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Sample records for phosphatidylcholine molecular species

  1. Quantitative analysis of phosphatidylcholine molecular species using HPLC and light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, J F; Gadella, B M; van Golde, L M; Tielens, A G

    1998-02-01

    A number of HPLC chromatographic procedures can be used to separate intact molecular species of phosphatidylcholine (PC), but on-line quantification has remained problematic due to insensitivity of UV-detection for saturated species. Here, a new method is presented, separating all major PC molecular species from a variety of biological samples in intact form using a single, short and isocratic run. Species were separated on two RP18 reverse-phase columns in series and all species displayed an exponential relation between retention time and the percentage of acetonitrile or triethylamine in the mobile phase, allowing optimization of the mobile phase on a theoretical base, rather than on time-consuming test-runs. The use of triethylamine as a volatile additive instead of choline chloride allowed the use of light scattering detection. On a molar base, the response of the detector was invariant between species and allowed quantification of as little as 50 pmoles. The method was tested using phosphatidylcholines with widely different molecular species patterns, such a PC from rat liver, porcine pulmonary surfactant, bovine heart, boar sperm cells, and the parasite Schistosoma mansoni. As only volatile components are present in the solvents, individual molecular species can easily be recovered in pure form from the column effluent, enabling their further analysis (e.g., scintillation counting).

  2. Distribution of plasma phosphatidylcholine molecular species in rabbits fed fish oil is modulated by dietary n-6 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Koba, K; Horrobin, D F; DeMarco, A C; Ni, I H; Huang, Y S

    1995-12-01

    The present study examined the distribution of plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecular species in rabbits fed a chow diet supplemented with fish oil (FO) in combination with either hydrogenated coconut oil or the n-6 fatty acid-rich evening primrose oil (EPO) for 4 weeks. Significant proportions of plasma PC molecular species contained long-chain n-3 fatty acids. Addition of EPO to the FO supplemented diet increased the incorporation of n-6 fatty acids into plasma PC molecules; it also raised the proportions of 16:0-18:2, n-6, 18:1-18:2, n-6, 18:2, n-6-18:2, n-6, and 16:0-20:4, n-6. The increase of n-6 fatty acid-containing PC was at the expense of n-3 fatty acid containing PC species. However, feeding n-6 fatty acids did not affect the distribution of PC molecular species based on total carbon chain length. The most interesting observation was that dietary suplementation with EPO, raised the ratio of 22:6, n-3-containing to 20:5, n-3-containing molecular species, suggesting an enhanced conversion of 20:5, n-3 to 22:6, n-3.

  3. Investigation of natural phosphatidylcholine sources: separation and identification by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS2) of molecular species.

    PubMed

    Le Grandois, Julie; Marchioni, Eric; Zhao, Minjie; Giuffrida, Francesca; Ennahar, Saïd; Bindler, Françoise

    2009-07-22

    This study is a contribution to the exploration of natural phospholipid (PL) sources rich in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) with nutritional interest. Phosphatidylcholines (PCs) were purified from total lipid extracts of different food matrices, and their molecular species were separated and identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS(2)). Fragmentation of lithiated adducts allowed for the identification of fatty acids linked to the glycerol backbone. Soy PC was particularly rich in species containing essential fatty acids, such as (18:2-18:2)PC (34.0%), (16:0-18:2)PC (20.8%), and (18:1-18:2)PC (16.3%). PC from animal sources (ox liver and egg yolk) contained major molecular species, such as (16:0-18:2)PC, (16:0-18:1)PC, (18:0-18:2)PC, or (18:0-18:1)PC. Finally, marine source (krill oil), which was particularly rich in (16:0-20:5)PC and (16:0-22:6)PC, appeared to be an interesting potential source for food supplementation with LC-PUFA-PLs, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

  4. Identification of volatiles from oxidised phosphatidylcholine molecular species using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Zhao, Minjie; Khalil, Ali; Marcic, Christophe; Bindler, Françoise; Marchioni, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS) was used to investigate the volatile compounds from oxidised phosphatidylcholine molecular species. 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC) and 1-stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SLPC) were chosen as models. The influence of several parameters on the efficiency of volatile oxidised compounds (VOCs) microextraction, such as type of fibre, extraction duration and temperature were studied. The best results were obtained with a polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fibre used at 50 °C during 25 min. The effect of oxidation temperature on the yield of VOCs from SOPC and SLPC was investigated. Oxidative kinetics of SOPC and SLPC were investigated by measuring both the production of VOCs and the degradation of starting materials. More than 30 VOCs were detected by means of the reference mass spectra of the National Institute of Standards and Technology mass spectral library, and most of them were further confirmed by comparing their mass spectra and retention time with those obtained from authentic reference compounds under the same analytical conditions. Moreover, the origins of VOCs from oxidised PLs were studied by comparing those obtained from their corresponding triacylglycerides under the same experimental conditions. The main VOCs identified from oxidised SOPC were (E)-2-decenal, nonanal and octanal and from oxidised SLPC were (E)-2-heptenal, (E)-2-octenal and (E, E)-2,4-decadienal. The proposed method was applied to a real food sample, soy lecithin.

  5. Molecular characterization of a phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Preuss, I; Kaiser, I; Gehring, U

    2001-10-01

    While searching for a phospholipase C (PLC) specific for phosphatidylcholine in mammalian tissues, we came across such an activity originating from a contamination of Pseudomonas fluorescens. This psychrophilic bacterium was found to contaminate placental extracts upon processing in the cold. The secreted phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing PLC was purified by a combination of chromatographic procedures. As substrates, the enzyme preferred dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-phosphatidylcholine over phosphatidylinositol. The active enzyme is a monomer of approximately 40 kDa. As for other bacterial PLCs, the enzyme requires Ca2+ and Zn2+ for activity; dithiothreitol affected the activity due to its chelation of Zn2+, but this inhibition could be compensated for by addition of ZnCl2. The compound D609, described to selectively inhibit phosphatidylcholine-specific PLCs, caused half-inhibition of the P. fluorescens enzyme at approximately 420 microM, while 50-fold lower concentrations similarly affected PLCs from Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens. Partial peptide sequences obtained from the pure P. fluorescens enzyme after tryptic cleavage were used to clone a DNA fragment of 3.5 kb from a P. fluorescens gene library prepared from our laboratory isolate. It contains an ORF of 1155 nucleotides encoding the PLC. There is no significant sequence homology to other PLCs, suggesting that the P. fluorescens enzyme represents a distinct subclass of bacterial PLCs. The protein lacks cysteine residues and consequently contains no disulfide bonds. Interestingly, P. fluorescens reference strain DSMZ 50090 is devoid of the PLC activity described here as well as of the relevant coding sequence.

  6. Do cholinephosphotransferase and phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase synthesize different species of phosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.H.; Moore, T.S.

    1986-04-01

    Two pathways exist for phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis in castor bean endosperm. The major pathway utilizes the reaction; (CDPcholine + diacylglycerol ..-->.. PC + CMP) while the other is through (PE + 3 S-Adenosylmethioninie ..-->.. PC + 3 homocysteine). The reason for two pathways is not clear. In an effort to determine if they produce two different products, radioactive precursors (SAM and CDPcholine) were administered to isolated endoplasmic reticulum from the castor bean endosperm. The products were extracted, chromatographed on TLC, and the PC classes separated by argentation chromatography. The radioactivity was determined by a RTLC Scanner. By these methods, it has been determined that there are differences between the PC products of the methyltransferase and the cholinephosphotransferase.

  7. Egg-sphingomyelin and cholesterol form a stoichiometric molecular complex in bilayers of egg-phosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Peter J; Wolf, Claude

    2010-12-02

    Sphingomyelin and cholesterol are membrane lipids that interact to form liquid-ordered phase believed to act as a platform for the organization of signaling proteins. We report analyses of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction patterns recorded from aqueous dispersions of ternary mixtures of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk and cholesterol to investigate how cholesterol distributes between the two phospholipids. In the absence of cholesterol the two phospholipids are immiscible between 20 and 50 °C. Addition of up to 22 mol % cholesterol to equimolar mixtures of the phospholipids results in partition of some sphingomyelin into a phosphatidylcholine phase at 37 °C. Increased proportions of cholesterol result in partition of the excess cholesterol into the phosphatidylcholine phase which is in equilibrium with a stoichiometric complex of 1.7:1, sphingomyelin:cholesterol. The molecular order of the complex may explain the basis upon which proteins are assembled within the membrane raft.

  8. Prediction of water-phosphatidylcholine membrane partition coefficient of some drugs from their molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Mohammad Hossein; Moghaddam, Masoomeh Raei

    2012-10-01

    In this work, the phosphatidylcholine membrane-water partition coefficients (MA) of some drugs were estimated from their theoretical derived molecular descriptors by applying quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methodology. The data set consisted of 46 drugs where their log MA were determined experimentally. Descriptors used in this work were calculated by DRAGON (version 1) package, on the basis of optimized molecular structures, and the most relevant descriptors were selected by stepwise multilinear regressions (MLRs). These descriptors were used to developing linear and nonlinear models by using MLR and artificial neural networks (ANNs), respectively. During this investigation, the best QSAR model was identified when using the ANN model that produced a reasonable level of correlation coefficients (R(train) = 0.995, R(test) = 0.948) and low standard error (SE(train) = 0.099, SE(test) = 0.326). The built model was fully assessed by various validation methods, including internal and external validation test, Y-randomization test, and cross-validation (Q(2) = 0.805). The results of this investigation revealed the applicability of QSAR approaches in the estimation of phosphatidylcholine membrane-water partition coefficients.

  9. Quantitation of isobaric phosphatidylcholine species in human plasma using a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) species in human plasma are used as biomarkers of disease. PC biomarkers are often limited by the inability to separate isobaric PC. In this work, we developed a targeted shotgun approach for analysis of isobaric and isomeric PC. This approach is comprised of two mass spectr...

  10. MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass Spectrometric Determination and Antioxidative Activity of Purified Phosphatidylcholine Fractions from Shrimp Species.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xiaolin; Liang, Yi; Huang, Zheng; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2017-02-15

    Purification, characterization, and antioxidative activity in vitro of shrimp phosphatidylcholines (PCs) were investigated. The molecular structures of shrimp PCs were determined by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. The MS(2) fragments produced from protonated PC precursors and sodiated PC precursors were identified. The specific fragments including [M + Na - trimethylamine](+), [M + Na - 205](+), [M + Na - RCOOH - trimethylamine](+), and [M + H - RCOOH - trimethylamine](+) could distinguish the precursor type to confirm PC molecular structures. The antioxidative activities of purified shrimp PC fractions were evaluated by assay of DPPH free radical scavenging activity, and their effects on the oxidative stability of camellia oil were measured by monitoring changes in the peroxide value assay during oxidation. The PC fractions from Penaeus chinesis and Macrobranchium nipponense showed stronger antioxidative activities than those of other species. All of the shrimp PCs at 0.2% (w/w) improved the oxidative stability of camellia oil significantly (P < 0.05) compared to controls. The experimental findings suggest that shrimp PCs might be a valuable source of natural antioxidants for edible oils or other food dispersions.

  11. Numerical simulation of physicochemical interactions between oxygen atom and phosphatidylcholine due to direct irradiation of atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma to biological membrane with quantum mechanical molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Satoshi; Yoshida, Taketo; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2017-10-01

    Plasma medicine is one of the most attractive applications using atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma. With respect to direct contact of the discharge plasma with a biological membrane, reactive oxygen species play an important role in induction of medical effects. However, complicated interactions between the plasma radicals and membrane have not been understood well. In the present work, we simulated elemental processes at the first stage of physicochemical interactions between oxygen atom and phosphatidylcholine using the quantum mechanical molecular dynamics code in a general software AMBER. The change in the above processes was classified according to the incident energy of oxygen atom. At an energy of 1 eV, the abstraction of a hydrogen atom and recombination to phosphatidylcholine were simultaneously occurred in chemical attachment of incident oxygen atom. The exothermal energy of the reaction was about 80% of estimated one based on the bond energies of ethane. An oxygen atom over 10 eV separated phosphatidylcholine partially. The behaviour became increasingly similar to physical sputtering. The reaction probability of oxygen atom was remarkably high in comparison with that of hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that we can uniformly estimate various physicochemical dynamics of reactive oxygen species against membrane lipids.

  12. The Distribution of Phosphatidylcholine Species in Superficial-Type Pharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaka, Takahiro; Shinriki, Satoru; Masaki, Noritaka; Hirano, Shigeru; Kitamura, Morimasa; Muto, Manabu; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Juichi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. Superficial-type pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (STPSCC) is defined as carcinoma in situ or microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma without invasion to the muscular layer. An exploration of the biological characteristics of STPSCC could uncover the invasion mechanism of this carcinoma. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) in combination with fatty acids is considered to play an important role in cell motility. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is especially suitable for phospholipid analysis because this technique can distinguish even fatty acid compositions. Study Design. IMS analysis of frozen human specimens. Methods. IMS analysis was conducted to elucidate the distribution of PC species in STPSCC tissues. STPSCC tissue sections from five patients were analyzed, and we identified the signals that showed significant increases in the subepithelial invasive region relative to the superficial region. Results. Three kinds of PC species containing arachidonic acid, that is, PC (16:0/20:4), PC (18:1/20:4), and PC (18:0/20:4), were increased in the subepithelial invasive region. Conclusion. These results may be associated with the invasion mechanism of hypopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:28373982

  13. Energy-minimized structures and packing states of a homologous series of mixed-chain phosphatidylcholines: a molecular mechanics study on the diglyceride moieties.

    PubMed Central

    Li, S; Wang, Z Q; Lin, H N; Huang, C

    1993-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholines or C(X):C(Y)PC, quantitatively the most abundant lipids in animal cell membranes, are structurally composed of two parts: a headgroup and a diglyceride. The diglyceride moiety consists of the glycerol backbone and two acyl chains. It is the wide diversity of the acyl chains, or the large variations in X and Y in C(X):C(Y)PC, that makes the family of phosphatidylcholines an extremely complex mixture of different molecular species. Since most of the physical properties of phospholipids with the same headgroup depend strongly on the structures of the lipid acyl chains, the energy-minimized structure and steric energy of each diglyceride moiety of a series of 14 molecular species of phosphatidylcholines with molecular weights identical to that of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine without the headgroup are determined in this communication by molecular mechanics (MM) calculations. Results of two types of trans-bilayer dimer for each of the 14 molecular species of phosphatidylcholines are also presented; specifically, the dimeric structures are constructed initially based on the partially interdigitated and mixed interdigitated packing motifs followed subsequently by the energy-minimized refinement with MM calculations. Finally, tetramers with various structures to model the lateral lipid-lipid interactions in a lipid bilayer are considered. Results of laborious MM calculations show that saturated diacyl C(X):C(Y)PC with delta C/CL values greater than 0.41 prefer topologically to assemble into tetramers of the mixed interdigitated motif, and those with delta C/CL values less than 0.41 prefer to assemble into tetramers with a repertoire of the partially interdigitated motif. Here, delta C/CL, a lipid asymmetry parameter, is defined as the normalized acyl chain length difference between the sn-1 and sn-2 acyl chains for a C(X):C(Y)PC molecule; an increase in delta C/CL value is an indication of increasing asymmetry between the two lipid acyl chains. These

  14. Charge pairing of headgroups in phosphatidylcholine membranes: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed Central

    Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, M; Takaoka, Y; Miyagawa, H; Kitamura, K; Kusumi, A

    1999-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of the hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase was carried out for 5 ns to study the interaction among DMPC headgroups in the membrane/water interface region. The phosphatidylcholine headgroup contains a positively charged choline group and negatively charged phosphate and carbonyl groups, although it is a neutral molecule as a whole. Our previous study (Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, M., Y. Takaoka, H. Miyagawa, K. Kitamura, and A. Kusumi. 1997. J. Phys. Chem. 101:3677-3691) showed the formation of water cross-bridges between negatively charged groups in which a water molecule is simultaneously hydrogen bonded to two DMPC molecules. Water bridges link 76% of DMPC molecules in the membrane. In the present study we show that relatively stable charge associations (charge pairs) are formed between the positively and negatively charged groups of two DMPC molecules. Charge pairs link 93% of DMPC molecules in the membrane. Water bridges and charge pairs together form an extended network of interactions among DMPC headgroups linking 98% of all membrane phospholipids. The average lifetimes of DMPC-DMPC associations via charge pairs, water bridges and both, are at least 730, 1400, and over 1500 ps, respectively. However, these associations are dynamic states and they break and re-form several times during their lifetime. PMID:10049307

  15. Diacylglycerol kinase δ phosphorylates phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C-dependent, palmitic acid-containing diacylglycerol species in response to high glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiromichi; Kado, Sayaka; Taketomi, Akinobu; Sakane, Fumio

    2014-09-19

    Decreased expression of diacylglycerol (DG) kinase (DGK) δ in skeletal muscles is closely related to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. To identify DG species that are phosphorylated by DGKδ in response to high glucose stimulation, we investigated high glucose-dependent changes in phosphatidic acid (PA) molecular species in mouse C2C12 myoblasts using a newly established liquid chromatography/MS method. We found that the suppression of DGKδ2 expression by DGKδ-specific siRNAs significantly inhibited glucose-dependent increases in 30:0-, 32:0-, and 34:0-PA and moderately attenuated 30:1-, 32:1-, and 34:1-PA. Moreover, overexpression of DGKδ2 also enhanced the production of these PA species. MS/MS analysis revealed that these PA species commonly contain palmitic acid (16:0). D609, an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), significantly inhibited the glucose-stimulated production of the palmitic acid-containing PA species. Moreover, PC-PLC was co-immunoprecipitated with DGKδ2. These results strongly suggest that DGKδ preferably metabolizes palmitic acid-containing DG species supplied from the PC-PLC pathway, but not arachidonic acid (20:4)-containing DG species derived from the phosphatidylinositol turnover, in response to high glucose levels. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Diacylglycerol Kinase δ Phosphorylates Phosphatidylcholine-specific Phospholipase C-dependent, Palmitic Acid-containing Diacylglycerol Species in Response to High Glucose Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Hiromichi; Kado, Sayaka; Taketomi, Akinobu; Sakane, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    Decreased expression of diacylglycerol (DG) kinase (DGK) δ in skeletal muscles is closely related to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. To identify DG species that are phosphorylated by DGKδ in response to high glucose stimulation, we investigated high glucose-dependent changes in phosphatidic acid (PA) molecular species in mouse C2C12 myoblasts using a newly established liquid chromatography/MS method. We found that the suppression of DGKδ2 expression by DGKδ-specific siRNAs significantly inhibited glucose-dependent increases in 30:0-, 32:0-, and 34:0-PA and moderately attenuated 30:1-, 32:1-, and 34:1-PA. Moreover, overexpression of DGKδ2 also enhanced the production of these PA species. MS/MS analysis revealed that these PA species commonly contain palmitic acid (16:0). D609, an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), significantly inhibited the glucose-stimulated production of the palmitic acid-containing PA species. Moreover, PC-PLC was co-immunoprecipitated with DGKδ2. These results strongly suggest that DGKδ preferably metabolizes palmitic acid-containing DG species supplied from the PC-PLC pathway, but not arachidonic acid (20:4)-containing DG species derived from the phosphatidylinositol turnover, in response to high glucose levels. PMID:25112873

  17. First order melting transitions of highly ordered dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine gel phase membranes in molecular dynamics simulations with atomistic detail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Thomas; Schneck, Emanuel; Tanaka, Motomu

    2011-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with atomistic detail of the gel phase and melting transitions of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers in water reveal the dependency of many thermodynamic and structural parameters on the initial system ordering. We quantitatively compare different methods to create a gel phase system and we observe that a very high ordering of the gel phase starting system is necessary to observe behavior which reproduces experimental data. We performed heating scans with speeds down to 0.5 K/ns and could observe sharp first order phase transitions. Also, we investigated the transition enthalpy as the natural intrinsic parameter of first order phase transitions, and obtained a quantitative match with experimental values. Furthermore, we performed systematic investigations of the statistical distribution and heating rate dependency of the microscopic phase transition temperature.

  18. First order melting transitions of highly ordered dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine gel phase membranes in molecular dynamics simulations with atomistic detail.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Thomas; Schneck, Emanuel; Tanaka, Motomu

    2011-08-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations with atomistic detail of the gel phase and melting transitions of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers in water reveal the dependency of many thermodynamic and structural parameters on the initial system ordering. We quantitatively compare different methods to create a gel phase system and we observe that a very high ordering of the gel phase starting system is necessary to observe behavior which reproduces experimental data. We performed heating scans with speeds down to 0.5 K/ns and could observe sharp first order phase transitions. Also, we investigated the transition enthalpy as the natural intrinsic parameter of first order phase transitions, and obtained a quantitative match with experimental values. Furthermore, we performed systematic investigations of the statistical distribution and heating rate dependency of the microscopic phase transition temperature.

  19. Quantitation of isobaric phosphatidylcholine species in human plasma using a hybrid quadrupole linear ion-trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zacek, Petr; Bukowski, Michael; Rosenberger, Thad A; Picklo, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) species in human plasma are used as biomarkers of disease. PC biomarkers are often limited by the inability to separate isobaric PCs. In this work, we developed a targeted shotgun approach for analysis of isobaric and isomeric PCs. This approach is comprised of two MS methods: a precursor ion scanning (PIS) of mass m/z 184 in positive mode (PIS m/z +184) and MS(3) fragmentation in negative mode, both performed on the same instrument, a hybrid triple quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometer. The MS(3) experiment identified the FA composition and the relative abundance of isobaric and sn-1, sn-2 positional isomeric PC species, which were subsequently combined with absolute quantitative data obtained by PIS m/z +184 scan. This approach was applied to the analysis of a National Institute of Standards and Technology human blood plasma standard reference material (SRM 1950). We quantified more than 70 PCs and confirmed that a majority are present in isobaric and isomeric mixtures. The FA content determined by this method was comparable to that obtained using GC with flame ionization detection, supporting the quantitative nature of this MS method. This methodology will provide more in-depth biomarker information for clinical and mechanistic studies.

  20. Quantitation of isobaric phosphatidylcholine species in human plasma using a hybrid quadrupole linear ion-trap mass spectrometer[S

    PubMed Central

    Zacek, Petr; Bukowski, Michael; Rosenberger, Thad A.; Picklo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) species in human plasma are used as biomarkers of disease. PC biomarkers are often limited by the inability to separate isobaric PCs. In this work, we developed a targeted shotgun approach for analysis of isobaric and isomeric PCs. This approach is comprised of two MS methods: a precursor ion scanning (PIS) of mass m/z 184 in positive mode (PIS m/z +184) and MS3 fragmentation in negative mode, both performed on the same instrument, a hybrid triple quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometer. The MS3 experiment identified the FA composition and the relative abundance of isobaric and sn-1, sn-2 positional isomeric PC species, which were subsequently combined with absolute quantitative data obtained by PIS m/z +184 scan. This approach was applied to the analysis of a National Institute of Standards and Technology human blood plasma standard reference material (SRM 1950). We quantified more than 70 PCs and confirmed that a majority are present in isobaric and isomeric mixtures. The FA content determined by this method was comparable to that obtained using GC with flame ionization detection, supporting the quantitative nature of this MS method. This methodology will provide more in-depth biomarker information for clinical and mechanistic studies. PMID:27688258

  1. Reparameterized United Atom Model for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gel and Fluid Phosphatidylcholine Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Tjörnhammar, Richard; Edholm, Olle

    2014-12-09

    A new united atom parametrization of diacyl lipids like dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) has been constructed based on ab initio calculations to obtain fractional charges and the dihedral potential of the hydrocarbon chains, while the Lennard-Jones parameters of the acyl chains were fitted to reproduce the properties of liquid hydrocarbons. The results have been validated against published experimental X-ray and neutron scattering data for fluid and gel phase DPPC. The derived charges of the lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) headgroup are shown to yield dipole components in the range suggested by experiments. The aim has been to construct a new force field that retains and improves the good agreement for the fluid phase and at the same time produces a gel phase at low temperatures, with properties coherent with experimental findings. The gel phase of diacyl-PC lipids forms a regular triangular lattice in the hydrocarbon region. The global bilayer tilt obtains an azimuthal value of 31° and is aligned between lattice vectors in the bilayer plane. We also show that the model yields a correct heat of melting as well as decent heat capacities in the fluid and gel phase of DPPC.

  2. Interstellar protonated molecular species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etim, Emmanuel E.; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Arunan, Elangannan

    2017-08-01

    Majority of the known interstellar cations are protonated species believed to be the natural precursors for their corresponding neutral analogues formed via the dissociative recombination process. The protonation of a neutral species can occur in more than one position on the molecular structure thus resulting in more than one proton binding energy value and different protonated species for the same neutral species. In the present work, ab initio quantum calculations are employed to calculate accurate proton binding energies for over 100 neutral interstellar molecules of which majority of the neutral molecules are protonated in more than one position. From the results, protonated species resulting from a high proton binding energy prefers to remain protonated rather than transferring a proton and returning to its neutral form as compared to its analogue that gives rise to a lower proton binding energy (PBE) from the same neutral species. For two protonated species resulting from the same neutral molecule, the one that results in a higher PBE is more stable as compared to its counterpart that is responsible for the lower PBE for the same neutral species. Here, the most stable species are highlighted for all the systems considered.

  3. Differential Effects of Cholesterol, Ergosterol and Lanosterol on a Dipalmitoyl Phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membrane: A Molecular Dynamics Simulations Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cournia, Zoe; Ullmann, G. Matthias; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-02-01

    Lipid raft/domain formation may arise as a result of the effects of specific sterols on the physical properties of membranes. Here, using molecular dynamics simulation, we examine the effects of three closely-related sterols, ergosterol, cholesterol, and lanosterol, at a biologically relevant concentration (40 mol %) on the structural properties of a model dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membrane at 309 and 323 K. All three sterols are found to order the DPPC acyl tails and condense the membrane relative to the DPPC liquid-phase membrane, but each one does this to a significantly different degree. The smooth {alpha}-face of ergosterol, together with the presence of tail unsaturation in this sterol, leads to closer interaction of ergosterol with the lipids and closer packing of the lipids with each other, so ergosterol has a higher condensing effect on the membrane, as reflected by the area per lipid. Moreover, ergosterol induces a higher proportion of trans lipid conformers, a thicker membrane, and higher lipid order parameters and is aligned more closely with the membrane normal. Ergosterol also positions itself closer to the bilayer/water interface. In contrast, the rough {alpha}-face of lanosterol leads to a less close interaction of the steroid ring system with the phospholipid acyl chains, and so lanosterol orders, straightens, and packs the lipid acyl chains less well and is less closely aligned with the membrane normal. Furthermore, lanosterol lies closer to the relatively disordered membrane center than do the other sterols. The behavior of cholesterol in all the above respects is intermediate between that of lanosterol and ergosterol. The findings here may explain why ergosterol is the most efficient of the three sterols at promoting the liquid-ordered phase and lipid domain formation and may also furnish part of the explanation as to why cholesterol is evolutionarily preferred over lanosterol in higher-vertebrate plasma membranes.

  4. Chronic ethanol consumption alters the selective usage of phosphatidylethanolamine molecular species by methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, J.S.; Pukys, T.; Rubin, E. )

    1992-01-01

    The authors have examined the effects of chronic ethanol consumption on phospholipid methyltransferases, which may play a special role by synthesizing phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules containing predominantly polyunsaturated fatty acids. Rat liver microsomes from adenosylmethionine to convert endogenous phoshatidylethanolamine (PE) to radiolabeled PC, which was separated into its individual molecular species by reversed-phase HPLC. To assess the selective usage of PE molecular species for methylation, the authors determined the mole % of the PE molecular species in microsomes from control and ethanol-fed rats. Chronic ethanol consumption increased the selective usage of phospholipid molecular species containing palmitic acid combined with arachidonic acid or docosahexaenoic acid, whereas it did not affect the use of the corresponding stearic acid species. These results suggest that the long term interference with cellular physiology by altering the metabolism of a specific metabolic pool of molecular species is a mechanism by which chronic ethanol consumption could exert adverse effects of the liver.

  5. Structure and dynamic properties of diunsaturated 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Hyvönen, M T; Rantala, T T; Ala-Korpela, M

    1997-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acid chains are known to be an essential structural part of biomembranes, but only monounsaturated chains have been included in the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membrane systems. Here we present a 1-ns MD simulation for a diunsaturated 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PLPC; 16:0/18:2[delta9,12]) bilayer. The structural behavior of the phosphatidylcholine headgroup, the glycerol backbone, and the hydrating water were assessed and found to be consistent with the existing information about similar systems from both experimental and computational studies. Further analysis was focused on the structure of the double bond region and the effects of the diunsaturation on the bilayer interior. The behavior of the diunsaturated sn-2 chains is affected by the tilted beginning of the chain and the four main conformations of the double bond region. The double bonds of the sn-2 chains also influenced the characteristics of the saturated chains in the sn-1 position. Furthermore, extreme conformations of the sn-2 chains existed that are likely to be related to the functional role of the double bonds. The results here point out the importance of polyunsaturation for the biological interpretations deduced from the membrane MD simulations. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 16 PMID:9414205

  6. Determination of Oxidized Phosphatidylcholines by Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Pia; Pötz, Sandra; Brunner, Martina; Trötzmüller, Martin; Fauland, Alexander; Triebl, Alexander; Hartler, Jürgen; Lankmayr, Ernst; Köfeler, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    A novel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach for analysis of oxidized phosphatidylcholines by an Orbitrap Fourier Transform mass spectrometer in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was developed. This method depends on three selectivity criteria for separation and identification: retention time, exact mass at a resolution of 100,000 and collision induced dissociation (CID) fragment spectra in a linear ion trap. The process of chromatography development showed the best separation properties with a silica-based Kinetex column. This type of chromatography was able to separate all major lipid classes expected in mammalian samples, yielding increased sensitivity of oxidized phosphatidylcholines over reversed phase chromatography. Identification of molecular species was achieved by exact mass on intact molecular ions and CID tandem mass spectra containing characteristic fragments. Due to a lack of commercially available standards, method development was performed with copper induced oxidation products of palmitoyl-arachidonoyl-phosphatidylcholine, which resulted in a plethora of lipid species oxidized at the arachidonoyl moiety. Validation of the method was done with copper oxidized human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) prepared by ultracentrifugation. In these LDL samples we could identify 46 oxidized molecular phosphatidylcholine species out of 99 possible candidates. PMID:25874761

  7. Friction and wear behavior of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene as a function of crystallinity in the presence of the phospholipid dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Bruck, Angela L; Karuppiah, K S Kanaga; Sundararajan, Sriram; Wang, Jun; Lin, Zhiqun

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the friction and wear behavior of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were evaluated as a function of polymer crystallinity in the presence of the phospholipid dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) dissolved in ethanol. Samples of UHMWPE were separately heat treated to get high and low crystallinity samples. Degree of crystallinity was evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry. Quantitative friction and wear experiments were conducted using a custom-made microtribometer with commercially available spherical Si(3)N(4) probes in controlled and phospholipid-dissolved lubricants. The higher crystallinity sample exhibited slightly lower friction than the lower crystallinity in the control and decreased significantly when phospholipids were present. The higher crystallinity sample showed a higher wear resistance than the lower crystallinity sample during all reciprocating wear tests. DPPC acting as a lubricant had a marginal effect on the wear resistance of high crystallinity UHMWPE, whereas the low crystallinity sample became more prone to wear. Atomic force microscopy topography images and contact angle measurements of both samples before and after phospholipid exposure indicate that the higher crystallinity sample absorbed a greater density of DPPC. Increasing crystallinity is a way of escalating adsorption of surface active phospholipids onto UHMWPE to make it a more wear-resistant load-bearing material for total joint replacements. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Preparation and characterization of debranched-starch/phosphatidylcholine inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weiwei; Luo, Zhigang; Li, Lin; Fu, Xiong

    2015-01-21

    In this study, debranched-starch/phosphatidylcholine inclusion complexes were prepared. The effect of reaction parameters such as reaction temperature, reaction time, and addition amount of phosphatidylcholine on the phosphatidylcholine payload and inclusion rate was investigated. The phosphatidylcholine payload and inclusion rate prepared under the optimal conditions were 106 mg/g and 84.8%, respectively. The formation of debranched-starch/phosphatidylcholine inclusion complexes was confirmed by the results of XRD and FT-IR. Furthermore, the molecular, cluster, and fractal structures of the complexes were investigated using (13)C CP/MAS NMR and SAXS. The results indicated that the inclusion complexes were formed by hydrophobic interactions between alkyl chain of phosphatidylcholine and debranched-starch helix cavity. The complexes possessed a mass fractal structure, and a semicrystalline structure with a Bragg distance of 19.04 nm formed. After complexation, the stability of phosphatidylcholine was significantly improved, and phosphatidylcholine of the complexes can be gradually released with pancreatin treatment. This study revealed that debranched-starch can be used as an effective carrier of phosphatidylcholine for the purpose of improving its stability.

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Fonsecaea Species

    PubMed Central

    Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Sun, Jiufeng; Vicente, Vania A.; Klaassen, Corne H.W.; Bonifaz, Alexandro; van den Ende, A.H.G. Gerrits; Menken, Steph B.J.

    2011-01-01

    To assess population diversities among 81 strains of fungi in the genus Fonsecaea that had been identified down to species level, we applied amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) technology and sequenced the internal transcribed spacer regions and the partial cell division cycle, β-tubulin, and actin genes. Many species of the genus Fonsecaea cause human chromoblastomycosis. Strains originated from a global sampling of clinical and environmental sources in the Western Hemisphere, Asia, Africa, and Europe. According to AFLP fingerprinting, Fonsecaea isolates clustered in 5 groups corresponding with F. pedrosoi, F. monophora, and F. nubica: the latter 2 species each comprised 2 groups, and F. pedrosoi appeared to be of monophyletic origin. F. pedrosoi was found nearly exclusively in Central and South America. F. monophora and F. nubica were distributed worldwide, but both showed substantial geographic structuring. Clinical cases outside areas where Fonsecaea is endemic were probably distributed by human migration. PMID:21392438

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Fonsecaea species.

    PubMed

    Najafzadeh, Mohammad Javad; Sun, Jiufeng; Vicente, Vania A; Klaassen, Corne H W; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Gerrits van den Ende, A H G; Menken, Steph B J; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2011-03-01

    To assess population diversities among 81 strains of fungi in the genus Fonsecaea that had been identified down to species level, we applied amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) technology and sequenced the internal transcribed spacer regions and the partial cell division cycle, beta-tubulin, and actin genes. Many species of the genus Fonsecaea cause human chromoblastomycosis. Strains originated from a global sampling of clinical and environmental sources in the Western Hemisphere, Asia, Africa, and Europe. According to AFLP fingerprinting, Fonsecaea isolates clustered in 5 groups corresponding with F. pedrosoi, F. monophora, and F. nubica: the latter 2 species each comprised 2 groups, and F. pedrosoi appeared to be of monophyletic origin. F. pedrosoi was found nearly exclusively in Central and South America. F. monophora and F. nubica were distributed worldwide, but both showed substantial geographic structuring. Clinical cases outside areas where Fonsecaea is endemic were probably distributed by human migration.

  11. Biosynthesis of glycerolipid molecular species in photoreceptor membranes of frog retina

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegand, R.D.; Louie, K.; Anderson, R.E. )

    1987-05-01

    Phospholipid (PL) molecular species of vertebrate retinal photoreceptor cells are unique in that they contain two polyunsaturated fatty acids per molecule. Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 {omega}3) is the major component of these dipolyunsaturate species (DPS), which also contain 20:4{omega}6, 22:4{omega}6, 22:5{omega}6, and 22:5{omega}3. We have studied the de novo synthesis and metabolism of the (DPS) and other PL molecular species in frog rod outer segments (ROS) following intravitreal injection of 2-({sup 3}H)-glycerol. At 1, 2, 4, and 8 days after injection, ROS were prepared, PL extracted, and phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and phosphatidylserine (PS) isolated. PC, PE, and PS were converted to diglycerides (DG's) with phospholipase C. DG's were derivatized, fractionated into molecular species by HPLC, quantitated, and counted for radioactivity. The following were observed: (1) Specific activities (SA) of the PC DPS were 3-5 times higher than the same species in either PE or PS. (2) SA of the PC monopolyunsaturate species (MPS) (species which contain 22:6{omega}3 and/or 16:0 or 18:0) were 3-5 times lower than the SA of the PC DPS. In contrast, SA of PE MPS were 2-5 times higher than the SA of the PE DPS. (3) The major PS MPS synthesized contained 18:0 and 22:6{omega}3. SA of that species were similar to SA of the PS DPS. The data support the suggestion that PC DPS are synthesized and/or incorporated in ROS at a greater rate than the same species in either PE or PS. Our study thus provides evidence for different rates of synthesis and/or incorporation of the various molecular species of PC, PE, and PS in ROS.

  12. Molecular evolution of human species D adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christopher M.; Seto, Donald; Jones, Morris S.; Dyer, David W.; Chodosh, James

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviruses are medium-sized double stranded DNA viruses that infect vertebrates. Human adenoviruses cause an array of diseases. Currently there are 56 human adenovirus types recognized and characterized within seven species (A-G). Of those types, a majority belongs to species D. In this review, the genomic conservation and diversity are examined amongst human adenoviruses within species D, particularly in contrast to other human adenovirus species. Specifically, homologous recombination is presented as a driving force for the molecular evolution of human adenoviruses and the emergence of new adenovirus pathogens. PMID:21570490

  13. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Chlamydia Species.

    PubMed

    Sixt, Barbara S; Valdivia, Raphael H

    2016-09-08

    Species of Chlamydia are the etiologic agent of endemic blinding trachoma, the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases, significant respiratory pathogens, and a zoonotic threat. Their dependence on an intracellular growth niche and their peculiar developmental cycle are major challenges to elucidating their biology and virulence traits. The last decade has seen tremendous advances in our ability to perform a molecular genetic analysis of Chlamydia species. Major achievements include the generation of large collections of mutant strains, now available for forward- and reverse-genetic applications, and the introduction of a system for plasmid-based transformation enabling complementation of mutations; expression of foreign, modified, or reporter genes; and even targeted gene disruptions. This review summarizes the current status of the molecular genetic toolbox for Chlamydia species and highlights new insights into their biology and new challenges in the nascent field of Chlamydia genetics.

  14. How to Predict Molecular Interactions between Species?

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Sylvie; Schleicher, Jana; Guthke, Reinhard; Linde, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Organisms constantly interact with other species through physical contact which leads to changes on the molecular level, for example the transcriptome. These changes can be monitored for all genes, with the help of high-throughput experiments such as RNA-seq or microarrays. The adaptation of the gene expression to environmental changes within cells is mediated through complex gene regulatory networks. Often, our knowledge of these networks is incomplete. Network inference predicts gene regulatory interactions based on transcriptome data. An emerging application of high-throughput transcriptome studies are dual transcriptomics experiments. Here, the transcriptome of two or more interacting species is measured simultaneously. Based on a dual RNA-seq data set of murine dendritic cells infected with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the software tool NetGenerator was applied to predict an inter-species gene regulatory network. To promote further investigations of molecular inter-species interactions, we recently discussed dual RNA-seq experiments for host-pathogen interactions and extended the applied tool NetGenerator (Schulze et al., 2015). The updated version of NetGenerator makes use of measurement variances in the algorithmic procedure and accepts gene expression time series data with missing values. Additionally, we tested multiple modeling scenarios regarding the stimuli functions of the gene regulatory network. Here, we summarize the work by Schulze et al. (2015) and put it into a broader context. We review various studies making use of the dual transcriptomics approach to investigate the molecular basis of interacting species. Besides the application to host-pathogen interactions, dual transcriptomics data are also utilized to study mutualistic and commensalistic interactions. Furthermore, we give a short introduction into additional approaches for the prediction of gene regulatory networks and discuss their application to dual transcriptomics data. We

  15. Transitions and molecular packing in highly purified 1,2-dipalmitoyl- phosphatidylcholine-water phases. I. Transitions, improved phase diagrams, method of packing analysis, molecular structures of diglyceride, and polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albon, Norman

    1983-04-01

    Results of extensive studies of phases prepared from highly purified 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn -glycerol are presented. The methods used included x-ray diffraction and thermal analysis and both temperature and water content were varied. Details of the many well-defined phases obtained, all with bilayer structures, are given in tables. An improved phase diagram was obtained from thermal data which showed well-defined transitions, and from discontinuities in a plot of bilayer repeat spacings with water content. For analysis of molecular packing the bilayer was divided into diglyceride and phosphorylcholine regions. The properties of the diglyceride regions of both compounds are discussed. Estimates of the size and shape of the polar groups are made and the general principles involved in their packing and the influence of water are discussed. Among new features reported, are the existence of the 0⊥ close chain packing for the crystalline dipalmitoyl glycerol but not in any lecithin phase. Three single crystal lecithin phases with different water contents were prepared which are more stable than the hexagonal chain phases usually reported in the same regions. These hexagonal phases slowly recrystallize to more stable forms, but are usually obtained on cooling melts or higher temperature phases. However, the single crystal phases only exist over restricted composition ranges while phases with hexagonal, square, and disordered chain packing can accommodate a variation in water content by a tilt of the chain axes and changes in bilayer thickness. Transition widths vary and are extremely sensitive to impurities.

  16. Characterization of phospholipid molecular species and peptide molecules in wheat sprout hydroalcoholic extract.

    PubMed

    Lucci, Paolo; Pacetti, Deborah; Calzuola, Isabella; Marsili, Valeria; Perni, Stefano; Giavarini, Flavio; Frega, Natale Giuseppe; Gianfranceschi, Gian Luigi

    2013-11-27

    The phospholipid molecular species and the main peptide molecules of wheat sprout hydroalcoholic extract have been fully characterized by normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled online with positive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The extract that resulted was rich in phospholipid molecular species formed by the combination of the two essential fatty acids (α-linoleic and α-linolenic). These species accounted for 51.7% of total phosphatidic acid, 47.3% of total phosphatidylethanolamine, 37.7% of total phosphatidylcholine, and 14.1% of total phosphatidylinositol. The last one showed the highest amounts of species containing palmitic acid, thus representing the most saturated phospholipid class. The extract was also shown to contain several peptide sequences with both potential antioxidant domains and interaction sites for phospholipids (i.e., H-Ala-Gly-Ser-Met-Met-Cys-NH2, H-Tyr-Met-Thr-Val-Val-Ala-Cys-NH2, etc.); this latter finding can have a highly positive impact on the poor peptides bioavailability. Because of the presence of essential fatty acids-rich phospholipids and bioactive peptides, wheat sprout hydroalcoholic extract can be considered a potential functional food ingredient.

  17. Simultaneous analysis of glycolipids and phospholids molecular species in avocado (Persea americana Mill) fruit.

    PubMed

    Pacetti, Deborah; Boselli, Emanuele; Lucci, Paolo; Frega, Natale G

    2007-05-25

    The molecular species of phospholipids (PLs) and glycolipids (GLs) were simultaneously characterized in the pulp and almond of the avocado fruit (Persea americana Mill) of four varieties by means of high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry. In the pulp, the predominant species of monoglycosyldiglycerides (MGD) were m/z 796.6 (oleic/linolenic and linoleic/linoleic acids) and m/z 800.4 (stearic/linoleic and oleic/oleic acids). One of the main diglycosyldiglycerides (DGD) both in the pulp and almond was m/z 958.5 (oleic/linolenic); however, the pulp was also rich of m/z 962.4 (oleic/oleic), whereas in the almond, m/z 934.5 (palmitic/linoleic and palmitoleic/oleic) and m/z 960.5 (oleic/linoleic and stearic/linolenic) were more abundant. In the almond, the main PL classes (phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol (PI)) contained always palmitic/linoleic acids. Alpha-linolenic acid was contained as MGD (linolenic/linolenic) and DGD (linolenic/linolenic), more present in the pulp than in the almond. The major molecular species of glycocerebrosides (GCer) in the pulp and almond carried hydroxy-palmitic acid (C(16h:0))/4,8-sphyngadienine (d(18:2)).

  18. The interaction of bioactive peptides with an immobilized phosphatidylcholine monolayer.

    PubMed Central

    Mozsolits, H; Lee, T H; Wirth, H J; Perlmutter, P; Aguilar, M I

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of three bioactive peptides, bombesin, beta-endorphin, and glucagon with a phosphatidylcholine monolayer that was immobilized to porous silica particles and packed into a stainless steel column cartridge, has been studied using dynamic elution techniques. This immobilized lipid monolayer provides a biophysical model system with which to study the binding of peptides to a lipid membrane. In particular, the influence of temperature and methanol concentration on the affinity of each peptide for the immobilized lipid surface was assessed. For all test peptides, nonlinear retention plots were observed at all temperatures that contrasted sharply with the simple linear plots observed for the small unstructured control molecules N-acetyltryptophanamide and diphenylalanine. An analysis of the thermodynamics of the interaction of peptides with the immobilized monolayer was also carried out. The results revealed that while the peptides interacted with the monolayer predominantly through hydrophobic interactions, the relative contribution of DeltaH(assoc)(O) and DeltaS(assoc)(O) to the overall free energy of association was dependent on the temperature and methanol concentration. In particular, it was evident that under most conditions, the binding of the peptides to the immobilized lipid monolayer was enthalpy-driven, i.e., mediated by nonclassical hydrophobic interactions. Significant band-broadening and asymmetric and split peaks were also observed for bombesin, beta-endorphin, and glucagon at different temperatures and methanol concentrations. These changes in affinity and peak shape are consistent with the formation of multiple conformational species during the interaction of these peptides with the lipid monolayer. In addition, the binding behavior of the three test peptides on an n-octylsilica surface that lacked the phospho headgroups of the phospholipid was significantly different from that observed with the immobilized phosphatidylcholine surface

  19. Relationship between lipid saturation and lipid-protein interaction in liver mitochondria modified by catalytic hydrogenation with reference to cardiolipin molecular species.

    PubMed Central

    Schlame, M; Horvàth, L; Vìgh, L

    1990-01-01

    Lipid acyl double bonds in isolated mitochondrial membranes were gradually reduced by palladium-complex-catalysed hydrogenation, and the resulting saturation was monitored by fatty acid analysis of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin. The courses of hydrogenation of these phospholipids suggested that cardiolipin is in a membrane compartment which is less accessible to the applied catalyst. Native cardiolipin and its hydrogenation products were further characterized by analysis of their molecular diacylglycerol species. A decrease in the double bond content was accompanied by an increased amount of motionally restricted lipids at the hydrophobic interface of proteins as measured by two different spin-labelled lipids (C-14 positional isomers of spin-labelled stearic acid and phosphatidylcholine analogues). The protein-immobilized fraction of spin-labelled stearic acid increased in parallel with the hydrogenation of cardiolipin rather than of phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine. These data are interpreted in terms of a tight association of cardiolipin with membrane proteins, which becomes looser upon double bond reduction leading to the replacement of cardiolipin by spin-labelled stearic acid in the solvation shell. Thus the hydrophobic moiety of cardiolipin, characterized by double-unsaturated C18-C18 diacylglycerol species, seems to be an important structural requirement for the high protein affinity of this compound. PMID:2154183

  20. Molecular Fingerprints to Identify Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Spampinato, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of molecular techniques have been developed for genotyping Candida species. Among them, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and microsatellite length polymorphisms (MLP) analysis have recently emerged. MLST relies on DNA sequences of internal regions of various independent housekeeping genes, while MLP identifies microsatellite instability. Both methods generate unambiguous and highly reproducible data. Here, we review the results achieved by using these two techniques and also provide a brief overview of a new method based on high-resolution DNA melting (HRM). This method identifies sequence differences by subtle deviations in sample melting profiles in the presence of saturating fluorescent DNA binding dyes. PMID:23844370

  1. Molecular and mesoscopic properties of hydrophilic polymer-grafted phospholipids mixed with phosphatidylcholine in aqueous dispersion: interaction of dipalmitoyl N-poly(ethylene glycol)phosphatidylethanolamine with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine studied by spectrophotometry and spin-label electron spin resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Belsito, S; Bartucci, R; Montesano, G; Marsh, D; Sportelli, L

    2000-01-01

    Spin-label electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, together with optical density measurements, has been used to investigate, at both the molecular and supramolecular levels, the interactions of N-poly(ethylene glycol)-phosphatidylethanolamines (PEG-PE) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) in aqueous dispersions. PEG-PEs are micelle-forming hydrophilic polymer-grafted lipids that are used extensively for steric stabilization of PC liposomes to increase their lifetimes in the blood circulation. All lipids had dipalmitoyl (C16:0) chains, and the polymer polar group of the PEG-PE lipids had a mean molecular mass of either 350 or 2000 Da. PC/PEG-PE mixtures were investigated over the entire range of relative compositions. Spin-label ESR was used quantitatively to investigate bilayer-micelle conversion with increasing PEG-PE content by measurements at temperatures for which the bilayer membrane component of the mixture was in the gel phase. Both saturation transfer ESR and optical density measurements were used to obtain information on the dependence of lipid aggregate size on PEG-PE content. It is found that the stable state of lipid aggregation is strongly dependent not only on PEG-PE content but also on the size of the hydrophilic polar group. These biophysical properties may be used for optimized design of sterically stabilized liposomes. PMID:10692327

  2. Molecular phylogenetics of representative Paramecium species.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Agnieszka

    2007-01-01

    The genus Paramecium has been known to science for 250 years and contains some of the most widely studied species of ciliates. At present, the basic research object for phylogenetic studies is the genome of various paramecia. One of the most widely used markers are genes coding for various rRNA's. Comparative analyses of sequences coding rRNA were applied for resolving the systematic position of some paramecia species and also for the establishment of an accurate taxonomy of Paramecium. Paramecia were also model organisms for their systematic group in more general studies in a comparative analysis among ciliates, fungi, plants and multicellular animals, illustrating the evolutionary relationships between Archaebacteria and Eucaryota. A new, revolutionary genealogy proposed the shifting of presumptively advanced groups towards more primitive ones, and traditionally primitive forms were located closer to highly specialized taxa, but rRNA analysis did not unambiguously resolve associations within the studied groups. Because of the aforementioned concerns, the number of molecular markers used for alternative studies is growing, such as genes coding proteins from the Hsp family or histone proteins. Other promising candidate markers may be hemoglobin genes or genes coding á-tubulins. In case of comparative analyses ofnucleotide sequences, the outcome of the research usually depends upon a subjective choice of DNA. One of the directions of research in molecular phylogenetics include indirect methods that allow for an estimation of entire genomes, for example RAPD-PCR-fingerprinting.

  3. Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (Esi-Ms/Ms) Analysis of the Lipid Molecular Species Composition of Yeast Subcellular Membranes Reveals Acyl Chain-Based Sorting/Remodeling of Distinct Molecular Species En Route to the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Schneiter, Roger; Brügger, Britta; Sandhoff, Roger; Zellnig, Günther; Leber, Andrea; Lampl, Manfred; Athenstaedt, Karin; Hrastnik, Claudia; Eder, Sandra; Daum, Günther; Paltauf, Fritz; Wieland, Felix T.; Kohlwein, Sepp D.

    1999-01-01

    Nano-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nano-ESI-MS/MS) was employed to determine qualitative differences in the lipid molecular species composition of a comprehensive set of organellar membranes, isolated from a single culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Remarkable differences in the acyl chain composition of biosynthetically related phospholipid classes were observed. Acyl chain saturation was lowest in phosphatidylcholine (15.4%) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE; 16.2%), followed by phosphatidylserine (PS; 29.4%), and highest in phosphatidylinositol (53.1%). The lipid molecular species profiles of the various membranes were generally similar, with a deviation from a calculated average profile of ∼± 20%. Nevertheless, clear distinctions between the molecular species profiles of different membranes were observed, suggesting that lipid sorting mechanisms are operating at the level of individual molecular species to maintain the specific lipid composition of a given membrane. Most notably, the plasma membrane is enriched in saturated species of PS and PE. The nature of the sorting mechanism that determines the lipid composition of the plasma membrane was investigated further. The accumulation of monounsaturated species of PS at the expense of diunsaturated species in the plasma membrane of wild-type cells was reversed in elo3Δ mutant cells, which synthesize C24 fatty acid-substituted sphingolipids instead of the normal C26 fatty acid-substituted species. This observation suggests that acyl chain-based sorting and/or remodeling mechanisms are operating to maintain the specific lipid molecular species composition of the yeast plasma membrane. PMID:10459010

  4. Activity of phosphatidylcholine-transfer protein from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves with mitochondria and chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Julienne, Marianne; Vergnolle, Chantal; Kader, Jean-Claude

    1981-01-01

    A low-molecular-weight protein catalysing the transfer of phosphatidylcholine from liposomes to mitochondria and chloroplasts has been isolated from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) by chromatography on Sephadex G-75. PMID:7325986

  5. Very high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine liposomes: partitioning and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, A I; Smirnova, T I; Morse, P D

    1995-01-01

    Partitioning and molecular dynamics of 2,2,6,6,-tetramethylpiperedine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) nitroxide radicals in large unilamellar liposomes (LUV) composed from 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine were investigated by using very high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Experiments carried out at a microwave frequency of 94.3 GHz completely resolved the TEMPO EPR spectrum in the aqueous and hydrocarbon phases. An accurate computer simulation method combined with Levenberg-Marquardt optimization was used to analyze the TEMPO EPR spectra in both phases. Spectral parameters extracted from the simulations gave the actual partitioning of the TEMPO probe between the LUV hydrocarbon and aqueous phases and allowed analysis of picosecond rotational dynamics of the probe in the LUV hydrocarbon phase. In very high frequency EPR experiments, phase transitions in the LUV-TEMPO system were observed as sharp changes in both partitioning and rotational correlation times of the TEMPO probe. The phase transition temperatures (40.5 +/- 0.2 and 32.7 +/- 0.5 degrees C) are in agreement with previously reported differential scanning microcalorimetry data. Spectral line widths were analyzed by using existing theoretical expressions for motionally narrowed nitroxide spectra. It was found that the motion of the small, nearly spherical, TEMPO probe can be well described by anisotropic Brownian diffusion in isotropic media and is not restricted by the much larger hydrocarbon chains existing in ripple structure (P beta') or fluid bilayer structure (L alpha) phases. PMID:7647239

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Asymmetric NaCl and KCl Solutions Separated by Phosphatidylcholine Bilayers: Potential Drops and Structural Changes Induced by Strong Na+-Lipid Interactions and Finite Size Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Joo; Song, Yuhua; Baker, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    Differences of ionic concentrations across lipid bilayers are some of the primary energetic driving forces for cellular electrophysiology. While macroscopic models of asymmetric ionic solutions are well-developed, their connection to ion, water, and lipid interactions at the atomic scale are much more poorly understood. In this study, we used molecular dynamics to examine a system of two chambers of equal ionic strength, but differing amounts of NaCl and KCl, separated by a lipid bilayer. Our expectation was that the net electrostatic potential difference between the two chambers should be small or zero. Contrary to our expectation, a large potential difference (−70 mV) slowly evolved across the two water chambers over the course of our 172-ns simulation. This potential primarily originated from strong Na+ binding to the carbonyls of the phosphatidylcholine lipids. This ion adsorption also led to significant structural and mechanical changes in the lipid bilayer. We discuss this surprising result in the context of indirect experimental evidence for Na+ interaction with bilayers as well as potential caveats in current biomembrane simulation methodology, including force-field parameters and finite size effects. PMID:18222999

  7. Docosahexaenoate-containing molecular species of glycerophospholipids from frog retinal rod outer segments show different rates of biosynthesis and turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, K.; Wiegand, R.D.; Anderson, R.E.

    1988-12-13

    The authors have studied the de novo synthesis and subsequent turnover of major docosahexaenoate-containing molecular species in frog rod outer segment (ROS) phospholipids following intravitreal injection of (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol. On selected days after injection, ROS were prepared and phospholipids extracted. Phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and phosphatidylserine (PS) were isolated and converted to diradylglycerols with phospholipase C. Diradylglycerols were derivatized with benzoic anhydride and resolve into diacylglycerobenzoates and ether-linked glycerobenzoates. The diacylglycerobenzoates were fractionated into molecular species by HPLC, quantitated, and counted for radioactivity. Label was incorporated into ROS phospholipids by day 1 and was followed up through the eighth day. The dipolyenoic species 22:6-22:6 from PC showed 1 3-5 times higher radiospecific activity than the same species from either PE or PS. The rate of decline was determined by calculating the half-life of each molecular species, which was used as a measure of the turnover of the species. The percent distribution of radioactivity in the molecular species of PC and PE was quite different from the relative mass distribution at day 1. However, percent dpm approached the mole percent by 31 days. In PS, percent dpm and mole percent were the same at all time points. These results indicate that the molecular species composition of PC and PE in frog retinal ROS is determined by a combination of factors, which include rate of synthesis, rate of degradation, and selective interconversions. In contrast, PS composition appears to be determined at the time of synthesis.

  8. Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Diversified Cardiolipin Molecular Species in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has been used successfully in mapping different lipids in tissue sections, yet existing protocols fail to detect the diverse species of mitochondria-unique cardiolipins (CLs) in the brain which are essential for cellular and mitochondrial physiology. We have developed methods enabling the imaging of individual CLs in brain tissue. This was achieved by eliminating ion suppressive effects by (i) cross-linking carboxyl/amino containing molecules on tissue with 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-carbodiimide hydrochloride and (ii) removing highly abundant phosphatidylcholine head groups via phospholipase C treatment. These treatments allowed the detection of CL species at 100 μm resolution and did not affect the amount or molecular species distribution of brain tissue CLs. When combined with augmented matrix application, these modifications allowed the visualization and mapping of multiple CL species in various regions of the brain including the thalamus, hippocampus, and cortex. Areas such as the dentate and stratum radiatum exhibited higher CL signals than other areas within the hippocampal formation. The habenular nuclear (Hb)/dorsal third ventricle (D3 V) and lateral ventricle (LV) areas were identified as CL “hot spots”. Our method also allowed structural MS/MS fragmentation and mapping of CLs with identified fatty acid residues and demonstrated a nonrandom distribution of individual oxidizable (polyunsaturated fatty acid containing) and nonoxidizable (nonpolyunsaturated containing) CLs in different anatomical areas of the brain. To our knowledge, this method is the first label-free approach for molecular mapping of diversified CLs in brain tissue. PMID:24949523

  9. Production of 1,2-didocosahexaenoyl phosphatidylcholine by bonito muscle lysophosphatidylcholine/transacylase.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Kaoru; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Tamotsu; Matsuura, Fumito; Satouchi, Kiyoshi; Koike, Tohru

    2004-10-01

    1,2-Didocosahexaenoyl phosphatidylcholine (PC), which has highly unsaturated fatty acid at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions of glycerol, is a characteristic molecular species of bonito muscle. To examine the involvement of a de novo route in its synthesis, the molecular species of phosphatidic acid (PA) were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry using a 1,3-bis[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]propan-2-olato dizinc(II) complex, a novel phosphate-capture molecule. However, 1,2-didocosahexaenoyl species could not be detected. Next, 1,2-didocosahexaenoyl PC synthesis by the cytosolic lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC)/transacylase was examined using endogenous LPC from bonito muscle, in which the 2-docosahexaenoyl species is abundant. The LPC/transacylase synthesized 1,2-didocosahexaenoyl PC as the most abundant molecular species. For further characterization, the LPC/transacylase was purified to homogeneity from the 100,000 x g supernatant of bonito muscle. The isolated LPC/transacylase is a labile glycoprotein with molecular mass of 52 kDa including a 5-kDa sugar moiety. The LPC/transacylase showed a PC synthesis (transacylase activity) below and above the critical micelle concentration of substrate LPC, and fatty acid release (lysophospholipase activity) was always smaller than the transacylase activity, even with a monomeric substrate. These results suggest that the LPC/transacylase is responsible for the synthesis of 1,2-didocosahexaenoyl PC.

  10. Lipid Classes, Fatty Acid Composition, and Glycerolipid Molecular Species of the Red Alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla, a Prostaglandin-Producing Seaweed.

    PubMed

    Honda, Masaki; Ishimaru, Takashi; Itabashi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla is a well-known producer of prostaglandins, such as PGE2 and PGF2α. In this study, the characteristics of glycerolipids as substrates of prostaglandin production were clarified, and the lipid classes, fatty acid composition, and glycerolipid molecular species were investigated in detail. The major lipid classes were monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), as well as phosphatidylcholine (PC), which accounted for 43.0% of the total lipid profile. Arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), a prostaglandin precursor, and palmitic acid (16:0) were the predominant fatty acids in the total lipid profile. The 20:4n-6 content was significantly high in MGDG and PC (more than 60%), and the 16:0 content was significantly high in DGDG and SQDG (more than 50%). Chiral-phase high-performance liquid chromatography determined that fatty acids were esterified at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of those lipids. The main glycerolipid molecular species were 20:4n-6/20:4n-6 (sn-1/sn-2) for MGDG (56.5%) and PC (40.0%), and 20:4n-6/16:0 for DGDG (75.4%) and SQDG (58.4%). Thus, it was considered that the glycerolipid molecular species containing one or two 20:4n-6 were the major substrates for prostaglandin production in G. vermiculophylla.

  11. Molecular species identification boosts bat diversity

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Frieder; Dietz, Christian; Kiefer, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The lack of obvious morphological differences between species impedes the identification of species in many groups of organisms. Meanwhile, DNA-based approaches are increasingly used to survey biological diversity. In this study we show that sequencing the mitochondrial protein-coding gene NADH dehydrogenase, subunit 1 (nd1) from 534 bats of the Western Palaearctic region corroborates the promise of DNA barcodes in two major respects. First, species described with classical taxonomic tools can be genetically identified with only a few exceptions. Second, substantial sequence divergence suggests an unexpected high number of undiscovered species. PMID:17295921

  12. Composition of cardiolipin molecular species in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, K; Kanamoto, R; Kito, M

    1980-01-01

    The composition of the molecular species of acidic phospholipids in Escherichia coli B during the late exponential growth phase at 37 degrees C was determined. Two phosphatidyl groups of cardiolipin, the 3-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) and 1-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) moieties of cardiolipin, were isolated by limited hydrolysis with phospholipase C. No significant difference in the composition of the molecular species was found between the 3-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) and 1-(3-sn-phosphatidyl) moieties. On the other hand, the composition of the molecular species of phosphatidylglycerol was different from that of cardiolipin. Phosphatidylglycerol contained more of the 1-palmitoyl 2-cis-9,10-methylenehexadecanoyl and 1-palmitoyl 2-cis-11,12-methyleneoctadecanoyl species than did cardiolipin. The difference in the composition of the molecular species between cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol may depend on the difference in the turnover rates of both phospholipids. PMID:6988400

  13. A simplified procedure for semi-targeted lipidomic analysis of oxidized phosphatidylcholines induced by UVA irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Florian; Bicker, Wolfgang; Oskolkova, Olga V; Tschachler, Erwin; Bochkov, Valery N

    2012-06-01

    Oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) are increasingly recognized as signaling mediators that are not only markers of oxidative stress but are also "makers" of pathology relevant to disease pathogenesis. Understanding the biological role of individual molecular species of OxPLs requires the knowledge of their concentration kinetics in cells and tissues. In this work, we describe a straightforward "fingerprinting" procedure for analysis of a broad spectrum of molecular species generated by oxidation of the four most abundant species of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines (OxPCs). The approach is based on liquid-liquid extraction followed by reversed-phase HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization MS/MS. More than 500 peaks corresponding in retention properties to polar and oxidized PCs were detected within 8 min at 99 m/z precursor values using a single diagnostic product ion in extracts from human dermal fibroblasts. Two hundred seventeen of these peaks were fluence-dependently and statistically significantly increased upon exposure of cells to UVA irradiation, suggesting that these are genuine oxidized or oxidatively fragmented species. This method of semitargeted lipidomic analysis may serve as a simple first step for characterization of specific "signatures" of OxPCs produced by different types of oxidative stress in order to select the most informative peaks for identification of their molecular structure and biological role.

  14. Molecular characterization of Eimeria species in macropods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Fenwick, Stan; Potter, Abbey; Elliot, Aileen; Power, Michelle; Beveridge, Ian; Ryan, Una

    2012-10-01

    A total of 597 faecal samples were collected from western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus), Euros (M. robustus), red kangaroos (M. rufus) in Western Australia and Eastern Grey Kangaroos (M. giganteus) from Victoria and screened for the presence of Eimeria by PCR at the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) locus. The overall prevalence was 24.3% (145/597). At the 18S rRNA locus, sequences were obtained for 25 of the 145 positives. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that all the macropod-derived Eimeria species grouped in a separate marsupial clade that included Eimeria trichosuri from brushtail possums. At least 6 different clades were identified within the marsupial isolates and many of the genotypes identified are likely to be valid species, however morphological and biological data need to be collected to match sequences to previously characterized Eimeria species or identify if they are new species.

  15. Biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sohlenkamp, Christian; López-Lara, Isabel M; Geiger, Otto

    2003-03-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major membrane-forming phospholipid in eukaryotes and can be synthesized by either of two pathways, the methylation pathway or the CDP-choline pathway. Many prokaryotes lack PC, but it can be found in significant amounts in membranes of rather diverse bacteria and based on genomic data, we estimate that more than 10% of all bacteria possess PC. Enzymatic methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine via the methylation pathway was thought to be the only biosynthetic pathway to yield PC in bacteria. However, a choline-dependent pathway for PC biosynthesis has been discovered in Sinorhizobium meliloti. In this pathway, PC synthase, condenses choline directly with CDP-diacylglyceride to form PC in one step. A number of symbiotic (Rhizobium leguminosarum, Mesorhizobium loti) and pathogenic (Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Brucella melitensis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Borrelia burgdorferi and Legionella pneumophila) bacteria seem to possess the PC synthase pathway and we suggest that the respective eukaryotic host functions as the provider of choline for this pathway. Pathogens entering their hosts through epithelia (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae) require phosphocholine substitutions on their cell surface components that are biosynthetically also derived from choline supplied by the host. However, the incorporation of choline in these latter cases proceeds via choline phosphate and CDP-choline as intermediates. The occurrence of two intermediates in prokaryotes usually found as intermediates in the eukaryotic CDP-choline pathway for PC biosynthesis raises the question whether some bacteria might form PC via a CDP-choline pathway.

  16. Cardiolipin: characterization of distinct oxidized molecular species

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhwan; Minkler, Paul E.; Salomon, Robert G.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a phospholipid predominantly found in the mitochondrial inner membrane and is associated structurally with individual complexes of the electron transport chain (ETC). Because the ETC is the major mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating site, the proximity to the ETC and bisallylic methylenes of the PUFA chains of CL make it a likely target of ROS in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Oxidized cellular CL products, uniquely derived from ROS-induced autoxidation, could serve as biomarkers for the presence of the ROS and could help in the understanding of the mechanism of oxidative stress. Because major CL species have four unsaturated acyl chains, whereas other phospholipids usually have only one in the sn-2 position, characterization of oxidized CL is highly challenging. In the current study, we exposed CL, under aerobic conditions, to singlet oxygen (1O2), the radical initiator 2,2′-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride, or room air, and the oxidized CL species were characterized by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Our reverse-phase ion-pair HPLC-MS/MS method can characterize the major and minor oxidized CL species by detecting distinctive fragment ions associated with specific oxidized species. The HPLC-MS/MS results show that monohydroperoxides and bis monohydroperoxides were generated under all three conditions. However, significant amounts of CL dihydroperoxides were produced only by 1O2-mediated oxidation. These products were barely detectable from radical oxidation either in a liposome bilayer or in thin film. These observations are only possible due to the chromatographic separation of the different oxidized species. PMID:20858593

  17. Molecular Diagnosis of Pathogenic Sporothrix Species

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Hoog, G. Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Background Sporotrichosis is a chronic (sub)cutaneous infection caused by thermodimorphic fungi in the order, Ophiostomatales. These fungi are characterized by major differences in routes of transmission, host predilections, species virulence, and susceptibilities to antifungals. Sporothrix species emerge in the form of outbreaks. Large zoonoses and sapronoses are ongoing in Brazil and China, respectively. Current diagnostic methods based on morphology and physiology are inaccurate due to closely related phenotypes with overlapping components between pathogenic and non-pathogenic Sporothrix. There is a critical need for new diagnostic tools that are specific, sensitive, and cost-effective. Methodology We developed a panel of novel markers, based on calmodulin (CAL) gene sequences, for the large-scale diagnosis and epidemiology of clinically relevant members of the Sporothrix genus, and its relative, Ophiostoma. We identified specific PCR-based markers for S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii, S. globosa, S. mexicana, S. pallida, and O. stenoceras. We employed a murine model of disseminated sporotrichosis to optimize a PCR assay for detecting Sporothrix in clinical specimens. Results Primer-BLAST searches revealed candidate sequences that were conserved within a single species. Species-specific primers showed no significant homology with human, mouse, or microorganisms outside the Sporothrix genus. The detection limit was 10–100 fg of DNA in a single round of PCR for identifying S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii, S. globosa, S. mexicana, and S. pallida. A simple, direct PCR assay, with conidia as a source of DNA, was effective for rapid, low-cost genotyping. Samples from a murine model of disseminated sporotrichosis confirmed the feasibility of detecting S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii DNA in spleen, liver, lungs, heart, brain, kidney, tail, and feces of infected animals. Conclusions This PCR-based method could successfully detect and identify a single species in samples

  18. Elucidation of Phosphatidylcholine Composition in Krill Oil Extracted from Euphausia superba

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Bjørn; Hoem, Nils; Berge, Kjetil

    2010-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry was used to elucidate the phospholipids in krill oil extracted from Euphausia superba, an emerging source for human nutritional supplements. The study was carried out in order to map the species of the choline-containing phospholipid classes: phosphatidylcholine and lyso-phosphatidylcholine. In addition, the prevalent phosphatidylcholine class was quantified and the results compared with prior analysis. The qualification was performed with separation on a reverse phase chromatography column, while the quantification was obtained with class separation on a normal phase chromatography column. An Orbitrap system was used for the detection, and pulsed-Q dissociation fragmentation was utilized for the identification of the species. An asymmetrical exclusion list was applied for detection of phospholipid species of lower concentration, significantly improving the number of species observed. A total of 69 choline-containing phospholipids were detected, whereof 60 phosphatidylcholine substances, among others seven with probable omega-3 fatty acids in both sn-1 and sn-2. The phosphatidylcholine concentration was estimated to be 34 ± 5 g/100 g oil (n = 5). These results confirm the complexity of the phospholipid composition of krill oil, and the presence of long chained, heavily unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:20848234

  19. Elucidation of phosphatidylcholine composition in krill oil extracted from Euphausia superba.

    PubMed

    Winther, Bjørn; Hoem, Nils; Berge, Kjetil; Reubsaet, Léon

    2011-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry was used to elucidate the phospholipids in krill oil extracted from Euphausia superba, an emerging source for human nutritional supplements. The study was carried out in order to map the species of the choline-containing phospholipid classes: phosphatidylcholine and lyso-phosphatidylcholine. In addition, the prevalent phosphatidylcholine class was quantified and the results compared with prior analysis. The qualification was performed with separation on a reverse phase chromatography column, while the quantification was obtained with class separation on a normal phase chromatography column. An Orbitrap system was used for the detection, and pulsed-Q dissociation fragmentation was utilized for the identification of the species. An asymmetrical exclusion list was applied for detection of phospholipid species of lower concentration, significantly improving the number of species observed. A total of 69 choline-containing phospholipids were detected, whereof 60 phosphatidylcholine substances, among others seven with probable omega-3 fatty acids in both sn-1 and sn-2. The phosphatidylcholine concentration was estimated to be 34 ± 5 g/100 g oil (n = 5). These results confirm the complexity of the phospholipid composition of krill oil, and the presence of long chained, heavily unsaturated fatty acids.

  20. From brain to food: analysis of phosphatidylcholins, lyso-phosphatidylcholins and phosphatidylcholin-plasmalogens derivates in Alzheimer's disease human post mortem brains and mice model via mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Marcus O W; Grösgen, Sven; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Tanila, Heikki; Grimm, Heike S; Hartmann, Tobias

    2011-10-21

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular senile plaques mainly consisting of Aβ, a 40-42 amino acid long peptide, and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, accompanied by an excessive loss of synapses. Recently evidence accumulated that nutrition, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, influences AD pathogenesis. Especially mid-life food habits with the consumption of specific fatty acids (FA) appear to influence the disease risk. The timely separation between food intake and disease makes a direct correlation with detailed analysis of eating habits combined with accurate food analysis nearly unattainable. A possible solution to circumvent these difficulties is to investigate the FA composition in human post mortem brain. In this study we focused on the main phospholipids phosphatidylcholin (PC), phosphatidylcholin-plasmalogen (PC-PL) and lyso-phosphatidylcholin (lyso-PC) in AD brains compared to control brains. Frontal cortices, temporal cortices and cerebellum of 30 AD (mean 78 years) and 14 control aged matched brains (mean 77.4 years) as well as APP transgenic mice compared to control mice were analyzed using an AB Sciex 4000 Qtrap mass spectrometer utilizing a FIA MS/MS method. PC, PC-PL and lyso-PC metabolites were analyzed in respect to saturation level and FA composition. As expected, the majority of the lipid species showed no significant differences, but interestingly a few species revealed a highly significant reduction in AD brains. These FAs are potential candidates for further food analysis in respect to AD pathology. Additionally, we show that the method applied with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) used for this study is suitable for semi quantitative analysis of small amounts (10 μl) of brain tissue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Differentiation of Seven Malassezia Species

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditya K.; Kohli, Yatika; Summerbell, Richard C.

    2000-01-01

    A system based on PCR and restriction endonuclease analysis was developed to distinguish the seven currently recognized Malassezia species. Seventy-eight strains, including authentic culture collection strains and routine clinical isolates, were investigated for variation in the ribosomal DNA repeat units. Two genomic regions, namely, the large subunit of the ribosomal gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, were amplified by PCR, and products were digested with restriction endonucleases. The patterns generated were useful in identification of five out of seven Malassezia species. M. sympodialis was readily distinguishable in that its ITS region yielded a 700-bp amplified fragment, whereas the other six species yielded an 800-bp fragment. M. globosa and M. restricta were very similar in the regions studied and could be distinguished only by performing a hot start-touchdown PCR on primers for the β-tubulin gene. Primers based on the conserved areas of the Candida cylindracea lipase gene, which were used in an attempt to amplify Malassezia lipases, yielded an amplification product after annealing at 55°C only with M. pachydermatis. This specific amplification may facilitate the rapid identification of this organism. PMID:10790115

  2. Characterization of Capsicum species using anatomical and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Dias, G B; Gomes, V M; Moraes, T M S; Zottich, U P; Rabelo, G R; Carvalho, A O; Moulin, M; Gonçalves, L S A; Rodrigues, R; Da Cunha, M

    2013-02-28

    Capsicum species are frequently described in terms of genetic divergence, considering morphological, agronomic, and molecular databases. However, descriptions of genetic differences based on anatomical characters are rare. We examined the anatomy and the micromorphology of vegetative and reproductive organs of several Capsicum species. Four Capsicum accessions representing the species C. annuum var. annuum, C. baccatum var. pendulum, C. chinense, and C. frutescens were cultivated in a greenhouse; leaves, fruits and seeds were sampled and their organ structure analyzed by light and scanning electronic microscopy. Molecular accession characterization was made using ISSR markers. Polymorphism was observed among tector trichomes and also in fruit color and shape. High variability among accessions was detected by ISSR markers. Despite the species studied present a wide morphological and molecular variability that was not reflected by anatomical features.

  3. Quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of glycerophospholipid molecular species in the two halophyte seed oils: Eryngium maritimum and Cakile maritima.

    PubMed

    Zitouni, Manel; Wewer, Vera; Dörmann, Peter; Abdelly, Chedly; Ben Youssef, Nabil

    2016-12-15

    Future applications of lipids in clinical cohort studies demand detailed glycerophospholipid molecule information and the application of high-throughput lipidomics platforms. In the present work, a novel sensitive technique with high mass resolution and accuracy was applied to accomplish phospholipid analysis. Nanospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to separate and quantify the glycerophospholipid classes as well as molecular species in two halophyte seed oils from Cakile maritima and Eryngium maritimum. Precursor or neutral loss scans of their polar head groups allowed the detection of molecular species within particular glycerophospholipid classes. Phosphatidylcholine was found to be the most abundant glycerophospholipid in both seed oils whereas phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid were less abundant. Phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylglycerol were minor glycerophospholipids. Several molecular species within each class were detected and the main molecular species (C36:4, C36:3, C36:2, 34:2 and C34:1) were quantitatively different between the two halophytes and the different glycerophospholipids.

  4. Why do species vary in their rate of molecular evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Bromham, Lindell

    2009-01-01

    Despite hopes that the processes of molecular evolution would be simple, clock-like and essentially universal, variation in the rate of molecular evolution is manifest at all levels of biological organization. Furthermore, it has become clear that rate variation has a systematic component: rate of molecular evolution can vary consistently with species body size, population dynamics, lifestyle and location. This suggests that the rate of molecular evolution should be considered part of life-history variation between species, which must be taken into account when interpreting DNA sequence differences between lineages. Uncovering the causes and correlates of rate variation may allow the development of new biologically motivated models of molecular evolution that may improve bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:19364710

  5. Why do species vary in their rate of molecular evolution?

    PubMed

    Bromham, Lindell

    2009-06-23

    Despite hopes that the processes of molecular evolution would be simple, clock-like and essentially universal, variation in the rate of molecular evolution is manifest at all levels of biological organization. Furthermore, it has become clear that rate variation has a systematic component: rate of molecular evolution can vary consistently with species body size, population dynamics, lifestyle and location. This suggests that the rate of molecular evolution should be considered part of life-history variation between species, which must be taken into account when interpreting DNA sequence differences between lineages. Uncovering the causes and correlates of rate variation may allow the development of new biologically motivated models of molecular evolution that may improve bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses.

  6. Interaction of the Lipopeptide Biosurfactant Lichenysin with Phosphatidylcholine Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Coronel, Jonathan R; Marqués, Ana; Manresa, Ángeles; Aranda, Francisco J; Teruel, José A; Ortiz, Antonio

    2017-09-26

    Lichenysins produced by Bacillus licheniformis are anionic lipopeptide biosurfactants with cytotoxic, antimicrobial, and hemolytic activities that possess enormous potential for chemical and biological applications. Through the use of physical techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry, small- and wide-angle X-ray diffraction, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy as well as molecular dynamics simulations, we report on the interaction of Lichenysin with synthetic phosphatidylcholines differing in hydrocarbon chain length. Lichenysin alters the thermotropic phase behavior of phosphatidylcholines, displaying fluid-phase immiscibility and showing a preferential partitioning into fluid domains. The interlamellar repeat distance of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is modified, affecting both the phospholipid palisade and the lipid/water interface, which also experiences a strong dehydration. Molecular dynamics confirms that Lichenysin is capable of interacting both with the hydrophobic portion of DPPC and with the polar headgroup region, which is of particular relevance to explain much of its properties. The results presented here help to establish a molecular basis for the Lichenysin-induced perturbation of model and biological membranes previously described in the literature.

  7. Effects of hypochlorous acid on unsaturated phosphatidylcholines.

    PubMed

    Arnhold, J; Osipov, A N; Spalteholz, H; Panasenko, O M; Schiller, J

    2001-11-01

    Effects of hypochlorous acid and of the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system on mono- and polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines were analyzed by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Chlorohydrins and glycols were detected as main products according to the characteristic shift of molecular masses. Mainly mono-chlorohydrins result upon the incubation of HOCl/(-)OCl with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, whereas only traces of mono-glycols were detected. 1-Palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine yielded a complex mixture of products. Mono-chlorohydrins and glycols dominated only at short incubation, while bis-chlorohydrins as well as products containing one chlorohydrin and one glycol moiety appeared after longer incubation. Similarly, a complex product mixture resulted upon incubation of 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine with hypochlorous acid. Additionally, tris-chlorohydrins, products with two chlorohydrin and one glycol moiety, as well as lysophosphatidylcholines and fragmentation products of the arachidonoyl side chain were detectable. Mono-chlorohydrins of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were detected after the incubation of the latter phospholipid with the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system at pH 6.0. These chlorohydrins were not observed in the absence of chloride, hydrogen peroxide, or myeloperoxidase as well as in the presence of methionine, taurine, or sodium azide. Thus, mono-chlorohydrins in 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine produced by hypochlorous acid from the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system can also be detected by means of MALDI-TOF MS.

  8. Identification of phospholipids classes and molecular species in different types of egg yolk by using UPLC-Q-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abdelmoneim H; Zou, Xiaoqiang; Lu, Jian; Abed, Sherif M; Yao, Yunping; Tao, Guanjun; Jin, Qingzhe; Wang, Xingguo

    2017-04-15

    Egg phospholipids (PLs) are currently the products of greatest commercial interest with major area of importance in various fields. Therefore, in this study, duck, hen and quail egg yolk PLs were isolated by solvent extraction with chilled acetone precipitation, and subsequently separated and identified by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). Egg PLs were separated on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) with ethylene bridged hybrid (BEH) column by gradient elution using acetonitrile/ammonium formate as a mobile phase, and detected by mass spectrometry (MS) under electrospray ionization in positive and negative ion mode. Structural characterizations of 57 molecular species of egg yolk PLs were identified based on MS/MS fragment ion information and elemental composition in MassLynx 4.1 software. The obtained results showed that phosphatidylcholine (16:0-18:1), phosphatidylethanolamine (18:0-20:4), phosphatidylinositol (18:0-18:2), phosphatidylserine (18:0-18:2), sphingomyelin (d18:1/16:0) and lysophosphatidylcholine (16:0) were the predominant species among the different classes of egg yolk phospholipids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Low molecular weight species in humic and fulvic fractions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.A.; Collin, P.J.; Malcolm, R.L.; Perdue, E. Michael; Cresswell, P.

    1988-01-01

    Fourier transform solution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry with homogated water peak irradiation is a useful method for detecting low molecular weight substances in humic extracts. Succinate, acetate, methanol, formate, lactate and some aryl methoxyl compounds have been detected in extracts from a wide range of sources. In view of the controversy over whether low molecular weight substances are contaminants in humic extracts introduced by the concentration procedure, we report that some of these materials are not contaminants since 1H-NMR can be used to follow their formation from higher molecular weight species. ?? 1988.

  10. Molecular species delimitation in the genus Eumerus (Diptera: Syrphidae).

    PubMed

    Chroni, A; Djan, M; Vidaković, D Obreht; Petanidou, T; Vujić, A

    2017-02-01

    Eumerus is one of the most diverse genera of hoverfly worldwide. Species delimitation within genus is considered to be difficult due to: (a) lack of an efficient key; (b) non-defined taxonomical status of a large number of species; and (c) blurred nomenclature. Here, we present the first molecular study to delimit species of the genus by using a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome-c oxidase subunit I gene (COI) gene. We assessed 75 specimens assigned to 28 taxa originating from two biogeographic zones: 22 from the western Palaearctic and six from the Afrotropical region. Two datasets were generated based on different sequence lengths to explore the significance of availability of more polymorphic sites for species delimitation; dataset A with a total length of 647 bp and dataset B with 746 bp. Various tree inference approaches and Poisson tree processes models were applied to evaluate the putative 'taxonomical' vs. 'molecular' taxa clusters. All analyses resulted in high taxonomic resolution and clear species delimitation for both the dataset lengths. Furthermore, we revealed a high number of mitochondrial haplotypes and high intraspecific variability. We report two major monophyletic clades, and seven 'molecular' groups of taxa formed, which are congruent with morphology-based taxonomy. Our results support the use of the mitochondrial COI gene in species diagnosis of Eumerus.

  11. Arsenic-Containing Phosphatidylcholines: A New Group of Arsenolipids Discovered in Herring Caviar.

    PubMed

    Viczek, Sandra A; Jensen, Kenneth B; Francesconi, Kevin A

    2016-04-18

    A new group of arsenolipids based on cell-membrane phosphatidylcholines has been discovered in herring caviar (fish roe). A combination of HPLC with elemental and molecular mass spectrometry was used to identify five arsenic-containing phosphatidylcholines; the same technique applied to salmon caviar identified an arsenic-containing phosphatidylethanolamine. The arsenic group in these membrane lipids might impart particular properties to the molecules not displayed by their non-arsenic analogues. Additionally, the new compounds have human health implications according to recent results showing high cytotoxicity for some arsenolipids. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Molecular Systematic Comparison of North American Lygus Species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genus Lygus is widely distributed in North America and Eurasia. The tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), is one of the most serious pest species within this genus. This pest has over 300 known host plants. We employed various molecular markers to investigate both inter- a...

  13. Improved Molecular Technique for the Differentiation of Neotropical Anopheline Species

    PubMed Central

    Matson, Ryan; Rios, Carlos Tong; Chavez, Cesar Banda; Gilman, Robert H.; Florin, David; Sifuentes, Victor Lopez; Greffa, Roldan Cardenas; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Fernandez, Roberto; Portocarrero, Daniel Velasquez; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Kosek, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated a PCR-RFLP of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 region (ITS2) to distinguish species of Anopheles commonly reported in the Amazon and validated this method using reared F1 offspring. The following species of Anopheles were used for molecular analysis: An. (Nys.) benarrochi, An. (Nys.) darlingi, An. (Nys.) nuneztovari, An. (Nys.) konderi, An. (Nys.) rangeli, and An. (Nys.) triannulatus sensu lato (s.l.). In addition, three species of the subgenus Anopheles, An. (Ano.) forattini, An. (Ano.) mattogrossensis, and An. (Ano.) peryassui were included for testing. Each of the nine species tested yielded diagnostic banding patterns. The PCR-RFLP method was successful in identifying all life stages including exuviae with small fractions of the sample. The assay is rapid and can be applied as an unbiased confirmatory method for identification of morphologic variants, disputed samples, imperfectly preserved specimens, and life stages from which taxonomic keys do not allow for definitive species determination. PMID:18337348

  14. A single molecular marker to distinguish between species of Dioscorea.

    PubMed

    Techen, Natascha; Parveen, Iffat; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-03-01

    Yams are species of the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae), which consists of approximately 630 species. The majority of the world production of yams occurs in Africa with 58.8 million t annually, but they are also produced in the Americas and Asia. The saponins in yams have been reported to possess various properties to improve health. The tuber and aerial parts of various species often share morphological similarities, which can cause problems in the proper identification of sample material. For example, the rootstocks and aerial parts of Dioscorea villosa L. share similarities with Dioscorea polystachia Turcz. Dioscorea bulbifera L. may be mistaken for Dioscorea alata L. owing to similar morphologies. Various molecular analyses have been published to help with the identification of species and varieties within the genus Dioscorea. The multi-loci or single-locus analysis has resulted in varying success, some with only a limited discrimination rate. In the present study, a single nuclear genomic region, biparentally inherited, was analyzed for its usefulness as a molecular marker for species identification and discrimination between D. bulbifera, D. villosa, D. nipponica, D. alata, D. caucasica, and D. deltoidea samples. The results of this study show that the LFY genomic region can be useful as a molecular marker to distinguish between samples.

  15. Phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis by the Kennedy pathway occurs at different sites in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Farine, Luce; Niemann, Moritz; Schneider, André; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) are among the most abundant phospholipids in biological membranes. In many eukaryotes, the CDP-ethanolamine and CDP-choline branches of the Kennedy pathway represent major and often essential routes for the production of PE and PC, with ethanolamine and choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferases (EPT and CEPT, respectively) catalysing the last reactions in the respective pathways. Although the site of PE and PC synthesis is commonly known to be the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), detailed information on the localization of the different phosphotransferases is lacking. In the unicellular parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, both branches of the Kennedy pathway are essential for cell growth in culture. We have previously reported that T. brucei EPT (TbEPT) catalyses the production of ether-type PE molecular species while T. brucei CEPT (TbCEPT) synthesizes diacyl-type PE and PC molecular species. We now show that the two enzymes localize to different sub-compartments of the ER. By expressing a series of tagged forms of the two enzymes in T. brucei parasites, in combination with sub-cellular fractionation and enzyme activity measurements, TbEPT was found exclusively in the perinuclear ER, a distinct area located close to but distinct from the nuclear membrane. In contrast, TbCEPT was detected in the bulk ER. PMID:26577437

  16. Phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis by the Kennedy pathway occurs at different sites in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Farine, Luce; Niemann, Moritz; Schneider, André; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-11-18

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) are among the most abundant phospholipids in biological membranes. In many eukaryotes, the CDP-ethanolamine and CDP-choline branches of the Kennedy pathway represent major and often essential routes for the production of PE and PC, with ethanolamine and choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferases (EPT and CEPT, respectively) catalysing the last reactions in the respective pathways. Although the site of PE and PC synthesis is commonly known to be the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), detailed information on the localization of the different phosphotransferases is lacking. In the unicellular parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, both branches of the Kennedy pathway are essential for cell growth in culture. We have previously reported that T. brucei EPT (TbEPT) catalyses the production of ether-type PE molecular species while T. brucei CEPT (TbCEPT) synthesizes diacyl-type PE and PC molecular species. We now show that the two enzymes localize to different sub-compartments of the ER. By expressing a series of tagged forms of the two enzymes in T. brucei parasites, in combination with sub-cellular fractionation and enzyme activity measurements, TbEPT was found exclusively in the perinuclear ER, a distinct area located close to but distinct from the nuclear membrane. In contrast, TbCEPT was detected in the bulk ER.

  17. Corroborating molecular species discovery: Four new pine-feeding species of Chionaspis (Hemiptera, Diaspididae)

    PubMed Central

    Vea, Isabelle M.; Gwiazdowski, Rodger A.; Normark, Benjamin B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The genus Chionaspis (Hemiptera, Diaspididae) includes two North American species of armored scale insects feeding on Pinaceae: Chionaspis heterophyllae Cooley, and Chionaspis pinifoliae (Fitch). Despite the economic impact of conifer-feeding Chionaspis on horticulture, the species diversity in this group has only recently been systematically investigated using samples from across the group’s geographic and host range. This paper provides morphological recognition characters for four new species that were recently hypothesized to exist on the basis of molecular evidence. The new species, here described, are Chionaspis brachycephalon Vea sp. n., Chionaspis caudata Vea sp. n., Chionaspis sonorae Vea sp. n. and Chionaspis torreyanae Vea sp. n.  One of the new species, Chionaspis caudata Vea, has a gland spine at the apex of the pygidium, between the median lobes, unlike any other species of Chionaspis. An identification key to the species of Chionaspis feeding on pine in North America is provided. PMID:23717184

  18. Levels of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf Phosphatidic Acids, Phosphatidylserines, and Most Trienoate-Containing Polar Lipid Molecular Species Increase during the Dark Period of the Diurnal Cycle.

    PubMed

    Maatta, Sara; Scheu, Brad; Roth, Mary R; Tamura, Pamela; Li, Maoyin; Williams, Todd D; Wang, Xuemin; Welti, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that plant leaf polar lipid fatty acid composition varies during the diurnal (dark-light) cycle. Fatty acid synthesis occurs primarily during the light, but fatty acid desaturation continues in the absence of light, resulting in polyunsaturated fatty acids reaching their highest levels toward the end of the dark period. In this work, Arabidopsis thaliana were grown at constant (21°C) temperature with 12-h light and 12-h dark periods. Collision induced dissociation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) demonstrated that 16:3 and 18:3 fatty acid content in membrane lipids of leaves are higher at the end of the dark than at the end of the light period, while 16:1, 16:2, 18:0, and 18:1 content are higher at the end of the light period. Lipid profiling of membrane galactolipids, phospholipids, and lysophospholipids by electrospray ionization triple quadrupole MS indicated that the monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylcholine classes include molecular species whose levels are highest at end of the light period and others that are highest at the end of the dark period. The levels of phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylserine classes were higher at the end of the dark period, and molecular species within these classes either followed the class pattern or were not significantly changed in the diurnal cycle. Phospholipase D (PLD) is a family of enzymes that hydrolyzes phospholipids to produce PA. Analysis of several PLD mutant lines suggests that PLDζ2 and possibly PLDα1 may contribute to diurnal cycling of PA. The polar lipid compositional changes are considered in relation to recent data that demonstrate phosphatidylcholine acyl editing.

  19. Levels of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf Phosphatidic Acids, Phosphatidylserines, and Most Trienoate-Containing Polar Lipid Molecular Species Increase during the Dark Period of the Diurnal Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Maatta, Sara; Scheu, Brad; Roth, Mary R.; Tamura, Pamela; Li, Maoyin; Williams, Todd D.; Wang, Xuemin; Welti, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that plant leaf polar lipid fatty acid composition varies during the diurnal (dark–light) cycle. Fatty acid synthesis occurs primarily during the light, but fatty acid desaturation continues in the absence of light, resulting in polyunsaturated fatty acids reaching their highest levels toward the end of the dark period. In this work, Arabidopsis thaliana were grown at constant (21°C) temperature with 12-h light and 12-h dark periods. Collision induced dissociation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) demonstrated that 16:3 and 18:3 fatty acid content in membrane lipids of leaves are higher at the end of the dark than at the end of the light period, while 16:1, 16:2, 18:0, and 18:1 content are higher at the end of the light period. Lipid profiling of membrane galactolipids, phospholipids, and lysophospholipids by electrospray ionization triple quadrupole MS indicated that the monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylcholine classes include molecular species whose levels are highest at end of the light period and others that are highest at the end of the dark period. The levels of phosphatidic acid (PA) and phosphatidylserine classes were higher at the end of the dark period, and molecular species within these classes either followed the class pattern or were not significantly changed in the diurnal cycle. Phospholipase D (PLD) is a family of enzymes that hydrolyzes phospholipids to produce PA. Analysis of several PLD mutant lines suggests that PLDζ2 and possibly PLDα1 may contribute to diurnal cycling of PA. The polar lipid compositional changes are considered in relation to recent data that demonstrate phosphatidylcholine acyl editing. PMID:22629276

  20. Highlights on molecular identification of closely related species.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Lígia A; Araujo, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    The term "complex" emerged in the literature at the beginning of the genomic era associated to taxonomy and grouping organisms that belong to different species but exhibited similar patterns according to their morphological, physiological and/or other phenotypic features. DNA-DNA hybridization values ~70% and high identity on 16S rRNA gene sequences were recommended for species delineation. Electrophoretic methods showed in some cases to be useful for species identification and population structure but the reproducibility was questionable. Later, the implementation of polyphasic approaches involving phenotypic and molecular methods brought new insights into the analysis of population structure and phylogeny of several "species complexes", allowing the identification of new closely related species. Likewise, the introduction of multilocus sequence typing and sequencing analysis of several genes offered an evolutionary perspective to the term "species complex". Several centres worldwide have recently released increasing genetic information on distinct microbial species. A brief review will be presented to highlight the definition of "species complex" for selected microorganisms, mainly the prokaryotic Acinetobacter calcoaceticus -Acinetobacter baumannii, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Burkholderia cepacia, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Nocardia asteroides complexes, and the eukaryotic Aspergillus fumigatus, Leishmania donovani and Saccharomyces sensu stricto complexes. The members of these complexes may show distinct epidemiology, pathogenicity and susceptibility, turning critical their correct identification. Dynamics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes can be very distinct and the term "species complex" should be carefully extended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Legionella dumoffii Utilizes Exogenous Choline for Phosphatidylcholine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Kania, Magdalena; Janczarek, Monika; Chmiel, Elżbieta; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidycholine (PC) is the major membrane-forming phospholipid in eukaryotes but it has been found in only a limited number of prokaryotes. Bacteria synthesize PC via the phospholipid N-methylation pathway (Pmt) or via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway (Pcs) or both. Here, we demonstrated that Legionella dumoffii has the ability to utilize exogenous choline for phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis when bacteria grow in the presence of choline. The Pcs seems to be a primary pathway for synthesis of this phospholipid in L. dumoffii. Structurally different PC species were distributed in the outer and inner membranes. As shown by the LC/ESI-MS analyses, PC15:0/15:0, PC16:0/15:0, and PC17:0/17:1 were identified in the outer membrane and PC14:0/16:0, PC16:0/17:1, and PC20:0/15:0 in the inner membrane. L. dumoffii pcsA gene encoding phosphatidylcholine synthase revealed the highest sequence identity to pcsA of L. bozemanae (82%) and L. longbeachae (81%) and lower identity to pcsA of L. drancourtii (78%) and L. pneumophila (71%). The level of TNF-α in THP1-differentiated cells induced by live and temperature-killed L. dumoffii cultured on a medium supplemented with choline was assessed. Live L. dumoffii bacteria cultured on the choline-supplemented medium induced TNF-α three-fold less efficiently than cells grown on the non-supplemented medium. There is an evident effect of PC modification, which impairs the macrophage inflammatory response. PMID:24821544

  2. Combined Reversed Phase HPLC, Mass Spectrometry, and NMR Spectroscopy for a Fast Separation and Efficient Identification of Phosphatidylcholines

    PubMed Central

    Willmann, Jan; Thiele, Herbert; Leibfritz, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    In respect of the manifold involvement of lipids in biochemical processes, the analysis of intact and underivatised lipids of body fluids as well as cell and tissue extracts is still a challenging task, if detailed molecular information is required. Therefore, the advantage of combined use of high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry (MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy will be shown analyzing three different types of extracts of the ubiquitous membrane component phosphatidylcholine. At first, different reversed phase modifications were tested on phosphatidylcholines (PC) with the same effective carbon number (ECN) for their applicability in lipid analysis. The results were taken to improve the separation of three natural PC extract types and a new reversed phase (RP)-HPLC method was developed. The individual species were characterized by one- and two-dimensional NMR and positive or negative ion mode quadrupole time of flight (q-TOF)-MS as well as MS/MS techniques. Furthermore, ion suppression effects during electrospray ionisation (ESI), difficulties, limits, and advantages of the individual analytical techniques are addressed. PMID:20871812

  3. The Phosphatidylcholine Diacylglycerol Cholinephosphotransferase Is Required for Efficient Hydroxy Fatty Acid Accumulation in Transgenic Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhaohui; Ren, Zhonghai; Lu, Chaofu

    2012-01-01

    We previously identified an enzyme, phosphatidylcholine diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase (PDCT), that plays an important role in directing fatty acyl fluxes during triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis. The PDCT mediates a symmetrical interconversion between phosphatidylcholine (PC) and diacylglycerol (DAG), thus enriching PC-modified fatty acids in the DAG pool prior to forming TAG. We show here that PDCT is required for the efficient metabolism of engineered hydroxy fatty acids in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds. When a fatty acid hydroxylase (FAH12) from castor (Ricinus communis) was expressed in Arabidopsis seeds, the PDCT-deficient mutant accumulated only about half the amount of hydroxy fatty acids compared with that in the wild-type seeds. We also isolated a PDCT from castor encoded by the RcROD1 (Reduced Oleate Desaturation1) gene. Seed-specific coexpression of this enzyme significantly increased hydroxy fatty acid accumulation in wild type-FAH12 and in a previously produced transgenic Arabidopsis line coexpressing a castor diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2. Analyzing the TAG molecular species and regiochemistry, along with analysis of fatty acid composition in TAG and PC during seed development, indicate that PDCT acts in planta to enhance the fluxes of fatty acids through PC and enrich the hydroxy fatty acids in DAG, and thus in TAG. In addition, PDCT partially restores the oil content that is decreased in FAH12-expressing seeds. Our results add a new gene in the genetic toolbox for efficiently engineering unusual fatty acids in transgenic oilseeds. PMID:22371508

  4. Interactions of beta-blockers with model lipid membranes: molecular view of the interaction of acebutolol, oxprenolol, and propranolol with phosphatidylcholine vesicles by time-dependent fluorescence shift and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Först, Gesche; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Schubert, Rolf; Hof, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Since pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic activities of drugs are often related to their interactions with biomembranes, it is of high interest to establish an approach for the characterization of these interactions at the molecular level. For the present study, beta-blockers (oxprenolol, propranolol, and acebutolol) were selected due to their well described nonspecific membrane effects (NME). Their interactions with model lipid membranes composed of palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) were studied using Time-Dependent Fluorescence Shift (TDFS) and Generalized Polarization (GP) as well as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Liposomal vesicles were labeled with fluorescent membrane polarity probes (Laurdan, Prodan, and Dtmac). Increasing beta-blocker concentrations (0-10 mM for acebutolol and oxprenolol, and 0-1.5 mM for propranolol) significantly rigidifies the lipid bilayer at the glycerol and headgroup level, which was detected in the steady-state and in the time-resolved fluorescence data. The effects of propranolol were considerably stronger than those of the two other beta-blockers. The addition of fluorescent probes precisely located at different levels within the lipid bilayer revealed the insertion of the beta-blockers into the POPC bilayer at the glycerol backbone level, which was further confirmed by MD simulations in the case of propranolol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Time-resolved investigations of singlet oxygen luminescence in water, in phosphatidylcholine, and in aqueous suspensions of phosphatidylcholine or HT29 cells.

    PubMed

    Baier, Jürgen; Maier, Max; Engl, Roland; Landthaler, Michael; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2005-02-24

    Singlet oxygen was generated by energy transfer from the photoexcited sensitizer, Photofrin or 9-acetoxy-2,7,12,17-tetrakis-(beta-methoxyethyl)-porphycene (ATMPn), to molecular oxygen. Singlet oxygen was detected time-resolved by its luminescence at 1270 nm in an environment of increasing complexity, water (H2O), pure phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine in water (lipid suspensions), and aqueous suspensions of living cells. In the case of the lipid suspensions, the sensitizers accumulated in the lipids, whereas the localizations in the cells are the membranes containing phosphatidylcholine. By use of Photofrin, the measured luminescence decay times of singlet oxygen were 3.5 +/- 0.5 micros in water, 14 +/- 2 micros in lipid, 9 +/- 2 micros in aqueous suspensions of lipid droplets, and 10 +/- 3 micros in aqueous suspensions of human colonic cancer cells (HT29). The decay time in cell suspensions was much longer than in water and was comparable to the value in suspensions of phosphatidylcholine. That luminescence signal might be attributed to singlet oxygen decaying in the lipid areas of cellular membranes. The measured luminescence decay times of singlet oxygen excited by ATMPn in pure lipid and lipid suspensions were the same within the experimental error as for Photofrin. In contrast to experiments with Photofrin, the decay time in aqueous suspension of HT29 cells was 6 +/- 2 micros when using ATMPn.

  6. Thermotropic and Barotropic Phase Behavior of Phosphatidylcholine Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Hitoshi; Goto, Masaki; Tada, Kaori; Tamai, Nobutake

    2013-01-01

    Bilayers formed by phospholipids are frequently used as model biological membranes in various life science studies. A characteristic feature of phospholipid bilayers is to undergo a structural change called a phase transition in response to environmental changes of their surroundings. In this review, we focus our attention on phase transitions of some major phospholipids contained in biological membranes, phosphatidylcholines (PCs), depending on temperature and pressure. Bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), which is the most representative lipid in model membrane studies, will first be explained. Then, the bilayer phase behavior of various kinds of PCs with different molecular structures is revealed from the temperature–pressure phase diagrams, and the difference in phase stability among these PC bilayers is discussed in connection with the molecular structure of the PC molecules. Furthermore, the solvent effect on the phase behavior is also described briefly. PMID:23348926

  7. Submental fat reduction by mesotherapy using phosphatidylcholine alone vs. phosphatidylcholine and organic silicium: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Co, Abigail C; Abad-Casintahan, Maria Flordeliz; Espinoza-Thaebtharm, Agnes

    2007-12-01

    Excess skin and fatty tissues beneath the jaw lead to a double chin deformity. Localized fat deposits in this area are a cause of discomfort and anguish, leading patients to undergo surgical procedures such as liposuction and dermolipectomy to improve the cosmetic effect. Both procedures require anesthesia and an operating room setting and are quite expensive. Fearful of extensive surgery and its complications, patients and physicians seek less invasive methods. Mesotherapy with phosphatidylcholine and other cocktails have been used to treat localized fat deposits. However, there are few published articles regarding its effectiveness and some are even anecdotal. This study aims to determine the efficacy of phosphatidylcholine alone vs. phosphatidylcholine and organic silicium in submental fat reduction. Twelve patients with submental fat deposit with no coexisting morbidity and with informed consent were included in the study. They were submitted to one to five treatment sessions with an average interval of 2 weeks between each session. The medication administered was injected, either pure phosphatidylcholine or a combination of phosphatidylcholine and organic silicium. Baseline measurements of submental fat using vernier caliper and digital photographs of the patients were taken during each treatment session. The occurrence of adverse effects was likewise noted. Results Among the 12 patients, 11 completed the treatment course, and 1 was excluded from the study because of failure to follow up. Both phosphatidylcholine and a combination of phosphatidylcholine and organic silicium were equally effective in reducing submental fat deposits. There was no significant difference as to the rate and degree of reduction. Significant reduction in the thickness of submental fat was achieved after three treatment sessions. Adverse reactions in both groups were mild and transitory ranging from heavy sensation, localized heat, nodulations, and slight bruising that abated 3 to 5

  8. Molecular approaches to identify cryptic species and polymorphic species within a complex community of fig wasps.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jin-Hua; Wang, Ning-Xin; Li, Yan-Wei; Murphy, Robert W; Wan, Dong-Guang; Niu, Li-Ming; Hu, Hao-Yuan; Fu, Yue-Guan; Huang, Da-Wei

    2010-11-29

    Cryptic and polymorphic species can complicate traditional taxonomic research and both of these concerns are common in fig wasp communities. Species identification is very difficult, despite great effort and the ecological importance of fig wasps. Herein, we try to identify all chalcidoid wasp species hosted by one species of fig, using both morphological and molecular methods. We compare the efficiency of four different DNA regions and find that ITS2 is highly effective for species identification, while mitochondrial COI and Cytb regions appear less reliable, possibly due to the interference signals from either nuclear copies of mtDNA, i.e. NUMTs, or the effects of Wolbachia infections. The analyses suggest that combining multiple markers is the best choice for inferring species identifications as any one marker may be unsuitable in a given case.

  9. Analysis of lidar systems for profiling aurorally excited molecular species.

    PubMed

    Collins, R L; Lummerzheim, D; Smith, R W

    1997-08-20

    We report a detailed analysis of lidar systems that profile aurorally excited molecular species in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere ( ~80 -300 km). Current profiling of this region is performed with incoherent scatter radars that determine the total electron and ion concentrations but not the individual species. Studies of the aeronomy of the thermosphere requires knowledge of the species present and their relative populations in the different vibrational and rotational states. We review the spectroscopy of nitrogen to determine an optimized lidar system. We combine these results with current auroral observations and models to determine the performance of an actual lidar system. The study shows that such systems can provide high-resolution (1 km, 100 s) measurements of these species with current laser technology.

  10. Molecular phylogenetics of geographically restricted Acropora species: implications for threatened species conservation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Z T; Miller, D J; Wallace, C C

    2013-12-01

    To better understand the underlying causes of rarity and extinction risk in Acropora (staghorn coral), we contrast the minimum divergence ages and nucleotide diversity of an array of species with different range sizes and levels of threat. Time-calibrated Bayesian analyses based upon concatenated nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data implied contemporary range size and vulnerability are linked to species age. However, contrary to previous hypotheses that suggest geographically restricted Acropora species evolved in the Plio-Pleistocene, the molecular phylogeny depicts some Indo-Australian species have greater antiquity, diverging in the Miocene. Species age is not related to range size as a simple positive linear function and interpreting the precise tempo of evolution in this genus is greatly complicated by morphological homoplasy and a sparse fossil record. Our phylogenetic reconstructions provide new examples of how morphology conceals cryptic evolutionary relationships in this keystone genus, and offers limited support for the species groupings currently used in Acropora systematics. We hypothesize that in addition to age, other mechanisms (such as a reticulate ancestry) delimit the contemporary range of some Acropora species, as evidenced by the complex patterns of allele sharing and paraphyly we uncover. Overall, both new and ancient evolutionary information may be lost if geographically restricted and threatened Acropora species are forced to extinction. In order to protect coral biodiversity and resolve the evolutionary history of staghorn coral, further analyses based on comprehensive and heterogeneous morphological and molecular data utilizing reticulate models of evolution are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Cell Survival Signaling Requires Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Matt; Upadhyay, Awani; Ido, Liyana J.; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Identification of pro-cell survival signaling pathways has implications for cancer, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative disease. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor LET-23 (LET-23 EGFR) has a prosurvival function in counteracting excitotoxicity, and we identify novel molecular players required for this prosurvival signaling. uv1 sensory cells in the C. elegans uterus undergo excitotoxic death in response to activation of the OSM-9/OCR-4 TRPV channel by the endogenous agonist nicotinamide. Activation of LET-23 EGFR can effectively prevent this excitotoxic death. We investigate the roles of signaling pathways known to act downstream of LET-23 EGFR in C. elegans and find that the LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway, but not the IP3 receptor pathway, is required for efficient LET-23 EGFR activity in its prosurvival function. However, activation of LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway does not appear to be sufficient to fully mimic LET-23 EGFR activity. We screen for genes that are required for EGFR prosurvival function and uncover a role for phosphatidylcholine biosynthetic enzymes in EGFR prosurvival function. Finally, we show that exogenous application of phosphatidylcholine is sufficient to prevent some deaths in this excitotoxicity model. Our work implicates regulation of lipid synthesis downstream of EGFR in cell survival and death decisions. PMID:27605519

  12. Molecular Identification of Cryptosporidium Species from Pet Snakes in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Yimming, Benjarat; Pattanatanang, Khampee; Sanyathitiseree, Pornchai; Inpankaew, Tawin; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Phasuk, Jumnongjit

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important pathogen causing gastrointestinal disease in snakes and is distributed worldwide. The main objectives of this study were to detect and identify Cryptosporidium species in captive snakes from exotic pet shops and snake farms in Thailand. In total, 165 fecal samples were examined from 8 snake species, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor), corn snake (Elaphe guttata), ball python (Python regius), milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum), king snake (Lampropeltis getula), rock python (Python sebae), rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria), and carpet python (Morelia spilota). Cryptosporidium oocysts were examined using the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-modified acid-fast staining and a molecular method based on nested-PCR, PCR-RFLP analysis, and sequencing amplification of the SSU rRNA gene. DMSO-modified acid-fast staining revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in 12 out of 165 (7.3%) samples, whereas PCR produced positive results in 40 (24.2%) samples. Molecular characterization indicated the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum (mouse genotype) as the most common species in 24 samples (60%) from 5 species of snake followed by Cryptosporidium serpentis in 9 samples (22.5%) from 2 species of snake and Cryptosporidium muris in 3 samples (7.5%) from P. regius. PMID:27658593

  13. Molecular delineation of species in the coral holobiont.

    PubMed

    Stat, Michael; Baker, Andrew C; Bourne, David G; Correa, Adrienne M S; Forsman, Zac; Huggett, Megan J; Pochon, Xavier; Skillings, Derek; Toonen, Robert J; van Oppen, Madeleine J H; Gates, Ruth D

    2012-01-01

    The coral holobiont is a complex assemblage of organisms spanning a diverse taxonomic range including a cnidarian host, as well as various dinoflagellate, prokaryotic and acellular symbionts. With the accumulating information on the molecular diversity of these groups, binomial species classification and a reassessment of species boundaries for the partners in the coral holobiont is a logical extension of this work and will help enhance the capacity for comparative research among studies. To aid in this endeavour, we review the current literature on species diversity for the three best studied partners of the coral holobiont (coral, Symbiodinium, prokaryotes) and provide suggestions for future work on systematics within these taxa. We advocate for an integrative approach to the delineation of species using both molecular genetics in combination with phenetic characters. We also suggest that an a priori set of criteria be developed for each taxonomic group as no one species concept or accompanying set of guidelines is appropriate for delineating all members of the coral holobiont. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular characterization and RAPD analysis of Juniperus species from Iran.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, J; Behravan, J; Hassany, M; Emami, S A; Shahriari, F; Khayyat, M H

    2011-06-07

    The genus Juniperus L. (Cupressaceae), an aromatic evergreen plant, consists of up to 68 species around the world. We classified five species of Juniperus found in Iran using molecular markers to provide a means for molecular identification of Iranian species. Plants were collected (three samples of each species) from two different provinces of Iran (Golestan and East Azarbayejan). The DNA was extracted from the leaves using a Qiagen Dneasy Plant Mini Kit. Amplification was performed using 18 ten-mer RAPD primers. Genetic distances were estimated based on 187 RAPD bands to construct a dendrogram by means of unweighted pair group method of arithmetic means. It was found that J. communis and J. oblonga were differentiated from the other species. Genetic distance values ranged from 0.19 (J. communis and J. oblonga) to 0.68 (J. communis and J. excelsa). Juniperus foetidissima was found to be most similar to J. sabina. Juniperus excelsa subspecies excelsa and J. excelsa subspecies polycarpos formed a distinct group.

  15. Molecular Identification of Cryptosporidium Species from Pet Snakes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yimming, Benjarat; Pattanatanang, Khampee; Sanyathitiseree, Pornchai; Inpankaew, Tawin; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Phasuk, Jumnongjit

    2016-08-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important pathogen causing gastrointestinal disease in snakes and is distributed worldwide. The main objectives of this study were to detect and identify Cryptosporidium species in captive snakes from exotic pet shops and snake farms in Thailand. In total, 165 fecal samples were examined from 8 snake species, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor), corn snake (Elaphe guttata), ball python (Python regius), milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum), king snake (Lampropeltis getula), rock python (Python sebae), rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria), and carpet python (Morelia spilota). Cryptosporidium oocysts were examined using the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-modified acid-fast staining and a molecular method based on nested-PCR, PCR-RFLP analysis, and sequencing amplification of the SSU rRNA gene. DMSO-modified acid-fast staining revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in 12 out of 165 (7.3%) samples, whereas PCR produced positive results in 40 (24.2%) samples. Molecular characterization indicated the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum (mouse genotype) as the most common species in 24 samples (60%) from 5 species of snake followed by Cryptosporidium serpentis in 9 samples (22.5%) from 2 species of snake and Cryptosporidium muris in 3 samples (7.5%) from P. regius.

  16. Variable soft sphere molecular model for air species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koura, Katsuhisa; Matsumoto, Hiroaki

    1992-05-01

    A reliable set of cross-section parameters of the variable soft sphere (VSS) molecular model is determined for the Monte Carlo simulation of air species from the transport collision integrals or potential parameters provided by Cubley and Mason (1975) over the high-temperature range 300-15,000 K. The VSS cross-section parameters for the inverse-power-law potential are also determined from the viscosity coefficients recommended by Maitland and Smith (1972) for common species in the low (20-300 K) and high (300-2000 K) temperature ranges.

  17. Variable soft sphere molecular model for air species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koura, Katsuhisa; Matsumoto, Hiroaki

    1992-05-01

    A reliable set of cross-section parameters of the variable soft sphere (VSS) molecular model is determined for the Monte Carlo simulation of air species from the transport collision integrals or potential parameters provided by Cubley and Mason [Phys. Fluids 18, 1109 (1975)] over the high-temperature range 300-15 000 K. The VSS cross-section parameters for the inverse-power-law potential are also determined from the viscosity coefficients recommended by Maitland and Smith [J. Chem. Eng. Data 17, 150 (1972)] for common species in the low (20-300 K) and high (300-2000 K) temperature ranges.

  18. Identification of Pseudallescheria and Scedosporium Species by Three Molecular Methods▿

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiaoyun; Gerrits van den Ende, A. H. G.; Bakkers, J. M. J. E.; Sun, Jiufeng; Lackner, M.; Najafzadeh, M. J.; Melchers, W. J. G.; Li, Ruoyu; de Hoog, G. S.

    2011-01-01

    The major clinically relevant species in Scedosporium (teleomorph Pseudallescheria) are Pseudallescheria boydii, Scedosporium aurantiacum, Scedosporium apiospermum, and Scedosporium prolificans, while Pseudallescheria minutispora, Petriellopsis desertorum, and Scedosporium dehoogii are exceptional agents of disease. Three molecular methods targeting the partial β-tubulin gene were developed and evaluated to identify six closely related species of the S. apiospermum complex using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), PCR-based reverse line blot (PCR-RLB), and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). qPCR was not specific enough for the identification of all species but had the highest sensitivity. The PCR-RLB assay was efficient for the identification of five species. LAMP distinguished all six species unambiguously. The analytical sensitivities of qPCR, PCR-RLB, and LAMP combined with MagNAPure, CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide), and FTA filter (Whatman) extraction were 50, 5 × 103, and 5 × 102 cells/μl, respectively. When LAMP was combined with a simplified DNA extraction method using an FTA filter, identification to the species level was achieved within 2 h, including DNA extraction. The FTA-LAMP assay is therefore recommended as a cost-effective, simple, and rapid method for the identification of Scedosporium species. PMID:21177887

  19. Comparative molecular cytogenetic characterization of seven Deschampsia (Poaceae) species.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Alexandra V; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Zoshchuk, Svyatoslav A; Twardovska, Maryana O; Yurkevich, Olga Yu; Andreev, Igor O; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Kunakh, Viktor A; Muravenko, Olga V

    2017-01-01

    The genus Deschampsia P. Beauv (Poaceae) involves a group of widespread polymorphic species. Some of them are highly tolerant to stressful and variable environmental conditions, and D. antarctica is one of the only two vascular plants growing in Antarctic. This species is a source of useful for selection traits and a valuable model for studying an environmental stress tolerance in plants. Genome diversity and comparative chromosomal phylogeny within the genus have not been studied yet as karyotypes of most Deschampsia species are poorly investigated. We firstly conducted a comparative molecular cytogenetic analysis of D. antarctica (Antarctic Peninsula) and related species from various localities (D. cespitosa, D. danthonioides, D. elongata, D. flexuosa (= Avenella flexuosa), D. parvula and D. sukatschewii by fluorescence in situ hybridization with 45S and 5S rDNA, DAPI-banding and sequential rapid in situ hybridization with genomic DNA of D. antarctica, D. cespitosa, and D. flexuosa. Based on patterns of distribution of the examined markers, chromosomes of the studied species were identified. Within these species, common features as well as species peculiarities in their karyotypic structure and chromosomal distribution of molecular cytogenetic markers were characterized. Different chromosomal rearrangements were detected in D. antarctica, D. flexuosa, D. elongata and D. sukatschewii. In karyotypes of D. antarctica, D. cespitosa, D. elongata and D. sukatschewii, 0-3 B chromosomes possessed distinct DAPI-bands were observed. Our findings suggest that the genome evolution of the genus Deschampsia involved polyploidy and also different chromosomal rearrangements. The obtained results will help clarify the relationships within the genus Deschampsia, and can be a basis for the further genetic and biotechnological studies as well as for selection of plants tolerant to extreme habitats.

  20. Complexity in Dioryctria zimmermani Species Group: Incongruence Between Species Limits and Molecular Diversity

    Treesearch

    Amanda D. Roe; Daniel R. Miller; Susan J. Weller

    2011-01-01

    Dioryctria (Zeller 1846) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Phycitinae) moths, commonlyknown as coneworms, are a group of important coniferous pests. InterspeciÞc overlap of molecular, morphological, and behavioral traits has made identiÞcation and delimitation of these species problematic, impeding their management and control. In particular, delimitation of members of the...

  1. Molecular characterization of Ephedra species found in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ghafoor, S; Shah, M M; Ahmad, H; Swati, Z A; Shah, S H; Pervez, A; Farooq, U

    2007-12-11

    Ephedra, also known as "ma huang", is a dioecious, drought- and frost-resistant, perennial, evergreen shrub with compelling medicinal value. The genus is represented by 42 species around the world, 9 of which were provisionally reported from Pakistan. Species of the genus have a controversial taxonomy due to their overlapping morphological features. Conventional tools alone are not sufficient for characterizing the species. The objective of present study was to assess the genetic variability present in different biotypes of Ephedra growing in Pakistan using molecular markers. A total of six genotypes collected from diverse geographic zones of Pakistan were used. The DNA of all genotypes was amplified using nine randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers to study genetic variability at the molecular level. The dissimilarity coefficient matrix based on the data of 9 RAPD primers was used to construct a dendrogram which was then used to group the genotypes in clusters. Based on the dendrogram and dissimilarity coefficient matrix, the RAPD markers used here revealed a moderate to high level of genetic polymorphism (6 to 49%) among the genotypes. It was found that the collection of genotype accessions from Swat Valley in northwestern Pakistan was most distantly related to the other five collections. More molecular markers including functional genes and ribosomal spacer regions are suggested to find a better estimate of the genetic diversity present in Ephedra growing in Pakistan. The information provided here is useful for identifying valuable Ephedra variants which will be used for medicinal purposes and earning foreign currency.

  2. Integrative taxonomy by molecular species delimitation: multi-locus data corroborate a new species of Balkan Drusinae micro-endemics.

    PubMed

    Vitecek, Simon; Kučinić, Mladen; Previšić, Ana; Živić, Ivana; Stojanović, Katarina; Keresztes, Lujza; Bálint, Miklós; Hoppeler, Felicitas; Waringer, Johann; Graf, Wolfram; Pauls, Steffen U

    2017-06-06

    Taxonomy offers precise species identification and delimitation and thus provides basic information for biological research, e.g. through assessment of species richness. The importance of molecular taxonomy, i.e., the identification and delimitation of taxa based on molecular markers, has increased in the past decade. Recently developed exploratory tools now allow estimating species-level diversity in multi-locus molecular datasets. Here we use molecular species delimitation tools that either quantify differences in intra- and interspecific variability of loci, or divergence times within and between species, or perform coalescent species tree inference to estimate species-level entities in molecular genetic datasets. We benchmark results from these methods against 14 morphologically readily differentiable species of a well-defined subgroup of the diverse Drusinae subfamily (Trichoptera, Limnephilidae). Using a 3798 bp (6 loci) molecular data set we aim to corroborate a geographically isolated new species by integrating comparative morphological studies and molecular taxonomy. Our results indicate that only multi-locus species delimitation provides taxonomically relevant information. The data further corroborate the new species Drusus zivici sp. nov. We provide differential diagnostic characters and describe the male, female and larva of this new species and discuss diversity patterns of Drusinae in the Balkans. We further discuss potential and significance of molecular species delimitation. Finally we argue that enhancing collaborative integrative taxonomy will accelerate assessment of global diversity and completion of reference libraries for applied fields, e.g., conservation and biomonitoring.

  3. Phase transitions in phosphatidylcholine multibilayers

    PubMed Central

    Westerman, Philip W.; Vaz, Maria João; Strenk, Lawrence M.; Doane, J. William

    1982-01-01

    The 2H NMR spectrum of a multilamellar dispersion of 1-myristoyl-2-[14,14,14-2H3]myristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine with 1 mol% cholesterol in excess water has been recorded at temperatures between -15°C and 36°C. Motionally averaged quadrupole coupling constants 〈νQ〉 and motionally induced asymmetry parameters η are obtained by spectral analysis. Values of these quantities indicate that, at temperatures below -4°C, any rotational motion of the molecules about their molecular long axis is slow on the NMR time scale. At temperatures immediately above the pretransition these same parameters show that a fast-rotational motion is occurring about the molecular long axis. This rotational motion is hindered in that the molecules flip about a twofold symmetry axis. Between -4°C and the pretransition, spectra appear as the superposition of two powder patterns, one corresponding to the pattern observed below -4°C and the other to the pattern above the pretransition. The relative contribution of the latter increases with temperature until the pretransition is reached. These data have been interpreted in two ways: either the sample between -4°C and the pretransition contains two populations of rapidly and slowly rotating molecules, or there is only a single population of molecules undergoing a 180° flipping motion on the time scale of the NMR measurement. The latter interpretation is more consistent with other experimental findings. At the temperature of the main transition the hydrocarbon chains melt. In the absence of cholesterol, spectra are more complex in that the line shape is reproduced by the superposition of three spectral powder patterns between -4°C and the pretransition and by the superposition of two spectral patterns above the pretransition. It is postulated that these two patterns observed above the pretransition are in direct correspondence to the two ripple structures observed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy in the absence of

  4. Molecular and Morphological Inference of Three Cryptic Species within the Merodon aureus Species Group (Diptera: Syrphidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ačanski, Jelena; Vujić, Ante; Ståhls, Gunilla; Radenković, Snežana; Milić, Dubravka; Obreht Vidaković, Dragana; Đan, Mihajla

    2016-01-01

    The Merodon aureus species group (Diptera: Syrphidae: Eristalinae) comprises a number of different sub-groups and species complexes. In this study we focus on resolving the taxonomic status of the entity previously identified as M. cinereus B, here identified as M. atratus species complex. We used an integrative approach based on morphological descriptions, combined with supporting characters that were obtained from molecular analyses of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene as well as from geometric morphometry of wing and surstylus shapes and environmental niche comparisons. All applied data and methods distinguished and supported three morphologically cryptic species: M. atratus stat. nov., M. virgatus sp. nov. and M. balkanicus sp. nov., which constitute the M. atratus species complex. We present an identification key for the sub-groups and species complexes of the M. aureus species group occurring in Europe, describe the taxa and discuss the utility of the applied methods for species delimitation. The estimated divergence times for the species splits of these taxa coincide with the Pleistocene Günz-Mindel interglaciation and the Great interglaciation (between the Ris and Mindel glacial periods). PMID:27532618

  5. Molecular and morphological identification of Colletotrichum species of clinical interest.

    PubMed

    Cano, Josep; Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa

    2004-06-01

    Colletotrichum species have caused human infections in recent years. Because of the difficulties in recognizing them in vitro, we have designed a quick and unambiguous molecular test, based on the amplification of a specific fragment of the internal transcribed spacer 1 region, to distinguish any Colletotrichum isolate from other fungi, including the common pathogenic species. Analysis of the sequences of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragment showed sufficient variability to clearly separate the five species of Colletotrichum that are of clinical interest, i.e., Colletotrichum coccodes, C. crassipes, C. dematium, C. gloeosporioides, and C. graminicola. Sequencing of the D1-D2 region of the large-subunit rDNA gene also supported these results. Additionally, we reviewed the most suitable morphological characteristics for the in vitro identification of these increasingly important opportunistic fungi.

  6. Molecular and Morphological Identification of Colletotrichum Species of Clinical Interest

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Josep; Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa

    2004-01-01

    Colletotrichum species have caused human infections in recent years. Because of the difficulties in recognizing them in vitro, we have designed a quick and unambiguous molecular test, based on the amplification of a specific fragment of the internal transcribed spacer 1 region, to distinguish any Colletotrichum isolate from other fungi, including the common pathogenic species. Analysis of the sequences of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragment showed sufficient variability to clearly separate the five species of Colletotrichum that are of clinical interest, i.e., Colletotrichum coccodes, C. crassipes, C. dematium, C. gloeosporioides, and C. graminicola. Sequencing of the D1-D2 region of the large-subunit rDNA gene also supported these results. Additionally, we reviewed the most suitable morphological characteristics for the in vitro identification of these increasingly important opportunistic fungi. PMID:15184418

  7. Leaf carbon assimilation and molecular phylogeny in Cattleya species (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Andrade-Souza, V; Almeida, A-A F; Corrêa, R X; Costa, M A; Mielke, M S; Gomes, F P

    2009-08-11

    We examined leaf CO(2) assimilation and how it varied among species within the orchid genus Cattleya. Measurements of CO(2) assimilation and maximum quantum yield of PS II (Fv/Fm) were made for mature leaves of nine species using a portable system for photosynthesis measurement and a portable fluorometer. Leaf area was measured with an area meter, and the specific leaf mass was determined. DNA of nine Cattleya species and two species of Hadrolaelia was extracted using the CTAB protocol. Each sample was amplified and sequenced using primers for the trnL gene. The phylogenetic analyses, using neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony methods, retrieved a group that included Cattleya and Hadrolaelia species, in which the unifoliate species were separated from the bifoliates. The topologies of the two cladograms showed some similarities. However, C. guttata (bifoliate) was placed in the unifoliate clade in the neighbor-joining tree, while C. warneri (unifoliate) was not placed in this clade in the maximum parsimony tree. Most Cattleya species keep the leaf stomata closed from 6 am to 4 pm. We suggest that C. elongata, C. tigrina and C. tenuis have C(3)-crassulacean acid metabolism since they open their stomata around 12 am. The Fv/Fm values remained relatively constant during the measurements of CO(2) assimilation. The same was observed for the specific leaf mass values, although great variations were found in the leaf area values. When the species were grouped using molecular data in the neighbor-joining analysis, no relation was observed with CO(2) assimilation.

  8. Reliable molecular identification of nine tropical whitefly species

    PubMed Central

    Ovalle, Tatiana M; Parsa, Soroush; Hernández, Maria P; Becerra Lopez-Lavalle, Luis A

    2014-01-01

    The identification of whitefly species in adult stage is problematic. Morphological differentiation of pupae is one of the better methods for determining identity of species, but it may vary depending on the host plant on which they develop which can lead to misidentifications and erroneous naming of new species. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment amplified from the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene is often used for mitochondrial haplotype identification that can be associated with specific species. Our objective was to compare morphometric traits against DNA barcode sequences to develop and implement a diagnostic molecular kit based on a RFLP-PCR method using the COI gene for the rapid identification of whiteflies. This study will allow for the rapid diagnosis of the diverse community of whiteflies attacking plants of economic interest in Colombia. It also provides access to the COI sequence that can be used to develop predator conservation techniques by establishing which predators have a trophic linkage with the focal whitefly pest species. PMID:25614792

  9. Synthesis of a Novel Biodegradable Polyurethane with Phosphatidylcholines

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jun; Chen, Niancao; Chen, Yuanwei; Luo, Xianglin

    2010-01-01

    A novel polyurethane was successfully synthesized by chain-extension of biodegradable poly (l-lactide) functionalized phosphatidylcholine (PC) with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) as chain extender (PUR-PC). The molecular weights, glass transition temperature (Tg) increased significantly after the chain-extension. The hydrophilicity of PUR-PC was better than the one without PC, according to a water absorption test. Moreover, the number of adhesive platelets and anamorphic platelets on PUR-PC film were both less than those on PUR film. These preliminary results suggest that this novel polyurethane might be a better scaffold than traditional biodegradable polyurethanes for tissue engineering due to its better blood compatibility. Besides, this study also provides a new method to prepare PC-modified biodegradable polyurethanes. PMID:20480047

  10. Zoonotic potential and molecular epidemiology of Giardia species and giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Molecular diagnostic tools have been used recently in assessing the taxonomy, zoonotic potential, and transmission of Giardia species and giardiasis in humans and animals. The results of these studies have firmly established giardiasis as a zoonotic disease, although host adaptation at the genotype and subtype levels has reduced the likelihood of zoonotic transmission. These studies have also identified variations in the distribution of Giardia duodenalis genotypes among geographic areas and between domestic and wild ruminants and differences in clinical manifestations and outbreak potentials of assemblages A and B. Nevertheless, our efforts in characterizing the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis and the roles of various animals in the transmission of human giardiasis are compromised by the lack of case-control and longitudinal cohort studies and the sampling and testing of humans and animals living in the same community, the frequent occurrence of infections with mixed genotypes and subtypes, and the apparent heterozygosity at some genetic loci for some G. duodenalis genotypes. With the increased usage of multilocus genotyping tools, the development of next-generation subtyping tools, the integration of molecular analysis in epidemiological studies, and an improved understanding of the population genetics of G. duodenalis in humans and animals, we should soon have a better appreciation of the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis, the disease burden of zoonotic transmission, the taxonomy status and virulences of various G. duodenalis genotypes, and the ecology of environmental contamination.

  11. Zoonotic Potential and Molecular Epidemiology of Giardia Species and Giardiasis†

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Molecular diagnostic tools have been used recently in assessing the taxonomy, zoonotic potential, and transmission of Giardia species and giardiasis in humans and animals. The results of these studies have firmly established giardiasis as a zoonotic disease, although host adaptation at the genotype and subtype levels has reduced the likelihood of zoonotic transmission. These studies have also identified variations in the distribution of Giardia duodenalis genotypes among geographic areas and between domestic and wild ruminants and differences in clinical manifestations and outbreak potentials of assemblages A and B. Nevertheless, our efforts in characterizing the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis and the roles of various animals in the transmission of human giardiasis are compromised by the lack of case-control and longitudinal cohort studies and the sampling and testing of humans and animals living in the same community, the frequent occurrence of infections with mixed genotypes and subtypes, and the apparent heterozygosity at some genetic loci for some G. duodenalis genotypes. With the increased usage of multilocus genotyping tools, the development of next-generation subtyping tools, the integration of molecular analysis in epidemiological studies, and an improved understanding of the population genetics of G. duodenalis in humans and animals, we should soon have a better appreciation of the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis, the disease burden of zoonotic transmission, the taxonomy status and virulences of various G. duodenalis genotypes, and the ecology of environmental contamination. PMID:21233509

  12. Human leukocyte inhibitory factor (LIF): two distinct molecular species.

    PubMed

    Brown, A P; Rocklin, R E

    1979-03-01

    Human leukocyte inhibitory factor or LIF was generated in vitro by stimulating blood lymphocytes with concanavalin A (Con A). The control and Con A active supernatants were partially purified by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The fraction containing LIF (68,000 daltons) activity was then subjected to isoelectric focusing (pH 3 to 10 ampholines) in a sucrose gradient. Two LIF activities were reproducibly recovered by this procedure. One molecular form was found to have an isoelectric point of approximately pH 5.0 and the other approximately pH 8.5. Both molecular species were rechromatographed on Sephadex G-75 and found to have the same apparent m.w. (68 to 75,000). Furthermore, the biologic activity of both factors was destroyed after treatment with diisopropylphosphofluoridate, suggesting that they may be esterases.

  13. Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine: A Remarkable Exception to Tocopherol s Membrane Presence

    SciTech Connect

    Marquardt, Drew; Williams, Justin; Kinnun, Justin A.; Kucerka, Norbert; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Wassall, Stephen; Katsaras, John; Harroun, Thad

    2014-01-01

    Using data obtained from different physical techniques (i.e., neutron diffraction, NMR and UV spectroscopy), we present evidence which explains some of the conflicting and inexplicable data found in the literature regarding -tocopherol s (aToc s) behavior in dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (di-14:0PC) bilayers. Without exception, the data point to aToc s active chromanol moiety residing deep in the hydrophobic core of di-14:0PC bilayers, a location that is in stark contrast to aToc s location in other PC bilayers. Our result is a clear example of the importance of lipid species diversity in biological membranes and importantly, it suggests that measurements of aToc s oxidation kinetics, and its associated byproducts observed in di-14:0PC bilayers, should be reexamined, this time taking into account its noncanonical location in this bilayer.

  14. Molecular Characterization of Eimeria Species Naturally Infecting Egyptian Baldi Chickens

    PubMed Central

    GADELHAQ, Sahar M; ARAFA, Waleed M; ABOELHADID, Shawky M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Coccidiosis is a serious protozoal disease of poultry. The identification of Eimeria species has important implications for diagnosis and control as well as for epidemiology. The molecular characterization of Eimeria species infecting Egyptian baladi chickens was investigated. Methods: Eimeria species oocysts were harvested from intestines of naturally infected Egyptian baldi chickens. The morphometry characterization of oocysts along with COCCIMORPH software was done. The DNA was extracted initially by freezing and thawing then the prepared samples was subjected to commercial DNA kits. The DNA products were analyzed through conventional polymerase chain reaction by using amplified region (SCAR) marker. Results: The PCR results confirmed the presence of 7 Eimeria species in the examined fecal samples of Egyptian baldi breed with their specific ampilicon sizes being E. acervulina (811bp), E. brunette (626bp), E. tenella (539bp), E. maxima (272bp), E. necatrix (200bp), E. mitis (327bp) and E. praecopx (354bp). A sequencing of the two most predominant species of Eimeria was done, on E. tenella and E. máxima. Analysis of the obtained sequences revealed high identities 99% between Egyptian isolates and the reference one. Similarly, E. maxima isolated from Egyptian baldi chickens showed 98% nucleotide identities with the reference strain. Only single nucleotide substitution was observed among the Egyptian E. tenella isolates (A181G) when compared to the reference one. The Egyptian isolates acquired 4 unique mutations (A68T, C164T, G190A and C227G) in compared with the reference sequence. Conclusion: This is the first time to identify the 7 species of Eimeria from Egyptian baladi chickens. PMID:25904950

  15. Molecular phylogenetic assessment of host range in five Dermanyssus species.

    PubMed

    Roy, L; Dowling, A P G; Chauve, C M; Lesna, I; Sabelis, M W; Buronfosse, T

    2009-06-01

    Given that 14 out of the 25 currently described species of Dermanyssus Dugès, 1834, are morphologically very close to each another, misidentifications may occur and are suspected in at least some records. One of these 14 species is the red fowl mite, D. gallinae (De Geer, 1778), a blood parasite of wild birds, but also a pest in the poultry industry. Using molecular phylogenetic tools we aimed to answer two questions concerning host specificity and synanthropicity: (1) is D. gallinae the only species infesting European layer farms?, and (2) can populations of D. gallinae move from wild to domestic birds and vice versa? Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene sequences were obtained from 73 Dermanyssus populations collected from nests of wild European birds and from poultry farms and these were analyzed using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Mapping of the observed host range on the obtained topology and correlation with behavioural observations revealed that (1) host range is strongly dependent on some ecological parameters (e.g. nest hygiene, exposure to pesticides and predators), that (2) out of five species under test, synanthropic populations were found only in lineages of D. gallinae, and that (3) at least some haplotypes found in wild birds were very close to those found in association with domestic birds.

  16. Isoniazid interaction with phosphatidylcholine-based membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Amanda Vicente; Marengo Trindade, Paulo; Marques, Sheylla; Brum, Tainá; Harte, Etienne; Rodrigues, Marieli Oliveira; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; da Silva, Pedro Almeida; Pohlmann, Adriana R.; Alves, Isabel Dantas; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues

    2013-11-01

    Interaction between the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid (INH) and phosphatidylcholine membranes was investigated in terms of: (i) drug affinity to a lipid bilayer and (ii) drug-induced changes in the dynamic properties of liposomes, such as membrane hydration state, polar head and non-polar acyl chain order and lipid phase transition behavior. These parameters were studied by plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy (PWR), UV-visible, horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. PWR measurements showed an INH membrane dissociation constant value of 0.031 μM to phosphatidylcholine bilayers. INH induced higher membrane perturbation in the plane which is perpendicular to the membrane plane. The INH saturation concentration in phosphatidylcholine liposomes was 170 μM. At this concentration, HATR-FTIR and NMR findings showed that INH may interact with the lipid polar head, increasing the number of hydrogen bonds in the phosphate region and enhancing the choline motional freedom. DSC measurements showed that, at 115 μM, INH was responsible for a decrease in lipid phase transition temperature of approximately 2 °C and had no influence in the lipid enthalpy variation (ΔH). However, at 170 μM, INH induced the reduction of the ΔH by approximately 52%, suggesting that the drug may increase the distance among lipid molecules and enhance the freedom of the lipid acyl chains methylene groups. This paper provides information on the effects of INH on membrane dynamics which is important to understand liposome targeting of the drug and for the development of anti-TB pharmacologic systems that not only are less susceptible to resistance but also have low toxicity.

  17. Molecular identification of entomopathogenic Fusarium species associated with Tribolium species in stored grains.

    PubMed

    Chehri, Khosrow

    2017-03-01

    Fusarium species are common pathogens of plants, animals and insects worldwide, including Iran. The occurrence of entomopathogenic Fusarium species isolated from Tribolium species as one of the most important insect pests of stored grains were sampled from various provinces in western Iran. In total, 15 Tribolium species belonging to T. castaneum (Herbst) and T. confusum (Du Val) (Col: Tenebrionidae) were detected and 8 isolates from Fusarium spp. were collected from them. Based on morphological features, the Fusarium isolates were classified into F. keratoplasticum and F. proliferatum. The phylogenetic trees based on tef1 dataset clearly separated all morphological taxa. DNA sequences of ITS regions and β-tubulin gene were also confirmed morphological taxa. All of the Fusarium isolates were evaluated for their pathogenicity on T. confusum. Maximum mortality rate was observed for F. keratoplasticum (isolate FSSCker2) and this isolate may be considered as a good candidate for biological control in the ecosystem of stored grains. This is the first report on molecular identification of Fusarium species isolated from insects in Iran and F. keratoplasticum and F. proliferatum were isolated for the first time from Tribolium species as two entomopathogenic fungi.

  18. Number of ancestral human species: a molecular perspective.

    PubMed

    Curnoe, D; Thorne, A

    2003-01-01

    Despite the remarkable developments in molecular biology over the past three decades, anthropological genetics has had only limited impact on systematics in human evolution. Genetics offers the opportunity to objectively test taxonomies based on morphology and may be used to supplement conventional approaches to hominid systematics. Our analyses, examining chromosomes and 46 estimates of genetic distance, indicate there may have been only around 4 species on the direct line to modern humans and 5 species in total. This contrasts with current taxonomies recognising up to 23 species. The genetic proximity of humans and chimpanzees has been used to suggest these species are congeneric. Our analysis of genetic distances between them is consistent with this proposal. It is time that chimpanzees, living humans and all fossil humans be classified in Homo. The creation of new genera can no longer be a solution to the complexities of fossil morphologies. Published genetic distances between common chimpanzees and bonobos, along with evidence for interbreeding, suggest they should be assigned to a single species. The short distance between humans and chimpanzees also places a strict limit on the number of possible evolutionary 'side branches' that might be recognised on the human lineage. All fossil taxa were genetically very close to each other and likely to have been below congeneric genetic distances seen for many mammals. Our estimates of genetic divergence suggest that periods of around 2 million years are required to produce sufficient genetic distance to represent speciation. Therefore, Neanderthals and so-called H. erectus were genetically so close to contemporary H. sapiens they were unlikely to have been separate species. Thus, it is likely there was only one species of human (H. sapiens) for most of the last 2 million years. We estimate the divergence time of H. sapiens from 16 genetic distances to be around 1.7 Ma which is consistent with evidence for the earliest

  19. Acyl-chain remodeling of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant defective in de novo and salvage phosphatidylcholine synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kishino, Hideyuki; Eguchi, Hiroki; Takagi, Keiko; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • Dioctanoyl-PC (diC8PC) supported growth of a yeast mutant defective in PC synthesis. • diC8PC was converted to PC species containing longer acyl residues in the mutant. • Both acyl residues of diC8PC were replaced by longer fatty acids in vitro. • This system will contribute to the elucidation of the acyl chain remodeling of PC. - Abstract: A yeast strain, in which endogenous phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis is controllable, was constructed by the replacement of the promoter of PCT1, encoding CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, with GAL1 promoter in a double deletion mutant of PEM1 and PEM2, encoding phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase and phospholipid methyltransferase, respectively. This mutant did not grow in the glucose-containing medium, but the addition of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (diC8PC) supported its growth. Analyses of the metabolism of {sup 13}C-labeled diC8PC ((methyl-{sup 13}C){sub 3}-diC8PC) in this strain using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry revealed that it was converted to PC species containing acyl residues of 16 or 18 carbons at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions. In addition, both acyl residues of (methyl-{sup 13}C){sub 3}-diC8PC were replaced with 16:1 acyl chains in the in vitro reaction using the yeast cell extract in the presence of palmitoleoyl-CoA. These results indicate that PC containing short acyl residues was remodeled to those with acyl chains of physiological length in yeast.

  20. Effects of diacylglycerols on conformation of phosphatidylcholine headgroups in phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, E M; Lester, D S; Borchardt, D B; Zidovetzki, R

    1995-01-01

    The effects of five diacylglycerols (DAGs), diolein, 1-stearoyl,2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol, dioctanoylglycerol, 1-oleoyl,2-sn-acetylglycerol, and dipalmitin (DP), on the structure of lipid bilayers composed of mixtures of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine (4:1 mol/mol) were examined by 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine deuterated at the alpha- and beta-positions of the choline moiety was used to probe the surface region of the membranes. Addition of each DAG except DP caused a continuous decrease in the beta-deuteron quadrupole splittings and a concomitant increase in the alpha-deuteron splittings indicating that DAGs induce a conformational change in the phosphatidylcholine headgroup. Additional evidence of conformational change was found at high DAG concentrations (> or = 20 mol%) where the alpha-deuteron peaks became doublets indicating that the two alpha-deuterons were not equivalent. The changes induced by DP were consistent with the lateral phase separation of the bilayers into gel-like and fluid-like domains with the phosphatidylcholine headgroups in the latter phase being virtually unaffected by DP. The DAG-induced changes in alpha-deuteron splittings were found to correlate with DAG-enhanced protein kinase C (PK-C) activity, suggesting that the DAG-induced conformational changes of the phosphatidylcholine headgroups are either directly or indirectly related to a mechanism of PK-C activation. 2H NMR relaxation measurements showed significant increase of the spin-lattice relaxation times for the region of the phosphatidylcholine headgroups, induced by all DAGs except DP. However, this effect of DAGs did not correlate with the DAG-induced activation of PK-C. PMID:8519996

  1. Molecular analysis of phylogenetic relationships among Myrmecophytic macaranga species (Euphorbiaceae).

    PubMed

    Blattner, F R; Weising, K; Bänfer, G; Maschwitz, U; Fiala, B

    2001-06-01

    Many species of the paleotropical pioneer tree genus Macaranga Thou. (Euphorbiaceae) live in association with ants. Various types of mutualistic interactions exist, ranging from the attraction of unspecific ant visitors to obligate myrmecophytism. In the latter, nesting space and food bodies are exchanged for protection by highly specific ant partners (mainly species of the myrmicine genus Crematogaster). As a first step toward elucidating the coevolution of ant-plant interactions in the Macaranga-Crematogaster system, we have initiated a molecular investigation of the plant partners' phylogeny. Nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were analyzed for 73 accessions from 47 Macaranga species, representing 17 sections or informally described species groups. Three accessions from the putative sister taxon Mallotus Lour, were included as outgroups. Cladograms of the ITS data revealed Macaranga to be nested within Mallotus. ITS sequences are highly similar within section Pachystemon s.str., suggesting a relatively recent and rapid radiation of obligate myrmecophytes within this section. Forty-three accessions, mainly of ant-inhabited species, were additionally investigated by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and microsatellite-primed PCR (MP-PCR) techniques. Phenetic analysis of RAPD and MP-PCR banding profiles generally confirmed the ITS results. Best resolutions for individual clades were obtained when ITS and RAPD/MP-PCR data were combined into a single matrix and analyzed phenetically. The combined analysis suggests multiple (four) rather than a single evolutionary origin of myrmecophytism, at least one reversal from obligate myrmecophytism to nonmyrmecophytism, and one loss of mutualistic specifity.

  2. Molecular Species Delimitation in the Racomitrium canescens Complex (Grimmiaceae) and Implications for DNA Barcoding of Species Complexes in Mosses

    PubMed Central

    Stech, Michael; Veldman, Sarina; Larraín, Juan; Muñoz, Jesús; Quandt, Dietmar; Hassel, Kristian; Kruijer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In bryophytes a morphological species concept is still most commonly employed, but delimitation of closely related species based on morphological characters is often difficult. Here we test morphological species circumscriptions in a species complex of the moss genus Racomitrium, the R. canescens complex, based on variable DNA sequence markers from the plastid (rps4-trnT-trnL region) and nuclear (nrITS) genomes. The extensive morphological variability within the complex has led to different opinions about the number of species and intraspecific taxa to be distinguished. Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions allowed to clearly distinguish all eight currently recognised species of the complex plus a ninth species that was inferred to belong to the complex in earlier molecular analyses. The taxonomic significance of intraspecific sequence variation is discussed. The present molecular data do not support the division of the R. canescens complex into two groups of species (subsections or sections). Most morphological characters, albeit being in part difficult to apply, are reliable for species identification in the R. canescens complex. However, misidentification of collections that were morphologically intermediate between species questioned the suitability of leaf shape as diagnostic character. Four partitions of the molecular markers (rps4-trnT, trnT-trnL, ITS1, ITS2) that could potentially be used for molecular species identification (DNA barcoding) performed almost equally well concerning amplification and sequencing success. Of these, ITS1 provided the highest species discrimination capacity and should be considered as a DNA barcoding marker for mosses, especially in complexes of closely related species. Molecular species identification should be complemented by redefining morphological characters, to develop a set of easy-to-use molecular and non-molecular identification tools for improving biodiversity assessments and ecological research including mosses. PMID

  3. Molecular species delimitation in the Racomitrium canescens complex (Grimmiaceae) and implications for DNA barcoding of species complexes in mosses.

    PubMed

    Stech, Michael; Veldman, Sarina; Larraín, Juan; Muñoz, Jesús; Quandt, Dietmar; Hassel, Kristian; Kruijer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In bryophytes a morphological species concept is still most commonly employed, but delimitation of closely related species based on morphological characters is often difficult. Here we test morphological species circumscriptions in a species complex of the moss genus Racomitrium, the R. canescens complex, based on variable DNA sequence markers from the plastid (rps4-trnT-trnL region) and nuclear (nrITS) genomes. The extensive morphological variability within the complex has led to different opinions about the number of species and intraspecific taxa to be distinguished. Molecular phylogenetic reconstructions allowed to clearly distinguish all eight currently recognised species of the complex plus a ninth species that was inferred to belong to the complex in earlier molecular analyses. The taxonomic significance of intraspecific sequence variation is discussed. The present molecular data do not support the division of the R. canescens complex into two groups of species (subsections or sections). Most morphological characters, albeit being in part difficult to apply, are reliable for species identification in the R. canescens complex. However, misidentification of collections that were morphologically intermediate between species questioned the suitability of leaf shape as diagnostic character. Four partitions of the molecular markers (rps4-trnT, trnT-trnL, ITS1, ITS2) that could potentially be used for molecular species identification (DNA barcoding) performed almost equally well concerning amplification and sequencing success. Of these, ITS1 provided the highest species discrimination capacity and should be considered as a DNA barcoding marker for mosses, especially in complexes of closely related species. Molecular species identification should be complemented by redefining morphological characters, to develop a set of easy-to-use molecular and non-molecular identification tools for improving biodiversity assessments and ecological research including mosses.

  4. Defining species-specific immunodominant B cell epitopes for molecular serology of Chlamydia species.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan U; Poudel, Anil; Ruettger, Anke; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Urgently needed species-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antibodies against Chlamydia spp. have been elusive due to high cross-reactivity of chlamydial antigens. To identify Chlamydia species-specific B cell epitopes for such assays, we ranked the potential epitopes of immunodominant chlamydial proteins that are polymorphic among all Chlamydia species. High-scoring peptides were synthesized with N-terminal biotin, followed by a serine-glycine-serine-glycine spacer, immobilized onto streptavidin-coated microtiter plates, and tested with mono-specific mouse hyperimmune sera against each Chlamydia species in chemiluminescent ELISAs. For each of nine Chlamydia species, three to nine dominant polymorphic B cell epitope regions were identified on OmpA, CT618, PmpD, IncA, CT529, CT442, IncG, Omp2, TarP, and IncE proteins. Peptides corresponding to 16- to 40-amino-acid species-specific sequences of these epitopes reacted highly and with absolute specificity with homologous, but not heterologous, Chlamydia monospecies-specific sera. Host-independent reactivity of such epitopes was confirmed by testing of six C. pecorum-specific peptides from five proteins with C. pecorum-reactive sera from cattle, the natural host of C. pecorum. The probability of cross-reactivity of peptide antigens from closely related chlamydial species or strains correlated with percent sequence identity and declined to zero at <50% sequence identity. Thus, phylograms of B cell epitope regions predict the specificity of peptide antigens for rational use in the genus-, species-, or serovar-specific molecular serology of Chlamydia spp. We anticipate that these peptide antigens will improve chlamydial serology by providing easily accessible assays to nonspecialist laboratories. Our approach also lends itself to the identification of relevant epitopes of other microbial pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Defining Species-Specific Immunodominant B Cell Epitopes for Molecular Serology of Chlamydia Species

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, K. Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan U.; Poudel, Anil; Ruettger, Anke; Sachse, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Urgently needed species-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antibodies against Chlamydia spp. have been elusive due to high cross-reactivity of chlamydial antigens. To identify Chlamydia species-specific B cell epitopes for such assays, we ranked the potential epitopes of immunodominant chlamydial proteins that are polymorphic among all Chlamydia species. High-scoring peptides were synthesized with N-terminal biotin, followed by a serine-glycine-serine-glycine spacer, immobilized onto streptavidin-coated microtiter plates, and tested with mono-specific mouse hyperimmune sera against each Chlamydia species in chemiluminescent ELISAs. For each of nine Chlamydia species, three to nine dominant polymorphic B cell epitope regions were identified on OmpA, CT618, PmpD, IncA, CT529, CT442, IncG, Omp2, TarP, and IncE proteins. Peptides corresponding to 16- to 40-amino-acid species-specific sequences of these epitopes reacted highly and with absolute specificity with homologous, but not heterologous, Chlamydia monospecies-specific sera. Host-independent reactivity of such epitopes was confirmed by testing of six C. pecorum-specific peptides from five proteins with C. pecorum-reactive sera from cattle, the natural host of C. pecorum. The probability of cross-reactivity of peptide antigens from closely related chlamydial species or strains correlated with percent sequence identity and declined to zero at <50% sequence identity. Thus, phylograms of B cell epitope regions predict the specificity of peptide antigens for rational use in the genus-, species-, or serovar-specific molecular serology of Chlamydia spp. We anticipate that these peptide antigens will improve chlamydial serology by providing easily accessible assays to nonspecialist laboratories. Our approach also lends itself to the identification of relevant epitopes of other microbial pathogens. PMID:25761461

  6. Greek PDO saffron authentication studies using species specific molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Bosmali, I; Ordoudi, S A; Tsimidou, M Z; Madesis, P

    2017-10-01

    Saffron, the spice produced from the red stigmas of the flower of Crocus sativus L. is a frequent target of fraud and mislabeling practices that cannot be fully traced using the ISO 3632 trade standard specifications and test methods. A molecular approach is proposed herein as a promising branding strategy for the authentication of highly esteemed saffron brands such as the Greek Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) "Krokos Kozanis". Specific ISSR (inter-simple sequence repeat) markers were used to assess for the first time, the within species variability of several populations of C. sativus L. from the cultivation area of "Krokos Kozanis" as well as the potential differences with the band pattern produced by other Crocus species. Then, species-specific markers were developed taking advantage of an advanced molecular technique such as the HRM analysis coupled with universal DNA barcoding regions (trnL) (Bar-HRM) and applied to saffron admixtures with some of the most common plant adulterants (Calendula officinalis, Carthamus tinctorius, Gardenia jasminoides, Zea mays and Curcuma longa). The sensitivity of the procedure was tested for turmeric as a case study whereas HPLC-fluorescence determination of secondary metabolites was also employed for comparison. The overall results indicated that the Bar-HRM approach is quite effective in terms of specificity and sensitivity. Its effectiveness regarding the detection of turmeric was comparable to that of a conventional HPLC method (0.5% vs 1.0%, w/w). Yet, the proposed DNA-based method is much faster, cost-effective and can be used even by non-geneticists, in any laboratory having access to an HRM-capable real-time PCR instrumentation. It can be, thus, regarded as a strong analytical tool in saffron authentication studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Waechter, Charles J.; Lester, Robert L.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence is presented which indicates that the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine by the methylation pathway in growing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is repressed by the presence of choline in the growth medium. This result, obtained previously for glucose-grown cells, was also observed for lactate-grown cells, of which half of the phosphatidylcholine is mitochondrial. A respiration-deficient mutant of the parent wild-type strain has been studied, and its inability to form functional mitochondria cannot be due to an impaired methylation pathway, as it has been shown to incorporate 14C-CH3-methionine into all of the methylated glycerophosphatides. The incorporation rate is depressed by the inclusion of 1 mm choline in the growth medium, suggesting a regulatory effect similar to that demonstrated for the wild-type strain. The effects of choline on the glycerophospholipid composition of lactate and glucose-grown cells is presented. The repressive effects of the two related bases, mono- and dimethylethanolamine, were examined, and reduced levels of 14C-CH3-methionine incorporation were found for cells grown in the presence of these bases. The effect of choline on the methylation rates is reversible and glucosegrown cells regain the nonrepressed level of methylation activity in 60 to 80 min after removal of choline from the growth medium. Images PMID:5547992

  8. Pathways for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Morales, Fernando; Schobert, Max; López-Lara, Isabel M; Geiger, Otto

    2003-12-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major membrane-forming phospholipid in eukaryotes with important structural and signalling functions. Although many prokaryotes lack PC, it can be found in significant amounts in membranes of rather diverse bacteria. Two pathways for PC biosynthesis are known in bacteria, the methylation pathway and the phosphatidylcholine synthase (PCS) pathway. In the methylation pathway, phosphatidylethanolamine is methylated three times to yield PC, in reactions catalysed by one or several phospholipid N-methyltransferases (PMTs). In the PCS pathway, choline is condensed directly with CDP-diacylglyceride to form PC in a reaction catalysed by PCS. Using cell-free extracts, it was demonstrated that Sinorhizobium meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Rhizobium leguminosarum, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Mesorhizobium loti and Legionella pneumophila have both PMT and PCS activities. In addition, Rhodobacter sphaeroides has PMT activity and Brucella melitensis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Borrelia burgdorferi have PCS activities. Genes from M. loti and L. pneumophila encoding a Pmt or a Pcs activity and the genes from P. aeruginosa and Borrelia burgdorferi responsible for Pcs activity have been identified. Based on these functional assignments and on genomic data, one might predict that if bacteria contain PC as a membrane lipid, they usually possess both bacterial pathways for PC biosynthesis. However, important pathogens such as Brucella melitensis, P. aeruginosa and Borrelia burgdorferi seem to be exceptional as they possess only the PCS pathway for PC formation.

  9. Towards the bridging of molecular genetics data across Xenopus species.

    PubMed

    Riadi, Gonzalo; Ossandón, Francisco; Larraín, Juan; Melo, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    The clawed African frog Xenopus laevis has been one of the main vertebrate models for studies in developmental biology. However, for genetic studies, Xenopus tropicalis has been the experimental model of choice because it shorter life cycle and due to a more tractable genome that does not result from genome duplication as in the case of X. laevis. Today, although still organized in a large number of scaffolds, nearly 85% of X. tropicalis and 89% of X. laevis genomes have been sequenced. There is expectation for a comparative physical map that can be used as a Rosetta Stone between X. laevis genetic studies and X. tropicalis genomic research. In this work, we have mapped using coarse-grained alignment the 18 chromosomes of X. laevis, release 9.1, on the 10 reference scaffolds representing the haploid genome of X. tropicalis, release 9.0. After validating the mapping with theoretical data, and estimating reference averages of genome sequence identity, 37 to 44% between the two species, we have carried out a synteny analysis for 2,112 orthologous genes. We found that 99.6% of genes are in the same organization. Taken together, our results make possible to establish the correspondence between 62 and 65.5% of both genomes, percentage of identity, synteny and automatic annotation of transcripts of both species, providing a new and more comprehensive tool for comparative analysis of these two species, by allowing to bridge molecular genetics data among them.

  10. Molecular evidence for species-level distinctions in clouded leopards.

    PubMed

    Buckley-Beason, Valerie A; Johnson, Warren E; Nash, Willliam G; Stanyon, Roscoe; Menninger, Joan C; Driscoll, Carlos A; Howard, JoGayle; Bush, Mitch; Page, John E; Roelke, Melody E; Stone, Gary; Martelli, Paolo P; Wen, Ci; Ling, Lin; Duraisingam, Ratna K; Lam, Phan V; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2006-12-05

    Among the 37 living species of Felidae, the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) is generally classified as a monotypic genus basal to the Panthera lineage of great cats. This secretive, mid-sized (16-23 kg) carnivore, now severely endangered, is traditionally subdivided into four southeast Asian subspecies (Figure 1A). We used molecular genetic methods to re-evaluate subspecies partitions and to quantify patterns of population genetic variation among 109 clouded leopards of known geographic origin (Figure 1A, Tables S1 ans S2 in the Supplemental Data available online). We found strong phylogeographic monophyly and large genetic distances between N. n. nebulosa (mainland) and N. n. diardi (Borneo; n = 3 individuals) with mtDNA (771 bp), nuclear DNA (3100 bp), and 51 microsatellite loci. Thirty-six fixed mitochondrial and nuclear nucleotide differences and 20 microsatellite loci with nonoverlapping allele-size ranges distinguished N. n. nebulosa from N. n. diardi. Along with fixed subspecies-specific chromosomal differences, this degree of differentiation is equivalent to, or greater than, comparable measures among five recognized Panthera species (lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar, and snow leopard). These distinctions increase the urgency of clouded leopard conservation efforts, and if affirmed by morphological analysis and wider sampling of N. n. diardi in Borneo and Sumatra, would support reclassification of N. n. diardi as a new species (Neofelis diardi).

  11. Molecular Evidence for Species-Level Distinctions in Clouded Leopards

    PubMed Central

    Buckley-Beason, Valerie A.; Johnson, Warren E.; Nash, Willliam G.; Stanyon, Roscoe; Menninger, Joan C.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Howard, JoGayle; Bush, Mitch; Page, John E.; Roelke, Melody E.; Stone, Gary; Martelli, Paolo P.; Wen, Ci; Ling, Lin; Duraisingam, Ratna K.; Lam, Phan V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Among the 37 living species of Felidae, the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) is generally classified as a monotypic genus basal to the Panthera lineage of great cats [1–5]. This secretive, mid-sized (16–23 kg) carnivore, now severely endangered, is traditionally subdivided into four southeast Asian subspecies (Figure 1A) [4–8]. We used molecular genetic methods to re-evaluate subspecies partitions and to quantify patterns of population genetic variation among 109 clouded leopards of known geographic origin (Figure 1A, Tables S1 and S2 in the Supplemental Data available online). We found strong phylogeographic monophyly and large genetic distances between N. n. nebulosa (mainland) and N. n. diardi (Borneo; n = 3 individuals) with mtDNA (771 bp), nuclear DNA (3100 bp), and 51 microsatellite loci. Thirty-six fixed mitochondrial and nuclear nucleotide differences and 20 microsatellite loci with nonoverlapping allele-size ranges distinguished N. n. nebulosa from N. n. diardi. Along with fixed subspecies-specific chromosomal differences, this degree of differentiation is equivalent to, or greater than, comparable measures among five recognized Panthera species (lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar, and snow leopard). These distinctions increase the urgency of clouded leopard conservation efforts, and if affirmed by morphological analysis and wider sampling of N. n. diardi in Borneo and Sumatra, would support reclassification of N. n. diardi as a new species (Neofelis diardi). PMID:17141620

  12. Ixodes ventalloi: morphological and molecular support for species integrity.

    PubMed

    Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Giannelli, Alessio; Persichetti, Maria Flaminia; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Solano-Gallego, Laia; Brianti, Emanuele; Parisi, Antonio; Wall, Richard; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Despite their medical and veterinary importance, some tick species are so poorly studied, that their role within pathogen vector transmission cycles is difficult to assess. The tick Ixodes ventalloi is one such species, and its biology and phylogenetic status remain an issue of debate. In the present study, specimens of adult I. ventalloi (n = 65 females; n = 31 males) infesting cats in the Lipari Island (Aeolian archipelago, Sicily, southern Italy) were characterized morphologically and molecularly, the latter based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) genes. The genetic data and phylogenetic analyses for both mitochondrial genes suggest the existence of two distinct genogroups. The ecological and epidemiological significance of the genetic structure within the I. ventalloi endemic population remains to be determined. The results highlight the need for further analysis of this tick species, including whole mitochondrial genome sequencing and crossbreeding studies, which will be pivotal to complement features of its status as a vector of pathogens.

  13. Atomic and molecular fluorescence as a stratospheric species monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, K.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an investigation are presented evaluating the potential of atomic and molecular fluorescence as a stratospheric monitor of the concentrations of any one of 18 minor species: Cl, Cl2, ClO, ClO2, CO, H2, HCHO, HCl, HNO2, HNO3, H2S, NH3, NO, NO2, N2O, O, OH, and SO2. All spectral regions from the vacuum ultraviolet through the infrared were included. It was found that suitable systems can be constructed for the stratospheric monitoring of CO (5 ppb), NO2 (less than 1 ppb), OH (0.2 ppt), and O (50-200 ppt). The fluorescence sensitivities for Cl (0.5-1.0 ppt), H2 (0.2 ppm at 10 torr) and SO2 (1-10 ppb) are marginally insufficient with current technology.

  14. Atomic and molecular fluorescence as a stratospheric species monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, K.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an investigation are presented evaluating the potential of atomic and molecular fluorescence as a stratospheric monitor of the concentrations of any one of 18 minor species: Cl, Cl2, ClO, ClO2, CO, H2, HCHO, HCl, HNO2, HNO3, H2S, NH3, NO, NO2, N2O, O, OH, and SO2. All spectral regions from the vacuum ultraviolet through the infrared were included. It was found that suitable systems can be constructed for the stratospheric monitoring of CO (5 ppb), NO2 (less than 1 ppb), OH (0.2 ppt), and O (50-200 ppt). The fluorescence sensitivities for Cl (0.5-1.0 ppt), H2 (0.2 ppm at 10 torr) and SO2 (1-10 ppb) are marginally insufficient with current technology.

  15. Spectral identification/elimination of molecular species in spacecraft glow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, B. D.; Marinelli, W. J.; Rawlins, W. T.

    1985-09-01

    Computer models of molecular electronic and vibrational emission intensities were developed. Known radiative emission rates (Einstein coefficients) permit the determination of relative excited state densities from spectral intensities. These codes were applied to the published spectra of glow above shuttle surface and to the Spacelab 1 results of Torr and Torr. The theoretical high-resolution spectra were convolved with the appropriate instrumental slit functions to allow accurate comparison with data. The published spacelab spectrum is complex but N2+ Meinel emission can be clearly identified in the ram spectrum. M2 First Positive emission does not correlate well with observed features, nor does the CN Red System. Spectral overlay comparisons are presented. The spectrum of glow above shuttle surfaces, in contrast to the ISO data, is not highly structured. Diatomic molecular emission was matched to the observed spectral shape. Source excitation mechanisms such as (oxygen atom)-(surface species) reaction product chemiluminescence, surface recombination, or resonance fluorescent re-emission will be discussed for each tentative assignment. These assignments are the necessary first analytical step toward mechanism identification. Different glow mechanisms will occur above surfaces under different orbital conditions.

  16. Spectral identification/elimination of molecular species in spacecraft glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, B. D.; Marinelli, W. J.; Rawlins, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Computer models of molecular electronic and vibrational emission intensities were developed. Known radiative emission rates (Einstein coefficients) permit the determination of relative excited state densities from spectral intensities. These codes were applied to the published spectra of glow above shuttle surface and to the Spacelab 1 results of Torr and Torr. The theoretical high-resolution spectra were convolved with the appropriate instrumental slit functions to allow accurate comparison with data. The published spacelab spectrum is complex but N2+ Meinel emission can be clearly identified in the ram spectrum. M2 First Positive emission does not correlate well with observed features, nor does the CN Red System. Spectral overlay comparisons are presented. The spectrum of glow above shuttle surfaces, in contrast to the ISO data, is not highly structured. Diatomic molecular emission was matched to the observed spectral shape. Source excitation mechanisms such as (oxygen atom)-(surface species) reaction product chemiluminescence, surface recombination, or resonance fluorescent re-emission will be discussed for each tentative assignment. These assignments are the necessary first analytical step toward mechanism identification. Different glow mechanisms will occur above surfaces under different orbital conditions.

  17. Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Wild Musa Species

    PubMed Central

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Christelová, Pavla; Van den Houwe, Ines; Häkkinen, Markku; Roux, Nicolas; Swennen, Rony; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    The production of bananas is threatened by rapid spreading of various diseases and adverse environmental conditions. The preservation and characterization of banana diversity is essential for the purposes of crop improvement. The world's largest banana germplasm collection maintained at the Bioversity International Transit Centre (ITC) in Belgium is continuously expanded by new accessions of edible cultivars and wild species. Detailed morphological and molecular characterization of the accessions is necessary for efficient management of the collection and utilization of banana diversity. In this work, nuclear DNA content and genomic distribution of 45S and 5S rDNA were examined in 21 diploid accessions recently added to ITC collection, representing both sections of the genus Musa. 2C DNA content in the section Musa ranged from 1.217 to 1.315 pg. Species belonging to section Callimusa had 2C DNA contents ranging from 1.390 to 1.772 pg. While the number of 45S rDNA loci was conserved in the section Musa, it was highly variable in Callimusa species. 5S rRNA gene clusters were found on two to eight chromosomes per diploid cell. The accessions were genotyped using a set of 19 microsatellite markers to establish their relationships with the remaining accessions held at ITC. Genetic diversity done by SSR genotyping platform was extended by phylogenetic analysis of ITS region. ITS sequence data supported the clustering obtained by SSR analysis for most of the accessions. High level of nucleotide diversity and presence of more than two types of ITS sequences in eight wild diploids pointed to their origin by hybridization of different genotypes. This study significantly expands the number of wild Musa species where nuclear genome size and genomic distribution of rDNA loci is known. SSR genotyping identified Musa species that are closely related to the previously characterized accessions and provided data to aid in their classification. Sequence analysis of ITS region

  18. Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Wild Musa Species.

    PubMed

    Čížková, Jana; Hřibová, Eva; Christelová, Pavla; Van den Houwe, Ines; Häkkinen, Markku; Roux, Nicolas; Swennen, Rony; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    The production of bananas is threatened by rapid spreading of various diseases and adverse environmental conditions. The preservation and characterization of banana diversity is essential for the purposes of crop improvement. The world's largest banana germplasm collection maintained at the Bioversity International Transit Centre (ITC) in Belgium is continuously expanded by new accessions of edible cultivars and wild species. Detailed morphological and molecular characterization of the accessions is necessary for efficient management of the collection and utilization of banana diversity. In this work, nuclear DNA content and genomic distribution of 45S and 5S rDNA were examined in 21 diploid accessions recently added to ITC collection, representing both sections of the genus Musa. 2C DNA content in the section Musa ranged from 1.217 to 1.315 pg. Species belonging to section Callimusa had 2C DNA contents ranging from 1.390 to 1.772 pg. While the number of 45S rDNA loci was conserved in the section Musa, it was highly variable in Callimusa species. 5S rRNA gene clusters were found on two to eight chromosomes per diploid cell. The accessions were genotyped using a set of 19 microsatellite markers to establish their relationships with the remaining accessions held at ITC. Genetic diversity done by SSR genotyping platform was extended by phylogenetic analysis of ITS region. ITS sequence data supported the clustering obtained by SSR analysis for most of the accessions. High level of nucleotide diversity and presence of more than two types of ITS sequences in eight wild diploids pointed to their origin by hybridization of different genotypes. This study significantly expands the number of wild Musa species where nuclear genome size and genomic distribution of rDNA loci is known. SSR genotyping identified Musa species that are closely related to the previously characterized accessions and provided data to aid in their classification. Sequence analysis of ITS region

  19. Importance of phosphatidylcholine on the chloroplast surface.

    PubMed

    Botella, César; Jouhet, Juliette; Block, Maryse A

    2017-01-01

    In plant cells, phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major glycerolipid of most membranes but practically lacking from the plastid internal membranes. In chloroplasts, PC is absent from the thylakoids and the inner envelope membrane. It is however the main component of the outer envelope membrane, where it exclusively distributes in the outer monolayer. This unique distribution is likely related with operational compartmentalization of plant lipid metabolism. In this review, we summarize the different mechanisms involved in homeostasis of PC in plant cells. The specific origin of chloroplast PC is examined and the involvement of the P4-ATPase family of phospholipid flippases (ALA) is considered with a special attention to the recently reported effect of the endoplasmic reticulum-localized ALA10 on modification of chloroplast PC desaturation. The different possible roles of chloroplast PC are then discussed and analyzed in consideration of plant physiology.

  20. Phosphatidylcholine: Greasing the Cholesterol Transport Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lagace, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Negative feedback regulation of cholesterol metabolism in mammalian cells ensures a proper balance of cholesterol with other membrane lipids, principal among these being the major phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC). Processes such as cholesterol biosynthesis and efflux, cholesteryl ester storage in lipid droplets, and uptake of plasma lipoproteins are tuned to the cholesterol/PC ratio. Cholesterol-loaded macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions display increased PC biosynthesis that buffers against elevated cholesterol levels and may also facilitate cholesterol trafficking to enhance cholesterol sensing and efflux. These same mechanisms could play a generic role in homeostatic responses to acute changes in membrane free cholesterol levels. Here, I discuss the established and emerging roles of PC metabolism in promoting intracellular cholesterol trafficking and membrane lipid homeostasis. PMID:27081313

  1. Reaction of discoidal complexes of apolipoprotein A-I and various phosphatidylcholines with lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase. Interfacial effects.

    PubMed

    Jonas, A; Zorich, N L; Kézdy, K E; Trick, W E

    1987-03-25

    Complexes of phospholipids-apolipoprotein A-I-cholesterol, containing various bulk phosphatidylcholines or a matrix of the ether analog of 1-palmitoyl 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine including test phosphatidylcholines were used as substrates for human lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase. The enzymatic reaction rates for both series of complexes were determined as a function of temperature, particle concentration, neutral salt concentration, and the type of anion present in solution. The kinetic results support the hypothesis that phospholipids, in discoidal complexes, modulate the reaction rates by molecular effects at the active site, but also by interfacial effects on the interaction of the enzyme with the particles. The relevant interfacial parameters are the lipid packing at the interface and the structure of apolipoprotein A-I.

  2. Integrating a Numerical Taxonomic Method and Molecular Phylogeny for Species Delimitation of Melampsora Species (Melampsoraceae, Pucciniales) on Willows in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peng; Wang, Qing-Hong; Tian, Cheng-Ming; Kakishima, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The species in genus Melampsora are the causal agents of leaf rust diseases on willows in natural habitats and plantations. However, the classification and recognition of species diversity are challenging because morphological characteristics are scant and morphological variation in Melampsora on willows has not been thoroughly evaluated. Thus, the taxonomy of Melampsora species on willows remains confused, especially in China where 31 species were reported based on either European or Japanese taxonomic systems. To clarify the species boundaries of Melampsora species on willows in China, we tested two approaches for species delimitation inferred from morphological and molecular variations. Morphological species boundaries were determined based on numerical taxonomic analyses of morphological characteristics in the uredinial and telial stages by cluster analysis and one-way analysis of variance. Phylogenetic species boundaries were delineated based on the generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions including the 5.8S and D1/D2 regions of the large nuclear subunit of the ribosomal RNA gene. Numerical taxonomic analyses of 14 morphological characteristics recognized in the uredinial-telial stages revealed 22 morphological species, whereas the GMYC results recovered 29 phylogenetic species. In total, 17 morphological species were in concordance with the phylogenetic species and 5 morphological species were in concordance with 12 phylogenetic species. Both the morphological and molecular data supported 14 morphological characteristics, including 5 newly recognized characteristics and 9 traditionally emphasized characteristics, as effective for the differentiation of Melampsora species on willows in China. Based on the concordance and discordance of the two species delimitation approaches, we concluded that integrative taxonomy by using both morphological and molecular variations was

  3. Integrating a Numerical Taxonomic Method and Molecular Phylogeny for Species Delimitation of Melampsora Species (Melampsoraceae, Pucciniales) on Willows in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Wang, Qing-Hong; Tian, Cheng-Ming; Kakishima, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The species in genus Melampsora are the causal agents of leaf rust diseases on willows in natural habitats and plantations. However, the classification and recognition of species diversity are challenging because morphological characteristics are scant and morphological variation in Melampsora on willows has not been thoroughly evaluated. Thus, the taxonomy of Melampsora species on willows remains confused, especially in China where 31 species were reported based on either European or Japanese taxonomic systems. To clarify the species boundaries of Melampsora species on willows in China, we tested two approaches for species delimitation inferred from morphological and molecular variations. Morphological species boundaries were determined based on numerical taxonomic analyses of morphological characteristics in the uredinial and telial stages by cluster analysis and one-way analysis of variance. Phylogenetic species boundaries were delineated based on the generalized mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model analysis of the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2) regions including the 5.8S and D1/D2 regions of the large nuclear subunit of the ribosomal RNA gene. Numerical taxonomic analyses of 14 morphological characteristics recognized in the uredinial-telial stages revealed 22 morphological species, whereas the GMYC results recovered 29 phylogenetic species. In total, 17 morphological species were in concordance with the phylogenetic species and 5 morphological species were in concordance with 12 phylogenetic species. Both the morphological and molecular data supported 14 morphological characteristics, including 5 newly recognized characteristics and 9 traditionally emphasized characteristics, as effective for the differentiation of Melampsora species on willows in China. Based on the concordance and discordance of the two species delimitation approaches, we concluded that integrative taxonomy by using both morphological and molecular variations was

  4. Molecular species delimitation methods recover most song-delimited cicada species in the European Cicadetta montana complex.

    PubMed

    Wade, E J; Hertach, T; Gogala, M; Trilar, T; Simon, C

    2015-12-01

    Molecular species delimitation is increasingly being used to discover and illuminate species level diversity, and a number of methods have been developed. Here, we compare the ability of two molecular species delimitation methods to recover song-delimited species in the Cicadetta montana cryptic species complex throughout Europe. Recent bioacoustics studies of male calling songs (premating reproductive barriers) have revealed cryptic species diversity in this complex. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses were used to analyse the mitochondrial genes COI and COII and the nuclear genes EF1α and period for thirteen European Cicadetta species as well as the closely related monotypic genus Euboeana. Two molecular species delimitation methods, general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) and Bayesian phylogenetics and phylogeography, identified the majority of song-delimited species and were largely congruent with each other. None of the molecular delimitation methods were able to fully recover a recent radiation of four Greek species. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  5. Oral phosphatidylcholine pretreatment alleviates the signs of experimental rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Erős, Gabor; Ibrahim, Saleh; Siebert, Nikolai; Boros, Mihály; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylcholine-derived metabolites exhibit anti-inflammatory properties in various stress conditions. We hypothesized that dietary phosphatidylcholine may potentially function as an anti-inflammatory substance and may decrease inflammatory activation in a chronic murine model of rheumatoid arthritis (collagen-induced arthritis). Methods The experiments were performed on male DBA1/J mice. In groups 1 to 3 (n = 10 each), collagen-induced arthritis was induced by administration of bovine collagen II. In group 2 the animals were fed ad libitum with phosphatidylcholine-enriched diet as a pretreatment, while the animals of group 3 received this nourishment as a therapy, after the onset of the disease. The severity of the disease and inflammation-linked hyperalgesia were evaluated with semiquantitative scoring systems, while the venular leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions and functional capillary density were assessed by means of in vivo fluorescence microscopy of the synovial tissue. Additionally, the mRNA expressions of cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2, TNFα and endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase were determined, and classical histological analysis was performed. Results Phosphatidylcholine pretreatment reduced the collagen-induced arthritis-induced hypersensitivity, and decreased the number of leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions and the extent of functional capillary density as compared with those of group 1. It also ameliorated the tissue damage and decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. The expressions of the cannabinoid receptors and TNFα were not influenced by the phosphatidylcholine intake. Phosphatidylcholine-enriched food administrated as therapy failed to evoke the aforementioned changes, apart from the reduction of the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. Conclusions Phosphatidylcholine-enriched food as pretreatment, but not as therapy, appears to exert beneficial effects

  6. Molecular characterisation of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and assessment of zoonotic transmission

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The molecular characterization of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is essential for accurately identifying organisms and assessing zoonotic transmission. Results of recent molecular epidemiologic studies strongly suggest that zoonotic transmission plays an important role in crypt...

  7. Biliary phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylcholine profiles in sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, Annika; Ehehalt, Robert; Lehmann, Wolf-Dieter; Erben, Gerhard; Weiss, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Yvonne; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Stiehl, Adolf; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Sauer, Peter; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To analyze phospholipid profiles in intrahepatic bile from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and secondary sclerosing cholangitis (SSC). METHODS: Intrahepatic bile specimens collected via endoscopic retrograde cholangiography from 41 patients were analyzed. Fourteen of these patients were diagnosed with PSC, 10 with SSC, 11 with choledocholithiasis or no identifiable biliary disease, and 6 with cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC). Bile acid, cholesterol, protein, and bilirubin contents as well as pancreas lipase activity in bile were determined by biochemical methods. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) species were quantified using nano-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Bile from all the examined patient groups showed a remarkably similar PC and LPC species composition, with only minor statistical differences. Total biliary PC concentrations were highest in controls (8030 ± 1843 μmol/L) and lowest in patients with CCC (1969 ± 981 μmol/L) (P = 0.005, controls vs SSC and CCC, respectively, P < 0.05). LPC contents in bile were overall low (4.2% ± 1.8%). Biliary LPC/PC ratios and ratios of biliary PC to bilirubin, PC to cholesterol, PC to protein, and PC to bile acids showed no intergroup differences. CONCLUSION: PC and LPC profiles being similar in patients with or without sclerosing cholangitis, these phospholipids are likely not of major pathogenetic importance in this disease group. PMID:24023488

  8. Biliary phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylcholine profiles in sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Gauss, Annika; Ehehalt, Robert; Lehmann, Wolf-Dieter; Erben, Gerhard; Weiss, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Yvonne; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Stiehl, Adolf; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Sauer, Peter; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils

    2013-09-07

    To analyze phospholipid profiles in intrahepatic bile from patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and secondary sclerosing cholangitis (SSC). Intrahepatic bile specimens collected via endoscopic retrograde cholangiography from 41 patients were analyzed. Fourteen of these patients were diagnosed with PSC, 10 with SSC, 11 with choledocholithiasis or no identifiable biliary disease, and 6 with cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC). Bile acid, cholesterol, protein, and bilirubin contents as well as pancreas lipase activity in bile were determined by biochemical methods. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) species were quantified using nano-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Bile from all the examined patient groups showed a remarkably similar PC and LPC species composition, with only minor statistical differences. Total biliary PC concentrations were highest in controls (8030 ± 1843 μmol/L) and lowest in patients with CCC (1969 ± 981 μmol/L) (P = 0.005, controls vs SSC and CCC, respectively, P < 0.05). LPC contents in bile were overall low (4.2% ± 1.8%). Biliary LPC/PC ratios and ratios of biliary PC to bilirubin, PC to cholesterol, PC to protein, and PC to bile acids showed no intergroup differences. PC and LPC profiles being similar in patients with or without sclerosing cholangitis, these phospholipids are likely not of major pathogenetic importance in this disease group.

  9. [Effect of macrocyclic esters on mitochondrial and phosphatidylcholine membranes].

    PubMed

    Bogatskiĭ, A V; Luk'ianenko, N G; Nazarov, E I; Nazarova, N Iu; Konup, I P

    1982-01-01

    It has been found that some macrocyclic esters have no ionophoric properties, but can block valinomycin-induced potassium transport in mitochondrial membranes and lessen the potassium current induced by valinomycin in phosphatidylcholine bilayers. It has been also discovered that 36-member cyclic esters of succinic acid and propylene glycoles decrease fluorescence of puridine nucleotides in mitochondria and produce a modifying effect on bimolecular phosphatidylcholine membranes in the medium of litium, calcium and magnesium chlorides at unilateral injection. The results obtained suggest that cyclopolyesters under investigation form mixed complexes with the macromolecules in the composition of mitochondrial and phosphatidylcholine membranes with the participation of the integrated ion.

  10. Biosynthetic preparation of selectively deuterated phosphatidylcholine in genetically modified Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Maric, Selma; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Schiller, Jürgen; Marek, Magdalena; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William; Arleth, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major component of eukaryotic cell membranes and one of the most commonly used phospholipids for reconstitution of membrane proteins into carrier systems such as lipid vesicles, micelles and nanodiscs. Selectively deuterated versions of this lipid have many applications, especially in structural studies using techniques such as NMR, neutron reflectivity and small-angle neutron scattering. Here we present a comprehensive study of selective deuteration of phosphatidylcholine through biosynthesis in a genetically modified strain of Escherichia coli. By carefully tuning the deuteration level in E. coli growth media and varying the deuteration of supplemented carbon sources, we show that it is possible to achieve a controlled deuteration for three distinct parts of the PC lipid molecule, namely the (a) lipid head group, (b) glycerol backbone and (c) fatty acyl tail. This biosynthetic approach paves the way for the synthesis of specifically deuterated, physiologically relevant phospholipid species which remain difficult to obtain through standard chemical synthesis. PMID:25301578

  11. Molecular identification of iridoviruses infecting various sturgeon species in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bigarré, L; Lesne, M; Lautraite, A; Chesneau, V; Leroux, A; Jamin, M; Boitard, P M; Toffan, A; Prearo, M; Labrut, S; Daniel, P

    2017-01-01

    Iridoviridae are known to cause disease in sturgeons in North America. Here, histological and molecular methods were used to screen for this family of virus in sturgeons from various European farms with low-to-high morbidity. Some histological samples revealed basophilic cells in the gill and labial epithelia, strongly suggesting the accumulation of iridovirus particles. Newly developed generic PCR tests targeting the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of sturgeon iridoviruses identified in North America, namely the white sturgeon iridovirus and the Namao virus (NV), produced positive signals in most samples from four sturgeon species: Russian (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii), Siberian (A. baerii), Adriatic (A. naccarii) and beluga (Huso huso). The sequences of the PCR products were generally highly similar one another, with nucleotide identities greater than 98%. They were also related to (74-88%), although distinct from, American sturgeon iridoviruses. These European viruses were thus considered variants of a single new virus, provisionally named Acipenser iridovirus-European (AcIV-E). Moreover, three samples infected with AcIV-E showed genetic heterogeneity, with the co-existence of two sequences differing by five nucleotides. One of our European samples carried a virus distinct from AcIV-E, but closely related to NV identified in Canada (95%). This study demonstrates the presence of two distinct sturgeon iridoviruses in Europe: a new genotype AcIV-E and an NV-related virus.

  12. Molecular characterization of Trichinella species from wild animals in Israel.

    PubMed

    Erster, Oran; Roth, Asael; King, Roni; Markovics, Alex

    2016-11-15

    Trichinellosis is a worldwide disease caused by nematode worms of the genus Trichinella, frequently diagnosed in Israel. However, the identity of the Israeli isolates have not been studied. Here we describe the molecular characterization of 58 isolates collected from jackals (Canis aureus), wild boar (Sus scrofa), foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and a wolf (Canis lupus) in central and northern Israel. Isolates were analyzed using the multiplex PCR analysis encompassing expansion segment V (ESV) and internal sequence 1 (ITS-1) markers, which identified 52 of the 58 samples. Out of the six unidentified samples, four were successfully identified using extended PCR assays for ESV and ITS-1, developed in this study. Our analysis identified 44 isolates as T. britovi, 8 as T. spiralis, four mixed infections, and two isolates were not identified. Clonal analysis of the ITS-1 sequences from six isolates confirmed the initial identification of four mixed infections. These results show that the prevalent species in Israel are T. britovi and T. spiralis, with nearly 7% (4 of 58) incidence of mixed infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Evidence of Different Rickettsia Species in Villeta, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Faccini-Martínez, Álvaro A; Ramírez-Hernández, Alejandro; Forero-Becerra, Elkin; Cortés-Vecino, Jesús A; Escandón, Patricia; Rodas, Juan D; Palomar, Ana M; Portillo, Aránzazu; Oteo, José A; Hidalgo, Marylin

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to detect and identify Rickettsia species in ticks collected in rural areas of Villeta, Colombia. Tick specimens were collected from domestic animals and walls of houses in five rural villages of Villeta town and from humans in Naranjal village (same town). Moreover, a flea collected from the same area was also processed. DNA was extracted and tested by conventional, semi-nested, and nested PCR reactions targeting rickettsial genes. In the ticks collected from humans from Naranjal village, a nymph of Amblyomma cajennense sensu lato was amplified using primers for ompA and sequenced (100% identity with "Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii"). Last, three amplicons from the Ctenocephalides felis flea, corresponding to gltA, ompB, and 16S rRNA genes, showed high identity with R. felis (98.5%, 97.3%, and 99.2%, respectively) and "Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis" (99.7% and 100%, respectively). To our knowledge, these results correspond to the first molecular detection in Colombia of "Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii" and "Ca. Rickettsia asemboensis" in fleas.

  14. Molecular studies on the species complex of Trichosirocalus horridus in the biological control of Carduinae weeds.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genus Trichosirocalus Colonnelli, 1979, (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Ceutorhynchinae) includes 17 Palaearctic species mainly feeding on Plantaginaceae and Asteraceae. We studied the taxonomic status of the species complex of Trichosirocalus horridus (TH) by means of molecular markers. We used bot...

  15. Rubber molecular weight regulation, in vitro, in plant species that produce high and low molecular weights in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cornish, K; Castillón, J; Scott, D J

    2000-01-01

    In three rubber-producing species, in vitro, the rates of initiation and polymerization and the biopolymer molecular weight produced were affected by the concentration of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) initiator and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) elongation substrate (monomer). Ficus elastica, a low molecular weight-producer in vivo, synthesized rubber polymers approximately twice the molecular weight of those made by Hevea brasiliensis or Parthenium argentatum (which produce high molecular weights in vivo), possibly due to its lower IPP Km. In all species, increasing FPP concentrations increased rubber biosynthetic rate and new molecules initiated but decreased molecular weight by competition with the allylic diphosphate (APP) end of elongating rubber molecules for the APP binding site. Increasing IPP concentrations increased rubber biosynthetic rate and rubber molecular weight, but only when FPP concentrations were below the FPP Km's or where negative cooperativity operated. In conclusion, rubber transferase is not the prime regulator of rubber molecular weight in vivo.

  16. Phosphatidylcholine and the CDP-Choline Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fagone, Paolo; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    The CDP-choline pathway of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) biosynthesis was first described more than 50 years ago. Investigation of the CDP-choline pathway in yeast provides a basis for understanding the CDP-choline pathway in mammals. PtdCho is considered as an intermediate in a cycle of synthesis and degradation, and the activity of a CDP-choline cycle is linked to subcellular membrane lipid movement. The components of the mammalian CDP-choline pathway include choline transport, choline kinase, phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, and choline phosphotransferase activities. The protein isoforms and biochemical mechanisms of regulation of the pathway enzymes are related to their cell and tissue-specific functions. Regulated PtdCho turnover mediated by phospholipases or neuropathy target esterase participates in the mammalian CDP-choline cycle. Knockout mouse models define the biological functions of the CDP-choline cycle in mammalian cells and tissues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:23010477

  17. Oxidative interactions between the erythrocyte membrane and phosphatidylcholine vesicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, E; Huestis, W H

    1994-05-20

    Sonicated unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles induce hemoglobin oxidation in erythrocytes and resealed membrane fragments (buds) at pH 5.5. No such oxidation was observed in vesicle-bud mixtures at pH 7.4, in cells or buds suspended in pH 5.5 buffer, or in cells incubated with multilamellar lipid vesicles at pH 5.5. In buds, vesicle-induced hemoglobin oxidation was accompanied by lipid peroxidation and formation of covalent high molecular weight protein aggregates. The causative relationships among the oxidative events were examined using selective antioxidants and membrane fragments in which the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 was cleaved. Protein cross-linking and lipid peroxidation were found to be independent events, but both were found only in concert with heme oxidation. Further, vesicle-induced hemoglobin oxidation was found to be correlated with quasi-stable adsorption of intact vesicles to cells; intercalation of foreign lipid into the cell bilayer was not required. The inability of multilamellar vesicles to induce these low pH oxidative effects suggests a steric limitation on this cell-vesicle association. The results suggest that membrane component reorganization and patching induced by low pH may enhance vesicle adsorption, which in turn initiates oxidative damage.

  18. EPR study of spermine interaction with multilamellar phosphatidylcholine liposomes.

    PubMed

    Momo, F; Wisniewska, A; Stevanato, R

    1995-11-22

    The interaction of spermine with egg-yolk phosphatidylcholine liposomes was investigated. The EPR spin labeling technique evidenced that spermine induces modifications of some membrane functions of biological interest like water permeability and is a possible modulator of diffusion processes for charged and polar molecules. The association constant for a hypothesized complex between spermine and the phosphate group of phosphatidylcholine was evaluated by enzymatic methods.

  19. Phosphatidylcholine Derived Bolaamphiphiles via ‘Click’ Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    O’Neil, Edward J.; DiVittorio, Kristy M.; Smith, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    The copper catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition is employed to modify phosphatidylcholine precursors with sn-2 acyl chains containing terminal alkyne or azide groups. Although the reactions are conducted as biphasic dispersions, the yields are essentially quantitative. Bolaamphiphiles are formed by simply clicking together two phosphatidylcholine alkyne precursors to a central bisazide scaffold. The chemistry introduces polar 1,4-triazole units into the lipophilic region of the bilayer membrane, and the bolaamphiphiles do not form stable vesicles. PMID:17217264

  20. Regulation of phosphatidylcholine synthesis in rat liver endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Sribney, M; Knowles, C L; Lyman, E M

    1976-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine in rat liver microsomal preparations catalysed by CDP-choline-1,2-diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase (EC 2.7.8.2) was inhibited by a combination of ATP and CoA or ATP and pantetheine. ATP alone at high concentrations (20 mM) inhibits phosphatidylcholine formation to the extent of 70%. In the presence of 0.1 mM-CoA, ATP (2 mM) inhibits to the extent of 80% and in the presence of 1 mM-pantetheine to the extent of 90%. ADP and other nucleotide triphosphates in combination with either CoA or pantetheine are only 10-30% as effective in inhibiting phosphatidylcholine synthesis. AMP(CH2)PP [adenosine 5'-(alphabeta-methylene)triphosphate] together with CoA inhibits to the extent of 59% and with pantetheine by 48%. AMP-P(CH2)P [adenosine 5'-(betagamma-methylene)triphosphate] together with either CoA or pantetheine had no significant effect on phosphatidylcholine formation. Other closely related derivatives of pantothenic acid were without effect either alone or in the presence of ATP, as were thiol compounds such as cysteine, homocysteine, cysteamine, dithiothreitol and glutathione. Several mechanisms by which this inhibition might take place were ruled out and it is concluded that ATP together with either CoA or pantetheine interacts reversibly with phosphatidylcholine synthetase to cause temporarily the inhibition of phosphatidylcholine formation. PMID:182154

  1. Molecular lipid species in urinary exosomes as potential prostate cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Skotland, Tore; Ekroos, Kim; Kauhanen, Dimple; Simolin, Helena; Seierstad, Therese; Berge, Viktor; Sandvig, Kirsten; Llorente, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes have recently appeared as a novel source of noninvasive cancer biomarkers, since these nanovesicles contain molecules from cancer cells and can be detected in biofluids. We have here investigated the potential use of lipids in urinary exosomes as prostate cancer biomarkers. A high-throughput mass spectrometry quantitative lipidomic analysis was performed to reveal the lipid composition of urinary exosomes in prostate cancer patients and healthy controls. Control samples were first analysed to characterise the lipidome of urinary exosomes and test the reproducibility of the method. In total, 107 lipid species were quantified in urinary exosomes. Several differences, for example, in cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine, were found between urinary exosomes and exosomes derived from cell lines, thus showing the importance of in vivo studies for biomarker analysis. The 36 most abundant lipid species in urinary exosomes were then quantified in 15 prostate cancer patients and 13 healthy controls. Interestingly, the levels of nine lipids species were found to be significantly different when the two groups were compared. The highest significance was shown for phosphatidylserine (PS) 18:1/18:1 and lactosylceramide (d18:1/16:0), the latter also showed the highest patient-to-control ratio. Furthermore, combinations of these lipid species and PS 18:0-18:2 distinguished the two groups with 93% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Finally, in agreement with the reported dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism in cancer cells, alteration in specific sphingolipid lipid classes were observed. This study shows for the first time the potential use of exosomal lipid species in urine as prostate cancer biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mass spectrometry images acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelin in MDA-MB-231 breast tumor models[S

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Greenwood, Tiffany R.; Glunde, Kristine; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The lipid compositions of different breast tumor microenvironments are largely unknown due to limitations in lipid imaging techniques. Imaging lipid distributions would enhance our understanding of processes occurring inside growing tumors, such as cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Recent developments in MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enable rapid and specific detection of lipids directly from thin tissue sections. In this study, we performed multimodal imaging of acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines (PC), a lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), and a sphingomyelin (SM) from different microenvironments of breast tumor xenograft models, which carried tdTomato red fluorescent protein as a hypoxia-response element-driven reporter gene. The MSI molecular lipid images revealed spatially heterogeneous lipid distributions within tumor tissue. Four of the most-abundant lipid species, namely PC(16:0/16:0), PC(16:0/18:1), PC(18:1/18:1), and PC(18:0/18:1), were localized in viable tumor regions, whereas LPC(16:0/0:0) was detected in necrotic tumor regions. We identified a heterogeneous distribution of palmitoylcarnitine, stearoylcarnitine, PC(16:0/22:1), and SM(d18:1/16:0) sodium adduct, which colocalized primarily with hypoxic tumor regions. For the first time, we have applied a multimodal imaging approach that has combined optical imaging and MALDI-MSI with ion mobility separation to spatially localize and structurally identify acylcarnitines and a variety of lipid species present in breast tumor xenograft models. PMID:22930811

  3. Phospholipid lateral diffusion in phosphatidylcholine-sphingomyelin-cholesterol monolayers; effects of oxidatively truncated phosphatidylcholines.

    PubMed

    Parkkila, Petteri; Stefl, Martin; Olżyńska, Agnieszka; Hof, Martin; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in a number of pathological conditions and the generated oxidatively modified lipids influence membrane properties and functions, including lipid-protein interactions and cellular signaling. Brewster angle microscopy demonstrated oxidatively truncated phosphatidylcholines to promote phase separation in monolayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol). More specifically, 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PazePC), was found to increase the miscibility transition pressure of the SM/Chol-phase. Lateral diffusion of lipids is influenced by a variety of membrane properties, thus making it a sensitive parameter to observe the coexistence of different lipid phases, for instance. The dependence on lipid lateral packing of the lateral diffusion of fluorophore-containing phospholipid analogs was investigated in Langmuir monolayers composed of POPC, SM, and Chol and additionally containing oxidatively truncated phosphatidylcholines, using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). To our knowledge, these are the first FCS results on miscibility transition in ternary lipid monolayers, confirming previous results obtained using Brewster angle microscopy on such lipid monolayers. Wide-field fluorescence microscopy was additionally employed to verify the transition, i.e. the loss and reformation of SM/Chol domains.

  4. Molecular identification of Pilobolus species from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Foos, K Michael; Sheehan, Kathy B

    2011-01-01

    Pilobolus, a widely distributed coprophilous fungus, grows on herbivore dung. Species of Pilobolus traditionally are described with imprecise morphological characteristics potentially leading to misidentification. In this study we used PCR analysis of taxonomically informative sequences to provide more consistent species identification from isolates obtained in Yellowstone National Park. We collected Pilobolus park-wide from six taxa of herbivores over 9 y. Multiple transfers of single sporangium isolates provided pure cultures from which DNA was extracted. Sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of DNA that code for rRNA genes were used to distinguish among similar species. We describe several species of Pilobolus associated with herbivores in various habitats, including two species not previously reported, P. heterosporus and P. sphaerosporus. Our results show that phylogenetic species identification of Pilobolus based on sequence analysis of pure culture isolates provides a more reliable means of identifying species than traditional methods.

  5. Interaction of fluoxetine with phosphatidylcholine liposomes.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Stevanato, Roberto

    2005-10-22

    Fluoxetine (Prozac) is one of the latest of a new generation of antidepressants, approved by FDA in 2002. The interactions of fluoxetine with multilamellar liposomes of pure phosphatidylcholine (PC) or containing cholesterol 10% molar were studied as a function of the lipid chain lengths, using differential scanning calorimetry and spin labelling EPR techniques. The DSC profiles of the gel-to-fluid state transition of liposomes of DMPC (C14:0) are broadened and shifted towards lower temperatures at increasing dopant concentrations and, with less than 10% fluoxetine, any detectable transition is destroyed. The broadened profiles and the lowered transition temperatures demonstrate that both the size and the packing of the cooperative units undergoing the transition are modified by fluoxetine, leading to a looser and more flexible bilayer. No phase separation was observed. The effects of fluoxetine on the thermotropic phase behaviour of DPPC (C16:0) and, even more, of DSPC (C18:0) are different from that of DMPC. In fact, in the former cases, two peaks appeared at increasing dopant concentrations, suggesting the occurrence of a phase separation phenomenon, which is a sign of a binding of fluoxetine in the phosphate region. In cholesterol containing membranes, fluoxetine, even at low concentrations, leads to a general corruption of the membrane, both in terms of packing and cooperativity, and the formation of any new phase is no longer observable. EPR spectra reflect the disordered motion of acyl chains in the bilayer. It was found that fluoxetine lowers the order of the lipid chains mainly in correspondence of the fifth carbon position of SASL, indicating a possible accumulation near the interfacial region.

  6. Phylogenetic Molecular Species Delimitations Unravel Potential New Species in the Pest Genus Spodoptera Guenée, 1852 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Pascaline; Barbut, Jérôme; Le Ru, Bruno; Silvain, Jean-François; Clamens, Anne-Laure; d’Alençon, Emmanuelle; Kergoat, Gael J.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays molecular species delimitation methods promote the identification of species boundaries within complex taxonomic groups by adopting innovative species concepts and theories (e.g. branching patterns, coalescence). As some of them can efficiently deal with large single-locus datasets, they could speed up the process of species discovery compared to more time consuming molecular methods, and benefit from the existence of large public datasets; these methods can also particularly favour scientific research and actions dealing with threatened or economically important taxa. In this study we aim to investigate and clarify the status of economically important moths species belonging to the genus Spodoptera (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae), a complex group in which previous phylogenetic analyses and integrative approaches already suggested the possible occurrence of cryptic species and taxonomic ambiguities. In this work, the effectiveness of innovative (and faster) species delimitation approaches to infer putative species boundaries has been successfully tested in Spodoptera, by processing the most comprehensive dataset (in terms of number of species and specimens) ever achieved; results are congruent and reliable, irrespective of the set of parameters and phylogenetic models applied. Our analyses confirm the existence of three potential new species clusters (for S. exigua (Hübner, 1808), S. frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797) and S. mauritia (Boisduval, 1833)) and support the synonymy of S. marima (Schaus, 1904) with S. ornithogalli (Guenée, 1852). They also highlight the ambiguity of the status of S. cosmiodes (Walker, 1858) and S. descoinsi Lalanne-Cassou & Silvain, 1994. This case study highlights the interest of molecular species delimitation methods as valuable tools for species discovery and to emphasize taxonomic ambiguities. PMID:25853412

  7. Cloning of Glycerophosphocholine Acyltransferase (GPCAT) from Fungi and Plants: A NOVEL ENZYME IN PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE SYNTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Głąb, Bartosz; Beganovic, Mirela; Anaokar, Sanket; Hao, Meng-Shu; Rasmusson, Allan G; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Banaś, Antoni; Stymne, Sten; Lager, Ida

    2016-11-25

    Glycero-3-phosphocholine (GPC), the product of the complete deacylation of phosphatidylcholine (PC), was long thought to not be a substrate for reacylation. However, it was recently shown that cell-free extracts from yeast and plants could acylate GPC with acyl groups from acyl-CoA. By screening enzyme activities of extracts derived from a yeast knock-out collection, we were able to identify and clone the yeast gene (GPC1) encoding the enzyme, named glycerophosphocholine acyltransferase (GPCAT). By homology search, we also identified and cloned GPCAT genes from three plant species. All enzymes utilize acyl-CoA to acylate GPC, forming lyso-PC, and they show broad acyl specificities in both yeast and plants. In addition to acyl-CoA, GPCAT efficiently utilizes LPC and lysophosphatidylethanolamine as acyl donors in the acylation of GPC. GPCAT homologues were found in the major eukaryotic organism groups but not in prokaryotes or chordates. The enzyme forms its own protein family and does not contain any of the acyl binding or lipase motifs that are present in other studied acyltransferases and transacylases. In vivo labeling studies confirm a role for Gpc1p in PC biosynthesis in yeast. It is postulated that GPCATs contribute to the maintenance of PC homeostasis and also have specific functions in acyl editing of PC (e.g. in transferring acyl groups modified at the sn-2 position of PC to the sn-1 position of this molecule in plant cells). © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Elucidation of molecular dynamics of invasive species of rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cultivated rice fields are aggressively invaded by weedy rice in the U.S. and worldwide. Weedy rice results in loss of yield and seed contamination. The molecular dynamics of the evolutionary adaptive traits of weedy rice are not fully understood. To understand the molecular basis and identify the i...

  9. Echinostoma 'revolutum' (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) species complex revisited: species delimitation based on novel molecular and morphological data gathered in Europe.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Simona; Faltýnková, Anna; Brown, Rebecca; Blasco-Costa, Isabel; Soldánová, Miroslava; Sitko, Jiljí; Scholz, Tomáš; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2014-11-27

    The systematics of echinostomes within the so-called 'revolutum' group of the genus Echinostoma, which encompasses the type-species E. revolutum and a number of morphologically similar species, has long been controversial. Recent molecular studies indicate the existence of more species than previously considered valid, thus stressing the need for wider taxon sampling from natural host populations. This is especially true for Europe where morphological evidence indicates higher species diversity than previously thought, but where molecular data are virtually lacking. This gap in our knowledge was addressed in the present study through an integration of morphological and molecular approaches in the investigation of a dataset with larger taxonomic and geographical coverage. More than 20,000 freshwater snails belonging to 16 species were collected during 1998-2012 from various localities in eight countries in Europe. Snail screening provided representative larval isolates for five species of the 'revolutum' group, identified by their morphology. Adult isolates for four species recovered from natural and experimental infections were also identified. Partial fragments of the mitochondrial nad1 and 28S rRNA genes were amplified for 74 and 16 isolates, respectively; these were analysed together with the sequences of Echinostoma spp. available on GenBank. Delineation of the European Echinostoma spp. was carried out based on molecular, morphological and ecological data. The large-scale screening revealed infections with five Echinostoma spp., including one new species: E. revolutum (sensu stricto), E. miyagawai, E. paraulum, E. bolschewense and Echinostoma n. sp. The newly-generated nad1 sequences from Europe fall into six distinct, well-supported, reciprocally monophyletic lineages corresponding to the species identifications based on morphology; this was corroborated by the 28S rDNA sequences. The analyses of the total nad1 dataset provided evidence for 12 monophyletic

  10. Molecular characterisation of the species of the genus Zygosaccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Zorman, Tina; Belloch, Carmela; Querol, Amparo

    2003-09-01

    The restriction fragments polymorphisms of the mitochondrial DNA and the PCR fragment that comprised the internal transcribes spacers and the 5.8S rRNA gene, together with the electrophoretic karyotypes of 40 strains from the 10 species of the genus Zygosaccharomyces, including the new species Z. lentus were examined. The RFLP's of the ITS-5.8S region showed a specific restriction pattern for each species, including the new species Z. lentus. The only exception were the species Z. cidri and Z. fermentati that produced identical restriction profiles. The electrophoretic chromosome patterns confirmed the differences between the species of this genus, including the phylogenetic closest species Z. cidri and Z. fermentati. They present few chromosomes ranging from 3 bands (4 or 5 chromosomes) for Z. florentinus to 7 bands (8 to 10 chromosomes) for Z. cidri and Z. fermentati. The strain level resolution power of RFLP's of mtDNA of this genus enabled the characterisation of strains from the same species, even where they are isolated from the same substrate. However, in the cases of Z. bailii and Z. lentus, electrophoretic karyotyping there was considerable variation.

  11. Altered expression of ganglioside GM3 molecular species and a potential regulatory role during myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Go, Shinji; Go, Shiori; Veillon, Lucas; Ciampa, Maria Grazia; Mauri, Laura; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken; Prinetti, Alessandro; Sonnino, Sandro; Inokuchi, Jin-Ichi

    2017-04-28

    Gangliosides (sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids) help regulate many important biological processes, including cell proliferation, signal transduction, and differentiation, via formation of functional microdomains in plasma membranes. The structural diversity of gangliosides arises from both the ceramide moiety and glycan portion. Recently, differing molecular species of a given ganglioside are suggested to have distinct biological properties and regulate specific and distinct biological events. Elucidation of the function of each molecular species is important and will provide new insights into ganglioside biology. Gangliosides are also suggested to be involved in skeletal muscle differentiation; however, the differential roles of ganglioside molecular species remain unclear. Here we describe striking changes in quantity and quality of gangliosides (particularly GM3) during differentiation of mouse C2C12 myoblast cells and key roles played by distinct GM3 molecular species at each step of the process. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Synthesis of phosphatidylcholine under possible primitive earth conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M.; Eichberg, J.; Oro, J.

    1982-01-01

    Using a primitive earth evaporating pond model, the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine was accomplished when a reaction mixture of choline chloride and disodium phosphatidate, in the presence of cyanamide and traces of acid, was evaporated and heated at temperatures ranging from 25 to 100 C for 7 hours. Optimum yields of about 15% were obtained at 80 C. Phosphatidylcholine was identified by chromatographic, chemical and enzymatic degradation methods. On enzymatic hydrolysis with phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C, lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphorylcholine were formed, respectively. Alkaline hydrolysis gave glycerophosphorylcholine. The synthesis of phosphatidylcholine as the major compound was accompanied by the formation of lysophosphatidylcholine in smaller amounts. Cyanamide was found to be essential for the formation of phosphatidylcholine, and only traces of HCl, of the order of that required to convert the disodium phosphatidate to free phosphatidic acid were found necessary for the synthesis. This work suggests that phosphatidylcholine, which is an essential component of most biological membranes, could have been synthesized on the primitive earth.

  13. Tunable controlled release of molecular species from Halloysite nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elumalai, Divya Narayan

    Encouraged by potential applications in rust coatings, self-healing composites, selective delivery of drugs, and catalysis, the transport of molecular species through Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), specifically the storage and controlled release of these molecules, has attracted strong interest in recent years. HNTs are a naturally occurring biocompatible nanomaterial that are abundantly and readily available. They are alumosilicate based tubular clay nanotubes with an inner lumen of 15 nm and a length of 600-900 nm. The size of the inner lumen of HNTs may be adjusted by etching. The lumen can be loaded with functional agents like antioxidants, anticorrosion agents, flame-retardant agents, drugs, or proteins, allowing for a sustained release of these agents for hours. The release times can be further tuned for days and months by the addition of tube end-stoppers. In this work a three-dimensional, time-quantified Monte Carlo model that efficiently describes diffusion through and from nanotubes is implemented. Controlled delivery from Halloysite Nanotubes (HNT) is modeled based on interactions between the HNT's inner wall and the nanoparticles (NP) and among NPs themselves. The model was validated using experimental data published in the literature. The validated model is then used to study the effect of multiple parameters like HNT diameter and length, particle charge, ambient temperature and the creation of smart caps at the tube ends on the release of encapsulated NPs. The results show that release profiles depend on the size distribution of the HNT batch used for the experiment, as delivery is sensitive to HNT lumen and length. The effect of the addition of end-caps to the HNTs, on the rate of release of encapsulated NPs is also studied here. The results show that the release profiles are significantly affected by the addition of end caps to the HNTs and is sensitive to the end-cap pore lumen. A very good agreement with the experiment is observed when a weight

  14. Ecology has contrasting effects on genetic variation within species versus rates of molecular evolution across species in water beetles.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Tomochika; Vogler, Alfried P; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2015-01-22

    Comparative analysis is a potentially powerful approach to study the effects of ecological traits on genetic variation and rate of evolution across species. However, the lack of suitable datasets means that comparative studies of correlates of genetic traits across an entire clade have been rare. Here, we use a large DNA-barcode dataset (5062 sequences) of water beetles to test the effects of species ecology and geographical distribution on genetic variation within species and rates of molecular evolution across species. We investigated species traits predicted to influence their genetic characteristics, such as surrogate measures of species population size, latitudinal distribution and habitat types, taking phylogeny into account. Genetic variation of cytochrome oxidase I in water beetles was positively correlated with occupancy (numbers of sites of species presence) and negatively with latitude, whereas substitution rates across species depended mainly on habitat types, and running water specialists had the highest rate. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions from nearly-neutral theories of evolution, and suggest that the comparative analysis using large databases can give insights into correlates of genetic variation and molecular evolution.

  15. Ecology has contrasting effects on genetic variation within species versus rates of molecular evolution across species in water beetles

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Tomochika; Vogler, Alfried P.; Barraclough, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analysis is a potentially powerful approach to study the effects of ecological traits on genetic variation and rate of evolution across species. However, the lack of suitable datasets means that comparative studies of correlates of genetic traits across an entire clade have been rare. Here, we use a large DNA-barcode dataset (5062 sequences) of water beetles to test the effects of species ecology and geographical distribution on genetic variation within species and rates of molecular evolution across species. We investigated species traits predicted to influence their genetic characteristics, such as surrogate measures of species population size, latitudinal distribution and habitat types, taking phylogeny into account. Genetic variation of cytochrome oxidase I in water beetles was positively correlated with occupancy (numbers of sites of species presence) and negatively with latitude, whereas substitution rates across species depended mainly on habitat types, and running water specialists had the highest rate. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions from nearly-neutral theories of evolution, and suggest that the comparative analysis using large databases can give insights into correlates of genetic variation and molecular evolution. PMID:25621335

  16. Molecular Analysis of Sarcoidosis Tissues for Mycobacterium Species DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhiheng; Pride, David T.; Collins, Robert D.; Cover, Timothy L.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2002-01-01

    We performed polymerase chain reaction analysis, for Mycobacterium species 16S rRNA, rpoB, and IS6110 sequences, on 25 tissue specimens from patients with sarcoidosis and on 25 control tissue specimens consisting of mediastinal or cervical lymph nodes and lung biopsies. Mycobacterium species 16S rRNA sequences were amplified from 12 (48%) rpoB sequences from 6 (24%) of the sarcoidosis specimens. In total, 16S rRNA or rpoB sequences were amplified from 15 sarcoidosis specimens (60%) but were not detected in any of the control tissues (p=0.00002, Chi square). In three specimens, the sequences resembled Mycobacterium species other than M. tuberculosis. All specimens with sequences consistent with M. tuberculosis were negative for IS6110. We provide evidence that one of a variety of Mycobacterium species, especially organisms resembling M. tuberculosis, is found in most patients with sarcoidosis. PMID:12453366

  17. Molecular identification of Paragonimus species by DNA pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Janwan, Penchom; Sanpool, Oranuch; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Srichantaratsamee, Chutatip; Anamnart, Witthaya; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-06-01

    DNA pyrosequencing for PCR amplicons is an attractive strategy for the identification of microorganisms because of its short time performance for large number of samples. In this study, the primers targeting the fragment of ITS2 region of nuclear ribosomal RNA gene were newly developed for pyrosequencing-based identification of 6 Paragonimus species, Paragonimus bangkokensis, Paragonimus harinasutai, Paragonimus heterotremus, Paragonimus macrorchis, Paragonimus siamensis and Paragonimus westermani. Pyrosequencing determination of 39 nucleotides of partial ITS2 region could discriminate 6 Paragonimus species, and could also detect intra-species genetic variation of P. macrorchis. This DNA pyrosequencing-based identification can be a valuable tool to improve species-level identification of Paragonimus in the endemic areas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular relationships between closely related strains and species of nematodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, M. H.; Wall, S. M.; Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.; Hecht, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrophoretic comparisons have been made for 24 enzymes in the Bergerac and Bristol strains of Caenorhabditis elegans and the related species, Caenorhabditis briggsae. No variation was detected between the two strains of C. elegans. In contrast, the two species, C. elegans and C. briggsae exhibited electrophoretic differences in 22 of 24 enzymes. A consensus 5S rRNA sequence was determined for C. elegans and found to be identical to that from C. briggsae. By analogy with other species with relatively well established fossil records it can be inferred that the time of divergence between the two nematode species is probably in the tens of millions of years. The limited anatomical evolution during a time period in which proteins undergo extensive changes supports the hypothesis that anatomical evolution is not dependent on overall protein changes.

  19. Chemical analysis of molecular species through turbid medium.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rajan; Petrov, Georgi I; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2014-02-04

    Subsurface analysis of chemical species is imperative for biomedical diagnostics and imaging, homeland security, and pharmaceutical and other industries; however, the access to the object of interest is often obscured by an optically scattering medium which limits the ability to inspect the chemical composition of the sample. In this report, we employ coherent Raman microspectroscopy in a combination with a hierarchical cluster analysis to mitigate the effect of scattering and demonstrate the identification of multiple chemical species.

  20. Regulation of Lipid and Glucose Metabolism by Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye Won; Wei, Jie; Cohen, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, a.k.a. StARD2) binds phosphatidylcholines and catalyzes their intermembrane transfer and exchange in vitro. The structure of PC-TP comprises a hydrophobic pocket and a well-defined head-group binding site, and its gene expression is regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α. Recent studies have revealed key regulatory roles for PC-TP in lipid and glucose metabolism. Notably, Pctp−/− mice are sensitized to insulin action and exhibit more efficient brown fat-mediated thermogenesis. PC-TP appears to limit access of fatty acids to mitochondria by stimulating the activity of thioesterase superfamily member 2, a newly characterized long-chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesterase. Because PC-TP discriminates among phosphatidylcholines within lipid bilayers, it may function as a sensor that links metabolic regulation to membrane composition. PMID:20338778

  1. Efficacy of phosphatidylcholine in the modulation of motion sickness susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.; Ryan, P.; Homick, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of pharmacological doses of phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) in the modulation of motion sickness induced by exposure to coriolis stimulation in a rotating chair. Subjects received daily dietary supplements of 25 grams of lecithin (90 percent phosphatidylcholine) and were tested for their susceptibility to motion sickness after 4 h, 2 d, and 21 d. A small but statistically significant increase in susceptibility (+15 percent) was noted 4 h after supplemental phosphatidylcholine, with four of nine subjects demonstrating a marked increase in susceptibility. This finding was attributed to choline's stimulatory action on cholinergic systems, an action which opposes that of the classical antimotion sickness drug scopolamine. Chronic lecithin loading revealed a trend towards reduced susceptibility, possibly indicating the occurrence of adaptive mechanisms such as receptor down-regulation. Withdrawal from lecithin loading, perhaps coupled with anticholinergic treatment, might prove to be a potent prophylactic regimen and ought to be tested.

  2. Molecular approaches identify known species, reveal cryptic species and verify host specificity of Chinese Philotrypesis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mei-Jiao; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Bian, Sheng-Nan; Li, Yan-Wei; Niu, Li-Ming; Hu, Hao-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Shan; Murphy, Robert W; Huang, Da-Wei

    2012-07-01

    Philotrypesis, a major component of the fig wasp community (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), is a model taxon for studying male fighting and mating behaviour. Its extreme sexual dimorphism and male polymorphism render species identification uncertain and in-depth research on its ecology, behaviour and other evolutionary topics challenging. The fig wasps' enclosed habitat within the syconia makes their mating behaviour inaccessible, to the extent of matching conspecific females and males. In this study, we combine morphological and molecular analyses to identify species of Philotrypesis sampled from south China and to associate their extraordinarily dimorphic genders and labile male morphologies. Morphological evaluations of females identify 22 species and 28 male morphs. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 data detect 21 species using females, and 15 species among the males. Most of the males match the species as delimited by females. Both markers reveal cryptic species in P. quadrisetosa on Ficus vasculosa. Most species of wasps live on one species of fig but three species co-occur in two hosts (F. microcarpa and F. benjamina), which indicates host switching.

  3. Molecular identification of Entamoeba species in savanna woodland chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii).

    PubMed

    Jirků-Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Čepička, Ivan; Kalousová, Barbora; Jirků, Milan; Stewart, Fiona; Levecke, Bruno; Modrý, David; Piel, Alex K; Petrželková, Klára J

    2016-05-01

    To address the molecular diversity and occurrence of pathogenic species of the genus Entamoeba spp. in wild non-human primates (NHP) we conducted molecular-phylogenetic analyses on Entamoeba from wild chimpanzees living in the Issa Valley, Tanzania. We compared the sensitivity of molecular [using a genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR)] and coproscopic detection (merthiolate-iodine-formaldehyde concentration) of Entamoeba spp. We identified Entamoeba spp. in 72 chimpanzee fecal samples (79%) subjected to species-specific PCRs for six Entamoeba species/groups (Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba nuttalli, Entamoeba dispar, Entamoeba moshkovskii, Entamoeba coli and Entamoeba polecki ST2). We recorded three Entamoeba species: E. coli (47%), E. dispar (16%), Entamoeba hartmanni (51%). Coproscopically, we could only distinguish the cysts of complex E. histolytica/dispar/moshkovskii/nuttalli and E. coli. Molecular prevalence of entamoebas was higher than the prevalence based on the coproscopic examination. Our molecular phylogenies showed that sequences of E. dispar and E. coli from Issa chimpanzees are closely related to sequences from humans and other NHP from GenBank. The results showed that wild chimpanzees harbour Entamoeba species similar to those occurring in humans; however, no pathogenic species were detected. Molecular-phylogenetic methods are critical to improve diagnostics of entamoebas in wild NHP and for determining an accurate prevalence of Entamoeba species.

  4. A new Sparassis species from Spain described using morphological and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Dios, Jaime B; Wang, Zheng; Binder, Manfred; Hibbett, David S

    2006-10-01

    Sparassis miniensis, collected in Pinus pinaster forests in Galicia (northwest Iberian Peninsula) is described as a new species, based on morphological and molecular data. Sparassis miniensis is morphologically distinct from all other species in the genus Sparassis based on scattered flabellae, which are strongly laciniated, azonate, and arise from an orange to rose-purplish base. The sporadic presence of clamp connections is restricted to subhymenial hyphae. Molecular data from LSU-rDNA, ITS and partial gene coding RNA polymerase subunit II (rpb2) suggest a close relationship between the new species S. miniensis and S. brevipes, another European species producing large fruiting bodies but with entire flabellae and no clamp connections.

  5. Molecular characterization of DSC1 orthologs in invertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying-Jun; Yu, Lin-Lin; Xu, Hai-Jun; Dong, Ke; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2012-05-01

    DSC1 and BSC1 are two founding members of a novel family of invertebrate voltage-gated cation channels with close structural and evolutionary relationships to voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels. In this study, we searched the published genome sequences for DSC1 orthologs. DSC1 orthologs were found in all 48 insect species, and in other invertebrate species belonging to phyla Mollusca, Cnidaria, Hemichordata and Echinodermata. However, DSC1 orthologs were not found in four arachnid species, Ixodes scapularis, Rhipicephalus microplus, Tetranychus urticae and Varroa destructor, two species in Annelida or any vertebrate species. We then cloned and sequenced NlSC1 and BmSC1 full-length cDNAs from the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) and the silkworm (Bombyx mori), respectively. NlSC1 and BmSC1 share about 50% identity with DSC1, and the expression of NlSC1 and BmSC1 transcripts was most abundant in the head and antenna in adults. All DSC1 orthologs contain a unique and conserved DEEA motif, instead of the EEEE or EEDD motif in classical calcium channels or the DEKA motif in sodium channels. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that DSC1 and its orthologs form a separate group distinct from the classical voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels and constitute a unique family of cation channels. The DSC1/BSC1-family channels could be potential targets of new and safe insecticides for pest control.

  6. Molecular and biochemical properties of storage mites (except Blomia species).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Iraola, Victor; Carnés, Jerónimo

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the allergological importance of different mite species not belonging to the family Pyroglyphidae has been demonstrated. These mites, commonly named storage mites, include Lepidoglyphus destructor, Glycyphagus domesticus, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Acarus siro, Aleuroglyphus ovatus, Suidasia medanensis and Thyreophagus entomophagus. Several allergens from these species have been purified, sequenced and cloned. Many of these allergens have shown sequence homology and a biological function similar to those previously described in Blomia tropicalis and the Dermatophagoides spp. The main allergens described in storage mites include fatty acid binding proteins, tropomysin and paramyosin homologues, apoliphorine like proteins, alfa-tubulines and other, such as group 2, 5 and 7 allergens, which definitive biological function has not been described yet. Besides the purification and characterization of allergens, the allergenicity of other species such as Acarus farris, Austroglycyphagus malaysiensis, Blomia kulagini and B. tjibodas, Cheyletus eruditus, Chortoglyphus arcuatus, Gohieria fusca, Thyreophagus entomophagus and Tyrophagus longior has been investigated. Research has also been conducted to identify allergens in parasitic mites, such as Psoroptes ovis, Sarcoptes scabiei, Varroa jacobsoni, Diplaegidia columbae and Hemisarcoptes cooremani. The allergenicity of mites present in agricultural environments has been investigated. Crossreactivity studies have also been performed to elucidate to what extent all these mites share common, or species specific epitopes. Herein we present a comprehensive review of the allergenicity of mite species which have been implicated in human respiratory and/or dermatological diseases.

  7. Molecular analysis of Malassezia species isolated from hospitalized neonates.

    PubMed

    Zomorodain, Kamiar; Mirhendi, Hossein; Tarazooie, Bita; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Zeraati, Hojjat; Nayeri, Fatemeh

    2008-01-01

    Malassezia species are a part of the skin microflora of neonates. Under certain circumstances, they can cause diseases ranging from simple pustulosis to lifethreatening fungemia in newborn infants. Little information is available about the epidemiology of Malassezia species in neonates. In the present study, we successfully isolated Malassezia yeasts from 68.7% of hospitalized neonates. Using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFPL), M. furfur (88.06%) was identified as the most isolated species, followed in frequency by M. globosa (10.48%), M. obtusa (0.73%), and M. slooffiae (0.73%). Among the variables studied, only a longer stay in the ward resulted in a higher colonization rate. Using multiple logistic regression, only the type of hospital and ward had some effects on the colonization rate. Our results supported the hypothesis that neonates acquire Malassezia flora through direct contact with their mothers or hospital personnel.

  8. Molecular structure and stability of dissolved lithium polysulfide species.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, M; Govind, Niranjan; Walter, Eric; Burton, Sarah D; Shukla, Anil; Devaraj, Arun; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chongmin; Karim, Ayman; Thevuthasan, S

    2014-06-14

    The ability to predict the solubility and stability of lithium polysulfide is vital in realizing longer lasting lithium-sulfur batteries. Herein we report combined experimental and computational analyses to understand the dissolution mechanism of lithium polysulfide species in an aprotic solvent medium. Multinuclear NMR, variable temperature ESR and sulfur K-edge XAS analyses reveal that the lithium exchange between polysulfide species and solvent molecules constitutes the first step in the dissolution process. Lithium exchange leads to de-lithiated polysulfide ions (Sn(2-)) which subsequently form highly reactive free radicals through dissociation reaction (Sn(2-) → 2Sn/2˙(-)). The energy required for the dissociation and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species is analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) based calculations. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility.

  9. Molecular systematics of citrus-associated Alternaria species.

    PubMed

    Peever, T L; Su, G; Carpenter-Boggs, L; Timmer, L W

    2004-01-01

    The causal agents of Alternaria brown spot of tangerines and tangerine hybrids, Alternaria leaf spot of rough lemon and Alternaria black rot of citrus historically have been referred to as Alternaria citri or A. alternata. Ten species of Alternaria recently were described among a set of isolates from leaf lesions on rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri) and tangelo (C. paradisi × C. reticulata), and none of these isolates was considered representative of A. alternata or A. citri. To test the hypothesis that these newly described morphological species are congruent with phylogenetic species, selected Alternaria brown spot and leaf spot isolates, citrus black rot isolates (post-harvest pathogens), isolates associated with healthy citrus tissue and reference species of Alternaria from noncitrus hosts were scored for sequence variation at five genomic regions and used to estimate phylogenies. These data included 432 bp from the 5' end of the mitochondrial ribosomal large subunit (mtLSU), 365 bp from the 5' end of the beta-tubulin gene, 464 bp of an endopolygalacturonase gene (endoPG) and 559 and 571 bp, respectively, of two anonymous genomic regions (OPA1-3 and OPA2-1). The mtLSU and beta-tubulin phylogenies clearly differentiated A. limicola, a large-spored species causing leaf spot of Mexican lime, from the small-spored isolates associated with citrus but were insufficiently variable to resolve evolutionary relationships among the small-spored isolates from citrus and other hosts. Sequence analysis of translation elongation factor alpha, calmodulin, actin, chitin synthase and 1, 3, 8-trihydroxynaphthalene reductase genes similarly failed to uncover significant variation among the small-spored isolates. Phylogenies estimated independently from endoPG, OPA1-3 and OPA2-1 data were congruent, and analysis of the combined data from these regions revealed nine clades, eight of which contained small-spored, citrus-associated isolates. Lineages inferred from analysis of the

  10. Distribution and Molecular Diversity of Arborescent Gossypium Species.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mexico is a center of diversity of Gossypium. As currently circumscribed, arborescent Gossypium species (Section Erioxylum) are widely distributed in dry deciduous forests located from the central state of Sinaloa at the north of its range to the eastern state of Oaxaca in the south. However, extens...

  11. Molecular detection of a potentially toxic diatom species.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Bidhan Chandra; Cimarelli, Lucia; Singh, Kumar Saurabh; Brandi, Letizia; Brandi, Anna; Puccinelli, Camilla; Marcheggiani, Stefania; Spurio, Roberto

    2015-05-06

    A few diatom species produce toxins that affect human and animal health. Among these, members of the Pseudo-nitzschia genus were the first diatoms unambiguously identified as producer of domoic acid, a neurotoxin affecting molluscan shell-fish, birds, marine mammals, and humans. Evidence exists indicating the involvement of another diatom genus, Amphora, as a potential producer of domoic acid. We present a strategy for the detection of the diatom species Amphora coffeaeformis based on the development of species-specific oligonucleotide probes and their application in microarray hybridization experiments. This approach is based on the use of two marker genes highly conserved in all diatoms, but endowed with sufficient genetic divergence to discriminate diatoms at the species level. A region of approximately 450 bp of these previously unexplored marker genes, coding for elongation factor 1-a (eEF1-a) and silicic acid transporter (SIT), was used to design oligonucleotide probes that were tested for specificity in combination with the corresponding fluorescently labeled DNA targets. The results presented in this work suggest a possible use of this DNA chip technology for the selective detection of A. coffeaeformis in environmental settings where the presence of this potential toxin producer may represent a threat to human and animal health. In addition, the same basic approach can be adapted to a wider range of diatoms for the simultaneous detection of microorganisms used as biomarkers of different water quality levels.

  12. Molecular Structure and Stability of Dissolved Lithium Polysulfide Species

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.; Govind, Niranjan; Walter, Eric D.; Burton, Sarah D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Devaraj, Arun; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Karim, Ayman M.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-01-01

    Ability to predict the solubility and stability of lithium polysulfide is vital in realizing longer lasting lithium-sulfur batteries. Herein we report a combined computational and experimental spectroscopic analysis to understand the dissolution mechanism of lithium polysulfide species in an aprotic solvent medium. Multinuclear NMR and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) analysis reveals that the lithium exchange between polysulfide species and solvent molecule constitutes the first step in the dissolution process. Lithium exchange leads to de-lithiated polysulfide ions which subsequently forms highly reactive free radicals through disproportion reaction. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility. The energy required for the disproportion and possible dimer formation reactions of the polysulfide species are analyzed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We validate our calculations with variable temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Based on these findings, we discuss approaches to optimize the electrolyte in order to control the polysulfide solubility.

  13. Use of Sloppy Molecular Beacon Probes for Identification of Mycobacterial Species ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    El-Hajj, Hiyam H.; Marras, Salvatore A. E.; Tyagi, Sanjay; Shashkina, Elena; Kamboj, Mini; Kiehn, Timothy E.; Glickman, Michael S.; Kramer, Fred Russell; Alland, David

    2009-01-01

    We report here the use of novel “sloppy” molecular beacon probes in homogeneous PCR screening assays in which thermal denaturation of the resulting probe-amplicon hybrids provides a characteristic set of amplicon melting temperature (Tm) values that identify which species is present in a sample. Sloppy molecular beacons possess relatively long probe sequences, enabling them to form hybrids with amplicons from many different species despite the presence of mismatched base pairs. By using four sloppy molecular beacons, each possessing a different probe sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, four different Tm values can be determined simultaneously. We tested this technique with 27 different species of mycobacteria and found that each species generates a unique, highly reproducible signature that is unaffected by the initial bacterial DNA concentration. Utilizing this general paradigm, screening assays can be designed for the identification of a wide range of species. PMID:19171684

  14. Diabetes-induced changes in specific lipid molecular species in rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Han, X; Abendschein, D R; Kelley, J G; Gross, R W

    2000-01-01

    Intrinsic cardiac dysfunction during the diabetic state has been causally linked to changes in myocardial lipid metabolism. However, the precise alterations in the molecular species of myocardial polar and non-polar lipids during the diabetic state and their responses to insulin have not been investigated. Herein we demonstrate four specific alterations in rat myocardial lipid molecular species after induction of the diabetic state by streptozotocin treatment: (i) a massive remodelling of triacylglycerol molecular species including a >5-fold increase in tripalmitin mass and a 60% decrease in polyunsaturated triacylglycerol molecular species mass (i.e. triacylglycerols containing at least one acyl residue with more than two double bonds); (ii) a 46% increase in myocardial phosphatidylinositol mass; (iii) a 44% increase in myocardial plasmenylethanolamine mass and (iv) a 22% decrease in 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine content. Each of the changes in phospholipid classes, subclasses and individual molecular species were prevented by insulin treatment after induction of the diabetic state. In sharp contrast, the alterations in triacylglycerol molecular species were not preventable by peripheral insulin treatment after induction of the diabetic state. These results segregate diabetes-induced alterations in myocardial lipid metabolism into changes that can be remedied or not by routine peripheral insulin treatment and suggest that peripheral insulin therapy alone may not be sufficient to correct all of the metabolic alterations present in diabetic myocardium. PMID:11062060

  15. Identification of molecular species of acylglycerols of Philippine wild edible mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wild edible mushrooms are widely consumed in many countries. We successfully cultivated four edible, medicinal Philippine mushrooms in liquid culture. Recently, we identified the molecular species of acylglycerols in the lipid extract of mushroom G. lucidum NRRL66208. One hundred and three molecular...

  16. A Molecular Orbital Study of Atmospherically Important Species.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    AD-A33 656 A MOLECULARORBIAL STUDYOFAMOSPHERICALL IMPORTANT / SPECIES(U) COLLEGE OF THE HOL CROSS WORCESTER MA DEPT OF CHEMISTRY C A DEAKYNE JUN 83...Period Covered: Final Report, June 2 h- 1983. Author: Carol A. Deakyne Department of Chemistry College of the Holy Cross Worcester, MA. 01610...Controlling Office: United States Air Force Air Force Office of Scientific Research Building 410 Bolling AFB, D.C. 20332 Security Class: Unclassified

  17. Molecular identification and differentiation of Brevibacterium species and strains.

    PubMed

    Hoppe-Seyler, Tobias-Simon; Jaeger, Beate; Bockelmann, Wilhelm; Geis, Arnold; Heller, Knut-Jochem

    2007-01-01

    Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction enzyme analysis (ARDRA), pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ribotyping were used to differentiate among 24 strains of Brevibacterium linens, Brevibacterium casei and Brevibacterium epidermidis obtained from type culture collections or isolated from various smear ripened cheeses. ARDRA was applied to the 16S rDNA. B. linens was shown to be a quite heterogenic group with 2 to at least 4 copies of rrn operons per strain with aberrant nucleotide sequences. AccI gave genus specific restriction patterns and was used to separate Brevibacterium from Corynebacterium species. The expected species specificity of TaqI applied to B. linens type culture strains, but not to all strains isolated from cheese. By AvaI restriction, B. casei and B. linens were differentiated from B. epidermidis and the orange pigmented Arthrobacter casei, a new species of coryneform bacteria; by XmnI restriction, B. linens and B. epidermidis were differentiated from B. casei. One of 4 B. linens genotypes could not be distinguished from B. casei by this method. Here, the typical orange B. linens pigments were used for classification, which was confirmed by partial sequencing of the 16S rDNA.

  18. DFT models of molecular species in carbonate molten salts.

    PubMed

    Carper, W Robert; Wahlbeck, Phillip G; Griffiths, Trevor R

    2012-05-10

    Raman spectra of high temperature carbonate melts are correlated with carbonate species modeled at 923 K using B3LYP/(6-311+G(2d,p)) density functional calculations. Species that are theoretically stable at 923 K include O(2-), O(2)(-), O(2)(2-), CO(3)(2-), C(2)O(6)(2-), CO(4)(-), CO(4)(2-), CO(4)(4-), CO(5)(2-), KCO(4)(-), LiCO(4)(-), KO(2)(-), LiO(2)(-), NaO(2)(-), KO(2), LiO(2), NaO(2), KCO(3)(-), LiCO(3)(-), and NaCO(3)(-). Triangular, linear, and bent forms are theoretically possible for KO(2)(-) and NaO(2)(-). Triangular and linear forms may exist for LiO(2)(-). Linear and triangular versions are theoretically possible for LiO(2)(-) and KO(2). A triangular version of NaO(2) may exist. The correlation between measured and theoretical Raman spectra indicate that monovalent cations are to be included in several of the species that produce Raman spectra.

  19. Characterization of glycerophospholipid molecular species in six species of edible clams by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Yuan; Zhou, Da-Yong; Zhao, Qi; Yin, Fa-Wen; Hu, Xiao-Pei; Song, Liang; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Jian-Run; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2017-03-15

    The molecular species of glycerophosphocholine (GPCho), glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPEtn), glycerophosphoserine (GPSer), lysoglycerophosphocholine (LGPCho) and lysoglycerophosphoethanolamine (LGPEtn) from six species of edible clams were characterized by using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. At least 435, 453, 468, 443, 427 and 444 glycerophospholipid (GP) molecular species were characterized, respectively, from Cyclina sinensis, Mactra chinensis Philippi, Mactra veneriformis Reeve, Meretrix meretrix, Ruditapes philippinarum and Saxidomus purpurata. Most of the predominant GP molecular species in clam contained polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), indicating that clam is a potential resource of GP enriched PUFA. According to the amount of the major molecular species containing EPA and DHA, Cyclina sinensis was the best fit species for GPCho, Mactra veneriformis Reeve was the best fit species for GPEtn, Mactra chinensis Philippi was the best fit species for GPSer and LGPEtn, and Saxidomus purpurata was the best fit species for LGPCho.

  20. Molecular markers for identification of P. ramorum and other Phytophthora species from diseased tissue

    Treesearch

    Frank N. Martin; Paul W. Tooley

    2006-01-01

    Molecular techniques have been developed for detection and identification of P. ramorum and other Phytophthora species that are based on the mitochondrially encoded sequences. One technique uses a Phytophthora genus specific primer to determine if a Phytophthora species is present, followed by...

  1. Molecular method for Bartonella species identification in clinical and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    García-Esteban, Coral; Gil, Horacio; Rodríguez-Vargas, Manuela; Gerrikagoitia, Xeider; Barandika, Jesse; Escudero, Raquel; Jado, Isabel; García-Amil, Cristina; Barral, Marta; García-Pérez, Ana L; Bhide, Mangesh; Anda, Pedro

    2008-02-01

    A new, efficient molecular method for detection of Bartonella, based on the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer and 16S rRNA amplification by multiplex PCR combined with reverse line blotting, was designed. This assay could simultaneously detect 20 different known species and other Bartonella species not described previously.

  2. Molecular characterization of Babesia and Cytauxzoon species in wild South-African meerkats.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, Sarah; Menard, Sandie; Berry, Antoine

    2015-04-01

    Piroplasms, including Babesia, Cytauxzoon and Theileria species, frequently infect domestic and wild mammals. At present, there is no information on the occurrence and molecular identity of these tick-borne blood parasites in the meerkat, one of South Africa's most endearing wildlife celebrities. Meerkats live in territorial groups, which may occur on ranchland in close proximity to humans, pets and livestock. Blood collected from 46 healthy meerkats living in the South-African Kalahari desert was screened by microscopy and molecular methods, using PCR and DNA sequencing of 18S rRNA and ITS1 genes. We found that meerkats were infected by 2 species: one species related to Babesia sp. and one species related to Cytauxzoon sp. Ninety one percent of the meerkats were infected by the Cytauxzoon and/or the Babesia species. Co-infection occurred in 46% of meerkats. The pathogenicity and vectors of these two piroplasm species remains to be determined.

  3. Discrimination of Neotropical Anopheles species based on molecular and wing geometric morphometric traits.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Giovan F; Correa, Margarita M

    2017-10-01

    Morphological similarities among closely related Anopheles species that differ in biological traits and malaria transmission represent a challenge in medical entomology; therefore, new tools are constantly tested to bring solutions. Particularly, in this work, a geometric morphometric analysis of wing geometry variation, based on morphologically and molecularly identified specimens, was applied for the discrimination of fourteen Anopheles species belonging to the Nyssorhynchus, Anopheles and Kerteszia subgenera. DNA barcodes helped to confirm species assignation and the geometric morphometric approach revealed wing form differences not only at the subgenera but also at the species level. Each subgenus presented a particular wing size trend, possibly related to the evolutionary history of these lineages. Wing shape allowed species discrimination, except for some very closely related taxa. The current findings highlight the importance of using complementary approaches involving morphological and molecular data for Anopheles species discrimination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA Barcoding and Molecular Phylogeny of Drosophila lini and Its Sibling Species.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Feng; Wen, Shuo-Yang; Kawai, Kuniko; Gao, Jian-Jun; Hu, Yao-Guang; Segawa, Ryoko; Toda, Masanori J

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila lini and its two sibling species, D. ohnishii and D. ogumai, are hardly distinguishable from one another in morphology. These species are more or less reproductively isolated. The mitochondrial ND2 and COI-COII and the nuclear ITS1-ITS2 regions were sequenced to seek for the possibility of DNA barcoding and to reconstruct the phylogeny of them. The character-based approach for DNA barcoding detected some diagnostic nucleotides only for monophyletic D. ogumai, but no informative sites for the other two very closely species, D. lini and D. ohnishii, of which strains intermingled in the molecular phylogenetic trees. Thus, this study provides another case of limited applicability of DNA barcoding in species delineation, as in other cases of related Drosophila species. The molecular phylogenetic tree inferred from the concatenated sequences strongly supported the monophyly of the cluster of the three species, that is, the lini clade. We propose some hypotheses of evolutionary events in this clade.

  5. Molecular Characterization of Theileria Species Associated with Mortality in Four Species of African Antelopes

    PubMed Central

    Nijhof, A. M.; Pillay, V.; Steyl, J.; Prozesky, L.; Stoltsz, W. H.; Lawrence, J. A.; Penzhorn, B. L.; Jongejan, F.

    2005-01-01

    Pathogen DNA was isolated from roan antelope (Hippotragus equinus), sable antelope (Hippotragus niger), greater kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), and common gray duiker (Sylvicapra grimmia) in South Africa whose deaths were attributed to either theileriosis or cytauxzoonosis. We developed Theileria species-specific probes used in combination with reverse line blot hybridization assays and identified three different species of Theileria in four African antelope species. The close phylogenetic relationship between members of the genera Theileria and Cytauxzoon, similarities in the morphologies of developmental stages, and confusion in the literature regarding theileriosis or cytauxzoonosis are discussed. PMID:16333074

  6. Molecular characterization of Theileria species associated with mortality in four species of African antelopes.

    PubMed

    Nijhof, A M; Pillay, V; Steyl, J; Prozesky, L; Stoltsz, W H; Lawrence, J A; Penzhorn, B L; Jongejan, F

    2005-12-01

    Pathogen DNA was isolated from roan antelope (Hippotragus equinus), sable antelope (Hippotragus niger), greater kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), and common gray duiker (Sylvicapra grimmia) in South Africa whose deaths were attributed to either theileriosis or cytauxzoonosis. We developed Theileria species-specific probes used in combination with reverse line blot hybridization assays and identified three different species of Theileria in four African antelope species. The close phylogenetic relationship between members of the genera Theileria and Cytauxzoon, similarities in the morphologies of developmental stages, and confusion in the literature regarding theileriosis or cytauxzoonosis are discussed.

  7. Molecular characterisation of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and assessment of zoonotic transmission.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lihua; Fayer, Ronald

    2008-09-01

    The molecular characterisation of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is essential for accurately identifying organisms and assessing zoonotic transmission. Results of recent molecular epidemiological studies strongly suggest that zoonotic transmission plays an important role in cryptosporidiosis epidemiology. In such cases the most prevalent zoonotic species is Cryptosporidium parvum. Genotyping and subtyping data suggest that zoonotic transmission is not as prevalent in the epidemiology of giardiasis. Molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is a relatively recent application that is evolving as new genes are found that increase the accuracy of identification while discovering a greater diversity of species and yet unnamed taxa within these two important genera. As molecular data accumulate, our understanding of the role of zoonotic transmission in epidemiology and clinical manifestations is becoming clearer.

  8. Molecular phylogeography of two sibling species of Eurema butterflies.

    PubMed

    Narita, Satoko; Nomura, Masashi; Kato, Yoshiomi; Yata, Osamu; Kageyama, Daisuke

    2007-11-01

    The common yellow butterfly Eurema hecabe is widely distributed in East Asia, and is one of the most burdensome species for taxonomists due to the numerous geographic and seasonal wing colour patterns. Moreover, within this species, individuals with a yellow wing fringe that occur in temperate regions of Japan (Y type) proved to be biologically different from others that occur widely in subtropical regions of Japan and all over East Asia (B type). To unveil the genetic variation within and between the two types, a total of 50 butterflies collected at 18 geographic localities in East Asia were examined for nucleotide sequence variation of three mitochondrial regions: cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COIII) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5). In addition, they were also examined for infection status with the endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia. The three mitochondrial sequences consistently showed that (i) Y type and B type were highly divergent, (ii) nucleotide variation within B type was very small although sampled from a geographically wide range, and (iii) a weak association existed between mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and Wolbachia infection status.

  9. How to describe a cryptic species? Practical challenges of molecular taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Jörger, Katharina M; Schrödl, Michael

    2013-09-27

    Molecular methods of species delineation are rapidly developing and widely considered as fast and efficient means to discover species and face the 'taxonomic impediment' in times of biodiversity crisis. So far, however, this form of DNA taxonomy frequently remains incomplete, lacking the final step of formal species description, thus enhancing rather than reducing impediments in taxonomy. DNA sequence information contributes valuable diagnostic characters and -at least for cryptic species - could even serve as the backbone of a taxonomic description. To this end solutions for a number of practical problems must be found, including a way in which molecular data can be presented to fulfill the formal requirements every description must meet. Multi-gene barcoding and a combined molecular species delineation approach recently revealed a radiation of at least 12 more or less cryptic species in the marine meiofaunal slug genus Pontohedyle (Acochlidia, Heterobranchia). All identified candidate species are well delimited by a consensus across different methods based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers. The detailed microanatomical redescription of Pontohedyle verrucosa provided in the present paper does not reveal reliable characters for diagnosing even the two major clades identified within the genus on molecular data. We thus characterize three previously valid Pontohedyle species based on four genetic markers (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, 16S rRNA, nuclear 28S and 18S rRNA) and formally describe nine cryptic new species (P. kepii sp. nov., P. joni sp. nov., P. neridae sp. nov., P. liliae sp. nov., P. wiggi sp. nov., P. wenzli sp. nov., P. peteryalli sp. nov., P. martynovi sp. nov., P. yurihookeri sp. nov.) applying molecular taxonomy, based on diagnostic nucleotides in DNA sequences of the four markers. Due to the minute size of the animals, entire specimens were used for extraction, consequently the holotype is a voucher of extracted DNA ('DNA

  10. How to describe a cryptic species? Practical challenges of molecular taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular methods of species delineation are rapidly developing and widely considered as fast and efficient means to discover species and face the 'taxonomic impediment’ in times of biodiversity crisis. So far, however, this form of DNA taxonomy frequently remains incomplete, lacking the final step of formal species description, thus enhancing rather than reducing impediments in taxonomy. DNA sequence information contributes valuable diagnostic characters and –at least for cryptic species – could even serve as the backbone of a taxonomic description. To this end solutions for a number of practical problems must be found, including a way in which molecular data can be presented to fulfill the formal requirements every description must meet. Multi-gene barcoding and a combined molecular species delineation approach recently revealed a radiation of at least 12 more or less cryptic species in the marine meiofaunal slug genus Pontohedyle (Acochlidia, Heterobranchia). All identified candidate species are well delimited by a consensus across different methods based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers. Results The detailed microanatomical redescription of Pontohedyle verrucosa provided in the present paper does not reveal reliable characters for diagnosing even the two major clades identified within the genus on molecular data. We thus characterize three previously valid Pontohedyle species based on four genetic markers (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, 16S rRNA, nuclear 28S and 18S rRNA) and formally describe nine cryptic new species (P. kepii sp. nov., P. joni sp. nov., P. neridae sp. nov., P. liliae sp. nov., P. wiggi sp. nov., P. wenzli sp. nov., P. peteryalli sp. nov., P. martynovi sp. nov., P. yurihookeri sp. nov.) applying molecular taxonomy, based on diagnostic nucleotides in DNA sequences of the four markers. Due to the minute size of the animals, entire specimens were used for extraction, consequently the holotype is a voucher of

  11. Hybridization and endangered species protection in the molecular era.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Robert K; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2016-06-01

    After decades of discussion, there is little consensus on the extent to which hybrids between endangered and nonendangered species should be protected by US law. As increasingly larger, genome-scale data sets are developed, we can identify individuals and populations with even trace levels of genetic admixture, making the 'hybrid problem' all the more difficult. We developed a decision-tree framework for evaluating hybrid protection, including both the processes that produced hybrids (human-mediated or natural) and the ecological impact of hybrids on natural ecosystems. We then evaluated our decision tree for four case studies drawn from our own work and briefly discuss several other cases from the literature. Throughout, we highlight the management outcomes that our approach provides and the nuances of hybridization as a conservation problem. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Molecular and morphologic data reveal multiple species in Peromyscus pectoralis

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert D.; Schmidly, David J.; Amman, Brian R.; Platt, Roy N.; Neumann, Kathy M.; Huynh, Howard M.; Muñiz-Martínez, Raúl; López-González, Celia; Ordóñez-Garza, Nicté

    2015-01-01

    DNA sequence and morphometric data were used to re-evaluate the taxonomy and systematics of Peromyscus pectoralis. Phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference) of DNA sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene in 44 samples of P. pectoralis indicated 2 well-supported monophyletic clades. The 1st clade contained specimens from Texas historically assigned to P. p. laceianus; the 2nd was comprised of specimens previously referable to P. p. collinus, P. p. laceianus, and P. p. pectoralis obtained from northern and eastern Mexico. Levels of genetic variation (~7%) between these 2 clades indicated that the genetic divergence typically exceeded that reported for other species of Peromyscus. Samples of P. p. laceianus north and south of the Río Grande were not monophyletic. In addition, samples representing P. p. collinus and P. p. pectoralis formed 2 clades that differed genetically by 7.14%. Multivariate analyses of external and cranial measurements from 63 populations of P. pectoralis revealed 4 morpho-groups consistent with clades in the DNA sequence analysis: 1 from Texas and New Mexico assignable to P. p. laceianus; a 2nd from western and southern Mexico assignable to P. p. pectoralis; a 3rd from northern and central Mexico previously assigned to P. p. pectoralis but herein shown to represent an undescribed taxon; and a 4th from southeastern Mexico assignable to P. p. collinus. Based on the concordance of these results, populations from the United States are referred to as P. laceianus, whereas populations from Mexico are referred to as P. pectoralis (including some samples historically assigned to P. p. collinus, P. p. laceianus, and P. p. pectoralis). A new subspecies is described to represent populations south of the Río Grande in northern and central Mexico. Additional research is needed to discern if P. p. collinus warrants species recognition. PMID:26937045

  13. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms in teratogenesis involving reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; Bhuller, Yadvinder; Chen, Connie S; Jeng, Winnie; Kasapinovic, Sonja; Kennedy, Julia C; Kim, Perry M; Laposa, Rebecca R; McCallum, Gordon P; Nicol, Christopher J; Parman, Toufan; Wiley, Michael J; Wong, Andrea W

    2005-09-01

    Developmental pathologies may result from endogenous or xenobiotic-enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules and/or alter signal transduction. This minireview focuses upon several model drugs (phenytoin, thalidomide, methamphetamine), environmental chemicals (benzo[a]pyrene) and gamma irradiation to examine this hypothesis in vivo and in embryo culture using mouse, rat and rabbit models. Embryonic prostaglandin H synthases (PHSs) and lipoxygenases bioactivate xenobiotics to free radical intermediates that initiate ROS formation, resulting in oxidation of proteins, lipids and DNA. Oxidative DNA damage and embryopathies are reduced in PHS knockout mice, and in mice treated with PHS inhibitors, antioxidative enzymes, antioxidants and free radical trapping agents. Thalidomide causes embryonic DNA oxidation in susceptible (rabbit) but not resistant (mouse) species. Embryopathies are increased in mutant mice deficient in the antioxidative enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), or by glutathione (GSH) depletion, or inhibition of GSH peroxidase or GSH reductase. Inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice are partially protected. Inhibition of Ras or NF-kB pathways reduces embryopathies, implicating ROS-mediated signal transduction. Atm and p53 knockout mice deficient in DNA damage response/repair are more susceptible to xenobiotic or radiation embryopathies, suggesting a teratological role for DNA damage, consistent with enhanced susceptibility to methamphetamine in ogg1 knockout mice with deficient repair of oxidative DNA damage. Even endogenous embryonic oxidative stress carries a risk, since untreated G6PD- or ATM-deficient mice have increased embryopathies. Thus, embryonic processes regulating the balance of ROS formation, oxidative DNA damage and repair, and ROS-mediated signal transduction may be important determinants of teratological risk.

  14. Molecular evidence of Sarcocystis species in captive snakes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Abe, Niichiro; Matsubara, Katsuki; Tamukai, Kenichi; Miwa, Yasutsugu; Takami, Kazutoshi

    2015-08-01

    Sarcocystis nesbitti, using snakes as the definitive host, is a causative agent of acute human muscular sarcocystosis in Malaysia. Therefore, it is important to explore the distribution and prevalence of S. nesbitti in snakes. Nevertheless, epizootiological information of S. nesbitti in snakes remains insufficient because few surveys have assessed Sarcocystis infection in snakes in endemic countries. In Japan, snakes are popular exotic pet animals that are imported from overseas, but the degree of Sarcocystis infection in them remains unclear. The possibility exists that muscular sarcocystosis by S. nesbitti occurs in contact with captive snakes in non-endemic countries. For a total of 125 snake faecal samples from 67 snake species collected at animal hospitals, pet shops and a zoo, this study investigated the presence of Sarcocystis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the 18S ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA). Four (3.2%) faecal samples were positive by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rDNA sequences obtained from four amplification products revealed one isolate from a beauty snake (Elaphe taeniura), Sarcocystis zuoi, which uses rat snakes as the definitive host. The isolate from a Macklot's python (Liasis mackloti) was closely related with unidentified Sarcocystis sp. from reticulated pythons in Malaysia. The remaining two isolates from tree boas (Corallus spp.) were closely related with Sarcocystis lacertae, Sarcocystis gallotiae and unidentified Sarcocystis sp. from smooth snakes, Tenerife lizards and European shrews, respectively. This report is the first of a study examining the distribution of Sarcocystis species in captive snakes in Japan.

  15. Thermochemistry of new molecular species: SBr and HSBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornellas, Fernando R.

    2007-05-01

    Total energies, optimized geometries, and vibrational frequencies of SBr and HSBr have been evaluated at the coupled cluster level of theory with the correlation consistent basis sets. Extrapolated to the complete basis set limit and with corrections for core-valence, scalar relativistic, and spin-orbit effects, atomization energies were computed and then combined with the experimental heats of formation of the atomic species to generate very accurate heats of formation for the species SBr and HSBr. For SBr, we predict 37.45 and 36.07kcal/mol for ΔHf(0K ) and ΔHf (298.15K ), respectively, in very good agreement with the inferred experimental values of 37.98 and 36.15kcal/mol. For HSBr, the estimate turns out to be 10.38 and 8.29kcal/mol for ΔHf (0K ) and ΔHf (298.15K ), respectively. Using the more recent HBrO experimental heat of formation at 298.15K of Lock et al., [J. Phys. Chem. 100, 7972 (1996)] the inferred experimental value for HSBr is predicted to be 8.15kcal/mol, compared with 8.65kcal/mol derived from the data of Ruscic and Berkowitz [J. Chem. Phys. 101, 7795 (1994)]. Considering the better agreement of the result with that predicted using the experimental value of ΔHf(298.15K ) of Lock et al., the author also supports the suggestion made by Denis [J. Phys. Chem. A. 110, 5887 (2006)] that the result of Lock et al. should be preferred over the one of Ruscic and Berkowitz. For ΔHf(0K ), the author found 10.38 and 10.56kcal/mol, respectively, for the theoretical and inferred experimental estimates.

  16. Effect of E coli endotoxin on the leakage of /sup 14/C-sucrose from phosphatidylcholine liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Onji, T.; Liu, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of E coli endotoxin on the leakage of /sup 14/C-sucrose from phosphatidylcholine liposomes in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ was studied. Endotoxin decreased the leakage from liposomes from 27% to 4% in 5 hr when Ca/sup 2 +/ (1 mM) was incorporated into liposomes during sonication. The effect of endotoxin on the leakiness of liposomes was concentration dependent. Ca/sup 2 +/ alone increased the leakage of /sup 14/C-sucrose from liposomes. Mg/sup 2 +/ at concentrations higher than 5 mM exhibited an effect similar to that of Ca/sup 2 +/. These findings suggest that endotoxin increases the molecular packing of phosphatidylcholine bilayers in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ or Mg/sup 2 +/. A change in the physical state of membrane lipid bilayers induced by endotoxin may affect the function of biological membranes.

  17. Polyion Covalency: Exotic Species from the Unexplored World of Electrostatically Shielded Molecular Ion Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Frank

    2017-10-04

    We employ standard quantum chemical methods to describe a variety of kinetically stable polyionic molecular species that are trapped in appreciable potential wells by chemical bonding forces, despite powerful electrostatic opposition that challenges conventional chemical detection and characterization. The studied species are covalent or dative analogs of "anti-electrostatic" hydrogen-bonded (AEHB) species, all illustrating how short-range quantum covalency can overcome the powerful "shielding" opposition of long-range electrostatic forces to form highly-charged molecular species, analogous to known neutral or singly ionic counterparts. We provide computational predictions of representative structural, spectroscopic, and NBO-based electronic signatures of multiply-charged analogs of common neutral species (CH3CH3, CO2, FeCO) to suggest the unique material properties that are characteristic of this largely unexplored domain of polyionic chemical phenomena. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Relationship between morphological taxonomy and molecular divergence within Crustacea: proposal of a molecular threshold to help species delimitation.

    PubMed

    Lefébure, T; Douady, C J; Gouy, M; Gibert, J

    2006-08-01

    With today's technology for production of molecular sequences, DNA taxonomy and barcoding arose as a new tool for evolutionary biology and ecology. However, their validities still need to be empirically evaluated. Of most importance is the strength of the correlation between morphological taxonomy and molecular divergence and the possibility to define some molecular thresholds. Here, we report measurements of this correlation for two mitochondrial genes (COI and 16S rRNA) within the sub-phylum Crustacea. Perl scripts were developed to ensure objectivity, reproducibility, and exhaustiveness of our tests. Our analysis reveals a general correlation between molecular divergence and taxonomy. This correlation is particularly high for shallow taxonomic levels allowing us to propose a COI universal crustacean threshold to help species delimitation. At higher taxonomic levels this correlation decreases, particularly when comparing different families. Those results plead for DNA use in taxonomy and suggest an operational method to help crustacean species delimitation that is linked to the phylogenetic species definition. This pragmatic tool is expected to fine tune the present classification, and not, as some would have believed, to tear it apart.

  19. Endemic Amorphophallus (Araceae) from Madagascar: a revised key, a new species and molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Hetterscheid, Wilbert L A; Claudel, Cyrille

    2014-12-01

    Since the revision of Amorphophallus of Madagascar (Bot Jahrb Syst 121(1):1-17, 1999) several additional new species have been described. The recent discovery of another new species promted the preparation of a revised key as well as the description of the new species. Amorphophallus hildebrandtii, never restudied since its analysis by Engler in 1881, has been refound and restudied. Meanwhile molecular phylogenetic studies have provided new insights in the relationships of the endemic Madagascan species. The new species Amorphophallus perrieri is described. A new revised key to the endemic Amorphophallus species of Madagascar is provided. An emended description of A. hildebrandtii is provided. A molecular phylogeny of the endemic Madagascan species of Amorphophallus is provided. The enigmatic character of a very short spadix in A. hildebrandtii has been confirmed, after it was thought for many years that it was artificially shorter in the holotype specimen than in nature. This was suggested by the fact that the spadix of the holotype is broken. The monophyletic character of the Madagascan endemic species clade remained unchallenged after analysis including all new species discovered recently, incl. the new species presented in this paper.

  20. Delimitating cryptic species in the Gracilaria domingensis complex (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta) using molecular and morphological data.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Goia de M; Gurgel, C Frederico D; Costa, Emmanuelle da S; de Jesus, Priscila B; Oliveira, Mariana C; Oliveira, Eurico C; Davis, Charles C; Nunes, José Marcos de Castro

    2016-12-01

    Species in the genus Gracilaria that display conspicuously flattened vegetative morphologies are a taxonomically challenging group of marine benthic red algae. This is a result of their species richness, morphological similarity, and broad phenotypic plasticity. Within this group, the Gracilaria domingensis complex is one of the most common, conspicuous, and morphologically variable species along the tropical western Atlantic Ocean. Previous research has identified that members of this complex belong to two distantly related clades. However, despite this increased phylogentic resolution, species delimitations within each of these clades remain unclear. Our study assessed the species diversity within this difficult complex using morphological and molecular data from three genetic markers (cox1, UPA, and rbcL). We additionally applied six single-marker species delimitation methods (SDM: ABGD, GMYCs, GMYCm, SPN, bPTP, and PTP) to rbcL, which were largely in agreement regarding species delimitation. These results, combined with our analysis of morphology, indicate that the G. domingensis complex includes seven distinct species, each of which are not all most closely related: G. cervicornis; a ressurected G. ferox; G. apiculata subsp. apiculata; a new species, Gracilaria baiana sp. nov.; G. intermedia subsp. intermedia; G. venezuelensis; and G. domingensis sensu stricto, which includes the later heterotypic synonym, G. yoneshigueana. Our study demonstrates the value of multipronged strategies, including the use of both molecular and morphological approaches, to decipher cryptic species of red algae.

  1. Morphology delimits more species than molecular genetic clusters of invasive Pilosella.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Chandra E; Ensing, David J; Gaskin, John F; De Clerck-Floate, Rosemarie A; Pither, Jason

    2015-07-01

    • Accurate assessments of biodiversity are paramount for understanding ecosystem processes and adaptation to change. Invasive species often contribute substantially to local biodiversity; correctly identifying and distinguishing invaders is thus necessary to assess their potential impacts. We compared the reliability of morphology and molecular sequences to discriminate six putative species of invasive Pilosella hawkweeds (syn. Hieracium, Asteraceae), known for unreliable identifications and historical introgression. We asked (1) which morphological traits dependably discriminate putative species, (2) if genetic clusters supported morphological species, and (3) if novel hybridizations occur in the invaded range.• We assessed 33 morphometric characters for their discriminatory power using the randomForest classifier and, using AFLPs, evaluated genetic clustering with the program structure and subsequently with an AMOVA. The strength of the association between morphological and genotypic dissimilarity was assessed with a Mantel test.• Morphometric analyses delimited six species while genetic analyses defined only four clusters. Specifically, we found (1) eight morphological traits could reliably distinguish species, (2) structure suggested strong genetic differentiation but for only four putative species clusters, and (3) genetic data suggest both novel hybridizations and multiple introductions have occurred.• (1) Traditional floristic techniques may resolve more species than molecular analyses in taxonomic groups subject to introgression. (2) Even within complexes of closely related species, relatively few but highly discerning morphological characters can reliably discriminate species. (3) By clarifying patterns of morphological and genotypic variation of invasive Pilosella, we lay foundations for further ecological study and mitigation. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  2. Molecular tools for cryptic Candida species identification with applications in a clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Gamarra, Soledad; Dudiuk, Catiana; Mancilla, Estefanía; Vera Garate, María Verónica; Guerrero, Sergio; Garcia-Effron, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Candida spp. includes more than 160 species but only 20 species pose clinical problems. C. albicans and C. parapsilosis account for more than 75% of all the fungemias worldwide. In 1995 and 2005, one C. albicans and two C. parapsilosis-related species were described, respectively. Using phenotypic traits, the identification of these newly described species is inconclusive or impossible. Thus, molecular-based procedures are mandatory. In the proposed educational experiment we have adapted different basic molecular biology techniques designed to identify these species including PCR, multiplex PCR, PCR-based restriction endonuclease analysis and nuclear ribosomal RNA amplification. During the classes, students acquired the ability to search and align gene sequences, design primers, and use bioinformatics software. Also, in the performed experiments, fungal molecular taxonomy concepts were introduced and the obtained results demonstrated that classic identification (phenotypic) in some cases needs to be complemented with molecular-based techniques. As a conclusion we can state that we present an inexpensive and well accepted group of classes involving important concepts that can be recreated in any laboratory. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Leptospira species molecular epidemiology in the genomic era.

    PubMed

    Caimi, K; Repetto, S A; Varni, V; Ruybal, P

    2017-10-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease which global burden is increasing often related to climatic change. Hundreds of whole genome sequences from worldwide isolates of Leptospira spp. are available nowadays, together with online tools that permit to assign MLST sequence types (STs) directly from raw sequence data. In this work we have applied R7L-MLST to near 500 genomes and strains collection globally distributed. All 10 pathogenic species as well as intermediate were typed using this MLST scheme. The correlation observed between STs and serogroups in our previous work, is still satisfied with this higher dataset sustaining the implementation of MLST to assist serological classification as a complementary approach. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences from R7-MLST loci allowed us to resolve taxonomic inconsistencies but also showed that events such as recombination, gene conversion or lateral gene transfer played an important role in the evolution of Leptospira genus. Whole genome sequencing allows us to contribute with suitable epidemiologic information useful to apply in the design of control strategies and also in diagnostic methods for this illness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Morphological and molecular characterization of two novel species of Agaricus section Xanthodermatei.

    PubMed

    Callac, Philippe; Guinberteau, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Agaricus specimens collected in France belong to two novel entities resembling small forms of A. moelleri and A. xanthodermus, two common species in section Xanthodermatei. Molecular (IT1+ITS2 DNA sequence) and morphological comparisons between eight presumed similar taxa of the section support the elevation of both entities to species rank. The new entities are described as A. parvitigrinus and A. xanthodermulus. They form a group with A. laskibarii, a rare species also recently described from France, and A. californicus, a North-American species. The well known A. moelleri and A. xanthodermus are the most related species among the studied sample. Like other species of the section, both new species have a phenolic odor and are probably toxic.

  5. Molecular identification of three Indian snake species using simple PCR-RFLP method.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Bhawna; Meganathan, P R; Haque, Ikramul

    2010-07-01

    Three endangered Indian snake species, Python molurus, Naja naja, and Xenochrophis piscator are known to be significantly involved in illegal trade. Effective authentication of species is required to curb this illegal trade. In the absence of morphological features, molecular identification techniques hold promise to address the issue of species identification. We present an effective PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method for easy identification of the three endangered snake species, Python molurus, Naja naja, and Xenochrophis piscator. A 431-bp amplicon from cytochrome b gene was amplified using novel snake-specific primers following restriction digestion with enzymes Mbo II and Fok I. The species-specific reference fragment patterns were obtained for the target species, which enabled successful identification of even highly degraded shed skin sample confirming the utility of the technique in case of poor-quality DNA. The assay could be effectively used for forensic authentication of three Indian snake species and would help strengthen conservation efforts.

  6. [Molecular evolution of satellite DNA CLsat in lizards of the Darevskia species (Sauria: Lacertidae): correlation with species diversity].

    PubMed

    Chobanu, D G; Grechko, V V; Darevskiĭ, I S

    2003-11-01

    The structure and evolution of a satellite DNA family was examined in lizards from the genus Darevskia (family Lacertidae). Comparison of tandem units of repeated DNA (satDNA), CLsat, in all species from the genus Darevskia has shown that their variability is largely based on single-nucleotide substitutions, which constitute about 50 diagnostic positions underlying classification of the family into three subfamilies. Maximum differences between the subfamilies reached 25%. At this level of tandem unit divergence between the subfamilies, no cross-hybridization between them was observed (at 65 degrees C). The individual variability of one subfamily within the species was on average 5% while the variability between species consensuses within a subfamily was 10%. The presence of highly conserved regions in all monomers and some features of their organization show that satellites of all Darevskia species belong to one satDNA family. The organization of unit sequences of satellites CLsat and Agi also detected by us in another lizard genus, Lacerts s. str. was compared. Similarity that was found between these satellites suggests their relatedness and common origin. A possible pathway of evolution of these two satDNA families is proposed. The distribution and content of CLsat repeat subfamilies in all species of the genus was examined by Southern blotting hybridization. Seven species had mainly CLsatI (83 to 96%); three species, approximately equal amounts of CLsatI and CLsatIII (the admixture of CLsatII was 2-3%); and five species, a combination of all three subfamilies in highly varying proportions. Based on these results as well as on zoogeographic views on phylogeny and taxonomy of the Darevskia species, hypotheses on the evolution of molecular-genetic relationships within this genus are advanced.

  7. Quantitation of Interacting Molecular Species and Measurement of Molecular Avidity by Single Radial (Immuno) Diffusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    FIGURE LEGEND 1lL ;Ta ,j - ’V y ilii INTRODUCTION Mancini et al. (1965) developed a single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) method for the quantitation of...quantitation of antigens by single radial immunodiffusion . Immunochem, 2, 5. Mancini , G., Nash, D. R. and Heremans, J. F. (1970) Further studies on...FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Single radial immunodiffusion , Single radial diffusion, Molecular interaction, Molecular avidity, endotoxin ’-." 19 A63TRACT

  8. Accounting for molecular stochasticity in systematic revisions: species limits and phylogeny of Paroaria.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, Liliana M; Porzecanski, Ana Luz

    2009-10-01

    Different frameworks have been proposed for using molecular data in systematic revisions, but there is ongoing debate on their applicability, merits and shortcomings. In this paper we examine the fit between morphological and molecular data in the systematic revision of Paroaria, a group of conspicuous songbirds endemic to South America. We delimited species based on examination of >600 specimens, and developed distance-gap, and distance- and character-based coalescent simulations to test species limits with molecular data. The morphological and molecular data collected were then analyzed using parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian phylogenetics. The simulations were better at evaluating the new species limits than using genetic distances. Species diversity within Paroaria had been underestimated by 60%, and the revised genus comprises eight species. Phylogenetic analyses consistently recovered a congruent topology for the most recently derived species in the genus, but the most basal divergences were not resolved with these data. The systematic and phylogenetic hypotheses developed here are relevant to both setting conservation priorities and understanding the biogeography of South America.

  9. Molecular species composition of plant cardiolipin determined by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yonghong; Peisker, Helga

    2016-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL), an anionic phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane, provides essential functions for stabilizing respiratory complexes and is involved in mitochondrial morphogenesis and programmed cell death in animals. The role of CL and its metabolism in plants are less well understood. The measurement of CL in plants, including its molecular species composition, is hampered by the fact that CL is of extremely low abundance, and that plants contain large amounts of interfering compounds including galactolipids, neutral lipids, and pigments. We used solid phase extraction by anion exchange chromatography to purify CL from crude plant lipid extracts. LC/MS was used to determine the content and molecular species composition of CL. Thus, up to 23 different molecular species of CL were detected in different plant species, including Arabidopsis, mung bean, spinach, barley, and tobacco. Similar to animals, plant CL is dominated by highly unsaturated species, mostly containing linoleic and linolenic acid. During phosphate deprivation or exposure to an extended dark period, the amount of CL decreased in Arabidopsis, accompanied with an increased degree in unsaturation. The mechanism of CL remodeling during stress, and the function of highly unsaturated CL molecular species, remains to be defined. PMID:27179363

  10. Molecular evidence for cryptic speciation in the Cyclophorus fulguratus (Pfeiffer, 1854) species complex (Caenogastropoda: Cyclophoridae) with description of new species.

    PubMed

    Nantarat, Nattawadee; Wade, Christopher M; Jeratthitikul, Ekgachai; Sutcharit, Chirasak; Panha, Somsak

    2014-01-01

    A high degree of intraspecific variation, both genetic and in shell morphology, of the operculate land snail Cyclophorus fulguratus (Pfeiffer, 1854) suggests that its classification as a single species warrants reconsideration. We sequenced two nuclear (18S and 28S) and two mitochondrial (16S and COI) genes of 46 C. fulguratus specimens and used them to estimate the phylogeny and to determine the validity of species boundaries. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed the presence of three lineages corresponding to three geographically disjunctive populations of C. fulguratus in Thailand. Likelihood tests of topologies significantly supported the non-monophyly of the C. fulguratus-complex and Bayesian species delimitation analysis significantly supported the potential representation as distinct species of these three lineages. Discriminant function analysis based on geometric-morphometrics of shell shape allowed for significant distinction of these three candidate species, although they revealed a considerable degree of overlap of shell shape reflecting their crypsis morphologically. The diagnostic characters are provided by color pattern, pattern of protoconch and pattern of jaw. In conclusion, the results support that the C. fulguratus s.l., as currently recognized, consists of three distinct species in Thailand: C. fulguratus s.s., C. rangunensis and C. abditus sp.nov., which are described herein.

  11. Molecular species delimitation of a symbiotic fig-pollinating wasp species complex reveals extreme deviation from reciprocal partner specificity.

    PubMed

    Darwell, Clive T; al-Beidh, Sarah; Cook, James M

    2014-09-18

    Symbiotic relationships have contributed to major evolutionary innovations, the maintenance of fundamental ecosystem functions, and the generation and maintenance of biodiversity. However, the exact nature of host/symbiont associations, which has important consequences for their dynamics, is often poorly known due to limited understanding of symbiont taxonomy and species diversity. Among classical symbioses, figs and their pollinating wasps constitute a highly diverse keystone resource in tropical forest and savannah environments. Historically, they were considered to exemplify extreme reciprocal partner specificity (one-to-one host-symbiont species relationships), but recent work has revealed several more complex cases. However, there is a striking lack of studies with the specific aims of assessing symbiont diversity and how this varies across the geographic range of the host. Here, we use molecular methods to investigate cryptic diversity in the pollinating wasps of a widespread Australian fig species. Standard barcoding genes and methods were not conclusive, but incorporation of phylogenetic analyses and a recently developed nuclear barcoding gene (ITS2), gave strong support for five pollinator species. Each pollinator species was most common in a different geographic region, emphasising the importance of wide geographic sampling to uncover diversity, and the scope for divergence in coevolutionary trajectories across the host plant range. In addition, most regions had multiple coexisting pollinators, raising the question of how they coexist in apparently similar or identical resource niches. Our study offers a striking example of extreme deviation from reciprocal partner specificity over the full geographical range of a fig-wasp system. It also suggests that superficially identical species may be able to co-exist in a mutualistic setting albeit at different frequencies in relation to their fig host's range. We show that comprehensive sampling and molecular

  12. Persistence of phase coexistence in disaturated phosphatidylcholine monolayers at high surface pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Crane, J M; Putz, G; Hall, S B

    1999-01-01

    Prior reports that the coexistence of the liquid-expanded (LE) and liquid-condensed (LC) phases in phospholipid monolayers terminates in a critical point have been compromised by experimental difficulties with Langmuir troughs at high surface pressures and temperatures. The studies reported here used the continuous interface of a captive bubble to minimize these problems during measurements of the phase behavior for monolayers containing the phosphatidylcholines with the four different possible combinations of palmitoyl and/or myristoyl acyl residues. Isothermal compression produced surface pressure-area curves for dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) that were indistinguishable from previously published data obtained with Langmuir troughs. During isobaric heating, a steep increase in molecular area corresponding to the main LC-LE phase transition persisted for all four compounds to 45 mN/m, at which collapse of the LE phase first occurred. No other discontinuities to suggest other phase transitions were apparent. Isobars for DPPC at higher pressures were complicated by collapse of the monolayer, but continued to show evidence up to 65 mN/m for at least the onset of the LC-LE transition. The persistence of the main phase transition to high surface pressures suggests that a critical point for these monolayers of disaturated phospholipids is either nonexistent or inaccessible at an air-water interface. PMID:10585934

  13. Structural Characterization of Unsaturated Phosphatidylcholines Using Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hugh I.; Kim, Hyungjun; Pang, Eric S.; Ryu, Ernest K.; Beegle, Luther W.; Loo, Joseph A.; Goddard, William A.; Kanik, Isik

    2009-01-01

    A number of phosphatidylcholine (PC) cations spanning a mass range of 400 to 1000 Da are investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled with traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). A high correlation between mass and mobility is demonstrated with saturated phosphatidylcholine cations in N2. A significant deviation from this mass-mobility correlation line is observed for the unsaturated PC cation. We found that the double bond in the acyl chain causes a 5% reduction in drift time. The drift time is reduced at a rate of ~1% for each additional double bond. Theoretical collision cross sections of PC cations exhibit good agreement with experimentally evaluated values. Collision cross sections are determined using the recently derived relationship between mobility and drift time in TWIMS stacked ring ion guide (SRIG) and compared to estimate collision cross-sections using empiric calibration method. Computational analysis was performed using the modified trajectory (TJ) method with nonspherical N2 molecules as the drift gas. The difference between estimated collision cross-sections and theoretical collision cross-sections of PC cations is related to the sensitivity of the PC cation collision cross-sections to the details of the ion-neutral interactions. The origin of the observed correlation and deviation between mass and mobility of PC cations is discussed in terms of the structural rigidity of these molecules using molecular dynamic simulations. PMID:19764704

  14. Structural characterization of unsaturated phosphatidylcholines using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hugh I; Kim, Hyungjun; Pang, Eric S; Ryu, Ernest K; Beegle, Luther W; Loo, Joseph A; Goddard, William A; Kanik, Isik

    2009-10-15

    A number of phosphatidylcholine (PC) cations spanning a mass range of 400-1000 Da are investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled with traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). A high correlation between mass and mobility is demonstrated with saturated phosphatidylcholine cations in N(2). A significant deviation from this mass-mobility correlation line is observed for the unsaturated PC cation. We found that the double bond in the acyl chain causes a 5% reduction in drift time. The drift time is reduced at a rate of approximately 1% for each additional double bond. Theoretical collision cross sections of PC cations exhibit good agreement with experimentally evaluated values. Collision cross sections are determined using the recently derived relationship between mobility and drift time in TWIMS stacked ring ion guide (SRIG) and compared to estimated collision cross sections using an empiric calibration method. Computational analysis was performed using the modified trajectory (TJ) method with nonspherical N(2) molecules as the drift gas. The difference between estimated collision cross sections and theoretical collision cross sections of PC cations is related to the sensitivity of the PC cation collision cross sections to the details of the ion-neutral interactions. The origin of the observed correlation and deviation between mass and mobility of PC cations is discussed in terms of the structural rigidity of these molecules using molecular dynamic simulations.

  15. The interfacial elastic packing interactions of galactosylceramides, sphingomyelins, and phosphatidylcholines.

    PubMed Central

    Smaby, J M; Kulkarni, V S; Momsen, M; Brown, R E

    1996-01-01

    The interfacial elastic packing interactions of different galactosylceramides (GalCers), sphingomyelins (SMs), and phosphatidylcholines (PC) were compared by determining their elastic area compressibility moduli (Cs-1) as a function of lateral packing pressure (pi) in a Langmuir-type film balance. To assess the relative contributions of the lipid headgroups as well as those of the ceramide and diacylglycerol hydrocarbon regions, we synthesized various GalCer and SM species with identical, homogeneous acyl residues and compared their behavior to that of PCs possessing similar hydrocarbon structures. For PCs, this meant that the sn-1 acyl chain was long and saturated (e.g., palmitate) and the sn-2 chain composition was varied to match that of GalCer or SM. When at equivalent pi and in either the chain-disordered (liquid-expanded) or chain-ordered (liquid-condensed) state, GalCer films were less elastic than either SM or PC films. When lipid headgroups were identical (SM and PC), Cs-1 values (at equivalent pi) for chain-disordered SMs, but not chain-ordered SMs, were 25-30% higher than those of PCs. Typical values for fluid phase (liquid-expanded) GalCer at 30 mN/m and 24 degrees C were 158 (+/- 7) mN/m, whereas those of SM were 135 (+/- 7) mN/m and those of PC were 123 (+/- 2) mN/m. Pressure-induced transitions to chain-ordered states (liquid-condensed) resulted in significant increases (two- to fourfold) in the "in-plane" compressibility for all three lipid types. Typical Cs-1 values for chain-ordered GalCers at 30 mN/m and 24 degrees C were between 610 and 650 mN/m, whereas those of SM and of PC were very similar and were between 265 and 300 mN/m. Under fluid phase conditions, the pi-Cs-1 behavior for each lipid type was insensitive to whether the acyl chain was saturated or monounsaturated. Measurement of the Cs-1 values also provided an effective way to evaluate the two-dimensional phase transition region of SMs, GalCers, and PCs. Modest heterogeneity in the acyl

  16. European species of Clavaria (Agaricales, Agaricomycetes) with dark basidiomata - a morphological and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Kautmanová, I; Tomšovský, M; Dueñas, M; Martín, M P

    2012-12-01

    Clavaria species with dark basidiomata occurring in Europe were analysed using morphological and molecular methods. Morphological analyses revealed four groups containing seven Clavaria species with dark basidiomata. Phylogenetic analysis of the LSU nrDNA region confirmed the separate positions of all seven Clavaria species within the genus. All sequences were grouped in four well-supported clades, mostly corresponding to defined morphological species. The results of the molecular study are inconsistent with the infrageneric classification of Clavaria based on the presence or absence of clamps on the bases of basidia and two widely accepted subgenera. Clavaria and Holocoryne appear to be polyphyletic. A new approach in species delimitation is presented: 1) C. asperulispora and C. atrofusca are two distinct species recognized by the shape of their spores, and the name C. neo-nigrita is a possible synonym of C. asperulispora; 2) species with clustered fragile basidiomata, C. fumosa and Clavaria cf. fuscoferruginea, which are almost identical in shape and size of spores differing only in the darker basidiomata of the latter, are phylogenetically unrelated; 3) Clavaria atrobadia is a dubious species, the name being most likely a synonym of C. fuscoferruginea; 4) two species with close morphological and phylogenetic affinity, C. atroumbrina and C. pullei, are distinguished based on the more oblong and narrower spores of the former. Comparison of European and North American material suggests the transatlantic nature of the distribution of C. asperulispora, C. atroumbrina and C. fumosa.

  17. Seroprofiling at the Candida albicans protein species level unveils an accurate molecular discriminator for candidemia.

    PubMed

    Pitarch, Aida; Nombela, César; Gil, Concha

    2016-02-16

    Serum antibodies to specific Candida proteins have been reported as potential diagnostic biomarkers for candidemia. However, their diagnostic usefulness at the protein species level has hardly been examined. Using serological proteome analysis, we explored the IgG-antibody responses to Candida albicans protein species in candidemia and control patients. We found that 87 discrete protein species derived from 34 unique proteins were IgG-targets, although only 43 of them were differentially recognized by candidemia and control sera. An increase in the speciation of the immunome, connectivity and modularity of antigenic species co-recognition networks, and heterogeneity of antigenic species recognition patterns was associated with candidemia. IgG antibodies to certain discrete protein species were better predictors of candidemia than those to their corresponding proteins. A molecular discriminator delineated from the combined fingerprints of IgG antibodies to two distinct species of phosphoglycerate kinase and enolase accurately classified candidemia and control patients. These results provide new insight into the anti-Candida IgG-antibody response development in candidemia, and demonstrate that an immunoproteomic signature at the molecular level may be useful for its diagnosis. Our study further highlights the importance of defining pathogen-specific antigens at the chemical and molecular level for their potential application as immunodiagnostic reagents or even vaccine candidates.

  18. Non-conjugated small molecule FRET for differentiating monomers from higher molecular weight amyloid beta species.

    PubMed

    Ran, Chongzhao; Zhao, Wei; Moir, Robert D; Moore, Anna

    2011-04-29

    Systematic differentiation of amyloid (Aβ) species could be important for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In spite of significant progress, controversies remain regarding which species are the primary contributors to the AD pathology, and which species could be used as the best biomarkers for its diagnosis. These controversies are partially caused by the lack of reliable methods to differentiate the complicated subtypes of Aβ species. Particularly, differentiation of Aβ monomers from toxic higher molecular weight species (HrMW) would be beneficial for drug screening, diagnosis, and molecular mechanism studies. However, fast and cheap methods for these specific aims are still lacking. We demonstrated the feasibility of a non-conjugated FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) technique that utilized amyloid beta (Aβ) species as intrinsic platforms for the FRET pair assembly. Mixing two structurally similar curcumin derivatives that served as the small molecule FRET pair with Aβ40 aggregates resulted in a FRET signal, while no signal was detected when using Aβ40 monomer solution. Lastly, this FRET technique enabled us to quantify the concentrations of Aβ monomers and high molecular weight species in solution. We believe that this FRET technique could potentially be used as a tool for screening for inhibitors of Aβ aggregation. We also suggest that this concept could be generalized to other misfolded proteins/peptides implicated in various pathologies including amyloid in diabetes, prion in bovine spongiform encephalopathy, tau protein in AD, and α-synuclein in Parkinson disease.

  19. Molecular species of acylglycerols incorporating radiolabeled fatty acids from castor (Ricinus communis L.) microsomal incubations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiann-Tsyh; Chen, Jennifer M; Liao, Lucy P; McKeon, Thomas A

    2002-08-28

    Sixty-one molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) and diacylglycerols produced from castor microsomal incubations incorporating six different (14)C-labeled fatty acids have been identified and quantified. The preference for incorporation into TAG was in the order ricinoleate > oleate > linoleate > linolenate > stearate > palmitate. Ricinoleate was the major fatty acid incorporated, whereas stearate, linolenate, and palmitate were incorporated at low levels. Twenty-one molecular species of acylglycerols (HPLC peaks) in castor oil have also been assigned. The levels of TAG in castor oil are RRR (triricinolein) > RR-TAG > R-TAG > no R-TAG. The levels of the molecular species within the groups of RR-TAG, RL-TAG, and LL-TAG individually are ricinoleate > linoleate > oleate > linolenate, stearate, and palmitate. The results of the labeled fatty acid incorporation are consistent with ricinoleate being preferentially driven into TAG and oleate being converted to ricinoleate in castor oil biosynthesis.

  20. Effect of soybean phosphatidylcholine on lipid profile of bovine oocytes matured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pitangui-Molina, Caroline P; Vireque, Alessandra A; Tata, Alessandra; Belaz, Katia Roberta A; Santos, Vanessa G; Ferreira, Christina R; Eberlin, Marcos N; Silva-de-Sá, Marcos Felipe; Ferriani, Rui A; Rosa-E-Silva, Ana Carolina J S

    2017-04-01

    The phospholipid (PL) composition of embryo and oocyte membranes affects thermal phase behavior and several physicochemical properties such as fluidity and permeability. The characterization of PL profiles and the development of suitable in vitro maturation (IVM) protocols, that are able to modify membrane's composition, may result in significant improvements in oocyte developmental potential and cryotolerance. Using soybean phosphatidylcholine (PC) as a model supplement, we evaluated the effect of PL supplementation during IVM on bovine cumulus-oocyte-complex (COC). Substantial changes in the lipid profiles of oocyte membrane were observed and associated with pre-implantation data. The propensity of the PC supplement to become soluble in the maturation medium and/or diffuse into mineral oil was also assessed. Oocytes were matured in TCM without supplementation, i.e. control, (n=922) or supplemented with 50 or 100μM PC (n=994). The maturation media and mineral oil pre- and post- IVM, along with control and PC-treated oocytes were then analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), and the lipid profiles were compared via principal component analysis (PCA). Soybean PCs are bioavailable and stable in IVM medium; further, PCs did not diffuse to the mineral oil, which also remained unaltered by the metabolism of treated oocytes. PC supplementation at 100μM resulted in substantially greater relative abundances of polyunsatured PL, namely PC (32:1), PC (34:2), PC (36:6), PC (36:4), and PC (38:6), in oocyte membrane. These differences indicated that short-term exposure to the PC supplement could indeed modify the lipid composition of IVM-oocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Membrane incorporation of polyunsaturated molecular species of PC was favored, and does so without compromising the viability of the subsequent embryo in regards to cleavage, blastocyst development and hatching rate. The reported approach will allow for the

  1. Refined OPLS all-atom force field for saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers at full hydration.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Arkadiusz; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Cramariuc, Oana; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Rog, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    We report parametrization of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the framework of the Optimized Parameters for Liquid Simulations all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field. We chose DPPC as it is one of the most studied phospholipid species and thus has plenty of experimental data necessary for model validation, and it is also one of the highly important and abundant lipid types, e.g., in lung surfactant. Overall, PCs have not been previously parametrized in the OPLS-AA force field; thus, there is a need to derive its bonding and nonbonding parameters for both the polar and nonpolar parts of the molecule. In the present study, we determined the parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties and in the acyl chains, as well the partial atomic charges. In these calculations, we used three methods: (1) Hartree-Fock (HF), (2) second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and (3) density functional theory (DFT). We also tested the effect of the polar environment by using the polarizable continuum model (PCM), and for acyl chains the van der Waals parameters were also adjusted. In effect, six parameter sets were generated and tested on a DPPC bilayer. Out of these six sets, only one was found to be able to satisfactorily reproduce experimental data for the lipid bilayer. The successful DPPC model was obtained from MP2 calculations in an implicit polar environment (PCM).

  2. Detection of multiple species of human Paragonimus from Mexico using morphological data and molecular barcodes.

    PubMed

    López-Caballero, J; Oceguera-Figueroa, A; León-Règagnon, V

    2013-11-01

    Paragonimus mexicanus is the causal agent of human paragonimiasis in several countries of the Americas. It is considered to be the only species of the genus present in Mexico, where it is responsible for human infection. Through the investigation of P. mexicanus specimens from several places throughout Mexico, we provide morphological, molecular and geographical evidence that strongly suggests the presence of at least three species from this genus in Mexico. These results raise questions regarding the diagnosis, treatment, prophylaxis and control of human paragonimiasis in Mexico. We also provide a brief discussion regarding biodiversity inventories and the convenience of providing molecular and morphological information in biodiversity studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Method of molecular specie alteration by nonresonant laser induced dielectric breakdown

    DOEpatents

    Ronn, Avigdor M.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of a molecular specie by itself or in the presence of a secondary material at a pressure above a threshold value for the particular system by a laser of predetermined minimum power and having a frequency displaced from an absorption line of the specie causes severance of the weakest bond and a yield of products containing at least one dissociative fragment from said specie. A Rogowski type TEA CO.sub.2 --N.sub.2 --He laser has been used successfully on a wide variety of molecular species. Solid, liquid and gaseous end products have been obtained depending upon the starting materials. When solids have been produced they are in the form of microfine particles or microfine aggregates. A neodymium glass laser has also been used successfully.

  4. Molecular and morphological description of two new species of Stemphylium from China and France.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Geng, Yun; Pei, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Xiu-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Two new species of Stemphylium (anamorphic Pleospora) are described on the basis of morphological characters and molecular phylogenetic analyses. Stemphylium phaseolina and S. variabilis were isolated respectively from diseased leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris L. in Hebei Province, China, and from diseased leaves of Allium sativum L. in Angres, France. The two species exhibit characteristic Stemphylium morphology but are distinct from similar species based on the morphology and development of conidia. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) nuclear rDNA region and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) genes were sequenced. The results of maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analyses of the combined DNA sequences of these two gene regions supported S. phaseolina and S. variabilis as two distinct phylogenetic species. The taxonomic descriptions of the new species and their comparison with related species are presented, together with the phylogenetic analysis based on combined DNA sequences of ITS and gpd gene regions.

  5. Molecular Species Delimitation and Morphology of Aquatic and Sub-Aquatic Bugs (Heteroptera) in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Meyin A Ebong, Solange; Petit, Elsa; Le Gall, Philippe; Chen, Ping-Ping; Nieser, Nico; Guilbert, Eric; Njiokou, Flobert; Marsollier, Laurent; Guégan, Jean-François; Pluot-Sigwalt, Dominique; Eyangoh, Sara; Harry, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic and semi-aquatic bugs (Heteroptera) represent a remarkable diversity and a resurging interest has been given to documenting at the species level these insects inhabiting Cameroon in Central Africa due to their potential implication in the transmission of the bacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causal agent of Buruli ulcer, an emerging human disease. A survey was carried out over two years in Cameroon. Morphological analyses were done in two steps. A first step consisted in separating the specimens based on broadly shared characters into morphotypes. The specimens were then separated into two independent batches containing each the same representation of each morphotype. One batch (309 specimens) was used by taxonomy experts on aquatic bugs for species level identification and/or to reconcile nymph with their corresponding adult species. The second batch (188 specimens) was used to define species based on the COI DNA sequences (standard sequence used for "DNA barcoding") and using the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) method. The first morphological analysis step separated the specimens into 63 different morphotypes (49 adults and 14 nymphs), which were then found to belong to 54 morphological species in the infra-orders Gerromorpha and Nepomorpha based on the species-level morphological identification, and 41-45 putative molecular species according to the gap value retained in the ABGD. Integrating morphology and "DNA barcoding" reconciled all the specimens into 62 aquatic bug species in Cameroon. Generally, we obtained a good congruence between species a priori identified based on morphology from adult morphotypes and molecular putative species. Moreover, molecular identification has allowed the association of 86% of nymphs with adults. This work illustrates the importance of integrative taxonomy.

  6. Molecular Species Delimitation and Morphology of Aquatic and Sub-Aquatic Bugs (Heteroptera) in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Le Gall, Philippe; Chen, Ping-Ping; Nieser, Nico; Guilbert, Eric; Njiokou, Flobert; Marsollier, Laurent; Guégan, Jean-François; Pluot-Sigwalt, Dominique; Eyangoh, Sara; Harry, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic and semi-aquatic bugs (Heteroptera) represent a remarkable diversity and a resurging interest has been given to documenting at the species level these insects inhabiting Cameroon in Central Africa due to their potential implication in the transmission of the bacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causal agent of Buruli ulcer, an emerging human disease. A survey was carried out over two years in Cameroon. Morphological analyses were done in two steps. A first step consisted in separating the specimens based on broadly shared characters into morphotypes. The specimens were then separated into two independent batches containing each the same representation of each morphotype. One batch (309 specimens) was used by taxonomy experts on aquatic bugs for species level identification and/or to reconcile nymph with their corresponding adult species. The second batch (188 specimens) was used to define species based on the COI DNA sequences (standard sequence used for “DNA barcoding”) and using the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) method. The first morphological analysis step separated the specimens into 63 different morphotypes (49 adults and 14 nymphs), which were then found to belong to 54 morphological species in the infra-orders Gerromorpha and Nepomorpha based on the species-level morphological identification, and 41–45 putative molecular species according to the gap value retained in the ABGD. Integrating morphology and “DNA barcoding” reconciled all the specimens into 62 aquatic bug species in Cameroon. Generally, we obtained a good congruence between species a priori identified based on morphology from adult morphotypes and molecular putative species. Moreover, molecular identification has allowed the association of 86% of nymphs with adults. This work illustrates the importance of integrative taxonomy. PMID:27149077

  7. Comparative molecular species delimitation in the charismatic Nawab butterflies (Nymphalidae, Charaxinae, Polyura).

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Emmanuel F A; Morinière, Jérôme; Müller, Chris J; Kunte, Krushnamegh; Turlin, Bernard; Hausmann, Axel; Balke, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The charismatic tropical Polyura Nawab butterflies are distributed across twelve biodiversity hotspots in the Indomalayan/Australasian archipelago. In this study, we tested an array of species delimitation methods and compared the results to existing morphology-based taxonomy. We sequenced two mitochondrial and two nuclear gene fragments to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships within Polyura using both Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood. Based on this phylogenetic framework, we used the recently introduced bGMYC, BPP and PTP methods to investigate species boundaries. Based on our results, we describe two new species Polyura paulettae Toussaint sp. n. and Polyura smilesi Toussaint sp. n., propose one synonym, and five populations are raised to species status. Most of the newly recognized species are single-island endemics likely resulting from the recent highly complex geological history of the Indomalayan-Australasian archipelago. Surprisingly, we also find two newly recognized species in the Indomalayan region where additional biotic or abiotic factors have fostered speciation. Species delimitation methods were largely congruent and succeeded to cross-validate most extant morphological species. PTP and BPP seem to yield more consistent and robust estimations of species boundaries with respect to morphological characters while bGMYC delivered contrasting results depending on the different gene trees considered. Our findings demonstrate the efficiency of comparative approaches using molecular species delimitation methods on empirical data. They also pave the way for the investigation of less well-known groups to unveil patterns of species richness and catalogue Earth's concealed, therefore unappreciated diversity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Chronopotentiometric studies of phosphatidylcholine bilayers modified by ergosterol.

    PubMed

    Naumowicz, Monika; Petelska, Aneta Dorota; Figaszewski, Zbigniew Artur

    2011-01-01

    We have monitored the effect of ergosterol on electrical capacitance and electrical resistance of the phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes using chronopotentiometry method. The chronopotentiometric characteristic of the bilayers depends on constant-current flow through the membranes. For low current values, no electroporation takes place and the membrane voltage rises exponentially to a constant value described by the Ohm's law. Based on these kinds of chronopotentiometric curves, a method of the membrane capacitance and the membrane resistance calculations is presented.

  9. Localization of phosphatidylcholine in outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the effects of phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus on the extent of phospholipid hydrolysis in envelope membrane vesicles and in intact chloroplasts. When isolated envelope vesicles were incubated in presence of phospholipase C, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol, but not phosphatidylinositol, were totally converted into diacylglycerol if they were available to the enzyme (i.e., when the vesicles were sonicated in presence of phospholipase C). These experiments demonstrate that phospholipase C can be used to probe the availability of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol in the cytosolic leaflet of the outer envelope membrane from spinach chloroplasts. When isolated, purified, intact chloroplasts were incubated with low amounts of phospholipase C (0.3 U/mg chlorophyll) under very mild conditions (12 degrees C for 1 min), greater than 80% of phosphatidylcholine molecules and almost none of phosphatidylglycerol molecules were hydrolyzed. Since we have also demonstrated, by using several different methods (phase-contrast and electron microscopy, immunochemical and electrophoretic analyses) that isolated spinach chloroplasts, and especially their outer envelope membrane, remained intact after mild treatment with phospholipase C, we can conclude that there is a marked asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts. Phosphatidylcholine, the major polar lipid of the outer envelope membrane, is almost entirely accessible from the cytosolic side of the membrane and therefore is probably localized in the outer leaflet of the outer envelope bilayer. On the contrary, phosphatidylglycerol, the major polar lipid in the inner envelope membrane and the thylakoids, is probably not accessible to phospholipase C from the cytosol and therefore is probably localized mostly in the inner leaflet of the outer envelope membrane and in the other chloroplast membranes. PMID:3988805

  10. Standardised molecular diagnostic tool for the identification of cryptic species within the Bemisia tabaci complex.

    PubMed

    Elfekih, S; Tay, W T; Gordon, K; Court, L; De Barro, P

    2017-07-23

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex harbours over 40 cryptic species that have been placed in 11 phylogenetically distinct clades based on the molecular characterisation of partial mitochondrial DNA COI (mtCOI) gene region. Four cryptic species are currently within the invasive clade i.e. 'MED', 'MEAM1', 'MEAM2' and IO'. Correct identification of these species is a critical step towards implementing reliable measures for plant biosecurity and border protection, however no standardised B. tabaci-specific primers are currently available which has caused inconsistencies in the species identification processes. We report three sets of PCR primers developed to amplify the mtCOI region which can be used for genotyping 'MED', 'MEAM1', and 'IO' species and tested these primers on 91 MED, 35 MEAM1 and five IO individuals. PCR and sequencing of amplicons identified a total of 21, six and one haplotypes in MED, MEAM1 and IO respectively, of which six haplotypes were new to the B. tabaci database. These primer pairs enabled standardisation and robust molecular species identification via mtCOI screening of the targeted invasive cryptic species and will improve quarantine decisions. The use of this diagnostic tool could be extended to other species within the complex. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrating molecular and morphological approaches for characterizing parasite cryptic species: implications for parasitology.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Steven A; DE León, Gerardo Pérez-Ponce

    2011-11-01

    Herein we review theoretical and methodological considerations important for finding and delimiting cryptic species of parasites (species that are difficult to recognize using traditional systematic methods). Applications of molecular data in empirical investigations of cryptic species are discussed from an historical perspective, and we evaluate advantages and disadvantages of approaches that have been used to date. Developments concerning the theory and practice of species delimitation are emphasized because theory is critical to interpretation of data. The advantages and disadvantages of different molecular methodologies, including the number and kind of loci, are discussed relative to tree-based approaches for detecting and delimiting cryptic species. We conclude by discussing some implications that cryptic species have for research programmes in parasitology, emphasizing that careful attention to the theory and operational practices involved in finding, delimiting, and describing new species (including cryptic species) is essential, not only for fully characterizing parasite biodiversity and broader aspects of comparative biology such as systematics, evolution, ecology and biogeography, but to applied research efforts that strive to improve development and understanding of epidemiology, diagnostics, control and potential eradication of parasitic diseases.

  12. Use of Repetitive Sequences for Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Avena Species from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Diana; Rodrigues, Joana; Varela, Ana; Veloso, Maria Manuela; Viegas, Wanda; Silva, Manuela

    2016-02-04

    Genomic diversity of Portuguese accessions of Avena species--diploid A. strigosa and hexaploids A. sativa and A. sterilis--was evaluated through molecular and cytological analysis of 45S rDNA, and other repetitive sequences previously studied in cereal species--rye subtelomeric sequence (pSc200) and cereal centromeric sequence (CCS1). Additionally, retrotransposons and microsatellites targeting methodologies--IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism)--were performed. A very high homology was detected for ribosomal internal transcribed sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) between the species analyzed, although nucleolar organizing regions (NOR) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed distinct number of Nor loci between diploid and hexaploid species. Moreover, morphological diversity, evidenced by FISH signals with different sizes, was observed between distinct accessions within each species. pSc200 sequences were for the first time isolated from Avena species but proven to be highly similar in all genotypes analyzed. The use of primers designed for CCS1 unraveled a sequence homologous to the Ty3/gypsy retrotransposon Cereba, that was mapped to centromeric regions of diploid and hexaploid species, being however restricted to the more related A and D haplomes. Retrotransposon-based methodologies disclosed species- and accessions-specific bands essential for the accurate discrimination of all genotypes studied. Centromeric, IRAP and REMAP profiles therefore allowed accurate assessment of inter and intraspecific variability, demonstrating the potential of these molecular markers on future oat breeding programs.

  13. Two new species of Maritrema Nicoll, 1907 (Digenea: Microphallidae) from New Zealand: morphological and molecular characterisation.

    PubMed

    Presswell, Bronwen; Blasco-Costa, Isabel; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2014-05-01

    Two new species of the microphallid genus Maritrema (Maritrema) Nicoll, 1907 are described from freshwaters in the South Island of New Zealand. Maritrema deblocki n. sp. occurs as an adult in the mallard Anas platyrhynchos (L.); Maritrema poulini n. sp. is found as sporocysts/cercariae in Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Gray) and as metacercariae in two species of amphipod and two species of isopod. We use morphological and molecular characterisation to distinguish between the two species, and compare them to their four morphologically closest congeners. M. deblocki n. sp. and M. poulini n. sp. are distinguished from each other by the relative sucker size, the positions of the genital pore and ovary, the convergence of the vitelline ribbons, and overall size. With the aid of molecular data, we matched life cycle stages of M. poulini n. sp. and assessed its use of multiple second intermediate hosts. Phylogenetic analyses included sequences for the two new species and the available microphallid sequences for the large ribosomal subunit and the internal transcribed spacer 1 of the ribosomal RNA gene. Closer to each other than to any other species, the sister species together with Maritrema novaezealandense Martorelli, Fredensborg, Mouritsen & Poulin, 2004, Maritrema heardi (Kinsella & Deblock, 1994), Maritrema eroliae Yamaguti, 1939 and Maritrema oocysta (Lebour, 1907) formed a well-supported clade. In addition, we clarify the taxonomic identity of several unidentified Microphallus spp. in the recent ecological literature from New Zealand and propose corrected spellings for a number of Maritrema species epithets.

  14. Stability of drug-carrier emulsions containing phosphatidylcholine mixtures.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Michele; Pattarino, Franco; Ignoni, Terenzio

    2002-03-01

    Lipid emulsion particles containing 10% of medium chain triglycerides were prepared using 2% w/w of a mixture 1:1 w/w of purified soya phosphatidylcholine and 2-hexanoyl phosphatidylcholine as emulsifier mixture, for use as drug carriers. The mean droplet sizes of emulsions, prepared using an Ultra Turrax or a high-pressure homogenizer, were about 288 and 158 nm, respectively, compared with 380 and 268 nm for emulsions containing lecithin, or 325 and 240 nm for those containing 6-phosphatidylcholine. The stability of the emulsions, determined by monitoring the decrease of a lipophilic marker at a specified level within the emulsion, and observing coalescence over time, was also greatly increased using the emulsifier mixture. The emulsion stability did not notably change in the presence of a model destabilizing drug, indomethacin. The use of a second hydrophilic surfactant to adjust the packing properties of the lecithin at the oil-water interface provided an increase in the stability of lipid emulsions, and this may be of importance in the formulation of drug delivery systems.

  15. Molecular signatures of longevity: Insights from cross-species comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Siming; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2017-10-01

    Much of the current research on longevity focuses on the aging process within a single species. Several molecular players (e.g. IGF1 and MTOR), pharmacological compounds (e.g. rapamycin and metformin), and dietary approaches (e.g. calorie restriction and methionine restriction) have been shown to be important in regulating and modestly extending lifespan in model organisms. On the other hand, natural lifespan varies much more significantly across species. Within mammals alone, maximum lifespan differs more than 100 fold, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent comparative studies are beginning to shed light on the molecular signatures associated with exceptional longevity. These include genome sequencing of microbats, naked mole rat, blind mole rat, bowhead whale and African turquoise killifish, and comparative analyses of gene expression, metabolites, lipids and ions across multiple mammalian species. Together, they point towards several putative strategies for lifespan regulation and cancer resistance, as well as the pathways and metabolites associated with longevity variation. In particular, longevity may be achieved by both lineage-specific adaptations and common mechanisms that apply across the species. Comparing the resulting cross-species molecular signatures with the within-species lifespan extension strategies will improve our understanding of mechanisms of longevity control and provide a starting point for novel and effective interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A molecular contribution to the assessment of the Tricholoma equestre species complex.

    PubMed

    Moukha, Serge; Férandon, Cyril; Beroard, Erika; Guinberteau, Jacques; Castandet, Benoît; Callac, Philippe; Creppy, Edmond; Barroso, Gérard

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, interest in the Tricholoma equestre species complex has increased because of several cases of severe and sometimes fatal rhabdomyolysis reported in France and Poland. These occurred after repeated consumption of large portions of T. equestre sporophores during consecutive meals, despite the fact that this species is renowned as a tasty edible wild mushroom. The T. equestre species complex includes three ectomycorrhizal species Tricholoma flavovirens (Pers.) S. Lundell, Tricholoma auratum (Paulet) Gillet, and T. equestre (L.) P. Kummer. All these species produce sporophores with intense yellow gills but are difficult to distinguish by morphological analyses at both the macroscopic and microscopic levels. In T. equestre, two additional varieties are recognized: T. equestre var. populinum (Christensen & Noordeloos) associated with Populus sp. and/or Betula sp. trees and sometimes recognized as Tricholoma frondosae (Kalamees & Shchukin) and T. equestre var. pallidifolia characterized by pale to white gills, frequently recognized as Tricholoma joachimii (Bon & Riva). To explore the taxonomic (species delimitation), ecological, and geographical extent and limits of the T. equestre species complex, we have carried out a molecular comparison of worldwide strains belonging to this complex by using sequences of two molecular markers: the internal transcript spacer (ITS)1/5.8S/ITS2 region of the nuclear ribosomal unit and the 5' part of the mitochondrial cox1 gene. Phylogenetic analyses support the placement of European T. equestre, T. flavovirens, and T. auratum strains as representatives of a single species. This species appears associated with various conifers trees, depending on the geographic origin (Pinus pinaster for T. auratum, Pinus sylvestris or Abies alba for T. equestre and T. flavovirens). However, in the context of a single T. equestre species, the geographical location could lead to the characterization of sub-species or varieties, as suggested

  17. Molecular characterization of the species Salvinia (Salviniaceae) from the upper Paraná River floodplain.

    PubMed

    Machado, S A; Oliveira, A V; Fabrin, T M C; Prioli, S M A P; Prioli, A J

    2016-08-12

    The pteridophytes Salvinia minima, S. herzogii, and S. auriculata are among the most abundant aquatic macrophytes in the upper Paraná River floodplain. Since some species have highly similar morphological features, it is very difficult to identify members of this genus to the species level. An indication of this difficulty is a set of poorly differentiated taxa comprising S. auriculata and S. herzogii known as the 'S. auriculata complex', which is found in the Paraná River together with other Salvinia species such as S. biloba and S. molesta. Some authors have reported the existence of inter-species hybrids. Despite the complex Salvinia taxonomy, few genetic studies have been performed on purported species within the genus to resolve this complexity. The present study was conducted to determine useful molecular sequences for the discrimination of Salvinia species of the upper Paraná River floodplain. Molecular data were compared with data of other species of the genus to clarify phylogenetic relationships, employing the nucleotide sequence trnL-trnF from the chloroplast DNA. The results revealed that Salvinia populations in the upper Paraná River floodplain belong to different species and indicated that species of the S. auriculata complex may be distinguished from one another after the division of the S. minima group, corroborating results by other researchers. Although the taxonomic position of S. oblongifolia was clarified, as high closeness between S. oblongifolia and the S. auriculata complex was reported, Salvinia kinship is still not thoroughly established and further investigations in morphology and molecular diversity are required.

  18. A molecular approach towards taxonomic identification of elasmobranch species from Maltese fisheries landings.

    PubMed

    Vella, Adriana; Vella, Noel; Schembri, Sarah

    2017-09-08

    The mitochondrial genome, through the application of DNA barcoding, provides a powerful tool for identifying species even when specimens are either incomplete or belong to species that exhibit cryptic diversity. In fisheries management accurate identification of whole or part of the specimens landed is a fundamental requirement for the conservation of species affected directly or indirectly by the fisheries activities. In this study cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) sequences were used to genetically distinguish 36 elasmobranch species collected from Maltese (Central Mediterranean) commercial fisheries landings. Each species was analysed using these two mtDNA loci where COI (610bp) and ND2 (990bp) efficiently distinguished between the various species studied, leading to the identification of 101 haplotypes, with the intraspecific p-distance ranging between 0 and 0.75% (mean 0.10%, SD ±0.13%). This study enhances the molecular data available on elasmobranchs by providing new ND2 sequences for various species, while providing both COI and ND2 data for poorly studied Mediterranean species including: the large pelagic sharks Alopias vulpinus, A. superciliosus, Carcharhinus altimus, C. plumbeus, Carcharadon carcharias, Isurus oxyrinchus, Prionace glauca and Odontaspis ferox; the smaller demersal sharks Somniosus rostratus, Squatina aculeata, S. oculata and Squalus sp.; and the endemic stingray Dasyatis tortonesei. It also confirmed the landings of species whose identification relies strongly on molecular tools, namely Squalus sp. and D. tortonesei, which are both first confirmed records amongst Maltese fisheries landings. Morphologically, the latter two species, can be easily misidentified with S. blainville and D. pastinaca respectively. Additionally, this study evaluated the genetic differences between different polychromatic forms of Raja clavata, R. radula and Dipturus oxyrinchus. Based on the currently analysed specimens

  19. Morphometric variation and molecular characterization of snow trout species from Kashmir valley, India.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Amir; Bisht, Balwant Singh; Mir, Javaid Iqbal; Patiyal, Rabindar Singh; Kumar, Rohit

    2016-11-01

    There is a significant taxonomic ambiguity among snow trout species due to their morphometric similarities. In view of this, a morphometric and molecular study was conducted on five different species of genus Schizothorax that have been reported from Kashmir valley. Morphometric data analyzed using multivariate statistics (Principal component analysis and cluster analysis) indicated the significant grouping of species to individual clusters. Mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene analysis revealed 0.2%-4.5% genetic divergence among the five species. This study confirms that utility of cytochrome oxidase I in species delineation along with morphometric data. Phylogenetic tree obtained using Neighbor-Joining method revealed that all the five species represented distinct species group. The Schizothorax genus formed two distinct clades; one containing S. niger, S. curvifrons and S. plagiostomus, while other clade containing S. esocinus and S. labiatus. This phlogeny trend was also supported by cluster analysis of morphometric characters. The phylogenetic analysis with other published COI sequences revealed distinct nature of these five species. The study may aid in the taxonomic identification of snow trout species in India. This may further increase the knowledge of the ichthyologists in planning conservation and management strategies for these important fish species along with their natural habitat.

  20. Association of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancer tissues with molecular features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Kei; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Matsunaga, Yasutaka; Ito, Miki; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Naito, Takafumi; Adachi, Yasushi; Tachibana, Mami; Tanuma, Tokuma; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Toshiya; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Imamura, Masafumi; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Maruyama, Reo; Suzuki, Hiromu; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-03-30

    Recently, bacterial infection causing periodontal disease has attracted considerable attention as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fusobacterium species is an oral bacterial group of the human microbiome. Some evidence suggests that Fusobacterium species promote colorectal cancer development; however, no previous studies have reported the association between Fusobacterium species and pancreatic cancer. Therefore, we examined whether Fusobacterium species exist in pancreatic cancer tissue. Using a database of 283 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we tested cancer tissue specimens for Fusobacterium species. We also tested the specimens for KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations and measured microRNA-21 and microRNA-31. In addition, we assessed epigenetic alterations, including CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Our data showed an 8.8% detection rate of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancers; however, tumor Fusobacterium status was not associated with any clinical and molecular features. In contrast, in multivariate Cox regression analysis, compared with the Fusobacterium species-negative group, we observed significantly higher cancer-specific mortality rates in the positive group (p = 0.023). In conclusion, Fusobacterium species were detected in pancreatic cancer tissue. Tumor Fusobacterium species status is independently associated with a worse prognosis of pancreatic cancer, suggesting that Fusobacterium species may be a prognostic biomarker of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Unrecognized diversity in New Guinean crayfish species (Decapoda, Parastacidae): The evidence from molecular data.

    PubMed

    Bláha, Martin; Patoka, Jiří; Kozák, Pavel; Kouba, Antonín

    2016-11-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among imported ornamental crayfish belonging to the genus Cherax were inferred from a combined dataset of 3 mitochondrial genes (COI, 16S and 12S) and by comparison with available GenBank sequences of 14 Cherax species. Furthermore, the concordance of previously described species obtained from a wholesaler (Cherax boesemani, C. holthuisi and C. peknyi) with available GenBank sequences was verified based on COI with special respect to comparison with sequences assigned as Cherax species. Recently described species C. gherardiae, C. pulcher and C. subterigneus belong to the northern group of Cherax species. Comparison and analysis with other GenBank COI sequences show previously unreported diversity of New Guinean species, suggesting 5 putative new species. Surprisingly, species assigned to the subgenus Astaconephrops do not form a monophyletic clade; this subgenus should be reappraised relative to the purported typical morphological characteristic of the uncalcified patch on male chelae. Increasing importation of crayfish underscores the importance of accurate species identification. Use of basic molecular methods is a necessary requisite for documenting occurrence, abundance and population trends of target species. Consequently, it helps to support eventual conservation decision-making by stakeholders.

  2. Three novel species of Stemphylium from Sinkiang, China: their morphological and molecular characterization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three new species of Stemphylium were isolated from diseased leaves of Luffa cylindrica, Lycium chinense and Cucumis melo growing in the Sinkiang province of Northwest China. Stemphylium luffae, S. lycii and S. cucumis are described by morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses. The principal...

  3. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ratios of regioisomers of 74 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using HPLC and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lequerella oil. The ratios of relative abundances of the fragment ions fr...

  4. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ratios of regioisomers of 72 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lesquerella oil. The ratios of ion signal intensities (or relative abundances) of ...

  5. Quantification of the molecular species of tetraacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) Oil by HPLC and MS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirteen molecular species of tetraacylglycerols in the seed oil of Physaria fendleri were recently identified. We report here the quantification of these tetraacylglycerols using HPLC with evaporative light scattering detector and the MS of the HPLC fractions. Ion signal intensities of MS1 from th...

  6. Capturing the transient species at the electrode-electrolyte interface by in situ dynamic molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiachao; Zhou, Yufan; Hua, Xin; Liu, Songqin; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-09-21

    In situ time-resolved identification of interfacial transient reaction species were captured using imaging mass spectrometry, leading to the discovery of more complex elementary electrode reactions and providing an unprecedented understanding of the reaction mechanism on the electrode surface and solid-electrolyte interface using dynamic molecular imaging.

  7. EMERGING MOLECULAR AND COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPLATIONS: A WORKSHOP SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benson, W.H., R.T. Di Giulio, J.C. Cook, J. Freedman, R.L. Malek, C. Thompson and D. Versteeg. In press. Emerging Molecular and Computational Approaches for Cross-Species Extrapolations: A Workshop Summary Report (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-...

  8. EMERGING MOLECULAR AND COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPLATIONS: A WORKSHOP SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benson, W.H., R.T. Di Giulio, J.C. Cook, J. Freedman, R.L. Malek, C. Thompson and D. Versteeg. In press. Emerging Molecular and Computational Approaches for Cross-Species Extrapolations: A Workshop Summary Report (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-...

  9. Species identification in the genus Saprolegnia (Oomycetes): defining DNA-based molecular operational taxonomic units.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Sierra, Jose Vladimir; Martín, María P; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier

    2014-07-01

    The lack of a robust taxonomy in the genus Saprolegnia is leading to the presence of incorrectly named isolates in culture collections and of an increasing number of misassigned sequences in DNA databases. Accurate species delimitation is critical for most biological disciplines. A recently proposed approach to solve species delimitation (taxonomic diagnosis system) of difficult organisms is the definition of molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs). We have used 961 sequences of nrDNA ITS from culture collections (461 sequences) and GenBank (500 sequences), to perform phylogenetic and clustering optimization analyses. As result, we have identified 29 DNA-based MOTUs in agreement with phylogenetic studies. The resulting molecular clusters support the validity of 18 species of Saprolegnia and identify 11 potential new ones. We have also listed a number of incorrectly named isolates in culture collections, misassigned species names to GenBank sequences, and reference sequences for the species. We conclude that GenBank represents the main source of errors for identifying Saprolegnia species since it possesses sequences with misassigned names and also sequencing errors. The presented taxonomic diagnosis system might help setting the basis for a suitable identification of species in this economically important genus.

  10. Delimiting Species Boundaries within a Paraphyletic Species Complex: Insights from Morphological, Genetic, and Molecular Data on Paramecium sonneborni (Paramecium aurelia species complex, Ciliophora, Protozoa).

    PubMed

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Sawka, Natalia

    2015-09-01

    The demarcation of boundaries between protist species is often problematic because of the absence of a uniform species definition, the abundance of cryptic diversity, and the occurrence of convergent morphology. The ciliates belonging to the Paramecium aurelia complex, consisting of 15 species, are a good model for such systematic and evolutionary studies. One member of the complex is P. sonneborni, previously known only from one stand in Texas (USA), but recently found in two new sampling sites in Cyprus (creeks running to Salt Lake and Oroklini Lake near Larnaca). The studied Paramecium sonneborni strains (from the USA and Cyprus) reveal low viability in the F1 and F2 generations of interstrain hybrids and may be an example of ongoing allopatric speciation. Despite its molecular distinctiveness, we postulate that P. sonneborni should remain in the P. aurelia complex, making it a paraphyletic taxon. Morphological studies have revealed that some features of the nuclear apparatus of P. sonneborni correspond to the P. aurelia spp. complex, while others are similar to P. jenningsi and P. schewiakoffi. The observed discordance indicates rapid splitting of the P. aurelia-P. jenningsi-P. schewiakoffi group, in which genetic, morphological, and molecular boundaries between species are not congruent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Acanthamoeba keratitis: improving the Scottish diagnostic service for the rapid molecular detection of Acanthamoeba species.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Claire Low; Coyne, Michael; Jones, Brian; Anijeet, Deepa

    2015-07-01

    Acanthamoeba species are responsible for causing the potentially sight-threatening condition, Acanthamoeba keratitis, which is commonly associated with contact lens use. In this report, we highlight the challenges faced using conventional laboratory identification methods to identify this often under-reported pathogen, and discuss the reasons for introducing the first national service in Scotland for the rapid and sensitive molecular identification of Acanthamoeba species. By comparing culture and molecular testing data from a total of 63 patients (n = 80 samples) throughout Scotland presenting with ocular eye disease, we describe the improvement in detection rates where an additional four positive cases were identified using a molecular assay versus culture. The testing of a further ten patients by confocal imaging is also presented. This report emphasizes the importance of continuing to improve clinical laboratory services to ensure a prompt, correct diagnosis and better prognosis, in addition to raising awareness of this potentially debilitating opportunistic pathogen.

  12. A perfect time to harness advanced molecular technologies to explore the fundamental biology of Toxocara species.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Robin B

    2013-04-15

    Toxocarosis is of major canine health and socioeconomic importance worldwide. Although many studies have given insights into toxocarosis, to date, there has been limited exploration of the molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, epidemiology and ecology of Toxocara species as well as parasite-host interactions using '-omic' technologies. The present article gives a background on Toxocara species and toxocarosis, describes molecular tools for specific identification and genetic analysis, and provides a prospective view of the benefits that advanced molecular technologies will have towards better understanding the parasites and disease. Tackling key biological questions employing a 'systems biology' approach should lead to new and improved strategies for the treatment, diagnosis and control of toxocarosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Delimiting species boundaries within the Neotropical bamboo Otatea (Poaceae: Bambusoideae) using molecular, morphological and ecological data.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sanchez, Eduardo; Sosa, Victoria

    2010-02-01

    Species delimitation is a task that has engaged taxonomists for more than two centuries. Recently, it has been demonstrated that molecular data and ecological niche modeling are useful in species delimitation. In this paper multiple data sets (molecular, morphological, ecological) were utilized to set limits for the species belonging to the Neotropical bamboo Otatea, because there is disagreement about species circumscriptions and also because the genus has an interesting distribution, with most of its populations in Mexico and a single disjunct population in Colombia. Molecular and morphological phylogenetic analyses recovered trees with conflicting topologies. Tree-based morphological and character-based analyses recognized the same entities. Ecological niche models and PCA/MANOVAS agreed with the recognition of the same entities that resulted from the morphological analyses. Morphological analyses retrieved clades supported by diagnostic characters and coherent geographical distributions. Based on these results seven entities should be recognized in Otatea, instead of the three previously described species. Copyright (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Molecular mechanism of species-dependent sweet taste toward artificial sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Ha, Matthew; Meng, Xuan-Yu; Kaur, Tanno; Khaleduzzaman, Mohammed; Zhang, Zhe; Jiang, Peihua; Li, Xia; Cui, Meng

    2011-07-27

    The heterodimer of Tas1R2 and Tas1R3 is a broadly acting sweet taste receptor, which mediates mammalian sweet taste toward natural and artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. Perception of sweet taste is a species-selective physiological process. For instance, artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame taste sweet to humans, apes, and Old World monkeys but not to New World monkeys and rodents. Although specific regions determining the activation of the receptors by these sweeteners have been identified, the molecular mechanism of species-dependent sweet taste remains elusive. Using human/squirrel monkey chimeras, mutagenesis, and molecular modeling, we reveal that the different responses of mammalian species toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame are determined by the steric effect of a combination of a few residues in the ligand binding pocket. Residues S40 and D142 in the human Tas1R2, which correspond to residues T40 and E142 in the squirrel monkey Tas1R2, were found to be the critical residues for the species-dependent difference in sweet taste. In addition, human Tas1R2 residue I67, which corresponds to S67 in squirrel monkey receptor, modulates the higher affinity of neotame than of aspartame. Our studies not only shed light on the molecular mechanism of species-dependent sweet taste toward artificial sweeteners, but also provide guidance for designing novel effective artificial sweet compounds.

  15. Molecular Mechanism of Species-dependent Sweet Taste toward Artificial Sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Ha, Matthew; Meng, Xuan-Yu; Kaur, Tanno; Khaleduzzaman, Mohammed; Zhang, Zhe; Jiang, Peihua; Li, Xia; Cui, Meng

    2011-01-01

    The heterodimer of Tas1R2 and Tas1R3 is a broadly acting sweet taste receptor, which mediates mammalian sweet taste toward natural and artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. Perception of sweet taste is a species selective physiological process. For instance, artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame taste sweet to humans, apes and Old World monkeys but not to New World monkeys and rodents. Although specific regions determining the activation of the receptors by these sweeteners have been identified, the molecular mechanism of species-dependent sweet taste remains elusive. Using human/squirrel monkey chimeras, mutagenesis and molecular modeling, we reveal that the different responses of mammalian species towards the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame are determined by the steric effect of a combination of a few residues in the ligand binding pocket. Residues S40 and D142 in the human Tas1R2, which correspond to residues T40 and E142 in the squirrel monkey Tas1R2, were found to be the critical residues for the species dependent difference in sweet taste. In addition, human Tas1R2 residue I67, which corresponds to S67 in squirrel monkey receptor, modulates the higher affinity of neotame than that of aspartame. Our studies not only shed light on the molecular mechanism of species dependent sweet taste toward artificial sweeteners, but also provide guidance for designing novel effective artificial sweet compounds. PMID:21795555

  16. Molecular ecology studies of species radiations: current research gaps, opportunities, and challenges.

    PubMed

    de la Harpe, Marylaure; Paris, Margot; Karger, Dirk N; Rolland, Jonathan; Kessler, Michael; Salamin, Nicolas; Lexer, Christian

    2017-03-18

    Understanding the drivers and limits of species radiations is a crucial goal of evolutionary genetics and molecular ecology, yet research on this topic has been hampered by the notorious difficulty of connecting micro- and macro-evolutionary approaches to studying the drivers of diversification. To chart the current research gaps, opportunities, and challenges of molecular ecology approaches to studying radiations, we examine the literature in the journal Molecular Ecology and re-visit recent high-profile examples of evolutionary genomic research on radiations. We find that available studies of radiations are highly unevenly distributed among taxa, with many ecologically important and species-rich organismal groups remaining severely understudied, including arthropods, plants, and fungi. Most studies employed molecular methods suitable over either short or long evolutionary time scales, such as microsatellites or Restriction site Associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) in the former case and conventional amplicon sequencing of organellar DNA in the latter. The potential of molecular ecology studies to address and resolve patterns and processes around the species level in radiating groups of taxa is currently limited primarily by sample size and a dearth of information on radiating nuclear genomes as opposed to organellar ones. Based on our literature survey and personal experience, we suggest possible ways forward in the coming years. We touch on the potential and current limitations of whole genome sequencing (WGS) in studies of radiations. We suggest that WGS and targeted ('capture') resequencing emerge as the methods of choice for scaling up the sampling of populations, species, and genomes, including currently understudied organismal groups and the genes or regulatory elements expected to matter most to species radiations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-strand conformation polymorphism for molecular variability studies of six viroid species.

    PubMed

    Elleuch, Amine; Hamdi, Imen; Bessaies, Nabiha; Fakhfakh, Hatem

    2013-01-01

    Molecular diversity within six viroid species and different molecular variants, in each species infecting fruit trees was first estimated by the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique and then by direct sequencing analysis. The different variants studied are to three Australian grapevine viroids(AGVd), four citrus dwarfing viroids (CDVd), eleven grapevine yellow speckle viroids type-1 (GYSVd-1), four hop stunt viroids (HSVd), seven peach latent mosaic viroids (PLMVd), and eight pear blister canker viroids (PBCVd). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) conditions were compared and optimized to improve the sensitivity of the existing SSCP parameters. The relationships among the various SSCP profiles observed and the variation in nucleotide sequences was studied. The results indicate that the variations of some parameters of electrophoresis for each species allowed higher resolution and hence detection of single nucleotide variations among clones initially clustered into the same group.

  18. Molecular strategies for detection and quantification of mycotoxin-producing Fusarium species: a review.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liang; Jiang, Yueming; Chen, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Fusarium contamination is considered a major agricultural problem, which could not only significantly reduce yield and quality of agricultural products, but produce mycotoxins that are virulence factors responsible for many diseases of humans and farm animals. One strategy to identify toxigenic Fusarium species is the use of modern molecular methods, which include the analysis of DNA target regions for differentiation of the Fusarium species, particularly the mycotoxin-producing Fusarium species such as F. verticillioides and F. graminearum. Additionally, polymerase chain reaction assays are used to determine the genes involved in the biosynthesis of the toxins in order to facilitate a qualitative and quantitative detection of Fusarium-producing mycotoxins. Also, it is worth mentioning that some factors that modulate the biosynthesis of mycotoxins are not only determined by their biosynthetic gene clusters, but also by environmental conditions. Therefore, all of the aforementioned factors which may affect the molecular diagnosis of mycotoxins will be reviewed and discussed in this paper.

  19. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G.

    1993-12-01

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  20. Molecular phylogeny and species delimitation in the section Longibrachiatum of Trichoderma

    PubMed Central

    Druzhinina, Irina S.; Komoń-Zelazowska, Monika; Ismaiel, Adnan; Jaklitsch, Walter; Mullaw, Temesgen; Samuels, Gary J.; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2012-01-01

    The phylogenetically most derived group of the genus Trichoderma – section Longibrachiatum, includes some of the most intensively studied species, such as the industrial cellulase producer T. reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina), or the facultative opportunistic human pathogens T. longibrachiatum and H. orientalis. At the same time, the phylogeny of this clade is only poorly understood. Here we used a collection of 112 strains representing all currently recognized species and isolates that were tentatively identified as members of the group, to analyze species diversity and molecular evolution. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses based on several unlinked loci in individual and concatenated datasets confirmed 13 previously described species and 3 previously recognized phylogenetic species all of which were not yet described formally. When the genealogical concordance criterion, the K/θ method and comparison of frequencies of pairwise nucleotide differences were applied to the data sample, 10 additional new phylogenetic species were recognized, seven of which consisted only of a single lineage. Our analysis thus identifies 26 putative species in section Longibrachiatum, what doubles the currently estimated taxonomic diversity of the group, and illustrates the power of combining genealogical concordance and population genetic analysis for dissecting species in a recently diverged group of fungal species. PMID:22405896

  1. First molecular evidence for underestimated biodiversity of Rhachotropis (Crustacea, Amphipoda), with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Lörz, Anne-Nina; Linse, Katrin; Smith, Peter J; Steinke, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The crustacean genus Rhachotropis has a worldwide distribution and amongst the largest bathymetric range known from any amphipod genus. DNA barcoding of new material from around New Zealand and the Ross Sea indicated depth-related biogeographic patterns. New Zealand Rhachotropis do not form a monophyletic clade. Species from bathyal depths on the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand, show lower sequence divergence to bathyal species from California and the Arctic than to abyssal New Zealand species. Species sampled in the Kermadec Trench, north of New Zealand below 5000 m, seem to be more closely related to Ross Sea abyssal species than to the New Zealand shelf species. The worldwide geographic and bathymetric distribution for all Rhachotropis species is presented here. Depth may have a greater influence on phylogeny than geographic distance.Molecular and morphological investigations of Rhachotropis specimens from the Chatham Rise, New Zealand revealed a species new to science which is described in detail, including scanning electron microscopy. This increases the number of described species of Rhachotropis to 60 worldwide.

  2. Molecular Identification of Candida Species Isolated from Onychomycosis in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaobo; Ling, Bo; Yang, Xianwei; Liao, Wanqing; Pan, Weihua; Yao, Zhirong

    2015-12-01

    Candida is a common cause of onychomycosis, especially for fingernail onychomycosis. In this study, two simple PCR-based assays combined with the internal transcribed spacers sequencing were performed to reveal the prevalence of Candida species including emerging species in onychomycosis, and triazole antifungal susceptibility profiles for Candida species were also evaluated. Among 210 Candida strains isolated from onychomycosis, Candida parapsilosis was the most common species (54.3%), followed by C. albicans (23.3%) and C. metapsilosis (9.5%). However, C. metapsilosis became the second leading species in toenail onychomycosis and accounted for 19.5% of Candida isolates from toenail samples. C. nivariensis, an emerging species, was firstly recovered from a toenail sample. Other emerging species such as C. orthopsilosis, C. pararugosa and C. fabryi were also identified by molecular tools. C. metapsilosis isolates exhibited significantly higher fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentrations than those exhibited by C. parapsilosis and C. albicans (P < 0.001). This study provides insight into the prevalence, distribution and susceptibility profiles of Candida species including emerging Candida species in onychomycosis.

  3. Density functional theory-based conformational analysis of a phospholipid molecule (dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine).

    PubMed

    Krishnamurty, S; Stefanov, M; Mineva, T; Bégu, S; Devoisselle, J M; Goursot, A; Zhu, R; Salahub, D R

    2008-10-23

    The conformational space of the dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) molecule has been studied using density functional theory (DFT), augmented with a damped empirical dispersion energy term (DFT-D). Fourteen ground-state isomers have been found with total energies within less than 1 kcal/mol. Despite differences in combinations of their torsion angles, all these conformers share a common geometric profile, which includes a balance of attractive, repulsive, and constraint forces between and within specific groups of atoms. The definition of this profile fits with most of the structural characteristics deduced from measured NMR properties of DMPC solutions. The calculated vibrational spectrum of the molecule is in good agreement with experimental data obtained for DMPC bilayers. These results support the idea that DMPC molecules preserve their individual molecular structures in the various assemblies.

  4. In-Depth Lipidomic Analysis of Molecular Species of Triacylglycerides, Diacylglycerides, Glycerophospholipids, and Sphingolipids of Buttermilk by GC-MS/FID, HPLC-ELSD, and UPLC-QToF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Gómez, Pilar; Montero, Olimpio; Fontecha, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Buttermilk, a byproduct of butter manufacturing, has gained considerable attention due to its high concentration of polar lipids as phospho- and sphingolipids from the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). These polar lipids (PLs) are essential components of all cellular membranes and exert a variety of indispensable metabolic, neurological, and intracellular signaling processes. Despite its importance, there are few research studies that report a comprehensive characterization of the lipid molecular species of MFGM that could contribute to a better understanding of their putative healthful activities. In this study, procedures such as pressurized liquid extraction of polar and nonpolar lipids and their fractionation by flash chromatography have been carried out. The obtained fractions were submitted to an exhaustive characterization from a lipidomic point of view. The characterization includes new data about the identification and quantification of triacylglycerides (TAG), diacylglycerides (DAG), and phospho- and sphingolipids using different chromatographic techniques. The fatty acid profile was comparable to that of the milk fat but with a highly diverse composition of fatty acids. Molecular species have also been determined by using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadruple-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/QToF-MS). The TAG (16:0/16:0/6:0) and TAG (16:0/16:0/8:0) were the predominant saturated TAG species and TAG (14:0/18:1/16:0) and TAG (16:0/16:0/18:1) presented the highest content of monounsaturated TAG species. Furthermore; over 30 molecular species of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylinositol (PI) could be identified within PL, with PC (16:0/18:1) being the most abundant species. Whereas C16:0 was found to be the preferred FA in TAGs, it was C18:1 in PLs. Several ganglioside species have also been characterized with d18:1 ceramide moiety and secondary acyl chains ranging from C

  5. The effect of phosphatidylcholine to sphingomyelin mole ratio on the dynamic properties of sheep erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Borochov, H; Zahler, P; Wilbrandt, W; Shinitzky, M

    1977-11-01

    Sheep red blood cells are shown to incorporate phosphatidylchline when incubated in human plasma in the presence of EGTA. This treatment results in up to a 5-fold increase in mol ratio of phosphatidylcholine to sphingomyelin. By replacing EGTA with Ca+ the increase of phsphatidylcholine content is completely inhibited, due to the activation of the membrane bound lecithinase which rapidly degrades the incorporated phosphatidylcholine. Analogous treatments of the isolate membranes resulted in similar phosphatidylcholine incorporation but in the presence of Ca+ a residual phosphatidylcholine uptake was still oberved. These results suggest that in the isolated membranes small amounts of phosphatidylcholine can be incorporated into an additional region which is unavailable for the membrane lecithinase. The increase in the phosphatidylcholine to sphingomyelin mol ratio in sheep red blood cells is concomitant with an increase in lipid fluidity, as well as increase in osmotic fragility9

  6. Use of Repetitive Sequences for Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Avena Species from Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Diana; Rodrigues, Joana; Varela, Ana; Veloso, Maria Manuela; Viegas, Wanda; Silva, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Genomic diversity of Portuguese accessions of Avena species—diploid A. strigosa and hexaploids A. sativa and A. sterilis—was evaluated through molecular and cytological analysis of 45S rDNA, and other repetitive sequences previously studied in cereal species—rye subtelomeric sequence (pSc200) and cereal centromeric sequence (CCS1). Additionally, retrotransposons and microsatellites targeting methodologies—IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism)—were performed. A very high homology was detected for ribosomal internal transcribed sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) between the species analyzed, although nucleolar organizing regions (NOR) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed distinct number of Nor loci between diploid and hexaploid species. Moreover, morphological diversity, evidenced by FISH signals with different sizes, was observed between distinct accessions within each species. pSc200 sequences were for the first time isolated from Avena species but proven to be highly similar in all genotypes analyzed. The use of primers designed for CCS1 unraveled a sequence homologous to the Ty3/gypsy retrotransposon Cereba, that was mapped to centromeric regions of diploid and hexaploid species, being however restricted to the more related A and D haplomes. Retrotransposon-based methodologies disclosed species- and accessions-specific bands essential for the accurate discrimination of all genotypes studied. Centromeric, IRAP and REMAP profiles therefore allowed accurate assessment of inter and intraspecific variability, demonstrating the potential of these molecular markers on future oat breeding programs. PMID:26861283

  7. Coupled biophysical global ocean model and molecular genetic analyses identify multiple introductions of cryptogenic species.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Michael N; Sen Gupta, Alex; England, Matthew H

    2005-08-23

    The anthropogenic introduction of exotic species is one of the greatest modern threats to marine biodiversity. Yet exotic species introductions remain difficult to predict and are easily misunderstood because knowledge of natural dispersal patterns, species diversity, and biogeography is often insufficient to distinguish between a broadly dispersed natural population and an exotic one. Here we compare a global molecular phylogeny of a representative marine meroplanktonic taxon, the moon-jellyfish Aurelia, with natural dispersion patterns predicted by a global biophysical ocean model. Despite assumed high dispersal ability, the phylogeny reveals many cryptic species and predominantly regional structure with one notable exception: the globally distributed Aurelia sp.1, which, molecular data suggest, may occasionally traverse the Pacific unaided. This possibility is refuted by the ocean model, which shows much more limited dispersion and patterns of distribution broadly consistent with modern biogeographic zones, thus identifying multiple introductions worldwide of this cryptogenic species. This approach also supports existing evidence that (i) the occurrence in Hawaii of Aurelia sp. 4 and other native Indo-West Pacific species with similar life histories is most likely due to anthropogenic translocation, and (ii) there may be a route for rare natural colonization of northeast North America by the European marine snail Littorina littorea, whose status as endemic or exotic is unclear.

  8. Begonia myanmarica (Begoniaceae), a new species from Myanmar, and molecular phylogenetics of Begonia sect. Monopteron.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yu-Hsin; Kim, Young-Dong; Peng, Ching-I; Htwe, Khin Myo; Cho, Seong-Hyun; Kono, Yoshiko; Chung, Kuo-Fang

    2017-12-01

    A new species, Begonia myanmarica, was discovered from Myanmar and herein documented. Characterized by a single developed wing in the ovary/fruit, this species would be assigned to sect. Monopteron (sensu Doorenbos et al. in The sections of Begonia including descriptions, keys and species lists: studies in Begoniaceae VI. Wageningen Agricultural University, Wageningen, 1998) that is known by B. griffithiana and B. nepalensis from the Himalaya. To confirm its sectional assignment, we conducted morphological, phylogenetic and cytological studies. Morphological observations indicated that B. myanmarica was distinguishable from the two known species of sect. Monopteron by the leaf shape and size, 1-locular ovary, parietal placentation and chromosome number. Molecular phylogenetic analysis using nrITS sequences showed that B. myanmarica was not allied with the clade of sect. Monopteron, though both were nested within sect. Platycentrum-sect. Sphenanthera clade. Studies of morphology, molecular phylogenetics and cytology support the recognition of the new species, Begonia myanmarica, which is fully described and illustrated. Our results also indicate that B. myanmarica is not closely related to species previously assigned to sect. Monopteron, suggesting that the fruit morphology of a single developed wing in the ovary/fruit characterizing sect. Monopteron is homoplasious.

  9. Morphological and molecular affinities of two East Asian species of Stenhelia (Crustacea, Copepoda, Harpacticoida)

    PubMed Central

    Karanovic, Tomislav; Kim, Kichoon; Lee, Wonchoel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Definition of monophyletic supraspecific units in the harpacticoid subfamily Stenheliinae Brady, 1880 has been considered problematic and hindered by the lack of molecular or morphology based phylogenies, as well as by incomplete original descriptions of many species. Presence of a modified seta on the fifth leg endopod has been suggested recently as a synapomorphy of eight species comprising the redefined genus Stenhelia Boeck, 1865, although its presence was not known in S. pubescens Chislenko, 1978. We redescribe this species in detail here, based on our freshly collected topotypes from the Russian Far East. The other species redescribed in this paper was collected from the southern coast of South Korea and identified as the Chinese S. taiae Mu & Huys, 2002, which represents its second record ever and the first one in Korea. A fragment of the mtCOI gene was successfully PCR-amplified from two specimens of each species, which represents the first molecular data for this genus, and from additional 19 specimens belonging to six different species of other stenheliins from Korea and Russia. Reconstructed phylogenies confirm previously postulated monophyly of Stenhelia and polyphyly of the closely related genus Delavalia Brady, 1869. Average pairwise maximum likelihood distances between S. pubescens and S. taiae are only slightly above 10%, suggesting a very close relationship despite numerous newly discovered micro-morphological differences and despite macro-morphological similarities being probable plesiomorphies. PMID:24899857

  10. Species identification refined by molecular scatology in a community of sympatric carnivores in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Laguardia, Alice; Wang, Jun; Shi, Fang-Lei; Shi, Kun; Riordan, Philip

    2015-03-18

    Many ecological studies and conservation management plans employ noninvasive scat sampling based on the assumption that species' scats can be correctly identified in the field. However, in habitats with sympatric similarly sized carnivores, misidentification of scats is frequent and can lead to bias in research results. To address the scat identification dilemma, molecular scatology techniques have been developed to extract DNA from the donor cells present on the outer lining of the scat samples. A total of 100 samples were collected in the winter of 2009 and 2011 in Taxkorgan region of Xinjiang, China. DNA was extracted successfully from 88% of samples and genetic species identification showed that more than half the scats identified in the field as snow leopard (Panthera uncia) actually belonged to fox (Vulpes vulpes). Correlation between scat characteristics and species were investigated, showing that diameter and dry weight of the scat were significantly different between the species. However it was not possible to define a precise range of values for each species because of extensive overlap between the morphological values. This preliminary study confirms that identification of snow leopard feces in the field is misleading. Research that relies upon scat samples to assess distribution or diet of the snow leopard should therefore employ molecular scatology techniques. These methods are financially accessible and employ relatively simple laboratory procedures that can give an indisputable response to species identification from scats.

  11. [DNA molecular identification of Herba Dendrobii and its adulterant species based on ITS sequence analysis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; He, Tao; Chun, Ze

    2009-11-01

    To identify Herba Dendrobii and its adulterant species on molecular level, the rDNA ITS sequences of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii were studied. Genomic DNA of Dendrobium was extracted using the modified cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method. The PCR products of the rDNA ITS sequences of Dendrobium (32 materials) were purified and then sequenced. The characteristic of the sequences and the genetic distance were compared between Bulbophyllum odoratissimum and Dendrobium, Dendrobium interspecies and different populations. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using the UPGMA method by the biology softwares including BioEdit, MEGA4.0 etc. The PCR products were purified and then sequenced. It was built up that the database of rDNA ITS sequences of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii (32 materials). The ITS1 was 228-234 bp, the GC content accounting for 45.7%-53.0%. Its variable sites were 167, accounting for 67.34%. The Parsim-Informative positions were 106, accounting for 42.74%. The ITS2 was 241-247 bp, the GC accounting for 44.8% - 55.7%. The variable sites were 165, accounting for 66.27%. The Parsim-Informative positions were 115, accounting for 46.18%. The genetic distance between B. odoratissimum and Dendrobium was 0.295. The average genetic distance was 0.142 between Dendrobium species, and there were 2-156 variable nucleotides. The average genetic distance between different populations was 0.002, and there were 2-156 variable nucleotides. The genetic distance between B. odoratissimum and Dendrobium was greater than that of Denrobium interspecies. Meanwhile, the genetic distance between Denrobium species was also greater than that of different populations (varieties). The molecular phylogeny tree was constructed on the database of rDNA ITS the sequences of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii using the biology softwares. Then 10 materials on molecular level were authenticated. It is concluded that using of the whole sequences database of 17 species of Herba Dendrobii

  12. Rapid identification of Candida dubliniensis using a species-specific molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Wong, M; Marras, S A; Cross, E W; Kiehn, T E; Chaturvedi, V; Tyagi, S; Perlin, D S

    2000-08-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that has been linked to oral candidiasis in AIDS patients, although it has recently been isolated from other body sites. DNA sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of rRNA genes from reference Candida strains was used to develop molecular beacon probes for rapid, high-fidelity identification of C. dubliniensis as well as C. albicans. Molecular beacons are small nucleic acid hairpin probes that brightly fluoresce when they are bound to their targets and have a significant advantage over conventional nucleic acid probes because they exhibit a higher degree of specificity with better signal-to-noise ratios. When applied to an unknown collection of 23 strains that largely contained C. albicans and a smaller amount of C. dubliniensis, the species-specific probes were 100% accurate in identifying both species following PCR amplification of the ITS2 region. The results obtained with the molecular beacons were independently verified by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis-based genotyping and by restriction enzyme analysis with enzymes BsmAI and NspBII, which cleave recognition sequences within the ITS2 regions of C. dubliniensis and C. albicans, respectively. Molecular beacons are promising new probes for the rapid detection of Candida species.

  13. Molecular identification of python species: development and validation of a novel assay for forensic investigations.

    PubMed

    Ciavaglia, Sherryn A; Tobe, Shanan S; Donnellan, Stephen C; Henry, Julianne M; Linacre, Adrian M T

    2015-05-01

    Python snake species are often encountered in illegal activities and the question of species identity can be pertinent to such criminal investigations. Morphological identification of species of pythons can be confounded by many issues and molecular examination by DNA analysis can provide an alternative and objective means of identification. Our paper reports on the development and validation of a PCR primer pair that amplifies a segment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene that has been suggested previously as a good candidate locus for differentiating python species. We used this DNA region to perform species identification of pythons, even when the template DNA was of poor quality, as might be the case with forensic evidentiary items. Validation tests are presented to demonstrate the characteristics of the assay. Tests involved the cross-species amplification of this marker in non-target species, minimum amount of DNA template required, effects of degradation on product amplification and a blind trial to simulate a casework scenario that provided 100% correct identity. Our results demonstrate that this assay performs reliably and robustly on pythons and can be applied directly to forensic investigations where the presence of a species of python is in question.

  14. A molecular identification protocol for roots of boreal forest tree species1

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Morgan J.; Karst, Justine; Pec, Gregory J.; Davis, Corey S.; Hall, Jocelyn C.; Cahill, James F.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Roots play a key role in many ecological processes, yet our ability to identify species from bulk root samples is limited. Molecular tools may be used to identify species from root samples, but they have not yet been developed for most systems. Here we present a PCR-based method previously used to identify roots of grassland species, modified for use in boreal forests. • Methods: We used repeatable interspecific size differences in fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphisms of three noncoding chloroplast DNA regions to identify seven woody species common to boreal forests in Alberta, Canada. • Results: Abies balsamea, Alnus crispa, Betula papyrifera, Pinus contorta, and Populus tremuloides were identifiable to species, while Picea glauca and Picea mariana were identifiable to genus. In mixtures of known composition of foliar DNA, species were identified with 98% accuracy using one region. Mixed root samples of unknown composition were identified with 100% accuracy; four species were identified using one region, while three species were identified using two regions. • Discussion: This methodology is accurate, efficient, and inexpensive, and thus a valuable approach for ecological studies of roots. Furthermore, this method has now been validated for both grassland and boreal forest systems, and thus may also have applications in any plant community. PMID:25383267

  15. Molecular Phylogeny of the Pseudallescheria boydii Species Complex: Proposal of Two New Species†

    PubMed Central

    Gilgado, Felix; Cano, Josep; Gené, Josepa; Guarro, Josep

    2005-01-01

    Pseudallescheria boydii (anamorph Scedosporium apiospermum) is the species responsible for human scedosporiosis, a fungal infection with a high mortality rate and which is difficult to treat. Recently, it has been demonstrated that high genetic variation exists within this species. We have performed a morphological and molecular study involving numerous strains of clinical or environmental origins and from different countries. The analysis of partial sequences of the β-tubulin (two loci) and calmodulin genes and the internal transcribed spacer region of the rRNA gene has demonstrated that P. boydii is a species complex. The combined analysis of the sequences of the four loci of 60 strains has showed the presence of 44 haplotypes in the ingroup. Three species morphologically related to P. boydii sensu stricto, i.e., Pseudallescheria angusta, Pseudallescheria ellipsoidea, and Pseudallescheria fusoidea, which had previously been considered synonyms, could be differentiated genetically from P. boydii in our study. It is relevant that two of the three strains now included in P. ellipsoidea have caused invasive infections. The species Pseudallescheria minutispora and Scedosporium aurantiacum are clearly phylogenetically separated from the other species studied and are here proposed as new. Morphological features support this proposal. All the strains included in S. aurantiacum species have a clinical origin, while those included in P. minutispora are environmental. Further studies are needed to demonstrate whether all the species included in the P. boydii complex have different clinical spectra and antifungal susceptibility. PMID:16207945

  16. Molecular evidence for convergent evolution and allopolyploid speciation within the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The moss Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) Bruch & Schimp. is an important experimental model system for evolutionary-developmental studies. In order to shed light on the evolutionary history of Physcomitrella and related species within the Funariaceae, we analyzed the natural genetic diversity of the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex. Results Molecular analysis of the nuclear single copy gene BRK1 reveals that three Physcomitrium species feature larger genome sizes than Physcomitrella patens and encode two expressed BRK1 homeologs (polyploidization-derived paralogs), indicating that they may be allopolyploid hybrids. Phylogenetic analyses of BRK1 as well as microsatellite simple sequence repeat (SSR) data confirm a polyphyletic origin for three Physcomitrella lineages. Differences in the conservation of mitochondrial editing sites further support hybridization and cryptic speciation within the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex. Conclusions We propose a revised classification of the previously described four subspecies of Physcomitrella patens into three distinct species, namely Physcomitrella patens, Physcomitrella readeri and Physcomitrella magdalenae. We argue that secondary reduction of sporophyte complexity in these species is due to the establishment of an ecological niche, namely spores resting in mud and possible spore dispersal by migratory birds. Besides the Physcomitrium-Physcomitrella species complex, the Funariaceae are host to their type species, Funaria hygrometrica, featuring a sporophyte morphology which is more complex. Their considerable developmental variation among closely related lineages and remarkable trait evolution render the Funariaceae an interesting group for evolutionary and genetic research. PMID:25015729

  17. Morphological and molecular characterization of Cladosporium cladosporioides species complex causing pecan tree leaf spot.

    PubMed

    Walker, C; Muniz, M F B; Rolim, J M; Martins, R R O; Rosenthal, V C; Maciel, C G; Mezzomo, R; Reiniger, L R S

    2016-09-16

    The objective of this study was to characterize species of the Cladosporium cladosporioides complex isolated from pecan trees (Carya illinoinensis) with symptoms of leaf spot, based on morphological and molecular approaches. Morphological attributes were assessed using monosporic cultures on potato dextrose agar medium, which were examined for mycelial growth, sporulation, color, and conidia and ramoconidia size. Molecular characterization comprised isolation of DNA and subsequent amplification of the translation elongation factor 1α (TEF-1α) region. Three species of the C. cladosporioides complex were identified: C. cladosporioides, Cladosporium pseudocladosporioides, and Cladosporium subuliforme. Sporulation was the most important characteristic differentiating species of this genus. However, morphological features must be considered together with molecular analysis, as certain characters are indistinguishable between species. TEF-1αcan be effectively used to identify and group isolates belonging to the C. cladosporioides complex. The present study provides an important example of a methodology to ascertain similarity between isolates of this complex causing leaf spot in pecan trees, which should facilitate future pathogenicity studies.

  18. Morphological and molecular evidence for two new species of Tetragonopterus (Characiformes: Characidae) from central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, G S C; Melo, B F; Oliveira, C; Benine, R C

    2013-05-01

    The combination of morphological and molecular data of Tetragonopterus species collected in the Rio Araguaia basin allows the recognition of two undescribed species that are presented in this article. These species are distinguished from their congeners (Tetragonopterus anostomus, Tetragonopterus argenteus, Tetragonopterus carvalhoi, Tetragonopterus chalceus and Tetragonopterus rarus) by characters related to the number and morphology of the teeth, the numbers of gill rakers on the upper and lower limbs of the first gill arch, the number of predorsal scales and the overall colour pattern. In addition, the analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences identified an accentuated genetic distance between these two new species and their congeners. A discussion of the phylogenetic relationships within Tetragonopterus is provided. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  19. Morphological and molecular characterization of the two known North American Chlorociboria species and their anamorphs.

    PubMed

    Tudor, Daniela; Margaritescu, Simona; Sánchez-Ramírez, Santiago; Robinson, Sara C; Cooper, Paul A; Moncalvo, Jean Marc

    2014-08-01

    This study confirms that the two known Chlorociboria species from North America correspond to Chlorociboria aeruginascens and Chlorociboria aeruginosa that were originally described from Europe. The anamorphs of these two species are unambiguously identified for the first time: the genetic connection between C. aeruginascens is Dothiorina tulasnei, is here demonstrated for the first time by molecular data, and the anamorph of C. aeruginosa was previously undescribed. These two species are more closely related to different Southern Hemisphere taxa than they are to each other, indicating complex speciation processes in a global geographic context. Pure cultures isolated from the two species were grown on various media for examination of growth rate, sporulation, and xylindein production. The latter is responsible for green staining of wood and has applications in craftsmanship and perhaps also for drug development. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of Piper species: a perspective from screening to molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Malhotra, Shashwat; Prasad, Ashok K; Van der Eycken, Erik V; Bracke, Marc E; Stetler-Stevenson, William G; Parmar, Virinder S; Ghosh, Balaram

    2015-01-01

    Identifying novel therapeutic agents from natural sources and their possible intervention studies has been one of the major areas in biomedical research in recent years. Piper species are highly important - commercially, economically and medicinally. Our groups have been working for more than two decades on the identification and characterization of novel therapeutic lead molecules from Piper species. We have extensively studied the biological activities of various extracts of Piper longum and Piper galeatum, and identified and characterized novel molecules from these species. Using synthetic chemistry, various functional groups of the lead molecules were modified and structure activity relationship (SAR) studies identified synthetic molecules with better efficacy and lower IC50 values. Moreover, the mechanisms of actions of some of these molecules were studied at the molecular level. The objective of this review is to summarize experimental data published from our laboratories and others on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials of Piper species and their chemical constituents.

  1. Ion channel behavior of amphotericin B in sterol-free and cholesterol- or ergosterol-containing supported phosphatidylcholine bilayer model membranes investigated by electrochemistry and spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weimin; Zhang, Zheling; Han, Xiaojun; Tang, Jilin; Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2002-01-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is a popular drug frequently applied in the treatment of systemic fungal infections. In the presence of ruthenium (II) as the maker ion, the behavior of AmB to form ion channels in sterol-free and cholesterol- or ergosterol-containing supported phosphatidylcholine bilayer model membranes were studied by cyclic votammetry, AC impedance spectroscopy, and UV/visible absorbance spectroscopy. Different concentrations of AmB ranging from a molecularly dispersed to a highly aggregated state of the drug were investigated. In a fixed cholesterol or ergosterol content (5 mol %) in glassy carbon electrode-supported model membranes, our results showed that no matter what form of AmB, monomeric or aggregated, AmB could form ion channels in supported ergosterol-containing phosphatidylcholine bilayer model membranes. However, AmB could not form ion channels in its monomeric form in sterol-free and cholesterol-containing supported model membranes. On the one hand, when AmB is present as an aggregated state, it can form ion channels in cholesterol-containing supported model membranes; on the other hand, only when AmB is present as a relatively highly aggregated state can it form ion channels in sterol-free supported phosphatidylcholine bilayer model membranes. The results showed that the state of AmB played an important role in forming ion channels in sterol-free and cholesterol-containing supported phosphatidylcholine bilayer model membranes. PMID:12496093

  2. Apolipoprotein-induced conversion of phosphatidylcholine bilayer vesicles into nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chung-Ping Leon; Chiu, Michael H; Wu, Xinping; Lee, Sean K; Prenner, Elmar J; Weers, Paul M M

    2011-03-01

    Apolipoprotein mediated formation of nanodisks was studied in detail using apolipophorin III (apoLp-III), thereby providing insight in apolipoprotein-lipid binding interactions. The spontaneous solubilization of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) vesicles occured only in a very narrow temperature range at the gel-liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature, exhibiting a net exothermic interaction based on isothermal titration calorimetry analysis. The resulting nanodisks were protected from proteolysis by trypsin, endoproteinase Glu-C, chymotrypsin and elastase. DMPC solubilization and the simultaneous formation of nanodisks were promoted by increasing the vesicle diameter, protein to lipid ratio and concentration. Inclusion of cholesterol in DMPC dramatically enhanced the rate of nanodisk formation, presumably by stabilization of lattice defects which form the main insertion sites for apolipoprotein α-helices. The presence of fully saturated acyl chains with a length of 13 or 14 carbons in phosphatidylcholine allowed the spontaneous vesicle solubilization upon apolipoprotein addition. Nanodisks with C13:0-phosphatidylcholine were significantly smaller with a diameter of 11.7 ± 3.1nm compared to 18.5 ± 5.6 nm for DMPC nanodisks determined by transmission electron microscopy. Nanodisk formation was not observed when the phosphatidylcholine vesicles contained acyl chains of 15 or 16 carbons. However, using very high concentrations of lipid and protein (>10mg/ml), 1,2,-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine nanodisks could be produced spontaneously although the efficiency remained low. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of the molecular species of acylglycerols containing hydroxy fatty acids in wild edible mushroom Ganoderma lucidum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Edible Philippine mushrooms including Ganoderma lucidum have many health benefits. Seventy-two molecular species of triacylglycerols and five molecular species of diacylglycerols containing hydroxy fatty acids (FA) in the lipid extract of this mushroom were identified by HPLC and MS. The mono-, di- ...

  4. Molecular Phylogeny of the Neotropical Genus Christensonella (Orchidaceae, Maxillariinae): Species Delimitation and Insights into Chromosome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Samantha; Cabral, Juliano S.; Whitten, W. Mark; Williams, Norris H.; Singer, Rodrigo B.; Neubig, Kurt M.; Guerra, Marcelo; Souza, Anete P.; Amaral, Maria do Carmo E.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Species' boundaries applied within Christensonella have varied due to the continuous pattern of variation and mosaic distribution of diagnostic characters. The main goals of this study were to revise the species' delimitation and propose a more stable classification for this genus. In order to achieve these aims phylogenetic relationships were inferred using DNA sequence data and cytological diversity within Christensonella was examined based on chromosome counts and heterochromatin patterns. The results presented describe sets of diagnostic morphological characters that can be used for species' identification. Methods Phylogenetic studies were based on sequence data of nuclear and plastid regions, analysed using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood criteria. Cytogenetic observations of mitotic cells were conducted using CMA and DAPI fluorochromes. Key Results Six of 21 currently accepted species were recovered. The results also support recognition of the ‘C. pumila’ clade as a single species. Molecular phylogenetic relationships within the ‘C. acicularis–C. madida’ and ‘C. ferdinandiana–C. neowiedii’ species' complexes were not resolved and require further study. Deeper relationships were incongruent between plastid and nuclear trees, but with no strong bootstrap support for either, except for the position of C. vernicosa. Cytogenetic data indicated chromosome numbers of 2n = 36, 38 and 76, and with substantial variation in the presence and location of CMA/DAPI heterochromatin bands. Conclusions The recognition of ten species of Christensonella is proposed according to the molecular and cytogenetic patterns observed. In addition, diagnostic morphological characters are presented for each recognized species. Banding patterns and chromosome counts suggest the occurrence of centric fusion/fission events, especially for C. ferdinandiana. The results suggest that 2n = 36 karyotypes evolved from 2n = 38 through descendent

  5. The role of positive selection in determining the molecular cause of species differences in disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Related species, such as humans and chimpanzees, often experience the same disease with varying degrees of pathology, as seen in the cases of Alzheimer's disease, or differing symptomatology as in AIDS. Furthermore, certain diseases such as schizophrenia, epithelial cancers and autoimmune disorders are far more frequent in humans than in other species for reasons not associated with lifestyle. Genes that have undergone positive selection during species evolution are indicative of functional adaptations that drive species differences. Thus we investigate whether biomedical disease differences between species can be attributed to positively selected genes. Results We identified genes that putatively underwent positive selection during the evolution of humans and four mammals which are often used to model human diseases (mouse, rat, chimpanzee and dog). We show that genes predicted to have been subject to positive selection pressure during human evolution are implicated in diseases such as epithelial cancers, schizophrenia, autoimmune diseases and Alzheimer's disease, all of which differ in prevalence and symptomatology between humans and their mammalian relatives. In agreement with previous studies, the chimpanzee lineage was found to have more genes under positive selection than any of the other lineages. In addition, we found new evidence to support the hypothesis that genes that have undergone positive selection tend to interact with each other. This is the first such evidence to be detected widely among mammalian genes and may be important in identifying molecular pathways causative of species differences. Conclusion Our dataset of genes predicted to have been subject to positive selection in five species serves as an informative resource that can be consulted prior to selecting appropriate animal models during drug target validation. We conclude that studying the evolution of functional and biomedical disease differences between species is an

  6. Taxonomic revision and molecular phylogenetics of the Idarnes incertus species-group (Hymenoptera, Agaonidae, Sycophaginae).

    PubMed

    Farache, Fernando H A; Cruaud, Astrid; Genson, Gwenaëlle; Rasplus, Jean-Yves; Pereira, Rodrigo A S

    2017-01-01

    Sycophaginae is a group of non-pollinating fig wasps considered closely related to the fig pollinators (Agaoninae, Tetrapusiinae, and Kradibiinae) in the most recent phylogenetic analyses. They occur in all tropical regions and are associated with Ficus subgenera Urostigma and Sycomorus. There are six described genera of Sycophaginae, and two are native and confined to the Neotropics, namely Idarnes Walker, 1843 and Anidarnes Bouček, 1993. Genus Idarnes is divided into three morphologically distinct groups that were proven to be monophyletic by recent molecular phylogenetic analyses. In this paper we reviewed the Idarnes incertus species-group and provide detailed morphological descriptions and illustrations for the species belonging to this group. Three previously described species were redescribed: I. brasiliensis (Mayr, 1906) comb. nov., I. hansoni Bouček, 1993, and I. incertus (Ashmead, 1900). Seventeen new species are described by Farache and Rasplus: I. amacayacuensissp. n., I. amazonicussp. n., I. americanaesp. n., I. badiovertexsp. n., I. brevissp. n., I. brunneussp. n., I. comptonisp. n., I. cremersiaesp. n., I. dimorphicussp. n., I. flavicrussp. n., I. flaviventrissp. n., I. gibberosussp. n., I. gordhisp. n., I. maximussp. n., I. nigriventrissp. n., I. pseudoflavussp. n. and I. ramirezisp. n. We provided keys for the identification of the species as well as for recognising the different species-groups of Idarnes and a closely related genus (Sycophaga Westwood, 1840). Additionally, phylogenetic relationships among 13 species of the I. incertus species-group were inferred using four molecular markers and discussed in the light of Ficus taxonomy and host specificity.

  7. Taxonomic revision and molecular phylogenetics of the Idarnes incertus species-group (Hymenoptera, Agaonidae, Sycophaginae)

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Astrid; Genson, Gwenaëlle; Rasplus, Jean-Yves; Pereira, Rodrigo A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Sycophaginae is a group of non-pollinating fig wasps considered closely related to the fig pollinators (Agaoninae, Tetrapusiinae, and Kradibiinae) in the most recent phylogenetic analyses. They occur in all tropical regions and are associated with Ficus subgenera Urostigma and Sycomorus. There are six described genera of Sycophaginae, and two are native and confined to the Neotropics, namely Idarnes Walker, 1843 and Anidarnes Bouček, 1993. Genus Idarnes is divided into three morphologically distinct groups that were proven to be monophyletic by recent molecular phylogenetic analyses. In this paper we reviewed the Idarnes incertus species-group and provide detailed morphological descriptions and illustrations for the species belonging to this group. Three previously described species were redescribed: I. brasiliensis (Mayr, 1906) comb. nov., I. hansoni Bouček, 1993, and I. incertus (Ashmead, 1900). Seventeen new species are described by Farache and Rasplus: I. amacayacuensis sp. n., I. amazonicus sp. n., I. americanae sp. n., I. badiovertex sp. n., I. brevis sp. n., I. brunneus sp. n., I. comptoni sp. n., I. cremersiae sp. n., I. dimorphicus sp. n., I. flavicrus sp. n., I. flaviventris sp. n., I. gibberosus sp. n., I. gordhi sp. n., I. maximus sp. n., I. nigriventris sp. n., I. pseudoflavus sp. n. and I. ramirezi sp. n. We provided keys for the identification of the species as well as for recognising the different species-groups of Idarnes and a closely related genus (Sycophaga Westwood, 1840). Additionally, phylogenetic relationships among 13 species of the I. incertus species-group were inferred using four molecular markers and discussed in the light of Ficus taxonomy and host specificity. PMID:28168097

  8. Species identification refined by molecular scatology in a community of sympatric carnivores in Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    LAGUARDIA, Alice; WANG, Jun; SHI, Fang-Lei; SHI, Kun; RIORDAN, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Many ecological studies and conservation management plans employ noninvasive scat sampling based on the assumption that species’ scats can be correctly identified in the field. However, in habitats with sympatric similarly sized carnivores, misidentification of scats is frequent and can lead to bias in research results. To address the scat identification dilemma, molecular scatology techniques have been developed to extract DNA from the donor cells present on the outer lining of the scat samples. A total of 100 samples were collected in the winter of 2009 and 2011 in Taxkorgan region of Xinjiang, China. DNA was extracted successfully from 88% of samples and genetic species identification showed that more than half the scats identified in the field as snow leopard (Panthera uncia) actually belonged to fox (Vulpes vulpes). Correlation between scat characteristics and species were investigated, showing that diameter and dry weight of the scat were significantly different between the species. However it was not possible to define a precise range of values for each species because of extensive overlap between the morphological values. This preliminary study confirms that identification of snow leopard feces in the field is misleading. Research that relies upon scat samples to assess distribution or diet of the snow leopard should therefore employ molecular scatology techniques. These methods are financially accessible and employ relatively simple laboratory procedures that can give an indisputable response to species identification from scats. PMID:25855225

  9. Molecular phylogeny of black flies in the Simulium tuberosum (Diptera: Simuliidae) species group in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sriphirom, Paradee; Sopaladawan, Piyamas Nanork; Wongpakam, Komgrit; Pramual, Pairot

    2014-01-01

    Black flies are medically and ecologically significant insects. They are also interesting from an evolutionary standpoint regarding the role of chromosomal change and ecological adaptation. In this study, molecular genetic markers based on multiple gene sequences were used to assess genetic diversity and to infer phylogenetic relationships for a group of cytologically highly diverse black flies of the Simulium tuberosum species group in Thailand. Ecological affinities of the species were also investigated. High levels of genetic diversity were found in cytological species complexes, S. tani and S. doipuiense, and also in S. rufibasis, which was cytologically nearly monomorphic. The results highlight the necessity of integrating multilevel markers for fully understanding black fly biodiversity. Phylogenetic relationships based on multiple gene sequences were consistent with an existing dendrogram inferred from cytological and morphological data. Simulium tani is the most distinctive taxa among the members of the S. tubersosum species group in Thailand based on its divergent morphological characters. Molecular data supported the monophyletic status of S. tani, S. weji, and S. yuphae, but S. doipuiense and S. rufibasis were polyphyletic, most likely due to incomplete lineage sorting and inadequate phylogenetic signals. Ecological analyses revealed that members of the S. tuberosum species group have clearly different ecological niches. The results thus supported previous views of the importance of ecology in black fly evolution.

  10. Feline drug metabolism and disposition: pharmacokinetic evidence for species differences and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Court, Michael H

    2013-09-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cats respond differently to certain drugs compared with other companion animal species, the causes of these differences are poorly understood. This article evaluates published evidence for altered drug effects in cats, focusing on pharmacokinetic differences between cats, dogs, and humans, and the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. More work is needed to better understand drug metabolism and disposition differences in cats, thereby enabling more rational prescribing of existing medications, and the development of safer drugs for this species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficiency of rep-PCR fingerprinting as a useful technique for molecular typing of plant pathogenic fungal species: Botryosphaeriaceae species as a case study.

    PubMed

    Abdollahzadeh, Jafar; Zolfaghari, Sajedeh

    2014-12-01

    Progress in molecular biology and the advent of rapid and accurate molecular techniques have contributed to precise and rapid detection and differentiation of microbial pathogens. Identification of the Botryosphaeriaceae species based on morphology has been problematic over time. In this study, we used rep-PCR technique as a molecular tool for typing and differentiation of the Botryosphaeriaceae species, well-known and cosmopolitan fungal pathogens on woody plants. Three primer sets BOX, ERIC and REP were used to differentiate 27 species belong to eight genera. The majority of them were examined in terms of typing and differentiation using molecular methods for the first time. All the primer sets were able to generate species-specific DNA fingerprints from all the tested strains, with two exceptions in the genera Diplodia and Spencermartinsia. Despite the deficiency of each primer sets to separate a few species, cluster analysis of combined data sets indicated the ability of rep-PCR technique to separate 26 out of 27 examined species in highly supported clusters corresponded to the species recognized based on DNA sequence data. Our findings revealed the efficiency of rep-PCR for detection and differentiation of the Botryosphaeriaceae species, especially cryptic species with the same ITS sequences and similar morphology.

  12. Molecular phylogeny of extant horseshoe crabs (Xiphosura, Limulidae) indicates Paleogene diversification of Asian species.

    PubMed

    Obst, Matthias; Faurby, Søren; Bussarawit, Somchai; Funch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Horseshoe crabs are marine invertebrates well known for their exceptionally low rates of diversification during their entire evolutionary history. Despite the low species diversity in the group, the phylogenetic relationships among the extant species, especially among the three Asian species are still unresolved. Here we apply a new set of molecular genetic data in combination with a wide geographic sampling of the intra-specific diversity to reinvestigate the evolutionary history among the four living limulid xiphosurans. Our analysis of the intraspecific diversity reveals low levels of connectivity among Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda lineages, which can be explained by the estuarine-bound ecology of this species. Moreover, a clear genetic break across the Thai-Malay Peninsula suggests the presence of cryptic species in C. rotundicauda. The limulid phylogeny finds strong support for a monophyletic genus Tachypleus and a diversification of the three Asian species during the Paleogene period, with speciation events well separated in time by several million years. The tree topology suggests that the three Asian species originated in central South East Asia from a marine stem group that inhabited the shallow coastal waters between the Andaman Sea, Vietnam, and Borneo. In this region C. rotundicauda probably separated from the Tachypleus stem group by invading estuarine habitats, while Tachypleus tridentatus most likely migrated northeast along the Southern coast of China and towards Japan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of atypical Streptococcus species from porcine clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Matajira, Carlos E C; Gomes, Vasco T M; Silva, Ana Paula S; Mesquita, Renan E; Christ, Ana Paula G; Sato, Maria Inês Z; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-10-01

    The Streptococcus species present broad phenotypic variation, making identification difficult using only traditional microbiological methods. Even though Streptococcus suis is the most important species for the worldwide swine industry, other Streptococcus species appear to be able to cause disease in swine and could represent a higher underestimated risk for porcine health. The aim of this study was to identify Streptococcus-like isolates by MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA sequencing and further molecular and antibiotic susceptibility characterization of the atypical Streptococcus species capable of causing disease in swine. Fifty presumptive Streptococcus isolates from diseased pigs isolated from different Brazilian States between 2002 and 2014 were evaluated. Among the studied isolates, 26% were identified as Streptococcus hyovaginalis, 24% as Streptococcus plurianimalium, 12% as Streptococcus alactolyticus, 10% as Streptococcus hyointestinalis, and the remaining isolates belonged to Streptococcus henryi (6%), Streptococcus thoraltensis (6%), Streptococcus gallolyticus (6%), Streptococcus gallinaceus (4%), Streptococcus sanguinis (4%), and Streptococcus mitis (2%). The Streptococcus isolates were successfully identified by spectral cluster analysis and 16S rRNA sequencing with 96% of concordance between the techniques. The SE-AFLP analysis also supported Streptococcus species distinction and enabled further observation of higher genetic heterogeneity intra-species. The identified Streptococcus species presented variable MIC values to β-lactams, enrofloxacin and florfenicol, and high resistance rates to tetracyclines and macrolides, which appear to be directly related to the industry's antimicrobial usage and resistance selection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Morphological and molecular evidence for the occurrence of three Hippocampus species (Teleostei: Syngnathidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Rosana Beatriz; Siccha-Ramirez, Raquel; Silva, José Rodrigo Santos; Oliveira, Claudio

    2014-09-16

    For many decades only two species of seahorses were recognized from Brazil: Hippocampus reidi Ginsburg, 1933, the long snout seahorse, and H. erectus Perry, 1810, the lined seahorse. The presence of a possible third species, recognized in 2002, brought about the need for a broad revision of the genus in Brazilian waters. A total of 335 specimens of seahorses, obtained from Brazilian and other collections, representing the three putative species from Brazil were analyzed: H. reidi, the species of greatest abundance and occurs in estuaries and the sea; H. erectus, which occurs only in the sea, and Hippocampus patagonicus was also determined to be present based on multiple specimens. Our morphometric / numerical and molecular analysis showed that the species currently identified as H. erectus in Brazil is actually H. patagonicus Piacentino & Luzatto, 2004. The existence of a possible third species, was instead based on the true H. erectus, as confirmed in the present study by the study of classical systematic and mitochondrial analysis. Thus, we recognize three species of seahorses in Brazil: H. erectus, H. reidi and H. patagonicus.

  15. Molecular perspective on the American transisthmian species of Macrobrachium (Caridea, Palaemonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Pileggi, Leonardo G.; Rossi, Natália; Wehrtmann, Ingo S.; Mantelatto, Fernando L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The closure of the Isthmus of Panama (about 3.1 million years ago) separated previously continuous populations and created two groups of extant species, which live now in the Pacific and Atlantic drainage systems. This relatively recent event was a trigger to diversification of various species in the Neotropics, nonetheless there are exemplars that do not show sufficient morphologic variability to separate them by traditional morphological tools. About 60 years ago, some freshwater decapod species with high morphological similarity were separate by previous researchers, based on geographical distribution, in Pacific and Atlantic and considered as “sister species”. However, the complete isolation of these prawns by this geographical barrier is questionable, and it has generated doubts about the status of the following transisthmian pairs of sibling species: Macrobrachium occidentale × Macrobrachium heterochirus, Macrobrachium americanum × Macrobrachium carcinus, Macrobrachium digueti × Macrobrachium olfersii, Macrobrachium hancocki × Macrobrachium crenulatum, Macrobrachium tenellum × Macrobrachium acanthurus and Macrobrachium panamense × Macrobrachium amazonicum. Here we evaluated the relation among these pairs of sibling species in a molecular phylogenetic context. We generated 95 new sequences: 26 sequences of 16S rDNA, 25 of COI mtDNA and 44 of 18S nDNA. In total, 181 sequences were analyzed by maximum likelihood phylogenetic method, including 12 Macrobrachium transisthmian species, as well as seven other American Macrobrachium species, and two other palaemonids. Our analysis corroborated the morphological proximity of the sibling species. Despite the high degree of morphological similarities and considerable genetic diversification encountered among the transisthmian sister species, our data support the conclusion that all species included in sibling groups studied herein are valid taxonomic entities, but not all pairs of siblings form natural

  16. Taxonomic and Molecular Identification of Mesocriconema and Criconemoides Species (Nematoda: Criconematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Marco A.; Robbins, Robert T.; Szalanski, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    Populations of Mesocriconema curvatum, M. kirjanovae, M. onoense, M. ornatum, M. sphaerocephala, M. surinamense, M. vadense, M. xenoplax, and Criconemoides informis from different geographical areas in the continental United States were characterized morphologically and molecularly. A new ring nematode from Washington County, Arkansas, is also described and named Mesocriconema ozarkiense n. sp., This new species is characterized by females with small flattened submedian lobes, lower than or at the same level as the labial disc, vagina straight, very well developed spermatheca without sperm, no more than one anastomoses, L=379-512 μm, V=89-93, stylet length = 49-61 μm, R=107-119, annuli with slightly crenate margins on tail portion and a simple anterior vulval lip. The molecular characterization of M. ozarkiense n. sp. using the ITS rRNA gene sequence and the phylogenesis relationship of this new species with the ring nematodes included in this study are provided. PMID:23482878

  17. Taxonomic identification of algae (morphological and molecular): species concepts, methodologies, and their implications for ecological bioassessment.

    PubMed

    Manoylov, Kalina M

    2014-06-01

    Algal taxonomy is a key discipline in phycology and is critical for algal genetics, physiology, ecology, applied phycology, and particularly bioassessment. Taxonomic identification is the most common analysis and hypothesis-testing endeavor in science. Errors of identification are often related to the inherent problem of small organisms with morphologies that are difficult to distinguish without research-grade microscopes and taxonomic expertise in phycology. Proposed molecular approaches for taxonomic identification from environmental samples promise rapid, potentially inexpensive, and more thorough culture-independent identification of all algal species present in a sample of interest. Molecular identification has been used in biodiversity and conservation, but it also has great potential for applications in bioassessment. Comparisons of morphological and molecular identification of benthic algal communities are improved by the identification of more taxa; however, automated identification technology does not allow for the simultaneous analysis of thousands of samples. Currently, morphological identification is used to verify molecular taxonomic identities, but with the increased number of taxa verified in algal gene libraries, molecular identification will become a universal tool in biological studies. Thus, in this report, successful application of molecular techniques related to algal bioassessment is discussed. © 2014 Phycological Society of America.

  18. Molecular phylogenetics, seed morphometrics, chromosome number evolution and systematics of European Elatine L. (Elatinaceae) species

    PubMed Central

    Sramkó, Gábor; Tóth, János Pál; Laczkó, Levente; Kalinka, Anna; Horváth, Orsolya; Skuza, Lidia; Lukács, Balázs András; Popiela, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The genus Elatine contains ca 25 species, all of which are small, herbaceous annuals distributed in ephemeral waters on both hemispheres. However, due to a high degree of morphological variability (as a consequence of their amphibious life-style), the taxonomy of this genus remains controversial. Thus, to fill this gap in knowledge, we present a detailed molecular phylogenetic study of this genus based on nuclear (rITS) and plastid (accD-psaI, psbJ-petA, ycf6-psbM-trnD) sequences using 27 samples from 13 species. On the basis of this phylogenetic analysis, we provide a solid phylogenetic background for the modern taxonomy of the European members of the genus. Traditionally accepted sections of this tree (i.e., Crypta and Elatinella) were found to be monophyletic; only E. borchoni—found to be a basal member of the genus—has to be excluded from the latter lineage to achieve monophyly. A number of taxonomic conclusions can also be drawn: E. hexandra, a high-ploid species, is most likely a stabilised hybrid between the main sections; E. campylosperma merits full species status based on both molecular and morphological evidence; E. gussonei is a more widespread and genetically diverse species with two main lineages; and the presence of the Asian E. ambigua in the European flora is questionable. The main lineages recovered in this analysis are also supported by a number of synapomorphic morphological characters as well as uniform chromosome counts. Based on all the evidence presented here, two new subsections within Elatinella are described: subsection Hydropipera consisting of the temperate species of the section, and subsection Macropodae including the Mediterranean species of the section. PMID:28028470

  19. The Syllis gracilis species complex: A molecular approach to a difficult taxonomic problem (Annelida, Syllidae).

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Campos, Patricia; Giribet, Gonzalo; Riesgo, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Syllis gracilis is an emblematic member of the subfamily Syllinae (Syllidae, Annelida), which inhabits shallow, temperate coastal waters and can be found on algae, coral rubble, and sponges. Their distinctive ypsiloid chaetae, usually found in specimens from populations all around the world, led to the consideration of the species as cosmopolitan, even though four other species have similar chaetae: Syllis magellanica, S. picta, S. mayeri and S. ypsiloides. The discovery of deeply divergent lineages in the Mediterranean Sea, that were morphologically similar, questioned the cosmopolitanism of S. gracilis and suggested the possibility of it being a species complex. In order to assess the speciation patterns within the putative S. gracilis complex, we undertook species delimitation and phylogenetic analyses on 61 specimens morphologically ascribed to Syllis gracilis and closely related species using a multilocus molecular dataset (two mitochondrial and two nuclear markers). Our results suggest high levels of genetic differentiation between the S. gracilis populations analyzed, some of which have morphologically distinctive features. Five to eight distinct lineages (depending on the analysis) were identified, all with geographically restricted distributions. Although the presence of ypsiloid chaetae has been traditionally considered the main character to identify S. gracilis, we conclude that this feature is homoplastic. Instead, we propose that characters such as the degree of fusion of blades and shafts in chaetae, the morphology of the posterior chaetae or the animal color pattern should be considered to differentiate lineages within the S. gracilis species complex. Our study does not support the cosmopolitanism of S. gracilis, and instead provides morphological and molecular evidence of the existence of a complex of pseudo-cryptic species.

  20. Molecular phylogenetics, seed morphometrics, chromosome number evolution and systematics of European Elatine L. (Elatinaceae) species.

    PubMed

    Sramkó, Gábor; Molnár V, Attila; Tóth, János Pál; Laczkó, Levente; Kalinka, Anna; Horváth, Orsolya; Skuza, Lidia; Lukács, Balázs András; Popiela, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The genus Elatine contains ca 25 species, all of which are small, herbaceous annuals distributed in ephemeral waters on both hemispheres. However, due to a high degree of morphological variability (as a consequence of their amphibious life-style), the taxonomy of this genus remains controversial. Thus, to fill this gap in knowledge, we present a detailed molecular phylogenetic study of this genus based on nuclear (rITS) and plastid (accD-psaI, psbJ-petA, ycf6-psbM-trnD) sequences using 27 samples from 13 species. On the basis of this phylogenetic analysis, we provide a solid phylogenetic background for the modern taxonomy of the European members of the genus. Traditionally accepted sections of this tree (i.e., Crypta and Elatinella) were found to be monophyletic; only E. borchoni-found to be a basal member of the genus-has to be excluded from the latter lineage to achieve monophyly. A number of taxonomic conclusions can also be drawn: E. hexandra, a high-ploid species, is most likely a stabilised hybrid between the main sections; E. campylosperma merits full species status based on both molecular and morphological evidence; E. gussonei is a more widespread and genetically diverse species with two main lineages; and the presence of the Asian E. ambigua in the European flora is questionable. The main lineages recovered in this analysis are also supported by a number of synapomorphic morphological characters as well as uniform chromosome counts. Based on all the evidence presented here, two new subsections within Elatinella are described: subsection Hydropipera consisting of the temperate species of the section, and subsection Macropodae including the Mediterranean species of the section.

  1. Knockout of arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase results in sex-dependent changes in phosphatidylcholine metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Madelyn C.; Douillet, Christelle C.

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase is the key enzyme in the methylation pathway for inorganic arsenic. We have recently shown that As3mt knockout (KO) has a profound effect on metabolomic profiles in mice. Phosphatidylcholine species (PCs) were the largest group of metabolites altered in both plasma and urine. The present study used targeted analysis to investigate the KO-associated changes in PC profiles in the liver, the site of PC synthesis. Results show that As3mt KO has a systemic effect on PC metabolism and that this effect is sex dependent. PMID:27591999

  2. Knockout of arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase results in sex-dependent changes in phosphatidylcholine metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Madelyn C; Douillet, Christelle C; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2016-12-01

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase is the key enzyme in the methylation pathway for inorganic arsenic. We have recently shown that As3mt knockout (KO) has a profound effect on metabolomic profiles in mice. Phosphatidylcholine species (PCs) were the largest group of metabolites altered in both plasma and urine. The present study used targeted analysis to investigate the KO-associated changes in PC profiles in the liver, the site of PC synthesis. Results show that As3mt KO has a systemic effect on PC metabolism and that this effect is sex dependent.

  3. Molecular typing of clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex from Northeast Mexico.

    PubMed

    González, Gloria M; Casillas-Vega, Néstor; Garza-González, Elvira; Hernández-Bello, Romel; Rivera, Gildardo; Rodríguez, Jesús Ancer; Bocanegra-Garcia, Virgilio

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is caused by members of the Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex. Based on molecular identification, these two species have been further differentiated into molecular types. The aim of this work was to characterize clinical cryptococcal isolates recovered from six hospitals in Northeast Mexico from 1995 to 2011. One hundred and sixty-six isolates, which were characterized by biochemical tests and in vitro susceptibility to amphotericin B, fluconazole, and voriconazole, and M13 PCR fingerprinting, were included in this study. Utilizing phenotypic tests, 153 isolates (92.16 %) were identified as C. neoformans and 13 (7.83 %) as C. gattii. All isolates were susceptible to all antifungals tested. Employing M13 PCR fingerprinting, eight molecular types were detected. VNI was the most common genotype (124 cases; 74.6 %), followed by VNII (15 cases; 9 %), VNIII (8 cases; 4.8 %), VNIV (6 cases; 3.6 %), VGI (6 cases; 3.6 %), VGII (3 cases; 1.8 %), and VGIII and VGIV (2 cases, 1.2 % each). We confirm the presence of C. gattii in clinical isolates in Northeast Mexico, and a high clonal diversity in the studied strains of C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex.

  4. Molecular Diversity of Seed-borne Fusarium Species Associated with Maize in India

    PubMed Central

    Aiyaz, Mohammed; Divakara, Shetty Thimmappa; Mudili, Venkataramana; Moore, Geromy George; Gupta, Vijai Kumar; Yli-Mattila, Tapani; Nayaka, Siddaiah Chandra; Niranjana, Siddapura Ramachandrappa

    2016-01-01

    A total of 106 maize seed samples were collected from different agro-climatic regions of India. Sixty-two Fusarium isolates were recovered, 90% of which were identified as Fusarium verticillioides based on morphological and molecular characters. Use of the tef-1α gene corrected/refined the morphological species identifications of 11 isolates, and confirmed those of the remaining isolates. Genetic diversity among the Fusarium isolates involved multilocus fingerprinting profiles by Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR) UPGMA and tef-1α gene phenetic analyses; for which, we observed no significant differences among the isolates based on geographic origin or fumonisin production; most of the subdivision related to species. Genotyping was performed on the F. verticillioides isolates, using 12 primer sets from the fumonisin pathway, to elucidate the molec-ular basis of fumonisin production or non-production. One fumonisin-negative isolate, UOMMF-16, was unable to amplify nine of the 12 fumonisin cluster genes tested. We also used the CD-ELISA method to confirm fumonisin production for our 62 Fusarium isolates. Only 15 isolates were found to be fumonisin-negative. Interestingly, genotypic characterization re-vealed six isolates with various gene deletion patterns that also tested positive for the production of fumonisins via CD-ELISA. Our findings confirm the importance of molecular studies for species delimitation, and for observing genetic and phenotypic diversity, among the Fusaria. PMID:27226769

  5. Drosophila genomes and the development of affordable molecular markers for species genotyping.

    PubMed

    Minuk, Leigh; Civetta, Alberto

    2011-04-01

    The recent completion of genome sequencing of 12 species of Drosophila has provided a powerful resource for hypothesis testing, as well as the development of technical tools. Here we take advantage of genome sequence data from two closely related species of Drosophila, Drosophila simulans and Drosophila sechellia, to quickly identify candidate molecular markers for genotyping based on expected insertion or deletion (indel) differences between species. Out of 64 candidate molecular markers selected along the second and third chromosome of Drosophila, 51 molecular markers were validated using PCR and gel electrophoresis. We found that the 20% error rate was due to sequencing errors in the genome data, although we cannot rule out possible indel polymorphisms. The approach has the advantage of being affordable and quick, as it only requires the use of bioinformatics tools for predictions and a PCR and agarose gel based assay for validation. Moreover, the approach could be easily extended to a wide variety of taxa with the only limitation being the availability of complete or partial genome sequence data.

  6. The species flocks of East African cichlid fishes: recent advances in molecular phylogenetics and population genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel

    With more than 3,000 species, the fish family Cichlidae is one of the most species-rich families of vertebrates. Cichlids occur in southern and central America, Africa, Madagascar, and India. The hotspot of their biodiversity is East Africa, where they form adaptive radiations composed of hundreds of endemic species in several lakes of various sizes and ages. The unparalleled species richness of East African cichlids has been something of a conundrum for evolutionary biologists and ecologists, since it has been in doubt whether these hundreds of species arose by allopatric speciation or whether it is necessary to invoke somewhat less traditional models of speciation, such as micro-allopatric, peripatric, or even sympatric speciation or evolution through sexual selection mediated by female choice. Ernst Mayr's analyses of these evolutionary uniquely diverse species assemblages have contributed to a more direct approach to this problem and have led to a deeper understanding of the patterns and processes that caused the formation of these huge groups of species. We review here recent molecular data on population differentiation and phylogenetics, which have helped to unravel, to some extent, the patterns and processes that led to the formation and ecological maintenance of cichlid species flocks. It is becoming apparent that sexually selected traits do play an important role in speciation in micro-allopatric or even sympatric settings. Species richness seems to be roughly correlated with the surface area, but not the age, of the lakes. We observe that the oldest lineages of a species flock of cichlids are often less species-rich and live in the open water or deepwater habitats. While the species flocks of the Lake Malawai and the Lake Victoria areas were shown to be monophyletic, the cichlid assemblage of Lake Tanganyika seems to consist of several independent species flocks. Cichlids emerge as an evolutionary model system in which many fundamental questions in

  7. Brucella abortus Synthesizes Phosphatidylcholine from Choline Provided by the Host

    PubMed Central

    Comerci, Diego J.; Altabe, Silvia; de Mendoza, Diego; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2006-01-01

    The Brucella cell envelope is characterized by the presence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), a common phospholipid in eukaryotes that is rare in prokaryotes. Studies on the composition of Brucella abortus 2308 phospholipids revealed that the synthesis of PC depends on the presence of choline in the culture medium, suggesting that the methylation biosynthetic pathway is not functional. Phospholipid composition of pmtA and pcs mutants indicated that in Brucella, PC synthesis occurs exclusively via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway. Transformation of Escherichia coli with an expression vector containing the B. abortus pcs homologue was sufficient for PC synthesis upon induction with IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside), while no PC formation was detected when bacteria were transformed with a vector containing pmtA. These findings imply that Brucella depends on choline provided by the host cell to form PC. We could not detect any obvious associated phenotype in the PC-deficient strain under vegetative or intracellular growth conditions in macrophages. However, the pcs mutant strain displays a reproducible virulence defect in mice, which suggests that PC is necessary to sustain a chronic infection process. PMID:16484204

  8. Gut flora metabolism of phosphatidylcholine promotes cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zeneng; Klipfell, Elizabeth; Bennett, Brian J.; Koeth, Robert; Levison, Bruce S.; DuGar, Brandon; Feldstein, Ariel E.; Britt, Earl B.; Fu, Xiaoming; Chung, Yoon-Mi; Wu, Yuping; Schauer, Phil; Smith, Jonathan D.; Allayee, Hooman; Tang, W. H. Wilson; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics studies hold promise for discovery of pathways linked to disease processes. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide. A metabolomics approach was used to generate unbiased small molecule metabolic profiles in plasma that predict risk for CVD. Three metabolites of the dietary lipid phosphatidylcholine, namely choline, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), and betaine, were identified and then shown to predict risk for CVD in an independent large clinical cohort. Dietary supplementation of mice with choline, TMAO or betaine promoted up-regulation of multiple macrophage scavenger receptors linked to atherosclerosis, and supplementation with choline or TMAO promoted atherosclerosis. Studies using germ-free mice confirmed a critical role for dietary choline and gut flora in TMAO production, augmented macrophage cholesterol accumulation and foam cell formation. Suppression of intestinal microflora in atherosclerosis-prone mice inhibited dietary choline-enhanced atherosclerosis. Genetic variations controlling expression of flavin monooxygenases (FMOs), an enzymatic source of TMAO, segregated with atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice. Discovery of a relationship between gut flora-dependent metabolism of dietary phosphatidylcholine and CVD pathogenesis provides opportunities for development of both novel diagnostic tests and therapeutic approaches for atherosclerotic heart disease. PMID:21475195

  9. Novel pathway for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis in bacteria associated with eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    López-Lara, I M; Geiger, O

    2001-10-04

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major membrane-forming phospholipid in eukaryotes and can be synthesised by either of two pathways, the CDP-choline pathway or the methylation pathway. Many prokaryotes lack PC, but it can be found in significant amounts in membranes of distantly related bacteria such as Rhizobacteria and Spirochetes. Enzymatic methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine via the methylation pathway was thought to be the only biosynthetic pathway to yield PC in bacteria. However, a novel choline-dependent pathway for PC biosynthesis has been discovered in Sinorhizobium meliloti. In this pathway, a novel enzymatic activity, PC synthase, condenses choline directly with CDP-diacylglyceride to form PC in one step. Surprisingly, genomes of some pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Borrelia burgdorferi and Legionella pneumophila) contain genes similar to the sinorhizobial gene for phosphatidylcholine synthase. We, therefore, suggest that the new PC synthase pathway is present in a number of bacteria displaying symbiotic or pathogenic associations with eukaryotes and that the eukaryotic host functions as the provider of choline for this pathway.

  10. Physical and biological properties of cationic triesters of phosphatidylcholine

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, RC; Ashley, GW; Shida, MM; Rakhmanova, VA; Tarahovsky, YS; Pantazatos, DP; Kennedy, MT; Pozharski, EV; Baker, KA; Jones, RD; Rosenzweig, HS; Choi, KL; Qiu, R; McIntosh, TJ

    1999-01-01

    The properties of a new class of phospholipids, alkyl phosphocholine triesters, are described. These compounds were prepared from phosphatidylcholines through substitution of the phosphate oxygen by reaction with alkyl trifluoromethylsulfonates. Their unusual behavior is ascribed to their net positive charge and absence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The O-ethyl, unsaturated derivatives hydrated to generate large, unilamellar liposomes. The phase transition temperature of the saturated derivatives is very similar to that of the precursor phosphatidylcholine and quite insensitive to ionic strength. The dissociation of single molecules from bilayers is unusually facile, as revealed by the surface activity of aqueous liposome dispersions. Vesicles of cationic phospholipids fused with vesicles of anionic lipids. Liquid crystalline cationic phospholipids such as 1, 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine triflate formed normal lipid bilayers in aqueous phases that interacted with short, linear DNA and supercoiled plasmid DNA to form a sandwich-structured complex in which bilayers were separated by strands of DNA. DNA in a 1:1 (mol) complex with cationic lipid was shielded from the aqueous phase, but was released by neutralizing the cationic charge with anionic lipid. DNA-lipid complexes transfected DNA into cells very effectively. Transfection efficiency depended upon the form of the lipid dispersion used to generate DNA-lipid complexes; in the case of the O-ethyl derivative described here, large vesicle preparations in the liquid crystalline phase were most effective. PMID:10545361

  11. Dietary and biliary phosphatidylcholine activates PKCζ in rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Shahzad; Mansbach, Charles M

    2015-04-01

    Chylomicron output by the intestine is proportional to intestinal phosphatidylcholine (PC) delivery. Using five different variations of PC delivery to the intestine, we found that lyso-phosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), the absorbed form of PC, concentrations in the cytosol (0 to 0.45 nM) were proportional to the input rate. The activity of protein kinase C (PKC)ζ, which controls prechylomicron output rate by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), correlated with the lyso-PC concentration suggesting that it may be a PKCζ activator. Using recombinant PKCζ, the Km for lyso-PC activation was 1.49 nM and the Vmax 1.12 nM, more than the maximal lyso-PC concentration in cytosol, 0.45 nM. Among the phospholipids and their lyso derivatives, lyso-PC was the most potent activator of PKCζ and the only one whose cytosolic concentration suggested that it could be a physiological activator because other phospholipid concentrations were negligible. PKCζ was on the surface of the dietary fatty acid transport vesicle, the caveolin-1-containing endocytic vesicle. Once activated, PKCζ, eluted off the vesicle. A conformational change in PKCζ on activation was suggested by limited proteolysis. We conclude that PKCζ on activation changes its conformation resulting in elution from its vesicle. The downstream effect of dietary PC is to activate PKCζ, resulting in greater chylomicron output by the ER.

  12. Visualization of the cell-selective distribution of PUFA-containing phosphatidylcholines in mouse brain by imaging mass spectrometry[S

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Yuki; Konishi, Yoshiyuki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Kajihara, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Taguchi, Ryo; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) can be used to visualize the distribution of various biomolecules, especially lipids, in the cells and tissues. In this study, we report the cell-selective distribution of PUFA-containing glycerophospholipids (GPLs) in the mouse brain. We established a practical experimental procedure for the IMS of GPLs. We demonstrated that optimization of the composition of the matrix solution and spectrum normalization to the total ion current (TIC) is critical. Using our procedure, we simultaneously differentiated and visualized the localizations of specific molecular species of GPLs in mouse brain sections. The results showed that PUFA-containing phosphatidylcholines (PCs) were distributed in a cell-selective manner: arachidonic acid- and docosahexaenoic acid-containing PCs were seen in the hippocampal neurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells, respectively. Furthermore, these characteristic localizations of PUFA-PCs were formed during neuronal maturation. The phenomenon of brain cell-selective production of specific PUFA-GPLs will help elucidate the potential physiological functions of PUFAs in specific brain regions. PMID:19417221

  13. Molecular identification and prevalence of malassezia species in pityriasis versicolor patients from kashan, iran.

    PubMed

    Talaee, Rezvan; Katiraee, Farzad; Ghaderi, Maryam; Erami, Mahzad; Kazemi Alavi, Azam; Nazeri, Mehdi

    2014-08-01

    Malassezia species are lipophilic yeasts found on the skin surface of humans and other warm-blooded vertebrates. It is associated with various human diseases, especially pityriasis versicolor, which is a chronic superficial skin disorder. The aim of the present study was to identify Malassezia species isolated from patients' samples affected by pityriasis versicolor, using molecular methods in Kashan, Iran. A total of 140 subjects, suspected of having pityriasis versicolor from Kashan, were clinically diagnosed and then confirmed by direct microscopic examination. The scraped skin specimens were inoculated in modified Dixon's medium. DNA was extracted from the colonies and PCR amplification was carried out for the 26s rDNA region. PCR products were used to further restriction fragment length polymorphism by CfoI enzyme. Direct examination was positive in 93.3% of suspected pityriasis versicolor lesions. No statistically significant difference was observed in the frequency of Malassezia species between women and men. The highest prevalence of tinea versicolor was seen in patients 21-30 years-of-age. No difference could be seen in the frequency of Malassezia species depending on the age of the patients. In total, 65% of patients with pityriasis versicolor had hyperhidrosis. The most commonly isolated Malassezia species in the pityriasis versicolor lesions were; Malassezia globosa (66%), M. furfur (26%), M. restricta (3%), M. sympodialis (3%), and M. slooffiae (2%). Malassezia species were mainly isolated from the neck and chest. This study showed M. globosa to be the most common Malassezia species isolated from Malassezia skin disorders in Kashan, Iran. The PCR-RFLP method was useful in the rapid identification of the Malassezia species. By using these methods, the detection and identification of individual Malassezia species from clinical samples was substantially easier.

  14. Morphological and molecular evidence for cryptic species of springsnails [genus Pseudamnicola ( Corrosella) (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Hydrobiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Delicado, Diana; Ramos, Marian A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Several Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) populations of the central and eastern Iberian Peninsula have been ascribed to Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) astieri (Dupuy, 1851), though recent evidence demonstrates the species could be endemic to the departments of Var and Alpes-Maritimes in France. Through the identification of cryptic species using a combined morphological and phylogenetic approach, this paper provides a detailed morphological description of Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) astieri, clarifying its taxonomic boundaries and confirming it as a French endemic. In parallel, by comparing Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) populations from the provinces of Castellón and Valencia in Eastern Spain, it was observed that rather than Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) astieri they represented a new species here described as Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) hauffei sp. n. Among other characters, the two species show marked differences in shell shape, male and female genital systems, radular formula and concentration of the nervous system. Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) hauffei sp. n. was also compared morphologically to another two Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) species living in nearby areas [Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) hinzi Boeters, 1986 and Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) navasiana (Fagot, 1907)], molecularly to Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) falkneri (Boeters, 1970), the type species of the subgenus, and to the rest of the Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) species described so far. Morphological differentiation between the species is supported by a genetic divergence of 7.4% inferred from a partial sequence (658 bp) of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI). On the basis of an average 8% (5.39 to 11.15%) divergence estimated for the COI gene in other Pseudamnicola (Corrosella) species reported in GenBank, the existence of two specific entities is here proposed, which will have impact on conservation policies both in France and in Spain. PMID:22639531

  15. The bladed Bangiales (Rhodophyta) of the South Eastern Pacific: Molecular species delimitation reveals extensive diversity.

    PubMed

    Guillemin, Marie-Laure; Contreras-Porcia, Loretto; Ramírez, María Eliana; Macaya, Erasmo C; Contador, Cristian Bulboa; Woods, Helen; Wyatt, Christopher; Brodie, Juliet

    2016-01-01

    A molecular taxonomic study of the bladed Bangiales of the South Eastern Pacific (coast of Chile) was undertaken based on sequence data of the mitochondrial COI and chloroplast rbcL for 193 specimens collected from Arica (18°S) in the north to South Patagonia (53°S) in the south. The results revealed for the first time that four genera, Porphyra, Pyropia, Fuscifolium and Wildemania were present in the region. Species delimitation was determined based on a combination of a General Mixed Yule Coalescence model (GMYC) and Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) coupled with detection of monophyly in tree reconstruction. The overall incongruence between the species delimitation methods within each gene was 29%. The GMYC method led to over-splitting groups, whereas the ABGD method had a tendency to lump groups. Taking a conservative approach to the number of putative species, at least 18 were recognized and, with the exception of the recently described Pyropia orbicularis, all were new to the Chilean flora. Porphyra and Pyropia were the most diverse genera with eight 'species' each, whereas only a 'single' species each was found for Fuscifolium and Wildemania. There was also evidence of recently diverging groups: Wildemania sp. was distinct but very closely related to W. amplissima from the Northern Hemisphere and raises questions in relation to such disjunct distributions. Pyropia orbicularis was very closely related to two other species, making species delimitation very difficult but provides evidence of an incipient speciation. The difference between the 'species' discovered and those previously reported for the region is discussed in relation to the difficulty of distinguishing species based on morphological identification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Identification and Prevalence of Malassezia Species in Pityriasis Versicolor Patients From Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Talaee, Rezvan; Katiraee, Farzad; Ghaderi, Maryam; Erami, Mahzad; Kazemi Alavi, Azam; Nazeri, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Malassezia species are lipophilic yeasts found on the skin surface of humans and other warm-blooded vertebrates. It is associated with various human diseases, especially pityriasis versicolor, which is a chronic superficial skin disorder. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to identify Malassezia species isolated from patients’ samples affected by pityriasis versicolor, using molecular methods in Kashan, Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 140 subjects, suspected of having pityriasis versicolor from Kashan, were clinically diagnosed and then confirmed by direct microscopic examination. The scraped skin specimens were inoculated in modified Dixon’s medium. DNA was extracted from the colonies and PCR amplification was carried out for the 26s rDNA region. PCR products were used to further restriction fragment length polymorphism by CfoI enzyme. Results: Direct examination was positive in 93.3% of suspected pityriasis versicolor lesions. No statistically significant difference was observed in the frequency of Malassezia species between women and men. The highest prevalence of tinea versicolor was seen in patients 21–30 years-of-age. No difference could be seen in the frequency of Malassezia species depending on the age of the patients. In total, 65% of patients with pityriasis versicolor had hyperhidrosis. The most commonly isolated Malassezia species in the pityriasis versicolor lesions were; Malassezia globosa (66%), M. furfur (26%), M. restricta (3%), M. sympodialis (3%), and M. slooffiae (2%). Malassezia species were mainly isolated from the neck and chest. Conclusions: This study showed M. globosa to be the most common Malassezia species isolated from Malassezia skin disorders in Kashan, Iran. The PCR-RFLP method was useful in the rapid identification of the Malassezia species. By using these methods, the detection and identification of individual Malassezia species from clinical samples was substantially easier. PMID:25485051

  17. Species limits in Diaporthe: molecular re-assessment of D. citri, D. foeniculina and D. rudis with a new species on Citrus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Species of Diaporthe are important plant pathogens associated with a wide range of hosts throughout the world. In the present study, the species causing melanose and stem end rot diseases on Citrus spp. were revised. Morphology and molecular phylogenetic analyses of the complete nuclear ribosomal in...

  18. Molecular Characterization of Natural Hybrids Formed between Five Related Indigenous Clade 6 Phytophthora Species

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Treena I.

    2015-01-01

    Most Phytophthora hybrids characterized to date have emerged from nurseries and managed landscapes, most likely generated as a consequence of biological invasions associated with the movement of living plants and germplasm for ornamental, horticultural and agricultural purposes. Presented here is evidence for natural hybridization among a group of five closely related indigenous clade 6 Phytophthora species isolated from waterways and riparian ecosystems in Western Australia. Molecular characterization of hybrids consisted of cloning and sequencing two nuclear genes (ITS and ASF), sequencing of two further nuclear loci (BT and HSP) and of two mitochondrial loci (COI and NADH). Additionally, phenotypic traits including morphology of sporangia and optima and maxima temperatures for growth were also determined. In most cases the nuclear genes were biparentally and in all cases the mtDNA were uniparentally inherited, indicating hybrid formation through sexual crosses. Some isolates bear the molecular signature of three parents suggesting additional hybrid events, although it cannot be determined from the data if these were sequential or simultaneous. These species and their hybrids co-exist in riparian ecosystems and waterways where their ability for rapid asexual proliferation would enable them to rapidly colonize green plant litter. The apparent ease of hybridization could eventually lead to the merging of species through introgression. However, at this point in time, species integrity has been maintained and a more likely scenario is that the hybrids are not stable evolutionary lineages, but rather transient hybrid clones. PMID:26248187

  19. First molecular detection and characterization of Sarcocystis species in slaughtered cattle in North-West Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Amairia, Safa; Amdouni, Yosra; Rjeibi, Mohamed Ridha; Rouatbi, Mariem; Awadi, Sofia; Gharbi, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    Sarcocystis spp. is one of the most prevalent foodborne parasites infecting both animals and humans. Consumption of raw or undercooked infected meat is a risk factor of human intestinal sarcocystosis. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of Sarcocystis species infecting slaughtered Tunisian cattle in North-West Tunisia (Béja governorate). DNA was extracted from 150 beef meat samples and a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used for identification. The overall infection prevalence of Sarcocystis spp. was 38% (57/150). Two species were identified, namely S. hominis (25%; 39/150) and S. cruzi (12%; 18/150). For both species, the highest prevalence was in Thibar locality (52.9 and 17.6% for S. hominis and S. cruzi, respectively). The molecular prevalence of S. cruzi was significantly higher in animals aged between two and eight years (19.2%; 10/52). This is the first molecular identification of Sarcocystis species in Tunisian cattle. Further studies in both human and animal Tunisian populations are needed to rank this parasitic disease among others. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular analyses reveal high species diversity of trematodes in a sub-Arctic lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soldánová, Miroslava; Georgieva, Simona; Roháčováa, Jana; Knudsen, Rune; Kuhn, Jesper A.; Henriksen, Eirik H.; Siwertsson, Anna; Shaw, Jenny C.; Kuris, Armand M.; Amundsen, Per-Arne; Scholz, Tomáš; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2017-01-01

    To identify trematode diversity and life-cycles in the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, Norway, we characterised 120 trematode isolates from mollusc first intermediate hosts, metacercariae from second intermediate host fishes and invertebrates, and adults from fish and invertebrate definitive hosts, using molecular techniques. Phylogenies based on nuclear and/or mtDNA revealed high species richness (24 species or species-level genetic lineages), and uncovered trematode diversity (16 putative new species) from five families typical in lake ecosystems (Allocreadiidae, Diplostomidae, Plagiorchiidae, Schistosomatidae and Strigeidae). Sampling potential invertebrate hosts allowed matching of sequence data for different stages, thus achieving molecular elucidation of trematode life-cycles and exploration of host-parasite interactions. Phylogenetic analyses also helped identify three major mollusc intermediate hosts (Radix balthica, Pisidium casertanum and Sphaerium sp.) in the lake. Our findings increase the known trematode diversity at the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, showing that digenean diversity is high in this otherwise depauperate sub-Arctic freshwater ecosystem, and indicating that sub-Arctic and Arctic ecosystems may be characterised by unique trematode assemblages.

  1. Molecular analyses reveal high species diversity of trematodes in a sub-Arctic lake.

    PubMed

    Soldánová, Miroslava; Georgieva, Simona; Roháčová, Jana; Knudsen, Rune; Kuhn, Jesper A; Henriksen, Eirik H; Siwertsson, Anna; Shaw, Jenny C; Kuris, Armand M; Amundsen, Per-Arne; Scholz, Tomáš; Lafferty, Kevin D; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2017-03-14

    To identify trematode diversity and life-cycles in the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, Norway, we characterised 120 trematode isolates from mollusc first intermediate hosts, metacercariae from second intermediate host fishes and invertebrates, and adults from fish and invertebrate definitive hosts, using molecular techniques. Phylogenies based on nuclear and/or mtDNA revealed high species richness (24 species or species-level genetic lineages), and uncovered trematode diversity (16 putative new species) from five families typical in lake ecosystems (Allocreadiidae, Diplostomidae, Plagiorchiidae, Schistosomatidae and Strigeidae). Sampling potential invertebrate hosts allowed matching of sequence data for different stages, thus achieving molecular elucidation of trematode life-cycles and exploration of host-parasite interactions. Phylogenetic analyses also helped identify three major mollusc intermediate hosts (Radix balthica, Pisidium casertanum and Sphaerium sp.) in the lake. Our findings increase the known trematode diversity at the sub-Arctic Lake Takvatn, showing that digenean diversity is high in this otherwise depauperate sub-Arctic freshwater ecosystem, and indicating that sub-Arctic and Arctic ecosystems may be characterised by unique trematode assemblages.

  2. Assessment of two new molecular methods for identification of Candida parapsilosis sensu lato species.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Effron, Guillermo; Canton, Emilia; Pemán, Javier; Dilger, Amanda; Romá, Eva; Perlin, David S

    2011-09-01

    Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis, and C. metapsilosis replaced C. parapsilosis groups I, II, and III in 2005. Since then, an increased interest in studying their epidemiology has arisen based on the observed differences in antifungal susceptibilities and virulence the three species. A strict differentiation of these species cannot be achieved by phenotypic methods. We evaluate two new molecular methodologies to differentiate among these species by the use of a collection of 293 bloodstream infection isolates of C. parapsilosis sensu lato. For the first method, the isolates were studied using PCR amplification of a fragment of the C. parapsilosis sensu lato FKS1 gene and a universal primer pair followed by EcoRI enzyme digestion. The other method used the allele discrimination ability of molecular beacons in a multiplex real-time PCR format. Both methods of identification showed 100% concordance with internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1)/ITS2 sequencing and proved to be effective for clinical applications, even with mixed-species DNAs.

  3. The taxonomic foundation, species circumscription and continental endemisms of Singerocybe: evidence from morphological and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiao; Feng, Bang; Yang, Zhu L; Li, Yan-Chun; Ratkowsky, David; Gates, Genevieve; Takahashi, Haruki; Rexer, Karl-Heinz; Kost, Gerhard W; Karunarathna, Samantha C

    2014-01-01

    The genus Singerocybe (Tricholomataceae, Agaricales, Basidiomycota) has been the subject of controversy since its proposal in 1988. Its taxonomic foundation, species circumscription and geographical distribution have not yet been examined with molecular sequence data. In this study phylogenetic analyses on this group of fungi were conducted based on collections from Europe, eastern Asia, southern Asia, North America and Australia, with four nuclear markers, ITS, nrLSU, tef1-α and rpb2. Molecular phylogenetic analyses, together with morphological observations, strongly support Singerocybe as a monophyletic group and identify the vesicles in the pileal and stipe cuticle as a synapomorphy of this genus. Seven species are recognized in the genus, including one new species and four new combinations. Clitocybe trogioides and Clitocybe trogioides var. odorifera are synonyms of Singerocybe humilis and Singerocybe alboinfundibuliformis respectively. Most of these species are geographically restricted in their distributions. Furthermore our study expands the distribution range of Singerocybe from the North Temperate Zone to Australia (Tasmania) and tropical southern Asia.

  4. The calmodulin intergenic spacer as molecular target for characterization of Leishmania species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human leishmaniasis is a neglected disease caused by parasites of the genus Leishmania. Clinical aspects of this disease can vary significantly, reflecting the wide range of parasites in the genus Leishmania. Knowing accurately the Leishmania species infecting humans is important for clinical case management and evaluation of epidemiological risk. Calmodulin is an essential gene in trypanosomatids that modulates the calcium metabolism in various cellular activities. Despite its strong conservation in trypanosomatids, it has been recently observed that its untranslated regions (UTR) diverge among species. Methods In this study we analyzed the sequences and the absolute dinucleotide frequency of the intergenic spacer of the calmodulin gene (containing both, 3′ and 5′UTR) in nine reference Leishmania species and ten clinical isolates obtained from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Results We show that the short calmodulin intergenic spacers exhibit features that make them interesting for applications in molecular characterization and phylogenetic studies of Leishmania. Dendrograms based on sequence alignments and on the dinucleotide frequency indicate that this particular region of calmodulin gene might be useful for species typing between the Leishmania and Viannia subgenera. Conclusions Mutations and composition of the calmodulin intergenic spacer from Leishmania species might have taxonomic value as parameters to define if an isolate is identical to a certain species or belongs to one of the two current subgenera. PMID:24438764

  5. Molecular and Morphological Identification of Mealybug Species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Brazilian Vineyards

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco da Silva, Vitor C.; Bertin, Aline; Blin, Aurélie; Germain, Jean-François; Bernardi, Daniel; Rignol, Guylène; Botton, Marcos; Malausa, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) are pests constraining the international trade of Brazilian table grapes. They damage grapes by transmitting viruses and toxins, causing defoliation, chlorosis, and vigor losses and favoring the development of sooty mold. Difficulties in mealybug identification remain an obstacle to the adequate management of these pests. In this study, our primary aim was to identify the principal mealybug species infesting the major table grape-producing regions in Brazil, by morphological and molecular characterization. Our secondary aim was to develop a rapid identification kit based on species-specific Polymerase Chain Reactions, to facilitate the routine identification of the most common pest species. We surveyed 40 sites infested with mealybugs and identified 17 species: Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell), Dysmicoccus sylvarum Williams and Granara de Willink, Dysmicoccus texensis (Tinsley), Ferrisia cristinae Kaydan and Gullan, Ferrisia meridionalis Williams, Ferrisia terani Williams and Granara de Willink, Phenacoccus baccharidis Williams, Phenacoccus parvus Morrison, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley, Planococcus citri (Risso), Pseudococcus viburni (Signoret), Pseudococcus cryptus Hempel, four taxa closely related each of to Pseudococcus viburni, Pseudococcus sociabilis Hambleton, Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn) and Pseudococcus meridionalis Prado, and one specimen from the genus Pseudococcus Westwood. The PCR method developed effectively identified five mealybug species of economic interest on grape in Brazil: D. brevipes, Pl. citri, Ps. viburni, Ph. solenopsis and Planococcus ficus (Signoret). Nevertheless, it is not possible to assure that this procedure is reliable for taxa that have not been sampled already and might be very closely related to the target species. PMID:25062012

  6. Molecular and morphological identification of mealybug species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Brazilian vineyards.

    PubMed

    Pacheco da Silva, Vitor C; Bertin, Aline; Blin, Aurélie; Germain, Jean-François; Bernardi, Daniel; Rignol, Guylène; Botton, Marcos; Malausa, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) are pests constraining the international trade of Brazilian table grapes. They damage grapes by transmitting viruses and toxins, causing defoliation, chlorosis, and vigor losses and favoring the development of sooty mold. Difficulties in mealybug identification remain an obstacle to the adequate management of these pests. In this study, our primary aim was to identify the principal mealybug species infesting the major table grape-producing regions in Brazil, by morphological and molecular characterization. Our secondary aim was to develop a rapid identification kit based on species-specific Polymerase Chain Reactions, to facilitate the routine identification of the most common pest species. We surveyed 40 sites infested with mealybugs and identified 17 species: Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell), Dysmicoccus sylvarum Williams and Granara de Willink, Dysmicoccus texensis (Tinsley), Ferrisia cristinae Kaydan and Gullan, Ferrisia meridionalis Williams, Ferrisia terani Williams and Granara de Willink, Phenacoccus baccharidis Williams, Phenacoccus parvus Morrison, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley, Planococcus citri (Risso), Pseudococcus viburni (Signoret), Pseudococcus cryptus Hempel, four taxa closely related each of to Pseudococcus viburni, Pseudococcus sociabilis Hambleton, Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn) and Pseudococcus meridionalis Prado, and one specimen from the genus Pseudococcus Westwood. The PCR method developed effectively identified five mealybug species of economic interest on grape in Brazil: D. brevipes, Pl. citri, Ps. viburni, Ph. solenopsis and Planococcus ficus (Signoret). Nevertheless, it is not possible to assure that this procedure is reliable for taxa that have not been sampled already and might be very closely related to the target species.

  7. A simplified protocol for molecular identification of Eimeria species in field samples.

    PubMed

    Haug, Anita; Thebo, Per; Mattsson, Jens G

    2007-05-15

    This study aimed to find a fast, sensitive and efficient protocol for molecular identification of chicken Eimeria spp. in field samples. Various methods for each of the three steps of the protocol were evaluated: oocyst wall rupturing methods, DNA extraction methods, and identification of species-specific DNA sequences by PCR. We then compared and evaluated five complete protocols. Three series of oocyst suspensions of known number of oocysts from Eimeria mitis, Eimeria praecox, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella were prepared and ground using glass beads or mini-pestle. DNA was extracted from ruptured oocysts using commercial systems (GeneReleaser, Qiagen Stoolkit and Prepman) or phenol-chloroform DNA extraction, followed by identification of species-specific ITS-1 sequences by optimised single species PCR assays. The Stoolkit and Prepman protocols showed insufficient repeatability, and the former was also expensive and relatively time-consuming. In contrast, both the GeneReleaser protocol and phenol-chloroform protocols were robust and sensitive, detecting less than 0.4 oocysts of each species per PCR. Finally, we evaluated our new protocol on 68 coccidia positive field samples. Our data suggests that rupturing the oocysts by mini-pestle grinding, preparing the DNA with GeneReleaser, followed by optimised single species PCR assays, makes a robust and sensitive procedure for identifying chicken Eimeria species in field samples. Importantly, it also provides minimal hands-on-time in the pre-PCR process, lower contamination risk and no handling of toxic chemicals.

  8. Multigene Molecular Systematics Confirm Species Status of Morphologically Convergent Pagurus Hermit Crabs

    PubMed Central

    Matzen da Silva, Joana; dos Santos, Antonina; Cunha, Marina R.; Costa, Filipe O.; Creer, Simon; Carvalho, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In spite of contemporary morphological taxonomy appraisals, apparent high morphological similarity raises uncertainty about the species status of certain Pagurus hermit crabs. This is exemplified between two European species, Pagurus excavatus (Herbst, 1791) and Pagurus alatus (Fabricius 1775), whose species status is still difficult to resolve using morphological criteria alone. Methodology/Principal Findings To address such ambiguities, we used combinations of Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian Inference (BI) methods to delineate species boundaries of P. alatus and P. excavatus and formulate an intermediate Pagurus phylogenetic hypothesis, based upon single and concatenated mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase I [COI]) and nuclear (16S and 28s ribosomal RNA) gene partitions. The molecular data supported the species status of P. excavatus and P. alatus and also clearly resolved two divergent clades within hermit crabs from the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Conclusions/Significance Despite the abundance and prominent ecological role of hermit crabs, Pagurus, in North East Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea ecosystems, many important aspects of their taxonomy, biology, systematics and evolution remain poorly explored. The topologies presented here should be regarded as hypotheses that can be incorporated into the robust and integrated understanding of the systematic relationships within and between species of the genus Pagurus inhabiting the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. PMID:22174780

  9. Species and hybrid identification of sturgeon caviar: a new molecular approach to detect illegal trade.

    PubMed

    Boscari, E; Barmintseva, A; Pujolar, J M; Doukakis, P; Mugue, N; Congiu, L

    2014-05-01

    Overexploitation of wild populations due to the high economic value of caviar has driven sturgeons to near extinction. The high prices commanded by caviar on world markets have made it a magnet for illegal and fraudulent caviar trade, often involving low-value farmed caviar being sold as top-quality caviar. We present a new molecular approach for the identification of pure sturgeon species and hybrids that are among the most commercialized species in Europe and North America. Our test is based on the discovery of species-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ribosomal protein S7, supplemented with the Vimentin gene and the mitochondrial D-loop. Test validations performed in 702 specimens of target and nontarget sturgeon species demonstrated a 100% identification success for Acipenser naccarii, A. fulvescens, A. stellatus, A. sinensis and A. transmontanus. In addition to species identification, our approach allows the identification of Bester and AL hybrids, two of the most economically important hybrids in the world, with 80% and 100% success, respectively. Moreover, the approach has the potential to identify many other existing sturgeon hybrids. The development of a standardized sturgeon identification tool will directly benefit trade law enforcement, providing the tools to monitor and regulate the legal trade of caviar and protect sturgeon stocks from illicit producers and traders, hence contributing to safeguarding this group of heavily threatened species. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Molecular characterization of Morchella species from the Western Himalayan region of India.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Harpreet Kaur; Acharya, Karan; Ramesh, G; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2011-04-01

    The molecular diversity of thirty-two different Morchella cultures/fruiting bodies, collected from the Western Himalayan region was studied in this investigation. Considerable taxonomic confusion exists regarding many species of Morchella. Although classical taxonomy is helpful in identification for many ascomycetes, morels exhibit considerable morphological diversity and there is disagreement in the identification of morel species. Phylogenetic analyses based on DNA sequences could help in sorting out morel taxonomy which is essential to better define the morel diversity. In this study, sequence analysis revealed that in the Western Himalayan region of India, both yellow (M. crassipes, M. spongiola) and black morels (M. elata, M. angusticeps, and M. gigas) were prominent along with two Verpa species. Phylogenetic analysis by maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference revealed two different clades and a clear distinction between yellow and black morels.

  11. Morphological and Molecular Phylogenetic Data Reveal a New Species of Primula (Primulaceae) from Hunan, China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xun-Lin; Hu, Chi-Ming; Hao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Primulaceae, Primula undulifolia, is described from the hilly area of Hunan province in south-central China. Its morphology and distributional range suggest that it is allied to P. kwangtungensis, both adapted to subtropical climate, having contiguous distribution and similar habitat, growing on shady and moist cliffs. Petioles, scapes and pedicels of them are densely covered with rusty multicellular hairs, but the new species can be easily distinguished by its smaller flowers and narrowly oblong leaves with undulate margins. Molecular phylogenetic analysis based on four DNA markers (ITS, matK, trnL-F and rps16) confirmed the new species as an independent lineage and constitutes a main clade together with P. kwangtungensis, P. kweichouensis, P. wangii and P. hunanensis of Primula sect. Carolinella. PMID:27579832

  12. Cytochrome C interaction with cardiolipin/phosphatidylcholine model membranes: effect of cardiolipin protonation.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna P; Molotkovsky, Julian G; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2006-06-01

    Resonance energy transfer between anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine as a donor and heme moiety of cytochrome c (cyt c) as an acceptor has been employed to explore the protein binding to model membranes, composed of phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin (CL). The existence of two types of protein-lipid complexes has been hypothesized where either deprotonated or partially protonated CL molecules are responsible for cyt c attachment to bilayer surface. To quantitatively describe cyt c membrane binding, the adsorption model based on scaled particle and double layer theories has been employed, with potential-dependent association constants being treated as a function of acidic phospholipid mole fraction, degree of CL protonation, ionic strength, and surface coverage. Multiple arrays of resonance energy transfer data obtained under conditions of varying pH, ionic strength, CL content, and protein/lipid molar ratio have been analyzed in terms of the model of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems combined with the adsorption model allowing for area exclusion and electrostatic effects. The set of recovered model parameters included effective protein charge, intrinsic association constants, and heme distance from the bilayer midplane for both types of protein-lipid complexes. Upon increasing CL mole fraction from 10 to 20 mol % (the value close to that characteristic of the inner mitochondrial membrane), the binding equilibrium dramatically shifted toward cyt c association with partially protonated CL species. The estimates of heme distance from bilayer center suggest shallow bilayer location of cyt c at physiological pH, whereas at pH below 6.0, the protein tends to insert into membrane core.

  13. Cytochrome c Interaction with Cardiolipin/Phosphatidylcholine Model Membranes: Effect of Cardiolipin Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Gorbenko, Galyna P.; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Kinnunen, Paavo K. J.

    2006-01-01

    Resonance energy transfer between anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine as a donor and heme moiety of cytochrome c (cyt c) as an acceptor has been employed to explore the protein binding to model membranes, composed of phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin (CL). The existence of two types of protein-lipid complexes has been hypothesized where either deprotonated or partially protonated CL molecules are responsible for cyt c attachment to bilayer surface. To quantitatively describe cyt c membrane binding, the adsorption model based on scaled particle and double layer theories has been employed, with potential-dependent association constants being treated as a function of acidic phospholipid mole fraction, degree of CL protonation, ionic strength, and surface coverage. Multiple arrays of resonance energy transfer data obtained under conditions of varying pH, ionic strength, CL content, and protein/lipid molar ratio have been analyzed in terms of the model of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems combined with the adsorption model allowing for area exclusion and electrostatic effects. The set of recovered model parameters included effective protein charge, intrinsic association constants, and heme distance from the bilayer midplane for both types of protein-lipid complexes. Upon increasing CL mole fraction from 10 to 20 mol % (the value close to that characteristic of the inner mitochondrial membrane), the binding equilibrium dramatically shifted toward cyt c association with partially protonated CL species. The estimates of heme distance from bilayer center suggest shallow bilayer location of cyt c at physiological pH, whereas at pH below 6.0, the protein tends to insert into membrane core. PMID:16565064

  14. Molecular, biochemical, and morphometric characterization of Fasciola species potentially causing zoonotic disease in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Rahimy, Hoda H; Mahgoub, Abeer M A; El-Gebaly, Naglaa Saad M; Mousa, Wahid M A; Antably, Abeer S A E

    2012-09-01

    Fascioliasis is an important disease caused by Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. The distributions of both species overlap in many areas of Asia and Africa including Egypt. Fifty adult Fasciola worms were collected from livers of cattle and sheep slaughtered in abattoirs, Cairo, Egypt. They were subjected to morphological and metric assessment of external features of fresh adults, morphological and metric assessment of internal anatomy of stained mounted worms, determination of electrophorezed bands of crude adult homogenates using SDS-PAGE, and molecular characterization of species-specific DNA segments using RFLP-PCR. It was found that the correlation between conventional morphology and its morphotype was statistically significant (P value = 0.00). Using SDS-PAGE, 13 bands were detected among both genotypes of Fasciola (35.7, 33.6, 32.4, 29.3, 27.5, 26, 24.4, 23, 21.45, 19, 16.75, 12.5, and 9.1 kDa).The most prevalent bands were that with a molecular weight of 29.3, 26, and 19 kDa. Bands detected were common for both species, but protein bands could not distinguish between F. hepatica and F. gigantica. The result of PCR for the amplification of the selected 28S rDNA fragment with the designed primer set yielded 618 bp long PCR products for F. hepatica and F. gigantica. Different band patterns generated after digestion of the 618 bp segment by the enzyme AvaII obtained with F. hepatica showed segments of the length 529, 62, 27 bp, while with F. gigantica 322, 269, 27 bp bands were obtained. Genotyping revealed no equivocal results. The conventional morphological parameters for species determination of Fasciola spp. endemic in Egypt were evaluated versus protein bands characterization and genotyping. It was concluded that conventional morphological and metric assessments were not useful for differentiation between F. gigantica and F. hepatica due to extensive overlap in the relative ranges. Similar conclusion was reached concerning protein band

  15. Scrambled eggs: A highly sensitive molecular diagnostic workflow for Fasciola species specific detection from faecal samples

    PubMed Central

    Calvani, Nichola Eliza Davies; Windsor, Peter Andrew; Bush, Russell David

    2017-01-01

    Background Fasciolosis, due to Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, is a re-emerging zoonotic parasitic disease of worldwide importance. Human and animal infections are commonly diagnosed by the traditional sedimentation and faecal egg-counting technique. However, this technique is time-consuming and prone to sensitivity errors when a large number of samples must be processed or if the operator lacks sufficient experience. Additionally, diagnosis can only be made once the 12-week pre-patent period has passed. Recently, a commercially available coprological antigen ELISA has enabled detection of F. hepatica prior to the completion of the pre-patent period, providing earlier diagnosis and increased throughput, although species differentiation is not possible in areas of parasite sympatry. Real-time PCR offers the combined benefits of highly sensitive species differentiation for medium to large sample sizes. However, no molecular diagnostic workflow currently exists for the identification of Fasciola spp. in faecal samples. Methodology/Principal findings A new molecular diagnostic workflow for the highly-sensitive detection and quantification of Fasciola spp. in faecal samples was developed. The technique involves sedimenting and pelleting the samples prior to DNA isolation in order to concentrate the eggs, followed by disruption by bead-beating in a benchtop homogeniser to ensure access to DNA. Although both the new molecular workflow and the traditional sedimentation technique were sensitive and specific, the new molecular workflow enabled faster sample throughput in medium to large epidemiological studies, and provided the additional benefit of speciation. Further, good correlation (R2 = 0.74–0.76) was observed between the real-time PCR values and the faecal egg count (FEC) using the new molecular workflow for all herds and sampling periods. Finally, no effect of storage in 70% ethanol was detected on sedimentation and DNA isolation outcomes; enabling

  16. Autoantibodies against mouse bromelain-modified RBC are specifically inhibited by a common membrane phospholipid, phosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, K O; Hardy, S J

    1985-01-01

    Sera from mice injected 4 days earlier with lipopolysaccharide lysed mouse RBC treated with bromelain (brom). This lytic activity was totally inhibited by including phosphatidylcholine at final concentrations of about 2 micrograms/ml, or more, in the lytic mixtures. In contrast, the lytic activity of antibodies against rat RBC was not inhibited, even at concentrations of phosphatidylcholine up to 2.5 mg/ml. Various components of the phosphatidylcholine molecule, and other lipids including the closely-related molecule dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl-dimethyl-ethanolamine which is identical to dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, except for the absence of a CH2 group on the polar head group, did not inhibit lysis by the autoantibodies. Autoantibodies against mouse brom RBC, but not antibodies against rat RBC, bound to, and could be eluted from, phosphatidylcholine molecules attached to an insoluble matrix. Liposomes of phosphatidylcholine prepared in the presence of phosphatidic acid or phosphatidylinositol did not inhibit the lysis of mouse brom RBC by autoantibodies to the same extent as liposomes of only phosphatidylcholine. This suggests that phosphatidylcholine is recognized by the autoantibodies only if presented in a certain configuration. We suggest that the function of these autoantibodies may be to facilitate the removal of membrane-damaged cells from the body. Such cells may arise by the process of ageing, or because of the effects of infectious agents such as viruses. PMID:4007927

  17. Evidence for an oleoyl phosphatidylcholine desaturase in microsomal preparations from cotyledons of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) seed.

    PubMed Central

    Slack, C R; Roughan, P G; Browse, J

    1979-01-01

    1. [14C]Oleoyl-CoA was metabolized rapidly and essentially completely by microsomal preparations from developing safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) cotyledons, and most of the [14C]oleate was incorporated into 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine. 2. In aerobic reaction mixtures containing NADH2 the [14C]oleate in 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine was converted into [14C]linoleate without any change in the specific radioactivity of the lipid. Over a 60 min incubation period the extent of conversion of [14C]oleoyl phosphatidylcholine into [14C]linoleoyl phosphatidylcholine was generally greater than 60%. The rate of desaturation of endogenous [14C]oleoyl phosphatidylcholine labelled from [14C]oleoyl-CoA was much greater that of exogenous [14C]dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine the specific radioactivity of the oleoyl moiety of the lipid remained constant, indicating that labelled and unlabelled oleate were desaturated at the same rate. On this assumption an initial rate of desaturation of about 15 nmol of oleate desaturated/min per mumol of 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine was estimated. 4. [14C]Oleate esterified at positions 1 and 2 of both endogenous and exogenous 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine was desaturated. 5. Attempts to demonstrate the presence of an oleoyl-CoA desaturase in safflower microsomal fractions by the appearance of linoleoyl-CoA in reaction mixtures were inconclusive. PMID:475773

  18. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of a New Trichuris Species (Nematoda- Trichuridae), and Phylogenetic Relationships of Trichuris Species of Cricetid Rodents from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Robles, María del Rosario; Cutillas, Cristina; Panei, Carlos Javier; Callejón, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Populations of Trichuris spp. isolated from six species of sigmodontine rodents from Argentina were analyzed based on morphological characteristics and ITS2 (rDNA) region sequences. Molecular data provided an opportunity to discuss the phylogenetic relationships among the Trichuris spp. from Noth and South America (mainly from Argentina). Trichuris specimens were identified morphologically as Trichuris pardinasi, T. navonae, Trichuris sp. and Trichuris new species, described in this paper. Sequences analyzed by Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference methods showed four main clades corresponding with the four different species regardless of geographical origin and host species. These four species from sigmodontine rodents clustered together and separated from Trichuris species isolated from murine and arvicoline rodents (outgroup). Different genetic lineages observed among Trichuris species from sigmodontine rodents which supported the proposal of a new species. Moreover, host distribution showed correspondence with the different tribes within the subfamily Sigmodontinae. PMID:25393618

  19. Morphological and molecular characterization of a new Trichuris species (Nematoda- Trichuridae), and phylogenetic relationships of Trichuris species of Cricetid rodents from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Robles, María Del Rosario; Cutillas, Cristina; Panei, Carlos Javier; Callejón, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Populations of Trichuris spp. isolated from six species of sigmodontine rodents from Argentina were analyzed based on morphological characteristics and ITS2 (rDNA) region sequences. Molecular data provided an opportunity to discuss the phylogenetic relationships among the Trichuris spp. from Noth and South America (mainly from Argentina). Trichuris specimens were identified morphologically as Trichuris pardinasi, T. navonae, Trichuris sp. and Trichuris new species, described in this paper. Sequences analyzed by Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference methods showed four main clades corresponding with the four different species regardless of geographical origin and host species. These four species from sigmodontine rodents clustered together and separated from Trichuris species isolated from murine and arvicoline rodents (outgroup). Different genetic lineages observed among Trichuris species from sigmodontine rodents which supported the proposal of a new species. Moreover, host distribution showed correspondence with the different tribes within the subfamily Sigmodontinae.

  20. Molecular characterisation of Anaplasma species from African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Danielle; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Jolles, Anna; Beechler, Brianna; Jabbar, Abdul

    2017-03-01

    Bovine anaplasmosis is a tick-borne disease, mainly caused by Anaplasma marginale and A. centrale and is distributed in tropical and sub-tropical areas. This study aimed to characterise A. marginale and A. centrale from African buffaloes in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa, using the DNA sequences of the genes coding for major surface protein (msp1β) and heat shock protein (groEL), respectively. A total of 747 blood samples were collected from February 2014 to August 2016 from African buffaloes kept in KNP, and DNAs were tested using a molecular-phylogenetic approach. Out of 747 samples tested, 129 (17.3%) and 98 (13.1%) were positive for single infection with A. marginale and A. centrale, respectively; whereas 113 (15.1%) were positive for both Anaplasma spp. Pairwise difference of 1.6-8.5% was observed in msp1β sequences of A. marginale whereas that was only 0.3-2.4% for groEL sequences of A. centrale. Separate phylogenetic analyses of msp1β and groEL sequences of A. marginale and A. centrale, respectively, revealed that sequences of Anaplasma spp. from African buffaloes were unique and they grouped separately when compared with previously published sequences of both species. This is the first study to characterise A. marginale and A. centrale from African buffalo using species specific molecular markers. This study will pave the way for future studies to assess genetic variation among Anaplasma spp. from wild ruminants using molecular markers that are better at differentiating between species and strains than the more commonly used 16S rRNA gene, and help to undertake health and fitness studies and host-parasite dynamics using quantitative molecular tools.

  1. Molecular assessment of bacterial vaginosis by Lactobacillus abundance and species diversity.

    PubMed

    Dols, Joke A M; Molenaar, Douwe; van der Helm, Jannie J; Caspers, Martien P M; de Kat Angelino-Bart, Alie; Schuren, Frank H J; Speksnijder, Adrianus G C L; Westerhoff, Hans V; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Boon, Mathilde E; Reid, Gregor; de Vries, Henry J C; Kort, Remco

    2016-04-23

    To date, women are most often diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using microscopy based Nugent scoring or Amsel criteria. However, the accuracy is less than optimal. The aim of the present study was to confirm the identity of known BV-associated composition profiles and evaluate indicators for BV using three molecular methods. Evaluation of indicators for BV was carried out by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V5-V7 region, a tailor-made 16S rRNA oligonucleotide-based microarray, and a PCR-based profiling technique termed IS-profiling, which is based on fragment variability of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. An inventory of vaginal bacterial species was obtained from 40 females attending a Dutch sexually transmitted infection outpatient clinic, of which 20 diagnosed with BV (Nugent score 7-10), and 20 BV negative (Nugent score 0-3). Analysis of the bacterial communities by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed two clusters in the BV negative women, dominated by either Lactobacillus iners or Lactobacillus crispatus and three distinct clusters in the BV positive women. In the former, there was a virtually complete, negative correlation between L. crispatus and L. iners. BV positive subjects showed cluster profiles that were relatively high in bacterial species diversity and dominated by anaerobic species, including Gardnerella vaginalis, and those belonging to the Families of Lachnospiraceae and Leptotrichiaceae. Accordingly, the Gini-Simpson index of species diversity, and the relative abundance Lactobacillus species appeared consistent indicators for BV. Under the conditions used, only the 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing method was suitable to assess species diversity, while all three molecular composition profiling methods were able to indicate Lactobacillus abundance in the vaginal microbiota. An affordable and simple molecular test showing a depletion of the genus Lactobacillus in combination with an increased species diversity of vaginal

  2. Sequence diversity in three tomato species: SNPs, markers, and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Gómez, José M; Maloof, Julin N

    2009-07-03

    Tomato species are of significant agricultural and ecological interest, with cultivated tomato being among the most common vegetable crops grown. Wild tomato species are native to diverse habitats in South America and show great morphological and ecological diversity that has proven useful in breeding programs. However, relatively little is known about nucleotide diversity between tomato species. Until recently limited sequence information was available for tomato, preventing genome-wide evolutionary analyses. Now, an extensive collection of tomato expressed sequence tags (ESTs) is available at the SOL Genomics Network (SGN). This database holds sequences from several species, annotated with quality values, assembled into unigenes, and tested for homology against other genomes. Despite the importance of polymorphism detection for breeding and natural variation studies, such analyses in tomato have mostly been restricted to cultivated accessions. Importantly, previous polymorphisms surveys mostly ignored the linked meta-information, limiting functional and evolutionary analyses. The current data in SGN is thus an under-exploited resource. Here we describe a cross-species analysis taking full-advantage of available information. We mined 20,000 interspecific polymorphisms between Solanum lycopersicum and S. habrochaites or S. pennellii and 28,800 intraspecific polymorphisms within S. lycopersicum. Using the available meta-information we classified genes into functional categories and obtained estimations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) quality, position in the gene, and effect on the encoded proteins, allowing us to perform evolutionary analyses. Finally, we developed a set of more than 10,000 between-species molecular markers optimized by sequence quality and predicted intron position. Experimental validation of 491 of these molecular markers resulted in confirmation of 413 polymorphisms. We present a new analysis of the extensive tomato EST sequences

  3. A test of color-based taxonomy in nudibranchs: Molecular phylogeny and species delimitation of the Felimida clenchi (Mollusca: Chromodorididae) species complex.

    PubMed

    Padula, Vinicius; Bahia, Juliana; Stöger, Isabella; Camacho-García, Yolanda; Malaquias, Manuel António E; Cervera, Juan Lucas; Schrödl, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, species identification in nudibranch gastropods relies heavily on body color pattern. The Felimida clenchi species complex, a group of brightly colored Atlantic and Mediterranean species in the family Chromodorididae, has a history of exceptional controversy and discussion among taxonomists. The most widely accepted hypothesis is that the complex includes four species (Felimida clenchi, F. neona, F. binza and F. britoi), each with a characteristic body color pattern. In this study, we investigated the taxonomic value of coloration in the Felimida clenchi complex, using molecular phylogenetics, species-delimitation analyses (ABGD, GMYC, PTP), haplotype-network methods, and the anatomy of the reproductive system. None of our analyses recovered the traditional separation into four species. Our results indicated the existence of three species, a result inconsistent with previous taxonomic hypotheses. We distinguished an undescribed species of Felimida and redefined the concepts of F. clenchi and F. binza, both highly polychromatic species. For the first time, molecular data support the existence of extreme color polymorphism in chromatic nudibranch species, with direct implications for the taxonomy of the group and its diversity. The polychromatism observed in the F. clenchi complex apparently correlates with the regional occurrence of similar color patterns in congeneric species, suggesting different mimicry circles. This may represent a parallel in the marine environment to the mechanisms that play a major role in the diversification of color in terrestrial and fresh-water chromatic groups, such as heliconian butterflies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phylogenetic relationships among Neoechinorhynchus species (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from North-East Asia based on molecular data.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Mikhailova, Ekaterina; Denisova, Galina

    2014-02-01

    Phylogenetic and statistical analyses of DNA sequences of two genes, cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox 1) of the mitochondrial DNA and 18S subunit of the nuclear ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA), was used to characterize Neoechinorhynchus species from fishes collected in different localities of North-East Asia. It has been found that four species can be clearly recognized using molecular markers-Neoechinorhynchus tumidus, Neoechinorhynchus beringianus, Neoechinorhynchus simansularis and Neoechinorhynchus salmonis. 18S sequences ascribed to Neoechinorhynchus crassus specimens from North-East Asia were identical to those of N. tumidus, but differed substantially from North American N. crassus. We renamed North-East Asian N. crassus specimens to N. sp., although the possibility that they represent a subspecies of N. tumidus cannot be excluded, taking into account a relatively small distance between cox 1 sequences of North-East Asian specimens of N. crassus and N. tumidus. Maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference analyses were performed for phylogeny reconstruction. All the phylogenetic trees showed that North-East Asian species of Neoechinorhynchus analyzed in this study represent independent clades, with the only exception of N. tumidus and N. sp. for 18S data. Phylogenetic analysis has shown that the majority of species sampled (N. tumidus+N. sp., N. simansularis and N. beringianus) are probably very closely related, while N. salmonis occupies separate position in the trees, possibly indicating a North American origin of this species. © 2013.

  5. Molecular phylogeny of some avian species using Cytochrome b gene sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Awad, A; Khalil, S. R; Abd-Elhakim, Y. M

    2015-01-01

    Veritable identification and differentiation of avian species is a vital step in conservative, taxonomic, forensic, legal and other ornithological interventions. Therefore, this study involved the application of molecular approach to identify some avian species i.e. Chicken (Gallus gallus), Muskovy duck (Cairina moschata), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), Laughing dove (Streptopelia senegalensis), and Rock pigeon (Columba livia). Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples and partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (358 bp) was amplified and sequenced using universal primers. Sequences alignment and phylogenetic analyses were performed by CLC main workbench program. The obtained five sequences were deposited in GenBank and compared with those previously registered in GenBank. The similarity percentage was 88.60% between Gallus gallus and Coturnix japonica and 80.46% between Gallus gallus and Columba livia. The percentage of identity between the studied species and GenBank species ranged from 77.20% (Columba oenas and Anas platyrhynchos) to 100% (Gallus gallus and Gallus sonneratii, Coturnix coturnix and Coturnix japonica, Meleagris gallopavo and Columba livia). Amplification of the partial sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene proved to be practical for identification of an avian species unambiguously. PMID:27175180

  6. Molecular phylogeny and morphometric analyses reveal deep divergence between Amazonia and Atlantic Forest species of Dendrophryniscus.

    PubMed

    Fouquet, Antoine; Recoder, Renato; Teixeira, Mauro; Cassimiro, José; Amaro, Renata Cecília; Camacho, Agustín; Damasceno, Roberta; Carnaval, Ana Carolina; Moritz, Craig; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut

    2012-03-01

    Dendrophryniscus is an early diverging clade of bufonids represented by few small-bodied species distributed in Amazonia and the Atlantic Forest. We used mitochondrial (414 bp of 12S, 575 bp of 16S genes) and nuclear DNA (785 bp of RAG-1) to investigate phylogenetic relationships and the timing of diversification within the genus. These molecular data were gathered from 23 specimens from 19 populations, including eight out of the 10 nominal species of the genus as well as Rhinella boulengeri. Analyses also included sequences of representatives of 18 other bufonid genera that were publically available. We also examined morphological characters to analyze differences within Dendrophryniscus. We found deep genetic divergence between an Amazonian and an Atlantic Forest clade, dating back to Eocene. Morphological data corroborate this distinction. We thus propose to assign the Amazonian species to a new genus, Amazonella. The species currently named R. boulengeri, which has been previously assigned to the genus Rhamphophryne, is shown to be closely related to Dendrophryniscus species. Our findings illustrate cryptic trends in bufonid morphological evolution, and point to a deep history of persistence and diversification within the Amazonian and Atlantic rainforests. We discuss our results in light of available paleoecological data and the biogeographic patterns observed in other similarly distributed groups.

  7. Molecular evidence for species status of the endangered Hainan peacock pheasant.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiang; Wang, Biao; Zhang, Yang-Yun; Liu, Ying; Liang, Wei; Wang, Ji-Chao; Shi, Hai-Tao; Su, Wen-Ba; Zhang, Zheng-Wang

    2008-01-01

    The Hainan peacock pheasant is an endangered taxon found only on Hainan Island of China. Due to lack of detailed taxonomic studies, whether it is a subspecies of the grey peacock pheasant (Polyplectron bicalcaratum katsumatae) or a full species (Polyplectron katsumatae) remained unclear. We used molecular markers, including the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and intron G of the nuclear ovomucoid gene, to reevaluate the taxonomy of the Hainan peacock pheasant. The results showed phylogeographic monophyly and large genetic distance between the Hainan peacock pheasant and the grey peacock pheasant. Sequence differences corroborated the species-level distinction between these two peacock pheasants, which were inferred to have diverged about 1.4+/-0.3 million years ago, near the time Hainan Island became separated from mainland China. Because the population density of the Hainan peacock pheasant is very low in its tropical forest on the island and the wild population is declining, it is now becoming severely endangered and should be ranked as the rarest species in the Order Galliformes in China. Our results increase the urgency of getting more morphological data to support the classification of the Hainan peacock pheasant as a distinct species and taking more conservation action immediately to protect this endangered island species.

  8. Molecular Variation in Chloroplast DNA Regions in Ancestral Species of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, N. T.; Mori, N.; Tsunewaki, K.

    1994-01-01

    Restriction map variation in two 5-6-kb chloroplast DNA regions of five diploid Aegilops species in the section Sitopsis and two wild tetraploid wheats, Triticum dicoccoides and Triticum araraticum, was investigated with a battery of four-cutter restriction enzymes. A single accession each of Triticum durum, Triticum timopheevi and Triticum aestivum was included as a reference. More than 250 restriction sites were scored, of which only seven sites were found polymorphic in Aegilops speltoides. No restriction site polymorphisms were detected in all of the other diploid and tetraploid species. In addition, six insertion/deletion polymorphisms were detected, but they were mostly unique or species-specific. Estimated nucleotide diversity was 0.0006 for A. speltoides, and 0.0000 for all the other investigated species. In A. speltoides, none of Tajima's D values was significant, indicating no clear deviation from the neutrality of molecular polymorphisms. Significant non-random association was detected for three combinations out of 10 possible pairs between polymorphic restriction sites in A. speltoides. Phylogenetic relationship among all the plastotypes (plastid genotype) suggested the diphyletic origin of T. dicoccoides and T. araraticum. A plastotype of one A. speltoides accession was identical to the major type of T. araraticum (T. timopheevi inclusively). Three of the plastotypes found in the Sitopsis species are very similar, but not identical, to that of T. dicoccoides, T. durum and T. aestivum. PMID:7916310

  9. Molecular Survey on Brucellosis in Rodents and Shrews - Natural Reservoirs of Novel Brucella Species in Germany?

    PubMed

    Hammerl, J A; Ulrich, R G; Imholt, C; Scholz, H C; Jacob, J; Kratzmann, N; Nöckler, K; Al Dahouk, S

    2017-04-01

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease introduced from animal reservoirs to humans. In Germany, bovine and ovine/caprine brucellosis were eradicated more than a decade ago and mandatory measures in livestock have been implemented to keep the officially brucellosis-free status. In contrast, surveillance of wildlife is still challenging, and reliable data on the prevalence of brucellae in small mammal populations do not exist. To assess the epidemiology of Brucella spp. in rodents and shrews, a molecular survey was carried out. A total of 537 rodents and shrews were trapped in four federal states located throughout Germany and investigated for the presence of Brucella. Using a two-step molecular assay based on the detection of the Brucella-specific bcsp31 and IS711 sequences in tissue samples, 14.2% (n = 76) of the tested animals were positive. These originated mainly from western and south-western Germany, where preliminary analyses indicate population density-dependent Brucella prevalence in voles (Myodes glareolus) and mice (Apodemus spp.). recA typing revealed a close relationship to a potentially novel Brucella species recently isolated from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Austria. The molecular detection of brucellae in various rodent taxa and for the first time in shrew species shows that these animals may be naturally infected or at least have a history of exposure to Brucella spp.

  10. Molecular shifts in limb identity underlie development of feathered feet in two domestic avian species

    PubMed Central

    Domyan, Eric T; Kronenberg, Zev; Infante, Carlos R; Vickrey, Anna I; Stringham, Sydney A; Bruders, Rebecca; Guernsey, Michael W; Park, Sungdae; Payne, Jason; Beckstead, Robert B; Kardon, Gabrielle; Menke, Douglas B; Yandell, Mark; Shapiro, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Birds display remarkable diversity in the distribution and morphology of scales and feathers on their feet, yet the genetic and developmental mechanisms governing this diversity remain unknown. Domestic pigeons have striking variation in foot feathering within a single species, providing a tractable model to investigate the molecular basis of skin appendage differences. We found that feathered feet in pigeons result from a partial transformation from hindlimb to forelimb identity mediated by cis-regulatory changes in the genes encoding the hindlimb-specific transcription factor Pitx1 and forelimb-specific transcription factor Tbx5. We also found that ectopic expression of Tbx5 is associated with foot feathers in chickens, suggesting similar molecular pathways underlie phenotypic convergence between these two species. These results show how changes in expression of regional patterning genes can generate localized changes in organ fate and morphology, and provide viable molecular mechanisms for diversity in hindlimb scale and feather distribution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12115.001 PMID:26977633

  11. Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of air sac catfishes of the Heteropneustes fossilis species complex (Siluriformes: Heteropneustidae).

    PubMed

    Ratmuangkhwang, Sahat; Musikasinthorn, Prachya; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2014-10-01

    The air sac catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis (Siluriformes: Heteropneustidae), is widely distributed in freshwaters of the Indian subcontinent and mainland southeast Asia. No comprehensive molecular studies that cover the broad distributional areas have been carried out to date. Here, we conducted molecular phylogenetic analyses using both mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences to suggest that the Heteropneustes fossilis species complex consists of three clades that may potentially be separate species with distinct geographical distribution (southeast Asia, northeastern India, and southwestern India). The first and second clades are more closely related to each other than they are to the third clade. Within the first clade there is a basal divergence of a subclade consisting of individuals from the Upper Irrawaddy River basin of Myanmar, which share some morphological traits with members of the Indian clades. Our molecular and morphological data are congruent with hypotheses that the Early-Middle Miocene disconnection between the paleo-Tsangpo River and the Irrawaddy River caused the vicariant divergence between southeast Asian and northeastern Indian clades, and that the southeast Asian Heteropneustes originated from the Upper Irrawaddy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Resonance ionization spectroscopy measurement of the vapor pressure of several molecular species

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, G.A.; Jessup, D.A.; Borella, H.M.; Franks, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) has found increasing application to various problems involving detection of low levels of atomic, and more recently molecular, species. This work demonstrates the usefulness of RIS in measuring vapor pressure curves of molecular species at very low pressures. Specifically, the vapor pressures versus temperature relationship for rubidium iodide (RbI) and potassium iodide (KI) was measured by applying RIS to atomic Rb and K, using a two-laser system. A pulsed molecular nitrogen laser first dissociated the RbI to produce ground-state Rb atoms in the experimental cell. A flashlamp-pumped dye laser then ionized the Rb in a process wherein two photons of the same wavelength are absorbed, the first exciting Rb via an allowed transition to an upper state (5/sup 2/S/sub 1/2/ ..-->.. 6/sup 2//sub 1/2 or 3/2/) lying in energy slightly more than half the distance to the ionization limit, and the second photon ionizing the excited Rb. In the case of KI, an excimer-laser-pumped dye laser was used in a similar way. An applied dc electric field swept the photoelectrons to a proportional counter for subsequent amplification and detection. The photoelectron signal was then related back to RbI and KI concentrations.

  13. Taxonomic and Molecular Identification of Hemicaloosia, Hemicycliophora, Gracilacus and Paratylenchus Species (Nematoda: Criconematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cordero López, Marco A.; Robbins, Robert T.; Szalanski, Allen L.

    2013-01-01

    Populations of Hemicycliophora epicharoides, H. gigas, H. labiata, H. pruni, H. shepherdi, H. vidua, H. zuckermani, Gracilacus straeleni, and Paratylenchus labiosus were obtained from different geographical areas in the continental United States and characterized morphological and molecularly. Two new species of Hemicycliophorinae: Hemicaloosia uarki n. sp from Pinetree, St. Francis County, Arkansas, and Hemicycliophora wyei n. sp from Wayne County, North Carolina, are also described. Hemicaloosia uarki n. sp. is characterized by having two lip annuli separated from the rest of body and directed anteriorly, a long stylet (106-124 μm), long body length (1,081-1,326 μm) and a single lateral fields demarcated by interruptions of the body annuli. Hemicycliophora wyei n. sp. showed a lateral fields demarked by two faint lines with transverse anastomoses and/or breaks of the striae; an elongated not offset conical tail with distinct annulations and a rounded tip and long vulval lips with a vulval sleeve. The molecular characterizations of the new (H. uarki n. sp. and H. wyei n. sp.) and known species of Criconematidae using the ITS1 rDNA gene sequence and the molecular phylogenetic relationships are provided. PMID:24115782

  14. Taxonomic and Molecular Identification of Bakernema, Criconema, Hemicriconemoides, Ogma and Xenocriconemella Species (Nematoda: Criconematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Marco A.; Robbins, Robert T.; Szalanski, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    Populations of Bakernema inaequale, C. petasum, C. sphagni, C. mutabile, Ogma octangulare, Xenocriconemella macrodora and Hemicriconemoides chitwoodi were identified and re-described from different geographical areas in the continental United States and molecularly characterized. Two new species of spine nematodes Criconema arkaense n. sp. from Washington County and Lee County, Arkansas and Criconema warrenense n. sp from Warren, Bradley County, Arkansas are also described and named. Criconema arkaense is characterize by having a conspicuous lip region offset from the body with two annuli, short rounded tail with a thin cuticular sheath and subterminal anus. Criconema warrenense n. sp. has two lip region annuli about the same width, first annulus directed posteriorly, separated by a narrow neck annulus and a short conoid tail, unilobed non-folded annulus. The molecular characterization of Criconema arkaense and Criconema warrenense using ITS1 rDNA gene sequence and the molecular phylogenetic relationships of these new species along with the known spines nematodes are provided. PMID:23482683

  15. Using Combined Morphological, Allometric and Molecular Approaches to Identify Species of the Genus Raillietiella (Pentastomida)

    PubMed Central

    Kelehear, Crystal; Spratt, David M.; Dubey, Sylvain; Brown, Gregory P.; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Taxonomic studies of parasites can be severely compromised if the host species affects parasite morphology; an uncritical analysis might recognize multiple taxa simply because of phenotypically plastic responses of parasite morphology to host physiology. Pentastomids of the genus Raillietiella are endoparasitic crustaceans primarily infecting the respiratory system of carnivorous reptiles, but also recorded from bufonid anurans. The delineation of pentastomids at the generic level is clear, but the taxonomic status of many species is not. We collected raillietiellids from lungs of the invasive cane toad (Rhinella marina), the invasive Asian house gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus), and a native tree frog (Litoria caerulea) in tropical Australia, and employed a combination of genetic analyses, and traditional and novel morphological methods to clarify their identity. Conventional analyses of parasite morphology (which focus on raw values of morphological traits) revealed two discrete clusters in terms of pentastome hook size, implying two different species of pentastomes: one from toads and a tree frog (Raillietiella indica) and another from lizards (Raillietiella frenatus). However, these clusters disappeared in allometric analyses that took pentastome body size into account, suggesting that only a single pentastome taxon may be involved. Our molecular data revealed no genetic differences between parasites in toads versus lizards, confirming that there was only one species: R. frenatus. This pentastome (previously known only from lizards) clearly is also capable of maturing in anurans. Our analyses show that the morphological features used in pentastomid taxonomy change as the parasite transitions through developmental stages in the definitive host. To facilitate valid descriptions of new species of pentastomes, future taxonomic work should include both morphological measurements (incorporating quantitative measures of body size and hook bluntness) and molecular data

  16. Relationships of the Woody Medicago Species (Section Dendrotelis) Assessed by Molecular Cytogenetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Castro, Mercedes; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The organization of rDNA genes in the woody medic species from the agronomically important Medicago section Dendrotelis was analysed to gain insight into their taxonomic relationships, to assess the levels of infraspecific variation concerning ribosomal loci in a restricted and fragmented insular species (M. citrina) and to assess the nature of its polyploidy. Methods Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 45S ribosomal DNA genes in the three species of section Dendrotelis (M. arborea, M. citrina, M. strasseri) and the related M. marina from section Medicago. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to assess the genomic relationships of the polyploid M. citrina with the putatively related species from section Dendrotelis. Key Results The diploid (2n = 16) M. marina has a single 45S and two 5S rDNA loci, a pattern usually detected in previous studies of Medicago diploid species. However, polyploid species from section Dendrotelis depart from expectations. The tetraploid species (2n = 32) M. arborea and M. strasseri have one 45S rDNA locus and two 5S rDNA loci, whereas in the hexaploid (2n = 48) M. citrina four 45S rDNA and five 5S rDNA loci have been detected. No single chromosome of M. citrina was uniformly labelled after using genomic probes from M. arborea and M. strasseri. Instead, cross-hybridization signals in M. citrina were restricted to terminal chromosome arms and NOR regions. Conclusions FISH results support the close taxonomic interrelationship between M. arborea and M. strasseri. In these tetraploid species, NOR loci have experienced a diploidization event through physical loss of sequences, a cytogenetic feature so far not reported in other species of the genus. The high number of rDNA loci and GISH results support the specific status for the hexaploid M. citrina, and it is suggested that this species is not an autopolyploid derivative of M. arborea or M. strasseri. Further, molecular

  17. Widespread utility of highly informative AFLP molecular markers across divergent shark species.

    PubMed

    Zenger, Kyall R; Stow, Adam J; Peddemors, Victor; Briscoe, David A; Harcourt, Robert G

    2006-01-01

    Population numbers of many shark species are declining rapidly around the world. Despite the commercial and conservation significance, little is known on even the most fundamental aspects of their population biology. Data collection that relies on direct observation can be logistically challenging with sharks. Consequently, molecular methods are becoming increasingly important to obtain knowledge that is critical for conservation and management. Here we describe an amplified fragment length polymorphism method that can be applied universally to sharks to identify highly informative genome-wide polymorphisms from 12 primer pairs. We demonstrate the value of our method on 15 divergent shark species within the superorder Galeomorphii, including endangered species which are notorious for low levels of genetic diversity. Both the endangered sand tiger shark (Carcharodon taurus, N = 18) and the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, N = 7) displayed relatively high levels of allelic diversity. A total of 59 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.373) and 78 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.316) were resolved in C. taurus and C. carcharias, respectively. Results from other sharks (e.g., Orectolobus ornatus, Orectolobus sp., and Galeocerdo cuvier) produced remarkably high numbers of polymorphic loci (106, 94, and 86, respectively) from a limited sample size of only 2. A major constraint to obtaining much needed genetic data from sharks is the time-consuming process of developing molecular markers. Here we demonstrate the general utility of a technique that provides large numbers of informative loci in sharks.

  18. Modified oleic cottonseeds show altered content, composition and tissue-specific distribution of triacylglycerol molecular species.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; Sturtevant, Drew; Chapman, Kent D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted increases in monounsaturated (oleic acid) fatty acid content of refined cottonseed oil could support improved human nutrition and cardiovascular health. Genetic modifications of cottonseed fatty acid composition have been accomplished using several different molecular strategies. Modification of oleic acid content in cottonseed embryos using a dominant-negative protein approach, while successful in effecting change in the desired fatty acid composition, resulted in reduced oil content and seed viability. Here these changes in fatty acid composition were associated with changes in dominant molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAGs) and their spatial distributions within embryo tissues. A combination of mass spectrometry (MS)-based lipidomics approaches, including MS imaging of seed cryo-sections, revealed that cotton embryos expressing a non-functional allele of a Brassica napus delta-12 desaturase showed altered accumulation of TAG species, especially within cotyledonary tissues. While lipid analysis of seed extracts could demonstrate detailed quantitative changes in TAG species in transgenics, the spatial contribution of metabolite compartmentation could only be visualized by MS imaging. Our results suggest tissue-specific differences in TAG biosynthetic pathways within cotton embryos, and indicate the importance of considering the location of metabolites in tissues in addition to their identification and quantification when developing a detailed view of cellular metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Techniques for Detection, Species Differentiation, and Phylogenetic Analysis of Microsporidia

    PubMed Central

    Franzen, Caspar; Müller, Andreas

    1999-01-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that infect a broad range of vertebrates and invertebrates. These parasites are now recognized as one of the most common pathogens in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. For most patients with infectious diseases, microbiological isolation and identification techniques offer the most rapid and specific determination of the etiologic agent. This is not a suitable procedure for microsporidia, which are obligate intracellular parasites requiring cell culture systems for growth. Therefore, the diagnosis of microsporidiosis currently depends on morphological demonstration of the organisms themselves. Although the diagnosis of microsporidiosis and identification of microsporidia by light microscopy have greatly improved during the last few years, species differentiation by these techniques is usually impossible and transmission electron microscopy may be necessary. Immunfluorescent-staining techniques have been developed for species differentiation of microsporidia, but the antibodies used in these procedures are available only at research laboratories at present. During the last 10 years, the detection of infectious disease agents has begun to include the use of nucleic acid-based technologies. Diagnosis of infection caused by parasitic organisms is the last field of clinical microbiology to incorporate these techniques and molecular techniques (e.g., PCR and hybridization assays) have recently been developed for the detection, species differentiation, and phylogenetic analysis of microsporidia. In this paper we review human microsporidial infections and describe and discuss these newly developed molecular techniques. PMID:10194459

  20. First molecular characterization of a Hepatozoon species (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) infecting birds and description of a new species infecting storm petrels (Aves: Hydrobatidae).

    PubMed

    Merino, Santiago; Martínez, Javier; Masello, Juan F; Bedolla, Yuliana; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2014-06-01

    During a survey of blood parasites in a population of Leach's and black storm petrels ( Oceanodroma leucorhoa and Oceanodroma melania) in Mexico, infection by a Hepatozoon species in erythrocytes of several birds was noted. Here we describe the species as Hepatozoon peircei sp. nov. Some species of Hepatozoon described from birds have been identified as lankesterellids when DNA molecular analyses were conducted. However, a sequence of 1,774 bp of the parasite found infecting storm petrels in this study clearly show the parasite is a species of the genus Hepatozoon. This is the first Hepatozoon species infecting birds to be characterized at the molecular level and the first found infecting erythrocytes and not leucocytes.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of the Neotropical Pristimantis leptolophus species group (Anura: Craugastoridae): molecular approach and description of a new polymorphic species.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Correa, Mauricio; Jiménez-Rivillas, Carlos; Daza, Juan M

    2017-03-10

    Pristimantis, distributed throughout the New World tropics, is the most speciose vertebrate genus. Pristimantis presents an enormous morphological diversity and is currently divided into several demonstrably non-monophyletic phenetic species groups. With the purpose of increasing our understanding of Pristimantis systematics, we present the first phylogenetic analysis using molecular evidence to test the monophyly and infer evolutionary relationships within the Pristimantis leptolophus group, an endemic group of frogs from the highlands of the Colombian Andes. Our phylogenetic reconstruction recovers the group as monophyletic with high support, indicating general concordance between molecular data and morphological data. In addition, we describe a new polymorphic species lacking conspicuous tubercles, a regular attribute among species of the P. leptolophus species group and endemic from the Páramo de Sonsón complex (Antioquia, Colombia). The phylogenetic position of the new species is inferred and other systematic implications in the light of our results are discussed.

  2. Molecular tools for species and sex identification in the mixed-species flocks of bean geese and white-fronted geese.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-kyung; Lee, Sang-im; Lee, Hang; Lee, Sangdon

    2012-11-01

    Genetic studies on protected species can be difficult, particularly when they form a mixed-species flock with other species. The bean goose (Anser fabalis), which is internationally recognized as a threatened species, was observed to form overwintering foraging flocks with white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) at agricultural lands to feed on the grains in Korea. Non-invasive samples such as feces and feather that are readily available in their foraging ground can be useful for understanding the structure and composition of populations, but they often require specific experimental conditions due to small amount or low quality of DNA. In this study, we designed sets of primers that would allow efficient molecular identification of species and sex of individuals of bean geese and white-fronted geese. Species-specific primers (WFG-F/BG-F and G-R), developed from ND2 region of mitochondrial DNA, produced PCR products with different sizes which allow easy species identification without further sequencing. Based on published CHD 1 sequences, we designed internal primers (Gsex-F and Gsex-R) for sex determination that can be used in nested PCR after applying P2/P8 primers, and our methods clearly showed high success rate of molecular sexing from non-invasive samples. These molecular tools open the possibilities for genetic studies using non-invasive samples collected from a mixed-species aggregation containing bean geese and white-fronted geese.

  3. Molecular Identification, Antifungal Susceptibility Profile, and Biofilm Formation of Clinical and Environmental Rhodotorula Species Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Jorge Meneses; Bizerra, Fernando César; Ferreira, Renata Carmona e

    2013-01-01

    Rhodotorula species are emergent fungal pathogens capable of causing invasive infections, primarily fungemia. They are particularly problematic in immunosuppressed patients when using a central venous catheter. In this study, we evaluated the species distribution of 51 clinical and 8 environmental Rhodotorula species isolates using the ID32C system and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Antifungal susceptibility testing and biofilm formation capability using a crystal violet staining assay were performed. Using ITS sequencing as the gold standard, the clinical isolates were identified as follows: 44 R. mucilaginosa isolates, 2 R. glutinis isolates, 2 R. minuta isolates, 2 R. dairenensis isolates, and 1 Rhodosporidium fluviale isolate. The environmental isolates included 7 R. mucilaginosa isolates and 1 R. slooffiae isolate. Using the ID32C system, along with a nitrate assimilation test, only 90.3% of the isolates tested were correctly identified. In the biofilm formation assay, R. mucilaginosa and R. minuta exhibited greater biofilm formation ability compared to the other Rhodotorula species; the clinical isolates of R. mucilaginosa showed greater biofilm formation compared to the environmental isolates (P = 0.04). Amphotericin B showed good in vitro activity (MIC ≤ 1 μg/ml) against planktonic cells, whereas voriconazole and posaconazole showed poor activity (MIC50/MIC90, 2/4 μg/ml). Caspofungin and fluconazole MICs were consistently high for all isolates tested (≥64 μg/ml and ≥ 4 μg/ml, respectively). In this study, we emphasized the importance of molecular methods to correctly identify Rhodotorula species isolates and non-R. mucilaginosa species in particular. The antifungal susceptibility profile reinforces amphotericin B as the antifungal drug of choice for the treatment of Rhodotorula infections. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating putative differences in the ability of biofilm formation among different Rhodotorula species

  4. Molecular identification, antifungal susceptibility profile, and biofilm formation of clinical and environmental Rhodotorula species isolates.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Jorge Meneses; Bizerra, Fernando César; Ferreira, Renata Carmona E; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Rhodotorula species are emergent fungal pathogens capable of causing invasive infections, primarily fungemia. They are particularly problematic in immunosuppressed patients when using a central venous catheter. In this study, we evaluated the species distribution of 51 clinical and 8 environmental Rhodotorula species isolates using the ID32C system and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Antifungal susceptibility testing and biofilm formation capability using a crystal violet staining assay were performed. Using ITS sequencing as the gold standard, the clinical isolates were identified as follows: 44 R. mucilaginosa isolates, 2 R. glutinis isolates, 2 R. minuta isolates, 2 R. dairenensis isolates, and 1 Rhodosporidium fluviale isolate. The environmental isolates included 7 R. mucilaginosa isolates and 1 R. slooffiae isolate. Using the ID32C system, along with a nitrate assimilation test, only 90.3% of the isolates tested were correctly identified. In the biofilm formation assay, R. mucilaginosa and R. minuta exhibited greater biofilm formation ability compared to the other Rhodotorula species; the clinical isolates of R. mucilaginosa showed greater biofilm formation compared to the environmental isolates (P = 0.04). Amphotericin B showed good in vitro activity (MIC ≤ 1 μg/ml) against planktonic cells, whereas voriconazole and posaconazole showed poor activity (MIC(50)/MIC(90), 2/4 μg/ml). Caspofungin and fluconazole MICs were consistently high for all isolates tested (≥64 μg/ml and ≥ 4 μg/ml, respectively). In this study, we emphasized the importance of molecular methods to correctly identify Rhodotorula species isolates and non-R. mucilaginosa species in particular. The antifungal susceptibility profile reinforces amphotericin B as the antifungal drug of choice for the treatment of Rhodotorula infections. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating putative differences in the ability of biofilm formation among different Rhodotorula

  5. Advances in conservation endocrinology: the application of molecular approaches to the conservation of endangered species.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, Christopher; McDonough, Caitlin E; Felton, Rachel; Milnes, Matthew R

    2014-07-01

    Among the numerous societal benefits of comparative endocrinology is the application of our collective knowledge of hormone signaling towards the conservation of threatened and endangered species - conservation endocrinology. For several decades endocrinologists have used longitudinal hormone profiles to monitor reproductive status in a multitude of species. Knowledge of reproductive status among individuals has been used to assist in the management of captive and free-ranging populations. More recently, researchers have begun utilizing molecular and cell-based techniques to gain a more complete understanding of hormone signaling in wildlife species, and to identify potential causes of disrupted hormone signaling. In this review we examine various in vitro approaches we have used to compare estrogen receptor binding and activation by endogenous hormones and phytoestrogens in two species of rhinoceros; southern white and greater one-horned. We have found many of these techniques valuable and practical in species where access to research subjects and/or tissues is limited due to their conservation status. From cell-free, competitive binding assays to full-length receptor activation assays; each technique has strengths and weaknesses related to cost, sensitivity, complexity of the protocols, and relevance to in vivo signaling. We then present a novel approach, in which receptor activation assays are performed in primary cell lines derived from the species of interest, to minimize the artifacts of traditional heterologous expression systems. Finally, we speculate on the promise of next generation sequencing and transcriptome profiling as tools for characterizing hormone signaling in threatened and endangered species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Value of Molecular vs. Morphometric and Acoustic Information for Species Identification Using Sympatric Molossid Bats

    PubMed Central

    Gager, Yann; Tarland, Emilia; Lieckfeldt, Dietmar; Ménage, Matthieu; Botero-Castro, Fidel; Rossiter, Stephen J.; Kraus, Robert H. S.; Ludwig, Arne; Dechmann, Dina K. N.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental condition for any work with free-ranging animals is correct species identification. However, in case of bats, information on local species assemblies is frequently limited especially in regions with high biodiversity such as the Neotropics. The bat genus Molossus is a typical example of this, with morphologically similar species often occurring in sympatry. We used a multi-method approach based on molecular, morphometric and acoustic information collected from 962 individuals of Molossus bondae, M. coibensis, and M. molossus captured in Panama. We distinguished M. bondae based on size and pelage coloration. We identified two robust species clusters composed of M. molossus and M. coibensis based on 18 microsatellite markers but also on a more stringently determined set of four markers. Phylogenetic reconstructions using the mitochondrial gene co1 (DNA barcode) were used to diagnose these microsatellite clusters as M. molossus and M. coibensis. To differentiate species, morphological information was only reliable when forearm length and body mass were combined in a linear discriminant function (95.9% correctly identified individuals). When looking in more detail at M. molossus and M. coibensis, only four out of 13 wing parameters were informative for species differentiation, with M. coibensis showing lower values for hand wing area and hand wing length and higher values for wing loading. Acoustic recordings after release required categorization of calls into types, yielding only two informative subsets: approach calls and two-toned search calls. Our data emphasizes the importance of combining morphological traits and independent genetic data to inform the best choice and combination of discriminatory information used in the field. Because parameters can vary geographically, the multi-method approach may need to be adjusted to local species assemblies and populations to be entirely informative. PMID:26943355

  7. Systematics and Molecular Phylogeny of the Family Oscarellidae (Homoscleromorpha) with Description of Two New Oscarella Species

    PubMed Central

    Gazave, Eve; Lavrov, Dennis V.; Cabrol, Jory; Renard, Emmanuelle; Rocher, Caroline; Vacelet, Jean; Adamska, Maja; Borchiellini, Carole; Ereskovsky, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    The family Oscarellidae is one of the two families in the class Homoscleromorpha (phylum Porifera) and is characterized by the absence of a skeleton and the presence of a specific mitochondrial gene, tatC. This family currently encompasses sponges in two genera: Oscarella with 17 described species and Pseudocorticium with one described species. Although sponges in this group are relatively well-studied, phylogenetic relationships among members of Oscarellidae and the validity of genus Pseudocorticium remain open questions. Here we present a phylogenetic analysis of Oscarellidae using four markers (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, atp6, tatC), and argue that it should become a mono-generic family, with Pseudocorticium being synonymized with Oscarella, and with the transfer of Pseudocorticium jarrei to Oscarella jarrei. We show that the genus Oscarella can be subdivided into four clades, each of which is supported by either a small number of morphological characters or by molecular synapomorphies. In addition, we describe two new species of Oscarella from Norwegian fjords: O. bergenensis sp. nov. and O. nicolae sp. nov., and we compare their morphology, anatomy, and cytology with other species in this genus. Internal anatomical characters are similar in both species, but details of external morphology and particularly of cytological characters provide diagnostic features. Our study also confirms that O. lobularis and O. tuberculata are two distinct polychromic sibling species. This study highlights the difficulties of species identification in skeleton-less sponges and, more generally, in groups where morphological characters are scarce. Adopting a multi-marker approach is thus highly suitable for these groups. PMID:23737959

  8. Systematics and molecular phylogeny of the family oscarellidae (homoscleromorpha) with description of two new oscarella species.

    PubMed

    Gazave, Eve; Lavrov, Dennis V; Cabrol, Jory; Renard, Emmanuelle; Rocher, Caroline; Vacelet, Jean; Adamska, Maja; Borchiellini, Carole; Ereskovsky, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    The family Oscarellidae is one of the two families in the class Homoscleromorpha (phylum Porifera) and is characterized by the absence of a skeleton and the presence of a specific mitochondrial gene, tatC. This family currently encompasses sponges in two genera: Oscarella with 17 described species and Pseudocorticium with one described species. Although sponges in this group are relatively well-studied, phylogenetic relationships among members of Oscarellidae and the validity of genus Pseudocorticium remain open questions. Here we present a phylogenetic analysis of Oscarellidae using four markers (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, atp6, tatC), and argue that it should become a mono-generic family, with Pseudocorticium being synonymized with Oscarella, and with the transfer of Pseudocorticium jarrei to Oscarella jarrei. We show that the genus Oscarella can be subdivided into four clades, each of which is supported by either a small number of morphological characters or by molecular synapomorphies. In addition, we describe two new species of Oscarella from Norwegian fjords: O. bergenensis sp. nov. and O. nicolae sp. nov., and we compare their morphology, anatomy, and cytology with other species in this genus. Internal anatomical characters are similar in both species, but details of external morphology and particularly of cytological characters provide diagnostic features. Our study also confirms that O. lobularis and O. tuberculata are two distinct polychromic sibling species. This study highlights the difficulties of species identification in skeleton-less sponges and, more generally, in groups where morphological characters are scarce. Adopting a multi-marker approach is thus highly suitable for these groups.

  9. Molecular and Morphological Evidence Demonstrating Two Species of Helicometrina Linton 1910 (Digenea: Opecoelidae) in Northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Marcelo E; Valdivia, Isabel M; Chavez, Rosa A; Molina, Horacio; Cárdenas, Leyla

    2015-12-01

    The opecoelid Helicometrina nimia Linton, 1910 has been reported from numerous marine fishes along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of the Americas. Along the Chilean coast, H. nimia is found in fishes belonging to at least 9 families. This surprisingly low host specificity of H. nimia raises question about the correct identification of specimens assigned to this species. Here we evaluate whether H. nimia specimens isolated from sympatric fish species in northern Chile but with different diets and found in different habitats (water column and demersal) are the same species. Our results demonstrate that specimens from the shallow benthic fish Labrisomus philippii (Steindachner) do not correspond to H. nimia but instead belong to a new species of Helicometrina. This species is described and distinguished from H. nimia using morphological descriptions and 2 molecular markers (the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene and the V4 region of the SSU rRNA gene). The new species Helicometrina labrisomi (Digenea: Opecoelidae), is found in the intestine of L. philippii (Steindachner, 1866) (Pisces: Labrisomidae), a shallow benthic fish that inhabits the northern coast of Chile. We also studied the related Helicometrina nimia Linton, 1910 from the benthopelagic fishes Paralabrax humeralis (Valenciennes, 1828) and Acanthistius pictus (Tschudi, 1846) (Serranidae). The new species differs from H. nimia by a combination of characters that include ovary shape, number of uterine loops, and position of the genital pore. Our results indicate that morphological characteristics, such as body size, extent of the vitellarium, shape of the testes, and cirrus sac size and extent, traditionally used in the taxonomy of Helicometrina are highly variable. In contrast, meristic and morphological characteristics, such as a lobed ovary, the number of uterine loops, dimensions of the pharynx, and the opening of the genital pore, are highly constant.

  10. TNF-α-induced up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines is reduced by phosphatidylcholine in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major lipid of the gastrointestinal mucus layer. We recently showed that mucus from patients suffering from ulcerative colitis has low levels of PC. Clinical studies reveal that the therapeutic addition of PC to the colonic mucus using slow release preparations is beneficial. The positive role of PC in this disease is still unclear; however, we have recently shown that PC has an intrinsic anti-inflammatory property. It could be demonstrated that the exogenous application of PC inhibits membrane-dependent actin assembly and TNF-α-induced nuclear NF-κB activation. We investigate here in more detail the hypothesis that the exogenous application of PC has anti-inflammatory properties. Methods PC species with different fatty acid side chains were applied to differentiated and non-differentiated Caco-2 cells treated with TNF-α to induce a pro-inflammatory response. We analysed TNF-α-induced NF-κB-activation via the transient expression of a NF-κB-luciferase reporter system. Pro-inflammatory gene transcription was detected with the help of a quantitative real time (RT)-PCR analysis. We assessed the binding of TNF-α to its receptor by FACS and analysed lipid rafts by isolating detergent resistant membranes (DRMs). Results The exogenous addition of all PC species tested significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory signalling. The expression levels of IL-8, ICAM-1, IP-10, MCP-1, TNF-α and MMP-1 were significantly reduced after PC pre-treatment for at least two hours. The effect was comparable to the inhibition of NF-kB by the NF-kB inhibitor SN 50 and was not due to a reduced binding of TNF-α to its receptor or a decreased surface expression of TNF-α receptors. PC was also effective when applied to the apical side of polarised Caco-2 cultures if cells were stimulated from the basolateral side. PC treatment changed the compartmentation of the TNF-α-receptors 1 and 2 to DRMs. Conclusion PC induces a prolonged

  11. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alters phosphatidylcholine metabolism in elicited peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, R.I.; Allegretto, N.J.; Kiener, P.A.; Warr, G.A. )

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the effects of LPS on mouse peritoneal macrophage phospholipids using radiolabeled precursors. LPS (200 ng/ml) stimulated incorporation of ({sup 32}P) into all classes of phospholipids within 0.5 hr, and after 2 hr the increase was 60% greater than controls. Separation of the phospholipid classes by thin-layer chromatography revealed a selective increase in incorporation of label into phosphatidylcholine (PC) (90% increase compared to approximately 50% in the other phospholipids). In macrophages labeled with ({sup 3}H)-choline, LPS stimulated both the incorporation of label into PC and the release of incorporated label into the medium. The time dependencies of stimulated ({sup 3}H) release and ({sup 32}P) incorporation were similar. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that LPS activates macrophages via a PC-specific phospholipase-dependent mechanism.

  12. Miscibility properties of binary phosphatidylcholine mixtures. A calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    van Dijck, P W; Kaper, A J; Oonk, H A; de Gier, J

    1977-10-03

    From data obtained by differential scanning calorimetry phase diagrams were constructed, using a thermodynamically based fitting method. The following binary mixtures of phosphatidylcholines in water were studied: 14:0/14:0-glycerophosphocholine/16:0/16:0-glucerophosphocholine, 14:0/14:0-glycerophosphocholine/18:0/18:0-glycerophosphocholine, 12:0/12:0-glycerophosphocholine/16:0/16:0-glycerophosphocholine, 18:1t/18:1t-glycerophosphocholine/14:0/14:0-glycerophosphocholine and 18:1t/18:1t-glycerophosphocholine/16:0/16:0-glycerophosphocholine. A comparison is made of the present results with those obtained using probe techniques and the differences are discussed.

  13. Kinetin Increases Water Permeability of Phosphatidylcholine Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Stillwell, William; Hester, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Kinetin is shown to increase substantially the water permeability of liposomes composed of several types of phosphatidylcholines including the natural phospholipids egg lecithin and asolectin and the synthetic phospholipids dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. Kinetin effects were measured from 16.3 micromolar to 2.4 millimolar at temperatures from 10°C to 50°C and at pH 2.0, 7.0, and 11.0. Temperature studies indicate that kinetin produces a larger increase in water permeability with membranes in the more fluid liquid crystalline state. Kinetin is also shown to enhance [14C]glucose permeability and perhaps promotes membrane aggregation. From these experiments, we conclude that kinetin may produce its initial effect by altering the lipid bilayer portion of membranes. PMID:16662860

  14. Two new species of Encotyllabe (Monogenea: Capsalidae) based on morphometric and molecular evidence: parasites of two inshore fish species of northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, F A; González, M T; Oliva, M E

    2014-06-01

    Two new species, Encotyllabe cheilodactyli and Encotyllabe antofagastensis (Monogenea: Capsalidae), have been found in the pharyngeal plates of Cheilodactylus variegatus and Anisotremus scapularis, respectively, in northern Chile (23°38'N, 70°24'W). Descriptions of the new species were based on morphometric and molecular evidence. Both species differ from previously described species of the genus by a combination of characteristics, including the size and relative position of the testes and the shapes of the major and small hamulus. In addition, E. cheilodactyli is unique among the known species of Encotyllabe due to the testes crossing the equatorial line of the body proper, and E. antofagastensis is unique among the known species of Encotyllabe due to its penis structure and anatomy leading to the genital pore. The analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase I gene as well as morphometric analyses demonstrated that the specimens belonged to 2 different species.

  15. Antibiotic-loaded phosphatidylcholine inhibits staphylococcal bone infection

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Jessica Amber; Beenken, Karen E; Skinner, Robert A; Meeker, Daniel G; Smeltzer, Mark S; Haggard, Warren O; Troxel, Karen S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To test antibiotic-loaded coating for efficacy in reducing bacterial biofilm and development of osteomyelitis in an orthopaedic model of implant infection. METHODS Phosphatidylcholine coatings loaded with 25% vancomycin were applied to washed and sterilized titanium wires 20 mm in length. A 10 mm segment was removed from rabbit radius (total = 9; 5 coated, 4 uncoated), and the segment was injected with 1 × 106 colony forming units (CFUs) of Staphylococcus aureus (UAMS-1 strain). Titanium wires were inserted through the intramedullary canal of the removed segment and into the proximal radial segment and the segment was placed back into the defect. After 7 d, limbs were removed, X-rayed, swabbed for tissue contamination. Wires were removed and processed to determine attached CFUs. Tissue was swabbed and streaked on agar plates to determine bacteriological score. RESULTS Antibiotic-loaded coatings resulted in significantly reduced biofilm formation (4.7 fold reduction in CFUs; P < 0.001) on titanium wires and reduced bacteriological score in surrounding tissue (4.0 ± 0 for uncoated, 1.25 ± 0.5 for coated; P = 0.01). Swelling and pus formation was evident in uncoated controls at the 7 d time point both visually and radiographically, but not in antibiotic-loaded coatings. CONCLUSION Active antibiotic was released from coated implants and significantly reduced signs of osteomyelitic symptoms. Implant coatings were well tolerated in bone. Further studies with additional control groups and longer time periods are warranted. Antibiotic-loaded phosphatidylcholine coatings applied at the point of care could prevent implant-associated infection in orthopaedic defects. PMID:27622146

  16. Molecular species-sensitive optical coherence tomography using coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Daniel L.; Bredfeldt, Jeremy; Hambir, Selezion; Dlott, Dana D.; Kitchell, Barbara; Gruebele, Martin; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2003-07-01

    We present our progress in developing a novel technique and instrument that images specific molecular species in biological tissues using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Standard OCT instruments measure only the scattering from structural features, such as refractive index changes. We utilize Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Spectroscopy, a nonlinear optics technique that can selectively stimulate molecular groups, to gather compositional information from the sample. Being a coherent process, our instrument will produce interference between the nonlinear anti-Stokes signal produced in the sample and a reference molecular sample to both exclude background and nonresonant signals and range features in the tissue. Because of this, we will also gain the benefits of sensitivity that interferometry can provide. By utilizing the tunability of an optical parametric oscillator, we can address a range of molecular resonances from 1500 cm-1 to 3500 cm-1. This frequency range offers the possibility of measuring the distributions and densities of proteins, lipids, and nuclear material that we believe will be useful for determining the early presence of epithelial carcinomas. We demonstrate the principle of this imaging method by producing interference between two separately produced CARS signals from the same probe and Stokes beams.

  17. Molecular signatures of transgenerational response to ocean acidification in a species of reef fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunter, Celia; Welch, Megan J.; Ryu, Taewoo; Zhang, Huoming; Berumen, Michael L.; Nilsson, Göran E.; Munday, Philip L.; Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    The impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems will depend on species capacity to adapt. Recent studies show that the behaviour of reef fishes is impaired at projected CO 2 levels; however, individual variation exists that might promote adaptation. Here, we show a clear signature of parental sensitivity to high CO 2 in the brain molecular phenotype of juvenile spiny damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus, primarily driven by circadian rhythm genes. Offspring of CO 2-tolerant and CO 2-sensitive parents were reared at near-future CO 2 (754 μatm) or present-day control levels (414 μatm). By integrating 33 brain transcriptomes and proteomes with a de novo assembled genome we investigate the molecular responses of the fish brain to increased CO 2 and the expression of parental tolerance to high CO 2 in the offspring molecular phenotype. Exposure to high CO 2 resulted in differential regulation of 173 and 62 genes and 109 and 68 proteins in the tolerant and sensitive groups, respectively. Importantly, the majority of differences between offspring of tolerant and sensitive parents occurred in high CO 2 conditions. This transgenerational molecular signature suggests that individual variation in CO 2 sensitivity could facilitate adaptation of fish populations to ocean acidification.

  18. Genetic characterization, species differentiation and detection of Fasciola spp. by molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Liver flukes belonging to the genus Fasciola are among the causes of foodborne diseases of parasitic etiology. These parasites cause significant public health problems and substantial economic losses to the livestock industry. Therefore, it is important to definitively characterize the Fasciola species. Current phenotypic techniques fail to reflect the full extent of the diversity of Fasciola spp. In this respect, the use of molecular techniques to identify and differentiate Fasciola spp. offer considerable advantages. The advent of a variety of molecular genetic techniques also provides a powerful method to elucidate many aspects of Fasciola biology, epidemiology, and genetics. However, the discriminatory power of these molecular methods varies, as does the speed and ease of performance and cost. There is a need for the development of new methods to identify the mechanisms underpinning the origin and maintenance of genetic variation within and among Fasciola populations. The increasing application of the current and new methods will yield a much improved understanding of Fasciola epidemiology and evolution as well as more effective means of parasite control. Herein, we provide an overview of the molecular techniques that are being used for the genetic characterization, detection and genotyping of Fasciola spp.. PMID:21658284

  19. Molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to "hot" chili peppers.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Sven-Eric; Julius, David

    2002-02-08

    Chili peppers produce the pungent vanilloid compound capsaicin, which offers protection from predatory mammals. Birds are indifferent to the pain-producing effects of capsaicin and therefore serve as vectors for seed dispersal. Here, we determine the molecular basis for this species-specific behavioral response by identifying a domain of the rat vanilloid receptor that confers sensitivity to capsaicin to the normally insensitive chicken ortholog. Like its mammalian counterpart, the chicken receptor is activated by heat or protons, consistent with the fact that both mammals and birds detect noxious heat and experience thermal hypersensitivity. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the ecological phenomenon of directed deterence and suggest that the capacity to detect capsaicin-like inflammatory substances is a recent acquisition of mammalian vanilloid receptors.

  20. Cryptic species of hairworm parasites revealed by molecular data and crowdsourcing of specimen collections.

    PubMed

    Hanelt, Ben; Schmidt-Rhaesa, Andreas; Bolek, Matthew G

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing cryptic species promotes a better understanding of biodiversity, systematics, evolutionary biology, and biogeography. When cryptic species are disease-causing organisms, such as parasites, their correct recognition has important implications for the study of epidemiology, disease ecology, and host-parasite relationships. Freshwater nematomorphs (Nematomorpha: Gordiida) or hairworms, are an enigmatic yet fascinating group of parasites that are known to manipulate host behavior to aid transition from the parasitic phase, within terrestrial insects, to the free-living aquatic stage. Hairworm taxonomy has been hampered by a paucity of informative diagnostic characters and it has long been suspected that this group contains numerous cryptic species. Study of single hairworm species over large geographical areas has been difficult due to extremely rare encounters and unreliable methods of collecting adult worms. Here we report that by using crowdsourcing, citizen scientists have collected and submitted samples of Gordius cf. robustus from throughout its range in North America making its genetic study possible. Combined with our own collections, we examined samples from 28 localities within the USA; despite the collection of numerous hairworms from Canada and Mexico, G. cf. robustus were not collected outside of the contiguous United States. Mitochondrial CO1 genetic distances revealed that specimens grouped into 8 clades separated by 8-24.3%. In addition, molecular evidence from mitochondrial (CO1 and cytB) and nuclear (partial 28S, ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) DNA suggests that these 8 clades are distinct species and that this group of species is paraphyletic, since the North American species G. attoni and the European species G. aquaticus and G. balticus group among the G. robustus lineages. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between genetic (CO1) and geographic distance between the 8 Gordius species. This study demonstrates the value of involving the

  1. Three new species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae) from limestone karsts of China based on morphological and molecular evidence.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Pan, Bo; Liu, Jing; Xu, Wei-Bin; Chung, Kuo-Fang

    2015-12-01

    With more than 160 described species, Primulina is one of the most characteristic plant groups of the Sino-Vietnamese limestone flora. In our continous botanical inventory of the limestone flora of South China, we collected three new Primulina species not identifiable to known species. Molecular phylogenetic analyses based on nuclear ITS and chloroplast trnL-F and trnH-psbA sequences strongly support the placement the three new species in Primulina. In addition to morphological differences, DNA sequences of all these three new species show substantial divergencies, sustaining the recognition of these three new species. Based on morphological and molecular data, we describe and illustrate three new Primulina species: P. maculata, P. pengii, and P. yangshanensis.

  2. [Molecular identification of 15 species of Ilex genus based on ITS sequence analysis ].

    PubMed

    Yi, Fan; Han, Feng-ming; Peng, Yong

    2014-06-01

    To establish molecular method for identification of Ilex plants using the internal transcribed spacer(ITS) bar- code. DNA was extracted using centrifugal columnar kits. The ITS sequences of all experimental samples were amplified and sequenced using a pair of universal primers. The alignment and the phylogenetic tree were performed in MEGA5. 0. The length of ITS sequence in each species was 759 bp,in which there were 216 sites discrepancy. DNA barcoding technology based on ITS sequence can be used to identify plants of Ilex genus.

  3. Molecular identification of cryptic diversity in species of cis-Andean Mylossoma (Characiformes: Serrasalmidae).

    PubMed

    Mateussi, Nadayca T B; Pavanelli, Carla Simone; Oliveira, Claudio

    2017-09-01

    Mylossoma is a Serrasalmidae genus with only two current valid species in the cis-Andean region but with several available names, today considered as junior synonymous. Morphological information combined with single-locus DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase I gene analysed by Barcode Index Number and General Mixed Yule Coalescent model were used in the present study to help the recognition of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in cis-Andean Mylossoma and discuss species boundaries within the genus. Five OTUs were recognized based on both morphological and molecular approaches. The analysis using the Barcode Index Number resulted in five OTUs, with M. duriventre being split in one unity in the Amazon, one in the Orinoco, one in Paraná-Paraguay and one in Tocantins-Araguaia which is coherent with our morphological results.

  4. Three Human Gnathostomiasis Cases in Thailand with Molecular Identification of Causative Parasite Species.

    PubMed

    Jongthawin, Jurairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Sadaow, Lakkhana; Janwan, Penchom; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sangchan, Apichat; Visaetsilpanonta, Siriraksa; Keawkong, Worasak; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2015-09-01

    Human gnathostomiasis is one of the important food-borne parasitic zoonoses. The disease is caused by a spirurid roundworm of the genus Gnathostoma. Here, we describe three parasitological confirmed cases of human gnathostomiasis, caused by Gnathostoma spinigerum, in a hospital in Thailand during 2004-2012. Clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcome of cases were revealed. Parasites were accidentally recovered from patients and morphologically identified as Gnathostoma species. Confirmed diagnosis and identification of causative parasite species was made by DNA extraction of the recovered worms, followed by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS2) of DNA and the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox-1) gene. Sequences corresponding to ITS2 and cox-1 were similar to G. spinigerum. To our knowledge, this study represents the first molecular confirmation that recovered G. spinigerum is a causative agent of human infection in Thailand. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  5. Three Human Gnathostomiasis Cases in Thailand with Molecular Identification of Causative Parasite Species

    PubMed Central

    Jongthawin, Jurairat; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Sanpool, Oranuch; Sadaow, Lakkhana; Janwan, Penchom; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sangchan, Apichat; Visaetsilpanonta, Siriraksa; Keawkong, Worasak; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2015-01-01

    Human gnathostomiasis is one of the important food-borne parasitic zoonoses. The disease is caused by a spirurid roundworm of the genus Gnathostoma. Here, we describe three parasitological confirmed cases of human gnathostomiasis, caused by Gnathostoma spinigerum, in a hospital in Thailand during 2004–2012. Clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcome of cases were revealed. Parasites were accidentally recovered from patients and morphologically identified as Gnathostoma species. Confirmed diagnosis and identification of causative parasite species was made by DNA extraction of the recovered worms, followed by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS2) of DNA and the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox-1) gene. Sequences corresponding to ITS2 and cox-1 were similar to G. spinigerum. To our knowledge, this study represents the first molecular confirmation that recovered G. spinigerum is a causative agent of human infection in Thailand. PMID:26055743

  6. Morphological and molecular evidence for two new species of Laetiporus (Basidiomycota, Polyporales) from southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Chen, Yuanyuan; Cui, Baokai; Liu, Honggao; Wang, Yuanzhong

    2014-01-01

    Two Laetiporus species, L. ailaoshanensis and L. zonatus spp. nov., are described from southwestern China based on morphological and molecular characters. Laetiporus ailaoshanensis is characterized by orange-yellow to reddish orange pileal surface and cream to buff pores when fresh, azonate to faintly zonate pileus, ovoid to ellipsoid basidiospores (5.0-6.2 × 4.0-5.0 μm), and it has been observed only on Lithocarpus. Laetiporus zonatus is characterized by white to cream pileal surface with buff to clay-buff base when fresh, concentrically zonate basidiocarps, ellipsoid to pyriform or drop-shaped basidiospores (5.8-7.2 × 4.3-5.5 μm), and it has been found only on Quercus. The phylogenetic relationships of all recognized Laetiporus species were inferred from a combined dataset of ITS and nLSU-rDNA sequences, and L. ailaoshanensis and L. zonatus represent two new lineages in this group.

  7. Molecular phylogeny of Ascotricha, including two new marine algae-associated species.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoli; Li, Wei; Cai, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses based on a broad taxonomic sampling of Ascotricha were conducted using the sequences of nuc rDNA region encompassing the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, along with the 5.8S rDNA (ITS), partial nuc 18S rDNA (18S) and partial β-tubulin gene (TUB2). Hypoxyloid Xylariaceae and xylarioid Xylariaceae were inferred as two distinct lineages in the Xylariaceae in the combined ITS-TUB2 phylogeny. Within xylarioid Xylariaceae species of Ascotricha form a monophyletic group. Two new marine algae-associated fungi, Ascotricha longipila and A. parvispora, are described on the basis of morphological and molecular characters and the combination, A. sinuosa, is proposed. A synopsis of the morphological characters and a dichotomous key to Ascotricha species are provided.

  8. Development of a novel, simple and rapid molecular identification system for clinical Candida species.

    PubMed

    Deák, R; Bodai, L; Aarts, H J M; Maráz, A

    2004-08-01

    Identification of clinical yeast isolates causing candidiasis is routinely performed by commercial yeast identification systems based on biochemical, morphological and physiological tests. These systems require 3-5 days and the proportion of identifications that are incorrect is high. Our novel and rapid molecular identification system for clinical Candida species is based on the analysis of restriction patterns obtained from PCR-generated ribosomal DNA sequences using five restriction enzymes. A software package (CandID) was designed to include a database of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns for 29 Candida species. For 'in-house' validation, 122 clinical isolates that had previously identified in clinical laboratories were typed by this system. These clinical isolates were also independently re-identified by the API 20C AUX system. The ribosomal DNA RFLP database in the context of supporting analytical software allowed simple and rapid (1 work day) identification.

  9. Molecular data for Crenavolva species (Gastropoda, Ovulidae) reveals the synonymy of C. chiapponii

    PubMed Central

    Reijnen, Bastian T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During fieldwork in Indonesia and Malaysia, eight lots containing 33 specimens belonging to the genus Crenavolva (Ovulidae) were collected. Species were initially identified as Crenavolva aureola, Crenavolva chiapponii, Crenavolva striatula and Crenavolva trailli, respectively. For Crenavolva chiapponii this is the second record. In contrast to the ecological data available from the original description of this species, it was found in shallow water on a gorgonian host coral, i.e. Acanthogorgia sp. A molecular analysis based on COI and 16S mtDNA markers, including sequence data obtained from GenBank, showed that Crenavolva chiapponii should be considered a junior synonym of Crenavolva aureola and that previously identified ovulid specimens are probably misidentified. PMID:25987877

  10. Interactions of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine with cholesteryl polyethoxy neoglycolipids containing N-acetyl- D-glucosamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemoun, Rachida; Gelhausen, Micaèle; Besson, Françoise; Lafont, Dominique; Buchet, René; Boullanger, Paul; Roux, Bernard

    1999-03-01

    Series of neoglycolipids containing cholesteryl and N-acetyl- D-glucosaminyl groups were synthesized with various ethoxy linkers. Their self aggregations and intermolecular interactions, without and with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC), were characterized in dry and hydrated states, by using infrared spectroscopy. The neoglycolipids in the dry state formed intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the CO and N-H or O-H groups of N-acetyl- D-glucosamine (GlcNAc). In the presence of EYPC, these intermolecular interactions were broken and new hydrogen bonds, involving the phosphate group of EYPC and N-H or O-H groups of GlcNAc of neoglycolipid, were formed. The presence of water molecules altered these intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The CO groups of EYPC were not affected by the presence of neoglycolipids, either in hydrated or in dry states, indicating that the GlcNAc polar groups interacted mostly with EYPC phosphate residues. The phase transition-temperature of mixtures of EYPC containing either cholesterol or neoglycolipid were similar, indicating that the cholesteryl group of the neoglycolipid interacted in the same manner as cholesterol with hydrocarbon chains of EYPC. Some structural models of molecular interactions of neoglycolipids were discussed in relation with the molecular recognition of wheat germ agglutinin.

  11. Molecular diversity and relationships of North American Elymus trachycaulus and the Eurasian E. caninus species.

    PubMed

    Sun, Genlou; Tang, Hemei; Salomon, Björn

    2006-05-01

    The morphological similarity of Elymus trachycaulus to the Eurasian E. caninus has often been noted. This has lead to controversial and contradicting taxonomic treatments. Nevertheless, there has been no systematic investigation on molecular genetic similarity between E. trachycaulus and E. caninus. In this study, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was used to study the similarity between the two species. RAPD analysis of 38 samples representing E. caninus and E. trachycaulus complex yielded 111 interpretable RAPD bands. The Jaccard's similarity values for E. caninus ranged from 0.38 between accessions H10345 and H10353 to 0.97 between accessions H8745 and H10096, with an average of 0.67. The Jaccard's similarity values for E. trachycaulus complex ranged from 0.09 between E. trachycaulus ssp. subsecundus (PI 537321) and E. trachycaulus ssp. violaceus (PI 272612) to 0.78 between accessions PI 315368 and PI 372644, with an average of 0.43. The results from different analyses (NJ and PCA) were similar but not identical. The molecular genetic separation between E. caninus and E. trachycaulus was consistent. The PCA analysis clearly separated all E. caninus accessions from E. trachycaulus and its subspecies. The NJ analysis also showed separation between most accessions of E. caninus and E. trachycaulus. Further analysis excluding E. trachycaulus ssp. subsecundus and ssp. violaceus revealed that E. caninus species and E. trachycaulus species were clearly separated into two distinct groups. The RAPD data thus support the treatment of E. caninus and E. trachycaulus as distinct species. The analyses further indicate that E. violaceus is nested within E. trachycaulus, and more related to E. trachycaulus complex rather than to E. caninus.

  12. Species identification and molecular typing of human Brucella isolates from Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Amr; Shaheed, Faraz; Khan, Mohd W.

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease of major concern in Kuwait and the Middle East. Human brucellosis can be caused by several Brucella species with varying degree of pathogenesis, and relapses are common after apparently successful therapy. The classical biochemical methods for identification of Brucella are time-consuming, cumbersome, and provide information limited to the species level only. In contrast, molecular methods are rapid and provide differentiation at intra-species level. In this study, four molecular methods [16S rRNA gene sequencing, real-time PCR, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA)-8, MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 were evaluated for the identification and typing of 75 strains of Brucella isolated in Kuwait. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of all isolates showed 90–99% sequence identity with B. melitensis and real-time PCR with genus- and species- specific primers identified all isolates as B. melitensis. The results of ERIC-PCR suggested the existence of 75 ERIC genotypes of B. melitensis with a discriminatory index of 0.997. Cluster classification of these genotypes divided them into two clusters, A and B, diverging at ~25%. The maximum number of genotypes (n = 51) were found in cluster B5. MLVA-8 analysis identified all isolates as B. melitensis, and MLVA-8, MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 typing divided the isolates into 10, 32 and 71 MLVA types, respectively. Furthermore, the combined minimum spanning tree analysis demonstrated that, compared to MLVA types discovered all over the world, the Kuwaiti isolates were a distinct group of MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 types in the East Mediterranean Region. PMID:28800594

  13. Differential effect of surfactant and its saturated phosphatidylcholines on human blood macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gille, Christian; Spring, Bärbel; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Gebhard, Caroline; Basile, Denise; Lauber, Kirsten; Poets, Christian F; Orlikowsky, Thorsten W

    2007-02-01

    Blood monocyte-derived macrophages invading the alveolus encounter pulmonary surfactant, a phospholipoprotein complex that changes composition during lung development. We tested the hypothesis that characteristic phosphatidylcholine (PC) components differentially influence macrophage phenotype and function, as determined by phagocytosis of green fluorescent protein-labeled Escherichia coli and alphaCD3-induced T cell proliferation. Human macrophages were exposed to surfactant (Curosurf(R)), to two of its characteristic phosphadidylcholine (PC) components (dipalmitoyl-PC and palmitoylmyristoyl-PC), and to a ubiquituous PC (palmitoyloleoyl-PC) as control. Interaction of Curosurf and PC species with macrophages was assessed using Lissaminetrade mark-dihexadecanoyl-phosphoethanolamine-labeled liposomes. Curosurf and both saturated surfactant PC species downregulated CD14 expression and upregulated CD206. HLA-DR and CD80 were upregulated by Curosurf and palmitoylmyristoyl-PC, whereas dipalmitoyl-PC showed no effect. The latter upregulated TLR2 and TLR4 expression, whereas Curosurf and palmitoylmyristoyl-PC had no effect. PC species tested were incorporated in comparable amounts by macrophages. Curosurf and PC species inhibited phagocytosis of E. coli. Scavenger receptor CD36, CD68, SR-A, and LOX-1 mRNA expression was upregulated by Curosurf, whereas PC species only upregulated SR-A. Curosurf and palmitoylmyristoyl-PC inhibited alphaCD3-induced T cell proliferation by 50%, whereas dipalmitoyl-PC and palmitoyloleoyl-PC showed no effect. These data identify individual surfactant PC species as modifiers of macrophage differentiation and suggest differential effects on innate and adaptive immune functions.

  14. Phylogenomics and molecular signatures for species from the plant pathogen-containing order xanthomonadales.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Hafiz Sohail; Gupta, Radhey S

    2013-01-01

    The species from the order Xanthomonadales, which harbors many important plant pathogens and some human pathogens, are currently distinguished primarily on the basis of their branching in the 16S rRNA tree. No molecular or biochemical characteristic is known that is specific for these bacteria. Phylogenetic and comparative analyses were conducted on 26 sequenced Xanthomonadales genomes to delineate their branching order and to identify molecular signatures consisting of conserved signature indels (CSIs) in protein sequences that are specific for these bacteria. In a phylogenetic tree based upon sequences for 28 proteins, Xanthomonadales species formed a strongly supported clade with Rhodanobacter sp. 2APBS1 as its deepest branch. Comparative analyses of protein sequences have identified 13 CSIs in widely distributed proteins such as GlnRS, TypA, MscL, LysRS, LipA, Tgt, LpxA, TolQ, ParE, PolA and TyrB that are unique to all species/strains from this order, but not found in any other bacteria. Fifteen additional CSIs in proteins (viz. CoxD, DnaE, PolA, SucA, AsnB, RecA, PyrG, LigA, MutS and TrmD) are uniquely shared by different Xanthomonadales except Rhodanobacter and in a few cases by Pseudoxanthomonas species, providing further support for the deep branching of these two genera. Five other CSIs are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and 1-3 species from the orders Chromatiales, Methylococcales and Cardiobacteriales suggesting that these deep branching orders of Gammaproteobacteria might be specifically related. Lastly, 7 CSIs in ValRS, CarB, PyrE, GlyS, RnhB, MinD and X001065 are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and a limited number of Beta- or Gamma-proteobacteria. Our analysis indicates that these CSIs have likely originated independently and they are not due to lateral gene transfers. The Xanthomonadales-specific CSIs reported here provide novel molecular markers for the identification of these important plant and human pathogens and also as potential targets

  15. Phylogenomics and Molecular Signatures for Species from the Plant Pathogen-Containing Order Xanthomonadales

    PubMed Central

    Naushad, Hafiz Sohail; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2013-01-01

    The species from the order Xanthomonadales, which harbors many important plant pathogens and some human pathogens, are currently distinguished primarily on the basis of their branching in the 16S rRNA tree. No molecular or biochemical characteristic is known that is specific for these bacteria. Phylogenetic and comparative analyses were conducted on 26 sequenced Xanthomonadales genomes to delineate their branching order and to identify molecular signatures consisting of conserved signature indels (CSIs) in protein sequences that are specific for these bacteria. In a phylogenetic tree based upon sequences for 28 proteins, Xanthomonadales species formed a strongly supported clade with Rhodanobacter sp. 2APBS1 as its deepest branch. Comparative analyses of protein sequences have identified 13 CSIs in widely distributed proteins such as GlnRS, TypA, MscL, LysRS, LipA, Tgt, LpxA, TolQ, ParE, PolA and TyrB that are unique to all species/strains from this order, but not found in any other bacteria. Fifteen additional CSIs in proteins (viz. CoxD, DnaE, PolA, SucA, AsnB, RecA, PyrG, LigA, MutS and TrmD) are uniquely shared by different Xanthomonadales except Rhodanobacter and in a few cases by Pseudoxanthomonas species, providing further support for the deep branching of these two genera. Five other CSIs are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and 1–3 species from the orders Chromatiales, Methylococcales and Cardiobacteriales suggesting that these deep branching orders of Gammaproteobacteria might be specifically related. Lastly, 7 CSIs in ValRS, CarB, PyrE, GlyS, RnhB, MinD and X001065 are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and a limited number of Beta- or Gamma-proteobacteria. Our analysis indicates that these CSIs have likely originated independently and they are not due to lateral gene transfers. The Xanthomonadales-specific CSIs reported here provide novel molecular markers for the identification of these important plant and human pathogens and also as potential

  16. Putative hybrids between two Anisakis cryptic species: molecular genotyping using High Resolution Melting.

    PubMed

    Cavallero, S; Costa, A; Caracappa, S; Gambetta, B; D'Amelio, S

    2014-11-01

    The genus Anisakis includes nine recognized species and the complex of cryptic species Anisakis simplex s. l. is often associated with the human disease known as anisakiasis. During the last decades the use of nuclear ribosomal ITS allowed the identification and description of numerous anisakid nematodes and the discovery of recombinant genotypes or putative hybrids even in other parasitic helminths, such as those between A. simplex sensu stricto and A. pegreffii. The existence of pure hybrids of the two sibling species has been long debated due to the large recovery of larval forms from sympatric areas and the rare observation of adult hybrids. The aims of the present report were to identify anisakid nematodes collected from Stenella coeruleoalba using PCR-RFLP of ITS and to focus the interest on hybrid forms using a High Resolution Melting (HRM) and direct sequencing analyses, since the new record of putative hybrid at adult stage. The PCR-RFLP analysis enabled to identify A. simplex s.s., A. pegreffii, the heterozygous genotype of the two species and A. physeteris. The use of the genotyping approach based on HRM confirmed the profiles of the two species A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii, and of the hybrid individuals. The new record of adult hybrids in definitive hosts rekindles the long debate about their existence and their evolutionary meaning. Since the reproductive isolation between A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii is the assumption for their existence as separated species, the use of alternative molecular markers and population genetic studies on adult anisakids are recommended.

  17. Prevalence and first molecular identification of Sarcocystis species in cattle and water buffaloes in India.

    PubMed

    Daptardar, Monal; Singh, Balbir Bagicha; Aulakh, Rabinder Singh; Gill, Jatinder Paul Singh

    2016-09-01

    The importance of Sarcocystis hominis in causing zoonotic infections is well known. Recently, S. hominis like cysts have been reported from water buffalo in China. Previous studies indicate prevalence of Sarcocystis species in bovine populations in India but molecular evidence is required for proper species differentiation. We examined two hundred and ninety six cardiac tissue samples of Indian water buffaloes and cattle from northern and western parts of the country. Tissues were examined for Sarcocystis using intact cyst isolation method, pepsin acid digestion method and Sarcocystis 18S rRNA PCR. The combination of primers was used for 18S rRNA PCR amplification followed by sequencing. Twenty five representative samples were sent for sequencing and 19 readable sequences were obtained for phylogenetic analysis. Overall, the Sarcocystis cysts/zoites were recorded in 44% (95% CI 38-49%), 58% (95% CI 53-64%) and 68% (95% CI 63-73%) from both cattle and buffalo samples using intact cyst isolation, pepsin-HCl digestion method and conventional PCR, respectively. The results indicate that pepsin-HCl digestion method and conventional PCR are more sensitive than intact cyst isolation for detection of Sarcocystis species in tissue samples. The prevalence of Sarcocystis species was high in buffalo as compared to cattle intermediate hosts. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that more than one Sarcocystis species are circulating in cattle and water buffaloes in India. The results further indicate that experimental transmission studies are required to re-confirm the identities and host ranges of the Sarcocystis species in cattle and water buffaloes in India.

  18. Conserved and species-specific molecular denominators in mammalian skeletal muscle aging.

    PubMed

    Mercken, Evi M; Capri, Miriam; Carboneau, Bethany A; Conte, Maria; Heidler, Juliana; Santoro, Aurelia; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Freire, Marta; Khraiwesh, Husam; González-Reyes, José A; Moaddel, Ruin; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Villalba, José M; Mattison, Julie A; Wittig, Ilka; Franceschi, Claudio; de Cabo, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Aging is a complex phenomenon involving functional decline in multiple physiological systems. We undertook a comparative analysis of skeletal muscle from four different species, i.e. mice, rats, rhesus monkeys, and humans, at three different representative stages during their lifespan (young, middle, and old) to identify pathways that modulate function and healthspan. Gene expression profiling and computational analysis revealed that pathway complexity increases from mice to humans, and as mammals age, there is predominantly an upregulation of pathways in all species. Two downregulated pathways, the electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation, were common among all four species in response to aging. Quantitative PCR, biochemical analysis, mitochondrial DNA measurements, and electron microscopy revealed a conserved age-dependent decrease in mitochondrial content, and a reduction in oxidative phosphorylation complexes in monkeys and humans. Western blot analysis of key proteins in mitochondrial biogenesis discovered that (i) an imbalance toward mitochondrial fusion occurs in aged skeletal muscle and (ii) mitophagy is not overtly affected, presumably leading to the observed accumulation of abnormally large, damaged mitochondria with age. Select transcript expression analysis uncovered that the skeletal inflammatory profile differentially increases with age, but is most pronounced in humans, while increased oxidative stress (as assessed by protein carbonyl adducts and 4-hydroxynonenal) is common among all species. Expression studies also found that there is unique dysregulation of the nutrient sensing pathways among the different species with age. The identification of conserved pathways indicates common molecular mechanisms intrinsic to health and lifespan, whereas the recognition of species-specific pathways emphasizes the importance of human studies for devising optimal therapeutic modalities to slow the aging process.

  19. Molecular Identification of Closely Related Candida Species Using Two Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Fingerprinting Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Muriel; Sendid, Boualem; Fradin, Chantal; Gaillardin, Claude; Poulain, Daniel; Nguyen, Huu-Vang

    2011-01-01

    Recent changes in the epidemiology of candidiasis highlighted an increase in non- Candida albicans species emphasizing the need for reliable identification methods. Molecular diagnostics in fungal infections may improve species characterization, particularly in cases of the closely related species in the Candida complexes. We developed two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, targeting either a part of the intergenic spacer 2 or the entire intergenic spacer (IGS) of ribosomal DNA using a panel of 270 isolates. A part of the intergenic spacer was used for discrimination between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and between species of the C. glabrata complex (C. glabrata/C. bracarensis/C. nivariensis). The whole IGS was applied to C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis, and to separate C. famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) from C. guilliermondii (Pichia guilliermondii) and from the other species within this complex (ie, C. carpophila, C. fermentati and C. xestobii). Sharing similar biochemical patterns, Pichia norvegensis and C. inconspicua exhibited specific IGS profiles. Our study confirmed that isolates of C. guilliermondii were frequently mis-identified as C. famata. As much as 67% of the clinical isolates phenotypically determined as C. famata were recognized mostly as true P. guilliermondii. Conversely, 44% of the isolates initially identified as C. guilliermondii were corrected by the IGS fingerprints as C. parapsilosis, C. fermentati, or C. zeylanoides. These two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism methods may be used as reference tools [either alternatively or adjunctively to the existing ribosomal DNA (26S or ITS) sequence comparisons] for unambiguous determination of the Candida species for which phenotypic characterization remains problematic. PMID:21227390

  20. Molecular Phylogeny and Zoogeography of the Capoeta damascina Species Complex (Pisces: Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Alwan, Nisreen; Esmaeili, Hamid-Reza; Krupp, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Capoeta damascina was earlier considered by many authors as one of the most common freshwater fish species found throughout the Levant, Mesopotamia, Turkey, and Iran. However, owing to a high variation in morphological characters among and within its various populations, 17 nominal species were described, several of which were regarded as valid by subsequent revising authors. Capoeta damascina proved to be a complex of closely related species, which had been poorly studied. The current study aims at defining C. damascina and the C. damascina species complex. It investigates phylogenetic relationships among the various members of the C. damascina complex, based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Phylogenetic relationships were projected against paleogeographical events to interpret the geographic distribution of the taxa under consideration in relation to the area's geological history. Samples were obtained from throughout the geographic range and were subjected to genetic analyses, using two molecular markers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (n = 103) and the two adjacent divergence regions (D1-D2) of the nuclear 28S rRNA genes (n = 65). Six closely related species were recognized within the C. damascina complex, constituting two main lineages: A western lineage represented by C. caelestis, C. damascina, and C. umbla and an eastern lineage represented by C. buhsei, C. coadi, and C. saadii. The results indicate that speciation of these taxa is rather a recent event. Dispersal occurred during the Pleistocene, resulting in present-day distribution patterns. A coherent picture of the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of the C. damascina species complex is drawn, explaining the current patterns of distribution as a result of paleogeographic events and ecological adaptations.

  1. Molecular Evidence for High Frequency of Multiple Paternity in a Freshwater Shrimp Species Caridina ensifera

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Gen Hua; Chang, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular genetic analyses of parentage provide insights into mating systems. Although there are 22,000 members in Malacostraca, not much has been known about mating systems in Malacostraca. The freshwater shrimp Caridina ensifera blue, is a new species belonging to Malacostraca which was discovered recently in Sulawesi, Indonesia. Due to its small body size and low fecundity, this species is an ideal species to study the occurrence and frequency of multiple paternity and to understand of how the low fecundity species persist and evolve. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we developed four polymorphic microsatellites from C. ensifera and applied them to investigate the occurrence and frequency of multiple paternity in 20 C. ensifera broods caught from Lake Matano, Sulawesi. By genotyping the mother and all offspring from each brood we discovered multiple paternity in all 20 broods. In most of the 20 broods, fathers contributed skewed numbers of offspring and there was an apparent inverse correlation between reproductive success of sires and their relatedness to mothers. Conclusions/Significance Our results in combination with recent reports on multiple paternity in crayfish, crab and lobster species suggests that multiple paternity is common in Malacostraca. Skewed contribution of fathers to the numbers of offspring and inverse correlation between reproductive success of sires and their relatedness to mothers suggest that sperm competition occurred and/or pre- and postcopulatory female choice happen, which may be important for avoiding the occurrence of inbreeding and optimize genetic variation in offspring and for persistence and evolution of low fecundity species. PMID:20856862

  2. Molecular Phylogeny and Zoogeography of the Capoeta damascina Species Complex (Pisces: Teleostei: Cyprinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Nisreen; Esmaeili, Hamid-Reza; Krupp, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Capoeta damascina was earlier considered by many authors as one of the most common freshwater fish species found throughout the Levant, Mesopotamia, Turkey, and Iran. However, owing to a high variation in morphological characters among and within its various populations, 17 nominal species were described, several of which were regarded as valid by subsequent revising authors. Capoeta damascina proved to be a complex of closely related species, which had been poorly studied. The current study aims at defining C. damascina and the C. damascina species complex. It investigates phylogenetic relationships among the various members of the C. damascina complex, based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Phylogenetic relationships were projected against paleogeographical events to interpret the geographic distribution of the taxa under consideration in relation to the area’s geological history. Samples were obtained from throughout the geographic range and were subjected to genetic analyses, using two molecular markers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (n = 103) and the two adjacent divergence regions (D1-D2) of the nuclear 28S rRNA genes (n = 65). Six closely related species were recognized within the C. damascina complex, constituting two main lineages: A western lineage represented by C. caelestis, C. damascina, and C. umbla and an eastern lineage represented by C. buhsei, C. coadi, and C. saadii. The results indicate that speciation of these taxa is rather a recent event. Dispersal occurred during the Pleistocene, resulting in present-day distribution patterns. A coherent picture of the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of the C. damascina species complex is drawn, explaining the current patterns of distribution as a result of paleogeographic events and ecological adaptations. PMID:27309854

  3. Species-specific size expansion and molecular evolution of the oleosins in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Sun, Yepeng; Su, Wujie; Yang, Jing; Liu, Xiuming; Wang, Yanfang; Wang, Fawei; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiaokun

    2012-11-10

    Oleosins are hydrophobic plant proteins thought to be important for the formation of oil bodies, which supply energy for seed germination and subsequent seedling growth. To better understand the evolutionary history and diversity of the oleosin gene family in plants, especially angiosperms, we systematically investigated the molecular evolution of this family using eight representative angiosperm species. A total of 73 oleosin members were identified, with six members in each of four monocot species and a greater but variable number in the four eudicots. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the angiosperm oleosin genes belonged to three monophyletic lineages. Species-specific gene duplications, caused mainly by segmental duplication, led to the great expansion of oleosin genes and occurred frequently in eudicots after the monocot-eudicot divergence. Functional divergence analyses indicate that significant amino acid site-specific selective constraints acted on the different clades of oleosins. Adaptive evolution analyses demonstrate that oleosin genes were subject to strong purifying selection after their species-specific duplications and that rapid evolution occurred with a high degree of evolutionary dynamics in the pollen-specific oleosin genes. In conclusion, this study serves as a foundation for genome-wide analyses of the oleosins. These findings provide insight into the function and evolution of this gene family in angiosperms and pave the way for studies in other plants.

  4. Characterization of Metarhizium species and varieties based on molecular analysis, heat tolerance and cold activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandes, E.K.K.; Keyser, C.A.; Chong, J.P.; Rangel, D.E.N.; Miller, M.P.; Roberts, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The genetic relationships and conidial tolerances to high and low temperatures were determined for isolates of several Metarhizium species and varieties. Methods and Results: Molecular-based techniques [AFLP and rDNA (ITS1, ITS2 and 5??8S) gene sequencing] were used to characterize morphologically identified Metarhizium spp. isolates from a wide range of sources. Conidial suspensions of isolates were exposed to wet heat (45 ?? 0??2??C) and plated on potato dextrose agar plus yeast extract (PDAY) medium. After 8-h exposure, the isolates divided clearly into two groups: (i) all isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae (Ma-an) and Metarhizium from the flavoviride complex (Mf) had virtually zero conidial relative germination (RG), (ii) Metarhizium anisopliae var. acridum (Ma-ac) isolates demonstrated high heat tolerance (c. 70-100% RG). Conidial suspensions also were plated on PDAY and incubated at 5??C for 15 days, during which time RGs for Ma-an and Ma-ac isolates were virtually zero, whereas the two Mf were highly cold active (100% RG). Conclusions: Heat and cold exposures can be used as rapid tools to tentatively identify some important Metarhizium species and varieties. Significance and Impact of the Study: Identification of Metarhizium spp. currently relies primarily on DNA-based methods; we suggest a simple temperature-based screen to quickly obtain tentative identification of isolates as to species or species complexes. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Molecular and morphological divergence in a pair of bird species and their ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, Noah K; Dosanjh, Vishal S; Palma, Ricardo L; Hull, Joshua M; Kimball, Rebecca T; Sánchez, Pablo; Sarasola, José Hernán; Parker, Patricia G

    2009-12-01

    In an evolutionary context, parasites tend to be morphologically conservative relative to their hosts. However, the rate of neutral molecular evolution across many parasite lineages is faster than in their hosts. Although this relationship is apparent at the macroevolutionary scale, insight into the processes underpinning it may be gained through investigations at the microevolutionary scale. Birds and their ectoparasitic lice have served as important natural experiments in co-evolution. Here, we compared mitochondrial and morphological divergence in 2 recently diverged avian host lineages and their parasites. Gálapagos hawks (Buteo galapagoensis) are phenotypically divergent from their closest mainland relatives, the Swainson's hawk (Buteo swainsoni). Both species are host to a feather louse species of Craspedorrhynchus (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Ischnocera, Philopteridae). We sequenced the 5′ end of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI) from a set of hawks and lice. Although this fragment allowed unambiguous identification of host and parasite lineages on the islands and the mainland, only a single variable site was present in the 2 hosts, but 2 major Craspedorrhynchus clades divergent by ~10% were recovered that sorted perfectly with host species. We found significant population genetic structure within the Galápagos Craspedorrhynchus lineage. While the host species are highly differentiated phenotypically, the 2 Craspedorrhynchus louse lineages are phenotypically overlapping, although subtle but significant morphological differences exist.

  6. Molecular Diagnosis and Identification of Leishmania Species in Jordan from Saved Dry Samples

    PubMed Central

    Hijjawi, Nawal; Kanani, Kalil A.; Rasheed, Malak; Atoum, Manar; Abdel-Dayem, Mona; Irhimeh, Mohammad R.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of the endemic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Jordan relies on patient clinical presentation and microscopic identification. Studies toward improved identification of the causative Leishmania species, especially in regions where multiple species exist, and the introduction of these techniques into medical diagnosis is paramount. This study looked at the current epidemiology of CL in Jordan. Clinically diagnosed 41 patients with CL were tested for the presence of Leishmania parasite using both Giemsa staining from skin scraps on glass slides and ITS1-PCR from samples blotted onto storage cards (NucleoCards®). Microscopically, 28 out of the 41 (68.3%) collected samples were positive for amastigotes, whereas the molecular ITS1-PCR amplification successfully identified 30 of the 41 samples (73.2%). Furthermore, PCR-RFLP analysis allowed species identification which is impossible microscopically. Of the 30 PCR positive samples, 28 were Leishmania major positive and the other two samples were Leishmania tropica. This indicates that L. major is the most prevalent species in Jordan and the two L. tropica cases originated from Syria indicating possible future L. tropica outbreaks. Diagnosis of CL based on clinical presentation only may falsely increase its prevalence. Although PCR is more sensitive, it is still not available in our medical laboratories in Jordan. PMID:27403435

  7. Diversity of Clonostachys species assessed by molecular phylogenetics and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Lucas M; Moreira, Gláucia M; Ferreira, Douglas; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Pfenning, Ludwig H

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the species diversity among 45 strains of Clonostachys from different substrates and localities in Brazil using molecular phylogenetics, and compared the results with the phenotypic classification of strains obtained from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Phylogenetic analyses were based on beta tubulin (Tub), ITS-LSU rDNA, and a combined Tub-ITS DNA dataset. MALDI-TOF MS analyses were performed using intact conidia and conidiophores of strains cultivated on oatmeal agar and 4% malt extract agar. Six known species were identified: Clonostachys byssicola, Clonostachys candelabrum, Clonostachys pseudochroleuca, Clonostachys rhizophaga, Clonostachys rogersoniana, and Clonostachys rosea. Two clades and two singleton lineages did not correspond to known species represented in the reference DNA dataset and were identified as Clonostachys sp. 1-4. Multivariate cluster analyses of MALDI-TOF MS data classified the strains into eight clusters and three singletons, corresponding to the ten identified species plus one additional cluster containing two strains of C. rogersoniana that split from the other co-specific strains. The consistent results of MALDI-TOF MS supported the identification of strains assigned to C. byssicola and C. pseudochroleuca, which did not form well supported clades in all phylogenetic analyses, but formed distinct clusters in the MALDI-TOF dendrograms.

  8. Molecular Diagnosis and Identification of Leishmania Species in Jordan from Saved Dry Samples.

    PubMed

    Hijjawi, Nawal; Kanani, Kalil A; Rasheed, Malak; Atoum, Manar; Abdel-Dayem, Mona; Irhimeh, Mohammad R

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of the endemic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Jordan relies on patient clinical presentation and microscopic identification. Studies toward improved identification of the causative Leishmania species, especially in regions where multiple species exist, and the introduction of these techniques into medical diagnosis is paramount. This study looked at the current epidemiology of CL in Jordan. Clinically diagnosed 41 patients with CL were tested for the presence of Leishmania parasite using both Giemsa staining from skin scraps on glass slides and ITS1-PCR from samples blotted onto storage cards (NucleoCards®). Microscopically, 28 out of the 41 (68.3%) collected samples were positive for amastigotes, whereas the molecular ITS1-PCR amplification successfully identified 30 of the 41 samples (73.2%). Furthermore, PCR-RFLP analysis allowed species identification which is impossible microscopically. Of the 30 PCR positive samples, 28 were Leishmania major positive and the other two samples were Leishmania tropica. This indicates that L. major is the most prevalent species in Jordan and the two L. tropica cases originated from Syria indicating possible future L. tropica outbreaks. Diagnosis of CL based on clinical presentation only may falsely increase its prevalence. Although PCR is more sensitive, it is still not available in our medical laboratories in Jordan.

  9. Speciation in ancient cryptic species complexes: evidence from the molecular phylogeny of Brachionus plicatilis (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Gómez, Africa; Serra, Manuel; Carvalho, Gary R; Lunt, David H

    2002-07-01

    Continental lake-dwelling zooplanktonic organisms have long been considered cosmopolitan species with little geographic variation in spite of the isolation of their habitats. Evidence of morphological cohesiveness and high dispersal capabilities support this interpretation. However, this view has been challenged recently as many such species have been shown either to comprise cryptic species complexes or to exhibit marked population genetic differentiation and strong phylogeographic structuring at a regional scale. Here we investigate the molecular phylogeny of the cosmopolitan passively dispersing rotifer Brachionus plicatilis (Rotifera: Monogononta) species complex using nucleotide sequence variation from both nuclear (ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1, ITS1) and mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, COI) genes. Analysis of rotifer resting eggs from 27 salt lakes in the Iberian Peninsula plus lakes from four continents revealed nine genetically divergent lineages. The high level of sequence divergence, absence of hybridization, and extensive sympatry observed support the specific status of these lineages. Sequence divergence estimates indicate that the B. plicatilis complex began diversifying many millions of years ago, yet has showed relatively high levels of morphological stasis. We discuss these results in relation to the ecology and genetics of aquatic invertebrates possessing dispersive resting propagules and address the apparent contradiction between zooplanktonic population structure and their morphological stasis.

  10. Morphological and molecular variation in Tylototriton (Caudata: Salamandridae) in Laos, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Phimmachak, Somphouthone; Aowphol, Anchalee; Stuart, Bryan L

    2015-08-24

    The salamandrid genus Tylototriton is poorly known in Laos, with one described species and unverified reports of two others. We undertook new fieldwork and obtained samples of Tylototriton at six localities across northern Laos during 2009-2013. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA, principal component analyses of 13 mensural characters, and qualitative morphological comparisons with samples from across the geographic range of Tylototriton were performed. Samples from Laos fell into four molecular and morphological groups, consisting of T. notialis, T. panhai, T. anguliceps, and a fourth lineage that is hypothesized here to be an undescribed species. Tylototriton podichthys sp. nov. is distinguished from its congeners by having distinct mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and in characteristics of the glandular skin on the head and body, shape of the rib nodules, and coloration of the body and limbs. This study expands the number of confirmed Tylototriton species in Laos from one to four, with the description of one species and extension of the ranges of T. panhai and T. anguliceps to Laos. An improved understanding of the geographic ranges of T. podichthys sp. nov. and T. anguliceps within Laos is needed.

  11. First Molecular Characterization of Leishmania Species Causing Visceral Leishmaniasis among Children in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Mahdy, Mohammed A. K.; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M.; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Saif-Ali, Reyadh; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Al-Eryani, Samira M.; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a debilitating, often fatal disease caused by Leishmania donovani complex; however, it is a neglected tropical disease. L. donovani complex comprises two closely related species, L. donovani that is mostly anthroponotic and L. infantum that is zoonotic. Differentiation between these two species is critical due to the differences in their epidemiology and pathology. However, they cannot be differentiated morphologically, and their speciation using isoenzyme-based methods poses a difficult task and may be unreliable. Molecular characterization is now the most reliable method to differentiate between them and to determine their phylogenetic relationships. The present study aims to characterize Leishmania species isolated from bone marrows of Yemeni pediatric patients using sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS1) gene. Out of 41 isolates from Giemsa-stained bone marrow smears, 25 isolates were successfully amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction and sequenced in both directions. Phylogenetic analysis using neighbor joining method placed all study isolates in one cluster with L. donovani complex (99% bootstrap). The analysis of ITS1 for microsatellite repeat numbers identified L. infantum in 11 isolates and L. donovani in 14 isolates. These data suggest the possibility of both anthroponotic and zoonotic transmission of VL-causing Leishmania species in Yemen. Exploring the possible animal reservoir hosts is therefore needed for effective control to be achieved. PMID:26966902

  12. First Molecular Characterization of Leishmania Species Causing Visceral Leishmaniasis among Children in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Saif-Ali, Reyadh; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Al-Eryani, Samira M; Lim, Yvonne A L; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a debilitating, often fatal disease caused by Leishmania donovani complex; however, it is a neglected tropical disease. L. donovani complex comprises two closely related species, L. donovani that is mostly anthroponotic and L. infantum that is zoonotic. Differentiation between these two species is critical due to the differences in their epidemiology and pathology. However, they cannot be differentiated morphologically, and their speciation using isoenzyme-based methods poses a difficult task and may be unreliable. Molecular characterization is now the most reliable method to differentiate between them and to determine their phylogenetic relationships. The present study aims to characterize Leishmania species isolated from bone marrows of Yemeni pediatric patients using sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS1) gene. Out of 41 isolates from Giemsa-stained bone marrow smears, 25 isolates were successfully amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction and sequenced in both directions. Phylogenetic analysis using neighbor joining method placed all study isolates in one cluster with L. donovani complex (99% bootstrap). The analysis of ITS1 for microsatellite repeat numbers identified L. infantum in 11 isolates and L. donovani in 14 isolates. These data suggest the possibility of both anthroponotic and zoonotic transmission of VL-causing Leishmania species in Yemen. Exploring the possible animal reservoir hosts is therefore needed for effective control to be achieved.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Cyclamen Species Collected from Different Parts of Turkey by RAPD and SRAP Markers.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Ozhan; Curuk, Pembe; Aslan, Fatma; Bayramoglu, Melda; Izgu, Tolga; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Kacar, Yildiz Aka; Mendi, Yesim Yalcin

    2017-02-01

    The genus Cyclamen (family Myrsinaceae) contains about 20 species, most of which occur in the Mediterranean region. Turkey has critically important Cyclamen genetic resources. Molecular characterization of plant materials collected from different regions of Turkey in which Cyclamen species grow naturally, namely Adana, Antalya, Aydın, Muğla, İzmir, Denizli, Kahramanmaraş, Osmaniye, Eskişehir, Trabzon, and Rize provinces, was performed using RAPD and SRAP markers. DNA was successfully amplified by 30 RAPD primers and 14 SRAP primer pairs. Among the 470 bands generated by the RAPD primers, 467 were polymorphic. The number of bands detected by a single primer set ranged from 11 to 22 (average of 15.6). The percentage polymorphism was 99.3 % based on the RAPD data. In the SRAP analysis, a total of 216 bands were generated, showing 100 % polymorphism. The number of bands detected by a single primer set ranged from 9 to 22 (average of 15.4). All data were scored and UPGMA dendrograms were constructed with similar results in both marker systems, i.e., different species from nine provinces of Turkey were separated from each other in the dendrograms with the same species being clustered together.

  14. Molecular detection and species identification of Alexandrium (Dinophyceae) causing harmful algal blooms along the Chilean coastline

    PubMed Central

    Jedlicki, Ana; Fernández, Gonzalo; Astorga, Marcela; Oyarzún, Pablo; Toro, Jorge E.; Navarro, Jorge M.; Martínez, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims On the basis of morphological evidence, the species involved in South American Pacific coast harmful algal blooms (HABs) has been traditionally recognized as Alexandrium catenella (Dinophyceae). However, these observations have not been confirmed using evidence based on genomic sequence variability. Our principal objective was to accurately determine the species of Alexandrium involved in local HABs in order to implement a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for its rapid and easy detection on filter-feeding shellfish, such as mussels. Methodology For species-specific determination, the intergenic spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S subunit, ITS2 and the hypervariable genomic regions D1–D5 of the large ribosomal subunit of local strains were sequenced and compared with two data sets of other Alexandrium sequences. Species-specific primers were used to amplify signature sequences within the genomic DNA of the studied species by conventional and real-time PCR. Principal results Phylogenetic analysis determined that the Chilean strain falls into Group I of the tamarensis complex. Our results support the allocation of the Chilean Alexandrium species as a toxic Alexandrium tamarense rather than A. catenella, as currently defined. Once local species were determined to belong to Group I of the tamarensis complex, a highly sensitive and accurate real-time PCR procedure was developed to detect dinoflagellate presence in Mytilus spp. (Bivalvia) samples after being fed (challenged) in vitro with the Chilean Alexandrium strain. The results show that real-time PCR is useful to detect Alexandrium intake in filter-feeding molluscs. Conclusions It has been shown that the classification of local Alexandrium using morphological evidence is not very accurate. Molecular methods enabled the HAB dinoflagellate species of the Chilean coast to be assigned as A. tamarense rather than A. catenella. Real-time PCR analysis based on A. tamarense primers allowed the

  15. Binding of calcium to phosphatidylcholines as determined by proton magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yabusaki, K K; Wells, M A

    1975-01-14

    The interactions of calcium, magnesium, and the rare earth cations, cerium, neodymium, and praseodymium, with phosphatidylcholines were studied by proton magnetic resonance and infared spectroscopy. The calcium-induced chemical shifts for the various protons of phosphatidylcholine were C alpha choline greater than C beta choline greater than N(CH3)3 greater than C3 glycerol. No significant chemical shifts were observed for the C1 and C2 glycerol protons. None of the acyl chain protons were affected by the presence of calcium. Analysis of the salt-induced chemical shifts yielded binding curves with an excellent fit with the theoretical. The vicinal coupling constants for the various protons of phosphatidylcholine did not appear to change in the presence of calcium. The lanthanide-induced isotropic shifts for the protons of phosphatidylcholines followed the order Cbeta choline greater than C3 glycerol greater than Calpha choline greater than N(CH3)3. Examination of the P=O stretching band (1150-1300 cm-1) of phosphatidylcholines by differential infrared spectroscopy showed that this band shifted to shorter wavelengths in the presence of calcium. The site of calcium binding to phosphatidylcholines as deduced from the proton magnetic resonance and infrared data is discussed in light of the high specificity for calcium in enhancing the amino-catalyzed methanolysis of phosphatidylcholines.

  16. Inferior Prefrontal Cortex Mediates the Relationship between Phosphatidylcholine and Executive Functions in Healthy, Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zamroziewicz, Marta K.; Zwilling, Chris E.; Barbey, Aron K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the neural mechanisms that mediate the relationship between phosphatidylcholine and executive functions in cognitively intact older adults. We hypothesized that higher plasma levels of phosphatidylcholine are associated with better performance on a particular component of the executive functions, namely cognitive flexibility, and that this relationship is mediated by gray matter structure of regions within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) that have been implicated in cognitive flexibility. Methods: We examined 72 cognitively intact adults between the ages of 65 and 75 in an observational, cross-sectional study to investigate the relationship between blood biomarkers of phosphatidylcholine, tests of cognitive flexibility (measured by the Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System Trail Making Test), and gray matter structure of regions within the PFC. A three-step mediation analysis was implemented using multivariate linear regressions and we controlled for age, sex, education, income, depression status, and body mass index. Results: The mediation analysis revealed that gray matter thickness of one region within the PFC, the left inferior PFC (Brodmann’s Area 45), mediates the relationship between phosphatidylcholine blood biomarkers and cognitive flexibility. Conclusion: These results suggest that particular nutrients may slow or prevent age-related cognitive decline by influencing specific structures within the brain. This report demonstrates a novel structural mediation between plasma phosphatidylcholine levels and cognitive flexibility. Future work should examine the potential mechanisms underlying this mediation, including phosphatidylcholine-dependent cell membrane integrity of the inferior PFC and phosphatidylcholine-dependent cholinergic projections to the inferior PFC. PMID:27733825

  17. Synthesis and in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial studies of novel structured phosphatidylcholines with phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Marrapu; Kaki, Shiva Shanker; Karuna, Mallampalli S L; Sarada, Sripada; Kumar, C Ganesh; Prasad, R B N

    2017-04-15

    Novel phenoylated phosphatidylcholines were synthesized from 1,2-dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine/egg 1,2-diacyl phosphatidylcholine and phenolic acids such as ferulic, sinapic, vanillic and syringic acids. The structures of phenoylated phosphatidylcholines were confirmed by spectral analysis. 2-acyl-1-lyso phosphatidylcholine was synthesized from phosphatidylcholine via regioselective enzymatic hydrolysis and was reacted with hydroxyl protected phenolic acids to produce corresponding phenoylated phosphatidylcholines in 48-56% yields. Deprotection of protected phenoylated phosphatidylcholines resulted in phenoylated phosphatidylcholines in 87-94% yields. The prepared compounds were evaluated for their preliminary in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Among the active derivatives, compound 1-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy) cinnamoyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine exhibited excellent antioxidant activity with EC50 value of 16.43μg/mL. Compounds 1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy) cinnamoyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy) cinnamoyl-2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine exhibited good antioxidant activity with EC50 values of 36.05 and 33.35μg/mL respectively. Compound 1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy) cinnamoyl-2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine exhibited good antibacterial activity against Klebsiella planticola with MIC of 15.6μg/mL and compound 1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy) benzoyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine exhibited good antifungal activity against Candida albicans with MIC of 15.6μg/mL.

  18. Morphological redescription and molecular characterization of three species of Travassosinematidae (Nematoda: Oxyurida: Thelastomatoidea) from Gryllotalpa africana Beauv (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae).

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Chaudhary, Anshu; Singh, Hridaya Shanker

    2013-01-01

    Binema mirzaia (Basir, 1942a) Basir, 1956, Cameronia nisari (Parveen and Jairajpuri, 1985) Adamson and Van Waerebeke, 1992a and Mirzaiella meerutensis Singh and Malti, 2003 are redescribed morphologically along with molecular identification from the intestine of mole cricket Gryllotalpa africana. Molecular characterization was carried out using the D2-D3 expansion domains of the 18S ribosomal DNA region. This study first time presents molecular data for the above three nematode species.

  19. Molecular signatures of plastic phenotypes in two eusocial insect species with simple societies

    PubMed Central

    Patalano, Solenn; Vlasova, Anna; Wyatt, Chris; Ewels, Philip; Camara, Francisco; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Asher, Claire L.; Jurkowski, Tomasz P.; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Bachman, Martin; González-Navarrete, Irene; Minoche, André E.; Krueger, Felix; Lowy, Ernesto; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Rodriguez-Ales, Jose Luis; Nascimento, Fabio S.; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Gabaldon, Toni; Tarver, James E.; Andrews, Simon; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Hughes, William O. H.; Guigó, Roderic; Reik, Wolf; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is important in adaptation and shapes the evolution of organisms. However, we understand little about what aspects of the genome are important in facilitating plasticity. Eusocial insect societies produce plastic phenotypes from the same genome, as reproductives (queens) and nonreproductives (workers). The greatest plasticity is found in the simple eusocial insect societies in which individuals retain the ability to switch between reproductive and nonreproductive phenotypes as adults. We lack comprehensive data on the molecular basis of plastic phenotypes. Here, we sequenced genomes, microRNAs (miRNAs), and multiple transcriptomes and methylomes from individual brains in a wasp (Polistes canadensis) and an ant (Dinoponera quadriceps) that live in simple eusocial societies. In both species, we found few differences between phenotypes at the transcriptional level, with little functional specialization, and no evidence that phenotype-specific gene expression is driven by DNA methylation or miRNAs. Instead, phenotypic differentiation was defined more subtly by nonrandom transcriptional network organization, with roles in these networks for both conserved and taxon-restricted genes. The general lack of highly methylated regions or methylome patterning in both species may be an important mechanism for achieving plasticity among phenotypes during adulthood. These findings define previously unidentified hypotheses on the genomic processes that facilitate plasticity and suggest that the molecular hallmarks of social behavior are likely to differ with the level of social complexity. PMID:26483466

  20. Molecular diversity of Annona species and proximate fruit composition of selected genotypes.

    PubMed

    Anuragi, Hirdayesh; Dhaduk, Haresh L; Kumar, Sushil; Dhruve, Jitendra J; Parekh, Mithil J; Sakure, Amar A

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the genetic variation in germplasm is of utmost importance for crop improvement. Therefore, efforts were made to analyse the molecular marker based genetic diversity of 20 Annona genotypes from five different species of family Annonaceae. During analysis, a set of 11 RAPD primers yielded a total of 152 bands with 80.01 % polymorphism and PIC for RAPD ranged from 0.86 to 0.92 with a mean of 0.89. With 93.05 % polymorphism, 12 SSR primers produced 39 amplicons. The PIC for SSRs ranged from 0.169 to 0.694 with of average of 0.339. The dendrogram produced from pooled molecular data of 11 RAPD and 12 SSR primers showed seven clusters at a cutoff value of 0.78. The dendrogram discriminated all the Annona genotypes suggesting that significant genetic diversity was present among the genotypes. Proximate fruit composition study of nine fruiting genotypes of Annona revealed that A. squamosa possessed significantly higher amount of most of studies biochemical which gives an opportunity to fruit breeders to improve the other Annona species. Likewise, A. muricata being rich in seed oil content can be exploited in oil industries.

  1. Various Molecular Species of Diacylglycerol Hydroperoxide Activate Human Neutrophils via PKC Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Takekoshi, Susumu; Tanino, Yutaka; Watanabe, Keiichi; Nakano, Minoru; Hitomi, Yoshiaki; Takigawa, Tomoko; Ogino, Keiki; Yamamoto, Yorihiro

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed that diacylglycerol hydroperoxide-induced unregulated signal transduction causes oxidative stress-related diseases. In this study, we investigated which molecular species of diacylglycerol hydroperoxide activated human peripheral neutrophils. All diacylglycerol hydroperoxides, diacylglycerol hydroxides, and diacyglycerols tested in the present study induced superoxide production by neutrophils. The ability to activate neutrophils among molecular species containing the same fatty acid composition was as follows; diacylglycerol hydroperoxide>diacylglycerol hydroxide≥diacylglycerol. The diacylglycerol hydroperoxide composed of linoleate was a stronger activator for neutrophils than that composed of arachidonate. 1-Palmitoyl-2-linoleoylglycerol hydroperoxide (PLG-OOH) was the strongest stimulator for neutrophils. We reconfirmed that PLG-OOH activated protein kinase C (PKC) in neutrophils. PLG-OOH induced the phosphorylation of p47phox, a substrate of PKC and a cytosolic component of NADPH oxidase, in neutrophils, as did N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine or 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate. Moreover, the time course of p47phox phosphorylation was comparable to that of superoxide production. These results suggest that PLG-OOH activated intracellular protein kinase C. PLG-OOH, produced via an uncontrolled process, can act as a biological second messenger to cause inflammatory disease from oxidative stress. PMID:18392102

  2. Molecular phylogenetics of the holly leafminers (Diptera: Agromyzidae: Phytomyza): species limits, speciation, and dietary specialization.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, S J; Wiegmann, B M

    2000-11-01

    A molecular phylogenetic analysis was conducted to determine relationships and to investigate character evolution in the Phytomyza ilicis group of leafmining flies on hollies (Aquifoliaceae: Ilex). A total of 2207 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and II genes were sequenced for all known holly leafminers, as well as for several undescribed members of this group. Maximum-parsimony analysis of the sequence data indicates that these leafminers form a monophyletic group with the inclusion of an undescribed leafminer that feeds on the distantly related plant Gelsemium sempevirens (Loganiaceae). Species boundaries of previously known and of undescribed holly leafmining species were confirmed with the molecular data, with one exception. Optimization of variable ecological and morphological characters onto the most parsimonious phylogeny suggests that these traits are evolutionarily labile, requiring multiple instances of convergence and/or reversal to explain their evolutionary history. Speciation in holly leafminers is associated with host shifts and appears to involve colonization of new hosts more often than cospeciation as the hosts diverge. Monophagy is the most common feeding pattern in holly leafminers, and more generalized feeding is inferred to have evolved at least two separate times, possibly as a prelude to speciation. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Molecular signatures of plastic phenotypes in two eusocial insect species with simple societies.

    PubMed

    Patalano, Solenn; Vlasova, Anna; Wyatt, Chris; Ewels, Philip; Camara, Francisco; Ferreira, Pedro G; Asher, Claire L; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Bachman, Martin; González-Navarrete, Irene; Minoche, André E; Krueger, Felix; Lowy, Ernesto; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Rodriguez-Ales, Jose Luis; Nascimento, Fabio S; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Gabaldon, Toni; Tarver, James E; Andrews, Simon; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Hughes, William O H; Guigó, Roderic; Reik, Wolf; Sumner, Seirian

    2015-11-10

    Phenotypic plasticity is important in adaptation and shapes the evolution of organisms. However, we understand little about what aspects of the genome are important in facilitating plasticity. Eusocial insect societies produce plastic phenotypes from the same genome, as reproductives (queens) and nonreproductives (workers). The greatest plasticity is found in the simple eusocial insect societies in which individuals retain the ability to switch between reproductive and nonreproductive phenotypes as adults. We lack comprehensive data on the molecular basis of plastic phenotypes. Here, we sequenced genomes, microRNAs (miRNAs), and multiple transcriptomes and methylomes from individual brains in a wasp (Polistes canadensis) and an ant (Dinoponera quadriceps) that live in simple eusocial societies. In both species, we found few differences between phenotypes at the transcriptional level, with little functional specialization, and no evidence that phenotype-specific gene expression is driven by DNA methylation or miRNAs. Instead, phenotypic differentiation was defined more subtly by nonrandom transcriptional network organization, with roles in these networks for both conserved and taxon-restricted genes. The general lack of highly methylated regions or methylome patterning in both species may be an important mechanism for achieving plasticity among phenotypes during adulthood. These findings define previously unidentified hypotheses on the genomic processes that facilitate plasticity and suggest that the molecular hallmarks of social behavior are likely to differ with the level of social complexity.

  4. SalmoBase: an integrated molecular data resource for Salmonid species.

    PubMed

    Samy, Jeevan Karloss Antony; Mulugeta, Teshome Dagne; Nome, Torfinn; Sandve, Simen Rød; Grammes, Fabian; Kent, Matthew Peter; Lien, Sigbjørn; Våge, Dag Inge

    2017-06-26

    Salmonids are ray-finned fishes which constitute 11 genera and at least 70 species including Atlantic salmon, whitefishes, graylings, rainbow trout, and char. The common ancestor of all Salmonidae experienced a whole genome duplication (WGD) ~80 million years ago, resulting in an autotetraploid genome. Genomic rediplodization is still going on in salmonid species, providing an unique system for studying evolutionary consequences of whole genome duplication. In recent years, high quality genome sequences of Atlantic salmon and Rainbow trout has been established, due to their scientific and commercial values. In this paper we introduce SalmoBase ( http://www.salmobase.org/ ), a tool for making molecular resources for salmonids public available in a framework of visualizations and analytic tools. SalmoBase has been developed as a part of the ELIXIR.NO project. Currently, SalmoBase contains molecular resources for Atlantic salmon and Rainbow trout. Data can be accessed through BLAST, Genome Browser (GBrowse), Genetic Variation Browser (GVBrowse) and Gene Expression Browser (GEBrowse). To the best of our knowledge, SalmoBase is the first database which integrates salmonids data and allow users to study salmonids in an integrated framework. The database and its tools (e.g., comparative genomics tools, synteny browsers) will be expanded as additional public resources describing other Salmonidae genomes become available.

  5. Molecular Identification of Mucor and Lichtheimia Species in Pure Cultures of Zygomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Ziaee, Ardeshir; Zia, Mohammadali; Bayat, Mansour; Hashemi, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Background The Mucorales are an important opportunistic fungi that can cause mucormycosis in immunocompromised patients. The fast and precise diagnosis of mucormycosis is very important because, if the diagnosis is not made early enough, dissemination often occurs. It is now well established that molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) are feasible and reliable tools for the early and accurate diagnosis of mucormycosis agents. Objectives The present study was conducted to evaluate the validity of PCR-RFLP for the identification of Mucorales and some important Mucor and Lichtheimia species in pure cultures of Zygomycetes. Materials and Methods Specific sense and anti-sense primers were used to amplify the Mucorales, Mucor, and Lichtheimia DNA. The PCR products were digested by AfIII, XmnI, and AcII restriction enzymes, and the resultant restriction pattern was analyzed. Results On the basis of the molecular and morphological data, we identified Mucor plumbeus (10.83%), M. circinelloides (9.17%), Lichtheimia corymbifera (9.17%), M. racemosus (5.83%), M. ramosissimus (3.33%), and L. blakesleeana (0.83%). Conclusions It seems that PCR-RFLP is a suitable technique for the identification of Mucorales at the species level. PMID:27284399

  6. Molecular phylogenetic and dating analysis of pierid butterfly species using complete mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Hao, J S; Sun, X Y; Zheng, B; Yang, Q

    2016-12-02

    Pieridae is a butterfly family whose evolutionary history is poorly understood. Due to the difficulties in identifying morphological synapomorphies within the group and the scarcity of the fossil records, only a few studies on higher phylogeny of Pieridae have been reported to date. In this study, we describe the complete mitochondrial genomes of four pierid butterfly species (Aporia martineti, Aporia hippia, Aporia bieti, and Mesapia peloria), in order to better characterize the pierid butterfly mitogenomes and perform the phylogenetic analyses using all available mitogenomic sequence data (13PCGs, rRNAs, and tRNAs) from the 18 pierid butterfly species comprising the three main subfamilies (Dismorphiinae, Coliadinae and Pierinae). Our analysis shows that the four new mitogenomes share similar features with other known pierid mitogenomes in gene order and organization. Phylogenetic analyses by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference show that the pierid higher-level relationship is: Dismorphiinae + (Coliadinae + Pierinae), which corroborates the results of some previous molecular and morphological studies. However, we found that the Hebomoia and Anthocharis make a sister group, supporting the traditional tribe Anthocharidini; in addition, the Mesapia peloria was shown to be clustered within the Aporia group, suggesting that the genus Mesapia should be reduced to the taxonomic status of subgenus. Our molecular dating analysis indicates that the family Pieridae began to diverge during the Late Cretaceous about 92 million years ago (mya), while the subfamily Pierinae diverged from the Coliadinae at about 86 mya (Late Cretaceous).

  7. Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of the widely distributed Amanita species, A. muscaria and A. pantherina.

    PubMed

    Oda, Takashi; Tanaka, Chihiro; Tsuda, Mitsuya

    2004-08-01

    The molecular phylogeny and biogeography of two widely distributed Amanita species, A. muscaria and A. pantherina, were studied based on specimens from diverse localities. Analyses of both a partial sequence of the ITS region of nuclear DNA and a partial sequence of the beta-tubulin gene were able to resolve specimens of each species. Analyses revealed a greater divergence of the beta-tubulin region than the ITS region. Based on molecular phylogeny of the combination of the ITS and beta-tubulin regions, A. muscaria could be separated into at least three groups (Eurasian, Eurasian subalpine, and North American), and A. pantherina could be separated into at least two groups (North American and Eurasian). We hypothesize that the speciation of A. muscaria occurred in Eurasia with subsequent migration to North America via land bridges. However, it is impossible to determine whether A. pantherina moved from Eurasia to North America or vice versa. For both A. muscaria and A. pantherina, the intracontinental relationships of both Eurasia and North America were closer than the relationships between eastern Asia and eastern North America.