translocation of carbamate indicate that the tunnel is composed of three continuous water pockets and two narrow connecting parts, near Ala-23 and Gly-575. The two narrow parts render two free energy barriers of 6.7 and 8.4 kcal/mol. Three water pockets were filled with about 21, 9 and 9 waters, respectively, and the corresponding relative free energies of carbamate residing in these free energy minima are 5.8, 0 and 1.6 kcal/mol, respectively. The release of phosphate into solution at the site for the formation of carbamate allows the side chain of Arg-306 to rotate towards Glu-25, Glu-383, and Glu-604. This rotation is virtually prohibited by a barrier of at least 23 kcal/mol when phosphate remains bound. This conformational change not only opens the entrance of the tunnel but also shields the charge-charge repulsion from the three glutamate residues when carbamate passes through the tunnel. Two mutants, A23F and G575F, were designed to block the migration of carbamate through the narrowest parts of the carbamate tunnel. The mutants retained only 1.7% and 3.8% of the catalytic activity for the synthesis of carbamoyl phosphate relative to the wild type CPS, respectively. PMID:20187643

  13. Fungal phosphate transporter serves as a receptor backbone for gibbon ape leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, L; van Zeijl, M; Johann, S V; O'Hara, B

    1997-10-01

    Pit1, the receptor for gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV), is proposed to be an integral membrane protein with five extracellular loops. Chimeras made between Pit1 homologs differing in permissivity for infection and between Pit1 and the related protein Pit2 have shown that the fourth extracellular loop plays a critical role in infection. However, further elucidation of the roles of the extracellular loops in infection is hampered by the high level of sequence similarity among these proteins. The sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, Pho-4, from the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa is distantly related to Pit1 and -2, showing an amino acid identity of only 35% to Pit1 in the putative extracellular loops. We show here that Pho-4 itself does not function as a receptor for GALV. Introduction of 12 Pit1-specific amino acid residues in the putative fourth extracellular loop of Pho-4 resulted in a functional GALV receptor. Therefore, the presence of a Pit1 loop 4-specific sequence is sufficient to confer receptor function for the mammalian retrovirus GALV on the fungal phosphate transporter Pho-4.

  14. Phosphate transporters OsPHT1;9 and OsPHT1;10 are involved in phosphate uptake in rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We characterized the function of two rice phosphate (Pi) transporters: OsPHT1;9 (OsPT9) and OsPHT1;10 (OsPT10). OsPT9 and OsPT10 were expressed in the root epidermis, root hairs, and lateral roots, with the expression being specifically induced by Pi-starvation. In leaves, the expression of the two ...

  15. Phosphate transporters in marine phytoplankton and their viruses: cross-domain commonalities in viral-host gene exchanges.

    PubMed

    Monier, Adam; Welsh, Rory M; Gentemann, Chelle; Weinstock, George; Sodergren, Erica; Armbrust, E Virginia; Eisen, Jonathan A; Worden, Alexandra Z

    2012-01-01

    Phosphate (PO(4)) is an important limiting nutrient in marine environments. Marine cyanobacteria scavenge PO(4) using the high-affinity periplasmic phosphate binding protein PstS. The pstS gene has recently been identified in genomes of cyanobacterial viruses as well. Here, we analyse genes encoding transporters in genomes from viruses that infect eukaryotic phytoplankton. We identified inorganic PO(4) transporter-encoding genes from the PHO4 superfamily in several virus genomes, along with other transporter-encoding genes. Homologues of the viral pho4 genes were also identified in genome sequences from the genera that these viruses infect. Genome sequences were available from host genera of all the phytoplankton viruses analysed except the host genus Bathycoccus. Pho4 was recovered from Bathycoccus by sequencing a targeted metagenome from an uncultured Atlantic Ocean population. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that pho4 genes from pelagophytes, haptophytes and infecting viruses were more closely related to homologues in prasinophytes than to those in what, at the species level, are considered to be closer relatives (e.g. diatoms). We also identified PHO4 superfamily members in ocean metagenomes, including new metagenomes from the Pacific Ocean. The environmental sequences grouped with pelagophytes, haptophytes, prasinophytes and viruses as well as bacteria. The analyses suggest that multiple independent pho4 gene transfer events have occurred between marine viruses and both eukaryotic and bacterial hosts. Additionally, pho4 genes were identified in available genomes from viruses that infect marine eukaryotes but not those that infect terrestrial hosts. Commonalities in marine host-virus gene exchanges indicate that manipulation of host-PO(4) uptake is an important adaptation for viral proliferation in marine systems. Our findings suggest that PO(4) -availability may not serve as a simple bottom-up control of marine phytoplankton.

  16. Influence of phosphate on the transport properties of lead in sand.

    PubMed

    Butkus, Michael A; Johnson, Marie C

    2011-01-15

    Temporal moment analysis was used to examine the transport of lead species in sand columns. The influence of sodium phosphate (PO(4(aq))) and hydroxyapatite (HA) on lead transport was also evaluated. Transport properties of lead microparticles (diameter>0.45 μm) were a function of electrophoretic mobility: those particles with electrophoretic mobility less than -1 × 10(-8)m(2)/Vs exhibited significantly lower dimensionless first temporal moment (θ) and second temporal moment (σ(θ)(2)). The forms of lead investigated in this work had a tendency to move in sand over a wide pH range. Although the PO(4(aq)) amendment substantially reduced lead mass recoveries in the sand column effluent, lead microparticles were formed that had a tendency to move rapidly and with minimal dispersion when compared with controls. Treatments with HA provided limited reduction in lead mass recovery and minimal changes in lead transport properties. A colloid stability model was used to predict attachment of lead particles in sand.

  17. Dynamics of periarbuscular membranes visualized with a fluorescent phosphate transporter in arbuscular mycorrhizal roots of rice.

    PubMed

    Kobae, Yoshihiro; Hata, Shingo

    2010-03-01

    In arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, host plants supply photosynthates to AM fungi and, in return, they receive inorganic nutrients such as phosphate from finely branched fungal arbuscules. Plant cortical cells envelope arbuscules with periarbuscular membranes that are continuous with the plant plasma membranes. We prepared transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) plants that express a fusion of green fluorescent protein with rice AM-inducible phosphate transporter, OsPT11-GFP, and grew them with AM fungi. The fluorescence of the fusion transporter was observed in the arbuscule branch domain, where active nutrient exchange seems to occur. In contrast, a signal was not detected around intracellular hyphal coils on colonization by either Glomus mosseae or Gigaspora rosea, making the difference between Arum- and Paris-type mycorrhizae ambiguous. We also invented a simple device involving glass-bottomed Petri dishes for in planta observation of fluorescent proteins in living AM roots with an inverted fluorescence microscope. The plant bodies remain completely intact, avoiding any stressful procedure such as cutting, staining, etc. Since rice roots exhibit a very low level of autofluorescence, the device enabled clear time-lapse imaging to analyze the formation, function and degeneration of arbuscules. In cortical cells, arbuscules seemed to be functional for only 2-3 d. Suddenly, the arbuscular branches became fragile and they shrank. At this stage, however, the periarbuscular membranes appeared intact. Then, the fluorescence of the transporter disappeared within only 2.5-5.5 h. The collapse of arbuscules occurred in the subsequent several days. Thus, our device has a great advantage for investigation of dynamic features of AM symbiosis.

  18. Thyroid hormones regulate phosphate homoeostasis through transcriptional control of the renal type IIa sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter (Npt2a) gene.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Mariko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Masuda, Masashi; Kozai, Mina; Takei, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Sarasa; Sato, Tadatoshi; Segawa, Hiroko; Taketani, Yutaka; Arai, Hidekazu; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi; Takeda, Eiji

    2010-03-15

    The type IIa renal sodium-dependent phosphate (Na/Pi) co-transporter Npt2a is implicated in the control of serum phosphate levels. It has been demonstrated previously that renal Npt2a protein and its mRNA expression are both up-regulated by the thyroid hormone T3 (3,3',5-tri-iodothyronine) in rats. However, it has never been established whether the induction was mediated by a direct effect of thyroid hormones on the Npt2a promoter. To address the role of Npt2a in T3-dependent regulation of phosphate homoeostasis and to identify the molecular mechanisms by which thyroid hormones modulate Npt2a gene expression, mice were rendered pharmacologically hypo- and hyper-thyroid. Hypothyroid mice showed low levels of serum phosphate and a marked decrease in renal Npt2a protein abundance. Importantly, we also showed that Npt2a-deficient mice had impaired serum phosphate responsiveness to T3 compared with wild-type mice. Promoter analysis with a luciferase assay revealed that the transcriptional activity of a reporter gene containing the Npt2a promoter and intron 1 was dependent upon TRs (thyroid hormone receptors) and specifically increased by T3 in renal cells. Deletion analysis and EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) determined that there were unique TREs (thyroid-hormone-responsive elements) within intron 1 of the Npt2a gene. These results suggest that Npt2a plays a critical role as a T3-target gene, to control phosphate homoeostasis, and that T3 transcriptionally activates the Npt2a gene via TRs in a renal cell-specific manner.

  19. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a) Identification...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a) Identification...

  1. Droplet transport system and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, G. Paul (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Embodiments of droplet transport systems and methods are disclosed for levitating and transporting single or encapsulated droplets using thermocapillary convection. One method embodiment, among others comprises providing a droplet of a first liquid; and applying thermocapillary convection to the droplet to levitate and move the droplet.

  2. Regulation of renal phosphate transport by FGF23 is mediated by FGFR1 and FGFR4.

    PubMed

    Gattineni, Jyothsna; Alphonse, Priyatharshini; Zhang, Qiuyu; Mathews, Nisha; Bates, Carlton M; Baum, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a bone-derived hormone that acts on the proximal tubule to decrease phosphate reabsorption and serum levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃ [1,25(OH)₂ Vitamin D₃]. Abnormal FGF23 metabolism has been implicated in several debilitating hypophosphatemic and hyperphosphatemic disorders. The renal receptors responsible for the phosphaturic actions of FGF23 have not been elucidated. There are four fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR); 1-4 with "b" and "c" isoforms for receptors 1, 2, and 3. FGFR1, 3, and 4 are expressed in the mouse proximal tubule, and deletion of any one receptor did not affect serum phosphate levels, suggesting that more than one receptor is involved in mediating the phosphaturic actions of FGF23. To determine the receptors responsible for the phosphaturic actions of FGF23, we studied Fgfr1 (kidney conditional) and Fgfr4 (global) double mutant mice (Fgfr1⁻/⁻/Fgfr4⁻/⁻). Fgfr1⁻/⁻/Fgfr4⁻/⁻ mice have higher FGF23 levels than their wild-type counterparts (108.1 ± 7.3 vs. 4,953.6 ± 675.0 pg/ml; P < 0.001). Despite the elevated FGF23 levels, Fgfr1⁻/⁻/Fgfr4⁻/⁻ mice have elevated serum phosphorus levels, increased brush-border membrane vesicle (BBMV) phosphate transport, and increased Na-P(i) cotransporter 2c (NaPi-2c) protein expression compared with wild-type mice. These data are consistent with FGFR1 and FGFR4 being the critical receptors for the phosphaturic actions of FGF23.

  3. LA-ICP-MS analysis of isolated phosphatic grains indicates selective rare earth element enrichment during reworking and transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Gerald; Reuter, Markus; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Piller, Werner E.

    2016-04-01

    water chemistry under certain well constrained circumstances of primary authigenesis. Are these conditions not met, REE patterns are more likely to reflect complex enrichment processes that likely already started to occur during reworking over geologically relatively short time frames. Similarities in the REE patterns of clearly detrital and biogenic phosphate further suggest that the often observed 'hat-shaped' pattern in biogenic phosphates can easily result from increased middle REE (Neodymium to Holmium) scavenging during taphonomic processes prior to final deposition. Finally, cluster analysis coupled with sedimentological considerations proved a valuable tool for the characterization of REE patterns of phosphates in terms of their formation conditions and depositional history, such as the distinction of phosphates formed in situ from reworked and transported phosphate grains.

  4. Anion transporters and biological systems.

    PubMed

    Gale, Philip A; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2013-12-17

    In this Account, we discuss the development of new lipid bilayer anion transporters based on the structure of anionophoric natural products (the prodigiosins) and purely synthetic supramolecular systems. We have studied the interaction of these compounds with human cancer cell lines, and, in general, the most active anion transporter compounds possess the greatest anti-cancer properties. Initially, we describe the anion transport properties of synthetic molecules that are based on the structure of the family of natural products known as the prodiginines. Obatoclax, for example, is a prodiginine derivative with an indole ring that is currently in clinical trials for use as an anti-cancer drug. The anion transport properties of the compounds were correlated with their toxicity toward small cell human lung cancer GLC4 cells. We studied related compounds with enamine moieties, tambjamines, that serve as active transporters. These molecules and others in this series could depolarize acidic compartments within GLC4 cells and trigger apoptosis. In a study of the variation of lipophilicity of a series of these compounds, we observed that, as log P increases, the anion transport efficiency reaches a peak and then decreases. In addition, we discuss the anion transport properties of series of synthetic supramolecular anion receptor species. We synthesized trisureas and thioureas based on the tren backbone, and found that the thiourea compounds effectively transport anions. Fluorination of the pendant phenyl groups in this series of compounds greatly enhances the transport properties. Similar to our earlier results, the most active anion transporters reduced the viability of human cancer cell lines by depolarizing acidic compartments in GLC4 cells and triggering apoptosis. In an attempt to produce simpler transporters that obey Lipinski's Rule of Five, we synthesized simpler systems containing a single urea or thiourea group. Once again the thiourea systems, and in particular

  5. Preparation, characterization, biological activity, and transport study of polystyrene based calcium-barium phosphate composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Mujahid Ali; Rafiuddin

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-barium phosphate (CBP) composite membrane with 25% polystyrene was prepared by co-precipitation method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the membrane. The membrane was found to be crystalline in nature with consistent arrangement of particles and no indication of visible cracks. The electrical potentials measured across the composite membrane in contact with univalent electrolytes (KCl, NaCl and LiCl), have been found to increase with decrease in concentrations. Thus the membrane was found to be cation-selective. Transport properties of developed membranes may be utilized for the efficient desalination of saline water and more importantly demineralization process. The antibacterial study of this composite membrane shows good results for killing the disease causing bacteria along with waste water treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Resistance of Francisella Novicida to Fosmidomycin Associated with Mutations in the Glycerol-3-Phosphate Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Ryan S.; McKenney, Elizabeth S.; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2012-01-01

    The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway is essential in most prokaryotes and some lower eukaryotes but absent from human cells, and is a validated target for antimicrobial drug development. The formation of MEP is catalyzed by 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR). MEP pathway genes have been identified in many category A and B biothreat agents, including Francisella tularensis, which causes the zoonosis tularemia. Fosmidomycin (Fos) inhibits purified Francisella DXR. This compound also inhibits the growth of F. tularensis NIH B38, F. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS bacteria. Related compounds such as FR900098 and the lipophilic prodrug of FR900098 (compound 1) have been developed to improve the bioavailability of these DXR inhibitors. In performing disk-inhibition assays with these compounds, we observed breakthrough colonies of F. novicida in the presence of Fos, suggesting spontaneous development of Fos resistance (FosR). FosR bacteria had decreased sensitivity to both Fos and FR900098. The two most likely targets for the development of mutants would be the DXR enzyme itself or the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) that allows entry of Fos into the bacteria. Sensitivity of FosR F. novicida bacteria to compound 1 was not abated suggesting that spontaneous resistance is not due to mutation of DXR. We thus predicted that the glpT transporter may be mutated leading to this resistant phenotype. Supporting this, transposon insertion mutants at the glpT locus were also found to be resistant to Fos. DNA sequencing of four different spontaneous FosR colonies demonstrated a variety of deletions in the glpT coding region. The overall frequency of FosR mutations in F. novicida was determined to be 6.3 × 10−8. Thus we conclude that one mechanism of resistance of F. novicida to Fos is caused by mutations in GlpT. This is the first description of spontaneous mutations in Francisella leading to FosR. PMID:22905031

  7. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  8. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, Samuel D.

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  9. Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Langley's Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program employs a heavily instrumented, B 737-100 as its Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TRSV). The TRSV has been used during the demonstration trials of the Time Reference Scanning Beam Microwave Landing System (TRSB MLS), the '4D flight-management' concept, ATC data links, and airborne windshear sensors. The credibility obtainable from successful flight test experiments is often a critical factor in the granting of substantial commitments for commercial implementation by the FAA and industry. In the case of the TRSB MLS, flight test demonstrations were decisive to its selection as the standard landing system by the ICAO.

  10. Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Langley's Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program employs a heavily instrumented, B 737-100 as its Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TRSV). The TRSV has been used during the demonstration trials of the Time Reference Scanning Beam Microwave Landing System (TRSB MLS), the '4D flight-management' concept, ATC data links, and airborne windshear sensors. The credibility obtainable from successful flight test experiments is often a critical factor in the granting of substantial commitments for commercial implementation by the FAA and industry. In the case of the TRSB MLS, flight test demonstrations were decisive to its selection as the standard landing system by the ICAO.

  11. Tether Transportation System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangham, M. E.; Lorenzini, E.; Vestal, L.

    1998-01-01

    The projected traffic to geostationary earth orbit (GEO) is expected to increase over the next few decades. At the same time, the cost of delivering payloads from the Earth's surface to low earth orbit (LEO) is projected to decrease, thanks in part to the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). A comparable reduction in the cost of delivering payloads from LEO to GEO is sought. The use of in-space tethers, eliminating the requirement for traditional chemical upper stages and thereby reducing the launch mass, has been identified as such an alternative. Spinning tethers are excellent kinetic energy storage devices for providing the large delta vee's required for LEO to GEO transfer. A single-stage system for transferring payloads from LEO to GEO was proposed some years ago. The study results presented here contain the first detailed analyses of this proposal, its extension to a two-stage system, and the likely implementation of the operational system.

  12. Nectar secretion requires sucrose phosphate synthases and the sugar transporter SWEET9.

    PubMed

    Lin, I Winnie; Sosso, Davide; Chen, Li-Qing; Gase, Klaus; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Kessler, Danny; Klinkenberg, Peter M; Gorder, Molly K; Hou, Bi-Huei; Qu, Xiao-Qing; Carter, Clay J; Baldwin, Ian T; Frommer, Wolf B

    2014-04-24

    Angiosperms developed floral nectaries that reward pollinating insects. Although nectar function and composition have been characterized, the mechanism of nectar secretion has remained unclear. Here we identify SWEET9 as a nectary-specific sugar transporter in three eudicot species: Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica rapa (extrastaminal nectaries) and Nicotiana attenuata (gynoecial nectaries). We show that SWEET9 is essential for nectar production and can function as an efflux transporter. We also show that sucrose phosphate synthase genes, encoding key enzymes for sucrose biosynthesis, are highly expressed in nectaries and that their expression is also essential for nectar secretion. Together these data are consistent with a model in which sucrose is synthesized in the nectary parenchyma and subsequently secreted into the extracellular space via SWEET9, where sucrose is hydrolysed by an apoplasmic invertase to produce a mixture of sucrose, glucose and fructose. The recruitment of SWEET9 for sucrose export may have been a key innovation, and could have coincided with the evolution of core eudicots and contributed to the evolution of nectar secretion to reward pollinators.

  13. A Medicago truncatula phosphate transporter indispensable for the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Javot, Hélène; Penmetsa, R Varma; Terzaghi, Nadia; Cook, Douglas R; Harrison, Maria J

    2007-01-30

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is a mutualistic endosymbiosis formed by plant roots and AM fungi. Most vascular flowering plants have the ability to form these associations, which have a significant impact on plant health and consequently on ecosystem function. Nutrient exchange is a central feature of the AM symbiosis, and AM fungi obtain carbon from their plant host while assisting the plant with the acquisition of phosphorus (as phosphate) from the soil. In the AM symbiosis, the fungus delivers P(i) to the root through specialized hyphae called arbuscules. The molecular mechanisms of P(i) and carbon transfer in the symbiosis are largely unknown, as are the mechanisms by which the plant regulates the symbiosis in response to its nutrient status. Plants possess many classes of P(i) transport proteins, including a unique clade (Pht1, subfamily I), members of which are expressed only in the AM symbiosis. Here, we show that MtPT4, a Medicago truncatula member of subfamily I, is essential for the acquisition of P(i) delivered by the AM fungus. However, more significantly, MtPT4 function is critical for AM symbiosis. Loss of MtPT4 function leads to premature death of the arbuscules; the fungus is unable to proliferate within the root, and symbiosis is terminated. Thus, P(i) transport is not only a benefit for the plant but is also a requirement for the AM symbiosis.

  14. Intelligent Transport Systems in the Management of Road Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalupová, Blanka; Hlavoň, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    Extension of European Union causes increase of free transfer of people and goods. At the same time they raised the problems associated with the transport, e.g. congestion and related accidents on roads, air traffic delays and more. To increase the efficiency and safety of transport, the European Commission supports the introduction of intelligent transport systems and services in all transport sectors. Implementation of intelligent transport systems and services in the road transport reduces accident frequency, increases the capacity of existing infrastructure and reduces congestions. Use of toll systems provides resources needed for the construction and operation of a new road network, improves public transport, cycling transport and walking transport, and also their multimodal integration with individual car transport.

  15. The PhoBR two-component system regulates antibiotic biosynthesis in Serratia in response to phosphate

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Secondary metabolism in Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 (Serratia 39006) is controlled via a complex network of regulators, including a LuxIR-type (SmaIR) quorum sensing (QS) system. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism by which phosphate limitation controls biosynthesis of two antibiotic secondary metabolites, prodigiosin and carbapenem, in Serratia 39006. Results We demonstrate that a mutation in the high affinity phosphate transporter pstSCAB-phoU, believed to mimic low phosphate conditions, causes upregulation of secondary metabolism and QS in Serratia 39006, via the PhoBR two-component system. Phosphate limitation also activated secondary metabolism and QS in Serratia 39006. In addition, a pstS mutation resulted in upregulation of rap. Rap, a putative SlyA/MarR-family transcriptional regulator, shares similarity with the global regulator RovA (regulator of virulence) from Yersina spp. and is an activator of secondary metabolism in Serratia 39006. We demonstrate that expression of rap, pigA-O (encoding the prodigiosin biosynthetic operon) and smaI are controlled via PhoBR in Serratia 39006. Conclusion Phosphate limitation regulates secondary metabolism in Serratia 39006 via multiple inter-linked pathways, incorporating transcriptional control mediated by three important global regulators, PhoB, SmaR and Rap. PMID:19476633

  16. The competitive advantage of a dual-transporter system.

    PubMed

    Levy, Sagi; Kafri, Moshe; Carmi, Miri; Barkai, Naama

    2011-12-09

    Cells use transporters of different affinities to regulate nutrient influx. When nutrients are depleted, low-affinity transporters are replaced by high-affinity ones. High-affinity transporters are helpful when concentrations of nutrients are low, but the advantage of reducing their abundance when nutrients are abundant is less clear. When we eliminated such reduced production of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae high-affinity transporters for phosphate and zinc, the elapsed time from the initiation of the starvation program until the lack of nutrients limited growth was shortened, and recovery from starvation was delayed. The latter phenotype was rescued by constitutive activation of the starvation program. Dual-transporter systems appear to prolong preparation for starvation and to facilitate subsequent recovery, which may optimize sensing of nutrient depletion by integrating internal and external information about nutrient availability.

  17. The sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol is not required for photosynthetic electron transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides but enhances growth under phosphate limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, C.; Somerville, C.R. ); Beatty, J.T. ); Prince, R.C. )

    1993-02-15

    All photosynthetic organisms, with the exception of several species of photosynthetic bacteria, are thought to contain the sulfolipid 6-sulfo-[alpha]-D-quinovosyldiacylglycerol. The association of this lipid with photosynthetic membranes has led to the assumption that it plays some role in photosynthesis. Stable null mutants of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides completely lacking sulfolipid were obtained by disruption of the sqdB gene. The ratios of the various components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as the electron transfer rates during cyclic electron transport, were not altered in the mutants, when grown under optimal conditions. Growth rates of wild type and mutants were identical under a variety of growth conditions, with the exception of phosphate limitation, which resulted in reduced growth of the mutants. Phosphate limitation of the wild type a used a significant reduction in the amount of all phospholipids and an increased amount of sulfolipid. By contrast, the sulfolipid-deficient mutant had reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine but maintained a normal level of phosphatidylglycerol. In addition, two unidentified lipids lacking phosphorus accumulated in the membranes of both wild-type and mutant strains under phosphate limitation. We conclude that sulfolipid plays no significant unique role in photoheterotrophic growth or photosynthetic electron transport in R. sphaeroides but may function as a surrogate for phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylglycerol, under phosphate-limiting conditions. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Earthquake damage to transportation systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most destructive natural hazards known to man. A large magnitude earthquake near a populated area can affect residents over thousands of square kilometers and cause billions of dollars in property damage. Such an event can kill or injure thousands of residents and disrupt the socioeconomic environment for months, sometimes years. A serious result of a large-magnitude earthquake is the disruption of transportation systems, which limits post-disaster emergency response. Movement of emergency vehicles, such as police cars, fire trucks and ambulances, is often severely restricted. Damage to transportation systems is categorized below by cause including: ground failure, faulting, vibration damage, and tsunamis.

  19. Surveillance systems for intermodal transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovlev, Sergej; Voznak, Miroslav; Andziulis, Arunas

    2015-05-01

    Intermodal container monitoring is considered a major security issue in many major logistic companies and countries worldwide. Current representation of the problem, we face today, originated in 2002, right after the 9/11 attacks. Then, a new worldwide Container Security Initiative (CSI, 2002) was considered that shaped the perception of the transportation operations. Now more than 80 larger ports all over the world contribute to its further development and integration into everyday transportation operations and improve the regulations for the developing regions. Although, these new improvements allow us to feel safer and secure, constant management of transportation operations has become a very difficult problem for conventional data analysis methods and information systems. The paper deals with a proposal of a whole new concept for the improvement of the Containers Security Initiative (CSI) by virtually connecting safety, security processes and systems. A conceptual middleware approach with deployable intelligent agent modules is proposed to be used with possible scenarios and a testbed is used to test the solution. Middleware examples are visually programmed using National Instruments LabView software packages and Wireless sensor network hardware modules. An experimental software is used to evaluate he solution. This research is a contribution to the intermodal transportation and is intended to be used as a means or the development of intelligent transport systems.

  20. Zinc Deficiency Up-Regulates Expression of High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Genes in Both Phosphate-Sufficient and -Deficient Barley Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunyuan; Barker, Susan Jane; Langridge, Peter; Smith, Frank W.; Graham, Robin David

    2000-01-01

    Phosphate (P) is taken up by plants through high-affinity P transporter proteins embedded in the plasma membrane of certain cell types in plant roots. Expression of the genes that encode these transporters responds to the P status of the plants, and their transcription is normally tightly controlled. However, this tight control of P uptake is lost under Zn deficiency, leading to very high accumulation of P in plants. We examined the effect of plant Zn status on the expression of the genes encoding the HVPT1 and HVPT2 high-affinity P transporters in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Weeah) roots. The results show that the expression of these genes is intimately linked to the Zn status of the plants. Zn deficiency induced the expression of genes encoding these P transporters in plants grown in either P-sufficient or -deficient conditions. Moreover, the role of Zn in the regulation of these genes is specific in that it cannot be replaced by manganese (a divalent cation similar to Zn). It appears that Zn plays a specific role in the signal transduction pathway responsible for the regulation of genes encoding high-affinity P transporters in plant roots. The significance of Zn involvement in the regulation of genes involved in P uptake is discussed. PMID:10982454

  1. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli ABC transport receptor phosphate-binding protein at the Protein Crystallography Station.

    PubMed

    Sippel, K H; Bacik, J; Quiocho, F A; Fisher, S Z

    2014-06-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential molecule for all known life. Organisms have developed many mechanisms to ensure an adequate supply, even in low-phosphate conditions. In prokaryotes phosphate transport is instigated by the phosphate-binding protein (PBP), the initial receptor for the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) phosphate transporter. In the crystal structure of the PBP-phosphate complex, the phosphate is completely desolvated and sequestered in a deep cleft and is bound by 13 hydrogen bonds: 12 to protein NH and OH donor groups and one to a carboxylate acceptor group. The carboxylate plays a key recognition role by accepting a phosphate hydrogen. PBP phosphate affinity is relatively consistent across a broad pH range, indicating the capacity to bind monobasic (H2PO4-) and dibasic (HPO4(2-)) phosphate; however, the mechanism by which it might accommodate the second hydrogen of monobasic phosphate is unclear. To answer this question, neutron diffraction studies were initiated. Large single crystals with a volume of 8 mm3 were grown and subjected to hydrogen/deuterium exchange. A 2.5 Å resolution data set was collected on the Protein Crystallography Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Initial refinement of the neutron data shows significant nuclear density, and refinement is ongoing. This is the first report of a neutron study from this superfamily.

  2. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli ABC transport receptor phosphate-binding protein at the Protein Crystallography Station

    PubMed Central

    Sippel, K. H.; Bacik, J.; Quiocho, F. A.; Fisher, S. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential molecule for all known life. Organisms have developed many mechanisms to ensure an adequate supply, even in low-phosphate conditions. In prokaryotes phosphate transport is instigated by the phosphate-binding protein (PBP), the initial receptor for the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) phosphate transporter. In the crystal structure of the PBP–phosphate complex, the phosphate is completely desolvated and sequestered in a deep cleft and is bound by 13 hydrogen bonds: 12 to protein NH and OH donor groups and one to a carboxylate acceptor group. The carboxylate plays a key recognition role by accepting a phosphate hydrogen. PBP phosphate affinity is relatively consistent across a broad pH range, indicating the capacity to bind monobasic (H2PO4 −) and dibasic (HPO4 2−) phosphate; however, the mechanism by which it might accommodate the second hydrogen of monobasic phosphate is unclear. To answer this question, neutron diffraction studies were initiated. Large single crystals with a volume of 8 mm3 were grown and subjected to hydrogen/deuterium exchange. A 2.5 Å resolution data set was collected on the Protein Crystallography Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Initial refinement of the neutron data shows significant nuclear density, and refinement is ongoing. This is the first report of a neutron study from this superfamily. PMID:24915101

  3. Optimal concentrations in transport systems.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kaare H; Kim, Wonjung; Holbrook, N Michele; Bush, John W M

    2013-06-06

    Many biological and man-made systems rely on transport systems for the distribution of material, for example matter and energy. Material transfer in these systems is determined by the flow rate and the concentration of material. While the most concentrated solutions offer the greatest potential in terms of material transfer, impedance typically increases with concentration, thus making them the most difficult to transport. We develop a general framework for describing systems for which impedance increases with concentration, and consider material flow in four different natural systems: blood flow in vertebrates, sugar transport in vascular plants and two modes of nectar drinking in birds and insects. The model provides a simple method for determining the optimum concentration copt in these systems. The model further suggests that the impedance at the optimum concentration μopt may be expressed in terms of the impedance of the pure (c = 0) carrier medium μ0 as μopt 2(α)μ0, where the power α is prescribed by the specific flow constraints, for example constant pressure for blood flow (α = 1) or constant work rate for certain nectar-drinking insects (α = 6). Comparing the model predictions with experimental data from more than 100 animal and plant species, we find that the simple model rationalizes the observed concentrations and impedances. The model provides a universal framework for studying flows impeded by concentration, and yields insight into optimization in engineered systems, such as traffic flow.

  4. Optimal concentrations in transport systems

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kaare H.; Kim, Wonjung; Holbrook, N. Michele; Bush, John W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Many biological and man-made systems rely on transport systems for the distribution of material, for example matter and energy. Material transfer in these systems is determined by the flow rate and the concentration of material. While the most concentrated solutions offer the greatest potential in terms of material transfer, impedance typically increases with concentration, thus making them the most difficult to transport. We develop a general framework for describing systems for which impedance increases with concentration, and consider material flow in four different natural systems: blood flow in vertebrates, sugar transport in vascular plants and two modes of nectar drinking in birds and insects. The model provides a simple method for determining the optimum concentration copt in these systems. The model further suggests that the impedance at the optimum concentration μopt may be expressed in terms of the impedance of the pure (c = 0) carrier medium μ0 as μopt∼2αμ0, where the power α is prescribed by the specific flow constraints, for example constant pressure for blood flow (α = 1) or constant work rate for certain nectar-drinking insects (α = 6). Comparing the model predictions with experimental data from more than 100 animal and plant species, we find that the simple model rationalizes the observed concentrations and impedances. The model provides a universal framework for studying flows impeded by concentration, and yields insight into optimization in engineered systems, such as traffic flow. PMID:23594815

  5. Pressure effects on the interactions of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium transport enzyme with calcium and dinitrophenyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Hasselbach, W

    1988-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of dinitrophenyl phosphate by the sarcoplasmic calcium transport enzyme has been studied. The magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate complex is the true substrate of the enzyme (K = 7000 M-1) by which it is hydrolyzed at 20 degrees C with a turnover rate of 4 s-1. Activation by calcium ions occurs between 0.1 and 1 microM as observed for ATP hydrolysis. The activation volume of the enzyme saturated with both ligands exhibits pronounced pressure-dependence, rising from 25 ml/mol at atmospheric pressure to 80 ml/mol at 100 MPa. The apparent binding volumes for magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate and calcium are likewise pressure-dependent. The volume changes connected with the binding of magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate is quite small approaching zero at 100 MPa. The apparent binding volume for calcium greatly increases with pressure from 35 ml/mol at atmospheric pressure to 150 ml/mol at 70 MPa. A nearly constant binding volume of approximately 40 ml/mol results if the effect of pressure on the respective rate constants that contribute to the apparent binding constant, is taken into account. The pressure-dependence of enzyme activity at subsaturating calcium concentrations yields an activation volume of 250 ml/mol related to the rate of calcium binding indicating the occurrence of a transient large volume expansion of the enzyme complex. The volume changes observed for the calcium-dependent interaction of the enzyme with magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate well agree with that found for magnesium p-nitrophenyl phosphate (W. Hasselbach and L. Stephan,Z. Naturforsch. 42 c, 641-652 (1987)) indicating that the found volume changes are intrinsic properties of the transport enzyme, independent of the respective energy donor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of two phosphate transporter genes from Rhizopogon luteolus and Leucocortinarius bulbiger, two ectomycorrhizal fungi of Pinus tabulaeformis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Rong; Wang, Jugang; Liu, Min; Duan, Guozhen; Gao, Xiaomin; Bai, Shulan; Han, Yachao

    2016-10-01

    Inorganic phosphorus (Pi) is essential for plant growth, and phosphate (P) deficiency is a primary limiting factor in Pinus tabulaeformis development in northern China. P acquisition in mycorrhizal plants is highly dependent on the activities of phosphate transporters of their root-associated fungi. In the current study, two phosphate transporter genes, RlPT and LbPT, were isolated from Rhizopogon luteolus and Leucocortinarius bulbiger, respectively, two ectomycorrhizal fungi forming symbiotic interactions with the P. tabulaeformis. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the sequence of the phosphate transporter of L. bulbiger is most closely related to a phosphate transporter of Hebeloma cylindrosporum, whereas the phosphate transporter of R. luteolus is most closely related to that of Piloderma croceum. The subcellular localization indicated that RlPT and LbPT were expressed in the plasma membrane. The complementation assay in yeast indicated that both RlPT and LbPT partially compensated for the absence of phosphate transporter activity in the MB192 yeast strain, with a K m value of 57.90 μmol/L Pi for RlPT and 35.87 μmol/L Pi for LbPT. qPCR analysis revealed that RlPT and LbPT were significantly up-regulated at lower P availability, which may enhance P uptake and transport under Pi starvation. Our results suggest that RlPT and LbPT presumably play a key role in Pi acquisition by P. tabulaeformis via ectomycorrhizal fungi.

  7. Influence of lithium vacancies on the polaronic transport in olivine phosphate structure

    SciTech Connect

    Murugavel, Sevi Sharma, Monika; Shahid, Raza

    2016-01-28

    Intercalation and deintercalation of lithium ions in cathode materials are of principal to the operation of current rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The performance of lithium ion batteries highly relies on the active cathode material which includes cell potential, power/energy density, capacity, etc. An important issue in this class of material is to resolve the factors governing the electron and ion transport in olivine phosphate structure. In this class of material, there is still an open debate on the mechanism of charge transport including both polarons and lithium ions. On the one hand, this is due to the large disparity between the experimental results and the theoretical model predictions. On the other hand, this is also due to the lack of precise experimental measurement without any parasitic phases in a given cathode material. Here, we present the polaronic conduction in lithiated triphylite LiFePO{sub 4} (LFP) and delithiated heterosite FePO{sub 4} (FP) by means of broadband ac impedance spectroscopy over wide range temperatures and frequency. It is found that the LFP phase possess two orders of higher polaronic conductivity than FP phase despite having similar mobility of polarons in both phases. We show that the differences in the polaronic conductivity of two phases are due to the significant differences in concentration of polarons. It is found that the formation energy of polarons in individual phases is mainly determined by the corresponding defect state associated with it. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed within the framework of Mott model of polaronic conduction and explored the origin of polaronic conduction mechanism in this class of material.

  8. The sphingosine-1-phosphate transporter Spns2 expressed on endothelial cells regulates lymphocyte trafficking in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Simmons, Szandor; Kawamura, Shunsuke; Inoue, Asuka; Orba, Yasuko; Tokudome, Takeshi; Sunden, Yuji; Arai, Yuji; Moriwaki, Kazumasa; Ishida, Junji; Uemura, Akiyoshi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Hirashima, Masanori; Sawa, Hirofumi; Aoki, Junken; Ishii, Masaru; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    The bioactive lysophospholipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) promotes the egress of newly formed T cells from the thymus and the release of immature B cells from the bone marrow. It has remained unclear, however, where and how S1P is released. Here, we show that in mice, the S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (Spns2) is responsible for the egress of mature T cells and immature B cells from the thymus and bone marrow, respectively. Global Spns2-KO mice exhibited marked accumulation of mature T cells in thymi and decreased numbers of peripheral T cells in blood and secondary lymphoid organs. Mature recirculating B cells were reduced in frequency in the bone marrow as well as in blood and secondary lymphoid organs. Bone marrow reconstitution studies revealed that Spns2 was not involved in S1P release from blood cells and suggested a role for Spns2 in other cells. Consistent with these data, endothelia-specific deletion of Spns2 resulted in defects of lymphocyte egress similar to those observed in the global Spns2-KO mice. These data suggest that Spns2 functions in ECs to establish the S1P gradient required for T and B cells to egress from their respective primary lymphoid organs. Furthermore, Spns2 could be a therapeutic target for a broad array of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:22406534

  9. The sphingosine-1-phosphate transporter Spns2 expressed on endothelial cells regulates lymphocyte trafficking in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Simmons, Szandor; Kawamura, Shunsuke; Inoue, Asuka; Orba, Yasuko; Tokudome, Takeshi; Sunden, Yuji; Arai, Yuji; Moriwaki, Kazumasa; Ishida, Junji; Uemura, Akiyoshi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Hirashima, Masanori; Sawa, Hirofumi; Aoki, Junken; Ishii, Masaru; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2012-04-01

    The bioactive lysophospholipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) promotes the egress of newly formed T cells from the thymus and the release of immature B cells from the bone marrow. It has remained unclear, however, where and how S1P is released. Here, we show that in mice, the S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (Spns2) is responsible for the egress of mature T cells and immature B cells from the thymus and bone marrow, respectively. Global Spns2-KO mice exhibited marked accumulation of mature T cells in thymi and decreased numbers of peripheral T cells in blood and secondary lymphoid organs. Mature recirculating B cells were reduced in frequency in the bone marrow as well as in blood and secondary lymphoid organs. Bone marrow reconstitution studies revealed that Spns2 was not involved in S1P release from blood cells and suggested a role for Spns2 in other cells. Consistent with these data, endothelia-specific deletion of Spns2 resulted in defects of lymphocyte egress similar to those observed in the global Spns2-KO mice. These data suggest that Spns2 functions in ECs to establish the S1P gradient required for T and B cells to egress from their respective primary lymphoid organs. Furthermore, Spns2 could be a therapeutic target for a broad array of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  10. A phosphate transporter expressed in arbuscule-containing cells in potato.

    PubMed

    Rausch, C; Daram, P; Brunner, S; Jansa, J; Laloi, M; Leggewie, G; Amrhein, N; Bucher, M

    2001-11-22

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas are the most common non-pathogenic symbioses in the roots of plants. It is generally assumed that this symbiosis facilitated the colonization of land by plants. In arbuscular mycorrhizas, fungal hyphae often extend between the root cells and tuft-like branched structures (arbuscules) form within the cell lumina that act as the functional interface for nutrient exchange. In the mutualistic arbuscular-mycorrhizal symbiosis the host plant derives mainly phosphorus from the fungus, which in turn benefits from plant-based glucose. The molecular basis of the establishment and functioning of the arbuscular-mycorrhizal symbiosis is largely not understood. Here we identify the phosphate transporter gene StPT3 in potato (Solanum tuberosum). Functionality of the encoded protein was confirmed by yeast complementation. RNA localization and reporter gene expression indicated expression of StPT3 in root sectors where mycorrhizal structures are formed. A sequence motif in the StPT3 promoter is similar to transposon-like elements, suggesting that the mutualistic symbiosis evolved by genetic rearrangements in the StPT3 promoter.

  11. Overexpression of Mitochondrial Phosphate Transporter 3 Severely Hampers Plant Development through Regulating Mitochondrial Function in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Fengjuan; Wan, Xiaomin; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Dan; Zheng, Chengchao; Liu, Pei; Huang, Jinguang

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are abundant and important organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells, which maintain metabolic communication with the cytosol through mitochondrial carriers. The mitochondrial membrane localized phosphate transporter (MPT) plays vital roles in diverse development and signaling processes, especially the ATP biosynthesis. Among the three MPT genes in Arabidopsis genome, AtMPT3 was proven to be a major member, and its overexpression gave rise to multiple developmental defects including curly leaves with deep color, dwarfed stature, and reduced fertility. Transcript profiles revealed that genes involved in plant metabolism, cellular redox homeostasis, alternative respiration pathway, and leaf and flower development were obviously altered in AtMPT3 overexpression (OEMPT3) plants. Moreover, OEMPT3 plants also accumulated higher ATP content, faster respiration rate and more reactive oxygen species (ROS) than wild type plants. Overall, our studies showed that AtMPT3 was indispensable for Arabidopsis normal growth and development, and provided new sights to investigate its possible regulation mechanisms. PMID:26076137

  12. Phosphate and zinc transport and signalling in plants: toward a better understanding of their homeostasis interaction.

    PubMed

    Bouain, Nadia; Shahzad, Zaigham; Rouached, Aida; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Berthomieu, Pierre; Abdelly, Chedly; Poirier, Yves; Rouached, Hatem

    2014-11-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) and zinc (Zn) are two essential nutrients for plant growth. In soils, these two minerals are either present in low amounts or are poorly available to plants. Consequently, worldwide agriculture has become dependent on external sources of Pi and Zn fertilizers to increase crop yields. However, this strategy is neither economically nor ecologically sustainable in the long term, particularly for Pi, which is a non-renewable resource. To date, research has emphasized the analysis of mineral nutrition considering each nutrient individually, and showed that Pi and Zn homeostasis is highly regulated in a complex process. Interestingly, numerous observations point to an unexpected interconnection between the homeostasis of the two nutrients. Nevertheless, despite their fundamental importance, the molecular bases and biological significance of these interactions remain largely unknown. Such interconnections can account for shortcomings of current agronomic models that typically focus on improving the assimilation of individual elements. Here, current knowledge on the regulation of the transport and signalling of Pi and Zn individually is reviewed, and then insights are provided on the recent progress made towards a better understanding of the Zn-Pi homeostasis interaction in plants. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Lunar articulated remote transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The students of the Florida A&M/Florida State University College of Engineering continued their design from 1988 to 1989 on a first generation lunar transportation vehicle for use on the surface of the Moon between the years 2010 and 2020. Attention is focused on specific design details on all components of the Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS). The Lunar ARTS will be a three-cart, six-wheeled articulated vehicle. Its purpose will be the transportation of astronauts and/or materials for excavation purposes at a short distance from the base (37.5 km). The power system includes fuel cells for both the primary system and the back-up system. The vehicle has the option of being operated in a manned or unmanned mode. The unmanned mode includes stereo imaging with signal processing for navigation. For manned missions the display console is a digital readout displayed on the inside of the astronaut's helmet. A microprocessor is also on board the vehicle. Other components of the vehicle include a double wishbone/flexible hemispherical wheel suspension; chassis; a steering system; motors; seat retraints; heat rejection systems; solar flare protection; dust protection; and meteoroid protection. A one-quarter scale dynamic model has been built to study the dynamic behavior of the vehicle. The dynamic model closely captures the mechanical and electrical details of the total design.

  14. Lunar articulated remote transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Geoffrey; Conley, Gerald; Diaz, Claudine; Dimella, Timothy; Dodson, Pete; Hykin, Jeff; Richards, Byron; Richardson, Kroy; Shetzer, Christie; Vandyke, Melissa

    1990-01-01

    A first generation lunar transportation vehicle was designed for use on the surface of the Moon between the years 2010 and 2020. Attention is focussed on specific design details on all components of the Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS). The Lunar ARTS will be a three cart, six-wheeled articulated vehicle. It's purpose will be for the transportation of astronauts and/or materials for excavation purposes at a short distance from the base (37.5 kilometers). The power system includes fuel cells for both the primary system and the back-up system. The vehicle has the option of being operated in a manned or unmanned mode. The unmanned mode includes stereo imaging with signal processing for navigation. For manned missions the display console is a digital readout displayed on the inside of the asronaut's helmet. A microprocessor is also on board the vehicle. Other components of the vehicle include: a double wishbone/flexible hemispherical wheel suspension; chassis; a steering system; motors; seat restraints, heat rejection systems; solar flare protection; dust protection; and meteoroid protection. A one-quarter scale dynamic model was built to study the dynamic behavior of the vehicle. The dynamic model closely captures the mechanical and electrical details of the total design.

  15. Effect of silver ions on transport and retention of phosphate by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, W J; Rosenberg, H

    1982-01-01

    Silver ions inhibited phosphate uptake and exchange in Escherichia coli and caused efflux of accumulated phosphate as well as of mannitol, succinate, glutamine, and proline. The effects of Ag+ were reversed by thiols and, to a lesser extent, by bromide. In the presence of N-ethylmaleimide and several uncouplers, Ag+ failed to cause phosphate efflux, but still inhibited exchange of intracellular and extracellular phosphate, indicating an interaction at more than one site. It is unlikely that Ag+ caused metabolite efflux by acting solely as an uncoupler, as an inhibitor of the respiratory chain, or as a thiol reagent. PMID:6749823

  16. Integrated Intermodal Passenger Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klock, Ryan; Owens, David; Schwartz, Henry; Plencner, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Modern transportation consists of many unique modes of travel. Each of these modes and their respective industries has evolved independently over time, forming a largely incoherent and inefficient overall transportation system. Travelers today are forced to spend unnecessary time and efforts planning a trip through varying modes of travel each with their own scheduling, pricing, and services; causing many travelers to simply rely on their relatively inefficient and expensive personal automobile. This paper presents a demonstration program system to not only collect and format many different sources of trip planning information, but also combine these independent modes of travel in order to form optimal routes and itineraries of travel. The results of this system show a mean decrease in inter-city travel time of 10 percent and a 25 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions over personal automobiles. Additionally, a 55 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions is observed for intra-city travel. A conclusion is that current resources are available, if somewhat hidden, to drastically improve point to point transportation in terms of time spent traveling, the cost of travel, and the ecological impact of a trip. Finally, future concepts are considered which could dramatically improve the interoperability and efficiency of the transportation infrastructure.

  17. Phosphate reduction in a hydroxyapatite fluoride removal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egner, A.

    2012-12-01

    Fluorosis is a widespread disease that occurs as a result of excess fluoride consumption and can cause severe tooth and bone deformations. To combat fluorosis, several previous studies have examined the potential to replace traditional bone char filters with synthetic hydroxyapatite. Calcite particles with a synthetic hydroxyapatite coating have been shown to effectively removed fluoride, yet the low-cost method for forming these particles leaves high amounts of phosphate both in synthesis waste-water and in filter effluent. High phosphate in filter effluent is problematic because consumption of extremely high phosphate can leach calcium from bones, further exacerbating the fluoride effect. This study examines ways of reducing and reusing waste. In particular, a method of fluoride removal is explored in which fluorapatite coatings may be formed directly. In preliminary studies, batches of 4.1g of Florida limestone (<710 μm) were equilibrated with 100 mL of 10ppm fluoride. In a control batch containing lime but no added phosphate, 14% treatment was achieved, but with added phosphate, 100% treatment was achieved in all batches. Batches with lower levels of phosphate took longer to reach 100% treatment, ranging from less than 24 hours in the highest phosphate batches to approximately 42 hours in the lowest batches. The lower levels tested were well within reasonable levels for drinking water and reached 0ppm fluoride in 42 hours or less.

  18. slalom encodes an adenosine 3′-phosphate 5′-phosphosulfate transporter essential for development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lüders, Florian; Segawa, Hiroaki; Stein, David; Selva, Erica M.; Perrimon, Norbert; Turco, Salvatore J.; Häcker, Udo

    2003-01-01

    Sulfation of all macromolecules entering the secretory pathway in higher organisms occurs in the Golgi and requires the high-energy sulfate donor adenosine 3′-phosphate 5′-phosphosulfate. Here we report the first molecular identification of a gene that encodes a transmembrane protein required to transport adenosine 3′-phosphate 5′-phosphosulfate from the cytosol into the Golgi lumen. Mutations in this gene, which we call slalom, display defects in Wg and Hh signaling, which are likely due to the lack of sulfation of glycos aminoglycans by the sulfotransferase sulfateless. Analysis of mosaic mutant ovaries shows that sll function is also essential for dorsal–ventral axis determination, suggesting that sll transports the sulfate donor required for sulfotransferase activity of the dorsal–ventral determinant pipe. PMID:12853478

  19. The soybean mycorrhiza-inducible phosphate transporter gene, GmPT7, also shows localized expression at the tips of vein endings of senescent leaves.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuki; Kobae, Yoshihiro; Omoto, Eiji; Tanaka, Aiko; Banba, Mari; Takai, Shoko; Tamura, Yosuke; Hirose, Aya; Komatsu, Kunihiko; Otagaki, Shungo; Matsumoto, Shogo; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka; Masuta, Chikara; Ishimoto, Masao; Hata, Shingo

    2014-12-01

    GmPT7 was originally identified as an arbuscular mycorrhiza-inducible gene of soybean that encodes a member of subfamily I in the PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER 1 family. In the present study, we established conditions under which a number of dwarf soybean plants complete their life cycles in a growth chamber. Using this system, we grew transgenic soybean with a GmPT7 promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion gene and evaluated GmPT7 expression in detail. GmPT7 was highly expressed in mature, but not in collapsed, arbuscule-containing cortical cells, suggesting its importance in the absorption of fungus-derived phosphate and/or arbuscule development. GmPT7 was also expressed in the columella cells of root caps and in the lateral root primordia of non-mycorrhizal roots. The expression of GmPT7 occurred only in the late stage of phosphorus translocation from leaves to seeds, after water evaporation from the leaves ceased, and later than the expression of GmUPS1-2, GmNRT1.7a and GmNRT1.7b, which are possibly involved in nitrogen export. GmPT7 expression was localized in a pair of tracheid elements at the tips of vein endings of senescent leaves. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the tip tracheid elements in yellow leaves were still viable and had intact plasma membranes. Thus, we think that GmPT7 on the plasma membranes transports phosphate from the apoplast into the tip elements. GmPT7 knockdown resulted in no significant effects, the function of GmPT7 remaining to be clarified. We propose a working model in which phosphate incorporated in vein endings moves to seeds via xylem to phloem transfer. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Ceramide 1-Phosphate Increases P-Glycoprotein Transport Activity at the Blood-Brain Barrier via Prostaglandin E2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mesev, Emily V.; Miller, David S.

    2017-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven efflux pump, regulates permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Sphingolipids, endogenous to brain tissue, influence inflammatory responses and cell survival in vitro. Our laboratory has previously shown that sphingolipid signaling by sphingosine 1-phosphate decreases basal P-glycoprotein transport activity. Here, we investigated the potential for another sphingolipid, ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), to modulate efflux pumps at the BBB. Using confocal microscopy and measuring luminal accumulation of fluorescent substrates, we assessed the transport activity of several efflux pumps in isolated rat brain capillaries. C1P treatment induced P-glycoprotein transport activity in brain capillaries rapidly and reversibly. In contrast, C1P did not affect transport activity of two other major efflux transporters, multidrug resistance protein 2 and breast cancer resistance protein. C1P induced P-glycoprotein transport activity without changing transporter protein expression. Inhibition of the key signaling components in the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 signaling cascade (phospholipase A2, COX-2, multidrug resistance protein 4, and G-protein–coupled prostaglandin E2 receptors 1 and 2), abolished P-glycoprotein induction by C1P. We show that COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 are required for C1P-mediated increases in P-glycoprotein activity independent of transporter protein expression. This work describes how C1P activates a signaling cascade to dynamically regulate P-glycoprotein transport at the BBB and offers potential clinical targets to modulate neuroprotection and drug delivery to the CNS. PMID:28119480

  1. Ceramide 1-Phosphate Increases P-Glycoprotein Transport Activity at the Blood-Brain Barrier via Prostaglandin E2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mesev, Emily V; Miller, David S; Cannon, Ronald E

    2017-04-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven efflux pump, regulates permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Sphingolipids, endogenous to brain tissue, influence inflammatory responses and cell survival in vitro. Our laboratory has previously shown that sphingolipid signaling by sphingosine 1-phosphate decreases basal P-glycoprotein transport activity. Here, we investigated the potential for another sphingolipid, ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), to modulate efflux pumps at the BBB. Using confocal microscopy and measuring luminal accumulation of fluorescent substrates, we assessed the transport activity of several efflux pumps in isolated rat brain capillaries. C1P treatment induced P-glycoprotein transport activity in brain capillaries rapidly and reversibly. In contrast, C1P did not affect transport activity of two other major efflux transporters, multidrug resistance protein 2 and breast cancer resistance protein. C1P induced P-glycoprotein transport activity without changing transporter protein expression. Inhibition of the key signaling components in the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 signaling cascade (phospholipase A2, COX-2, multidrug resistance protein 4, and G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E2 receptors 1 and 2), abolished P-glycoprotein induction by C1P. We show that COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 are required for C1P-mediated increases in P-glycoprotein activity independent of transporter protein expression. This work describes how C1P activates a signaling cascade to dynamically regulate P-glycoprotein transport at the BBB and offers potential clinical targets to modulate neuroprotection and drug delivery to the CNS.

  2. Cellular resistance to Evans blue toxicity involves an up-regulation of a phosphate transporter implicated in vesicular glutamate storage.

    PubMed

    Israël, M; Tomasi, M; Bostel, S; Meunier, F M

    2001-08-01

    It has recently been suggested that the brain-specific Na+-dependent phosphate inorganic co-transporter (BNPI) is able to support glutamate transport and storage in synaptic vesicles. A procedure for measuring the vesicular pool of glutamate is described and was used to select cell lines according to their glutamate storage capacity. Two cell lines were selected: C6BU-1, with a large intracellular glutamate storage capacity, and NG108-15, devoid of it. Their contents in BNPI mRNA were compared by RT-PCR. We found that both cell lines had BNPI, but in addition C6BU-1 alone expresses the other isoform, DNPI. We also carried out a clonal selection of NG108-15 cells in the presence of the dye Evans blue, a competitive inhibitor of vesicular glutamate transport, very toxic for cells in culture. It was assumed that only those that sequester and eliminate the drug by overexpressing a vesicular glutamate transporter would survive. We found that the NG108-15 clones resistant to Evans blue had an increased storage capacity for glutamate. These cells also up-regulated the BNPI isoform of the phosphate transporter as shown by RT-PCR and northern blot.

  3. Effects of age on intestinal phosphate transport and biochemical values of broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianhui; Yuan, Jianmin; Miao, Zhiqiang; Guo, Yuming

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this experiment was to characterize the mRNA expression profile of type IIb sodium-inorganic phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-IIb) and the biochemical values of serum alkaline phosphatase (AKP), calcium, inorganic phosphorus, tibial ash and minerals of broiler chickens with aging. Methods A total of 56 one-day-old Arbor Acres male broiler chickens were used. Broiler chickens were weighed and samples were collected weekly from day 1. Results The result showed that before the growth inflection point, ash, calcium, and phosphorus content in the tibia of broiler chickens increased with growth (before 3 weeks of age), although there were no significant differences in chicks at different ages in the later period of the experiment and weight gain rate was relatively slow at this stage (4 to 6 weeks). NaPi-IIb gene expression in the small intestine in the early growth stage was higher than that in the later growth stage. Expression of calbindin and the vitamin D receptor protein in the intestinal mucosa increased with age in the duodenum and jejunum. Serum AKP activity first increased and subsequently decreased after peaking at 1 week of age, but there was no significant difference after 3 weeks of age. Conclusion These results show that compared with the early growth stage, the weight-gain rate of broiler chickens in the late growth stage gradually decreased with gradual tibia maturation, along with weaker positive transport of phosphorus in the intestine and reinforced re-absorption of phosphorus in the kidney, which might be the reason that phosphorus requirement in the late growth stage was decreased. PMID:27703131

  4. B-subunit of phosphate-specific transporter from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a thermostable ATPase.

    PubMed

    Sarin, J; Aggarwal, S; Chaba, R; Varshney, G C; Chakraborti, P K

    2001-11-30

    The B-subunit of phosphate-specific transporter (PstB) is an ABC protein. pstB was polymerase chain reaction-amplified from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The overexpressed protein was found to be in inclusion bodies. The protein was solubilized using 1.5% N-lauroylsarcosine and was purified by gel permeation chromatography. The molecular mass of the protein was approximately 31 kDa. The eluted protein showed ATP-binding ability and exhibited ATPase activity. Among different nucleotide triphosphates, ATP was found to be the preferred substrate for M. tuberculosis PstB-ATPase. The study of the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis yielded K(m) of approximately 72 microm and V(max) of approximately 0.12 micromol/min/mg of protein. Divalent cation like manganese was inhibitory to the ATPase activity. Magnesium or calcium, on the other hand, had no influence on the functionality of the enzyme. The classical ATPase inhibitors like sodium azide, sodium vanadate, and N-ethylmaleimide were without any effect but an ATP analogue, 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyl adenosine, inhibited the ATPase function of the recombinant protein with a K(i) of approximately 0.40 mm. Furthermore, there was hardly any ATP hydrolyzing ability of the PstB as a result of mutation of the conserved aspartic acid residue to lysine in the Walker motif B, confirming the recombinant protein is an ATPase. Interestingly, analysis of the recombinant PstB revealed that it is a thermostable ATPase; thus, our results highlight for the first time the presence of such an enzyme in any mesophilic bacteria.

  5. The Space Taxi™ transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Douglas

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent studies by Orbital to significantly reduce NASA's future launch costs and improve crew safety through the implementation of a low-risk, evolutionary space transportation architecture. These studies were performed as a part of NASA's Space Transportation Architecture Studies (STAS) and subsequent internally-funded efforts. A large number of vehicles and architecture approaches were examined and evaluated. Orbital's recommended architecture includes a small, multifunctional vehicle, referred to as a Space Taxi™, which would serve as: an emergency crew return vehicle for the International Space Station (ISS), a two-way human space transportation system, a small cargo delivery and return vehicle, and as a passenger module for a future Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). The Space Taxi™ would initially be launched on a heavy-lift Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV), currently under development by U.S. industry and the U.S. Air Force. Together with a small cargo carrier located behind the Space Taxi™, this combination of vehicles would be used to meet future ISS servicing requirements. Later, a two-stage, commercially developed RLV would replace the EELV in launching the Space Taxi™ system at a significantly lower cost. .

  6. Suppression of Arbuscule Degeneration in Medicago truncatula phosphate transporter4 Mutants Is Dependent on the Ammonium Transporter 2 Family Protein AMT2;3

    PubMed Central

    Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Floss, Daniela S.; Gomez, S. Karen; Pumplin, Nathan; Ding, Yi; Levesque-Tremblay, Veronique; Noar, Roslyn D.; Daniels, Dierdra A.; Bravo, Armando; Eaglesham, James B.; Benedito, Vagner A.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Harrison, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, the plant gains access to phosphate (Pi) and nitrogen delivered by its fungal symbiont. Transfer of mineral nutrients occurs at the interface between branched hyphae called arbuscules and root cortical cells. In Medicago truncatula, a Pi transporter, PT4, is required for symbiotic Pi transport, and in pt4, symbiotic Pi transport fails, arbuscules degenerate prematurely, and the symbiosis is not maintained. Premature arbuscule degeneration (PAD) is suppressed when pt4 mutants are nitrogen-deprived, possibly the result of compensation by PT8, a second AM-induced Pi transporter. However, PAD is also suppressed in nitrogen-starved pt4 pt8 double mutants, negating this hypothesis and furthermore indicating that in this condition, neither of these symbiotic Pi transporters is required for symbiosis. In M. truncatula, three AMT2 family ammonium transporters are induced during AM symbiosis. To test the hypothesis that suppression of PAD involves AMT2 transporters, we analyzed double and triple Pi and ammonium transporter mutants. ATM2;3 but not AMT2;4 was required for suppression of PAD in pt4, while AMT2;4, but not AMT2;3, complemented growth of a yeast ammonium transporter mutant. In summary, arbuscule life span is influenced by PT4 and ATM2;3, and their relative importance varies with the nitrogen status of the plant. PMID:25841038

  7. Vapor phase heat transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedstrom, J. C.; Neeper, D. A.

    1985-09-01

    Progress in theoretical and experimental investigations of various forms of a vapor transport system for solar space heating is described, which could also be applied to service water heating. The refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector, which may be located on the external wall or roof of a building. The vapor is condensed in a passively discharged thermal storage unit located within the building. The condensed liquid can be returned to the collector either by a motor-driven pump or by a completely passive self-pumping mechanism in which the vapor pressure lifts the liquid from the condenser to the collector. The theoretical investigation analyzes this self-pumping scheme. Experiments in solar test cells compared the operation of both passive and active forms of the vapor system with the operation of a passive water wall. The vapor system operates as expected, with potential advantages over other passive systems in design flexibility and energy yield.

  8. Parathyroid hormone inhibits phosphate transport in OK cells but not in LLC-PK1 and JTC-12.P3 cells.

    PubMed

    Malmström, K; Murer, H

    1986-07-01

    Na+-dependent phosphate transport and its response to parathyroid hormone (PTH) has been investigated in three continuous cell lines of renal epithelial origin (LLC-PK1, JTC-12.P3, and OK). The apparent Km for phosphate was similar, but the maximal transport rate (Vmax) was markedly different in the three cell lines. PTH and forskolin produced an increase of cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in all cell lines, but Na+-dependent phosphate transport was inhibited exclusively in the OK cells (a threefold reduction of influx after 4 h of exposure to 10(-10) M PTH). The change in phosphate transport is accounted for by a lowered Vmax (30.8 +/- 5.3 vs. 10.2 +/- 1.1 pmol X mg-1 X 3 min-1). The reduction in phosphate transport was reversible, such that 5 h after removal of PTH the Vmax had increased threefold over the inhibited state. Addition of PTH did not alter Na+-dependent L-alanine influx in the OK cells. Experiments with apical membrane vesicles showed that the change in Vmax occurred at the membrane level. It is concluded that the regulatory event responsible for PTH-reduced phosphate transport is beyond cAMP. Of the cell lines studied, only OK cells have a complete regulatory cascade.

  9. Atomic basis of the exquisite specificity of phosphate and sulfate transport receptors.

    PubMed

    Quiocho, F A

    1996-04-01

    We have determined, by the method of x-ray crystallography, the 1.7 A resolution three-dimensional structures of the ligand-bound form of the phosphate receptor as well as the sulfate receptor. These protein structures provide an unprecedented atomic-level understanding of the mechanism governing the exquisite specificity of each receptor. Although they lack amino acid sequence homology, both receptors have very similar three-dimensional structure. The structure consists of two globular domains separated by a deep cleft which contains the ligand-binding site. The bound phosphate and sulfate are totally devoid of water of hydration. The bound phosphate is tightly held in place by 12 hydrogen bonds, 11 with donor and 1 with acceptor groups. The acceptor group (an Asp carboxylate side chain) plays three key roles. It confers specificity by directly recognizing one proton of either the monobasic or dibasic phosphate. It also assists in the recognition of another proton of the monobasic phosphate. Finally, because of charge repulsion, it disallows binding of fully ionized sulfate. The sulfate bound to the sulfate receptor makes seven hydrogen bonds with uncharged polar groups exclusively. The absence of an acceptor group in the binding site of the sulfate receptor is not conducive to phosphate binding.

  10. Exome sequencing identifies a novel homozygous mutation in the phosphate transporter SLC34A1 in hypophosphatemia and nephrocalcinosis.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Braslavsky, Débora; Lu, James T; Kleppe, Soledad; Clément, Florencia; Cassinelli, Hamilton; Liu, David S; Liern, Jose Miguel; Vallejo, Graciela; Bergadá, Ignacio; Gibbs, Richard A; Campeau, Phillipe M; Lee, Brendan H

    2014-11-01

    Two Argentinean siblings (a boy and a girl) from a nonconsanguineous family presented with hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypophosphatemia, low parathyroid hormone (PTH), and nephrocalcinosis. The goal of this study was to identify genetic causes of the clinical findings in the two siblings. Whole exome sequencing was performed to identify disease-causing mutations in the youngest sibling, and a candidate variant was screened in other family members by Sanger sequencing. In vitro experiments were conducted to determine the effects of the mutation that was identified. Affected siblings (2 y.o. female and 10 y.o male) and their parents were included in the study. Informed consent was obtained for genetic studies. A novel homozygous mutation in the gene encoding the renal sodium-dependent phosphate transporter SLC34A1 was identified in both siblings (c.1484G>A, p.Arg495His). In vitro studies showed that the p.Arg495His mutation resulted in decreased phosphate uptake when compared to wild-type SLC34A1. The homozygous G>A transition that results in the substitution of histidine for arginine at position 495 of the renal sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, SLC34A1, is involved in disease pathogenesis in these patients. Our report of the second family with two mutated SLC34A1 alleles expands the known phenotype of this rare condition.

  11. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel Homozygous Mutation in the Phosphate Transporter SLC34A1 in Hypophosphatemia and Nephrocalcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Braslavsky, Débora; Lu, James T.; Kleppe, Soledad; Clément, Florencia; Cassinelli, Hamilton; Liu, David S.; Liern, Jose Miguel; Vallejo, Graciela; Bergadá, Ignacio; Gibbs, Richard A.; Campeau, Phillipe M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Two Argentinean siblings (a boy and a girl) from a nonconsanguineous family presented with hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypophosphatemia, low parathyroid hormone (PTH), and nephrocalcinosis. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify genetic causes of the clinical findings in the two siblings. Design: Whole exome sequencing was performed to identify disease-causing mutations in the youngest sibling, and a candidate variant was screened in other family members by Sanger sequencing. In vitro experiments were conducted to determine the effects of the mutation that was identified. Patients and Other Participants: Affected siblings (2 y.o. female and 10 y.o male) and their parents were included in the study. Informed consent was obtained for genetic studies. Results: A novel homozygous mutation in the gene encoding the renal sodium-dependent phosphate transporter SLC34A1 was identified in both siblings (c.1484G>A, p.Arg495His). In vitro studies showed that the p.Arg495His mutation resulted in decreased phosphate uptake when compared to wild-type SLC34A1. Conclusions: The homozygous G>A transition that results in the substitution of histidine for arginine at position 495 of the renal sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, SLC34A1, is involved in disease pathogenesis in these patients. Our report of the second family with two mutated SLC34A1 alleles expands the known phenotype of this rare condition. PMID:25050900

  12. Contribution of TAT System Translocated PhoX to Campylobacter jejuni Phosphate Metabolism and Resilience to Environmental Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Drozd, Mary; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Liu, Zhe; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a common gastrointestinal pathogen that colonizes food animals; it is transmitted via fecal contamination of food, and infections in immune-compromised people are more likely to result in serious long-term illness. Environmental phosphate is likely an important sensor of environmental fitness and the ability to obtain extracellular phosphate is central to the bacteria's core metabolic responses. PhoX is the sole alkaline phosphatase in C. jejuni, a substrate of the TAT transport system. Alkaline phosphatases mediate the hydrolytic removal of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from phospho-organic compounds and thereby contribute significantly to the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) mediated formation of poly P, a molecule that regulates bacterial response to stresses and virulence. Similarly, deletion of the tatC gene, a key component of the TAT system, results in diverse phenotypes in C. jejuni including reduced stress tolerance and in vivo colonization. Therefore, here we investigated the contribution of phoX in poly P synthesis and in TAT-system mediated responses. The phoX deletion mutant showed significant decrease (P<0.05) in poly P accumulation in stationary phase compared to the wild-type, suggesting that PhoX is a major contributor to the inorganic phosphate pool in the cell which is essential for poly P synthesis. The phoX deletion is sufficient for a nutrient stress defect similar to the defect previously described for the ΔtatC mutant. Additionally, the phoX deletion mutant has increased resistance to certain antimicrobials. The ΔphoX mutant was also moderately defective in invasion and intracellular survival within human intestinal epithelial cells as well as in chicken colonization. Further, the ΔphoX mutant produced increased biofilm that can be rescued with 1 mM inorganic phosphate. The qRT-PCR of the ΔphoX mutant revealed transcriptional changes that suggest potential mechanisms for the increased biofilm phenotype. PMID:22028859

  13. Compact magnetic levitation transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Suppes, G.J.

    1992-09-15

    This patent describes a magnetic levitation transportation system, it comprises: vehicle loading and unloading stations, at least one primary pair of laterally spaced rails comprises of magnetically interactive material extending between the vehicle loading and unloading stations, a vehicle of a size, a magnetic levitation means, energy conversion means for energizing the magnetic levitation means on the vehicle and for maintaining the speed and acceleration of the vehicle during travel, braking control means for creating a net braking force on the vehicle in a braking condition, and speed control means on the vehicle for accelerating and decelerating the vehicle.

  14. Transportable and Hybrid Transportable AC Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-11

    Systems (TACS) 10 2.1.1 Objectives 10 2.1.2 Primary Results 10 2.1.3 Lessons Learned 13 2.1.4 Phase 1 Summary...Lessons Learned 15 2.2.4 Phase 2 Summary 16 2.3 Last Known Status of all Fielded Units under ARO 16 3.0 FUTURE EFFORTS...Substrate 6 Figure 2 – Foldable Solar Subarrays also know as Power Flex ™ modules 7 Figure 3 – Foldable modules - Left with anti-glint; Right

  15. Cadmium (II) and lead (II) transport in a polymer inclusion membrane using tributyl phosphate as mobile carrier and CuFeO(2) as a polarized photo electrode.

    PubMed

    Arous, Omar; Amara, Mourad; Trari, Mohamed; Bouguelia, Aissa; Kerdjoudj, Hacène

    2010-08-15

    In this work, a development of polymeric inclusion membranes for the cations separation is reported. The membrane was made up of cellulose triacetate (CTA) with a tributyl phosphate (TBP) incorporated into the polymer as metal ions carrier. The transport of lead (II) and cadmium (II) ions in two membrane systems polymer inclusion membrane (PIM), PIM coupled with photo-chemical electrode using TBP as carrier and 2-nitro phenyl octyl ether (NPOE) or tris ethylhexyl phosphate (TEHP) as plasticizer have been investigated. The membranes: polymer+plasticizer+carrier were synthesized and characterized by FTIR, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Transports of lead and cadmium have been studied using these systems and the results were compared to commercial cation exchange membrane (CRA). The obtained results showed that for Pb(2+) ion, the concentrations of the strip phase increases using synthesized membranes. The conduction band of the delafossite CuFeO(2) (-1.25 V(SCE)) yields a thermodynamically M(2+) (=Pb(2+), Cd(2+)) photo electrodeposition and speeds up the diffusion process. In all the cases, the potential of the electrode M/M(2+) in the feed compartment increases until a maximum value, reached at approximately 100 min above which it undergoes a diminution. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification and developmental expression of the mitochondrial phosphate transport protein gene from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Feng, Q L; Ladd, T R; Retnakaran, A; Davey, K G; Palli, S R

    1998-10-01

    Phosphate transport protein (PTP) is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein responsible for the translocation of inorganic phosphate into the mitochondrial matrix. A full length cDNA clone encoding the PTP was isolated from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana. The deduced amino acid sequence of the longest ORF of CfPTP cDNA showed high similarity with the amino acid sequences of PTPs cloned from several species. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that CfPTP occupied an intermediate position between vertebrates on the one side and yeast and nematodes on the other side. Studies on the developmental expression of CfPTP mRNA showed that higher levels of mRNA were present during the feeding and growing stages than during molting periods.

  17. Extracellular inorganic phosphate regulates gibbon ape leukemia virus receptor-2/phosphate transporter mRNA expression in rat bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Keinoshin; Mizuno, Morimichi; Komori, Takahide; Tamura, Masato

    2004-01-01

    In mammalian cells, several observations indicate not only that phosphate transport probably regulates local inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration, but also that Pi affects normal cellular metabolism, which in turn regulates apoptosis and the process of mineralization. To elucidate how extracellular Pi regulates cellular functions of pre-osteoblastic cells, we investigated the expression of type III sodium (Na)-dependent Pi transporters in rat bone marrow stromal cells and ROB-C26 pre-osteoblastic cells. The mRNA expression level of gibbon ape leukemia virus receptor (Glvr)-2 was increased by the addition of Pi in rat bone marrow stromal cells, but not in ROB-C26 or normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. In contrast, the level of Glvr-1 mRNA was not altered by the addition of extracellular Pi in these cells. The induction of Glvr-2 mRNA by Pi was inhibited in the presence of cycloheximide (CHX). Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) /extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway inhibitors; U0126 (1.4-diamino-2, 3-dicyano-1, 4-bis [2-amino-phenylthio] butadiene) and PD98059 (2'-Amino-3'-methoxyflavone) inhibited inducible Glvr-2 mRNA expression, but p38 MEK inhibitor SB203580 [4-(4'-fluorophenyl)-2-(4'-methyl-sulfinylphenyl)-5-(4'pyridyl) imidazole] did not inhibit the induction of Glvr-2 mRNA expression, suggesting that extracellular Pi regulates de novo protein synthesis and MEK/ERK activity in rat bone marrow stromal cells, and through these, induction of Glvr-2 mRNA. Although Pi also induced osteopontin mRNA expression in rat bone marrow stromal cells but not in ROB-C26 and NRK cells, changes in cell viability with the addition of Pi were similar in both cell types. These data indicate that extracellular Pi regulates Glvr-2 mRNA expression, provide insights into possible mechanisms whereby Pi may regulate protein phosphorylation, and suggest a potential role for the Pi transporter in rat bone marrow stromal cells.

  18. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr1 in the Proximal and Distal Tubule Identifies Distinct Roles in Phosphate and Calcium Transport.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaobin; Yang, Jiancheng; Li, Linqiang; Huang, Jinsong; King, Gwendalyn; Quarles, L Darryl

    2016-01-01

    A postnatal role of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) in the kidney is suggested by its binding to α-Klotho to form an obligate receptor for the hormone fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). FGFR1 is expressed in both the proximal and distal renal tubular segments, but its tubular specific functions are unclear. In this study, we crossed Fgfr1flox/flox mice with either gamma-glutamyltransferase-Cre (γGT-Cre) or kidney specific-Cre (Ksp-Cre) mice to selectively create proximal tubule (PT) and distal tubule (DT) Fgfr1 conditional knockout mice (designated Fgfr1PT-cKO and Fgfr1DT-cKO, respectively). Fgfr1PT-cKO mice exhibited an increase in sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter expression, hyperphosphatemia, and refractoriness to the phosphaturic actions of FGF-23, consistent with a direct role of FGFR1 in mediating the proximal tubular phosphate responses to FGF-23. In contrast, Fgfr1DT-cKO mice unexpectedly developed hypercalciuria, secondary elevations of parathyroid hormone (PTH), hypophosphatemia and enhanced urinary phosphate excretion. Fgfr1PT-cKO mice also developed a curly tail/spina bifida-like skeletal phenotype, whereas Fgfr1DT-cKO mice developed renal tubular micro-calcifications and reductions in cortical bone thickness. Thus, FGFR1 has dual functions to directly regulate proximal and distal tubule phosphate and calcium reabsorption, indicating a physiological role of FGFR1 signaling in both phosphate and calcium homeostasis.

  19. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr1 in the Proximal and Distal Tubule Identifies Distinct Roles in Phosphate and Calcium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaobin; Yang, Jiancheng; Li, Linqiang; Huang, Jinsong; King, Gwendalyn; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2016-01-01

    A postnatal role of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) in the kidney is suggested by its binding to α-Klotho to form an obligate receptor for the hormone fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). FGFR1 is expressed in both the proximal and distal renal tubular segments, but its tubular specific functions are unclear. In this study, we crossed Fgfr1flox/flox mice with either gamma-glutamyltransferase-Cre (γGT-Cre) or kidney specific-Cre (Ksp-Cre) mice to selectively create proximal tubule (PT) and distal tubule (DT) Fgfr1 conditional knockout mice (designated Fgfr1PT-cKO and Fgfr1DT-cKO, respectively). Fgfr1PT-cKO mice exhibited an increase in sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter expression, hyperphosphatemia, and refractoriness to the phosphaturic actions of FGF-23, consistent with a direct role of FGFR1 in mediating the proximal tubular phosphate responses to FGF-23. In contrast, Fgfr1DT-cKO mice unexpectedly developed hypercalciuria, secondary elevations of parathyroid hormone (PTH), hypophosphatemia and enhanced urinary phosphate excretion. Fgfr1PT-cKO mice also developed a curly tail/spina bifida-like skeletal phenotype, whereas Fgfr1DT-cKO mice developed renal tubular micro-calcifications and reductions in cortical bone thickness. Thus, FGFR1 has dual functions to directly regulate proximal and distal tubule phosphate and calcium reabsorption, indicating a physiological role of FGFR1 signaling in both phosphate and calcium homeostasis. PMID:26839958

  20. Flow injection potentiometric system for the simultaneous determination of inositol phosphates and phosphate: phosphorus nutritional evaluation on seeds and grains.

    PubMed

    Parra, Aleix; Ramon, Meritxell; Alonso, Julián; Lemos, Sherlan G; Vieira, Edivan C; Nogueira, Ana R A

    2005-10-05

    A simple flow injection potentiometric (FIP) system, which uses a tubular cobalt electrode, has been developed for phosphorus nutritional evaluation of seeds and grains. Inorganic phosphorus, P(i), is determined using a 1 x 10(-2) mol.L(-1) potassium phthalate buffer solution adjusted at pH 4. A sensitivity of 47 mV/decade and an operating range from 10 to 1000 mg.L(-1) (1 x 10(-4)-1 x 10(-2) M) of dihydrogen phosphate are obtained. The inositol phosphates amount, which is referred to the organic phosphorus, P(org), is directly determined from extracts using a 1 x 10(-2) mol.L(-1) Tris-HCl buffer solution adjusted at pH 8. A sensitivity of 127 mV/decade and an operating range of 10-1000 mg.L(-1) (2.5 x 10(-4)-5 x 10(-3) M) of P(org) (expressed as inositol hexakisphosphoric acid monocalcium) are achieved. Some samples of seed and grain are analyzed by an ICP-OES and a spectrophotometric method to compare results to the developed flow system; no significant differences at the 95% confidence level are observed using a paired t test. Other samples such as animal nursing feed, soybean meal, and corn are also analyzed with the proposed FIP system, showing a good correlation to the ICP-OES values.

  1. Urban Transportation Planning Short Course: Evaluation of Alternative Transportation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This urban transportation pamphlet delves into the roles of policy groups and technical staffs in evaluating alternative transportation plans, evaluation criteria, systems to evaluate, and evaluation procedures. The introduction admits the importance of subjective, but informed, judgment as an effective tool in weighing alternative transportation…

  2. Stimulatory effect of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-like substances from Solanum malacoxylon and Cestrum diurnum on phosphate transport in chick jejunum.

    PubMed

    Peterlik, M; Wasserman, R H

    1978-10-01

    Extracts of the calcinogenic plants Solanum malocoxylon and Cestrum diurnum stimulate phosphate absorption by the jejunum of vitamin D-deficient chicks, as determined by everted gut sac technique. Their action on cellular pathways of transepithelial phosphate transport is indistinguishable thereby from that of cholecalciferol. Increased net absorption from the lumen was due to enhanced uptake of phosphate from the luminal side, while leakage of tissue phosphate in the opposite direction was apparently unaffected. Steep serosa/mucosa concentration gradients were observed as consequence of enhanced levels of transepithelial phosphate flux in the mucosa-to-serosa direction. With respect to their stimulatory action on phosphate absorption, the calcinogenic plant factors retained their biological activity when phosphate transport was depressed by a high strontium diet. Their action in overcoming the strontium inhibition of phosphate absorption, calcium-binding protein synthesis, and alkaline phosphatase activity, was comparable to the effect of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol. On the basis of these biological responses, the action of the plant factors from Solanum malacoxylon and Cestrum diurnum provides further evidence for their close resemblance to the hormonally active sterol.

  3. The regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by phosphate in pea involves early and systemic signalling events.

    PubMed

    Balzergue, Coline; Puech-Pagès, Virginie; Bécard, Guillaume; Rochange, Soizic F

    2011-01-01

    Most plants form root symbioses with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, which provide them with phosphate and other nutrients. High soil phosphate levels are known to affect AM symbiosis negatively, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. This report describes experimental conditions which triggered a novel mycorrhizal phenotype under high phosphate supply: the interaction between pea and two different AM fungi was almost completely abolished at a very early stage, prior to the formation of hyphopodia. As demonstrated by split-root experiments, down-regulation of AM symbiosis occurred at least partly in response to plant-derived signals. Early signalling events were examined with a focus on strigolactones, compounds which stimulate pre-symbiotic fungal growth and metabolism. Strigolactones were also recently identified as novel plant hormones contributing to the control of shoot branching. Root exudates of plants grown under high phosphate lost their ability to stimulate AM fungi and lacked strigolactones. In addition, a systemic down-regulation of strigolactone release by high phosphate supply was demonstrated using split-root systems. Nevertheless, supplementation with exogenous strigolactones failed to restore root colonization under high phosphate. This observation does not exclude a contribution of strigolactones to the regulation of AM symbiosis by phosphate, but indicates that they are not the only factor involved. Together, the results suggest the existence of additional early signals that may control the differentiation of hyphopodia.

  4. The regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by phosphate in pea involves early and systemic signalling events

    PubMed Central

    Balzergue, Coline; Puech-Pagès, Virginie; Bécard, Guillaume; Rochange, Soizic F.

    2011-01-01

    Most plants form root symbioses with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, which provide them with phosphate and other nutrients. High soil phosphate levels are known to affect AM symbiosis negatively, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. This report describes experimental conditions which triggered a novel mycorrhizal phenotype under high phosphate supply: the interaction between pea and two different AM fungi was almost completely abolished at a very early stage, prior to the formation of hyphopodia. As demonstrated by split-root experiments, down-regulation of AM symbiosis occurred at least partly in response to plant-derived signals. Early signalling events were examined with a focus on strigolactones, compounds which stimulate pre-symbiotic fungal growth and metabolism. Strigolactones were also recently identified as novel plant hormones contributing to the control of shoot branching. Root exudates of plants grown under high phosphate lost their ability to stimulate AM fungi and lacked strigolactones. In addition, a systemic down-regulation of strigolactone release by high phosphate supply was demonstrated using split-root systems. Nevertheless, supplementation with exogenous strigolactones failed to restore root colonization under high phosphate. This observation does not exclude a contribution of strigolactones to the regulation of AM symbiosis by phosphate, but indicates that they are not the only factor involved. Together, the results suggest the existence of additional early signals that may control the differentiation of hyphopodia. PMID:21045005

  5. Vesicular transport systems in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene H; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Canonical and unconventional mechanisms of secretion in many eukaryotic cells are relatively well known. In contrast to the situation in animal cells, mechanisms of secretion in fungi must include the capacity for trans-cell wall passage of macromolecules to the extracellular space. Although these mechanisms remain somewhat elusive, several studies in recent years have suggested that vesicular transport is required for trans-cell wall secretion of large molecules. Several fungal molecules, including proteins, lipids, polysaccharides and pigments, are released to the extracellular space in vesicles. In pathogenic fungi, a number of these vesicular components are associated with fungal virulence. Indeed, extracellular vesicles produced by fungi can interfere with the immunomodulatory activity of host cells. Fungal vesicles share many functional aspects with mammalian exosomes and extracellular vesicles produced by bacteria, plants and protozoa, but their cellular origin remains unknown. Here, we discuss the involvement of vesicular transport systems in fungal physiology and pathogenesis, making parallels with the mammalian, bacterial, protozoan and plant cell literature. PMID:22082294

  6. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  7. Oxygen isotopes as a tracer of phosphate sources and cycling in aquatic systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. B.; Kendall, C.; Paytan, A.

    2013-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate can provide valuable information about sources and processes affecting phosphorus as it moves through hydrologic systems. Applications of this technique in soil and water have become more common in recent years due to improvements in extraction methods and instrument capabilities, and studies in multiple aquatic environments have demonstrated that some phosphorus sources may have distinct isotopic compositions within a given system. Under normal environmental conditions, the oxygen-phosphorus bonds in dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) can only be broken by enzymatic activity. Biological cycling of DIP will bring the phosphate oxygen into a temperature-dependent equilibrium with the surrounding water, overprinting any existing isotopic source signals. However, studies conducted in a wide range of estuarine, freshwater, and groundwater systems have found that the phosphate oxygen is often out of biological equilibrium with the water, suggesting that it is common for at least a partial isotopic source signal to be retained in aquatic systems. Oxygen isotope analysis on various potential phosphate sources such as synthetic and organic fertilizers, animal waste, detergents, and septic/wastewater treatment plant effluents show that these sources span a wide range of isotopic compositions, and although there is considerable overlap between the source groups, sources may be isotopically distinct within a given study area. Recent soil studies have shown that isotopic analysis of phosphate oxygen is also useful for understanding microbial cycling across different phosphorus pools, and may provide insights into controls on phosphorus leaching. Combining stable isotope information from soil and water studies will greatly improve our understanding of complex phosphate cycling, and the increasing use of this isotopic technique across different environments will provide new information regarding anthropogenic phosphate inputs and

  8. Manned transportation system study - Evaluation of candidate transportation architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, Nicholas; Klemer, R.; Sooter, C.

    1992-01-01

    The overall evaluation process, the tool developed to perform the evaluation, and the evaluation results in determining the right approach to meet the nation's mannned transportation needs are presented. To address the various considerations, architecture sets consisting of the candidate transportation systems are constructed. As this methodology results in multiple architectures to examine, an architecture evaluation tool was developed to facilitate the evaluation of the architecture attribute values from the system values of the attributes.

  9. Sustainability Analysis of Innovative Transport System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiere, Ieva; Bazbauers, Gatis

    2011-01-01

    The focus of the research is to develop a new approach to transport solution based on the use of a conveyortype system and to compare the environmental impact of the new system with the existing ones. The new transport system consists of a conveyor driven by an electric motor, with a wind power plant supplying electricity, hydrogen storage and a fuel cell for matching the wind power production with the motor load. The research tasks included the evaluation of the consumption of fossil fuels and the associated environmental impact of existing transport system and a comparison with energy consumption and associated environmental impact of the new system. The energy balance of the conveyor transport system was modelled on an hourly basis by using the EnergyPLAN computer program [1] which allows to analyze a combination of intermittent renewable energy technologies, storage and transport systems. The results show that the existing transport system has greater impact on the environment than the proposed one.

  10. Classical transport in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Antonios

    This thesis reports on the manifestation of structural disorder on molecular transport and it consists of two parts. Part I discusses the relations between classical transport and the underlying structural complexity of the system. Both types of molecular diffusion, namely Gaussian and non- Gaussian are presented and the relevant time regimes are discussed. In addition the concept of structural universality is introduced and connected with the diffusion metrics. One of the most robust techniques for measuring molecular mean square displacements is magnetic resonance. This method requires encoding and subsequently reading out after an experimentally controlled time, a phase φ to the spins using magnetic field gradients. The main limitation for probing short diffusion lengths L(t) ˜ 1micro m with magnetic resonance is the requirement to encode and decode the phase φ in very short time intervals. Therefore, to probe such displacements a special probe was developed equipped with a gradient coil capable of delivering magnetic field gradients of approximately 90 G/cmA . The design of the probe is reported. Part I also includes a discussion of experiments of transport in two qualitatively different disordered phantoms and reports on a direct observation of universality in one-dimension. The results reveal the universal power law scaling of the diffusion coefficient at the long-time regime and illustrate the essence of structural universality by experimentally determining the structure correlation function of the phantoms. In addition, the scaling of the diffusive permeability of the phantoms with respect to the pore size is investigated. Additional work presented includes a detailed study of adsorption of methane gas in Vycor disordered glass. The techniques described in Part I of this thesis are widely used for measuring structural parameters of porous media, such as the surface-to-volume ratio or diffusive permeability. Part II of this thesis discusses the

  11. A Brassica napus PHT1 phosphate transporter, BnPht1;4, promotes phosphate uptake and affects roots architecture of transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Feng; Zhao, Cai-Zhi; Liu, Chun-Sen; Huang, Ke-Lin; Guo, Qian-Qian; Chang, Li-Li; Xiong, Huan; Li, Xue-Bao

    2014-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the essential nutrient elements for plant development. In this work, BnPht1;4 gene, encoding a phosphate transporter of PHT1 family, was isolated from Brassica napus. BnPht1;4 possesses the major characteristic of PHT1 high-affinity Pi transporters in plants, such as plasma-membrane localization and 12 transmembrane-spanning domains. Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR analysis and promoter activity assay showed BnPht1;4 was inert in plants under Pi sufficient conditions. However, expression of this gene was remarkably enhanced in roots under Pi deficient conditions. Interestingly, under low Pi conditions, its promoter activity is impaired in tips of elongated roots, suggesting that the high-affinity Pi transporter may be not involved in low Pi response at root tip area. The experimental results also indicated that BnPht1;4 induction by Pi deficiency is dependent on the existence of sugar. In 35S:BnPht1;4 transgenic Arabidopsis, the increase of Pi availability resulted in the change of root architecture under Pi deficient conditions, showing longer primary roots and lower lateral root density than that of wild type. By cis-element analysis, two P1BS and two W-box elements were found in BnPht1;4 promoter. Yeast one-hybrid assay indicated that PHR1 could bind to the BnPht1;4 promoter. P1BS elements in BnPht1;4 promoter are essential for BnPht1;4 induction in Pi starvation response. Furthermore, WRKY75 could bind to the BnPht1;4 promoter, in which W-box elements are important for this binding. These results indicated BnPht1;4 may be dually controlled by two family regulators under low Pi responses. Thus, our data on the regulative mechanism of high-affinity Pi transporter in Pi starvation response will be valuable for B. napus molecular agriculture.

  12. Plasmodesmata localizing proteins regulate transport and signaling during systemic acquired immunity in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants is mediated by the signaling molecules azelaic acid (AzA),glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), and salicylic acid (SA).Here, we show that AzA and G3P transport occurs via the symplastic route, which is regulated by channels known as plasmodesmata (PD). In contrast...

  13. Characterization of two phosphate transporters from barley; evidence for diverse function and kinetic properties among members of the Pht1 family.

    PubMed

    Rae, Anne L; Cybinski, Daisy H; Jarmey, Janine M; Smith, Frank W

    2003-09-01

    Putative phosphate transporters have been identified in a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) genomic library by their homology to known phosphate transporters from dicot species. The genes designated HORvu;Pht1;1 and HORvu;Pht1;6 encode proteins of 521 and 535 amino acids respectively with 12 predicted membrane-spanning domains and other motifs common to the Phtl family of phosphate transporters. HORvu;Pht1;1 is expressed exclusively in roots and is strongly induced by phosphate deprivation. HORvu;Pht1;6 is expressed in the aerial parts of the plant with strongest expression in old leaves and flag leaves. In situ hybridization showed that HORvu;Pht1;6 is expressed in the phloem of vascular bundles in leaves and ears. In order to study the biochemical properties of HORvu;Pht1;1 and HORvu;Pht1;6, the genes were expressed in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants under the control of the rice actin promoter and suspension cell cultures were generated. Cells derived from transgenic plants were able to take up phosphate at a much higher rate than control cells, demonstrating that both genes encode functional phosphate transporters. The estimated Km for phosphate for cells expressing HORvu;Pht1;1 was 9.06 +/- 0.82 microM, which is characteristic of a high-affinity transporter. The rate of phosphate uptake decreased with increasing pH, suggesting that HORvu;Pht1;1 operates as a H+/H2PO4(-) symporter. In contrast, the estimated Km for phosphate for cells expressing HORvu;Pht1;6 was 385 +/- 61 microM, which is characteristic of a low-affinity transporter. Taken together, the results suggest that HORvu;Pht1;1 functions in uptake of phosphate at the root surface, while HORvu;Pht1;6 probably functions in remobilization of stored phosphate from leaves.

  14. The participation of phosphate in the formation of a carrier for the transport of Mg++ and Mn++ ions into yeast cells.

    PubMed

    JENNINGS, D H; HOPPER, D C; ROTHSTEIN

    1958-05-20

    During the absorption of phosphate by yeast, the cells acquire the capacity to absorb Mn(++) and Mg(++), a capacity which is retained even after phosphate is no longer present in the medium. Cells pretreated with phosphate and then washed, slowly lose their ability to absorb Mn(++), the rate of loss depending on the temperature and on the metabolic state. The fermentation of sugars induces a very rapid loss of absorptive capacity, whereas the respiration of ethyl alcohol, lactate, or pyruvate has little effect. Inhibitor studies with sodium acetate, redox dyes, and arsenate, reveal parallel effects on Mn(++) absorption, and on phosphate absorption. It is concluded that the synthesis of a carrier for the transport of Mg(++) and Mn(++) involves a phosphorylation step closely coupled with reactions involved in the absorption of phosphate.

  15. Strigolactones are involved in phosphate- and nitrate-deficiency-induced root development and auxin transport in rice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huwei; Tao, Jinyuan; Liu, Shangjun; Huang, Shuangjie; Chen, Si; Xie, Xiaonan; Yoneyama, Koichi; Zhang, Yali; Xu, Guohua

    2014-12-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) or their derivatives have recently been defined as novel phytohormones that regulate root development. However, it remains unclear whether SLs mediate root growth in response to phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) deficiency. In this study, the responses of root development in rice (Oryza sativa L.) to different levels of phosphate and nitrate supply were investigated using wild type (WT) and mutants defective in SL synthesis (d10 and d27) or insensitive to SL (d3). Reduced concentration of either phosphate or nitrate led to increased seminal root length and decreased lateral root density in WT. Limitation of either P or N stimulated SL production and enhanced expression of D10, D17, and D27 and suppressed expression of D3 and D14 in WT roots. Mutation of D10, D27, or D3 caused loss of sensitivity of root response to P and N deficiency. Application of the SL analogue GR24 restored seminal root length and lateral root density in WT and d10 and d27 mutants but not in the d3 mutant, suggesting that SLs were induced by nutrient-limiting conditions and led to changes in rice root growth via D3. Moreover, P or N deficiency or GR24 application reduced the transport of radiolabelled indole-3-acetic acid and the activity of DR5::GUS auxin reporter in WT and d10 and d27 mutants. These findings highlight the role of SLs in regulating rice root development under phosphate and nitrate limitation. The mechanisms underlying this regulatory role involve D3 and modulation of auxin transport from shoots to roots.

  16. Modeling phosphate transport and removal in a compact bed filled with a mineral-based sorbent for domestic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Inga; Jourak, Amir; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Hedström, Annelie; Lundström, T Staffan; Viklander, Maria

    2013-11-01

    Phosphorus filter units containing mineral-based sorbents with a high phosphate (PO4) binding capacity have been shown to be appropriate for removing PO4 in the treatment of domestic wastewater in on-site facilities. However, a better understanding of their PO4 removal mechanisms, and reactions that could lead to the formation of PO4 compounds, is required to evaluate the potential utility of candidate sorbents. Models based on data obtained from laboratory-scale experiments with columns of selected materials can be valuable for acquiring such understanding. Thus, in this study the transport and removal of PO4 in experiments with a laboratory-scale column filled with a commercial silicate-based sorbent were modeled, using the hydro-geochemical transport code PHREEQC. The resulting models, that incorporated the dissolution of calcite, kinetic constrains for the dissolution of calcium oxide (CaO) and wollastonite (CaSiO3), and the precipitation of amorphous tricalcium phosphate, Ca3(PO4)2, successfully simulated the removal of PO4 observed in the experiments. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling phosphate transport and removal in a compact bed filled with a mineral-based sorbent for domestic wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Inga; Jourak, Amir; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Hedström, Annelie; Lundström, T. Staffan; Viklander, Maria

    2013-11-01

    Phosphorus filter units containing mineral-based sorbents with a high phosphate (PO4) binding capacity have been shown to be appropriate for removing PO4 in the treatment of domestic wastewater in on-site facilities. However, a better understanding of their PO4 removal mechanisms, and reactions that could lead to the formation of PO4 compounds, is required to evaluate the potential utility of candidate sorbents. Models based on data obtained from laboratory-scale experiments with columns of selected materials can be valuable for acquiring such understanding. Thus, in this study the transport and removal of PO4 in experiments with a laboratory-scale column filled with a commercial silicate-based sorbent were modeled, using the hydro-geochemical transport code PHREEQC. The resulting models, that incorporated the dissolution of calcite, kinetic constrains for the dissolution of calcium oxide (CaO) and wollastonite (CaSiO3), and the precipitation of amorphous tricalcium phosphate, Ca3(PO4)2, successfully simulated the removal of PO4 observed in the experiments.

  18. An Arabidopsis ABC Transporter Mediates Phosphate Deficiency-Induced Remodeling of Root Architecture by Modulating Iron Homeostasis in Roots.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinsong; Piñeros, Miguel A; Li, Xiaoxuan; Yang, Haibing; Liu, Yu; Murphy, Angus S; Kochian, Leon V; Liu, Dong

    2017-02-13

    The remodeling of root architecture is a major developmental response of plants to phosphate (Pi) deficiency and is thought to enhance a plant's ability to forage for the available Pi in topsoil. The underlying mechanism controlling this response, however, is poorly understood. In this study, we identified an Arabidopsis mutant, hps10 (hypersensitive to Pi starvation 10), which is morphologically normal under Pi sufficient condition but shows increased inhibition of primary root growth and enhanced production of lateral roots under Pi deficiency. hps10 is a previously identified allele (als3-3) of the ALUMINUM SENSITIVE3 (ALS3) gene, which is involved in plant tolerance to aluminum toxicity. Our results show that ALS3 and its interacting protein AtSTAR1 form an ABC transporter complex in the tonoplast. This protein complex mediates a highly electrogenic transport in Xenopus oocytes. Under Pi deficiency, als3 accumulates higher levels of Fe(3+) in its roots than the wild type does. In Arabidopsis, LPR1 (LOW PHOSPHATE ROOT1) and LPR2 encode ferroxidases, which when mutated, reduce Fe(3+) accumulation in roots and cause root growth to be insensitive to Pi deficiency. Here, we provide compelling evidence showing that ALS3 cooperates with LPR1/2 to regulate Pi deficiency-induced remodeling of root architecture by modulating Fe homeostasis in roots.

  19. Transport in closed nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushong, Neil

    2005-03-01

    An alternative way to describe electrical transport in nanoscale systems has been recently proposed where two large but finite charged electrodes discharge across a nanoscale junction (M. Di Ventra and T. Todorov, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004)). We have applied this concept to describe the dynamics of a finite quasi-one dimensional gold wire using both a simple tight-binding model and time-dependent density-functional theory. After an initial transient, a quasi-steady state sets in whose lifetime increases with system size. This quasi-steady state is due to the wave properties of the electron wavefunctions and the resultant uncertainty principle and is established without inelastic effects. The corresponding current-voltage characteristics at steady state are in very good agreement with those calculated from the static scattering approach. We discuss local electron distributions, electrostatic potentials, and local resistivity dipoles formed at the quasi-steady state and compare these findings with the static open-boundary problem. A relation between information entropy and electron dynamics is discussed. Work supported by NSF.

  20. The security of mass transport ticketing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sel, Marc; Seys, Stefaan; Verheul, Eric

    Mass transport ticketing systems in most developed countries are making a rapid transition from ‘traditional’ paper or carton-based ticketing systems towards a contactless ‘smart card‘ based approach. This article discusses the main IT security aspects of mass transport ticketing systems (metro, bus, etc).

  1. A National MagLev Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The case for a national high-speed magnetic-levitation (MagLev) transportation system is presented. Focus is on current issues facing the country, such as national security, the economy, transportation, technology, and the environment. NASA s research into MagLev technology for launch assist is also highlighted. Further, current socio-cultural norms regarding motor-vehicle-based transportation systems are questioned in light of the problems currently facing the U.S. The multidisciplinary benefits of a long-distance MagLev system support the idea that such a system would be an important element of a truly multimodal U.S. transportation infrastructure.

  2. Sugar transport systems of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705.

    PubMed

    Parche, Stephan; Amon, Johannes; Jankovic, Ivana; Rezzonico, Enea; Beleut, Manfred; Barutçu, Hande; Schendel, Inke; Eddy, Mike P; Burkovski, Andreas; Arigoni, Fabrizio; Titgemeyer, Fritz

    2007-01-01

    Here we present the complement of the carbohydrate uptake systems of the strictly anaerobic probiotic Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705. The genome analysis of this bacterium predicts that it has 19 permeases for the uptake of diverse carbohydrates. The majority belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter family with 13 systems identified. Among them are permeases for lactose, maltose, raffinose, and fructooligosaccharides, a commonly used prebiotic additive. We found genes that encode a complete phosphotransferase system (PTS) and genes for three permeases of the major facilitator superfamily. These systems could serve for the import of glucose, galactose, lactose, and sucrose. Growth analysis of NCC2705 cells combined with biochemical characterization and microarray data showed that the predicted substrates are consumed and that the corresponding transport and catabolic genes are expressed. Biochemical analysis of the PTS, in which proteins are central in regulation of carbon metabolism in many bacteria, revealed that B. longum has a glucose-specific PTS, while two other species (Bifidobacterium lactis and Bifidobacterium bifidum) have a fructose-6-phosphate-forming fructose-PTS instead. It became obvious that most carbohydrate systems are closely related to those from other actinomycetes, with a few exceptions. We hope that this report on B. longum carbohydrate transporter systems will serve as a guide for further in-depth analyses on the nutritional lifestyle of this beneficial bacterium. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Linking Gene Expression in the Intestine to Production of Gametes Through the Phosphate Transporter PITR-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Balklava, Zita; Rathnakumar, Navin D.; Vashist, Shilpa; Schweinsberg, Peter J.; Grant, Barth D.

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential mineral for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell metabolism and structure. Its uptake into the cell is mediated by membrane-bound transporters and coupled to Na+ transport. Mammalian sodium-dependent Pi cotransporters have been grouped into three families NaPi-I, NaPi-II, and NaPi-III. Despite being discovered more than two decades ago, very little is known about requirements for NaPi-III transporters in vivo, in the context of intact animal models. Here we find that impaired function of the Caenorhabditis elegans NaPi-III transporter, pitr-1, results in decreased brood size and dramatically increased expression of vitellogenin by the worm intestine. Unexpectedly, we found that the effects of pitr-1 mutation on vitellogenin expression in the intestine could only be rescued by expression of pitr-1 in the germline, and not by expression of pitr-1 in the intestine itself. Our results indicate the existence of a signal from the germline that regulates gene expression in the intestine, perhaps linking nutrient export from the intestine to production of gametes by the germline. PMID:27449055

  4. Redundant Systems of Phosphatidic Acid Biosynthesis via Acylation of Glycerol-3-Phosphate or Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Athenstaedt, Karin; Weys, Sabine; Paltauf, Fritz; Daum, Günther

    1999-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lipid particles harbor two acyltransferases, Gat1p and Slc1p, which catalyze subsequent steps of acylation required for the formation of phosphatidic acid. Both enzymes are also components of the endoplasmic reticulum, but this compartment contains additional acyltransferase(s) involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidic acid (K. Athenstaedt and G. Daum, J. Bacteriol. 179:7611–7616, 1997). Using the gat1 mutant strain TTA1, we show here that Gat1p present in both subcellular fractions accepts glycerol-3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate as a substrate. Similarly, the additional acyltransferase(s) present in the endoplasmic reticulum can acylate both precursors. In contrast, yeast mitochondria harbor an enzyme(s) that significantly prefers dihydroxyacetone phosphate as a substrate for acylation, suggesting that at least one additional independent acyltransferase is present in this organelle. Surprisingly, enzymatic activity of 1-acyldihydroxyacetone phosphate reductase, which is required for the conversion of 1-acyldihydroxyacetone phosphate to 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate (lysophosphatidic acid), is detectable only in lipid particles and the endoplasmic reticulum and not in mitochondria. In vivo labeling of wild-type cells with [2-3H, U-14C]glycerol revealed that both glycerol-3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate can be incorporated as a backbone of glycerolipids. In the gat1 mutant and the 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase slc1 mutant, the dihydroxyacetone phosphate pathway of phosphatidic acid biosynthesis is slightly preferred as compared to the wild type. Thus, mutations of the major acyltransferases Gat1p and Slc1p lead to an increased contribution of mitochondrial acyltransferase(s) to glycerolipid synthesis due to their substrate preference for dihydroxyacetone phosphate. PMID:10049376

  5. Phenolsulfonphthalein transport by potential-sensitive urate transport system.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Shirou; Shimamoto, Soji; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Michiya; Miyazaki, Katsumi; Hirano, Takeshi; Iseki, Ken

    2005-08-22

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the transporter-mediated secretion systems for phenolsulfonphthalein in brush-border membranes. In human and rat renal brush-border membranes, a potential-sensitive transport system has been shown to be involved in the efflux of organic anions. The uptake of phenolsulfonphthalein into rat renal brush-border membrane vesicles was stimulated by an inside-positive membrane potential. This potential-sensitive uptake of phenolsulfonphthalein was inhibited by probenecid, pyrazinoate and urate. p-Aminohippurate had no effect on the potential-sensitive uptake of phenolsulfonphthalein. Moreover, urate competitively inhibited the uptake of phenolsulfonphthalein. On the other hand, the uptake of phenolsulfonphthalein was slightly increased in the presence of an outward Cl- gradient. These results suggest that phenolsulfonphthalein has high affinity for the potential-sensitive urate transport system but has low affinity for an anion exchanger.

  6. Modulation of intestinal calcium and phosphate transport in young goats fed a nitrogen- and/or calcium-reduced diet.

    PubMed

    Elfers, Kristin; Wilkens, Mirja R; Breves, Gerhard; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S

    2015-12-28

    Feeding ruminants a reduced N diet is a common approach to reduce N output based on rumino-hepatic circulation. However, a reduction in N intake caused massive changes in Ca and inorganic phosphate (Pi) homoeostasis in goats. Although a single dietary Ca reduction stimulated intestinal Ca absorption in a calcitriol-dependent manner, a concomitant reduction of Ca and N supply led to a decrease in calcitriol, and therefore a modulation of intestinal Ca and Pi absorption. The aim of this study was to examine the potential effects of dietary N or Ca reduction separately on intestinal Ca and Pi transport in young goats. Animals were allocated to a control, N-reduced, Ca-reduced or combined N- and Ca-reduced diet for about 6-8 weeks, whereby N content was reduced by 25 % compared with recommendations. In Ussing chamber experiments, intestinal Ca flux rates significantly decreased in goats fed a reduced N diet, whereas Pi flux rates were unaffected. In contrast, a dietary Ca reduction stimulated Ca flux rates and decreased Pi flux rates. The combined dietary N and Ca reduction withdrew the stimulating effect of dietary Ca reduction on Ca flux rates. The expression of Ca-transporting proteins decreased with a reduced N diet too, whereas Pi-transporting proteins were unaffected. In conclusion, a dietary N reduction decreased intestinal Ca transport by diminishing Ca-transporting proteins, which became clear during simultaneous N and Ca reduction. Therefore, N supply in young ruminant nutrition is of special concern for intestinal Ca transport.

  7. Some factors affecting phosphate transport in a perfused rat heart preparation.

    PubMed Central

    Medina, G; Illingworth, J

    1980-01-01

    Pi uptake by a perfused rat heart preparation did not require the presence of any other permeant anion, but was markedly dependent on the extracellular Na+ concentration and accelerated when tissue oxygenation was inadequate. Pi efflux was also independent of other permeant anions, but apparently varied with the intracellular Na+ concentration. Cardiac Pi efflux was not sensitive to a number of inhibitors that clock Cl- movement in heart and other tissues. Both uptake and efflux apparently proceed via a reversible electroneutral co-transport system linked to the transmembrane Na+ gradient. Pi uptake was independent of cardiac work load, but the efflux rate was sharply accelerated after an increase in aortic pressure development, with a slow return towards basal values during sustained periods of high work output. An inverted biphasic effect on the efflux rate was observed after a reduction in cardiac work load. Mild hypoxia and respiratory and metabolic acidosis each resulted in a transient acceleration of Pi efflux followed by a return towards basal values during prolonged exposure to the stimulus, whereas respiratory and metabolic alkalosis produced a similar but inverted response. The origin of these phasic effects on Pi efflux remains to be identified at present. PMID:7396864

  8. Developing an Inositol-Phosphate-Actuated Nanochannel System by Mimicking Biological Calcium Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Tang, Qiuhan; Chen, Zhonghui; Zhao, Shilong; Qing, Guangyan; Sun, Taolei

    2017-09-13

    In eukaryotic cells, ion channels, which ubiquitously present as polypeptides or proteins, usually regulate the ion transport across biological membranes by conformational switching of the channel proteins in response to the binding of diverse signaling molecules (e.g., inositol phosphate, abbreviated to InsP). To mimic the gating behaviors of natural Ca(2+) channels manipulated by InsPs, a smart poly[(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-4-(3-acryloylthioureido) benzoic acid)0.2] (denoted as PNI-co-ATBA0.2) was integrated onto a porous anodic alumina (PAA) membrane, building an InsP-actuated nanochannel system. Driven by the intensive hydrogen bonding complexation of ATBA monomer with InsP, the copolymer chains displayed a remarkable and reversible conformational transition from a contracted state to a swollen one, accompanied with significant changes in surface morphology, wettability, and viscoelasticity. Benefiting from these features, dynamic gating behaviors of the nanochannels located on the copolymer-modified PAA membrane could be precisely manipulated by InsPs, reflected as a satisfactory linear relationship between real-time variation in transmembrane ionic current and the InsP concentration over a wide range from 1 nmol L(-1) to 10 μmol L(-1), as well as a clear discrimination among InsP2, InsP3, and InsP6. This study indicates the great potential of biomolecule-responsive polymers in the fabrication of biomimetic ion nanochannels and other nanoscale biodevices.

  9. Phosphorus acquisition efficiency in arbuscular mycorrhizal maize is correlated with the abundance of root-external hyphae and the accumulation of transcripts encoding PHT1 phosphate transporters.

    PubMed

    Sawers, Ruairidh J H; Svane, Simon F; Quan, Clement; Grønlund, Mette; Wozniak, Barbara; Gebreselassie, Mesfin-Nigussie; González-Muñoz, Eliécer; Chávez Montes, Ricardo A; Baxter, Ivan; Goudet, Jerome; Jakobsen, Iver; Paszkowski, Uta

    2017-04-01

    Plant interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi have long attracted interest for their potential to promote more efficient use of mineral resources in agriculture. Their use, however, remains limited by a lack of understanding of the processes that determine the outcome of the symbiosis. In this study, the impact of host genotype on growth response to mycorrhizal inoculation was investigated in a panel of diverse maize lines. A panel of 30 maize lines was evaluated with and without inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. The line Oh43 was identified to show superior response and, along with five other reference lines, was characterized in greater detail in a split-compartment system, using (33) P to quantify mycorrhizal phosphorus uptake. Changes in relative growth indicated variation in host capacity to profit from the symbiosis. Shoot phosphate content, abundance of root-internal and -external fungal structures, mycorrhizal phosphorus uptake, and accumulation of transcripts encoding plant PHT1 family phosphate transporters varied among lines. Superior response in Oh43 is correlated with extensive development of root-external hyphae, accumulation of specific Pht1 transcripts and high phosphorus uptake by mycorrhizal plants. The data indicate that host genetic factors influence fungal growth strategy with an impact on plant performance.

  10. STARS: The Space Transportation Architecture Risk System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Joel S.

    1997-01-01

    Because of the need to perform comparisons between transportation systems that are likely to have significantly different levels of risk, both because of differing degrees of freedom in achieving desired performance levels and their different states of development and utilization, an approach has been developed for performing early comparisons of transportation architectures explicitly taking into account quantitative measures of uncertainty and resulting risk. The approach considers the uncertainty associated with the achievement of technology goals, the effect that the achieved level of technology will have on transportation system performance and the relationship between transportation system performance/capability and the ability to accommodate variations in payload mass. The consequences of system performance are developed in terms of expected values and associated standard deviations of nonrecurring, recurring and the present value of transportation system life cycle cost. Typical results are presented to illustrate the application of the methodology.

  11. Developmentally regulated mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated transport of a lysosomal enzyme across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Urayama, Akihiko; Grubb, Jeffrey H; Sly, William S; Banks, William A

    2004-08-24

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII is a lysosomal storage disorder resulting from inherited deficiency of beta-glucuronidase (GUS). Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII is characterized by glycosaminoglycan storage in most tissues, including brain. In these disorders, enzyme delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the main obstacle to correction of lysosomal storage in the CNS. Prior studies suggested mouse brain is accessible to GUS in the first 2 weeks of life but not later. To explore a possible role for the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor in GUS transport across the BBB in neonatal mice, we compared brain uptake of phosphorylated GUS (P-GUS) and nonphosphorylated GUS (NP-GUS) in newborn and adult mice. (131)I-P-GUS was transported across the BBB after i.v. injection in 2-day-old mice. The brain influx rate (K(in)) of (131)I-P-GUS in 2-day-old mice was 0.21 microl/g.min and decreased with age. By 7 weeks of age, transport of (131)I-P-GUS was not significant. Capillary depletion revealed that 62% of the (131)I-P-GUS in brain was in brain parenchyma in 2-day-old mice. In addition, uptake of (131)I-P-GUS into brain was significantly reduced by coinjection of unlabeled P-GUS or M6P in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the K(in) of (131)I-NP-GUS (0.04 microl/g.min) was significantly lower than (131)I-P-GUS in 2-day-old mice. Transcardiac brain perfusion confirmed that neither (131)I-P-GUS nor (131)I-NP-GUS crossed the BBB in adult mice. These results indicate that (131)I-P-GUS transport into brain parenchyma in early postnatal life is mediated by the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor. This receptor-mediated transport is not observed in adult mice.

  12. Detection of phosphate transporter genes from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in mature tree roots under experimental soil pH manipulation

    DOE PAGES

    Carrino-Kyker, Sarah R.; Kluber, Laurel A.; Coyle, Kaitlin P.; ...

    2016-10-04

    We present the majority of terrestrial plant roots are colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that, in exchange for carbon, provide plants with enhanced nutrient uptake — most notably inorganic phosphate (Pi). To mediate the uptake of Pi from the soil, AM fungi possess high affinity inorganic phosphate transporters (PTs). Under laboratory conditions, Pi concentrations have been shown to regulate AM fungal-specific PT gene expression. The relationship between PT expression and Pi in the field remains unexplored. Here we quantify AM fungal-specific PTs from maple tree roots in situ. In an effort to limit edaphic parameters, root samples were collectedmore » from manipulated forested plots that had elevated soil Pi availability, either through direct Pi application or elevating pH to lower exchangeable aluminum. The aim of the study was to examine AM fungal-specific PT gene expression both prior to and following soil Pi amendment; however, a direct correlation between soil Pi concentration and PT gene expression was not observed. PT transcripts were detected to a greater extent under elevated pH and, while our results are confounded by an overall low detection of PT genes (23 % of all samples collected), our findings raise interesting questions regarding the role of soil pH on PT function. In conclusion, our study is a first step in understanding how edaphic properties influence PT expression and plant P acquisition in mature tree roots.« less

  13. Physiological evidence for a sodium-dependent high-affinity phosphate and nitrate transport at the plasma membrane of leaf and root cells of Zostera marina L.

    PubMed

    Rubio, L; Linares-Rueda, A; García-Sánchez, M J; Fernández, J A

    2005-02-01

    Zostera marina L. is an angiosperm that grows in a medium in which inorganic phosphate (P(i)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) are present in micromolar concentrations and must be absorbed against a steep electrochemical potential gradient. The operation of a Na(+)-dependent NO(3)(-) transport was previously demonstrated in leaf cells of this plant, suggesting that other Na(+)-coupled systems could mediate the uptake of anions. To address this question, P(i) transport was studied in leaves and roots of Z. marina, as well as NO(3)(-) uptake in roots. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated that micromolar concentrations of P(i) induced depolarizations of the plasma membrane of root cells. However, this effect was not observed in leaf cells. P(i)-induced depolarizations showed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (K(m)=1.5+/-0.6 microM P(i); D(max)=7.8+/-0.8 mV), and were not observed in the absence of Na(+). However, depolarizations were restored when Na(+) was resupplied. NO(3)(-) additions also evoked depolarizations of the plasma membrane of root cells only in the presence of Na(+). Both NO(3)(-)- and P(i)-induced depolarizations were accompanied by an increase in cytoplasmic Na(+) activity, detected by Na(+)-sensitive microelectrodes. P(i) net uptake (measured in depletion experiments) was stimulated by Na(+). These results strongly suggest that P(i) uptake in roots of Z. marina is mediated by a high-affinity Na(+)-dependent transport system. Both NO(3)(-) and P(i) transport systems exploit the steep inwardly directed electrochemical potential gradient for Na(+), considering the low cytoplasmic Na(+) activity (10.7+/-3.3 mM Na(+)) and the high external Na(+) concentration (500 mM Na(+)).

  14. Pharmacology of the sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling system.

    PubMed

    Zu Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer; Ihlefeld, Katja; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2013-01-01

    The recent success of FTY720 (Fingolimod, Gilenya(®)), which has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and is the first-in-class sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulating drug, has boosted the interest in further drug development in this area. Several selective S1P1 receptor-modulating drugs are being investigated in clinical trials for the treatment of diverse autoimmune disorders. Sphingosine kinase inhibitors are under development for the treatment of cancer, aberrant angiogenesis and inflammatory diseases; an inhibitor of SK2 with relatively low affinity is being analysed in patients with advanced solid tumours. While an indirect S1P lyase inhibitor has just failed the proof of concept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, S1P lyase is still a promising target for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Another approach is the development of S1P-scavenging or -clearing agents, including a monoclonal S1P antibody that has successfully passed phase I clinical trials and will be further developed for age-related macular degeneration.

  15. Effect of Dietary Nutrient Density on Small Intestinal Phosphate Transport and Bone Mineralization of Broilers during the Growing Period

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhiqiang; Song, Zhigang; Yang, Yu; Tian, Wenxia; Guo, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    A 2 × 4 factorial experiment was conducted to determine the effects of dietary nutrient density on growth performance, small intestinal epithelial phosphate transporter expression, and bone mineralization of broiler chicks fed with diets with different nutrient densities and nonphytate phosphorus (NPP) levels. The broilers were fed with the same starter diets from 0 to 21 days of age. In the grower phase (day 22 to 42), the broilers were randomly divided into eight groups according to body weight. Relatively high dietary nutrient density (HDND) and low dietary nutrient density (LDND) diets were assigned metabolic energy (ME) values of 3,150 and 2,950 kcal/kg, respectively. Crude protein and essential amino acid levels were maintained in the same proportion as ME to prepare the two diet types. NPP levels were 0.25%, 0.30%, 0.35%, and 0.40% of the diets. Results showed that a HDND diet significantly increased the body weight gain (BWG) of broilers and significantly decreased the feed conversion ratio and NPP consumed per BWG. HDND significantly decreased tibial P content of the broilers. Conversely, mRNA expression of NaPi-IIb and protein expression of calbindin were significantly increased in the intestine of broilers fed a HDND diet. HDND also increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression, especially at a relatively low dietary NPP level (0.25%). The mRNA expression of NaPi-IIa in the kidneys was significantly increased at a relatively low dietary NPP level (0.25%) to maintain P balance. Tibial P, calcium, and ash content were significantly decreased, as were calbindin and VDR expression levels in the intestine at a low NPP level. Therefore, HDND improved the growth rate of broilers and increased the expression of phosphate and calcium transporter in the small intestine, but adversely affected bone mineralization. PMID:27100791

  16. Effect of Dietary Nutrient Density on Small Intestinal Phosphate Transport and Bone Mineralization of Broilers during the Growing Period.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhui; Yuan, Jianmin; Miao, Zhiqiang; Song, Zhigang; Yang, Yu; Tian, Wenxia; Guo, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    A 2 × 4 factorial experiment was conducted to determine the effects of dietary nutrient density on growth performance, small intestinal epithelial phosphate transporter expression, and bone mineralization of broiler chicks fed with diets with different nutrient densities and nonphytate phosphorus (NPP) levels. The broilers were fed with the same starter diets from 0 to 21 days of age. In the grower phase (day 22 to 42), the broilers were randomly divided into eight groups according to body weight. Relatively high dietary nutrient density (HDND) and low dietary nutrient density (LDND) diets were assigned metabolic energy (ME) values of 3,150 and 2,950 kcal/kg, respectively. Crude protein and essential amino acid levels were maintained in the same proportion as ME to prepare the two diet types. NPP levels were 0.25%, 0.30%, 0.35%, and 0.40% of the diets. Results showed that a HDND diet significantly increased the body weight gain (BWG) of broilers and significantly decreased the feed conversion ratio and NPP consumed per BWG. HDND significantly decreased tibial P content of the broilers. Conversely, mRNA expression of NaPi-IIb and protein expression of calbindin were significantly increased in the intestine of broilers fed a HDND diet. HDND also increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression, especially at a relatively low dietary NPP level (0.25%). The mRNA expression of NaPi-IIa in the kidneys was significantly increased at a relatively low dietary NPP level (0.25%) to maintain P balance. Tibial P, calcium, and ash content were significantly decreased, as were calbindin and VDR expression levels in the intestine at a low NPP level. Therefore, HDND improved the growth rate of broilers and increased the expression of phosphate and calcium transporter in the small intestine, but adversely affected bone mineralization.

  17. Systems Studies of DDT Transport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, H. L.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Major consequences of present and additional environmental quantities of DDT pesticide are predictable by mathematical models of transport, accumulation and concentration mechanisms in the Wisconsin regional ecosystem. High solubility and stability produce increased DDT concentrations at high organism trophic levels within world biosphere…

  18. Systems Studies of DDT Transport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, H. L.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Major consequences of present and additional environmental quantities of DDT pesticide are predictable by mathematical models of transport, accumulation and concentration mechanisms in the Wisconsin regional ecosystem. High solubility and stability produce increased DDT concentrations at high organism trophic levels within world biosphere…

  19. 49 CFR 37.33 - Airport transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airport transportation systems. 37.33 Section 37.33 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.33 Airport transportation systems. (a) Transportation...

  20. 49 CFR 37.33 - Airport transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airport transportation systems. 37.33 Section 37.33 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.33 Airport transportation systems. (a) Transportation...

  1. Glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from beef kidney is an allosteric system of the V-type.

    PubMed

    Lara-Lemus, R; Calcagno, M L

    1998-10-14

    The enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from beef kidney has been purified to homogeneity by allosteric-site affinity chromatography. Its amino acid composition and the N-terminal sequence (1-42), were obtained. The amino acid sequence of this segment is essentially identical to the corresponding regions of the human and hamster glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminases. The beef enzyme is a hexamer of 32.5 kDa subunits; this is nearly 2.5 kDa higher than the molecular mass of the homologous enzyme from Escherichia coli. Beef kidney deaminase exhibits a notable difference from the bacterial enzyme in its allosteric activation by N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate This metabolite, which is also is the allosteric activator of the bacterial glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase, activates the enzyme by increasing its kcat without any change in the Km values for glucosamine 6-phosphate, over a wide range of activator concentration. This observation places beef kidney deaminase in the class of V-type allosteric systems.

  2. Aerial Robotic System for Transportation and Logistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Kakuya; Hashimoto, Naohisa; Komoriya, Kiyoshi

    The status quo of a research on a novel aerial robotic system for transportation and logistics is presented. Under a new concept for an aerial robotic transportation system, three-Dimensional Transportation Robots (3DTR) were constructed with twin turbojet engines equipped by high performance noise reduction system and a flexibly jointed delta wing controlled by 2-axis actuators. This vehicle is also stable in the air due to its pendulum structure. The first flight was successfully conducted on November 22, 2005. Flight examination of 3DTR indicates its short take-off and landing (STOL) capability.

  3. Transportation Systems. Curriculum Guide for Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chastain, Gary K.

    This curriculum guide for a 1-semester or 1-year course in transportation provides activities that show and explain many of the occupations, devices, and systems that are related to transportation on land, water, air, and space. The guide contains competencies (task lists), student competency records, and management sheets. Management sheets,…

  4. Transportation Systems. Curriculum Guide for Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chastain, Gary K.

    This curriculum guide for a 1-semester or 1-year course in transportation provides activities that show and explain many of the occupations, devices, and systems that are related to transportation on land, water, air, and space. The guide contains competencies (task lists), student competency records, and management sheets. Management sheets,…

  5. Phosphate Transporter Genes as Reliable Gene Markers for the Identification and Discrimination of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the Genus Glomus ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Sokolski, Serge; Dalpé, Yolande; Piché, Yves

    2011-01-01

    An inorganic phosphate transporter gene sequence (852-bp section) allowed discrimination between 10 Glomus fungal species represented by 25 strains. It was particularly valuable in differentiating between morphologically similar species with nucleotide and amino acid sequence differences higher than 3%. This gene is proposed as a reliable barcode for the Glomeromycetes. PMID:21193669

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi differ in their ability to regulate the expression of phosphate transporters in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Tian, Hui; Drijber, Rhae A; Li, Xiaolin; Miller, Daniel N; Wienhold, Brian J

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies have found that some phosphate (Pi) starvation inducible transporter genes are downregulated and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) inducible Pi transporter genes are upregulated in maize roots associated with the fungus Glomus intraradices. However, little is known about the functional diversity of different AM fungal species in influencing the expression of Pi transporters in maize roots. Here, we studied the expression of two Pi transporter genes ZEAma:Pht1;3 (Pi starvation inducible) and ZEAma:Pht1;6 (AM inducible) in maize root colonized by different AM fungal inoculants. Non-mycorrhizal maize, maize colonized by Glomus deserticola (CA113), Glomus intraradices (IA506), Glomus mosseae (CA201), Gigaspora gigantea (MN922A) and the co-inoculation of all four species were established. The expression patterns of the two genes were quantified using real-time, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The expression level of ZEAma:Pht1;6 was 26-135 times higher in AM plants than in non-mycorrhizal maize roots, whereas the expression level of ZEAma:Pht1;3 was five to 44 times lower in AM plants than in non-mycorrhizal plants. Expression of the two genes differed with inoculation treatment, and increasing the diversity of AM fungi in maize roots led to greater expression of ZEAma:Pht1;6 as well as Pi uptake in shoots. The expression of ZEAma:Pht1;6 was significantly positively correlated with AM colonization rate, concentration of AM biomarkers in maize roots, Pi uptake and dry weight of shoot, but negatively correlated with the expression of ZEAma:Pht1;3. Addition of Pi fertilizer at a low concentration significantly increased the expression of ZEAma:Pht1;6 but had no effect on the expression of ZEAma:Pht1;3.

  7. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dimethylnitrosamine in mammalian cells (CHO/HGPRT system): enhancement by calcium phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, J.P.; Machanoff, R.; Sebastian, J.R.S.; Hsie, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    The cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) was determined in the CHO/HGPRT system. Metabolic activation of the promutagen was achieved by use of a liver homogenate supernatant (S9) prepared from Aroclor 1254-induced Sprague-Dawley rats. The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of DMN were enhanced by the inclusion of calcium chloride in the incubation mix, and this enhancement was dependent on the presence of sodium phosphate. Under conditions that yielded maximal activity (10 mM calcium chloride, 10 mM magnesium chloride, 50 mM sodium phosphate), an apparent calcium phosphate precipitate was observed. DMN activity increased with increasing amounts of S9 protein over the range 0.3-3.0 mg/ml in the S9 mix and appeared to plateau at higher concentrations. The mutagencity of DMN can be described as 110 mutants/10/sup 6/ cells per mM DMN per mg/ml S9 protein per hour.

  8. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  9. Glycerol-3-phosphate is a critical mobile inducer of systemic immunity in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is an important metabolite that contributes to the growth and disease-related physiologies of prokaryotes, plants, animals and humans alike. Here we show that G3P serves as the inducer of an important form of broad-spectrum immunity in plants, termed systemic acquired resi...

  10. Structural interaction with transportation and handling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Problems involved in the handling and transportation of finished space vehicles from the factory to the launch site are presented, in addition to recommendations for properly accounting for in space vehicle structural design, adverse interactions during transportation. Emphasis is given to the protection of vehicle structures against those environments and loads encountered during transportation (including temporary storage) which would exceed the levels that the vehicle can safely withstand. Current practices for verifying vehicle safety are appraised, and some of the capabilities and limitations of transportation and handling systems are summarized.

  11. Influence of nutrient signals and carbon allocation on the expression of phosphate and nitrogen transporter genes in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hui; Yuan, Xiaolei; Duan, Jianfeng; Li, Wenhu; Zhai, Bingnian; Gao, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization of plant roots causes the down-regulation of expression of phosphate (Pi) or nitrogen (N) transporter genes involved in direct nutrient uptake pathways. The mechanism of this effect remains unknown. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the expression of Pi or N transporter genes in roots of winter wheat colonized by AM fungus responded to (1) Pi or N nutrient signals transferred from the AM extra-radical hyphae, or (2) carbon allocation changes in the AM association. A three-compartment culture system, comprising a root compartment (RC), a root and AM hyphae compartment (RHC), and an AM hyphae compartment (HC), was used to test whether the expression of Pi or N transporter genes responded to nutrients (Pi, NH4+ and NO3-) added only to the HC. Different AM inoculation density treatments (roots were inoculated with 0, 20, 50 and 200 g AM inoculum) and light regime treatments (6 hours light and 18 hours light) were established to test the effects of carbon allocation on the expression of Pi or N transporter genes in wheat roots. The expression of two Pi transporter genes (TaPT4 and TaPHT1.2), five nitrate transporter genes (TaNRT1.1, TaNRT1.2, TaNRT2.1, TaNRT2.2, and TaNRT2.3), and an ammonium transporter gene (TaAMT1.2) was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of TaPT4, TaNRT2.2, and TaAMT1.2 was down-regulated by AM colonization only when roots of host plants received Pi or N nutrient signals. However, the expression of TaPHT1.2, TaNRT2.1, and TaNRT2.3 was down-regulated by AM colonization, regardless of whether there was nutrient transfer from AM hyphae. The expression of TaNRT1.2 was also down-regulated by AM colonization even when there was no nutrient transfer from AM hyphae. The present study showed that an increase in carbon consumption by the AM fungi did not necessarily result in greater down-regulation of expression of Pi or N transporter genes. PMID:28207830

  12. Influence of nutrient signals and carbon allocation on the expression of phosphate and nitrogen transporter genes in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hui; Yuan, Xiaolei; Duan, Jianfeng; Li, Wenhu; Zhai, Bingnian; Gao, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization of plant roots causes the down-regulation of expression of phosphate (Pi) or nitrogen (N) transporter genes involved in direct nutrient uptake pathways. The mechanism of this effect remains unknown. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the expression of Pi or N transporter genes in roots of winter wheat colonized by AM fungus responded to (1) Pi or N nutrient signals transferred from the AM extra-radical hyphae, or (2) carbon allocation changes in the AM association. A three-compartment culture system, comprising a root compartment (RC), a root and AM hyphae compartment (RHC), and an AM hyphae compartment (HC), was used to test whether the expression of Pi or N transporter genes responded to nutrients (Pi, NH4+ and NO3-) added only to the HC. Different AM inoculation density treatments (roots were inoculated with 0, 20, 50 and 200 g AM inoculum) and light regime treatments (6 hours light and 18 hours light) were established to test the effects of carbon allocation on the expression of Pi or N transporter genes in wheat roots. The expression of two Pi transporter genes (TaPT4 and TaPHT1.2), five nitrate transporter genes (TaNRT1.1, TaNRT1.2, TaNRT2.1, TaNRT2.2, and TaNRT2.3), and an ammonium transporter gene (TaAMT1.2) was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of TaPT4, TaNRT2.2, and TaAMT1.2 was down-regulated by AM colonization only when roots of host plants received Pi or N nutrient signals. However, the expression of TaPHT1.2, TaNRT2.1, and TaNRT2.3 was down-regulated by AM colonization, regardless of whether there was nutrient transfer from AM hyphae. The expression of TaNRT1.2 was also down-regulated by AM colonization even when there was no nutrient transfer from AM hyphae. The present study showed that an increase in carbon consumption by the AM fungi did not necessarily result in greater down-regulation of expression of Pi or N transporter genes.

  13. Expression of the rat renal PiT-2 phosphate transporter.

    PubMed

    Leung, J C; Barac-Nieto, M; Hering-Smith, K; Silverstein, D M

    2005-05-01

    NaPi-2a is the main sodium-dependent Pi (Na+-Pi) transporter in the apical membrane of the renal proximal tubule. Another group of Pi transporters, Glvr-1 (PiT-1) and Ram-1 (PiT-2), was identified. The PiT-2 cRNA induces Na+-dependent Pi uptake into Xenopus laevis oocytes. Prior studies have revealed the presence of the Pit-2 transporter in the kidney. Further characterization of the PiT-2 transporter in the kidney and assessment of its developmental regulation. Using primers specific for the PiT-2 mRNA and an antibody specific for the PiT-2 protein, we assessed the expression and developmental regulation of the renal PiT-2 mRNA and protein. RT-PCR analysis revealed that a 182 bp product was evident in the total kidney (TK), cortex (C), and medulla (M). Northern blots demonstrated a PiT-2 mRNA of approximately 4 kb (expected size) in the TK, C, and M. PiT-2 mRNA expression was similar in all kidney regions. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis revealed that the PiT-2 cDNA was highly abundant in OK and MDCK culture cells. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis revealed expected products at all ages studied. Densitometry demonstrated similar levels of expression of PiT-2 mRNA in the kidneys of older versus younger animals, and persistent expression in elderly rats. The PiT-2 protein was present in the TK, C, and M, and in OK and MDCK cells. PiT-2 protein abundance was similar at all ages studied. These studies further characterize the renal PiT-2 transporter and show that its expression is stable throughout development and ageing.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner-core phosphates are required for complete LPS synthesis and transport to the outer membrane in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Delucia, Angela M; Six, David A; Caughlan, Ruth E; Gee, Patricia; Hunt, Ian; Lam, Joseph S; Dean, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Gram-negative outer membrane (OM) integrity is maintained in part by Mg(2+) cross-links between phosphates on lipid A and on core sugars of adjacent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules. In contrast to other Gram-negative bacteria, waaP, encoding an inner-core kinase, could not be inactivated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To examine this further, expression of the kinases WaaP or WapP/WapQ/PA5006 was placed under the control of the arabinose-regulated pBAD promoter. Growth of these strains was arabinose dependent, confirming that core phosphorylation is essential in P. aeruginosa. Transmission electron micrographs of kinase-depleted cells revealed marked invaginations of the inner membrane. SDS-PAGE of total LPS from WaaP-depleted cells showed accumulation of a fast-migrating band. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed that LPS from these cells exhibits a unique truncated core consisting of two 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acids (Kdo), two l-glycero-d-manno-heptoses (Hep), and one hexose but completely devoid of phosphates, indicating that phosphorylation by WaaP is necessary for subsequent core phosphorylations. MS analysis of lipid A from WaaP-depleted cells revealed extensive 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose modification. OM prepared from these cells by Sarkosyl extraction of total membranes or by sucrose density gradient centrifugation lacked truncated LPS. Instead, truncated LPS was detected in the inner membrane fractions, consistent with impaired transport/assembly of this species into the OM. IMPORTANCE Gram-negative bacteria have an outer membrane (OM) comprised of a phospholipid inner leaflet and a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer leaflet. The OM protects cells from toxic molecules and is important for survival during infection. The LPS core kinase gene waaP can be deleted in several Gram-negative bacteria but not in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We used a controlled-expression system to deplete WaaP directly in P. aeruginosa cells, which halted growth. WaaP depletion

  15. Nonredundant regulation of rice arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by two members of the phosphate transporter1 gene family.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Yi; Grønlund, Mette; Jakobsen, Iver; Grotemeyer, Marianne Suter; Rentsch, Doris; Miyao, Akio; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Kumar, Chellian Santhosh; Sundaresan, Venkatesan; Salamin, Nicolas; Catausan, Sheryl; Mattes, Nicolas; Heuer, Sigrid; Paszkowski, Uta

    2012-10-01

    Pi acquisition of crops via arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is becoming increasingly important due to limited high-grade rock Pi reserves and a demand for environmentally sustainable agriculture. Here, we show that 70% of the overall Pi acquired by rice (Oryza sativa) is delivered via the symbiotic route. To better understand this pathway, we combined genetic, molecular, and physiological approaches to determine the specific functions of two symbiosis-specific members of the PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1 (PHT1) gene family from rice, ORYsa;PHT1;11 (PT11) and ORYsa;PHT1;13 (PT13). The PT11 lineage of proteins from mono- and dicotyledons is most closely related to homologs from the ancient moss, indicating an early evolutionary origin. By contrast, PT13 arose in the Poaceae, suggesting that grasses acquired a particular strategy for the acquisition of symbiotic Pi. Surprisingly, mutations in either PT11 or PT13 affected the development of the symbiosis, demonstrating that both genes are important for AM symbiosis. For symbiotic Pi uptake, however, only PT11 is necessary and sufficient. Consequently, our results demonstrate that mycorrhizal rice depends on the AM symbiosis to satisfy its Pi demands, which is mediated by a single functional Pi transporter, PT11.

  16. OsPT2, a phosphate transporter, is involved in the active uptake of selenite in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianhe; Hu, Bin; Li, Wei; Che, Ronghui; Deng, Kun; Li, Hua; Yu, Feiyan; Ling, Hongqing; Li, Youjun; Chu, Chengcai

    2014-03-01

    • Selenite is a predominant form of selenium (Se) available to plants, especially in anaerobic soils, but the molecular mechanism of selenite uptake by plants is not well understood. • ltn1, a rice mutant previously shown to have increased phosphate (Pi) uptake, was found to exhibit higher selenite uptake than the wild-type in both concentration- and time-dependent selenite uptake assays. Respiratory inhibitors significantly inhibited selenite uptake in the wildtype and the ltn1 mutant, indicating that selenite uptake was coupled with H(+) and energy-dependent. Selenite uptake was greatly enhanced under Pi-starvation conditions, suggesting that Pi transporters are involved in selenite uptake. • OsPT2, the most abundantly expressed Pi transporter in the roots, is also significantly up-regulated in ltn1 and dramatically induced by Pi starvation. OsPT2-overexpressing and knockdown plants displayed significantly increased and decreased rates of selenite uptake, respectively, suggesting that OsPT2 plays a crucial role in selenite uptake. Se content in rice grains also increased significantly in OsPT2-overexpressing plants. • These data strongly demonstrate that selenite and Pi share similar uptake mechanisms and that OsPT2 is involved in selenite uptake, which provides a potential strategy for breeding Se-enriched rice varieties.

  17. Involvement of disulphide bonds in the renal sodium/phosphate co-transporter NaPi-2.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Y; Boyer, C J; Vincent, E; Dugré, A; Vachon, V; Potier, M; Béliveau, R

    1997-01-01

    The rat renal brush border membrane sodium/phosphate co-transporter NaPi-2 was analysed in Western blots with polyclonal antibodies raised against its N-terminal and C-terminal segments. Under reducing conditions, proteins of 45-49 and 70-90 kDa (p45 and p70) were detected with N-terminal antibodies, and proteins of 40 and 70-90 kDa (p40 and p70) were detected with C-terminal antibodies. p40 and p45 apparently result from a post-translational cleavage of NaPi-2 but remain linked through one or more disulphide bonds. Glycosidase digestion showed that both polypeptides are glycosylated; the cleavage site could thus be located between Asn-298 and Asn-328, which have been shown to constitute the only two N-glycosylated residues in NaPi-2. In the absence of reducing agents, both N-terminal and C-terminal antibodies detected p70 and a protein of 180 kDa (p180), suggesting the presence of p70 dimers. Much higher concentrations of beta-mercaptoethanol were required to produce a given effect in intact membrane vesicles than in solubilized proteins, indicating that the affected disulphide bonds are not exposed at the surface of the co-transporter. Phosphate transport activity decreased with increasing concentrations of reducing agents [beta-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol and tris-(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine] and was linearly correlated with the amount of p180 detected. The target sizes estimated from the radiation-induced loss of intensity of p40, p70 and p180 were all approx. 190 kDa, suggesting that NaPi-2 exists as an oligomeric protein in which the subunits are sufficiently close to one another to allow substantial energy transfer between the monomers. When protein samples were pretreated with beta-mercaptoethanol [2.5% and 5% (v/v) to optimize the detection of p40 and p70] before irradiation, target sizes estimated from the radiation-induced loss of intensity of p40 and p70 were 74 and 92 kDa respectively, showing the presence of disulphide bridges in the molecular

  18. Propulsion system for research VTOL transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsma, L. W.; Zigan, S.

    1973-01-01

    In anticipation of an eventual VTOL requirement for civil aviation, NASA has been conducting studies directed toward determining and developing the technology required for a commercial VTOL transport. In this paper, the commercial transport configurations are briefly reviewed; the propulsion system specifications and components developed by the engine study contractor are presented and described; and methods for using the lift-propulsion system for aircraft attitude control are discussed.

  19. A Conserved Two-Component Signal Transduction System Controls the Response to Phosphate Starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Martin, Pablo; Fernández, Matilde; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; O'Connell, Kerry Joan; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; MacSharry, John; Zomer, Aldert

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on the identification and molecular characterization of the two-component regulatory system (2CRS) PhoRP, which controls the response to inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. The response regulator PhoP was shown to bind to the promoter region of pstSCAB, specifying a predicted Pi transporter system, as well as that of phoU, which encodes a putative Pi-responsive regulatory protein. This interaction is assumed to cause transcriptional modulation under conditions of Pi limitation. Our data suggest that the phoRP genes are subject to positive autoregulation and, together with pstSCAB and presumably phoU, represent the complete regulon controlled by the phoRP-encoded 2CRS in B. breve UCC2003. Determination of the minimal PhoP binding region combined with bioinformatic analysis revealed the probable recognition sequence of PhoP, designated here as the PHO box, which together with phoRP is conserved among many high-GC-content Gram-positive bacteria. The importance of the phoRP 2CRS in the response of B. breve to Pi starvation conditions was confirmed by analysis of a B. breve phoP insertion mutant which exhibited decreased growth under phosphate-limiting conditions compared to its parent strain UCC2003. PMID:22635988

  20. A conserved two-component signal transduction system controls the response to phosphate starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Martin, Pablo; Fernández, Matilde; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; O'Connell, Kerry Joan; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; MacSharry, John; Zomer, Aldert; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2012-08-01

    This work reports on the identification and molecular characterization of the two-component regulatory system (2CRS) PhoRP, which controls the response to inorganic phosphate (P(i)) starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. The response regulator PhoP was shown to bind to the promoter region of pstSCAB, specifying a predicted P(i) transporter system, as well as that of phoU, which encodes a putative P(i)-responsive regulatory protein. This interaction is assumed to cause transcriptional modulation under conditions of P(i) limitation. Our data suggest that the phoRP genes are subject to positive autoregulation and, together with pstSCAB and presumably phoU, represent the complete regulon controlled by the phoRP-encoded 2CRS in B. breve UCC2003. Determination of the minimal PhoP binding region combined with bioinformatic analysis revealed the probable recognition sequence of PhoP, designated here as the PHO box, which together with phoRP is conserved among many high-GC-content Gram-positive bacteria. The importance of the phoRP 2CRS in the response of B. breve to P(i) starvation conditions was confirmed by analysis of a B. breve phoP insertion mutant which exhibited decreased growth under phosphate-limiting conditions compared to its parent strain UCC2003.

  1. Detection of phosphate transporter genes from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in mature tree roots under experimental soil pH manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrino-Kyker, Sarah R.; Kluber, Laurel A.; Coyle, Kaitlin P.; Burke, David J.

    2016-10-04

    We present the majority of terrestrial plant roots are colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that, in exchange for carbon, provide plants with enhanced nutrient uptake — most notably inorganic phosphate (Pi). To mediate the uptake of Pi from the soil, AM fungi possess high affinity inorganic phosphate transporters (PTs). Under laboratory conditions, Pi concentrations have been shown to regulate AM fungal-specific PT gene expression. The relationship between PT expression and Pi in the field remains unexplored. Here we quantify AM fungal-specific PTs from maple tree roots in situ. In an effort to limit edaphic parameters, root samples were collected from manipulated forested plots that had elevated soil Pi availability, either through direct Pi application or elevating pH to lower exchangeable aluminum. The aim of the study was to examine AM fungal-specific PT gene expression both prior to and following soil Pi amendment; however, a direct correlation between soil Pi concentration and PT gene expression was not observed. PT transcripts were detected to a greater extent under elevated pH and, while our results are confounded by an overall low detection of PT genes (23 % of all samples collected), our findings raise interesting questions regarding the role of soil pH on PT function. In conclusion, our study is a first step in understanding how edaphic properties influence PT expression and plant P acquisition in mature tree roots.

  2. Detection of phosphate transporter genes from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in mature tree roots under experimental soil pH manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrino-Kyker, Sarah R.; Kluber, Laurel A.; Coyle, Kaitlin P.; Burke, David J.

    2016-10-04

    We present the majority of terrestrial plant roots are colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that, in exchange for carbon, provide plants with enhanced nutrient uptake — most notably inorganic phosphate (Pi). To mediate the uptake of Pi from the soil, AM fungi possess high affinity inorganic phosphate transporters (PTs). Under laboratory conditions, Pi concentrations have been shown to regulate AM fungal-specific PT gene expression. The relationship between PT expression and Pi in the field remains unexplored. Here we quantify AM fungal-specific PTs from maple tree roots in situ. In an effort to limit edaphic parameters, root samples were collected from manipulated forested plots that had elevated soil Pi availability, either through direct Pi application or elevating pH to lower exchangeable aluminum. The aim of the study was to examine AM fungal-specific PT gene expression both prior to and following soil Pi amendment; however, a direct correlation between soil Pi concentration and PT gene expression was not observed. PT transcripts were detected to a greater extent under elevated pH and, while our results are confounded by an overall low detection of PT genes (23 % of all samples collected), our findings raise interesting questions regarding the role of soil pH on PT function. In conclusion, our study is a first step in understanding how edaphic properties influence PT expression and plant P acquisition in mature tree roots.

  3. Glucose-1-Phosphate Transport into Protoplasts and Chloroplasts from Leaves of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Fettke, Joerg; Malinova, Irina; Albrecht, Tanja; Hejazi, Mahdi; Steup, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Almost all glucosyl transfer reactions rely on glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) that either immediately acts as glucosyl donor or as substrate for the synthesis of the more widely used Glc dinucleotides, ADPglucose or UDPglucose. In this communication, we have analyzed two Glc-1-P-related processes: the carbon flux from externally supplied Glc-1-P to starch by either mesophyll protoplasts or intact chloroplasts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). When intact protoplasts or chloroplasts are incubated with [U-14C]Glc-1-P, starch is rapidly labeled. Incorporation into starch is unaffected by the addition of unlabeled Glc-6-P or Glc, indicating a selective flux from Glc-1-P to starch. However, illuminated protoplasts incorporate less 14C into starch when unlabeled bicarbonate is supplied in addition to the 14C-labeled Glc-1-P. Mesophyll protoplasts incubated with [U-14C]Glc-1-P incorporate 14C into the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose. Protoplasts prepared from leaves of mutants of Arabidopsis that lack either the plastidial phosphorylase or the phosphoglucomutase isozyme incorporate 14C derived from external Glc-1-P into starch, but incorporation into starch is insignificant when protoplasts from a mutant possessing a highly reduced ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity are studied. Thus, the path of assimilatory starch biosynthesis initiated by extraplastidial Glc-1-P leads to the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose, and at this intermediate it is fused with the Calvin cycle-driven route. Mutants lacking the plastidial phosphoglucomutase contain a small yet significant amount of transitory starch. PMID:21115809

  4. Structure and Expression Profile of the Phosphate Pht1 Transporter Gene Family in Mycorrhizal Populus trichocarpa1[W

    PubMed Central

    Loth-Pereda, Verónica; Orsini, Elena; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Lota, Frédéric; Kohler, Annegret; Diss, Loic; Blaudez, Damien; Chalot, Michel; Nehls, Uwe; Bucher, Marcel; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Gene networks involved in inorganic phosphate (Pi) acquisition and homeostasis in woody perennial species able to form mycorrhizal symbioses are poorly known. Here, we describe the features of the 12 genes coding for Pi transporters of the Pht1 family in poplar (Populus trichocarpa). Individual Pht1 transporters play distinct roles in acquiring and translocating Pi in different tissues of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal poplar during different growth conditions and developmental stages. Pi starvation triggered the up-regulation of most members of the Pht1 family, especially PtPT9 and PtPT11. PtPT9 and PtPT12 showed a striking up-regulation in ectomycorrhizas and endomycorrhizas, whereas PtPT1 and PtPT11 were strongly down-regulated. PtPT10 transcripts were highly abundant in arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) roots only. PtPT8 and PtPT10 are phylogenetically associated to the AM-inducible Pht1 subfamily I. The analysis of promoter sequences revealed conserved motifs similar to other AM-inducible orthologs in PtPT10 only. To gain more insight into gene regulatory mechanisms governing the AM symbiosis in woody plant species, the activation of the poplar PtPT10 promoter was investigated and detected in AM of potato (Solanum tuberosum) roots. These results indicated that the regulation of AM-inducible Pi transporter genes is conserved between perennial woody and herbaceous plant species. Moreover, poplar has developed an alternative Pi uptake pathway distinct from AM plants, allowing ectomycorrhizal poplar to recruit PtPT9 and PtPT12 to cope with limiting Pi concentrations in forest soils. PMID:21705655

  5. Systemic Analysis Approaches for Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Air transportation system designers have had only limited success using traditional operations research and parametric modeling approaches in their analyses of innovations. They need a systemic methodology for modeling of safety-critical infrastructure that is comprehensive, objective, and sufficiently concrete, yet simple enough to be used with reasonable investment. The methodology must also be amenable to quantitative analysis so issues of system safety and stability can be rigorously addressed. However, air transportation has proven itself an extensive, complex system whose behavior is difficult to describe, no less predict. There is a wide range of system analysis techniques available, but some are more appropriate for certain applications than others. Specifically in the area of complex system analysis, the literature suggests that both agent-based models and network analysis techniques may be useful. This paper discusses the theoretical basis for each approach in these applications, and explores their historic and potential further use for air transportation analysis.

  6. Space transportation systems supporting a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, C. C.; Woodcock, Gordon

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on preliminary design studies conducted by NASA and its contractors to define the transportation vehicle for the support of a human return to the moon mission. Attention is given to the transportation needs and requirements, the design solutions to meet these requirements, the rationale for the selection of the designs, and the ground/orbital support facilities for placing these systems into routine earth-moon transportation service. The reference system includes a partially reusable lunar transfer vehicle that operates between the earth and lunar orbits and a fully reusable lunar excursion vehicle that operates between the lunar orbit and the lunar surface. The system can deliver 27 metric tons of cargo to the lunar surface in an automated flight mode, and can transport a crew of four and deliver 15 tons of cargo in a piloted mode.

  7. The WIPP transportation system: Dedicated to safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.; McFadden, M.

    1993-12-01

    When developing a transportation system to transport transuranic (TRU) waste from ten widely-dispersed generator sites, the Department of Energy (DOE) recognized and addressed many challenges. Shipments of waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were to cover a twenty-five year period and utilize routes covering over twelve thousand miles in twenty-three states. Enhancing public safety by maximizing the payload, thus reducing the number of shipments, was the primary objective. To preclude the requirement for overweight permits, the DOE started with a total shipment weight limit of 80,000 pounds and developed an integrated transportation system consisting of a Type ``B`` package to transport the material, a lightweight tractor and trailer, stringent driver requirements, and a shipment tracking system referred to as ``TRANSCOM``.

  8. Expression systems for cloned xenobiotic transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, John B.

    2005-05-01

    One challenge of modern biology is to be able to match genes and their encoded proteins with events at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organism levels, and thus, provide a multi-level understanding of gene function and dysfunction. How well this can be done for xenobiotic transporters depends on a knowledge of the genes expressed in the tissue, the cellular locations of the gene products (do they function for uptake or efflux?), and our ability to match substrates with transporters using information obtained from cloned transporters functioning in heterologous expression systems. Clearly, making a rational choice of expression system to use for the characterization and study of cloned xenobiotic transporters is a critical part of study design. This choice requires well-defined goals, as well as an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of candidate expression systems.

  9. Transportation Telematics Systems Operation Efficiency Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siergiejczyk, Mirosław

    2012-03-01

    In the paper is presented a method of assessing of the exploitation efficiency of transport telematics systems. In order to obtain as an overall assessment of transport telematics systems, as the method for evaluating was accepted the multi-state analysis of the exploitation process. Then was elaborated the model of exploitation process of the telematics system. The problem of fundamental importance in the study of efficiency is to determine the partial measures of effectiveness. Using the characteristics of the exploitation process, a model of exploitation efficiency of telematics system was elaborated and the measures of its evaluation are presented.

  10. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems. (a...

  11. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems....

  12. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems. (a...

  13. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems. (a...

  14. Fire and materials modeling for transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Skocypec, R.D.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L.; Nicolette, V.F.; Tieszen, S.R.; Thomas, R.

    1994-10-01

    Fire is an important threat to the safety of transportation systems. Therefore, understanding the effects of fire (and its interaction with materials) on transportation systems is crucial to quantifying and mitigating the impact of fire on the safety of those systems. Research and development directed toward improving the fire safety of transportation systems must address a broad range of phenomena and technologies, including: crash dynamics, fuel dispersion, fire environment characterization, material characterization, and system/cargo thermal response modeling. In addition, if the goal of the work is an assessment and/or reduction of risk due to fires, probabilistic risk assessment technology is also required. The research currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in each of these areas is summarized in this paper.

  15. TRANSIMS: Transportation analysis and simulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.; Beckman, R.; Baggerly, K.

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) Project, the system`s major modules, and the project`s near-term plans. TRANSIMS will employ advanced computational and analytical techniques to create an integrated regional transportation systems analysis environment. The simulation environment will include a regional population of individual travelers and freight loads with travel activities and plans, whose individual interactions will be simulated on the transportation system, and whose environmental impact will be determined. We will develop an interim operational capability (IOC) for each major TRANSIMS module during the five-year program. When the IOC is ready, we will complete a specific case study to confirm the IOC features, applicability, and readiness.

  16. Design of a lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaravelu, A.; Goddard, H.; Gold, R.; Greenwell, S.; Lander, J.; Nordell, B.; Stepp, K.; Styer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a good transportation infrastructure is a major requirement for the establishment of a permanent lunar base. Transportation is characterized by the technology available in a specific time frame and the need to transport personnel and cargo between Earth and Moon, and between lunar bases. In our study, attention was first focused on developing a transportation system for the first generation lunar base. As a first step, a tracked-type multipurpose lunar transportation vehicle was considered as a possible mode of transportation and a detailed study was conducted on the various aspects of the vehicle. Since the vehicle is composed of many moving parts, exposing it to the environment of the Moon, where fine dust particles are prevalent, can cause problems associated with lubrication and friction. The vehicle also posed problems concerning weight and power. Hence, several modifications were made to the above design ideas conceptually, and a Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS) is proposed as a more effective alternative with the following objectives: (1) minimizing the transportation of construction material and fuel from Earth or maximizing the use of the lunar material; (2) use of novel materials and light-weight structures; (3) use of new manufacturing methods and technology such as magnetic levitation using superconducting materials; and (4) innovative concepts of effectively utilizing the exotic lunar conditions, i.e., high thermal gradients, lack of atmosphere, lower gravity, etc. To achieve the above objectives of designing transportation systems from concept to operation, the project was planned in three phases: (1) conceptual design; (2) detailed analysis and synthesis; and (3) construction, testing, evaluation, and operation. In this project, both phases 1 and 2 have been carried out and work on phase 3 is in progress. In this paper, the details of the Lunar ARTS are discussed and the future work on the vehicle are

  17. Design of a lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaravelu, A.; Goddard, H.; Gold, R.; Greenwell, S.; Lander, J.; Nordell, B.; Stepp, K.; Styer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a good transportation infrastructure is a major requirement for the establishment of a permanent lunar base. Transportation is characterized by the technology available in a specific time frame and the need to transport personnel and cargo between Earth and Moon, and between lunar bases. In our study, attention was first focused on developing a transportation system for the first generation lunar base. As a first step, a tracked-type multipurpose lunar transportation vehicle was considered as a possible mode of transportation and a detailed study was conducted on the various aspects of the vehicle. Since the vehicle is composed of many moving parts, exposing it to the environment of the Moon, where fine dust particles are prevalent, can cause problems associated with lubrication and friction. The vehicle also posed problems concerning weight and power. Hence, several modifications were made to the above design ideas conceptually, and a Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS) is proposed as a more effective alternative with the following objectives: (1) minimizing the transportation of construction material and fuel from Earth or maximizing the use of the lunar material; (2) use of novel materials and light-weight structures; (3) use of new manufacturing methods and technology such as magnetic levitation using superconducting materials; and (4) innovative concepts of effectively utilizing the exotic lunar conditions, i.e., high thermal gradients, lack of atmosphere, lower gravity, etc. To achieve the above objectives of designing transportation systems from concept to operation, the project was planned in three phases: (1) conceptual design; (2) detailed analysis and synthesis; and (3) construction, testing, evaluation, and operation. In this project, both phases 1 and 2 have been carried out and work on phase 3 is in progress. In this paper, the details of the Lunar ARTS are discussed and the future work on the vehicle are

  18. Identification of glucose-6-phosphate transporter as a key regulator functioning at the autophagy initiation step.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hye-Hyun; Oh, Yumin; Lee, Huikyong; Lee, WonJae; Chang, Jae-Woong; Pyo, Ha-Kyung; Nah, Do hyung; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2015-07-22

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involving autophagosome formation via lysosome. However, the initiation step of autophagy is largely unknown. We found an interaction between ULK1 and ATG9 in mammalian cells and utilized the interaction to identify novel regulators of autophagy upstream of ULK1. We established a cell-based screening assay employing bimolecular fluorescence complementation. By performing gain-of-function screening, we identified G6PT as an autophagy activator. G6PT enhanced the interaction between N-terminal Venus-tagged ULK1 and C-terminal Venus-tagged ATG9, and increased autophagic flux independent of its transport activity. G6PT negatively regulated mTORC1 activity, demonstrating that G6PT functions upstream of mTORC1 in stimulating autophagy.

  19. Hyperspectral imaging utility for transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgelall, Raj; Rafert, J. Bruce; Tolliver, Denver

    2015-03-01

    The global transportation system is massive, open, and dynamic. Existing performance and condition assessments of the complex interacting networks of roadways, bridges, railroads, pipelines, waterways, airways, and intermodal ports are expensive. Hyperspectral imaging is an emerging remote sensing technique for the non-destructive evaluation of multimodal transportation infrastructure. Unlike panchromatic, color, and infrared imaging, each layer of a hyperspectral image pixel records reflectance intensity from one of dozens or hundreds of relatively narrow wavelength bands that span a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Hence, every pixel of a hyperspectral scene provides a unique spectral signature that offers new opportunities for informed decision-making in transportation systems development, operations, and maintenance. Spaceborne systems capture images of vast areas in a short period but provide lower spatial resolution than airborne systems. Practitioners use manned aircraft to achieve higher spatial and spectral resolution, but at the price of custom missions and narrow focus. The rapid size and cost reduction of unmanned aircraft systems promise a third alternative that offers hybrid benefits at affordable prices by conducting multiple parallel missions. This research formulates a theoretical framework for a pushbroom type of hyperspectral imaging system on each type of data acquisition platform. The study then applies the framework to assess the relative potential utility of hyperspectral imaging for previously proposed remote sensing applications in transportation. The authors also introduce and suggest new potential applications of hyperspectral imaging in transportation asset management, network performance evaluation, and risk assessments to enable effective and objective decision- and policy-making.

  20. An understanding of renal stone development in a mixed oxalate-phosphate system.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangying; Wang, Lijun; Dosen, Anja; Tang, Ruikang; Giese, Rossman F; Giocondi, Jennifer L; Orme, Christine A; Hoyer, John R; Nancollas, George H

    2008-07-15

    The in vivo formation of calcium oxalate concretions having calcium phosphate nidi is simulated in an in vitro (37 degrees C, pH 6.0) dual constant composition (DCC) system undersaturated (sigma DCPD = -0.330) with respect to brushite (DCPD, CaHPO 4 . 2H 2O) and slightly supersaturated (sigma COM = 0.328) with respect to calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM, CaC2O4 . H2O). The brushite dissolution provides calcium ions that raise the COM supersaturation, which is heterogeneously nucleated either on or near the surface of the dissolving calcium phosphate crystals. The COM crystallites may then aggregate, simulating kidney stone formation. Interestingly, two intermediate phases, anhydrous dicalcium phosphate (monetite, CaHPO4) and calcium oxalate trihydrate (COT), are also detected by X-ray diffraction during this brushite-COM transformation. In support of clinical observations, the results of these studies demonstrate the participation of calcium phosphate phases in COM crystallization providing a possible physical chemical mechanism for kidney stone formation.

  1. Not planning a sustainable transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Finnveden, Göran Åkerman, Jonas

    2014-04-01

    The overall objective of the Swedish transport policy is to ensure the economically efficient and sustainable provision of transport services for people and business throughout the country. More specifically, the transport sector shall, among other things, contribute to the achievement of environmental quality objectives in which the development of the transport system plays an important role in the achievement of the objectives. The aim of this study is to analyse if current transport planning supports this policy. This is done by analysing two recent cases: the National Infrastructure Plan 2010–2021, and the planning of Bypass Stockholm, a major road investment. Our results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. Another interesting aspect of the planning processes is that the long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes, neither as a clear goal nor as factor that will influence future transport systems. In this way, the long-term sustainability aspects are not present in the planning. We conclude that the two cases do not contribute to a sustainable transport system. Thus, several changes must be made in the processes, including putting up clear targets for emissions. Also, the methodology for the environmental assessments needs to be further developed and discussed. - Highlights: • Two cases are studied to analyse if current planning supports a sustainable transport system. • Results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. • Long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes. • Current practices do not contribute to a sustainable planning processes. • Methodology and process for environmental assessments must be further developed and discussed.

  2. Human Transportation System (HTS) study: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  3. Human Transportation System (HTS) study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  4. Study of aircraft in intraurban transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    A systems analysis was conducted to define the technical economic and operational characteristics of an aircraft transportation system for short-range intracity commutor operations. The analysis was for 1975 and 1985 in the seven county, Detroit, Michigan area. STOL and VTOL aircraft were studied in sizes from 40 to 120 passengers. The preferred vehicle for the Detroit area was the deflected slipstream STOL. Since the study was parametric in nature, it is applicable to generalization, and it was concluded that a feasible intraurban air transportation system could be developed in many viable situations.

  5. A laser-powered flight transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.; Sun, K. C.; Jones, W. S.

    1978-01-01

    Laser energy transmitted from a solar-power satellite via a set of relay satellites is used to power a cruising air transport; i.e., a laser-powered airplane. The result is a nearly fuelless pollution-free flight transportation system which is cost competitive with the fuel-conservative airplane of the future. The major components of this flight system include a laser-power satellite, relay satellites, laser-powered turbofans, and a conventional airframe. The relay satellites are orbiting optical systems which intercept the beam from a power satellite and refocus and redirect the beam to its next target.

  6. A laser-powered flight transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.; Sun, K. C.; Jones, W. S.

    1978-01-01

    Laser energy transmitted from a solar-power satellite via a set of relay satellites is used to power a cruising air transport; i.e., a laser-powered airplane. The result is a nearly fuelless pollution-free flight transportation system which is cost competitive with the fuel-conservative airplane of the future. The major components of this flight system include a laser-power satellite, relay satellites, laser-powered turbofans, and a conventional airframe. The relay satellites are orbiting optical systems which intercept the beam from a power satellite and refocus and redirect the beam to its next target.

  7. Advanced secondary power system for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. C.; Hansen, I. G.; Beach, R. F.; Plencner, R. M.; Dengler, R. P.; Jefferies, K. S.; Frye, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A concept for an advanced aircraft power system was identified that uses 20-kHz, 440-V, sin-wave power distribution. This system was integrated with an electrically powered flight control system and with other aircraft systems requiring secondary power. The resulting all-electric secondary power configuration reduced the empty weight of a modern 200-passenger, twin-engine transport by 10 percent and the mission fuel by 9 percent.

  8. Alternative battery systems for transportation uses

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Thackeray

    2016-07-12

    Argonne Distinguished Fellow Michael Thackeray highlights the need for alternative battery systems for transportation uses. Such systems will not only need to be smaller, lighter and more energy dense, but also able to make electric vehicles more competitive with internal combustion engine vehicles.

  9. Alternative battery systems for transportation uses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Thackeray

    2012-07-25

    Argonne Distinguished Fellow Michael Thackeray highlights the need for alternative battery systems for transportation uses. Such systems will not only need to be smaller, lighter and more energy dense, but also able to make electric vehicles more competitive with internal combustion engine vehicles.

  10. Preliminary description of the transportation operations systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    This document presents a preliminary description of the transportation operations systems designed to ship spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) from waste generator sites to authorized waste receiving facilities. It is an initial effort to define the operations system and identifies the activities and system components necessary to provide complete transportation capability. It is intended that this be a project level working document to facilitate dialog for further identification of system elements and functional requirements. This process will lead to issuance of a System Requirements and Description (SRD) document for the transportation operations systems and will identify detailed system functional requirements, performance criteria, and functional interfaces. The transportation system is quite complex and is influenced by a large number of external factors and interfaces. Some of these interfaces (such as the repository) are just now being developed. Others (such as utility-handling capabilities) are currently in existence and must be accommodated or modified. Additionally, the allocation of requirements is likewise both developing (with the repository) and somewhat fixed. 16 refs., 15 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Relationship between sodium-dependent phosphate transporter (NaPi-IIc) function and cellular vacuole formation in opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Yuji; Segawa, Hiroko; Ohnishi, Saori; Ohi, Akiko; Ito, Mikiko; Kaneko, Ichiro; Kido, Shinsuke; Tatsumi, Sawako; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    NaPi-IIc/SLC34A3 is a sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporter in the renal proximal tubules and its mutations cause hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets with hypercalciuria (HHRH). In the present study, we created a specific antibody for opossum SLC34A3, NaPi-IIc (oNaPi-IIc), and analyzed its localization and regulation in opossum kidney cells (a tissue culture model of proximal tubular cells). Immunoreactive oNaPi-IIc protein levels increased during the proliferative phase and decreased during differentiation. Moreover, stimulating cell growth upregulated oNaPi-IIc protein levels, whereas suppressing cell proliferation downregulated oNaPi-IIc protein levels. Immunocytochemistry revealed that endogenous and exogenous oNaPi-IIc proteins localized at the protrusion of the plasma membrane, which is a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) rich-membrane, and at the intracellular vacuolar membrane. Exogenous NaPi-IIc also induced cellular vacuoles and localized in the plasma membrane. The ability to form vacuoles is specific to electroneutral NaPi-IIc, and not electrogenic NaPi-IIa or NaPi-IIb. In addition, mutations of NaPi-IIc (S138F and R468W) in HHRH did not cause cellular PIP2-rich vacuoles. In conclusion, our data anticipate that NaPi-IIc may regulate PIP2 production at the plasma membrane and cellular vesicle formation.

  12. Arabidopsis copper transport protein COPT2 participates in the cross talk between iron deficiency responses and low-phosphate signaling.

    PubMed

    Perea-García, Ana; Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Andrés-Colás, Nuria; Vera-Sirera, Francisco; Pérez-Amador, Miguel A; Puig, Sergi; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2013-05-01

    Copper and iron are essential micronutrients for most living organisms because they participate as cofactors in biological processes, including respiration, photosynthesis, and oxidative stress protection. In many eukaryotic organisms, including yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and mammals, copper and iron homeostases are highly interconnected; yet, such interdependence is not well established in higher plants. Here, we propose that COPT2, a high-affinity copper transport protein, functions under copper and iron deficiencies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). COPT2 is a plasma membrane protein that functions in copper acquisition and distribution. Characterization of the COPT2 expression pattern indicates a synergic response to copper and iron limitation in roots. We characterized a knockout of COPT2, copt2-1, that leads to increased resistance to simultaneous copper and iron deficiencies, measured as reduced leaf chlorosis and improved maintenance of the photosynthetic apparatus. We propose that COPT2 could play a dual role under iron deficiency. First, COPT2 participates in the attenuation of copper deficiency responses driven by iron limitation, possibly to minimize further iron consumption. Second, global expression analyses of copt2-1 versus wild-type Arabidopsis plants indicate that low-phosphate responses increase in the mutant. These results open up new biotechnological approaches to fight iron deficiency in crops.

  13. The Integrated Air Transportation System Evaluation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Earl R., III; Hees, Jing; Villani, James A.; Yackovetsky, Robert E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Throughout U.S. history, our nation has generally enjoyed exceptional economic growth, driven in part by transportation advancements. Looking forward 25 years, when the national highway and skyway systems are saturated, the nation faces new challenges in creating transportation-driven economic growth and wealth. To meet the national requirement for an improved air traffic management system, NASA developed the goal of tripling throughput over the next 20 years, in all weather conditions while maintaining safety. Analysis of the throughput goal has primarily focused on major airline operations, primarily through the hub and spoke system.However, many suggested concepts to increase throughput may operate outside the hub and spoke system. Examples of such concepts include the Small Aircraft Transportation System, civil tiltrotor, and improved rotorcraft. Proper assessment of the potential contribution of these technologies to the domestic air transportation system requires a modeling capability that includes the country's numerous smaller airports, acting as a fundamental component of the National Air space System, and the demand for such concepts and technologies. Under this task for NASA, the Logistics Management Institute developed higher fidelity demand models that capture the interdependence of short-haul air travel with other transportation modes and explicitly consider the costs of commercial air and other transport modes. To accomplish this work, we generated forecasts of the distribution of general aviation based aircraft and GA itinerant operations at each of nearly 3.000 airport based on changes in economic conditions and demographic trends. We also built modules that estimate the demand for travel by different modes, particularly auto, commercial air, and GA. We examined GA demand from two perspectives: top-down and bottom-up, described in detail.

  14. A Robust Scalable Transportation System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew; DeLaurentis, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the 2005 Revolutionary System Concept for Aeronautics (RSCA) study entitled "A Robust, Scalable Transportation System Concept". The objective of the study was to generate, at a high-level of abstraction, characteristics of a new concept for the National Airspace System, or the new NAS, under which transportation goals such as increased throughput, delay reduction, and improved robustness could be realized. Since such an objective can be overwhelmingly complex if pursued at the lowest levels of detail, instead a System-of-Systems (SoS) approach was adopted to model alternative air transportation architectures at a high level. The SoS approach allows the consideration of not only the technical aspects of the NAS", but also incorporates policy, socio-economic, and alternative transportation system considerations into one architecture. While the representations of the individual systems are basic, the higher level approach allows for ways to optimize the SoS at the network level, determining the best topology (i.e. configuration of nodes and links). The final product (concept) is a set of rules of behavior and network structure that not only satisfies national transportation goals, but represents the high impact rules that accomplish those goals by getting the agents to "do the right thing" naturally. The novel combination of Agent Based Modeling and Network Theory provides the core analysis methodology in the System-of-Systems approach. Our method of approach is non-deterministic which means, fundamentally, it asks and answers different questions than deterministic models. The nondeterministic method is necessary primarily due to our marriage of human systems with technological ones in a partially unknown set of future worlds. Our goal is to understand and simulate how the SoS, human and technological components combined, evolve.

  15. Strigolactones are transported through the xylem and play a key role in shoot architectural response to phosphate deficiency in nonarbuscular mycorrhizal host Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kohlen, Wouter; Charnikhova, Tatsiana; Liu, Qing; Bours, Ralph; Domagalska, Malgorzata A; Beguerie, Sebastien; Verstappen, Francel; Leyser, Ottoline; Bouwmeester, Harro; Ruyter-Spira, Carolien

    2011-02-01

    The biosynthesis of the recently identified novel class of plant hormones, strigolactones, is up-regulated upon phosphate deficiency in many plant species. It is generally accepted that the evolutionary origin of strigolactone up-regulation is their function as a rhizosphere signal that stimulates hyphal branching of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In this work, we demonstrate that this induction is conserved in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), although Arabidopsis is not a host for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We demonstrate that the increase in strigolactone production contributes to the changes in shoot architecture observed in response to phosphate deficiency. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, column chromatography, and multiple reaction monitoring-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, we identified two strigolactones (orobanchol and orobanchyl acetate) in Arabidopsis and have evidence of the presence of a third (5-deoxystrigol). We show that at least one of them (orobanchol) is strongly reduced in the putative strigolactone biosynthetic mutants more axillary growth1 (max1) and max4 but not in the signal transduction mutant max2. Orobanchol was also detected in xylem sap and up-regulated under phosphate deficiency, which is consistent with the idea that root-derived strigolactones are transported to the shoot, where they regulate branching. Moreover, two additional putative strigolactone-like compounds were detected in xylem sap, one of which was not detected in root exudates. Together, these results show that xylem-transported strigolactones contribute to the regulation of shoot architectural response to phosphate-limiting conditions.

  16. Iontophoretic Transport Across a Multiple Membrane System

    PubMed Central

    MOLOKHIA, SARAH A.; ZHANG, YANHUI; HIGUCHI, WILLIAM I.; LI, S. KEVIN

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the iontophoretic transport behavior across multiple membranes of different barrier properties. Spectra/Por® (SP) and Ionac membranes were the synthetic membranes and sclera was the biomembrane in this model study. The barrier properties of SP membranes were determined individually in passive and iontophoresis transport experiments with tetraethylammonium ion (TEA), chloride ion (Cl), and mannitol as the model permeants. Passive and iontophoretic transport experiments were then conducted with an assembly of SP membranes. The contribution of electroosmosis to iontophoresis was assessed using the mannitol data. Model analysis was performed to study the contribution of diffusion and electromigration to electrotransport across the multiple membrane system. The effects of membrane barrier thickness upon ion-exchange membrane-enhanced iontophoresis were examined with Ionac, SP, and sclera. The present study shows that iontophoretic transport of TEA across the membrane system was related to the thicknesses and permeability coefficients of the membranes and the electromobilities of the permeant across the individual membranes in the assembly. Model analysis suggests significant contribution of diffusion within the membranes across the membrane system, and this mechanism is relatively independent of the current density applied across the system in iontophoresis dominant transport. PMID:17990310

  17. 77 FR 24559 - Marine Transportation System National Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... Maritime Administration Marine Transportation System National Advisory Council ACTION: National Advisory Council public meeting. SUMMARY: The Maritime Administration announces that the Marine Transportation... on the integration of marine highways into the national transportation system and the development...

  18. Shuttle derived manned transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordway, Wayne L.

    1991-01-01

    Shuttle derivatives have been under study by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for a number of years. With Space Station Freedom and the Lunar/Mars Initiative established as national objectives, the demand for access to earth orbit is accelerating. These objectives have resulted in efforts to address additional launch requirements that must be met as the turn of the century approaches. Among the top level requirements are increased safety, higher reliability, lower cost, and the need for heavy lift launch capability. To satisfy these requirements, some of the largest technology demands will be placed upon the propulsion systems. Shuttle derived manned concepts are presented and the associated propulsion issues which arise from the top level requirements are discussed. These concepts are presented in terms of an overall architecture which can be achieved with modest up-front development.

  19. Bacterial ferrous iron transport: the Feo system.

    PubMed

    Lau, Cheryl K Y; Krewulak, Karla D; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-03-01

    To maintain iron homeostasis within the cell, bacteria have evolved various types of iron acquisition systems. Ferric iron (Fe(3+)) is the dominant species in an oxygenated environment, while ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) is more abundant under anaerobic conditions or at low pH. For organisms that must combat oxygen limitation for their everyday survival, pathways for the uptake of ferrous iron are essential. Several bacterial ferrous iron transport systems have been described; however, only the Feo system appears to be widely distributed and is exclusively dedicated to the transport of iron. In recent years, many studies have explored the role of the FeoB and FeoA proteins in ferrous iron transport and their contribution toward bacterial virulence. The three-dimensional structures for the Feo proteins have recently been determined and provide insight into the molecular details of the transport system. A highly select group of bacteria also express the FeoC protein from the same operon. This review will provide a comprehensive look at the structural and functional aspects of the Feo system. In addition, bioinformatics analyses of the feo operon and the Feo proteins have been performed to complement our understanding of this ubiquitous bacterial uptake system, providing a new outlook for future studies. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Amino acid transport by prosthecae of Asticcacaulis biprosthecum: evidence for a broad-range transport system.

    PubMed

    Tam, E; Pate, J L

    1985-10-01

    Prosthecae purified from cells of Asticcaulis biprosthecum possess active transport systems that transport all 20 amino acids tested. Using ascorbate-reduced phenazine methosulphate in the presence of oxygen, all 20 amino acids are accumulated against a concentration gradient by isolated prosthecae. Results of experiments testing the inhibition of transport of one amino acid by another, and of experiments testing the exchange of exogenous amino acids with those preloaded in prosthecae, along with characteristics of mutants defective in amino acid transport, suggest the presence in prosthecae of three amino acid transport systems. One, the general or G system, transports at least 18 of the 20 amino acids tested. Another system, referred to as the proline or P system, transports seven amino acids (including proline) that are also transported by the G system. The third system transports only glutamate and aspartate, and is referred to as the acidic amino acid transport system or A system.

  1. Type I glycogen storage diseases: disorders of the glucose-6-phosphatase/glucose-6-phosphate transporter complexes.

    PubMed

    Chou, Janice Y; Jun, Hyun Sik; Mansfield, Brian C

    2015-05-01

    Disorders of the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase)/glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) complexes consist of three subtypes: glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), deficient in the liver/kidney/intestine-restricted G6Pase-α (or G6PC); GSD-Ib, deficient in a ubiquitously expressed G6PT (or SLC37A4); and G6Pase-β deficiency or severe congenital neutropenia syndrome type 4 (SCN4), deficient in the ubiquitously expressed G6Pase-β (or G6PC3). G6Pase-α and G6Pase-β are glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) hydrolases with active sites lying inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and as such are dependent upon the G6PT to translocate G6P from the cytoplasm into the lumen. The tissue expression profiles of the G6Pase enzymes dictate the disease's phenotype. A functional G6Pase-α/G6PT complex maintains interprandial glucose homeostasis, while a functional G6Pase-β/G6PT complex maintains neutrophil/macrophage energy homeostasis and functionality. G6Pase-β deficiency is not a glycogen storage disease but biochemically it is a GSD-I related syndrome (GSD-Irs). GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib patients manifest a common metabolic phenotype of impaired blood glucose homeostasis not shared by GSD-Irs. GSD-Ib and GSD-Irs patients manifest a common myeloid phenotype of neutropenia and neutrophil/macrophage dysfunction not shared by GSD-Ia. While a disruption of the activity of the G6Pase-α/G6PT complex readily explains why GSD-Ia and GSD-Ib patients exhibit impaired glucose homeostasis, the basis for neutropenia and myeloid dysfunction in GSD-Ib and GSD-Irs are only now starting to be understood. Animal models of all three disorders are now available and are being exploited to both delineate the disease more precisely and develop new treatment approaches, including gene therapy.

  2. The Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor System

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.W.; Hassberger, J.A.; Smith, C.; Carelli, M.; Greenspan, E.; Peddicord, K.L.; Stroh, K.; Wade, D.C.; Hill, R.N.

    1999-05-27

    The Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor (STAR) system is a development architecture for implementing a small nuclear power system, specifically aimed at meeting the growing energy needs of much of the developing world. It simultaneously provides very high standards for safety, proliferation resistance, ease and economy of installation, operation, and ultimate disposition. The STAR system accomplishes these objectives through a combination of modular design, factory manufacture, long lifetime without refueling, autonomous control, and high reliability.

  3. Vapor-phase heat-transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedstrom, J. C.

    1983-11-01

    A vapor-phase heat-transport system is being tested in one of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The system consists of one selective-surface collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector by gravity or with a pump. Results from several operating configurations are presented, together with a comparison with other passive systems. A new self-pumping concept is presented.

  4. Vapor-phase heat-transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedstrom, J. C.

    A vapor-phase heat-transport system is being tested in one of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The system consists of one selective-surface collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector by gravity or with a pump. Results from several operating configurations are presented, together with a comparison with other passive systems. A new self-pumping concept is presented.

  5. A Mars/phobos Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A transportation system will be necessary to support construction and operation of bases on Phobos and Mars beginning in the year 2020 or later. An approach to defining a network of vehicles and the types of vehicles which may be used in the system are presented. The network will provide a convenient, integrated means for transporting robotically constructed bases to Phobos and Mars. All the technology needed for the current plan is expected to be available for use at the projected date of cargo departure from the Earth system. The modular design of the transportation system provides easily implemented contingency plans, so that difficulties with any one vehicle will have a minimal effect on the progress of the total mission. The transportation network proposed consists of orbital vehicles and atmospheric entry vehicles. Initially, only orbital vehicles will participate in the robotic construction phase of the Phobos base. The Interplanetary Transfer Vehicle (ITV) will carry the base and construction equipment to Phobos where the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicles (OMV's) will participate in the initial construction of the base. When the Mars base is ready to be sent, one or more ITV's will be used to transport the atmospheric entry vehicles from Earth. These atmospheric vehicles are the One Way Landers (OWL's) and the Ascent/Descent Vehicles (ADV's). They will be used to carry the base components and/or construction equipment. The OMV's and the Orbital Transfer Vehicles (OTV's) will assist in carrying the atmospheric entry vehicles to low Martian orbit where the OWL's or ADV's will descent to the planet surface. The ADV's were proposed to accommodate expansion of the system. Additionally, a smaller version of the ADV class is capable of transporting personnel between Mars and Phobos.

  6. Nitrate transport system in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Schloemen, R H; Garrett, R H

    1974-04-01

    Nitrate uptake in Neurospora crassa has been investigated under various conditions of nitrogen nutrition by measuring the rate of disappearance of nitrate from the medium and by determining mycelial nitrate accumulation. The nitrate transport system is induced by either nitrate or nitrite, but is not present in mycelia grown on ammonia or Casamino Acids. The appearance of nitrate uptake activity is prevented by cycloheximide, puromycin, or 6-methyl purine. The induced nitrate transport system displays a K(m) for nitrate of 0.25 mM. Nitrate uptake is inhibited by metabolic poisons such as 2,4-dinitrophenol, cyanide, and antimycin A. Furthermore, mycelia can concentrate nitrate 50-fold. Ammonia and nitrite are non-competitive inhibitors with respect to nitrate, with K(i) values of 0.13 and 0.17 mM, respectively. Ammonia does not repress the formation of the nitrate transport system. In contrast, the nitrate uptake system is repressed by Casamino Acids. All amino acids individually prevent nitrate accumulation, with the exception of methionine, glutamine, and alanine. The influence of nitrate reduction and the nitrate reductase protein on nitrate transport was investigated in wild-type Neurospora lacking a functional nitrate reductase and in nitrate non-utilizing mutants, nit-1, nit-2, and nit-3. These mycelia contain an inducible nitrate transport system which displays the same characteristics as those found in the wild-type mycelia having the functional nitrate reductase. These findings suggest that nitrate transport is not dependent upon nitrate reduction and that these two processes are separate events in the assimilation of nitrate.

  7. Pathogen transport in groundwater systems: contrasts with traditional solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Randall J.; Johnson, William P.

    2016-12-01

    Water quality affects many aspects of water availability, from precluding use to societal perceptions of fit-for-purpose. Pathogen source and transport processes are drivers of water quality because they have been responsible for numerous outbreaks resulting in large economic losses due to illness and, in some cases, loss of life. Outbreaks result from very small exposure (e.g., less than 20 viruses) from very strong sources (e.g., trillions of viruses shed by a single infected individual). Thus, unlike solute contaminants, an acute exposure to a very small amount of contaminated water can cause immediate adverse health effects. Similarly, pathogens are larger than solutes. Thus, interactions with surfaces and settling become important even as processes important for solutes such as diffusion become less important. These differences are articulated in "Colloid Filtration Theory", a separate branch of pore-scale transport. Consequently, understanding pathogen processes requires changes in how groundwater systems are typically characterized, where the focus is on the leading edges of plumes and preferential flow paths, even if such features move only a very small fraction of the aquifer flow. Moreover, the relatively short survival times of pathogens in the subsurface require greater attention to very fast (<10 year) flow paths. By better understanding the differences between pathogen and solute transport mechanisms discussed here, a more encompassing view of water quality and source water protection is attained. With this more holistic view and theoretical understanding, better evaluations can be made regarding drinking water vulnerability and the relation between groundwater and human health.

  8. Pathogen transport in groundwater systems: contrasts with traditional solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Randall J.; Johnson, William P.

    2017-06-01

    Water quality affects many aspects of water availability, from precluding use to societal perceptions of fit-for-purpose. Pathogen source and transport processes are drivers of water quality because they have been responsible for numerous outbreaks resulting in large economic losses due to illness and, in some cases, loss of life. Outbreaks result from very small exposure (e.g., less than 20 viruses) from very strong sources (e.g., trillions of viruses shed by a single infected individual). Thus, unlike solute contaminants, an acute exposure to a very small amount of contaminated water can cause immediate adverse health effects. Similarly, pathogens are larger than solutes. Thus, interactions with surfaces and settling become important even as processes important for solutes such as diffusion become less important. These differences are articulated in "Colloid Filtration Theory", a separate branch of pore-scale transport. Consequently, understanding pathogen processes requires changes in how groundwater systems are typically characterized, where the focus is on the leading edges of plumes and preferential flow paths, even if such features move only a very small fraction of the aquifer flow. Moreover, the relatively short survival times of pathogens in the subsurface require greater attention to very fast (<10 year) flow paths. By better understanding the differences between pathogen and solute transport mechanisms discussed here, a more encompassing view of water quality and source water protection is attained. With this more holistic view and theoretical understanding, better evaluations can be made regarding drinking water vulnerability and the relation between groundwater and human health.

  9. The Effects of Reduced Tillage on Phosphate Transport from Agricultural Land.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    as Bray P1 (Bray and Kurtz, 1945). However, it also reflects the pool of TPP that would be available to algae . Lake and Morrison (1975) reported on a...P04 -P) and labile phosphorus in runoff from croplands. p.509-533. hI KiiLsel, W.G. (ed). CREAMS : A field-scale model for chemicals, runoff and er...modeling. Chapter 12. In Knisel, W.G. (ed). CREAMS : A field-scale model for chemicals, runoff and erosion from agricultural management systems. USDA

  10. Crew Transportation System Design Reference Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mango, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Contains summaries of potential design reference mission goals for systems to transport humans to andfrom low Earth orbit (LEO) for the Commercial Crew Program. The purpose of this document is to describe Design Reference Missions (DRMs) representative of the end-to-end Crew Transportation System (CTS) framework envisioned to successfully execute commercial crew transportation to orbital destinations. The initial CTS architecture will likely be optimized to support NASA crew and NASA-sponsored crew rotation missions to the ISS, but consideration may be given in this design phase to allow for modifications in order to accomplish other commercial missions in the future. With the exception of NASA’s mission to the ISS, the remaining commercial DRMs are notional. Any decision to design or scar the CTS for these additional non-NASA missions is completely up to the Commercial Provider. As NASA’s mission needs evolve over time, this document will be periodically updated to reflect those needs.

  11. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  12. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  13. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  14. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  15. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dimethylnitrosamine in mammalian cells (CHO/HGPRT system): enhancement by calcium phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, J.P.; Machanoff, R.; San Sebastian, J.R.; Hsie, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    The cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) was determined in the CHO/HGPRT system. Metabolic activation of the promutagen was achieved by use of a liver homogenate supernatant (S9) prepared from Aroclor 1254-induced Sprague-Dawley rats. The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of DMN were enhanced by the inclusion of calcium chloride in the incubation mix, and this enhancement was dependent on the presence of sodium phosphate. Under conditions that yielded maximal activity (10 mM calcium chloride, 10 mM magnesium chloride, 50 mM sodium phosphate), an apparent calcium phospate precipitate was observed. DMN activity increased with increasing amounts of S9 protein over the range 0.3-3.0 mg/ml in the S9 mix and appeared to plateau at higher concentrations. The mutagenicity of DMN can be described as 110 mutants/10/sup 6/ cells per mM DMN per mg/ml S9 protein per hour.

  16. l-Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate, a Bactericidal Agent

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chu-Tay; Engel, Robert; Tropp, Burton E.

    1977-01-01

    At a concentration of 2.5 mM, dl-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate has a bactericidal effect upon Escherichia coli. The glycerol 3-phosphate transport system is required for the entry of the biologically active l-enantiomer. l-Glyceraldehyde must be phosphorylated by the cell to exert its full effect upon growth. The addition of dl-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to a culture of E. coli caused no preferential inhibition of the accumulation of deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, or phosphoglycerides, although protein accumulation was less affected. Studies with mutant strains ruled out catabolic glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, anabolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate):sn-glycerol 3-phosphate oxidoreductase, and fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase as the primary sites of action. l-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is a competitive inhibitor of sn-glycerol 3-phosphate in the reactions catalyzed by acyl coenzyme A:sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (Ki of 1.8 mM) and cytidine 5′-diphosphate-diglyceride:sn-glycerol 3-phosphate phosphatidyltransferase (Ki of 2.7 mM). A Km mutant for the former enzyme was susceptible to the inhibitor. l-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate does not affect acyl coenzyme A:lysophosphatidate acyltransferase activity. In vivo, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol accumulation are inhibited to the same extent by the addition of dl-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to a culture of E. coli. PMID:319747

  17. PARTS: (Plasma Accelerated Reusable Transport System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aherne, Michael; Davis, Phil; England, Matt; Gustavsson, Jake; Pankow, Steve; Sampaio, Chere; Savella, Phil

    2002-01-01

    The Plasma Accelerated Reusable Transport System (PARTS) is an unmanned cargo shuttle intended to ferry large payloads to and from Martian orbit using a highly efficient VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR). The design of PARTS focuses on balancing cost and minimizing transit time for a chosen payload consisting of vehicles, satellites, and other components provided by interested parties.

  18. Transportation systems analyses: Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The principal objective of this study is to accomplish a systems engineering assessment of the nation's space transportation infrastructure. This analysis addresses the necessary elements to perform man delivery and return, cargo transfer, cargo delivery, payload servicing, and the exploration of the Moon and Mars. Specific elements analyzed, but not limited to, include the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), the National Launch System (NLS), the current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) fleet, ground facilities, the Space Station Freedom (SSF), and other civil, military and commercial payloads. The performance of this study entails maintaining a broad perspective on the large number of transportation elements that could potentially comprise the U.S. space infrastructure over the next several decades. To perform this systems evaluation, top-level trade studies are conducted to enhance our understanding of the relationships between elements of the infrastructure. This broad 'infrastructure-level perspective' permits the identification of preferred infrastructures. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assure the credibility and usefulness of study results. This executive summary of the transportation systems analyses (TSM) semi-annual report addresses the SSF logistics resupply. Our analysis parallels the ongoing NASA SSF redesign effort. Therefore, there could be no SSF design to drive our logistics analysis. Consequently, the analysis attempted to bound the reasonable SSF design possibilities (and the subsequent transportation implications). No other strategy really exists until after a final decision is rendered on the SSF configuration.

  19. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

  20. Tomorrows' Air Transportation System Breakout Series Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss tomorrow's air transportation system. Section of this presentation includes: chair comments; other general comments; surface congestion alleviation; runway productivity; enhanced arrival/departure tools; integrated airspace decision support tools; national traffic flow management, runway independent operations; ATM TFM weather; and terminal weather.

  1. Future space transportation systems analysis study. Phase 1 extension: Transportation systems reference data, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Transportation mass requirements are developed for various mission and transportation modes based on vehicle systems sized to fit the exact needs of each mission. The parametric data used to derive the mass requirements for each mission and transportation mode are presented to enable accommodation of possible changes in mode options or payload definitions. The vehicle sizing and functional requirements used to derive the parametric data are described.

  2. Function of the Golgi-located phosphate transporter PHT4;6 is critical for senescence-associated processes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hassler, Sebastian; Jung, Benjamin; Lemke, Lilia; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Martinoia, Enrico; Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard

    2016-01-01

    The phosphate transporter PHT4;6 locates to the trans-Golgi compartment, and its impaired activity causes altered intracellular phosphate compartmentation, leading to low cytosolic Pi levels, a blockage of Golgi-related processes such as protein glycosylation and hemicellulose biosynthesis, and a dwarf phenotype. However, it was unclear whether altered Pi homeostasis in pht4;6 mutants causes further cellular problems, typically associated with limited phosphate availability. Here we report that pht4;6 mutants exhibit a markedly increased disposition to induce dark-induced senescence. In control experiments, in which pht4;6 mutants and wild-type plants developed similarly, we confirmed that accelerated dark-induced senescence in mutants is not a ‘pleiotropic’ process associated with the dwarf phenotype. In fact, accelerated dark-induced senescence in pht4;6 mutants correlates strongly with increased levels of toxic NH4 + and higher sensitivity to ammonium, which probably contribute to the inability of pht4;6 mutants to recover from dark treatment. Experiments with modified levels of either salicylic acid (SA) or trans-zeatin (tZ) demonstrate that altered concentrations of these compounds in pht4;6 plants act as major cellular mediators for dark-induced senescence. This conclusion gained further support from the notion that the expression of the pht4;6 gene is, in contrast to genes coding for major phosphate importers, substantially induced by tZ. Taken together, our findings point to a critical function of PHT4;6 to control cellular phosphate levels, in particular the cytosolic Pi availability, required to energize plant primary metabolism for proper plant development. Phosphate and its allocation mediated by PHT4;6 is critical to prevent onset of dark-induced senescence. PMID:27325894

  3. Space Transportation System (STS): Emergency support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoski, T.; Nicholson, L.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for emergency support of the Space Transportation System (STS) are summarized. Coverage would be provided by the DSN during emergencies that would prevent communications between the shuttle and the White Sands TDRSS receiving station. The DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  4. Disorder and Transport in Highly Correlated Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    Denr Dow. Vlease find included 1th100 copies of the Annu at [rport for my Grant NOOO 14- 1 j- 14󈧪, entitled " Disorder and Transport in I licility...of N ava1l Research for your support. 1Ian K. Sch~ilter Fnclosures Appr~I ~ir k~ll~ereleae;\\ t)Is~i I gm~U itedl ONR GRANT N00014-91J-1438 " Disorder ...001 i92-11805 ’ Introduction This grant was a new start dedicated to studies of disorder and transport in highly correlated electron systems, mostly

  5. Some characteristics of microemulsions in sodium dioleyl phosphate/n-heptane/brine system

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, Gen; Harada, Makoto; Shioi, Akihisa; Goto, Masahiro; Nakashio, Fumiyuki

    1995-12-01

    The behavior of microemulsions in the sodium dioleyl phosphate (SDOLP)/n-heptane system was investigated. This system provided a water-in-oil microemulsion without using a cosurfactant. The phase diagram of the WinsorII was determined. Along the phase boundary between the microemulsion and the excess brine solution, the small angle X-ray scattering, the viscosity, and the electric conductivity of the microemulsions were measured. SDOLP provided the spherical aggregates, which were highly isolated from each other even in the concentrated region of the aggregates. These characteristics were estimated to be attributed to peculiar packing of the hydrocarbon chain tails of SDOLP due to cis-double bonds.

  6. A Course in Transport Phenomena in Multicomponent, Multiphase, Reacting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbonell, R. G.; Whitaker, S.

    1978-01-01

    This course concentrates on a rigorous development of the multicomponent transport equations, boundary conditions at phase interfaces, and volume-averaged transport equations for multiphase reacting systems. (BB)

  7. The yeast mitochondrial citrate transport protein: identification of the Lysine residues responsible for inhibition mediated by Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Remani, Sreevidya; Sun, Jiakang; Kotaria, Rusudan; Mayor, June A; Brownlee, June M; Harrison, David H T; Walters, D Eric; Kaplan, Ronald S

    2008-12-01

    The present investigation identifies the molecular basis for the well-documented inhibition of the mitochondrial inner membrane citrate transport protein (CTP) function by the lysine-selective reagent pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Kinetic analysis indicates that PLP is a linear mixed inhibitor of the Cys-less CTP, with a predominantly competitive component. We have previously concluded that the CTP contains at least two substrate binding sites which are located at increasing depths within the substrate translocation pathway and which contain key lysine residues. In the present investigation, the roles of Lys-83 in substrate binding site one, Lys-37 and Lys-239 in substrate binding site two, and four other off-pathway lysines in conferring PLP-inhibition of transport was determined by functional characterization of seven lysine to cysteine substitution mutants. We observed that replacement of Lys-83 with cysteine resulted in a 78% loss of the PLP-mediated inhibition of CTP function. In contrast, replacement of either Lys-37 or Lys-239 with cysteine caused a modest reduction in the inhibition caused by PLP (i.e., 31% and 20% loss of inhibition, respectively). Interestingly, these losses of PLP-mediated inhibition could be rescued by covalent modification of each cysteine with MTSEA, a reagent that adds a lysine-like moiety (i.e. SCH(2)CH(2)NH(3) (+)) to the cysteine sulfhydryl group. Importantly, the replacement of non-binding site lysines (i.e., Lys-45, Lys-48, Lys-134, Lys-141) with cysteine resulted in little change in the PLP inhibition. Based upon these results, we conducted docking calculations with the CTP structural model leading to the development of a physical binding model for PLP. In combination, our data support the conclusion that PLP exerts its main inhibitory effect by binding to residues located within the two substrate binding sites of the CTP, with Lys-83 being the primary determinant of the total PLP effect since the replacement of this single lysine

  8. Optimization for Reduced-Fat / Low-NaCl Meat Emulsion Systems with Sea Mustard (Undaria pinnatifida) and Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheon-Jei; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Choi, Yun-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The effects of reducing fat levels from 30% to 20% and salt concentrations from 1.5% to 1.0% by partially substituting incorporated phosphate and sea mustard were investigated based on physicochemical properties of reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion systems. Cooking loss and emulsion stability, hardness, springiness, and cohesiveness for reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion systems with 20% pork back fat and 1.2% sodium chloride samples with incorporation of phosphate and sea mustard were similar to the control with 30% pork back fat and 1.5% sodium chloride. Results showed that reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion system samples containing phosphate and sea mustard had higher apparent viscosity. The results of this study show that the incorporation of phosphate and sea mustard in the formulation will successfully reduce fat and salt in the final meat products.

  9. Optimization for Reduced-Fat / Low-NaCl Meat Emulsion Systems with Sea Mustard (Undaria pinnatifida) and Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cheon-Jei; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The effects of reducing fat levels from 30% to 20% and salt concentrations from 1.5% to 1.0% by partially substituting incorporated phosphate and sea mustard were investigated based on physicochemical properties of reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion systems. Cooking loss and emulsion stability, hardness, springiness, and cohesiveness for reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion systems with 20% pork back fat and 1.2% sodium chloride samples with incorporation of phosphate and sea mustard were similar to the control with 30% pork back fat and 1.5% sodium chloride. Results showed that reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion system samples containing phosphate and sea mustard had higher apparent viscosity. The results of this study show that the incorporation of phosphate and sea mustard in the formulation will successfully reduce fat and salt in the final meat products. PMID:26761874

  10. The Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, P.

    1996-10-01

    The present paper describes, for purposes of the Department of Energy (DoE) Hydrogen Program Review, Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) progress on the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project for the period January through June 1996. This period represents the first six months of the three year project. The estimated cost over three years is $3.9M, $1.859M of which is funded by the DoE ($600 k for fiscal year 1996). The goal of the Palm Desert Project is to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community. The project will demonstrate the practical utility of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as vehicle power plants. This transportation system will be developed in the City of Palm Desert in southern California and will include a fleet of 8 fuel cell powered vehicles, solar and wind powered hydrogen generating facilities, a consumer-ready refueling station, and a service infrastructure. The system holds the promise of a clean environment and an energy supply that is predictable, domestic, safe, and abundant. During, the first part of 1996 SERC has nearly completed building a fuel cell powered personal utility vehicle, which features an upgraded safety and computer system; they have designed and built a test bench that is able to mimic golf cart loads and test fuel cell system auxiliary components; they have begun the design of the solar hydrogen generating station; they have worked with Sandia National Laboratory on an advanced metal hydride storage system; they have increased the power density of the SERC fuel cell by as much as 50%; and they have reached out to the rest of the world with a new fact sheet, world wide web pages, a press release, video footage for a television program. and instruction within the community.

  11. Liners for ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Miller, Christopher Francis

    2010-08-10

    Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

  12. 360 degree vision system: opportunities in transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Simon

    2007-09-01

    Panoramic technologies are experiencing new and exciting opportunities in the transportation industries. The advantages of panoramic imagers are numerous: increased areas coverage with fewer cameras, imaging of multiple target simultaneously, instantaneous full horizon detection, easier integration of various applications on the same imager and others. This paper reports our work on panomorph optics and potential usage in transportation applications. The novel panomorph lens is a new type of high resolution panoramic imager perfectly suitable for the transportation industries. The panomorph lens uses optimization techniques to improve the performance of a customized optical system for specific applications. By adding a custom angle to pixel relation at the optical design stage, the optical system provides an ideal image coverage which is designed to reduce and optimize the processing. The optics can be customized for the visible, near infra-red (NIR) or infra-red (IR) wavebands. The panomorph lens is designed to optimize the cost per pixel which is particularly important in the IR. We discuss the use of the 360 vision system which can enhance on board collision avoidance systems, intelligent cruise controls and parking assistance. 360 panoramic vision systems might enable safer highways and significant reduction in casualties.

  13. Primary cultures of renal epithelial cells from X-linked hypophosphatemic (Hyp) mice express defects in phosphate transport and vitamin D metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, C L; Tenenhouse, H S; Scriver, C R

    1988-01-01

    Mutation in a gene (symbol Hyp) on the X chromosome causes hypophosphatemia in the mouse. The murine phenotype is a counterpart of X-linked hypophosphatemia in man. Both exhibit impaired renal reabsorption of phosphate in vivo. In vitro studies in the Hyp mouse have shown decreased Na+-dependent phosphate transport at the brush border membrane and abnormal mitochondrial vitamin D metabolism. To determine whether the mutant renal phenotype is intrinsic to the kidney or dependent upon putative extrinsic humoral factor(s) for its expression, we established primary cultures of renal epithelial cells from normal and Hyp male mouse kidneys. The cells are derived from proximal tubule. Initial uptake rates of phosphate and alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside (alpha-MG), a metabolically inert analogue of D-glucose, were measured simultaneously in confluent monolayers exhibiting epithelial polarity and tight junctions. The mean phosphate/alpha-MG uptake ratio in Hyp cultures was 82% of that in normal cells (P less than 0.01, n = 96). Moreover, the production of 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 was significantly elevated in confluent cultures of Hyp cells relative to normal cells. These results imply that the Hyp gene is expressed in situ in renal epithelium and suggest that humoral factors are not necessary for the mutant renal phenotype in X-linked hypophosphatemia of mouse and man. PMID:3414685

  14. Automatic braking system modification for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Transportation Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coogan, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Modifications were designed for the B-737-100 Research Aircraft autobrake system hardware of the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Program at Langley Research Center. These modifications will allow the on-board flight control computer to control the aircraft deceleration after landing to a continuously variable level for the purpose of executing automatic high speed turn-offs from the runway. A bread board version of the proposed modifications was built and tested in simulated stopping conditions. Test results, for various aircraft weights, turnoff speed, winds, and runway conditions show that the turnoff speeds are achieved generally with errors less than 1 ft/sec.

  15. Small Aircraft Transportation System Concept and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Durham, Michael H.; Tarry, Scott E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes both the vision and the early public-private collaborative research for the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS). The paper outlines an operational definition of SATS, describes how SATS conceptually differs from current air transportation capabilities, introduces four SATS operating capabilities, and explains the relation between the SATS operating capabilities and the potential for expanded air mobility. The SATS technology roadmap encompasses on-demand, widely distributed, point-to-point air mobility, through hired-pilot modes in the nearer-term, and through self-operated user modes in the farther-term. The nearer-term concept is based on aircraft and airspace technologies being developed to make the use of smaller, more widely distributed community reliever and general aviation airports and their runways more useful in more weather conditions, in commercial hired-pilot service modes. The farther-term vision is based on technical concepts that could be developed to simplify or automate many of the operational functions in the aircraft and the airspace for meeting future public transportation needs, in personally operated modes. NASA technology strategies form a roadmap between the nearer-term concept and the farther-term vision. This paper outlines a roadmap for scalable, on-demand, distributed air mobility technologies for vehicle and airspace systems. The audiences for the paper include General Aviation manufacturers, small aircraft transportation service providers, the flight training industry, airport and transportation authorities at the Federal, state and local levels, and organizations involved in planning for future National Airspace System advancements.

  16. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  17. Human Transportation System (HTS) study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes work completed under the Human Transportation System Study. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems (e.g., Shuttle, Titan, etc. ) as well as proposed systems (e.g., PLS, Single-Stage-to-Orbit, etc.) to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  18. Low energy beam transport system developments

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  19. National Launch System Space Transportation Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoodless, Ralph M., Jr.; Monk, Jan C.; Cikanek, Harry A., III

    1991-01-01

    The present liquid-oxygen/liquid-hydrogen engine is described as meeting the specific requirements of the National Launch System (NLS) Program including cost-effectiveness and robustness. An overview of the NLS and its objectives is given which indicates that the program aims to develop a flexible launch system to meet security, civil, and commercial needs. The Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) provides core and boost propulsion for the 1.5-stage vehicle and core propulsion for the solid booster vehicle. The design incorporates step-throttling, order-of-magnitude reductions in welds, and configuration targets designed to optimize robustness. The STME is designed to provide adaptable and dependable propulsion while minimizing recurring costs and is designed to meet the needs of NLS and other typical space-transportation programs currently being planned.

  20. Controlled ecological life support system: Transportation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustan, E.; Vinopal, T.

    1982-01-01

    This report discusses a study utilizing a systems analysis approach to determine which NASA missions would benefit from controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) technology. The study focuses on manned missions selected from NASA planning forecasts covering the next half century. Comparison of various life support scenarios for the selected missions and characteristics of projected transportation systems provided data for cost evaluations. This approach identified missions that derived benefits from a CELSS, showed the magnitude of the potential cost savings, and indicated which system or combination of systems would apply. This report outlines the analytical approach used in the evaluation, describes the missions and systems considered, and sets forth the benefits derived from CELSS when applicable.

  1. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.

    1987-04-28

    A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

  2. Space transportation system payload safety policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheller, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A brief description of the Space Transportation System (STS) is given, and the evolution of a payload safety policy for it is described. The policy adopted in June, 1976, minimizes STS involvement in the payload design process while maintaining the assurance of a safe operation. The payload developer is responsible for assurance of safety and verification of compliance with the requirements. The STS will exercise reviews to ensure that interaction between payloads does not create hazards.

  3. Transportable vitrification system demonstration on mixed waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.R.; Whitehouse, J.C.; Wilson, C.N.; Van Ryn, F.R.

    1998-04-22

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is a large scale, fully integrated, vitrification system for the treatment of low-level and mixed wastes in the form of sludges, soils, incinerator ash, and many other waste streams. It was demonstrated on surrogate waste at Clemson University and at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) prior to treating actual mixed waste. Treatment of a combination of dried B and C Pond sludge and CNF sludge was successfully demonstrated at ORR in 1997. The demonstration produced 7,616 kg of glass from 7,328 kg of mixed wastes with a 60% reduction in volume. Glass formulations for the wastes treated were developed using a combination of laboratory crucible studies with the actual wastes and small melter studies at Clemson with both surrogate and actual wastes. Initial characterization of the B and C Pond sludge had not shown the presence of carbon or fluoride, which required a modified glass formulation be developed to maintain proper glass redox and viscosity. The CNF sludge challenges the glass formulations due to high levels of phosphate and iron. The demonstration was delayed several times by permitting problems, a glass leak, and electrical problems. The demonstration showed that the two wastes could be successfully vitrified, although the design glass production rate was not achieved. The glass produced met the Universal Treatment Standards and the emissions from the TVS were well within the allowable permit limits.

  4. An auxin transport independent pathway is involved in phosphate stress-induced root architectural alterations in Arabidopsis. Identification of BIG as a mediator of auxin in pericycle cell activation.

    PubMed

    López-Bucio, José; Hernández-Abreu, Esmeralda; Sánchez-Calderón, Lenin; Pérez-Torres, Anahí; Rampey, Rebekah A; Bartel, Bonnie; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2005-02-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants display a number of root developmental responses to low phosphate availability, including primary root growth inhibition, greater formation of lateral roots, and increased root hair elongation. To gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms by which phosphorus (P) availability alters postembryonic root development, we performed a mutant screen to identify genetic determinants involved in the response to P deprivation. Three low phosphate-resistant root lines (lpr1-1 to lpr1-3) were isolated because of their reduced lateral root formation in low P conditions. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that all lpr1 mutants were allelic to BIG, which is required for normal auxin transport in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of lateral root primordia (LRP) development in wild-type and lpr1 mutants revealed that BIG is required for pericycle cell activation to form LRP in both high (1 mm) and low (1 microm) P conditions, but not for the low P-induced alterations in primary root growth, lateral root emergence, and root hair elongation. Exogenously supplied auxin restored normal lateral root formation in lpr1 mutants in the two P treatments. Treatment of wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings with brefeldin A, a fungal metabolite that blocks auxin transport, phenocopies the root developmental alterations observed in lpr1 mutants in both high and low P conditions, suggesting that BIG participates in vesicular targeting of auxin transporters. Taken together, our results show that auxin transport and BIG function have fundamental roles in pericycle cell activation to form LRP and promote root hair elongation. The mechanism that activates root system architectural alterations in response to P deprivation, however, seems to be independent of auxin transport and BIG.

  5. Cargo transportation by airships: A systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. J.; Dalton, C.

    1976-01-01

    A systems engineering study of a lighter than air airship transportation system was conducted. The feasibility of the use of airships in hauling cargo was demonstrated. Social, legal, environmental and political factors were considered as well as the technical factors necessary to design an effective airship transportation system. In order to accomplish an effective airship transportation program two phases of implementation were recommended. Phase I would involve a fleet of rigid airships of 3.5 million cubic feet displacement capable of carrying 25 tons of cargo internal to the helium-filled gas bag. The Phase I fleet would demonstrate the economic and technical feasibility of modern-day airships while providing a training capability for the construction and operation of larger airships. The Phase II portion would be a fleet of rigid airships of 12 million cubic feet displacement capable of carrying a cargo of 100 tons a distance of 2,000 miles at a cruising speed of 60 mph. An economic analysis is given for a variety of missions for both Phase I and Phase II airships.

  6. The Palm Desert renewable [hydrogen] transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlin, C.E.; Lehman, P.

    1998-08-01

    This paper describes the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) progress on the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project for the period June 1997 through May 1998. The project began in March 1996. The goal of the Palm Desert Project is to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community. The project demonstrates the practical utility of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell as a vehicle power system. The project includes designing and building 4 fuel cell powered vehicles, a solar hydrogen generating and refueling station, and a fuel cell vehicle diagnostic center. Over this last year, SERC has built a fuel cell powered neighborhood electric vehicle and delivered it to the City of Palm Desert. The design of the hydrogen refueling station is near completion and it is anticipated that construction will be complete in the fall of 1998. The vehicles are currently being refueled at a temporary refueling station. The diagnostic center is being designed and maintenance procedures as well as computer diagnostic programs for the fuel cell vehicles are being developed. City employees are driving the vehicles daily and monitoring data are being collected. The drivers are pleased with the performance of the vehicles.

  7. Effects of freeze-thaw cycling on metal-phosphate formation and stability in single and multi-metal systems.

    PubMed

    Hafsteinsdóttir, Erla G; White, Duanne A; Gore, Damian B

    2013-04-01

    Freeze-thaw cycling may influence the chemistry, mineral stability and reaction rate during metal orthophosphate fixation. This study assessed the formation and stability of Cu-, Pb-, and Zn-phosphates in chemically simple laboratory systems during 240 freeze-thaw cycles (120 days) from +10 to -20 °C, using X-ray diffractometry. In single heavy metal systems, chloro- and hydroxy-pyromorphite (Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)(Cl,OH)), sodalite (Na(6)Zn(6)(PO(4))(6)·8H(2)O), chiral zincophosphate (Na(12)(Zn(12)P(12)O(48))·12H(2)O), and copper phosphate hydrate (Cu(3)(PO(4))(2)·3H(2)O) were the primary phosphate minerals that formed, and were typically stable during the experiment. Zinc and Cu-phosphate formation was reduced in multi heavy metal systems, and was substantially lower in abundance than chloropyromorphite. Successful Cu-, Pb- and Zn-phosphate formation can be expected in cold and freezing environments like the polar regions. However, field implementation of orthophosphate fixation needs to consider competing ion effects, concentration of the phosphate source, and the amount of free-water.

  8. Visualizing Mobility of Public Transportation System.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Fu, Chi-Wing; Arisona, Stefan Müller; Erath, Alexander; Qu, Huamin

    2014-12-01

    Public transportation systems (PTSs) play an important role in modern cities, providing shared/massive transportation services that are essential for the general public. However, due to their increasing complexity, designing effective methods to visualize and explore PTS is highly challenging. Most existing techniques employ network visualization methods and focus on showing the network topology across stops while ignoring various mobility-related factors such as riding time, transfer time, waiting time, and round-the-clock patterns. This work aims to visualize and explore passenger mobility in a PTS with a family of analytical tasks based on inputs from transportation researchers. After exploring different design alternatives, we come up with an integrated solution with three visualization modules: isochrone map view for geographical information, isotime flow map view for effective temporal information comparison and manipulation, and OD-pair journey view for detailed visual analysis of mobility factors along routes between specific origin-destination pairs. The isotime flow map linearizes a flow map into a parallel isoline representation, maximizing the visualization of mobility information along the horizontal time axis while presenting clear and smooth pathways from origin to destinations. Moreover, we devise several interactive visual query methods for users to easily explore the dynamics of PTS mobility over space and time. Lastly, we also construct a PTS mobility model from millions of real passenger trajectories, and evaluate our visualization techniques with assorted case studies with the transportation researchers.

  9. Competitive immobilization of Pb in an aqueous ternary-metals system by soluble phosphates with varying pH.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Ren, Jie; Wang, Mei; Song, Xinlai; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Jiayu; Li, Fasheng; Guo, Guanlin

    2016-09-01

    Chemical immobilization by phosphates has been widely and successfully applied to treat Pb in wastewater and contaminated soils. Pb in wastewaters and soils, however, always coexists with other heavy metals and their competitive reactions with phosphates have not been quantitatively and systematically studied. In this approach, immobilization of Pb, Zn, and Cd by mono-, di-, and tripotassium phosphate (KH2PO4, K2HPO4, and K3PO4) was observed in the single- and ternary-metals solutions. The immobilization rates of the three metals were determined by the residual concentration. The mineral composition and structure of the precipitates were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that competitive reaction occurred in Pb-Zn-Cd ternary system, with immobilization rates decrease of <3.6%, <78%, and <89% for Pb, Zn and Cd (molar ratios of P: metal <1), respectively, compared to single metal system. The reaction of Pb with three phosphates exhibited intense competitiveness and the phosphates had a stronger affinity for Pb when Cl(-) was added. Pb-phosphate minerals formed by KH2PO4 with the better crystalline characteristics and largest size were very stable with a low dissolution rate (<0.02%) in the solution of pH 2.88, compared to K2HPO4 and K3PO4. This study demonstrated that Pb could be firstly and effectively immobilized by phosphates in multi-metal solutions containing Pb, Zn and Cd. Moreover, the research provided the insight of the importance of phosphate with low pH (e.g. KH2PO4) and the presence of Cl(-) for more efficient immobilization of Pb in the multi-metals pollution system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Next generation: In-space transportation system(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, Fredrick; Redus, Jerry; Kelley, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The development of the next generation In-Space Transportation System presents a unique challenge to the design of a propulsion system for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). Never before have the requirements for long-life, multiple mission use, space basing, high reliability, man-rating, and minimum maintenance come together with performance in one system that must protect the lives of space travelers, support the mission logistics needs, and do so at an acceptable cost. The challenge that is presented is to quantify the bounds of these requirements. The issue is one of degree. The length of acceptable life in space, the time it takes for reuse to pay off, and the degree to which space basing is practical (full, partial, or expended) are the issues that determine the reusable bounds of a design and include dependability, contingency capabilities, resilency, and minimum dependence on a maintenance node in preparation for and during a mission. Missions to planet earth, other non-NASA missions, and planetary missions will provide important but less demanding requirements for the transportation systems of the future. The mission proposed for the SEI require a family of transportation vehicles to meet the requirements for establishing a permanent human presence on the Moon and eventually on Mars. Specialized vehicles are needed to accomplish the different phases of each mission. These large scale missions require assembly in space and will provide the greatest usage of the planned integrated transportation system. The current approach to defining the In-Space Transportation System for the SEI Moon missions with later Mars mission applications is presented. Several system development options, propulsion concepts, current/proposed activities are reviewed, and key propulsion design criteria, issues, and technology challenges for the next generation In-Space Transportation System(s) are outlined.

  11. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  12. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  13. Corridor guided transport system utilizing permanent magnet levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, J.J.; Poland, A.P.; Lombardi, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    The invention relates to a corridor guided transport system including a guided goods conveyance container utilizing permanent magnet levitation. The transport system of the invention eliminates the need for the wheel and track arrangement presently required by known and utilized conventional train systems and also required by some conventional magnetic levitation transport systems and, as a result, is safer to operate and maintain than either of these known transportation systems.

  14. Heavy particle transport in sputtering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This contribution aims to discuss the theoretical background of heavy particle transport in plasma sputtering systems such as direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS), high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), or multi frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (MFCCP). Due to inherently low process pressures below one Pa only kinetic simulation models are suitable. In this work a model appropriate for the description of the transport of film forming particles sputtered of a target material has been devised within the frame of the OpenFOAM software (specifically dsmcFoam). The three dimensional model comprises of ejection of sputtered particles into the reactor chamber, their collisional transport through the volume, as well as deposition of the latter onto the surrounding surfaces (i.e. substrates, walls). An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution fitted to results from Monte-Carlo simulations is assumed initially. Binary collisions are treated via the M1 collision model, a modified variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The dynamics of sputtered and background gas species can be resolved self-consistently following the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) approach or, whenever possible, simplified based on the test particle method (TPM) with the assumption of a constant, non-stationary background at a given temperature. At the example of an MFCCP research reactor the transport of sputtered aluminum is specifically discussed. For the peculiar configuration and under typical process conditions with argon as process gas the transport of aluminum sputtered of a circular target is shown to be governed by a one dimensional interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. The results are analyzed and discussed on the basis of the obtained velocity distribution functions (VDF). This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  15. Hyperspectral range imaging for transportation systems evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgelall, Raj; Rafert, J. B.; Atwood, Don; Tolliver, Denver D.

    2016-04-01

    Transportation agencies expend significant resources to inspect critical infrastructure such as roadways, railways, and pipelines. Regular inspections identify important defects and generate data to forecast maintenance needs. However, cost and practical limitations prevent the scaling of current inspection methods beyond relatively small portions of the network. Consequently, existing approaches fail to discover many high-risk defect formations. Remote sensing techniques offer the potential for more rapid and extensive non-destructive evaluations of the multimodal transportation infrastructure. However, optical occlusions and limitations in the spatial resolution of typical airborne and space-borne platforms limit their applicability. This research proposes hyperspectral image classification to isolate transportation infrastructure targets for high-resolution photogrammetric analysis. A plenoptic swarm of unmanned aircraft systems will capture images with centimeter-scale spatial resolution, large swaths, and polarization diversity. The light field solution will incorporate structure-from-motion techniques to reconstruct three-dimensional details of the isolated targets from sequences of two-dimensional images. A comparative analysis of existing low-power wireless communications standards suggests an application dependent tradeoff in selecting the best-suited link to coordinate swarming operations. This study further produced a taxonomy of specific roadway and railway defects, distress symptoms, and other anomalies that the proposed plenoptic swarm sensing system would identify and characterize to estimate risk levels.

  16. An overview of European space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    With the completion of the launch rocket series Ariane 1 to 4, Europe will have reached the same capacity to transport commercial payloads as the USA has with the Space Shuttle and the kick stages which are presently operative. The near term development of these capacities would require Europe to develop a larger launch rocket, Araine 5. Further motivations for this rocket are access to manned spaceflight, the development of an European space station, and the demand for shuttle technology. Shuttle technology is the subject of research being done in France on the winged re-entry vehicle Hermes. Operation of the European space station Columbus will require development of an interorbital transport system to facilitate traffic between the various segments of the space station. All European space transportation systems will have to match their quality to that of the other countries involve in space flight. All areas of development are marked not only by possible cooperation but also by increased competition because of increasing commercialization of space flight.

  17. National Space Transportation System (NSTS) technology needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterhalter, David L.; Ulrich, Kimberly K.

    1990-01-01

    The National Space Transportation System (NSTS) is one of the Nation's most valuable resources, providing manned transportation to and from space in support of payloads and scientific research. The NSTS program is currently faced with the problem of hardware obsolescence, which could result in unacceptable schedule and cost impacts to the flight program. Obsolescence problems occur because certain components are no longer being manufactured or repair turnaround time is excessive. In order to achieve a long-term, reliable transportation system that can support manned access to space through 2010 and beyond, NASA must develop a strategic plan for a phased implementation of enhancements which will satisfy this long-term goal. The NSTS program has initiated the Assured Shuttle Availability (ASA) project with the following objectives: eliminate hardware obsolescence in critical areas, increase reliability and safety of the vehicle, decrease operational costs and turnaround time, and improve operational capability. The strategy for ASA will be to first meet the mandatory needs - keep the Shuttle flying. Non-mandatory changes that will improve operational capability and enhance performance will then be considered if funding is adequate. Upgrade packages should be developed to install within designated inspection periods, grouped in a systematic approach to reduce cost and schedule impacts, and allow the capability to provide a Block 2 Shuttle (Phase 3).

  18. High phosphate serum levels correlate with the severity of experimental severe acute pancreatitis: insight into the purinergic system.

    PubMed

    Mazzini, Guilherme S; Jost, Daniel T; Ramos, Denise B; Oses, Jean P; Zeni, Mateus A; Machoseki, Rafael; Kist, Luiza W; Bogo, Mauricio R; Bonan, Carla D; Edelweiss, Maria I; Duarte, Marta M; Portela, Luis V; Souza, Diogo O; Osvaldt, Alessandro B

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular purines are a component of the systemic inflammatory response, and their levels are modulated by ectonucleotidases. In addition, nucleotide hydrolysis releases phosphate. We studied serum phosphate levels as a predictor of severity in acute pancreatitis (AP) and their correlation with extracellular purinergic metabolism. Acute pancreatitis was induced by the retrograde injection of sodium taurocholate. The AP group was compared with animals submitted to a model of sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture. The sham group was submitted to laparotomy and closure. We measured the phosphate and purine levels in serum and the expression of 5'-nucleotidase (CD73) and the adenosine A2a receptor in pancreatic tissue by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Serum phosphate levels were higher in severe AP and correlated with severity. Severe AP led to increased serum levels of adenosine diphosphate, adenosine monophosphate, and adenosine. In addition, adenosine monophosphate conversion to adenosine in serum was accelerated in the AP groups. We found a positive correlation between serum adenosine and phosphate in the AP groups. The expression levels of CD73 and the adenosine A2a receptor in the pancreas were not altered. Our study suggests that serum phosphate correlates with severity in AP and implicates extracellular purines in the systemic response to severe AP.

  19. Technological Support for Logistics Transportation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujak, Andrzej; Śliwa, Zdzisław; Gębczyńska, Alicja

    The modern world is changing introducing robots, remotely controlled vehicles and other crewless means of transportation to reduce people's mistakes, as the main cause of incidents and crashes during traffic. New technologies are supporting operators and drivers, and according to some studies they can even replace them. Such programs as: AHS, UAH, IVBSS or MTVR are under development to improve traffic flow and its safety, to reduce traffic hazards and crashes. It is necessary to analyze such concepts and implement them boldly, including Polish logistics' companies, new programs, highways' system etc., as they will be applied in the future, so it is necessary to prepare logistics infrastructure ahead of time in order to capitalize on these improvements. The problem is quite urgent as transportation in the country must not be outdated to meet clients' expectations and to keep pace with competing foreign companies.

  20. Reactive Chemical Transport Under Multiphase System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y.; Yeh, G.

    2001-12-01

    A numerical model, HYDROBIOGEOCHEM, is developed for modeling reactive chemical transport under multiphase flow systems. The chemistry part of this model is derived from BIOGEOCHEM, which is a general computer code that simulates biogeochemial processes from a reaction-based mechanistic point of view. To reduce primary dependent variables (PDVs), Gauss-Jordan decomposition is applied to the governing matrix equations for transport, resulting in mobile components and mobile kinetic variables as PDVs. Options of sequential iteration approach (SIA), predictor corrector and operator splitting method are incorporated in the code to make it versatile. The model is a practical tool for assessing migration of subsurface contamination and proper designing of remediation technologies. Examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of the new model.

  1. Acid resistant zirconium phosphate for the long term application of (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Young; Vyas, Chirag K; Kim, Bo-Ram; Kim, Hee Jung; Hur, Min Goo; Yang, Seung Dae; Park, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Sang Wook

    2016-12-01

    The (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator system is an excellent source for producing ready-to-use Ga-68 in clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) applications. The column adsorbent is the key component for the (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator system. Therefore, several studies have been conducted to identify column materials with a stable and superior elution yield in an acidic eluent (0.1 N HCl solution). In this study, four different zirconium phosphates were synthesized with a particle size of 200-800nm, pore-size of 55∼190Å and surface area of 0.72-268m(2)g(-1). Synthesized and studied amorphous zirconium phosphate (ZrP-1) exhibited excellent acid resistant properties for the 0.1 N HCl eluent and a large surface area of 268m(2)g(-1). Amorphous ZrP-1 showed a good Ga-68 elution yield of 74% in 0.1 N HCl eluent accompanying extraordinary low breakthrough of Ge-68 (0.007%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved sugar cane juice clarification by understanding calcium oxide-phosphate-sucrose systems.

    PubMed

    Doherty, William O S

    2011-03-09

    It is accepted that the efficiency of sugar cane clarification is closely linked with sugar juice composition (including suspended or insoluble impurities), the inorganic phosphate content, the liming condition and type, and the interactions between the juice components. These interactions are not well understood, particularly those between calcium, phosphate, and sucrose in sugar cane juice. Studies have been conducted on calcium oxide (CaO)/phosphate/sucrose systems in both synthetic and factory juices to provide further information on the defecation process (i.e., simple liming to effect impurity removal) and to identify an effective clarification process that would result in reduced scaling of sugar factory evaporators, pans, and centrifugals. Results have shown that a two-stage process involving the addition of lime saccharate to a set juice pH followed by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a final juice pH or a similar two-stage process where the order of addition of the alkalis is reversed prior to clarification reduces the impurity loading of the clarified juice compared to that of the clarified juice obtained by the conventional defecation process. The treatment process showed reductions in CaO (27% to 50%) and MgO (up to 20%) in clarified juices with no apparent loss in juice clarity or increase in residence time of the mud particles compared to those in the conventional process. There was also a reduction in the SiO2 content. However, the disadvantage of this process is the significant increase in the Na2O content.

  3. Progress in photonic transport network systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ken-Ichi

    2002-07-01

    The network paradigm is changing rapidly spurred by the dramatic increase in IP traffic and recent progress in photonic network technologies. A key requirement, enhancing the performance of existing IP-based multimedia communication networks, can be most effectively achieved by introducing optical path technologies that exploit wavelength routing. Cost effective and reliable optical cross-connection is essential. Different optical switch technologies have been proposed and tested. Among them, the PLC (Planer Lightwave Circuit) switch has demonstrated excellent performance, particularly with regard to system reliability. Network control mechanisms based on the overlay and peer model models have been developed. The presentation will highlight some of the key system technologies. To develop very large scale and robust networks, effective traffic engineering capabilities are necessary. This will be achieved through optical path control. To develop future IP-centric networks, an operation mechanism based on distributed control is important. The degree to which the necessary transport and IP routing functions are integrated will determine system cost-effectiveness. The Photonic MPLS (Multi Protocol Label Switching) router, which integrates all the functions and provides seamless operation between IP and optical layers, has been proposed and developed. The technical feasibility of a recent prototype system has been proven. Finally, some of the cutting-edge photonic transport technologies that we have recently developed are demonstrated; these technologies will enable us to achieve another level of network performance enhancement in the future.

  4. Design of Large Momentum Acceptance Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D.R. Douglas

    2005-05-01

    The use of energy recovery to enable high power linac operation often gives rise to an attendant challenge--the transport of high power beams subtending large phase space volumes. In particular applications--such as FEL driver accelerators--this manifests itself as a requirement for beam transport systems with large momentum acceptance. We will discuss the design, implementation, and operation of such systems. Though at times counterintuitive in behavior (perturbative descriptions may, for example, be misleading), large acceptance systems have been successfully utilized for generations as spectrometers and accelerator recirculators [1]. Such systems are in fact often readily designed using appropriate geometric descriptions of beam behavior; insight provided using such a perspective may in addition reveal inherent symmetries that simplify construction and improve operability. Our discussion will focus on two examples: the Bates-clone recirculator used in the Jefferson Lab 10 kW IR U pgrade FEL (which has an observed acceptance of 10% or more) and a compaction-managed mirror-bend achromat concept with an acceptance ranging from 50 to 150 MeV.

  5. Functional analysis of the novel mycorrhiza-specific phosphate transporter AsPT1 and PHT1 family from Astragalus sinicus during the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xianan; Huang, Wu; Liu, Fengchuan; Tang, Nianwu; Liu, Yi; Lin, Hui; Zhao, Bin

    2013-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas contribute significantly to inorganic phosphate (Pi) uptake in plants. Gene networks involved in the regulation and function of the Pht1 family transporters in legume species during AM symbiosis are not fully understood. In order to characterize the six distinct members of Pht1 transporters in mycorrhizal Astragalus sinicus, we combined cellular localization, heterologous functional expression in yeast with expression/subcellular localization studies and reverse genetics approaches in planta. Pht1;1 and Pht1;4 silenced lines were generated to uncover the role of the newly discovered dependence of the AM symbiosis on another phosphate transporter AsPT1 besides AsPT4. These Pht1 transporters are triggered in Pi-starved mycorrhizal roots. AsPT1 and AsPT4 were localized in arbuscule-containing cells of the cortex. The analysis of promoter sequences revealed conserved motifs in both AsPT1 and AsPT4. AsPT1 overexpression showed higher mycorrhization levels than controls for parameters analysed, including abundance of arbuscules. By contrast, knockdown of AsPT1 by RNA interference led to degenerating or dead arbuscule phenotypes identical to that of AsPT4 silencing lines. AsPT4 but not AsPT1 is required for symbiotic Pi uptake. These results suggest that both, AsPT1 and AsPT4, are required for the AM symbiosis, most importantly, AsPT1 may serve as a novel symbiotic transporter for AM development. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Energy transport in closed quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Levin, G A; Jones, W A; Walczak, K; Yerkes, K L

    2012-03-01

    We examine energy transport in an ensemble of closed quantum systems driven by stochastic perturbations. One can show that the probability and energy fluxes can be described in terms of quantum advection modes (QAMs) associated with the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix. These QAMs play the role of Landauer channels in a system with discrete energy spectrum and the eigenfunctions that cannot be described as plane waves. In order to determine the type of correlations that exist between the direction and magnitudes of each QAM and the average direction of energy and probability fluxes we have numerically solved the time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing a single particle trapped in a parabolic potential well which is perturbed by stochastic ripples. The ripples serve as a localized energy source and are offset to one side of the potential well. As the result a nonzero net energy flux flows from one part of the potential well to another across the symmetry center of the potential. We find that some modes exhibit positive correlation with the direction of the energy flow. Other modes, that carry a smaller energy per unit of the probability flux, anticorrelate with the energy flow and thus provide a backflow of the probability. The overall picture of energy transport that emerges from our results is very different from the conventional one based on a system with continuous energy spectrum.

  7. Energy transport in closed quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, G. A.; Jones, W. A.; Walczak, K.; Yerkes, K. L.

    2012-03-01

    We examine energy transport in an ensemble of closed quantum systems driven by stochastic perturbations. One can show that the probability and energy fluxes can be described in terms of quantum advection modes (QAMs) associated with the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix. These QAMs play the role of Landauer channels in a system with discrete energy spectrum and the eigenfunctions that cannot be described as plane waves. In order to determine the type of correlations that exist between the direction and magnitudes of each QAM and the average direction of energy and probability fluxes we have numerically solved the time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing a single particle trapped in a parabolic potential well which is perturbed by stochastic ripples. The ripples serve as a localized energy source and are offset to one side of the potential well. As the result a nonzero net energy flux flows from one part of the potential well to another across the symmetry center of the potential. We find that some modes exhibit positive correlation with the direction of the energy flow. Other modes, that carry a smaller energy per unit of the probability flux, anticorrelate with the energy flow and thus provide a backflow of the probability. The overall picture of energy transport that emerges from our results is very different from the conventional one based on a system with continuous energy spectrum.

  8. A space transportation system operations model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W. Douglas; White, Nancy H.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a description of a computer program which permits assessment of the operational support requirements of space transportation systems functioning in both a ground- and space-based environment. The scenario depicted provides for the delivery of payloads from Earth to a space station and beyond using upper stages based at the station. Model results are scenario dependent and rely on the input definitions of delivery requirements, task times, and available resources. Output is in terms of flight rate capabilities, resource requirements, and facility utilization. A general program description, program listing, input requirements, and sample output are included.

  9. Fireworthiness of transport aircraft interior systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of certain aspects of the evaluation of the fireworthiness of transport aircraft interiors. First, it addresses the key materials question concerning the effect of interior systems on the survival of passengers and crew in the case of an uncontrolled fire. Second, it examines some technical opportunities that are available today through the modification of aircraft interior subsystem components, modifications that may reasonably by expected to provide improvements in aircraft fire safety. Cost and risk benefits still remain to be determined.

  10. Operating systems in the air transportation environment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, G. W.

    1971-01-01

    Consideration of the problems facing air transport at present, and to be expected in the future. In the Northeast Corridor these problems involve community acceptance, airway and airport congestion and delays, passenger acceptance, noise reduction, and improvements in low-density short-haul economics. In the development of a superior short-haul operating system, terminal-configured vs cruise-configured vehicles are evaluated. CTOL, STOL, and VTOL aircraft of various types are discussed. In the field of noise abatement, it is shown that flight procedural techniques are capable of supplementing ?quiet engine' technology.

  11. Conceptual design of a Mars transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and several major aerospace corporations the University of Minnesota has developed a scenario to place humans on Mars by the year 2016. The project took the form of a year-long design course in the senior design curricula at the University's Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics Department. Students worked with the instructor, teaching assistants and engineers in industry to develop a vehicle and the associated mission profile to fulfill the requirements of the Mars Transportation System. This report is a summary of the final design and the process though which the final product was developed.

  12. Mars integrated transportation system multistage Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In accordance with the objective of the Mars Integrated Transport System (MITS) program, the Multistage Mars Mission (MSMM) design team developed a profile for a manned mission to Mars. The purpose of the multistage mission is to send a crew of five astronauts to the martian surface by the year 2019. The mission continues man's eternal quest for exploration of new frontiers. This mission has a scheduled duration of 426 days that includes experimentation en route as well as surface exploration and experimentation. The MSMM is also designed as a foundation for a continuing program leading to the colonization of the planet Mars.

  13. Space transportation system biomedical operations support study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    The shift of the Space Transportation System (STS) flight tests of the orbiter vehicle to the preparation and flight of the payloads is discussed. Part of this change is the transition of the medical and life sciences aspects of the STS flight operations to reflect the new state. The medical operations, the life sciences flight experiments support requirements and the intramural research program expected to be at KSC during the operational flight period of the STS and a future space station are analyzed. The adequacy of available facilities, plans, and resources against these future needs are compared; revisions and/or alternatives where appropriate are proposed.

  14. National Space Transportation Systems Program mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. A., Jr.; Aldrich, A. D.; Lunney, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The STS 41-C National Space Transportation Systems Program Mission Report contains a summary of the major activities and accomplishments of the eleventh Shuttle flight and fifth flight of the OV-099 vehicle, Challenger. Also summarized are the significant problems that occurred during STS 41-C, and a problem tracking list that is a complete list of all problems that occurred during the flight. The major objectives of flight STS 41-C were to successfully deploy the LDEF (long duration exposure facility) and retrieve, repair and redeploy the SMM (Solar Maximum Mission) spacecraft, and perform functions of IMAX and Cinema 360 cameras.

  15. Third-order TRANSPORT: A computer program for designing charged particle beam transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.; Brown, K.L.; Rothacker, F.

    1995-05-01

    TRANSPORT has been in existence in various evolutionary versions since 1963. The present version of TRANSPORT is a first-, second-, and third-order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of static-magnetic beam transport systems. This report discusses the following topics on TRANSPORT: Mathematical formulation of TRANSPORT; input format for TRANSPORT; summaries of TRANSPORT elements; preliminary specifications; description of the beam; physical elements; other transformations; assembling beam lines; operations; variation of parameters for fitting; and available constraints -- the FIT command.

  16. Calcium phosphate ceramic systems in growth factor and drug delivery for bone tissue engineering: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman

    2012-01-01

    Calcium phosphates (CaPs) are the most widely used bone substitutes in bone tissue engineering due to their compositional similarities to bone mineral and excellent biocompatibility. In recent years, CaPs, especially hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate, have attracted significant interest in simultaneous use as bone substitute and drug delivery vehicle, adding a new dimension to their application. CaPs are more biocompatible than many other ceramic and inorganic nanoparticles. Their biocompatibility and variable stoichiometry, thus surface charge density, functionality, and dissolution properties, make them suitable for both drug and growth factor delivery. CaP matrices and scaffolds have been reported to act as delivery vehicles for growth factors and drugs in bone tissue engineering. Local drug delivery in musculoskeletal disorder treatments can address some of the critical issues more effectively and efficiently than the systemic delivery. CaPs are used as coatings on metallic implants, CaP cements, and custom designed scaffolds to treat musculoskeletal disorders. This review highlights some of the current drug and growth factor delivery approaches and critical issues using CaP particles, coatings, cements, and scaffolds towards orthopedic and dental applications. PMID:22127225

  17. Calcium phosphate ceramic systems in growth factor and drug delivery for bone tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman

    2012-04-01

    Calcium phosphates (CaPs) are the most widely used bone substitutes in bone tissue engineering due to their compositional similarities to bone mineral and excellent biocompatibility. In recent years, CaPs, especially hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate, have attracted significant interest in simultaneous use as bone substitute and drug delivery vehicle, adding a new dimension to their application. CaPs are more biocompatible than many other ceramic and inorganic nanoparticles. Their biocompatibility and variable stoichiometry, thus surface charge density, functionality, and dissolution properties, make them suitable for both drug and growth factor delivery. CaP matrices and scaffolds have been reported to act as delivery vehicles for growth factors and drugs in bone tissue engineering. Local drug delivery in musculoskeletal disorder treatments can address some of the critical issues more effectively and efficiently than the systemic delivery. CaPs are used as coatings on metallic implants, CaP cements, and custom designed scaffolds to treat musculoskeletal disorders. This review highlights some of the current drug and growth factor delivery approaches and critical issues using CaP particles, coatings, cements, and scaffolds towards orthopedic and dental applications. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sulphate incorporation and glass formation in phosphate systems for nuclear and toxic waste immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, P.A. Hand, R.J.

    2008-07-01

    Glass formation and the capacity for sulphur incorporation have been investigated within the systems P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-R{sub y}O (R = Li, Na, K, Mg, Ca, Ba, Pb). Linear relationships have been identified linking log [SO{sub 3}] with the oxide ion activity, which can be represented to varying degrees by normalized cation field strength index {sigma}(z/a{sup 2}), theoretical optical basicity {lambda}{sub th}, oxygen to phosphorus molar ratio [O]/[P], or P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content. When prepared under oxidizing conditions only basic, highly depolymerized phosphate glasses for which {sigma}(z/a{sup 2}) < {approx}1.2; {lambda}{sub th} > {approx}0.5; [O]/[P] > {approx}3.8; or P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content <{approx}40 mol% can incorporate levels of sulphur that could be considered useful from a waste immobilization perspective. Data for several phosphate and borosilicate glasses suggest that the {sigma}(z/a{sup 2}) scale provides the best residual fitting error and that if glasses are considered within their familial limits, this can provide a useful methodology for predicting sulphur capacity.

  19. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken by mouth or used as enemas. Indigestion. Aluminum phosphate and calcium phosphate are FDA-permitted ingredients ... Phosphate salts containing sodium, potassium, aluminum, or calcium are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term, when sodium phosphate is inserted into the ...

  20. In vitro degradation and cytocompatibility of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using the monocalcium phosphate monohydrate/hydroxyapatite system reveals rapid conversion to HA as a key mechanism.

    PubMed

    Alge, Daniel L; Goebel, W Scott; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2012-04-01

    We previously showed that dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) cements can be prepared using monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and hydroxyapatite (HA). In this study, we have characterized the degradation properties and biocompatibility of these novel cements. To study the degradation properties, cements were prepared using MCPM:HA molar ratios of 4:1, 2:1, 2:3, and 2:5. Degradation was evaluated in vitro by static soaking in PBS, and changes in pH, mass, compressive strength, and composition were monitored. Conversion of DCPD to HA was noted in the 4:1 group, which initially consisted of pure DCPD. However, the 2:1 group, which initially consisted of DCPD and an intermediate amount of unreacted HA, underwent rapid conversion to HA associated with significantly greater pH drop and mass loss as well as a complete loss of mechanical integrity. On the basis of these results, we directly compared the cytocompatibility of 2:1 MCPM:HA cements to DCPD cements prepared with an equivalent percent molar excess of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) using an in vitro cell viability assay. Viability of cells co-cultured with 2:1 MCPM:HA cements was significantly reduced after just 48 h, while viability of cells cultured with the β-TCP-based cements was no different from control cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that conversion to HA plays an important role in the degradation of DCPD cements prepared with the MCPM/HA system, affecting both physical properties and cytocompatibility. These results could have important clinical implications for MCPM/HA cements.

  1. Sulfate transport mechanisms in epithelial systems.

    PubMed

    Gerencser, G A; Ahearn, G A; Zhang, J; Cattey, M A

    2001-04-01

    A novel invertebrate gastrointestinal transport mechanism has been shown to couple chloride-sulfate exchange in an electrogenic fashion. In the lobster, Homarus americanus, the hepatopancreas, or digestive gland, exists as an outpocketing of the digestive tract, representing a single cell layer separating the gut lumen and an open circulatory system composed of hemolymph. Investigations utilizing independently prepared brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles revealed discrete antiport systems which possess the capacity to bring about a transcellular secretion of sulfate. The luminal antiport system functions as a high-affinity, one-to-one chloride-sulfate exchanger that is stimulated by an increase in luminal hydrogen ion concentration. Such a system would take advantage of the high chloride concentration of ingested seawater as well as the high proton concentrations generated during digestion, which further suggests a potential regulation by resident sodium-proton exchangers. Exchange of one chloride for one divalent sulfate ion provides the driving force for electrogenic vectorial translocation. The basolateral antiport system was found to be electroneutral in nature, responsive to gradients of the dicarboxylic anion oxalate while lacking in proton stimulation. No evidence of sodium-sulfate co-transport, commonly reported for the brush border of vertebrate renal and intestinal epithelia, was observed in either membrane preparation. The two antiporters together can account for the low hemolymph to seawater sulfate levels previously described in decapod crustaceans. A secretory pathway for sulfate based upon electrogenic chloride-antiport may appear among invertebrates partly in response to digestion taking place in a seawater environment. J. Exp. Zool. 289:245-253, 2001. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-12-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, wastes were sometimes stored underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas. Remediation of these sites requires extensive sampling to determine the extent of the contamination, to monitor clean-up and remediation progress, and for post-closure monitoring of facilities. The DOE would benefit greatly if it had reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site the full range of analyses required. Such systems would accelerate and thereby reduce the cost of clean-up and remediation efforts by (1) providing critical analytical data more rapidly, and (2) eliminating the handling, shipping and manpower associated with sample shipments. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  3. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.; Malhotra, J.L.; Herman, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, wastes were sometimes disposed of underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas. Remediation of these sites requires extensive sampling to determine the extent of the contamination, to monitor clean-up and remediation progress, and for post-closure monitoring of facilities. The DOE would benefit greatly if it had reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site a full range of analyses meeting high levels of quality assurance and control. Such systems would accelerate and thereby reduce the cost of clean-up and remediation efforts by (1) providing critical analytical data more rapidly, and (2) eliminating the handling, shipping and manpower associated with sample shipments. The goals of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project are the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system is designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  4. A study of characteristics of intercity transportation systems. Phase 1: Definition of transportation comparison methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, J. M.; Smith, J. L.; Lifson, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine a unified methodological framework for the comparison of intercity passenger and freight transportation systems; (2) to review the attributes of existing and future transportation systems for the purpose of establishing measures of comparison. These objectives were made more specific to include: (1) development of a methodology for comparing long term transportation trends arising from implementation of various R&D programs; (2) definition of value functions and attribute weightings needed for further transportation goals.

  5. Thermal analysis of sludge transport system for Argon backfill and extended transport window

    SciTech Connect

    ROMANO, T.

    2003-10-02

    This calculation, which addresses the use of argon as the backfill gas and extended periods of transfer, provides the thermal and gas generation analyses for the Sludge Transportation System (STS) under Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) for onsite transportation of the STS between the K Basins and the interim storage location (Le., T Plant). The STS is comprised of a packaging and transportation system for the removal of radioactive sludge from the K Basins.

  6. Recent advances in renal phosphate handling.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Emily G; White, Kenneth E

    2010-04-01

    Phosphate is critical for the maintenance of skeletal integrity, is a necessary component of important biomolecules, and is central to signal transduction and cell metabolism. It is becoming clear that endocrine communication between the skeleton, kidney, and the intestine is involved in maintaining appropriate serum phosphate concentrations, and that the kidney is the primary site for minute-to-minute regulation of phosphate levels. The identification of genetic alterations in Mendelian disorders of hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia has led to the isolation of novel genes and the identification of new roles for existing proteins--such as fibroblast growth factor 23 and its processing systems, the co-receptor alpha-klotho, and phosphate transporters--in the control of renal phosphate handling. Recent findings also indicate that fibroblast growth factor 23 has feedback mechanisms involving parathyroid hormone and vitamin D that control phosphate homeostasis. This Review will highlight genetic, in vitro and in vivo findings, and will discuss how these clinical and experimental discoveries have uncovered novel aspects of renal phosphate handling and opened new research and therapeutic avenues.

  7. Innovative technology summary report: Transportable vitrification system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    At the end of the cold war, many of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) major nuclear weapons facilities refocused their efforts on finding technically sound, economic, regulatory compliant, and stakeholder acceptable treatment solutions for the legacy of mixed wastes they had produced. In particular, an advanced stabilization process that could effectively treat the large volumes of settling pond and treatment sludges was needed. Based on this need, DOE and its contractors initiated in 1993 the EM-50 sponsored development effort required to produce a deployable mixed waste vitrification system. As a consequence, the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) effort was undertaken with the primary requirement to develop and demonstrate the technology and associated facility to effectively vitrify, for compliant disposal, the applicable mixed waste sludges and solids across the various DOE complex sites. After 4 years of development testing with both crucible and pilot-scale melters, the TVS facility was constructed by Envitco, evaluated and demonstrated with surrogates, and then successfully transported to the ORNL ETTP site and demonstrated with actual mixed wastes in the fall of 1997. This paper describes the technology, its performance, the technology applicability and alternatives, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  8. Risk management model in road transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhapov, R. L.; Nikolaeva, R. V.; Gatiyatullin, M. H.; Makhmutov, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents the results of a study of road safety indicators that influence the development and operation of the transport system. Road safety is considered as a continuous process of risk management. Authors constructed a model that relates the social risks of a major road safety indicator - the level of motorization. The model gives a fairly accurate assessment of the level of social risk for any given level of motorization. Authors calculated the dependence of the level of socio-economic costs of accidents and injured people in them. The applicability of the concept of socio-economic damage is caused by the presence of a linear relationship between the natural and economic indicators damage from accidents. The optimization of social risk is reduced to finding the extremum of the objective function that characterizes the economic effect of the implementation of measures to improve safety. The calculations make it possible to maximize the net present value, depending on the costs of improving road safety, taking into account socio-economic damage caused by accidents. The proposed econometric models make it possible to quantify the efficiency of the transportation system, allow to simulate the change in road safety indicators.

  9. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-04-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, wastes were sometimes stored underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas. The DOE would benefit greatly if it had reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site the full range of analyses required. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soils, ground water and surface waters. This document describes the requirements for such a laboratory.

  10. Lysine post-translational modification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase regulates hepatic and systemic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bond, Simon T; Howlett, Kirsten F; Kowalski, Greg M; Mason, Shaun; Connor, Timothy; Cooper, Adrian; Streltsov, Victor; Bruce, Clinton R; Walder, Ken R; McGee, Sean L

    2017-03-03

    Reciprocal regulation of hepatic glycolysis and gluconeogenesis contributes to systemic metabolic homeostasis. Recent evidence from lower order organisms has found that reversible post-translational modification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), particularly acetylation, contributes to the reciprocal regulation of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis. However, whether this occurs in mammalian hepatocytes in vitro or in vivo is unknown. Several proteomics studies have identified 4 lysine residues in critical regions of mammalian GAPDH that are altered by multiple post-translational modifications. In FAO hepatoma cells, mutation of all 4 lysine residues (4K-R GAPDH) to mimic their unmodified state reduced GAPDH glycolytic activity and glycolytic flux and increased gluconeogenic GAPDH activity and glucose production. Hepatic expression of 4K-R GAPDH in mice increased GAPDH gluconeogenic activity and the contribution of gluconeogenesis to endogenous glucose production in the unfed state. Consistent with the increased reliance on the energy-consuming gluconeogenic pathway, plasma free fatty acids and ketones were elevated in mice expressing 4K-R GAPDH, suggesting enhanced lipolysis and hepatic fatty acid oxidation. In normal mice, food withholding and refeeding, as well as hormonal regulators of reciprocal glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, such as insulin, glucagon, and norepinephrine, had no effect on global GAPDH acetylation. However, GAPDH acetylation was reduced in obese and type 2 diabetic db/db mice. These findings show that post-translational modification of GAPDH lysine residues regulates hepatic and systemic metabolism, revealing an unappreciated role for hepatic GAPDH in substrate selection and utilization.-Bond, S. T., Howlett, K. F., Kowalski, G. M., Mason, S., Connor, T., Cooper, A., Streltsov, V., Bruce, C. R., Walder, K. R., McGee, S. L. Lysine post-translational modification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase regulates hepatic and systemic

  11. Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate-binding protein AtPH1 controls the localization of the metal transporter NRAMP1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Agorio, Astrid; Giraudat, Jérôme; Bianchi, Michele Wolfe; Marion, Jessica; Espagne, Christelle; Castaings, Loren; Lelièvre, Françoise; Curie, Catherine; Thomine, Sébastien; Merlot, Sylvain

    2017-04-03

    "Too much of a good thing" perfectly describes the dilemma that living organisms face with metals. The tight control of metal homeostasis in cells depends on the trafficking of metal transporters between membranes of different compartments. However, the mechanisms regulating the location of transport proteins are still largely unknown. Developing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings require the natural resistance-associated macrophage proteins (NRAMP3 and NRAMP4) transporters to remobilize iron from seed vacuolar stores and thereby acquire photosynthetic competence. Here, we report that mutations in the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-containing protein AtPH1 rescue the iron-deficient phenotype of nramp3nramp4 Our results indicate that AtPH1 binds phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) in vivo and acts in the late endosome compartment. We further show that loss of AtPH1 function leads to the mislocalization of the metal uptake transporter NRAMP1 to the vacuole, providing a rationale for the reversion of nramp3nramp4 phenotypes. This work identifies a PH domain protein as a regulator of plant metal transporter localization, providing evidence that PH domain proteins may be effectors of PI3P for protein sorting.

  12. The Two-Component Regulatory System senX3-regX3 Regulates Phosphate-Dependent Gene Expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis▿

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Robert T.; Kriakov, Jordan; Garforth, Scott J.; Baughn, Anthony D.; Jacobs, William R.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphate import is required for the growth of mycobacteria and is regulated by environmental inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations, although the mechanism of this regulation has not been characterized. The expression of genes involved in Pi acquisition is frequently regulated by two-component regulatory systems (2CRs) consisting of a sensor histidine kinase and a DNA-binding response regulator. In this work, we have identified the senX3-regX3 2CR as a Pi-dependent regulator of genes involved in phosphate acquisition in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Characterization of senX3 mutants with different PhoA phenotypes suggests a dual role for SenX3 as a phosphatase or a phosphodonor for the response regulator RegX3, depending upon Pi availability. Expression of PhoA activity required phosphorylation of RegX3, consistent with a role for phosphorylated RegX3 (RegX3∼P) as a transcriptional activator of phoA. Furthermore, purified RegX3∼P bound to promoter sequences from phoA, senX3, and the high-affinity phosphate transporter component pstS, demonstrating direct transcriptional control of all three genes. DNase I footprinting and primer extension analyses have further defined the DNA-binding region and transcriptional start site within the phoA promoter. A DNA motif consisting of an inverted repeat was identified in each of the promoters bound by RegX3∼P. Based upon our findings, we propose a model for Pi-regulated gene expression mediated by SenX3-RegX3 in mycobacteria. PMID:17526710

  13. Sensor system for fuel transport vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; West, David L.

    2016-03-22

    An exemplary sensor system for a fuel transport vehicle can comprise a fuel marker sensor positioned between a fuel storage chamber of the vehicle and an access valve for the fuel storage chamber of the vehicle. The fuel marker sensor can be configured to measure one or more characteristics of one or more fuel markers present in the fuel adjacent the sensor, such as when the marked fuel is unloaded at a retail station. The one or more characteristics can comprise concentration and/or identity of the one or more fuel markers in the fuel. Based on the measured characteristics of the one or more fuel markers, the sensor system can identify the fuel and/or can determine whether the fuel has been adulterated after the marked fuel was last measured, such as when the marked fuel was loaded into the vehicle.

  14. A study of characteristics of intercity transportation systems. Phase 1: Definition of transportation comparison methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, J. M.; Smith, J. L.; Lifson, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    Decision making in early transportation planning must be responsive to complex value systems representing various policies and objectives. The assessment of alternative transportation concepts during the early initial phases of the system life cycle, when supportive research and technology development activities are defined, requires estimates of transportation, environmental, and socio-economic impacts throughout the system life cycle, which is a period of some 40 or 50 years. A unified methodological framework for comparing intercity passenger and freight transportation systems is described and is extended to include the comparison of long term transportation trends arising from implementation of the various R & D programs. The attributes of existing and future transportation systems are reviewed in order to establish measures for comparison, define value functions, and attribute weightings needed for comparing alternative policy actions for furthering transportation goals. Comparison criteria definitions and an illustrative example are included.

  15. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  16. Transport systems research vehicle color display system operations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, Wesley C.; Johnson, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    A recent upgrade of the Transport Systems Research Vehicle operated by the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program Office at the NASA Langley Research Center has resulted in an all-glass panel in the research flight deck. Eight ARINC-D size CRT color displays make up the panel. A major goal of the display upgrade effort was ease of operation and maintenance of the hardware while maintaining versatility needed for flight research. Software is the key to this required versatility and will be the area demanding the most detailed technical design expertise. This document is is intended to serve as a single source of quick reference information needed for routine operation and system level maintenance. Detailed maintenance and modification of the display system will require specific design documentation and must be accomplished by individuals with specialized knowledge and experience.

  17. Influence of Ramadan-type fasting on carbohydrate metabolism, brush border membrane enzymes and phosphate transport in rat kidney used as a model.

    PubMed

    Salim, Samina; Farooq, Neelam; Priyamvada, Shubha; Asghar, Mohammad; Khundmiri, Syed Jalal; Khan, Samia; Khan, Farah; Yusufi, Ahad Noor Khan

    2007-11-01

    Ramadan fasting is a unique model of fasting in which Muslims the world over abstain from food and water from dawn to sunset for 1 month. We hypothesized that this model of prolonged intermittent fasting would result in specific adaptive alterations in rat kidney to keep a positive balance of metabolites and inorganic phosphate (Pi). The effect of Ramadan-type fasting was studied on enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and brush border membrane (BBM) and BBM uptake of 32Pi in different renal tissue zones in the rat model. Rats were fasted (12 h) and then re-fed (12 h) daily for 30 d similar to human Ramadan fasting. Ramadan-type fasting resulted in increased serum Pi and phospholipids, whereas Pi clearance decreased. Serum creatinine and its clearance were not affected. Fasting caused a significant decrease in the activities of lactate and malate dehydrogenases, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, both in the renal cortex and medulla. However, the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase profoundly increased but that of malic enzyme decreased. The activities of alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase in BBM decreased, whereas transport of 32Pi significantly increased. The decrease in enzyme activities and increase in 32Pi transport were due to alterations of both maximal velocities and relative affinities. The results indicate that Ramadan-type fasting caused specific metabolic alterations with enhanced Pi conservation in different kidney tissues in a rat model used for Ramadan fasting in man.

  18. Transport of the aromatic amino acids into isolated rat liver cells. Properties of uptake by two distinct systems.

    PubMed Central

    Salter, M; Knowles, R G; Pogson, C I

    1986-01-01

    The transport of the aromatic amino acids into isolated rat liver cells was studied. There was a rapid and substantial binding of the aromatic amino acids, L-alanine and L-leucine to the plasma membrane. This has important consequences for the determination of rates of transport and intracellular concentrations of the amino acids. Inhibition studies with a variety of substrates of various transport systems gave results consistent with aromatic amino acid transport being catalysed by two systems: a 2-aminobicyclo(2,2,1)heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH)-insensitive aromatic D- and L-amino acid-specific system, and the L-type system (BCH-sensitive). The BCH-insensitive component of transport was Na+-independent and facilitated non-concentrative transport of the aromatic amino acids; it was unaffected by culture of liver cells for 24 h, by 48 h starvation, dexamethasone phosphate or glucagon. Kinetic properties of the BCH-inhibitable component were similar to those previously reported for the L2-system in liver cells. The BCH-insensitive component was a comparatively low-Km low-Vmax. transport system that we suggest is similar to the T-transport system previously seen only in human red blood cells. The results are discussed with reference to the importance of the T- and L-systems in the control of aromatic L-amino acid degradation in the liver. PMID:3954748

  19. Hemolysis associated with pneumatic tube system transport for blood samples.

    PubMed

    Kara, Hasan; Bayir, Aysegul; Ak, Ahmet; Degirmenci, Selim; Akinci, Murat; Agacayak, Ahmet; Marcil, Emine; Azap, Melih

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of hemolysis of blood samples may be increased by transport in a pneumatic tube system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of pneumatic tube system transport on hemolysis of blood samples. Blood samples were transported from the emergency department to the hospital laboratory manually by hospital staff (49 patients) or with a pneumatic tube system (53 patients). The hemolysis index and serum chemistry studies were performed on the blood samples and compared between the different methods of transport. The blood samples that were transported by the pneumatic tube system had a greater frequency of hemolysis and greater mean serum potassium and median creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase levels than samples transported manually. Blood samples transported from the emergency department to the hospital laboratory by a pneumatic tube system may have a greater frequency of hemolysis than samples transported manually. This may necessitate repeat phlebotomy and cause a delay in completing the laboratory analysis.

  20. Future space transportation system architecture avionics requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Howard; Engelund, Walt

    1993-01-01

    NASA began a multi-center study in January 1993 to examine options for providing the most cost effective space transportation system in the future. The key advanced avionics requirements for these vehicle concepts are envisioned to provide significantly improved operational efficiency and effectiveness. It is very desirable to have adaptive guidance, navigation, and control approaches that will allow launch and return in almost any weather condition. The vehicles must be able to accommodate atmospheric density variations and winds without software changes. The flight operations must become much more autonomous in all flight regimes like an aircraft, and preflight checkout should make use of the onboard systems. When the vehicle returns to the launch site, subsystem health must be known and maintenance tasks scheduled accordingly. Ground testing of most subsystems must be eliminated. Also, the health monitoring system must be designed to enhance the ability to abort the mission significantly and save the crew and the vehicle. The displays and controls must be much less complex than current systems and must significantly reduce pilot work load. It is important to have low power, light weight displays and controls. Rendezvous and docking and all flight phases must have autopilot capability to reduce pilot work load for routine operations and in abort situations. The vehicles must have the demonstrated ability to return to the launch site. Abort from all mission phases can put additional demands on the communications system.

  1. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.; Keith, V.F.; Spertzel, R.O.; De Avila, J.C.; O`Donnell, M.; Vann, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE`s internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex.

  2. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  3. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles-based systems for siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaochun; Li, Zehao; Zhao, Xueqin; Keen, Lawrence; Kong, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the enormous therapeutic potential of siRNA as a treatment strategy, the delivery is still a problem due to unfavorable biodistribution profiles and poor intracellular bioavailability. Calcium phosphate (CaP) co-precipitate has been used for nearly 40 years for in vitro transfection due to its non-toxic nature and simplicity of preparation. The surface charge of CaP will be tuned into positive by surface modification, which is important for siRNA loading and crossing cell membrane without enzymatic degradation. The new siRNA carrier system will also promote the siRNA escape from lysosome to achieve siRNA sustained delivery and high-efficiency silence. In this review, we focus on the current research activity in the development of CaP nanoparticles for siRNA delivery. These nanoparticles are mainly classified into lipid coated, polymer coated and various other types for discussion. PMID:27252888

  4. 77 FR 26067 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... Doc No: 2012-10586] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory... Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS... implementation of intelligent transportation systems. Through its sponsor, the ITS Joint Program......

  5. Simulation framework for intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Tentner, A.

    1996-10-01

    A simulation framework has been developed for a large-scale, comprehensive, scaleable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The simulator is designed for running on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems, but can run on standalone workstations for smaller simulations. The simulator currently models instrumented smart vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide two-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. Realistic modeling of variations of the posted driving speed are based on human factors studies that take into consideration weather, road conditions, driver personality and behavior, and vehicle type. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on parallel computers, such as ANL`s IBM SP-2, for large-scale problems. A novel feature of the approach is that vehicles are represented by autonomous computer processes which exchange messages with other processes. The vehicles have a behavior model which governs route selection and driving behavior, and can react to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, the simulation is scaleable to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  6. NASA's advanced space transportation system launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.

    1991-01-01

    Some insight is provided into the advanced transportation planning and systems that will evolve to support long term mission requirements. The general requirements include: launch and lift capacity to low earth orbit (LEO); space based transfer systems for orbital operations between LEO and geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), the Moon, and Mars; and Transfer vehicle systems for long duration deep space probes. These mission requirements are incorporated in the NASA Civil Needs Data Base. To accomplish these mission goals, adequate lift capacity to LEO must be available: to support science and application missions; to provide for construction of the Space Station Freedom; and to support resupply of personnel and supplies for its operations. Growth in lift capacity must be time phased to support an expanding mission model that includes Freedom Station, the Mission to Planet Earth, and an expanded robotic planetary program. The near term increase in cargo lift capacity associated with development of the Shuttle-C is addressed. The joint DOD/NASA Advanced Launch System studies are focused on a longer term new cargo capability that will significantly reduce costs of placing payloads in space.

  7. 77 FR 55266 - Marine Transportation System National Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... Maritime Administration Marine Transportation System National Advisory Council ACTION: National Advisory Council public meeting. SUMMARY: The Maritime Administration announces that the Marine Transportation... financing mechanisms and provide adequate ship capacity for marine highway services. DATES: The meeting...

  8. MODELING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT THROUGH SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling of contaminant transport through soil to groundwater to a receptor requires that consideration be given to the many processes which control the transport and fate of chemical constituents in the subsurface environment. These processes include volatilization, degradation,...

  9. A Review of Enamel Remineralisation Potential of Calcium- and Phosphate-based Remineralisation Systems.

    PubMed

    Ekambaram, Manikandan; Mohd Said, Siti N B; Yiu, Cynthia K Y

    2017-08-07

    Along with calcium and phosphate ions, fluoride ions promote remineralisation of noncavitated carious lesions to form fluorapatite. However, the supply of calcium and phosphate ions from saliva may not be adequate for effective remineralisation in patients with high caries risk. Therefore, an additional supply of calcium and phosphate ions is mandatory to enhance effective remineralisation with fluoride ions. Several calcium- and phosphate-based remineralisation agents are available for clinical use. However, the nature of the incorporated calcium and phosphate ions and the method of their stabilisation are not similar. Therefore, this review summarises research findings on the enamel remineralisation potential of calcium- and phosphate-based remineralisation agents. Appropriate key words were used and the Pubmed electronic database was searched to retrieve articles. Screening through titles and abstracts identified relevant articles. Full text review of the identified relevant articles was performed and the significant findings were summarised and presented in this review. Several studies including laboratory-based studies, in situ and randomised controlled clinical trials showed casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP)-containing remineralisation agents to have superior remineralisation potential compared to other forms of calcium- and phosphate-based remineralisation agents, such as functionalised tri-calcium phosphate (fTCP) and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). More long-term clinical studies are necessary to compare the enamel remineralisation potential of calcium- and phosphate-based agents that contain fTCP and ACP with those containing CPP-ACP. Additional well-designed randomised controlled clinical trials are also necessary to justify long-term clinical supplemental use of products containing CPP-ACP.

  10. Fuel cell system for transportation applications

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1993-09-28

    A propulsion system is described for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell and receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and uses water and air for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor. 3 figures.

  11. Fuel cell system for transportation applications

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Romesh; Ahmed, Shabbir; Krumpelt, Michael; Myles, Kevin M.

    1993-01-01

    A propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

  12. Fireworthiness of transport aircraft interior systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The key materials question is addressed concerning the effect of interior systems on the survival of passengers and crew in the case of an uncontrolled transport aircraft fire. Technical opportunities are examined which are available through the modification of aircraft interior subsystem components, modifications that may reasonably be expected to provide improvements in aircraft fire safety. Subsystem components discussed are interior panels, seats, and windows. By virtue of their role in real fire situations and as indicated by the results of large scale simulation tests, these components appear to offer the most immediate and highest payoff possible by modifying interior materials of existing aircraft. These modifications have the potential of reducing the rate of fire growth, with a consequent reduction of heat, toxic gas, and smoke emission throughout the habitable interior of an aircraft, whatever the initial source of the fire.

  13. Improved fuel cell system for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, M.K.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

  14. Status of the National Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The National Space Transportation System is a national resources serving the government, Department of Defense and commercial needs of the USA and others. Four orbital flight tests were completed July 4, 1982, and the first Operational Flight (STS-5) which placed two commercial communications into orbit was conducted November 11, 1982. February 1983 marked the first flight of the newest orbiter, Challenger. Planned firsts in 1983 include: use of higher performance main engines and solid rocket boosters, around-the-clock crew operations, a night landing, extra-vehicular activity, a dedicated DOD mission, and the first flight of a woman crew member. By the end of 1983, five commercial payloads and two tracking and data relay satellites should be deployed and thirty-seven crew members should have made flights aboard the space shuttle.

  15. Combustion experimentation aboard the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of the preliminary concept, specifications, and general requirements of a proposed Combustion Facility (CF) for the Spacelab payload of the Space Transportation System. The CF will permit an experimenter to use suitably contained liquid, gas, or solid fuels. He can specify and establish the composition and pressure level of the atmosphere in which the combustion will take place. It will be possible to characterize the experiment with common types of instrumentation as well as selected specialized equipment, to study the combustion process visually by direct observation and by motion picture coverage, and to obtain time histories of pertinent experimental parameters. During an experimental period, the CF will depend on Spacelab resources for power, heat rejection, and vacuum. Activating the CF and preparing it for the various experiments, performing the experiments, and shutting down the facility will be largely manual operations performed by flight personnel.

  16. [Pneumatic tube system for blood products transport].

    PubMed

    Bardiaux, L; Boulanger, E; Leconte des Floris, M-F; Bourcier, V; Cottier, D

    2012-11-01

    Blood product transport from blood bank to the patient care areas of hospitals is a key step in the transfusion process. The pneumatic tube system is now widely used in hospitals. Strict performance specifications must be respected to guarantee blood safety: robustness, easy to use and respect the constraints imposed to blood products. To secure the disposal of blood products ordered to a carrier (delivery step), a security device must be deployed (video camera, barcode reading, fax, chip), allowing in particular to limit the risk of addressing error when sending (in the case of device with several arrival stations) or picked up by the wrong carrier. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Space Transportation System solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, failsafe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system completed the required qualification and verification tests and is certified for the intended application. Substantiation data include analytical and test data.

  18. The air transportation/energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The changing pattern of transportation is discussed, and the energy intensiveness of various modes of transportation is also analyzed. Sociopsychological data affecting why people travel by air are presented, along with governmental regulation and air transportation economics. The aviation user tax structure is shown in tabular form.

  19. The air transportation/energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The changing pattern of transportation is discussed, and the energy intensiveness of various modes of transportation is also analyzed. Sociopsychological data affecting why people travel by air are presented, along with governmental regulation and air transportation economics. The aviation user tax structure is shown in tabular form.

  20. Biofilm responses to ageing and to a high phosphate load in a bench-scale drinking water system.

    PubMed

    Batté, Magali; Koudjonou, Boniface; Laurent, Patrick; Mathieu, Laurence; Coallier, Josée; Prévost, Michèle

    2003-03-01

    The effects of ageing and of phosphate load on drinking water biofilms developed on a polycarbonate substratum in the pseudo-equilibrium state have been evaluated. Phosphate was added in an amount higher than the stochiometric nutrient requirements of bacteria, at concentrations commonly applied in a drinking water distribution system for corrosion control. Multiple parameters were monitored: heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs), total direct counts (TDCs) and potential exoproteolytic activity (PEPA) in order to characterise changes in bacterial biofilms. The total carbohydrate, amino acid and phosphate contents of biofilms were analysed to characterise and monitor the biochemical composition of the biofilm.The three enumeration methods showed that a pseudo-equilibrium state was reached after 7 weeks of colonisation after which, the bacterial growth rate in the biofilm was 0.1 log per week on average. Bulk phosphate addition doubled the phosphate in the biofilm, but did not affect the other biological, physiological or chemical parameters measured. Polysaccharides increased in the biofilm with ageing and the dynamics of individual carbohydrate synthesis also varied with the age of the biofilm. Once pseudo-equilibrium, it was found that the total proteins were globally constant, whereas the spectra of some individual amino acids of the proteins had significantly changed.

  1. Sequential injection system for simultaneous determination of sucrose and phosphate in cola drinks using paired emitter-detector diode sensor.

    PubMed

    Saetear, Phoonthawee; Khamtau, Kittiwut; Ratanawimarnwong, Nuanlaor; Sereenonchai, Kamonthip; Nacapricha, Duangjai

    2013-10-15

    This work presents the simultaneous determination of sucrose and phosphate by using sequential injection (SI) system with a low cost paired emitter-detector diode (PEDD) light sensor. The PEDD uses two 890 nm LEDs. Measurement of sucrose in Brix unit was carried out based on the detection of light refraction occurring at the liquid interface (the schlieren effect) between the sucrose solution and water. Phosphate was measured from the formation of calcium phosphate with turbidimetric detection. With careful design of the loading sequence and volume (sample--precipitating reagent--sample), simultaneous detection of sucrose and phosphate was accomplished with the single PEDD detector. At the optimized condition, linear calibrations from 1 to 7 Brix sucrose and from 50 to 200mg PO4(3-)L(-1) were obtained. Good precision at lower than 2% RSD (n=10) for both analytes with satisfactory throughput of 21 injections h(-1) was achieved. The method was successfully applied for the determination of sucrose and phosphate in cola drinks. The proposed method is readily applicable for automation and is found to be an alternative method to conventional procedures for on-line quality control process in cola drink industry. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A realtime, online automated system for measurement of Phosphate ions in atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violaki, Kalliopi; Fang, Ting; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Weber, Rodney James; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Primary productivity of continental and marine ecosystems is often limited or co-limited by phosphorus. Of particular interest is the role of phosphorus in marine primary productivity, owing to its potential for affecting the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The atmosphere is considered a principal source of externally-supplied nutrients for large areas of the surface ocean, and oligotrophic open oceans in particular. Atmospheric inorganic P species (e.g. mono- or diprotonated orthophosphate) comprise the most bioavailable P form, and have been studied for many decades. Nevertheless, there are very large uncertainties in the phosphate biogeochemical budget due to the lack of observations and the poor match of the model to observations. This study presents a novel automated on-line, real-time analytical method for the analysis of water-soluble PO4-3 ions in atmospheric particles. The instrumentation consists of a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) coupled with a reaction coil to allow reagents to interact with the PILS liquid flow; the composite flow is then introduced into a mini spectrophotometer, which is equipped with a long path length of 250cm Liquid Wavequide Capillary Cell (LWCC), achieving low detection limit. This new system overcomes the limitations on detection and time resolution, as the configuration presented allows for measurement with 8 minute resolution. The data, when combined with routine PILS-IC or aerosol mass spectrometry, allows for an unprecedented insight towards the drivers of phosphate solubility and its relation to acidification from atmospheric acids. We present results for concentration of PM2.5 PO4-3 in Atlanta Georgia for a 2 month period (February-March, 2015) and the Eastern Mediterranean and its relation to aerosol acidity and other meteorological parameters. The results are discussed together with future directions towards optimized performance during long periods of operation.

  3. Phosphorus metabolism and population dynamics in a biological phosphate-removal system with simultaneous anaerobic phosphate stripping.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing-hua; Yuan, Lin-jiang; Chen, Xi; Liu, Lun; Luo, Da-cheng

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the metabolism of phosphorus and changes in population dynamics were investigated via simultaneous chemical stripping in sidestream in an acetate-fed sequencing batch reactor. The synthesized intracellular polyphosphate (poly-P) by polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) gradually decreased when the biomass was subjected to 83 d of P stripping. Initially, the P removal efficiency of the system improved from 94.3% to 96.9%. Thereafter, a relatively high level of P in effluent was observed, during which time the stoichiometric ratios of Prelease/HAcuptake decreased, Glycogendegraded/HAcuptake and poly-β-hydroxyvalerate/PHA increased. The results revealed that a metabolic shift from polyphosphate-accumulating metabolism to glycogen-accumulating metabolism. Correspondingly, PAOs declined to less than 1% of the population, glycogen-accumulating organisms proliferated to almost 20% instead. The results of PCR–DGGE also indicated that the microbial community structure considerably changed in response to the gradually decreasing poly-P content. These findings imply that intracellular poly-P level is important for the stable of P removal system. Furthermore, it suggests that it is not a stable and effective way for P recycling from anaerobic stage of the biological P removal system in sidestream.

  4. Transport in active systems crowded by obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2017-02-01

    The reactive and diffusive dynamics of a single chemically powered Janus motor in a crowded medium of moving but passive obstacles is investigated using molecular simulation. It is found that the reaction rate of the catalytic motor reaction decreases in a crowded medium as the volume fraction of obstacles increases as a result of a reduction in the Smoluchowski diffusion-controlled reaction rate coefficient that contributes to the overall reaction rate. A continuum model is constructed and analyzed to interpret the dependence of the steady-state reaction rate observed in simulations on the volume fraction of obstacles in the system. The steady-state concentration fields of reactant and product are shown to be sensitive to the local structure of obstacles around the Janus motor. It is demonstrated that the active motor exhibits enhanced diffusive motion at long times with a diffusion constant that decreases as the volume fraction of crowding species increases. In addition, the dynamical properties of a passive tracer particle in a system containing many active Janus motors is studied to investigate how an active environment influences the transport of non-active species. The diffusivity of a passive tracer particle in an active medium is found to be enhanced in systems with forward-moving Janus motors due to the cooperative dynamics of these motors.

  5. Synthesis and Physicochemical Characterization of D-Tagatose-1-Phosphate: The Substrate of the Tagatose-1-Phosphate Kinase in the Phosphotransferase System-Mediated D-Tagatose Catabolic Pathway of Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Simon, Patricia; Counson, Melody; Galleni, Moreno; Freedberg, Darón I; Thompson, John; Joris, Bernard; Battistel, Marcos D

    2015-01-01

    We report the first enzymatic synthesis of D-tagatose-1-phosphate (Tag-1P) by the multicomponent phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) present in tagatose-grown cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Physicochemical characterization by (31)P and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that, in solution, this derivative is primarily in the pyranose form. Tag-1P was used to characterize the putative tagatose-1-phosphate kinase (TagK) of the Bacillus licheniformis PTS-mediated D-tagatose catabolic pathway (Bli-TagP). For this purpose, a soluble protein fusion was obtained with the 6 His-tagged trigger factor (TF(His6)) of Escherichia coli. The active fusion enzyme was named TagK-TF(His6). Tag-1P and D-fructose-1-phosphate are substrates for the TagK-TF(His6) enzyme, whereas the isomeric derivatives D-tagatose-6-phosphate and D-fructose-6-phosphate are inhibitors. Studies of catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) reveal that the enzyme specificity is markedly in favor of Tag-1P as the substrate. Importantly, we show in vivo that the transfer of the phosphate moiety from PEP to the B. licheniformis tagatose-specific Enzyme II in E. coli is inefficient. The capability of the PTS general cytoplasmic components of B. subtilis, HPr and Enzyme I to restore the phosphate transfer is demonstrated. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Argonne simulation framework for intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Canfield, T.; Brown-VanHoozer, A.; Tentner, A.

    1996-04-01

    A simulation framework has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The simulator is designed to run on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems; however, a version for a stand alone workstation is also available. The ITS simulator includes an Expert Driver Model (EDM) of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units. The EDM is capable of performing optimal route planning and communicating with Traffic Management Centers (TMC). A dynamic road map data base is sued for optimum route planning, where the data is updated periodically to reflect any changes in road or weather conditions. The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces that includes human-factors studies to support safety and operational research. Realistic modeling of variations of the posted driving speed are based on human factor studies that take into consideration weather, road conditions, driver`s personality and behavior and vehicle type. The simulator has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers, but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of the developed simulator is that vehicles will be represented by autonomous computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. Vehicle processes interact with each other and with ITS components by exchanging messages. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  7. Metabolite transport and associated sugar signalling systems underpinning source/sink interactions.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Cara A; Paul, Matthew J; Foyer, Christine H

    2016-10-01

    Metabolite transport between organelles, cells and source and sink tissues not only enables pathway co-ordination but it also facilitates whole plant communication, particularly in the transmission of information concerning resource availability. Carbon assimilation is co-ordinated with nitrogen assimilation to ensure that the building blocks of biomass production, amino acids and carbon skeletons, are available at the required amounts and stoichiometry, with associated transport processes making certain that these essential resources are transported from their sites of synthesis to those of utilisation. Of the many possible posttranslational mechanisms that might participate in efficient co-ordination of metabolism and transport only reversible thiol-disulphide exchange mechanisms have been described in detail. Sucrose and trehalose metabolism are intertwined in the signalling hub that ensures appropriate resource allocation to drive growth and development under optimal and stress conditions, with trehalose-6-phosphate acting as an important signal for sucrose availability. The formidable suite of plant metabolite transporters provides enormous flexibility and adaptability in inter-pathway coordination and source-sink interactions. Focussing on the carbon metabolism network, we highlight the functions of different transporter families, and the important of thioredoxins in the metabolic dialogue between source and sink tissues. In addition, we address how these systems can be tailored for crop improvement.

  8. A serum factor that activates the phosphatidylinositol phosphate signaling system in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Tigyi, G; Dyer, D; Matute, C; Miledi, R

    1990-01-01

    Blood sera from many vertebrate species elicit large oscillatory chloride currents in oocytes from the frog Xenopus laevis. Rabbit serum was active at dilutions as great as one part in 10 million. Intracellularly applied serum was ineffective, and externally applied serum failed to trigger oscillatory currents when the intracellular level of ionized calcium was prevented from rising by loading the oocyte with EGTA. The serum also caused an increase of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in the oocyte. We conclude that serum contains a factor which activates a membrane receptor that is coupled to the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system. The active factor is a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 60-70 kDa in gel permeation chromatography. Although the normal function of the serum factor is still unknown, it may have far-reaching implications, because it acts on the multifunctional phosphatidylinositol phosphate signaling system. Also, because of its great potency the serum factor and Xenopus oocytes are very useful for probing the operation of the phosphatidylinositol system. PMID:1689488

  9. Systematic Development of Intelligent Systems for Public Road Transport.

    PubMed

    García, Carmelo R; Quesada-Arencibia, Alexis; Cristóbal, Teresa; Padrón, Gabino; Alayón, Francisco

    2016-07-16

    This paper presents an architecture model for the development of intelligent systems for public passenger transport by road. The main objective of our proposal is to provide a framework for the systematic development and deployment of telematics systems to improve various aspects of this type of transport, such as efficiency, accessibility and safety. The architecture model presented herein is based on international standards on intelligent transport system architectures, ubiquitous computing and service-oriented architecture for distributed systems. To illustrate the utility of the model, we also present a use case of a monitoring system for stops on a public passenger road transport network.

  10. Systematic Development of Intelligent Systems for Public Road Transport

    PubMed Central

    García, Carmelo R.; Quesada-Arencibia, Alexis; Cristóbal, Teresa; Padrón, Gabino; Alayón, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture model for the development of intelligent systems for public passenger transport by road. The main objective of our proposal is to provide a framework for the systematic development and deployment of telematics systems to improve various aspects of this type of transport, such as efficiency, accessibility and safety. The architecture model presented herein is based on international standards on intelligent transport system architectures, ubiquitous computing and service-oriented architecture for distributed systems. To illustrate the utility of the model, we also present a use case of a monitoring system for stops on a public passenger road transport network. PMID:27438836

  11. Denitrification-Coupled Iron(II) Oxidation: A Key Process Regulating the Fate and Transport of Nitrate, Phosphate, and Arsenic in a Wastewater-Contaminated Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. L.; Kent, D. B.; Repert, D. A.; Hart, C. P.

    2007-12-01

    Denitrification in the subsurface is often viewed as a heterotrophic process. However, some denitrifiers can also utilize inorganic electron donors. In particular, Fe(II), which is common in many aquifers, could be an important reductant for contaminant nitrate. Anoxic iron oxidation would have additional consequences, including decreased mobility for species like arsenic and phosphate, which bind strongly to hydrous Fe(III) oxide. A study was conducted in a wastewater contaminant plume on Cape Cod to assess the potential for denitrification- coupled Fe(II) oxidation. Previous changes in wastewater disposal upgradient of the study area had resulted in nitrate being transported into a portion of the anoxic zone of the plume and decreased concentrations of Fe(II), phosphate, and arsenic. A series of anoxic tracers (groundwater + nitrate + bromide) were injected into the unaffected, Fe(II)-containing zone under natural gradient conditions. Denitrification was stimulated within 1 m of transport (4 days) for both low and high (100 & 1000 μM) nitrate additions, initially producing stiochiometric quantities of nitrous oxide (>300 μM N) and trace amounts of nitrite. Subsequent injections at the same site reduced nitrate even more rapidly and produced less nitrous oxide, especially over longer transport distances. Fe(II) and nitrate concentrations decreased together and this was accompanied by an increase in colloidal Fe(III) and decreases in pH, total arsenic, and phosphate concentrations. All plume constituents returned to background levels several weeks after the tracer tests were completed. Groundwater microorganisms collected on filters during the tracer test rapidly and immediately reduced nitrite and oxidized Fe(II) in 3-hr laboratory incubations. Several pure cultures of Fe(II)-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria were isolated from core material and subsequently characterized. All of the isolates were mixotrophic, simultaneously oxidizing organic carbon and Fe

  12. Intelligent transportation infrastructure deployment analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Rathi, A.K.; Harding, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    Much of the work on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) to date has emphasized technologies, standards/protocols, architecture, user services, core infrastructure requirements, and various other technical and institutional issues. ITS implementations in the United States and elsewhere in the world have demonstrated benefits in the areas of safety, productivity, efficiency, and environmental impact. However, quantitative benefits and satisfactory cost estimates are not available or cannot be derived for many components of the ITS, whether deployed individually or in some integrated fashion. The limitations of existing analysis and evaluation capabilities coupled with the lack of strong empirical evidence presents a major knowledge and data gap for infrastructure investment decisions involving ITS alternatives. This paper describes the over-arching issues and requirements associated with the analysis capabilities required for a systematic, faithful, and rigorous evaluation of the impacts of deploying ITS in a metropolitan area. It then describes the conceptual framework of a modeling system that will provide a preliminary analysis capability to support ITS deployment analysis and evaluation.

  13. NANONIS TRAMEA - A Quantum Transport Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampen, Thorsten; Thissen, Andreas; Schaff, Oliver; Pioda, Alessandro

    Nanonis Tramea is a quantum leap with respect to increased speed for transport measurements taking research onto a new level. Measurements which took several hours in the past can now be done in minutes without compromising signal quality. Tramea uses its fast, high-resolution, high-precision and ultra-low-noise outputs and inputs to generate and acquire up to 20000 data points per second on 24 channels in parallel. This is not only up to 1000 x faster than typical measurement systems but it is also time deterministic with highest precision. Here, the time separation between points is constant so that artefacts caused by unequal point spacings in non-deterministic measurement systems are avoided. The emphasis here is the real-time relation. Tramea comes with a built-in interface which allows for control of the instruments' basic functions from any programming environment. For users requiring more functionality and higher speeds a full-featured LabVIEW-based programming interface or scripting module are available as add-on modules. Due to the modularity and flexibility of the hardware and software architecture of Tramea upgrades with standardized add-on modules are possible. Non-standard requests can still be handled by the various programming options.

  14. National Space Transportation Systems Program mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. A., Jr.; Aldrich, A. D.; Lunney, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The 515-41B National Space Transportation Systems Program Mission Report contains a summary of the major activities and accomplishments of the sixth operational Shuttle flight and fourth flight of the OV-099 vehicle, Challenger. Since this flight was the first to land at Kennedy Space Center, the vehicle was towed directly to the OPF (Orbiter Processing Facility) where preparations for flight STS-41C, scheduled for early April 1984, began immediately. The significant problems that occurred during STS-41B are summarized and a problem tracking list that is a complete list of all problems that occurred during the flight is given. None of the problems will affect the STS 41C flight. The major objectives of flight STS-41B were to successfully deploy the Westar satellite and the Indonesian Communications Satellite-B2 (PALAPA-B2); to evaluate the MMU (Manned Maneuvering Unit) support for EVA (Extravehicular Activities); to exercise the MFR (Manipulator Foot Restraint); to demonstrate a closed loop rendezvous; and to operate the M.R (Monodisperse Latex Reactor), the ACES (Acoustic Containerless Experiment System) and the IEF (Isoelectric Focusing) in cabin experiments; and to obtain photographs with the Cinema 360 Cameras.

  15. Advanced space transportation systems, BARGOUZIN booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prampolini, Marco; Louaas, Eric; Prel, Yves; Kostromin, Sergey; Panichkin, Nickolay; Sumin, Yuriy; Osin, Mikhail; Iranzo-Greus, David; Rigault, Michel; Beaurain, André; Couteau, Jean-Noël

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of Advanced Space Transportation Systems Studies sponsored by CNES in 2006, a study called "BARGOUZIN" was performed by a joint team led by ASTRIUM ST and TSNIIMASH. Beyond these leaders, the team comprised MOLNIYA, DASSAULT AVIATION and SNECMA as subcontractors. The "BARGOUZIN" concept is a liquid fuelled fly-back booster (LFBB), mounted on the ARIANE 5 central core stage in place of the current solid rocket booster. The main originality of the concept lies in the fact that the "BARGOUZIN" features a cluster of VULCAIN II engines, similar to the one mounted on the central core stage of ARIANE 5. An astute permutation strategy, between the booster engines and central core engine is expected to lead to significant cost reductions. The following aspects were addressed during the preliminary system study: engine number per booster trade-off/abort scenario analysis, aerodynamic consolidation, engine reliability, ascent controllability, ground interfaces separation sequence analysis, programmatics. These topics will be briefly presented and synthesized in this paper, giving an overview of the credibility of the concept.

  16. Phosphate Sink Containing Two-Component Signaling Systems as Tunable Threshold Devices

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Munia; Kothamachu, Varun B.; Feliu, Elisenda; Scharf, Birgit E.; Porter, Steven L.; Soyer, Orkun S.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims to design de novo biological systems and reengineer existing ones. These efforts have mostly focused on transcriptional circuits, with reengineering of signaling circuits hampered by limited understanding of their systems dynamics and experimental challenges. Bacterial two-component signaling systems offer a rich diversity of sensory systems that are built around a core phosphotransfer reaction between histidine kinases and their output response regulator proteins, and thus are a good target for reengineering through synthetic biology. Here, we explore the signal-response relationship arising from a specific motif found in two-component signaling. In this motif, a single histidine kinase (HK) phosphotransfers reversibly to two separate output response regulator (RR) proteins. We show that, under the experimentally observed parameters from bacteria and yeast, this motif not only allows rapid signal termination, whereby one of the RRs acts as a phosphate sink towards the other RR (i.e. the output RR), but also implements a sigmoidal signal-response relationship. We identify two mathematical conditions on system parameters that are necessary for sigmoidal signal-response relationships and define key parameters that control threshold levels and sensitivity of the signal-response curve. We confirm these findings experimentally, by in vitro reconstitution of the one HK-two RR motif found in the Sinorhizobium meliloti chemotaxis pathway and measuring the resulting signal-response curve. We find that the level of sigmoidality in this system can be experimentally controlled by the presence of the sink RR, and also through an auxiliary protein that is shown to bind to the HK (yielding Hill coefficients of above 7). These findings show that the one HK-two RR motif allows bacteria and yeast to implement tunable switch-like signal processing and provides an ideal basis for developing threshold devices for synthetic biology applications. PMID:25357192

  17. Education in Transportation Systems Planning: Highway Research Record No. 462.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Transportation Research Board.

    The papers contained in the issue of Highway Research Record focus on current and emerging patterns of education and training related to transportation systems planning. The five papers are: Transportation Centers and Other Mechanisms to Encourage Interdisciplinary Research and Training Efforts in Transportation (Frederick J. Wegmann and Edward A.…

  18. Elements of a Mars transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nock, K. T.; Friedlander, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Earth to Mars transportation requirements are derived for a permanent Mars base of 20 people operating in the 2035 time frame. In order to satisfy these requirements, various transportation modes are developed assuming an existing space infrastructure including propellant tankers, crew and consumable transfer vehicles, orbital facilities and extraterrestrial propellant factories. These transportation modes are compared with respect to total propellant requirements, number of vehicles required, flight times, frequency of opportunity and several other characteristics. Directions for further studies and analysis are indicated.

  19. Transport in mesoscopic charge density wave systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Mark Ivar

    This thesis presents several theoretical studies on the electrical transport of charge density waves in mesoscopic systems. On this length scale the fields of mesoscopic physics and superconductivity merge with the physics of CDW's. The research is focussed on the demonstration of new (quantum) physics in both the quasi- particle and the collective transport modes. Using a Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk scattering approach, it is shown that the tunneling conductance reflects the local density of states, rather than the bulk density of states as in superconductors. The conductance depends also on the phase of the CDW relative to the interface. Characteristic oscillations remain present after an ensemble averaging. We investigate two types of Aharonov-Bohm effects in CDW conductors. It is noted that a parity effect exist for the number of electrons in the ring, which shifts the modulation of the observables with half of a flux quantum. The second problem addresses the collective CDW motion through an ensemble of columnar defects threaded by a magnetic flux. We show that the pinning properties of a single defect are periodically affected by the normal flux quantum. However, in an ensemble of uncorrelated Aharonov-Bohm rings, the effective (averaged) threshold field reflects a half flux quantum periodicity, similar to the Al'tshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations. These results are in qualitative agreement with experiments. We investigate the Josephson current through a superconductor-CDW-Superconductor (S/C/S) junction. For this system we formulate the kinetic equations within the Keldysh formalism. In the sliding regime, the narrow band noise frequency locks to the Josephson frequency. As a result, oscillations appear in the current-voltage characteristic, accompanied by plateaus in the collective CDW conductance. Furthermore, we investigate the 'Poor man's Josephson effect' in a C/N/C junction, in relation to the Josephson current through an S/N/S junction. The sliding

  20. Integrated mass transportation system study/definition/implementation program definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, R. K.; Deptula, D. A.; Yorke, G. G.

    1975-01-01

    Specific actions needed to plan and effect transportation system improvements are identified within the constraints of limited financial, energy and land use resources, and diverse community requirements. A specific program is described which would develop the necessary generalized methodology for devising improved transportation systems and evaluate them against specific criteria for intermodal and intramodal optimization. A consistent, generalized method is provided for study and evaluation of transportation system improvements.