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Sample records for phosphatidyl serine ps

  1. Occurrence of phosphatidyl-D-serine in the rat cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Omori, Taketo; Mihara, Hisaaki; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2009-05-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), a relatively abundant component of mammalian cell membranes, plays important roles in biological processes including apoptosis and cell signaling. It is believed that phosphatidyl-L-serine is the only naturally occurring PS. Here, we describe for the first time the occurrence of phosphatidyl-D-serine (D-PS) in rat cerebrum. Quantitative HPLC analysis of the derivatives of serine liberated from PS by hydrolysis revealed that the amount of D-PS was approximately 1% of the total PS in the cerebrum. Enzymatic cleavage of cerebrum PS with phospholipase D and phospholipase C resulted in the release of both isomers of serine and phosphoserine, respectively, providing additional evidence for the existence of D-PS. Free D-serine was incorporated into PS in an in vitro system using a cerebrum extract, and this activity was inhibited by EDTA, suggesting the occurrence of a divalent cation-dependent enzyme that synthesizes D-PS by a base-exchange reaction.

  2. Phosphatidyl serine-dependent antiprothrombin antibody is exclusive to patients with lupus anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, J; Saitoh, N; Gotoh, M; Kawasugi, K; Gohchi, K; Tsukamoto, M

    1996-06-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether antiprothrombin antibody (aPT) [to prothrombin (PT) alone or PT/phosphatidyl serine (PS) complex] actually existed in patients with lupus anticoagulant (LA) and/or anticardiolipin antibody (aCL). aPT to PT alone was positive in 2/7 LA-positive (29%) and 3/7 LA/aCL-positive (43%) patients. aPT to PT/PS complex was positive in 4/7 LA-positive (57%) and 4/7 LA/aCL-positive (57%) patients in the presence of Ca2+. However, none of the aCL-positive patients without LA or the LA/aCL-negative patients were positive for aPT and aPT/PS. Thus, we confirmed the existence of aPT and aPT/PS specifically among LA-positive patients. However, the clinicopathological significance of aPT and aPT/PS in this clinical setting is yet to be clarified. PMID:8670583

  3. Two antiprothrombin antibodies against prothrombin and prothrombin-phosphatidyl serine show partial but not total identity.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, J; Sanaka, T; Nishizawa, A; Gotoh, M; Gohchi, K

    2002-12-01

    Recently, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using prothrombin (PT) as the antigen has become a widely used test. Two ELISA methods for the detection of antiprothrombin antibody have been used extensively: one method employs PT as an antigen (aPT), and the other employs PT and phosphatidyl serine (aPT/PS) as antigens along with Ca. However, the results obtained by the two methods are not necessarily consistent with each other even using the same samples, suggesting the possibility that aPT and aPT/PS are different antibodies. We conducted an investigation to determine whether aPT and aPT/PS are identical or different antibodies. Five patients who were positive for both tests become negative to aPT after absorption with an aPT-ELISA plate or fluid-phase PT; however, they retained reactivity to aPT/PS after the same absorption procedure. These results suggest that aPT and aPT/PS are partially identical, yet still different antibodies. However, further examination employing more samples may be needed to verify our hypothesis including clarification of the clinicopathological significance of these antibodies in the future. PMID:12441908

  4. Isolation of a nitric oxide inhibitor from mammary tumor cells and its characterization as phosphatidyl serine

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Macrophages from mice bearing large D1-DMBA-3 mammary tumors have a decreased capacity to kill tumor targets. This effect is due to an impaired ability to produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Here we report that the DA-3 tumor cell line, derived from the in vivo adenocarcinoma D1-DMBA-3, produces a factor that inhibits both NO production/release and cytotoxicity of LPS-activated peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEM). However, other complex macrophage functions such as phagocytosis, superoxide production, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, and synthesis of proteins were not reduced by this factor. The NO inhibitor has been found to be lipid in nature. Lipid extracts from DA-3 cell culture supernatants were purified by repeated silica gel column chromatography. The active molecule was unambiguously characterized as phosphatidyl serine (PS) by fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry. Preliminary results indicate a lack of induced NO synthase (iNOS) activity in the lysates of LPS-activated PEM pretreated with PS. The ubiquity of PS in the inner leaflet of biological membranes and its NO inhibitory property, suggest that this phospholipid may be one of the long elusive molecules responsible for regulating physiological levels of NO in the host and hence preventing cellular dysfunction and/or tissue damage. Furthermore, the possible overexpression and shedding of PS by DA-3 tumor cells may represent a novel mechanism to impair macrophage cytotoxicity, a host function that contributes to the protection against developing neoplasms. PMID:8064242

  5. Exposure of FVIII in the Presence of Phosphatidyl Serine Reduces Generation of Memory B-Cells and Induces Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Hyporesponsiveness in Hemophilia A Mice.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Radha; Davidowitz, Andrew; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-08-01

    A major complication of replacement therapy with Factor VIII (FVIII) for hemophilia A (HA) is the development of unwanted immune responses. Previous studies showed that administration of FVIII in the presence of phosphatidyl serine (PS) reduced the development of anti-FVIII antibodies in HA mice. However, the impact of PS-mediated effects on immunological memory, such as generation of memory B-cells, is not clear. The effect of PS on memory B-cells was therefore investigated using adoptive transfer approach in FVIII(-/-) HA mice. Adoptive transfer of memory B-cells from a PS-FVIII-treated group to naïve mice followed by challenge of the recipient mice with FVIII showed a significantly reduced anti-FVIII antibody response in the recipient mice, compared with animals that received memory B-cells from free FVIII and FVIII-charge matched phosphatidyl glycerol (PG) group. The decrease in memory B-cell response is accompanied by an increase in FoxP3 expressing regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Flow cytometry studies showed that the generation of Tregs is higher in PS-treated animals as compared with FVIII and FVIII-PG treated animals. The PS-mediated hyporesponsiveness was found to be antigen-specific. The PS-FVIII immunization showed hyporesponsiveness toward FVIII rechallenge but not against ovalbumin (OVA) rechallenge, an unrelated antigen. This demonstrates that PS reduces immunologic memory of FVIII and induces antigen-specific peripheral tolerance in HA mice.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Phosphatidyl Choline from Spinach Leaves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devor, Kenneth A.

    1979-01-01

    This inexpensive but informative experiment for undergraduate biochemistry students involves isolating phosphatidyl choline from spinach leaves. Emphasis is on introducing students to techniques of lipid extraction, separation of lipids, identification using thin layer chromatography, and identification of fatty acids. Three periods of three hours…

  7. Binding to phosphatidyl serine membranes causes a conformational change in the concave face of annexin I.

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, M; Ossa, C G

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that binding of annexin I to phospholipids induces the formation of a second phospholipid binding site. It is shown that the N terminus on the concave side of membrane-bound annexin I is cleaved much faster by trypsin or cathepsin than the N terminus of the free protein. The reactivity of the unique disulfide bond located near the concave face was similarly increased by membrane binding. These results demonstrate that Ca(2+)-dependent membrane binding induces a conformational change on the concave side of the annexin I molecule and support the notion that this face of the molecule may contribute to the formation of the secondary membrane-binding site. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 PMID:8994623

  8. Mercury Induces the Externalization of Phosphatidyl-Serine in Human Renal Proximal Tubule (HK-2) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Dwayne J.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2007-01-01

    The underlying mechanism for the biological activity of inorganic mercury is believed to be the high affinity binding of divalent mercuric cations to thiols of sulfhydryl groups of proteins. A comprehensive analysis of published data indicates that inorganic mercury is one of the most environmentally abundant toxic metals, is a potent and selective nephrotoxicant that preferentially accumulates in the kidneys, and is known to produce cellular injury in the kidneys. Binding sites are present in the proximal tubules, and it is in the epithelial cells of these tubules that toxicants such as inorganic mercury are reabsorbed. This can affect the enzymatic activity and the structure of various proteins. Mercury may alter protein and membrane structure and function in the epithelial cells and this alteration may result in long term residual effects. This research was therefore designed to evaluate the dose-response relationship in human renal proximal tubule (HK-2) cells following exposure to inorganic mercury. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay for cell viability. The Annexin-V assay was performed by flow cytometry to determine the extent of phosphatidylserine externalization. Cells were exposed to mercury for 24 hours at doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 μg/mL. Cytotoxicity experiments yielded a LD50 value of 4.65 ± 0.6 μg/mL indicating that mercury is highly toxic. The percentages of cells undergoing early apoptosis were 0.70 ± 0.03%, 10.0 ± 0.02%, 11.70 ± 0.03%, 15.20 ± 0.02%, 16.70 ± 0.03%, 24.20 ±0.02%, and 25.60 ± 0.04% at treatments of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 μg/mL of mercury respectively. This indicates a dose-response relationship with regard to mercury-induced cytotoxicity and the externalization of phosphatidylserine in HK-2 cells. PMID:17617677

  9. Detection of related substances in polyene phosphatidyl choline extracted from soybean and in its commercial capsule by comprehensive supercritical fluid chromatography with mass spectrometry compared with HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qikun; Liu, Wanjun; Li, Xiaoting; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical fluid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was used to comprehensively profile polyene phosphatidyl choline (PPC) extracted from soybean. We achieved an efficient chromatographic analysis using a BEH-2EP column (3 × 100 mm(2) , 1.7 μm) with a mobile phase consisting of CO2 and a cosolvent in gradient combination at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The cosolvent consisted of methanol, acetonitrile, and water (containing 10 mM ammonium acetate and 0.2% formic acid). The total single-run time was 7 min. We used this method to accurately detect ten different phospholipids (PLs) during extraction. The limits of quantification for phosphatidyl choline, lyso-phosphatidylcholine (LPC), phosphatidic acid (PA), sphingomyelin, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl inositol (PI), cholesterol, cardiolipin, phosphatidyl serine, and phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PE) were 20.6, 19.52, 1.21, 2.38, 0.50, 2.28, 54.3, 0.60, 0.65, and 4.85 ng/mL, respectively. However, adopting the high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection method issued by the China Food and Drug Administration, only PA, LPC, PE, PI, and PPC could be analyzed accurately, and the limits of quantification were 33.89, 60.5, 30.3, 10.9, and 61.79 μg/mL, respectively. The total single-run time was at the least 20 min. Consequently, the supercritical fluid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was more suitable for the analysis of related PLs.

  10. Facile Synthesis of Phosphatidyl Saccharides for Preparation of Anionic Nanoliposomes with Enhanced Stability

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shuang; Cheong, Ling-Zhi; Falkeborg, Mia; Liu, Lei; Dong, Mingdong; Jensen, Henrik Max; Bertelsen, Kresten; Thorsen, Michael; Tan, Tianwei; Xu, Xuebing; Guo, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Physical stability during storage and against processing such as dehyration/rehydration are the cornerstone in designing delivery vehicles. In this work, mono-, di- and tri-saccharides were enzymatically conjugated to phosphatidyl group through a facile approach namely phospholipase D (PLD) mediated transphosphatidylation in a biphasic reaction system. The purified products were structurally identified and the connectivities of carbohydrate to phosphatidyl moiety precisely mapped by 1H, 31P, 13C NMR pulse sequences and LC-ESI-FTMS. The synthetic phosphatidyl saccharides were employed as the sole biomimetic component for preparation of nanoliposomes. It was found that the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of phosphatidyl saccharides increases as more bulky sugar moiety (mono- to tri-) is introduced. Phosphatidyl di-saccharide had the largest membrane curvature. In comparison to the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine liposome, all phosphatidyl saccharides liposomes are anionic and demonstrated significantly enhanced stability during storage. According to the confocal laser scan microscopy (CLSM) and atom force microscopy (AFM) analyses, the nanoliposomes formed by the synthetic phosphatidyl saccharides also show excellent stability against dehydration/rehydration process in which most of the liposomal structures remained intact. The abundance hydroxyl groups in the saccharide moieties might provide sufficient H-bondings for stabilization. This work demonstrated the synthesized phosphatidyl saccharides are capable of functioning as enzymatically liable materials which can form stable nanoliposomes without addition of stabilizing excipients. PMID:24069243

  11. Molecular Basis of Phosphatidyl-myo-inositol Mannoside Biosynthesis and Regulation in Mycobacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Marcelo E.; Korduláková, Jana; Alzari, Pedro M.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Jackson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs) are unique glycolipids found in abundant quantities in the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope of all Mycobacterium species. They are based on a phosphatidyl-myo-inositol lipid anchor carrying one to six mannose residues and up to four acyl chains. PIMs are considered not only essential structural components of the cell envelope but also the structural basis of the lipoglycans (lipomannan and lipoarabinomannan), all important molecules implicated in host-pathogen interactions in the course of tuberculosis and leprosy. Although the chemical structure of PIMs is now well established, knowledge of the enzymes and sequential events leading to their biosynthesis and regulation is still incomplete. Recent advances in the identification of key proteins involved in PIM biogenesis and the determination of the three-dimensional structures of the essential phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosyltransferase PimA and the lipoprotein LpqW have led to important insights into the molecular basis of this pathway. PMID:20801880

  12. Serine biosynthesis and transport defects.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W

    2016-07-01

    l-serine is a non-essential amino acid that is biosynthesized via the enzymes phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP). Besides its role in protein synthesis, l-serine is a potent neurotrophic factor and a precursor of a number of essential compounds including phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, glycine, and d-serine. Serine biosynthesis defects result from impairments of PGDH, PSAT, or PSP leading to systemic serine deficiency. Serine biosynthesis defects present in a broad phenotypic spectrum that includes, at the severe end, Neu-Laxova syndrome, a lethal multiple congenital anomaly disease, intermediately, infantile serine biosynthesis defects with severe neurological manifestations and growth deficiency, and at the mild end, the childhood disease with intellectual disability. A serine transport defect resulting from deficiency of the ASCT1, the main transporter for serine in the central nervous system, has been recently described in children with neurological manifestations that overlap with those observed in serine biosynthesis defects. l-serine therapy may be beneficial in preventing or ameliorating symptoms in serine biosynthesis and transport defects, if started before neurological damage occurs. Herein, we review serine metabolism and transport, the clinical, biochemical, and molecular aspects of serine biosynthesis and transport defects, the mechanisms of these diseases, and the potential role of serine therapy. PMID:27161889

  13. Lysophosphatidylserine analogues differentially activate three LysoPS receptors.

    PubMed

    Uwamizu, Akiharu; Inoue, Asuka; Suzuki, Kensuke; Okudaira, Michiyo; Shuto, Akira; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Makide, Kumiko; Ikubo, Masaya; Nakamura, Sho; Jung, Sejin; Sayama, Misa; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Aoki, Junken

    2015-03-01

    Lysophosphatidylserine (1-oleoyl-2 R-lysophosphatidylserine, LysoPS) has been shown to have lipid mediator-like actions such as stimulation of mast cell degranulation and suppression of T lymphocyte proliferation, although the mechanisms of LysoPS actions have been elusive. Recently, three G protein-coupled receptors (LPS1/GPR34, LPS2/P2Y10 and LPS3/GPR174) were found to react specifically with LysoPS, raising the possibility that LysoPS serves as a lipid mediator that exerts its role through these receptors. Previously, we chemically synthesized a number of LysoPS analogues and evaluated them as agonists for mast-cell degranulation. Here, we used a transforming growth factor-α (TGFα) shedding assay to see if these LysoPS analogues activated the three LysoPS receptors. Modification of the serine moiety significantly reduced the ability of the analogues to activate the three LysoPS receptors, whereas modification of other parts resulted in loss of activity in receptor-specific manner. We found that introduction of methyl group to serine moiety (1-oleoyl-lysophosphatidylallothreonine) and removal of sn-2 hydroxyl group (1-oleoyl-2-deoxy-LysoPS) resulted in reduction of reactivity with LPS1 and LPS3, respectively. Accordingly, we synthesized a LysoPS analogue with the two modifications (1-oleoyl-2-deoxy-lysophosphatidylallothreonine) and found it to be an LPS2-selective agonist. These pharmacological tools will definitely help to identify the biological roles of these LysoPS receptors. PMID:25320102

  14. d-serine levels in Alzheimer's disease: implications for novel biomarker development

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, C; Lourenco, M V; Vargas-Lopes, C; Suemoto, C K; Brandão, C O; Reis, T; Leite, R E P; Laks, J; Jacob-Filho, W; Pasqualucci, C A; Grinberg, L T; Ferreira, S T; Panizzutti, R

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder still in search of effective methods of diagnosis. Altered levels of the NMDA receptor co-agonist, d-serine, have been associated with neurological disorders, including schizophrenia and epilepsy. However, whether d-serine levels are deregulated in AD remains elusive. Here, we first measured D-serine levels in post-mortem hippocampal and cortical samples from nondemented subjects (n=8) and AD patients (n=14). We next determined d-serine levels in experimental models of AD, including wild-type rats and mice that received intracerebroventricular injections of amyloid-β oligomers, and APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Finally, we assessed d-serine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 21 patients with a diagnosis of probable AD, as compared with patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (n=9), major depression (n=9) and healthy controls (n=10), and results were contrasted with CSF amyloid-β/tau AD biomarkers. d-serine levels were higher in the hippocampus and parietal cortex of AD patients than in control subjects. Levels of both d-serine and serine racemase, the enzyme responsible for d-serine production, were elevated in experimental models of AD. Significantly, d-serine levels were higher in the CSF of probable AD patients than in non-cognitively impaired subject groups. Combining d-serine levels to the amyloid/tau index remarkably increased the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis of probable AD in our cohort. Our results show that increased brain and CSF d-serine levels are associated with AD. CSF d-serine levels discriminated between nondemented and AD patients in our cohort and might constitute a novel candidate biomarker for early AD diagnosis. PMID:25942042

  15. Synthetic sulfoglycolipids targeting the serine-threonine protein kinase Akt.

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara; Dangate, Milind; Vetro, Maria; Donvito, Giulia; Gabrielli, Luca; Amigoni, Loredana; Cassinelli, Giuliana; Lanzi, Cinzia; Ceriani, Michela; De Gioia, Luca; Filippi, Giulia; Cipolla, Laura; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Perego, Paola; Colombo, Diego

    2016-08-15

    The serine-threonine protein kinase Akt, also known as protein kinase B, is a key component of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mTOR axis. Deregulated activation of this pathway is frequent in human tumors and Akt-dependent signaling appears to be critical in cell survival. PI3K activation generates 3-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositols that bind Akt pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. The blockage of Akt PH domain/phosphoinositides interaction represents a promising approach to interfere with the oncogenic potential of over-activated Akt. In the present study, phosphatidyl inositol mimics based on a β-glucoside scaffold have been synthesized as Akt inhibitors. The compounds possessed one or two lipophilic moieties of different length at the anomeric position of glucose, and an acidic or basic group at C-6. Docking studies, ELISA Akt inhibition assays, and cellular assays on different cell models highlighted 1-O-octadecanoyl-2-O-β-d-sulfoquinovopyranosyl-sn-glycerol as the best Akt inhibitor among the synthesized compounds, which could be considered as a lead for further optimization in the design of Akt inhibitors.

  16. Photoregulated expression of the PsPK3 and PsPK5 genes in pea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Khanna, R; Lin, X; Watson, J C

    1999-01-01

    The PsPK3 and PsPK5 genes of the garden pea encode protein-serine/threonine kinases whose catalytic domains are closely related to known signal transducing kinases from animals and fungi. The PsPK3 polypeptide is predicted to be located in the nucleus, whereas PsPK5 is a homologue of NPH1, the probable blue light receptor for phototropism from Arabidopsis. We found previously that when etiolated pea seedlings are illuminated with continuous white light, PsPK3 and PsPK5 transcript levels within apical buds decline substantially, reaching their minimum levels within one day of exposure to light. The role of light in regulating the expression of the PsPK3 and PsPK5 genes was investigated further. To gain insight into the rapidity with which expression changes, 6-day old, dark-grown pea seedlings were transferred to continuous white light, and PsPK3 and PsPK5 RNA levels monitored over the ensuing 24 h. While transcripts from the RbcS gene family increase, the PsPK3 and PsPK5 mRNAs decline rapidly to their minimum levels. PsPK5 mRNA declines 10-fold in ca. 2 h, whereas PsPK3 mRNA declines 4-fold in ca. 8 h. We used single pulses of light to elucidate which photoreceptor triggers the negative regulation of PsPK3 and PsPK5 gene expression. To assess phytochrome involvement, etiolated seedlings were treated with single pulses of red light, red followed by far-red light, or far-red light alone. RbcS induction by a red light pulse is reversible with a subsequent far-red light pulse, clearly showing that phytochrome mediates its induction. Likewise, RbcS expression is induced with a single pulse of blue light or a dichromatic pulse of red+blue light. However, none of these pulses trigger the PsPK3 and PsPK5 mRNA levels to decline. Given the lack of effectiveness of light pulses, etiolated seedlings were transferred to continuous light of three different qualities to determine the spectral sensitivity of PsPK3 and PsPK5 gene expression. Exposure to continuous red, continuous

  17. Phosphatidylcholine synthesis in castor bean endosperm. I. Metabolism of L-serine. [Ricinus communis

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, A.J.; Moore, T.S. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Endosperm halves from 3-day-old castor bean (Ricinus communis var Hale) were incubated for 30 minutes with L(/sup 14/C)serine, after which label was observed in ethanolamine, choline, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, ethanolaminephosphate, and CDPethanolamine, but not in cholinephosphate or CDPcholine. Only later did significant amounts of isotope become incorporated into cholinephosphate and CDPcholine. The choline kinase inhibitor hemicholinium-3 prevented the incorporation of label from serine into choline-phosphate and CDPcholine, reduced the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)choline into phosphatidylcholine by 65%, but inhibited the incorporation of label into phosphatidylcholine from serine by only 15%. The inhibitor did not prevent the incorporation of labeled methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine into phosphatidyldimethylethanolamine plus phosphatidyl-choline. The amount of incorporation of label from the methyl donor was only 8% of that from choline into phosphatidylcholine. The implications of these results for the pathway and regulation of phosphatidylcholine synthesis from the water-soluble precursors are discussed.

  18. The ps in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Newton, David W

    2012-01-01

    The decline of ps (pharmaceutical sciences) content and emphasis, especially pharmaceutics in pharmacy education, has been followed by pharmacy practice journals since the final BS to PharmD degree transition of 1990-2000. The particular deficit of drug compatibility, compounding, packaging, reactivity, solubility, stability and storage instruction, and information was a major impetus for the 1996 premier of the International journal of pharmaceutical compounding and the 2011 introduction of the Science and technology for the hospital pharmacist electronic newsletter. The four ps examples provided in this article to corroborate the introduction to Vol. 1, No. 2 of the Science and technology for the hospital pharmacist, which featured Dr. Richard Penna's prudent reflection that biological, chemical, and physical ps facts and knowledge are vital to patient care.

  19. Serine proteases of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-02-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  20. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  1. Compressing inverse lyotropic systems: Structural behavior and energetics of dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Michela; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Di Gregorio, Giordano M; Ferrero, Claudio; Finet, Stephanie; Mariani, Paolo

    2003-08-01

    The pressure effects on the stability and energetics of lipid phases in the L-alpha-dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (DOPE)-water system are presented. Using synchrotron diffraction experiments, performed at a wide range of concentrations, pressure-induced transitions from the inverse hexagonal (H(II)) to the lamellar L(alpha) phase and from the L(alpha) to the lamellar L(beta) phase are demonstrated. Moreover, in the most dehydrated samples an intermediate phase is found between the H(II) and the L(alpha) phases, confirming that the lamellar-to-nonlamellar phase transition occurs through key intermediate structures. Simple molecular packing arguments lead to an interpretation of the phase behavior: in fact, pressure induces a progressive stiffening of the DOPE hydrocarbon chains and a reduction of the cross-sectional area. Because pressure is more effective in reducing the cross-sectional area near the terminal methyl groups than at the water-lipid interface, the curvature of that interface in the H(II) phase is reduced during compression. The work of isothermal compression was then obtained and analyzed in terms of the elastic energetic contributions that should stabilize the DOPE phases during compression. As a result, we observe that the isothermal lateral compression modulus is almost independent of concentration, but it increases as a function of pressure, suggesting that the DOPE repulsion becomes very strong while the whole lipid shape becomes more cylindrical. On the other hand, the bending rigidity is observed to decrease with increasing pressure, while the spontaneous curvature becomes less negative. This suggests that the chain repulsion becomes relatively weaker, and thus less efficient in balancing the torque of head-group repulsion, as the order parameter increases. PMID:14525023

  2. The effect of polyene phosphatidyl choline intervention on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and related mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mingbo; Li, Xiuling; Zhang, Bingyong; Han, Shuangyin; Yang, Yuxiu; Zhou, Bingxi; Zhang, Yanri

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has similar clinical pathological changes to alcoholic hepatitis. It shows increased incidence and young trend year by year. Polyene phosphatidyl choline (PPC) is widely used in clinic for liver disease treatment. The effect and mechanism of PPC on NASH have not been fully elucidated. Thirty healthy male Wistar rats were randomly equally divided into control, NASH group, and PPC group. NASH model was established by high fat diet. PPC was intraperitoneal injected to NASH rat from the second week at 80 mg/kg·d for three weeks. Body weight, liver weight index, ALT, AST, TG, and TC were tested. TNF-α and IL-1β levels were detected by ELISA. NF-κB mRNA and protein expression in liver tissue were determined by real time PCR and Western blot. SOD activity and ROS content were measured by colorimetry. NASH rat presented significantly elevated body weight and liver weight index, increased ROS content, declined SOD activity, enhanced liver function and inflammatory factors expression, and upregulated NF-κB mRNA and protein levels compared with control (P < 0.05). PPC intervention obviously reduced body weight and liver weight index, declined ROS content, amplified SOD activity, decreased liver function, weakened inflammatory factor TNF-α and IL-1β expression, and downregulated NF-κB mRNA and protein levels compared with NASH group (P < 0.05). PPC can play a treatment effect on NASH through regulating oxidative balance, inhibiting inflammatory factors and NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27347340

  3. The importance of serine metabolism in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mattaini, Katherine R; Sullivan, Mark R; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2016-08-01

    Serine metabolism is frequently dysregulated in cancers; however, the benefit that this confers to tumors remains controversial. In many cases, extracellular serine alone is sufficient to support cancer cell proliferation, whereas some cancer cells increase serine synthesis from glucose and require de novo serine synthesis even in the presence of abundant extracellular serine. Recent studies cast new light on the role of serine metabolism in cancer, suggesting that active serine synthesis might be required to facilitate amino acid transport, nucleotide synthesis, folate metabolism, and redox homeostasis in a manner that impacts cancer. PMID:27458133

  4. Serine Biosynthesis and Regulation in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Pizer, Lewis I.; Ponce-De-Leon, Manuel; Michalka, Jack

    1969-01-01

    Nutritional mutants of Haemophilus influenzae requiring l-serine for growth were shown to be deficient in their capacity to synthesize serine-phosphate from 3-phosphoglycerate. On the basis of the correlation between this block and the requirement for an exogenous supply of the amino acid, it was concluded that the “phosphorylated” pathway is the only pathway used by H. influenzae for serine biosynthesis. Serine inhibits serine-phosphate production, thereby regulating its own synthesis in a manner analagous to the Enterobacteriaceae. A mutant strain that required either serine or tryptophan for growth was normal in serine-phosphate synthesis and regulation. It was concluded that this strain probably has a tryptophan synthetase with an increased Michaelis constant for serine. PMID:5305003

  5. Synaptotagmin 1 causes phosphatidyl inositol lipid-dependent actin remodeling in cultured non-neuronal and neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, Anna-Karin; Karlsson, Roger

    2012-01-15

    Here we demonstrate that a dramatic actin polymerizing activity caused by ectopic expression of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptotagmin 1 that results in extensive filopodia formation is due to the presence of a lysine rich sequence motif immediately at the cytoplasmic side of the transmembrane domain of the protein. This polybasic sequence interacts with anionic phospholipids in vitro, and, consequently, the actin remodeling caused by this sequence is interfered with by expression of a phosphatidyl inositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2)-targeted phosphatase, suggesting that it intervenes with the function of PIP2-binding actin control proteins. The activity drastically alters the behavior of a range of cultured cells including the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y and primary cortical mouse neurons, and, since the sequence is conserved also in synaptotagmin 2, it may reflect an important fine-tuning role for these two proteins during synaptic vesicle fusion and neurotransmitter release.

  6. Phage-encoded Serine Integrases and Other Large Serine Recombinases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Margaret C M

    2015-08-01

    The large serine recombinases (LSRs) are a family of enzymes, encoded in temperate phage genomes or on mobile elements, that precisely cut and recombine DNA in a highly controllable and predictable way. In phage integration, the LSRs act at specific sites, the attP site in the phage and the attB site in the host chromosome, where cleavage and strand exchange leads to the integrated prophage flanked by the recombinant sites attL and attR. The prophage can excise by recombination between attL and attR but this requires a phage-encoded accessory protein, the recombination directionality factor (RDF). Although the LSRs can bind specifically to all the recombination sites, only specific integrase-bound sites can pair in a synaptic complex prior to strand exchange. Recent structural information has led to a breakthrough in our understanding of the mechanism of the LSRs, notably how the LSRs bind to their substrates and how LSRs display this site-selectivity. We also understand that the RDFs exercise control over the LSRs by protein-protein interactions. Other recent work with the LSRs have contributed to our understanding of how all serine recombinases undergo strand exchange subunit rotation, facilitated by surfaces that resemble a molecular bearing.

  7. An update on serine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    van der Crabben, S N; Verhoeven-Duif, N M; Brilstra, E H; Van Maldergem, L; Coskun, T; Rubio-Gozalbo, E; Berger, R; de Koning, T J

    2013-07-01

    Serine deficiency disorders are caused by a defect in one of the three synthesising enzymes of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway. Serine deficiency disorders give rise to a neurological phenotype with psychomotor retardation, microcephaly and seizures in newborns and children or progressive polyneuropathy in adult patients. There are three defects that cause serine deficiency of which 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency, the defect affecting the first step in the pathway, has been reported most frequently. The other two disorders in L-serine biosynthesis phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) deficiency and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) deficiency have been reported only in a limited number of patients. The biochemical hallmarks of all three disorders are low concentrations of serine in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma. Prompt recognition of affected patients is important, since serine deficiency disorders are treatable causes of neurometabolic disorders. The use of age-related reference values for serine in CSF and plasma can be of great help in establishing a correct diagnosis of serine deficiency, in particular in newborns and young children. PMID:23463425

  8. Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases*

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas H.; Antalis, Toni M.; Wu, Qingyu

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of genome and expressed sequence tag data bases at the turn of the millennium unveiled a new protease family named the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) in a Journal of Biological Chemistry minireview (Hooper, J. D., Clements, J. A., Quigley, J. P., and Antalis, T. M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 857–860). Since then, the number of known TTSPs has more than doubled, and more importantly, our understanding of the physiological functions of individual TTSPs and their contribution to human disease has greatly increased. Progress has also been made in identifying molecular substrates and endogenous inhibitors. This minireview summarizes the current knowledge of the rapidly advancing TTSP field. PMID:19487698

  9. L-serine synthesis in the central nervous system: a review on serine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaie, L; Klomp, L W; Berger, R; de Koning, T J

    2010-03-01

    The de novo synthesis of the amino acid L-serine plays an essential role in the development and functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). L-serine displays many metabolic functions during different developmental stages; among its functions providing precursors for amino acids, protein synthesis, nucleotide synthesis, neurotransmitter synthesis and L-serine derived lipids. Patients with congenital defects in the L-serine synthesizing enzymes present with severe neurological abnormalities and underscore the importance of this synthetic pathway. In this review, we will discuss the cellular functions of the L-serine pathway, structure and enzymatic properties of the enzymes involved and genetic defects associated with this pathway. PMID:19963421

  10. BKM-120 (Buparlisib): A Phosphatidyl-Inositol-3 Kinase Inhibitor with Anti-Invasive Properties in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Nowicki, Michal O; Behera, Prajna; Cho, Choi-Fong; Chiocca, E Antonio; Lawler, Sean E

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive, invasive tumor of the central nervous system (CNS). There is a widely acknowledged need for anti-invasive therapeutics to limit glioblastoma invasion. BKM-120 is a CNS-penetrant pan-class I phosphatidyl-inositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor in clinical trials for solid tumors, including glioblastoma. We observed that BKM-120 has potent anti-invasive effects in glioblastoma cell lines and patient-derived glioma cells in vitro. These anti-migratory effects were clearly distinguishable from cytostatic and cytotoxic effects at higher drug concentrations and longer durations of drug exposure. The effects were reversible and accompanied by changes in cell morphology and pronounced reduction in both cell/cell and cell/substrate adhesion. In vivo studies showed that a short period of treatment with BKM-120 slowed tumor spread in an intracranial xenografts. GDC-0941, a similar potent and selective PI3K inhibitor, only caused a moderate reduction in glioblastoma cell migration. The effects of BKM-120 and GDC-0941 were indistinguishable by in vitro kinase selectivity screening and phospho-protein arrays. BKM-120 reduced the numbers of focal adhesions and the velocity of microtubule treadmilling compared with GDC-0941, suggesting that mechanisms in addition to PI3K inhibition contribute to the anti-invasive effects of BKM-120. Our data suggest the CNS-penetrant PI3K inhibitor BKM-120 may have anti-invasive properties in glioblastoma. PMID:26846842

  11. BKM-120 (Buparlisib): A Phosphatidyl-Inositol-3 Kinase Inhibitor with Anti-Invasive Properties in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Nowicki, Michal O.; Behera, Prajna; Cho, Choi-Fong; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Lawler, Sean E.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive, invasive tumor of the central nervous system (CNS). There is a widely acknowledged need for anti-invasive therapeutics to limit glioblastoma invasion. BKM-120 is a CNS-penetrant pan-class I phosphatidyl-inositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor in clinical trials for solid tumors, including glioblastoma. We observed that BKM-120 has potent anti-invasive effects in glioblastoma cell lines and patient-derived glioma cells in vitro. These anti-migratory effects were clearly distinguishable from cytostatic and cytotoxic effects at higher drug concentrations and longer durations of drug exposure. The effects were reversible and accompanied by changes in cell morphology and pronounced reduction in both cell/cell and cell/substrate adhesion. In vivo studies showed that a short period of treatment with BKM-120 slowed tumor spread in an intracranial xenografts. GDC-0941, a similar potent and selective PI3K inhibitor, only caused a moderate reduction in glioblastoma cell migration. The effects of BKM-120 and GDC-0941 were indistinguishable by in vitro kinase selectivity screening and phospho-protein arrays. BKM-120 reduced the numbers of focal adhesions and the velocity of microtubule treadmilling compared with GDC-0941, suggesting that mechanisms in addition to PI3K inhibition contribute to the anti-invasive effects of BKM-120. Our data suggest the CNS-penetrant PI3K inhibitor BKM-120 may have anti-invasive properties in glioblastoma. PMID:26846842

  12. D-Serine and Serine Racemase Are Associated with PSD-95 and Glutamatergic Synapse Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; Jacobi, Ariel A.; Anderson, Stewart A.; Lynch, David R.

    2016-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous coagonist at the glycine site of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), synthesized by serine racemase (SR) through conversion of L-serine. It is crucial for synaptic plasticity and is implicated in schizophrenia. Our previous studies demonstrated specific loss of SR, D-serine-responsive synaptic NMDARs, and glutamatergic synapses in cortical neurons lacking α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which promotes glutamatergic synapse formation and maturation during development. We thus hypothesize that D-serine and SR (D-serine/SR) are associated with glutamatergic synaptic development. Using morphological and molecular studies in cortical neuronal cultures, we demonstrate that D-serine/SR are associated with PSD-95 and NMDARs in postsynaptic neurons and with glutamatergic synapse stability during synaptic development. Endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95, but not presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), in glutamatergic synapses of cultured cortical neurons. Low-density astrocytes in cortical neuronal cultures lack SR expression but contain enriched D-serine in large vesicle-like structures, suggesting possible synthesis of D-serine in postsynaptic neurons and storage in astrocytes. More interestingly, endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95 in the postsynaptic terminals of glutamatergic synapses during early and late synaptic development, implicating involvement of D-serine/SR in glutamatergic synaptic development. Exogenous application of D-serine enhances the interactions of SR with PSD-95 and NR1, and increases the number of VGLUT1- and PSD-95-positive glutamatergic synapses, suggesting that exogenous D-serine enhances postsynaptic SR/PSD-95 signaling and stabilizes glutamatergic synapses during cortical synaptic development. This is blocked by NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-CK), a specific antagonist at the glycine site of NMDARs, demonstrating

  13. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  14. Pharmacological Activities and Hydrolysis by Peptidases of [Phospho-Ser(6)]-Bradykinin (pS(6)-BK).

    PubMed

    Assis, Diego M; Juliano, Luiz; Paschoalin, Thaysa; Kouyoumdjian, Maria; Calixto, Joao B; Santos, Robson A S; Pertinhez, Thelma A; Gauthier, Francis; Moreau, Thierry; Blaber, Michael; Juliano, Maria A

    2015-09-15

    Phosphorylated kininogen and some of its fragments containing serine phosphorylated bradykinin ([pS(6)]-Bk) were identified in human serum and plasma by a phosphoproteomic approach. We report the kininogenase ability of human tissue and plasma kallikreins and tryptase to generate [pS(6)]-Bk or Lys-[pS(6)]-Bk having as substrate the synthetic human kininogen fluorescent fragment Abz-MISLMKRPPGF[pS(386)]PFRSSRI-NH2. The pharmacological assays of [pS(6)]-Bk showed it as a full B2 bradykinin receptor agonist in smooth muscle, it produces a portal liver hypertensive response in rat and mouse paw edema that lasts longer than Bk. The rat hypotensive response to infusions of Bk is greater than that of [pS(6)]Bk, both if injected through femoral vein or aorta. [pS(6)]-Bk was more resistant than Bk to kininase digestion performed with angiotensin converting enzyme, neprilysin, thimet oligopeptidase, aminopeptidase P and carboxypeptidase M. (1)H-NMR experiments indicated that [pS(6)]-Bk has lower flexibility, with the pS(6)-P(7) bond restricted to the trans conformation, and can explain [pS(6)]-Bk resistance to hydrolysis. In conclusion, [pS(6)]-Bk presenting lower activity than Bk, with longer lasting effects and being slowly released by kininogenases from synthetic Abz-MISLMKRPPGF[pS(386)]PFRSSRI-NH2, suggests that phosphorylation of the kininogens can be an efficient kallikrein-kinin system regulator.

  15. Serine deprivation enhances antineoplastic activity of biguanides.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Hulea, Laura; Toban, Nader; Birman, Elena; Blouin, Marie-José; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Zhao, Yunhua; Topisirovic, Ivan; St-Pierre, Julie; Pollak, Michael

    2014-12-15

    Metformin, a biguanide widely used in the treatment of type II diabetes, clearly exhibits antineoplastic activity in experimental models and has been reported to reduce cancer incidence in diabetics. There are ongoing clinical trials to evaluate its antitumor properties, which may relate to its fundamental activity as an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation. Here, we show that serine withdrawal increases the antineoplastic effects of phenformin (a potent biguanide structurally related to metformin). Serine synthesis was not inhibited by biguanides. Instead, metabolic studies indicated a requirement for serine to allow cells to compensate for biguanide-induced decrease in oxidative phosphorylation by upregulating glycolysis. Furthermore, serine deprivation modified the impact of metformin on the relative abundance of metabolites within the citric acid cycle. In mice, a serine-deficient diet reduced serine levels in tumors and significantly enhanced the tumor growth-inhibitory actions of biguanide treatment. Our results define a dietary manipulation that can enhance the efficacy of biguanides as antineoplastic agents that target cancer cell energy metabolism.

  16. MUW Approach of PS OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Pircher, Michael

    Polarization sensitive (PS) OCT is a functional extension of OCT that exploits the light's polarization state to generate intrinsic, tissue specific contrast and enables quantitative measurements of tissue parameters. This chapter explains the technique, discusses polarization-changing light-tissue interactions and demonstrates the application of PS-OCT to retinal imaging. Two polarization-changing light-tissue interactions are discussed and their use for retinal diagnostics are demonstrated: (i) birefringence, which is found in fibrous tissues like the retinal nerve fiber layer and can be used for glaucoma diagnostics; and (ii) depolarization, which is observed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and can be used to segment the RPE and associated lesions like drusen or geographic atrophies in age related macular degeneration.

  17. Sorafenib/regorafenib and phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase/thymoma viral proto-oncogene inhibition interact to kill tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sajithlal, Gangadharan B; Hamed, Hossein A; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Booth, Laurence; Tavallai, Seyedmehrad; Syed, Jahangir; Grant, Steven; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2013-10-01

    The present studies were undertaken to determine whether the multikinase inhibitors sorafenib/regorafenib cooperated with clinically relevant , phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K)-thymoma viral proto-oncogene (AKT) inhibitors to kill tumor cells. In liver, colorectal, lung, breast, kidney, and brain cancer cells, at clinically achievable doses, sorafenib/regorafenib and the PI3K inhibitor acetic acid (1S,4E,10R,11R,13S,14R)-[4-diallylaminomethylene-6-hydroxy-1-methoxymethyl-10,13-dimethyl-3,7,17-trioxo-1,3,4,7,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17-dodecahydro-2-oxa-cyclopenta[a]phenanthren-11-yl ester (PX-866) cooperated in a greater than additive fashion to kill tumor cells. Cells lacking phosphatase and tensin homolog were as sensitive to the drug combination as cells expressing the protein. Similar data were obtained using the AKT inhibitors perifosine and 8-[4-(1-aminocyclobutyl)phenyl]-9-phenyl-1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-f] [1,6]naphthyridin-3(2H)-one hydrochloride (MK2206). PX-866 treatment abolished AKT/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) phosphorylation, and cell killing correlated with reduced activity of AKT and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Expression of activated AKT and to a lesser extent activated mTOR reduced drug combination lethality. Expression of B-cell lymphoma-extra large or dominant negative caspase 9, but not cellular FLICE (FADD-like IL-1b-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein short, protected cells from the drug combination. Treatment of cells with PX-866 increased protein levels of p62, lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2), and microtubule-associated protein light chain (LC) 3 and LC3II that correlated with a large increase in LC3-green fluorescent protein (GFP) vesicle numbers. Exposure of PX-866 treated cells to sorafenib reduced p62 and LAMP2 levels, decreased the ratio of LC3 to LC3II, and reduced LC3-GFP vesicle levels. Knockdown of Beclin1 or autophagy-related 5 suppressed drug toxicity by ∼40%. In vivo, sorafenib and PX-866 or

  18. D-serine in the developing human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sabine A; Dorland, Lambertus; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G; Hendriks, Margriet; Klomp, Leo W J; Berger, Ruud; de Koning, Tom J

    2006-10-01

    To elucidate the role of D-serine in human central nervous system, we analyzed D-serine, L-serine, and glycine concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy children and children with a defective L-serine biosynthesis (3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency). Healthy children showed high D-serine concentrations immediately after birth, both absolutely and relative to glycine and L-serine, declining to low values at infancy. D-Serine concentrations were almost undetectable in untreated 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase-deficient patients. In one patient treated prenatally, D-serine concentration was nearly normal at birth and the clinical phenotype was normal. These observations suggest a pivotal role for D-serine in normal and aberrant human brain development. PMID:17068790

  19. Topoisomerase-I PS506 as a Dual Function Cancer Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Gjerset, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    Novel biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapy selection are urgently needed to facilitate early detection and improve therapy outcomes. We have previously identified a novel phosphorylation site at serine 506 (PS506) on topoisomerase-I (topo-I) and have shown that it is widely expressed in cell lines derived from several cancers, including lung cancer, but is low in cell lines derived from non-cancerous tissues. Here we have investigated how PS506 expression in lung tissue specimens correlates with their malignant status. We find that PS506 expression is significantly elevated in malignant tumors of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared to adjacent, non-cancerous lung tissue and benign lung tumors. PS506 expression was up to 6-fold higher in malignant specimens than in paired non-malignant tissue. Using the well-characterized NIH/NCI 60-cell line panel, we correlate the most elevated expression levels of PS506 in lung, ovarian, and colon cancer cells lines with increased sensitivity to camptothecin, a plant alkaloid that targets topo-I. This is consistent with our earlier studies in a smaller sampling of cell lines and with our finding that PS506 increases topo-I DNA binding. Two widely used chemotherapeutic drugs for ovarian and colon cancer, topotecan and irinotecan, respectively, are derived from camptothecin. Irinotecan has also displayed efficacy in clinical trials of NSCLC. Our results suggest that elevated PS506 expression may correlate with clinical chemosensitivity to these agents in ovarian, colon, and NSCLC. PS506 may therefore serve as a biomarker for diagnosis or therapy selection.

  20. Topoisomerase-I PS506 as a Dual Function Cancer Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Gjerset, Ruth A.

    2015-01-01

    Novel biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapy selection are urgently needed to facilitate early detection and improve therapy outcomes. We have previously identified a novel phosphorylation site at serine 506 (PS506) on topoisomerase-I (topo-I) and have shown that it is widely expressed in cell lines derived from several cancers, including lung cancer, but is low in cell lines derived from non-cancerous tissues. Here we have investigated how PS506 expression in lung tissue specimens correlates with their malignant status. We find that PS506 expression is significantly elevated in malignant tumors of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared to adjacent, non-cancerous lung tissue and benign lung tumors. PS506 expression was up to 6-fold higher in malignant specimens than in paired non-malignant tissue. Using the well-characterized NIH/NCI 60-cell line panel, we correlate the most elevated expression levels of PS506 in lung, ovarian, and colon cancer cells lines with increased sensitivity to camptothecin, a plant alkaloid that targets topo-I. This is consistent with our earlier studies in a smaller sampling of cell lines and with our finding that PS506 increases topo-I DNA binding. Two widely used chemotherapeutic drugs for ovarian and colon cancer, topotecan and irinotecan, respectively, are derived from camptothecin. Irinotecan has also displayed efficacy in clinical trials of NSCLC. Our results suggest that elevated PS506 expression may correlate with clinical chemosensitivity to these agents in ovarian, colon, and NSCLC. PS506 may therefore serve as a biomarker for diagnosis or therapy selection. PMID:26248194

  1. Serine protease inhibitors of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2012-05-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a superfamily of structurally conserved proteins that inhibit serine proteases and play key physiological roles in numerous biological systems such as blood coagulation, complement activation and inflammation. A number of serpins have now been identified in parasitic helminths with putative involvement in immune regulation and in parasite survival through interference with the host immune response. This review describes the serpins and smapins (small serine protease inhibitors) that have been identified in Ascaris spp., Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum Onchocerca volvulus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Anisakis simplex, Trichuris suis, Schistosoma spp., Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani and Echinococcus spp. and discusses their possible biological functions, including roles in host-parasite interplay and their evolutionary relationships. PMID:22310379

  2. p21ras initiates Rac-1 but not phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase/PKB, mediated signaling pathways in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Genot, E; Reif, K; Beach, S; Kramer, I; Cantrell, D

    1998-10-01

    p21ras is activated by the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and then co-ordinates important signaling pathways for T lymphocyte activation. Effector pathways for this guanine nucleotide binding protein in T cells are mediated by the serine/threonine kinase Raf-1 and the Ras-related GTPase Rac-1. In fibroblasts, an important effector for the Ras oncogene is Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns 3-kinase). Activation of this lipid kinase is able to induce critical Rac-1 signaling pathways and can couple p21ras to cell survival mechanisms via the serine/threonine kinase Akt/PKB. The role of PtdIns 3-kinase in Ras signaling in T cells has not been explored. In the present study, we examined the ability of PtdIns 3-kinase to initiate the Rac-1 signaling pathways important for T cell activation. We also examined the possibility that Akt/PKB is regulated by Ras signaling pathways in T lymphocytes. The results show that Ras can initiate a Rac-1 mediated pathway that regulates the transcriptional function of AP-1 complexes. PtdIns 3-kinase signals cannot mimic p21ras and induce the Rac mediated responses of AP-1 transcriptional activation. Moreover, neither TCR or Ras activation of AP-1 is dependent on PtdIns 3-kinase. PKB is activated in response to triggering of the T cell antigen receptor; PtdIns 3-kinase activity is both required and sufficient for this TCR response. In contrast, p21ras signals are unable to induce Akt/PKB activity in T cell nor is Ras function required for Akt/PKB activation in response to the TCR. The present data thus highlight that PtdIns 3-kinase and Akt/PKB are not universal Ras effector molecules. Ras can initiate Rac-1 regulated signaling pathways in the context of T cell antigen receptor function independently of PtdIns 3-kinase activity.

  3. Significance of the D-serine-deaminase and D-serine metabolism of Staphylococcus saprophyticus for virulence.

    PubMed

    Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc, Türkan; Kline, Kimberly; Nielsen, Hailyn V; Hultgren, Scott; Gatermann, Sören G

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species of Staphylococcus that is typically uropathogenic and possesses a gene coding for a D-serine-deaminase (DsdA). As D-serine is prevalent in urine and toxic or bacteriostatic to many bacteria, it is not surprising that the D-serine-deaminase gene is found in the genome of uropathogens. It has been suggested that D-serine-deaminase or the ability to respond to or to metabolize D-serine is important for virulence. For uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a high intracellular D-serine concentration affects expression of virulence factors. S. saprophyticus is able to grow in the presence of high D-serine concentrations; however, its D-serine metabolism has not been described. The activity of the D-serine-deaminase was verified by analyzing the formation of pyruvate from D-serine in different strains with and without D-serine-deaminase. Cocultivation experiments were performed to show that D-serine-deaminase confers a growth advantage to S. saprophyticus in the presence of D-serine. Furthermore, in vivo coinfection experiments showed a disadvantage for the ΔdsdA mutant during urinary tract infection. Expression analysis of known virulence factors by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed that the surface-associated lipase Ssp is upregulated in the presence of D-serine. In addition, we show that S. saprophyticus is able to use D-serine as the sole carbon source, but interestingly, D-serine had a negative effect on growth when glucose was also present. Taken together, D-serine metabolism is associated with virulence in S. saprophyticus, as at least one known virulence factor is upregulated in the presence of D-serine and a ΔdsdA mutant was attenuated in virulence murine model of urinary tract infection.

  4. Significance of the d-Serine-Deaminase and d-Serine Metabolism of Staphylococcus saprophyticus for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sakinc, Türkan; Kline, Kimberly; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott; Gatermann, Sören G.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species of Staphylococcus that is typically uropathogenic and possesses a gene coding for a d-serine-deaminase (DsdA). As d-serine is prevalent in urine and toxic or bacteriostatic to many bacteria, it is not surprising that the d-serine-deaminase gene is found in the genome of uropathogens. It has been suggested that d-serine-deaminase or the ability to respond to or to metabolize d-serine is important for virulence. For uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a high intracellular d-serine concentration affects expression of virulence factors. S. saprophyticus is able to grow in the presence of high d-serine concentrations; however, its d-serine metabolism has not been described. The activity of the d-serine-deaminase was verified by analyzing the formation of pyruvate from d-serine in different strains with and without d-serine-deaminase. Cocultivation experiments were performed to show that d-serine-deaminase confers a growth advantage to S. saprophyticus in the presence of d-serine. Furthermore, in vivo coinfection experiments showed a disadvantage for the ΔdsdA mutant during urinary tract infection. Expression analysis of known virulence factors by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed that the surface-associated lipase Ssp is upregulated in the presence of d-serine. In addition, we show that S. saprophyticus is able to use d-serine as the sole carbon source, but interestingly, d-serine had a negative effect on growth when glucose was also present. Taken together, d-serine metabolism is associated with virulence in S. saprophyticus, as at least one known virulence factor is upregulated in the presence of d-serine and a ΔdsdA mutant was attenuated in virulence murine model of urinary tract infection. PMID:24082071

  5. Revealing the multiple structures of serine

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Susana; Sanz, M. Eugenia; López, Juan C.; Alonso, José L.

    2007-01-01

    We explored the conformational landscape of the proteinogenic amino acid serine [CH2OHCH(NH2)COOH] in the gas phase. Solid serine was vaporized by laser ablation, expanded in a supersonic jet, and characterized by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. In the isolation conditions of the jet there have been discovered up to seven different neutral (non-zwitterionic) structures of serine, which are conclusively identified by the comparison between the experimental values of the rotational and quadrupole coupling constants with those predicted by ab initio calculations. These seven forms can serve as a basis to represent the shape of serine in the gas phase. From the postexpansion abundances we derived the conformational stability trend, which is controlled by the subtle network of intramolecular hydrogen bonds formed between the polar groups in the amino acid backbone and the hydroxy side chain. It is proposed that conformational cooling perturbs the equilibrium conformational distribution; thus, some of the lower-energy forms are “missing” in the supersonic expansion. PMID:18077350

  6. 21 CFR 582.5701 - Serine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Serine. 582.5701 Section 582.5701 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5701 - Serine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Serine. 582.5701 Section 582.5701 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5701 - Serine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Serine. 582.5701 Section 582.5701 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  9. Kinetic analysis of a unique direct prothrombinase, fgl2, and identification of a serine residue critical for the prothrombinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Camie W Y; Chan, Matthew W C; Liu, Mingfeng; Fung, Laisum; Cole, Edward H; Leibowitz, Julian L; Marsden, Philip A; Clark, David A; Levy, Gary A

    2002-05-15

    fgl2 prothrombinase, by its ability to generate thrombin, has been shown to be pivotal to the pathogenesis of viral-induced hepatitis, cytokine-induced fetal loss syndrome, and xeno- and allograft rejection. In this study, the molecular basis of fgl2 prothrombinase activity was examined in detail. Purified fgl2 protein generated in a baculovirus expression system had no measurable prothrombinase activity, whereas the activity was restored when the purified protein was reconstituted into phosphatidyl-L-serine-containing vesicles. Reconstituted fgl2 catalyzed the cleavage of human prothrombin to thrombin with kinetics consistent with a first order reaction, with an apparent V(max) value of 6 mol/min/mol fgl2 and an apparent K(m) value for prothrombin of 8.3 microM. The catalytic activity was totally dependent on calcium, and factor Va (500 nM) enhanced the catalytic efficiency of fgl2 by increasing the apparent V(max) value to 3670 mol/min/mol fgl2 and decreasing the apparent K(m) value for prothrombin to 7.2 microM. By a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and production of truncated proteins, it was clearly shown that residue Ser(89) was critical for the prothrombinase activity of fgl2. Furthermore, fgl2 prothrombinase activity was not inhibited by antithrombin III, soybean trypsin inhibitor, 4-aminobenzamidine, aprotinin, or phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, whereas diisopropylfluorophosphate completely abrogated the activity. In this work we provide direct evidence that fgl2 cleaves prothrombin to thrombin consistent with serine protease activity and requires calcium, phospholipids, and factor Va for its full activity. PMID:11994472

  10. In Vivo d-Serine Hetero-Exchange through Alanine-Serine-Cysteine (ASC) Transporters Detected by Microelectrode Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    d-Serine, a co-agonist of N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, has been implicated in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as cerebral ischemia, lateral amyotrophic sclerosis, or schizophrenia. d-Serine signaling represents an important pharmacological target for treating these diseases; however, the biochemical mechanisms controlling extracellular d-serine levels in vivo are still unclear. d-Serine heteroexchange through small neutral amino acid transporters has been shown in cell cultures and brain slices and could provide a biochemical mechanism for the control of d-serine extracellular concentration in vivo. Alternatively, exocytotic d-serine release has also been proposed. In this study, the dynamics of d-serine release and clearance were explored in vivo on a second-by-second time scale using microelectrode biosensors. The rate of d-serine clearance in the rat frontal cortex after a microionophoretic injection revealed a transporter-mediated uptake mechanism. d-Serine uptake was blocked by small neutral l-amino acids, implicating alanine-serine-cysteine (ASC) transporters, in particular high affinity Asc-1 and low affinity ASCT2 transporters. Interestingly, changes in alanine, serine, or threonine levels resulted in d-serine release through ASC transporters. Asc-1, but not ASCT2, appeared to release d-serine in response to changes in amino acid concentrations. Finally, neuronal silencing by tetrodotoxin increased d-serine extracellular concentration by an ASC-transporter-dependent mechanism. Together, these results indicate that d-serine heteroexchange through ASC transporters is present in vivo and may constitute a key component in the regulation of d-serine extracellular concentration. PMID:23581544

  11. HSAN1 mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase reveal a close structure-function-phenotype relationship.

    PubMed

    Bode, Heiko; Bourquin, Florence; Suriyanarayanan, Saranya; Wei, Yu; Alecu, Irina; Othman, Alaa; Von Eckardstein, Arnold; Hornemann, Thorsten

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited peripheral neuropathy caused by mutations in the SPTLC1 and SPTLC2 subunits of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). The mutations induce a permanent shift in the substrate preference from L-serine to L-alanine, which results in the pathological formation of atypical and neurotoxic 1-deoxy-sphingolipids (1-deoxySL). Here we compared the enzymatic properties of 11 SPTLC1 and six SPTLC2 mutants using a uniform isotope labelling approach. In total, eight SPT mutants (STPLC1p.C133W, p.C133Y, p.S331F, p.S331Y and SPTLC2p.A182P, p.G382V, p.S384F, p.I504F) were associated with increased 1-deoxySL synthesis. Despite earlier reports, canonical activity with l-serine was not reduced in any of the investigated SPT mutants. Three variants (SPTLC1p.S331F/Y and SPTLC2p.I505Y) showed an increased canonical activity and increased formation of C20 sphingoid bases. These three mutations are associated with an exceptionally severe HSAN1 phenotype, and increased C20 sphingosine levels were also confirmed in plasma of patients. A principal component analysis of the analysed sphingoid bases clustered the mutations into three separate entities. Each cluster was related to a distinct clinical outcome (no, mild and severe HSAN1 phenotype). A homology model based on the protein structure of the prokaryotic SPT recapitulated the same grouping on a structural level. Mutations associated with the mild form clustered around the active site, whereas mutations associated with the severe form were located on the surface of the protein. In conclusion, we showed that HSAN1 mutations in SPT have distinct biochemical properties, which allowed for the prediction of the clinical symptoms on the basis of the plasma sphingoid base profile. PMID:26681808

  12. A reappraisal of the dog-heart infarct plasmalogen, its conception as a bis-phosphatidic acid and current recognition as an N-acyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Hack, M H; Helmy, F M

    1982-01-01

    1. We have re-examined the lipids from myocardial infarcts of cat, dog, rabbit and man, mainly through TLC methods, and confirm the identity of cat and dog "infarct plasmalogen" as an N-acyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (NAPE). This substance was not detected in infarcts of rabbit and man. 2. We have extended our observations on a similar phosphatide, as the plasmalogen form, naturally occurring in the brain and optic nerve of fish. 3. Supporting evidence for the NAPE identity was provided from non-plasmalogen forms isolated from peas and lentils. 4. NAPE in all of its forms was shown to be a reluctant substrate for the phospholipase A2 of snake venoms. 5. Co-chromatography problems involving NAPE, semi-lyso cardiolipin and bis-phosphatidic acid are documented and their relationship to the infarct phenomenon discussed.

  13. Serine and one-carbon metabolism in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Vousden, Karen H

    2016-10-01

    The non-essential amino acid serine supports several metabolic processes that are crucial for the growth and survival of proliferating cells, including protein, amino acid and glutathione synthesis. As an important one-carbon donor to the folate cycle, serine contributes to nucleotide synthesis, methylation reactions and the generation of NADPH for antioxidant defence. Many cancer cells are highly dependent on serine, a trait that provides several novel therapeutic opportunities, either through the inhibition of de novo serine synthesis or by limiting the availability or uptake of exogenous serine. PMID:27634448

  14. Vanadium inhibition of serine and cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, N; Cerletti, P; De Vincentiis, M; Salvati, A; Scippa, S

    1999-03-01

    A study was made on the effect of vanadium, in both the tetravalent state in vanadyl sulphate and in the pentavalent state in sodium meta-vanadate, and ortho-vanadate, on the proteolysis of azocasein by two serine proteases, trypsin and subtilisin and two cysteine proteases bromelain and papain. Also the proteolysis of bovine azoalbumin by serine proteases was considered. An inhibitory effect was present in all cases, except meta-vanadate with subtilisin. The oxidation level of vanadium by itself did not determine the inhibition kinetics, which also depended on the type and composition of the vanadium containing molecule and on the enzyme assayed. The pattern of inhibition was similar for proteases belonging to the same class. The highest inhibition was obtained with meta-vanadate on papain and with vanadyl sulphate on bromelain.

  15. PE and PS Lipids Synergistically Enhance Membrane Poration by a Peptide with Anticancer Properties.

    PubMed

    Leite, Natália Bueno; Aufderhorst-Roberts, Anders; Palma, Mario Sergio; Connell, Simon D; Ruggiero Neto, João; Beales, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Polybia-MP1 (MP1) is a bioactive host-defense peptide with known anticancer properties. Its activity is attributed to excess serine (phosphatidylserine (PS)) on the outer leaflet of cancer cells. Recently, higher quantities of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) were also found at these cells' surface. We investigate the interaction of MP1 with model membranes in the presence and absence of POPS (PS) and DOPE (PE) to understand the role of lipid composition in MP1's anticancer characteristics. Indeed we find that PS lipids significantly enhance the bound concentration of peptide on the membrane by a factor of 7-8. However, through a combination of membrane permeability assays and imaging techniques we find that PE significantly increases the susceptibility of the membrane to disruption by these peptides and causes an order-of-magnitude increase in membrane permeability by facilitating the formation of larger transmembrane pores. Significantly, atomic-force microscopy imaging reveals differences in the pore formation mechanism with and without the presence of PE. Therefore, PS and PE lipids synergistically combine to enhance membrane poration by MP1, implying that the combined enrichment of both these lipids in the outer leaflet of cancer cells is highly significant for MP1's anticancer action. These mechanistic insights could aid development of novel chemotherapeutics that target pathological changes in the lipid composition of cancerous cells.

  16. PE and PS Lipids Synergistically Enhance Membrane Poration by a Peptide with Anticancer Properties

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Natália Bueno; Aufderhorst-Roberts, Anders; Palma, Mario Sergio; Connell, Simon D.; Neto, João Ruggiero; Beales, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Polybia-MP1 (MP1) is a bioactive host-defense peptide with known anticancer properties. Its activity is attributed to excess serine (phosphatidylserine (PS)) on the outer leaflet of cancer cells. Recently, higher quantities of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) were also found at these cells’ surface. We investigate the interaction of MP1 with model membranes in the presence and absence of POPS (PS) and DOPE (PE) to understand the role of lipid composition in MP1’s anticancer characteristics. Indeed we find that PS lipids significantly enhance the bound concentration of peptide on the membrane by a factor of 7–8. However, through a combination of membrane permeability assays and imaging techniques we find that PE significantly increases the susceptibility of the membrane to disruption by these peptides and causes an order-of-magnitude increase in membrane permeability by facilitating the formation of larger transmembrane pores. Significantly, atomic-force microscopy imaging reveals differences in the pore formation mechanism with and without the presence of PE. Therefore, PS and PE lipids synergistically combine to enhance membrane poration by MP1, implying that the combined enrichment of both these lipids in the outer leaflet of cancer cells is highly significant for MP1’s anticancer action. These mechanistic insights could aid development of novel chemotherapeutics that target pathological changes in the lipid composition of cancerous cells. PMID:26331251

  17. D-serine transporter in Staphylococcus saprophyticus identified.

    PubMed

    Marlinghaus, Lennart; Huß, Melanie; Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc-Güler, Türkan; Gatermann, Sören G

    2016-07-01

    Among staphylococci Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species that is typically uropathogenic and an important cause of urinary tract infections in young women. The amino acid D-serine occurs in relatively high concentrations in human urine and has a bacteriostatic or toxic effect on many bacteria. In uropathogenic Escherichia coli and S. saprophyticus, the amino acid regulates the expression of virulence factors and can be used as a nutrient. The ability of uropathogens to respond to or to metabolize D-serine has been suggested as a factor that enables colonization of the urinary tract. Until now nothing is known about D-serine transport in S. saprophyticus We generated mutants of putative transporter genes in S. saprophyticus 7108 that show homology to the D-serine transporter cycA of E. coli and tested them in a D-serine depletion assay to analyze the D-serine uptake rate of the cells. The mutant of SPP1070 showed a strong decrease in D-serine uptake. Therefore, SSP1070 was identified as a major D-serine transporter in S. saprophyticus 7108 and was named D-serine transporter A (DstA). D-serine caused a prolonged lag phase of S. saprophyticus in a chemically defined medium. This negative effect was dependent on the presence of DstA.

  18. D-serine transporter in Staphylococcus saprophyticus identified.

    PubMed

    Marlinghaus, Lennart; Huß, Melanie; Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc-Güler, Türkan; Gatermann, Sören G

    2016-07-01

    Among staphylococci Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species that is typically uropathogenic and an important cause of urinary tract infections in young women. The amino acid D-serine occurs in relatively high concentrations in human urine and has a bacteriostatic or toxic effect on many bacteria. In uropathogenic Escherichia coli and S. saprophyticus, the amino acid regulates the expression of virulence factors and can be used as a nutrient. The ability of uropathogens to respond to or to metabolize D-serine has been suggested as a factor that enables colonization of the urinary tract. Until now nothing is known about D-serine transport in S. saprophyticus We generated mutants of putative transporter genes in S. saprophyticus 7108 that show homology to the D-serine transporter cycA of E. coli and tested them in a D-serine depletion assay to analyze the D-serine uptake rate of the cells. The mutant of SPP1070 showed a strong decrease in D-serine uptake. Therefore, SSP1070 was identified as a major D-serine transporter in S. saprophyticus 7108 and was named D-serine transporter A (DstA). D-serine caused a prolonged lag phase of S. saprophyticus in a chemically defined medium. This negative effect was dependent on the presence of DstA. PMID:27252156

  19. Mesoderm Differentiation from hiPS Cells.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hiroyuki; Era, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells are very attractive tools for modeling diseases and regenerative medicine. However, to achieve them, the efficient differentiation methods of hiPS cells into aimed cell type in vitro are necessary. Because mesoderm cells are useful in particular, we have developed the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells into mesoderm cells previously. In this time, these methods were improved for hiPS cells and now human mesoderm cells are able to be obtained efficiently. It is certain that the new methods are applicable to various studies and therapies.

  20. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF.

    PubMed

    Keularts, Irene M L W; Leroy, Piet L J M; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M; Spaapen, Leo J M; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2010-12-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and enzyme measurement (in one patient) excluded 3-PGDH deficiency. Deficiencies in other serine biosynthesis enzymes were highly unlikely on clinical grounds. On basis of the fasting state, ketone bodies and lactate in plasma, urine and CSF, we speculate that reduced serine levels were due to its use as gluconeogenic substrate, conversion to pyruvate by brain serine racemase or decreased L-serine production because of a lack of glucose. These are the first strikingly similar cases of patients with a clear secondary serine deficiency associated with a toxic encephalopathy.

  1. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF.

    PubMed

    Keularts, Irene M L W; Leroy, Piet L J M; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M; Spaapen, Leo J M; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2010-12-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and enzyme measurement (in one patient) excluded 3-PGDH deficiency. Deficiencies in other serine biosynthesis enzymes were highly unlikely on clinical grounds. On basis of the fasting state, ketone bodies and lactate in plasma, urine and CSF, we speculate that reduced serine levels were due to its use as gluconeogenic substrate, conversion to pyruvate by brain serine racemase or decreased L-serine production because of a lack of glucose. These are the first strikingly similar cases of patients with a clear secondary serine deficiency associated with a toxic encephalopathy. PMID:20300853

  2. A serine hydroxymethyltransferase from marine bacterium Shewanella algae: Isolation, purification, characterization and l-serine production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Bingzhao; Liu, Ziduo

    2013-10-01

    Currently, l-serine is mainly produced by enzymatic conversion, in which serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is the key enzyme, suggesting the importance of searching for a SHMT with high activity. Shewanella algae, a methanol-utilizing marine bacterium showing high SHMT activity, was selected based on screening bacterial strains and comparison of the activities of SHMTs. A glyA was isolated from the S. algae through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR) and it encoded a 417 amino acid polypeptide. The SaSHMT, encoded by the glyA, showed the optimal activity at 50°C and pH 7.0, and retained over 45% of its maximal activity after incubation at 40°C for 3h. The enzyme showed better stability under alkaline environment (pH 6.5-9.0) than Hyphomicrobium methylovorum GM2's SHMT (pH 6.0-7.5). The SaSHMT can produce 77.76mM of l-serine by enzymatic conversion, with the molecular conversion rate in catalyzing glycine to l-serine being 1.41-fold higher than that of Escherichia coli. Therefore, the SaSHMT has the potential for industrial applications due to its tolerance of alkaline environment and a relatively high enzymatic conversion rate. PMID:23632047

  3. A bumblebee (Bombus ignitus) venom serine protease inhibitor that acts as a microbial serine protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hu; Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Kwang Sik; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Lee, Kyung Yong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2014-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors from bumblebee venom have been shown to block plasmin activity. In this study, we identified the protein BiVSPI from the venom of Bombus ignitus to be a serine protease inhibitor and an antimicrobial factor. BiVSPI is a 55-amino acid mature peptide with ten conserved cysteine residues and a P1 methionine residue. BiVSPI is expressed in the venom gland and also found in the venom as an 8-kDa peptide. Recombinant BiVSPI that was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells exhibited inhibitory activity against chymotrypsin but not trypsin. BiVSPI also inhibited microbial serine proteases, such as subtilisin A (Ki=6.57nM) and proteinase K (Ki=7.11nM). In addition, BiVSPI was shown to bind directly to Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Beauveria bassiana but not to Escherichia coli. Consistent with these results, BiVSPI exhibited antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. These findings provide evidence for a novel serine protease inhibitor in bumblebee venom that has antimicrobial functions.

  4. Serine incorporation into the selenocysteine moiety of glutathione peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sunde, R.A.; Evenson, J.K.

    1987-01-15

    The selenium in mammalian glutathione peroxidase is present as a selenocysteine ((Se)Cys) moiety incorporated into the peptide backbone 41-47 residues from the N-terminal end. To study the origin of the skeleton of the (Se)Cys moiety, we perfused isolated rat liver with /sup 14/C- or /sup 3/H-labeled amino acids for 4 h, purified the GSH peroxidase, derivatized the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase to carboxymethylselenocysteine ((Se)Cys(Cm)), and determined the amino acid specific activity. Perfusion with (/sup 14/C)cystine resulted in (/sup 14/C)cystine incorporation into GSH peroxidase without labeling (Se)Cys(Cm), indicating that cysteine is not a direct precursor for (Se)Cys. (/sup 14/C)Serine perfusion labeled serine, glycine (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase product), and (Se)Cys(Cm) in purified GSH peroxidase, whereas (3-3H)serine perfusion only labeled serine and (Se)Cys(Cm), thus demonstrating that the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase is derived from serine. The similar specific activities of serine and (Se)Cys(Cm) strongly suggest that the precursor pool of serine used for (Se) Cys synthesis is the same or similar to the serine pool used for acylation of seryl-tRNAs.

  5. Serine Racemase Deletion Protects Against Cerebral Ischemia And Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Asif K.; Ahmad, Abdullah S.; Zeynalov, Emil; Gazi, Sadia K.; Sikka, Gautam; Ehmsen, Jeffrey T.; Barrow, Roxanne K.; Coyle, Joseph T.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Doré, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    D-serine, formed from L-serine by serine racemase (SR), is a physiologic co-agonist at NMDA receptors. Using mice with targeted deletion of SR, we demonstrate a role for D-serine in NMDA receptor mediated neurotoxicity and stroke. Brain cultures of SR deleted mice display markedly diminished nitric oxide (NO) formation and neurotoxicity. In intact SR knockout mice NO formation and nitrosylation of NO targets are substantially reduced. Infarct volume following middle cerebral artery occlusion is dramatically diminished in several regions of the brains of SR mutant mice despite evidence of increased NMDA receptor number and sensitivity. PMID:20107067

  6. P.S. 49: A Special Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Christian

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Teachers and Writers Collaborative at P.S 49 and the principal who keeps the writing program going. Discusses how the collaboration works and the teaching techniques used by the writing teachers in the school. (MG)

  7. Second bound state of PsH.

    PubMed

    Mitroy, J; Bromley, M W J

    2007-02-01

    The existence of a second bound state of PsH that is electronically stable and also stable against positron annihilation by the normal 2gamma and 3gamma processes is demonstrated by explicit calculation. The state can be found in the ;{2,4}S;{o} symmetries with the two electrons in a spin-triplet state. The binding energy against dissociation into the H(2p)+Ps(2p) channel was 7.03 x 10;(-4) hartree. The dominant decay mode of the states will be radiative decay into a configuration that autoionizes or undergoes positron annihilation. The NaPs system of the same symmetry is also electronically stable with a binding energy of 1.514 x 10;(-3) hartree with respect to the Na(3p)+Ps(2p) channel.

  8. Conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Milano, Teresa; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Pascarella, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Water molecules occurring in the interior of protein structures often are endowed with key structural and functional roles. We report the results of a systematic analysis of conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases (SHMTs). SHMTs are an important group of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that catalyze the reversible conversion of l-serine and tetrahydropteroylglutamate to glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydropteroylglutamate. The approach utilized in this study relies on two programs, ProACT2 and WatCH. The first software is able to categorize water molecules in a protein crystallographic structure as buried, positioned in clefts or at the surface. The other program finds, in a set of superposed homologous proteins, water molecules that occur approximately in equivalent position in each of the considered structures. These groups of molecules are referred to as 'clusters' and represent structurally conserved water molecules. Several conserved clusters of buried or cleft water molecules were found in the set of 11 bacterial SHMTs we took into account for this work. The majority of these clusters were not described previously. Possible structural and functional roles for the conserved water molecules are envisaged. This work provides a map of the conserved water molecules helpful for deciphering SHMT mechanism and for rational design of molecular engineering experiments.

  9. Drosophila PS1 integrin is a laminin receptor and differs in ligand specificity from PS2.

    PubMed Central

    Gotwals, P J; Fessler, L I; Wehrli, M; Hynes, R O

    1994-01-01

    We have expressed Drosophila position-specific (PS) integrins on the surfaces of Schneider S2 cells and tested for adhesion and spreading on various matrix molecules. We report that PS1 integrin is a laminin receptor and that PS1 and PS2 integrins promote cell spreading on two different Drosophila extracellular matrix molecules, laminin and tiggrin, respectively. The differing ligand specificities of these two integrins, combined with data on the in vivo expression patterns of the integrins and their ligands, lead to a model for the structure of integrin-dependent attachments in the pupal wings and embryonic muscles of Drosophila. Images PMID:7972082

  10. Structure-Based Design of an Organoruthenium Phosphatidyl-inositol-3-Kinase Inhibitor Reveals a Switch Governing Lipid Kinase Potency and Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Xie,P.; Williams, D.; Atilla-Gokcumen, G.; Milk, L.; Xiao, M.; Smalley, K.; Herlyn, M.; Meggers, E.; Marmorstein, R.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations that constitutively activate the phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway, including alterations in PI3K, PTEN, and AKT, are found in a variety of human cancers, implicating the PI3K lipid kinase as an attractive target for the development of therapeutic agents to treat cancer and other related diseases. In this study, we report on the combination of a novel organometallic kinase inhibitor scaffold with structure-based design to develop a PI3K inhibitor, called E5E2, with an IC50 potency in the mid-low-nanomolar range and selectivity against a panel of protein kinases. We also show that E5E2 inhibits phospho-AKT in human melanoma cells and leads to growth inhibition. Consistent with a role for the PI3K pathway in tumor cell invasion, E5E2 treatment also inhibits the migration of melanoma cells in a 3D spheroid assay. The structure of the PI3K?/E5E2 complex reveals the molecular features that give rise to this potency and selectivity toward lipid kinases with implications for the design of a subsequent generation of PI3K-isoform-specific organometallic inhibitors.

  11. Contributions of the D-serine pathway to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Viviane; Wong, Albert H C; Roder, John C

    2012-03-01

    The glutamate neurotransmitter system is one of the major candidate pathways for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and increased understanding of the pharmacology, molecular biology and biochemistry of this system may lead to novel treatments. Glutamatergic hypofunction, particularly at the NMDA receptor, has been hypothesized to underlie many of the symptoms of schizophrenia, including psychosis, negative symptoms and cognitive impairment. This review will focus on D-serine, a co-agonist at the NMDA receptor that in combination with glutamate, is required for full activation of this ion channel receptor. Evidence implicating D-serine, NMDA receptors and related molecules, such as D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), G72 and serine racemase (SRR), in the etiology or pathophysiology of schizophrenia is discussed, including knowledge gained from mouse models with altered D-serine pathway genes and from preliminary clinical trials with D-serine itself or compounds modulating the D-serine pathway. Abnormalities in D-serine availability may underlie glutamatergic dysfunction in schizophrenia, and the development of new treatments acting through the D-serine pathway may significantly improve outcomes for many schizophrenia patients. PMID:21295046

  12. On the phenotypic spectrum of serine biosynthesis defects.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Shaheen, Ranad; Hertecant, Jozef; Galadari, Hassan I; Albaqawi, Badi S; Nabil, Amira; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-05-01

    L-serine is a non-essential amino acid that is de novo synthesized via the enzymes phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP). Besides its role in protein synthesis, L-serine is a precursor of a number of important compounds. Serine biosynthesis defects result from deficiencies in PGDH, PSAT, or PSP and have a broad phenotypic spectrum ranging from Neu-Laxova syndrome, a lethal multiple congenital anomaly disease at the severe end to a childhood disease with intellectual disability at the mild end, with infantile growth deficiency, and severe neurological manifestations as an intermediate phenotype. In this report, we present three subjects with serine biosynthesis effects. The first was a stillbirth with Neu-Laxova syndrome and a homozygous mutation in PHGDH. The second was a neonate with growth deficiency, microcephaly, ichthyotic skin lesions, seizures, contractures, hypertonia, distinctive facial features, and a homozygous mutation in PSAT1. The third subject was an infant with growth deficiency, microcephaly, ichthyotic skin lesions, anemia, hypertonia, distinctive facial features, low serine and glycine in plasma and CSF, and a novel homozygous mutation in PHGDH gene. Herein, we also review previous reports of serine biosynthesis defects and mutations in the PHGDH, PSAT1, and PSPH genes, discuss the variability in the phenotypes associated with serine biosynthesis defects, and elaborate on the vital roles of serine and the potential consequences of its deficiency. PMID:26960553

  13. Serine in plants: biosynthesis, metabolism, and functions.

    PubMed

    Ros, Roc; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Krueger, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Serine (Ser) has a fundamental role in metabolism and signaling in living organisms. In plants, the existence of different pathways of Ser biosynthesis has complicated our understanding of this amino acid homeostasis. The photorespiratory glycolate pathway has been considered to be of major importance, whereas the nonphotorespiratory phosphorylated pathway has been relatively neglected. Recent advances indicate that the phosphorylated pathway has an important function in plant metabolism and development. Plants deficient in this pathway display developmental defects in embryos, male gametophytes, and roots. We propose that the phosphorylated pathway is more important than was initially thought because it is the only Ser source for specific cell types involved in developmental events. Here, we discuss its importance as a link between metabolism and development in plants.

  14. Highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Yoshiko; Usuki, Hirokazu; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a highly potent fibrinolytic serine protease from Streptomyces omiyaensis (SOT), which belongs to the trypsin family. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT was examined using in vitro assays and was compared with those of known fibrinolytic enzymes such as plasmin, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase, and nattokinase. Compared to other enzymes, SOT showed remarkably higher hydrolytic activity toward mimic peptides of fibrin and plasminogen. The fibrinolytic activity of SOT is about 18-fold higher than that of plasmin, and is comparable to that of t-PA by fibrin plate assays. Furthermore, SOT had some plasminogen activator-like activity. Results show that SOT and nattokinase have very different fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic modes, engendering significant synergetic effects of SOT and nattokinase on fibrinolysis. These results suggest that SOT presents important possibilities for application in the therapy of thrombosis.

  15. Production of L-serine by Sarcina albida.

    PubMed

    Ema, M; Kakimoto, T; Chibata, I

    1979-06-01

    Conditions for the production of microbial L-serine hydroxymethyltransferase and for the conversion of glycine to L-serine were studied. A number of microorganisms were screened for their abilities to form and accululate L-serine from glycine, and Sarcina albida was selected as the best organism. Enzyme activity in this organism as high as 0.12 U/ml could be produced in shaken cultures at 30 degrees C in a medium containing glucose, ammonium sulfate, glycine, yeast extract, and inorganic salts. L-Serine was produced most efficiently by shaking cells at 30 degrees C in a reaction mixture containing 20% glycine, 5 X 10(-3) M formaldehyde, and 3 X 10(-4) M pyridoxal phosphate in yields of 22 mg of broth in 5 days. L-Serine was easily isolated in 84% yields by ion-exchange resin.

  16. Participation of D-serine in the development and reproduction of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Minoru; Suzuki, Chihiro; Niwano, Kimio; Kanekatsu, Rensuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Horiike, Kihachiro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagata, Yoko

    2016-04-01

    The silkworm Bombyx mori contains high concentrations of free D-serine, an optical isomer of L-serine. To elucidate its function, we first investigated the localization of D-serine in various organs of silkworm larvae, pupae, and adult moths. Using immunohistochemical analysis with an anti-D-serine antibody, we found D-serine in the microvilli of midgut goblet and cylindrical cells and in peripheral matrix components of testicular and ovarian cells. By spectrophotometric analysis, D-serine was also found in the hemolymph and fat body. D-Alanine was not detected in the various organs by immunohistochemistry. Serine racemase, which catalyzes the inter-conversion of L- and D-serine, was found to co-localize with D-serine, and D-serine production from L-serine by intrinsic serine racemase was suggested. O-Phospho-L-serine is an inhibitor of serine racemase, and it was administered to the larvae to reduce the D-serine level. This reagent decreased the midgut caspase-3 level and caused a delay in spermatogenesis and oogenesis. The reagent also decreased mature sperm and egg numbers, suggesting D-serine participation in these processes. D-Serine administration induced an increase in pyruvate levels in testis, midgut, and fat body, indicating conversion of D-serine to pyruvate. On the basis of these results, together with our previous investigation of ATP biosynthesis in testis, we consider the possible involvement of D-serine in ATP synthesis for metamorphosis and reproduction.

  17. Homodimerization and hetero-oligomerization of the single-domain trefoil protein pNR-2/pS2 through cysteine 58.

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, M P; Westley, B R; May, F E

    1997-01-01

    The single-domain human trefoil proteins [pNR-2/pS2 and human intestinal trefoil factor (hITF)] have seven cysteine residues, of which six are involved in maintaining the structure of the trefoil domain. The seventh does not form part of the trefoil domain and is located three residues from the C-terminus. The ability of the pNR-2/pS2 single trefoil domain protein to dimerize was examined by using recombinant protein with either a cysteine or a serine residue at this position by equilibrium ultracentrifugation, laser-assisted desorption MS, gel filtration and PAGE. pNR-2/pS2 Cys58 formed dimers, whereas pNR-2/pS2 Ser58 did not. Experiments in which the dimer was treated with thiol agents demonstrated that the dimer was linked via a disulphide bond and that the intermolecular disulphide bond was more susceptible to reduction than the intramolecular disulphide bonds. To examine whether dimeric pNR-2/pS2 was secreted by oestrogen-responsive breast cancer cells, which are known to express pNR-2/pS2 mRNA, conditioned medium was separated on non-denaturing polyacrylamide gels, transferred to PVDF membrane and reacted with antiserum against pNR-2/pS2. Monomeric and dimeric pNR-2/pS2 were detected but the majority of the protein reactivity was associated with a larger protein. Treatment of this protein with thiol agents suggested that it is an oligomer containing pNR-2/pS2 linked to another protein by a disulphide bond. These studies suggest that the biological action of pNR-2/pS2 single-domain trefoil protein might involve the formation of homodimers or oligomers with other proteins. PMID:9355742

  18. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Yuling; Choo, Young Moo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia Jingming; Cui Zheng; Wang Dong; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2011-09-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. > Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. > Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. > Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  19. Beyond metric gravity: Progress on PS-200

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, T.; Brown, R.E.; Camp, J.B.; Darling, T.; Dyer, P.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Hughes, R.J.; Jarmie, N.; King, N.S.P.; Lizon, D.C.; Nieto, M.M.; Schauer, M.M.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Cornford, S.; Hosea, K.; Kenefick, R.A.; Hoibraaten, S.; Midzor, M.M.; Parry, S.P.; Ristenen, R.A.; Witteborn, F.C.; Rochet, J.

    1993-03-01

    The reconciliation of quantum mechanics and gravity on varying distance scales requires changes to General Relativity that may be testable implications. We briefly review the status of tests with matter of the inverse square law and the principle of equivalence, then report on progress on the drift-tube measurement section of PS- 200, the experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons.

  20. Beyond metric gravity: Progress on PS-200

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, T.; Brown, R.E.; Camp, J.B.; Darling, T.; Dyer, P.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Hughes, R.J.; Jarmie, N.; King, N.S.P.; Lizon, D.C.; Nieto, M.M.; Schauer, M.M.M.; Schecker, J.A. ); Cornford, S.; Hosea, K.; Kenefick, R.A. ); Hoibraaten, S.; Midzor, M.M.; Parry, S.P.; Ristenen, R.A. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (U

    1993-01-01

    The reconciliation of quantum mechanics and gravity on varying distance scales requires changes to General Relativity that may be testable implications. We briefly review the status of tests with matter of the inverse square law and the principle of equivalence, then report on progress on the drift-tube measurement section of PS- 200, the experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons.

  1. 10th Anniversary P.S.

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    John Adams parle de la préhistoire du P.S. avec présentation des dias. Le DG B.Gregory prend la parole. Les organisateurs présentent sous la direction du "Prof.Ocktette"(?) un sketch très humoristique (p.e.existence de Quark etc.....)

  2. 10th Anniversary P.S.

    SciTech Connect

    2005-10-28

    John Adams parle de la préhistoire du P.S. avec présentation des dias. Le DG B.Gregory prend la parole. Les organisateurs présentent sous la direction du "Prof.Ocktette"(?) un sketch très humoristique (p.e.existence de Quark etc.....)

  3. The 4 Ps as a Guiding Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.

    2013-01-01

    A 4 Ps perspective addresses immediate needs: to help institutions gain traction in their retention strategies by framing and reframing the challenges and the possible responses, by challenging some of the traditional mental models about retention that can distract or dilute those strategies, and by offering focus and coherence to institutional…

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    PRISIC, SLADJANA; HUSSON, ROBERT N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). A similar number of two-component systems are also present, indicating that these two signal transduction mechanisms are both important in the adaptation of this bacterial pathogen to its environment. The M. tuberculosis phosphoproteome includes hundreds of Ser- and Thr-phosphorylated proteins that participate in all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, supporting a critical role for the STPKs in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. Nine of the STPKs are receptor type kinases, with an extracytoplasmic sensor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, indicating that these kinases transduce external signals. Two other STPKs are cytoplasmic and have regulatory domains that sense changes within the cell. Structural analysis of some of the STPKs has led to advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which these STPKs are activated and regulated. Functional analysis has provided insights into the effects of phosphorylation on the activity of several proteins, but for most phosphoproteins the role of phosphorylation in regulating function is unknown. Major future challenges include characterizing the functional effects of phosphorylation for this large number of phosphoproteins, identifying the cognate STPKs for these phosphoproteins, and determining the signals that the STPKs sense. Ultimately, combining these STPK-regulated processes into larger, integrated regulatory networks will provide deeper insight into M. tuberculosis adaptive mechanisms that contribute to tuberculosis pathogenesis. Finally, the STPKs offer attractive targets for inhibitor development that may lead to new therapies for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25429354

  5. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Ane H.; Mingossi, Fabiana B.; Dias, Renata O.; Franco, Flávia P.; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O.; Moura, Daniel S.; Silva-Filho, Marcio C.

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane’s (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory. PMID:27598134

  6. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Ane H; Mingossi, Fabiana B; Dias, Renata O; Franco, Flávia P; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2016-09-01

    Sugarcane's (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory.

  7. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Ane H; Mingossi, Fabiana B; Dias, Renata O; Franco, Flávia P; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane's (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory. PMID:27598134

  8. D-Serine metabolism in C6 glioma cells: Involvement of alanine-serine-cysteine transporter (ASCT2) and serine racemase (SRR) but not D-amino acid oxidase (DAO)

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pilleriin; Walker, Rosie; Cockayne, Rebecca; Wood, Matthew JA; Harrison, Paul J; Burnet, Philip WJ

    2010-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor coagonist. It is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase (SRR), but many aspects of its metabolism remain unclear, especially in the forebrain, which lacks active D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), the major D-serine degradative enzyme. Candidate mechanisms include SRR operating in α,β-eliminase mode (converting D-serine to pyruvate) and regulation by serine transport, in which the alanine-serine-cysteine transporter ASCT2 is implicated. Here we report studies in C6 glioma cells, which “simulate” the forebrain, in that the cells express SRR and ASCT2 but lack DAO activity. We measured D-serine, ASCT2, SRR, and DAO expression and DAO activity in two situations: after incubation of cells for 48 hr with serine isomers and after increased or decreased SRR expression by transfection and RNA interference, respectively. Incubation with serine enantiomers decreased [3H]D-serine uptake and ASCT2 mRNA and increased SRR immunoreactivity but did not alter DAO immunoreactivity, and DAO activity remained undetectable. SRR overexpression increased D-serine and pyruvate and decreased [3H]D-serine uptake and ASCT2 mRNA but did not affect DAO. SRR knockdown did not alter any of the parameters. Our data suggest that D-serine transport mediated by ASCT2 contributes prominently to D-serine homeostasis when DAO activity is absent. The factors regulating D-serine are important for understanding normal NMDA receptor function and because D-serine, along with DAO and SRR, is implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of schizophrenia. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20091774

  9. Serine one-carbon catabolism with formate overflow

    PubMed Central

    Meiser, Johannes; Tumanov, Sergey; Maddocks, Oliver; Labuschagne, Christiaan Fred; Athineos, Dimitris; Van Den Broek, Niels; Mackay, Gillian M.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Blyth, Karen; Vousden, Karen; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Vazquez, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Serine catabolism to glycine and a one-carbon unit has been linked to the anabolic requirements of proliferating mammalian cells. However, genome-scale modeling predicts a catabolic role with one-carbon release as formate. We experimentally prove that in cultured cancer cells and nontransformed fibroblasts, most of the serine-derived one-carbon units are released from cells as formate, and that formate release is dependent on mitochondrial reverse 10-CHO-THF synthetase activity. We also show that in cancer cells, formate release is coupled to mitochondrial complex I activity, whereas in nontransformed fibroblasts, it is partially insensitive to inhibition of complex I activity. We demonstrate that in mice, about 50% of plasma formate is derived from serine and that serine starvation or complex I inhibition reduces formate synthesis in vivo. These observations transform our understanding of one-carbon metabolism and have implications for the treatment of diabetes and cancer with complex I inhibitors.

  10. The Study of Interpenetration Length between dPS Films and PS-grafted Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoyeon; Jo, Seongjun; Hirata, Toyoaki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Tanaka, Keiji; Ryu, Du Yeol

    In polymer thin film system, the type of interfacial interaction is a critical parameter to determining the thermal and physical properties of polymer films. Interestingly, the interfacial energy of grafted substrates with polymer chains is remarkably altered by simply controlling grafting density, which has been referred to as autophobicity. In this study, we investigated the interpenetrating interfaces between deuterated polystyrene (dPS) and grafted substrates with the same chemical identity. PS-grafted substrates were prepared using a grafting-to approach with hydroxyl end-functionalized polystyrene (PSOH) in a dry brush regime, where the brush thickness and grafting density were determined based on the chain length (or molecular weight, Mn) of PSOHs. The interpenetration lengths (ξ) at interfaces between dPS and PS-grafted layers were characterized using neutron reflectivity (NR) measurements (performed at the SOFIA beam-line at J-PARC, Japan). Academic adviser.

  11. ACTIVATION OF A CRYPTIC D-SERINE DEAMINASE (DSD) GENE FROM PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    EPA Science Inventory

    D-serine inhibits growth of P. cepacia 17616; however, resistant mutants able to express an ordinarily cryptic D-serine deaminase (dsd) gene were isolated readily. The resistant strains formed high levels of a D-serine deaminase active on D-threonine as well as D-serine. IS eleme...

  12. The new CERN PS timing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Julian; Sikolenko, Vitali

    1994-12-01

    The PS complex consists of nine interacting accelerators, which can produce from cycle to cycle beams varying in end user, particle type, energy, time structure and beam-geometry. Since the introduction of the new timing system, the sequencing of the PS accelerators now depends dynamically on their status, so that sequence changes in real-time are now produced automatically. This greatly improves the response time for changing end user requests and simplifies the task of the machine operators who no longer need to program it manually. Coordinating this intricate time-sharing particle factory is the MTG (Master Timing Generator) which broadcasts messages around the complex containing summary information on what each part must do next, and the timing needed to carry it out. These messages are received by Tg8 VME timing modules which then provide nearby equipment with timing pulses and the VME host processors with task synchronization events and summary information.

  13. Dilation framing camera with 4 ps resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Houzhi; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Jinyuan; Xie, Weixin; Bai, Yanli; Lei, Yunfei; Liao, Yubo; Niu, Hanben

    2016-04-01

    A framing camera using pulse-dilation technology is reported in this article. The camera uses pulse dilation of an electron signal from a pulsed photo-cathode (PC) to achieve high temporal resolution. While the PC is not pulsed, the measured temporal resolution of the camera without pulse-dilation is about 71 ps. While the excitation pulse is applied on the PC, the measured temporal resolution is improved to 4 ps by using the pulse-dilation technology. The spatial resolution of the dilation framing camera is also measured, which is better than 100 μm. The relationship between the temporal resolution and the PC bias voltage is obtained. The variation of the temporal resolution with the gradient of the PC excitation pulse is also provided.

  14. Processing of the phospholipid analogue phosphatidyl(N-sulphorhodamine B sulphonyl)ethanolamine by rat hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Verkade, H J; Zaal, K J; Derksen, J T; Vonk, R J; Hoekstra, D; Kuipers, F; Scherphof, G L

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the processing of the non-exchangeable fluorescent phospholipid analogue phosphatidyl(N-sulphorhodamine B sulphonyl)ethanolamine (N-Rh-PE) by rat liver cells. In the hepatocyte couplet system, N-Rh-PE was incorporated into the plasma membrane at 2 degrees C and readily internalized upon warming to 37 degrees C. Fluorescence was initially found to be concentrated in vesicles clustered throughout the cell, but subsequently it started to accumulate in pericanalicular vesicles, tentatively identified as lysosomes, and in the bile canalicular lumen. Analysis of cells and media by t.l.c. revealed the slow formation of at least two metabolites. After intravenous injection into bile-fistula rats of [9,10-3H-oleoyl]N-Rh-PE incorporated in small unilamellar liposomes, the initial rates of elimination from plasma of 3H and rhodamine label were virtually identical. However, biliary secretion of the 3H label (5.5% of dose at 2 h) was much slower than that of the rhodamine label (49.3% at 2 h). The rhodamine label in bile was chloroform-soluble, but not identical to the native molecule, and was resistant to phospholipase A2 and alkaline hydrolysis. To gain insight in the mechanism of the rapid bile secretion of this metabolite, we compared the processing of N-Rh-PE, its deacylated form [glycerophospho(N-sulphorhodamine B sulphonyl)ethanolamine; Gly-N-Rh] and the rhodamine label itself (sulphorhodamine B sulphonyl chloride; SRho). Intravenous injection of chloroform-soluble N-Rh-PE and of methanol/water-soluble Gly-N-Rh complexed with albumin both resulted in rapid bile secretion of chloroform-soluble fluorescent compounds (60.2% and 86.3% respectively at 2 h), which showed behaviour identical to that of the metabolite of liposomal N-Rh-PE on t.l.c. Methanol/water-soluble SRho was also rapidly secreted into bile (89.5% at 2 h) without being metabolized. Bile secretion of the chloroform-soluble metabolite of N-Rh-PE and of SRho was markedly impaired (-31% and

  15. Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI)-Anchors and Metalloproteases: Their Roles in the Regulation of Exosome Composition and NKG2D-Mediated Immune Recognition

    PubMed Central

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Campos-Silva, Carmen; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Communication within the immune system depends on the release of factors that can travel and transmit information at points distant from the cell that produced them. In general, immune cells use two key strategies that can occur either at the plasma membrane or in intracellular compartments to produce such factors, vesicle release and proteolytic cleavage. Release of soluble factors in exosomes, a subset of vesicles that originate from intracellular compartments, depends generally on biochemical and lipid environment features. This physical environment allows proteins to be recruited to membrane microdomains that will be later endocytosed and further released to the extracellular milieu. Cholesterol and sphingolipid rich domains (also known as lipid rafts or detergent-resistant membranes, DRMs) often contribute to exosomes and these membrane regions are rich in proteins modified with Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI) and lipids. For this reason, many palmitoylated and GPI-anchored proteins are preferentially recruited to exosomes. In this review, we analyse the biochemical features involved in the release of NKG2D-ligands as an example of functionally related gene families encoding both transmembrane and GPI-anchored proteins that can be released either by proteolysis or in exosomes, and modulate the intensity of the immune response. The immune receptor NKG2D is present in all human Natural Killer and T cells and plays an important role in the first barrier of defense against tumor and infection. However, tumor cells can evade the immune system by releasing NKG2D-ligands to induce down-regulation of the receptor. Some NKG2D-ligands can be recruited to exosomes and potently modulate receptor expression and immune function, while others are more susceptible to metalloprotease cleavage and are shed as soluble molecules. Strikingly, metalloprotease inhibition is sufficient to drive the accumulation in exosomes of ligands otherwise released by metalloprotease

  16. Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI)-Anchors and Metalloproteases: Their Roles in the Regulation of Exosome Composition and NKG2D-Mediated Immune Recognition.

    PubMed

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Campos-Silva, Carmen; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Communication within the immune system depends on the release of factors that can travel and transmit information at points distant from the cell that produced them. In general, immune cells use two key strategies that can occur either at the plasma membrane or in intracellular compartments to produce such factors, vesicle release and proteolytic cleavage. Release of soluble factors in exosomes, a subset of vesicles that originate from intracellular compartments, depends generally on biochemical and lipid environment features. This physical environment allows proteins to be recruited to membrane microdomains that will be later endocytosed and further released to the extracellular milieu. Cholesterol and sphingolipid rich domains (also known as lipid rafts or detergent-resistant membranes, DRMs) often contribute to exosomes and these membrane regions are rich in proteins modified with Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI) and lipids. For this reason, many palmitoylated and GPI-anchored proteins are preferentially recruited to exosomes. In this review, we analyse the biochemical features involved in the release of NKG2D-ligands as an example of functionally related gene families encoding both transmembrane and GPI-anchored proteins that can be released either by proteolysis or in exosomes, and modulate the intensity of the immune response. The immune receptor NKG2D is present in all human Natural Killer and T cells and plays an important role in the first barrier of defense against tumor and infection. However, tumor cells can evade the immune system by releasing NKG2D-ligands to induce down-regulation of the receptor. Some NKG2D-ligands can be recruited to exosomes and potently modulate receptor expression and immune function, while others are more susceptible to metalloprotease cleavage and are shed as soluble molecules. Strikingly, metalloprotease inhibition is sufficient to drive the accumulation in exosomes of ligands otherwise released by metalloprotease

  17. Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI)-Anchors and Metalloproteases: Their Roles in the Regulation of Exosome Composition and NKG2D-Mediated Immune Recognition

    PubMed Central

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Campos-Silva, Carmen; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Communication within the immune system depends on the release of factors that can travel and transmit information at points distant from the cell that produced them. In general, immune cells use two key strategies that can occur either at the plasma membrane or in intracellular compartments to produce such factors, vesicle release and proteolytic cleavage. Release of soluble factors in exosomes, a subset of vesicles that originate from intracellular compartments, depends generally on biochemical and lipid environment features. This physical environment allows proteins to be recruited to membrane microdomains that will be later endocytosed and further released to the extracellular milieu. Cholesterol and sphingolipid rich domains (also known as lipid rafts or detergent-resistant membranes, DRMs) often contribute to exosomes and these membrane regions are rich in proteins modified with Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI) and lipids. For this reason, many palmitoylated and GPI-anchored proteins are preferentially recruited to exosomes. In this review, we analyse the biochemical features involved in the release of NKG2D-ligands as an example of functionally related gene families encoding both transmembrane and GPI-anchored proteins that can be released either by proteolysis or in exosomes, and modulate the intensity of the immune response. The immune receptor NKG2D is present in all human Natural Killer and T cells and plays an important role in the first barrier of defense against tumor and infection. However, tumor cells can evade the immune system by releasing NKG2D-ligands to induce down-regulation of the receptor. Some NKG2D-ligands can be recruited to exosomes and potently modulate receptor expression and immune function, while others are more susceptible to metalloprotease cleavage and are shed as soluble molecules. Strikingly, metalloprotease inhibition is sufficient to drive the accumulation in exosomes of ligands otherwise released by metalloprotease

  18. Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI)-Anchors and Metalloproteases: Their Roles in the Regulation of Exosome Composition and NKG2D-Mediated Immune Recognition.

    PubMed

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Campos-Silva, Carmen; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Communication within the immune system depends on the release of factors that can travel and transmit information at points distant from the cell that produced them. In general, immune cells use two key strategies that can occur either at the plasma membrane or in intracellular compartments to produce such factors, vesicle release and proteolytic cleavage. Release of soluble factors in exosomes, a subset of vesicles that originate from intracellular compartments, depends generally on biochemical and lipid environment features. This physical environment allows proteins to be recruited to membrane microdomains that will be later endocytosed and further released to the extracellular milieu. Cholesterol and sphingolipid rich domains (also known as lipid rafts or detergent-resistant membranes, DRMs) often contribute to exosomes and these membrane regions are rich in proteins modified with Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI) and lipids. For this reason, many palmitoylated and GPI-anchored proteins are preferentially recruited to exosomes. In this review, we analyse the biochemical features involved in the release of NKG2D-ligands as an example of functionally related gene families encoding both transmembrane and GPI-anchored proteins that can be released either by proteolysis or in exosomes, and modulate the intensity of the immune response. The immune receptor NKG2D is present in all human Natural Killer and T cells and plays an important role in the first barrier of defense against tumor and infection. However, tumor cells can evade the immune system by releasing NKG2D-ligands to induce down-regulation of the receptor. Some NKG2D-ligands can be recruited to exosomes and potently modulate receptor expression and immune function, while others are more susceptible to metalloprotease cleavage and are shed as soluble molecules. Strikingly, metalloprotease inhibition is sufficient to drive the accumulation in exosomes of ligands otherwise released by metalloprotease

  19. Formation of antihydrogen in p -Ps collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, S.; Sinha, C.; Sil, N.C. )

    1990-08-01

    Cross sections for antihydrogen formation for the process {ital {bar p}}+Ps{r arrow}{bar H}+{ital e} have been calculated utilizing the charge-conjugation and time-reversal invariance as suggested by Humberston {ital et} {ital al}. (J. Phys. B 20, L25 (1987)). Calculations are performed in the framework of the eikonal approximation for a wide range of antiproton energy (20--11 000 keV).

  20. Nimbolide, a neem limonoid inhibits Phosphatidyl Inositol-3 Kinase to activate Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in a hamster model of oral oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sophia, Josephraj; Kiran Kishore T., Kranthi; Kowshik, Jaganathan; Mishra, Rajakishore; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine kinase is frequently inactivated by the oncogenic signalling kinases PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK in diverse malignancies. The present study was designed to investigate GSK-3β signalling circuits in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model and the therapeutic potential of the neem limonoid nimbolide. Inactivation of GSK-3β by phosphorylation at serine 9 and activation of PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK and β-catenin was associated with increased cell proliferation and apoptosis evasion during stepwise evolution of HBP carcinomas. Administration of nimbolide inhibited PI3K/Akt signalling with consequent activation of GSK-3β thereby inducing trafficking of β-catenin away from the nucleus and enhancing the expression of miR-126 and let-7. Molecular docking studies confirmed interaction of nimbolide with PI3K, Akt, ERK and GSK-3β. Furthermore, nimbolide attenuated cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased p-cyclin D1Thr286 and pro-apoptotic proteins. The present study has unravelled aberrant phosphorylation as a key determinant for oncogenic signalling and acquisition of cancer hallmarks in the HBP model. The study has also provided mechanistic insights into the chemotherapeutic potential of nimbolide that may be a useful addition to the armamentarium of natural compounds targeting PI3K for oral cancer treatment. PMID:26902162

  1. Nimbolide, a neem limonoid inhibits Phosphatidyl Inositol-3 Kinase to activate Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in a hamster model of oral oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sophia, Josephraj; Kiran Kishore T, Kranthi; Kowshik, Jaganathan; Mishra, Rajakishore; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2016-02-23

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine kinase is frequently inactivated by the oncogenic signalling kinases PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK in diverse malignancies. The present study was designed to investigate GSK-3β signalling circuits in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model and the therapeutic potential of the neem limonoid nimbolide. Inactivation of GSK-3β by phosphorylation at serine 9 and activation of PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK and β-catenin was associated with increased cell proliferation and apoptosis evasion during stepwise evolution of HBP carcinomas. Administration of nimbolide inhibited PI3K/Akt signalling with consequent activation of GSK-3β thereby inducing trafficking of β-catenin away from the nucleus and enhancing the expression of miR-126 and let-7. Molecular docking studies confirmed interaction of nimbolide with PI3K, Akt, ERK and GSK-3β. Furthermore, nimbolide attenuated cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased p-cyclin D1(Thr286) and pro-apoptotic proteins. The present study has unravelled aberrant phosphorylation as a key determinant for oncogenic signalling and acquisition of cancer hallmarks in the HBP model. The study has also provided mechanistic insights into the chemotherapeutic potential of nimbolide that may be a useful addition to the armamentarium of natural compounds targeting PI3K for oral cancer treatment.

  2. Nimbolide, a neem limonoid inhibits Phosphatidyl Inositol-3 Kinase to activate Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in a hamster model of oral oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sophia, Josephraj; Kiran Kishore T, Kranthi; Kowshik, Jaganathan; Mishra, Rajakishore; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine kinase is frequently inactivated by the oncogenic signalling kinases PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK in diverse malignancies. The present study was designed to investigate GSK-3β signalling circuits in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model and the therapeutic potential of the neem limonoid nimbolide. Inactivation of GSK-3β by phosphorylation at serine 9 and activation of PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK and β-catenin was associated with increased cell proliferation and apoptosis evasion during stepwise evolution of HBP carcinomas. Administration of nimbolide inhibited PI3K/Akt signalling with consequent activation of GSK-3β thereby inducing trafficking of β-catenin away from the nucleus and enhancing the expression of miR-126 and let-7. Molecular docking studies confirmed interaction of nimbolide with PI3K, Akt, ERK and GSK-3β. Furthermore, nimbolide attenuated cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased p-cyclin D1(Thr286) and pro-apoptotic proteins. The present study has unravelled aberrant phosphorylation as a key determinant for oncogenic signalling and acquisition of cancer hallmarks in the HBP model. The study has also provided mechanistic insights into the chemotherapeutic potential of nimbolide that may be a useful addition to the armamentarium of natural compounds targeting PI3K for oral cancer treatment. PMID:26902162

  3. Mapping of Stat3 serine phosphorylation to a single residue (727) and evidence that serine phosphorylation has no influence on DNA binding of Stat1 and Stat3.

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Z; Darnell, J E

    1997-01-01

    During their polypeptide ligand-induced activation Stats (signaltransducers andactivators oftranscription) 1 and 3 acquire, in addition to an obligatory tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphorylation on serine which boosts their transactivating potential [Wen, Z., Zhong, Z. and Darnell, J. E. Jr. (1995) Cell 82, 241-250]. By examining phosphopeptide maps of wild-type and mutant protein we show here that the Stat3 serine phosphorylation, like the Stat1 serine phosphorylation, occurs on a single residue, serine 727. Neither the DNA binding of Stat1 nor Stat3 is demonstrably affected by the presence or absence of the serine phosphorylation. Thus the earlier demonstration that transcription is enhanced by the presence of the serine 727 residue likely occurs after DNA binding. These findings do not agree with earlier claims of excess serine to tyrosine phosphorylation in activated Stats 1 and 3 or to claims of more stable DNA binding of serine phosphorylated Stat dimers. PMID:9153303

  4. Spectroscopic Classification of PS16ccj with Mayall/KOSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-05-01

    We report the classification of PS16ccj from spectroscopic observation with KOSMOS on the Mayall telescope. The observation was made on 2016 May 05 UT. We classify PS16ccj as a SN Ia near maximum light.

  5. Relative utilization of serine and glycine by chicks.

    PubMed

    Featherston, W R

    1975-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the relative utilizaiton of glycine and serine by chicks fed basal crystalline amino acid diets devoid of these amino acids. The crystalline amino acid mixture was fed at one and three times the requirement levels, thereby stimulating uric acid synthesis at differing rates. In addition, 5 per cent L-glutamine replaced L-glutamic acid on an isonitrogenous basis in three diets containing normal levels of amino acids in the second study. Chicks fed diets devoid of glycine and serine grew less rapidly and less efficiently than chicks fed diets containing either serine or glycine plus serine. These decreases were roughly the same whether the diet contained normal or high levels of amino acids. Serine was as efficient as glycine in supporting chick growth and feed efficiency regardless of whether diets containing normal or high levels of amino acids were fed. Chicks fed diets containing high levels of amino acids grew approximately 81 per cent as rapidly, but 24 per cent more efficiently, than chicks fed normal levels of amino acids, and excreted approximately twice the amount of uric acid per gram of nitrogen consumed. In spite of increased uric acid excretion by chicks fed the high amino acid diets, the dietary void in glycine and serine was no more detrimental to chick growth or feed efficiency than that noted when normal levels of amino acids were fed. Feeding 5 per cent L-glutamine rather than L-glutamic acid in the diet containing normal levels of amino acids had little effect on weight gain, feed efficiency or uric acid excretion. The absence of cystine from the amino acid mixture used in the third study did not have a marked influence on the relative utilization of glycine and serine by the chick. PMID:1169769

  6. A Serine Protease Isolated from the Bristles of the Amazonic Caterpillar, Premolis semirufa, Is a Potent Complement System Activator

    PubMed Central

    Villas Boas, Isadora Maria; Pidde-Queiroz, Giselle; Magnoli, Fabio Carlos; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M.; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The caterpillar of the moth Premolis semirufa, commonly named pararama, is found in the Brazilian Amazon region. Accidental contact with the caterpillar bristles causes an intense itching sensation, followed by symptoms of an acute inflammation, which last for three to seven days after the first incident. After multiple accidents a chronic inflammatory reaction, called “Pararamose”, characterized by articular synovial membrane thickening with joint deformities common to chronic synovitis, frequently occurs. Although complement mediated inflammation may aid the host defense, inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system and generation of anaphylatoxins can lead to inflammatory disorder and pathologies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in vitro, whether the Premolis semirufa’s bristles extract could interfere with the human complement system. Results The bristles extract was able to inhibit the haemolytic activity of the alternative pathway, as well as the activation of the lectin pathway, but had no effect on the classical pathway, and this inhibition seemed to be caused by activation and consumption of complement components. The extract induced the production of significant amounts of all three anaphylatoxins, C3a, C4a and C5a, promoted direct cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and induced a significant generation of terminal complement complexes in normal human serum. By using molecular exclusion chromatography, a serine protease of 82 kDa, which activates complement, was isolated from P. semirufa bristles extract. The protease, named here as Ps82, reduced the haemolytic activity of the alternative and classical pathways and inhibited the lectin pathway. In addition, Ps82 induced the cleavage of C3, C4 and C5 and the generation of C3a and C4a in normal human serum and it was capable to cleave human purified C5 and generate C5a. The use of Phenanthroline, metalloprotease inhibitor, in the reactions did not significantly

  7. Generation of iPS Cells from Granulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Various types of somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Somatic stem cells may generate iPS cells more efficiently than do differentiated cells. We show that granulosa cells exhibit characteristic of somatic stem cells and can be reprogrammed to iPS cells more efficiently or with few factors. Here, we describe generation of mouse and pig iPS cells from granulosa cells with high efficiency.

  8. Endothelin-1 stimulates catalase activity through the PKCδ-mediated phosphorylation of serine 167.

    PubMed

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Hou, Yali; Kangath, Archana; Pardo, Daniel; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Black, Stephen M

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown that endothelin-1 (ET-1) stimulates catalase activity in endothelial cells and in lambs with acute increases in pulmonary blood flow (PBF), without altering gene expression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Exposing pulmonary arterial endothelial cells to ET-1 increased catalase activity and decreased cellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. These changes correlated with an increase in serine-phosphorylated catalase. Using the inhibitory peptide δV1.1, this phosphorylation was shown to be protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) dependent. Mass spectrometry identified serine 167 as the phosphorylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a phospho-mimic (S167D) catalase. Activity assays using recombinant protein purified from Escherichia coli or transiently transfected COS-7 cells demonstrated that S167D catalase had an increased ability to degrade H2O2 compared to the wild-type enzyme. Using a phospho-specific antibody, we were able to verify that pS167 catalase levels are modulated in lambs with acute increases in PBF in the presence and absence of the ET receptor antagonist tezosentan. S167 is located on the dimeric interface, suggesting it could be involved in regulating the formation of catalase tetramers. To evaluate this possibility we utilized analytical gel filtration to examine the multimeric structure of recombinant wild-type and S167D catalase. We found that recombinant wild-type catalase was present as a mixture of monomers and dimers, whereas S167D catalase was primarily tetrameric. Further, the incubation of wild-type catalase with PKCδ was sufficient to convert wild-type catalase into a tetrameric structure. In conclusion, this is the first report indicating that the phosphorylation of catalase regulates its multimeric structure and activity.

  9. Effects of L-serine ingestion on human sleep.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yukihiko; Takahashi, Satomi; Shen, Manzhen; Yamaguchi, Kohji; Satoh, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of L-serine intake on human sleep, we conducted two randomized double-blinded crossover studies. In Study 1, healthy subjects who were dissatisfied with their sleep were given L-serine or a placebo 30 min before going to bed. After waking the next morning, subjective sleep quality was rated using the Ogri-Shirakawa-Azumi subjective sleep rating scale. In Study 2, subjective sleep quality was rated using the St. Mary's Hospital sleep questionnaire, and objective parameters, including sleep initiation time, number of nighttime awakenings, and hours of sleep, were evaluated using actigraphy. In Study 1, factors related to "sleep initiation" and "sleep maintenance" during the L-serine intake period were significantly improved compared to the placebo intake period (p = 0.02 and p = 0.008, respectively). In Study 2, scores for "How well did you sleep last night?" and "How satisfied were you with last night's sleep?" were significantly better during L-serine intake compared to placebo (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03, respectively). Subjective evaluation of sleep quality on waking was thus improved. In addition, objective evaluation using actigraphy showed that the "number of nighttime awakenings" tended to be decreased (p = 0.08). These findings suggest that intake of L-serine before going to bed may improve human sleep. PMID:25197619

  10. Two Proteases, Trypsin Domain-containing 1 (Tysnd1) and Peroxisomal Lon Protease (PsLon), Cooperatively Regulate Fatty Acid β-Oxidation in Peroxisomal Matrix*

    PubMed Central

    Okumoto, Kanji; Kametani, Yukari; Fujiki, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying protein turnover and enzyme regulation in the peroxisomal matrix remain largely unknown. Trypsin domain-containing 1 (Tysnd1) and peroxisomal Lon protease (PsLon) are newly identified peroxisomal matrix proteins that harbor both a serine protease-like domain and a peroxisome-targeting signal 1 (PTS1) sequence. Tysnd1 processes several PTS1-containing proteins and cleaves N-terminal presequences from PTS2-containing protein precursors. Here we report that knockdown of Tysnd1, but not PsLon, resulted in accumulation of endogenous β-oxidation enzymes in their premature form. The protease activity of Tysnd1 was inactivated by intermolecular self-conversion of the 60-kDa form to 15- and 45-kDa chains, which were preferentially degraded by PsLon. Peroxisomal β-oxidation of a very long fatty acid was significantly decreased by knockdown of Tysnd1 and partially lowered by PsLon knockdown. Taken together, these data suggest that Tysnd1 is a key regulator of the peroxisomal β-oxidation pathway via proteolytic processing of β-oxidation enzymes. The proteolytic activity of oligomeric Tysnd1 is in turn controlled by self-cleavage of Tysnd1 and degradation of Tysnd1 cleavage products by PsLon. PMID:22002062

  11. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate alleviates spatial memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice by restoring IRS-1 signaling defects in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ning; Han, Kun; Kong, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Sha, Sha; Ren, Gui-Ru; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) fundamentally represents a metabolic disease associated with brain insulin resistance. TNF-α/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling plays a central role in serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a potent antioxidant, has been verified to attenuate peripheral insulin resistance by reducing IRS-1 signaling blockage. This study aimed to investigate the effects and possible mechanisms of EGCG on central IRS-1 signaling in vivo. APP/PS1 mice were treated with EGCG, and spatial memory was assessed by the Morris water maze test. Levels of soluble and insoluble Aβ42 in the hippocampus were determined by ELISA. The activation of NF-α/JNK and IRS signaling was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Our results showed that EGCG ameliorated the impaired learning and memory in APP/PS1 mice. Notably, we found a significant reduction of IRS-1pS636 level accompanied with decreased Aβ42 levels in the hippocampus of 13-month-old female APP/PS1 mice after treatment with EGCG (2 or 6 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Furthermore, EGCG treatment inhibited TNF-α/JNK signaling and increased the phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that long-term consumption of EGCG may alleviate AD-related cognitive deficits by effectively attenuating central insulin resistance.

  12. Heterogeneity of the serine synthetic pathway in Entamoeba species.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoko; Makiuchi, Takashi; Jeelani, Ghulam; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) catalyzes the third step of the phosphorylated serine biosynthetic pathway, and occurred multiple times in evolution, while enzymes catalyzing the first and second steps in the pathway have single respective origins. In the present study, we examined the existence of PSP among genus Entamoeba including a human enteric parasite, Entamoeba histolytica. E. histolytica as well as majority of Entamoeba species have the first and second enzymes, but lacks PSP. In contrast, a reptilian enteric parasite, Entamoeba invadens possesses canonical PSP. Thus, there are variations in the existence of the serine biosynthetic ability among Entamoeba species. PMID:27268730

  13. Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs): Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Dautin, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins. PMID:22069633

  14. Regulation of transcription by eukaryotic-like serine-threonine kinases and phosphatases in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wright, David P; Ulijasz, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial eukaryotic-like serine threonine kinases (eSTKs) and serine threonine phosphatases (eSTPs) have emerged as important signaling elements that are indispensable for pathogenesis. Differing considerably from their histidine kinase counterparts, few eSTK genes are encoded within the average bacterial genome, and their targets are pleiotropic in nature instead of exclusive. The growing list of important eSTK/P substrates includes proteins involved in translation, cell division, peptidoglycan synthesis, antibiotic tolerance, resistance to innate immunity and control of virulence factors. Recently it has come to light that eSTK/Ps also directly modulate transcriptional machinery in many microbial pathogens. This novel form of regulation is now emerging as an additional means by which bacteria can alter their transcriptomes in response to host-specific environmental stimuli. Here we focus on the ability of eSTKs and eSTPs in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens to directly modulate transcription, the known mechanistic outcomes of these modifications, and their roles as an added layer of complexity in controlling targeted RNA synthesis to enhance virulence potential. PMID:25603430

  15. Purification and properties of serine hydroxymethyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed Central

    Delle Fratte, S; White, R H; Maras, B; Bossa, F; Schirch, V

    1997-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) catalyzes the reversible cleavage of serine to glycine with the transfer of the one-carbon group to tetrahydrofolate to form 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. No SHMT has been purified from a nonmethanogenic Archaea strain, in part because this group of organisms uses modified folates as the one-carbon acceptor. These modified folates are not readily available for use in assays for SHMT activity. This report describes the purification and characterization of SHMT from the thermophilic organism Sulfolobus solfataricus. The exchange of the alpha-proton of glycine with solvent protons in the absence of the modified folate was used as the activity assay. The purified protein catalyzes the synthesis of serine from glycine and a synthetic derivative of a fragment of the natural modified folate found in S. solfataricus. Replacement of the modified folate with tetrahydrofolate did not support serine synthesis. In addition, this SHMT also catalyzed the cleavage of both allo-threonine and beta-phenylserine in the absence of the modified folate. The cleavage of these two amino acids in the absence of tetrahydrofolate is a property of other characterized SHMTs. The enzyme contains covalently bound pyridoxal phosphate. Sequences of three peptides showed significant similarity with those of peptides of SHMTs from two methanogens. PMID:9393711

  16. Production, purification, and properties of serine carboxypeptidase from Paecilomyces carneus.

    PubMed

    Umetsu, H; Hishinuma, K; Wake, H; Ichishima, E

    1996-07-01

    Seventeen strains of the genus Paecilomyces were examined for their ability to produce serine carboxypeptidase. Paecilomyces carneus IFO 7012 exhibited the highest potency for serine carboxypeptidase production. A maximum yield of serine carboxypeptidase was obtained by koji culture of the strain at 22 degrees C for 7 days. The serine carboxypeptidase was purified to homogeneity from an extract of the koji culture. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 47,000 by HPLC. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was determined to be 4.0, and the optimum pH was 4.0 toward benzyloxycarbonyl-L-glutamyl-L-tyrosine (Z-Glu-Tyr) and benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-alanine (Z-Phe-Ala), respectively. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and p-chloromercurybenzoate. Relative hydrolysis rates of N-acylpeptides and kinetic studies indicated that the enzyme preferred substrates having bulky amino acids in the penultimate position from their carboxy-termini. PMID:8661688

  17. A serine sensor for multicellularity in a bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Arvind R; DeLoughery, Aaron; Bradshaw, Niels; Chen, Yun; O’Shea, Erin; Losick, Richard; Chai, Yunrong

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a simple environmental sensing mechanism for biofilm formation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis that operates without the involvement of a dedicated RNA or protein. Certain serine codons, the four TCN codons, in the gene for the biofilm repressor SinR caused a lowering of SinR levels under biofilm-inducing conditions. Synonymous substitutions of these TCN codons with AGC or AGT impaired biofilm formation and gene expression. Conversely, switching AGC or AGT to TCN codons upregulated biofilm formation. Genome-wide ribosome profiling showed that ribosome density was higher at UCN codons than at AGC or AGU during biofilm formation. Serine starvation recapitulated the effect of biofilm-inducing conditions on ribosome occupancy and SinR production. As serine is one of the first amino acids to be exhausted at the end of exponential phase growth, reduced translation speed at serine codons may be exploited by other microbes in adapting to stationary phase. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01501.001 PMID:24347549

  18. Expression and characterization of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus alkaline serine protease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT A putative protease gene (aprE) from the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was determined to be a serine protease based on inhibition by PMSF. Biochemical characterization demonstrated the enzyme had...

  19. PS2004 Light-harvesting Systems Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Robert E. Blankenship

    2005-11-01

    This special issue of the international scientific research journal Photosynthesis Research consists of 25 original peer-reviewed contributions from participants in the PS 2004 Lisht-Harvesting Systems Workshop. This workshop was held from 26-29, 2004 at Hotel Le Chantecler, Sainte-Adele, Quebec, Canada. The workshop was a satellite meeting of the XIII International Congress on Photosynthesis held August 29-September 3, 2004 in Montreal, Canada. The workshope dealt with all types of photosynthetic antenna systems and types of organisms, including anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, algae and higher plants, as well as in vitro studies of isolated pigments. This collection of papers is a good representation of the highly interdisciplinary nature of modern research on photosynthetic antenna complexes, utilizing techniques of advanced spectroscopy, biochemistry, molecular biology, synthetic chemistry and structural determination to understand these diverse and elegant molecular complexes.

  20. [Sensitivity of Ps. aeruginosa to disinfectant agents].

    PubMed

    Korudzhiĭski, N; Tsankova, S; Karadzhov, S

    1986-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, isolated from semen of bulls as well as from the surrounding milieu at Artificial Insemination Stations, were tested for susceptibility to disinfection agents, such as fesiasept, concentrate C4, and chloramine with 25% active chlorine and sodium hydroxide. The investigation was carried out in vitro under practical conditions too. The analysis of results led to the conclusion that in the case of environmental contamination with Ps. aeruginosa along with semen contamination most effective proved concentrate C4 in the form of 2.5 per cent water solution. The disinfection of lab glassware and equipment, instruments, towels, kerchiefs, cloths, and white overalls and aprons is to be carried out with 1.5 per cent water solution of chloramine. PMID:3101277

  1. Sphingoid bases and the serine catabolic enzyme CHA1 define a novel feedforward/feedback mechanism in the response to serine availability.

    PubMed

    Montefusco, David J; Newcomb, Benjamin; Gandy, Jason L; Brice, Sarah E; Matmati, Nabil; Cowart, L Ashley; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2012-03-16

    Targets of bioactive sphingolipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were previously identified using microarray experiments focused on sphingolipid-dependent responses to heat stress. One of these heat-induced genes is the serine deamidase/dehydratase Cha1 known to be regulated by increased serine availability. This study investigated the hypothesis that sphingolipids may mediate the induction of Cha1 in response to serine availability. The results showed that inhibition of de novo synthesis of sphingolipids, pharmacologically or genetically, prevented the induction of Cha1 in response to increased serine availability. Additional studies implicated the sphingoid bases phytosphingosine and dihydrosphingosine as the likely mediators of Cha1 up-regulation. The yeast protein kinases Pkh1 and Pkh2, known sphingoid base effectors, were found to mediate CHA1 up-regulation via the transcription factor Cha4. Because the results disclosed a role for sphingolipids in negative feedback regulation of serine metabolism, we investigated the effects of disrupting this mechanism on sphingolipid levels and on cell growth. Intriguingly, exposure of the cha1Δ strain to high serine resulted in hyperaccumulation of endogenous serine and in turn a significant accumulation of sphingoid bases and ceramides. Under these conditions, the cha1Δ strain displayed a significant growth defect that was sphingolipid-dependent. Together, this work reveals a feedforward/feedback loop whereby the sphingoid bases serve as sensors of serine availability and mediate up-regulation of Cha1 in response to serine availability, which in turn regulates sphingolipid levels by limiting serine accumulation.

  2. Photoinactivation of PS2 secondary donors by PS2 cation radicals and superoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.X.; Cheniae, G.M.; Blubaugh, D.J.; Golbeck, J.H.

    1991-12-31

    Illumination of Mn- and Cl-depleted PS2 causes rapid irreversible inactivation of specific redox-active components on the donor side of the PS2 Reaction Center (RC). Under aerobic conditions, weak light preillumination of NH{sub 2}OH-PS2 causes rapid loss of Y{sub Z}{sup {plus_minus}} formation, Y{sub Z} {yields} P{sub 680}{sup +}, the A{sub T}-band thermoluminescence emission, the Y{sub Z}{sup +}-dependent (Site 1) photooxidation of exogenous e{sup {minus}} donors, and the capability to photoligate Mn{sup 2+} into the water oxidizing enzyme (photoactivation), all without significantly affecting P{sub 680}{sup +}/Q{sub A}{sup {minus}} charge separation. In contrast, aerobic high light preillumination of Mn-depleted PS2 promotes very rapid and parallel loss of photoactivation and A{sub T}-band emission capabilities significantly than loss of either Y{sub Z}{sup +}-formation or P{sub 680}{sup +}/Q{sub A}{sup {minus}} charge separation capabilities. These photodamages and those to Cl-depleted thylakoids (4,5) generally are believed to be caused by reactions between the highly oxidizing cation radicals (P{sub 680}{sup +}/Chl{sup +}) and nearby amino acid residues of D{sub 1}>D{sub 2}. The reported promotion of the photodamages by e{sup {minus}} acceptors of Q{sub A}{sup {minus}}/Q{sub B}{sup {minus}} their inhibition by e{sup {minus}} donors to Y{sub Z}{sup +} and their occurrence under strict anaerobic conditions all tend to support the idea of direct damage by P{sub 680}{sup +}/Chl{sup +}. Our studies lead us to conclude that the photodamages to the donor side components are caused minimally by a rapid mechanism requiring both superoxide and PS2 cation radicals; and by a slower mechanism driven by the PS2 cation radicals only.

  3. Energy and expectation values of the PsH system

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.

    2006-05-15

    Close to converged energies and expectation values for PsH are computed using a ground state wave function consisting of 1800 explicitly correlated gaussians. The best estimate of the Ps{sup {infinity}}H energy was -0.789 196 740 hartree which is the lowest variational energy to date. The 2{gamma} annihilation rate for Ps{sup {infinity}}H was 2.471 78x10{sup 9} s{sup -1}.

  4. The effect of D-serine administration on cognition and mood in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Caroline; Vargas-Lopes, Charles; Marques, Priscila; Dantas, Camila; Manhães, Alex C.; Leite, Homero; Panizzutti, Rogerio

    2016-01-01

    Background D-serine is an endogenous co-agonist of the N-Methyl D-Aspartate Receptor (NMDAR) that plays a crucial role in cognition including learning processes and memory. Decreased D-serine levels have been associated with age-related decline in mechanisms of learning and memory in animal studies. Here, we asked whether D-serine administration in older adults improves cognition. Results D-serine administration improved performance in the Groton Maze learning test of spatial memory and learning and problem solving (F(3, 38)= 4.74, p = 0.03). Subjects that achieved higher increases in plasma D-serine levels after administration improved more in test performance (r2=−0.19 p = 0.009). D-serine administration was not associated with any significant changes in the other cognitive tests or in the mood of older adults (p > 0.05). Methods Fifty healthy older adults received D-serine and placebo in a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design study. We studied the effect of D-serine administration on the performance of cognitive tests and an analogue mood scale. We also collected blood samples to measure D-serine, L-serine, glutamate and glutamine levels. Conclusions D-serine administration may be a strategy to improve spatial memory, learning and problem solving in healthy older adults. Future studies should evaluate the impact of long-term D-serine administration on cognition in older adults. PMID:26933803

  5. Stat5a serine phosphorylation. Serine 779 is constitutively phosphorylated in the mammary gland, and serine 725 phosphorylation influences prolactin-stimulated in vitro DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Beuvink, I; Hess, D; Flotow, H; Hofsteenge, J; Groner, B; Hynes, N E

    2000-04-01

    The activity of transcription factors of the Stat family is controlled by phosphorylation of a conserved, carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for Stat dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation of Stats on specific serine residues has also been described. We have previously shown that in HC11 mammary epithelial cells Stat5a is phosphorylated on Tyr(694) in a prolactin-sensitive manner, whereas serine phosphorylation is constitutive (Wartmann, M., Cella, N., Hofer, P., Groner, B., Xiuwen, L., Hennighausen, L., and Hynes, N. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31863-31868). By using mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, we have now identified Ser(779), located in a unique Stat5a SP motif, as the site of serine phosphorylation. By using phospho-Ser(779)-specific antiserum, we have determined that Ser(779) is constitutively phosphorylated in mammary glands taken from different developmental stages. Stat5a isolated from spleen, heart, brain, and lung was also found to be phosphorylated on Ser(779). Ser(725) in Stat5a has also been identified as a phosphorylation site (Yamashita, H., Xu, J., Erwin, R. A., Farrar, W. L., Kirken, R. A., and Rui, H. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 30218-30224). Here we show that mutagenesis of Ser(725), Ser(779), or a combination of Ser(725/779) to an Ala had no effect on prolactin-induced transcriptional activation of a beta-casein reporter construct. However, following prolactin induction the Ser(725) mutant displayed sustained DNA binding activity compared with that of wild type Stat5a. The results suggest that Ser(725) phosphorylation has an impact on signal duration. PMID:10744710

  6. Stat5a serine phosphorylation. Serine 779 is constitutively phosphorylated in the mammary gland, and serine 725 phosphorylation influences prolactin-stimulated in vitro DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Beuvink, I; Hess, D; Flotow, H; Hofsteenge, J; Groner, B; Hynes, N E

    2000-04-01

    The activity of transcription factors of the Stat family is controlled by phosphorylation of a conserved, carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for Stat dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation of Stats on specific serine residues has also been described. We have previously shown that in HC11 mammary epithelial cells Stat5a is phosphorylated on Tyr(694) in a prolactin-sensitive manner, whereas serine phosphorylation is constitutive (Wartmann, M., Cella, N., Hofer, P., Groner, B., Xiuwen, L., Hennighausen, L., and Hynes, N. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31863-31868). By using mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, we have now identified Ser(779), located in a unique Stat5a SP motif, as the site of serine phosphorylation. By using phospho-Ser(779)-specific antiserum, we have determined that Ser(779) is constitutively phosphorylated in mammary glands taken from different developmental stages. Stat5a isolated from spleen, heart, brain, and lung was also found to be phosphorylated on Ser(779). Ser(725) in Stat5a has also been identified as a phosphorylation site (Yamashita, H., Xu, J., Erwin, R. A., Farrar, W. L., Kirken, R. A., and Rui, H. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 30218-30224). Here we show that mutagenesis of Ser(725), Ser(779), or a combination of Ser(725/779) to an Ala had no effect on prolactin-induced transcriptional activation of a beta-casein reporter construct. However, following prolactin induction the Ser(725) mutant displayed sustained DNA binding activity compared with that of wild type Stat5a. The results suggest that Ser(725) phosphorylation has an impact on signal duration.

  7. Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury Perturbs Homeostasis of Serine Enantiomers in the Body Fluid in Mice: Early Detection of Renal Dysfunction Using the Ratio of Serine Enantiomers

    PubMed Central

    Sasabe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Masataka; Miyoshi, Yurika; Tojo, Yosuke; Okamura, Chieko; Ito, Sonomi; Konno, Ryuichi; Mita, Masashi; Hamase, Kenji; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance of blood and urine amino acids in renal failure has been studied mostly without chiral separation. Although a few reports have shown the presence of D-serine, an enantiomer of L-serine, in the serum of patients with severe renal failure, it has remained uncertain how serine enantiomers are deranged in the development of renal failure. In the present study, we have monitored serine enantiomers using a two-dimensional HPLC system in the serum and urine of mice after renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), known as a mouse model of acute kidney injury. In the serum, the level of D-serine gradually increased after renal IRI in parallel with that of creatinine, whereas the L-serine level decreased sharply in the early phase after IRI. The increase of D-serine was suppressed in part by genetic inactivation of a D-serine-degrading enzyme, D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), but not by disruption of its synthetic enzyme, serine racemase, in mice. Renal DAO activity was detected exclusively in proximal tubules, and IRI reduced the number of DAO-positive tubules. On the other hand, in the urine, D-serine was excreted at a rate nearly triple that of L-serine in mice with sham operations, indicating that little D-serine was reabsorbed while most L-serine was reabsorbed in physiological conditions. IRI significantly reduced the ratio of urinary D−/L-serine from 2.82±0.18 to 1.10±0.26 in the early phase and kept the ratio lower than 0.5 thereafter. The urinary D−/L-serine ratio can detect renal ischemia earlier than kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) or neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in the urine, and more sensitively than creatinine, cystatin C, or the ratio of D−/L-serine in the serum. Our findings provide a novel understanding of the imbalance of amino acids in renal failure and offer a potential new biomarker for an early detection of acute kidney injury. PMID:24489731

  8. The HARP detector at the CERN PS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanesi, M. G.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Radicioni, E.; Simone, S.; Edgecock, R.; Ellis, M.; Robbins, S.; Soler, F. J. P.; Gößling, C.; Mass, M.; Bunyatov, S.; Chukanov, A.; Klimov, O.; Krasin, I.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kustov, D.; Popov, B.; Serdiouk, V.; Tereshchenko, V.; Carassiti, V.; Di Capua, E.; Evangelisti, F.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Artamonov, A.; Arce, P.; Brocard, R.; Decreuse, G.; Friend, B.; Giani, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Gorbunov, P.; Grant, A.; Grossheim, A.; Gruber, P.; Ivanchenko, V.; Legrand, J.-C.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Panman, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pasternak, J.; Tcherniaev, E.; Tsukerman, I.; van der Vlugt, R.; Veenhof, R.; Wiebusch, C.; Zucchelli, P.; Blondel, A.; Borghi, S.; Campanelli, M.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Morone, M. C.; Prior, G.; Schroeter, R.; Kato, I.; Gastaldi, U.; Mills, G. B.; Graulich, J. S.; Grégoire, G.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Ferri, F.; Paleari, F.; Kirsanov, M.; Postoev, V.; Bagulya, A.; Grichine, V.; Polukhina, N.; Palladino, V.; Coney, L.; Schmitz, D.; Barr, G.; De Santo, A.; Pattison, C.; Zuber, K.; Barichello, G.; Bobisut, F.; Gibin, D.; Guglielmi, A.; Laveder, M.; Menegolli, A.; Mezzetto, M.; Pepato, A.; Dumarchez, J.; Troquereau, S.; Vannucci, F.; Dore, U.; Iaciofano, A.; Lobello, M.; Marinilli, F.; Orestano, D.; Panayotov, D.; Pasquali, M.; Pastore, F.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Booth, C.; Buttar, C.; Hodgson, P.; Howlett, L.; Nicholson, R.; Bogomilov, M.; Burin, K.; Chizhov, M.; Kolev, D.; Petev, P.; Rusinov, I.; Tsenov, R.; Piperov, S.; Temnikov, P.; Apollonio, M.; Chimenti, P.; Giannini, G.; Santin, G.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Novella, P.; Sorel, M.; Tornero, A.

    2007-02-01

    HARP is a high-statistics, large solid angle experiment to measure hadron production using proton and pion beams with momenta between 1.5 and 15 GeV/ c impinging on many different solid and liquid targets from low to high Z. The experiment, located in the T9 beam of the CERN PS, took data in 2001 and 2002. For the measurement of momenta of produced particles and for the identification of particle types, the experiment includes a large-angle spectrometer, based on a Time Projection Chamber and a system of Resistive Plate Chambers, and a forward spectrometer equipped with a set of large drift chambers, a threshold Cherenkov detector, a time-of-flight wall and an electromagnetic calorimeter. The large angle system uses a solenoidal magnet, while the forward spectrometer is based on a dipole magnet. Redundancy in particle identification has been sought, to enable the cross-calibration of efficiencies and to obtain a few percent overall accuracy in the cross-section measurements. Detector construction, operation and initial physics performances are reported. In addition, the full chain for data recording and analysis, from trigger to the software framework, is described.

  9. Spectroscopic Classification of PS16chs with SOAR/Goodman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. A.; Hounsell, R. A.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-05-01

    We report the classification of PS16chs from spectroscopic observation with the Goodman spectrograph on the SOAR telescope. The observation was made on 2016 May 08 UT. We classify PS16chs as a SN Ia near maximum light at z = 0.19.

  10. Membrane-anchored serine proteases in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas; Wu, Qingyu

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteases of the trypsin-like family have long been recognized to be critical effectors of biological processes as diverse as digestion, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and immunity. In recent years, a subgroup of these enzymes has been identified that are anchored directly to plasma membranes, either by a carboxy-terminal transmembrane domain (Type I), an amino-terminal transmembrane domain with a cytoplasmic extension (Type II or TTSP), or through a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. Recent biochemical, cellular, and in vivo analyses have now established that membrane-anchored serine proteases are key pericellular contributors to processes vital for development and the maintenance of homeostasis. This chapter will review our current knowledge of the biological and physiological functions of these proteases, their molecular substrates, and their contributions to disease. PMID:21238933

  11. Dynamics simulation of the interaction between serine and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Ying-Bo; Han, Sheng-Hao; Yu, Hui

    2013-05-01

    Using the first principles density functional theory (DFT), we simulated the neutron scattering spectra of the hydration dynamics of serine. Experimental data analyses have shown that dissociative H2O molecules were more likely to form hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) with an -OH group in monohydrated serine and easily shift to a -NH_3 ^ + group at a higher hydration level [P. Zhang, Y. Zhang, S. H. Han, Q. W. Yan, R. C. Ford, and J. C. Li, J. Phys. Chem. A 110, 5000 (2006), 10.1021/jp0569741]. We set the 1:1 ratio hydrated compounds at the two positions and found that the H2O could be optimized to form H-bonds with -OH and -NH3+ separately. When the simulated phonon signals of the -OH…H2O and -NH3+…H2O combinations were summed on a 3:1 scale, the calculating spectra were in good agreement with the experimental results, especially for the peak at 423 cm-1 of the -OH…H2O combination and the peak at 367 cm-1 of the -NH3+…H2O combination, which mutually complemented the real spectrum. We confirm that H2O may break the intermolecular H-bonds of the interlaced binding -OH to form a new structure, and that with the skeleton deformation of serine, H2O forms stronger H-bonds more often with the -NH3+ side indicating the flexible dynamic mechanism of the serine hydration process.

  12. Protein chemical synthesis by serine and threonine ligation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinfeng; Lam, Hiu Yung; Lee, Chi Lung; Li, Xuechen

    2013-01-01

    An efficient method has been developed for the salicylaldehyde ester-mediated ligation of unprotected peptides at serine (Ser) or threonine (Thr) residues. The utility of this peptide ligation approach has been demonstrated through the convergent syntheses of two therapeutic peptides––ovine-corticoliberin and Forteo––and the human erythrocyte acylphosphatase protein (∼11 kDa). The requisite peptide salicylaldehyde ester precursor is prepared in an epimerization-free manner via Fmoc–solid-phase peptide synthesis. PMID:23569249

  13. Serine protease activation of near-silent epithelial Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Ray A; Boucher, Richard C; Stutts, M Jackson

    2004-01-01

    The regulation of epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) function is critical for normal salt and water balance. This regulation is achieved through cell surface insertion/retrieval of channels, by changes in channel open probability (Po), or through a combination of these processes. Epithelium-derived serine proteases, including channel activating protease (CAP) and prostasin, regulate epithelial Na+ transport, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that extracellular serine proteases activate a near-silent ENaC population resident in the plasma membrane. Single-channel events were recorded in outside-out patches from fibroblasts (NIH/3T3) stably expressing rat alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subunits (rENaC), before and during exposure to trypsin, a serine protease homologous to CAP and prostasin. Under baseline conditions, near-silent patches were defined as having rENaC activity (NPo) < 0.03, where N is the number of channels. Within 1-5 min of 3 microg/ml bath trypsin superfusion, NPo increased approximately 66-fold (n = 7). In patches observed to contain a single functional channel, trypsin increased Po from 0.02 +/- 0.01 to 0.57 +/- 0.03 (n = 3, mean +/- SE), resulting from the combination of an increased channel open time and decreased channel closed time. Catalytic activity was required for activation of near-silent ENaC. Channel conductance and the Na+/Li+ current ratio with trypsin were similar to control values. Modulation of ENaC Po by endogenous epithelial serine proteases is a potentially important regulator of epithelial Na+ transport, distinct from the regulation achieved by hormone-induced plasma membrane insertion of channels. PMID:12967915

  14. Site-specific DNA Inversion by Serine Recombinases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reversible site-specific DNA inversion reactions are widely distributed in bacteria and their viruses. They control a range of biological reactions that most often involve alterations of molecules on the surface of cells or phage. These programmed DNA rearrangements usually occur at a low frequency, thereby preadapting a small subset of the population to a change in environmental conditions, or in the case of phages, an expanded host range. A dedicated recombinase, sometimes with the aid of additional regulatory or DNA architectural proteins, catalyzes the inversion of DNA. RecA or other components of the general recombination-repair machinery are not involved. This chapter discusses site-specific DNA inversion reactions mediated by the serine recombinase family of enzymes and focuses on the extensively studied serine DNA invertases that are stringently controlled by the Fis-bound enhancer regulatory system. The first section summarizes biological features and general properties of inversion reactions by the Fis/enhancer-dependent serine invertases and the recently described serine DNA invertases in Bacteroides. Mechanistic studies of reactions catalyzed by the Hin and Gin invertases are then discussed in more depth, particularly with regards to recent advances in our understanding of the function of the Fis/enhancer regulatory system, the assembly of the active recombination complex (invertasome) containing the Fis/enhancer, and the process of DNA strand exchange by rotation of synapsed subunit pairs within the invertasome. The role of DNA topological forces that function in concert with the Fis/enhancer controlling element in specifying the overwhelming bias for DNA inversion over deletion and intermolecular recombination is emphasized. PMID:25844275

  15. Phospholipid Metabolism in Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Short, Steven A.; White, David C.; Aleem, M. I. H.

    1969-01-01

    The lipid composition of the chemoautotroph Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans has been examined. Fatty acids represent 2% of the dry weight of the cells and 86% of the total are extractable with organic solvents. About 25% of the total fatty acids are associated with diacyl phospholipids. Polar carotenoids, the benzoquinone coenzyme Q-8, and most of the fatty acids are present in the neutral lipids. The phospholipids have been identified as phosphatidyl monomethylethanolamine (42%), phosphatidyl glycerol (23%), phosphatidyl ethanolamine (20%), cardiolipin (13%), phosphatidyl choline (1.5%), and phosphatidyl dimethylethanolamine (1%) by chromatography of the diacyl lipids, by chromatography in four systems of the glycerol phosphate esters derived from the lipids by mild alkaline methanolysis, and by chromatographic identification of the products of acid hydrolysis of the esters. No trace of phosphatidylserine (PS), glycerolphosphorylserine, or serine could be detected in the lipid extract or in derivatives of that extract. This casts some doubt on the postulated involvement of PS in iron metabolism. After growth in the presence of 14C and 32P, there was essentially no difference in the turnover of either isotope in the glycerolphosphate ester derived from each lipid in cells grown at pH 1.5 or 3.5. Images PMID:5802599

  16. graal: a Drosophila gene coding for several mosaic serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Munier, Anne Isabelle; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Janeway, Charles A; Doucet, Daniel; Capovilla, Maria; Lagueux, Marie

    2004-10-01

    Serine proteases play vital roles in several biological processes such as development and immunity. We have characterized Graal, a large multi-domain serine protease from Drosophila. Graal is spliced in at least three transcripts that are present throughout development. The domains found in Graal proteins are: chitin-binding domains (CBD), scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains, low density lipoprotein receptor cysteine-rich (LDLR-CR) domains, histidine and proline-rich domains, a NGGYQPP-repeat domain and a serine protease domain. The last 2370 nucleotides of these RNAs are identical and encode a His-rich domain, two SRCR domains, two LDLR-CR domains and a protease domain. The transcription of graal is upregulated after fungal or bacterial infection. Analysis of the Iso1 (y;cn,sp,bw) strain shows that graal transcription is impaired in this fly line due to the insertion of a retrotransposon in the sixth exon. However, no phenotype could be observed consecutive to the absence of graal full length transcripts, particularly in the context of an immune challenge.

  17. Structural Basis for Catalytic Activation of a Serine Recombinase

    SciTech Connect

    Keenholtz, Ross A.; Rowland, Sally-J.; Boocock, Martin R.; Stark, W. Marshall; Rice, Phoebe A.

    2014-10-02

    Sin resolvase is a site-specific serine recombinase that is normally controlled by a complex regulatory mechanism. A single mutation, Q115R, allows the enzyme to bypass the entire regulatory apparatus, such that no accessory proteins or DNA sites are required. Here, we present a 1.86 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Sin Q115R catalytic domain, in a tetrameric arrangement stabilized by an interaction between Arg115 residues on neighboring subunits. The subunits have undergone significant conformational changes from the inactive dimeric state previously reported. The structure provides a new high-resolution view of a serine recombinase active site that is apparently fully assembled, suggesting roles for the conserved active site residues. The structure also suggests how the dimer-tetramer transition is coupled to assembly of the active site. The tetramer is captured in a different rotational substate than that seen in previous hyperactive serine recombinase structures, and unbroken crossover site DNA can be readily modeled into its active sites.

  18. Final results for π± production in the HARP/PS214 experiment at CERN PS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.; HARP/PS214 Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The final results on π± production in proton nucleus or π± nucleus interactions for incident particle momenta between 1.5 GeV/c and 15 GeV/c as measured in the HARP/PS214 experiment at CERN PS are presented.

  19. iPS cells: a source of cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yoshinori; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2011-02-01

    For the treatment of heart failure, a new strategy to improve cardiac function and inhibit cardiac remodeling needs to be established. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are pluripotent cells that can differentiate into cell types from all three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic effect of ES/iPS cell-derived progeny was reported in animal model. Mouse and human somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the transduction of four transcription factors, Oct 3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. However, the low induction efficiency hinders the clinical application of iPS technology, and efforts have been made to improve the reprogramming efficiency. There are variations in the characteristics in ES/iPS cell lines, and the further understanding is necessary for the applications of ES/iPS cell technology. Some improvements were also made in the methods to induce cardiomyocytes from ES/iPS cells efficiently. This review article is focused on generation of iPS cells, cardiomyocyte differentiation from ES/iPS cells, and transplantation of derived cardiomyocytes.This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  20. Preliminary Tuft Testing of Metallic Bristles Versus PS212, PS300, and HVOF300

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Turbine engine brush seals are designed with sacrificial brushes and hard shaft coatings to minimize shaft wear and reduce the cost of engine overhauls. Replacing a worm seal is more cost and time effective than refinishing an engine shaft. However, this tribological design causes excessive brush wear and reduces long term seal efficiency. An alternative approach is to coat the shaft with a solid lubricant and allow the bristles to wear into the shaft coating similar to traditional abradable labyrinth seals. This approach can result in reduced seal leakage by forcing the leakage to flow through the seal bristle pack or through a more tortuous shaft wear track. Key to this approach is limiting the shaft wear to an acceptable level were surface refinishing would not be required during every engine overhaul. Included in this paper are brush seal tuft test results for four metallic bristles (nickel-chrome or cobalt-chrome based superalloys) tested against three solid lubricant coatings (NASA's PS212, PS300, and HVOF300). These test results are also compared to previous baseline tests conducted with plasma sprayed chrome carbide. Compared to the baseline results, no tribological benefit was achieved with the metallic bristle/solid lubricant tribopairs tested. To improve the performance of the solid lubricant coatings, issues regarding lubricant phase sizes (homogeneity), and composition need to be addressed.

  1. PP and PS interferometric images of near-seafloor sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    I present interferometric processing examples from an ocean-bottom cable OBC dataset collected at a water depth of 800 m in the Gulf of Mexico. Virtual source and receiver gathers created through cross-correlation of full wavefields show clear PP reflections and PS conversions from near-seafloor layers of interest. Virtual gathers from wavefield-separated data show improved PP and PS arrivals. PP and PS brute stacks from the wavefield-separated data compare favorably with images from a non-interferometric processing flow. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  2. Genome-wide survey of prokaryotic serine proteases: Analysis of distribution and domain architectures of five serine protease families in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Lokesh P; Sowdhamini, R

    2008-01-01

    Background Serine proteases are one of the most abundant groups of proteolytic enzymes found in all the kingdoms of life. While studies have established significant roles for many prokaryotic serine proteases in several physiological processes, such as those associated with metabolism, cell signalling, defense response and development, functional associations for a large number of prokaryotic serine proteases are relatively unknown. Current analysis is aimed at understanding the distribution and probable biological functions of the select serine proteases encoded in representative prokaryotic organisms. Results A total of 966 putative serine proteases, belonging to five families, were identified in the 91 prokaryotic genomes using various sensitive sequence search techniques. Phylogenetic analysis reveals several species-specific clusters of serine proteases suggesting their possible involvement in organism-specific functions. Atypical phylogenetic associations suggest an important role for lateral gene transfer events in facilitating the widespread distribution of the serine proteases in the prokaryotes. Domain organisations of the gene products were analysed, employing sensitive sequence search methods, to infer their probable biological functions. Trypsin, subtilisin and Lon protease families account for a significant proportion of the multi-domain representatives, while the D-Ala-D-Ala carboxypeptidase and the Clp protease families are mostly single-domain polypeptides in prokaryotes. Regulatory domains for protein interaction, signalling, pathogenesis, cell adhesion etc. were found tethered to the serine protease domains. Some domain combinations (such as S1-PDZ; LON-AAA-S16 etc.) were found to be widespread in the prokaryotic lineages suggesting a critical role in prokaryotes. Conclusion Domain architectures of many serine proteases and their homologues identified in prokaryotes are very different from those observed in eukaryotes, suggesting distinct roles

  3. Phosphatidylserine (PS) Is Exposed in Choroidal Neovascular Endothelium: PS-Targeting Antibodies Inhibit Choroidal Angiogenesis In Vivo and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Aredo, Bogale; Zhang, Kaiyan; Zhong, Xin; Pulido, Jose S.; Wang, Shusheng; He, Yu-Guang; Huang, Xianming; Brekken, Rolf A.; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) accounts for 90% of cases of severe vision loss in patients with advanced age-related macular degeneration. Identifying new therapeutic targets for CNV may lead to novel combination therapies to improve outcomes and reduce treatment burden. Our goal was to test whether phosphatidylserine (PS) becomes exposed in the outer membrane of choroidal neovascular endothelium, and whether this could provide a new therapeutic target for CNV. Methods Choroidal neovascularization was induced in C57BL/6J mice using laser photocoagulation. Choroidal neovascularization lesions costained for exposed PS and for intercellular adhesion molecule 2 (or isolectin B4) were imaged in flat mounts and in cross sections. The laser CNV model and a choroidal sprouting assay were used to test the effect of PS-targeting antibodies on choroidal angiogenesis. Choroidal neovascularization lesion size was determined by intercellular adhesion molecule 2 (ICAM-2) staining of flat mounts. Results We found that PS was exposed in CNV lesions and colocalized with vascular endothelial staining. Treatment with PS-targeting antibodies led to a 40% to 80% reduction in CNV lesion area when compared to treatment with a control antibody. The effect was the same as that seen using an equal dose of an anti-VEGF antibody. Results were confirmed using the choroid sprouting assay, an ex vivo model of choroidal angiogenesis. Conclusions We demonstrated that PS is exposed in choroidal neovascular endothelium. Furthermore, targeting this exposed PS with antibodies may be of therapeutic value in CNV. PMID:26529048

  4. Characterization of a chemostable serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteases are important enzymes involved in numerous essential physiological processes and hold a strong potential for industrial applications. The proteolytic activity of insects’ gut is endowed by many isoforms with diverse properties and specificities. Thus, insect proteases can act as a tool in industrial processes. Results In the present study, purification and properties of a serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana and its potential application as an additive in various bio-formulations are reported. The enzyme was purified near to homogeneity by using acetone precipitation and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. Enzyme activity was increased up to 4.2 fold after gel filtration chromatography. The purified enzyme appeared as single protein-band with a molecular mass of ~ 27.8 kDa in SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature for the proteolytic activity for purified protein were found around pH 8.0 and 60°C respectively. Complete inhibition of the purified enzyme by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride confirmed that the protease was of serine-type. The purified enzyme revealed high stability and compatibility towards detergents, oxidizing, reducing, and bleaching agents. In addition, enzyme also showed stability towards organic solvents and commercial detergents. Conclusion Several important properties of a serine protease from P. Americana were revealed. Moreover, insects can serve as excellent and alternative source of industrially important proteases with unique properties, which can be utilized as additives in detergents, stain removers and other bio-formulations. Properties of the P. americana protease accounted in the present investigation can be exploited further in various industrial processes. As an industrial prospective, identification of enzymes with varying essential properties from different insect species might be good approach and bioresource. PMID:24229392

  5. Insulin resistance and muscle insulin receptor substrate‐1 serine hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Charles A.; Howell, Mary E. A.; Cartwright, Brian M.; McCurry, Melanie P.; Lee, Michelle L.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Stone, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome subjects is profound in spite of muscle insulin receptor and insulin‐responsive glucose transporter (GLUT4) expression being nearly normal. Insulin receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate‐1 (IRS‐1) at Tyr896 is a necessary step in insulin stimulation of translocation of GLUT4 to the cell surface. Serine phosphorylation of IRS‐1 by some kinases diminishes insulin action in mice. We evaluated the phosphorylation status of muscle IRS‐1 in 33 subjects with the metabolic syndrome and seventeen lean controls. Each underwent euglycemic insulin clamps and a thigh muscle biopsy before and after 8 weeks of either strength or endurance training. Muscle IRS‐1 phosphorylation at six sites was quantified by immunoblots. Metabolic syndrome muscle IRS‐1 had excess phosphorylation at Ser337 and Ser636 but not at Ser307, Ser789, or Ser1101. Ser337 is a target for phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and Ser636 is phosphorylated by c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase 1 (JNK1). Exercise training without weight loss did not change the IRS‐1 serine phosphorylation. These data suggest that baseline hyperphosphorylation of at least two key serines within muscle IRS‐1 diminishes the transmission of the insulin signal and thereby decreases the insulin‐stimulated translocation of GLUT4. Excess fasting phosphorylation of muscle IRS‐1 at Ser636 may be a major cause of the insulin resistance seen in obesity and might prevent improvement in insulin responsiveness when exercise training is not accompanied by weight loss. PMID:25472611

  6. Development and operating characteristics of the PS132 thermal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, F. C.

    1986-01-01

    The development and operating characterisitics of the PS132 thermal battery are described. The PS132 uses the electrochemical system Ca/LiCl-KCl eutectic-SiO2CACRO4, and it is one of the smallest batteries of its type ever built that can meet its electrical and envronmental requirements. A development program that included construction of approximately 400 PS132-like batteries showed that obtaining acceptable DEB electrolyte-cathode powders was a major problem. Most commercial DEB powders caused excessive amounts of CaLi2 molten metal to form in the operating thermal cells of the PS132. This molten metal then flowed from the cells and caused electrical short circuits.

  7. Structural basis of substrate specificity in the serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Perona, J. J.; Craik, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Structure-based mutational analysis of serine protease specificity has produced a large database of information useful in addressing biological function and in establishing a basis for targeted design efforts. Critical issues examined include the function of water molecules in providing strength and specificity of binding, the extent to which binding subsites are interdependent, and the roles of polypeptide chain flexibility and distal structural elements in contributing to specificity profiles. The studies also provide a foundation for exploring why specificity modification can be either straightforward or complex, depending on the particular system. PMID:7795518

  8. Discovery libraries targeting the major enzyme classes: the serine hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Otrubova, Katerina; Srinivasan, Venkat; Boger, Dale L

    2014-08-15

    Two libraries of modestly reactive ureas containing either electron-deficient acyl anilines or acyl pyrazoles were prepared and are reported as screening libraries for candidate serine hydrolase inhibitors. Within each library is a small but powerful subset of compounds that serve as a chemotype fragment screening library capable of subsequent structural diversification. Elaboration of the pyrazole-based ureas provided remarkably potent irreversible inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, apparent Ki=100-200 pM) complementary to those previously disclosed enlisting electron-deficient aniline-based ureas.

  9. Reprogramming therapeutics: iPS cell prospects for neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Abeliovich, Asa; Doege, Claudia A

    2009-02-12

    The recent description of somatic cell reprogramming to an embryonic stem (ES) cell-like phenotype, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, presents an exciting potential venue toward cell-based therapeutics and disease models for neurodegenerative disorders. Two recent studies (Dimos et al. and Ebert et al.) describe the initial characterization of neurodegenerative disease patient-derived iPS cell cultures as proof of concept for the utility of this technology.

  10. Serine proteases of the human immune system in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Heutinck, Kirstin M; ten Berge, Ineke J M; Hack, C Erik; Hamann, Jörg; Rowshani, Ajda T

    2010-07-01

    Serine proteases form a large family of protein-cleaving enzymes that play an essential role in processes like blood coagulation, apoptosis and inflammation. Immune cells express a wide variety of serine proteases such as granzymes in cytotoxic lymphocytes, neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and proteinase 3 in neutrophils and chymase and tryptase in mast cells. Regulation of proteolysis induced by these serine proteases is essential to prevent self-induced damage. Hence, there are specialized serine protease inhibitors, serpins, which are broadly distributed. Here, we discuss the function of human serine proteases in inflammation, apoptosis and tissue remodeling. Furthermore, we address their impact on development and progression of immune mediated-diseases. Understanding the mode of action of serine proteases will help to unravel molecular processes involved in immunological disorders and will facilitate the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  11. Spectroscopic and thermal studies of PS/PVAc blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elashmawi, I. S.; Hakeem, N. A.; Abdelrazek, E. M.

    2008-10-01

    Polystyrene and polyvinyl acetate (PS/PVAc) films were blended with different contents using casting method. The effect of PS content on PVAc blends was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Ultra violet and visible studies (UV/VIS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Significant changes in FT-IR, XRD and DSC analysis are observed which reveals an interactions between the two polymers and PS/PVAc blends had good or certain miscibility. XRD scans show some changes in the intensity and the height of the amorphous halos with increased PS. UV/VIS analysis revealed that the optical band gap decreases with increasing content of PS from 5 to 4.11 eV. A single glass transition temperature for each blend was observed, this DSC results supported that the miscibility existed in the blend. The apparent activation energy (E) of the blends was evaluated using TGA analysis. The value of E was increased with the increase of PS content.

  12. [Application for Lifestyle disease by iPS cells technologies].

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Currently it is less advanced to understand the pathology of lifestyle disease by using iPS cells because there is partly less direct connection between life style disease and iPS cells. So much more scientists focus on regenerative medicine such as beta cells therapy using iPS cells technologies. It will be indeed a powerful tool to generate beta cells from iPS cells as even in type2 diabetes patients, hyposecretion of insulin from beta cells in pancreas is one of causes. Another reason is complexity of the pathology of life style disease. There are a lot of reasons to cause lifestyle disease. Lifestyle diseases include cancer, chronic liver disease, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, metabolic syndrome, chronic renal failure, stroke, and obesity. Since obesity is one of major causes of lifestyle diseases, we want to focus on adipogenesis from iPS cells in this review. We analysed and established the differentiation protocol into adipocytes from mouse ES cells and human iPS cells. The other point in this review is the starting pluripotent cells for differentiation. Quality of pluripotent stem cells are one of most critical factors to succeed in getting well-differentiated cells. Recently, we have developed new naive human pluripotent stem cells (PSC),"Reset cells". Naive PSC have more similar to human epibast cells than conventional human PSC. They will be more ideal cells for differentiation because of their hypomethylated status and earlier stage of development. PMID:26923982

  13. [Application for Lifestyle disease by iPS cells technologies].

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Currently it is less advanced to understand the pathology of lifestyle disease by using iPS cells because there is partly less direct connection between life style disease and iPS cells. So much more scientists focus on regenerative medicine such as beta cells therapy using iPS cells technologies. It will be indeed a powerful tool to generate beta cells from iPS cells as even in type2 diabetes patients, hyposecretion of insulin from beta cells in pancreas is one of causes. Another reason is complexity of the pathology of life style disease. There are a lot of reasons to cause lifestyle disease. Lifestyle diseases include cancer, chronic liver disease, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, metabolic syndrome, chronic renal failure, stroke, and obesity. Since obesity is one of major causes of lifestyle diseases, we want to focus on adipogenesis from iPS cells in this review. We analysed and established the differentiation protocol into adipocytes from mouse ES cells and human iPS cells. The other point in this review is the starting pluripotent cells for differentiation. Quality of pluripotent stem cells are one of most critical factors to succeed in getting well-differentiated cells. Recently, we have developed new naive human pluripotent stem cells (PSC),"Reset cells". Naive PSC have more similar to human epibast cells than conventional human PSC. They will be more ideal cells for differentiation because of their hypomethylated status and earlier stage of development.

  14. l-Serine Deficiency Elicits Intracellular Accumulation of Cytotoxic Deoxysphingolipids and Lipid Body Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Esaki, Kayoko; Sayano, Tomoko; Sonoda, Chiaki; Akagi, Takumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    l-Serine is required to synthesize membrane lipids such as phosphatidylserine and sphingolipids. Nevertheless, it remains largely unknown how a diminished capacity to synthesize l-serine affects lipid homeostasis in cells and tissues. Here, we show that deprivation of external l-serine leads to the generation of 1-deoxysphingolipids (doxSLs), including 1-deoxysphinganine, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (KO-MEFs) lacking d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), which catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of l-serine. A novel mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach demonstrated that 1-deoxydihydroceramide was the most abundant species of doxSLs accumulated in l-serine-deprived KO-MEFs. Among normal sphingolipid species in KO-MEFs, levels of sphinganine, dihydroceramide, ceramide, and hexosylceramide were significantly reduced after deprivation of external l-serine, whereas those of sphingomyelin, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate were retained. The synthesis of doxSLs was suppressed by supplementing the culture medium with l-serine but was potentiated by increasing the ratio of l-alanine to l-serine in the medium. Unlike with l-serine, depriving cells of external l-leucine did not promote the occurrence of doxSLs. Consistent with results obtained from KO-MEFs, brain-specific deletion of Phgdh in mice also resulted in accumulation of doxSLs in the brain. Furthermore, l-serine-deprived KO-MEFs exhibited increased formation of cytosolic lipid bodies containing doxSLs and other sphingolipids. These in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that doxSLs are generated in the presence of a high ratio of l-alanine to l-serine in cells and tissues lacking Phgdh, and de novo synthesis of l-serine is necessary to maintain normal sphingolipid homeostasis when the external supply of this amino acid is limited. PMID:25903138

  15. New L-Serine Derivative Ligands as Cocatalysts for Diels-Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Carlos A. D.; Rodríguez-Borges, José E.; Freire, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    New L-serine derivative ligands were prepared and tested as cocatalyst in the Diels-Alder reactions between cyclopentadiene (CPD) and methyl acrylate, in the presence of several Lewis acids. The catalytic potential of the in situ formed complexes was evaluated based on the reaction yield. Bidentate serine ligands showed good ability to coordinate medium strength Lewis acids, thus boosting their catalytic activity. The synthesis of the L-serine ligands proved to be highly efficient and straightforward. PMID:24383009

  16. L-Serine Deficiency Elicits Intracellular Accumulation of Cytotoxic Deoxysphingolipids and Lipid Body Formation.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Kayoko; Sayano, Tomoko; Sonoda, Chiaki; Akagi, Takumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2015-06-01

    L-serine is required to synthesize membrane lipids such as phosphatidylserine and sphingolipids. Nevertheless, it remains largely unknown how a diminished capacity to synthesize L-serine affects lipid homeostasis in cells and tissues. Here, we show that deprivation of external L-serine leads to the generation of 1-deoxysphingolipids (doxSLs), including 1-deoxysphinganine, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (KO-MEFs) lacking D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), which catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of L-serine. A novel mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach demonstrated that 1-deoxydihydroceramide was the most abundant species of doxSLs accumulated in L-serine-deprived KO-MEFs. Among normal sphingolipid species in KO-MEFs, levels of sphinganine, dihydroceramide, ceramide, and hexosylceramide were significantly reduced after deprivation of external L-serine, whereas those of sphingomyelin, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate were retained. The synthesis of doxSLs was suppressed by supplementing the culture medium with L-serine but was potentiated by increasing the ratio of L-alanine to L-serine in the medium. Unlike with L-serine, depriving cells of external L-leucine did not promote the occurrence of doxSLs. Consistent with results obtained from KO-MEFs, brain-specific deletion of Phgdh in mice also resulted in accumulation of doxSLs in the brain. Furthermore, L-serine-deprived KO-MEFs exhibited increased formation of cytosolic lipid bodies containing doxSLs and other sphingolipids. These in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that doxSLs are generated in the presence of a high ratio of L-alanine to L-serine in cells and tissues lacking Phgdh, and de novo synthesis of L-serine is necessary to maintain normal sphingolipid homeostasis when the external supply of this amino acid is limited. PMID:25903138

  17. Profiling the microRNA Expression in Human iPS and iPS-derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Heuy-Ching; Greene, Whitney A; Kaini, Ramesh R; Shen-Gunther, Jane; Chen, Hung-I H; Cai, Hong; Wang, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-RPE). MiRNAs have been demonstrated to play critical roles in both maintaining pluripotency and facilitating differentiation. Gene expression networks accountable for maintenance and induction of pluripotency are linked and share components with those networks implicated in oncogenesis. Therefore, we hypothesize that miRNA expression profiling will distinguish iPS cells from their iPS-RPE progeny. To identify and analyze differentially expressed miRNAs, RPE was derived from iPS using a spontaneous differentiation method. MiRNA microarray analysis identified 155 probes that were statistically differentially expressed between iPS and iPS-RPE cells. Up-regulated miRNAs including miR-181c and miR-129–5p may play a role in promoting differentiation, while down-regulated miRNAs such as miR-367, miR-18b, and miR-20b are implicated in cell proliferation. Subsequent miRNA–target and network analysis revealed that these miRNAs are involved in cellular development, cell cycle progression, cell death, and survival. A systematic interrogation of temporal and spatial expression of iPS-RPE miRNAs and their associated target mRNAs will provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis, eye differentiation and development. PMID:25392691

  18. Dynamic properties of extremophilic subtilisin-like serine-proteases.

    PubMed

    Tiberti, Matteo; Papaleo, Elena

    2011-04-01

    The investigation of the structural determinants of enzymatic temperature adaptation is a crucial pre-requisite both in terms of fundamental research and industrial applications to develop new biocatalysts active at different temperature ranges. In several cases, the differences related to cold- or warm-adaptation are related to subtle structural and aminoacidic differences at the molecular level, often hard to detect. In this context, we present a comparative study of psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic subtilisin-like serine proteases by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent using a multiple-replica approach. Our results strongly enforce the current view on localized flexibility in crucial functional regions for cold-adapted serine proteases and point out a different optimization and usage of salt-bridge interactions and networks in cold- and warm-adapted enzymes. The analyses allow to identify a subset of structural and dynamic features strictly associated to cold adaptation and which change from cold- to heat-active subtilisins. In particular, the thermophilic subtilisin presents a high affinity calcium binding site which is not structurally conserved in the mesophilic and psychrophilic counterparts, which, as it turns out from the MD analyses, at the same position show a stable salt bridge network and no stabilizing intra-molecular interactions, respectively. These aspects, along with differential flexibility in regions close to the active site or substrate binding pocket, can be an indication of evolution at this protein site toward a lower stability moving from high to low temperature conditions.

  19. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4–fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester.

  20. Biochemical characterization of Acacia schweinfurthii serine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Odei-Addo, Frank; Frost, Carminita; Smith, Nanette; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Muramoto, Koji; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Gráf, László; Naude, Ryno

    2014-10-01

    One of the many control mechanisms of serine proteinases is their specific inhibition by protein proteinase inhibitors. An extract of Acacia schweinfurthii was screened for potential serine proteinase inhibition. It was successfully purified to homogeneity by precipitating with 80% (v/v) acetone and sequential chromatographic steps, including ion-exchange, affinity purification and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Reducing sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis conditions revealed an inhibitor (ASTI) consisting of two polypeptide chains A and B of approximate molecular weights of 16 and 10 kDa, respectively, and under non-reducing conditions, 26 kDa was observed. The inhibitor was shown to inhibit bovine trypsin (Ki of 3.45 nM) at an approximate molar ratio of inhibitor:trypsin (1:1). The A- and B-chains revealed complete sequences of 140 and 40 amino acid residues, respectively. Sequence similarity (70%) was reported between ASTI A-chain and ACTI A-chain (Acacia confusa) using ClustalW. The B-chain produced a 76% sequence similarity between ASTI and Leucaena leucocephala trypsin inhibitor. PMID:24090421

  1. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-01-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4–fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester. PMID:27150669

  2. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized from serine.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, N; Judith Vijaya, J; John Kennedy, L; Priadharsini, K; Palani, P

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent and serine as a reducing agent. UV-Visible spectra were used to confirm the formation of Ag NPs by observing the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 443nm. The emission spectrum of Ag NPs showed an emission band at 484nm. In the presence of microwave radiation, serine acts as a reducing agent, which was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectrum. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) were used to investigate the morphology of the synthesized sample. These images showed the sphere-like morphology. The elemental composition of the sample was determined by the energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) was used to find the crystalline nature of the Ag NPs. The electrochemical behavior of the synthesized Ag NPs was analyzed by the cyclic voltammetry (CV). Antibacterial experiments showed that the prepared Ag NPs showed relatively similar antibacterial activities, when compared with AgNO3 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  3. Normal mouse peritoneum contains a large population of Ly-1+ (CD5) B cells that recognize phosphatidyl choline. Relationship to cells that secrete hemolytic antibody specific for autologous erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have found that, in the peritoneums of normal adult mice, 5-15% of lymphocytes bind a fluorescent liposome probe. In ontogeny, cells with this specificity were shown to appear by 8 d after birth, and increase to the adult frequency by 2-3 wk. Some older mice contain an expanded population of these cells. We have shown that liposome binding occurs by cell surface IgM recognizing the common membrane phospholipid, phosphatidyl choline (PtC). Virtually all of these PtC-specific cells bear the cell surface marker Ly-1. Our results indicate that roughly 1 in 10 peritoneal Ly-1+ B cells has this single specificity. We have found that the precursors to all the cells that form plaques on protease-treated autologous erythrocytes (BrMRBC) are included in the PtC-specific population and can be isolated by FACS. We believe this is the first report of sorting large numbers of B cells with a single antigen specificity from normal, unimmunized animals. This method will allow for in vitro and in vivo studies of differentiative and proliferative properties of Ly-1+ B cells, which may help define their role in development and disease. PMID:3045250

  4. Adaptational modification of serine and threonine metabolism in the liver to essential amino acid deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kenji; Bannai, Makoto; Seki, Shinobu; Mori, Masato; Takahashi, Michio

    2009-03-01

    It is known that plasma serine and threonine concentrations are elevated in rats chronically fed an essential amino acid deficient diet, but the underlying mechanisms including related gene expressions or serine and threonine concentrations in liver remained to be elucidated. We fed rats lysine or valine deficient diet for 4 weeks and examined the mRNA expressions of serine synthesising (3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, PHGDH) and serine/threonine degrading enzymes (serine dehydratase, SDS) in the liver. Dietary deficiency induced marked elevation of hepatic serine and threonine levels associated with enhancement of PHGDH mRNA expression and repression of SDS mRNA expression. Increases in plasma serine and threonine levels due to essential amino acid deficiency in diet were caused by marked increases in hepatic serine and threonine levels. Proteolytic responses to the amino acid deficiency may be lessened by storing amino radicals as serine and inducing anorexia through elevation of threonine. PMID:18584286

  5. Enantioselective inhibition of D-serine transport by (S)-ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra S; Bernier, Michel; Camandola, Simonetta; Khadeer, Mohammed A; Moaddel, Ruin; Mattson, Mark P; Wainer, Irving W

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients with major depressive disorder receiving racemic ketamine, (R,S)-ketamine, experience transient increases in Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale scores and a coincident drop in plasma d-serine levels. The results suggest that (R,S)-ketamine produces an immediate, concentration-dependent pharmacological effect on d-serine plasma concentrations. One potential source of this effect is (R,S)-ketamine-induced inhibition of the transporter ASCT2, which regulates intracellular d-serine concentrations. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of (S)- and (R)-ketamine on ASCT2-mediated transport of d-serine in PC-12 and 1321N1 cells and primary neuronal cells in culture. Experimental Approach Intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels were determined using capillary electrophoresis–laser-induced fluorescence and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry respectively. Expression of ASCT2, Asc-1 and serine racemase was determined utilizing Western blotting. Key Results (S)-Ketamine produced a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular d-serine and reduced extracellular d-serine accumulation. In contrast, (R)-ketamine decreased both intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels. The ASCT2 inhibitor, benzyl-d-serine (BDS), and ASCT2 gene knockdown mimicked the action of (S)-ketamine on d-serine in PC-12 cells, while the Asc-1 agonist d-isoleucine reduced intracellular d-serine and increased extracellular d-serine accumulation. This response to d-isoleucine was not affected by BDS or (S)-ketamine. Primary cultures of rat neuronal cells expressed ASCT2 and were responsive to (S)-ketamine and BDS. (S)- and (R)-ketamine increased the expression of monomeric serine racemase in all the cells studied, with (S)-ketamine having the greatest effect. Conclusions and Implications (S)-Ketamine decreased cellular export of d-serine via selective inhibition of ASCT2, and this could represent a possible source

  6. An essential role for de novo biosynthesis of L-serine in CNS development.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shigeki

    2008-01-01

    L-serine plays a versatile role in intermediary metabolism in eukaryotic cells. The physiological significance of its de novo biosynthesis, however, remains largely unexplored. We demonstrated previously that neurons lose the ability to synthesize L-serine after their final differentiation and thus depend on astrocytes to supply this amino acid. This is due to a lack of neuronal expression of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), which initiates de novo L-serine synthesis via the phosphorylated pathway from the glycolytic intermediate 3-phosphoglycerate. In rodent brain, Phgdh is expressed exclusively by the neuroepithelium/radial glia/astrocyte lineage. In humans, serine deficiency disorders can result from a deficiency of Phgdh or other enzymes involved in serine biosynthesis in the phosphorylated pathway. Patients with such disorders have lower serine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid; they exhibit severe neurological symptoms including congenital microcephaly, feeding disabilities, and psychomotor retardation. L-serine supplementation can attenuate developmental defects in these patients. To define the physiological importance of de novo L-serine production, we generated Phgdh knockout mice using targeted gene disruption technique. Phgdh deletion drastically reduced serine and glycine levels in the body. Phgdh knockout mice exhibited overall growth retardation with severe brain malformation, culminating in embryonic lethality. These observations highlight the vital role of de novo L-serine synthesis in the formation and function of the mammalian central nervous system. Furthermore, the embryonic lethal phenotype of Phgdh knockouts indicates that L-serine must be synthesized endogenously in mouse (and probably humans) during embryonic development. PMID:18296366

  7. Brain-specific Phgdh deletion reveals a pivotal role for L-serine biosynthesis in controlling the level of D-serine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor co-agonist, in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung Hoon; Wada, Akira; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Miyoshi, Yurika; Sayano, Tomoko; Esaki, Kayoko; Kinoshita, Masami O; Tomonaga, Shozo; Azuma, Norihiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hamase, Kenji; Zaitsu, Kiyoshi; Machida, Takeo; Messing, Albee; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2010-12-31

    In mammalian brain, D-serine is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase, and it functions as an obligatory co-agonist at the glycine modulatory site of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-selective glutamate receptors. Although diminution in D-serine level has been implicated in NMDA receptor hypofunction, which is thought to occur in schizophrenia, the source of the precursor L-serine and its role in D-serine metabolism in adult brain have yet to be determined. We investigated whether L-serine synthesized in brain via the phosphorylated pathway is essential for D-serine synthesis by generating mice with a conditional deletion of D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh; EC 1.1.1.95). This enzyme catalyzes the first step in L-serine synthesis via the phosphorylated pathway. HPLC analysis of serine enantiomers demonstrated that both L- and D-serine levels were markedly decreased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of conditional knock-out mice, whereas the serine deficiency did not alter protein expression levels of serine racemase and NMDA receptor subunits in these regions. The present study provides definitive proof that L-serine-synthesized endogenously via the phosphorylated pathway is a key rate-limiting factor for maintaining steady-state levels of D-serine in adult brain. Furthermore, NMDA-evoked transcription of Arc, an immediate early gene, was diminished in the hippocampus of conditional knock-out mice. Thus, this study demonstrates that in mature neuronal circuits L-serine availability determines the rate of D-serine synthesis in the forebrain and controls NMDA receptor function at least in the hippocampus. PMID:20966073

  8. Pressure Monitoring Using Hybrid fs/ps Rotational CARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearney, Sean P.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of gas-phase pressure measurements at kHz-rates using fs/ps rotational CARS. Femtosecond pump and Stokes pulses impulsively prepare a rotational Raman coherence, which is then probed by a high-energy 6-ps pulse introduced at a time delay from the Raman preparation. Rotational CARS spectra were recorded in N2 contained in a room-temperature gas cell for pressures from 0.1 to 3 atm and probe delays ranging from 10-330 ps. Using published self-broadened collisional linewidth data for N2, both the spectrally integrated coherence decay rate and the spectrally resolved decay were investigated as means for detecting pressure. Shot-averaged and single-laser-shot spectra were interrogated for pressure and the accuracy and precision as a function of probe delay and cell pressure are discussed. Single-shot measurement accuracies were within 0.1 to 6.5% when compared to a transducer values, while the precision was generally between 1% and 6% of measured pressure for probe delays of 200 ps or more, and better than 2% as the delay approached 300 ps. A byproduct of the pressure measurement is an independent but simultaneous measurement of the gas temperature.

  9. Astrocytes are involved in trigeminal dynamic mechanical allodynia: potential role of D-serine.

    PubMed

    Dieb, W; Hafidi, A

    2013-09-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain affects millions of people worldwide. Despite decades of study on the neuronal processing of pain, mechanisms underlying enhanced pain states after injury remain unclear. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent changes play a critical role in triggering central sensitization in neuropathic pain. These receptors are regulated at the glycine site through a mandatory endogenous co-agonist D-serine, which is synthesized by astrocytes. Therefore, the present study was carried out to determine whether astrocytes are involved, through D-serine secretion, in dynamic mechanical allodynia (DMA) obtained after chronic constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-IoN) in rats. Two weeks after CCI-IoN, an important reaction of astrocytes was present in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as revealed by an up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in allodynic rats. In parallel, an increase in D-serine synthesis, which co-localized with its synthesis enzyme serine racemase, was strictly observed in astrocytes. Blocking astrocyte metabolism by intracisternal delivery of fluorocitrate alleviated DMA. Furthermore, the administration of D-amino-acid oxidase (DAAO), a D-serine-degrading enzyme, or that of L-serine O-sulfate (LSOS), a serine racemase inhibitor, significantly decreased pain behavior in allodynic rats. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are involved in the modulation of orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain via the release of the gliotransmitter D-serine.

  10. Subtilases: the superfamily of subtilisin-like serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Siezen, R. J.; Leunissen, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the clan (or superfamily) of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Over 200 subtilases are presently known, more than 170 of which with their complete amino acid sequence. In this update of our previous overview (Siezen RJ, de Vos WM, Leunissen JAM, Dijkstra BW, 1991, Protein Eng 4:719-731), details of more than 100 new subtilases discovered in the past five years are summarized, and amino acid sequences of their catalytic domains are compared in a multiple sequence alignment. Based on sequence homology, a subdivision into six families is proposed. Highly conserved residues of the catalytic domain are identified, as are large or unusual deletions and insertions. Predictions have been updated for Ca(2+)-binding sites, disulfide bonds, and substrate specificity, based on both sequence alignment and three-dimensional homology modeling. PMID:9070434

  11. Oxidative Deselenization of Selenocysteine: Applications for Programmed Ligation at Serine.

    PubMed

    Malins, Lara R; Mitchell, Nicholas J; McGowan, Sheena; Payne, Richard J

    2015-10-19

    Despite the unique chemical properties of selenocysteine (Sec), ligation at Sec is an under-utilized methodology for protein synthesis. We describe herein an unprecedented protocol for the conversion of Sec to serine (Ser) in a single, high-yielding step. When coupled with ligation at Sec, this transformation provides a new approach to programmed ligations at Ser residues. This new reaction is compatible with a wide range of functionality, including the presence of unprotected amino acid side chains and appended glycans. The utility of the methodology is demonstrated in the rapid synthesis of complex glycopeptide fragments of the epithelial glycoproteins MUC5AC and MUC4 and through the total synthesis of the structured, cysteine (Cys)-free protein eglin C. PMID:26384718

  12. The PIM family of serine/threonine kinases in cancer.

    PubMed

    Narlik-Grassow, Maja; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Carnero, Amancio

    2014-01-01

    The proviral insertion site in Moloney murine leukemia virus, or PIM proteins, are a family of serine/threonine kinases composed of three different isoforms (PIM1, PIM2, and PIM3) that are highly evolutionarily conserved. These proteins are regulated primarily by transcription and stability through pathways that are controlled by Janus kinase/Signal transducer and activator of transcription, JAK/STAT, transcription factors. The PIM family proteins have been found to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors, and their roles in these tumors were confirmed in mouse tumor models. Furthermore, the PIM family proteins have been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, cell cycle, and homing and migration, which has led to the postulation of these proteins as interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. In the present work, we review the importance of PIM kinases in tumor growth and as drug targets. PMID:23576269

  13. RAF protein-serine/threonine kinases: Structure and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Roskoski, Robert

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors block MEK activation in cells containing oncogenic B-RAF. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors can lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity. -- Abstract: A-RAF, B-RAF, and C-RAF are a family of three protein-serine/threonine kinases that participate in the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signal transduction cascade. This cascade participates in the regulation of a large variety of processes including apoptosis, cell cycle progression, differentiation, proliferation, and transformation to the cancerous state. RAS mutations occur in 15-30% of all human cancers, and B-RAF mutations occur in 30-60% of melanomas, 30-50% of thyroid cancers, and 5-20% of colorectal cancers. Activation of the RAF kinases requires their interaction with RAS-GTP along with dephosphorylation and also phosphorylation by SRC family protein-tyrosine kinases and other protein-serine/threonine kinases. The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. RAF kinase inhibitors are effective in blocking MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation in cells containing the oncogenic B-RAF Val600Glu activating mutation. RAF kinase inhibitors lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity in cells containing wild-type B-RAF and wild-type or activated mutant RAS. C-RAF plays a key role in this paradoxical increase in downstream MEK-ERK activation.

  14. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from Escherichia coli: purification and properties.

    PubMed Central

    Schirch, V; Hopkins, S; Villar, E; Angelaccio, S

    1985-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from Escherichia coli was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme was a homodimer of identical subunits with a molecular weight of 95,000. The amino acid sequence of the amino and carboxy-terminal ends and the amino acid composition of cysteine-containing tryptic peptides were in agreement with the primary structure proposed for this enzyme from the structure of the glyA gene (M. Plamann, L. Stauffer, M. Urbanowski, and G. Stauffer, Nucleic Acids Res. 11:2065-2074, 1983). The enzyme contained no disulfide bonds but had one sulfhydryl group on the surface of the protein. Several sulfhydryl reagents reacted with this exposed group and inactivated the enzyme. Spectra of the enzyme in the presence of substrates and substrate analogs showed that the enzyme formed the same complexes and in similar relative concentrations as previously observed with the cytosolic and mitochondrial rabbit liver isoenzymes. Kinetic studies with substrates showed that the affinity and synergistic binding of the amino acid and folate substrates were similar to those obtained with the rabbit liver isoenzymes. The enzyme catalyzed the cleavage of threonine, allothreonine, and 3-phenylserine to glycine and the corresponding aldehyde in the absence of tetrahydrofolate. The enzyme was also inactivated by D-alanine caused by the transamination of the active site pyridoxal phosphate to pyridoxamine phosphate. This substrate specificity was also observed with the rabbit liver isoenzymes. We conclude that the reaction mechanism and the active site structure of E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase are very similar to the mechanism and structure of the rabbit liver isoenzymes. PMID:3891721

  15. The collision between positronium (Ps) and muonium (Mu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Hasi; De, Rina

    2015-06-01

    The collision between a positronium(Ps) and a muonium(Mu) is studied for the first time using the static-exchange model and considering the system as a four-centerCoulomb problem in the centerof mass frame. An exact analysis is made to find the s-wave elastic phase-shifts, the scattering-lengths for both singlet and triplet channels, the integrated/total elastic cross section and the quenching cross section due to orthoto para conversion of Ps and the conversion ratio.

  16. Physiologically generated presenilin 1 lacking exon 8 fails to rescue brain PS1-/- phenotype and forms complexes with wildtype PS1 and nicastrin.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Hannah; Moreno, Cesar L; Steele, John W; Bogush, Alexey; Dickstein, Dara L; Kwok, John B J; Schofield, Peter R; Thinakaran, Gopal; Mathews, Paul M; Hof, Patrick R; Gandy, Sam; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2015-01-01

    The presenilin 1 (PSEN1) L271V mutation causes early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease by disrupting the alternative splicing of the PSEN1 gene, producing some transcripts harboring the L271V point mutation and other transcripts lacking exon 8 (PS1(∆exon8)). We previously reported that PS1 L271V increased amyloid beta (Aβ) 42/40 ratios, while PS1(∆exon8) reduced Aβ42/40 ratios, indicating that the former and not the exon 8 deletion transcript is amyloidogenic. Also, PS1(∆exon8) did not rescue Aβ generation in PS1/2 double knockout cells indicating its identity as a severe loss-of-function splice form. PS1(∆exon8) is generated physiologically raising the possibility that we had identified the first physiological inactive PS1 isoform. We studied PS1(∆exon8) in vivo by crossing PS1(∆exon8) transgenics with either PS1-null or Dutch APP(E693Q) mice. As a control, we crossed APP(E693Q) with mice expressing a deletion in an adjacent exon (PS1(∆exon9)). PS1(∆exon8) did not rescue embryonic lethality or Notch-deficient phenotypes of PS1-null mice displaying severe loss of function in vivo. We also demonstrate that this splice form can interact with wildtype PS1 using cultured cells and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP)/bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Further co-IP demonstrates that PS1(∆exon8) interacts with nicastrin, participating in the γ-secretase complex formation. These data support that catalytically inactive PS1(∆exon8) is generated physiologically and participates in protein-protein interactions. PMID:26608390

  17. A novel Na(+) -Independent alanine-serine-cysteine transporter 1 inhibitor inhibits both influx and efflux of D-Serine.

    PubMed

    Sakimura, Katsuya; Nakao, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Masato; Suzuki, Motohisa; Kimura, Haruhide

    2016-10-01

    NMDA receptor dysfunctions are hypothesized to underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and treatment with D-serine (D-Ser), an NMDA receptor coagonist, may improve the clinical symptoms of schizophrenia. Thus, upregulating the synaptic D-Ser level is a novel strategy for schizophrenia treatment. Na(+) -independent alanine-serine-cysteine transporter 1 (asc-1) is a transporter responsible for regulating the extracellular D-Ser levels in the brain. In this study, we discovered a novel asc-1 inhibitor, (+)-amino(1-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ACPP), and assessed its pharmacological profile. ACPP inhibited the D-[(3) H]Ser uptake in human asc-1-expressing CHO cells and rat primary neurons with IC50 values of 0.72 ± 0.13 and 0.89 ± 0.30 μM, respectively. In accordance with the lower asc-1 expression levels in astrocytes, ACPP did not inhibit D-Ser uptake in rat primary astrocytes. In a microdialysis study, ACPP dose dependently decreased the extracellular D-Ser levels in the rat hippocampus under the same conditions in which the asc-1 inhibitor S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMLC) increased it. To obtain insights into this difference, we conducted a D-[(3) H]Ser efflux assay using asc-1-expressing CHO cells. ACPP inhibited D-[(3) H]Ser efflux, whereas SMLC increased it. These results suggest that ACPP is a novel inhibitor of asc-1. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27302861

  18. Sequence conservation, phylogenetic relationships, and expression profiles of nondigestive serine proteases and serine protease homologs in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaolong; He, Yan; Hu, Yingxia; Zhang, Xiufeng; Wang, Yang; Zou, Zhen; Chen, Yunru; Blissard, Gary W; Kanost, Michael R; Jiang, Haobo

    2015-07-01

    Serine protease (SP) and serine protease homolog (SPH) genes in insects encode a large family of proteins involved in digestion, development, immunity, and other processes. While 68 digestive SPs and their close homologs are reported in a companion paper (Kuwar et al., in preparation), we have identified 125 other SPs/SPHs in Manduca sexta and studied their structure, evolution, and expression. Fifty-two of them contain cystine-stabilized structures for molecular recognition, including clip, LDLa, Sushi, Wonton, TSP, CUB, Frizzle, and SR domains. There are nineteen groups of genes evolved from relatively recent gene duplication and sequence divergence. Thirty-five SPs and seven SPHs contain 1, 2 or 5 clip domains. Multiple sequence alignment and molecular modeling of the 54 clip domains have revealed structural diversity of these regulatory modules. Sequence comparison with their homologs in Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae and Tribolium castaneum allows us to classify them into five subfamilies: A are SPHs with 1 or 5 group-3 clip domains, B are SPs with 1 or 2 group-2 clip domains, C, D1 and D2 are SPs with a single clip domain in group-1a, 1b and 1c, respectively. We have classified into six categories the 125 expression profiles of SP-related proteins in fat body, brain, midgut, Malpighian tubule, testis, and ovary at different stages, suggesting that they participate in various physiological processes. Through RNA-Seq-based gene annotation and expression profiling, as well as intragenomic sequence comparisons, we have established a framework of information for future biochemical research of nondigestive SPs and SPHs in this model species. PMID:25530503

  19. Isolation of PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 from etiolated pea epicotyls and their expression on a three-dimensional clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Hitotsubashi, Reiko; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Tanimoto, Eiichi; Ueda, Junichi

    We isolated novel cDNAs containing the complete open reading frames of a putative auxin influx carrier, PsAUX1, and a putative auxin efflux carrier, PsPIN2, from etiolated pea epicotyls. High levels of homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (Accession No. AY222857) and AtPINs. Phylogenetic analyses based on deduced amino acid sequences revealed that PsPIN2 belonged to a subclade including AtPIN3, AtPIN4 and AtPIN7, while PsPIN1 belonged to the same clade as AtPIN1. The results were similar for PsAUX1 and AtAUX1, where PsAUX1 belongs to the same subclade as AtAUX1 and CS-AUX1. Expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 in pea epicotyl segments was promoted upon incubation of the segments with auxin (indole-3-acetic acid). In 3.5-d-old etiolated pea seedlings, relatively high expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 was observed in the hook region, growing epicotyls and root tips as compared with those in mature regions of epicotyls and roots. Expression of PsPIN2 in roots was less than that in shoots. Simulated microgravity conditions on a three-dimensional clinostat remarkably increased gene expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the hook and the internodes of pea epicotyls, but the increase in PsPIN2 was less. In contrast, polar auxin transport of pea epicotyls was substantially suppressed under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3D clinostat, similar to data from a space experiment on STS-95. These results suggest that PsPINs and PsAUX1 are auxin-inducible genes, and that the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 genes is sensitive to gravistimulation.

  20. Near-threshold Ps(n=2)-p scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, Ilya; Bray, Igor

    2016-05-01

    We study the threshold behavior of elastic and inelastic collisions of the excited positronium (Ps) atom with the proton using the theory developed by Gailitis. We show that partial cross sections for elastic and quasielastic processes exhibit pronounced oscillations above the threshold and diverge as 1 / E where E is the collision energy. This behavior is limited from below by the energy equal to the relativistic splitting between degenerate Ps states. Ab initio close coupling calculations are in excellent agreement with the results of the threshold theory. The oscillations almost completely disappear in the total (summed over partial waves) cross sections. However, dipole-supported resonances appear in inelastic processes, in particular in the important process Ps(nl) + p --> H(n'l') +e+ below higher-energy thresholds. Above thresholds these cross sections don't exhibit oscillations but have the 1 / E divergence in an exothermic case. These results are important for current attempts to produce antihydrogen in a similar charge-conjugated reaction Ps(nl) + p --> H (n'l') +e- . Supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  1. Framing Retention for Institutional Improvement: A 4 Ps Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.

    2013-01-01

    A 4 Ps framework for student retention strategy is a construct for reframing the retention discussion in a way that enables institutional improvement by challenging some conventional wisdom and prevailing perspectives that have characterized retention strategy for years. It opens new possibilities for action and improvement by suggesting that…

  2. Solvent annealing of Micropatterned PS-b-PEO copolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Hee; Acharya, Himadri; Joeng, Hee June; Park, Cheolmin

    2009-03-01

    Solvent annealing of block copolymer thin films have been known as an effective way to control both orientation of microdomains with respect to the surface and their registration into a well ordered periodic lattice structure. We have recently demonstrated hierarchically ordered microdomains in a thin poly(styrene-b-ethylene oxide)(PS-b-PEO) film combined with microcontact printing. The solvent annealing gave rise to well ordered spherical PEO microdomains in large area by the confined dewetting of thin PS-b-PEO films which had been micropatterned on chemically modified surface during solvent annealing. In this presentation, we intentionally prepare a micropatterned dewet film of PS-b-PEO by spincoating a block copolymer solution on a topographic PDMS pre-pattern. Convex lens shaped spherical caps of PS-b-PEO individually located on each PDMS mesa were successfully transferred to a Si substrate by a conventional transfer printing technique. We investigate the effect of solvent on not only film wettability but also formation of hierarchical nanostructures.

  3. Boiling treatment of ABS and PS plastics for flotation separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Wu, Bao-xin; Liu, Qun

    2014-07-01

    A new physical method, namely boiling treatment, was developed to aid flotation separation of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and polystyrene (PS) plastics. Boiling treatment was shown to be effective in producing a hydrophilic surface on ABS plastic. Fourier Transform Infrared analysis was conducted to investigate the mechanism of boiling treatment of ABS. Surface rearrangement of polymer may be responsible for surface change of boiling treated ABS, and the selective influence of boiling treatment on the floatability of boiling treated plastics may be attributed to the difference in the molecular mobility of polymer chains. The effects of flotation time, frother concentration and particle size on flotation behavior of simple plastic were investigated. Based on flotation behavior of simple plastic, flotation separation of boiling treatment ABS and PS with different particle sizes was achieved efficiently. The purity of ABS and PS was up to 99.78% and 95.80%, respectively; the recovery of ABS and PS was up to 95.81% and 99.82%, respectively. Boiling treatment promotes the industrial application of plastics flotation and facilitates plastic recycling.

  4. BioMaPS: A Roadmap for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Maeve L.; Fister, K. Renee

    2010-01-01

    The manuscript outlines the impact that our National Science Foundation Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological and Mathematical Sciences program, BioMaPS, has had on the students and faculty at Murray State University. This interdisciplinary program teams mathematics and biology undergraduate students with mathematics and…

  5. Consistent scenario for B{yields}PS decays

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, D.; Lucio M, J. L.; Mendoza S, J. A.; Ramirez, Carlos A.

    2008-12-01

    We consider B{yields}PS decays where P stands for pseudoscalar and S for a heavy (1500 MeV) scalar meson. We achieve agreement with available experimental data, which includes two orders of magnitude hierarchy, assuming the scalars mesons are two quark states. The contribution of the dipolar penguin operator O{sub 11} is quantified.

  6. (PS)2: protein structure prediction server version 3.0.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsun-Tsao; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Chen, Chu-Huang; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lee, Chi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2015-07-01

    Protein complexes are involved in many biological processes. Examining coupling between subunits of a complex would be useful to understand the molecular basis of protein function. Here, our updated (PS)(2) web server predicts the three-dimensional structures of protein complexes based on comparative modeling; furthermore, this server examines the coupling between subunits of the predicted complex by combining structural and evolutionary considerations. The predicted complex structure could be indicated and visualized by Java-based 3D graphics viewers and the structural and evolutionary profiles are shown and compared chain-by-chain. For each subunit, considerations with or without the packing contribution of other subunits cause the differences in similarities between structural and evolutionary profiles, and these differences imply which form, complex or monomeric, is preferred in the biological condition for the subunit. We believe that the (PS)(2) server would be a useful tool for biologists who are interested not only in the structures of protein complexes but also in the coupling between subunits of the complexes. The (PS)(2) is freely available at http://ps2v3.life.nctu.edu.tw/. PMID:25943546

  7. (PS)2: protein structure prediction server version 3.0.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsun-Tsao; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Chen, Chu-Huang; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lee, Chi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2015-07-01

    Protein complexes are involved in many biological processes. Examining coupling between subunits of a complex would be useful to understand the molecular basis of protein function. Here, our updated (PS)(2) web server predicts the three-dimensional structures of protein complexes based on comparative modeling; furthermore, this server examines the coupling between subunits of the predicted complex by combining structural and evolutionary considerations. The predicted complex structure could be indicated and visualized by Java-based 3D graphics viewers and the structural and evolutionary profiles are shown and compared chain-by-chain. For each subunit, considerations with or without the packing contribution of other subunits cause the differences in similarities between structural and evolutionary profiles, and these differences imply which form, complex or monomeric, is preferred in the biological condition for the subunit. We believe that the (PS)(2) server would be a useful tool for biologists who are interested not only in the structures of protein complexes but also in the coupling between subunits of the complexes. The (PS)(2) is freely available at http://ps2v3.life.nctu.edu.tw/.

  8. 3Ps, Task-Based Learning, and the Japanese Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanasarnsanee, Mika

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of a work in progress that attempted to investigate to what extent task-based learning was more effective than the 3Ps approach in the teaching of Japanese as a foreign language in Thailand. (Author/VWL)

  9. Characterization of two mutations in the SPTLC1 subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I.

    PubMed

    Rotthier, Annelies; Penno, Anke; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Stettner, Georg M; Asselbergh, Bob; Van Hoof, Kim; Sticht, Heinrich; Lévy, Nicolas; Timmerman, Vincent; Hornemann, Thorsten; Janssens, Katrien

    2011-06-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I (HSAN-I) is an axonal peripheral neuropathy leading to progressive distal sensory loss and severe ulcerations. Mutations in SPTLC1 and SPTLC2, encoding the two subunits of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), the enzyme catalyzing the first and rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of sphingolipids, have been reported to cause HSAN-I. Here, we demonstrate that the SPTLC1 mutations p.S331F and p.A352V result in a reduction of SPT activity in vitro and are associated with increased levels of the deoxysphingoid bases 1-deoxy-sphinganine and 1-deoxymethyl-sphinganine in patients' plasma samples. Stably expressing p.S331F-SPTLC1 HEK293T cell lines likewise show accumulation of deoxysphingoid bases, but this accumulation is not observed in HEK293T cells overexpressing p.A352V-SPTLC1. These results confirm that the increased formation of deoxysphingoid bases is a key feature for HSAN-I as it is associated with all pathogenic SPTLC1 and SPTLC2 mutations reported so far, but also warrant for caution in the interpretation of in vitro data. PMID:21618344

  10. Reaction pathway of tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2011-11-01

    Tryptophanase, L-tryptophan indole-lyase with extremely absolute stereospecificity, can change the stereospecificity in concentrated diammonium hydrogenphosphate solution. While tryptophanase is not inert to D-serine in the absence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate, it can undergo L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine along with indole in the presence of it. It has been well known that tryptophanase synthesizes L-tryptophan from L-serine through a β-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type. However, a metabolic pathway of L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine has remained unclear. The present study aims to elucidate it. Diammonium hydrogenphosphate plays a role in the emergence of catalytic activity on D-serine. The salt gives tryptophanase a small conformational change, which makes it possible to catalyze D-serine. Tryptophanase-bound D-serine produces L-tryptophan synthesis by β-replacement reaction via the enzyme-bound aminoacrylate intermediate. Our result will be valuable in studying the origin of homochirality.

  11. Endocytosis by the asialoglycoprotein receptor is independent of cytoplasmic serine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Geffen, I; Fuhrer, C; Spiess, M

    1991-01-01

    The human asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor, like most other plasma membrane receptors, has previously been shown to be phosphorylated at serine residues within the cytoplasmic domain. Phorbol esters, which activate protein kinase C, cause hyperphosphorylation and down-regulation of the ASGP receptor in HepG2 cells. To test the importance of serine residues for receptor traffic and function, we have mutated all the cytoplasmic serines of the two receptor subunits H1 (at positions 16 and 37) and H2 (at positions 12, 13, and 55) to alanines or glycines. Stable transfected fibroblast cell lines expressing either mutant H1 alone or both mutant subunits together were created and compared to cell lines expressing the respective wild-type proteins. Mutant and wild-type subunits were found to have very similar distributions between the cell surface and intracellular compartments. Constitutive internalization of H1 alone and ligand uptake and degradation by cells expressing both receptor subunits were not affected by the mutations. Cytoplasmic serines and serine phosphorylation are thus not essential for receptor function and intracellular traffic. Analysis of individual serine mutations identified serine-12 of subunit H2 as the major site of phosphorylation in the ASGP receptor. Images PMID:1924301

  12. A PHGDH inhibitor reveals coordination of serine synthesis and 1-carbon unit fate

    PubMed Central

    Pacold, Michael E.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Chan, Sze Ham; Rohde, Jason M.; Lewis, Caroline A.; Swier, Lotteke J.Y.M.; Possemato, Richard; Chen, Walter W.; Sullivan, Lucas B.; Fiske, Brian P.; Cho, Sung Won; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Shaul, Yoav D.; Liu, Chieh Min; Zhou, Minerva; Koh, Min Jung; Chung, Haeyoon; Davidson, Shawn M.; Luengo, Alba; Wang, Amy Q.; Xu, Xin; Yasgar, Adam; Liu, Li; Rai, Ganesha; Westover, Kenneth D.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Shen, Min; Gray, Nathanael S.; Boxer, Matthew B.; Sabatini, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Serine is a both a proteinogenic amino acid and the source of one-carbon units essential for de novo purine and deoxythymidine synthesis. In the canonical glucose-derived serine synthesis pathway, Homo sapiens phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step. Genetic loss of PHGDH is toxic towards PHGDH-overexpressing breast cancer cell lines even in the presence of exogenous serine. Here, we use a quantitative high-throughput screen to identify small molecule PHGDH inhibitors. These compounds reduce the production of glucose-derived serine in cells and suppress the growth of PHGDH-dependent cancer cells in culture and in orthotopic xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, PHGDH inhibition reduced the incorporation into nucleotides of one-carbon units from glucose-derived and exogenous serine. We conclude that glycolytic serine synthesis coordinates the use of one-carbon units from endogenous and exogenous serine in nucleotide synthesis, and suggest that one-carbon unit wasting may contribute to the efficacy of PHGDH inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27110680

  13. Enzymatic Synthesis of Galactosylated Serine/Threonine Derivatives by β-Galactosidase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sooyoun; Rebehmed, Joseph; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Karboune, Salwa

    2015-01-01

    The transgalactosylations of serine/threonine derivatives were investigated using β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli as biocatalyst. Using ortho-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactoside as donor, the highest bioconversion yield of transgalactosylated N-carboxy benzyl L-serine benzyl ester (23.2%) was achieved in heptane:buffer medium (70:30), whereas with the lactose, the highest bioconversion yield (3.94%) was obtained in the buffer reaction system. The structures of most abundant galactosylated serine products were characterized by MS/MS. The molecular docking simulation revealed that the binding of serine/threonine derivatives to the enzyme's active site was stronger (-4.6~-7.9 kcal/mol) than that of the natural acceptor, glucose, and mainly occurred through interactions with aromatic residues. For N-tert-butoxycarbonyl serine methyl ester (6.8%) and N-carboxybenzyl serine benzyl ester (3.4%), their binding affinities and the distances between their hydroxyl side chain and the 1'-OH group of galactose moiety were in good accordance with the quantified bioconversion yields. Despite its lower predicted bioconversion yield, the high experimental bioconversion yield obtained with N-carboxybenzyl serine methyl ester (23.2%) demonstrated the importance of the thermodynamically-driven nature of the transgalactosylation reaction.

  14. Characterization of a novel Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pariani, Sebastián; Contreras, Marisol; Rossi, Franco R; Sander, Valeria; Corigliano, Mariana G; Simón, Francisco; Busi, María V; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Duschak, Vilma G; Clemente, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Many different types of serine proteinase inhibitors have been involved in several kinds of plant physiological processes, including defense mechanisms against phytopathogens. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which are included in the serine proteinase inhibitor family, are present in several organisms. These proteins play a regulatory role in processes that involve serine proteinases like trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, elastase and/or subtilisin. In the present work, we characterized two putative Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors from Arabidopsis thaliana, which have a single putative Kazal-type domain. The expression of these inhibitors is transiently induced in response to leaf infection by Botrytis cinerea, suggesting that they play some role in defense against pathogens. We also evaluated the inhibitory specificity of one of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which resulted to be induced during the local response to B. cinerea infection. The recombinant Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor displayed high specificity for elastase and subtilisin, but low specificity for trypsin, suggesting differences in its selectivity. In addition, this inhibitor exhibited a strong antifungal activity inhibiting the germination rate of B. cinerea conidia in vitro. Due to the important role of proteinase inhibitors in plant protection against pathogens and pests, the information about Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors described in the present work could contribute to improving current methods for plant protection against pathogens.

  15. Gelatinases and serine proteinase inhibitors of seminal plasma and the reproductive tract of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Kotłowska, M; Kowalski, R; Glogowski, J; Jankowski, J; Ciereszko, A

    2005-04-01

    This study examined proteolytic enzymes and serine proteinase inhibitors in turkey seminal plasma with relation to their distribution within the reproductive tract and to yellow semen syndrome (YSS). Proteases of blood plasma, extracts from the reproductive tract, and seminal plasma were analyzed by gelatin zymography. We found a clear regional distribution of proteolytic enzymes in the turkey reproductive tract. Each part was characterized by a unique profile of serine proteolytic enzymes of molecular weights ranging from 29 to 88 kDa. The ductus deferens was found to be a site of very intense proteolytic activity. Two metalloproteases of 58 and 66 kDa were detected in all parts of the reproductive tract and seminal plasma. Using electrophoretic methods for detection of anti-trypsin activity, we found three serine proteinase inhibitors in turkey seminal plasma. Two inhibitors were found in the testis and epididymis and a third in the ductus deferens and seminal plasma. Blood plasma was characterized by the presence of two metalloproteinases and one serine proteinase inhibitor (of low migration rate) that were also detected in the reproductive tract. Amidase and anti-trypsin activities (expressed per gram of protein) differed for yellow and white seminal plasma. We concluded that turkey seminal plasma contains metalloproteases, serine proteinases, and serine proteinase inhibitors. The metalloproteases and one proteinase inhibitor are related to blood proteinases but the other two inhibitors and serine proteinases seem to be unique for the reproductive tract.

  16. Involvement of serine proteases in the excystation and metacystic development of Entamoeba invadens.

    PubMed

    Makioka, Asao; Kumagai, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Seiki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2009-10-01

    Although the functions of cysteine proteases involved in the pathogenicity and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica have been demonstrated, little is known about the functions of serine proteases. We examined the involvement of serine proteases in amoebic excystation and metacystic development using inhibitors specific for serine proteases. Entamoeba invadens IP-1 strain was used as the model of excystation and metacystic development of E. histolytica. Four serine protease inhibitors, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), 4-(2-aminoethyl) bezensulfonylfluoride hydrochloride, 3, 4-dichloroisocoumarin, and N-tosyl-phe-chloromethylketone, decreased the number of metacystic amoebae in a dose-dependent manner, without showing cytotoxicity to cysts. PMSF inhibited not only the increase but also the development of metacystic amoebae as determined by the change of nucleus number from four- to one-nucleate amoebae. The protease activity in cyst lysates was also inhibited by PMSF and the band of protease on gelatin sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was weaker than controls when treated with PMSF. Three serine protease families, S28 (three types), S9 (two), and S26 (one) were retrieved from the database of E. invadens. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that amebic enzymes from the serine protease families formed different clades from those from other organisms. The expression levels of these serine proteases in cysts 5 h after the induction of excystation as assessed by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were higher than those observed prior to induction assayed by real-time RT-PCR; the increase in one type of S9 (named S9-3) expression was the highest. The expression of S9 enzymes also increased from cysts to trophozoites higher than the other family serine proteases. Thus, the results show that Entamoeba uses their serine proteases in the excystation and metacystic development, which leads to successful infection.

  17. Crystal Structure of Serine Racemase that Produces Neurotransmitter d-Serine for Stimulation of the NMDA Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Masaru

    d-Serine is an endogenous coagonist for the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor and is involved in excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Mammalian pyridoxal 5’-phosphate-dependent serine racemase, which is localized in the mammalian brain, catalyzes the racemization of l-serine to yield d-serine and vice versa. We have determined the structures of three forms of the mammalian enzyme homolog from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Lys57 and Ser82 located on the protein and solvent sides, respectively, with respect to the cofactor plane, are acid-base catalysts that shuttle protons to the substrate. The modified enzyme, which has a unique lysino-d-alanyl residue at the active site, also binds the substrate serine in the active site, suggesting that the lysino-d-alanyl residue acts as a catalytic base in the same manner as Lys57 of the wild type enzyme.

  18. Solubility, thermal, photoconductivity and laser damage threshold studies on L-serine acetate (LSA) single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, K.; Thayanithi, V.; Mani, A.; Amudha, M.; Kumar, P. Praveen

    2015-06-01

    L-serine acetate crystal was grown by slow evaporation technique. Solubility of L-Serine Acetate was determined at different temperatures. L-Serine Acetate was characterized by SEM is to identify the morphology of the crystal. TG and DTA study reveals the thermal stability of the grown crystal. Dielectric measurement was carried out for different temperature ranges. Photo conductivity study revealed the nature of conductivity of the crystal under halogen light. Laser damage threshold of the crystal was measured using Nd:YAG laser source. NLO property of the crystal is confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique.

  19. Cationic inhibitors of serine proteinases from buckwheat seeds.

    PubMed

    Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Musolyamov, A K; Egorov, T A; Belozersky, M A

    2001-09-01

    Preparations of low molecular weight protein inhibitors of serine proteinases have been obtained from buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) seeds by chromatography of seed extract on trypsin-Sepharose 4B, Mono-Q, and Mono-S ion exchangers (FPLC regime). Their molecular masses, determined by mass spectrometry, were 5203 (BWI-1c), 5347 (BWI-2c), 7760 (BWI-3c), and 6031 daltons (BWI-4c). All of the inhibitors possess high pH- and thermal stability in the pH range 2-12. In addition to trypsin, BWI-3c and BWI-4c inhibited chymotrypsin and subtilisin-like bacterial proteases. The N-terminal sequences of all of the inhibitors were determined: BWI-1c (23 residues), BWI-2c (33 residues), BWI-3c (18 residues), and BWI-4c (20 residues). In their physicochemical properties and N-terminal amino acid sequences, the buckwheat seed trypsin inhibitors BWI-3c and BWI-4c appear to belong to potato proteinase inhibitor I family. PMID:11703172

  20. Exploring a new serine protease from Cucumis sativus L.

    PubMed

    Nafeesa, Zohara; Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation is an important physiological process in hemostasis which is activated by sequential action of proteases. This study aims to understand the involvement of aqueous fruit extract of Cucumis sativus L. (AqFEC) European burp less variety in blood coagulation cascade. AqFEC hydrolyzed casein in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of protease activity was further confirmed by casein zymography which revealed the possible presence of two high molecular weight protease(s). The proteolytic activity was inhibited only by phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride suggesting the presence of serine protease(s). In a dose-dependent manner, AqFEC also hydrolysed Aα and Bβ subunits of fibrinogen, whereas it failed to degrade the γ subunit of fibrinogen even at a concentration as high as 100 μg and incubation time up to 4 h. AqFEC reduced the clotting time of citrated plasma by 87.65%. The protease and fibrinogenolytic activity of AqFEC suggests its possible role in stopping the bleeding and ensuing wound healing process.

  1. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) deficient mice absorb less cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Park, Tae-Sik; Li, Yan; Pan, Xiaoyue; Iqbal, Jahangir; Lu, David; Tang, Weiqing; Yu, Liqing; Goldberg, Ira J; Hussain, M Mahmood; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of sphingolipids. It has been reported that oral administration of myriocin (an SPT inhibitor) decreases plasma sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol levels, and reduces atherosclerosis in apoE knockout (KO) mice. We studied cholesterol absorption in myriocin-treated WT or apoE KO animals and found that, after myriocin treatment, the mice absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls, with no observable pathological changes in the small intestine. More importantly, we found that heterozygous Sptlc1 (a subunit of SPT) KO mice also absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls. To understand the mechanism, we measured protein levels of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), ABCG5, and ABCA1, three key factors involved in intestinal cholesterol absorption. We found that NPC1L1 and ABCA1 were decreased, whereas ABCG5 was increased in the SPT deficient small intestine. SM levels on the apical membrane were also measured and they were significantly decreased in SPT deficient mice, compared with controls. In conclusion, SPT deficiency might reduce intestinal cholesterol absorption by altering NPC1L1 and ABCG5 protein levels in the apical membranes of enterocytes through lowering apical membrane SM levels. This may be also true for ABCA1 which locates on basal membrane of enterocytes. Manipulation of SPT activity could thus provide a novel alternative treatment for dyslipidemia. PMID:19416652

  2. New serine-derived gemini surfactants as gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; de Lima, Maria C Pedroso; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-01-01

    Gemini surfactants have been extensively used for in vitro gene delivery. Amino acid-derived gemini surfactants combine the special aggregation properties characteristic of the gemini surfactants with high biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this work, novel serine-derived gemini surfactants, differing in alkyl chain lengths and in the linker group bridging the spacer to the headgroups (amine, amide and ester), were evaluated for their ability to mediate gene delivery either per se or in combination with helper lipids. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were characterized in terms of hydrodynamic diameter, surface charge, stability in aqueous buffer and ability to protect DNA. Efficient formulations, able to transfect up to 50% of the cells without causing toxicity, were found at very low surfactant/DNA charge ratios (1/1-2/1). The most efficient complexes presented sizes suitable for intravenous administration and negative surface charge, a feature known to preclude potentially adverse interactions with serum components. This work brings forward a new family of gemini surfactants with great potential as gene delivery systems.

  3. Regulation of Adrenal Aldosterone Production by Serine Protease Prostasin

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Takehiro; Kakizoe, Yutaka; Wakida, Naoki; Hayata, Manabu; Uchimura, Kohei; Shiraishi, Naoki; Miyoshi, Taku; Adachi, Masataka; Aritomi, Shizuka; Konda, Tomoyuki; Tomita, Kimio; Kitamura, Kenichiro

    2010-01-01

    A serine protease prostasin has been demonstrated to have a pivotal role in the activation of the epithelial sodium channel. Systemic administration of adenovirus carrying human prostasin gene in rats resulted in an increase in plasma prostasin and aldosterone levels. However, the mechanism by which the elevation of prostasin levels in the systemic circulation stimulated the plasma aldosterone levels remains unknown. Therefore, we examined if prostasin increases the aldosterone synthesis in a human adrenocortical cell line (H295R cells). Luciferase assay using CYP11B2 promoter revealed that prostasin significantly increased the transcriptional activity of CYP11B2. Prostasin significantly increased both CYP11B2 mRNA expression and aldosterone production in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, treatment with camostat mesilate, a potent prostasin inhibitor, had no effect on the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin and also a protease-dead mutant of prostasin significantly stimulated the aldosterone production. A T-type/L-type calcium channel blocker and a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor significantly reduced the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin. Our findings suggest a stimulatory effect of prostasin on the aldosterone synthesis by adrenal gland through the nonproteolytic action and indicate a new role of prostasin in the systemic circulation. PMID:20204133

  4. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) deficient mice absorb less cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Park, Tae-Sik; Li, Yan; Pan, Xiaoyue; Iqbal, Jahangir; Lu, David; Tang, Weiqing; Yu, Liqing; Goldberg, Ira J; Hussain, M Mahmood; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of sphingolipids. It has been reported that oral administration of myriocin (an SPT inhibitor) decreases plasma sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol levels, and reduces atherosclerosis in apoE knockout (KO) mice. We studied cholesterol absorption in myriocin-treated WT or apoE KO animals and found that, after myriocin treatment, the mice absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls, with no observable pathological changes in the small intestine. More importantly, we found that heterozygous Sptlc1 (a subunit of SPT) KO mice also absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls. To understand the mechanism, we measured protein levels of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), ABCG5, and ABCA1, three key factors involved in intestinal cholesterol absorption. We found that NPC1L1 and ABCA1 were decreased, whereas ABCG5 was increased in the SPT deficient small intestine. SM levels on the apical membrane were also measured and they were significantly decreased in SPT deficient mice, compared with controls. In conclusion, SPT deficiency might reduce intestinal cholesterol absorption by altering NPC1L1 and ABCG5 protein levels in the apical membranes of enterocytes through lowering apical membrane SM levels. This may be also true for ABCA1 which locates on basal membrane of enterocytes. Manipulation of SPT activity could thus provide a novel alternative treatment for dyslipidemia.

  5. Homologous inhibitors from potato tubers of serine endopeptidases and metallocarboxypeptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Hass, C M; Venkatakrishnan, R; Ryan, C A

    1976-01-01

    A potent polypeptide inhibitor of chymotrypsin has been purified from Russett Burbank potatoes. The inhibitor has no effect on bovine carboxypeptidases A or B but exhibits homology with a carboxypeptidase inhibitor that is also present in potato tubers. The chymotrypsin inhibitor has a molecular weight of approximately 5400 as estimated by gel filtration, amino acid analysis, and titration with chymotrypsin. The polypeptide chain consists of 49 amino acid residues, of which six are half-cystine, forming three disulfide bonds. Its size is similar to that of the carboxypeptidase inhibitor, which contains 39 amino acid residues and also has three disulfide bridges. In immunological double diffusion assays, the chymotrypsin inhibitor and the carboxypeptidase inhibitor do not crossreact; however, automatic Edman degradation of reduced and alkylated derivatives of the chymotrypsin inhibitor, yielding a partial sequence of 18 amino acid residues at the NH2-terminus, reveals a similarity in sequence to that of the carboxypeptidase inhibitor. Thus, inhibitors directed toward two distinct classes of proteases, the serine endopeptidases and the metallocarboxypeptidases, appear to have evolved from a common ancestor. Images PMID:1064864

  6. [Retinal Cell Therapy Using iPS Cells].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-03-01

    Progress in basic research, starting with the work on neural stem cells in the middle 1990's to embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells at present, will lead the cell therapy (regenerative medicine) of various organs, including the central nervous system to a big medical field in the future. The author's group transplanted iPS cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell sheets to the eye of a patient with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in 2014 as a clinical research. Replacement of the RPE with the patient's own iPS cell-derived young healthy cell sheet will be one new radical treatment of AMD that is caused by cellular senescence of RPE cells. Since it was the first clinical study using iPS cell-derived cells, the primary endpoint was safety judged by the outcome one year after surgery. The safety of the cell sheet has been confirmed by repeated tumorigenisity tests using immunodeficient mice, as well as purity of the cells, karyotype and genetic analysis. It is, however, also necessary to prove the safety by clinical studies. Following this start, a good strategy considering cost and benefit is needed to make regenerative medicine a standard treatment in the future. Scientifically, the best choice is the autologous RPE cell sheet, but autologous cell are expensive and sheet transplantation involves a risky part of surgical procedure. We should consider human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched allogeneic transplantation using the HLA 6 loci homozyous iPS cell stock that Prof. Yamanaka of Kyoto University is working on. As the required forms of donor cells will be different depending on types and stages of the target diseases, regenerative medicine will be accomplished in a totally different manner from the present small molecule drugs. Proof of concept (POC) of photoreceptor transplantation in mouse is close to being accomplished using iPS cell-derived photoreceptor cells. The shortest possible course for treatment

  7. Combined Skin Moisturization of Liposomal Serine Incorporated in Hydrogels Prepared with Carbopol ETD 2020, Rhesperse RM 100 and Hyaluronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeongmin; Ro, Jieun; Barua, Sonia; Hwang, Deuk Sun; Na, Seon-Jeong; Lee, Ho Sung; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Woo, Seulki; Kim, Hyewon; Hong, Bomi; Yun, Gyiae; Kim, Joong-Hark; Yoon, Young-Ho; Park, Myung-Gyu; Kim, Jia; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the combined moisturizing effect of liposomal serine and a cosmeceutical base selected in this study. Serine is a major amino acid consisting of natural moisturizing factors and keratin, and the hydroxyl group of serine can actively interact with water molecules. Therefore, we hypothesized that serine efficiently delivered to the stratum corneum (SC) of the skin would enhance the moisturizing capability of the skin. We prepared four different cosmeceutical bases (hydrogel, oil-in-water (O/W) essence, O/W cream, and water-in-oil (W/O) cream); their moisturizing abilities were then assessed using a Corneometer®. The hydrogel was selected as the optimum base for skin moisturization based on the area under the moisture content change-time curves (AUMCC) values used as a parameter for the water hold capacity of the skin. Liposomal serine prepared by a reverse-phase evaporation method was then incorporated in the hydrogel. The liposomal serine-incorporated hydrogel (serine level=1%) showed an approximately 1.62~1.77 times greater moisturizing effect on the skin than those of hydrogel, hydrogel with serine (1%), and hydrogel with blank liposome. However, the AUMCC values were not dependent on the level of serine in liposomal serine-loaded hydrogels. Together, the delivery of serine to the SC of the skin is a promising strategy for moisturizing the skin. This study is expected to be an important step in developing highly effective moisturizing cosmeceutical products. PMID:26557021

  8. Improvement in Regional CBF by L-Serine Contributes to Its Neuroprotective Effect in Rats after Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zheng-Lin; Wang, Guo-Hua; Sun, Li; Jiang, Rui; Zhao, Guang-Wei; Han, Le-Yang

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-serine, permanent focal cerebral ischemia was induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery while monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF). Rats were divided into control and L-serine-treated groups after middle cerebral artery occlusion. The neurological deficit score and brain infarct volume were assessed. Nissl staining was used to quantify the cortical injury. L-serine and D-serine levels in the ischemic cortex were analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography. We found that L-serine treatment: 1) reduced the neurological deficit score, infarct volume and cortical neuron loss in a dose-dependent manner; 2) improved CBF in the cortex, and this effect was inhibited in the presence of apamin plus charybdotoxin while the alleviation of both neurological deficit score and infarct volume was blocked; and 3) increased the amount of L-serine and D-serine in the cortex, and inhibition of the conversion of L-serine into D-serine by aminooxyacetic acid did not affect the reduction of neurological deficit score and infarct volume by L-serine. In conclusion, improvement in regional CBF by L-serine may contribute to its neuroprotective effect on the ischemic brain, potentially through vasodilation which is mediated by the small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels on the cerebral blood vessel endothelium. PMID:23825613

  9. Spectra and relaxation dynamics of the pseudohalide (PS) vibrational bands for Ru(bpy)2(PS)2 complexes, PS = CN, NCS and N3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Ryan; Gerardi, Helen K.; Weidinger, Daniel; Brown, Douglas J.; Dressick, Walter J.; Heilweil, Edwin J.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.

    2013-08-01

    Static and transient infrared spectroscopy were used to investigate cis-Ru(bpy)2(N3)2 (bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine), cis-Ru(bpy)2(NCS)2, and cis-Ru(bpy)2(CN)2 in solution. The NC stretching IR band for cis-Ru(bpy)2(NCS)2 appears at higher frequency (∼2106 cm-1 in DMSO) than for the free NCS- anion while the IR bands for the azide and cyanide complexes are closer to those of the respective free anions. The vibrational energy relaxation (VER) lifetime for the azide complex is found to be much shorter (∼5 ps) than for either the NCS or CN species (both ∼70 ps in DMSO) and the lifetimes resemble those for each corresponding free anion in solution. However, for cis-Ru(bpy)2(N3)2, it is determined that the transition frequency depends more on the solvent than the VER lifetime implying that intramolecular vibrational relaxation is predominant over solvent energy-extracting interactions. These results are compared to the behavior of other related metal complexes in solution.

  10. Bacterial serine proteases secreted by the autotransporter pathway: classification, specificity and role in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteases exist in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms and have emerged during evolution as the most abundant and functionally diverse group. In gram-negative bacteria, there is a growing family of high molecular weight serine proteases secreted to the external milieu by a fascinating and widely employed bacterial secretion mechanism, known as the autotransporter pathway. They were initially found in Neisseria, Shigella, and pathogenic Escherichia coli, but have now been also identified in Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella, and Edwarsiella species. Here, we focus on proteins belonging to the Serine Protease Autotransporter of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Recent findings regarding the predilection of serine proteases to host intracellular or extracellular protein-substrates involved in numerous biological functions, such as those implicated in cytoskeleton stability, autophagy or innate and adaptive immunity, have helped provide a better understanding of SPATEs’ contributions in pathogenesis. Here, we discuss their classification, substrate specificity, and potential roles in pathogenesis. PMID:23689588

  11. Functional Characterization of Calcineurin Homologs PsCNA1/PsCNB1 in Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Using a Host-Induced RNAi System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Guo, Jun; Voegele, Ralf T.; Zhang, Jinshan; Duan, Yinghui; Luo, Huaiyong; Kang, Zhensheng

    2012-01-01

    Calcineurin plays a key role in morphogenesis, pathogenesis and drug resistance in most fungi. However, the function of calcineurin genes in Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) is unclear. We identified and characterized the calcineurin genes PsCNA1 and PsCNB1 in Pst. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that PsCNA1 and PsCNB1 form a calcium/calmodulin regulated protein phosphatase belonging to the calcineurin heterodimers composed of subunits A and B. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that both PsCNA1 and PsCNB1 expression reached their maximum in the stage of haustorium formation, which is one day after inoculation. Using barely stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) as a transient expression vector in wheat, the expression of PsCNA1 and PsCNB1 in Pst was suppressed, leading to slower extension of fungal hyphae and reduced production of urediospores. The immune-suppressive drugs cyclosporin A and FK506 markedly reduced the germination rates of urediospores, and when germination did occur, more than two germtubes were produced. These results suggest that the calcineurin signaling pathway participates in stripe rust morphogenetic differentiation, especially the formation of haustoria during the early stage of infection and during the production of urediospores. Therefore PsCNA1 and PsCNB1 can be considered important pathogenicity genes involved in the wheat-Pst interaction. PMID:23139840

  12. The four "P"s of marketing are dead.

    PubMed

    English, J

    2000-01-01

    For several decades marketing planning in the United States has relied upon the "four Ps" model. Product, price, place, and promotion were considered the foundation of the marketing mix. This model, however, has never been a comfortable fit for health care and, as the new century dawns, we find that a new marketing model--emphasizing the "four Rs"--is emerging. The foundations of the new model are relevance, response, relationships, and results. PMID:11183425

  13. Science spin: iPS cell research in the news.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, T; Rachul, C

    2011-05-01

    Big scientific developments have always been spun to meet particular social agendas. We have seen it in the context of global warming, nuclear power, and genetically modified organisms. But few stories illustrate the phenomenon of spin as well as the reaction, and concomitant media coverage, that surrounded the November 2007 announcement regarding the reprogramming of skin cells to produce cells with qualities comparable to those of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

  14. PS3 CELL Development for Scientific Computation and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, M.; Sevre, E.; Wang, S. M.; Yuen, D. A.; Liu, S.; Lyness, M. D.; Broten, M.

    2007-12-01

    The Cell processor is one of the most powerful processors on the market, and researchers in the earth sciences may find its parallel architecture to be very useful. A cell processor, with 7 cores, can easily be obtained for experimentation by purchasing a PlayStation 3 (PS3) and installing linux and the IBM SDK. Each core of the PS3 is capable of 25 GFLOPS giving a potential limit of 150 GFLOPS when using all 6 SPUs (synergistic processing units) by using vectorized algorithms. We have used the Cell's computational power to create a program which takes simulated tsunami datasets, parses them, and returns a colorized height field image using ray casting techniques. As expected, the time required to create an image is inversely proportional to the number of SPUs used. We believe that this trend will continue when multiple PS3s are chained using OpenMP functionality and are in the process of researching this. By using the Cell to visualize tsunami data, we have found that its greatest feature is its power. This fact entwines well with the needs of the scientific community where the limiting factor is time. Any algorithm, such as the heat equation, that can be subdivided into multiple parts can take advantage of the PS3 Cell's ability to split the computations across the 6 SPUs reducing required run time by one sixth. Further vectorization of the code can allow for 4 simultanious floating point operations by using the SIMD (single instruction multiple data) capabilities of the SPU increasing efficiency 24 times.

  15. The four "P"s of marketing are dead.

    PubMed

    English, J

    2000-01-01

    For several decades marketing planning in the United States has relied upon the "four Ps" model. Product, price, place, and promotion were considered the foundation of the marketing mix. This model, however, has never been a comfortable fit for health care and, as the new century dawns, we find that a new marketing model--emphasizing the "four Rs"--is emerging. The foundations of the new model are relevance, response, relationships, and results.

  16. Serine-rich protein is a novel positive regulator for silicon accumulation in mangrove.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Rafii, Mohd Y; Azizi, Parisa; Idris, A S

    2015-02-10

    Silicon (Si) plays an important role in reducing plant susceptibility against a variety of different biotic and abiotic stresses; and also has an important regulatory role in soil to avoid heavy metal toxicity and providing suitable growing conditions for plants. A full-length cDNAs of 696bp of serine-rich protein was cloned from mangrove plant (Rhizophora apiculata) by amplification of cDNA ends from an expressed sequence tag homologous to groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), submitted to NCBI (KF211374). This serine-rich protein gene encodes a deduced protein of 223 amino acids. The transcript titre of the serine-rich protein was found to be strongly enriched in roots compared with the leaves of two month old mangrove plants and expression level of this serine-rich protein was found to be strongly induced when the mangrove seedlings were exposed to SiO2. Expression of the serine-rich protein transgenic was detected in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, where the amount of serine increased from 1.02 to 37.8mg/g. The same trend was also seen in Si content in the roots (14.3%) and leaves (7.4%) of the transgenic A. thaliana compared to the wild-type plants under Si treatment. The biological results demonstrated that the accumulation of the serine amino acid in the vegetative tissues of the transgenic plants enhanced their ability to absorb and accumulate more Si in the roots and leaves and suggests that the serine-rich protein gene has potential for use in genetic engineering of different stress tolerance characteristics.

  17. Copper(II)-mediated O-arylation of protected serines and threonines.

    PubMed

    El Khatib, Mirna; Molander, Gary A

    2014-09-19

    An effective protocol toward the O-arylation of β-hydroxy-α-amino acid substrates serine and threonine has been developed via Chan-Lam cross-coupling. This Cu(II)-catalyzed transformation involves benign open-flask conditions that are well-tolerated with a variety of protected (Boc-, Cbz-, Tr-, and Fmoc-) serine and threonine derivatives and various potassium organotrifluoroborates and boronic acids. PMID:25208062

  18. Serine-rich protein is a novel positive regulator for silicon accumulation in mangrove.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Rafii, Mohd Y; Azizi, Parisa; Idris, A S

    2015-02-10

    Silicon (Si) plays an important role in reducing plant susceptibility against a variety of different biotic and abiotic stresses; and also has an important regulatory role in soil to avoid heavy metal toxicity and providing suitable growing conditions for plants. A full-length cDNAs of 696bp of serine-rich protein was cloned from mangrove plant (Rhizophora apiculata) by amplification of cDNA ends from an expressed sequence tag homologous to groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), submitted to NCBI (KF211374). This serine-rich protein gene encodes a deduced protein of 223 amino acids. The transcript titre of the serine-rich protein was found to be strongly enriched in roots compared with the leaves of two month old mangrove plants and expression level of this serine-rich protein was found to be strongly induced when the mangrove seedlings were exposed to SiO2. Expression of the serine-rich protein transgenic was detected in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, where the amount of serine increased from 1.02 to 37.8mg/g. The same trend was also seen in Si content in the roots (14.3%) and leaves (7.4%) of the transgenic A. thaliana compared to the wild-type plants under Si treatment. The biological results demonstrated that the accumulation of the serine amino acid in the vegetative tissues of the transgenic plants enhanced their ability to absorb and accumulate more Si in the roots and leaves and suggests that the serine-rich protein gene has potential for use in genetic engineering of different stress tolerance characteristics. PMID:25479011

  19. Evolutionary Analysis of Novel Serine Proteases in the Venom Gland Transcriptome of Bitis gabonica rhinoceros

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Wagstaff, Simon C.; Harrison, Robert A.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Hutchinson, E. Gail

    2011-01-01

    Background Serine proteases are major components of viper venom and target various stages of the blood coagulation system in victims and prey. A better understanding of the diversity of serine proteases and other enzymes present in snake venom will help to understand how the complexity of snake venom has evolved and will aid the development of novel therapeutics for treating snake bites. Methodology and Principal Findings Four serine protease-encoding genes from the venom gland transcriptome of Bitis gabonica rhinoceros were amplified and sequenced. Mass spectrometry suggests the four enzymes corresponding to these genes are present in the venom of B. g. rhinoceros. Two of the enzymes, rhinocerases 2 and 3 have substitutions to two of the serine protease catalytic triad residues and are thus unlikely to be catalytically active, though they may have evolved other toxic functions. The other two enzymes, rhinocerases 4 and 5, have classical serine protease catalytic triad residues and thus are likely to be catalytically active, however they have glycine rather than the more typical aspartic acid at the base of the primary specificity pocket (position 189). Based on a detailed analysis of these sequences we suggest that alternative splicing together with individual amino acid mutations may have been involved in their evolution. Changes within amino acid segments which were previously proposed to undergo accelerated change in venom serine proteases have also been observed. Conclusions and Significance Our study provides further insight into the diversity of serine protease isoforms present within snake venom and discusses their possible functions and how they may have evolved. These multiple serine protease isoforms with different substrate specificities may enhance the envenomation effects and help the snake to adapt to new habitats and diets. Our findings have potential for helping the future development of improved therapeutics for snake bites. PMID:21731776

  20. Enhanced serine production by bone metastatic breast cancer cells stimulates osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pollari, Sirkku; Käkönen, Sanna-Maria; Edgren, Henrik; Wolf, Maija; Kohonen, Pekka; Sara, Henri; Guise, Theresa; Nees, Matthias; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Since bone metastatic breast cancer is an incurable disease, causing significant morbidity and mortality, an understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would be highly valuable. Here, we describe in vitro and in vivo evidences for the importance of serine biosynthesis in the metastasis of breast cancer to bone. We first characterized the bone metastatic propensity of the MDA-MB-231(SA) cell line variant as compared to the parental MDA-MB-231 cells by radiographic and histological observations in the inoculated mice. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of this isogenic cell line pair revealed that all the three genes involved in the L: -serine biosynthesis pathway, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase 1 (PSAT1), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSPH) were upregulated in the highly metastatic variant. This pathway is the primary endogenous source for L: -serine in mammalian tissues. Consistently, we observed that the proliferation of MDA-MB-231(SA) cells in serine-free conditions was dependent on PSAT1 expression. In addition, we observed that L: -serine is essential for the formation of bone resorbing human osteoclasts and may thus contribute to the vicious cycle of osteolytic bone metastasis. High expression of PHGDH and PSAT1 in primary breast cancer was significantly associated with decreased relapse-free and overall survival of patients and malignant phenotypic features of breast cancer. In conclusion, high expression of serine biosynthesis genes in metastatic breast cancer cells and the stimulating effect of L: -serine on osteoclastogenesis and cancer cell proliferation indicate a functionally critical role for serine biosynthesis in bone metastatic breast cancer and thereby an opportunity for targeted therapeutic interventions.

  1. Stabilization of PS/PLA cocontinuous blends by interfacial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lian; He, Siyao; Fruehwirth, John; Stein, Andreas; Cheng, Xiang; Macosko, Christopher

    Reduced graphene oxide (r-GO) is known to be effective in increasing the conductivity of cocontinuous polymer blends with a lower electrical percolation threshold. However, little is known regarding the localization and dynamics of r-GO along with morphology change during annealing. In this study, we develop a facile method to stabilize the polystyrene (PS)/polylactic acid (PLA) cocontinuous blends with r-GO jammed at interface. In this method, the non-functionalized GO is premixed with PLA via solvent method, and then reduced in-situ at 210oC to obtain a PLA/r-GO polymer composite. This composite is further mixed with PS via batch melt compounding. We observe the migration of r-GO from the PLA phase to the interface during annealing. The interfacial r-GO suppresses the coarsening of cocontinuous morphology and increases the conductivity of the filled polymer blend. Moreover, we systematically investigate the relationship between r-GO localization, rheological and conductivity change during annealing of r-GO filled PLA/PS blends. University of Minnesota Industrial Partnership for Research in Interfacial and Materials Engineering (IPRIME).

  2. Research of beam smoothing technologies using CPP, SSD, and PS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Su, Jingqin; Hu, Dongxia; Li, Ping; Yuan, Haoyu; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Yuancheng; Tian, Xiaocheng; Xu, Dangpeng; Dong, Jun; Zhu, Qihua

    2015-02-01

    Precise physical experiments place strict requirements on target illumination uniformity in Inertial Confinement Fusion. To obtain a smoother focal spot and suppress transverse SBS in large aperture optics, Multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) was studied combined with continuous phase plate (CPP) and polarization smoothing (PS). New ways of PS are being developed to improve the laser irradiation uniformity and solve LPI problems in indirect-drive laser fusion. The near field and far field properties of beams using polarization smoothing were studied and compared, including birefringent wedge and polarization control array. As more parameters can be manipulated in a combined beam smoothing scheme, quad beam smoothing was also studies. Simulation results indicate through adjusting dispersion directions of one-dimensional (1-D) SSD beams in a quad, two-dimensional SSD can be obtained. Experiments have been done on SG-III laser facility using CPP and Multi-FM SSD. The research provides some theoretical and experimental basis for the application of CPP, SSD and PS on high-power laser facilities.

  3. A new shape resonance in the Ps^- system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yew Kam

    2012-06-01

    There have been continues experimental and theoretical investigations on the positronium negative ion (Ps^-), one of the simplest three-lepton systems interacting through Coulomb forces. In the present work, we use highly correlated Hylleraas wave functions up to N=1078 terms together with employing the complex-coordinate rotation method [1] to investigate resonances in the Ps^- system. We have located a new S-wave shape resonance lying above the Ps (n=2) threshold. Our preliminary results for the resonance parameters are Er = - 0.0498788 a.u. and γ / 2 = 0.0139470 a.u., where Er and γ denote the resonance energy and width, respectively. This stabilized complex eigenvalue has never been reported in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. Here, by changing the mass of the positively charged particle from one unit of the electron mass to infinitely heavy, we have traced this resonance pole from the positronium negative ion to the hydrogen negative ion [2]. Detailed calculations will be presented at the meeting. [4pt] [1]. Y. K. Ho, Phys. Reports 99, 1 (1983) and references therein. [0pt] [2]. A. Burgers and E. Lindroth, Euro. Phys. J. D 10, 327 (2000).

  4. iPS cell transplantation for traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Goulão, Miguel; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of work has been published on transplantation of a wide range of neural stem and progenitor cell types derived from the developing and adult CNS, as well as from pluripotent embryonic stem cells, in models of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, many of these cell-based approaches present practical issues for clinical translation such as ethical cell derivation, generation of potentially large numbers of homogenously prepared cells, and immune rejection. With the advent of induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cell technology, many of these issues may potentially be overcome. To date, a number of studies have demonstrated integration, differentiation into mature CNS lineages, migration and long-term safety of iPS cell transplants in a variety of SCI models, as well as therapeutic benefits in some cases. Given the clinical potential of this advance in stem cell biology, we present a concise review of studies published to date involving iPS cell transplantation in animal models of SCI. PMID:26201863

  5. Unconventional serine proteases: Variations on the catalytic Ser/His/Asp triad configuration

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Özlem Doğan; Paetzel, Mark; Dalbey, Ross E.

    2008-01-01

    Serine proteases comprise nearly one-third of all known proteases identified to date and play crucial roles in a wide variety of cellular as well as extracellular functions, including the process of blood clotting, protein digestion, cell signaling, inflammation, and protein processing. Their hallmark is that they contain the so-called “classical” catalytic Ser/His/Asp triad. Although the classical serine proteases are the most widespread in nature, there exist a variety of “nonclassical” serine proteases where variations to the catalytic triad are observed. Such variations include the triads Ser/His/Glu, Ser/His/His, and Ser/Glu/Asp, and include the dyads Ser/Lys and Ser/His. Other variations are seen with certain serine and threonine peptidases of the Ntn hydrolase superfamily that carry out catalysis with a single active site residue. This work discusses the structure and function of these novel serine proteases and threonine proteases and how their catalytic machinery differs from the prototypic serine protease class. PMID:18824507

  6. Ketamine Metabolites Enantioselectively Decrease Intracellular D-Serine Concentrations in PC-12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra S.; Rutkowska, Ewelina; Plazinska, Anita; Khadeer, Mohammed; Moaddel, Ruin; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W.

    2016-01-01

    D-Serine is an endogenous NMDA receptor co-agonist that activates synaptic NMDA receptors modulating neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex and plays a key role in long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. D-serine is associated with NMDA receptor neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration and elevated D-serine concentrations have been associated with Alzheimer’s and Parkinsons’ diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that the ketamine metabolites (rac)-dehydronorketamine and (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine decrease intracellular D-serine concentrations in a concentration dependent manner in PC-12 cells. In the current study, PC-12 cells were incubated with a series of ketamine metabolites and the IC50 values associated with attenuated intracellular D-serine concentrations were determined. The results demonstrate that structural and stereochemical features of the studied compounds contribute to the magnitude of the inhibitory effect with (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine displaying the most potent inhibition with IC50 values of 0.18 ± 0.04 nM and 0.68 ± 0.09 nM. The data was utilized to construct a preliminary 3D-QSAR/pharmacophore model for use in the design of new and more efficient modulators of D-serine. PMID:27096720

  7. Influence of parasite encoded inhibitors of serine peptidases in early infection of macrophages with Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Eschenlauer, Sylvain C P; Faria, Marilia S; Morrison, Lesley S; Bland, Nicolas; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flavia L; DosReis, George A; Coombs, Graham H; Lima, Ana Paula C A; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2009-01-01

    Ecotin is a potent inhibitor of family S1A serine peptidases, enzymes lacking in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major. Nevertheless, L. major has three ecotin-like genes, termed inhibitor of serine peptidase (ISP). ISP1 is expressed in vector-borne procyclic and metacyclic promastigotes, whereas ISP2 is also expressed in the mammalian amastigote stage. Recombinant ISP2 inhibited neutrophil elastase, trypsin and chymotrypsin with Kis between 7.7 and 83 nM. L. major ISP2–ISP3 double null mutants (Δisp2/3) were created. These grew normally as promastigotes, but were internalized by macrophages more efficiently than wild-type parasites due to the upregulation of phagocytosis by a mechanism dependent on serine peptidase activity. Δisp2/3 promastigotes transformed to amastigotes, but failed to divide for 48 h. Intracellular multiplication of Δisp2/3 was similar to wild-type parasites when serine peptidase inhibitors were present, suggesting that defective intracellular growth results from the lack of serine peptidase inhibition during promastigote uptake. Δisp2/3 mutants were more infective than wild-type parasites to BALB/c mice at the early stages of infection, but became equivalent as the infection progressed. These data support the hypothesis that ISPs of L. major target host serine peptidases and influence the early stages of infection of the mammalian host. PMID:19016791

  8. Thermodynamic characteristics of protolytic equilibria of L-serine in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochergina, L. A.; Volkov, A. V.; Khokhlova, E. A.; Krutova, O. N.

    2011-05-01

    The heat effects of the reaction of aqueous solution of L-serine with aqueous solutions of HNO3 and KOH were determined by calorimetry at temperatures of 288.15, 298.15, and 308.15 K, and ionic strength values of 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 (background electrolyte, KNO3). Standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δr H o, Δr G o, Δr S o, Δ C {/p o}) of the acid-base reactions in aqueous solutions of L-serine were calculated. The effect of the concentration of background electrolyte and temperature on the heats of dissociation of amino acid was considered. The combustion energy of L-serine by bomb calorimetry in the medium of oxygen was determined. The standard combustion and formation enthalpies of crystalline L-serine were calculated. The heats of dissolution of crystalline L-serine in water and solutions of potassium hydroxide at 298.15 K were measured by direct calorimetry. The standard enthalpies of formation of L-serine and products of its dissociation in aqueous solution were calculated.

  9. Stat5a serine 725 and 779 phosphorylation is a prerequisite for hematopoietic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Friedbichler, Katrin; Kerenyi, Marc A.; Kovacic, Boris; Li, Geqiang; Hoelbl, Andrea; Yahiaoui, Saliha; Sexl, Veronika; Müllner, Ernst W.; Fajmann, Sabine; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Valent, Peter; Beug, Hartmut; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Bunting, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Stat5 transcription factors are essential gene regulators promoting proliferation, survival, and differentiation of all hematopoietic cell types. Mutations or fusions of oncogenic tyrosine kinases often result in constitutive Stat5 activation. We have modeled persistent Stat5 activity by using an oncogenic Stat5a variant (cS5). To analyze the hitherto unrecognized role of Stat5 serine phosphorylation in this context, we have generated cS5 constructs with mutated C-terminal serines 725 and 779, either alone or in combination. Genetic complementation assays in primary Stat5null/null mast cells and Stat5ΔN T cells demonstrated reconstitution of proliferation with these mutants. Similarly, an in vivo reconstitution experiment of transduced Stat5null/null fetal liver cells transplanted into irradiated wild-type recipients revealed that these mutants exhibit biologic activity in lineage differentiation. By contrast, the leukemogenic potential of cS5 in bone marrow transplants decreased dramatically in cS5 single-serine mutants or was completely absent upon loss of both serine phosphorylation sites. Our data suggest that Stat5a serine phosphorylation is a prerequisite for cS5-mediated leukemogenesis. Hence, interference with Stat5a serine phosphorylation might provide a new therapeutic option for leukemia and myeloid dysplasias without affecting major functions of Stat5 in normal hematopoiesis. PMID:20508164

  10. Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2009-08-07

    The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.

  11. Serine-71 phosphorylation of Rac1 modulates downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Janett; Proff, Julia; Hävemeier, Anika; Ladwein, Markus; Rottner, Klemens; Barlag, Britta; Pich, Andreas; Tatge, Helma; Just, Ingo; Gerhard, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 regulate a variety of cellular functions by signaling to different signal pathways. It is believed that the presence of a specific effector at the location of GTPase activation determines the route of downstream signaling. We previously reported about EGF-induced Ser-71 phosphorylation of Rac1/Cdc42. By using the phosphomimetic S71E-mutants of Rac1 and Cdc42 we investigated the impact of Ser-71 phosphorylation on binding to selected effector proteins. Binding of the constitutively active (Q61L) variants of Rac1 and Cdc42 to their specific interaction partners Sra-1 and N-WASP, respectively, as well as to their common effector protein PAK was abrogated when Ser-71 was exchanged to glutamate as phosphomimetic substitution. Interaction with their common effector proteins IQGAP1/2/3 or MRCK alpha was, however, hardly affected. This ambivalent behaviour was obvious in functional assays. In contrast to Rac1 Q61L, phosphomimetic Rac1 Q61L/S71E was not able to induce increased membrane ruffling. Instead, Rac1 Q61L/S71E allowed filopodia formation, which is in accordance with abrogation of the dominant Sra-1/Wave signalling pathway. In addition, in contrast to Rac1 transfected cells Rac1 S71E failed to activate PAK1/2. On the other hand, Rac1 Q61L/S71E was as effective in activation of NF-kappaB as Rac1 Q61L, illustrating positive signal transduction of phosphorylated Rac1. Together, these data suggest that phosphorylation of Rac1 and Cdc42 at serine-71 represents a reversible mechanism to shift specificity of GTPase/effector coupling, and to preferentially address selected downstream pathways. PMID:22970203

  12. Expectation values of the e{sup +}PsH system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Mitroy, J.

    2007-07-15

    Close to converged energies and expectation values for e{sup +}PsH are computed using a ground-state wave function consisting of 1500 explicitly correlated Gaussians. The best estimate of the e{sup +}PsH{sup {infinity}} energy was -0.810 254 hartrees, which has a binding energy of 0.021 057 hartrees against dissociation into e{sup +}+PsH. The 2{gamma} annihilation rate was 2.7508x10{sup 9} s{sup -1}. Binding energies and annihilation rates are also given for the different finite-mass variants of e{sup +}PsH. Comparisons between expectation values for e{sup +}PsH and PsH provide compelling evidence that the e{sup +}PsH ground state can be regarded as consisting of a weakly bound positron orbiting the PsH ground state.

  13. pS2 and response to adjuvant hormone therapy in primary breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Spyratos, F.; Andrieu, C.; Hacène, K.; Chambon, P.; Rio, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed 319 primary breast tumours for cytosolic pS2 content, with a median follow-up of 6 years. pS2 status correlated positively with oestradiol and progesterone receptors and negatively with Scarff, Bloom and Richardson grade. pS2 positivity was associated with longer overall survival, particularly in patients who received hormone therapy, in whom pS2 status was also predictive of the response to therapy. PMID:8297741

  14. Implantation serine proteinase 2 is a monomeric enzyme with mixed serine proteolytic activity and can silence signalling via proteinase activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Navneet; Fahr, Jochen; Renaux, Bernard; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Kumar, Rajeev; Nishikawa, Sandra; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Hollenberg, Morley D; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2013-12-01

    Implantation serine proteinase 2 (ISP2), a S1 family serine proteinase, is known for its role in the critical processes of embryo hatching and implantation in the mouse uterus. Native implantation serine proteinases (ISPs) are co-expressed and co-exist as heterodimers in uterine and blastocyst tissues. The ISP1-ISP2 enzyme complex shows trypsin-like substrate specificity. In contrast, we found that ISP2, isolated as a 34 kDa monomer from a Pichia pastoris expression system, exhibited a mixed serine proteolytic substrate specificity, as determined by a phage display peptide cleavage approach and verified by the in vitro cleavage of synthetic peptides. Based upon the peptide sequence substrate selectivity, a database search identified many potential ISP2 targets of physiological relevance, including the proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR2). The in vitro cleavage studies with PAR2-derived peptides confirmed the mixed substrate specificity of ISP2. Treatment of cell lines expressing proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) 1, 2, and 4 with ISP2 prevented receptor activation by either thrombin (PARs 1 and 4) or trypsin (PAR2). The disarming and silencing of PARs by ISP2 may play a role in successful embryo implantation.

  15. 7 CFR 1753.47 - Plans and specifications (P&S).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... from the approved LD (7 CFR part 1737) must be approved by RUS (See § 1753.3). (2) The standard RUS... borrower shall furnish GFR one set of P&S. The borrower may then proceed with procurement in accordance... of P&S is required. Two sets of P&S shall be furnished to GFR. RUS will return one set to...

  16. Communicating Knowing through Communities of Practice: Exploring Internal Communicative Processes and Differences among CoPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Joel O.; McPhee, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Knowing is an enacted, communicated process that is difficult to observe, let alone manage, in organizations. Communities of practice (CoPs) offer a productive solution for improving knowledge and knowledge management, but the communicative processes that enact CoPs have not been explored, leaving CoPs as an organizational black box. This research…

  17. 7 CFR 1753.37 - Plans and specifications (P&S).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Plans and specifications (P&S). 1753.37 Section 1753... Installation of Central Office Equipment § 1753.37 Plans and specifications (P&S). (a) General. (1) Prior to the preparation of P&S, the borrower shall review with the GFR the current and future requirements...

  18. 7 CFR 1753.37 - Plans and specifications (P&S).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Plans and specifications (P&S). 1753.37 Section 1753... Installation of Central Office Equipment § 1753.37 Plans and specifications (P&S). (a) General. (1) Prior to the preparation of P&S, the borrower shall review with the GFR the current and future requirements...

  19. 7 CFR 1753.37 - Plans and specifications (P&S).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Plans and specifications (P&S). 1753.37 Section 1753... Installation of Central Office Equipment § 1753.37 Plans and specifications (P&S). (a) General. (1) Prior to the preparation of P&S, the borrower shall review with the GFR the current and future requirements...

  20. 7 CFR 1753.37 - Plans and specifications (P&S).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Plans and specifications (P&S). 1753.37 Section 1753... Installation of Central Office Equipment § 1753.37 Plans and specifications (P&S). (a) General. (1) Prior to the preparation of P&S, the borrower shall review with the GFR the current and future requirements...

  1. D-serine in the midbrain periaqueductal gray contributes to morphine tolerance in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Sun, Mengjie; Li, Youyan

    2016-01-01

    Background The N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor plays a critical role in morphine tolerance. D-serine, a co-agonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, participates in many physiological and pathophysiological processes via regulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. The purinergic P2X7 receptor activation can induce the D-serine release in the central nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the role of the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray D-serine in the mechanism of morphine tolerance in rats. The development of morphine tolerance was induced in normal adult male Sprague–Dawley rats through subcutaneous injection of morphine (10 mg/kg). The analgesic effect of morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) was assessed by measuring mechanical withdrawal thresholds in rats with an electronic von Frey anesthesiometer. The D-serine concentration and serine racemase expression levels in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray were evaluated through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis, respectively. The effects of intra-ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray injections of the D-serine degrading enzyme D-amino acid oxidase and antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting the P2X7 receptor on chronic morphine-treated rats were also explored. Results We found that repeated morphine administrations decreased the antinociceptive potency of morphine evidenced by the percent changes in mechanical pain threshold in rats. By contrast, the D-serine contents and the expression levels of the serine racemase protein were upregulated in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray in morphine-tolerant rats. The development of morphine tolerance was markedly alleviated by intra-ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray injections of D-amino acid oxidase or antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting the P2X7 receptor. Conclusions Our data indicate that the development of antinociceptive tolerance to morphine is partially

  2. PsHint1, associated with the G-protein α subunit PsGPA1, is required for the chemotaxis and pathogenicity of Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Zhai, Chunhua; Hua, Chenlei; Qiu, Min; Hao, Yujuan; Nie, Pingping; Ye, Wenwu; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-02-01

    Zoospore chemotaxis to soybean isoflavones is essential in the early stages of infection by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae. Previously, we have identified a G-protein α subunit encoded by PsGPA1 which regulates the chemotaxis and pathogenicity of P. sojae. In the present study, we used affinity purification to identify PsGPA1-interacting proteins, including PsHint1, a histidine triad (HIT) domain-containing protein orthologous to human HIT nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1). PsHint1 interacted with both the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)- and guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-bound forms of PsGPA1. An analysis of the gene-silenced transformants revealed that PsHint1 was involved in the chemotropic response of zoospores to the isoflavone daidzein. During interaction with a susceptible soybean cultivar, PsHint1-silenced transformants displayed significantly reduced infectious hyphal extension and caused a strong cell death in plants. In addition, the transformants displayed defective cyst germination, forming abnormal germ tubes that were highly branched and exhibited apical swelling. These results suggest that PsHint1 not only regulates chemotaxis by interacting with PsGPA1, but also participates in a Gα-independent pathway involved in the pathogenicity of P. sojae.

  3. Identification and characterization of fusolisin, the Fusobacterium nucleatum autotransporter serine protease.

    PubMed

    Doron, Lior; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Ibrahim, Yara; Eini, Amir; Naor, Ronit; Rosen, Graciela; Bachrach, Gilad

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an oral anaerobe associated with periodontal disease, adverse pregnancy outcomes and colorectal carcinoma. A serine endopeptidase of 61-65 kDa capable of damaging host tissue and of inactivating immune effectors was detected previously in F. nucleatum. Here we describe the identification of this serine protease, named fusolisin, in three oral F. nucleatum sub-species. Gel zymogram revealed fusobacterial proteolytic activity with molecular masses ranging from 55-101 kDa. All of the detected proteases were inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor PMSF. analysis revealed that all of the detected proteases are encoded by genes encoding an open reading frame (ORF) with a calculated mass of approximately 115 kDa. Bioinformatics analysis of the identified ORFs demonstrated that they consist of three domains characteristic of autotransporters of the type Va secretion system. Our results suggest that the F. nucleatum fusolisins are derived from a precursor of approximately 115 kDa. After crossing the cytoplasmic membrane and cleavage of the leader sequence, the C-terminal autotransporter domain of the remaining 96-113 kDa protein is embedded in the outer membrane and delivers the N-terminal S8 serine protease passenger domain to the outer cell surface. In most strains the N-terminal catalytic 55-65 kDa domain self cleaves and liberates itself from the autotransporter domain after its transfer across the outer cell membrane. In F. nucleatum ATCC 25586 this autocatalytic activity is less efficient resulting in a full length membrane-anchored serine protease. The mature serine protease was found to cleave after Thr, Gly, Ala and Leu residues at the P1 position. Growth of F. nucleatum in complex medium was inhibited when serine protease inhibitors were used. Additional experiments are needed to determine whether fusolisin might be used as a target for controlling fusobacterial infections. PMID:25357190

  4. Serine Protease Activation Essential for Endothelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiayi; Guihard, Pierre J.; Blazquez-Medela, Ana M.; Guo, Yina; Moon, Jeremiah H.; Jumabay, Medet; Boström, Kristina I.; Yao, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Endothelial cells have the ability to undergo endothelial-mesenchymal transitions (EndMTs), by which they acquire a mesenchymal phenotype and stem-cell like characteristics. We previously found that EndMTs ocurred in the endothelium deficient in matrix Gla protein (MGP) enabling endothelial cells to contribute cells to vascular calcification. However, the mechanism responsible for initiating EndMTs is not fully understood. Objective To determine the role of specific serine proteases and sex determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2) in the initiation of EndMTs. Methods and Results In this study, we used in vivo and in vitro models of vascular calcification to demonstrate that serine proteases and Sox2 are essential for the initiation of EndMTs in MGP-deficient endothelium. We showed that expression of a group of specific serine proteases was highly induced in endothelial cells at sites of vascular calcification in Mgp null aortas. Treatment with serine protease inhibitors decreased both stem-cell marker expression and vascular calcification. In human aortic endothelial cells, this group of serine proteases also induced EndMTs, and the activation of proteases was mediated by Sox2. Knockdown of the serine proteases or Sox2 diminished EndMTs and calcification. Endothelial-specific deletion of Sox2 decreased expression of stem-cell markers and aortic calcification in MGP-deficient mice. Conclusions Our results suggest that Sox2-mediated activation of specific serine proteases is essential for initiating EndMTs, and thus, may provide new therapeutic targets for treating vascular calcification. PMID:26265629

  5. An Essential Signal Peptide Peptidase Identified in an RNAi Screen of Serine Peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Catherine X.; Brown, Elaine; Hamilton, Alana; Van der Veken, Pieter; Augustyns, Koen; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2015-01-01

    The serine peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei have been viewed as potential drug targets. In particular, the S9 prolyl oligopeptidase subfamily is thought to be a good avenue for drug discovery. This is based on the finding that some S9 peptidases are secreted and active in the mammalian bloodstream, and that they are a class of enzyme against which drugs have successfully been developed. We collated a list of all serine peptidases in T. brucei, identifying 20 serine peptidase genes, of which nine are S9 peptidases. We screened all 20 serine peptidases by RNAi to determine which, if any, are essential for bloodstream form T. brucei survival. All S9 serine peptidases were dispensable for parasite survival in vitro, even when pairs of similar genes, coding for oligopeptidase B or prolyl oligopeptidase, were targeted simultaneously. We also found no effect on parasite survival in an animal host when the S9 peptidases oligopeptidase B, prolyl oligopeptidase or dipeptidyl peptidase 8 were targeted. The only serine peptidase to emerge from the RNAi screen as essential was a putative type-I signal peptide peptidase (SPP1). This gene was essential for parasite survival both in vitro and in vivo. The growth defect conferred by RNAi depletion of SPP1 was rescued by expression of a functional peptidase from an RNAi resistant SPP1 gene. However, expression of catalytically inactive SPP1 was unable to rescue cells from the SPP1 depleted phenotype, demonstrating that SPP1 serine peptidase activity is necessary for T. brucei survival. PMID:25816352

  6. Quality control of the tribological coating PS212

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    PS212 is a self-lubricating, composite coating that is applied by the plasma spray process. It is a functional lubricating coating from 25 C (or lower) to 900 C. The coating is prepared from a blend of three different powders with very dissimilar properties. Therefore, the final chemical composition and lubricating effectiveness of the coatings are very sensitive to the process variables used in their preparation. Defined here are the relevant variables. The process and analytical procedures that will result in satisfactory tribological coatings are discussed.

  7. Combustion of PMMA, PE, and PS in a ramjet

    SciTech Connect

    van der Geld, C.W.M. ); Korting, P.A.O.G. ); Wijchers, T. )

    1990-03-01

    This paper reports the combustion behavior of polymethylmetharcrylate (PMMA), polyethylene (PE), and polystyrene (PS) with air investigated in a connected pipe test facility; spectroscopy showed the presence of OH, C{sub 2}, and CH and temperatures between 1300 and 3000 K during combustion. Particular attention was focused on regression rate and combustion efficiency and the role of temperature and soot production. The present investigation gives an understanding of the most important phenomena that control (or emanate from) the combustion of a cylindrical solid fuel with a rearward facing step, and this has application for solid fuel ramjets, the safe burning of toxic waste, and hot gas generators. The results are summarized.

  8. Create and Publish a Hierarchical Progressive Survey (HiPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernique, P.; Boch, T.; Pineau, F.; Oberto, A.

    2014-05-01

    Since 2009, the CDS promotes a method for visualizing based on the HEALPix sky tessellation. This method, called “Hierarchical Progressive Survey" or HiPS, allows one to display a survey progressively. It is particularly suited for all-sky surveys or deep fields. This visualization method is now integrated in several applications, notably Aladin, the SiTools/MIZAR CNES framework, and the recent HTML5 “Aladin Lite". Also, more than one hundred surveys are already available in this view mode. In this article, we will present the progress concerning this method and its recent adaptation to the astronomical catalogs such as the GAIA simulation.

  9. TRPV-1-mediated elimination of residual iPS cells in bioengineered cardiac cell sheet tissues

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Seta, Hiroyoshi; Haraguchi, Yuji; Alsayegh, Khaled; Sekine, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Yamazaki, Kenji; Okano, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    The development of a suitable strategy for eliminating remaining undifferentiated cells is indispensable for the use of human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells in regenerative medicine. Here, we show for the first time that TRPV-1 activation through transient culture at 42 °C in combination with agonists is a simple and useful strategy to eliminate iPS cells from bioengineered cardiac cell sheet tissues. When human iPS cells were cultured at 42 °C, almost all cells disappeared by 48 hours through apoptosis. However, iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts maintained transcriptional and protein expression levels, and cardiac cell sheets were fabricated after reducing the temperature. TRPV-1 expression in iPS cells was upregulated at 42 °C, and iPS cell death at 42 °C was TRPV-1-dependent. Furthermore, TRPV-1 activation through thermal or agonist treatment eliminated iPS cells in cardiac tissues for a final concentration of 0.4% iPS cell contamination. These findings suggest that the difference in tolerance to TRPV-1 activation between iPS cells and iPS cell-derived cardiac cells could be exploited to eliminate remaining iPS cells in bioengineered cell sheet tissues, which will further reduce the risk of tumour formation. PMID:26888607

  10. Expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fibroblast growth factor 2, phosphatidyl inositol 3 phosphate kinase and their clinical and prognostic significance in early and advanced stage of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Usul Afsar, Cigdem; Sahin, Berksoy; Gunaldi, Meral; Kılıc Bagir, Emine; Gumurdulu, Derya; Burgut, Refik; Erkisi, Melek; Kara, Ismail Oguz; Paydas, Semra; Karaca, Feryal; Ercolak, Vehbi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer related to death in the world. Squamous cell lung carcinoma (SqCLC) is the second most frequent histological subtype of lung carcinomas. Recently, growth factors, growth factor receptors, and signal transduction system-related gene amplifications and mutations are extensively under investigation to estimate the prognosis and to develop individualized therapies in SqCLC. In this study, besides the signal transduction molecule phosphatidyl inositol-3-phosphate kinase (IP3K) p110α, we explored the expressions of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and receptor-1 (FGFR1) in tumor tissue and also their clinical and prognostic significance in patients with early/advanced SqCLC. Materials and methods: From 2005 to 2013, 129 patients (23 early, 106 advanced disease) with a histopathological SqCLC diagnosis were selected from the hospital files of Cukurova University Medical Faculty for this study. Two independent pathologists evaluated FGFR1, FGF2, and PI3K (p110α) expressions in both tumor and stromal tissues from 99 of the patients with sufficient tissue samples, using immunohistochemistry. Considering survival analysis separately for patients with both early and advanced stage diseases, the relationship between the clinical features of the patients and expressions were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: FGFR1 expression was found to be low in 59 (60%) patients and high in 40 (40%) patients. For FGF2; 12 (12%) patients had high, 87 (88%) patients had low expression and for IP3K; 31 (32%) patients had high and 66 (68%) patients had low expressions. In univariate analysis, overall survival (OS) was significantly associated with stage of the disease and the performance status of the patient (P<0.0001 and P<0.001). There was no significant difference in OS of the patients with either low or high expressions of FGFR1, FGF2, and IP3K. When the patients with early or advanced stage

  11. Generation of Partially Reprogrammed Cells and Fully Reprogrammed iPS Cells by Plasmid Transfection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Hyun Woo; Hong, Yean Ju; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be directly generated from somatic cells by overexpression of defined transcription factors. iPS cells can perpetually self-renew and differentiate into all cell types of an organism. iPS cells were first generated through infection with retroviruses that contain reprogramming factors. However, development of an exogene-free iPS cell generation method is crucial for future therapeutic applications, because integrated exogenes result in the formation of tumors in chimeras and regain pluripotency after differentiation in vitro. Here, we describe a method to generate iPS cells by transfection of plasmid vectors and to convert partially reprogrammed cells into fully reprogrammed iPS cells by switching from mouse ESC culture conditions to KOSR-based media with bFGF. We also describe basic methods used to characterize fully reprogrammed iPS cells.

  12. LOCALIZATION OF POLYSOME-BOUND ALBUMIN AND SERINE DEHYDRATASE IN RAT LIVER CELL FRACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Ikehara, Yukio; Pitot, Henry C.

    1973-01-01

    The polysomes involved in albumin and serine dehydratase synthesis were identified and localized by the binding to rat liver polysomes of anti-rat serum albumin and anti-serine dehydratase [125I]Fab dimer and monomer. Techniques were developed for the isolation of undegraded free and membrane-bound polysomes and for the preparation of [125I]Fab monomers and dimers from the IgG obtained from the antisera to the two proteins, rat serum albumin and serine dehydratase. The distribution of anti-rat serum albumin [125I]Fab dimer in the polysome profile is in accordance with the size of polysomes that are expected to be synthesizing albumin. By direct precipitation, it has been demonstrated that nascent chains isolated from the membrane-bound polysomes by puromycin were precipitated by anti-rat serum albumin-IgG at a level of 5–6 times those released from free polysomes. Anti-rat serum albumin-[125I]Fab dimer reacted with membrane-bound polysomes almost exclusively compared to the binding of nonimmune, control [125I]Fab dimer; a significant degree of binding of anti-rat serum albumin-[125I]Fab to free polysomes was also obtained. The [125I]Fab dimer made from normal control rabbit serum does not react with polysomes from liver at all and this preparation will not interact with polysomes extracted from tissues that do not synthesize rat serum albumin. Both anti-serine dehydratase-[125I]Fab monomer and dimer react with free and bound polysomes from livers of animals fed a chow diet or those fed a high 90% protein diet and given glucagon. In the latter instance, however, it is clear that the majority of the binding occurs to the bound polysomes. Furthermore, the specificity of this reaction may be further shown by the use of kidney polysomes that do not normally synthesize serine dehydratase. When these latter polysomes are isolated, even after the addition of crude and purified serine dehydratase, no reaction with anti-serine dehydratase-Fab fragments could be

  13. The vacuolar serine protease, a cross-reactive allergen from Cladosporium herbarum.

    PubMed

    Pöll, Verena; Denk, Ursula; Shen, Horng-Der; Panzani, Raphael C; Dissertori, Oliver; Lackner, Peter; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Mari, Adriano; Crameri, Reto; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Rid, Raphaela; Richter, Klaus; Breitenbach, Michael; Simon-Nobbe, Birgit

    2009-04-01

    Subtilisin-like serine proteases make up one of the most important allergen-families regarding the number of individual allergens. Previously, fungal subtilisin-like serine proteases have been identified from Aspergillus-, Penicillium-, and Trichophyton-species having a prevalence of IgE-reactivity between 33% and 80%. Since IgE-cross-reactivity is a common phenomenon within fungal species we wanted to know whether this protein also represents an allergen in Cladosporium herbarum. Hence, a screening of a C. herbarum cDNA library was performed using the coding sequence of the Penicillium oxalicum vacuolar serine protease (Pen o 18) as hybridization probe, ending up with a full-length clone. Biochemical and immunological characterization of this clone revealed that C. herbarum vacuolar serine protease most likely is synthesized as a precursor with an N-terminal pro-enzyme sequence and represents a minor allergen (Cla h 9) with a prevalence of IgE-reactivity of 15.5%. Furthermore Cla h 9 specifically reacted with the two monoclonal antibodies FUM20 and PCM39, as do the vacuolar serine proteases from Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium species. Investigation of IgE-cross-reactivity between Cla h 9 and other fungal serine proteases revealed that cross-reactivity is higher between vacuolar than alkaline serine proteases. IgE-epitope mapping of Cla h 9 was done in order to test whether four Cla h 9-peptides having a high sequence homology to previously determined Pen ch 18-IgE-epitopes also harbour IgE-epitopes. Three-dimensional models of the vacuolar serine proteases from C. herbarum and Penicillium chrysogenum were generated for the three-dimensional localization of the Cla h 9- and Pen ch 18- IgE-reactive and -non-reactive peptides. Taken together a new C. herbarum allergen has been identified, which may be useful in a molecule-based approach of C. herbarum allergy-diagnosis and -therapy. Moreover, Cla h 9 represents a further member of the subtilisin-like serine

  14. Cysteine biosynthesis in Lactobacillus casei: identification and characterization of a serine acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Bogicevic, Biljana; Berthoud, Hélène; Portmann, Reto; Bavan, Tharmatha; Meile, Leo; Irmler, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    In bacteria, cysteine can be synthesized from serine by two steps involving an L-serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) and a cysteine synthase (CysK). While CysK is found in the publicly available annotated genome from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, a gene encoding SAT (cysE) is missing. In this study, we found that various strains of L. casei grew in a chemically defined medium containing sulfide as the sole sulfur source, indicating the presence of a serine O-acetyltransferase. The gene lying upstream of cysK is predicted to encode a homoserine trans-succinylase (metA). To study the function of this gene, it was cloned from L. casei FAM18110. The purified, recombinant protein did not acylate L-homoserine in vitro. Instead, it catalyzed the formation of O-acetyl serine from L-serine and acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, the plasmid expressing the L. casei gene complemented an Escherichia coli cysE mutant strain but not an E. coli metA mutant. This clearly demonstrated that the gene annotated as metA in fact encodes the SAT function and should be annotated as cysE.

  15. The uropathogenic species Staphylococcus saprophyticus tolerates a high concentration of D-serine.

    PubMed

    Sakinç, Türkân; Michalski, Nadine; Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören G

    2009-10-01

    Human urine contains a relatively high concentration of d-serine, which is toxic to several nonuropathogenic bacteria, but can be utilized or detoxified by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). The sequenced genome of uropathogenic Staphylococcus saprophyticus contains a gene with homology to the d-serine deaminase gene (dsdA) of UPEC. We found the gene in several clinical isolates of S. saprophyticus; however, the gene was absent in Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus cohnii, phylogenetically close relatives of S. saprophyticus, and could also not be detected in isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and 13 other staphylococcal species. In addition, the genomes of other sequenced staphylococci do not harbor homologues of this operon. Interestingly, S. saprophyticus could grow in media supplemented with relatively high concentrations of d-serine, whereas S. aureus, S. epidermidis and other staphylococcal species could not. The association of the dsdA gene with growth in media including d-serine was proved by introducing the gene into S. aureus Newman. Given the fact that UPEC and S. saprophyticus tolerate this compound, d-serine utilization and detoxification may be a general property of uropathogenic bacteria.

  16. Cell-type specific mechanisms of D-serine uptake and release in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, Magalie; Parpura, Vladimir; Mothet, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence during the last decade established that D-serine is a key signaling molecule utilized by neurons and astroglia in the mammalian central nervous system. D-serine is increasingly appreciated as the main physiological endogenous coagonist for synaptic NMDA receptors at central excitatory synapses; it is mandatory for long-term changes in synaptic strength, memory, learning, and social interactions. Alterations in the extracellular levels of D-serine leading to disrupted cell-cell signaling are a trademark of many chronic or acute neurological (i.e., Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, stroke) and psychiatric (i.e., schizophrenia) disorders, and are associated with addictive behavior (i.e., cocaine addiction). Indeed, fine tuning of the extracellular levels of D-serine, achieved by various molecular machineries and signaling pathways, is necessary for maintenance of accurate NMDA receptor functions. Here, we review the experimental data supporting the notion that astroglia and neurons use different pathways to regulate levels of extracellular D-serine. PMID:24910611

  17. Functional roles of endogenous D-serine in pain-induced ultrasonic vocalization.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Hitomi; Maekawa, Masao; Konno, Ryuichi; Hori, Yuuichi

    2012-11-14

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is crucial for pain-related behaviors. D-Serine is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase (SR) and modulates NMDAR functions by acting as an agonist at the glycine-binding site. We analyzed noxious stimulus-induced ultrasonic vocalization and locomotor activity in the open-field test using SR knockout (SR-KO) mice to examine the role of endogenous D-serine in mammalian behaviors. SR-KO mice emitted less ultrasonic vocalization after noxious stimulation (VAS) than wild-type (WT) mice. The locomotor activity of WT mice decreased with repeated daily exposures to the open field, whereas that of SR-KO mice remained unchanged. VAS was significantly enhanced during arthritis in WT mice, whereas it was not enhanced during arthritis in SR-KO mice. These results indicate that mice lacking the ability to produce D-serine endogenously in the brain differ from normal mice with respect to the chronic pain-induced behavioral changes.

  18. Approaches to the simultaneous inactivation of metallo-and serine-β-lactamases

    PubMed Central

    Ganta, Sudhakar Reddy; Perumal, Senthil; Pagadala, Sundar Ram Reddy; Samuelsen, Ørjan; Spencer, James; Pratt, R. F.; Buynak, John D.

    2010-01-01

    A series of cephalosporin-derived reverse hydroxamates and oximes were prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of representative metallo- and serine-β-lactamases. The reverse hydroxamates showed submicromolar inhibition of the GIM-1 metallo-β-lactamase. With respect to interactions with the classes A, C, and D serine β-lactamases, as judged by their correspondingly low Km values, the reverse hydroxamates were recognized in a manner similar to the non-hydroxylated N-H amide side chains of the natural substrates of these enzymes. This indicates that, with respect to recognition in the active site of the serine β-lactamases, the O=C-NR-OH functionality can function as a structural isostere of the O=C-NR-H group, with the NO-H group presumably replacing the amide N-H group as a hydrogen bond donor to the appropriate backbone carbonyl oxygen of the protein. The reverse hydroxamates, however, displayed kcat values up to three orders of magnitude lower than the natural substrates, thus indicating substantial slowing of the hydrolytic action of these serine β-lactamases. Although the degree of inactivation is not yet enough to be clinically useful, these initial results are promising. The substitution of the amide N-H bond by N-OH may represent a useful strategy for the inhibition of other serine hydrolases. PMID:19243936

  19. Phosphorylation drives a dynamic switch in serine/arginine-rich proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shengqi; Gapsys, Vytautas; Kim, Hai-Young; Bessonov, Sergey; Hsiao, He-Hsuan; Möhlmann, Sina; Klaukien, Volker; Ficner, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; de Groot, Bert; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important players in RNA metabolism and are extensively phosphorylated at serine residues in RS repeats. Here, we show that phosphorylation switches the RS domain of the serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 from a fully disordered state to a partially rigidified arch-like structure. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the conformational switch is restricted to RS repeats, critically depends on the phosphate charge state and strongly decreases the conformational entropy of RS domains. The dynamic switch also occurs in the 100 kDa SR-related protein hPrp28, for which phosphorylation at the RS repeat is required for spliceosome assembly. Thus, a phosphorylation-induced dynamic switch is common to the class of serine/arginine-rich proteins and provides a molecular basis for the functional redundancy of serine/arginine-rich proteins and the profound influence of RS domain phosphorylation on protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. PMID:24183573

  20. D-Serine and Glycine Differentially Control Neurotransmission during Visual Cortex Critical Period.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Claire N J; Dallérac, Glenn; Le Roux, Nicolas; Sacchi, Silvia; Levasseur, Grégoire; Amar, Muriel; Pollegioni, Loredano; Mothet, Jean-Pierre; Fossier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play a central role in synaptic plasticity. Their activation requires the binding of both glutamate and d-serine or glycine as co-agonist. The prevalence of either co-agonist on NMDA-receptor function differs between brain regions and remains undetermined in the visual cortex (VC) at the critical period of postnatal development. Here, we therefore investigated the regulatory role that d-serine and/or glycine may exert on NMDARs function and on synaptic plasticity in the rat VC layer 5 pyramidal neurons of young rats. Using selective enzymatic depletion of d-serine or glycine, we demonstrate that d-serine and not glycine is the endogenous co-agonist of synaptic NMDARs required for the induction and expression of Long Term Potentiation (LTP) at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Glycine on the other hand is not involved in synaptic efficacy per se but regulates excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by activating strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, then producing a shunting inhibition that controls neuronal gain and results in a depression of synaptic inputs at the somatic level after dendritic integration. In conclusion, we describe for the first time that in the VC both D-serine and glycine differentially regulate somatic depolarization through the activation of distinct synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. PMID:27003418

  1. D-Serine and Glycine Differentially Control Neurotransmission during Visual Cortex Critical Period

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Claire N. J.; Dallérac, Glenn; Le Roux, Nicolas; Sacchi, Silvia; Levasseur, Grégoire; Amar, Muriel; Pollegioni, Loredano; Mothet, Jean-Pierre; Fossier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play a central role in synaptic plasticity. Their activation requires the binding of both glutamate and d-serine or glycine as co-agonist. The prevalence of either co-agonist on NMDA-receptor function differs between brain regions and remains undetermined in the visual cortex (VC) at the critical period of postnatal development. Here, we therefore investigated the regulatory role that d-serine and/or glycine may exert on NMDARs function and on synaptic plasticity in the rat VC layer 5 pyramidal neurons of young rats. Using selective enzymatic depletion of d-serine or glycine, we demonstrate that d-serine and not glycine is the endogenous co-agonist of synaptic NMDARs required for the induction and expression of Long Term Potentiation (LTP) at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Glycine on the other hand is not involved in synaptic efficacy per se but regulates excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by activating strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, then producing a shunting inhibition that controls neuronal gain and results in a depression of synaptic inputs at the somatic level after dendritic integration. In conclusion, we describe for the first time that in the VC both D-serine and glycine differentially regulate somatic depolarization through the activation of distinct synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. PMID:27003418

  2. Cysteine biosynthesis in Lactobacillus casei: identification and characterization of a serine acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Bogicevic, Biljana; Berthoud, Hélène; Portmann, Reto; Bavan, Tharmatha; Meile, Leo; Irmler, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    In bacteria, cysteine can be synthesized from serine by two steps involving an L-serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) and a cysteine synthase (CysK). While CysK is found in the publicly available annotated genome from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, a gene encoding SAT (cysE) is missing. In this study, we found that various strains of L. casei grew in a chemically defined medium containing sulfide as the sole sulfur source, indicating the presence of a serine O-acetyltransferase. The gene lying upstream of cysK is predicted to encode a homoserine trans-succinylase (metA). To study the function of this gene, it was cloned from L. casei FAM18110. The purified, recombinant protein did not acylate L-homoserine in vitro. Instead, it catalyzed the formation of O-acetyl serine from L-serine and acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, the plasmid expressing the L. casei gene complemented an Escherichia coli cysE mutant strain but not an E. coli metA mutant. This clearly demonstrated that the gene annotated as metA in fact encodes the SAT function and should be annotated as cysE. PMID:26790714

  3. Identification of a small molecule inhibitor of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase to target serine biosynthesis in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mullarky, Edouard; Lucki, Natasha C.; Beheshti Zavareh, Reza; Anglin, Justin L.; Gomes, Ana P.; Nicolay, Brandon N.; Wong, Jenny C. Y.; Christen, Stefan; Takahashi, Hidenori; Singh, Pradeep K.; Blenis, John; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Asara, John M.; DeNicola, Gina M.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Lairson, Luke L.; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to promote growth and proliferation. The genetic evidence pointing to the importance of the amino acid serine in tumorigenesis is striking. The gene encoding the enzyme 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), which catalyzes the first committed step of serine biosynthesis, is overexpressed in tumors and cancer cell lines via focal amplification and nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated up-regulation. PHGDH-overexpressing cells are exquisitely sensitive to genetic ablation of the pathway. Here, we report the discovery of a selective small molecule inhibitor of PHGDH, CBR-5884, identified by screening a library of 800,000 drug-like compounds. CBR-5884 inhibited de novo serine synthesis in cancer cells and was selectively toxic to cancer cell lines with high serine biosynthetic activity. Biochemical characterization of the inhibitor revealed that it was a noncompetitive inhibitor that showed a time-dependent onset of inhibition and disrupted the oligomerization state of PHGDH. The identification of a small molecule inhibitor of PHGDH not only enables thorough preclinical evaluation of PHGDH as a target in cancers, but also provides a tool with which to study serine metabolism. PMID:26831078

  4. Serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation regulates DNA binding of bacterial transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Aida; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of bacterial transcriptional regulators (TRs) belonging to the family of two-component systems (TCSs) is a well-established mechanism for regulating gene expression. Recent evidence points to the fact that reversible phosphorylation of bacterial TRs on other types of residue, i.e. serine, threonine, tyrosine and cysteine, is also quite common. The phosphorylation of the ester type (phospho-serine/threonine/tyrosine) is more stable than the aspartate phosphorylation of TCSs. The kinases which catalyse these phosphorylation events (Hanks-type serine/threonine protein kinases and bacterial protein tyrosine kinases) are also much more promiscuous than the TCS kinases, i.e. each of them can phosphorylate several substrate proteins. As a consequence, the dynamics and topology of the signal transduction networks depending on these kinases differ significantly from the TCSs. Here, we present an overview of different classes of bacterial TR phosphorylated and regulated by serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. Particular attention is given to examples when serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases interact with TCSs, phosphorylating either the histidine kinases or the response regulators. We argue that these promiscuous kinases connect several signal transduction pathways and serve the role of signal integration. PMID:26220449

  5. Impaired neurogenesis in embryonic spinal cord of Phgdh knockout mice, a serine deficiency disorder model.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yuriko; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Yang, Jung Hoon; Suzuki, Takeshi; Azuma, Norihiro; Sakai, Kazuhisa; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yasuda, Kaori; Kuhara, Satoru; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2009-03-01

    Mutations in the d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH; EC 1.1.1.95) gene, which encodes an enzyme involved in de novol-serine biosynthesis, are shown to cause human serine deficiency disorder. This disorder has been characterized by severe neurological symptoms including congenital microcephaly and psychomotor retardation. Our previous work demonstrated that targeted disruption of mouse Phgdh leads to a marked decrease in serine and glycine, severe growth retardation of the central nervous system, and lethality after embryonic day 13.5. To clarify how a serine deficiency causes neurodevelopmental defects, we characterized changes in metabolites, gene expression and morphological alterations in the spinal cord of Phgdh knockout mice. BeadChip microarray analysis revealed significant dysregulation of genes involved in the cell cycle. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis also revealed a significant perturbation of regulatory networks that operate in the cell cycle progression. Moreover, morphological examinations of the knockout spinal cord demonstrated a marked deficit in dorsal horn neurons. Radial glia cells, native neural stem/progenitor cells, accumulated in the dorsal ventricular zone, but they did not proceed to a G(0)-like quiescent state. The present integrative study provides in vivo evidence that normal cell cycle progression and subsequent neurogenesis of radial glia cells are severely impaired by serine deficiency. PMID:19114063

  6. [Features of Expression of the PsSst] and PsIgn1 Genes in Nodules of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Symbiotic Mutants].

    PubMed

    Zhukova, V A; Rychagova, T S; Fedorina, Ya V; Pinaeva, A G; Andronova, E E; Borisova, A Yu; Tikhonovich, I A

    2016-04-01

    The sequences of the PsSst1 and PsIgn1 genes of pea (Pisum sativum L.) homologous to the symbiotic LjSST1 and LjIGN1 genes of Lotusjaponicus (Regel.) K. Larsen are determined. The expression level of PsSst1 and PsIgn1 genes is determined by real-time PCR in nodules of several symbiotic mutants and original lines of pea. Lines with increased (Sprint-2Fix⁻ (Pssym31)) and decreased (P61 (Pssym25)) expression level of both genes are revealed along with the lines characterized by changes in the expression level of only one of these genes. The revealed features of the PsSst1 and PsIgn1 expression allow us to expand the phenotypic characterization of pea symbiotic mutants. In addition, PsSst1 and PsIgn1 cDNA is sequenced in selected mutant lines, characterized by a decreased expression level of these genes in nodules, but no mutations are found. PMID:27529974

  7. [Features of Expression of the PsSst] and PsIgn1 Genes in Nodules of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Symbiotic Mutants].

    PubMed

    Zhukova, V A; Rychagova, T S; Fedorina, Ya V; Pinaeva, A G; Andronova, E E; Borisova, A Yu; Tikhonovich, I A

    2016-04-01

    The sequences of the PsSst1 and PsIgn1 genes of pea (Pisum sativum L.) homologous to the symbiotic LjSST1 and LjIGN1 genes of Lotusjaponicus (Regel.) K. Larsen are determined. The expression level of PsSst1 and PsIgn1 genes is determined by real-time PCR in nodules of several symbiotic mutants and original lines of pea. Lines with increased (Sprint-2Fix⁻ (Pssym31)) and decreased (P61 (Pssym25)) expression level of both genes are revealed along with the lines characterized by changes in the expression level of only one of these genes. The revealed features of the PsSst1 and PsIgn1 expression allow us to expand the phenotypic characterization of pea symbiotic mutants. In addition, PsSst1 and PsIgn1 cDNA is sequenced in selected mutant lines, characterized by a decreased expression level of these genes in nodules, but no mutations are found.

  8. iPS cell technology: Future impact on renal care.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Benjamin S; Steinman, Theodore I

    2015-08-01

    iPS cells from patients with kidney disease are a new tool with the potential to impact the future of renal care. They can be used in the laboratory to model the pathophysiology of human kidney disease, and have the potential to establish a new area of immunocompatible, on-demand renal transplantation. Critical challenges remain before the full potential of these cells can be accurately assessed. We need to understand whether the derived cell types are mature and can replace kidney function(s). To what extent can iPS cells model kidney disease in the simplified environment of cell culture? Ultimately, successful integration of these cells as autograft therapies will require demonstration of safety and efficacy equal or superior to the existing gold standards of kidney allograft transplantation and dialysis. Specific educational and infrastructural changes will be necessary if these specialized technologies are to be adopted as an accepted modalities in clinical medicine. Given these barriers, the first fruit of these labors is likely to be improved understanding of pathophysiological pathways in human IPS cell disease models, followed by drug discovery and testing. These experiments will lead naturally to improvements in differentiation and experiments in animal models testing function. The time course to achieve the desired goals remains unknown, but the ultimate hope is that new, more effective and less expensive modalities for renal replacement therapy will occur in the foreseeable future. A new standard of care for patients is anticipated that addresses limitations of currently available treatments. PMID:26454909

  9. The N-methyl D-aspartate receptor glycine site and D-serine metabolism: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    The N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptor requires two distinct agonists to operate. Glycine is assumed to be the endogenous ligand for the NMDA receptor glycine site, but this notion has been challenged by the discovery of high levels of endogenous d-serine in the mammalian forebrain. I have outlined an evolutionary framework for the appearance of a glycine site in animals and the metabolic events leading to high levels of D-serine in brain. Sequence alignments of the glycine-binding regions, along with the scant experimental data available, suggest that the properties of invertebrate NMDA receptor glycine sites are probably different from those in vertebrates. The synthesis of D-serine in brain is due to a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (B(6))-requiring serine racemase in glia. Although it remains unknown when serine racemase first evolved, data concerning the evolution of B(6) enzymes, along with the known occurrences of serine racemases in animals, point to D-serine synthesis arising around the divergence time of arthropods. D-Serine catabolism occurs via the ancient peroxisomal enzyme d-amino acid oxidase (DAO), whose ontogenetic expression in the hindbrain of mammals is delayed until the postnatal period and absent from the forebrain. The phylogeny of D-serine metabolism has relevance to our understanding of brain ontogeny, schizophrenia and neurotransmitter dynamics. PMID:15306409

  10. Human hair follicle pluripotent stem (hfPS) cells promote regeneration of peripheral-nerve injury: an advantageous alternative to ES and iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Kanoh, Maho; Niiyama, Shiro; Hamada, Yuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Sato, Yuichi; Hoffman, Robert M; Katsuoka, Kensei

    2009-08-01

    The optimal source of stem cells for regenerative medicine is a major question. Embryonic stem (ES) cells have shown promise for pluripotency but have ethical issues and potential to form teratomas. Pluripotent stem cells have been produced from skin cells by either viral-, plasmid- or transposon-mediated gene transfer. These stem cells have been termed induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS cells. iPS cells may also have malignant potential and are inefficiently produced. Embryonic stem cells may not be suited for individualized therapy, since they can undergo immunologic rejection. To address these fundamental problems, our group is developing hair follicle pluripotent stem (hfPS) cells. Our previous studies have shown that mouse hfPS cells can differentiate to neurons, glial cells in vitro, and other cell types, and can promote nerve and spinal cord regeneration in vivo. hfPS cells are located above the hair follicle bulge in what we have termed the hfPS cell area (hfPSA) and are nestin positive and keratin 15 (K-15) negative. Human hfPS cells can also differentiate into neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. In the present study, human hfPS cells were transplanted in the severed sciatic nerve of the mouse where they differentiated into glial fibrillary-acidic-protein (GFAP)-positive Schwann cells and promoted the recovery of pre-existing axons, leading to nerve generation. The regenerated nerve recovered function and, upon electrical stimulation, contracted the gastrocnemius muscle. The hfPS cells can be readily isolated from the human scalp, thereby providing an accessible, autologous and safe source of stem cells for regenerative medicine that have important advantages over ES or iPS cells.

  11. On the roles of the alanine and serine in the β-sheet structure of fibroin.

    PubMed

    Carrascoza Mayen, Juan Francisco; Lupan, Alexandru; Cosar, Ciprian; Kun, Attila-Zsolt; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2015-02-01

    In its silk II form, fibroin is almost exclusively formed from layers of β-sheets, rich in glycine, alanine and serine. Reported here are computational results on fibroin models at semi-empirical, DFT levels of theory and molecular dynamics (MD) for (Gly)10, (Gly-Ala)5 and (Gly-Ser)5 decapeptides. While alanine and serine introduce steric repulsions, the alanine side-chain adds to the rigidity of the sheet, allowing it to maintain a properly pleated structure even in a single β-sheet, and thus avoiding two alternative conformations which would interfere with the formation of the multi-layer pleated-sheet structure. The role of the serine is proposed to involve modulation of the hydrophobicity in order to construct the supramolecular assembly as opposed to random precipitation due to hydrophobicity.

  12. Conservation of sequence and function in fertilization of the cortical granule serine protease in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Xu, Dongdong; Wessel, Gary M

    2014-08-01

    Conservation of the cortical granule serine protease during fertilization in echinoderms was tested both functionally in sea stars, and computationally throughout the echinoderm phylum. We find that the inhibitor of serine protease (soybean trypsin inhibitor) effectively blocks proper transition of the sea star fertilization envelope into a protective sperm repellent, whereas inhibitors of the other main types of proteases had no effect. Scanning the transcriptomes of 15 different echinoderm ovaries revealed sequences of high conservation to the originally identified sea urchin cortical serine protease, CGSP1. These conserved sequences contained the catalytic triad necessary for enzymatic activity, and the tandemly repeated LDLr-like repeats. We conclude that the protease involved in the slow block to polyspermy is an essential and conserved element of fertilization in echinoderms, and may provide an important reagent for identification and testing of the cell surface proteins in eggs necessary for sperm binding.

  13. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes are found in P. falciparum, of which serine proteases are of particular interest due to their involvement in parasite-specific processes of egress and invasion. In P. falciparum, a number of serine proteases belonging to chymotrypsin, subtilisin, and rhomboid clans are found. This review focuses on the potential of P. falciparum serine proteases as antimalarial drug targets. PMID:24799897

  14. Proteolysis of cell adhesion molecules by serine proteases: a role in long term potentiation?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, K B; Martinez, J; Lynch, G

    1998-11-16

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease endogenous to hippocampal neurons, is shown to recognize a highly conserved sequence in the extracellular domain of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). When added to brain homogenates, tPA generated a CAM fragment similar in size to that produced in hippocampal slices by brief periods of NMDA receptor stimulation. The serine protease inhibitor 4-(2-Aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride blocked the effects of tPA with an approximately 50% suppression at 250 microM. The inhibitor at this concentration had no evident effect on synaptic responses but caused long term potentiation to decay back to baseline over a 1 h period. These results suggest that extracellular breakdown of cell adhesion molecules initiated by NMDA receptors and mediated by serine proteases contributes to the formation of stable potentiation.

  15. Identification of the active-site serine in human lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Farooqui, J.; Wohl, R.C.; Kezdy, F.J.; Scanu, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) from human plasma reacts stoichiometrically with diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) resulting in the complete loss of transacylase activity. Purified LCAT was covalently labeled with (TH) DFP and the labeled protein was reduced and carboxymethylated. Cyanogen bromide cleavage followed by gel permeation chromatography yielded a peptide of 4-5 KDa (LCAT CNBr-III) containing most of the radioactive label. Preliminary studies comparing the amino acid composition of the LCAT-CNBr-III with the sequence of LCAT indicate that this peptide corresponds to fragment 168-220. Automated Edman degradation of the radioactive peptide recovered a radioactive PTC-amino acid at cycle 14. Of all predicted CNBr fragments only peptide 168-220 contained a serine at residue 14 from the amino terminus of the peptide. The authors conclude that serine 181 is the active site serine of LCAT.

  16. Serine biosynthesis by photorespiratory and non-photorespiratory pathways: an interesting interplay with unknown regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Ros, R; Cascales-Miñana, B; Segura, J; Anoman, A D; Toujani, W; Flores-Tornero, M; Rosa-Tellez, S; Muñoz-Bertomeu, J

    2013-07-01

    Photorespiration is a primary metabolic pathway, which, given its energy costs, has often been viewed as a wasteful process. Despite having reached the consensus that one important function of photorespiration is the removal of toxic metabolite intermediates, other possible functions have emerged, and others could well emerge in the future. As a primary metabolic pathway, photorespiration interacts with other routes; however the nature of these interactions is not well known. One of these interacting pathways could be the biosynthesis of serine, since this amino acid is synthesised through photorespiratory and non-photorespiratory routes. At present, the exact contribution of each route to serine supply in different tissues and organs, their biological significance and how pathways are integrated and/or regulated remain unknown. Here, we review the non-photorespiratory serine biosynthetic pathways, their interactions with the photorespiratory pathway, their putative role in plants and their biotechnological interest.

  17. Classification scheme for the design of serine protease targeted compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Lang, Stanley A; Kozyukov, Andrey V; Balakin, Konstantin V; Skorenko, Andrey V; Ivashchenko, Andrey A; Savchuk, Nikolay P

    2002-11-01

    The development of a scoring scheme for the classification of molecules into serine protease (SP) actives and inactives is described. The method employed a set of pre-selected descriptors for encoding the molecular structures, and a trained neural network for classifying the molecules. The molecular requirements were profiled and validated by using available databases of SP- and non-SP-active agents [1,439 diverse SP-active molecules, and 5,131 diverse non-SP-active molecules from the Ensemble Database (Prous Science, 2002)] and Sensitivity Analysis. The method enables an efficient qualification or disqualification of a molecule as a potential serine protease ligand. It represents a useful tool for constraining the size of virtual libraries that will help accelerate the development of new serine protease active drugs. PMID:12825792

  18. Role of insulin receptor and insulin signaling on αPS2CβPS integrins' lateral diffusion.

    PubMed

    Mainali, Dipak; Syed, Aleem; Arora, Neha; Smith, Emily A

    2014-12-01

    Integrins are ubiquitous transmembrane receptors with adhesion and signaling properties. The influence of insulin receptor and insulin signaling on αPS2CβPS integrins' lateral diffusion was studied using single particle tracking in S2 cells before and after reducing the insulin receptor expression or insulin stimulation. Insulin signaling was monitored by Western blotting for phospho-Akt expression. The expression of the insulin receptor was reduced using RNA interference (RNAi). After insulin receptor RNAi, four significant changes were measured in integrin diffusion properties: (1) there was a 24% increase in the mobile integrin population, (2) 14% of the increase was represented by integrins with Brownian diffusion, (3) for integrins that reside in confined zones of diffusion, there was a 45% increase in the diameter of the confined zone, and (4) there was a 29% increase in the duration integrins spend in confined zones of diffusion. In contrast to reduced expression of the insulin receptor, which alters integrin diffusion properties, insulin stimulation alone or insulin stimulation under conditions of reduced insulin receptor expression have minimal effects on altering the measured integrin diffusion properties. The differences in integrin diffusion measured after insulin receptor RNAi in the presence or absence of insulin stimulation may be the result of other insulin signaling pathways that are activated at reduced insulin receptor conditions. No change in the average integrin diffusion coefficient was measured for any conditions included in this study.

  19. Laser-Free RF-Gun as a Combined Source of Thz and Ps-Sub-Ps X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustsson, R.; Boucher, S.; Finn, O.; Hartzell, J.; Ruelas, M.; Smirnov, A. V.; Storms, S.; Ning, Z.; Murokh, A.; Campese, T.; Faillace, L.; Verma, A.; Kim, Y.; Buaphad, P.; Andrews, A.; Berls, B.; Eckman, C.; Folkman, K.; Knowles-Swingle, A.; O'Neill, C.; Smith, M.; Grandsaert, T.; van der Geer, B.; de Loos, M.; Berg, W. J.; Sereno, N. S.; Sun, Y.; Zholents, A. A.

    A coherent, mm-sub-mm-wave source driven by a RF electron gun is proposed for wide research applications as well as auxiliary inspection and screening, safe imaging, cancer diagnostics, surface defectoscopy, and enhanced time-domain spectroscopy. It allows generation of high peak and average THz-sub-THz radiation power provided by beam pre-bunching and chirping in the RF gun followed by microbunching in magnetic compressor, and resonant Cherenkov radiation of an essentially flat beam in a robust, ∼inch-long, planar, mm-sub-mm gap structure. The proof-of-principle has been successfully demonstrated in Phase I on a 5 MeV beam of L-band thermionic injector of Idaho Accelerator Center. The system can also deliver an intense, ps-sub-ps bursts of low-to-moderate dose of relativistic electrons and X-ray radiation produced by the same beam required for pulsed radiolysis as well as to enhance screening efficiency, throughput and safety.

  20. Laser-free RF-gun as a combined source of THz and ps-sub-ps X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Agustsson, R.; Boucher, S.; Finn, O.; Hartzell, J.; Ruelas, M.; Smirnov, A. V.; Storms, S.; Ning, Z.; Murokh, A.; Campese, T.; Faillace, L.; Verma, A.; Kim, Y.; Buaphad, P.; Andrews, A.; Berls, B.; Eckman, C.; Folkman, K.; Knowles-Swingle, A.; O’Neill, C.; Smith, M.; Grandsaert, T.; van der Geer, B.; de Loos, M.; Berg, W. J.; Sereno, N. S.; Sun, Y.; Zholents, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    A coherent, mm-sub-mm-wave source driven by a RF electron gun is proposed for wide research applications as well as auxiliary inspection and screening, safe imaging, cancer diagnostics, surface defectoscopy, and enhanced time-domain spectroscopy. It allows generation of high peak and average THz-sub-THz radiation power provided by beam pre-bunching and chirping in the RF gun followed by microbunching in magnetic compressor, and resonant Cherenkov radiation of an essentially flat beam in a robust, ~inch-long, planar, mm-sub-mm gap structure. The proof-of-principle has been successfully demonstrated in Phase I on a 5 MeV beam of L-band thermionic injector of Idaho Accelerator Center. The system can also deliver an intense, ps-sub-ps bursts of low-to-moderate dose of relativistic electrons and X-ray radiation produced by the same beam required for pulsed radiolysis as well as to enhance screening efficiency, throughput and safety.

  1. Comparison of implosion core metrics: A 10 ps dilation X-ray imager vs a 100 ps gated microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, S. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.

    2016-11-01

    The dilation x-ray imager (DIXI) [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010); S. R. Nagel et al., ibid. 83, 10E116 (2012); S. R. Nagel et al., ibid. 85, 11E504 (2014)] is a high-speed x-ray framing camera that uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps. This is a 10 × improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) (100 ps resolution), and otherwise only achievable with 1D streaked imaging. A side effect of the dramatically reduced gate width is the comparatively lower detected signal level. Therefore we implement a Poisson noise reduction with non-local principal component analysis method [J. Salmon et al., J. Math. Imaging Vision 48, 279294 (2014)] to improve the robustness of the DIXI data analysis. Here we present results on ignition-relevant experiments at the NIF using DIXI. In particular we focus on establishing that/when DIXI gives reliable shape metrics (P0, P2, and P4 Legendre modes, and their temporal evolution/swings).

  2. Laser-free RF-gun as a combined source of THz and ps-sub-ps X-rays

    DOE PAGES

    Agustsson, R.; Boucher, S.; Finn, O.; Hartzell, J.; Ruelas, M.; Smirnov, A. V.; Storms, S.; Ning, Z.; Murokh, A.; Campese, T.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A coherent, mm-sub-mm-wave source driven by a RF electron gun is proposed for wide research applications as well as auxiliary inspection and screening, safe imaging, cancer diagnostics, surface defectoscopy, and enhanced time-domain spectroscopy. It allows generation of high peak and average THz-sub-THz radiation power provided by beam pre-bunching and chirping in the RF gun followed by microbunching in magnetic compressor, and resonant Cherenkov radiation of an essentially flat beam in a robust, ~inch-long, planar, mm-sub-mm gap structure. The proof-of-principle has been successfully demonstrated in Phase I on a 5 MeV beam of L-band thermionic injector of Idaho Accelerator Center. Themore » system can also deliver an intense, ps-sub-ps bursts of low-to-moderate dose of relativistic electrons and X-ray radiation produced by the same beam required for pulsed radiolysis as well as to enhance screening efficiency, throughput and safety.« less

  3. Modulation of glycine sites enhances social memory in rats using PQQ combined with d-serine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xingqin; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Rongjun; Peng, Ying; Qin, Xiaofeng; Mao, Shishi

    2016-07-15

    The aim of study was to investigate the effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) combined with d-serine on the modulation of glycine sites in the brain of rats using social recognition test. Rats were divided into seven groups (n=10) and given repeated intraperitoneal (ip) injections of saline, MK-801 (0.5mg/kg), clozapine (1mg/kg), haloperidol (0.1mg/kg), d-serine (0.8g/kg), PQQ (2.0μg/kg), or d-serine (0.4g/kg) combined with PQQ (1.0μg/kg) for seven days. A social recognition test, including assessment of time-dependent memory impairment, was performed. A non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, significantly impaired social memory, and this impairment was significantly repaired with an atypical antipsychotic (clozapine) but not with a typical antipsychotic (haloperidol). Likewise, d-serine combined with PQQ significantly improved MK-801-disrupted cognition in naïve rats, whereas haloperidol was ineffective. The present results show that the co-agonist NMDA receptor treated with PQQ and d-serine enhances social memory and may be an effective approach for treating the cognitive dysfunction observed in schizophrenic patients. PQQ stimulates glycine modulatory sites by which it may antagonize indirectly by removing glycine from the synaptic cleft or by binding the unsaturated site with d-serine in the brain, providing the insights into future research of central nervous system and drug discovery.

  4. Breast cancer protein PS2 synthesis in mammary gland of transgenic mice and secretion into milk.

    PubMed

    Tomasetto, C; Wolf, C; Rio, M C; Mehtali, M; LeMeur, M; Gerlinger, P; Chambon, P; Lathe, R

    1989-10-01

    PS2, a small estrogen-inducible secretory polypeptide with structural analogies to a growth factor, is produced by approximately 50% of human breast tumors. The function of PS2 is, however, unknown. To determine whether PS2 may play an autocrine role in the development of mammary tumors we constructed transgenic mice bearing fusion constructs designed to direct the expression of human PS2 in the lactating mammary gland under the control of the whey acidic protein (WAP) promoter. Mouse lines bearing the genomic PS2 gene under the control of the WAP promoter region (WAP-PS2-2) failed to express the transgene. However, mice harboring the fusion construct WAP-PS2-1, in which the PS2 coding sequence is inserted into the 5' untranslated region of the complete WAP gene, were observed to express the transgene. Expression was restricted to the secretory epithelium of the mammary gland during lactation, and PS2 protein was secreted into the milk. Nevertheless, no mammary gland dysplasia was observed, and PS2 expression had no discernable effect upon the physiology and/or development of the suckling young or the transgenic mother. PMID:2481815

  5. Absolute Magnitudes of Pan-STARRS PS1 Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Peter; Jedicke, R.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Denneau, L.; Wainscoat, R.; Bolin, B.; PS1SC Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Absolute magnitude (H) of an asteroid is a fundamental parameter describing the size and the apparent brightness of the body. Because of its surface shape, properties and changing illumination, the brightness changes with the geometry and is described by the phase function governed by the slope parameter (G). Although many years have been spent on detailed observations of individual asteroids to provide H and G, vast majority of minor planets have H based on assumed G and due to the input photometry from multiple sources the errors of these values are unknown. We compute H of ~ 180 000 and G of few thousands asteroids observed with the Pan-STARRS PS1 telescope in well defined photometric systems. The mean photometric error is 0.04 mag. Because on average there are only 7 detections per asteroid in our sample, we employed a Monte Carlo (MC) technique to generate clones simulating all possible rotation periods, amplitudes and colors of detected asteroids. Known asteroid colors were taken from the SDSS database. We used debiased spin and amplitude distributions dependent on size, spectral class distributions of asteroids dependent on semi-major axis and starting values of G from previous works. H and G (G12 respectively) were derived by phase functions by Bowell et al. (1989) and Muinonen et al. (2010). We confirmed that there is a positive systematic offset between H based on PS1 asteroids and Minor Planet Center database up to -0.3 mag peaking at 14. Similar offset was first mentioned in the analysis of SDSS asteroids and was believed to be solved by weighting and normalizing magnitudes by observatory codes. MC shows that there is only a negligible difference between Bowell's and Muinonen's solution of H. However, Muinonen's phase function provides smaller errors on H. We also derived G and G12 for thousands of asteroids. For known spectral classes, slope parameters agree with the previous work in general, however, the standard deviation of G in our sample is twice

  6. Contribution of Gelatinase, Serine Protease, and fsr to the Pathogenesis of Enterococcus faecalis Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Engelbert, Michael; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    Gelatinase and serine protease were found to contribute in concert to pathogenesis in a rabbit model of endophthalmitis. However, a mutant defective in the fsr regulator was observed to be more attenuated than a mutant rendered defective in the expression of gelatinase and serine protease as the result of a polar transposon insertion into the former. This increased attenuation suggests that there are possible additional pleiotropic effects of the defect in fsr on expression of traits contributing to the pathogenesis of enterococcal infection. PMID:15155673

  7. Opal suppressor serine tRNAs from bovine liver form phosphoseryl-tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, D; Diamond, A; Dudock, B

    1982-01-01

    An unusual minor species of bovine liver serine tRNA has previously been isolated, sequenced, and found to suppress the UGA termination codon in protein synthesis in vitro [Diamond, A., Dudock, B. & Hatfield, D. (1981) Cell 25, 497-506]. We have now found that this tRNA can be a substrate in a specific phosphorylation reaction in which phosphoseryl-tRNA is formed. Moreover, bovine liver contains a second UGA suppressor serine tRNA (tRNASerNCA; N is a modified nucleoside) which also forms phosphoseryl-tRNA. The nucleotide sequence and coding properties of tRNASerNCA are presented. Images PMID:6815648

  8. Tau phosphorylation at serine 396 residue is required for hippocampal LTD.

    PubMed

    Regan, Philip; Piers, Thomas; Yi, Jee-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Huh, Seonghoo; Park, Se Jin; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Whitcomb, Daniel J; Cho, Kwangwook

    2015-03-25

    Tau is required for the induction of long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Here we probe the role of tau in LTD, finding that an AMPA receptor internalization mechanism is impaired in tau KO mice, and that LTD causes specific phosphorylation at the serine 396 and 404 residues of tau. Surprisingly, we find that phosphorylation at serine 396, specifically, is critical for LTD but has no role in LTP. Finally, we show that tau KO mice exhibit deficits in spatial reversal learning. These findings underscore the physiological role for tau at the synapse and identify a behavioral correlate of its role in LTD. PMID:25810511

  9. The Cryptic dsdA Gene Encodes a Functional D-Serine Dehydratase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-06-01

    D-Serine, an important neurotransmitter, also contributes to bacterial adaptation and virulence in humans. It was reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 can grow on D-serine as the sole nitrogen source, and growth was severely reduced in the dadA mutant devoid of the D-alanine dehydrogenase with broad substrate specificity. In this study, the dsdA gene (PA3357) encoding a putative D-serine dehydratase was subjected to further characterization. Growth on D-serine as the sole source of nitrogen was retained in the ∆dsdA mutant and was abolished completely in the ∆dadA and ∆dadA-∆dsdA mutants. However, when complemented by dsdA on a plasmid, the double mutant was able to grow on D-serine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, supporting the proposed biochemical function of DsdA in the conversion of D-serine into pyruvate and ammonia. Among D- and L-amino acids tested, only D-serine and D-threonine could serve as the substrates of DsdA, and the Km of DsdA with D-serine was calculated to be 330 μM. Comparative genomics revealed that this cryptic dsdA gene was highly conserved in strains of P. aeruginosa, and that most strains of Pseudomonas putida possess putative dsdCAX genes encoding a transcriptional regulator DsdC and a D-serine transporter DsdX as in enteric bacteria. In conclusion, this study supports the presence of a cryptic dsdA gene encoding a functional D-serine dehydratase in P. aeruginosa, and the absence of dsdA expression in response to exogenous D-serine might be due to the loss of regulatory elements for gene activation during evolution. PMID:26957519

  10. The Cryptic dsdA Gene Encodes a Functional D-Serine Dehydratase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-06-01

    D-Serine, an important neurotransmitter, also contributes to bacterial adaptation and virulence in humans. It was reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 can grow on D-serine as the sole nitrogen source, and growth was severely reduced in the dadA mutant devoid of the D-alanine dehydrogenase with broad substrate specificity. In this study, the dsdA gene (PA3357) encoding a putative D-serine dehydratase was subjected to further characterization. Growth on D-serine as the sole source of nitrogen was retained in the ∆dsdA mutant and was abolished completely in the ∆dadA and ∆dadA-∆dsdA mutants. However, when complemented by dsdA on a plasmid, the double mutant was able to grow on D-serine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, supporting the proposed biochemical function of DsdA in the conversion of D-serine into pyruvate and ammonia. Among D- and L-amino acids tested, only D-serine and D-threonine could serve as the substrates of DsdA, and the Km of DsdA with D-serine was calculated to be 330 μM. Comparative genomics revealed that this cryptic dsdA gene was highly conserved in strains of P. aeruginosa, and that most strains of Pseudomonas putida possess putative dsdCAX genes encoding a transcriptional regulator DsdC and a D-serine transporter DsdX as in enteric bacteria. In conclusion, this study supports the presence of a cryptic dsdA gene encoding a functional D-serine dehydratase in P. aeruginosa, and the absence of dsdA expression in response to exogenous D-serine might be due to the loss of regulatory elements for gene activation during evolution.

  11. Development and characterization of sub-100 ps photomultiplier tubes.

    PubMed

    Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Mack, J M; Young, C S; Herrmann, H W; Caldwell, S E; Evans, S C; Sedilleo, T J; Kim, Y H; McEvoy, A; Milnes, J S; Howorth, J; Davis, B; O'Gara, P M; Garza, I; Miller, E K; Stoeffl, W; Ali, Z

    2010-10-01

    We describe the evaluation of a microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT), incorporating a 3 μm pore MCP and constant voltage anode and cathode gaps. The use of the small pore size results in PMTs with response functions of the order of 85 ps full-width-half-maximum, while the constant electric field across the anode and cathode gaps produces a uniform response function over the entire operating range of the device. The PMT was characterized on a number of facilities and employed on gas Cherenkov detectors fielded on various deuterium tritium fuel (DT) implosions on the Omega Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. The Cherenkov detectors are part of diagnostic development to measure Gamma ray reaction history for DT implosions on the National Ignition Facility. PMID:21033844

  12. Sub-10ps monolithic and low-power photodetector readout

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, Gary S.; Ruckman, Larry L.

    2009-02-20

    Recent advances in photon detectors have resulted in high-density imaging arrays that offer many performance and cost advantages. In particular, the excellent transit time spread of certain devices show promise to provide tangible benefits in applications such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Meanwhile, high-density, high-performance readout techniques have not kept on pace for exploiting these developments. Photodetector readout for next generation high event rate particle identification and time-resolved PET requires a highly-integrated, low-power, and cost-effective readout technique. We propose fast waveform sampling as a method that meets these criteria and demonstrate that sub-10ps resolution can be obtained for an existing device.

  13. Development and characterization of sub-100 ps photomultiplier tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Herrmann, H. W.; Caldwell, S. E.; Evans, S. C.; Sedilleo, T. J.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Milnes, J. S.; Howorth, J.; Davis, B.; O'Gara, P. M.; Garza, I.; Miller, E. K.; Stoeffl, W.; Ali, Z.

    2010-10-15

    We describe the evaluation of a microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT), incorporating a 3 {mu}m pore MCP and constant voltage anode and cathode gaps. The use of the small pore size results in PMTs with response functions of the order of 85 ps full-width-half-maximum, while the constant electric field across the anode and cathode gaps produces a uniform response function over the entire operating range of the device. The PMT was characterized on a number of facilities and employed on gas Cherenkov detectors fielded on various deuterium tritium fuel (DT) implosions on the Omega Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. The Cherenkov detectors are part of diagnostic development to measure Gamma ray reaction history for DT implosions on the National Ignition Facility.

  14. Midinfrared Nonlinear Optical Thiophosphates from LiZnPS4 to AgZnPS4: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Molin; Kang, Lei; Yao, Jiyong; Lin, Zheshuai; Wu, Yicheng; Chen, Chuangtian

    2016-04-18

    Our earlier theoretical calculation and preliminary experiment highlighted LiZnPS4 as a good mid-infrared (mid-IR) nonlinear optical (NLO) material. However, this compound suffers from problems including corrosion of the silica tubes, a pungent smell, deliquescence, and incongruent-melting behavior in the further single crystal growth and applications. In order to overcome these problems, herein, we investigate the analogues of LiZnPS4 and propose that AgZnPS4 would be a good candidate. The combination of experimental and theoretical study demonstrates that AgZnPS4 exhibits a much stronger NLO effect than that of LiZnPS4 despite the relatively smaller energy band gap. More importantly, AgZnPS4 melts congruently with a melting point as low as 534 °C, much lower than those of traditional IR NLO crystals, and is nondeliquescent with enough stability in the air. Such a good crystal growth habit and chemical stability enable AgZnPS4 to possess much better overall performance for the practical mid-IR NLO applications. PMID:27015097

  15. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  16. Hormone interactions and regulation of Unifoliata, PsPK2, PsPIN1 and LE gene expression in pea (Pisum sativum) shoot tips.

    PubMed

    Bai, Fang; DeMason, Darleen A

    2006-07-01

    The Unifoliata (Uni) gene plays a major role in development of the compound leaf in pea, but its regulation is unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of plant hormones on the expression of Uni, PsPK2 (the gene for a pea homolog of Arabidopsis PID, a regulator of PIN1 targeting), PsPIN1 (the major gene for a putative auxin efflux carrier) and LE (a gibberellin biosynthesis gene, GA3ox), and also examined mutual hormonal regulation of these genes, in pea shoot tips, including a number of mutants. The Uni promoter possessed putative auxin and gibberellin response elements. The PsPIN1 mRNA levels were increased in afila, which replaces leaflets with branched tendrils; and reduced in tendrilless, which replaces tendrils with leaflets, compared with the wild type (WT). In contrast, mRNA levels of LE were increased in uni and tendrilless and decreased in afila compared with the WT. Uni, PsPK2 and PsPIN1 are positively regulated by gibberellin and auxin, and were induced to higher levels by simultaneous application of auxin and gibberellin. Auxin induction of Uni, PsPK2 and PsPIN1 did not require de novo protein synthesis. LE was positively regulated by auxin and cytokinin. In conclusion, these results support the hypothesis that auxin and gibberellin positively regulate Uni, which controls pea compound leaf development. Also, Uni, PsPIN1, PsPK2 and LE are expressed differentially in the leaf mutants, suggesting that mutual regulation by auxin and gibberellin promotes compound leaf development. PMID:16760220

  17. 10th anniversary of iPS cells: the challenges that lie ahead.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    In 2006, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells were generated by Yamanaka and Takahashi for the first time from a mouse fibroblast culture by introducing four factors. In the 10 years since then, this breakthrough discovery has been making waves in the fields of biology and medical science. For example, various technologies for generating iPS cells have been developed, and we have cultivated a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in reprogramming. In addition, many researchers have explored the applications of iPS cells, such as drug discovery, the study of disease mechanisms and regenerative medicine, and the development of advanced technologies for the differentiation and qualification of the cells. Furthermore, the concept of iPS cell generation has inspired a number of studies that do not use iPS cells. We herein review and discuss the past, present and future of iPS cells and their related issues.

  18. Coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems based on PS-request protocols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongwoo; Park, Suwon; Rhee, Seung Hyong; Choi, Yong-Hoon; Chung, Young-uk; Hwang, Ho Young

    2011-01-01

    We introduce both the coexistence zone within the WiMAX frame structure and a PS-Request protocol for the coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems sharing a frequency band. Because we know that the PS-Request protocol has drawbacks, we propose a revised PS-Request protocol to improve the performance. Two PS-Request protocols are based on the time division operation (TDO) of WiFi system and WiMAX system to avoid the mutual interference, and use the vestigial power management (PwrMgt) bit within the Frame Control field of the frames transmitted by a WiFi AP. The performance of the revised PS-Request protocol is evaluated by computer simulation, and compared to those of the cases without a coexistence protocol and to the original PS-Request protocol. PMID:22163721

  19. Coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems based on PS-request protocols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongwoo; Park, Suwon; Rhee, Seung Hyong; Choi, Yong-Hoon; Chung, Young-uk; Hwang, Ho Young

    2011-01-01

    We introduce both the coexistence zone within the WiMAX frame structure and a PS-Request protocol for the coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems sharing a frequency band. Because we know that the PS-Request protocol has drawbacks, we propose a revised PS-Request protocol to improve the performance. Two PS-Request protocols are based on the time division operation (TDO) of WiFi system and WiMAX system to avoid the mutual interference, and use the vestigial power management (PwrMgt) bit within the Frame Control field of the frames transmitted by a WiFi AP. The performance of the revised PS-Request protocol is evaluated by computer simulation, and compared to those of the cases without a coexistence protocol and to the original PS-Request protocol.

  20. Calibration of PS09, PS10, and PS11 trans-Alaska pipeline system strong-motion instruments, with acceleration, velocity, and displacement records of the Denali fault earthquake, 03 November 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, John R.; Jensen, E. Gray; Sell, Russell; Stephens, Christopher D.; Nyman, Douglas J.; Hamilton, Robert C.; Hager, William C.

    2006-01-01

    In September, 2003, the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company (APSC) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) embarked on a joint effort to extract, test, and calibrate the accelerometers, amplifiers, and bandpass filters from the earthquake monitoring systems (EMS) at Pump Stations 09, 10, and 11 of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). These were the three closest strong-motion seismographs to the Denali fault when it ruptured in the MW 7.9 earthquake of 03 November 2002 (22:12:41 UTC). The surface rupture is only 3.0 km from PS10 and 55.5 km from PS09 but PS11 is 124.2 km away from a small rupture splay and 126.9 km from the main trace. Here we briefly describe precision calibration results for all three instruments. Included with this report is a link to the seismograms reprocessed using these new calibrations: http://nsmp.wr.usgs.gov/data_sets/20021103_2212_taps.html Calibration information in this paper applies at the time of the Denali fault earthquake (03 November 2002), but not necessarily at other times because equipment at these stations is changed by APSC personnel at irregular intervals. In particular, the equipment at PS09, PS10, and PS11 was changed by our joint crew in September, 2003, so that we could perform these calibrations. The equipment stayed the same from at least the time of the earthquake until that retrieval, and these calibrations apply for that interval.

  1. Tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Noriko, Fujii

    2009-06-01

    Tryptophanase, an enzyme with extreme absolute stereospecificity for optically active stereoisomers, catalyzes the synthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine and indole through a beta-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type, and has no activity on d-serine. We previously reported that tryptophanase changed its stereospecificity to degrade d-tryptophan in highly concentrated diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) solution. The present study provided the same stereospecific change seen in the d-tryptophan degradation reaction also occurs in tryptophan synthesis from d-serine. Tryptophanase became active to d-serine to synthesize l-tryptophan in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate. This reaction has never been reported before. d-serine seems to undergo beta-replacement via an enzyme-bonded alpha-aminoacylate intermediate to yield l-tryptophan.

  2. Serine Metabolism Supports the Methionine Cycle and DNA/RNA Methylation through De Novo ATP Synthesis in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Oliver D.K.; Labuschagne, Christiaan F.; Adams, Peter D.; Vousden, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Crosstalk between cellular metabolism and the epigenome regulates epigenetic and metabolic homeostasis and normal cell behavior. Changes in cancer cell metabolism can directly impact epigenetic regulation and promote transformation. Here we analyzed the contribution of methionine and serine metabolism to methylation of DNA and RNA. Serine can contribute to this pathway by providing one-carbon units to regenerate methionine from homocysteine. While we observed this contribution under methionine-depleted conditions, unexpectedly, we found that serine supported the methionine cycle in the presence and absence of methionine through de novo ATP synthesis. Serine starvation increased the methionine/S-adenosyl methionine ratio, decreasing the transfer of methyl groups to DNA and RNA. While serine starvation dramatically decreased ATP levels, this was accompanied by lower AMP and did not activate AMPK. This work highlights the difference between ATP turnover and new ATP synthesis and defines a vital function of nucleotide synthesis beyond making nucleic acids. PMID:26774282

  3. The macromolecular assembly of pathogen-recognition receptors is impelled by serine proteases, via their complement control protein modules.

    PubMed

    Le Saux, Agnès; Ng, Patricia Miang Lon; Koh, Joanne Jing Yun; Low, Diana Hooi Ping; Leong, Geraldine E-Ling; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2008-03-28

    Although the innate immune response is triggered by the formation of a stable assembly of pathogen-recognition receptors (PRRs) onto the pathogens, the driving force that enables this PRR-PRR interaction is unknown. Here, we show that serine proteases, which are activated during infection, participate in associating with the PRRs. Inhibition of serine proteases gravely impairs the PRR assembly. Using yeast two-hybrid and pull-down methods, we found that two serine proteases in the horseshoe crab Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda are able to bind to the following three core members of PRRs: galactose-binding protein, Carcinolectin-5 and C-reactive protein. These two serine proteases are (1) Factor C, which activates the coagulation pathway, and (2) C2/Bf, a protein from the complement pathway. By systematic molecular dissection, we show that these serine proteases interact with the core "pathogen-recognition complex" via their complement control protein modules. PMID:18279891

  4. Serine Metabolism Supports the Methionine Cycle and DNA/RNA Methylation through De Novo ATP Synthesis in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, Oliver D K; Labuschagne, Christiaan F; Adams, Peter D; Vousden, Karen H

    2016-01-21

    Crosstalk between cellular metabolism and the epigenome regulates epigenetic and metabolic homeostasis and normal cell behavior. Changes in cancer cell metabolism can directly impact epigenetic regulation and promote transformation. Here we analyzed the contribution of methionine and serine metabolism to methylation of DNA and RNA. Serine can contribute to this pathway by providing one-carbon units to regenerate methionine from homocysteine. While we observed this contribution under methionine-depleted conditions, unexpectedly, we found that serine supported the methionine cycle in the presence and absence of methionine through de novo ATP synthesis. Serine starvation increased the methionine/S-adenosyl methionine ratio, decreasing the transfer of methyl groups to DNA and RNA. While serine starvation dramatically decreased ATP levels, this was accompanied by lower AMP and did not activate AMPK. This work highlights the difference between ATP turnover and new ATP synthesis and defines a vital function of nucleotide synthesis beyond making nucleic acids.

  5. Nickel and cobalt resistance engineered in Escherichia coli by overexpression of serine acetyltransferase from the nickel hyperaccumulator plant Thlaspi goesingense.

    PubMed

    Freeman, John L; Persans, Michael W; Nieman, Ken; Salt, David E

    2005-12-01

    The overexpression of serine acetyltransferase from the Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Thlaspi goesingense causes enhanced nickel and cobalt resistance in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, overexpression of T. goesingense serine acetyltransferase results in enhanced sensitivity to cadmium and has no significant effect on resistance to zinc. Enhanced nickel resistance is directly related to the constitutive overactivation of sulfur assimilation and glutathione biosynthesis, driven by the overproduction of O-acetyl-L-serine, the product of serine acetyltransferase and a positive regulator of the cysteine regulon. Nickel in the serine acetyltransferase-overexpressing strains is not detoxified by coordination or precipitation with sulfur, suggesting that glutathione is involved in reducing the oxidative damage imposed by nickel. PMID:16332856

  6. Nickel and Cobalt Resistance Engineered in Escherichia coli by Overexpression of Serine Acetyltransferase from the Nickel Hyperaccumulator Plant Thlaspi goesingense

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, John L.; Persans, Michael W.; Nieman, Ken; Salt, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The overexpression of serine acetyltransferase from the Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Thlaspi goesingense causes enhanced nickel and cobalt resistance in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, overexpression of T. goesingense serine acetyltransferase results in enhanced sensitivity to cadmium and has no significant effect on resistance to zinc. Enhanced nickel resistance is directly related to the constitutive overactivation of sulfur assimilation and glutathione biosynthesis, driven by the overproduction of O-acetyl-l-serine, the product of serine acetyltransferase and a positive regulator of the cysteine regulon. Nickel in the serine acetyltransferase-overexpressing strains is not detoxified by coordination or precipitation with sulfur, suggesting that glutathione is involved in reducing the oxidative damage imposed by nickel. PMID:16332856

  7. p53 Protein-mediated regulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) is crucial for the apoptotic response upon serine starvation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yang; Wang, Shang-Jui; Jiang, Le; Zheng, Bin; Gu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although p53 is frequently mutated in human cancers, about 80% of human melanomas retain wild-type p53. Here we report that PHGDH, the key metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of the serine biosynthesis pathway, is a target of p53 in human melanoma cells. p53 suppresses PHGDH expression and inhibits de novo serine biosynthesis. Notably, upon serine starvation, p53-mediated cell death is enhanced dramatically in response to Nutlin-3 treatment. Moreover, PHGDH has been found recently to be amplified frequently in human melanomas. We found that PHGDH overexpression significantly suppresses the apoptotic response, whereas RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous PHGDH promotes apoptosis under the same treatment. These results demonstrate an important role of p53 in regulating the serine biosynthesis pathway through suppressing PHGDH expression and reveal serine deprivation as a novel approach to sensitize p53-mediated apoptotic responses in human melanoma cells. PMID:25404730

  8. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  9. Importance of tetrahedral intermediate formation in the catalytic mechanism of the serine proteases chymotrypsin and subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Teodolinda; O'Donohoe, Catrina A; Howe, Nicole; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2012-08-01

    Two new inhibitors in which the terminal α-carboxyl groups of Z-Ala-Ala-Phe-COOH and Z-Ala-Pro-Phe-COOH have been replaced with a proton to give Z-Ala-Ala-Phe-H and Z-Ala-Pro-Phe-H, respectively, have been synthesized. Using these inhibitors, we estimate that for α-chymotrypsin and subtilisin Carlsberg the terminal carboxylate group decreases the level of inhibitor binding 3-4-fold while a glyoxal group increases the level of binding by 500-2000-fold. We show that at pH 7.2 the effective molarities of the catalytic hydroxyl group of the active site serine are 41000-229000 and 101000-159000 for α-chymotrypsin and subtilisin Carlsberg, respectively. It is estimated that oxyanion stabilization and the increased effective molarity of the catalytic serine hydroxyl group can account for the catalytic efficiency of the reaction. We argue that substrate binding induces the formation of a strong hydrogen bond or low-barrier hydrogen bond between histidine-57 and aspartate-102 that increases the pK(a) of the active site histidine, allowing it to be an effective general base catalyst for the formation of the tetrahedral intermediate and increasing the effective molarity of the catalytic hydroxyl group of serine-195. A catalytic mechanism for acyl intermediate formation in the serine proteases is proposed.

  10. Cloning, expression and activity analysis of a novel fibrinolytic serine protease from Arenicola cristata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunling; Ju, Jiyu

    2015-06-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (< 40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form of A. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed in E. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result suggested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clot in vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene in A. cristata.

  11. Serine Protease Catalysis: A Computational Study of Tetrahedral Intermediates and Inhibitory Adducts.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Phong D; Mansoorabadi, Steven O; Frey, Perry A

    2016-08-01

    Peptide boronic acids and peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones (TFKs) inhibit serine proteases by forming monoanionic, tetrahedral adducts to serine in the active sites. Investigators regard these adducts as analogs of monoanionic, tetrahedral intermediates. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and fractional charge analysis show that tetrahedral adducts of model peptidyl TFKs are structurally and electrostatically very similar to corresponding tetrahedral intermediates. In contrast, the DFT calculations show the structures and electrostatic properties of analogous peptide boronate adducts to be significantly different. The peptide boronates display highly electrostatically positive boron, with correspondingly negative ligands in the tetrahedra. In addition, the computed boron-oxygen and boron-carbon bond lengths in peptide boronates (which are identical or very similar to the corresponding bonds in a peptide boronate adduct of α-lytic protease determined by X-ray crystallography at subangstrom resolution) are significantly longer than the corresponding bond lengths in model tetrahedral intermediates. Since protease-peptidyl TFKs incorporate low-barrier hydrogen bonds (LBHBs) between an active site histidine and aspartate, while the protease-peptide boronates do not, these data complement the spectroscopic and chemical evidence for the participation of LBHBs in catalysis by serine proteases. Moreover, while the potency of these classes of inhibitors can be correlated to the structures of the peptide moieties, the present results indicate that the strength of their bonds to serine contribute significantly to their inhibitory properties. PMID:27387593

  12. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  13. Entamoeba dispar: genetic diversity of Iranian isolates based on serine-rich Entamoeba dispar protein gene.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, A; Rasti, S; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, E; Kazemi, B; Bandehpour, M; Nochi, Z; Hooshyar, H; Rezaian, M

    2008-12-01

    The nucleotide sequences of Serine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Protein (SREHP) gene have already exhibited stable and significant polymorphism in the gene studies. Serine-rich protein is also present and polymorphic in Entamoeba dispar which called SREDP. The polymorphism of the Serine-Rich Entamoeba dispar Protein (SREDP) gene among 8 isolates obtained from Iranian cyst carriers were analyzed by a nested PCR-RFLP followed by sequencing of the PCR products. From those isolates, six distinct DNA patterns were observed after PCR-RFLP of the nested PCR, whereas sequencing showed 8 different patterns among the isolates. The results demonstrate an extensive genetic variability among Iranian E. dispar isolates. The repeat-containing region of the SREDP was found extensively polymorphic in size, number and order of repeat units. Genetic diversity of Iranian E. dispar isolates based on the SREDP was more polymorphic in comparison of Serine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Protein (SREHP) of the E. histolytica isolates as well as were different from a few known SREDP genes.

  14. Design of activated serine-containing catalytic triads with atomic level accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Sridharan; Wang, Chu; Yu, Kai; Kuzin, Alexandre P.; Richter, Florian; Lew, Scott; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Matthews, Megan L.; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Su, Min; Hunt, John. F.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    A challenge in the computational design of enzymes is that multiple properties must be simultaneously optimized -- substrate-binding, transition state stabilization, and product release -- and this has limited the absolute activity of successful designs. Here, we focus on a single critical property of many enzymes: the nucleophilicity of an active site residue that initiates catalysis. We design proteins with idealized serine-containing catalytic triads, and assess their nucleophilicity directly in native biological systems using activity-based organophosphate probes. Crystal structures of the most successful designs show unprecedented agreement with computational models, including extensive hydrogen bonding networks between the catalytic triad (or quartet) residues, and mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that these networks are critical for serine activation and organophosphate-reactivity. Following optimization by yeast-display, the designs react with organophosphate probes at rates comparable to natural serine hydrolases. Co-crystal structures with diisopropyl fluorophosphate bound to the serine nucleophile suggest the designs could provide the basis for a new class of organophosphate captures agents. PMID:24705591

  15. Reducing the serine availability complements the inhibition of the glutamine metabolism to block leukemia cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Polet, Florence; Corbet, Cyril; Pinto, Adan; Rubio, Laila Illan; Martherus, Ruben; Bol, Vanesa; Drozak, Xavier; Grégoire, Vincent; Riant, Olivier; Feron, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia cells are described as a prototype of glucose-consuming cells with a high turnover rate. The role of glutamine in fueling the tricarboxylic acid cycle of leukemia cells was however recently identified confirming its status of major anaplerotic precursor in solid tumors. Here we examined whether glutamine metabolism could represent a therapeutic target in leukemia cells and whether resistance to this strategy could arise. We found that glutamine deprivation inhibited leukemia cell growth but also led to a glucose-independent adaptation maintaining cell survival. A proteomic study revealed that glutamine withdrawal induced the upregulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), two enzymes of the serine pathway. We further documented that both exogenous and endogenous serine were critical for leukemia cell growth and contributed to cell regrowth following glutamine deprivation. Increase in oxidative stress upon inhibition of glutamine metabolism was identified as the trigger of the upregulation of PHGDH. Finally, we showed that PHGDH silencing in vitro and the use of serine-free diet in vivo inhibited leukemia cell growth, an effect further increased when glutamine metabolism was blocked. In conclusion, this study identified serine as a key pro-survival actor that needs to be handled to sensitize leukemia cells to glutamine-targeting modalities. PMID:26625201

  16. The natural killer cell serine protease gene Lmet1 maps to mouse chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Thia, K.Y.T.; Smyth, M.J.; Jenkins, N.A.; Gilbert, D.J.; Copeland, N.G.

    1995-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes play a key role in immune responses against viruses and tumors. Lymphocyte-mediated cytolysis by both cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells is often associated with the formation of membrane lesions on target cells caused by exocytosis of cytoplasmic granule serine proteases and a pore-forming protein, perforin. A variety of granzymes have been found to reside within the cytoplasmic granules of cytotoxic lymphocytes, but unlike perforin, isolated serine proteases are not intrinsically lytic. However, a role for serine proteases in cellular cytotoxicity has been supported by the ability of protease inhibitors to completely abrogate lymphocyte cytotoxicity, and the demonstration that serine proteases can initiate DNA fragmentation in target cells transfected or pretreated with a sublytic concentration of perforin. Granzymes cloned in human, mouse, and rat encode four granzyme activities and all are expressed in either T cells, their thymic precursors, and/or NK cells. In particular, a rat granzyme that cleaves after methionine residues, but not phenylalanine residues and its human equivalent, human Met-ase 1, are unique granzymes with restricted expression in CD3-NK cells. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Role of eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases in bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manuse, Sylvie; Fleurie, Aurore; Zucchini, Laure; Lesterlin, Christian; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess a repertoire of versatile protein kinases modulating diverse aspects of their physiology by phosphorylating proteins on various amino acids including histidine, cysteine, aspartic acid, arginine, serine, threonine and tyrosine. One class of membrane serine/threonine protein kinases possesses a catalytic domain sharing a common fold with eukaryotic protein kinases and an extracellular mosaic domain found in bacteria only, named PASTA for 'Penicillin binding proteins And Serine/Threonine kinase Associated'. Over the last decade, evidence has been accumulating that these protein kinases are involved in cell division, morphogenesis and developmental processes in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. However, observations differ from one species to another suggesting that a general mechanism of activation of their kinase activity is unlikely and that species-specific regulation of cell division is at play. In this review, we survey the latest research on the structural aspects and the cellular functions of bacterial serine/threonine kinases with PASTA motifs to illustrate the diversity of the regulatory mechanisms controlling bacterial cell division and morphogenesis. PMID:26429880

  18. Molecular insights into mechanisms of lepidopteran serine proteinase resistance to natural plant defenses.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Fábio K; Terra, Walter R

    2015-11-27

    Plants have a wide range of chemical defenses against predation, including substances that target digestive serine proteinases of herbivorous. Previous works demonstrated that lepidopteran insects have digestive serine proteinases resistant to plant proteinase inhibitors (PPIs) and ketone modifications, while coleopteran ones are sensitive to those plant defenses. This paper focuses on molecular aspects that lead lepidopteran serine proteinases to PPI and ketone modification resistance. Using biochemical experiments and computer 3D modeling we demonstrated that lepidopteran trypsins are more hydrophobic than coleopteran ones, a feature associated to trypsin oligomerization and decreased inhibition by PPI. Moreover, the determination of pKa values of chymotrypsin catalytic residues obtained by TPCK modification indicates that the environment around the active site of ketone-resistant and -sensitive chymotrypsins are different. Structural analysis using resistant and sensitive chymotrypsins data allowed us to point 2 hotspot regions around the active site that could explain the observed differences. Our set of results highlights features of serine proteinases important for understanding the resistance of insects to plant chemical defenses.

  19. Sphingolipid biosynthesis in cultured neurons. Down-regulation of serine palmitoyltransferase by sphingoid bases.

    PubMed

    Mandon, E C; van Echten, G; Birk, R; Schmidt, R R; Sandhoff, K

    1991-06-15

    Addition of exogenous sphingosine homologues (D-erythro configuration) with different alkyl chain lengths (12 and 18 carbon atoms) to the medium of primary cultured cerebellar cells resulted in a decrease of serine palmitoyltransferase activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. This enzyme catalyzes the first committed step in sphingolipid biosynthesis. Half-maximal reduction of enzyme activity occurred after a 4-h treatment with 25 microM sphingoid bases. Maximal decrease (approx. 80%) was obtained after treating the cells for 4-8 h with 50 microM long-chain bases. When a biosynthetically inert sphingoid, azidosphingosine (10-50 microM), was fed to the cells, decrease of 3-ketosphinganine formation was much slower, reaching its maximum (approx. 80%) after 24 h. In contrast to D-erythro-sphingosine, L-threo-C18-sphingosine did not yield any decrease of serine palmitoyltransferase activity when added to the cells under identical experimental conditions. Decrease of serine palmitoyltransferase activity was fully reversible after removal of the long-chain bases from the culture medium. Activities of other enzymes of lipid metabolism, ceramide synthase, long-chain acyl-CoA synthase and choline phosphotransferase, were not affected by the addition of sphingoid bases, indicating that the down regulation of serine palmitoyltransferase is quite specific. PMID:1646717

  20. VANADL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF ENOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF eNOS. Zhuowei Li, Jacqueline D. Carter, Lisa A. Dailey, Joleen Soukup, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    V...

  1. VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF ENOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF eNOS.

    Zhuowei Li, Jacqueline D. Carter, Lisa A. Dailey, Joleen Soukup, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina and NHEERL, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Ca...

  2. Role of eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases in bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manuse, Sylvie; Fleurie, Aurore; Zucchini, Laure; Lesterlin, Christian; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess a repertoire of versatile protein kinases modulating diverse aspects of their physiology by phosphorylating proteins on various amino acids including histidine, cysteine, aspartic acid, arginine, serine, threonine and tyrosine. One class of membrane serine/threonine protein kinases possesses a catalytic domain sharing a common fold with eukaryotic protein kinases and an extracellular mosaic domain found in bacteria only, named PASTA for 'Penicillin binding proteins And Serine/Threonine kinase Associated'. Over the last decade, evidence has been accumulating that these protein kinases are involved in cell division, morphogenesis and developmental processes in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. However, observations differ from one species to another suggesting that a general mechanism of activation of their kinase activity is unlikely and that species-specific regulation of cell division is at play. In this review, we survey the latest research on the structural aspects and the cellular functions of bacterial serine/threonine kinases with PASTA motifs to illustrate the diversity of the regulatory mechanisms controlling bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

  3. Crystal structure of bovine duodenase, a serine protease, with dual trypsin and chymotrypsin-like specificities.

    PubMed

    Pletnev, V Z; Zamolodchikova, T S; Pangborn, W A; Duax, W L

    2000-10-01

    The three-dimensional structure of duodenase, a serine protease from bovine duodenum mucosa, has been determined at 2.4A resolution. The enzyme, which has both trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like activities, most closely resembles human cathepsin G with which it shares 57% sequence identity and similar specificity. The catalytic Ser195 in duodenase adopts the energetically favored conformation typical of serine proteinases and unlike the strained state typical of lipase/esterases. Of several waters in the active site of duodenase, the one associated with Ser214 is found in all serine proteinases and most lipase/esterases. The conservation of the Ser214 residue in serine proteinase, its presence in the active site, and participation in a hydrogen water network involving the catalytic triad (His57, Asp107, and Ser195) argues for its having an important role in the mechanism of action. It may be referred to as a fourth member of the catalytic triad. Duodenase is one of a growing family of enzymes that possesses trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like activity. Not long ago, these activities were considered to be mutually exclusive. Computer modeling reveals that the S1 subsite of duodenase has structural features compatible with effective accommodation of P1 residues typical of trypsin (Arg/Lys) and chymotrypsin (Tyr/Phe) substrates. The determination of structural features associated with functional variation in the enzyme family may permit design of enzymes with a specific ratio of trypsin and chymotrypsin activities. PMID:10944388

  4. Serine/threonine protein phosphatases: multi-purpose enzymes in control of defense mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases are a group of enzymes involved in the regulation of defense mechanisms in plants. This paper describes the effects of an inhibitor of these enzymes on the expression of all of the genes associated with these defense mechanisms. The results suggest that inhibi...

  5. Mast cells limit extracellular levels of IL-13 via a serglycin proteoglycan-serine protease axis.

    PubMed

    Waern, Ida; Karlsson, Iulia; Thorpe, Michael; Schlenner, Susan M; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Åbrink, Magnus; Hellman, Lars; Pejler, Gunnar; Wernersson, Sara

    2012-12-01

    Mast cell (MC) granules contain large amounts of proteases of the chymase, tryptase and carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) type that are stored in complex with serglycin,a proteoglycan with heparin side chains. Hence, serglycinprotease complexes are released upon MC degranulation and may influence local inflammation. Here we explored the possibility that a serglycin-protease axis may regulate levels of IL-13, a cytokine involved in allergic asthma. Indeed, we found that wild-type MCs efficiently degraded exogenous or endogenously produced IL-13 upon degranulation,whereas serglycin −/− MCs completely lacked this ability.Moreover, MC-mediated IL-13 degradation was blocked both by a serine protease inhibitor and by a heparin antagonist,which suggests that IL-13 degradation is catalyzed by serglycin-dependent serine proteases and that optimal IL-13 degradation is dependent on both the serglycin and the protease component of the serglycin-protease complex.Moreover, IL-13 degradation was abrogated in MC-CPA −/−MC cultures, but was normal in cultures of MCs with an inactivating mutation of MC-CPA, which suggests that the IL-13-degrading serine proteases rely on MC-CPA protein.Together, our data implicate a serglycin-serine protease axis in the regulation of extracellular levels of IL-13. Reduction of IL-13 levels through this mechanism possibly can provide a protective function in the context of allergic inflammation. PMID:23667909

  6. An unorthodox sensory adaptation site in the Escherichia coli serine chemoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue-Sheng; Parkinson, John S

    2014-02-01

    The serine chemoreceptor of Escherichia coli contains four canonical methylation sites for sensory adaptation that lie near intersubunit helix interfaces of the Tsr homodimer. An unexplored fifth methylation site, E502, lies at an intrasubunit helix interface closest to the HAMP domain that controls input-output signaling in methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. We analyzed, with in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) kinase assays, the serine thresholds and response cooperativities of Tsr receptors with different mutationally imposed modifications at sites 1 to 4 and/or at site 5. Tsr variants carrying E or Q at residue 502, in combination with unmodifiable D and N replacements at adaptation sites 1 to 4, underwent both methylation and demethylation/deamidation, although detection of the latter modifications required elevated intracellular levels of CheB. These Tsr variants could not mediate a chemotactic response to serine spatial gradients, demonstrating that adaptational modifications at E502 alone are not sufficient for Tsr function. Moreover, E502 is not critical for Tsr function, because only two amino acid replacements at this residue abrogated serine chemotaxis: Tsr-E502P had extreme kinase-off output and Tsr-E502I had extreme kinase-on output. These large threshold shifts are probably due to the unique HAMP-proximal location of methylation site 5. However, a methylation-mimicking glutamine at any Tsr modification site raised the serine response threshold, suggesting that all sites influence signaling by the same general mechanism, presumably through changes in packing stability of the methylation helix bundle. These findings are consistent with control of input-output signaling in Tsr through dynamic interplay of the structural stabilities of the HAMP and methylation bundles. PMID:24272777

  7. An acyltransferase catalyzing the formation of diacylglucose is a serine carboxypeptidase-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Alice X.; Steffens, John C.

    2000-01-01

    1-O-β-acyl acetals serve as activated donors in group transfer reactions involved in plant natural product biosynthesis and hormone metabolism. However, the acyltransferases that mediate transacylation from 1-O-β-acyl acetals have not been identified. We report the identification of a cDNA encoding a 1-O-β-acylglucose-dependent acyltransferase functioning in glucose polyester biosynthesis by Lycopersicon pennellii. The acyltransferase cDNA encodes a serine carboxypeptidase-like protein, with a conserved Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad. Expression of the acyltransferase cDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae conferred the ability to disproportionate 1-O-β-acylglucose to diacylglucose. The disproportionation reaction is regiospecific, catalyzing the conversion of two equivalents of 1-O-β-acylglucose to 1,2-di-O-acylglucose and glucose. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate, a transition-state analog inhibitor of serine carboxypeptidases, inhibited acyltransferase activity and covalently labeled the purified acyltransferase, suggesting the involvement of an active serine in the mechanism of the transacylation. The acyltransferase exhibits no carboxypeptidase activity; conversely, the serine carboxypeptidases we have tested show no ability to transacylate using 1-O-acyl-β-glucoses. This acyltransferase may represent one member of a broader class of enzymes recruited from proteases that have adapted a common catalytic mechanism of catabolism and modified it to accommodate a wide range of group transfer reactions used in biosynthetic reactions of secondary metabolism. The abundance of serine carboxypeptidase-like proteins in plants suggests that this motif has been used widely for metabolic functions. PMID:10829071

  8. A critical appraisal of NLO+PS matching methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank; Schönherr, Marek; Siegert, Frank

    2012-09-01

    In this publication, uncertainties in and differences between the M C@NLO and P OWHEG methods for matching next-to-leading order QCD calculations with parton showers are discussed. Implementations of both algorithms within the event generator S HERPA and based on Catani-Seymour subtraction are employed to assess the impact on a representative selection of observables. In the case of M C@NLO a substantial simplification is achieved by using dipole subtraction terms to generate the first emission. A phase space restriction is employed, which allows to vary in a transparent way the amount of non-singular radiative corrections that are exponentiated. Effects on various observables are investigated, using the production of a Higgs boson in gluon fusion, with or without an associated jet, as a benchmark process. The case of H+jet production is presented for the first time in an NLO+PS matched simulation. Uncertainties due to scale choices and non-perturbative effects are explored in the production of W ± and Z bosons in association with a jet. Corresponding results are compared to data from the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  9. The New CERN PS control system overview and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perriollat, F.; Serre, C.

    1994-12-01

    The CERN PS control system is being completely rejuvenated. The existing system, whose design options were frozen in 1978, uses 16 bit minicomputers for process computers and for conventional consoles and services. These are being replaced by the agreed CERN Standard Architecture, using UNIX workstations as operator interface and VME based processors or PC frontends, under LynxOS. All CAMAC is essentially preserved. The project covers about five years and proceeds in steps of one year. Swicht over takes place in the annual shutdown, early in each year. No interference with the machine operation schedule is tolerated and this implies that no extra machine stops are planned for controls. The first two steps have been completed and operate to the complete satisfaction of the users; the LPI (Lep Preinjector) machines run since March 92 and the Proton Linac was started in March 93. The control system of the Lead Linac is being commissioned during 93 and 94. The third step of rejuvenation concerns the Booster machine and is under implementation now. The paper describes the architecture, the techniques used, the major components and the experience gained up to the conference time.

  10. A Critical Appraisal of NLO+PS Matching Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank; Schonherr, Marek; Siegert, Frank; /Freiburg U.

    2012-03-19

    In this publication, uncertainties in and differences between the MC{at}NLO and POWHEG methods for matching next-to-leading order QCD calculations with parton showers are discussed. Implementations of both algorithms within the event generator SHERPA are employed to assess the impact on a representative selection of observables. In the MC{at}NLO approach a phase space restriction has been added to subtraction and parton shower, which allows to vary in a transparent way the amount of non-singular radiative corrections that are exponentiated. Effects on various observables are investigated, using the production of a Higgs boson in gluon fusion, with or without an associated jet, as a benchmark process. The case of H+jet production is presented for the first time in an NLO+PS matched simulation. Uncertainties due to scale choices and non-perturbative effects are explored in the production of W{sup {+-}} and Z bosons in association with a jet. Corresponding results are compared to data from the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  11. PsANT, the adenine nucleotide translocase of Puccinia striiformis, promotes cell death and fungal growth

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chunlei; Wei, Jinping; Han, Qingmei; Liu, Rui; Duan, Xiaoyuan; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Xueling; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is a constitutive mitochondrial component that is involved in ADP/ATP exchange and mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis in yeast and mammals. However, little is known about the function of ANT in pathogenic fungi. In this study, we identified an ANT gene of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), designated PsANT. The PsANT protein contains three typical conserved mitochondrion-carrier-protein (mito-carr) domains and shares more than 70% identity with its orthologs from other fungi, suggesting that ANT is conserved in fungi. Immuno-cytochemical localization confirmed the mitochondrial localization of PsANT in normal Pst hyphal cells or collapsed cells. Over-expression of PsANT indicated that PsANT promotes cell death in tobacco, wheat and fission yeast cells. Further study showed that the three mito-carr domains are all needed to induce cell death. qRT-PCR analyses revealed an in-planta induced expression of PsANT during infection. Knockdown of PsANT using a host-induced gene silencing system (HIGS) attenuated the growth and development of virulent Pst at the early infection stage but not enough to alter its pathogenicity. These results provide new insight into the function of PsANT in fungal cell death and growth and might be useful in the search for and design of novel disease control strategies. PMID:26058921

  12. Ti-PS nanocomposites by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z. J.; Tay, B. K.

    2009-02-01

    We synthesize Ti-PS nanocomposites by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) technique. Ti nanoparticles at size of 5-15 nm are found in PS matrix. We propose the formation of Ti nanoparticles as a result of the combined effect of ion implantation and ion condensation in PIII&D process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reveal that Ti atoms have three different chemical states, metal, oxide and carbide. While surface Ti atoms are oxidized, embedded Ti atoms keep their metallic states by surrounding PS matrix. We characterize optical absorbance of Ti-PS nanocomposites by UV-VIS measurements. An adsorption peak due to the excitation of localized surface plasmon is found at wavelength 337.5 nm and the fractal nature of Ti-PS nanocomposites broaden absorption wavelength from UV to infrared. In addition, we use a protein assay to measure protein immobilization. It is found that the amount of protein immobilized on Ti-PS nanocomposites is almost twice than that on pristine PS. The enhancement mechanisms are attributed to the increased surface roughness as well as covalent linkages between protein molecules and functional groups on the surface of Ti-PS nanocomposites.

  13. NASA PS400: A New Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for High Temperature Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Edmonds, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    A new solid lubricant coating, NASA PS400, has been developed for high temperature tribological applications. This plasma sprayed coating is a variant of the patented PS304 coating and has been formulated to provide higher density, smoother surface finish and better dimensional stability than PS304. PS400 is comprised of a nickel-molybdenum binder that provides strength, creep resistance and extreme oxidative and dimensional stability. Chromium oxide, silver and barium-calcium fluoride eutectic are added to the binder to form PS400.Tribological properties were evaluated with a pin-on-disk test rig in sliding contact to 650 C. Coating material samples were exposed to air, argon and vacuum at 760 C followed by cross section microscopic analysis to assess microstructure stability. Oil-Free microturbine engine hot section foil bearing tests were undertaken to assess PS400 s suitability for hot foil gas bearing applications. The preliminary results indicate that PS400 exhibits tribological characteristics comparable to the PS304 coating but with enhanced creep resistance and dimensional stability suitable for demanding, dynamic applications.

  14. 7 CFR 1753.26 - Plans and specifications (P&S).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CFR part 1792, subpart C. (e) Two sets of the building plans and specifications shall be prepared and... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Plans and specifications (P&S). 1753.26 Section 1753... Buildings § 1753.26 Plans and specifications (P&S). (a) For headquarters and commercial office...

  15. SALT spectroscopic classification of PS15bzz as a type-Ia supernova at maximum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, S. W.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Miszalski, B.

    2015-09-01

    We obtained SALT (+RSS) spectroscopy of PS15bzz on 2015 Aug 16.9 UT, covering the wavelength range 360-820 nm. Cross-correlation of the spectrum with a template library using SNID (Blondin & Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) shows PS15bzz is a type-Ia supernova within a few days of maximum light.

  16. Preliminary Evaluation of PS300: A New Self-Lubricating High Temperature Composite Coating for Use to 800 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Edmonds, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces PS300, a plasma sprayed, self-lubricating composite coating for use in sliding contacts at temperatures to 800 C. PS300 is a metal bonded chrome oxide coating with silver and BaF2/CaF2 eutectic solid lubricant additives. PS300 is similar to PS200, a chromium carbide based coating, which is currently being investigated for a variety of tribological applications. In pin-on-disk testing up to 650 C, PS300 exhibited comparable friction and wear properties to PS200. The PS300 matrix, which is predominantly chromium oxide rather than chromium carbide, does not require diamond grinding and polishes readily with silicon carbide abrasives greatly reducing manufacturing costs compared to PS200. It is anticipated that PS300 has potential for sliding bearing and seal applications in both aerospace and general industry.

  17. Inhibition of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and endothelial cell damage by l-serine and glycine.

    PubMed

    Sim, Woo-Cheol; Han, Inhoi; Lee, Wonseok; Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Kang-Yo; Kim, Dong Gwang; Jung, Seung-Hwan; Oh, Seon-Hee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases. The use of vitamins to modulate homocysteine metabolism substantially lowers the risk by reducing plasma homocysteine levels. In this study, we evaluated the effects of l-serine and related amino acids on homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and endothelial cell damage using EA.hy926 human endothelial cells. Homocysteine treatment decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis, which were reversed by cotreatment with l-serine. l-Serine inhibited homocysteine-induced ER stress as verified by decreased glucose-regulated protein 78kDa (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) expression as well as X-box binding protein 1 (xbp1) mRNA splicing. The effects of l-serine on homocysteine-induced ER stress are not attributed to intracellular homocysteine metabolism, but instead to decreased homocysteine uptake. Glycine exerted effects on homocysteine-induced ER stress, apoptosis, and cell viability that were comparable to those of l-serine. Although glycine did not affect homocysteine uptake or export, coincubation of homocysteine with glycine for 24h reduced the intracellular concentration of homocysteine. Taken together, l-serine and glycine cause homocysteine-induced endothelial cell damage by reducing the level of intracellular homocysteine. l-Serine acts by competitively inhibiting homocysteine uptake in the cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which glycine lowers homocysteine levels are unclear. PMID:27064126

  18. [Effect of ethanol on synthesis of serine and exchange of methyl groups in hepatocytes by NMR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Kholmukhamedov, E L; Teplova, V V; Johnson, C B; MacDonald, J

    2010-01-01

    The method of NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the role of voltage-dependent anion channels in the outer mitochondrial membrane in the mechanism of ethanol hepatotoxicity using the synthesis of serine and exchange of methyl groups in hepatocytes metabolizing 13C-labeled glycine. Here we present and describe a methodological approach developed for the independent monitoring of the synthesis of serine in two intracellular compartments: the cytoplasm and mitochondria of intact hepatocytes, and quantification of different serine isotopomers synthesized in hepatocytes from 13C-labeled glycine. The data obtained indicate that the treatment of cells with ethanol as well as cysteamine (specific inhibitor of mitochondrial synthesis of serine) suppressed the level of mitochondria but not cytoplasmic serine isotopomers. It is concluded that the decrease in the production of mitochondrial serine isotopomers in hepatocytes exposed to ethanol can be caused not only by decreased permeability of the outer mitochondrial membrane due to the closure of voltage-dependent anion channels and suppression of the exchange of substrates of serine synthesis in mitochondria but also by the restoration of the cytoplasmic and/or mitochondrial pool of pyridine nucleotides (NADH) during the oxidation of ethanol. Our work reveals a new mechanism of action of ethanol (alcohol intoxication) in hepatocytes through the regulation of glycine metabolism and opens new possibilities in the treatment of alcohol poisoning.

  19. Inhibition of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and endothelial cell damage by l-serine and glycine.

    PubMed

    Sim, Woo-Cheol; Han, Inhoi; Lee, Wonseok; Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Kang-Yo; Kim, Dong Gwang; Jung, Seung-Hwan; Oh, Seon-Hee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases. The use of vitamins to modulate homocysteine metabolism substantially lowers the risk by reducing plasma homocysteine levels. In this study, we evaluated the effects of l-serine and related amino acids on homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and endothelial cell damage using EA.hy926 human endothelial cells. Homocysteine treatment decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis, which were reversed by cotreatment with l-serine. l-Serine inhibited homocysteine-induced ER stress as verified by decreased glucose-regulated protein 78kDa (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) expression as well as X-box binding protein 1 (xbp1) mRNA splicing. The effects of l-serine on homocysteine-induced ER stress are not attributed to intracellular homocysteine metabolism, but instead to decreased homocysteine uptake. Glycine exerted effects on homocysteine-induced ER stress, apoptosis, and cell viability that were comparable to those of l-serine. Although glycine did not affect homocysteine uptake or export, coincubation of homocysteine with glycine for 24h reduced the intracellular concentration of homocysteine. Taken together, l-serine and glycine cause homocysteine-induced endothelial cell damage by reducing the level of intracellular homocysteine. l-Serine acts by competitively inhibiting homocysteine uptake in the cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which glycine lowers homocysteine levels are unclear.

  20. Study of mechanical properties of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polystyrene (PS) polymers and their blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Shalini; Saxena, N. S.; Agrawal, R.; Saraswat, Vibhav K.

    2013-06-01

    Presented work is an effort to observe the variation in mechanical properties of two thermoplastic materials PVC, PS and their blends. PVC and PS are taken in the ratio of 100:0, 70:30, 50:50, and 0:100. Mixing of PVC and PS is carried out by solution casting method using tetra hydro furan as solvent. Dynamical mechanical analyzer (DMA) is used to study mechanical properties. The storage modulus, loss modulus and mechanical loss factor (tan δ) are determined with temperature. The pallets of pure PS, PVC and their blends are scanned over a temperature range from room to 140 °C. The variation of modulus, tan δ of pure PVC & pure PS and their blends with temperature were studied. The observed variation in modulus and tan δ could be accounted for their thermal behavior and compositions.

  1. TG/FTIR analysis on co-pyrolysis behavior of PE, PVC and PS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingli; Chen, Tianju; Luo, Xitao; Han, Dezhi; Wang, Zhiqi; Wu, Jinhu

    2014-03-01

    The pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis behaviors of polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) under N2 atmosphere were analyzed by Thermal gravimetric/Fourier transform infrared (TG/FTIR). The volatile products were analyzed to investigate the interaction of the plastic blends during the thermal decomposition process. The TGA results showed that the thermal stability increased followed by PVC, PS and PE. The pyrolysis process of PE was enhanced when mixed with PS. However, PS was postponed when mixed with PVC. As for PE and PVC, mutual block was happened when mixed together. The FTIR results showed that the free radical of the decomposition could combine into a stable compound. When PE mixed with PVC or PS, large amount of unsaturated hydrocarbon groups existed in products while the content of alkynes was decreased. The methyl (-CH3) and methylene (-CH2-) bonds were disappeared while PVC mixed with PE.

  2. Formation of positron-atom bound states in collisions between Rydberg Ps and neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, A. R.; Cassidy, D. B.; Deller, A.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2016-05-01

    Predicted 20 years ago, positron binding to neutral atoms has not yet been observed experimentally. A scheme is proposed to detect positron-atom bound states by colliding Rydberg positronium (Ps) with neutral atoms. Estimates of the charge-transfer reaction cross section are obtained using the first Born approximation for a selection of neutral atom targets and a wide range of incident Ps energies and principal quantum numbers. We also estimate the corresponding Ps ionization cross section. The accuracy of the calculations is tested by comparison with earlier predictions for charge transfer in Ps collisions with hydrogen and antihydrogen. We describe an existing Rydberg Ps beam suitable for producing positron-atom bound states and estimate signal rates based on the calculated cross sections and realistic experimental parameters. We conclude that the proposed methodology is capable of producing such states and of testing theoretical predictions of their binding energies.

  3. Tribology and Microstructure of PS212 with a Cr2O3 Seal Coat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Benoy, Patricia A.; Korenyi-Both, Andras; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    PS212 is a plasma sprayed metal bonding chrome carbide coating with solid lubricant additives which has lubricating properties at temperatures up to about 900 deg C. The coating is diamond ground to achieve an acceptable tribological surface. But, as with many plasma spray coatings, PS212 is not fully-dense. In this study, a chromium oxide base seal coating is used in an attempt to seal any porosity that is open to the surface of the PS212 coating, and to study the effect of the sealant on the tribological properties of PS212. The results indicate that the seal coating reduces friction and wear when it is applied and then diamond ground leaving a thin layer of seal coating which fills in the surface pits of the PS212 coating.

  4. iPS cell technology-based research for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Osafune, Kenji

    2012-09-01

    Regenerative medicine strategies using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are among the candidate approaches to treat diabetic nephropathy caused by type 1 diabetes. Cell transplantation therapy and disease modeling with patient-derived iPS cells should be examined for diabetic renal disease. Considerable work already has been performed with regard to the generation of renal lineage cells from mouse embryonic stem cells, however, few reports have described research with human embryonic stem cells or iPS cells. Further elucidation of the mechanisms of kidney development and establishing the method for directed differentiation from human iPS cells into renal lineage cells will be required for the development of iPS cell technology-based treatment for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23062989

  5. iPS cell technologies: significance and applications to CNS regeneration and disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, we demonstrated that mature somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state by gene transfer, generating induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Since that time, there has been an enormous increase in interest regarding the application of iPS cell technologies to medical science, in particular for regenerative medicine and human disease modeling. In this review article, we outline the current status of applications of iPS technology to cell therapies (particularly for spinal cord injury), as well as neurological disease-specific iPS cell research (particularly for Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease). Finally, future directions of iPS cell research are discussed including a) development of an accurate assay system for disease-associated phenotypes, b) demonstration of causative relationships between genotypes and phenotypes by genome editing, c) application to sporadic and common diseases, and d) application to preemptive medicine. PMID:24685317

  6. Human prostate-specific antigen: structural and functional similarity with serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Watt, K W; Lee, P J; M'Timkulu, T; Chan, W P; Loor, R

    1986-05-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the prostate-specific antigen (PA) from human seminal plasma has been determined from analyses of the peptides generated by cyanogen bromide, hydroxylamine, endoproteinases Arg-C and Lys-C. The single polypeptide chain of PA contains 240-amino acid residues and has a calculated Mr of 26,496. An N-linked carbohydrate side chain is predicted at asparagine-45, and O-linked carbohydrate side chains are possibly attached to serine-69, threonine-70, and serine-71. The primary structure of PA shows a high degree of sequence homology with other serine proteases of the kallikrein family. The active site residues of histidine, aspartic acid, and serine comprising the charge-relay system of typical serine proteases were found in similar positions in PA (histidine-41, aspartic acid-96, and serine-192). At pH 7.8, PA hydrolyzed insulin A and B chains, recombinant interleukin 2, and--to a lesser extent--gelatin, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and fibrinogen. The cleavage sites of these proteins by PA were chemically analyzed as the alpha-carboxyl side of some hydrophobic residues, tyrosine, leucine, valine, and phenylalanine, and of basic residues histidine, lysine, and arginine. The chymotrypsin-like activity of PA exhibited with the chromogenic substrate N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide yielded a specific activity of 9.21 microM per min per mg of PA and Km and kcat values of 15.3 mM and 0.075s-1, respectively. "Trypsin-like" activity of PA was also detected with N alpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide and gave a specific activity of 1.98 microM per min per mg of PA. Protease inhibitors such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, aprotinin, leupeptin, soybean trypsin inhibitor as well as Zn2+ and spermidine were effective inhibitors of PA enzymatic activity.

  7. Serine dipeptide lipids of Porphyromonas gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation: Relationship to Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Nemati, Reza; Anstadt, Emily; Liu, Yaling; Son, Young; Zhu, Qiang; Yao, Xudong; Clark, Robert B; Rowe, David W; Nichols, Frank C

    2015-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen strongly associated with loss of attachment and supporting bone for teeth. We have previously shown that the total lipid extract of P. gingivalis inhibits osteoblast differentiation through engagement of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis engage both mouse and human TLR2. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether these serine lipids inhibit osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo and whether TLR2 engagement is involved. Osteoblasts were obtained from calvaria of wild type or TLR2 knockout mouse pups that also express the Col2.3GFP transgene. Two classes of serine dipeptide lipids, termed Lipid 654 and Lipid 430, were tested. Osteoblast differentiation was monitored by cell GFP fluorescence and osteoblast gene expression and osteoblast function was monitored as von Kossa stained mineral deposits. Osteoblast differentiation and function were evaluated in calvarial cell cultures maintained for 21 days. Lipid 654 significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation and this inhibition was dependent on TLR2 engagement. Lipid 430 also significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation but these effects were only partially attributed to engagement of TLR2. More importantly, Lipid 430 stimulated TNF-α and RANKL gene expression in wild type cells but not in TLR2 knockout cells. Finally, osteoblast cultures were observed to hydrolyze Lipid 654 to Lipid 430 and this likely occurs through elevated PLA2 activity in the cultured cells. In conclusion, our results show that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation and function at least in part through engagement of TLR2. The Lipid 430 serine class also increased the expression of genes that could increase osteoclast activity. We conclude that Lipid 654 and Lipid 430 have the potential

  8. Intron-exon organization of the active human protein S gene PS. alpha. and its pseudogene PS. beta. : Duplication and silencing during primate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ploos van Amstel, H.; Reitsma, P.H.; van der Logt, C.P.; Bertina, R.M. )

    1990-08-28

    The human protein S locus on chromosome 3 consists of two protein S genes, PS{alpha} and PS{beta}. Here the authors report the cloning and characterization of both genes. Fifteen exons of the PS{alpha} gene were identified that together code for protein S mRNA as derived from the reported protein S cDNAs. Analysis by primer extension of liver protein S mRNA, however, reveals the presence of two mRNA forms that differ in the length of their 5{prime}-noncoding region. Both transcripts contain a 5{prime}-noncoding region longer than found in the protein S cDNAs. The two products may arise from alternative splicing of an additional intron in this region or from the usage of two start sites for transcription. The intron-exon organization of the PS{alpha} gene fully supports the hypothesis that the protein S gene is the product of an evolutional assembling process in which gene modules coding for structural/functional protein units also found in other coagulation proteins have been put upstream of the ancestral gene of a steroid hormone binding protein. The PS{beta} gene is identified as a pseudogene. It contains a large variety of detrimental aberrations, viz., the absence of exon I, a splice site mutation, three stop codons, and a frame shift mutation. Overall the two genes PS{alpha} and PS{beta} show between their exonic sequences 96.5% homology. Southern analysis of primate DNA showed that the duplication of the ancestral protein S gene has occurred after the branching of the orangutan from the African apes. A nonsense mutation that is present in the pseudogene of man also could be identified in one of the two protein S genes of both chimpanzee and gorilla. This implicates that silencing of one of the two protein S genes must have taken place before the divergence of the three African apes.

  9. PsTRXh1 and PsTRXh2 Are Both Pea h-Type Thioredoxins with Antagonistic Behavior in Redox Imbalances12

    PubMed Central

    Traverso, José A.; Vignols, Florence; Cazalis, Roland; Pulido, Amada; Sahrawy, Mariam; Cejudo, Francisco Javier; Meyer, Yves; Chueca, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Thioredoxins (TRXs) are small ubiquitous oxidoreductases involved in disulfide bond reduction of a large panel of target proteins. The most complex cluster in the family of plant TRXs is formed by h-type TRXs. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), nine members of this subgroup were described, which are less well known than their plastidial counterparts. The functional study of type-h TRXs is difficult because of the high number of isoforms and their similar biochemical characteristics, thus raising the question whether they have specific or redundant functions. Type-h TRXs are involved in seed germination and self incompatibility in pollen-pistil interaction. Their function as antioxidants has recently been proposed, but further work is needed to clarify this function in plants. In this study, we describe two new h-type TRXs from pea (Pisum sativum; stated PsTRXh1 and PsTRXh2). By functional complementation of a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) trx1Δ trx2Δ double mutant, we demonstrate that PsTRXh1 is involved in the redox-imbalance control, possibly through its interaction with peroxiredoxins. In contrast, PsTRXh2 provokes a phenotype of hypersensitivity to hydrogen peroxide in the yeast mutant. Furthermore, we show differential gene expression and protein accumulation of the two isoforms, PsTRXh1 protein being abundantly detected in vascular tissue and flowers, whereas PsTRXh2 gene expression was hardly detectable. By comparison with previous data of additional PsTRXh isoforms, our results indicate specific functions for the pea h-type TRXs so far described. PMID:17098852

  10. Accumulation and Phosphorylation of RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein 1 (RMI1) at Serine 284 and Serine 292 during Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Qin; Du, Li-Qing; Fan, Saijun; Liu, Qiang; Li, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome instability usually leads to tumorigenesis. Bloom syndrome (BS) is a genetic disease associated with chromosome instability. The BS gene product, BLM, has been reported to function in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) to prevent chromosome instability. BTR complex, composed of BLM, topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα), RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1, BLAP75) and RMI2 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 2, BLAP18), is crucial for maintaining genome stability. Recent work has demonstrated that RMI2 also plays critical role in SAC. However, little is know about RMI1 regulation during the cell cycle. Here we present that RMI1 protein level does not change through G1, S and G2 phases, but significantly increases in M phase. Moreover, phosphorylation of RMI1 occurs in mitosis. Upon microtubule-disturbing agent, RMI1 is phosphorylated primarily at the sites of Serine 284 and Serine 292, which does not interfere with the formation of BTR complex. Additionally, this phosphorylation is partially reversed by roscovitine treatment, implying cycling-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) might be one of the upstream kinases. PMID:26556339

  11. Accumulation and Phosphorylation of RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein 1 (RMI1) at Serine 284 and Serine 292 during Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Qin; Du, Li-Qing; Fan, Saijun; Liu, Qiang; Li, Lei

    2015-11-04

    Chromosome instability usually leads to tumorigenesis. Bloom syndrome (BS) is a genetic disease associated with chromosome instability. The BS gene product, BLM, has been reported to function in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) to prevent chromosome instability. BTR complex, composed of BLM, topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα), RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1, BLAP75) and RMI2 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 2, BLAP18), is crucial for maintaining genome stability. Recent work has demonstrated that RMI2 also plays critical role in SAC. However, little is know about RMI1 regulation during the cell cycle. Here we present that RMI1 protein level does not change through G1, S and G2 phases, but significantly increases in M phase. Moreover, phosphorylation of RMI1 occurs in mitosis. Upon microtubule-disturbing agent, RMI1 is phosphorylated primarily at the sites of Serine 284 and Serine 292, which does not interfere with the formation of BTR complex. Additionally, this phosphorylation is partially reversed by roscovitine treatment, implying cycling-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) might be one of the upstream kinases.

  12. PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Niederman, Robert A.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Frank, Harry A.

    2015-02-07

    These funds were used for partial support of the PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems, that was held on 8-11 August, 2013, at Washington University, St. Louis, MO. This conference, held in conjunction with the 16th International Congress on Photosynthesis/St. Louis, continued a long tradition of light-harvesting satellite conferences that have been held prior to the previous six international photosynthesis congresses. In this Workshop, the basis was explored for the current interest in replacing fossil fuels with energy sources derived form direct solar radiation, coupled with light-driven electron transport in natural photosynthetic systems and how they offer a valuable blueprint for conversion of sunlight to useful energy forms. This was accomplished through sessions on the initial light-harvesting events in the biological conversion of solar energy to chemically stored energy forms, and how these natural photosynthetic processes serve as a guide to the development of robust bio-hybrid and artificial systems for solar energy conversion into both electricity or chemical fuels. Organized similar to a Gordon Research Conference, a lively, informal and collegial setting was established, highlighting the exchange of exciting new data and unpublished results from ongoing studies. A significant amount of time was set aside for open discussion and interactive poster sessions, with a special session devoted to oral presentations by talented students and postdoctoral fellows judged to have the best posters. This area of research has seen exceptionally rapid progress in recent years, with the availability of a number of antenna protein structures at atomic resolution, elucidation of the molecular surface architecture of native photosynthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy and the maturing of ultrafast spectroscopic and molecular biological techniques for the investigation and manipulation of photosynthetic systems. The conferees

  13. iPS cells to model CDKL5-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Amenduni, Mariangela; De Filippis, Roberta; Cheung, Aaron Y L; Disciglio, Vittoria; Epistolato, Maria Carmela; Ariani, Francesca; Mari, Francesca; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Hayek, Youssef; Renieri, Alessandra; Ellis, James; Meloni, Ilaria

    2011-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a progressive neurologic disorder representing one of the most common causes of mental retardation in females. To date mutations in three genes have been associated with this condition. Classic RTT is caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene, whereas variants can be due to mutations in either MECP2 or FOXG1 or CDKL5. Mutations in CDKL5 have been identified both in females with the early onset seizure variant of RTT and in males with X-linked epileptic encephalopathy. CDKL5 is a kinase protein highly expressed in neurons, but its exact function inside the cell is unknown. To address this issue we established a human cellular model for CDKL5-related disease using the recently developed technology of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs can be expanded indefinitely and differentiated in vitro into many different cell types, including neurons. These features make them the ideal tool to study disease mechanisms directly on the primarily affected neuronal cells. We derived iPSCs from fibroblasts of one female with p.Q347X and one male with p.T288I mutation, affected by early onset seizure variant and X-linked epileptic encephalopathy, respectively. We demonstrated that female CDKL5-mutated iPSCs maintain X-chromosome inactivation and clones express either the mutant CDKL5 allele or the wild-type allele that serve as an ideal experimental control. Array CGH indicates normal isogenic molecular karyotypes without detection of de novo CNVs in the CDKL5-mutated iPSCs. Furthermore, the iPS cells can be differentiated into neurons and are thus suitable to model disease pathogenesis in vitro. PMID:21750574

  14. L-serine enhances the anaerobic lactate metabolism of Veillonella dispar ATCC 17745.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, E

    1987-06-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, the rate of metabolism of lactate by starved resting cells of Veillonella dispar ATCC 17745 was very low. Because pyruvate was metabolized well by the starved cells, oxidation of lactate to pyruvate, which is the first step of the lactate metabolism, must have been limited in the cells. In the starved cells, the levels of the metabolic intermediates, oxalacetate or fumarate, of which reductions to malate or to succinate could be coupled with lactate oxidation to pyruvate and initiate lactate metabolism, were quite low, suggesting that these had been reduced during the starvation steps under strictly anaerobic conditions. Thus, the starved cells were unable to start the anaerobic lactate metabolism because of shortage of such reducible substrates. L-serine greatly enhanced anaerobic lactate metabolism of the starved cells. This enhancement may have been due to metabolism of L-serine itself and conversion to oxalacetate and fumarate, which made it possible to begin lactate oxidation.

  15. Tobacco serine/threonine protein kinase gene NrSTK enhances black shank resistance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y-L; Wang, B-W; Xu, Z-L; Li, M-Y; Song, Z-B; Li, W-Z; Li, Y-P

    2015-01-01

    A serine/threonine protein kinase gene (NrSTK) was cloned from Nicotiana repanda based on the sequence of a previously isolated resistance gene analog (RGA). Expression of RGA was induced by challenge with the pathogen black shank. The NrSTK gene was predicted to encode a protein kinase that contained an ATP binding site at residues 41-69 and a serine/threonine protein kinase activation sequence spanning the region 161-173. Overexpression of NrSTK in the susceptible tobacco variety Honghuadajinyuan significantly enhanced resistance to black shank, indicating that NrSTK plays a role in incompatibility reactions between tobacco and the pathogen. Characterization of NrSTK will help elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in black shank resistance in N. repanda.

  16. Competitive inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by p-aminobenzamidine, a serine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Venturini, G; Menegatti, E; Ascenzi, P

    1997-03-01

    p-Aminobenzamidine competitively inhibits bovine trypsin, human and bovine thrombin, and human plasmin, all of which act on substrates containing preferentially the L-arginyl side chain at their P1 position. Considering the structural and functional similarity between p-aminobenzamidine and the L-arginyl side chain in trypsin-like serine proteinases, we investigated the interaction of p-aminobenzamidine with mouse brain nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which uses L-arginine as the substrate for generating NO and L-citrulline. p-Aminobenzamidine is a competitive NOS inhibitor (Ki = 1.2 x 10(-4) M, at pH 7.5 and 37.0 degrees C), but not an NO precursor. Therefore, p-aminobenzamidine affects the NO production and the trypsin-like serine proteinase action. PMID:9125158

  17. Purification and characterization of a serine protease from Cucumis trigonus Roxburghi.

    PubMed

    Asif-Ullah, Mufti; Kim, Key-Sun; Yu, Yeon Gyu

    2006-05-01

    Kachri fruit, Cucumis trigonus Roxburghi, contains high protease activity and has been used as meat tenderizer in the Indian subcontinent. A 67 kDa serine protease from Kachri fruit was purified by DEAE-Sepharose and CM-Sepharose chromatography, whose optimum activity was at pH 11 and 70 degrees C. Its activity was strongly inhibited by PMSF, but not by EDTA, pepstatin, or cysteine protease inhibitors. The substrate specificity of the purified protease towards synthetic peptides was comparable to cucumisin, the first characterized subtilisin class plant protease from the sarcocarp of melon fruit (Cucumis melo). These characteristics, along with the N-terminal amino acid sequence, indicated that the isolated protease from Cucumis trigonus Roxburghi is a cucumisin homologue, which belongs to the serine protease family. PMID:16603211

  18. The occurrence of type S1A serine proteases in sponge and jellyfish.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Ana; Doolittle, Russell F

    2006-12-01

    Although serine proteases are found in all kinds of cellular organisms and many viruses, the classic "chymotrypsin family" (Group S1A by the 1998 Barrett nomenclature) has an unusual phylogenetic distribution, being especially common in animals, entirely absent from plants and protists, and rare among fungi. The distribution in Bacteria is largely restricted to the genus Streptomyces, although a few isolated occurrences in other bacteria have been reported. The family may be entirely absent from Archaea. Although more than a thousand sequences have been reported for enzymes of this type from animals, none of them have been from early diverging phyla like Porifera or Cnidaria. We now report the existence of Group S1A serine proteases in a sponge (phylum Porifera) and a jellyfish (phylum Cnidaria), making it safe to conclude that all animal groups possess these enzymes.

  19. The Occurrence of Type S1A Serine Proteases in Sponge and Jellyfish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojas, Ana; Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    Although serine proteases are found in all kinds of cellular organisms and many viruses, the classic "chymotrypsin family" (Group S1A by th e 1998 Barrett nomenclature) has an unusual phylogenetic distribution , being especially common in animals, entirely absent from plants and protists, and rare among fungi. The distribution in Bacteria is larg ely restricted to the genus Streptomyces, although a few isolated occ urrences in other bacteria have been reported. The family may be enti rely absent from Archaea. Although more than a thousand sequences have been reported for enzymes of this type from animals, none of them ha ve been from early diverging phyla like Porifera or Cnidaria, We now report the existence of Group SlA serine proteases in a sponge (phylu m Porifera) and a jellyfish (phylum Cnidaria), making it safe to conc lude that all animal groups possess these enzymes.

  20. A novel serine protease secreted by medicinal maggots enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; Andersen, Anders S; Nazir, Sheresma; van Tilburg, Nico H; Oestergaard, Peter R; Krogfelt, Karen A; van Dissel, Jaap T; Hensbergen, Paul J; Bertina, Rogier M; Nibbering, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. As haemostatic processes play an important role in wound healing, this study focused on the effects of maggot secretions on coagulation and fibrinolysis. The results showed that maggot secretions enhance plasminogen activator-induced formation of plasmin and fibrinolysis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By contrast, coagulation was not affected by secretions. Biochemical studies indicated that a novel serine protease within secretions, designated Sericase, cleaved plasminogen to several fragments. Recombinant Sericase degraded plasminogen leading amongst others to the formation of the mini-plasminogen like fragment Val454-plasminogen. In addition, the presence of a non-proteolytic cofactor in secretions was discovered, which plays a role in the enhancement of plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis by Sericase. We conclude from our in vitro studies that the novel serine protease Sericase, with the aid of a non-proteolytic cofactor, enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis.

  1. Serine Protease(s) Secreted by the Nematode Trichuris muris Degrade the Mucus Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, Sumaira Z.; McGuckin, Michael A.; Grencis, Richard K.; Thornton, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The polymeric mucin component of the intestinal mucus barrier changes during nematode infection to provide not only physical protection but also to directly affect pathogenic nematodes and aid expulsion. Despite this, the direct interaction of the nematodes with the mucins and the mucus barrier has not previously been addressed. We used the well-established Trichuris muris nematode model to investigate the effect on mucins of the complex mixture of immunogenic proteins secreted by the nematode called excretory/secretory products (ESPs). Different regimes of T. muris infection were used to simulate chronic (low dose) or acute (high dose) infection. Mucus/mucins isolated from mice and from the human intestinal cell line, LS174T, were treated with ESPs. We demonstrate that serine protease(s) secreted by the nematode have the ability to change the properties of the mucus barrier, making it more porous by degrading the mucin component of the mucus gel. Specifically, the serine protease(s) acted on the N-terminal polymerising domain of the major intestinal mucin Muc2, resulting in depolymerisation of Muc2 polymers. Importantly, the respiratory/gastric mucin Muc5ac, which is induced in the intestine and is critical for worm expulsion, was protected from the depolymerising effect exerted by ESPs. Furthermore, serine protease inhibitors (Serpins) which may protect the mucins, in particular Muc2, from depolymerisation, were highly expressed in mice resistant to chronic infection. Thus, we demonstrate that nematodes secrete serine protease(s) to degrade mucins within the mucus barrier, which may modify the niche of the parasite to prevent clearance from the host or facilitate efficient mating and egg laying from the posterior end of the parasite that is in intimate contact with the mucus barrier. However, during a TH2-mediated worm expulsion response, serpins, Muc5ac and increased levels of Muc2 protect the barrier from degradation by the nematode secreted protease(s). PMID

  2. Regulation of Eye Development by Protein Serine/Threonine Phosphatases-1 and -2A.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Yang, Y; Gong, X-D; Huang, Z-X; Nie, Q; Wang, Z-F; Ji, W-K; Hu, X-H; Hu, W-F; Gong, L-L; Zhang, L; Huang, S; Qi, R-L; Yang, T-H; Chen, Z-G; Liu, W-B; Liu, Y-Z; Li, D W-C

    2015-01-01

    The protein serine/threonine phosphatases-1 and -2A are major cellular phosphatases, playing a fundamental role in organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. They contribute to 90% dephosphorylation in eukaryote proteins. In the eye, both phosphatases are highly expressed and display important functions in regulating normal eye development. Moreover, they are implicated in pathogenesis through modulation of stress-induced apoptosis. Here we review the recent progresses on these aspects.

  3. The phosphorylation of serine 492 of perilipin a directs lipid droplet fragmentation and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Amy; Gauthier, Denise; Garcia, Anne; Brasaemle, Dawn L

    2006-04-28

    Perilipin A is a key regulator of triacylglycerol storage and hydrolysis in adipocytes; phosphorylation of perilipin A by protein kinase A facilitates maximal lipolysis. Chronic stimulation of lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes causes large perinuclear lipid droplets to fragment into myriad dispersed perilipin A-covered microlipid droplets. In cultured fibroblasts stably expressing ectopic perilipin A, clustered lipid droplets disperse throughout the cytoplasm upon incubation of the cells with forskolin and isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) to elevate levels of cAMP and activate protein kinase A, mirroring events observed in adipocytes. Furthermore, diethylum-belliferyl phosphate inhibits stimulated lipolysis but not the dispersion of lipid droplets, suggesting that products of lipolysis are not required for this remodeling process. We hypothesized that protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of perilipin A triggers the remodeling of lipid droplets. The mutation of serine 492 of perilipin A to alanine prevented the dispersion of clustered lipid droplets in fibroblasts stably expressing the mutated perilipin upon incubation with forskolin and IBMX. In contrast, the substitution of serines 81, 222, 276, or 433 with alanine, either singly or in combinations, did not affect the protein kinase A-mediated remodeling of lipid droplets. Interestingly, substitution of serines 433, 492, and 517 of perilipin A with glutamic acid residues blocked the dispersion of clustered lipid droplets in cells incubated with forskolin and IBMX, indicating that the addition of a negative charge does not mimic a phosphate group. We conclude that protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of serine 492 of perilipin A drives the fragmentation and dispersion of lipid droplets. PMID:16488886

  4. Regulation of Eye Development by Protein Serine/Threonine Phosphatases-1 and -2A.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Yang, Y; Gong, X-D; Huang, Z-X; Nie, Q; Wang, Z-F; Ji, W-K; Hu, X-H; Hu, W-F; Gong, L-L; Zhang, L; Huang, S; Qi, R-L; Yang, T-H; Chen, Z-G; Liu, W-B; Liu, Y-Z; Li, D W-C

    2015-01-01

    The protein serine/threonine phosphatases-1 and -2A are major cellular phosphatases, playing a fundamental role in organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. They contribute to 90% dephosphorylation in eukaryote proteins. In the eye, both phosphatases are highly expressed and display important functions in regulating normal eye development. Moreover, they are implicated in pathogenesis through modulation of stress-induced apoptosis. Here we review the recent progresses on these aspects. PMID:26592247

  5. Total synthesis of daptomycin by cyclization via a chemoselective serine ligation.

    PubMed

    Lam, Hiu Yung; Zhang, Yinfeng; Liu, Han; Xu, Jianchao; Wong, Clarence T T; Xu, Ci; Li, Xuechen

    2013-04-24

    A total synthesis of daptomycin, the first natural product antibiotic launched in a generation, was achieved. This convergent synthesis relies on an efficient macrocyclization via a serine ligation to assemble the 31-membered cyclic depsipeptide. The difficult esterification by the nonproteinogenic amino acid kynurenine was accomplished via the esterification of a threonine residue by a suitably protected Trp ester, followed by ozonolysis. This synthesis provides a foundation and framework to prepare varied analogues of daptomycin to establish its structure-activity profile.

  6. Alternaria-derived serine protease activity drives IL-33–mediated asthma exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Snelgrove, Robert J.; Gregory, Lisa G.; Peiró, Teresa; Akthar, Samia; Campbell, Gaynor A.; Walker, Simone A.; Lloyd, Clare M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The fungal allergen Alternaria alternata is implicated in severe asthma and rapid onset life-threatening exacerbations of disease. However, the mechanisms that underlie this severe pathogenicity remain unclear. Objective We sought to investigate the mechanism whereby Alternaria was capable of initiating severe, rapid onset allergic inflammation. Methods IL-33 levels were quantified in wild-type and ST2−/− mice that lacked the IL-33 receptor given inhaled house dust mite, cat dander, or Alternaria, and the effect of inhibiting allergen-specific protease activities on IL-33 levels was assessed. An exacerbation model of allergic airway disease was established whereby mice were sensitized with house dust mite before subsequently being challenged with Alternaria (with or without serine protease activity), and inflammation, remodeling, and lung function assessed 24 hours later. Results Alternaria, but not other common aeroallergens, possessed intrinsic serine protease activity that elicited the rapid release of IL-33 into the airways of mice through a mechanism that was dependent upon the activation of protease activated receptor-2 and adenosine triphosphate signaling. The unique capacity of Alternaria to drive this early IL-33 release resulted in a greater pulmonary inflammation by 24 hours after challenge relative to the common aeroallergen house dust mite. Furthermore, this Alternaria serine protease–IL-33 axis triggered a rapid, augmented inflammation, mucus release, and loss of lung function in our exacerbation model. Conclusion Alternaria-specific serine protease activity causes rapid IL-33 release, which underlies the development of a robust TH2 inflammation and exacerbation of allergic airway disease. PMID:24636086

  7. Protein serine/threonine kinases in signal transduction for secondary metabolism and morphogenesis in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Umeyama, T; Lee, P-C; Horinouchi, S

    2002-08-01

    A number of proteins in the Gram-positive bacterial genus Streptomyces are phosphorylated on their serine/threonine and tyrosine residues in response to developmental phases. AfsR is one of these proteins and acts as a transcriptional factor in both the regulation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and morphological differentiation in Streptomyces griseus. In S. coelicolor A3(2), AfsR is phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by more than three protein kinases whose kinase activity is enhanced by means of autophosphorylation on their serine and threonine residues. The degree of autophosphorylation of AfsK is regulated by KbpA which, by binding directly to the kinase domain of AfsK, inhibits its autophosphorylation. Phosphorylation of AfsR enhances its DNA-binding activity and causes it to bind the promoter elements, including -35, of afsS, thus resulting in activation of afsS transcription. ATPase activity of AfsR is essential for this transcriptional activation, probably because the energy available from ATP hydrolysis is required for the isomerization of the closed complex between AfsR and RNA polymerase to a transcriptionally competent open complex. afsS, encoding a 63-amino-acid protein, then activates transcription of actII-ORF4, a pathway-specific transcriptional activator in the actinorhodin biosynthetic gene cluster, in an as yet unknown way. Distribution of the afsK- afsR systems in a wide variety of Streptomyces species and the presence of many phosphorylated proteins in a given Streptomyces strain suggest that the signal transduction via not only two-component regulatory systems but also serine/threonine kinases generally regulates secondary metabolism and morphogenesis in this genus.

  8. An isozyme of earthworm serine proteases acts on hydrolysis of triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Sugimoto, Manabu; Tsuboi, Sadao; Tsuji, Hideaki; Ishihara, Kohji

    2005-10-01

    An enzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol was purified from an earthworm. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and the catalytic function of the purified enzyme were identical to those of Isozyme C, an isozyme of the earthworm-serine proteases. No other lipase proteins were found in the earthworm cells. The isozyme might act on the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol as well as the protein decomposition.

  9. Distribution and evolution of the serine/aspartate racemase family in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Uda, Kouji; Abe, Keita; Dehara, Yoko; Mizobata, Kiriko; Sogawa, Natsumi; Akagi, Yuki; Saigan, Mai; Radkov, Atanas D; Moe, Luke A

    2016-02-01

    Free D-amino acids have been found in various invertebrate phyla, while amino acid racemase genes have been identified in few species. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the distribution, function, and evolution of amino acid racemases in invertebrate animals. We searched the GenBank databases, and found 11 homologous serine racemase genes from eight species in eight different invertebrate phyla. The cloned genes were identified based on their maximum activity as Acropora millepora (Cnidaria) serine racemase (SerR) and aspartate racemase (AspR), Caenorhabditis elegans (Nematoda) SerR, Capitella teleta (Annelida) SerR, Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca) SerR and AspR, Dugesia japonica (Platyhelminthes) SerR, Milnesium tardigradum (Tardigrada) SerR, Penaeus monodon (Arthropoda) SerR and AspR and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinodermata) AspR. We found that Acropora, Aplysia, Capitella, Crassostrea and Penaeus had two amino acid racemase paralogous genes and these paralogous genes have evolved independently by gene duplication at their recent ancestral species. The transcriptome analyses using available SRA data and enzyme kinetic data suggested that these paralogous genes are expressed in different tissues and have different functions in vivo. Phylogenetic analyses clearly indicated that animal SerR and AspR are not separated by their particular racemase functions and form a serine/aspartate racemase family cluster. Our results revealed that SerR and AspR are more widely distributed among invertebrates than previously known. Moreover, we propose that the triple serine loop motif at amino acid positions 150-152 may be responsible for the large aspartate racemase activity and the AspR evolution from SerR. PMID:26352274

  10. Malonate-based inhibitors of mammalian serine racemase: kinetic characterization and structure-based computational study.

    PubMed

    Vorlová, Barbora; Nachtigallová, Dana; Jirásková-Vaníčková, Jana; Ajani, Haresh; Jansa, Petr; Rezáč, Jan; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Otyepka, Michal; Hobza, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Lepšík, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Overactivation of NMDA receptors has been implicated in various neuropathological conditions, including brain ischaemia, neurodegenerative disorders and epilepsy. Production of d-serine, an NMDA receptor co-agonist, from l-serine is catalyzed in vivo by the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme serine racemase. Specific inhibition of this enzyme has been proposed as a promising strategy for treatment of neurological conditions caused by NMDA receptor dysfunction. Here we present the synthesis and activity analysis of a series of malonate-based inhibitors of mouse serine racemase (mSR). The compounds possessed IC50 values ranging from 40 ± 11 mM for 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)malonate down to 57 ± 1 μM for 2,2-dichloromalonate, the most effective competitive mSR inhibitor known to date. The structure-activity relationship of the whole series in the human orthologue (hSR) was interpreted using Glide docking, WaterMap analysis of hydration and quantum mechanical calculations based on the X-ray structure of the hSR/malonate complex. Docking into the hSR active site with three thermodynamically favourable water molecules was able to discern qualitatively between good and weak inhibitors. Further improvement in ranking was obtained using advanced PM6-D3H4X/COSMO semiempirical quantum mechanics-based scoring which distinguished between the compounds with IC50 better/worse than 2 mM. We have thus not only found a new potent hSR inhibitor but also worked out a computer-assisted protocol to rationalize the binding affinity which will thus aid in search for more effective SR inhibitors. Novel, potent hSR inhibitors may represent interesting research tools as well as drug candidates for treatment of diseases associated with NMDA receptor overactivation. PMID:25462239

  11. Effect of Plant Growth Regulators on Calcium-stimulated Serine Transport into Tobacco Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ivan K.

    1978-01-01

    The transport of serine into tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cultured in liquid medium was examined. Transport was inhibited approximately 50% by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, indoleacetic acid, α-naphthalene acetic acid, and kinetin at a concentration of 10 micrograms per milliliter. Transport was not inhibited by 2,6-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and inhibited less than 25% by p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid at this concentration. Removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid from the transport medium resulted in an alleviation of inhibition. Gibberellic acid at concentrations from 2 to 20 micrograms per milliliter stimulated transport. It was previously shown that inhibition of transport by La3+ was due to removal of Ca2+ from surface sites and inhibition of Ca2+ uptake by cells. None of the growth regulators tested had any significant effect on Ca2+ binding and/or transport. A contributing factor to the low transport rates in the absence of Ca2+ is the increased rate of serine efflux. None of the growth regulators tested had any significant effect on the rate of serine efflux. PMID:16660646

  12. Quantitative Correlation of Conformational Binding Enthalpy with Substrate Specificity of Serine Proteases.

    PubMed

    Waldner, Birgit J; Fuchs, Julian E; Huber, Roland G; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Schauperl, Michael; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2016-01-21

    Members of the same protease family show different substrate specificity, even if they share identical folds, depending on the physiological processes they are part of. Here, we investigate the key factors for subpocket and global specificity of factor Xa, elastase, and granzyme B which despite all being serine proteases and sharing the chymotrypsin-fold show distinct substrate specificity profiles. We determined subpocket interaction potentials with GRID for static X-ray structures and an in silico generated ensemble of conformations. Subpocket interaction potentials determined for static X-ray structures turned out to be insufficient to explain serine protease specificity for all subpockets. Therefore, we generated conformational ensembles using molecular dynamics simulations. We identified representative binding site conformations using distance-based hierarchical agglomerative clustering and determined subpocket interaction potentials for each representative conformation of the binding site. Considering the differences in subpocket interaction potentials for these representative conformations as well as their abundance allowed us to quantitatively explain subpocket specificity for the nonprime side for all three example proteases on a molecular level. The methods to identify key regions determining subpocket specificity introduced in this study are directly applicable to other serine proteases, and the results provide starting points for new strategies in rational drug design.

  13. p38 MAPK regulates PKAα and CUB-serine protease in Amphibalanus amphitrite cyprids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gen; He, Li-Sheng; Him Wong, Yue; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The MKK3-p38 MAPK pathway has been reported to mediate larval settlement in Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite. To clarify the underlying molecular mechanism, we applied label-free proteomics to analyze changes in the proteome of cyprids treated with a p38 MAPK inhibitor. The results showed that the expression levels of 80 proteins were significantly modified (p < 0.05). These differentially expressed proteins were assigned to 15 functional groups according to the KOG database and 9 pathways were significantly enriched. Further analysis revealed that p38 MAPK might regulate the energy supply and metamorphosis. Two potential regulatory proteins, CUB-serine protease and PKAα, were both down-regulated in expression. CUB-serine protease localized to postaxial seta 2 and 3, as well as the 4 subterminal sensilla in the antennule. Importantly, it was co-localized with the neuron transmitter serotonin in the sections, suggesting that the CUB-serine protease was present in the neural system. PKAα was highly expressed during the cyprid and juvenile stages, and it was co-localized with phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) to the cement gland, suggesting that PKAα might have some functions in cement glands. Overall, p38 MAPK might regulate multiple functions in A. amphitrite cyprids, including the energy supply, metamorphosis, neural system and cement glands. PMID:26434953

  14. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Dobrinic, Paula; Macek, Boris; Franjevic, Damjan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Francoise; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD, and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells. PMID:25278935

  15. Protein-serine/threonine/tyrosine kinases in bacterial signaling and regulation.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Charlotte; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Pagot, Yves; Poncet, Sandrine; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    In this review, we address some recent developments in the field of bacterial protein phosphorylation, focusing specifically on serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. We present an overview of recent studies outlining the scope of physiological processes that are regulated by phosphorylation, ranging from cell cycle, growth, cell morphology, to metabolism, developmental phenomena, and virulence. Specific emphasis is placed on Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a showcase organism for serine/threonine kinases, and Bacillus subtilis to illustrate the importance of protein phosphorylation in developmental processes. We argue that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases have a distinctive feature of phosphorylating multiple substrates and might thus represent integration nodes in the signaling network. Some open questions regarding the evolutionary benefits of relaxed substrate selectivity of these kinases are treated, as well as the notion of nonfunctional 'background' phosphorylation of cellular proteins. We also argue that phosphorylation events for which an immediate regulatory effect is not clearly established should not be dismissed as unimportant, as they may have a role in cross-talk with other post-translational modifications. Finally, recently developed methods for studying protein phosphorylation networks in bacteria are briefly discussed.

  16. Impact of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases on the Regulation of Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Pompeo, Frédérique; Foulquier, Elodie; Galinier, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess many kinases that catalyze phosphorylation of proteins on diverse amino acids including arginine, cysteine, histidine, aspartate, serine, threonine, and tyrosine. These protein kinases regulate different physiological processes in response to environmental modifications. For example, in response to nutritional stresses, the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can differentiate into an endospore; the initiation of sporulation is controlled by the master regulator Spo0A, which is activated by phosphorylation. Spo0A phosphorylation is carried out by a multi-component phosphorelay system. These phosphorylation events on histidine and aspartate residues are labile, highly dynamic and permit a temporal control of the sporulation initiation decision. More recently, another kind of phosphorylation, more stable yet still dynamic, on serine or threonine residues, was proposed to play a role in spore maintenance and spore revival. Kinases that perform these phosphorylation events mainly belong to the Hanks family and could regulate spore dormancy and spore germination. The aim of this mini review is to focus on the regulation of sporulation in B. subtilis by these serine and threonine phosphorylation events and the kinases catalyzing them. PMID:27148245

  17. Quantitative Correlation of Conformational Binding Enthalpy with Substrate Specificity of Serine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Members of the same protease family show different substrate specificity, even if they share identical folds, depending on the physiological processes they are part of. Here, we investigate the key factors for subpocket and global specificity of factor Xa, elastase, and granzyme B which despite all being serine proteases and sharing the chymotrypsin-fold show distinct substrate specificity profiles. We determined subpocket interaction potentials with GRID for static X-ray structures and an in silico generated ensemble of conformations. Subpocket interaction potentials determined for static X-ray structures turned out to be insufficient to explain serine protease specificity for all subpockets. Therefore, we generated conformational ensembles using molecular dynamics simulations. We identified representative binding site conformations using distance-based hierarchical agglomerative clustering and determined subpocket interaction potentials for each representative conformation of the binding site. Considering the differences in subpocket interaction potentials for these representative conformations as well as their abundance allowed us to quantitatively explain subpocket specificity for the nonprime side for all three example proteases on a molecular level. The methods to identify key regions determining subpocket specificity introduced in this study are directly applicable to other serine proteases, and the results provide starting points for new strategies in rational drug design. PMID:26709959

  18. A Highly Conserved Bacterial D-Serine Uptake System Links Host Metabolism and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, James P. R.; Gabrielsen, Mads; Goldstone, Robert J.; Grinter, Rhys; Wang, Dai; Cogdell, Richard J.; Walker, Daniel; Smith, David G. E.; Roe, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of any organism to sense and respond to challenges presented in the environment is critically important for promoting or restricting colonization of specific sites. Recent work has demonstrated that the host metabolite D-serine has the ability to markedly influence the outcome of infection by repressing the type III secretion system of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in a concentration-dependent manner. However, exactly how EHEC monitors environmental D-serine is not understood. In this work, we have identified two highly conserved members of the E. coli core genome, encoding an inner membrane transporter and a transcriptional regulator, which collectively help to “sense” levels of D-serine by regulating its uptake from the environment and in turn influencing global gene expression. Both proteins are required for full expression of the type III secretion system and diversely regulated prophage-encoded effector proteins demonstrating an important infection-relevant adaptation of the core genome. We propose that this system acts as a key safety net, sampling the environment for this metabolite, thereby promoting colonization of EHEC to favorable sites within the host. PMID:26727373

  19. Artemether Exhibits Amoebicidal Activity against Acanthamoeba castellanii through Inhibition of the Serine Biosynthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yihong; Ran, Wei; Man, Suqin; Li, Xueping; Gao, Hongjian; Tang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba sp. parasites are the causative agents of Acanthamoeba keratitis, fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis, and cutaneous infections. However, there are currently no effective drugs for these organisms. Here, we evaluated the activity of the antimalarial agent artemether against Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites and identified potential targets of this agent through a proteomic approach. Artemether exhibited in vitro amoebicidal activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner and induced ultrastructural modification and cell apoptosis. The iTRAQ quantitative proteomic analysis identified 707 proteins that were differentially expressed after artemether treatment. We focused on phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and phosphoserine aminotransferase in the serine biosynthesis pathway because of their importance to the growth and proliferation of protozoan and cancer cells. The expression of these proteins in Acanthamoeba was validated using quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting after artemether treatment. The changes in the expression levels of phosphoserine aminotransferase were consistent with those of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase. Therefore, the downregulation of phosphoserine aminotransferase may be due to the downregulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase. Furthermore, exogenous serine might antagonize the activity of artemether against Acanthamoeba trophozoites. These results indicate that the serine biosynthesis pathway is important to amoeba survival and that targeting these enzymes would improve the treatment of Acanthamoeba infections. Artemether may be used as a phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase inhibitor to control or block Acanthamoeba infections. PMID:26014935

  20. Structural insights into the polypharmacological activity of quercetin on serine/threonine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Baby, Bincy; Antony, Priya; Al Halabi, Walaa; Al Homedi, Zahrah; Vijayan, Ranjit

    2016-01-01

    Polypharmacology, the discovery or design of drug molecules that can simultaneously interact with multiple targets, is gaining interest in contemporary drug discovery. Serine/threonine kinases are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in oncology due to their role in cellular phosphorylation and altered expression in cancer. Quercetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, inhibits multiple cancer cell lines and is used as an anticancer drug in Phase I clinical trial. Quercetin glycosides have also received some attention due to their high bioavailability and activity against various diseases including cancer. However, these have been studied to a lesser extent. In this study, the structural basis of the multitarget inhibitory activity of quercetin and isoquercitrin, a glycoside derivative, on serine/threonine kinases using molecular modeling was explored. Structural analysis showed that both quercetin and isoquercitrin exhibited good binding energies and interacted with aspartate in the highly conserved Asp–Phe–Gly motif. The results indicate that isoquercitrin could be a more potent inhibitor of several members of the serine/threonine kinase family. In summary, the current structural evaluation highlights the multitarget inhibitory property of quercetin and its potential to be a chemical platform for oncological polypharmacology. PMID:27729770

  1. Change in activity of serine palmitoyltransferase affects sensitivity to syringomycin E in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Toume, Moeko; Tani, Motohiro

    2014-09-01

    Syringomycin E is a cyclic lipodepsipeptide produced by strains of the plant bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Genetic studies involving the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have revealed that complex sphingolipids play important roles in the action of syringomycin E. Here, we found a novel mutation that confers resistance to syringomycin E on yeast; that is, a deletion mutant of ORM1 and ORM2, which encode negative regulators of serine palmitoyltransferase catalyzing the initial step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, exhibited resistance to syringomycin E. On the contrary, overexpression of Orm2 resulted in high sensitivity to the toxin. Moreover, overexpression of Lcb1 and Lcb2, catalytic subunits of serine palmitoyltransferase, causes resistance to the toxin, whereas partial repression of expression of Lcb1 had the opposite effect. Partial reduction of complex sphingolipids by repression of expression of Aur1, an inositol phosphorylceramide synthase, also resulted in high sensitivity to the toxin. These results suggested that an increase in sphingolipid biosynthesis caused by a change in the activity of serine palmitoyltransferase causes resistance to syringomycin E.

  2. Serine dehydratase expression decreases in rat livers injured by chronic thioacetamide ingestion.

    PubMed

    López-Flores, Inmaculada; Barroso, Juan B; Valderrama, Raquel; Esteban, Francisco J; Martínez-Lara, Esther; Luque, Francisco; Peinado, M Angeles; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Lupiáñez, José A; Peragón, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Serine dehydratase (SerDH) is a gluconeogenic enzyme involved in the catabolism of serine, which is regulated by the composition of their diet and their hormonal status in rats. This study examines how chronic injury caused to the liver of rats by the ingestion of thioacetamide (TAA) affects SerDH protein, mRNA levels, enzyme kinetics and its tissue location. After 97 days' oral intake of TAA, the activity of SerDH at all substrate concentrations assayed was about 60% lower than in controls. No significant differences in Km values were found between the treated group and controls. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry revealed a significant reduction in the level of SerDH protein in the livers of the treated rats. SerDH was detected specifically in the periportal zone of the hepatic acinus and this location did not change in response to TAA treatment. The level of SerDH mRNA, quantified by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction, was significantly lower in treated rats than in the controls. The present findings suggest that the SerDH expression is rendered to be down regulatory during chronic liver injury induced by TAA. These results enhance our understanding about the biochemical mechanisms implied in the control and integration of serine catabolism during liver injury in rat.

  3. Electron attachment to amino acid clusters in helium nanodroplets: Glycine, alanine, and serine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Denifl, S.; Märk, T. D.; Ellis, A. M.; Scheier, P.

    2010-06-01

    The first detailed study of electron attachment to amino acid clusters is reported. The amino acids chosen for investigation were glycine, alanine, and serine. Clusters of these amino acids were formed inside helium nanodroplets, which provide a convenient low temperature (0.37 K) environment for growing noncovalent clusters. When subjected to low energy (2 eV) electron impact the chemistry for glycine and alanine clusters was found to be similar. In both cases, parent cluster anions were the major products, which contrasts with the corresponding monomers in the gas phase, where the dehydrogenated products ([AAn-H]-, where AA=amino acid monomer) dominate. Serine clusters are different, with the major product being the parent anion minus an OH group, an outcome presumably conferred by the facile loss of an OH group from the β carbon of serine. In addition to the bare parent anions and various fragment anions, helium atoms are also observed attached to both the parent anion clusters and the dehydrogenated parent anion clusters. Finally, we present the first anion yield spectra of amino acid clusters from doped helium nanodroplets as a function of incident electron energy.

  4. The host metabolite D-serine contributes to bacterial niche specificity through gene selection.

    PubMed

    Connolly, James P R; Goldstone, Robert J; Burgess, Karl; Cogdell, Richard J; Beatson, Scott A; Vollmer, Waldemar; Smith, David G E; Roe, Andrew J

    2015-03-17

    Escherichia coli comprise a diverse array of both commensals and niche-specific pathotypes. The ability to cause disease results from both carriage of specific virulence factors and regulatory control of these via environmental stimuli. Moreover, host metabolites further refine the response of bacteria to their environment and can dramatically affect the outcome of the host-pathogen interaction. Here, we demonstrate that the host metabolite, D-serine, selectively affects gene expression in E. coli O157:H7. Transcriptomic profiling showed exposure to D-serine results in activation of the SOS response and suppresses expression of the Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) used to attach to host cells. We also show that concurrent carriage of both the D-serine tolerance locus (dsdCXA) and the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island encoding a T3SS is extremely rare, a genotype that we attribute to an 'evolutionary incompatibility' between the two loci. This study demonstrates the importance of co-operation between both core and pathogenic genetic elements in defining niche specificity.

  5. The host metabolite D-serine contributes to bacterial niche specificity through gene selection

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, James PR; Goldstone, Robert J; Burgess, Karl; Cogdell, Richard J; Beatson, Scott A; Vollmer, Waldemar; Smith, David GE; Roe, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli comprise a diverse array of both commensals and niche-specific pathotypes. The ability to cause disease results from both carriage of specific virulence factors and regulatory control of these via environmental stimuli. Moreover, host metabolites further refine the response of bacteria to their environment and can dramatically affect the outcome of the host–pathogen interaction. Here, we demonstrate that the host metabolite, D-serine, selectively affects gene expression in E. coli O157:H7. Transcriptomic profiling showed exposure to D-serine results in activation of the SOS response and suppresses expression of the Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) used to attach to host cells. We also show that concurrent carriage of both the D-serine tolerance locus (dsdCXA) and the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island encoding a T3SS is extremely rare, a genotype that we attribute to an ‘evolutionary incompatibility' between the two loci. This study demonstrates the importance of co-operation between both core and pathogenic genetic elements in defining niche specificity. PMID:25526369

  6. A Highly Conserved Bacterial D-Serine Uptake System Links Host Metabolism and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Connolly, James P R; Gabrielsen, Mads; Goldstone, Robert J; Grinter, Rhys; Wang, Dai; Cogdell, Richard J; Walker, Daniel; Smith, David G E; Roe, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The ability of any organism to sense and respond to challenges presented in the environment is critically important for promoting or restricting colonization of specific sites. Recent work has demonstrated that the host metabolite D-serine has the ability to markedly influence the outcome of infection by repressing the type III secretion system of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in a concentration-dependent manner. However, exactly how EHEC monitors environmental D-serine is not understood. In this work, we have identified two highly conserved members of the E. coli core genome, encoding an inner membrane transporter and a transcriptional regulator, which collectively help to "sense" levels of D-serine by regulating its uptake from the environment and in turn influencing global gene expression. Both proteins are required for full expression of the type III secretion system and diversely regulated prophage-encoded effector proteins demonstrating an important infection-relevant adaptation of the core genome. We propose that this system acts as a key safety net, sampling the environment for this metabolite, thereby promoting colonization of EHEC to favorable sites within the host.

  7. p38 MAPK regulates PKAα and CUB-serine protease in Amphibalanus amphitrite cyprids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gen; He, Li-Sheng; Him Wong, Yue; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The MKK3-p38 MAPK pathway has been reported to mediate larval settlement in Amphibalanus (=Balanus) amphitrite. To clarify the underlying molecular mechanism, we applied label-free proteomics to analyze changes in the proteome of cyprids treated with a p38 MAPK inhibitor. The results showed that the expression levels of 80 proteins were significantly modified (p < 0.05). These differentially expressed proteins were assigned to 15 functional groups according to the KOG database and 9 pathways were significantly enriched. Further analysis revealed that p38 MAPK might regulate the energy supply and metamorphosis. Two potential regulatory proteins, CUB-serine protease and PKAα, were both down-regulated in expression. CUB-serine protease localized to postaxial seta 2 and 3, as well as the 4 subterminal sensilla in the antennule. Importantly, it was co-localized with the neuron transmitter serotonin in the sections, suggesting that the CUB-serine protease was present in the neural system. PKAα was highly expressed during the cyprid and juvenile stages, and it was co-localized with phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) to the cement gland, suggesting that PKAα might have some functions in cement glands. Overall, p38 MAPK might regulate multiple functions in A. amphitrite cyprids, including the energy supply, metamorphosis, neural system and cement glands. PMID:26434953

  8. Characterization of a Mn sup 2+ -dependent membrane serine kinase that is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J. )

    1991-03-11

    It is hypothesized that the insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase may directly phosphorylate and activate one or more serine kinases. The identities of such serine kinases as well as their modes of activation are unclear. The authors have described a serine kinase from rat liver membranes that copurifies with the IR on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-sepharose. The kinase is activated after phosphorylation of the WGA-sepharose-purified fraction by casein kinase-1, casein kinase-2, or casein kinase-3. A tyrosine kinase, possibly IR tyrosine kinase, also participates in the activation process since a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor such as vanadate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, or phosphotyrosine is required in reaction mixtures for activation to be observed. By contrast, phosphoserine and phosphothreonine do not support activation. The activated kinase can use IR {beta}-subunit, myelin basic protein (MBP), and histones as substrates. IR {beta}-subunit phosphorylation was stimulated by MBP, histones, and polylysine, and inhibited by heparin and poly(glu, tyr). The kinase prefers Mn{sup 2+} over Mg{sup 2+} as a metal cofactor.

  9. Structure-Based Mechanism for Early PLP-Mediated Steps of Rabbit Cytosolic Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Di Salvo, Martino L.; Scarsdale, J. Neel; Kazanina, Galina; Contestabile, Roberto; Schirch, Verne; Wright, H. Tonie

    2013-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzes the reversible interconversion of L-serine and glycine with transfer of one-carbon groups to and from tetrahydrofolate. Active site residue Thr254 is known to be involved in the transaldimination reaction, a crucial step in the catalytic mechanism of all pyridoxal 5′-phosphate- (PLP-) dependent enzymes, which determines binding of substrates and release of products. In order to better understand the role of Thr254, we have expressed, characterized, and determined the crystal structures of rabbit cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase T254A and T254C mutant forms, in the absence and presence of substrates. These mutants accumulate a kinetically stable gem-diamine intermediate, and their crystal structures show differences in the active site with respect to wild type. The kinetic and crystallographic data acquired with mutant enzymes permit us to infer that conversion of gem-diamine to external aldimine is significantly slowed because intermediates are trapped into an anomalous position by a misorientation of the PLP ring, and a new energy barrier hampers the transaldimination reaction. This barrier likely arises from the loss of the stabilizing hydrogen bond between the hydroxymethyl group of Thr254 and the ε-amino group of active site Lys257, which stabilizes the external aldimine intermediate in wild type SHMTs. PMID:23956983

  10. Modeling and structural analysis of evolutionarily diverse S8 family serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Aparna; Rodger, Euan James; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Mandal, Chhabinath

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are an abundant class of enzymes that are involved in a wide range of physiological processes and are classified into clans sharing structural homology. The active site of the subtilisin-like clan contains a catalytic triad in the order Asp, His, Ser (S8 family) or a catalytic tetrad in the order Glu, Asp and Ser (S53 family). The core structure and active site geometry of these proteases is of interest for many applications. The aim of this study was to investigate the structural properties of different S8 family serine proteases from a diverse range of taxa using molecular modeling techniques. In conjunction with 12 experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of S8 family members, our predicted structures from an archaeon, protozoan and a plant were used for analysis of the catalytic core. Amino acid sequences were obtained from the MEROPS database and submitted to the LOOPP server for threading based structure prediction. The predicted structures were refined and validated using PROCHECK, SCRWL and MODELYN. Investigation of secondary structures and electrostatic surface potential was performed using MOLMOL. Encompassing a wide range of taxa, our structural analysis provides an evolutionary perspective on S8 family serine proteases. Focusing on the common core containing the catalytic site of the enzyme, the analysis presented here is beneficial for future molecular modeling strategies and structure-based rational drug design.

  11. Controlled rotation mechanism of DNA strand exchange by the Hin serine recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Botao; McLean, Meghan M.; Lei, Xianbin; Marko, John F.; Johnson, Reid C.

    2016-01-01

    DNA strand exchange by serine recombinases has been proposed to occur by a large-scale rotation of halves of the recombinase tetramer. Here we provide the first direct physical evidence for the subunit rotation mechanism for the Hin serine invertase. Single-DNA looping assays using an activated mutant (Hin-H107Y) reveal specific synapses between two hix sites. Two-DNA “braiding” experiments, where separate DNA molecules carrying a single hix are interwound, show that Hin-H107Y cleaves both hix sites and mediates multi-step rotational relaxation of the interwinding. The variable numbers of rotations in the DNA braid experiments are in accord with data from bulk experiments that follow DNA topological changes accompanying recombination by the hyperactive enzyme. The relatively slow Hin rotation rates, combined with pauses, indicate considerable rotary friction between synapsed subunit pairs. A rotational pausing mechanism intrinsic to serine recombinases is likely to be crucial for DNA ligation and for preventing deleterious DNA rearrangements. PMID:27032966

  12. Serine protease variants encoded by Echis ocellatus venom gland cDNA: cloning and sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Hasson, S S; Mothana, R A; Sallam, T A; Al-balushi, M S; Rahman, M T; Al-Jabri, A A

    2010-01-01

    Envenoming by Echis saw-scaled viper is the leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa due to snake bite. Despite its medical importance, there have been few investigations into the toxin composition of the venom of this viper. Here, we report the cloning of cDNA sequences encoding four groups or isoforms of the haemostasis-disruptive Serine protease proteins (SPs) from the venom glands of Echis ocellatus. All these SP sequences encoded the cysteine residues scaffold that form the 6-disulphide bonds responsible for the characteristic tertiary structure of venom serine proteases. All the Echis ocellatus EoSP groups showed varying degrees of sequence similarity to published viper venom SPs. However, these groups also showed marked intercluster sequence conservation across them which were significantly different from that of previously published viper SPs. Because viper venom SPs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity and yet exert profoundly different effects on the mammalian haemostatic system, no attempt was made to assign functionality to the new Echis ocellatus EoSPs on the basis of sequence alone. The extraordinary level of interspecific and intergeneric sequence conservation exhibited by the Echis ocellatus EoSPs and analogous serine proteases from other viper species leads us to speculate that antibodies to representative molecules should neutralise (that we will exploit, by epidermal DNA immunization) the biological function of this important group of venom toxins in vipers that are distributed throughout Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent. PMID:20936075

  13. Studies on alkaline serine protease produced by Bacillus clausii GMBE 22.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Dilek; Bal, Hulya; Denizci, Aziz Akin; Ozturk, Nurcin Celik; Ozturk, Hasan Umit; Dilgimen, Aydan Salman; Ozturk, Dilek Coskuner; Erarslan, Altan

    2009-01-01

    An alkali tolerant Bacillus strain having extracellular serine alkaline protease activity was newly isolated from compost and identified as Bacillus clausii GMBE 22. An alkaline protease (AP22) was 4.66-fold purified in 51.5% yield from Bacillus clausii GMBE 22 by ethanol precipitation and DEAE-cellulose anion exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was identified as serine protease by LC-ESI-MS analysis. Its complete inhibition by phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride (PMSF) also justified that it is a serine alkaline protease. The molecular weight of the enzyme is 25.4 kDa. Optimal temperature and pH values are 60 degrees C and 12.0, respectively. The enzyme showed highest specificity to N-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA. The K(m) and k(cat) values for hydrolysis of this substrate are 0.347 mM and 1141 min(-1) respectively. The enzyme was affected by surface active agents to varying extents. The enzyme is stable for 2 h at 30 degrees C and pH 10.5. AP22 is also stable for 5 days over the pH range 9.0-11.0 at room temperature. AP22 has good pH stability compared with the alkaline proteases belonging to other strains of Bacillus clausii reported in the literature. PMID:19431045

  14. Integration-Free iPS Cells Engineered Using Human Artificial Chromosome Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Uno, Narumi; Ueda, Kana; Kurosaki, Hajime; Imaoka, Natsuko; Kazuki, Kanako; Ueno, Etsuya; Akakura, Yutaro; Katoh, Motonobu; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Masato; Yamanaka, Shinya; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have unique characteristics as gene-delivery vectors, including episomal transmission and transfer of multiple, large transgenes. Here, we demonstrate the advantages of HAC vectors for reprogramming mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Two HAC vectors (iHAC1 and iHAC2) were constructed. Both carried four reprogramming factors, and iHAC2 also encoded a p53-knockdown cassette. iHAC1 partially reprogrammed MEFs, and iHAC2 efficiently reprogrammed MEFs. Global gene expression patterns showed that the iHACs, unlike other vectors, generated relatively uniform iPS cells. Under non-selecting conditions, we established iHAC-free iPS cells by isolating cells that spontaneously lost iHAC2. Analyses of pluripotent markers, teratomas and chimeras confirmed that these iHAC-free iPS cells were pluripotent. Moreover, iHAC-free iPS cells with a re-introduced HAC encoding Herpes Simplex virus thymidine kinase were eliminated by ganciclovir treatment, indicating that the HAC safeguard system functioned in iPS cells. Thus, the HAC vector could generate uniform, integration-free iPS cells with a built-in safeguard system. PMID:21998730

  15. An efficient compressive sensing based PS-DInSAR method for surface deformation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. T.; Xu, H. P.; Shan, L.; Liu, W.; Chen, G. Z.

    2016-11-01

    Permanent scatterers differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (PS-DInSAR) is a technique for detecting surface micro-deformation, with an accuracy at the centimeter to millimeter level. However, its performance is limited by the number of SAR images available (normally more than 20 are needed). Compressive sensing (CS) has been proven to be an effective signal recovery method with only a very limited number of measurements. Applying CS to PS-DInSAR, a novel CS-PS-DInSAR method is proposed to estimate the deformation with fewer SAR images. By analyzing the PS-DInSAR process in detail, first the sparsity representation of deformation velocity difference is obtained; then, the mathematical model of CS-PS-DInSAR is derived and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of the measurement matrix is discussed to validate the proposed CS-PS-DInSAR in theory. The implementation of CS-PS-DInSAR is achieved by employing basis pursuit algorithms to estimate the deformation velocity. With the proposed method, DInSAR deformation estimation can be achieved by a much smaller number of SAR images, as demonstrated by simulation results.

  16. Inhibition of the integrin signal constitutes a mouse iPS cell niche.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Sayaka; Yoshina, Sawako; Mitani, Shohei

    2016-09-01

    Stem cells are regulated by their surrounding microenvironments, called niche, such as cell-cell interaction and extracellular matrix. Classically, feeder cells as a niche have been used in the culture of iPS cells from both the mouse and the human. However, the regulation mechanism of stem cells by feeder cells as a niche still have been partially unclear. In this study, we used three murine iPS cell lines, iPS-MEF-Ng-20D-17, iPS-MEF-Ng-178B-5 and iPS-MEF-Fb/Ng-440A-3, which were generated by different reprogramming methods. In general, these cell lines commonly need the feeder cells as a niche to culture. Recently, the effect of substrate stiffness is known in stem cell study. First, we focused on the mechanical properties of feeder cells, and then we speculated that feeder-less culture might be made possible by using molecules in place of the mechanical properties of the niche. Finally, we found that the combination of disintegrin (echistatin) and 2i (GSK3 inhibitor and MEK inhibitor) is a sufficient condition for three murine iPS culture. This novel method of mimicking the murine iPS cell niche may be useful to understand signaling pathways to maintain the pluripotency of stem cells. PMID:27633818

  17. Evaluation of ECHO PS Positioning System in a Porcine Model of Simulated Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Erin M; Voeller, Guy R; Roth, J Scott; Scott, Jeffrey R; Gagne, Darcy H; Iannitti, David A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Operative efficiency improvements for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) have focused on reducing operative time while maintaining overall repair efficacy. Our objective was to evaluate procedure time and positioning accuracy of an inflatable mesh positioning device (Echo PS Positioning System), as compared to a standard transfascial suture technique, using a porcine model of simulated LVHR. Methods. The study population consisted of seventeen general surgeons (n = 17) that performed simulated LVHR on seventeen (n = 17) female Yorkshire pigs using two implantation techniques: (1) Ventralight ST Mesh + Echo PS Positioning System (Echo PS) and (2) Ventralight ST Mesh + transfascial sutures (TSs). Procedure time and mesh centering accuracy overtop of a simulated surgical defect were evaluated. Results. Echo PS demonstrated a 38.9% reduction in the overall procedure time, as compared to TS. During mesh preparation and positioning, Echo PS demonstrated a 60.5% reduction in procedure time (P < 0.0001). Although a trend toward improved centering accuracy was observed for Echo PS (16.2%), this was not significantly different than TS. Conclusions. Echo PS demonstrated a significant reduction in overall simulated LVHR procedure time, particularly during mesh preparation/positioning. These operative time savings may translate into reduced operating room costs and improved surgeon/operating room efficiency.

  18. Evaluation of ECHO PS Positioning System in a Porcine Model of Simulated Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Erin M.; Voeller, Guy R.; Roth, J. Scott; Scott, Jeffrey R.; Gagne, Darcy H.; Iannitti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Operative efficiency improvements for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) have focused on reducing operative time while maintaining overall repair efficacy. Our objective was to evaluate procedure time and positioning accuracy of an inflatable mesh positioning device (Echo PS Positioning System), as compared to a standard transfascial suture technique, using a porcine model of simulated LVHR. Methods. The study population consisted of seventeen general surgeons (n = 17) that performed simulated LVHR on seventeen (n = 17) female Yorkshire pigs using two implantation techniques: (1) Ventralight ST Mesh + Echo PS Positioning System (Echo PS) and (2) Ventralight ST Mesh + transfascial sutures (TSs). Procedure time and mesh centering accuracy overtop of a simulated surgical defect were evaluated. Results. Echo PS demonstrated a 38.9% reduction in the overall procedure time, as compared to TS. During mesh preparation and positioning, Echo PS demonstrated a 60.5% reduction in procedure time (P < 0.0001). Although a trend toward improved centering accuracy was observed for Echo PS (16.2%), this was not significantly different than TS. Conclusions. Echo PS demonstrated a significant reduction in overall simulated LVHR procedure time, particularly during mesh preparation/positioning. These operative time savings may translate into reduced operating room costs and improved surgeon/operating room efficiency. PMID:23762628

  19. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as potential markers of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vlagea, Alexandru; Gil, Antonio; Cuesta, Maria V; Arribas, Florencia; Diez, Jesús; Lavilla, Paz; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora

    2013-06-01

    The antiphospholipid antibodies present in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are directed at a number of phospholipid-binding proteins: β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI), prothrombin, and so on. Antibodies directed at β2GPI are accepted as a classification criterion for APS, while the presence of antiprothrombin antibodies is not. In the present article, we investigated the possible role of antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as marker of APS on a cohort of 295 individuals with APS (95 primary APS and 45 secondary APS) and APS-related diseases. We found aPS/PT to be highly associated with venous thrombosis (immunoglobulin G [IgG] aPS/PT odds ratio [OR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.97-13.92 and IgM aPS/PT OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.35-4.77) and obstetric abnormalities (IgG aPS/PT OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.04-5.43), but not with arterial thrombosis. A very high degree of concordance between the concentration of aPS/PT and lupus anticoagulant activity was demonstrated. Therefore, we support the inclusion of aPS/PT determination as second-level assay to confirm APS classification.

  20. Reprogramming in vivo produces teratomas and iPS cells with totipotency features.

    PubMed

    Abad, María; Mosteiro, Lluc; Pantoja, Cristina; Cañamero, Marta; Rayon, Teresa; Ors, Inmaculada; Graña, Osvaldo; Megías, Diego; Domínguez, Orlando; Martínez, Dolores; Manzanares, Miguel; Ortega, Sagrario; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-10-17

    Reprogramming of adult cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) has opened new therapeutic opportunities; however, little is known about the possibility of in vivo reprogramming within tissues. Here we show that transitory induction of the four factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc in mice results in teratomas emerging from multiple organs, implying that full reprogramming can occur in vivo. Analyses of the stomach, intestine, pancreas and kidney reveal groups of dedifferentiated cells that express the pluripotency marker NANOG, indicative of in situ reprogramming. By bone marrow transplantation, we demonstrate that haematopoietic cells can also be reprogrammed in vivo. Notably, reprogrammable mice present circulating iPS cells in the blood and, at the transcriptome level, these in vivo generated iPS cells are closer to embryonic stem cells (ES cells) than standard in vitro generated iPS cells. Moreover, in vivo iPS cells efficiently contribute to the trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that they achieve a more plastic or primitive state than ES cells. Finally, intraperitoneal injection of in vivo iPS cells generates embryo-like structures that express embryonic and extraembryonic markers. We conclude that reprogramming in vivo is feasible and confers totipotency features absent in standard iPS or ES cells. These discoveries could be relevant for future applications of reprogramming in regenerative medicine. PMID:24025773

  1. Reprogramming in vivo produces teratomas and iPS cells with totipotency features.

    PubMed

    Abad, María; Mosteiro, Lluc; Pantoja, Cristina; Cañamero, Marta; Rayon, Teresa; Ors, Inmaculada; Graña, Osvaldo; Megías, Diego; Domínguez, Orlando; Martínez, Dolores; Manzanares, Miguel; Ortega, Sagrario; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-10-17

    Reprogramming of adult cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) has opened new therapeutic opportunities; however, little is known about the possibility of in vivo reprogramming within tissues. Here we show that transitory induction of the four factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc in mice results in teratomas emerging from multiple organs, implying that full reprogramming can occur in vivo. Analyses of the stomach, intestine, pancreas and kidney reveal groups of dedifferentiated cells that express the pluripotency marker NANOG, indicative of in situ reprogramming. By bone marrow transplantation, we demonstrate that haematopoietic cells can also be reprogrammed in vivo. Notably, reprogrammable mice present circulating iPS cells in the blood and, at the transcriptome level, these in vivo generated iPS cells are closer to embryonic stem cells (ES cells) than standard in vitro generated iPS cells. Moreover, in vivo iPS cells efficiently contribute to the trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that they achieve a more plastic or primitive state than ES cells. Finally, intraperitoneal injection of in vivo iPS cells generates embryo-like structures that express embryonic and extraembryonic markers. We conclude that reprogramming in vivo is feasible and confers totipotency features absent in standard iPS or ES cells. These discoveries could be relevant for future applications of reprogramming in regenerative medicine.

  2. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates.

    PubMed

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A; Clifton, Ian J; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W G; Schofield, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as 'transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs. PMID:27499424

  3. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    PubMed Central

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as ‘transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs. PMID:27499424

  4. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as `transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs.

  5. Reaction of serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase with the alternative substrate ketomalonate indicates rate-limiting protonation of a quinonoid intermediate.

    PubMed

    Karsten, William E; Ohshiro, Takashi; Izumi, Yoshikazu; Cook, Paul F

    2005-12-01

    Serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (SGAT) from Hyphomicrobium methylovorum is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of L-serine and glyoxylate to hydroxypyruvate and glycine. The primary deuterium isotope effect using L-serine 2-D is one on (V/K)serine and V in the steady state. Pre-steady-state experiments also indicate that there is no primary deuterium isotope effect with L-serine 2-D. The results suggest there is no rate limitation by abstraction of the alpha proton of L-serine in the SGAT reaction. In the steady-state a solvent deuterium isotope effect of about 2 was measured on (V/K)L-serine and (V/K)ketomalonate and about 5.5 on V. Similar solvent isotope effects were observed in the pre-steady-state for the natural substrates and the alternative substrate ketomalonate. In the pre-steady-state, no reaction intermediates typical of PLP enzymes were observed with the substrates L-serine, glyoxylate, and hydroxypyruvate. The data suggest that breakdown and formation of the ketimine intermediate is the primary rate-limiting step with the natural substrates. In contrast, using the alternative substrate ketomalonate, pre-steady-state experiments display the transient formation of a 490 nm absorbing species typical of a quinonoid intermediate. The solvent isotope effect results also suggest that with ketomalonate as substrate protonation at C(alpha) is the slowest step in the SGAT reaction. This is the first report of a rate-limiting protonation of a quinonoid at C(alpha) of the external Schiff base in an aminotransferase reaction. PMID:16313196

  6. [PS2 as a prognostic factor in 1065 cases of human breast cancer. A multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Besse, G; Kwiatkowski, F; Gaillard, G; Daver, A; Dalifard, I; Basuyau, J P; Brunelle, P; Wafflart, J; Angibeau, R M; Auvray, E

    1994-04-01

    pS2 protein assay was performed with Elsa-pS2 kit (CIS-Biointernational) on a group of 1,065 patients with operable breast cancer who underwent breast surgery in the years 1982 through 1990. The median follow-up was 57 months. This group included exclusively infiltrating ductal carcinoma with primary surgery. Age mean was 58 yr; T0-T1, 33.6%; T2-T4, 66.4%; Differentiation grade I, 29%; node negative, 53%; estrogen receptor (ER) positive, 62.4%; progesterone receptor (PR) positive, 55.2%; mean tumor size, 2.4 cm; local recurrence, 5.2%; metastasis, 17.5%. pS2 values varied from 0.1 to 707 ng/mg of cytosol protein (median, 5.6; mean 24.5; 95th percentile 112 ng/mg p). There was no significant relationship between the mean level of pS2 and age, tumor size, nodal status, whereas pS2 was related to histological grade (P < 10(-3)), ER (P < 10(-5)), and PR (P < 10(-5)). By using 2 ng/mg p as pS2 cutoff, 77/391 (19.7%) of ER+PR+ tumors were pS2-, and 122/345 (35.4%) of ER-PR-tumors were pS2+; with this cutoff, a strong relationship existed between pS2 and overall survival, but not between pS2 and relapse-free survival. With Cox multivariate analysis, pS2 protein was classified after lymph node status, histological size, ER, differentiation grade, age, clinical stage, PR. In patients with axillary lymph node involvement (N+), pS2 status could discriminate between good and bad prognosis, specially for patients with small tumors (< 2 cm) and with less than seven invaded nodes. This study showed that pS2 protein was a poor prognostic factor in comparison with classical factors.

  7. Generation of iPS Cells from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Episomal Vectors.

    PubMed

    Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Neises, Amanda; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood is the easy-to-access, minimally invasive, and the most abundant cell source to use for cell reprogramming. The episomal vector is among the best approaches for generating integration-free induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells due to its simplicity and affordability. Here we describe the detailed protocol for the efficient generation of integration-free iPS cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. With this optimized protocol, one can readily generate hundreds of iPS cell colonies from 1 ml of peripheral blood.

  8. The Characteristics of Murine iPS Cells and siRNA Transfection Under Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, K; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    iPS cells are attractive for the regenerative medicine. The creation of pluripotent cells from somatic cells has great potential for basic and clinical research and application. Retroviral transduction of four or three transfection factors has been shown to initiate a reprogramming process. Here, we describe the effect of transcription factors regarding the growth and differentiation of mouse iPS cells in normoxia or hypoxia. Furthermore, we introduce the function of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in mouse iPS cells in hypoxia using RT-PCR and western blotting together with HIFs knockdown techniques.

  9. Virus-induced gene silencing of PEAM4 affects floral morphology by altering the expression pattern of PsSOC1a and PsPVP in pea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe-Hao; Jia, Fei-Fei; Hu, Jiang-Qin; Pang, Ji-Liang; Xu, Lei; Wang, Li-Lin

    2014-01-15

    pea-MADS4 (PEAM4) regulates floral morphology in Pisum sativum L., however, its molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a recently developed reverse genetic approach that facilities an easier and more rapid study of gene functions. In this study, the PEAM4 gene was effectively silenced by VIGS using a pea early browning virus (PEBV) in wild type pea JI992. The infected plants showed abnormal phenotypes, as the floral organs, especially the sepals and petals changed in both size and shape, which made the corolla less closed. The petals changed in morphology and internal symmetry with, the stamens reduced and carpel dehisced. Larger sepals and longer tendrils with small cauline leaves appeared, with some sepals turning into bracts, and secondary inflorescences with fused floral organs were formed, indicating a flower-to-inflorescence change. The infected plants also displayed a delayed and prolonged flowering time. The PEAM4-VIGS plants with altered floral morphology were similar to the pim (proliferating inflorescence meristem) mutant and also mimicked the phenotypes of ap1 mutants in Arabidopsis. The expression pattern of the homologous genes PsSOC1a and PsSVP, which were involved in flowering time and florescence morphological control downstream of PEAM4, were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and mRNA in situ hybridization. PsSOC1a and PsSVP were ectopically expressed and enhanced in the floral meristems from PEAM4-silenced plants. Our data suggests that PEAM4 may have a similar molecular mechanism as AtAP1, which inhibits the expression of PsSOC1a and PsSVP in the floral meristem from the early stages of flower development. As such, in this way PEAM4 plays a crucial role in maintaining floral organ identity and flower development in pea.

  10. Virus-induced gene silencing of PEAM4 affects floral morphology by altering the expression pattern of PsSOC1a and PsPVP in pea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe-Hao; Jia, Fei-Fei; Hu, Jiang-Qin; Pang, Ji-Liang; Xu, Lei; Wang, Li-Lin

    2014-01-15

    pea-MADS4 (PEAM4) regulates floral morphology in Pisum sativum L., however, its molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a recently developed reverse genetic approach that facilities an easier and more rapid study of gene functions. In this study, the PEAM4 gene was effectively silenced by VIGS using a pea early browning virus (PEBV) in wild type pea JI992. The infected plants showed abnormal phenotypes, as the floral organs, especially the sepals and petals changed in both size and shape, which made the corolla less closed. The petals changed in morphology and internal symmetry with, the stamens reduced and carpel dehisced. Larger sepals and longer tendrils with small cauline leaves appeared, with some sepals turning into bracts, and secondary inflorescences with fused floral organs were formed, indicating a flower-to-inflorescence change. The infected plants also displayed a delayed and prolonged flowering time. The PEAM4-VIGS plants with altered floral morphology were similar to the pim (proliferating inflorescence meristem) mutant and also mimicked the phenotypes of ap1 mutants in Arabidopsis. The expression pattern of the homologous genes PsSOC1a and PsSVP, which were involved in flowering time and florescence morphological control downstream of PEAM4, were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and mRNA in situ hybridization. PsSOC1a and PsSVP were ectopically expressed and enhanced in the floral meristems from PEAM4-silenced plants. Our data suggests that PEAM4 may have a similar molecular mechanism as AtAP1, which inhibits the expression of PsSOC1a and PsSVP in the floral meristem from the early stages of flower development. As such, in this way PEAM4 plays a crucial role in maintaining floral organ identity and flower development in pea. PMID:24331430

  11. Serine 1179 Phosphorylation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Increases Superoxide Generation and Alters Cofactor Regulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hu; Zhuang, Yugang; Harbeck, Mark C; He, Donghong; Xie, Lishi; Chen, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for maintaining systemic blood pressure, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. In addition to producing NO, eNOS can also generate superoxide (O2-.) in the absence of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Previous studies have shown that bovine eNOS serine 1179 (Serine 1177/human) phosphorylation critically modulates NO synthesis. However, the effect of serine 1179 phosphorylation on eNOS superoxide generation is unknown. Here, we used the phosphomimetic form of eNOS (S1179D) to determine the effect of S1179 phosphorylation on superoxide generating activity, and its sensitivity to regulation by BH4, Ca2+, and calmodulin (CAM). S1179D eNOS exhibited significantly increased superoxide generating activity and NADPH consumption compared to wild-type eNOS (WT eNOS). The superoxide generating activities of S1179D eNOS and WT eNOS did not differ significantly in their sensitivity to regulation by either Ca2+ or CaM. The sensitivity of the superoxide generating activity of S1179D eNOS to inhibition by BH4 was significantly reduced compared to WT eNOS. In eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells, BH4 depletion with 10mM DAHP for 48 hours followed by 50ng/ml VEGF for 30 min to phosphorylate eNOS S1179 increased ROS accumulation compared to DAHP-only treated cells. Meanwhile, MTT assay indicated that overexpression of eNOS in HEK293 cells decreased cellular viability compared to control cells at BH4 depletion condition (P<0.01). VEGF-mediated Serine 1179 phosphorylation further decreased the cellular viability in eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells (P<0.01). Our data demonstrate that eNOS serine 1179 phosphorylation, in addition to enhancing NO production, also profoundly affects superoxide generation: S1179 phosphorylation increases superoxide production while decreasing sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of BH4 on this activity. PMID:26560496

  12. Serine suppresses the motor function of a periplasmic PomB mutation in the Vibrio flagella stator.

    PubMed

    Nishikino, Tatsuro; Zhu, Shiwei; Takekawa, Norihiro; Kojima, Seiji; Onoue, Yasuhiro; Homma, Michio

    2016-05-01

    The flagellar motor of Vibrio alginolyticus is made of two parts: a stator consisting of proteins PomA and PomB, and a rotor whose main component is FliG. The interaction between FliG and PomA generates torque for flagellar rotation. Based on cross-linking experiments of double-Cys mutants of PomB, we previously proposed that a conformational change in the periplasmic region of PomB caused stator activation. Double-Cys mutants lost their motility due to an intramolecular disulfide bridge. In this study, we found that the addition of serine, a chemotactic attractant, to a PomB(L160C/I186C) mutant restored motility without cleaving the disulfide bridge. We speculate that serine changed the rotor (FliG) conformation, affecting rotational direction. Combined with the counterclockwise (CCW)-biased mutation FliG(G214S), motility of PomB(L160C/I186C) was restored without the addition of serine. Likewise, motility was restored without serine in Che(-) mutants, in either a CCW-locked or clockwise (CW)-locked strain. In contrast, in a ΔcheY (CCW-locked) strain, Vibrio (L160C/I186C) required serine to be rescued. We speculate that CheY affects stator conformation and motility restoration by serine is independent on the chemotaxis signaling pathway. PMID:27004994

  13. Unlike pregnant adult women, pregnant adolescent girls cannot maintain glycine flux during late pregnancy because of decreased synthesis from serine.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jean W; Thame, Minerva M; Gibson, Raquel; Baker, Tameka M; Tang, Grace J; Chacko, Shaji K; Jackson, Alan A; Jahoor, Farook

    2016-03-14

    During pregnancy, glycine and serine become more important because they are the primary suppliers of methyl groups for the synthesis of fetal DNA, and more glycine is required for fetal collagen synthesis as pregnancy progresses. In an earlier study, we reported that glycine flux decreased by 39% from the first to the third trimester in pregnant adolescent girls. As serine is a primary precursor for glycine synthesis, the objective of this study was to measure and compare glycine and serine fluxes and inter-conversions in pregnant adolescent girls and adult women in the first and third trimesters. Measurements were made after an overnight fast by continuous intravenous infusions of 2H2-glycine and 15N-serine in eleven adolescent girls (17·4 (se 0·1) years of age) and in ten adult women (25·8 (se 0·5) years of age) for 4 h. Adolescent girls had significantly slower glycine flux and they made less glycine from serine in the third (P<0·05) than in the first trimester. Baby birth length was significantly shorter of adolescent girls (P=0·04) and was significantly associated with third trimester glycine flux. These findings suggest that the pregnant adolescent cannot maintain glycine flux in late pregnancy compared with early pregnancy because of decreased synthesis from serine. It is possible that the inability to maintain glycine synthesis makes her fetus vulnerable to impaired cartilage synthesis, and thus linear growth.

  14. Phosphorylation of AfsR by multiple serine/threonine kinases in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Sawai, Reiko; Suzuki, Ayano; Takano, Yuji; Lee, Ping-Chin; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2004-06-01

    AfsK, a protein serine/threonine kinase, autophosphorylates on serine and threonine residues and phosphorylates serine and threonine residues of AfsR, a transcriptional activator for afsS involved in secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). pkaG encoding a 592-amino-acid protein and SCD10.09 (named afsL) encoding a 580-amino-acid protein, both of which encode an AfsK-like protein, were transcribed throughout growth. PkaG with a histidine-tag and the kinase catalytic domain of PkaG, produced in Escherichia coli, autophosphorylated dominantly on threonine and slightly on serine residues. In addition, these proteins phosphorylated AfsR on threonine and serine residues. The catalytic domain of AfsL also autophosphorylated and phosphorylated AfsR, on threonine and serine residues in both cases. AfsR was thus found to be phosphorylated by multiple kinases. Disruption of the chromosomal pkaG gene resulted in slightly reduced production of the pigmented antibiotic actinorhodin. These findings, together with the presence of about 40 AfsK homologues and at least five AfsR homologues in S. coelicolor A3(2), suggest that the regulatory networks via eukaryotic-type protein phosphorylation are more diverse and versatile than we have expected.

  15. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts.

    PubMed

    Oppert, Brenda; Martynov, Alexander G; Elpidina, Elena N

    2012-09-01

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry3Aa toxin. As digestive peptidases are a determining factor in Cry toxicity and resistance, we evaluated the expression of peptidase transcripts in the midgut of T. molitor larvae fed either a control or Cry3Aa protoxin diet for 24 h (RNA-Seq), or in larvae exposed to the protoxin for 6, 12, or 24 h (microarrays). Cysteine peptidase transcripts (9) were similar to cathepsins B, L, and K, and their expression did not vary more than 2.5-fold in control and Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Serine peptidase transcripts (48) included trypsin, chymotrypsin and chymotrypsin-like, elastase 1-like, and unclassified serine peptidases, as well as homologs lacking functional amino acids. Highly expressed trypsin and chymotrypsin transcripts were severely repressed, and most serine peptidase transcripts were expressed 2- to 15-fold lower in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Many serine peptidase and homolog transcripts were found only in control larvae. However, expression of a few serine peptidase transcripts was increased or found only in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Therefore, Bt intoxication significantly impacted the expression of serine peptidases, potentially important in protoxin processing, while the insect maintained the production of critical digestive cysteine peptidases.

  16. Phosphorylation of SAF-A/hnRNP-U Serine 59 by Polo-Like Kinase 1 Is Required for Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Morrice, Nicholas; Britton, Sébastien; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2015-08-01

    Scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), also called heterogenous nuclear ribonuclear protein U (hnRNP-U), is phosphorylated on serine 59 by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in response to DNA damage. Since SAF-A, DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), which interacts with DNA-PKcs, have all been shown to have roles in mitosis, we asked whether DNA-PKcs phosphorylates SAF-A in mitosis. We show that SAF-A is phosphorylated on serine 59 in mitosis, that phosphorylation requires polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) rather than DNA-PKcs, that SAF-A interacts with PLK1 in nocodazole-treated cells, and that serine 59 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mitosis. Moreover, cells expressing SAF-A in which serine 59 is mutated to alanine have multiple characteristics of aberrant mitoses, including misaligned chromosomes, lagging chromosomes, polylobed nuclei, and delayed passage through mitosis. Our findings identify serine 59 of SAF-A as a new target of both PLK1 and PP2A in mitosis and reveal that both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of SAF-A serine 59 by PLK1 and PP2A, respectively, are required for accurate and timely exit from mitosis.

  17. Room temperature light emission from the low-dimensional semiconductors AZrPS{sub 6} ( A = K, Rb, Cs).

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Szarko, J. M.; Yuhas, B. D.; Malliakas, C. D.; Chen, L. X.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2010-03-29

    The new semiconducting thiophosphate compounds KZrPS{sub 6}, RbZrPS{sub 6}, and CsZrPS{sub 6} exhibit red light emission at room temperature. The materials have longer photoluminescence lifetimes than most of the inorganic chalcogenide semiconductors. They can be solution processed into thin films for potential device fabrication.

  18. 2. P.S. Rittermann, Photographer February 1995 BUILDING 990, WEST SIDE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. P.S. Rittermann, Photographer February 1995 BUILDING 990, WEST SIDE. - Presidio of San Francisco, Flammable Storage Building Submarine Mine Depot, Fort Point vicinity, Long Avenue, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  19. PS-OCT of natural pigmented and nonpigmented interproximal caries lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngaotheppitak, Patara; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to image early dental caries. The purpose of this study was to compare the measured reflectivity of natural caries lesions with the mineral loss measured using digital microradiography. An all polarization-maintaining fiber based PS-OCT system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire polarization resolved images of natural white spot lesions and pigmented lesions on the smooth surfaces of extracted teeth. There was a strong positive correlation between the increase in the integrated reflectivity in the perpendicular polarization axis of the PS-OCT system and the increase in the integrated mineral loss or lesion severity for both white-spot and pigmented lesions, P <0.001. Therefore, PS-OCT is well-suited to assess the severity of natural caries lesions and resolve the internal structure of early caries lesions for the potential assessment of the lesion activity.

  20. The Photodetachment of Ps ion and Low-Energy e(+) -H Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Two calculations in the area of positron collisions are presented. The first is the calculation of the photodetachment cross section of the positronium negative ion (Ps-) using accurate variational wave functions for both the initial bound-state and the final P continuum state. The second is the calculation of partial wave cross sections for Ps(1s)-formation in ef -H(ls) collisions using the hyperspherical hidden crossing method. Since the S-wave Stiickelberg phase is close to pi, the very small S-wave Ps(1s) formation cross section can be understood in terms of destructive interference. Other examples in positron collisions are given where it is either known or expected that destructive interference is the cause of the small S-wave Ps(1s) formation cross section. In addition, examples are presented of processes in atomic physics where the Stiickelberg phase is a multiple of pi/2.

  1. Studies on the controlled morphology and wettability of PS surfaces by electrospinning or electrospraying.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianfen; He, Aihua; Han, Charles

    2007-03-01

    Electrospinning/electrospraying is a simple and effective way to fabricate various polymer surfaces such as beads, fibers and other shapes in the range of micro- to nanometer. Various surface morphologies have been produced by electrospinning or electrospraying: beads with different sizes and shapes, bead-on-string structure with different aspect ratios and fibers with different diameters and shapes. Physical properties of the PS solutions such as viscosity, surface tension and conductivity greatly influence the electrospun or electrosprayed PS morphology. The wettability of a solid surface is greatly influenced by its surface morphology: A spin-coated PS membrane has a water contact angle of 97^o, while electrospun PS membranes have water contact angles around 150^o. The most hydrophobic membrane has a water CA of 159.5^o.

  2. Development and operating characteristics of the PS132 thermal battery. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    The development and operating characterisitics of the PS132 thermal battery are described. The PS132 uses the electrochemical system Ca/LiCl-KCl eutectic-SiO2/CaCrO4, and it is one of the smallest batteries of its type ever built that can meet its electrical and environmental requirements. A development program that included construction of approximately 400 PS132-like batteries showed that obtaining acceptable DEB electrolyte-cathode powders was a major problem. Most commercial DEB powders caused excessive amounts of CaLi/sub 2/ molten metal to form in the operating thermal cells of the PS132. This molten metal then flowed from the cells and caused electrical short circuits.

  3. [Trefoil factor 1 (pS2/TFF1), a peptide with numerous functions].

    PubMed

    Mathelin, Carole; Tomasetto, Catherine; Rio, Marie-Christine

    2005-09-01

    The trefoil factor (TFF) family includes three members : TFF1 also called pS2, TFF2 or spasmolytic peptide (SP) and TFF3 or intestinal trefoil factor (ITF). TFFs are associated with mucin-secreting epithelial cells and play a crucial role in mucosal defense and healing. In case of mucosa aggression (due to bacteria, virus or medication), inflammatory diseases and ulcerous pathology, they are involved in epithelium restitution and regeneration. In comparison with the other TFFs, pS2/TFF1 has particular functions. Notably, it acts like a suppressor gene for gastric tumors. Evidence of pS2/TFF1 overexpression has been found in a range of carcinomas (breast, bowel, prostate, pancreas, thyroid, lung...). In breast cancer, pS2/TFF1 overexpression contributes to a favorable prognosis. Moreover, it is a predictive factor of hormonotherapy response.

  4. Converted Ps amplitude variations on a dipping interface: Application to receiver functions in central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, K.; Park, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    Using the delay times of Ps converted phases in receiver functions (RFs), one can estimate the depth of interfaces underneath a seismic station. One can also evaluate elastic properties at an interface from changes of Ps polarity and Ps amplitude. Ps amplitude depends primarily on the impedance contrast at an interface, but the variation of Ps amplitude on back azimuth φ and ray parameter of the incoming P wave is affected if the interface is dipping and/or anisotropic rock surrounds the interface. In this study, we estimate RFs with various back azimuths and define a 'standard amplitude' of a converted phase at a dipping interface beneath a station, based on back-azimuth dependence of the Ps amplitudes. We apply this analysis to the stations located within the Kii Peninsula, central Japan. First, we estimate the plunge azimuth of the dipping oceanic Moho beneath a station from the delay-time moveout of the Moho-converted Ps phase using the method by Park et al. (2007; AGU FM). Using the theoretical Ps arrival time evaluated from this information, we read the amplitude of RFs. Since this amplitude data shows strong scatter, we calculate an average and its standard deviation for each 5°bin, and fit a simple function constructed with sin(φ), sin(2φ) and constant harmonic terms with a least-squares algorithm. The component of sin(φ) corresponds mainly to the contribution from the dipping interface, and that of sin(2φ) indicates the strength of anisotropy near the velocity interface. At almost all stations, the sin(φ) component dominates, but 4-lobed back-azimuth dependence is clearly confirmed at several stations in the southern part of the peninsula, where strongly anisotropic rocks have been proposed by other researchers. We found that the standard amplitudes and bias components depend on oceanic-Moho depth. As the oceanic Moho deepens to ~40 km, the Ps amplitudes decrease from 13% to 6% of the primary P wave. Ps amplitudes flatten at 5-7% of the primary P

  5. APP/PS1 transgenic mice treated with aluminum: an update of Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q L; Jia, L; Jiao, X; Guo, W L; Ji, J W; Yang, H L; Niu, Q

    2012-01-01

    There is still no animal model available that can mimic all the cognitive, behavioral, biochemical, and histopathological abnormalities observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We undertook to consider the interaction between genetic factors, including amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1), and environmental factors, such as Aluminum (Al) in determining susceptibility outcomes when studying the pathogenesis of AD. In this article, we provide an AD model in APP/PS1 transgenic mice triggered by Al. The animal model was established via intracerebral ventricular microinjection of aluminum chloride once a day for 5 days in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Twenty wild type (WT) mice and 20 APP/PS1 transgenic (TG) mice were separately divided into 2 groups (control and Al group), and a stainless steel injector with stopper was used for microinjection into the left-lateral cerebral ventricle of each mouse. The Morris water maze task was used to evaluate behavioral function of learning and memory ability on the 20th day after the last injection. This AD model's brain was analyzed by: (1) amyloid beta immunohistochemical staining; (2) Tunnel staining; (3) apoptotic rates; (4) caspase-3 gene expression. Here, decrease of cognitive ability and neural cells loss were shown in APP/PS1 transgenic mice exposed to Al, which were more extensive than those in APP/PS1 TG alone and WT mice exposed to Al alone. These findings indicate that there is a close relationship between over-expression of APP and PS1 genes and Al overload. It is also suggested that APP/PS1 TG mice exposed to Al have potential value for improving AD models.

  6. 7 CFR 1753.47 - Plans and specifications (P&S).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... from the approved LD (7 CFR part 1737) must be approved by RUS (See § 1753.3). (2) The standard RUS... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Plans and specifications (P&S). 1753.47 Section 1753... Construction by Contract § 1753.47 Plans and specifications (P&S). (a) General. (1) Prior to the preparation...

  7. 7 CFR 1753.47 - Plans and specifications (P&S).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... from the approved LD (7 CFR part 1737) must be approved by RUS (See § 1753.3). (2) The standard RUS... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Plans and specifications (P&S). 1753.47 Section 1753... Construction by Contract § 1753.47 Plans and specifications (P&S). (a) General. (1) Prior to the preparation...

  8. 7 CFR 1753.47 - Plans and specifications (P&S).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... from the approved LD (7 CFR part 1737) must be approved by RUS (See § 1753.3). (2) The standard RUS... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Plans and specifications (P&S). 1753.47 Section 1753... Construction by Contract § 1753.47 Plans and specifications (P&S). (a) General. (1) Prior to the preparation...

  9. 7 CFR 1753.47 - Plans and specifications (P&S).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... from the approved LD (7 CFR part 1737) must be approved by RUS (See § 1753.3). (2) The standard RUS... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Plans and specifications (P&S). 1753.47 Section 1753... Construction by Contract § 1753.47 Plans and specifications (P&S). (a) General. (1) Prior to the preparation...

  10. E-Cloud Drivent Single-Bunch Instabilities in PS2

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Furman, M.; Penn, G.; Secondo, R.; Vay, J-L.; De Maria, R.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Rumolo, G.

    2010-05-23

    One of the proposals under consideration for future upgrades of the LHC injector complex entails the replacement of the PS with the PS2, a longer circumference and higher energy synchrotron, with electron cloud effects representing a potentially serious limitation to the achievement of the upgrade goals. We report on ongoing numerical studies aiming at estimating the e-cloud density threshold for the occurrence of single bunch instabilities.

  11. Perceptions of Community Health Workers (CHWs/PS) in the U.S.-Mexico border HEART CVD study.

    PubMed

    Balcazar, Hector G; Wise, Sherrie; Redelfs, Alisha; Rosenthal, E Lee; de Heer, Hendrik D; Burgos, Ximena; Duarte-Gardea, Maria

    2014-02-01

    Although prior research has shown that Community Health Workers/Promotores de Salud (CHW/PS) can facilitate access to care, little is known about how CHW/PS are perceived in their community. The current study reports the findings of a randomized telephone survey conducted in a high-risk urban community environment along the U.S.-Mexico border. In preparation for a community-based CHW/PS intervention called the HEART ecological study, the survey aimed to assess perceptions of CHW/PS, availability and utilization of community resources (recreational and nutrition related) and health behaviors and intentions. A total of 7,155 calls were placed to complete 444 surveys in three zip codes in El Paso, Texas. Results showed that participants felt that healthful community resources were available, but utilization was low and variable: 35% reported going to a park, 20% reported having taken a health class, few reported using a gym (12%), recreation center (8%), or YMCA/YWCA (0.9%). Awareness and utilization of CHW/PS services were low: 20% of respondents had heard of CHW/PS, with 8% reporting previous exposure to CHW/PS services. Upon review of a definition of CHW/PS, respondents expressed positive views of CHW/PS and their value in the healthcare system. Respondents who had previous contact with a CHW/PS reported a significantly more positive perception of the usefulness of CHW/PS (p = 0.006), were more likely to see CHW/PS as an important link between providers and patients (p = 0.008), and were more likely to ask a CHW/PS for help (p = 0.009). Participants who utilized CHW/PS services also had significantly healthier intentions to reduce fast food intake. Future research is needed to evaluate if CHW/PS can facilitate utilization of available community resources such as recreational facilities among Hispanic border residents at risk for CVD. PMID:24518646

  12. Cloning and expression of the sucrose transporter gene PsSUT1 from tree peony leaf.

    PubMed

    Li, Y H; Guo, T; Cui, Y; Li, Y; He, D

    2015-10-16

    This study reports the cloning of a sucrose transporter gene, PsSUT1, from the leaf of tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa Lind. cv 'Huhong'). Expression patterns were examined in different organs and at different developmental stages. The full-length cDNA of PsSUT1 consisted of a 2001-bp sequence containing a 1557-bp open reading frame, encoding 519 amino acids with a conserved domain typical of the glycoside-pentoside-hexuronide superfamily. The amino acid sequence of PsSUT1 in tree peony shared high homology with that of other plants. At different developmental stages, PsSUT1 was expressed in roots, stems, leaves, and petals. Its expression level in stems was 10.9-fold higher than in petals at the flowering stage. Expression of PsSUT1 at the flowering stage was highest during flower development. The significant differences in PsSUT1 expression observed among developmental stages and organs were closely related to changes in sucrose content during flower opening. These results form the basis for further research on the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate metabolism and transport during flower development in tree peony.

  13. Efficient Generation of Virus-Free iPS Cells Using Liposomal Magnetofection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo Young; Noh, Eun Hyung; Chung, Hyung-Min; Kang, Man-Jong; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Se Pill

    2012-01-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is a powerful tool in regenerative medicine, and advances in nanotechnology clearly have great potential to enhance stem cell research. Here, we introduce a liposomal magnetofection (LMF) method for iPS cell generation. Efficient conditions for generating virus-free iPS cells from mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells were determined through the use of different concentrations of CombiMag nanoparticle-DNA(pCX-OKS-2A and pCX-cMyc)-lipoplexes and either one or two cycles of the LMF procedure. The cells were prepared in a short reprogramming time period (≤8 days, 0.032–0.040%). Among the seven LMF-iPS cell lines examined, two were confirmed to be integration-free, and an integration-free LMF-iPS cell line was produced under the least toxic conditions (single LMF cycle with a half-dose of plasmid). This cell line also displayed in vitro/in vivo pluripotency, including teratoma formation and chimeric mouse production. In addition, the safety of CombiMag-DNA lipoplexes for the transfection of MEF cells was confirmed through lactate dehydrogenase activity assay and transmission electron microscopy. These results demonstrated that the LMF method is simple, effective, and safe. LMF may represent a superior technique for the generation of virus-free or integration-free iPS cell lines that could lead to enhanced stem cell therapy in the future. PMID:23049868

  14. CART treatment improves memory and synaptic structure in APP/PS1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jia-li; Liou, Anthony K.F.; Shi, Yejie; Yin, Kai-lin; Chen, Ling; Li, Ling-ling; Zhu, Xiao-lei; Qian, Lai; Yang, Rong; Chen, Jun; Xu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Major characteristics of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) include deposits of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain, loss of synapses, and cognitive dysfunction. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) has recently been reported to attenuate Aβ-induced toxicity. In this study, CART localization in APP/PS1 mice was characterized and the protective effects of exogenous CART treatment were examined. Compared to age-matched wild type mice, 8-month-old APP/PS1 mice had significantly greater CART immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cortex. A strikingly similar pattern of Aβ plaque-associated CART immunoreactivity was observed in the cortex of AD cases. Treatment of APP/PS1 mice with exogenous CART ameliorated memory deficits; this effect was associated with improvements in synaptic ultrastructure and long-term potentiation, but not a reduction of the Aβ plaques. Exogenous CART treatment in APP/PS1 mice prevented depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and stimulated mitochondrial complex I and II activities, resulting in an increase in ATP levels. CART treatment of APP/PS1 mice also reduced reactive oxygen species and 4-hydroxynonenal, and mitigated oxidative DNA damage. In summary, CART treatment reduced multiple neuropathological measures and improved memory in APP/PS1 mice, and may therefore be a promising and novel therapy for AD. PMID:25959573

  15. Community Perspectives Associated With the African PsA-TT (MenAfriVac) Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Idoko, Olubukola T.; Diallo, Aldiouma; Sow, Samba O.; Hodgson, Abraham; Akinsola, Adebayo; Diarra, Bou; Haidara, Fadima Cheick; Ansah, Patrick Odum; Kampmann, Beate; Bouma, Enricke; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Enwere, Godwin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was established to address epidemic meningitis as a public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa and, to that end, worked to develop a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT. Methods. Experiences in 4 clinical trial sites are described. Culturally sensitive collaborative strategies were adopted to manage acceptable communication methods, peculiarities with the consent process, participant medical issues, community care, and death. Results. The clinical trials were completed successfully through community acceptance and active community collaboration. The trials also strengthened the capacities in the participating communities, and actively worked to resolve community problems. Conclusions. The understanding and integration of sociocultural realities of communities were major assets in the conduct and acceptance of these trials. MVP succeeded in these sites and provided a sound example for future clinical studies in Africa. Clinical Trials Registration. ISRTCN78147026 (PsA-TT 002); ISRCTN87739946 (PsA-TT 003); ISRCTN82484612 (PsA-TT 004); PACTR ATMR2010030001913177 (PsA-TT 006); and PACTR201110000328305 (PsA-TT 007). PMID:26553669

  16. Construction of a chromosome map for the phage group II Staphylococcus aureus Ps55.

    PubMed Central

    Bannantine, J P; Pattee, P A

    1996-01-01

    The genome size and a partial physical and genetic map have been defined for the phage group II Staphylococcus aureus Ps55. The genome size was estimated to be 2,771 kb by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the restriction enzymes SmaI, CspI, and SgrAI. The Ps55 chromosome map was constructed by transduction of auxotrophic and cryptic transposon insertions, with known genetic and physical locations in S. aureus NCTC 8325, into the Ps55 background. PFGE and DNA hybridization analysis were used to detect the location of the transposon in Ps55. Ps55 restriction fragments were then ordered on the basis of genetic conservation between the two strains. Cloned DNA probes containing the lactose operon (lac) and genes encoding staphylococcal protein A (spa), gamma hemolysin (hlg), and coagulase (coa) were also located on the map by PFGE and hybridization analysis. This methodology enabled a direct comparison of chromosomal organization between NCTC 8325 and Ps55 strains. The chromosome size, gene order, and some of the restriction sites are conserved between the two phage group strains. PMID:8955305

  17. PsPMEP, a pollen-specific pectin methylesterase of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Gómez, María Dolores; Renau-Morata, Begoña; Roque, Edelín; Polaina, Julio; Beltrán, José Pío; Cañas, Luis A

    2013-09-01

    Pectin methylesterases (PMEs) are a family of enzymes involved in plant reproductive processes such as pollen development and pollen tube growth. We have isolated and characterized PsPMEP, a pea (Pisum sativum L.) pollen-specific gene that encodes a protein with homology to PMEs. Sequence analysis showed that PsPMEP belongs to group 2 PMEs, which are characterized by the presence of a processable amino-terminal PME inhibitor domain followed by the catalytic PME domain. Moreover, PsPMEP contains several motifs highly conserved among PMEs with the essential amino acid residues involved in enzyme substrate binding and catalysis. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses showed that PsPMEP is expressed in pollen grains from 4 days before anthesis till anther dehiscence and in pollinated carpels. In the PsPMEP promoter region, we have identified several conserved cis-regulatory elements that have been associated with gene pollen-specific expression. Expression analysis of PsPMEP promoter fused to the uidA reporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana plants showed a similar expression pattern when compared with pea, indicating that this promoter is also functional in a non-leguminous plant. GUS expression was detected in mature pollen grains, during pollen germination, during pollen tube elongation along the transmitting tract, and when the pollen tube reaches the embryo sac in the ovule.

  18. CART treatment improves memory and synaptic structure in APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jia-li; Liou, Anthony K F; Shi, Yejie; Yin, Kai-lin; Chen, Ling; Li, Ling-ling; Zhu, Xiao-lei; Qian, Lai; Yang, Rong; Chen, Jun; Xu, Yun

    2015-05-11

    Major characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include deposits of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain, loss of synapses, and cognitive dysfunction. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) has recently been reported to attenuate Aβ-induced toxicity. In this study, CART localization in APP/PS1 mice was characterized and the protective effects of exogenous CART treatment were examined. Compared to age-matched wild type mice, 8-month-old APP/PS1 mice had significantly greater CART immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cortex. A strikingly similar pattern of Aβ plaque-associated CART immunoreactivity was observed in the cortex of AD cases. Treatment of APP/PS1 mice with exogenous CART ameliorated memory deficits; this effect was associated with improvements in synaptic ultrastructure and long-term potentiation, but not a reduction of the Aβ plaques. Exogenous CART treatment in APP/PS1 mice prevented depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and stimulated mitochondrial complex I and II activities, resulting in an increase in ATP levels. CART treatment of APP/PS1 mice also reduced reactive oxygen species and 4-hydroxynonenal, and mitigated oxidative DNA damage. In summary, CART treatment reduced multiple neuropathological measures and improved memory in APP/PS1 mice, and may therefore be a promising and novel therapy for AD.

  19. Preparation of pancreatic β-cells from human iPS cells with small molecules.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells obtained from patients are expected to be a useful source for cell transplantation therapy, because many patients (including those with type 1 diabetes and severe type 2 diabetes) are on waiting lists for transplantation for a long time due to the shortage of donors. At present, many concerns related to clinical application of human iPS cells have been raised, but rapid development of methods for the establishment, culture, and standardization of iPS cells will lead autologous cell therapy to be realistic sooner or later. However, establishment of a method for preparing some of desired cell types is still challenging. Regarding pancreatic β-cells, there have been many reports about differentiation of these cells from human embryonic stem (ES)/iPS cells, but a protocol for clinical application has still not been established. Since there is clear proof that cell transplantation therapy is effective for diabetes based on the results of clinical islet transplantation, pancreatic β-cells prepared from human iPS cells are considered likely to be effective for reducing the burden on patients. In this article, the current status of procedures for preparing pancreatic β-cells from human ES/iPS cells, including effective use of small molecules, is summarized, and some of the problems that still need to be overcome are discussed. PMID:22722666

  20. Efficient genomic correction methods in human iPS cells using CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Gee, Peter; Ishida, Kentaro; Hotta, Akitsu

    2016-05-15

    Precise gene correction using the CRISPR-Cas9 system in human iPS cells holds great promise for various applications, such as the study of gene functions, disease modeling, and gene therapy. In this review article, we summarize methods for effective editing of genomic sequences of iPS cells based on our experiences correcting dystrophin gene mutations with the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Designing specific sgRNAs as well as having efficient transfection methods and proper detection assays to assess genomic cleavage activities are critical for successful genome editing in iPS cells. In addition, because iPS cells are fragile by nature when dissociated into single cells, a step-by-step confirmation during the cell recovery process is recommended to obtain an adequate number of genome-edited iPS cell clones. We hope that the techniques described here will be useful for researchers from diverse backgrounds who would like to perform genome editing in iPS cells.

  1. Cloning and expression of the sucrose transporter gene PsSUT1 from tree peony leaf.

    PubMed

    Li, Y H; Guo, T; Cui, Y; Li, Y; He, D

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the cloning of a sucrose transporter gene, PsSUT1, from the leaf of tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa Lind. cv 'Huhong'). Expression patterns were examined in different organs and at different developmental stages. The full-length cDNA of PsSUT1 consisted of a 2001-bp sequence containing a 1557-bp open reading frame, encoding 519 amino acids with a conserved domain typical of the glycoside-pentoside-hexuronide superfamily. The amino acid sequence of PsSUT1 in tree peony shared high homology with that of other plants. At different developmental stages, PsSUT1 was expressed in roots, stems, leaves, and petals. Its expression level in stems was 10.9-fold higher than in petals at the flowering stage. Expression of PsSUT1 at the flowering stage was highest during flower development. The significant differences in PsSUT1 expression observed among developmental stages and organs were closely related to changes in sucrose content during flower opening. These results form the basis for further research on the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate metabolism and transport during flower development in tree peony. PMID:26505390

  2. Directed self-assembly materials for high resolution beyond PS-b-PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirahara, Eri; Paunescu, Margareta; Polishchuk, Orest; Jeong, EunJeong; Ng, Edward; Shan, Jianhui; Yin, Jian; Kim, Jihoon; Cao, Yi; Li, Jin; Hong, SungEun; Baskaran, Durairaj; Lin, Guanyang

    2016-03-01

    To extend directed self-assembly (DSA) of poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) for higher resolution, placement accuracy and potentially improved pattern line edge roughness (LER), we have developed a next-generation material platform of organic high-χ block copolymers ("HC series", AZEMBLYTM EXP PME-3000 series). The new material platform has a built-in orientation control mechanism which enables block copolymer domains to vertically selforient without topcoat/additive or delicate solvent vapor annealing. Furthermore, sub-10 nm lines and spaces (L/S) patterning by two major chemoepitaxy DSA, LiNe and SMARTTM processes, was successfully implemented on 12" wafer substrates by using the PME-3000 lamellar series. The results revealed that the new material platform is compatible with the existing PS-b-PMMA-based chemical prepatterns and standard protocols. We also introduced the built-in orientation control strategy to the conventional PS-b-PMMA system, producing a new generation of PS-b-PMMA materials with facile orientation control. The modified PS-b-PMMA (m-PS-b-PMMA) performed LiNe flow DSA yielding a comparable CD process window with improved LER/LWR/SWR after the L/S patterns were transferred into a Si substrate.

  3. Distribution of eukaryotic serine racemases in the bacterial domain and characterization of a representative protein in Roseobacter litoralis Och 149.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takaaki; Shimamura, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Tohru; Nunoura, Takuro; Deguchi, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct bacterial and eukaryotic serine racemases (SRs) have been identified based on phylogenetic and biochemical characteristics. Although some reports have suggested that marine heterotrophic bacteria have the potential to produce d-serine, the gene encoding bacterial SRs is not found in those bacterial genomes. In this study, using in-depth genomic analysis, we found that eukaryotic SR homologues were distributed widely in various bacterial genomes. Additionally, we selected a eukaryotic SR homologue from a marine heterotrophic bacterium, Roseobacter litoralis Och 149 (RiSR), and constructed an RiSR gene expression system in Escherichia coli for studying the properties of the enzyme. Among the tested amino acids, the recombinant RiSR exhibited both racemization and dehydration activities only towards serine, similar to many eukaryotic SRs. Mg2+ and MgATP enhanced both activities of RiSR, whereas EDTA abolished these enzymatic activities. The enzymatic properties and domain structure of RiSR were similar to those of eukaryotic SRs, particularly mammalian SRs. However, RiSR showed lower catalytic efficiency for L-serine dehydration (kcat/Km=0.094 min(-1) mM(-1)) than those of eukaryotic SRs reported to date (kcat/Km=0.6-21 min(-1) mM(-1)). In contrast, the catalytic efficiency for L-serine racemization of RiSR (kcat/Km=3.14 min(-1) mM(-1)) was 34-fold higher than that of l-serine dehydration. These data suggested that RiSR primarily catalysed serine racemization rather than dehydration.

  4. Paper sludge (PS) to bioethanol: Evaluation of virgin and recycle mill sludge for low enzyme, high-solids fermentation.

    PubMed

    Boshoff, Sonja; Gottumukkala, Lalitha Devi; van Rensburg, Eugéne; Görgens, Johann

    2016-03-01

    Paper sludge (PS) from the paper and pulp industry consists primarily of cellulose and ash and has significant potential for ethanol production. Thirty-seven PS samples from 11 South African paper and pulp mills exhibited large variation in chemical composition and resulting ethanol production. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of PS in fed-batch culture was investigated at high solid loadings and low enzyme dosages. Water holding capacity and viscosity of the PS influenced ethanol production at elevated solid loadings of PS. High viscosity of PS from virgin pulp mills restricted the solid loading to 18% (w/w) at an enzyme dosage of 20 FPU/gram dry PS (gdPS), whereas an optimal solid loading of 27% (w/w) was achieved with corrugated recycle mill PS at 11 FPU/gdPS. Ethanol concentration and yield of virgin pulp and corrugated recycle PS were 34.2g/L at 66.9% and 45.5 g/L at 78.2%, respectively.

  5. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli.

  6. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A.; Bannantine, John P.; Shoyama, Fernanda M.; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted. PMID:27597934

  7. Molecular genetic analysis of midgut serine proteases in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Isoe, Jun; Rascón, Alberto A; Kunz, Susan; Miesfeld, Roger L

    2009-12-01

    Digestion of blood meal proteins by midgut proteases provides anautogenous mosquitoes with the nutrients required to complete the gonotrophic cycle. Inhibition of protein digestion in the midgut of blood feeding mosquitoes could therefore provide a strategy for population control. Based on recent reports indicating that the mechanism and regulation of protein digestion in blood fed female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes is more complex than previously thought, we used a robust RNAi knockdown method to investigate the role of four highly expressed midgut serine proteases in blood meal metabolism. We show by Western blotting that the early phase trypsin protein (AaET) is maximally expressed at 3 h post-blood meal (PBM), and that AaET is not required for the protein expression of three late phase serine proteases, AaLT (late trypsin), AaSPVI (5G1), and AaSPVII. Using the trypsin substrate analog BApNA to analyze in vitro enzyme activity in midgut extracts from single mosquitoes, we found that knockdown of AaSPVI expression caused a 77.6% decrease in late phase trypsin-like activity, whereas, knockdown of AaLT and AaSPVII expression had no significant effect on BApNA activity. In contrast, injection of AaLT, AaSPVI, and AaSPVII dsRNA inhibited degradation of endogenous serum albumin protein using an in vivo protease assay, as well as, significantly decreased egg production in both the first and second gonotrophic cycles (P < 0.001). These results demonstrate that AaLT, AaSPVI, and AaSPVII all contribute to blood protein digestion and oocyte maturation, even though AaSPVI is the only abundant midgut late phase serine protease that appears to function as a classic trypsin enzyme. PMID:19883761

  8. Characterization of a serine proteinase homologous (SPH) in Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chuanjie; Chen, Liqiao; Qin, Jian G; Zhao, Daxian; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Ping; Li, Erchao

    2010-01-01

    The serine protease homologous (SPH) is an important cofactor of prophenoloxidase-activating enzyme (PPAE). The gene of SPH of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis (EsSPH) in hemocytes was cloned and characterized using reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The SPH cDNA consisted of 1386 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) encoded a protein of 378 amino acids, 154 bp 5'-untranslated region, and 95 bp 3'-untranslated region. Sequence comparisons against the GenBank database showed that EsSPH deduced amino acids had an overall identity to the gene of serine protease family from 41% to 70% of 15 invertebrate species. The protein had the structural characteristics of SPH, including the conserved six cysteine residues in the N-terminal clip domain and the functional activity (His157, Asp209, Gly311) in the C-terminal serine proteinase-like domain. To analyze the role of EsSPH in an acute infection, the temporal expression of the EsSPH gene after the Aeromonas hydrophila challenge was measured by real-time RT-PCR. The EsSPH transcripts in hemocytes significantly increased at 6 h, 12 h and 48 h over time after the A. hydrophila injection. This expression pattern shows that EsSPH has the potential to defend against invading microorganisms. The mRNA transcripts of EsSPH were detected in all tissues with the highest in the hepatopancreas. Interestingly, the mRNA transcripts of EsSPH and proPO were found in ova and expressed in oosperms, suggesting that the maternal transfer of EsSPH and proPO may exit in crab, but this warrants confirmation in further research.

  9. Human mast cell tryptase: Multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderslice, P.; Ballinger, S.M., Tam, E.K.; Goldstein, S.M.; Craik, C.S.; Caughey, G.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the {approx}1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5{prime} regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family.

  10. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A.; Bannantine, John P.; Shoyama, Fernanda M.; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a serine protease, Ba III-4, from Peruvian Bothrops atrox venom.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Soto, L A; Bonfim, V L; Novello, J C; Navarro Oviedo, R; Yarlequé Chocas, A; Marangoni, S

    2007-09-01

    A serine protease from Bothrops atrox (Peruvian specimen's venom) was isolated in two chromatographic steps in LC molecular exclusion and reverse phase-HPLC. This protein was denominated Ba III-4 (33,080.265 Da determinated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry) and showed pI of 5.06, Km 0.2 x 10(-1 ) M and the V (máx) 4.1 x 10(-1 )nmoles p-NA/lt/min on the synthetic substrate BapNA. Ba III-4 also showed ability to coagulate bovine fibrinogen. The serine protease was inhibited by soyben trypsin inhibitor and DA2II, which is an anti-hemorrhagic factor isolated from the opossum specie Didelphis albiventris. The primary structure of Ba III-4 showed the presence of His(44), Asp(94) and Ser(193) residues in the corresponding positions to the catalytic triad established in the serine proteases and Ser(193) are inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF). Amino acid analysis showed a high content of Asp, Glu, Gly, Ser, Ala and Pro, as well as 12 half-cysteine residues. Ba III-4 contained 293 amino acid residues and the primary structure of VIGGDECDIN EHPFLAFMYY SPRYFCGMTL INQEWVLTAA HCRYFCGMTL IHLGVHRESE KANYDEVRRF PKEKYFIFCD NNFTDDEVDK DIMLIRLDKP VSNSEHIAPL SLPSNPPSVG SVCRIMGWGQ TTTSPIDVLS PDEPHCANIN LFDNTVCHTA HPQVANTRTS TDTLCAGDLQ GGRDTCNGDS GGPLICNEQL HGILSWGGDP CAQPNKPAFY TKVYYFDHPW IKSIIAGNKK TVNFTCPPLR SDAKDDSTTY INQEWDWVLT AEHCDRTHMR NSFYDYSSIN SDS. Titration experiments did not show the presence of free sulfhydryl groups after 4 h incubation, nor were differences found in relation to titration kinetics in the presence of nondenaturating buffer. The isolation of this protein, Ba III-4, is of potential interest for the understanding of the pathomechanism of the snake venom action and for the identification of new blood coagulation enzymes of natural sources. PMID:17522968

  12. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival.

    PubMed

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A; Bannantine, John P; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc(2) 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted. PMID:27597934

  13. Adjustments of serine proteases of Daphnia pulex in response to temperature changes.

    PubMed

    Dölling, Ramona; Becker, Dörthe; Hawat, Susan; Koch, Marita; Schwarzenberger, Anke; Zeis, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Elevated temperatures considerably challenge aquatic invertebrates, and enhanced energy metabolism and protein turnover require adjustments of digestion. In Daphnia, the serine proteases chymotrypsin and trypsin represent the major proteolytic enzymes. Daphnia pulex acclimated to different temperature conditions or subjected to acute heat stress showed increased expression level of serine proteases with rising temperatures. Transcripts of trypsin isoforms were always present in higher amounts than observed for chymotrypsin. Additionally, trypsin isoform transcripts were induced by elevated temperatures to a larger extent. Correspondingly, trypsin activity dominated in cold-acclimated animals. However, the enzymatic activity of chymotrypsin increased at elevated temperatures, whereas trypsin activity slightly decreased, resulting in a shift to dominating chymotrypsin activity in warm-acclimated animals. Zymograms revealed eight bands with proteolytic activity in the range of 20 to 86 kDa. The single bands were assigned to trypsin or chymotrypsin activity applying specific inhibitors or from casein cleavage products identified by mass spectrometric analysis. The total amount of proteolytic activity was elevated with acclimation temperature increase and showed a transient decrease under acute heat stress. The contribution of the different isoforms to protein digestion indicated induction of chymotrypsin with increasing acclimation temperature. For trypsin, the share of one isoform decreased with elevated temperature, while another isoform was enhanced. Thus differential expression of serine proteases was observed in response to chronic and acute temperature changes. The observed phenotypic plasticity adjusts the set of active proteases to the altered needs of protein metabolism optimizing protein digestion for the temperature conditions experienced in the habitat. PMID:26773656

  14. The S8 serine, C1A cysteine and A1 aspartic protease families in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Beers, Eric P; Jones, Alan M; Dickerman, Allan W

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome has over 550 protease sequences representing all five catalytic types: serine, cysteine, aspartic acid, metallo and threonine (MEROPS peptidase database, http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), which probably reflect a wide variety of as yet unidentified functions performed by plant proteases. Recent indications that the 26S proteasome, a T1 family-threonine protease, is a regulator of light and hormone responsive signal transduction highlight the potential of proteases to participate in many aspects of plant growth and development. Recent discoveries that proteases are required for stomatal distribution, embryo development and disease resistance point to wider roles for four additional multigene families that include some of the most frequently studied (yet poorly understood) plant proteases: the subtilisin-like, serine proteases (family S8), the papain-like, cysteine proteases (family C1A), the pepsin-like, aspartic proteases (family A1) and the plant matrixin, metalloproteases (family M10A). In this report, 54 subtilisin-like, 30 papain-like and 59 pepsin-like proteases from Arabidopsis, are compared with S8, C1A and A1 proteases known from other plant species at the functional, phylogenetic and gene structure levels. Examples of structural conservation between S8, C1A and A1 genes from rice, barley, tomato and soybean and those from Arabidopsis are noted, indicating that some common, essential plant protease roles were established before the divergence of monocots and eudicots. Numerous examples of tandem duplications of protease genes and evidence for a variety of restricted expression patterns suggest that a high degree of specialization exists among proteases within each family. We propose that comprehensive analysis of the functions of these genes in Arabidopsis will firmly establish serine, cysteine and aspartic proteases as regulators and effectors of a wide range of plant processes.

  15. BbrzSP-32, the first serine protease isolated from Bothrops brazili venom: Purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Zaqueo, Kayena D; Kayano, Anderson M; Domingos, Thaisa F S; Moura, Laura A; Fuly, André L; da Silva, Saulo L; Acosta, Gerardo; Oliveira, Eliandre; Albericio, Fernando; Zanchi, Fernando B; Zuliani, Juliana P; Calderon, Leonardo A; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M

    2016-05-01

    Snake venom toxins are related not only in detention, death and the promotion of initial digestion of prey but also due to their different biochemical, structural and pharmacological effects they can result in new drugs. Among these toxins snake venom serine proteases (SVSPs) should be highlighted because they are responsible for inducing changes in physiological functions such as blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and platelet aggregation. This article presents the first serine protease (SP) isolated from Bothrops brazili: BbrzSP-32. The new SP showed 36 kDa of relative molecular mass and its absolute mass was confirmed by mass spectrometry as 32,520 Da. It presents 79.48% identity when compared to other SVSPs and was able to degrade the α-chain of fibrinogen, in in vitro models, because of this it is considered a SVTLE-A. It showed dose-dependent activity in the process of degradation of fibrin networks demonstrating greater specificity for this activity when compared to its thrombolytic action. BbrzSP-32 demonstrated proteolytic activity on gelatin and chromogenic substrates for serine proteases and thrombin-like enzymes (S-2288 and S-2238 respectively), besides having coagulant activity on human plasma. After pre-incubation with PMSF and benzamidine the coagulant and proteolytic activities on the S-2288 and S-2238 substrates were reduced. BbrzSP-32 shows stability against pH and temperature variations, demonstrating optimum activity between 30 and 40 °C and in the pH range 7.5 to 8.5. A new SP with potential biotechnological application was isolated. PMID:26827743

  16. A novel aceE mutation leading to a better growth profile and a higher L-serine production in a high-yield L-serine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum strain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen; Chen, Ziwei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Guoqiang; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Shi, Jinsong; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-09-01

    A comparative genomic analysis was performed to study the genetic variations between the L-serine-producing strain Corynebacterium glutamicum SYPS-062 and the mutant strain SYPS-062-33a, which was derived from SYPS-062 by random mutagenesis with enhanced L-serine production. Some variant genes between the two strains were reversely mutated or deleted in the genome of SYPS-062-33a to verify the influences of the gene mutations introduced by random mutagenesis. It was found that a His-594 → Tyr mutation in aceE was responsible for the more accumulation of by-products, such as L-alanine and L-valine, in SYPS-062-33a. Furthermore, the influence of this point mutation on the L-serine production was investigated, and the results suggested that this point mutation led to a better growth profile and a higher L-serine production in the high-yield strain 33a∆SSAAI, which was derived from SYPS-062-33a by metabolic engineering with the highest L-serine production to date.

  17. Smad2 transduces common signals from receptor serine-threonine and tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    de Caestecker, M P; Parks, W T; Frank, C J; Castagnino, P; Bottaro, D P; Roberts, A B; Lechleider, R J

    1998-06-01

    SMAD proteins mediate signals from receptor serine-threonine kinases (RSKs) of the TGF-beta superfamily. We demonstrate here that HGF and EGF, which signal through RTKs, can also mediate SMAD-dependent reporter gene activation and induce rapid phosphorylation of endogenous SMAD proteins by kinase(s) downstream of MEK1. HGF induces phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of epitope-tagged Smad2 and a mutation that blocks TGF-beta signaling also blocks HGF signal transduction. Smad2 may thus act as a common positive effector of TGF-beta- and HGF-induced signals and serve to modulate cross talk between RTK and RSK signaling pathways.

  18. Serine, glycine and the one-carbon cycle: cancer metabolism in full circle

    PubMed Central

    Locasale, Jason W

    2013-01-01

    One carbon metabolism involving the folate and methionine cycle integrates carbon units from amino acids, including serine and glycine, and generates diverse outputs, such as the biosynthesis of lipids, nucleotides and proteins, the maintenance of redox status, and the substrates for methylation reactions. Long considered a ‘housekeeping’ process, this pathway has been recently shown to have additional complexity. Recent genetic and functional evidence also suggests that hyperactivation of this pathway is a possible driver of oncogenesis and establishes links to cellular epigenetic status. Given the wealth of clinically available agents that target one carbon metabolism, these new findings could present opportunities for translation into precision cancer medicine. PMID:23822983

  19. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 serine 307 correlates with JNK activity in atrophic skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilder, Thomas L.; Tou, Janet C L.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Wade, Charles E.; Graves, Lee M.

    2003-01-01

    c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to negatively regulate insulin signaling through serine phosphorylation of residue 307 within the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in adipose and liver tissue. Using a rat hindlimb suspension model for muscle disuse atrophy, we found that JNK activity was significantly elevated in atrophic soleus muscle and that IRS-1 was phosphorylated on Ser(307) prior to the degradation of the IRS-1 protein. Moreover, we observed a corresponding reduction in Akt activity, providing biochemical evidence for the development of insulin resistance in atrophic skeletal muscle.

  20. Immunisation against a serine protease inhibitor reduces intensity of Plasmodium berghei infection in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew R; Zakutansky, Sara E; Miura, Kazutoyo; Dicks, Matthew D J; Churcher, Thomas S; Jewell, Kerry E; Vaughan, Aisling M; Turner, Alison V; Kapulu, Melissa C; Michel, Kristin; Long, Carole A; Sinden, Robert E; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J; Biswas, Sumi

    2013-10-01

    The mosquito innate immune response is able to clear the majority of Plasmodium parasites. This immune clearance is controlled by a number of regulatory molecules including serine protease inhibitors (serpins). To determine whether such molecules could represent a novel target for a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine, we vaccinated mice with Anopheles gambiae serpin-2. Antibodies against Anopheles gambiae serpin-2 significantly reduced the infection of a heterologous Anopheles species (Anopheles stephensi) by Plasmodium berghei, however this effect was not observed with Plasmodium falciparum. Therefore, this approach of targeting regulatory molecules of the mosquito immune system may represent a novel approach to transmission-blocking malaria vaccines.

  1. Viscoelastic properties of pressure overload hypertrophied myocardium: effect of serine protease treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, Jason D.; Baicu, Catalin F.; Barnes, Mary A.; Spinale, Francis G.; Zile, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether and to what extent one component of the extracellular matrix, fibrillar collagen, contributes causally to abnormalities in viscoelasticity, collagen was acutely degraded by activation of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) with the serine protease plasmin. Papillary muscles were isolated from normal cats and cats with right ventricular pressure overload hypertrophy (POH) induced by pulmonary artery banding. Plasmin treatment caused MMP activation, collagen degradation, decreased the elastic stiffness constant, and decreased the viscosity constant in both normal and POH muscles. Thus, whereas many mechanisms may contribute to the abnormalities in myocardial viscoelasticity in the POH myocardium, changes in fibrillar collagen appear to play a predominant role.

  2. A non-radioactive method for the assay of many serine/threonine-specific protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Ross, Heike; Armstrong, Christopher G; Cohen, Philip

    2002-09-15

    The generation of drugs that modulate the activities of particular protein kinases has become a prime focus of the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. Consequently, improved methods for the development of high-throughput screening formats for these enzymes is a high priority. In the present study, we have designed three generic peptide substrates that can be used to assay a diverse range of protein kinases. These peptides share a common seven-residue epitope that includes the site of phosphorylation, and against which we have generated a phospho-specific antibody. Thus a large number of serine/threonine-specific protein kinases can be screened using a simple non-radioactive format.

  3. Phytochelatins are synthesized by two vacuolar serine carboxypeptidases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wünschmann, Jana; Beck, Andreas; Meyer, Laurent; Letzel, Thomas; Grill, Erwin; Lendzian, Klaus J

    2007-04-17

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are cysteine-rich peptides that chelate heavy metal ions, thereby mediating heavy metal tolerance in plants, fission yeast, and Caenorhabditis elegans. They are synthesized from glutathione by PC synthase, a specific dipeptidyltransferase. While Saccharomyces cerevisiae synthesizes PCs upon exposure to heavy metal ions, the S. cerevisiae genome does not encode a PC synthase homologue. How PCs are synthesized in yeast is unclear. This study shows that the vacuolar serine carboxypeptidases CPY and CPC are responsible for PC synthesis in yeast. The finding of a PCS-like activity of these enzymes in vivo discloses another route for PC biosynthesis in eukaryotes.

  4. Biochemical and biological characterization of two serine proteinases from Colombian Crotalus durissus cumanensis snake venom.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Arley Camilo; Pereañez, Jaime Andrés; Gutiérrez, José María; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2013-03-01

    Two clotting serine proteinases, named Cdc SI and Cdc SII, were isolated and characterized for the first time from Colombian Crotalus durissus cumanensis snake venom. The enzymes were purified using two chromatographic steps: molecular exclusion on Sephacryl S-200 and RP-HPLC on C8 Column. The molecular masses of the proteins, determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, were 28,561.4 and 28,799.2 Da for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. The aim of the present study was to evaluate enzymatic, coagulant and toxic properties of the two enzymes. The serine proteinases hydrolyzed specific chromogenic substrate (BaPNA) and exhibited a Michaelis-Menten behavior. Cdc SI had V(max) of 0.038 ± 0.003 nmol/min and K(M) of 0.034 ± 0.017 mM, while Cdc SII displayed values of V(max) of 0.267 ± 0.011 nmol/min and K(M) of 0.145 ± 0.023 mM. N-terminal sequences were VIGGDEXNIN and VIGGDICNINEHNFLVALYE for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. Molecular masses, N-terminal sequences, inhibition assays, and enzymatic profile suggest that Cdc SI and Cdc SII belong to the family of snake venom thrombin-like enzymes. These serine proteinases differed in their clotting activity on human plasma, showing a minimum coagulant dose of 25 μg and 0.571 μg for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. Enzymes also showed coagulant activity on bovine fibrinogen and degraded chain α of this protein. Toxins lack hemorrhagic and myotoxic activities, but are capable to induce defibrin(ogen)ation, moderate edema, and an increase in vascular permeability. These serine proteinases may contribute indirectly to the local hemorrhage induced by metalloproteinases, by causing blood clotting disturbances, and might also contribute to cardiovascular alterations characteristic of patients envenomed by C. d. cumanensis in Colombia.

  5. Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encodes a serine peptidase essential for colonisation

    PubMed Central

    Karlyshev, A.V.; Thacker, G.; Jones, M.A.; Clements, M.O.; Wren, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    According to MEROPS peptidase database, Campylobacter species encode 64 predicted peptidases. However, proteolytic properties of only a few of these proteins have been confirmed experimentally. In this study we identified and characterised a Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encoding a novel peptidase. The proteolytic activity associated with this enzyme was demonstrated in cell lysates. Moreover, enzymatic studies conducted with a purified protein confirmed a prediction of it being a serine peptidase. Furthermore, cj0511 mutant was found to be severely attenuated in chicken colonisation model, suggesting a role of the Cj0511 protein in infection. PMID:24918062

  6. A rapidly metabolizing pool of phosphatidylglycerol as a precursor of phosphatidylethanolamine and diglyceride in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, F J; Chen, S L; Fulco, A J

    1980-02-01

    Pulse-chase experiments in Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581 with [U-14C]palmitate, L-[U-14C]serine, and [U-14C]glycerol showed that a large pool of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) which exhibited rapid turnover in the phosphate moiety (PGt) underwent very rapid interconversion with the large diglyceride (DG) pool. Kinetics of DG labeling indicated that the fatty acyl and diacylated glycerol moieties of PGt were also utilized as precursors for net DG formation. The [U-14C]glycerol pulse-chase results also confirmed the presence of a second, metabolically stable pool of PG (PGs), which was deduced from [32P]phosphate studies. The other major phospholipid, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), exhibited pronounced lags relative to PG and DG in 14C-fatty acid, [14C]glycerol, and [32P]phosphate incorporation, but not for incorporation of L-[U-14C]serine into the ethanolamine group of PE or into the serine moiety of the small phosphatidylserine (PS) pool. Furthermore, initial rates of L-[U-14C]serine incorporation into the serine and ethanolamine moieties of PS and PE were unaffected by cerulenin. The results provided compelling in vivo evidence that de novo PGt, PS, and PE synthesis in this organism proceed for the most part sequentially in the order PGt yields PS yields PE rather than via branching pathways from a common intermediate and that the phosphatidyl moiety in PS and PE is derived largely from the corresponding moiety in PGt, whereas the DG pool indirectly provides an additional source for this conversion by way of the facile PGt in equilibrium or formed from DG interconversion. PMID:6767686

  7. A rapidly metabolizing pool of phosphatidylglycerol as a precursor of phosphatidylethanolamine and diglyceride in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, F J; Chen, S L; Fulco, A J

    1980-01-01

    Pulse-chase experiments in Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581 with [U-14C]palmitate, L-[U-14C]serine, and [U-14C]glycerol showed that a large pool of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) which exhibited rapid turnover in the phosphate moiety (PGt) underwent very rapid interconversion with the large diglyceride (DG) pool. Kinetics of DG labeling indicated that the fatty acyl and diacylated glycerol moieties of PGt were also utilized as precursors for net DG formation. The [U-14C]glycerol pulse-chase results also confirmed the presence of a second, metabolically stable pool of PG (PGs), which was deduced from [32P]phosphate studies. The other major phospholipid, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), exhibited pronounced lags relative to PG and DG in 14C-fatty acid, [14C]glycerol, and [32P]phosphate incorporation, but not for incorporation of L-[U-14C]serine into the ethanolamine group of PE or into the serine moiety of the small phosphatidylserine (PS) pool. Furthermore, initial rates of L-[U-14C]serine incorporation into the serine and ethanolamine moieties of PS and PE were unaffected by cerulenin. The results provided compelling in vivo evidence that de novo PGt, PS, and PE synthesis in this organism proceed for the most part sequentially in the order PGt yields PS yields PE rather than via branching pathways from a common intermediate and that the phosphatidyl moiety in PS and PE is derived largely from the corresponding moiety in PGt, whereas the DG pool indirectly provides an additional source for this conversion by way of the facile PGt in equilibrium or formed from DG interconversion. PMID:6767686

  8. Rapidly metabolizing pool of phosphatidylglycerol as a precursor for phosphatidylethanolamine and diglyceride in Bacillus megaterium

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, F.J.; Chen, S.L.; Fulco, A.J.

    1980-02-01

    Pulse-chase experiments in Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581 with (U-/sup 14/C)-palmitate, L-(U-/sup 14/C)serine, and (U-/sup 14/C)glycerol showed that a large pool of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) which exhibited rapid turnover in the phosphate moiety (PG/sub t/) underwent very rapid interconversion with the large diglyceride (DG) pool. Kinetics of DG labeling indicated that the fatty acyl and diacylated glycerol moieties of PG/sub t/ were also utilized as precursors for net DG formation. The (U-/sup 14/C)glycerol pulse-chase results also confirmed the presence of a second, metabolically stable pool of PG (PG/sub s/), which was deduced from (/sup 32/P)phosphate studies. The other major phospholipid, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), exhibited pronounced lags relative to PG and DG in /sup 14/C-fatty acid, (/sup 14/C)glycerol, and (/sup 32/P)-phosphate incorporation, but not for incorporation of L-(U-/sup 14/C)serine into the ethanolamine group of PE or into the serine moiety of the small phosphatidylserine (PS) pool. Furthermore, initial rates of L-(U-/sup 14/C)serine incorporation into the serine and ethanolamine moieties of PS and PE were unaffected by cerulenin. The results provided compelling in vivo evidence that de novo PG/sub t/, PS, and PE syntheses in this organism proceed for the most part sequentially in the order PG/sub t/ ..-->.. PS ..-->.. PE rather than via branching pathways from a common intermediate and that the phosphatidyl moiety in PS and PE is derived largely from the corresponding moiety in PG/sub t/, whereas the DG pool indirectly provides an additional source for this conversion by way of the facile PG/sub t/ in equilibrium DG interconversion.

  9. Converted Ps amplitude variations on the dipping slab Moho beneath the Kii Peninsula, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, K.; Park, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Receiver function (RF) analysis is a very useful method to detect seismic velocity discontinuities beneath a seismic station. One can estimate the depth of interfaces using the delay time of Ps converted phases in RFs. One can also evaluate elastic properties at an interface from changes of Ps polarity and Ps amplitude. Ps amplitude depends primarily on the impedance contrast at an interface, but the variation of Ps amplitude on back azimuth (BAZ) of the incoming P wave is affected if the interface is dipping and/or anisotropic rock surrounds the interface. Moreover, variation in the incidence angle of incoming P waves also causes variation in Ps amplitude. Shiomi and Park (2009; AGU FM) defined 'standard amplitude' of a converted phase at a dipping interface beneath a station, based on back azimuth dependence of the Ps amplitude. They did not consider ray parameter dependence to the Ps amplitude evaluation, but it affects the accuracy of the standard amplitude estimate. In this study, we check ray parameter dependence, and apply the method to the stations in the Kii Peninsula, central Japan. We select earthquakes with high signal-to-noise ratio observed from October 2000 to August 2010 with magnitudes 6.0 or greater. Checking distribution of BAZs and incidence angles of teleseismic waveforms observed at each station, we confirm that 80% of the selected events are located to the south of stations. Ray parameters of 10% of the events are larger than 0.077. In the case of dipping interface, Ps amplitude variation with BAZ is larger for incoming P waves with larger ray parameters. Since events located in the west or northeast of stations are fewer than other directions, the contribution of events with large ray parameter is not small in these directions. These directions correspond to the dipping direction of the subducting Philippine Sea slab, thus the Ps amplitudes tend to become large. This means the Ps amplitude may be overestimated when we do not take ray

  10. Novel behavioural characteristics of female APPSwe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, David; Low, Jac Kee; Logge, Warren; Garner, Brett; Karl, Tim

    2014-03-01

    Murine models are commonly used to evaluate progression of Alzheimer's disease. APPSwe/PS1ΔE9 (APPxPS1) mice have previously been reported to demonstrate impaired learning and memory in the Morris water maze test. However, this paradigm introduces a variety of behaviours that may confound performance of the mice, thus an alternative was sought. A battery of behavioural tests (light-dark test, elevated plus maze, novel object recognition task, social recognition test, cheeseboard task and prepulse inhibition) was used to investigate various behavioural and cognitive domains with relevance to Alzheimer's disease. We found 9-month old female APPxPS1 mice exhibited impaired spatial memory in the reversal cheeseboard task. In addition, task-dependent hyperlocomotion and anxiolytic-like behaviours were observed in the light-dark test. Female APPxPS1 demonstrated intact object recognition memory and sensorimotor gating was not significantly decreased compared to control mice except for one particular interstimulus interval. The social recognition test failed to detect preference for social novelty in control females. In conclusion, this is the first study to describe a memory deficit in female APPxPS1 mice in the hidden cheeseboard task. Transgenic females also exhibited task-dependent reduction in anxiety behaviours and hyperlocomotion. These novel findings enhance our understanding of the behavioural phenotype of APPxPS1 females and present the cheeseboard as a valid alternative to other established spatial memory tests. Furthermore, the task-dependency of some of our findings suggests that behavioural profiling of APPxPS1 transgenic mice should be assessed using a variety of behavioural paradigms.

  11. Polypeptide substrate specificity of PsLSMT. A set domain protein methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Roberta; Nayak, Nihar R; Mazarei, Mitra; Dirk, Lynnette M A; Houtz, Robert L

    2007-09-21

    Rubisco large subunit methyltransferase (PsLSMT) is a SET domain protein responsible for the trimethylation of Lys-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. The polypeptide substrate specificity determinants for pea Rubisco large subunit methyltransferase were investigated using a fusion protein construct between the first 23 amino acids from the large subunit of Rubisco and human carbonic anhydrase II. A total of 40 conservative and non-conservative amino acid substitutions flanking the target Lys-14 methylation site (positions P(-3) to P(+3)) were engineered in the fusion protein. The catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) of PsLSMT was determined using each of the substitutions and a polypeptide consensus recognition sequence deduced from the results. The consensus sequence, represented by X-(Gly/Ser)-(Phe/Tyr)-Lys-(Ala/Lys/Arg)-(Gly/Ser)-pi, where X is any residue, Lys is the methylation site, and pi is any aromatic or hydrophobic residue, was used to predict potential alternative substrates for PsLSMT. Four chloroplast-localized proteins were identified including gamma-tocopherol methyltransferase (gamma-TMT). In vitro methylation assays using PsLSMT and a bacterially expressed form of gamma-TMT from Perilla frutescens confirmed recognition and methylation of gamma-TMT by PsLSMT in vitro. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the PsLSMT homologue (NtLSMT) in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in a 2-fold decrease of alpha-tocopherol, the product of gamma-TMT. The results demonstrate the efficacy of consensus sequence-driven identification of alternative substrates for PsLSMT as well as identification of functional attributes of protein methylation catalyzed by LSMT.

  12. Assessment of coronary plaque collagen with polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giattina, Susanne D.; Courtney, Brian K.; Herz, Paul R.; Harman, Michelle; Shortkroff, Sonya; Stamper, Debra L.; Liu, Bin; Fujimoto, James G.; Brezinski, Mark E.

    2006-02-01

    Current evidence indicates that most plaques classified as vulnerable or ruptured plaques do not lead to unstable angina or myocardial infarction. Improved methods are needed to risk stratify plaques to identify those which lead to most acute coronary syndromes. Collagen depletion in the intima overlying lipid collections appears to be a critical component of unstable plaques. In this study, we use polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for the assessment of coronary plaque collagen. Collagen is birefringent, meaning that different polarization states travel through it at different velocities. Changes in PS-OCT images are a measure of tissue birefringence. Twenty-two coronary artery segments were imaged with PS-OCT and analyzed by picrosirius staining (a measure of collagen intensity and fiber size) and trichrome blue. The regression plot between PS-OCT changes and measured collagen yielded a correlation coefficient value of 0.475 (p<0.002). Good correlation was noted between two blinded investigators both with respect to PS-OCT measurements as well as luminosity as assessed by picrosirius. The predictive value of a PS-OCT measurement of negligible birefringence (less than 33% change) for minimal collagen was 93% while the predictive value of high birefringence (greater than 66% change) for high collagen concentrations was 89%. The effect of fiber type (chemical composition) was minimal relative to the effect due to fiber concentration. The capability of PS-OCT to assess plaque collagen content, in addition to its ability to generate high resolution structural assessments, make it a potentially powerful technology for identifying high risk plaques.

  13. Modeling Alzheimer's disease with human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

    PubMed

    Mungenast, Alison E; Siegert, Sandra; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have revolutionized the utility of human in vitro models of neurological disease. The iPS-derived and differentiated cells allow researchers to study the impact of a distinct cell type in health and disease as well as performing therapeutic drug screens on a human genetic background. In particular, clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been failing. Two of the potential reasons are first, the species gap involved in proceeding from initial discoveries in rodent models to human studies, and second, an unsatisfying patient stratification, meaning subgrouping patients based on the disease severity due to the lack of phenotypic and genetic markers. iPS cells overcome this obstacles and will improve our understanding of disease subtypes in AD. They allow researchers conducting in depth characterization of neural cells from both familial and sporadic AD patients as well as preclinical screens on human cells. In this review, we briefly outline the status quo of iPS cell research in neurological diseases along with the general advantages and pitfalls of these models. We summarize how genome-editing techniques such as CRISPR/Cas9 will allow researchers to reduce the problem of genomic variability inherent to human studies, followed by recent iPS cell studies relevant to AD. We then focus on current techniques for the differentiation of iPS cells into neural cell types that are relevant to AD research. Finally, we discuss how the generation of three-dimensional cell culture systems will be important for understanding AD phenotypes in a complex cellular milieu, and how both two- and three-dimensional iPS cell models can provide platforms for drug discovery and translational studies into the treatment of AD. PMID:26657644

  14. Modeling Alzheimer's disease with human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

    PubMed

    Mungenast, Alison E; Siegert, Sandra; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have revolutionized the utility of human in vitro models of neurological disease. The iPS-derived and differentiated cells allow researchers to study the impact of a distinct cell type in health and disease as well as performing therapeutic drug screens on a human genetic background. In particular, clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been failing. Two of the potential reasons are first, the species gap involved in proceeding from initial discoveries in rodent models to human studies, and second, an unsatisfying patient stratification, meaning subgrouping patients based on the disease severity due to the lack of phenotypic and genetic markers. iPS cells overcome this obstacles and will improve our understanding of disease subtypes in AD. They allow researchers conducting in depth characterization of neural cells from both familial and sporadic AD patients as well as preclinical screens on human cells. In this review, we briefly outline the status quo of iPS cell research in neurological diseases along with the general advantages and pitfalls of these models. We summarize how genome-editing techniques such as CRISPR/Cas9 will allow researchers to reduce the problem of genomic variability inherent to human studies, followed by recent iPS cell studies relevant to AD. We then focus on current techniques for the differentiation of iPS cells into neural cell types that are relevant to AD research. Finally, we discuss how the generation of three-dimensional cell culture systems will be important for understanding AD phenotypes in a complex cellular milieu, and how both two- and three-dimensional iPS cell models can provide platforms for drug discovery and translational studies into the treatment of AD.

  15. Transmission of PM-QPSK and PS-QPSK with different fiber span lengths.

    PubMed

    Sjödin, Martin; Puttnam, Ben J; Johannisson, Pontus; Shinada, Satoshi; Wada, Naoya; Andrekson, Peter A; Karlsson, Magnus

    2012-03-26

    We perform experimental and numerical investigations of the transmission reach of polarization-switched QPSK (PS-QPSK) and polarization-multiplexed QPSK (PM-QPSK) for three different fiber span lengths: 83, 111 and 136 km. In the experimental comparison we investigate the performance of PS-QPSK at 20 Gbaud and PM-QPSK at the same bit rate (60 Gbit/s) and at the same symbol rate, both the single channel case and a WDM system with 9 channels on a 50 GHz grid. We show that PS-QPSK gives significant benefits in transmission reach for all span lengths. Compared to PM-QPSK, use of PS-QPSK increases the reach with more than 41% for the same symbol rate and 21% for the same bit rate. In the numerical simulations we use the same data rates as in the experiment. The simulation results agree well with the experimental findings, but the transmission reach is longer due to the absence of various non-ideal effects and higher back-to-back sensitivity. Apart from using data coded in the absolute phase in the simulations, we also investigate differentially coded PS-QPSK for the first time and compare with PM-QPSK with differential coding. The power efficiency advantage of PS-QPSK then increases with approximately 0.3 dB at a bit error rate of 10⁻³, resulting in a further relative transmission reach improvement over PM-QPSK. Both the experimental and the numerical results indicate that PS-QPSK has slightly higher tolerance to inter-channel nonlinear crosstalk than PM-QPSK.

  16. Control of Appetite and Food Preference by NMDA Receptor and Its Co-Agonist d-Serine

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Matsui, Sho; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2016-01-01

    Obesity causes a significant negative impact on health of human beings world-wide. The main reason for weight gain, which eventually leads to obesity, is excessive ingestion of energy above the body’s homeostatic needs. Therefore, the elucidation of detailed mechanisms for appetite control is necessary to prevent and treat obesity. N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a post-synaptic glutamate receptor and is important for excitatory neurotransmission. It is expressed throughout the nervous system, and is important for long-term potentiation. It requires both ligand (glutamate) and co-agonist (d-serine or glycine) for efficient opening of the channel to allow calcium influx. d-serine is contained in fermented foods and marine invertebrates, and brain d-serine level is maintained by synthesis in vivo and supply from food and gut microbiota. Although the NMDA receptor has been reported to take part in the central regulation of appetite, the role of d-serine had not been addressed. We recently reported that exogenous d-serine administration can suppress appetite and alter food preference. In this review, we will discuss how NMDA receptor and its co-agonist d-seine participate in the control of appetite and food preference, and elaborate on how this system could possibly be manipulated to suppress obesity. PMID:27399680

  17. Control of Appetite and Food Preference by NMDA Receptor and Its Co-Agonist d-Serine.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Matsui, Sho; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2016-01-01

    Obesity causes a significant negative impact on health of human beings world-wide. The main reason for weight gain, which eventually leads to obesity, is excessive ingestion of energy above the body's homeostatic needs. Therefore, the elucidation of detailed mechanisms for appetite control is necessary to prevent and treat obesity. N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a post-synaptic glutamate receptor and is important for excitatory neurotransmission. It is expressed throughout the nervous system, and is important for long-term potentiation. It requires both ligand (glutamate) and co-agonist (d-serine or glycine) for efficient opening of the channel to allow calcium influx. d-serine is contained in fermented foods and marine invertebrates, and brain d-serine level is maintained by synthesis in vivo and supply from food and gut microbiota. Although the NMDA receptor has been reported to take part in the central regulation of appetite, the role of d-serine had not been addressed. We recently reported that exogenous d-serine administration can suppress appetite and alter food preference. In this review, we will discuss how NMDA receptor and its co-agonist d-seine participate in the control of appetite and food preference, and elaborate on how this system could possibly be manipulated to suppress obesity. PMID:27399680

  18. Modulation of the serine base exchange enzyme activity of rat brain membranes by amphiphilic cations and amphiphilic anions.

    PubMed

    Kanfer, J N; McCartney, D G

    1993-04-01

    The biosynthesis of phosphatidylserine in mammalian tissues is catalyzed by the serine base exchange enzyme. The activity of this membrane-bound enzyme can be manipulated by amphiphiles. Amphiphilic cations, such as oleylamine, W-7, chlorpromazine, and didodecyldimethylamine, stimulate the serine base exchange activity. Amphiphilic anions, such as bis(2-ethylhexyl) hydrogen phosphate and cholesterol sulfate, inhibit the serine base exchange activity. These effects are more pronounced at pH 7.0 than at the pH optimum of 8.5 for this enzyme. Both the stimulators and the inhibitors alter the Vmax values without changing the Km value for serine, suggesting that their mechanism of action is related to interactions of the membrane-bound cosubstrate, phosphatidylethanolamine, with the membrane-bound enzyme. The optimal concentration of stimulator varies with the amount of membrane protein present; however, supraoptimal concentrations cause inhibitions. It is proposed that the amphiphilic cations enhance the interaction of the phosphorylethanolamine moiety of the membrane-bound cosubstrate with the enzyme and the amphiphilic anions interfere with such an interaction. Some of the pharmacological properties of these amphiphilic cations, employed clinically as antidepressants, may be mediated by modulation of the serine base exchange enzyme activity.

  19. Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Activation Is Required for Serine 727 Phosphorylation of STAT3 in Schwann Cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Sang Hwa; Seo, Su-Yeong; Suh, Duk Joon

    2009-01-01

    In the peripheral nerves, injury-induced cytokines and growth factors perform critical functions in the activation of both the MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT3 pathways. In this study, we determined that nerve injury-induced ERK activation was temporally correlated with STAT3 phosphorylation at the serine 727 residue. In cultured Schwann cells, we noted that ERK activation is required for the serine phosphorylation of STAT3 by neuropoietic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Serine phosphorylated STAT3 by IL-6 was transported into Schwann cell nuclei, thereby indicating that ERK may regulate the transcriptional activity of STAT3 via the induction of serine phosphorylation of STAT3. Neuregulin-1 (NRG) also induced the serine phosphorylation of STAT3 in an ERK-dependent fashion. In contrast with the IL-6 response, serine phosphorylated STAT3 induced by NRG was not detected in the nucleus, thus indicating the non-nuclear function of serine phosphorylated STAT3 in response to NRG. Finally, we determined that the inhibition of ERK prevented injury-induced serine phosphorylation of STAT3 in an ex-vivo explants culture of the sciatic nerves. Collectively, the results of this study show that ERK may be an upstream kinase for the serine phosphorylation of STAT3 induced by multiple stimuli in Schwann cells after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:19885032

  20. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, which is dependent on the auto-activation of the kinase activation loop, contributes to its oncogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Jingdong; McMullen, Todd; Young, Leah C; Ingham, Robert J; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond

    2011-02-01

    It is well established that the tumorigenic potential of nucleophosmin (NPM)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), an oncogenic tyrosine kinase, is dependent on its tyrosine phosphorylation. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we found evidence of phosphorylation of three serine residues of NPM-ALK (Serine¹³⁵, Serine¹⁶⁴ and Serine⁴⁹⁷) ectopically expressed in GP293 cells. Using a specific anti-phosphoserine antibody and immunoprecipitation, we confirmed the presence of serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK in all three NPM-ALK-expressing cell lines examined. Similar to the tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphorylation of these serine residues was dependent on the activation status of the kinase activation loop of ALK. All of these three serine residues are biologically important as mutation of any one of these residues resulted in a significant reduction in the tumorigenicity of NPM-ALK (assessed by cell viability and clonogenic assay), which correlated with a substantial reduction in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-jun N-terminal kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK appears to be regulated by multiple serine kinases since it was markedly reduced by pharmacologic inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase-3, casein kinase I or mitogen-activated protein kinases. In summary, our study is the first to identify serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK and to provide evidence that it enhances the tumorigenic potential of this oncogenic protein.

  1. Comprehensive Analysis of a Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strain Extracellular Serine Protease VpSP37

    PubMed Central

    Bennici, Carmelo; Quatrini, Paola; Catania, Valentina; Mazzola, Salvatore; Ghersi, Giulio; Cuttitta, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Proteases play an important role in the field of tissue dissociation combined with regenerative medicine. During the years new sources of proteolytic enzymes have been studied including proteases from different marine organisms both eukaryotic and prokaryotic. Herein we have purified a secreted component of an isolate of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, with electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to 36 kDa, belonging to the serine proteases family. Sequencing of the N-terminus enabled the in silico identification of the whole primary structure consisting of 345 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 37.4 KDa. The purified enzyme, named VpSP37, contains a Serine protease domain between residues 35 and 276 and a canonical Trypsin/Chimotrypsin 3D structure. Functional assays were performed to evaluate protease activity of purified enzyme. Additionally the performance of VpSP37 was evaluated in tissue dissociations experiments and the use of such enzyme as a component of enzyme blend for tissue dissociation procedures is strongly recommended. PMID:26162075

  2. An evaluation of chromogenic substrates for characterization of serine protease produced by pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Chen, F R; Liu, P C; Lee, K K

    1999-01-01

    Four chromogenic substrates for characterizing serine protease of Vibrio alginolyticus were evaluated. The protease activity of bacterial extracellular products, or the fractions of 33 kD protease purified by the AKTA purifier system with various columns, was completely inhibited by ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid, ethylene glycol-bis(beta-amino-ethyl ether) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), antipain and phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride (PMSF) using water-soluble substrates (azoalbumin and azocasein). It was only completely inhibited by antipain and PMSF using water-insoluble substrates (azocoll and hide powder azure). The protease activity was not, or only partially, inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) using all four substrates. Since chelating agents and 1,10-phenanthroline are commonly employed as inhibitors to identify metalloprotease, the two water-soluble substrates may not be appropriate for this purpose, except for using 1,10-phenanthroline as an inhibitor. Chelating agents may be still applicable as inhibitors using water-insoluble substrates and 1,10-phenanthroline is highly recommended in the characterization for metalloprotease to avoid confusion. In the present study, the 33 kD protease was further confirmed as an SDS-resistant serine protease and not a metalloprotease. PMID:10413876

  3. A serine proteinase homologue, SPH-3, plays a central role in insect immunity.

    PubMed

    Felföldi, Gabriella; Eleftherianos, Ioannis; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Venekei, István

    2011-04-15

    Numerous vertebrate and invertebrate genes encode serine proteinase homologues (SPHs) similar to members of the serine proteinase family, but lacking one or more residues of the catalytic triad. These SPH proteins are thought to play a role in immunity, but their precise functions are poorly understood. In this study, we show that SPH-3 (an insect non-clip domain-containing SPH) is of central importance in the immune response of a model lepidopteran, Manduca sexta. We examine M. sexta infection with a virulent, insect-specific, Gram-negative bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. RNA interference suppression of bacteria-induced SPH-3 synthesis severely compromises the insect's ability to defend itself against infection by preventing the transcription of multiple antimicrobial effector genes, but, surprisingly, not the transcription of immune recognition genes. Upregulation of the gene encoding prophenoloxidase and the activity of the phenoloxidase enzyme are among the antimicrobial responses that are severely attenuated on SPH-3 knockdown. These findings suggest the existence of two largely independent signaling pathways controlling immune recognition by the fat body, one governing effector gene transcription, and the other regulating genes encoding pattern recognition proteins.

  4. Biochemical characterization of a detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Caldicoprobacter guelmensis.

    PubMed

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Laribi-Habchi, Hassiba; Elhoul, Mouna Ben; Hmida-Sayari, Aïda; Hacene, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Jaouadi, Bassem; Bejar, Samir

    2015-11-01

    Caldicoprobacter guelmensis isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma (Algeria) produced high amounts of extracellular thermostable serine alkaline protease (called SAPCG) (23,000U/mL). The latter was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, UNO Q-6 FPLC and Zorbex PSM 300 HPLC, and submitted to biochemical characterization assays. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer, with a molecular mass of 55,824.19Da. The 19 N-terminal residue sequence of SAPCG showed high homology with those of microbial proteases. The enzyme was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and diiodopropyl fluorophosphates (DFP), which suggested its belonging to the serine protease family. It showed optimum protease activity at pH 10 and 70°C with casein as a substrate. The thermoactivity and thermostability of SAPCG were enhanced in the presence of 2mM Ca(2+). Its half-life times at 80 and 90°C were 180 and 60min, respectively. Interestingly, the SAPCG protease exhibited significant compatibility with iSiS and Persil, and wash performance analysis revealed that it could remove blood-stains effectively. Overall, SAPCG displayed a number of attractive properties that make it a promising candidate for future applications as an additive in detergent formulations.

  5. Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase 1 and 2: Gene Sequence Variation and Functional Genomic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Hebbring, Scott J.; Chai, Yubo; Ji, Yuan; Abo, Ryan P.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Fridley, Brooke; Zhang, Jianping; Eckloff, Bruce W.; Wieben, Eric D.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) catalyzes the transfer of a beta carbon from serine to tetrahydrofolate (THF) to form glycine and 5,10-methylene-THF. This reaction plays an important role in neurotransmitter synthesis and metabolism. We set out to resequence SHMT1 and SHMT2, followed by functional genomic studies. We identified 87 and 60 polymorphisms in SHMT1 and SHMT2, respectively. We observed no significant functional effect of the 13 nonsynonymous SNPs in these genes, either on catalytic activity or protein quantity. We imputed additional variants across the two genes using “1000 Genomes” data, and identified 14 variants that were significantly associated (p-value < 1.0E-10) with SHMT1 mRNA expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines. Many of these SNPs were also significantly correlated with basal SHMT1 protein expression in 268 human liver biopsy samples. Reporter gene assays suggested that the SHMT1 promoter SNP, rs669340, contributed to this variation. Finally, SHMT1 and SHMT2 expression were significantly correlated with those of other Folate and Methionine Cycle genes at both the mRNA and protein levels. These experiments represent a comprehensive study of SHMT1 and SHMT2 gene sequence variation and its functional implications. In addition, we obtained preliminary indications that these genes may be co-regulated with other Folate and Methionine Cycle genes. PMID:22220685

  6. A novel serine protease with human fibrino(geno)lytic activities from Artocarpus heterophyllus latex.

    PubMed

    Siritapetawee, Jaruwan; Thumanu, Kanjana; Sojikul, Punchapat; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-07-01

    A protease was isolated and purified from Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) latex and designated as a 48-kDa antimicrobial protease (AMP48) in a previous publication. In this work, the enzyme was characterized for more biochemical and medicinal properties. Enzyme activity of AMP48 was strongly inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and soybean trypsin inhibitor, indicating that the enzyme was a plant serine protease. The N-terminal amino acid sequences (A-Q-E-G-G-K-D-D-D-G-G) of AMP48 had no sequence similarity matches with any sequence databases of BLAST search and other plant serine protease. The secondary structure of this enzyme was composed of high α-helix (51%) and low β-sheet (9%). AMP48 had fibrinogenolytic activity with maximal activity between 55 and 60°C at pH 8. The enzyme efficiently hydrolyzed α followed by partially hydrolyzed β and γ subunits of human fibrinogen. In addition, the fibrinolytic activity was observed through the degradation products by SDS-PAGE and emphasized its activity by monitoring the alteration of secondary structure of fibrin clot after enzyme digestion using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. This study presented the potential role to use AMP48 as antithrombotic for treatment thromboembolic disorders such as strokes, pulmonary emboli and deep vein thrombosis.

  7. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 and 2: gene sequence variation and functional genomic characterization.

    PubMed

    Hebbring, Scott J; Chai, Yubo; Ji, Yuan; Abo, Ryan P; Jenkins, Gregory D; Fridley, Brooke; Zhang, Jianping; Eckloff, Bruce W; Wieben, Eric D; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2012-03-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) catalyzes the transfer of a β-carbon from serine to tetrahydrofolate to form glycine and 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. This reaction plays an important role in neurotransmitter synthesis and metabolism. We set out to resequence SHMT1 and SHMT2, followed by functional genomic studies. We identified 87 and 60 polymorphisms in SHMT1 and SHMT2, respectively. We observed no significant functional effect of the 13 non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in these genes, either on catalytic activity or protein quantity. We imputed additional variants across the two genes using '1000 Genomes' data, and identified 14 variants that were significantly associated (p<1.0E-10) with SHMT1 messenger RNA expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines. Many of these SNPs were also significantly correlated with basal SHMT1 protein expression in 268 human liver biopsy samples. Reporter gene assays suggested that the SHMT1 promoter SNP, rs669340, contributed to this variation. Finally, SHMT1 and SHMT2 expression were significantly correlated with those of other Folate and Methionine Cycle genes at both the messenger RNA and protein levels. These experiments represent a comprehensive study of SHMT1 and SHMT2 gene sequence variation and its functional implications. In addition, we obtained preliminary indications that these genes may be co-regulated with other Folate and Methionine Cycle genes.

  8. Inhibition of Aeromonas sobria serine protease (ASP) by α2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoji; Wada, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Hidetomo; Irie, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Yamanaka, Hiroyasu; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Eto, Masatoshi; Imamura, Takahisa

    2012-10-01

    ASP is a serine protease secreted by Aeromonas sobria. ASP cleaves various plasma proteins, which is associated with onset of sepsis complications, such as shock and blood coagulation disorder. To investigate a host defense mechanism against this virulence factor, we examined the plasma for ASP inhibitor(s). Human plasma inhibited ASP activity for azocasein, which was almost completely abolished by treating plasma with methylamine, which inactivates α2-macroglobulin (α2-MG). The ASP-inhibitor complex in ASP-added plasma was not detected by immunoblotting using anti-ASP antibody; however, using gel filtration of the plasma ASP activity for an oligopeptide, the ASP substrate was eluted in the void fraction (Mw>200 000), suggesting ASP trapping by α2-MG. Indeed, human α2-MG inhibited ASP azocaseinolytic activity in a dose-dependent manner, rapidly forming a complex with the ASP. Fibrinogen degradation by ASP was completely inhibited in the presence of α2-MG. α1-Protease inhibitor, antithrombin, and α2-plasmin inhibitor neither inhibited ASP activity nor formed a complex with ASP. Surprisingly, ASP degraded these plasma serine protease inhibitors. Thus, α2-MG is the major ASP inhibitor in the human plasma and can limit ASP virulence activities in A. sobria infection sites. However, as shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, slow ASP inhibition by α2-MG in plasma may indicate insufficient ASP control in vivo.

  9. A Novel Serine Protease Secreted by Medicinal Maggots Enhances Plasminogen Activator-Induced Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Mariena J. A.; Andersen, Anders S.; Nazir, Sheresma; van Tilburg, Nico H.; Oestergaard, Peter R.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Hensbergen, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. As haemostatic processes play an important role in wound healing, this study focused on the effects of maggot secretions on coagulation and fibrinolysis. The results showed that maggot secretions enhance plasminogen activator-induced formation of plasmin and fibrinolysis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By contrast, coagulation was not affected by secretions. Biochemical studies indicated that a novel serine protease within secretions, designated Sericase, cleaved plasminogen to several fragments. Recombinant Sericase degraded plasminogen leading amongst others to the formation of the mini-plasminogen like fragment Val454-plasminogen. In addition, the presence of a non-proteolytic cofactor in secretions was discovered, which plays a role in the enhancement of plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis by Sericase. We conclude from our in vitro studies that the novel serine protease Sericase, with the aid of a non-proteolytic cofactor, enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis. PMID:24647546

  10. Chlamydia Serine Protease Inhibitor, targeting HtrA, as a New Treatment for Koala Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Amba; Fraser, Tamieka; Gillett, Amber; Tyndall, Joel D A; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam; Huston, Wilhelmina M

    2016-01-01

    The koala, an iconic marsupial native to Australia, is a threatened species in many parts of the country. One major factor in the decline is disease caused by infection with Chlamydia. Current therapeutic strategies to treat chlamydiosis in the koala are limited. This study examines the effectiveness of an inhibitor, JO146, which targets the HtrA serine protease for treatment of C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae in vitro and ex vivo with the aim of developing a novel therapeutic for koala Chlamydia infections. Clinical isolates from koalas were examined for their susceptibility to JO146. In vitro studies demonstrated that treatment with JO146 during the mid-replicative phase of C. pecorum or C. pneumoniae infections resulted in a significant loss of infectious progeny. Ex vivo primary koala tissue cultures were used to demonstrate the efficacy of JO146 and the non-toxic nature of this compound on peripheral blood mononuclear cells and primary cell lines established from koala tissues collected at necropsy. Our results suggest that inhibition of the serine protease HtrA could be a novel treatment strategy for chlamydiosis in koalas. PMID:27530689

  11. Purification and characterization of a novel serine protease from the mushroom Pholiota nameko.

    PubMed

    Guan, Gui-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Ying-Ying; Wang, He-Xiang; Ng, Tzi-Bun

    2011-06-01

    A novel serine protease, with a molecular mass of 19 kDa and the N-terminal sequence of ARTPEAPAEV, was isolated from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Pholiota nameko. The purification protocol comprised ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose and SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration on Superdex 75. It was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and Q-Sepharose but adsorbed on SP-Sepharose. It exhibited an optimum temperature at 50°C, an optimum pH at pH 8.8, a Km of 5.64 mg/mL and a Vmax of 0.98 μmol/min/mL against substrate casein. A number of metal ions inhibited the enzyme including Pb(2+), Mn(2+), Ca(2+), Hg(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Fe(3+) and Al(3+), with the inhibition of the last two cations being the most potent. K(+) and Mg(2+) slightly enhanced, while Li(+) moderately potentiated the activity of the protease. The protease was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), suggesting that it is a serine protease.

  12. A chemical proteomic atlas of brain serine hydrolases identifies cell type-specific pathways regulating neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Viader, Andreu; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Joslyn, Christopher M; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Mori, Simone; Nguyen, William; Conti, Bruno; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic specialization among major brain cell types is central to nervous system function and determined in large part by the cellular distribution of enzymes. Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class that plays fundamental roles in CNS metabolism and signaling. Here, we perform an activity-based proteomic analysis of primary mouse neurons, astrocytes, and microglia to furnish a global portrait of the cellular anatomy of serine hydrolases in the brain. We uncover compelling evidence for the cellular compartmentalization of key chemical transmission pathways, including the functional segregation of endocannabinoid (eCB) biosynthetic enzymes diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLα) and –beta (DAGLβ) to neurons and microglia, respectively. Disruption of DAGLβ perturbed eCB-eicosanoid crosstalk specifically in microglia and suppressed neuroinflammatory events in vivo independently of broader effects on eCB content. Mapping the cellular distribution of metabolic enzymes thus identifies pathways for regulating specialized inflammatory responses in the brain while avoiding global alterations in CNS function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12345.001 PMID:26779719

  13. Tryptogalinin Is a Tick Kunitz Serine Protease Inhibitor with a Unique Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, James J.; Schwarz, Alexandra; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Calvo, Eric; Pedra, Joao H. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background A salivary proteome-transcriptome project on the hard tick Ixodes scapularis revealed that Kunitz peptides are the most abundant salivary proteins. Ticks use Kunitz peptides (among other salivary proteins) to combat host defense mechanisms and to obtain a blood meal. Most of these Kunitz peptides, however, remain functionally uncharacterized, thus limiting our knowledge about their biochemical interactions. Results We discovered an unusual cysteine motif in a Kunitz peptide. This peptide inhibits several serine proteases with high affinity and was named tryptogalinin due to its high affinity for β-tryptase. Compared with other functionally described peptides from the Acari subclass, we showed that tryptogalinin is phylogenetically related to a Kunitz peptide from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, also reported to have a high affinity for β-tryptase. Using homology-based modeling (and other protein prediction programs) we were able to model and explain the multifaceted function of tryptogalinin. The N-terminus of the modeled tryptogalinin is detached from the rest of the peptide and exhibits intrinsic disorder allowing an increased flexibility for its high affinity with its inhibiting partners (i.e., serine proteases). Conclusions By incorporating experimental and computational methods our data not only describes the function of a Kunitz peptide from Ixodes scapularis, but also allows us to hypothesize about the molecular basis of this function at the atomic level. PMID:23658744

  14. Serine protease inhibitors block priming of monocytes for enhanced release of superoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Megyeri, P; Pabst, K M; Pabst, M J

    1995-01-01

    Monocytes freshly isolated from human blood produced large amounts of superoxide when triggered by phorbol ester. After monocytes were cultured for 18-24 hr in endotoxin-free, non-adherent conditions, they produced low amounts of superoxide. Addition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), or platelet-activating factor (PAF) at the beginning of culture 'primed' the monocytes, causing them to maintain a high superoxide response for at least 96 hr. Also, in response to LPS, monocytes secreted TNF-alpha. The ability of LPS, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha or PAF to maintain the high superoxide response was blocked by addition of inhibitors of serine proteases, either 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulphonyl fluoride (AEBSF) or 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin. AEBSF was most effective at 200 microns, and required 6 hr for maximum effect. AEBSF did not affect phorbol-triggered superoxide release by unprimed monocytes. AEBSF did not affect cell viability, nor did it interfere with the TNF-alpha secretion in response to LPS. An analogue of AEBSF that lacked ability to inhibit proteases did not affect monocyte responses. 3,4-Dichloroisocoumarin blocked priming at a low concentration, 1 microM. We conclude that activity of a monocyte serine protease is required to maintain the high superoxide response in monocytes primed with LPS, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, or PAF. PMID:8567031

  15. Rapid Optimization of Engineered Metabolic Pathways with Serine Integrase Recombinational Assembly (SIRA).

    PubMed

    Merrick, C A; Wardrope, C; Paget, J E; Colloms, S D; Rosser, S J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering in microbial hosts for heterologous biosynthesis of commodity compounds and fine chemicals offers a cheaper, greener, and more reliable method of production than does chemical synthesis. However, engineering metabolic pathways within a microbe is a complicated process: levels of gene expression, protein stability, enzyme activity, and metabolic flux must be balanced for high productivity without compromising host cell viability. A major rate-limiting step in engineering microbes for optimum biosynthesis of a target compound is DNA assembly, as current methods can be cumbersome and costly. Serine integrase recombinational assembly (SIRA) is a rapid DNA assembly method that utilizes serine integrases, and is particularly applicable to rapid optimization of engineered metabolic pathways. Using six pairs of orthogonal attP and attB sites with different central dinucleotide sequences that follow SIRA design principles, we have demonstrated that ΦC31 integrase can be used to (1) insert a single piece of DNA into a substrate plasmid; (2) assemble three, four, and five DNA parts encoding the enzymes for functional metabolic pathways in a one-pot reaction; (3) generate combinatorial libraries of metabolic pathway constructs with varied ribosome binding site strengths or gene orders in a one-pot reaction; and (4) replace and add DNA parts within a construct through targeted postassembly modification. We explain the mechanism of SIRA and the principles behind designing a SIRA reaction. We also provide protocols for making SIRA reaction components and practical methods for applying SIRA to rapid optimization of metabolic pathways.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  17. Structural and functional characterization of phosphomimetic mutants of cytochrome c at threonine 28 and serine 47.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Castellano, Alejandra; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Protein function is frequently modulated by post-translational modifications of specific residues. Cytochrome c, in particular, is phosphorylated in vivo at threonine 28 and serine 47. However, the effect of such modifications on the physiological functions of cytochrome c - namely, the transfer of electrons in the respiratory electron transport chain and the triggering of programmed cell death - is still unknown. Here we replace each of these two residues by aspartate, in order to mimic phosphorylation, and report the structural and functional changes in the resulting cytochrome c variants. We find that the T28D mutant causes a 30-mV decrease on the midpoint redox potential and lowers the affinity for the distal site of Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c1 in complex III. Both the T28D and S47D variants display a higher efficiency as electron donors for the cytochrome c oxidase activity of complex IV. In both protein mutants, the peroxidase activity is significantly higher, which is related to the ability of cytochrome c to leave the mitochondria and reach the cytoplasm. We also find that both mutations at serine 47 (S47D and S47A) impair the ability of cytoplasmic cytochrome c to activate the caspases cascade, which is essential for triggering programmed cell death.

  18. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  19. Crystal Structure of a Novel Viral Protease with a Serine/Lysine Catalytic Dyad Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman,A.; Lee, J.; Delmas, B.; Paetzel, M.

    2006-01-01

    The blotched snakehead virus (BSNV), an aquatic birnavirus, encodes a polyprotein (NH2-pVP2-X-VP4-VP3-COOH) that is processed through the proteolytic activity of its own protease (VP4) to liberate itself and the viral proteins pVP2, X and VP3. The protein pVP2 is further processed by VP4 to give rise to the capsid protein VP2 and four structural peptides. We report here the crystal structure of a VP4 protease from BSNV, which displays a catalytic serine/lysine dyad in its active site. This is the first crystal structure of a birnavirus protease and the first crystal structure of a viral protease that utilizes a lysine general base in its catalytic mechanism. The topology of the VP4 substrate binding site is consistent with the enzymes substrate specificity and a nucleophilic attack from the si-face of the substrates scissile bond. Despite low levels of sequence identity, VP4 shows similarities in its active site to other characterized Ser/Lys proteases such as signal peptidase, LexA protease and Lon protease. Together, the structure of VP4 provides insights into the mechanism of a recently characterized clan of serine proteases that utilize a lysine general base and reveals the structure of potential targets for antiviral therapy, especially for other related and economically important viruses, such as infectious bursal disease virus in poultry and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in aquaculture.

  20. A single ancient origin for prototypical serine/arginine-rich splicing factors.

    PubMed

    Califice, Sophie; Baurain, Denis; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Eukaryotic precursor mRNA splicing is a process involving a very complex RNA-protein edifice. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play essential roles in precursor mRNA constitutive and alternative splicing and have been suggested to be crucial in plant-specific forms of developmental regulation and environmental adaptation. Despite their functional importance, little is known about their origin and evolutionary history. SR splicing factors have a modular organization featuring at least one RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain and a carboxyl-terminal region enriched in serine/arginine dipeptides. To investigate the evolution of SR proteins, we infer phylogenies for more than 12,000 RRM domains representing more than 200 broadly sampled organisms. Our analyses reveal that the RRM domain is not restricted to eukaryotes and that all prototypical SR proteins share a single ancient origin, including the plant-specific SR45 protein. Based on these findings, we propose a scenario for their diversification into four natural families, each corresponding to a main SR architecture, and a dozen subfamilies, of which we profile both sequence conservation and composition. Finally, using operational criteria for computational discovery and classification, we catalog SR proteins in 20 model organisms, with a focus on green algae and land plants. Altogether, our study confirms the homogeneity and antiquity of SR splicing factors while establishing robust phylogenetic relationships between animal and plant proteins, which should enable functional analyses of lesser characterized SR family members, especially in green plants. PMID:22158759