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Sample records for phosphatidylserine targets single-walled

  1. Phosphatidylserine Targets Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes to Professional Phagocytes In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Konduru, Nagarjun V.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Feng, Weihong; Basova, Liana V.; Belikova, Natalia A.; Bayir, Hülya; Clark, Katherine; Rubin, Marc; Stolz, Donna; Vallhov, Helen; Scheynius, Annika; Witasp, Erika; Fadeel, Bengt; Kichambare, Padmakar D.; Star, Alexander; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley R.; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2009-01-01

    Broad applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) dictate the necessity to better understand their health effects. Poor recognition of non-functionalized SWCNT by phagocytes is prohibitive towards controlling their biological action. We report that SWCNT coating with a phospholipid “eat-me” signal, phosphatidylserine (PS), makes them recognizable in vitro by different phagocytic cells - murine RAW264.7 macrophages, primary monocyte-derived human macrophages, dendritic cells, and rat brain microglia. Macrophage uptake of PS-coated nanotubes was suppressed by the PS-binding protein, Annexin V, and endocytosis inhibitors, and changed the pattern of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Loading of PS-coated SWCNT with pro-apoptotic cargo (cytochrome c) allowed for the targeted killing of RAW264.7 macrophages. In vivo aspiration of PS-coated SWCNT stimulated their uptake by lung alveolar macrophages in mice. Thus, PS-coating can be utilized for targeted delivery of SWCNT with specified cargoes into professional phagocytes, hence for therapeutic regulation of specific populations of immune-competent cells. PMID:19198650

  2. Targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes for the treatment of breast cancer using photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    To develop a therapeutic system with cancer cell selectivity, the present study evaluated a possible specific and localized tumor treatment. Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure on the external face of the cell membrane is almost completely exclusive to cancer cells and endothelial cells in the tumor vasculature. The human protein annexin V is known to have strong calcium-dependent binding to anionic phospholipids such as PS. This protein was studied for targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to the vasculature of breast tumors. The synthesis of the protein annexin V, by a pET vector in Escherichia coli, constitutes the first phase of this study. Recombinant annexin V was purified from the cell lysate supernatant by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The overall production of purified annexin V protein was 50 mg/L. The binding ability of the protein annexin V was evaluated by determining the dissociation constant when incubated with proliferating human endothelial cells in vitro. The dissociation constant, Kd, was measured to be 0.8 nM, indicating relatively strong binding. This value of Kd is within the range reported in the literature. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were functionalized with annexin V using two intermediate linkers (containing FMOC and DSPE) resulting in stable suspensions. The SWNT and protein concentrations were 202 mg/L and 515 mg/L, respectively, using the linker with DSPE (average of nine preparations). The conjugation method that used the DSPE-PEG-maleimide linker allowed to successfully conjugate the SWNTs with final concentrations approximately five times higher than the linker containing FMOC. The conjugation method used has a non-covalent nature, and therefore the optical properties of the nanotubes were preserved. The conjugate was also visually observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), allowing to verify the presence of the protein annexin V on the surface of the nanotubes, with an height ranging between 2

  3. Imaging of Brain Tumors With Paramagnetic Vesicles Targeted to Phosphatidylserine

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Patrick M.; Pearce, John; Chu, Zhengtao; McPherson, Christopher M.; Takigiku, Ray; Lee, Jing-Huei; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate paramagnetic saposin C and dioleylphosphatidylserine (SapC-DOPS) vesicles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging phosphatidylserine (PS) expressed by glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. Materials and Methods Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles were formulated, and the vesicle diameter and relaxivity were measured. Targeting of Gd-DTPA-BSA/ SapC-DOPS vesicles to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo was compared with nontargeted paramagnetic vesicles (lacking SapC). Mice with GBM brain tumors were imaged at 3, 10, 20, and 24 h postinjection to measure the relaxation rate (R1) in the tumor and the normal brain. Results The mean diameter of vesicles was 175 nm, and the relaxivity at 7 Tesla was 3.32 (s*mM)−1 relative to the gadolinium concentration. Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles targeted cultured cancer cells, leading to an increased R1 and gadolinium level in the cells. In vivo, Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles produced a 9% increase in the R1 of GBM brain tumors in mice 10 h postinjection, but only minimal changes (1.2% increase) in the normal brain. Nontargeted paramagnetic vesicles yielded minimal change in the tumor R1 at 10 h postinjection (1.3%). Conclusion These experiments demonstrate that Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles can selectively target implanted brain tumors in vivo, providing noninvasive mapping of the cancer biomarker PS. PMID:24797437

  4. Hyaluronic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting MRI contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Yating; Wang, Lili; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-01-01

    A tumor-targeting carrier, hyaluronic acid (HA)-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), was explored to deliver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs) targeting to the tumor cells specifically. In this system, HA surface modification for SWCNTs was simply accomplished by amidation process and could make this nanomaterial highly hydrophilic. Cellular uptake was performed to evaluate the intracellular transport capabilities of HA-SWCNTs for tumor cells and the uptake rank was HA-SWCNTs> SWCNTs owing to the presence of HA, which was also evidenced by flow cytometry. The safety evaluation of this MRI CAs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. It revealed that HA-SWCNTs could stand as a biocompatible nanocarrier and gadolinium (Gd)/HA-SWCNTs demonstrated almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Moreover, GdCl3 bearing HA-SWCNTs could significantly increase the circulation time for MRI. Finally, to investigate the MRI contrast enhancing capabilities of Gd/HA-SWCNTs, T1-weighted MR images of tumor-bearing mice were acquired. The results suggested Gd/HA-SWCNTs had the highest tumor-targeting efficiency and T1-relaxivity enhancement, indicating HA-SWCNTs could be developed as a tumor-targeting carrier to deliver the CAs, GdCl3, for the identifiable diagnosis of tumor. PMID:26213465

  5. Hyaluronic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Yating; Wang, Lili; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-01-01

    A tumor-targeting carrier, hyaluronic acid (HA)-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), was explored to deliver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs) targeting to the tumor cells specifically. In this system, HA surface modification for SWCNTs was simply accomplished by amidation process and could make this nanomaterial highly hydrophilic. Cellular uptake was performed to evaluate the intracellular transport capabilities of HA-SWCNTs for tumor cells and the uptake rank was HA-SWCNTs> SWCNTs owing to the presence of HA, which was also evidenced by flow cytometry. The safety evaluation of this MRI CAs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. It revealed that HA-SWCNTs could stand as a biocompatible nanocarrier and gadolinium (Gd)/HA-SWCNTs demonstrated almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Moreover, GdCl3 bearing HA-SWCNTs could significantly increase the circulation time for MRI. Finally, to investigate the MRI contrast enhancing capabilities of Gd/HA-SWCNTs, T1-weighted MR images of tumor-bearing mice were acquired. The results suggested Gd/HA-SWCNTs had the highest tumor-targeting efficiency and T1-relaxivity enhancement, indicating HA-SWCNTs could be developed as a tumor-targeting carrier to deliver the CAs, GdCl3, for the identifiable diagnosis of tumor.

  6. Chinese medicine single-walled carbon nanotube targeting compound for antitumor therapy: a feasible way?

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-long; Li, Jie; Yan, Chun-yin; Lai, Ze-feng; Hu, Gui-jie

    2014-01-01

    Malignant cancer is the leading cause of death in man, exceeding cerebrovascular disease and heart disease. More than half of the total mortality due to malignant cancer is from lung, liver, intestinal and gastric cancer. Chemotherapy is one of the effective treatments for cancer. However, the great majority of Western anticancer medicines have considerable side effects. Herbal medicines offer many more advantages than synthesized compounds because they are made from purely natural compounds and have less adverse effects. However, the single administration methods used as standard in herbal medicine, and deficient drug targeting, severely limit their anticancer activity. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be used as drug carriers. They have been modified to form Chinese anticancer medicine-SWNT compounds which can specifically target tumors, thereby significantly increasing the therapeutic effectiveness of these medicines. Water-soluble SWNTs have high stability. As a drug carrier, SWNTs functional modification of the anticancer medicine may improve the targeting and killing of tumor cells. SWNTs have been attached to the Chinese antitumor medicines paclitaxel and plumbagin and have achieved excellent therapeutic effects. Furthermore, choosing the best administration methods such as internal iliac arterial infusion, intravesical infusion and embedment of a hypodermic chemotherapeutic pump, may also improve the anticancer effects of Chinese medicine.

  7. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Rationally Designed Vehicles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,J.; Wong,S.; Chen, S.; Zhao, X.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; and Ojima, I.

    2008-11-14

    A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotube surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.

  8. Vascular targeted single-walled carbon nanotubes for near-infrared light therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prickett, Whitney M.; Van Rite, Brent D.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Harrison, Roger G.

    2011-11-01

    A new approach for targeting carbon nanotubes to the tumor vasculature was tested using human endothelial cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro. Single-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with the F3 peptide using a polyethylene glycol linker to target nucleolin, a protein found on the surface of endothelial cells in the vasculature of solid tumors. Confocal microscopy and Raman analysis confirmed that the conjugate was internalized by actively dividing endothelial cells. Dividing endothelial cells were used to mimic these cells in the tumor vasculature. Incubation with the conjugate for 8 h or more caused significant cell death in both actively dividing endothelial cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells, an effect that is hypothesized to be due to the massive uptake of the conjugate. This targeted cell killing was further enhanced when coupled with near-infrared laser treatment. For confluent (non-dividing) endothelial cells, no cytotoxic effect was seen for incubation alone or incubation coupled with laser treatment. These results are promising and warrant further studies using this conjugate for cancer treatment in vivo.

  9. Plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes on monolayer graphene for sensing target protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Gi Gyu; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-05-01

    We developed plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on monolayer graphene as a biosensor to detect target antigen molecules, fc fusion protein without any treatment to generate binder groups for linker and antibody. This plasmonic welding induces atomic networks between SWCNTs as junctions containing carboxylic groups and improves the electrical sensitivity of a SWCNTs and the graphene membrane to detect target protein. We investigated generation of the atomic networks between SWCNTs by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy after plasmonic welding process. We compared the intensity ratios of D to G peaks from the Raman spectra and electrical sheet resistance of welded SWCNTs with the results of normal SWCNTs, which decreased from 0.115 to 0.086 and from 10.5 to 4.12, respectively. Additionally, we measured the drain current via source/drain voltage after binding of the antigen to the antibody molecules. This electrical sensitivity of the welded SWCNTs was 1.55 times larger than normal SWCNTs.

  10. Functional single-walled carbon nanotubes/chitosan conjugate for tumor cells targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Baoyan; Ou, Zhongmin; Xing, Da

    2009-08-01

    The application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the field of biomedicine is becoming an exciting topic because of their flexible structure and propensity for chemical functionalization. In this assay, a novel noncovalently functional SWCNTs based on a natural biocompatible polymer chitosan has been developed for tumor cells targeting. First, SWCNTs were modified by chitosan (CHIT-SWCNT). Second, CHIT-SWCNT was coupled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), based on the reaction between the isothiocyanate group of FITC and the primary amino group of chitosan. Third, the FITC functionalized CHIT-SWCNT was conjugated with folic acid (FA) after activation with EDC/NHS, based on the reaction between the NHS group of FA and the primary free amino group of chitosan to construct the functional SWCNT/CHIT conjugate, CHIT-SWCNT-FA. The fluorescence CHIT-SWCNT-FA has been used to detect tumor cells with confocal microscopy imaging technology. Our experimental results indicate that the novel CHIT-SWCNT-FA is soluble and stable in PBS, and it can be readily transported inside tumor cells. Combining the intrinsic properties of carbon nanotubes and the versatility of chitosan, CHIT-SWCNT can be used as potential devices for targeted drug delivery and tumor cell sensing. The proposed assay could provide a feasible alternative to presently available functional SWCNTs in biological applications.

  11. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    PubMed Central

    Dowall, S. D.; Graham, V. A.; Corbin-Lickfett, K.; Empig, C.; Schlunegger, K.; Bruce, C. B.; Easterbrook, L.; Hewson, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus. PMID:25815346

  12. Targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes for the treatment of breast cancer using photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Luís F. F.; Krais, John J.; Van Rite, Brent D.; Ramesh, Rajagopal; Resasco, Daniel E.; Harrison, Roger G.

    2013-09-01

    This paper focuses on the targeting of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the treatment of breast cancer with minimal side effects using photothermal therapy. The human protein annexin V (AV) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids expressed externally on the surface of tumour cells and endothelial cells that line the tumour vasculature. A 2 h incubation of the SWNT-AV conjugate with proliferating endothelial cells followed by washing and near-infrared (NIR) irradiation at a wavelength of 980 nm was enough to induce significant cell death; there was no significant cell death with irradiation or the conjugate alone. Administration of the same conjugate i.v. in BALB/c female mice with implanted 4T1 murine mammary at a dose of 0.8 mg SWNT kg-1 and followed one day later by NIR irradiation of the tumour at a wavelength of 980 nm led to complete disappearance of implanted 4T1 mouse mammary tumours for the majority of the animals by 11 days since the irradiation. The combination of the photothermal therapy with the immunoadjuvant cyclophosphamide resulted in increased survival. The in vivo results suggest the SWNT-AV/NIR treatment is a promising approach to treat breast cancer.

  13. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Fuel Cell Benchmarked Against US DOE 2017 Technical Targets

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Neetu; Ramesh, Palanisamy; Bekyarova, Elena; Tian, Xiaojuan; Wang, Feihu; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with varying degrees of functionalization were utilized for the fabrication of SWNT thin film catalyst support layers (CSLs) in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), which were suitable for benchmarking against the US DOE 2017 targets. Use of the optimum level of SWNT -COOH functionality allowed the construction of a prototype SWNT-based PEMFC with total Pt loading of 0.06 mgPt/cm2 - well below the value of 0.125 mgPt/cm2 set as the US DOE 2017 technical target for total Pt group metals (PGM) loading. This prototype PEMFC also approaches the technical target for the total Pt content per kW of power (<0.125 gPGM/kW) at cell potential 0.65 V: a value of 0.15 gPt/kW was achieved at 80°C/22 psig testing conditions, which was further reduced to 0.12 gPt/kW at 35 psig back pressure. PMID:23877112

  14. Targeted delivery and controlled release of Paclitaxel for the treatment of lung cancer using single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Baodan; Tan, Li; Zheng, Runhui; Tan, Huo; Zheng, Lixia

    2016-11-01

    A new type of drug delivery system (DDS) based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for controlled-release of the anti-cancer drug Paclitaxel (PTX) was constructed in this study. Chitosan (CHI) was non-covalently attached to the SWNTs to improve biocompatibility. Biocompatible hyaluronan was also combined to the outer CHI layer to realise the specific targeting property. The results showed that the release of PTX was pH-triggered and was better at lower pH (pH5.5). The modified SWNTs showed a significant improvement in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may have enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and further promoted cell apoptosis. The results of western blotting indicated that the apoptosis-related proteins were abundantly expressed in A549 cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and cell viability assay demonstrated that PTX-loaded SWNTs could destroy cell membrane integrity, thus inducing lower cell viability of the A549 cells. Thus, this targeting DDS could effectively inhibit cell proliferation and kill A549 cells, is a promising system for cancer therapy. PMID:27524057

  15. Octa-ammonium POSS-conjugated single-walled carbon nanotubes as vehicles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Naghmeh; Madani, Seyed Y.; Mosahebi, Afshin; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique physical and chemical properties. Furthermore, novel properties can be developed by attachment or encapsulation of functional groups. These unique properties facilitate the use of CNTs in drug delivery. We developed a new nanomedicine consisting of a nanocarrier, cell-targeting molecule, and chemotherapeutic drug and assessed its efficacy in vitro. Methods The efficacy of a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)-based nanoconjugate system is assessed in the targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to cancer cells. SWCNTs were oxidized and reacted with octa-ammonium polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (octa-ammonium POSS) to render them biocompatible and water dispersable. The functionalized SWCNTs were loaded with PTX, a chemotherapeutic agent toxic to cancer cells, and Tn218 antibodies for cancer cell targeting. The nanohybrid composites were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and ultraviolet–visible–near-infrared (UV–Vis–NIR). Additionally, their cytotoxic effects on Colon cancer cell (HT-29) and Breast cancer cell (MCF-7) lines were assessed in vitro. Results TEM, FTIR, and UV–Vis–NIR studies confirmed side-wall functionalization of SWCNT with COOH-groups, PTX, POSS, and antibodies. Increased cell death was observed with PTX–POSS–SWCNT, PTX–POSS–Ab–SWCNT, and free PTX compared to functionalized-SWCNT (f-SWCNT), POSS–SWCNT, and cell-only controls at 48 and 72 h time intervals in both cell lines. At all time intervals, there was no significant cell death in the POSS–SWCNT samples compared to cell-only controls. Conclusion The PTX-based nanocomposites were shown to be as cytotoxic as free PTX. This important finding indicates successful release of PTX from the nanocomposites and further reiterates the potential of SWCNTs to deliver drugs directly to targeted cells and tissues. PMID:26356347

  16. Thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine modified single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiali; Xie, Yingxia; Zhang, Yingjie; Huang, Heqing; Huang, Shengnan; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Zhi; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-11-01

    This report focuses on the thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine-modified single-walled carbon nanotube drug delivery system, which was designed to enhance the anti-tumor effect and reduce the side effects of doxorubicin. Doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes was prepared by reverse-phase evaporation method, the mean particle size was 232.0 ± 5.6 nm, and drug entrapment efficiency was 86.5 ± 3.7%. The drug release test showed that doxorubicin released more quickly at 42℃ than at 37℃. Compared with free doxorubicin, doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes could efficiently cross the cell membranes and afford higher anti-tumor efficacy on the human hepatic carcinoma cell line (SMMC-7721) cells in vitro. For in vivo experiments, the relative tumor volumes of the sarcomaia 180-bearing mice in thermo-sensitive liposomes group and doxorubicin group were significantly smaller than those of N.S. group. Meanwhile, the combination of near-infrared laser irradiation at 808 nm significantly enhanced the tumor growth inhibition both on SMMC-7721 cells and the sarcomaia 180-bearing mice. The quality of life such as body weight, mental state, food and water intake of sarcomaia 180 tumor-bearing mice treated with doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes were much higher than those treated with doxorubicin. In conclusion, doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes combined with near-infrared laser irradiation at 808 nm may potentially provide viable clinical strategies for targeting delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

  17. Functional single-walled carbon nanotubes based on an integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody for highly efficient cancer cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Zhongmin; Wu, Baoyan; Xing, Da; Zhou, Feifan; Wang, Huiying; Tang, Yonghong

    2009-03-01

    The application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the field of biomedicine is becoming an entirely new and exciting topic. In this study, a novel functional SWNT based on an integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody was developed and was used for cancer cell targeting in vitro. SWNTs were first modified by phospholipid-bearing polyethylene glycol (PL-PEG). The PL-PEG functionalized SWNTs were then conjugated with protein A. A SWNT-integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody system (SWNT-PEG-mAb) was thus constructed by conjugating protein A with the fluorescein labeled integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody. In vitro study revealed that SWNT-PEG-mAb presented a high targeting efficiency on integrin αvβ3-positive U87MG cells with low cellular toxicity, while for integrin αvβ3-negative MCF-7 cells, the system had a low targeting efficiency, indicating that the high targeting to U87MG cells was due to the specific integrin targeting of the monoclonal antibody. In conclusion, SWNT-PEG-mAb developed in this research is a potential candidate for cancer imaging and drug delivery in cancer targeting therapy.

  18. A novel cancer-targeting transporter with integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Zhongmin; Wu, Baoyan; Xing, Da

    2009-08-01

    The pursuit of efficient and highly targeting-selective transporters is an active topic in cancer-targeting therapy. In this study, a novel cancer-targeting transporter with integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was developed to investigate cancer cell targeting in vitro. SWCNTs were first modified by phospholipid-bearing polyethylene glycol (PL-PEG). PL-PEG functionalized SWCNTs were then conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody to construct SWCNT-integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody system (denoted as SWCNT-PEG-mAb). In vitro study revealed that the system had a high efficiency in cancer cell targeting in integrin αvβ3 positive U87MG cells. Moreover, the SWCNT-PEG-mAb is stable in physiological media, and can be readily transported into U87MG cells via integrin αvβ3-mediated endocytosis in cell. In summary, the integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody labeled SWCNT is a potential carrier-candidate for cancer-imaging and drug-delivering in cancer-targeting therapy.

  19. Global Phospholipidomics Analysis Reveals Selective Pulmonary Peroxidation Profiles Upon Inhalation of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kapralova, Valentina I.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K.; Swedin, Linda; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Fadeel, Bengt; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly believed that nanomaterials cause non-specific oxidative damage. Our mass spectrometry-based oxidative lipidomics analysis of all major phospholipid classes revealed highly selective patterns of pulmonary peroxidation after inhalation exposure of mice to single-walled carbon nanotubes. No oxidized molecular species were found in two most abundant phospholipid classes – phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Peroxidation products were identified in three relatively minor classes of anionic phospholipids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol whereby oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acid residues also showed unusual substrate specificity. This non-random peroxidation coincided with the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the lung. A similar selective phospholipid peroxidation profile was detected upon incubation of a mixture of total lung lipids with H2O2/cytochrome c known to catalyze cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation in apoptotic cells. The characterized specific phospholipid peroxidation signaling pathways indicate new approaches to the development of mitochondria targeted regulators of cardiolipin peroxidation to protect against deleterious effects of pro-apoptotic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the lung. PMID:21800898

  20. Phosphatidylserine (PS) Is Exposed in Choroidal Neovascular Endothelium: PS-Targeting Antibodies Inhibit Choroidal Angiogenesis In Vivo and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Aredo, Bogale; Zhang, Kaiyan; Zhong, Xin; Pulido, Jose S.; Wang, Shusheng; He, Yu-Guang; Huang, Xianming; Brekken, Rolf A.; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) accounts for 90% of cases of severe vision loss in patients with advanced age-related macular degeneration. Identifying new therapeutic targets for CNV may lead to novel combination therapies to improve outcomes and reduce treatment burden. Our goal was to test whether phosphatidylserine (PS) becomes exposed in the outer membrane of choroidal neovascular endothelium, and whether this could provide a new therapeutic target for CNV. Methods Choroidal neovascularization was induced in C57BL/6J mice using laser photocoagulation. Choroidal neovascularization lesions costained for exposed PS and for intercellular adhesion molecule 2 (or isolectin B4) were imaged in flat mounts and in cross sections. The laser CNV model and a choroidal sprouting assay were used to test the effect of PS-targeting antibodies on choroidal angiogenesis. Choroidal neovascularization lesion size was determined by intercellular adhesion molecule 2 (ICAM-2) staining of flat mounts. Results We found that PS was exposed in CNV lesions and colocalized with vascular endothelial staining. Treatment with PS-targeting antibodies led to a 40% to 80% reduction in CNV lesion area when compared to treatment with a control antibody. The effect was the same as that seen using an equal dose of an anti-VEGF antibody. Results were confirmed using the choroid sprouting assay, an ex vivo model of choroidal angiogenesis. Conclusions We demonstrated that PS is exposed in choroidal neovascular endothelium. Furthermore, targeting this exposed PS with antibodies may be of therapeutic value in CNV. PMID:26529048

  1. Identification of lipid-phosphatidylserine (PS) as the target of unbiasedly selected cancer specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Tanvi J.; Toombs, Jason E.; Minna, John D.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Udugamasooriya, Damith Gomika

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an anionic phospholipid maintained on the inner-leaflet of the cell membrane and is externalized in malignant cells. We previously launched a careful unbiased selection targeting biomolecules (e.g. protein, lipid or carbohydrate) distinct to cancer cells by exploiting HCC4017 lung cancer and HBEC30KT normal epithelial cells derived from the same patient, identifying HCC4017 specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1. In this current study, we identified PS as the target of PPS1. We validated direct PPS1 binding to PS using ELISA-like assays, lipid dot blot and liposome based binding assays. In addition, PPS1 recognized other negatively charged and cancer specific lipids such as phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylglycerol. PPS1 did not bind to neutral lipids such as phosphatidylethanolamine found in cancer and phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin found in normal cells. Further we found that the dimeric version of PPS1 (PPS1D1) displayed strong cytotoxicity towards lung cancer cell lines that externalize PS, but not normal cells. PPS1D1 showed potent single agent anti-tumor activity and enhanced the efficacy of docetaxel in mice bearing H460 lung cancer xenografts. Since PS and anionic phospholipid externalization is common across many cancer types, PPS1 may be an alternative to overcome limitations of protein targeted agents. PMID:27120792

  2. Targeted detection of phosphatidylserine in biomimetic membranes and in vitro cell systems using annexin V-containing cubosomes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lake, Vanessa; Le Brun, Anton P; James, Michael; Duff, Anthony P; Peng, Yong; McLean, Keith M; Hartley, Patrick G

    2013-11-01

    In this work we have formulated Annexin V (ANX) decorated phosphatidylserine containing phytantriol (PSPhy) cubosomes to act as probes for the enhanced detection of apoptotic membranes in both model and in vitro cell systems. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) indicated that ANX-containing PSPhy (ANX-PSPhy) cubosomes retain the Pn3m cubic symmetry and cubic phase nanoparticle characteristics of PSPhy cubosomes. The interaction of ANX-PSPhy cubosomes with apoptotic model and cellular membranes was also investigated using both quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and confocal microscopy which confirmed that ANX-PSPhy cubosomes can selectively bind to apoptotic cells and model membranes. Neutron reflectometry has also been used to show strong binding of ANX-PSPhy cubosomes to a model apoptotic membrane, and in addition reveals changes in both the bilayer structure and in the internal structure of the cubosome in a region adjacent to the membrane as a result of material exchange. This material exchange between cubosome and apoptotic model bilayer was further demonstrated using Cryo-TEM. We have demonstrated that lipid bound protein, in this case Annexin V, can be used to target cubosome systems to biological surfaces in vitro.

  3. Targeted detection of phosphatidylserine in biomimetic membranes and in vitro cell systems using annexin V-containing cubosomes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lake, Vanessa; Le Brun, Anton P; James, Michael; Duff, Anthony P; Peng, Yong; McLean, Keith M; Hartley, Patrick G

    2013-11-01

    In this work we have formulated Annexin V (ANX) decorated phosphatidylserine containing phytantriol (PSPhy) cubosomes to act as probes for the enhanced detection of apoptotic membranes in both model and in vitro cell systems. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) indicated that ANX-containing PSPhy (ANX-PSPhy) cubosomes retain the Pn3m cubic symmetry and cubic phase nanoparticle characteristics of PSPhy cubosomes. The interaction of ANX-PSPhy cubosomes with apoptotic model and cellular membranes was also investigated using both quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and confocal microscopy which confirmed that ANX-PSPhy cubosomes can selectively bind to apoptotic cells and model membranes. Neutron reflectometry has also been used to show strong binding of ANX-PSPhy cubosomes to a model apoptotic membrane, and in addition reveals changes in both the bilayer structure and in the internal structure of the cubosome in a region adjacent to the membrane as a result of material exchange. This material exchange between cubosome and apoptotic model bilayer was further demonstrated using Cryo-TEM. We have demonstrated that lipid bound protein, in this case Annexin V, can be used to target cubosome systems to biological surfaces in vitro. PMID:23899446

  4. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with (111)In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of (111)In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  5. Optical and nuclear imaging of glioblastoma with phosphatidylserine-targeted nanovesicles

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Víctor M.; Chu, Zhengtao; LaSance, Kathleen; Gray, Brian D.; Pak, Koon Yan; Rider, Therese; Greis, Kenneth D.; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal tumor imaging with targeted nanoparticles potentially offers both enhanced specificity and sensitivity, leading to more precise cancer diagnosis and monitoring. We describe the synthesis and characterization of phenol-substituted, lipophilic orange and far-red fluorescent dyes and a simple radioiodination procedure to generate a dual (optical and nuclear) imaging probe. MALDI-ToF analyses revealed high iodination efficiency of the lipophilic reporters, achieved by electrophilic aromatic substitution using the chloramide 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-3α,6α-diphenyl glycoluril (Iodogen) as the oxidizing agent in an organic/aqueous co-solvent mixture. Upon conjugation of iodine-127 or iodine-124-labeled reporters to tumor-targeting SapC-DOPS nanovesicles, optical (fluorescent) and PET imaging was performed in mice bearing intracranial glioblastomas. In addition, tumor vs non-tumor (normal brain) uptake was compared using iodine-125. These data provide proof-of-principle for the potential value of SapC-DOPS for multimodal imaging of glioblastoma, the most aggressive primary brain tumor. PMID:27096954

  6. Toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ong, Li-Chu; Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Tan, Yuen-Fen; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an important class of nanomaterials, which have numerous novel properties that make them useful in technology and industry. Generally, there are two types of CNTs: single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes. SWNTs, in particular, possess unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, allowing for a wide range of applications in various fields, including the electronic, computer, aerospace, and biomedical industries. However, the use of SWNTs has come under scrutiny, not only due to their peculiar nanotoxicological profile, but also due to the forecasted increase in SWNT production in the near future. As such, the risk of human exposure is likely to be increased substantially. Yet, our understanding of the toxicological risk of SWNTs in human biology remains limited. This review seeks to examine representative data on the nanotoxicity of SWNTs by first considering how SWNTs are absorbed, distributed, accumulated and excreted in a biological system, and how SWNTs induce organ-specific toxicity in the body. The contradictory findings of numerous studies with regards to the potential hazards of SWNT exposure are discussed in this review. The possible mechanisms and molecular pathways associated with SWNT nanotoxicity in target organs and specific cell types are presented. We hope that this review will stimulate further research into the fundamental aspects of CNTs, especially the biological interactions which arise due to the unique intrinsic characteristics of CNTs.

  7. Assembly of single-walled carbon nanohorn supported liposome particles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Jianfei; Dorn, Harry C; Geohegan, David; Zhang, Chenming

    2011-06-15

    Nanoparticle-supported liposomes can be a promising platform for drug delivery, vaccine development, and biomedical imaging. Single-walled carbon nanohorns are a relatively new carbon nanomaterial, and they could be used as carriers of drug and imaging reagents. Assembling lipids around carbon nanohorns would confer this nanomaterial much broader applications such as vaccine development and targeted drug delivery by embedding a target protein or immunogenic protein into the lipid bilayer structure. Here, we show the assembly of functionalized single-walled carbon nanohorns (-CH(2)-CH(2)-COOH(x), ~100 nm) with positively charged lipids through a freeze and thaw cycle. The assembled complex particles can be readily separated from individual nanohorns or liposomes under specific centrifugation conditions. The results from transmission electronic microscopy, flow cytometry through nitrobenzoxadiazole labeled lipids, and zeta potential analysis clearly show that the nanohorns are encapsulated by liposomes with a median size of ca. 120 nm.

  8. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Astha; Homayoun, Aida; Bannister, Christopher W; Yum, Kyungsuk

    2015-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that emit photostable near-infrared fluorescence have emerged as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine. Since the discovery of their near-infrared fluorescence, researchers have engineered single-walled carbon nanotubes to function as an optical biosensor that selectively modulates its fluorescence upon binding of target molecules. Here we review the recent advances in the single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical sensing technology for life sciences and biomedicine. We discuss the structure and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the mechanisms for molecular recognition and signal transduction in single-walled carbon nanotube complexes, and the recent development of various single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical biosensors. We also discuss the opportunities and challenges to translate this emerging technology into biomedical research and clinical use, including the biological safety of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The advances in single-walled carbon nanotube-based near-infrared optical sensing technology open up a new avenue for in vitro and in vivo biosensing with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution, beneficial for many areas of life sciences and biomedicine.

  9. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  10. Molecular discriminators using single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Tamoghna; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr; Ranjan Ray, Nihar; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2012-09-01

    The interaction between single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and amphiphilic molecules has been studied in a solid phase. SWNTs are allowed to interact with different amphiphilic probes (e.g. lipids) in a narrow capillary interface. Contact between strong hydrophobic and amphiphilic interfaces leads to a molecular restructuring of the lipids at the interface. The geometry of the diffusion front and the rate and the extent of diffusion of the interface are dependent on the structure of the lipid at the interface. Lecithin having a linear tail showed greater mobility of the interface as compared to a branched tail lipid like dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, indicating the hydrophobic interaction between single wall carbon nanotube core and the hydrophobic tail of the lipid. Solid phase interactions between SWNT and lipids can thus become a very simple but efficient means of discriminating amphiphilic molecules in general and lipids in particular.

  11. Ultralong single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, L X; O'Connell, M J; Doorn, S K; Liao, X Z; Zhao, Y H; Akhadov, E A; Hoffbauer, M A; Roop, B J; Jia, Q X; Dye, R C; Peterson, D E; Huang, S M; Liu, J; Zhu, Y T

    2004-10-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991 by Iijima, there has been great interest in creating long, continuous nanotubes for applications where their properties coupled with extended lengths will enable new technology developments. For example, ultralong nanotubes can be spun into fibres that are more than an order of magnitude stronger than any current structural material, allowing revolutionary advances in lightweight, high-strength applications. Long metallic nanotubes will enable new types of micro-electromechanical systems such as micro-electric motors, and can also act as a nanoconducting cable for wiring micro-electronic devices. Here we report the synthesis of 4-cm-long individual single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at a high growth rate of 11 microm s(-1) by catalytic chemical vapour deposition. Our results suggest the possibility of growing SWNTs continuously without any apparent length limitation.

  12. Cutting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Kirk J.; Gu, Zhenning; Shaver, Jonah; Chen, Zheyi; Flor, Erica L.; Schmidt, Daniel J.; Chan, Candace; Hauge, Robert H.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2005-07-01

    A two-step process is utilized for cutting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The first step requires the breakage of carbon-carbon bonds in the lattice while the second step is aimed at etching at these damage sites to create short, cut nanotubes. To achieve monodisperse lengths from any cutting strategy requires control of both steps. Room-temperature piranha and ammonium persulfate solutions have shown the ability to exploit the damage sites and etch SWNTs in a controlled manner. Despite the aggressive nature of these oxidizing solutions, the etch rate for SWNTs is relatively slow and almost no new sidewall damage is introduced. Carbon-carbon bond breakage can be introduced through fluorination to ~C2F, and subsequent etching using piranha solutions has been shown to be very effective in cutting nanotubes. The final average length of the nanotubes is approximately 100 nm with carbon yields as high as 70-80%.

  13. Laser ablation process for single-walled carbon nanotube production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single-walled carbon nanotubes. The original method developed by researchers at Rice University used a "double-pulse laser oven" process. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to include one-laser pulse (green or infrared), different pulse widths (ns to micros as well as continuous wave), and different laser wavelengths (e.g., CO2, or free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts, buffer gases (e.g., helium), oven temperatures, flow conditions, and even different porosities of the graphite targets. This article is an attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  14. Transmittance of single wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, W.; Hone, J.; Richards, P.L.; Zettl, A.

    2001-07-31

    The authors have measured the far infrared absorption of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes at 1.5K and SWNT ropes in polyethylene (PE) over the range 1.5 < T < 300 K. A weak peak is observed at 28 cm{sup -1} at 1.5K for free standing SWNT samples. The frequency and temperature dependence of the peak is consistent with absorption by an E{sub 2g} symmetric, ''squash mode'', SWNT phonon, which is infrared active due to an adsorbate or disorder. The peak frequency for SWNT ropes in PE is at 40 cm{sup -1} and temperature dependent. They attribute the increase in the frequency of the peak for SWNT in PE to the effect of {approx} 0.2GPa of hydrostatic pressure exerted on the SWNT ropes due to the thermal contraction of PE when cooled to low temperatures. Using two independent methods, they estimate that the SWNT may radially buckle at this pressure. The buckling distortion may cause the pressure dependence of the peak frequency. They cannot rule out the possibility that the peak is an absorption onset from adsorbate modes extrinsic to the SWNT or from interband transitions at a small electronic band gap. An effective medium calculation of Drude metal grains in polyethylene gives a frequency dependence consistent with their data, but the model underestimates the strength of scattering by orders of magnitude.

  15. Pore structure of single-wall carbon nanohorn aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K.; Kaneko, K.; Kokai, F.; Takahashi, K.; Yudasaka, M.; Iijima, S.

    2000-11-01

    Single-wall carbon nanohorn aggregates were characterized by N 2 adsorption at 77 K and `particle density' measurement using the high pressure He buoyancy method. The single-wall carbon nanohorn aggregate had micropores and its pore volume was 0.11 ml g -1. The particle density was 1.25 g ml -1. The particle density was not equal to the solid density of graphite (2.27 g ml -1) , but it agreed within 15% with the density of the single-wall carbon nanohorn estimated using previous TEM data. Hence single-wall carbon nanohorns have closed micropores covered with single graphene walls. According to N 2 adsorption, single-wall carbon nanohorns have a considerably large surface area (308 m2 g-1) and open microporosity which has been ascribed to the inter-particle aggregate structure, the so-called ` dahlia flower type structure'.

  16. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji; Kang, Yu-Xia; Pan, Wen; Lei, Wan; Feng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%–8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:27331813

  17. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  18. On the Stability and Abundance of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hedman, Daniel; Reza Barzegar, Hamid; Rosén, Arne; Wågberg, Thomas; Andreas Larsson, J.

    2015-01-01

    Many nanotechnological applications, using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are only possible with a uniform product. Thus, direct control over the product during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNT is desirable, and much effort has been made towards the ultimate goal of chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs. We have used density functional theory (DFT) to compute the stability of SWNT fragments of all chiralities in the series representing the targeted products for such applications, which we compare to the chiralities of the actual CVD products from all properly analyzed experiments. From this comparison we find that in 84% of the cases the experimental product represents chiralities among the most stable SWNT fragments (within 0.2 eV) from the computations. Our analysis shows that the diameter of the SWNT product is governed by the well-known relation to size of the catalytic nanoparticles, and the specific chirality is normally determined by the product’s relative stability, suggesting thermodynamic control at the early stage of product formation. Based on our findings, we discuss the effect of other experimental parameters on the chirality of the product. Furthermore, we highlight the possibility to produce any tube chirality in the context of recent published work on seeded-controlled growth. PMID:26581125

  19. On the Stability and Abundance of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Daniel; Reza Barzegar, Hamid; Rosén, Arne; Wågberg, Thomas; Andreas Larsson, J

    2015-01-01

    Many nanotechnological applications, using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are only possible with a uniform product. Thus, direct control over the product during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNT is desirable, and much effort has been made towards the ultimate goal of chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs. We have used density functional theory (DFT) to compute the stability of SWNT fragments of all chiralities in the series representing the targeted products for such applications, which we compare to the chiralities of the actual CVD products from all properly analyzed experiments. From this comparison we find that in 84% of the cases the experimental product represents chiralities among the most stable SWNT fragments (within 0.2 eV) from the computations. Our analysis shows that the diameter of the SWNT product is governed by the well-known relation to size of the catalytic nanoparticles, and the specific chirality is normally determined by the product's relative stability, suggesting thermodynamic control at the early stage of product formation. Based on our findings, we discuss the effect of other experimental parameters on the chirality of the product. Furthermore, we highlight the possibility to produce any tube chirality in the context of recent published work on seeded-controlled growth. PMID:26581125

  20. On the Stability and Abundance of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedman, Daniel; Reza Barzegar, Hamid; Rosén, Arne; Wågberg, Thomas; Andreas Larsson, J.

    2015-11-01

    Many nanotechnological applications, using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are only possible with a uniform product. Thus, direct control over the product during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNT is desirable, and much effort has been made towards the ultimate goal of chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs. We have used density functional theory (DFT) to compute the stability of SWNT fragments of all chiralities in the series representing the targeted products for such applications, which we compare to the chiralities of the actual CVD products from all properly analyzed experiments. From this comparison we find that in 84% of the cases the experimental product represents chiralities among the most stable SWNT fragments (within 0.2 eV) from the computations. Our analysis shows that the diameter of the SWNT product is governed by the well-known relation to size of the catalytic nanoparticles, and the specific chirality is normally determined by the product’s relative stability, suggesting thermodynamic control at the early stage of product formation. Based on our findings, we discuss the effect of other experimental parameters on the chirality of the product. Furthermore, we highlight the possibility to produce any tube chirality in the context of recent published work on seeded-controlled growth.

  1. Phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin inhibits protein translocation across the ER membrane.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-05-10

    Secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across and inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via translocon channels. To investigate the effect of the negatively-charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine on the translocation of nascent polypeptide chains through the translocon, we used the phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin C2-domain. Lactadherin inhibited targeting of nascent chain to the translocon by signal sequence and the initiation of translocation. Moreover, lactadherin inhibited the movement of the translocating polypeptide chain regardless of the presence or absence of positively-charged residues. Phosphatidylserine might be critically involved in translocon function, but it is not a major determinant for translocation arrest of positively-charged residues. PMID:23583395

  2. Cumulative and Continuous Laser Vaporization Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes and Nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Styers-Barnett, David J; Rouleau, Christopher M; Hu, Hui; Zhao, Bin; Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David B

    2008-01-01

    The conditions for the scaled synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and single wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) by laser vaporization at high temperatures are investigated and compared using in situ diagnostics. An industrial Nd:YAG laser (600 W, 1-500 Hz repetition rate) with tunable pulse widths (0.5-50 ms) is utilized to explore conditions for high yield production. High-speed videography (50,000 frames/s) of the laser plume and pyrometry of the target surface are correlated with ex situ high resolution TEM analysis of the products for pure carbon targets and carbon/catalyst targets to understand the effects of the processing conditions on the resulting nanostructures. Carbon is shown to self-assemble into single-wall nanohorn structures at rates of ~ 1 nm/ms which is comparable to the catalystassisted SWNT growth rates. Two regimes of laser ablation, cumulative ablation by multiple pulses, and continuous ablation by individual pulses, were explored. Cumulative ablation with spatially overlapping 0.5 ms pulses is favorable for the high yield and production rate of SWNTs at ~ 6 g/h while continuous ablation by individual long laser pulses (~ 20 ms) at high temperatures results in the highest yield of SWNHs without graphitic impurities at ~ 10 g/h. Adjustment of the laser pulse width is shown to control SWNH morphology.

  3. Cumulative and continuous laser vaporization synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes and nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puretzky, A. A.; Styers-Barnett, D. J.; Rouleau, C. M.; Hu, H.; Zhao, B.; Ivanov, I. N.; Geohegan, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    The conditions for the scaled synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and single wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) by laser vaporization at high temperatures are investigated and compared using in situ diagnostics. An industrial Nd:YAG laser (600 W, 1-500 Hz repetition rate) with tunable pulse widths (0.5-50 ms) is utilized to explore conditions for high-yield production. High-speed videography (50000 frames/s) of the laser plume and pyrometry of the target surface are correlated with ex situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the products for pure carbon targets and carbon/catalyst targets to understand the effects of the processing conditions on the resulting nanostructures. Carbon is shown to self-assemble into single-wall nanohorn structures at rates of ˜1 nm/ms, which is comparable to the catalyst-assisted SWNT growth rates. Two regimes of laser ablation, cumulative ablation by multiple pulses and continuous ablation by individual pulses, were explored. Cumulative ablation with spatially overlapping 0.5-ms pulses is favorable for the high yield and production rate of SWNTs at ˜6 g/h while continuous ablation by individual long laser pulses (˜20 ms) at high temperatures results in the highest yield of SWNHs at ˜10 g/h. Adjustment of the laser pulse width is shown to control SWNH morphology.

  4. Catheterized guinea pigs infected with Ebola Zaire virus allows safer sequential sampling to determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Dowall, Stuart; Taylor, Irene; Yeates, Paul; Smith, Leonie; Rule, Antony; Easterbrook, Linda; Bruce, Christine; Cook, Nicola; Corbin-Lickfett, Kara; Empig, Cyril; Schlunegger, Kyle; Graham, Victoria; Dennis, Mike; Hewson, Roger

    2013-02-01

    Sequential sampling from animals challenged with highly pathogenic organisms, such as haemorrhagic fever viruses, is required for many pharmaceutical studies. Using the guinea pig model of Ebola virus infection, a catheterized system was used which had the benefits of allowing repeated sampling of the same cohort of animals, and also a reduction in the use of sharps at high biological containment. Levels of a PS-targeting antibody (Bavituximab) were measured in Ebola-infected animals and uninfected controls. Data showed that the pharmacokinetics were similar in both groups, therefore Ebola virus infection did not have an observable effect on the half-life of the antibody.

  5. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred

  6. Ion adsorption mechanism of bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Tsutsui, M.; Al-zubaidi, A.; Ishii, Y.; Kawasaki, S.

    2016-07-01

    In order to elucidate ion adsorption mechanism of bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in situ synchrotron XRD measurements of SWCNT electrode in alkali halide aqueous electrolyte at several applied potentials were performed. It was found that the surface inside SWCNT is the important ion adsorption site.

  7. Strain Sensitivity in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Multifunctional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M. (Technical Monitor); Smits, Jan M., VI

    2005-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes represent the future of structural aerospace vehicle systems due to their unparalleled strength characteristics and demonstrated multifunctionality. This multifunctionality rises from the CNT's unique capabilities for both metallic and semiconducting electron transport, electron spin polarizability, and band gap modulation under strain. By incorporating the use of electric field alignment and various lithography techniques, a single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) test bed for measurement of conductivity/strain relationships has been developed. Nanotubes are deposited at specified locations through dielectrophoresis. The circuit is designed such that the central, current carrying section of the nanotube is exposed to enable atomic force microscopy and manipulation in situ while the transport properties of the junction are monitored. By applying this methodology to sensor development a flexible single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) based strain sensitive device has been developed. Studies of tensile testing of the flexible SWNT device vs conductivity are also presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using single walled HiPCO (high-pressure carbon monoxide) carbon nanotubes as strain sensing agents in a multi-functional materials system.

  8. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  9. Chemical Sensing with Polyaniline Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Mengning; Tang, Yifan; Gou, Pingping; Reber, Michael J; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-25

    Single-walled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (SWNT/PAni) nanocomposite with controlled core/shell morphology was synthesized by a noncovalent functionalization approach. Unique electron interactions between the SWNT core and the PAni shell were studied electrochemically and spectroscopically, and superior sensor performance to chemical gases and vapors was demonstrated.

  10. Flame Synthesis Of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes And Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wal, Randy L. Vander; Berger, Gordon M.; Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are widely sought for a variety of applications including gas storage, intercalation media, catalyst support and composite reinforcing material [1]. Each of these applications will require large scale quantities of CNTs. A second consideration is that some of these applications may require redispersal of the collected CNTs and attachment to a support structure. If the CNTs could be synthesized directly upon the support to be used in the end application, a tremendous savings in post-synthesis processing could be realized. Therein we have pursued both aerosol and supported catalyst synthesis of CNTs. Given space limitations, only the aerosol portion of the work is outlined here though results from both thrusts will be presented during the talk. Aerosol methods of SWNT, MWNT or nanofiber synthesis hold promise of large-scale production to supply the tonnage quantities these applications will require. Aerosol methods may potentially permit control of the catalyst particle size, offer continuous processing, provide highest product purity and most importantly, are scaleable. Only via economy of scale will the cost of CNTs be sufficient to realize the large-scale structural and power applications on both earth and in space. Present aerosol methods for SWNT synthesis include laser ablation of composite metalgraphite targets or thermal decomposition/pyrolysis of a sublimed or vaporized organometallic [2]. Both approaches, conducted within a high temperature furnace, have produced single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). The former method requires sophisticated hardware and is inherently limited by the energy deposition that can be realized using pulsed laser light. The latter method, using expensive organometallics is difficult to control for SWNT synthesis given a range of gasparticle mixing conditions along variable temperature gradients; multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) are a far more likely end products. Both approaches require large energy expenditures and

  11. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may be pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  12. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  13. Reinforcement of Epoxies Using Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Sharma, Jitendra; Chatterjee, Tirtha

    2008-03-01

    The reinforcement of bisphenol-A and bisphenol-F epoxies using single walled carbon nanotubes has been approached experimentally by understanding the nature of interactions between the matrices and nanotubes. Unassisted dispersions of single walled carbon nanotubes in epoxies were studied by a combination of radiation scattering (elastic small angle scattering and inelastic scattering), DSC based glass transition determination, melt rheology and solid-state mechanical testing in order to understand and correlate changes in local and global dynamics to the tailoring of composite mechanical properties. Significant changes in the glass transition temperature of the matrix can successfully account for changes in the viscoelastic properties of the epoxy dispersions for concentrations below the percolation threshold, while above the percolation threshold the network superstructure formed by the nanotubes controls the viscoelastic properties.

  14. Thermionic Emission of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Krainsky, Isay L.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Elich, Jeffrey M.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2004-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology, have investigated the thermionic properties of high-purity, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for use as electron-emitting electrodes. Carbon nanotubes are a recently discovered material made from carbon atoms bonded into nanometer-scale hollow tubes. Such nanotubes have remarkable properties. An extremely high aspect ratio, as well as unique mechanical and electronic properties, make single-wall nanotubes ideal for use in a vast array of applications. Carbon nanotubes typically have diameters on the order of 1 to 2 nm. As a result, the ends have a small radius of curvature. It is these characteristics, therefore, that indicate they might be excellent potential candidates for both thermionic and field emission.

  15. Magnetic correlations in ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou; Wang, Huai-Yu

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic correlations, including transverse magnetic correlation (TMC) and longitudinal magnetic correlation (LMC), of ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are comprehensively investigated by use of the double-time Green's function method. The influence of temperature, spin quantum number, diameter of the tube, anisotropy strength and external magnetic field to magnetic correlations are carefully calculated. An interesting result is that for the two smallest spin quantum numbers S=1, and 3/2, the LMC around the Curie point is negative, demonstrating that the neighboring spins in ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are antiparallel to each other along the tube axis direction in spite of the ferromagnetic exchanges between them, while it is not so along the transverse direction. This is due to the fact that the quantum spin fluctuation is believed anisotropic. The effect of the LMC is always in contrary to that of the TMC effect: if one is stronger, the other is weaker.

  16. Structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes: a graphene helix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Kap; Lee, Sohyung; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Min, Bong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Il; Lee, Kyung-Il; An, Kay Hyeok; John, Phillip

    2014-08-27

    Evidence is presented in this paper that certain single-wall carbon nanotubes are not seamless tubes, but rather adopt a graphene helix resulting from the spiral growth of a nano-graphene ribbon. The residual traces of the helices are confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The analysis also shows that the tubular graphene material may exhibit a unique armchair structure and the chirality is not a necessary condition for the growth of carbon nanotubes. The description of the structure of the helical carbon nanomaterials is generalized using the plane indices of hexagonal space groups instead of using chiral vectors. It is also proposed that the growth model, via a graphene helix, results in a ubiquitous structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:24838196

  17. Noise characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube network transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kim, Kang Hyun; Kim, Kyu Tae; Min, Yo-Sep; Park, Wanjun

    2008-07-01

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are studied with field effect transistors (FETs). Due to the geometrical complexity of nanotube networks in the channel area and the large number of tube-tube/tube-metal junctions, the inverse frequency, 1/f, dependence of the noise shows a similar level to that of a single single-walled carbon nanotube transistor. Detailed analysis is performed with the parameters of number of mobile carriers and mobility in the different environment. This shows that the change in the number of mobile carriers resulting in the mobility change due to adsorption and desorption of gas molecules (mostly oxygen molecules) to the tube surface is a key factor in the 1/f noise level for carbon nanotube network transistors.

  18. Noise characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube network transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kim, Kang Hyun; Kim, Kyu Tae; Min, Yo-Sep; Park, Wanjun

    2008-07-16

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are studied with field effect transistors (FETs). Due to the geometrical complexity of nanotube networks in the channel area and the large number of tube-tube/tube-metal junctions, the inverse frequency, 1/f, dependence of the noise shows a similar level to that of a single single-walled carbon nanotube transistor. Detailed analysis is performed with the parameters of number of mobile carriers and mobility in the different environment. This shows that the change in the number of mobile carriers resulting in the mobility change due to adsorption and desorption of gas molecules (mostly oxygen molecules) to the tube surface is a key factor in the 1/f noise level for carbon nanotube network transistors. PMID:21828739

  19. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    DOEpatents

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  20. Symmetry Properties of Single-Walled BC2N Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hui; Feng, Yuan Ping; Lin, Jainyi

    2009-06-01

    The symmetry properties of the single-walled BC2N nanotubes were investigated. All the BC2N nanotubes possess nonsymmorphic line groups. In contrast with the carbon and boron nitride nanotubes, armchair and zigzag BC2N nanotubes belong to different line groups, depending on the index n (even or odd) and the vector chosen. The number of Raman- active phonon modes is almost twice that of the infrared-active phonon modes for all kinds of BC2N nanotubes.

  1. Single-walled hollow nanospheres assembled from the aluminogermanate precursors.

    PubMed

    Bac, Bui Hoang; Song, Yungoo; Kim, Myung Hun; Lee, Young-Boo; Kang, Il Mo

    2009-10-14

    Ordered single-walled hollow aluminogermanate (ALGE) nanospheres (NSs) with average monodisperse diameters of 5 nm have been synthesized for the first time using simple pH control. This involved basification of the ALGE precursors (having an Al/Ge ratio of 1.33) to a pH value of 13, followed by immediate acidification to a pH value of 9.

  2. Modified Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforce Thermoplastic Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-COlon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    A significant improvement in the mechanical properties of the thermoplastic polyimide film was obtained by the addition of noncovalently functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Polyimide films were reinforced using pristine SWNTs and functionalized SWNTs (F-SWNTs). The tensile strengths of the polyimide films containing F-SWNTs were found to be approximately 1.4 times higher than those prepared from pristine SWNTs.

  3. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  4. Stamping single wall nanotubes for circuit quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Viennot, J. J. Kontos, T.; Palomo, J.

    2014-03-17

    We report on a dry transfer technique for single wall carbon nanotube devices, which allows to embed them in high finesse microwave cavity. We demonstrate the ground state charge readout and a quality factor of about 3000 down to the single photon regime. This technique allows to make devices such as double quantum dots, which could be instrumental for achieving the strong spin photon coupling. It can easily be extended to generic carbon nanotube based microwave devices.

  5. Quantitative optical imaging of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Lihong H.

    The development and application of optical imaging tools and probing techniques have been the subject of exciting research. These tools and techniques allow for non-invasive, simple sample preparation and relatively fast measurement of electronic and optical properties. They also provided crucial information on optoelectronic device application and development. As the field of nanostructure research emerged, they were modified and employed to understand various properties of these structures at the diffraction limit of light. Carbon nanotubes, up to hundreds of micrometers long and several nanometers thin, are perfect for testing and demonstrating newly-developed optical measurement platforms for individual nanostructures, due to their heterogeneous nature. By employing two quantitative imaging techniques, wide-field on-chip Rayleigh scattering spectroscopy and spatial modulation confocal absorption microscopy, we investigate the optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes. These techniques allow us to obtain the Rayleigh scattering intensity, absolute absorption cross section, spatial resolution, and spectral information of single-walled carbon nanotubes. By probing the optical resonance of hundreds of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a single measurement, the first technique utilizes Rayleigh scattering mechanism to obtain the chirality of carbon nanotubes. The second technique, by using high numerical aperture oil immersion objective lenses, we measure the absolute absorption cross section of a single-walled carbon nanotube. Combining all the quantitative values obtained from these techniques, we observe various interesting and recently discovered physical behaviors, such as long range optical coupling and universal optical conductivity on resonance, and demonstrate the possibility of accurate quantitative absorption measurement for individual structures at nanometer scale.

  6. Optical limiting in single-walled carbon nanotube suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. R.; Rawat, H. S.; Mehendale, S. C.; Rustagi, K. C.; Sood, A. K.; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2000-02-01

    Optical limiting behaviour of suspensions of single-walled carbon nanotubes in water, ethanol and ethylene glycol is reported. Experiments with 532 nm, 15 ns duration laser pulses show that optical limiting occurs mainly due to nonlinear scattering. The observed host liquid dependence of the optical limiting effect in different suspensions suggests that the scattering originates from microbubbles formed due to absorption-induced heating.

  7. Chromatographic size separation of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duesberg, G. S.; Muster, J.; Krstic, V.; Burghard, M.; Roth, S.

    The efficient purification of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is reported. Carbon nanospheres, metal particles, and amorphous carbon could be successfully removed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) applied to surfactant stabilised dispersions of SWNT raw material. In addition, length separation of the tubes was achieved. The SWNTs obtained can be adsorbed in high densities onto chemically modified substrates. As determined by AFM investigations, the purified material consists of about equal fractions of both individual SWNTS and ropes of SWNTs.

  8. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  9. Selective uptake of single-walled carbon nanotubes by circulating monocytes for enhanced tumour delivery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Rallapalli, Harikrishna; Prescher, Jennifer A; Larson, Timothy; Herzenberg, Leonore A; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-06-01

    In cancer imaging, nanoparticle biodistribution is typically visualized in living subjects using 'bulk' imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography and whole-body fluorescence. Accordingly, nanoparticle influx is observed only macroscopically, and the mechanisms by which they target cancer remain elusive. Nanoparticles are assumed to accumulate via several targeting mechanisms, particularly extravasation (leakage into tumour). Here, we show that, in addition to conventional nanoparticle-uptake mechanisms, single-walled carbon nanotubes are almost exclusively taken up by a single immune cell subset, Ly-6C(hi) monocytes (almost 100% uptake in Ly-6C(hi) monocytes, below 3% in all other circulating cells), and delivered to the tumour in mice. We also demonstrate that a targeting ligand (RGD) conjugated to nanotubes significantly enhances the number of single-walled carbon nanotube-loaded monocytes reaching the tumour (P < 0.001, day 7 post-injection). The remarkable selectivity of this tumour-targeting mechanism demonstrates an advanced immune-based delivery strategy for enhancing specific tumour delivery with substantial penetration.

  10. Selective uptake of single-walled carbon nanotubes by circulating monocytes for enhanced tumour delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Rallapalli, Harikrishna; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Larson, Timothy; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-06-01

    In cancer imaging, nanoparticle biodistribution is typically visualized in living subjects using `bulk' imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography and whole-body fluorescence. Accordingly, nanoparticle influx is observed only macroscopically, and the mechanisms by which they target cancer remain elusive. Nanoparticles are assumed to accumulate via several targeting mechanisms, particularly extravasation (leakage into tumour). Here, we show that, in addition to conventional nanoparticle-uptake mechanisms, single-walled carbon nanotubes are almost exclusively taken up by a single immune cell subset, Ly-6Chi monocytes (almost 100% uptake in Ly-6Chi monocytes, below 3% in all other circulating cells), and delivered to the tumour in mice. We also demonstrate that a targeting ligand (RGD) conjugated to nanotubes significantly enhances the number of single-walled carbon nanotube-loaded monocytes reaching the tumour (P < 0.001, day 7 post-injection). The remarkable selectivity of this tumour-targeting mechanism demonstrates an advanced immune-based delivery strategy for enhancing specific tumour delivery with substantial penetration.

  11. Robust cyclohexanone selective chemiresistors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Kelvin M; Swager, Timothy M

    2013-08-01

    Functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based chemiresistors are reported for a highly robust and sensitive gas sensor to selectively detect cyclohexanone, a target analyte for explosive detection. The trifunctional selector has three important properties: it noncovalently functionalizes SWCNTs with cofacial π-π interactions, it binds to cyclohexanone via hydrogen bond (mechanistic studies were investigated), and it improves the overall robustness of SWCNT-based chemiresistors (e.g., humidity and heat). Our sensors produced reversible and reproducible responses in less than 30 s to 10 ppm of cyclohexanone and displayed an average theoretical limit of detection (LOD) of 5 ppm.

  12. Improvements in Production of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzano, Leandro; Resasco, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development has been directed toward improvement of a prior batch process in which single-walled carbon nanotubes are formed by catalytic disproportionation of carbon monoxide in a fluidized-bed reactor. The overall effect of the improvements has been to make progress toward converting the process from a batch mode to a continuous mode and to scaling of production to larger quantities. Efforts have also been made to optimize associated purification and dispersion post processes to make them effective at large scales and to investigate means of incorporating the purified products into composite materials. The ultimate purpose of the program is to enable the production of high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes in quantities large enough and at costs low enough to foster the further development of practical applications. The fluidized bed used in this process contains mixed-metal catalyst particles. The choice of the catalyst and the operating conditions is such that the yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes, relative to all forms of carbon (including carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphite) produced in the disproportionation reaction is more than 90 weight percent. After the reaction, the nanotubes are dispersed in various solvents in preparation for end use, which typically involves blending into a plastic, ceramic, or other matrix to form a composite material. Notwithstanding the batch nature of the unmodified prior fluidized-bed process, the fluidized-bed reactor operates in a continuous mode during the process. The operation is almost entirely automated, utilizing mass flow controllers, a control computer running software specific to the process, and other equipment. Moreover, an important inherent advantage of fluidized- bed reactors in general is that solid particles can be added to and removed from fluidized beds during operation. For these reasons, the process and equipment were amenable to

  13. Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dillon, Anne C.; Heben, Michael J.; Gennett, Thomas; Parilla, Philip A.

    2007-01-09

    Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof. The metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes may be produced according to one embodiment of the invention by combining single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material and metal in a solution, and mixing the solution to incorporate at least a portion of the metal with the single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material. Other embodiments may comprise sputter deposition, evaporation, and other mixing techniques.

  14. Electronic structure control of single-walled carbon nanotube functionalization.

    PubMed

    Strano, Michael S; Dyke, Christopher A; Usrey, Monica L; Barone, Paul W; Allen, Mathew J; Shan, Hongwei; Kittrell, Carter; Hauge, Robert H; Tour, James M; Smalley, Richard E

    2003-09-12

    Diazonium reagents functionalize single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in aqueous solution with high selectivity and enable manipulation according to electronic structure. For example, metallic species are shown to react to the near exclusion of semiconducting nanotubes under controlled conditions. Selectivity is dictated by the availability of electrons near the Fermi level to stabilize a charge-transfer transition state preceding bond formation. The chemistry can be reversed by using a thermal treatment that restores the pristine electronic structure of the nanotube. PMID:12970561

  15. Deactivation of singlet oxygen by single-wall carbon nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Okazaki, Toshiya; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2006-11-01

    The deactivation rate constant of singlet oxygen 1O 2 by single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) was determined. The estimated rate constant by SWNHs, 8 × 10 4 L g -1 s -1, was significantly larger than the physical quenching rate constant by α-Tocopherol, 0.9 × 10 4 L g -1 s -1. The origin of this remarkable efficiency of SWNHs for 1O 2 deactivation is ascribed to the unique curvature of the graphitic tube in their horn shaped structure.

  16. Single Wall Nanotube Type-Specific Functionalization and Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter; Nikolaev, Pavel; Sosa, Edward; Arepalli, Sivaram; Yowell, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes were selectively solubilized in THF and separated from semiconducting nanotubes. Once separated, the functionalized metallic tubes were de-functionalized to restore their metallic band structure. Absorption and Raman spectroscopy of the enriched samples support conclusions of the enrichment of nanotube samples by metallic type. A scalable method for enriching nanotube conductive type has been developed. Raman and UV-Vis data indicate SWCNT reaction with dodecylbenzenediazonium results in metallic enrichment. It is expected that further refinement of this techniques will lead to more dramatic separations of types and diameters.

  17. Reaction of folic acid with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Mark D.; Chorney, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen-containing functional groups on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used to covalently bond folic acid molecules to the SWNTs. Infrared spectroscopy confirms intact molecular binding to the SWNTs through the formation of an amide bond between a carboxylic acid group on an SWNT and the primary amine group of folic acid. The folic acid-functionalized SWNTs are readily dispersible in water and phosphate-buffered saline, and the dispersions are stable for a period of two weeks or longer. These folic acid-functionalized SWNTs offer potential for use as biocompatible SWNTs.

  18. Neon adsorption on oxidized single-walled carbon nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Migone, Aldo; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio

    2012-02-01

    We will present the results of a study of neon adsorption on oxidized single-walled carbon nanohorns. Our adsorption isotherm measurements were conducted at temperatures below 24.5 K, the triple point for Ne. Results for the effective specific surface area and for the effective pore volume of the nanohorn aggregates will be presented. We will also report on the sorbent-loading dependence of the isosteric heat of neon on the nanohorns, and on the binding energy. Our results for this system will be compared with those obtained for Ne on a sample of dahlia-like nanohorns annealed at 520 K.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. Structure-Controlled Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) present structure-determined outstanding properties and SWNTs with a single (n, m) type are needed in many advanced applications. However, the chirality-specific growth of SWNTs is always a great challenge. Carbon nanotubes and their caps or catalysts can all act as the structural templates to guide the formation of SWNTs with a specified chirality. SWNT growth via a catalyzed chemical vapor deposition CVD process is normally more efficient and therefore of great interest. We developed a new family of catalyst, tungsten-based intermetallic nanocrystals, to grow SWNTs with specified chiral structures. Such intermetallic nanocrystals present unique structure and atomic arrangements, which are distinctly different from the normal alloy nanoparticles or simple metal nanocrystals, therefore can act as the template to grow SWNTs with designed (n, m) structures. Using W6Co7 catalysts, we realized the selective growth of (12, 6), (16, 0), (14, 4) and other chiralities. By the cooperation of thermodynamic and kinetic factors, SWNTs with high chirality purity can be obtained. . Structure-Controlled Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

  3. Polyaniline/single-walled carbon nanotube composite electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, P. C.; Malshe, A. M.; Harrell, W. R.; Gregory, R. V.; McGuire, K.; Rao, A. M.

    2004-11-01

    Composites of high molecular weight polyaniline (PANI) and various weight percentages of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were fabricated using solution processing. Electrical characteristics of metal-semiconductor (MS) devices fabricated from the PANI/SWNT composites were studied. Current-voltage ( I- V) characteristics of these devices indicate a significant increase in current with an increase in carbon nanotube concentration in the composite. The dominant transport mechanisms operating in these devices were investigated by plotting the forward I- V data on a log-log scale, which revealed two power-law regions with different exponents. In the lower voltage range, the exponent is approximately 1, implying that the charge transport mechanism is governed by Ohm's law. The charge transport mechanism in the higher voltage range, where the exponent varies between 1.1 and 1.7, is consistent with space-charge-limited (SCL) emission in the presence of shallow traps. The critical voltage ( Vc), which characterizes the onset of SCL conduction, decreases with increasing SWNT concentration. In addition, Vc was observed to increase with temperature. These initial results indicate that with further improvements in material consistency and reduction in defect densities, the polyaniline/single-walled carbon nanotube composite material can be used to fabricate organic electronic devices leading to many useful applications in microelectronics.

  4. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R. Nanney, Warren A.; Maddux, Cassandra J.A.; Martínez, Hernán L.; Malone, Marvin A.; Coe, James V.

    2014-12-15

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (n

  5. Boron and nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Azadi, Sam

    2006-10-01

    Boron nitride semiconducting zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), BcbNcnC, as a potential candidate for making nanoelectronic devices is investigated by first-principle full potential density functional theory (DFT). In contrast to the previous DFT calculations, where just one boron and nitrogen doping configuration is considered, here for the average over all possible configurations density of states is calculated in terms of boron and nitrogen concentrations. For example in many body techniques (MBTs) [R. Moradian, Phys. Rev. B 89 (2004) 205425] it is found that semiconducting average gap, Eg, could be controlled by doping nitrogen and boron. But in contrast to MBTs where gap edge in the average density of states is sharp, the gap edge is smeared and impurity states appear in the SWCNT semiconducting gap.

  6. Diameter-dependent solubility of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Duque, Juan G; Parra-Vasquez, A Nicholas G; Behabtu, Natnael; Green, Micah J; Higginbotham, Amanda L; Price, B Katherine; Leonard, Ashley D; Schmidt, Howard K; Lounis, Brahim; Tour, James M; Doorn, Stephen K; Cognet, Laurent; Pasquali, Matteo

    2010-06-22

    We study the solubility and dispersibility of as-produced and purified HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Variation in specific operating conditions of the HiPco process are found to lead to significant differences in the respective SWNT solubilities in oleum and surfactant suspensions. The diameter distributions of SWNTs dispersed in surfactant solutions are batch-dependent, as evidenced by luminescence and Raman spectroscopies, but are identical for metallic and semiconducting SWNTs within a batch. We thus find that small diameter SWNTs disperse at higher concentration in aqueous surfactants and dissolve at higher concentration in oleum than do large-diameter SWNTs. These results highlight the importance of controlling SWNT synthesis methods in order to optimize processes dependent on solubility, including macroscopic processing such as fiber spinning, material reinforcement, and films production, as well as for fundamental research in type selective chemistry, optoelectronics, and nanophotonics. PMID:20521799

  7. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Separated Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. R.; Fagan, J. A.; Tu, X.; Zheng, M.; Hight Walker, A. R.; Duque, J. G.; Crochet, J.; Doorn, S. K.

    2012-02-01

    The heterogeneity of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) produced by typical techniques complicates characterization and presents a barrier for technological applications. Improvements in separation and purification techniques enable detailed studies of specific nanotube properties by providing samples of unique chirality, length, metallicity, bundling, and interior filling. We report resonant Raman spectroscopy (RRS) measurements on these samples over a wide range of excitation wavelengths using a series of discrete and continuously tunable laser sources coupled to a triple-grating spectrometer. RRS of these homogeneous samples reveals unique spectral features and affords interpretation of intrinsic nanotube optical properties. Of particular interest are the G-band of chirally-pure armchair metallic SWCNTS and shifts of the radial breathing mode and excitation energy with water filling. Additionally, we will compare Raman results with other optical characterization techniques.

  8. Parametric amplification in single-walled carbon nanotube nanoelectromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Chiang; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2011-08-01

    The low quality factor (Q) of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) resonators has limited their sensitivity in sensing application. To this end, we employ the technique of parametric amplification by modulating the spring constant of SWNT resonators at twice the resonant frequency and achieve 10 times Q enhancement. The highest Q obtained at room temperature is around ˜700, which is 3-4 times better than previous Q record reported for doubly clamped SWNT resonators. Furthermore, efficient parametric amplification is found to only occur in the catenary vibration regime. Our results open up the possibility to employ light-weight and high-Q carbon nanotube resonators in single molecule and atomic mass sensing.

  9. Storage of Hydrogen in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A. C.; Jones, K. M.; Bekkedahl, T. A.; Kiang, C. H.; Bethune, D. S.; Heben, M. J.

    1997-03-27

    Pores of molecular dimensions can adsorb large quantities of gases owing to the enhanced density of the adsorbed material inside the pores, a consequence of the attractive potential of the pore walls. Pederson and Broughton have suggested that carbon nanotubes, which have diameters of typically a few nanometres, should be able to draw up liquids by capillarity, and this effect has been seen for low-surface-tension liquids in large-diameter, multi-walled nanotubes. Here we show that a gas can condense to high density inside narrow, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). Temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy shows that hydrogen will condense inside SWNTs under conditions that do not induce adsorption within a standard mesoporous activated carbon. The very high hydrogen uptake in these materials suggests that they might be effective as a hydrogen-storage material for fuel-cell electric vehicles.

  10. The electrochemical properties of bundles of single-walled nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Haridoss, P.; Uribe, F.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors studied electrochemical properties of single-walled fullerene nanotube bundles. The materials exhibited a highly anisotropic conductivity. Electrochemical cycling in solutions of alkyl ammonium salts in propylene carbonate revealed that the nanotubes are stable to at least {+-}1.5 V and have a fairly high accessible surface area. Double-layer charging currents of approximately 30 farads per gram were observed. This is on the same order of magnitude, though somewhat lower, than state-of-the-art values for ultra-capacitor materials. Electrochemical insertion of lithium was attempted. Though several features were observed in a slow cyclic voltammetric scan, these features were not reversible, indicating little reversible insertion. Several possible reasons for this behavior are discussed.

  11. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Based Structural Health Sensing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Smits, Jan M.; Williams, Phillip A.

    2004-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based materials represent the future aerospace vehicle construction material of choice based primarily on predicted strength-to-weight advantages and inherent multifunctionality. The multifunctionality of SWCNTs arises from the ability of the nanotubes to be either metallic or semi-conducting based on their chirality. Furthermore, simply changing the environment around a SWCNT can change its conducting behavior. This phenomenon is being exploited to create sensors capable of measuring several parameters related to vehicle structural health (i.e. strain, pressure, temperature, etc.) The structural health monitor is constructed using conventional electron-beam lithographic and photolithographic techniques to place specific electrode patterns on a surface. SWCNTs are then deposited between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic alignment technique. Prototypes have been constructed on both silicon and polyimide substrates, demonstrating that surface-mountable and multifunctional devices based on SWCNTs can be realized.

  12. Characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes for environmental implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Adsorption capacities of N2 and various organic vapors (methyl-ethyl ketone (MEK), toluene, and cyclohexane) on select electric-arc and HiPco produced single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were measured at 77 and 298 K, respectively. The amount of N2 adsorbed on a SWNT sample depended on the sample purity, methodology, and on the sample age. Adsorption capacities of organic vapors (100-1000 ppm vol) on SWNT in humid conditions were much higher than those for microporous activated carbons. These results established a foundation for additional studies related to potential environmental applications of SWNT. The MEK adsorption capacities of samples EA95 and CVD80 and mesoporous tire-derived activated carbon in humid conditions were lower than in dry conditions. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AIChE Annual Meeting (Austin, TX 11/7-12/2004).

  13. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  14. Interaction of aromatic derivatives with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Chun; Elias, Gracy; Wai, Chien M

    2010-11-15

    Fluorescence of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) normally exhibits diameter-dependent oxidative quenching behaviour. This behaviour can be changed substantially to become an almost diameter-independent quenching phenomenon in the presence of electron-withdrawing nitroaromatic compounds, including o-nitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and nitrobenzene. This change is observed for SWNTs suspended either in sodium dodecyl sulfate or in Nafion upon titration with hydrogen peroxide. Benzene, toluene, phenol, and nitromethane do not show such change. These findings suggest the possibility of forming an electron donor-acceptor complex between SWNTs and nitroaromatic compounds, resulting in leveling the redox potential of different SWNT species. The observation appears to provide a new method for modifying the electrochemical potentials of SWNTs through donor-acceptor complex formation. PMID:20878687

  15. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes as Transparent Electrodes for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, C.; Peltola, J.; Levitsky, I.; Glatkowski, P.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Rumbles, G.; Barnes, T.; Coutts, T.

    2006-01-01

    Transparent and electrically conductive coatings and films have a variety of uses in the fast-growing field of optoelectronic applications. Transparent electrodes typically include semiconductive metal oxides such as indium tin oxide (ITO), and conducting polymers such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), doped and stabilized with poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS). In recent years, Eikos, Inc. has conceived and developed technologies to deliver novel alternatives using single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT). These technologies offer products having a broad range of conductivity, excellent transparency, neutral color tone, good adhesion, abrasion resistance as well as mechanical robustness. Additional benefits include ease of ambient processing and patterning capability. This paper reports our recent findings on achieving 2.6% and 1.4% efficiencies on nonoptimized organic photovoltaic cells employing SWNT as a transparent electrode.

  16. Supramolecular functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Baris

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess extraordinary mechanical strength, thermal and electrical conductivity. These properties make them very attractive in many applications in the fields of nanotechnology, electronics, and optics. However, most of the SWNT syntheses methods result in different types of chiralities, which determine the electronic and optical properties of the sample. Thus, it is important to selectively solubilize and purify carbon nanotubes if one wants to use them in technological applications. Selective separation of SWNTs by chirality has been the research focus of many scientists. Here, a comparative study for the solubility of SWNTs with polyaromatic hydrocarbons and conjugated polymers was conducted. PEGylated corannulene derivative has been shown to disperse more metallic nanotubes than the commonly used sodium dodecyl sulfate dispersant. Phthalimide containing conjugated materials were found to be effective in solubilizing SWNTs. In addition, the structural and mechanistic implications for high solubility power were discussed for all dispersants.

  17. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Armchair Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haroz, Erik; Rice, William; Lu, Benjamin; Hauge, Robert; Magana, Donny; Doorn, Stephen; Nikolaev, Pasha; Arepalli, Sivaram; Kono, Junichiro

    2009-03-01

    We performed resonance Raman spectroscopy studies of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), including armchair SWNTs from (6,6) through (10,10). The measurements were carried out with excitation of 440-850 nm on aqueous ensemble samples of SWNTs enriched in metallic species. From this, we generated Raman excitation profiles (REPs) of the radial breathing mode and compare the REPs of armchairs and other metallic species. Additionally, we measured REPs of the G-band mode and observed how the Breit-Wigner-Fano line shape of the G^- peak evolves in peak position, width and intensity relative to the G^+ peak as different metallic nanotubes are excited. By combining these studies with absorption and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy studies, we present a comprehensive examination of the optical signatures of metallic SWNTs.

  18. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R.; Nanney, Warren A.; A. Maddux, Cassandra J.; Martínez, Hernán L.

    2014-01-01

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (n

  19. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R.; Malone, Marvin A.; Nanney, Warren A.; A. Maddux, Cassandra J.; Coe, James V.; Martínez, Hernán L.

    2014-12-01

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (n

  20. General synthesis of inorganic single-walled nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing; Liu, Huiling; Wang, Peng-peng; He, Jie; Wang, Xun

    2015-01-01

    The single-walled nanotube (SWNT) is an interesting nanostructure for fundamental research and potential applications. However, very few inorganic SWNTs are available to date due to the lack of efficient fabrication methods. Here we synthesize four types of SWNT: sulfide; hydroxide; phosphate; and polyoxometalate. Each type of SWNT possesses essentially uniform diameters. Detailed studies illustrate that the formation of SWNTs is initiated by the self-coiling of the corresponding ultrathin nanostructure embryo/building blocks on the base of weak interactions between them, which is not limited to specific compounds or crystal structures. The interactions between building blocks can be modulated by varying the solvents used, thus multi-walled tubes can also be obtained. Our results reveal that the generalized synthesis of inorganic SWNTs can be achieved by the self-coiling of ultrathin building blocks under the proper weak interactions. PMID:26510862

  1. Finely dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes for polysaccharide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang Yu; Chen, Hailan; Li, Peng; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2012-09-26

    Here we demonstrate a polysaccharide hydrogel reinforced with finely dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using biocompatible dispersants O-carboxymethylchitosan (OC) and chondroitin sulfate A (CS-A) as a structural support. Both of the dispersants can disperse SWNTs in aqueous solutions and hydrogel matrix as individual tubes or small bundles. Additionally, we have found that compressive modulus and strain of the hydrogels reinforced with SWNTs were enhanced as much as two times by the addition of a few weight percent of SWNTs. Moreover, the SWNT-incorporated hydrogels exhibited lower impedance and higher charge capacity than the alginate/dispersant hydrogel without SWNTs. The OC and the CS-A demonstrated much higher reinforcing enhancement than a commercially available dispersant, sodium dodecyl sulfate. Combined with the experimental data on the mechanical and electrical properties, the biocompatibility of OC and CS-A can provide the possibility of biomedical application of the SWNT-reinforced hydrogels. PMID:22909447

  2. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer solar cells has been conducted towards developing alternative lightweight, flexible devices for space power applications. Photovoltaic devices were constructed with regioregular poly(3-octylthiophene)-(P3OT) and purified, >95% w/w, laser-generated SWNTs. The P3OT composites were deposited on ITO-coated polyethylene terapthalate (PET) and I-V characterization was performed under simulated AM0 illumination. Fabricated devices for the 1.0% w/w SWNT-P3OT composites showed a photoresponse with an open-circuit voltage (V(sub oc)) of 0.98 V and a short-circuit current density (I(sub sc)) of 0.12 mA/sq cm. Optimization of carrier transport within these novel photovoltaic systems is proposed, specifically development of nanostructure-SWNT complexes to enhance exciton dissociation.

  3. On the vibrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arghavan, S.; Singh, A. V.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a detailed numerical study on the free and forced vibrations of single walled carbon nanotubes is presented. A simple and straightforward method developed such that the proximity of the mathematical model to the actual atomic structure of the nanotube is significantly retained, is used for this purpose. Both zigzag and armchair chiralities of the carbon nanotubes for clamped-free and clamped-clamped boundary conditions are analyzed and their natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are obtained. Results pertaining to axial, bending, and torsional modes of vibration are reported with discussions. These modes of vibration appear in the eigen-values and eigen-vectors without any distinction. The direct integration method by Newmark is used extensively along with the fast Fourier transform to identify different types of vibrational modes. In the case of zigzag nanotubes, the axial, bending, and torsional modes appear to be decoupled, whereas the armchair nanotubes show coupling between such modes.

  4. Multifunctional free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Nasibulin, Albert G; Kaskela, Antti; Mustonen, Kimmo; Anisimov, Anton S; Ruiz, Virginia; Kivistö, Samuli; Rackauskas, Simas; Timmermans, Marina Y; Pudas, Marko; Aitchison, Brad; Kauppinen, Marko; Brown, David P; Okhotnikov, Oleg G; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2011-04-26

    We report a simple and rapid method to prepare multifunctional free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films with variable thicknesses ranging from a submonolayer to a few micrometers having outstanding properties for a broad range of exceptionally performing devices. We have fabricated state-of-the-art key components from the same single component multifunctional SWCNT material for several high-impact application areas: high efficiency nanoparticle filters with a figure of merit of 147 Pa(-1), transparent and conductive electrodes with a sheet resistance of 84 Ω/◻ and a transmittance of 90%, electrochemical sensors with extremely low detection limits below 100 nM, and polymer-free saturable absorbers for ultrafast femtosecond lasers. Furthermore, the films are demonstrated as the main components in gas flowmeters, gas heaters, and transparent thermoacoustic loudspeakers. PMID:21361334

  5. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on lysozyme gelation.

    PubMed

    Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo

    2014-09-01

    The possibility to disperse carbon nanotubes in biocompatible matrices has got substantial interest from the scientific community. Along this research line, the inclusion of single walled carbon nanotubes in lysozyme-based hydrogels was investigated. Experiments were performed at different nanotube/lysozyme weight ratios. Carbon nanotubes were dispersed in protein solutions, in conditions suitable for thermal gelation. The state of the dispersions was determined before and after thermal treatment. Rheology, dynamic light scattering and different microscopies investigated the effect that carbon nanotubes exert on gelation. The gelation kinetics and changes in gelation temperature were determined. The effect of carbon and lysozyme content on the gel properties was, therefore, determined. At fixed lysozyme content, moderate amounts of carbon nanotubes do not disturb the properties of hydrogel composites. At moderately high volume fractions in carbon nanotubes, the gels become continuous in both lysozyme and nanotubes. This is because percolating networks are presumably formed. Support to the above statements comes by rheology.

  6. Shaping single walled nanotubes with an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zobelli, A.; Gloter, A.; Colliex, C.; Ewels, C. P.

    2008-01-15

    We show that electron irradiation in a dedicated scanning transmission microscope can be used as a nano-electron-lithography technique allowing the controlled reshaping of single walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. The required irradiation conditions have been optimized on the basis of total knock-on cross sections calculated within density functional based methods. It is then possible to induce morphological modifications, such as a local change of the tube chirality, by sequentially removing several tens of atoms with a nanometrical spatial resolution. We show that electron beam heating effects are limited. Thus, electron beam induced vacancy migration and nucleation might be excluded. These irradiation techniques could open new opportunities for nanoengineering a large variety of nanostructured materials.

  7. Radiation Protection Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.; Lu, Meng; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Doyle, Condell Dewayne; Kosynkin, Dimitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This invention is a means of radiation protection, or cellular oxidative stress mitigation, via a sequence of quenching radical species using nano-engineered scaffolds, specifically single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their derivatives. The material can be used as a means of radiation protection by reducing the number of free radicals within, or nearby, organelles, cells, tissue, organs, or living organisms, thereby reducing the risk of damage to DNA and other cellular components (i.e., RNA, mitochondria, membranes, etc.) that can lead to chronic and/or acute pathologies, including but not limited to cancer, cardiovascular disease, immuno-suppression, and disorders of the central nervous system. In addition, this innovation could be used as a prophylactic or antidote for accidental radiation exposure, during high-altitude or space travel where exposure to radiation is anticipated, or to protect from exposure from deliberate terrorist or wartime use of radiation- containing weapons.

  8. Single-wall carbon nanotubes based anticancer drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripisciano, C.; Kraemer, K.; Taylor, A.; Borowiak-Palen, E.

    2009-08-01

    Conventional administration of chemotherapeutic agents is compromised by their lack of selectivity which is the cause of a lethal effect accomplishment on healthy tissues. Since therapeutic and diagnostic agents could functionalize the structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the development of CNTs as drug containers would pave the way to their employment as nanovectors into the cells. Here a study on cisplatin (Cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP) - a platinum-based chemotherapy drug) embedding to single-wall CNTs (SWCNTs) is shown.Being sure that the anticancer drug discharge occurred, in vitro analysis have been performed. The inhibition of prostate cancer cells (PC3 and DU145) viability from tubes encapsulating cisplatin proved the efficiency of the produced delivery system.

  9. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  10. Extracellular entrapment and degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrera, Consol; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Lazzaretto, Beatrice; Andón, Fernando T.; Hultenby, Kjell; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Star, Alexander; Fadeel, Bengt

    2014-05-01

    Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials.Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Suppl. Fig. 1 - length distribution of SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 2 - characterization of pristine vs. oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 3 - endotoxin evaluation; suppl. Fig. 4 - NET characterization; suppl. Fig. 5 - UV-Vis/NIR analysis of biodegradation of oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 6 - cytotoxicity of partially degraded SWCNTs. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06047k

  11. Phosphatidylserine in the brain: metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Yong; Huang, Bill X; Spector, Arthur A

    2014-10-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is the major anionic phospholipid class particularly enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in neural tissues. PS is synthesized from phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine by exchanging the base head group with serine, and this reaction is catalyzed by phosphatidylserine synthase 1 and phosphatidylserine synthase 2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of Akt, Raf-1 and protein kinase C signaling, which supports neuronal survival and differentiation, requires interaction of these proteins with PS localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, neurotransmitter release by exocytosis and a number of synaptic receptors and proteins are modulated by PS present in the neuronal membranes. Brain is highly enriched with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and brain PS has a high DHA content. By promoting PS synthesis, DHA can uniquely expand the PS pool in neuronal membranes and thereby influence PS-dependent signaling and protein function. Ethanol decreases DHA-promoted PS synthesis and accumulation in neurons, which may contribute to the deleterious effects of ethanol intake. Improvement of some memory functions has been observed in cognitively impaired subjects as a result of PS supplementation, but the mechanism is unclear.

  12. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures.

    PubMed

    Fakher, Sundes; Nejm, Razan; Ayesh, Ahmad; Al-Ghaferi, Amal; Zeze, Dagou; Mabrook, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs), metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) and thin film transistor (TFT) structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance-voltage (C-V) for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors). Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses), the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  13. Suspended single-walled carbon nanotube fluidic sensors.

    PubMed

    Son, B H; Park, Ji-Yong; Lee, Soonil; Ahn, Y H

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the fabrication of liquid flow sensors employing partially suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We have found that the sign of the conductance change in SWNT flow sensors is not influenced by the direction of water flow for both supported and suspended devices. Therefore, the streaming potential is not the principal mechanism of the SWNT sensor response. Instead, the conductance change is more likely due to a reduction in the cation density in the electrical double layer, whose equilibrium conditions are determined by the liquid flow rate. More importantly, we have found that the sensitivity of suspended SWNT devices is more than 10 times greater than that of supported SWNT devices. A reduced screening effect and an increase in effective sensing volume are responsible for the enhanced sensitivity, which is consistent with the ion depletion model. We also have measured conductance as a function of gate bias at different flow rates and have determined the flow-rate dependent effective charge density, which influences the electrostatic configuration around SWNT devices.

  14. Purification Procedures for Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorelik, Olga P.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the comparison of a variety of procedures used to purify carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotube material is produced by the arc process and laser oven process. Most of the procedures are tested using laser-grown, single-wall nanotube (SWNT) material. The material is characterized at each step of the purification procedures by using different techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The identified impurities are amorphous and graphitic carbon, catalyst particle aggregates, fullerenes, and hydrocarbons. Solvent extraction and low-temperature annealing are used to reduce the amount of volatile hydrocarbons and dissolve fullerenes. Metal catalysts and amorphous as well as graphitic carbon are oxidized by reflux in acids including HCl, HNO3 and HF and other oxidizers such as H2O2. High-temperature annealing in vacuum and in inert atmosphere helps to improve the quality of SWNTs by increasing crystallinity and reducing intercalation.

  15. Hypergolic fuel detection using individual single walled carbon nanotube networks

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, S. C.; Willitsford, A. H.; Sumanasekera, G. U.; Yu, M.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.; Tian, W. Q.

    2010-06-15

    Accurate and reliable detection of hypergolic fuels such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and its derivatives is vital to missile defense, aviation, homeland security, and the chemical industry. More importantly these sensors need to be capable of operation at low temperatures (below room temperature) as most of the widely used chemical sensors operate at high temperatures (above 300 deg. C). In this research a simple and highly sensitive single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network sensor was developed for real time monitoring of hydrazine leaks to concentrations at parts per million levels. Upon exposure to hydrazine vapor, the resistance of the air exposed nanotubes (p-type) is observed to increase rapidly while that of the vacuum-degassed nanotubes (n-type) is observed to decrease. It was found that the resistance of the sample can be recovered through vacuum pumping and exposure to ultraviolet light. The experimental results support the electrochemical charge transfer mechanism between the oxygen redox couple of the ambient and the Fermi level of the SWNT. Theoretical results of the hydrazine-SWNT interaction are compared with the experimental observations. It was found that a monolayer of water molecules on the SWNT is necessary to induce strong interactions between hydrazine and the SWNT by way of introducing new occupied states near the bottom of the conduction band of the SWNT.

  16. Strain controlled thermomutability of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiping; Buehler, Markus J

    2009-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes are superior materials for thermal management and phononic device use due to their extremely high thermal conductivity and unique one-dimensional geometry. Here we report a systematic investigation of the effects of mechanical tensile, compressive and torsional strain on the thermal conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast to conventional predictions for solids, an unexpected dependence on the applied strain is revealed by the low-dimensional nature and tubular geometry of carbon nanotubes. Under tension, the thermal conductivity is reduced due to the softening of G-band phonon modes. Under compression--in contrast to the case for conventional theories for solids--geometric instabilities lower the thermal conductivity due to the scattering, shortening of the mean free path and interface resistance that arise from localized radial buckling. We find that when torsional strain is applied, the thermal conductivity drops as well, with significant reductions once the carbon nanotube begins to buckle. This thermomutability concept--the ability to control thermal properties by means of external cues--could be used in developing novel thermal materials whose properties can be altered in situ.

  17. Tuning Thermoelectric Properties of Chirality Selected Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Oshima, Yuki; Kitamura, Yoshimasa; Maniwa, Yutaka

    Thermoelectrics are a very important technology for efficiently converting waste heat into electric power. Hicks and Dresselhaus proposed an important approach to innovate the performance of thermoelectric devices, which involves using one-dimensional materials and properly tuning their Fermi level (PRB 1993). Therefore, understanding the relationship between the thermoelectric performance and the Fermi level of one-dimensional materials is of great importance to maximize their thermoelectric performance. Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is an ideal model for one-dimensional materials. Previously we reported continuous p-type and n-type control over the Seebeck coefficients of semiconducting SWCNT networks with diameter of 1.4 nm through an electric double layer transistor setup using an ionic liquid as the electrolyte (Yanagi et al., Nano Lett. 14, 6437 2014). We clarified the thermoelectric properties of semiconducting SWCNTs with diameter of 1.4 nm as a function of Fermi level. In this study, we investigated how the chiralities or electronic structures of SWCNTs influence on the thermoelectric properties. We found the significant difference in the line-shape of Seebeck coefficient as a function of gate voltage between the different electronic structures of SWCNTs.

  18. Endohedral Volume Control for Improved Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Jochen; Fagan, Jeffrey

    Liquid-phase processing of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) generally results in the exposure of their core volumes to the environment (opening) due to energy input necessary for purification and solubilization. For aqueous processing this results in SWCNTs routinely getting filled with water, which is detrimental to several properties. Importantly, water filling leads to significant redshifts to, and inhomogeneous broadening of, the electronic transitions of the SWCNTs, as well as a substantial decrease to their fluorescence quantum efficiency. Selection of (remaining) empty (end-capped) SWCNTs to avoid these adverse effects is possible by means of ultracentrifugation, but is a natively low yield process. In this work, SWCNTs are prefilled with linear alkanes or similar organic compounds, serving as a passive, highly homogeneous spacer, blocking the ingestion of water and hence preventing the detrimental consequences. Moreover, the low dielectric nature of the alkane core only weakly affects the local electronic wavefunction of the SWCNTs, effectively simulating empty core conditions and hence yielding much more resolved optical spectra with blue shifted peak positions compared to water filled SWCNTs. It is demonstrated that a wide variety of linear as well as cyclic alkanes can be applied for this purpose, in combination with various SWCNT materials.

  19. Methane storage on aluminum-doped single wall BNNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Khaled; Salabat, Kobra; Seif, Abdolvahab

    2014-08-01

    Adsorption of methane (CH4) on inside and outside of aluminum-doped (Al-doped) zigzag single-walled boron nitride nanotubes, BNNTs/Al, has been studied using density-functional theory (DFT) method. The effect of diameter and type of atom of BNNT replaced by the Al atom on the adsorption properties of CH4 were investigated. Our results indicate that, compared to pristine BNNTs, replacing both B atom by Al, BNNT/Al(B) and N atom by Al, BNNT/Al(N), can notably enhance the binding energy of CH4 on BNNTs and the latter case has been more superior. The average binding energy for the most stable configuration of CH4 on BNNTs/Al(N) and BNNTs/Al(B) are about -26.12 and -16.53 kJ mol-1, respectively, which are typical for the physisorption and suitable for technical applications. The results show that while the geometry of BNNT/Al(N or B)-CH4 complexes is determined by weak electrostatic forces, the binding energy mainly determines by dispersion forces. For all complexes, the energy gaps, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, dipole moments, natural charge and density of state (DOS) diagrams were extracted. Finally, the applicability of BNNTs/Al(N) both as a medium for storage and gas sensor for methane detection were confirmed.

  20. Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyimide with Dispersed Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Gaier, James R.; Sola, Francisco; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pi-complexes were formed from pristine HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and 1-pyrene- N-(4- N'-(5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxyimido)phenyl butanamide, 1. Polyimide films were prepared with these complexes as well as uncomplexed SWCNTs and the effects of nanoadditive addition on mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these films were evaluated. Although these properties were enhanced by both nanoadditives, larger increases in tensile strength and thermal and electrical conductivities were obtained when the SWCNT/1 complexes were used. At a loading level of 5.5 wt %, the Tg of the polyimide increased from 169 to 197 C and the storage modulus increased 20-fold (from 142 to 3045 MPa). The addition of 3.5 wt % SWCNT/1 complexes increased the tensile strength of the polyimide from 61.4 to 129 MPa; higher loading levels led to embrittlement and lower tensile strengths. The electrical conductivities (DC surface) of the polyimides increased to 1 x 10(exp -4) Scm(exp -1) (SWCNT/1 complexes loading level of 9 wt %). Details of the preparation of these complexes and their effects on polyimide film properties are discussed.

  1. Chirality Characterization of Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Williams, Phillip A.; Mayweather, Candis D.; Wincheski, Buzz; Park, Cheol; Namkung, Juock S.

    2005-01-01

    Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy are used for the chirality characterization of HiPco single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in aqueous solution with the surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. Radial breathing mode (RBM) Raman peaks for semiconducting and metallic SWNTs are identified by directly comparing the Raman spectra with the Kataura plot. The SWNT diameters are calculated from these resonant peak positions. Next, a list of (n, m) pairs, yielding the SWNT diameters within a few percent of that obtained from each resonant peak position, is established. The interband transition energies for the list of SWNT (n, m) pairs are calculated based on the tight binding energy expression for each list of the (n, m) pairs, and the pairs yielding the closest values to the corresponding experimental optical absorption peaks are selected. The results reveal that (1, 11), (4, 11), and (0, 11) as the most probable chiralities of the semiconducting nanotubes. The results also reveal that (4, 16), (6, 12) and (8, 8) are the most probable chiralities for the metallic nanotubes. Directly relating the Raman scattering data to the optical absorption spectra, the present method is considered the simplest technique currently available. Another advantage of this technique is the use of the E(sup 8)(sub 11) peaks in the optical absorption spectrum in the analysis to enhance the accuracy in the results.

  2. Dielectric properties of water inside single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Fuminori; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Kataura, Hiromichi; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2009-05-26

    In this paper, we report novel ferroelectric properties of a new form of ice inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). These are called "ice nanotubes" (ice NTs) and they consist of polygonal water rings stacked one-dimensionally along the SWCNT axis. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the ice NTs under an external electric field and in a temperature range between 100 and 350 K. It is revealed that ice NTs show stepwise polarization with a significant hysteresis loop as a function of the external field strength. In particular, pentagonal and heptagonal ice NTs are found to be the world's smallest ferroelectrics with spontaneous polarization of around 1 microC/cm(2). The n-gonal ice NT, where n = 5, 6, or 7, has (n + 1)-polarized structures with different polarizations. These findings suggest potential applications of SWCNTs encapsulating dielectric materials for the fabrication of the smallest ferroelectric devices. Experimental evidence for the presence of ice NTs inside SWCNTs is also discussed in great detail.

  3. Enhanced Raman Microprobe Imaging of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjiev, V. G.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Jandl, S.; Yowell, L.

    2003-01-01

    We explore Raman microprobe capabilities to visualize single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Although this technique is limited to a micron scale, we demonstrate that images of individual SWCNTs, bundles or their agglomerates can be generated by mapping Raman active elementary excitations. We measured the Raman response from carbon vibrations in SWCNTs excited by confocal scanning of a focused laser beam. Carbon vibrations reveal key characteristics of SWCNTs as nanotube diameter distribution (radial breathing modes, RBM, 100-300 cm(exp -1)), presence of defects and functional groups (D-mode, 1300-1350 cm(exp -1)), strain and oxidation states of SWCNTs, as well as metallic or semiconducting character of the tubes encoded in the lineshape of the G-modes at 1520-1600 cm(exp - 1). In addition, SWCNTs are highly anisotropic scatterers. The Raman response from a SWCNT is maximal for incident light polarization parallel to the tube axis and vanishing for perpendicular directions. We show that the SWCNT bundle shape or direction can be determined, with some limitations, from a set of Raman images taken at two orthogonal directions of the incident light polarization.

  4. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Anodes for Lithium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Kumta, Prashant; Maranchi, Jeff; Heben, Mike

    2006-01-01

    In recent experiments, highly purified batches of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have shown promise as superior alternatives to the graphitic carbon-black anode materials heretofore used in rechargeable thin-film lithium power cells. The basic idea underlying the experiments is that relative to a given mass of graphitic carbon-black anode material, an equal mass of SWCNTs can be expected to have greater lithium-storage and charge/discharge capacities. The reason for this expectation is that whereas the microstructure and nanostructure of a graphitic carbon black is such as to make most of the interior of the material inaccessible for intercalation of lithium, a batch of SWCNTs can be made to have a much more open microstructure and nanostructure, such that most of the interior of the material is accessible for intercalation of lithium. Moreover, the greater accessibility of SWCNT structures can be expected to translate to greater mobilities for ion-exchange processes and, hence, an ability to sustain greater charge and discharge current densities.

  5. Ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube network framed graphene hybrids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Hong, Tu; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2015-03-11

    Graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown superior potential in electronics and optoelectronics because of their excellent thermal, mechanical, electronic, and optical properties. Here, a simple method is developed to synthesize ultrathin SWNT-graphene films through chemical vapor deposition. These novel two-dimensional hybrids show enhanced mechanical strength that allows them to float on water without polymer supporting layers. Characterizations by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate that SWNTs can interlace as a concrete backbone for the subsequent growth of monolayer graphene. Optical and electrical transport measurements further show that SWNT-graphene hybrids inherit high optical transparency and superior electrical conductivity from monolayer graphene. We also explore the local optoelectronic properties of SWNT-graphene hybrids through spatially resolved photocurrent microscopy and find that the interactions between SWNTs and graphene can induce a strong photocurrent response in the areas where SWNTs link different graphene domains together. These fundamental studies may open a door for engineering optoelectronic properties of SWNT-graphene hybrids by controlling the morphologies of the SWNT frames. PMID:25686199

  6. Coarse-grained potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Wanlin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-11-01

    We develop the coarse-grained (CG) potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in CNT bundles and buckypaper for the study of the static and dynamic behaviors. The explicit expressions of the CG stretching, bending and torsion potentials for the nanotubes are obtained by the stick-spiral and the beam models, respectively. The non-bonded CG potentials between two different CG beads are derived from analytical results based on the cohesive energy between two parallel and crossing SWCNTs from the van der Waals interactions. We show that the CG model is applicable to large deformations of complex CNT systems by combining the bonded potentials with non-bonded potentials. Checking against full atom molecular dynamics calculations and our analytical results shows that the present CG potentials have high accuracy. The established CG potentials are used to study the mechanical properties of the CNT bundles and buckypaper efficiently at minor computational cost, which shows great potential for the design of micro- and nanomechanical devices and systems.

  7. Sorting centimetre-long single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Jong; Chae, Sang Hoon; Vu, Quoc An; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    While several approaches have been developed for sorting metallic (m) or semiconducting (s) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), the length of SWCNTs is limited within a micrometer, which restricts excellent electrical performances of SWCNTs for macro-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate a simple sorting method of centimetre-long aligned m- and s-SWCNTs. Ni particles were selectively and uniformly coated along the 1-cm-long m-SWCNTs by applying positive gate bias during electrochemical deposition with continuous electrolyte injection. To sort s-SWCNTs, the Ni coating was oxidized to form insulator outer for blocking of current flow through inner m-SWCNTs. Sorting of m-SWCNTs were demonstrated by selective etching of s-SWCNTs via oxygen plasma, while the protected m-SWCNTs by Ni coating remained intact. The series of source-drain pairs were patterned along the 1-cm-long sorted SWCNTs, which confirmed high on/off ratio of 104–108 for s-SWCNTs and nearly 1 for m-SWCNTs. PMID:27476909

  8. Third Harmonic Generation from Aligned Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Darius T., Jr.

    Optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been extensively studied during the last decade, and much basic knowledge has been accumulated on how light emission, scattering, and absorption occur in the realm of linear optics. However, their nonlinear optical properties remain largely unexplored. Here, we have observed strong third harmonic generation from highly aligned SWCNTs with intense mid-infrared radiation. Through power dependent experiments, we have determined the absolute value of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, chi(3), of our SWCNT film to be 6.92 x 10--12 esu, which is three orders of magnitude larger than that of the fused silica reference sample we used. Furthermore, through polarization-dependent third harmonic generation experiments, all the nonzero tensor elements of chi(3) have also been extracted. The contribution of the weaker tensor elements to the overall chi (3) signal has been calculated to be approximately 1/6 of that of the dominant c3z zzz component. These results open up new possibilities for application of carbon nanotubes in optoelectronics.

  9. Improved cellular uptake of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, A.; Serafini, S.; Menotta, M.; Sfara, C.; Pierigé, F.; Giorgi, L.; Ambrosi, G.; Rossi, L.; Magnani, M.

    2010-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) due to their unique structural and physicochemical properties, have been proposed as delivery systems for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic agents. However, SWNTs have proven difficult to solubilize in aqueous solution, limiting their use in biological applications. In an attempt to improve SWNTs' solubility, biocompatibility, and to increase cell penetration we have thoroughly investigated the construction of carbon scaffolds coated with aliphatic carbon chains and phospholipids to obtain micelle-like structures. At first, oxidized SWNTs (2370 ± 30 nmol mg - 1 of SWNTs) were covalently coupled with an alcoholic chain (stearyl alcohol, C18H37OH; 816 nmol mg - 1 of SWNTs). Subsequently, SWNTs-COOC18H37 derivatives were coated with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or -serine (PS) phospholipids obtaining micelle-like structures. We found that cellular uptake of these constructs by phagocytic cells occurs via an endocytotic mechanism for constructs larger than 400 nm while occurs via diffusion through the cell membrane for constructs up to 400 nm. The material that enters the cell by phagocytosis is actively internalized by macrophages and localizes inside endocytotic vesicles. In contrast the material that enters the cells by diffusion is found in the cell cytosol. In conclusion, we have realized new biomimetic constructs based on alkylated SWNTs coated with phospholipids that are efficiently internalized by different cell types only if their size is lower than 400 nm. These constructs are not toxic to the cells and could now be explored as delivery systems for non-permeant cargoes.

  10. Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy of Unbundled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostojic, G.; Zaric, S.; Kono, J.; Strano, M. S.; Moore, V. C.; Hauge, R. H.; Smalley, R. E.

    2004-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are currently under intensive investigation due to both interesting physical properties and possible applications. Owing to the recently developed method for separating bundled tubes [1], it is now possible to explore the true one-dimensional (1D) properties of SWNTs. We have used degenerate and nondegerenerate pump-probe measurements to probe the relaxation of photogenerated carriers in micelle suspended nanotubes prepared by this method. Degenerate pump-probe experiments in a wide range of the two lowest transition energies of semiconducting SWNTs show two distinct relaxation regimes. A fast relaxation component (0.3-1.2 ps) is always present whereas a slow component (5-20 ps) is resonantly enhanced whenever the pump photon energy coincides with an interband absorption peak. We attributed the fast relaxation to intraband carrier relaxation towards the band edge and the slow one to interband relaxation. Nondegenerate pump-probe experiments were performed to elucidate the details of these processes. [1] M. J. O'Connell et al., Science 297, 593 (2002). This work was supported by the Robert A. Welch Foundation (through Grant No. C-1509), the Texas Advanced Technology Program (through Project No. 003604-0001-2001), and the National Science Foundation CAREER Award (through Grant No. DMR-0134058).

  11. Optical properties of armchair (7, 7) single walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gharbavi, K.; Badehian, H.

    2015-07-15

    Full potential linearized augmented plane waves method with the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation potential was applied to calculate the optical properties of (7, 7) single walled carbon nanotubes. The both x and z directions of the incident photons were applied to estimate optical gaps, dielectric function, electron energy loss spectroscopies, optical conductivity, optical extinction, optical refractive index and optical absorption coefficient. The results predict that dielectric function, ε (ω), is anisotropic since it has higher peaks along z-direction than x-direction. The static optical refractive constant were calculated about 1.4 (z-direction) and 1.1 (x- direction). Moreover, the electron energy loss spectroscopy showed a sharp π electron plasmon peaks at about 6 eV and 5 eV for z and x-directions respectively. The calculated reflection spectra show that directions perpendicular to the tube axis have further optical reflection. Moreover, z-direction indicates higher peaks at absorption spectra in low range energies. Totally, increasing the diameter of armchair carbon nanotubes cause the optical band gap, static optical refractive constant and optical reflectivity to decrease. On the other hand, increasing the diameter cause the optical absorption and the optical conductivity to increase. Moreover, the sharp peaks being illustrated at optical spectrum are related to the 1D structure of CNTs which confirm the accuracy of the calculations.

  12. Flow Kills Conductivity of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Sanjiv; Macosko, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    Most composites of polymer and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) reported in the literature are made by solvent casting or simple compression molding. Commercial utility of these composites requires use of precision injection molding. We have observed a unique behavior wherein the SWNT composites made by injection molding or by extrusion are insulators but upon heating become electrically conductive. This behavior appears to be the result of a relaxation phenomenon in the SWNT composite. During flow into an injection mold or through an extrusion die the well-dispersed SWNT in the polymer matrix tend to align such that they are not in contact with each other and are farther than the minimum required distance, 5 nm (1), to achieve electrical percolation through electron hopping. Upon heating the SWNT relax and either touch each other or are at a distance less than or equal to 5 nm from each other to create a percolating. [1] Du, F., Scogna, R, C., Zhou, W., Brand, Stijn, Fischer, J. E., and Winey, K. I., Macromolecules 2004, 37, 9048-9055.

  13. Resonance Raman Optical Activity of Single Walled Chiral Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Péter R; Koltai, János; Surján, Péter R; Kürti, Jenő; Szabados, Ágnes

    2016-07-21

    Resonance (vibrational) Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of six chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are studied by theoretical means. Calculations are performed imposing line group symmetry. Polarizability tensors, computed at the π-electron level, are differentiated with respect to DFT normal modes to generate spectral intensities. This computational protocol yields a ROA spectrum in good agreement with the only experiment on SWCNT, available at present. In addition to the conventional periodic electric dipole operator we introduce magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole operators, suitable for conventional k-space calculations. Consequences of the complex nature of the wave function on the scattering cross section are discussed in detail. The resonance phenomenon is accounted for by the short time approximation. Involvement of fundamental vibrations in the region of the intermediate frequency modes is found to be more notable in ROA than in Raman spectra. Calculations indicate exceptionally strong resonance enhancement of SWCNT ROA signals. Resonance ROA profile of the (6,5) tube shows an interesting sign change that may be exploited experimentally for SWCNT identification. PMID:27315548

  14. Oxygen-Assisted Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, O.; Rajapakse, Arith; Collins, Philip

    2013-03-01

    Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has become a standard synthesis method for high quality single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Some drawbacks of the water-assisted method, however, include good control of water concentrations in the feedstock and poor control of SWCNT diameters below 2.0 nm. Here, we describe a variation of water-assisted CVD that uses dry feedstocks with a small, controlled quantity of molecular oxygen. Reactions of oxygen with hydrogen in the reaction zone provide all the benefits of water-assisted growth at the substrate while maintaining dry valves and flowmeters. In addition, the oxygen-based technique allows water concentrations in the system to be varied precisely and with short time constants. Perhaps because of the improved control, we find that the SWCNT diameter can be easily tuned by changing the oxygen concentration during the growth phase. Changing the oxygen concentration over the range of 0.5% to 1% varied the resulting SWCNT diameters from 1.5 to 0.5 nm, with typical diameter distributions less than +/- 30%. Control of SWCNT growth within this diameter range is ideal for probing opto-electronic properties of individual SWCNTs and SWCNT devices.

  15. A Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Gas Sensing Device

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Chun; Tang, Kea-Tiong; Teng, I-Ju; Kuo, Cheng-Tzu; Ho, Cheng-Long; Kuo, Han-Wen; Su, Tseng-Hsiung; Yang, Shang-Ren; Shi, Gia-Nan; Chang, Chang-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a chemical gas sensing device based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks. The SWCNT networks are synthesized on Al2O3-deposted SiO2/Si substrates with 10 nm-thick Fe as the catalyst precursor layer using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The development of interconnected SWCNT networks can be exploited to recognize the identities of different chemical gases by the strength of their particular surface adsorptive and desorptive responses to various types of chemical vapors. The physical responses on the surface of the SWCNT networks cause superficial changes in the electric charge that can be converted into electronic signals for identification. In this study, we tested NO2 and NH3 vapors at ppm levels at room temperature with our self-made gas sensing device, which was able to obtain responses to sensitivity changes with a concentration of 10 ppm for NO2 and 24 ppm for NH3. PMID:22164044

  16. Bulk Mechanical Properties of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarra, Matthew; Landi, Brian; Cress, Cory; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    The unique properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) make them especially well suited for use as electrodes in power devices such as lithium ion batteries, hydrogen fuel cells, solar cells, and supercapacitors. The performances of such devices are expected to be influenced, at least in part, by the mechanical properties of the SWNTs used in composites or in stand alone ``papers.'' Therefore, the elastic moduli and ultimate tensile strengths of SWNT papers were measured as functions of temperature, SWNT purity, SWNT length, and SWNT bundling. The SWNTs used to produce the papers were synthesized in an alexandrite laser vaporization reactor at 1100^oC and purified using conventional acid-reflux conditions. Characterization of the SWNTs was performed using SEM, BET, TGA, and optical and Raman spectroscopy. The purified material was filtered and dried to yield papers of bundled SWNTs which were analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). It was observed that the mechanical properties of acid-refluxed SWNT papers were significantly improved by controlled thermal oxidation and strain-hardening. Elastic moduli of SWNT papers were measured between 3 and 6 GPa. Ultimate (breaking) tensile stresses were measured between 45 and 90 MPa at 1-3% strain. These results and their implications in regard to potential applications in power devices will be discussed.

  17. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures.

    PubMed

    Fakher, Sundes; Nejm, Razan; Ayesh, Ahmad; Al-Ghaferi, Amal; Zeze, Dagou; Mabrook, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs), metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) and thin film transistor (TFT) structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance-voltage (C-V) for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors). Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses), the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states. PMID:27598112

  18. Sorting centimetre-long single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Woo Jong; Chae, Sang Hoon; Vu, Quoc An; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-08-01

    While several approaches have been developed for sorting metallic (m) or semiconducting (s) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), the length of SWCNTs is limited within a micrometer, which restricts excellent electrical performances of SWCNTs for macro-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate a simple sorting method of centimetre-long aligned m- and s-SWCNTs. Ni particles were selectively and uniformly coated along the 1-cm-long m-SWCNTs by applying positive gate bias during electrochemical deposition with continuous electrolyte injection. To sort s-SWCNTs, the Ni coating was oxidized to form insulator outer for blocking of current flow through inner m-SWCNTs. Sorting of m-SWCNTs were demonstrated by selective etching of s-SWCNTs via oxygen plasma, while the protected m-SWCNTs by Ni coating remained intact. The series of source-drain pairs were patterned along the 1-cm-long sorted SWCNTs, which confirmed high on/off ratio of 104–108 for s-SWCNTs and nearly 1 for m-SWCNTs.

  19. Developing Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes into an Industrial Material through the Super-Growth CVD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaba, Don

    2013-03-01

    Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube (CNT) 20 years ago, extensive effort has been made to utilize their exceptional intrinsic properties toward industrial applications. However, availability has significantly thwarted these endeavors. In one section of my presentation, I will describe our efforts toward the economical mass-production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) based on the water-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique, from which highly efficient synthesis of vertically aligned SWCNTs grow from substrates (SWCNT forests). Further, I will discuss our work to promote the industrial use of SWCNTs as a member of the Technology Research Association for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (TASC) (A consortium of five companies and AIST founded for the specific purpose of developing SWCNT industrial technology.) Specifically, I will present our progress on developing the technology for the synthetic control of SWCNTs and the development of standardized evaluation techniques for the purpose of understanding the relationship between the SWCNT forest structure, e.g. length, density, crystallinity, etc and the targeted property, e.g. conductivity, mechanical reinforcement, etc. Finally, I will present several examples of applications from composites to CNT-based devices. Technology Research Association for Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (TASC), Japan

  20. Spectroscopy-Based Characterization of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Namkung, Juock S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Seo, J.; Park, Cheol

    2003-01-01

    We present the initial results of our combined investigation of Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy in a batch of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The SWNT diameters are first estimated from the four radial breathing mode (RBM) peaks using a simple relation of omega(sub RBM) = 248/cm nm/d(sub t)(nm). The calculated diameter values are related to the optical absorption peaks through the expressions of first interband transition energies, i.e., E(sup S)(sub 11) = 2a gamma/d(sub t) for semiconducting and E(sup S)(sub 11) = 6a gamma/d(sub t) for metallic SWNTs, respectively, where a is the carbon-carbon bond length (0.144 nm) and gamma is the energy of overlapping electrons from nearest neighbor atoms, which is 2.9 eV for a SWNT. This analysis indicates that three RBM peaks are from semiconducting tubes, and the remaining one is from metallic tubes. The detailed analysis in the present study is focused on these three peaks of the first absorption band by determining the values of the representative (n,m) pairs. The first step of analysis is to construct a list of possible (n,m) pairs from the diameters calculated from the positions of the RBM peaks. The second step is to compute the first interband transition energy, E(sub 11), by substituting the constructed list of (n,m) into the expression of Reich and Thomsen, and Saito et al. Finally, the pairs with the energies closest to the experimental values are selected.

  1. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on soil microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Chung, H.; Son, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are novel materials that have the potential to be used in various commercial fields due to their unique physicochemical properties. As a result of commercial development of nanotechnology, SWCNTs may be discharged to the soil environment with unknown consequences. However, there are as yet no data in the scientific literature that demonstrate the effects of SWCNTs on microbial function in soils. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effects of SWCNTs on soil microbial activity through a 2-week incubation study on urban soils supplemented with different concentrations of SWCNTs ranging from 0 to 1000 μg CNT/g soil. Fluorometric test using fluorogenic substrates were employed for the measurement of several enzyme activities in soil samples. More specifically, we determined the changes in the activities of cellobiohydrolase, β-1,4-glucosidase, β-1,4-xylosidase, β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, L-leucine aminopeptidase and acid phosphatase which play important roles in the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in response to the addition of SWCNTs. We found that microbial enzyme activities decreased as the concentrations of SWCNT added increased. The lowest enzyme activities were observed under 1000 μg CNT/g soil. The overall pattern shows that enzyme activities decreased slightly in the first 2-3 days and increased in the later stage of the incubation. Our results suggest that relatively high concentrations of SWCNTs can inhibit microbial activities, and this may be due to microbial cell membrane damage caused by SWCNTs. However, further study needs to be conducted to determine the mechanism responsible for inhibitory effect of SWCNTs on soil microbial activity. It can be concluded that changes in the activities of extracellular enzymes can indicate the effect of SWCNTs on soil microorganisms and nutrient cycling.

  2. Extinction coefficients and purity of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, B; Itkis, M E; Niyogi, S; Hu, H; Perea, D E; Haddon, R C

    2004-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) hold great promise for advanced applications in aerospace, electronics and medicine, yet these industries require materials with rigorous quality control. There are currently no accepted standards for quality assurance or quality control among the commercial suppliers of SWNTs. We briefly discuss the applicability of various techniques to measure SWNT purity and review, in detail, the advantages of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for the quantitative assessment of the bulk carbonaceous purity of SWNTs. We review the use of solution phase NIR spectroscopy for the analysis and characterization of a variety of carbon materials, emphasizing SWNTs produced by the electric arc (EA), laser oven (LO) and HiPco (HC) methods. We consider the applicability of Beer's law to carbon materials dispersed in dimethylformamide (DMF) and the effective extinction coefficients that are obtained from such dispersions. Analysis of the areal absorptivities of the second interband transition of semiconducting EA-produced SWNTs for a number of samples of differing purities has lead to an absolute molar extinction coefficient for the carbonaceous impurities in EA-produced SWNT samples. We conclude that NIR spectroscopy is the clear method of choice for the assessment of the bulk carbonaceous purity of EA-produced SWNTs, and we suggest that an absolute determination of the purity of SWNTs is within reach. Continued work in this area is expected to lead to a universal method for the assessment of the absolute bulk purity of SWNTs from all sources--such a development will be of great importance for nanotube science and for future customers for this product.

  3. Elastomer Filled With Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Files, Bradley S.; Forest, Craig R.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that composites of a silicone elastomer with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are significantly stronger and stiffer than is the unfilled elastomer. The large strengthening and stiffening effect observed in these experiments stands in contrast to the much smaller strengthening effect observed in related prior efforts to reinforce epoxies with SWNTs and to reinforce a variety of polymers with multiple-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The relative largeness of the effect in the case of the silicone-elastomer/SWNT composites appears to be attributable to (1) a better match between the ductility of the fibers and the elasticity of the matrix and (2) the greater tensile strengths of SWNTs, relative to MWNTs. For the experiments, several composites were formulated by mixing various proportions of SWNTs and other filling materials into uncured RTV-560, which is a silicone adhesive commonly used in aerospace applications. Specimens of a standard "dog-bone" size and shape for tensile testing were made by casting the uncured elastomer/filler mixtures into molds, curing the elastomer, then pressing the specimens from a "cookie-cutter" die. The results of tensile tests of the specimens showed that small percentages of SWNT filler led to large increases in stiffness and tensile strength, and that these increases were greater than those afforded by other fillers. For example, the incorporation of SWNTs in a proportion of 1 percent increased the tensile strength by 44 percent and the modulus of elasticity (see figure) by 75 percent. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases decreased with increasing nanotube percentages because more nanotubes made the elastomer/nanotube composites more brittle. At an SWNT content of 10 percent, the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity were 125 percent and 562 percent, respectively, greater than the corresponding values for the unfilled elastomer.

  4. Toroidal Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Fullerene Crop Circles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We investigate energetics and structure of circular and polygonal single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using large scale molecular simulations on NAS SP2, motivated by their unusual electronic and magnetic properties. The circular tori are formed by bending tube (no net whereas the polygonal tori are constructed by turning the joint of two tubes of (n, n), (n+1, n-1) and (n+2, n-2) with topological pentagon-heptagon defect, in which n =5, 8 and 10. The strain energy of circular tori relative to straight tube decreases by I/D(sup 2) where D is torus diameter. As D increases, these tori change from buckling to an energetically stable state. The stable tori are perfect circular in both toroidal and tubular geometry with strain less than 0. 03 eV/atom when D greater than 10, 20 and 40 nm for torus (5,5), (8,8) and (10, 10). Polygonal tori, whose strain is proportional to the number of defects and I/D are energetically stable even for D less than 10 nm. However, their strain is higher than that of perfect circular tori. In addition, the local maximum strain of polygonal tori is much higher than that of perfect circular tori. It is approx. 0.03 eV/atom or less for perfect circular torus (5,5), but 0.13 and 0.21 eV/atom for polygonal tori (6,4)/(5,5) and (7,3)/(5,5). Therefore, we conclude that the circular tori with no topological defects are more energetically stable and kinetically accessible than the polygonal tori containing the pentagon-heptagon defects for the laser-grown SWNTs and Fullerene crop circles.

  5. Decarboxylation of oxidized single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vieira, H S; Andrada, D M; Mendonça, R; Santos, A P; Martins, M D; Macedo, W A A; Gorgulho, H F; Pimenta, L P S; Moreira, R L; Jorio, A; Pimenta, M A; Furtado, C A

    2007-10-01

    A classical protocol widely used in organic chemistry of aromatic and polyaromatic molecules has been successfully applied in this work for the decarboxylation of oxidized single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) to rend C-H SWNT derivatives. SWNT produced by arc discharge method have been oxidized during a purification process using strongly oxidant agents, such as hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid. The decarboxylation of oxidized SWNT has been conduced with copper(I) oxide in a 50:50 solution of N-methylpyrrolidone and quinoline. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and acid-base potentiometric titration analyses were carried out to characterize quali and quantitatively the changes in the chemical environment on the SWNT surface in each step of the purification and the decarboxylation process. Those techniques showed the appearance of mainly carboxylic and phenolic groups after the purification process and the disappearance of the carboxylic groups after the decarboxylation reaction. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated also the formation of aliphatic and aromatic C-H groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiometric titration results determined an efficiency higher than 90% for our decarboxylation procedure. The purity and structural quality of the SWNT sample used in the decarboxylation process were evaluated by thermogravimetry and Raman spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis identified a purified sample with approximately 80 wt% of SWNT, in fractions distributed in highly structured SWNTs (25 wt%), with distribution in composition, length and structural quality (35 wt%) and with very defective and short tubes (25 wt%). The damages on the purified SWNT walls were characterized by the Raman scattering analysis. PMID:18330151

  6. Superemission in vertically-aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Presently we used two samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes (VA SWCNTs) with parallelepiped geometry, sized 0.02 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm and 0.2 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm. We report absorption and emission properties of the VA SWCNTs, including strong anisotropy in both their absorption and emission spectra. We found that the emission spectra extend from the middle-IR range to the near-IR range, with such extended spectra being reported for the first time. Pumping the VA SWCNTs in the direction normal to their axis, superemission (SE) was observed in the direction along their axis. The SE band maximum is located at 7206 ± 0.4 cm-1. The energy and the power density of the superemission were estimated, along with the diffraction-limited divergence. At the pumping energy of 3 mJ/pulse, the SE energy measured by the detector was 0.74 mJ/pulse, corresponding to the total SE energy of 1.48 mJ/pulse, with the energy density of 18.5 mJ cm-2/pulse and the SE power density of 1.2 × 105 W cm-2/pulse. We report that a bundle of VA SWCNTs is an emitter with a relatively small divergence, not exceeding 3.9 × 10-3 rad. We developed a theoretical approach to explain such absorption and emission spectra. The developed theory is based on the earlier proposed SSH theory, which we extended to include the exchange interactions between the closest SWCNT neighbors. The developed theoretical ideas were implemented in a homemade FORTRAN code. This code was successfully used to calculate and reproduce the experimental spectra and to determine the SWCNT species that originate the respective absorption bands, with acceptable agreement between theory and experiment.

  7. Wiring-up hydrogenase with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Timothy J; Svedruzic, Drazenka; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Zhang, S B; King, Paul W; Heben, Michael J

    2007-11-01

    Many envision a future where hydrogen is the centerpiece of a sustainable, carbon-free energy supply. For example, the energy in sunlight may be stored by splitting water into H2 and O2 using inorganic semiconductors and photoelectrochemical approaches or with artificial photosynthetic systems that seek to mimic the light absorption, energy transfer, electron transfer, and redox catalysis that occurs in green plants. Unfortunately, large scale deployment of artificial water-splitting technologies may be impeded by the need for the large amounts of precious metals required to catalyze the multielectron water-splitting reactions. Nature provides a variety of microbes that can activate the dihydrogen bond through the catalytic activity of [NiFe] and [FeFe] hydrogenases, and photobiological approaches to water splitting have been advanced. One may also consider a biohybrid approach; however, it is difficult to interface these sensitive, metalloenzymes to other materials and systems. Here we show that surfactant-suspended carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) spontaneously self-assemble with [FeFe] hydrogenases in solution to form catalytically active biohybrids. Photoluminescence excitation and Raman spectroscopy studies show that SWNTs act as molecular wires to make electrical contact to the biocatalytic region of hydrogenase. Hydrogenase mediates electron injection into nanotubes having appropriately positioned lowest occupied molecular orbital levels when the H2 partial pressure is varied. The hydrogenase is strongly attached to the SWNTs, so mass transport effects are eliminated and the absolute potential of the electronic levels of the nanotubes can be unambiguously measured. Our findings reveal new nanotube physics and represent the first example of "wiring-up" an hydrogenase with another nanoscale material. This latter advance offers a nonprecious metal route to the design of new biohybrid architectures and building blocks for hydrogen-related technologies

  8. Study on the Microwave Permittivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaolai; Zhao, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we studied the microwave permittivity of the complex of the single-walled carbon nanotube and paraffin in 2-18GHz. In the range, the dielectric loss of single-walled carbon nanotube is higher, and the real part and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant decrease with the increase of frequency, and the dielectric constant…

  9. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  10. Antimicrobial Biomaterials based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Seyma

    Biomaterials that inactivate bacteria are needed to eliminate medical device infections. We investigate the antimicrobial nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) incorporated within biomedical polymers. In the first part, we focus on SWNT dispersed in the common biomedical polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as a potential antimicrobial biomaterial. We find Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis viability and metabolic activity to be significantly diminished in the presence of SWNT-PLGA, and to correlate with SWNT length and concentration. Up to 98 % of bacteria die within one hour of SWNT-PLGA versus 15-20% on pure PLGA. Shorter SWNT are found to be more toxic, possibly due to an increased density of open tube ends. In the second part, we investigate the antimicrobial activity of SWNT layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with the polyelectrolytes poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA). The dispersibility of SWNT in aqueous solution is significantly improved via the biocompatible nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene(20)sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) and the amphiphilic polymer phospholipid-poly(ethylene glycol) (PL-PEG). Absorbance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show SWNT with either Tween 20 or PL-PEG in aqueous solution to be well dispersed. Quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation (QCMD) measurements show both SWNT-Tween and SWNT-PL-PEG to LbL assemble with PLL and PGA into multilayer films, with the PL-PEG system yielding the greater final SWNT content. Bacterial inactivation rates are significantly higher (up to 90%) upon 24 hour incubation with SWNT containing films, compared to control films (ca. 20%). In the third part, we study the influence of bundling on the LbL assembly of SWNT with charged polymers, and on the antimicrobial properties of the assembled film. QCMD measurements show the bundled SWNT system to adsorb in an unusually strong fashion—to an extent three times greater than that

  11. Single Walled Carbon Nanohorns as Photothermal Cancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, John; Sarkar, Saugata; Zhang, Jianfei; Do, Thao; Manson, Mary kyle; Campbell, Tom; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; More, Karren Leslie; Geohegan, David B; Rylander, Christopher; Dorn, Harry C; Rylander, Nichole M

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles have significant potential as selective photo-absorbing agents for laser based cancer treatment. This study investigates the use of single walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as thermal enhancers when excited by near infrared (NIR) light for tumor cell destruction. Absorption spectra of SWNHs in deionized water at concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.085, and 0.1 mg/ml were measured using a spectrophotometer for the wavelength range of 200-1,400 nm. Mass attenuation coefficients were calculated using spectrophotometer transmittance data. Cell culture media containing 0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml SWNHs was laser irradiated at 1,064 nm wavelength with an irradiance of 40 W/cm{sup 2} for 0-5 minutes. Temperature elevations of these solutions during laser irradiation were measured with a thermocouple 8 mm away from the incident laser beam. Cell viability of murine kidney cancer cells (RENCA) was measured 24 hours following laser treatment with the previously mentioned laser parameters alone or with SWNHs. Cell viability as a function of radial position was determined qualitatively using trypan blue staining and bright field microscopy for samples exposed to heating durations of 2 and 6 minutes alone or with 0.085 mg/ml SWNHs. A Beckman Coulter Vi-Cell instrument quantified cell viability of samples treated with varying SWNH concentration (0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml) and heating durations of 0-6 minutes. Spectrophotometer measurements indicated inclusion of SWNHs increased light absorption and attenuation across all wavelengths. Utilizing SWNHs with laser irradiation increased temperature elevation compared to laser heating alone. Greater absorption and higher temperature elevations were observed with increasing SWNH concentration. No inherent toxicity was observed with SWNH inclusion. A more rapid and substantial viability decline was observed over time in samples exposed to SWNHs with laser treatment compared with samples experiencing laser

  12. Fully integrated single-walled carbon nanotube thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Macias, Fernando J.

    The development of composites of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with thermoplastics requires methods for good dispersion and achieving good interaction between SWNTs and the matrix. This thesis presents a new method to achieve good dispersion by a preliminary treatment called incipient wetting. The SWNTs dispersed in a solvent are mixed with polymer particles and deposited over them as the solvent is evaporated to give an initial dispersion. Factors that make this more effective are: good wetting of the polymer by the solvent, swelling of the polymer, high surface area of the polymer. Swelling enhances the initial dispersion with some initial mixing. A high surface area is achieved using polymer powder. High shear mixing alone does not achieve the same uniform and repeatable level of dispersion that the combination with incipient wetting allows. The incipient wetting method was studied and applied to different polymers. The possibility of recovering SWNTs from thermoplastics by dissolving or burning away the matrix is an extension of this study. A new comprehensive approach to control the interface of thermoplastics with SWNTs is studied. This is based on achieving direct chemical bonding between polymer molecules and functional groups on oxidized open ends, sidewalls, or both, in the SWNTs. Different concepts and approaches to these "fully integrated nanotube composites" are discussed. The concepts have been applied to epoxies elsewhere and are tested here with nylon-6,6 as a model system. Nylon was synthesized by interfacial polymerization in the presence of SWNTs resulting in excellent dispersion in the composite without further processing. The essential requirement for good dispersion is that the SWNTs are well dispersed in the solvent. Interfacial polymerization opens the way to many types of polymer-SWNT composites. Tests of full integration of SWNTs with open ended nanotubes showed promising results and hints of integration but were limited by

  13. Single-walled carbon nanotube-induced mitotic disruption⋆

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, L.M.; Hubbs, A.F.; Young, S.-H.; Kashon, M.L.; Dinu, C.Z.; Salisbury, J.L.; Benkovic, S.A.; Lowry, D.T.; Murray, A.R.; Kisin, E.R.; Siegrist, K.J.; Battelli, L.; Mastovich, J.; Sturgeon, J.L.; Bunker, K.L.; Shvedova, A.A.; Reynolds, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were among the earliest products of nanotechnology and have many potential applications in medicine, electronics, and manufacturing. The low density, small size, and biological persistence of carbon nanotubes create challenges for exposure control and monitoring and make respiratory exposures to workers likely. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to 24, 48 and 96 μg/cm2 single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). To investigate mitotic spindle aberrations at concentrations anticipated in exposed workers, primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells were exposed to SWCNT for 24–72 h at doses equivalent to 20 weeks of exposure at the Permissible Exposure Limit for particulates not otherwise regulated. We have now demonstrated fragmented centrosomes, disrupted mitotic spindles and aneuploid chromosome number at those doses. The data further demonstrated multipolar mitotic spindles comprised 95% of the disrupted mitoses. The increased multipolar mitotic spindles were associated with an increased number of cells in the G2 phase of mitosis, indicating a mitotic checkpoint response. Nanotubes were observed in association with mitotic spindle microtubules, the centrosomes and condensed chromatin in cells exposed to 0.024, 0.24, 2.4 and 24 μg/cm2 SWCNT. Three-dimensional reconstructions showed carbon nanotubes within the centrosome structure. The lower doses did not cause cytotoxicity or reduction in colony formation after 24 h; however, after three days, significant cytotoxicity was observed in the SWCNT-exposed cells. Colony formation assays showed an increased proliferation seven days after exposure. Our results show significant disruption of the mitotic spindle by SWCNT at occupationally relevant doses. The increased proliferation that was observed in carbon nanotube-exposed cells indicates a greater potential to pass the genetic damage to daughter

  14. Microwave pumped high-efficient thermoacoustic tumor therapy with single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Liewei; Ding, Wenzheng; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-01-01

    The ultra-short pulse microwave could excite to the strong thermoacoustic (TA) shock wave and deeply penetrate in the biological tissues. Based on this, we developed a novel deep-seated tumor therapy modality with mitochondria-targeting single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as microwave absorbing agents, which act efficiently to convert ultra-short microwave energy into TA shock wave and selectively destroy the targeted mitochondria, thereby inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. After the treatment of SWNTs (40 μg/mL) and ultra-short microwave (40 Hz, 1 min), 77.5% of cancer cells were killed and the vast majority were caused by apoptosis that initiates from mitochondrial damage. The orthotopic liver cancer mice were established as deep-seated tumor model to investigate the anti-tumor effect of mitochondria-targeting TA therapy. The results suggested that TA therapy could effectively inhibit the tumor growth without any observable side effects, while it was difficult to achieve with photothermal or photoacoustic therapy. These discoveries implied the potential application of TA therapy in deep-seated tumor models and should be further tested for development into a promising therapeutic modality for cancer treatment. PMID:26513410

  15. Microwave pumped high-efficient thermoacoustic tumor therapy with single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Liewei; Ding, Wenzheng; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-01-01

    The ultra-short pulse microwave could excite to the strong thermoacoustic (TA) shock wave and deeply penetrate in the biological tissues. Based on this, we developed a novel deep-seated tumor therapy modality with mitochondria-targeting single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as microwave absorbing agents, which act efficiently to convert ultra-short microwave energy into TA shock wave and selectively destroy the targeted mitochondria, thereby inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. After the treatment of SWNTs (40 μg/mL) and ultra-short microwave (40 Hz, 1 min), 77.5% of cancer cells were killed and the vast majority were caused by apoptosis that initiates from mitochondrial damage. The orthotopic liver cancer mice were established as deep-seated tumor model to investigate the anti-tumor effect of mitochondria-targeting TA therapy. The results suggested that TA therapy could effectively inhibit the tumor growth without any observable side effects, while it was difficult to achieve with photothermal or photoacoustic therapy. These discoveries implied the potential application of TA therapy in deep-seated tumor models and should be further tested for development into a promising therapeutic modality for cancer treatment.

  16. Sequestration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Sequestration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) in a suitably chosen polymer is under investigation as a means of promoting the dissolution of the nanotubes into epoxies. The purpose of this investigation is to make it possible to utilize SWCNs as the reinforcing fibers in strong, lightweight epoxy-matrix/carbon-fiber composite materials. SWCNs are especially attractive for use as reinforcing fibers because of their stiffness and strength-to-weight ratio: Their Young s modulus has been calculated to be 1.2 TPa, their strength has been calculated to be as much as 100 times that of steel, and their mass density is only one-sixth that of steel. Bare SWCNs cannot be incorporated directly into composite materials of the types envisioned because they are not soluble in epoxies. Heretofore, SWCNS have been rendered soluble by chemically attaching various molecular chains to them, but such chemical attachments compromise their structural integrity. In the method now under investigation, carbon nanotubes are sequestered in molecules of poly(m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-dioctyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene) [PmPV]. The strength of the carbon nanotubes is preserved because they are not chemically bonded to the PmPV. This method exploits the tendency of PmPV molecules to wrap themselves around carbon nanotubes: the wrapping occurs partly because there exists a favorable interface between the conjugated face of a nanotube and the conjugated backbone of the polymer and partly because of the helical molecular structure of PmPV. The constituents attached to the polymer backbones (the side chains) render the PmPV-wrapped carbon nanotubes PmPV soluble in organic materials that, in turn, could be used to suspend the carbon nanotubes in epoxy precursors. At present, this method is being optimized: The side chains on the currently available form of PmPV are very nonpolar and unable to react with the epoxy resins and/or hardeners; as a consequence, SWCN/PmPV composites have been

  17. Synergistic anticancer effect of RNAi and photothermal therapy mediated by functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Hongling; Li, Haixia; Gao, Yan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Honghong; Li, Lulu; Zhang, Chaofeng; Chen, Chengqun; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are special nano-materials which exhibit interesting physical and chemical properties, presenting new opportunities for biomedical research and applications. In this study, we have successfully adopted a novel strategy to chemically functionalize SWNTs with polyethylenimine (PEI) through purification, oxidation, amination and polymerization, which were then bound by DSPE-PEG2000-Maleimide for further conjugation with the tumor targeting NGR (Cys-Asn-Gly-Arg-Cys-) peptide via the maleimide group and sulfhydryl group of cysteine, and finally hTERT siRNA was loaded to obtain a novel tumor targeting siRNA delivery system, designated as SWNT-PEI/siRNA/NGR. The results showed that SWNT-PEI/siRNA/NGR could efficiently cross cell membrane, induced more severe apoptosis and stronger suppression in proliferation of PC-3 cells in vitro. Furthermore, in tumor-bearing mice model the delivery system exhibited higher antitumor activity due to more accumulation in tumor without obvious toxicity in main organs. The combination of RNAi and near-infrared (NIR) photothermal therapy significantly enhanced the therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, SWNT-PEI/siRNA/NGR is a novel and promising anticancer system by combining gene therapy and photothermal therapy. PMID:23046752

  18. Contributions of phosphatidylserine-positive platelets and leukocytes and microparticles to hypercoagulable state in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfa; Ma, Ruishuang; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Muhua; Zhao, Liangliang; Bi, Yayan; Kou, Junjie; Shi, Jialan; Zou, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    Hypercoagulability in gastric cancer is a common complication and a major contributor to poor prognosis. This study aimed to determine procoagulant activity of blood cells and microparticles (MPs) in gastric cancer patients. Phosphatidylserine-positive blood cells and MPs, and their procoagulant properties in particular, were assessed in 48 gastric cancer patients and 35 healthy controls. Phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in patients with tumor-node-metastasis stage III/IV gastric cancer were significantly higher than those in stage I/II patients or healthy controls. Moreover, procoagulant activity of platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in stage III/IV patients was significantly increased compared to the controls, as indicated by shorter clotting time, higher intrinsic and extrinsic factor tenase, and prothrombinase complex activity. Interestingly, lactadherin, which competes with factors V and VIII to bind phosphatidylserine, dramatically prolonged clotting time of the cells and MPs by inhibiting factor tenase and prothrombinase complex activity. Although anti-tissue factor antibody significantly attenuated extrinsic tenase complex activity of leukocytes and MPs, it only slightly prolonged clotting times. Meanwhile, treatment with radical resection reduced phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs, and prolonged the clotting times of the remaining cells and MPs. Our results suggest that phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs contribute to hypercoagulability and represent a potential therapeutic target to prevent coagulation in patients with stage III/IV gastric cancer.

  19. Binding of hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes to two hemoproteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we studied the binding interactions between hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and hemoglobin and myoglobin by the use of multi-spectral techniques and molecular modeling. The ultraviolet-vis absorbance and circular dichroism spectral results indicated that the binding interactions existed between hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and hemoglobin/myoglobin. These binding interactions partially affected the soret/heme bands of hemoglobin and myoglobin. The secondary structures of hemoproteins were partially destroyed by hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes. Fluorescence studies suggested that the complexes formed between hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and hemoglobin/myoglobin by hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic, and π-π stacking interactions. In addition, molecular modeling analysis well supported the experimental results.

  20. van der Waals interaction between a microparticle and a single-walled carbon nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Blagov, E. V.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.

    2007-06-15

    The Lifshitz-type formulas describing the free energy and the force of the van der Waals interaction between an atom (molecule) and a single-walled carbon nanotube are obtained. The single-walled nanotube is considered as a cylindrical sheet carrying a two-dimensional free-electron gas with appropriate boundary conditions on the electromagnetic field. The obtained formulas are used to calculate the van der Waals free energy and force between a hydrogen atom (molecule) and single-walled carbon nanotubes of different radii. Comparison studies of the van der Waals interaction of hydrogen atoms with single-walled and multiwalled carbon nanotubes show that depending on atom-nanotube separation distance, the idealization of graphite dielectric permittivity is already applicable to nanotubes with only two or three walls.

  1. Phototransformation-Induced Aggregation of Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Importance of Amorphous Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with proper functionalization are desirable for applications that require dispersion in aqueous and biological environments, and functionalized SWCNTs also serve as building blocks for conjugation with specific molecules in these applicatio...

  2. Change in the electrical characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube networks under photoresist treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Mi-Suk; Kim, Ju-Jin; Choi, Won Jin; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2016-08-01

    The electrical properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube network were investigated after photoresist treatment with the pristine device. Atomic force microscopy found that the diameters of the single-walled carbon nanotubes were increased after photoresist treatment and that the photoresist could not be completely removed from nanotube surfaces by using a simple cleaning process with an organic solvent. Although the presence of a residual photoresist had no noticeable effects on the Raman spectrum of single-walled carbon nanotubes in our devices, the charge carrier mobilities and the on/off ratios of the single-walled carbon nanotube devices were lowered due to the photoresist treatment, and the gate-hysteresis behavior in the devices that had undergone photoresist treatment was found to be different from that of pristine devices.

  3. Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Glow Discharge Fine Particle Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Imazato, N.; Imano, M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2008-09-07

    Carbon fine particles were synthesized being negatively charged and confined in a glow discharge plasma. The deposited fine particles were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and were confirmed to include single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  4. Evidence for substitutional boron in doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, P.; Pichler, T.; Reppert, J.; Rao, A. M.; Grobosch, M.; Knupfer, M.

    2010-05-03

    Precise determination of acceptors in the laser ablation grown B doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been elusive. Photoemission spectroscopy finds evidence for subpercent substitutional B in this material, which leads to superconductivity in thin film SWNT samples.

  5. Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes in a lipid bilayer as a new nanopore sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Kai; Li, Jingyuan; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2013-12-01

    An important issue in nanopore sensing is to construct stable and versatile sensors that can discriminate analytes with minute differences. Here we report a means of creating nanopores that comprise ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes inserted into a lipid bilayer. We investigate the ion transport and DNA translocation through single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores and find that our results are fundamentally different from previous studies using much longer single-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, we utilize the new single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores to selectively detect modified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in single-stranded DNA, which may have implications in screening specific genomic DNA sequences. This new nanopore platform can be integrated with many unique properties of carbon nanotubes and might be useful in molecular sensing such as DNA-damage detection, nanopore DNA sequencing and other nanopore-based applications.

  6. Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes in a lipid bilayer as a new nanopore sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Kai; Li, Jingyuan; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2013-01-01

    An important issue in nanopore sensing is to construct stable and versatile sensors that can discriminate analytes with minute differences. Here we report a means of creating nanopores that comprise ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes inserted into a lipid bilayer. We investigate the ion transport and DNA translocation through single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores and find that our results are fundamentally different from previous studies using much longer single-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, we utilize the new single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores to selectively detect modified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in single-stranded DNA, which may have implications in screening specific genomic DNA sequences. This new nanopore platform can be integrated with many unique properties of carbon nanotubes and might be useful in molecular sensing such as DNA-damage detection, nanopore DNA sequencing and other nanopore-based applications.

  7. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as a multimodal — thermoacoustic and photoacoustic — contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Manojit; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Green, Danielle; Sitharaman, Balaji; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a novel carbon nanotube-based contrast agent for both thermoacoustic and photoacoustic tomography. In comparison with de-ionized water, single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibited more than two-fold signal enhancement for thermoacoustic tomography at 3 GHz. In comparison with blood, they exhibited more than six-fold signal enhancement for photoacoustic tomography at 1064 nm wavelength. The large contrast enhancement of single-walled carbon nanotubes was further corroborated by tissue phantom imaging studies. PMID:19566311

  8. Preparation and Characterization of Newly Discovered Fibrous Aggregates of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Yuge, Ryota; Nihey, Fumiyuki; Toyama, Kiyohiko; Yudasaka, Masako

    2016-09-01

    Fibrous aggregates composed of radially assembled graphene-based single-walled nanotubules are prepared, named here as fibrous aggregates of single-walled carbon nanohorns (fib-CNHs), whose structure resembles that of chenille stems. The newly discovered fib-CNHs are 30-100 nm in diameter and 1-10 μm in length. The fib-CNHs show high dispersibility and conductivity. The fib-CNHs increase the advantages of nanocarbons in various fields. PMID:27226221

  9. Electron transport study of single wall nanotubes based on group 14 elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivasathya, S.; Thiruvadigal, D. John

    2012-06-01

    By applying non-equilibrium Green's functions in combination with density functional theory, we investigate the transport behaviours of single wall nanotubes based on group14 elements. The transmission spectrum and density of states for single wall nanotubes such as Lead nanotube(PbNT), Germanium nanotube(GeNT), Silicon nanotube(SiNT), Tin nanotube(SnNT) and Carbon nanotube(CNT) are compared.

  10. Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotube-sensitized europium nanoprobes for cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Avti, Pramod K; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    Lanthanoid-based optical probes with excitation wavelengths in the ultra-violet (UV) range (300-325 nm) have been widely developed as imaging probes. Efficient cellular imaging requires that lanthanoid optical probes be excited at visible wavelengths, to avoid UV damage to cells. The efficacy of europium-catalyzed single-walled carbon nanotubes (Eu-SWCNTs), as visible nanoprobes for cellular imaging, is reported in this study. Confocal fluorescence microscopy images of breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3 and MCF-7) and normal cells (NIH 3T3), treated with Eu-SWCNT at 0.2 μg/mL concentration, showed bright red luminescence after excitation at 365 nm and 458 nm wavelengths. Cell viability analysis showed no cytotoxic effects after the incubation of cells with Eu-SWCNTs at this concentration. Eu-SWCNT uptake is via the endocytosis mechanism. Labeling efficiency, defined as the percentage of incubated cells that uptake Eu-SWCNT, was 95%-100% for all cell types. The average cellular uptake concentration was 6.68 ng Eu per cell. Intracellular localization was further corroborated by transmission electron microscopy and Raman microscopy. The results indicate that Eu-SWCNT shows potential as a novel cellular imaging probe, wherein SWCNT sensitizes Eu(3+) ions to allow excitation at visible wavelengths, and stable time-resolved red emission. The ability to functionalize biomolecules on the exterior surface of Eu-SWCNT makes it an excellent candidate for targeted cellular imaging. PMID:22619533

  11. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Bruce Weisman, R

    2016-05-21

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.

  12. Root-growth mechanism for single-walled boron nitride nanotubes in laser vaporization technique.

    SciTech Connect

    Arenal, R.; Stephan, O.; Cochon, J.-L.; Loiseau, A.

    2007-12-26

    We present a detailed study of the growth mechanism of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes synthesized by laser vaporization, which is the unique route known to the synthesis of this kind of tube in high quantities. We have performed a nanometric chemical and structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (high-resolution mode (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy) of the synthesis products. Different boron-based compounds and other impurities were identified in the raw synthesis products. The results obtained by the TEM analysis and from the synthesis parameters (temperature, boron, and nitrogen sources) combined with phase diagram analysis to provide identification of the fundamental factors determining the nanotube growth mechanism. Our experiments strongly support a root-growth model that involves the presence of a droplet of boron. This phenomenological model considers the solubility, solidification, and segregation phenomena of the elements present in this boron droplet. In this model, we distinguish three different steps as a function of the temperature: (1) formation of the liquid boron droplet from the decomposition of different boron compounds existing in the hexagonal boron nitride target, (2) reaction of these boron droplets with nitrogen gas present in the vaporization chamber and recombination of these elements to form boron nitride, and (3) incorporation of the nitrogen atoms at the root of the boron particle at active reacting sites that achieves the growth of the tube.

  13. Distribution of single wall carbon nanotubes in the Xenopus laevis embryo after microinjection.

    PubMed

    Holt, Brian D; Shawky, Joseph H; Dahl, Kris Noel; Davidson, Lance A; Islam, Mohammad F

    2016-04-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are advanced materials with the potential for a myriad of diverse applications, including biological technologies and large-scale usage with the potential for environmental impacts. SWCNTs have been exposed to developing organisms to determine their effects on embryogenesis, and results have been inconsistent arising, in part, from differing material quality, dispersion status, material size, impurity from catalysts and stability. For this study, we utilized highly purified SWCNT samples with short, uniform lengths (145 ± 17 nm) well dispersed in solution. To test high exposure doses, we microinjected > 500 µg ml(-1) SWCNT concentrations into the well-established embryogenesis model, Xenopus laevis, and determined embryo compatibility and subcellular localization during development. SWCNTs localized within cellular progeny of the microinjected cells, but were heterogeneously distributed throughout the target-injected tissue. Co-registering unique Raman spectral intensity of SWCNTs with images of fluorescently labeled subcellular compartments demonstrated that even at regions of highest SWCNT concentration, there were no gross alterations to subcellular microstructures, including filamentous actin, endoplasmic reticulum and vesicles. Furthermore, SWCNTs did not aggregate and localized to the perinuclear subcellular region. Combined, these results suggest that purified and dispersed SWCNTs are not toxic to X. laevis animal cap ectoderm and may be suitable candidate materials for biological applications. PMID:26510384

  14. Near-infrared fluorescent sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes for life sciences applications.

    PubMed

    Boghossian, Ardemis A; Zhang, Jingqing; Barone, Paul W; Reuel, Nigel F; Kim, Jong-Ho; Heller, Daniel A; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Hilmer, Andrew J; Rwei, Alina; Arkalgud, Jyoti R; Zhang, Cathy T; Strano, Michael S

    2011-07-18

    Many properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) make them ideal candidates for sensors, particularly for biological systems. Both their fluorescence in the near-infrared range of 820-1600 nm, where absorption by biological tissues is often minimal, and their inherent photostability are desirable attributes for the design of in vitro and in vivo sensors. The mechanisms by which a target molecule can selectively alter the fluorescent emission include primarily changes in emission wavelength (i.e., solvatochromism) and intensity, including effects such as charge-transfer transition bleaching and exciton quenching. The central challenge lies in engineering the nanotube interface to be selective for the analyte of interest. In this work, we review the recent development in this area over the past few years, and describe the design rules that we have developed for detecting various analytes, ranging from stable small molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to macromolecules. Applications to in vivo sensor measurements using these sensors are also described. In addition, the emerging field of SWCNT-based single-molecule detection using band gap fluorescence and the recent efforts to accurately quantify and utilize this unique class of stochastic sensors are also described in this article. PMID:21751417

  15. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Bruce Weisman, R

    2016-05-21

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions. PMID:27140495

  16. Analysis of Stress Responsive Genes Induced by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in BJ Foreskin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Shubhashish; Sharma, Chidananda; Yog, Rajeshwari; Periakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Jejelowo, Olufisayo; Thomas, Renard; Barrera, Enrique V.; Rice-Ficht, Allison C.; Wilson, Bobby L.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is finding its use as a potential technology in consumer products, defense, electronics, and medical applications by exploiting the properties of nanomaterials. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are novel forms of these nanomaterials with potential for large applications. However, the toxicity studies on this material are not explored in detail and therefore limiting its use. It has been earlier reported that single-walled carbon nanotubes induces oxidative stress and also dictates activation of specific signaling pathway in keratinocytes. The present study explores the effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on stress genes in human BJ Foreskin cells. The results show induction of oxidative stress in BJ Foreskin cells by single-walled carbon nanotubes and increase in stress responsive genes. The genes included inducible genes like HMOX1, HMOX2, and Cyp1B1. In addition we validated increase for four genes by SWCNT, namely ATM, CCNC, DNAJB4, and GADD45A by RT-PCR. Moreover results of the altered stress related genes have been discussed and that partially explains some of the toxic responses induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17450800

  17. Current Progress in the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Type-Selected Horizontally Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Imad; Gemming, Thomas; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Liu, Zhongfan; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2016-08-23

    Exciting electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes show promise as a future class of electronic materials, yet the manufacturing challenges remain significant. The key challenges are to determine fabrication approaches for complex and flexible arrangements of nanotube devices that are reliable, rapid, and reproducible. Realizing regular array structures is an important step toward this goal. Considerable efforts have and are being made in this vein, although the progress to date is somewhat modest. However, there are reasons to be optimistic. Positive steps of being able to control not only the spatial location and diameter of the tubes but also their electronic type (chiral control) are being made. Two primary approaches are being exploited to address the challenges. Tube deposition techniques, on the one hand, and direct growth of the desired tube at the target location are being explored. While this review covers both approaches, the emphasis is on recent developments in the direct fabrication of type-selected horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition. PMID:27427780

  18. Phosphatidylserine: an antidepressive or a cognitive enhancer?

    PubMed

    Castilho, João C; Perry, Juliana C; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the putative antidepressive and cognitive enhancer effects of phosphatidylserine (BC-PS). The antidepressive effect of BC-PS (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg), compared to saline or imipramine (IMI; 25 mg/kg), was studied in the forced swimming test in rats. These drugs were administered 1 and 8 h after training and 1 h before the test. BC-PS (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg)-treated rats exhibited a significant decrease in immobility time (IT) in the test session (performed 24 h after training) when compared to control rats. Moreover, the IMI-treated group showed a significant reduction in IT in comparison to control rats. The cognitive enhancer effect of BC-PS (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) was studied in the three versions of the water maze task: spatial working memory version, spatial reference memory version, and cued version. There was no significant difference between the BC-PS-treated groups and control animals in these memory tasks. Taken together, the present results are suggestive of an antidepressive effect of BC-PS in the forced swimming test in rats but not of a cognitive enhancer effect of the drug in the water maze test.

  19. Review of Laser Ablation Process for Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2003-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The original method developed by researchers at Rice University utilized a "double pulse laser oven" process. A graphite target containing about 1 atomic percent of metal catalysts is ablated inside a 1473K oven using laser pulses (10 ns pulse width) in slow flowing argon. Two YAG lasers with a green pulse (532 nm) followed by an IR pulse (1064 nm) with a 50 ns delay are used for ablation. This set up produced single wall carbon nanotube material with about 70% purity having a diameter distribution peaked around 1.4 nm. The impurities consist of fullerenes, metal catalyst clusters (10 to 100 nm diameter) and amorphous carbon. The rate of production with the initial set up was about 60 mg per hour with 10Hz laser systems. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to improve the rate, consistency and study effects of different process parameters on the quality and quantity of SWCNTs. These variations include one to three YAG laser systems (Green, Green and IR), different pulse widths (nano to microseconds as well as continuous) and different laser wavelengths (Alexandrite, CO, CO2, free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). It is noted that yield from the single laser (Green or IR) systems is only a fraction of the two laser systems. The yield seemed to scale up with the repetition rate of the laser systems (10 to 60 Hz) and depended on the beam uniformity and quality of the laser pulses. The shift to longer wavelength lasers (free electron, CO and CO2) did not improve the quality, but increased the rate of production because these lasers are either continuous (CW) or high repetition rate pulses (kHz to MHz). The average power and the peak power of the lasers seem to influence the yields. Very high peak powers (MegaWatts per square centimeter) are noted to increase ablation of bigger particles with reduced yields of SWCNTs. Increased average powers

  20. Phosphatidylserine exposure is required for ADAM17 sheddase function

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Anselm; Kordowski, Felix; Büch, Joscha; Maretzky, Thorsten; Evers, Astrid; Andrä, Jörg; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Michalek, Matthias; Lorenzen, Inken; Somasundaram, Prasath; Tholey, Andreas; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Kunzelmann, Karl; Heinbockel, Lena; Nehls, Christian; Gutsmann, Thomas; Grötzinger, Joachim; Bhakdi, Sucharit; Reiss, Karina

    2016-01-01

    ADAM17, a prominent member of the ‘Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase' (ADAM) family, controls vital cellular functions through cleavage of transmembrane substrates. Here we present evidence that surface exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) is pivotal for ADAM17 to exert sheddase activity. PS exposure is tightly coupled to substrate shedding provoked by diverse ADAM17 activators. PS dependency is demonstrated in the following: (a) in Raji cells undergoing apoptosis; (b) in mutant PSA-3 cells with manipulatable PS content; and (c) in Scott syndrome lymphocytes genetically defunct in their capacity to externalize PS in response to intracellular Ca2+ elevation. Soluble phosphorylserine but not phosphorylcholine inhibits substrate cleavage. The isolated membrane proximal domain (MPD) of ADAM17 binds to PS but not to phosphatidylcholine liposomes. A cationic PS-binding motif is identified in this domain, replacement of which abrogates liposome-binding and renders the protease incapable of cleaving its substrates in cells. We speculate that surface-exposed PS directs the protease to its targets where it then executes its shedding function. PMID:27161080

  1. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  2. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2008-10-07

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  4. Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Weihua E-mail: muwh@itp.ac.cn; Cao, Jianshu; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can

    2014-01-28

    Single walled carbon nanotube's (SWCNT's) cross section can be flattened under hydrostatic pressure. One example is the cross section of a single walled carbon nanotube successively deforms from the original round shape to oval shape, then to peanut-like shape. At the transition point of reversible deformation between convex shape and concave shape, the side wall of nanotube is flattest. This flattest tube has many attractive properties. In the present work, an approximate approach is developed to determine the equilibrium shape of this unstrained flattest tube and the curvature distribution of this tube. Our results are in good agreement with recent numerical results, and can be applied to the study of pressure controlled electric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The present method can also be used to study other deformed inorganic and organic tube-like structures.

  5. Free vibration analysis of fluid-conveying single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, C. D.; Lu, C.; Rajendran, S.; Liew, K. M.

    2007-03-01

    The effect of fluid flow on the free vibration and instability of fluid-conveying single-walled carbon nanotubes is studied. The possibility of developing a technique to measure the mass flow rate of fluid is examined. Atomistic simulations and the continuum beam model are used. Simulations are performed to quantify the inertial, stiffness, Coriolis, and centrifugal forces generated by flow during the free vibration. A numerical expression is developed to measure the mass flow rate of the fluid velocities up to 40% of the critical flow velocity. This observation is useful to quantify the mass flow measurement of fluid conveying single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  6. Dispersion of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by in situ Polymerization Under Sonication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Watson, Kent A.; Crooks, Roy E.; Smith, Joseph, Jr.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; St.Clair, Terry L.

    2002-01-01

    Single wall nanotube reinforced polyimide nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ polymerization of monomers of interest in the presence of sonication. This process enabled uniform dispersion of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles in the polymer matrix. The resultant SWNT-polyimide nanocomposite films were electrically conductive (antistatic) and optically transparent with significant conductivity enhancement (10 orders of magnitude) at a very low loading (0.1 vol%). Mechanical properties as well as thermal stability were also improved with the incorporation of the SWNT.

  7. Process for separating metallic from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for separating semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes is disclosed. The method utilizes separation agents that preferentially associate with semiconducting nanotubes due to the electrical nature of the nanotubes. The separation agents are those that have a planar orientation, .pi.-electrons available for association with the surface of the nanotubes, and also include a soluble portion of the molecule. Following preferential association of the separation agent with the semiconducting nanotubes, the agent/nanotubes complex is soluble and can be solubilized with the solution enriched in semiconducting nanotubes while the residual solid is enriched in metallic nanotubes.

  8. Dispersion of single wall carbon nanotubes by in situ polymerization under sonication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Cheol; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Watson, Kent A.; Crooks, Roy E.; Smith, Joseph; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Clair, Terry L. St

    2002-10-01

    Single wall nanotube reinforced polyimide nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ polymerization of monomers of interest in the presence of sonication. This process enabled uniform dispersion of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles in the polymer matrix. The resultant SWNT-polyimide nanocomposite films were electrically conductive (antistatic) and optically transparent with significant conductivity enhancement (10 orders of magnitude) at a very low loading (0.1 vol%). Mechanical properties as well as thermal stability were also improved with the incorporation of the SWNT.

  9. Limits of the PECVD process for single wall carbon nanotubes growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohier, A.; Minea, T. M.; Djouadi, A. M.; Granier, A.; Dubosc, M.

    2006-04-01

    This Letter explores the capabilities of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition to grow vertical oriented single wall, double wall or multi walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Our dual process uses high-density low-pressure plasma excited by electron cyclotron resonance using acetylene diluted in ammonia. The early stages of CNTs synthesis have been probed taking advantage of the low growth rate of our process. Two antagonist effects have been shown up: the formation of catalyzed carbon nanotubes against ion assisted bonds breaking. The limits of plasma single wall CNTs growth are discussed and transitory stages have been revealed for the first time.

  10. Collision-induced fusion of two single-walled carbon nanotubes: A quantitative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mao, Fei; Meng, Xiang-Rui; Wang, Dong-Qi; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-07-01

    The coalescence processes of two (6, 0) single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated via coaxial collision based on the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding molecular dynamics method. According to the structure characteristics of the nanotubes, five impact cases are studied to explore the coalescence processes of the nanotubes. The simulation shows that various kinds of carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene sheets, graphene nanoribbons, and single-walled carbon nanotubes with larger diameters, are created after collision. Moreover, some defects formed in the carbon nanomaterials can be eliminated, and even the final configurations which are originally fragmented can almost become intact structures by properly quenching and annealing.

  11. Temperature threshold and water role in CVD growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Junfeng; Motta, Marcelo; Angels, Volker; Luo, Jikui; Johnson, Brian

    2016-02-01

    An in-depth understanding of the growth process of single walled carbon nanotubes is of vital importance to the control of the yield of the material and its carbon structure. Using a nickel/silica (Ni/SiOx) catalyst we have conducted a series of growth experiments with a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) system. We find that there is a temperature threshold in the CVD process, and if the reaction temperature sets above this threshold there will be no growth of the nanotubes. In association with this temperature effect, water plays an important role in the promotion or termination of the growth of single walled carbon nanotubes.

  12. Single-walled carbon nanotube growth from ion implanted Fe catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yongho; Sippel-Oakley, Jennifer; Ural, Ant

    2006-10-09

    The authors present experimental evidence that single-walled carbon nanotubes can be grown by chemical vapor deposition from ion implanted iron catalyst. They systematically characterize the effect of ion implantation dose and energy on the catalyst nanoparticles and nanotubes formed at 900 deg. C. They also fabricate a micromachined silicon grid for direct transmission electron microscopy characterization of the as-grown nanotubes. This work opens up the possibility of controlling the origin of single-walled nanotubes at the nanometer scale and of integrating them into nonplanar three-dimensional device structures with precise dose control.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of electron-irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Masaaki; Kimoto, Yoshihisa; Tada, Kazuhiro; Mori, Hideki; Akita, Seiji; Hirai, Yoshihiko; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2007-05-15

    Molecular dynamics studies are carried out to investigate electron-irradiation effects in single-walled carbon nanotubes. We have proposed a simulation model which includes the interaction between a high-energy incident electron and a carbon atom, based on Monte Carlo method using the elastic-scattering cross section. The atomic level behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube under electron irradiation is demonstrated in nanosecond time scale. The incident electron energy, tube diameter, and tube temperature dependences of electron-irradiation effects are studied with the simulation.

  14. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M.; Bruce Weisman, R.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and

  15. Ab initio computational investigation of physisorption of molecular hydrogen on achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ferre-Vilaplana, A

    2005-06-01

    Using relatively approximated methods, physisorption of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a mechanism to develop hydrogen storage systems has been only partially investigated in literature. Here, we use ab initio molecular-orbital theory, at benchmark quality level, to provide a more complete description about the mentioned mechanism. Physisorption inside and outside achiral-armchair and zigzag-SWCNTs, in the range of diameters from about 6 A-chiral vectors (5,5) and (8,0)-to more than 30 A-chiral vectors (30,30) and (40,0)-was examined. Perpendicular, longitudinal, and transversal configurations, with the hydrogen molecule centered on an aromatic ring, were taken into account. SWCNTs were modeled as curved coronenelike (C24H12) graphene sheets. Local modeling strategies, using more complete basis sets for the adsorbate and for the nearest atoms to the adsorbate than for the lion's share of the substrate, at the Moller-Plesset second-order correlation level, were selected for numerical treatment. Basis-set superposition errors were corrected by means of the counterpoise method of Bois and Bernardi. It was found that physisorption of molecular hydrogen on SWCNTs would depend mainly on the diameter being virtually independent of the chirality. Lowest physisorption energies, up to 20% less than that on planar graphene, would be reached outside nanotubes in the range of diameters of 6-10 A. For hydrogen storage purposes, highest physisorption energies, up to 40% greater than that on planar graphene, but not more, would be reached inside nanotubes in the relatively narrow range of diameters of 10-20 A. Finally, for diameters from 20 A onwards physisorption of molecular hydrogen on SWCNTs would be in the range of +/-10% of that on planar graphene. To our knowledge, this would be the most complete and realistic theoretical investigation of the target physisorption mechanism to date.

  16. Erythrocyte membrane phosphatidylserine exposure in obesity.

    PubMed

    Solá, Eva; Vayá, Amparo; Martínez, Marcial; Moscardó, Antonio; Corella, Dolores; Santaolaria, Maria-Luisa; España, Francisco; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio

    2009-02-01

    It has been suggested that increased erythrocyte membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure could contribute to hypercoagulability and hemorheological disturbances in obesity. The aim of our study was to evaluate PS exposure in obese patients and in a control group and to correlate this with hemorheological properties, i.e., erythrocyte aggregability (EA) and deformability, and to evaluate the effect of weight loss on these parameters. An anthropometric and analytical evaluation was performed at baseline and after 3 months on a diet (very low-calorie diet for 4 weeks and low-calorie diet for 2 months) on 49 severe or morbid obese patients (37 women, 12 men) and 55 healthy volunteers (39 women, 16 men). PS exposure on erythrocyte membrane was performed by flow cytometry. Erythrocyte aggregation was measured using the Myrenne MA(1) and the Sefam aggregometer. Erythrocyte deformability was determined in a stress diffractometer. Prothrombin fragment F1+2 (F1+2) was determined as a marker of the hypercoagulable state, and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) as an indicator of oxidative stress. Obese patients had a higher EA index, higher PS exposure on erythrocyte membranes and higher levels of MDA and F1+2. The differences in erythrocyte aggregation and F1+2 between obese patients and the control group were maintained after adjusting for PS exposure. After 3 months of diet, a significant reduction in PS exposure on erythrocyte membrane was observed. Obese patients show increased PS exposure on erythrocyte membrane, with no effect on rheological properties. Increased PS exposure could contribute to hypercoagulability in these patients. Weight loss obtained with diet treatment reduces PS exposure on erythrocyte membrane.

  17. Simultaneous Determination of Parathion, Malathion, Diazinon, and Pirimiphos Methyl in Dried Medicinal Plants Using Solid-Phase Microextraction Fibre Coated with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadkhaniha, Reza; Samadi, Nasrin; Salimi, Mona; Sarkhail, Parisa; Rastkari, Noushin

    2012-01-01

    A reliable and sensitive headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of different organophosphorus pesticides in dried medicinal plant samples is described. The analytes were extracted by single-walled carbon nanotubes as a new solid-phase microextraction adsorbent. The developed method showed good performance. For diazinon and pirimiphos methyl calibration, curves were linear (r2 ≥ 0.993) over the concentration ranges from 1.5 to 300 ng g−1, and the limit of detection at signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was 0.3 ng g−1. For parathion and malathion, the linear range and limit of detection were 2.5–300 (r2 ≥ 0.991) and 0.5 ng g−1, respectively. In addition, a comparative study between the single-walled carbon nanotubes and a commercial polydimethylsiloxane fibre for the determination of target analytes was carried out. Single-walled carbon nanotubes fibre showed higher extraction capacity, better thermal stability (over 350°C), and longer lifespan (over 250 times) than the commercial polydimethylsiloxane fibre. The developed method was successfully applied to determine target organophosphorus pesticides in real samples. PMID:22645439

  18. Simultaneous determination of parathion, malathion, diazinon, and pirimiphos methyl in dried medicinal plants using solid-phase microextraction fibre coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ahmadkhaniha, Reza; Samadi, Nasrin; Salimi, Mona; Sarkhail, Parisa; Rastkari, Noushin

    2012-01-01

    A reliable and sensitive headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of different organophosphorus pesticides in dried medicinal plant samples is described. The analytes were extracted by single-walled carbon nanotubes as a new solid-phase microextraction adsorbent. The developed method showed good performance. For diazinon and pirimiphos methyl calibration, curves were linear (r(2) ≥ 0.993) over the concentration ranges from 1.5 to 300 ng g(-1), and the limit of detection at signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was 0.3 ng g(-1). For parathion and malathion, the linear range and limit of detection were 2.5-300 (r(2) ≥ 0.991) and 0.5 ng g(-1), respectively. In addition, a comparative study between the single-walled carbon nanotubes and a commercial polydimethylsiloxane fibre for the determination of target analytes was carried out. Single-walled carbon nanotubes fibre showed higher extraction capacity, better thermal stability (over 350 °C), and longer lifespan (over 250 times) than the commercial polydimethylsiloxane fibre. The developed method was successfully applied to determine target organophosphorus pesticides in real samples.

  19. Conducting polymer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube based chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Nidhi; Niazi, Asad; Biradar, Ashok M.; Rajesh E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu; Mulchandani, Ashok E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu

    2014-10-13

    We report the fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based ultrasensitive label-free chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac biomarker, myoglobin (Ag-cMb). Poly(pyrrole-co-pyrrolepropylic acid) with pendant carboxyl groups was electrochemically deposited on electrophoretically aligned SWNT channel, as a conducting linker, for biomolecular immobilization of highly specific cardiac myoglobin antibody. The device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, source-drain current-voltage (I-V), and charge-transfer characteristic studies. The device exhibited a linear response with a change in conductance in SWNT channel towards the target, Ag-cMb, over the concentration range of 1.0 to 1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a sensitivity of ∼118% per decade with high specificity.

  20. ZnS nanocrystals decorated single-walled carbon nanotube based chemiresistive label-free DNA sensor

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh; Das, Basanta K.; Srinives, Sira; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    We fabricated ZnS nanocrystals decorated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based chemiresistive sensor for DNA. Since the charge transfer in the hybrid nanostructures is considered to be responsible for many of their unique properties, the role of ZnS nanocrystals toward its performance in DNA sensor was delineated. It was found that the free carboxyl groups surrounding the ZnS nanocrystals allowed large loading of single strand DNA (ssDNA) probe that provided an ease of hybridization with target complementary c-ssDNA resulting in large electron transfer to SWNT. Thus it provided a significant improvement in sensitivity toward c-ssDNA as compared to bare SWNT based DNA sensor. PMID:21286239

  1. One-step synthesis of fluorescently labelled, single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Guaragno, Michelle L; Gottardi, Riccardo; Fedorchak, Morgan V; Roy, Abhijit; Kumta, Prashant N; Little, Steven R

    2015-12-18

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be labelled with functional moieties that endow them with a number of unique characteristics, which can be applicable to biomedical applications such as imaging. Herein we describe a facile, one-step esterification process to functionalize SWNT with fluorescein. PMID:26458421

  2. Aggregation Kinetics and Transport of Single-Walled CarbonNanotubes at Low Surfactant Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about how low levels of surfactants can affect the colloidal stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and how surfactant-wrapping of SWNTs can impact ecological exposures in aqueous systems. In this study, SWNTs were suspended in water with sodium ...

  3. Production of vertical arrays of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2013-08-13

    A hot filament chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to grow at least one vertical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In general, various embodiments of the present invention disclose novel processes for growing and/or producing enhanced nanotube carpets with decreased diameters as compared to the prior art.

  4. MICROWAVE-INDUCED RAPID CHEMICAL FUNCTIONALIZATION OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES (R830901)

    EPA Science Inventory


    Abstract

    The microwave-induced chemical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is reported. The major advantage of this high-energy procedure is that it reduced the reaction time to the order of minutes and the number of steps in the reac...

  5. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6](3-) precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ∼0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance.

  6. On the Likelihood of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Causing Adverse Marine Ecological Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brief article discusses the ecological effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)in the marine environment. Based on new research and a review of the scientific literature, the paper concludes that SWNTs are unlikely to cause adverse ecological effects in the marine ...

  7. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6]3− precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ∼0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance. PMID:27025784

  8. Environmental Detection of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Utilizing Near-Infrared Fluorescence

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a growing number of applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) in modern technologies and, subsequently, growth in production of CNT has expanded rapidly. Single-walled CNT (SWCNT) consist of a graphene sheet rolled up into a tube. With growing manufacture and use, the ...

  9. Cofactor-free detection of phosphatidylserine with cyclic peptides mimicking lactadherin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Wang, Fang; Wang, Qin; Gao, Jianmin

    2011-10-01

    Cyclic peptides (cLacs) are designed to mimic the natural phosphatidylserine (PS) binding protein lactadherin. Unlike annexin V or its small molecule mimics, the cLac peptides selectively target PS-presenting membranes with no need for metal cofactors. We further show that a fluorophore-labeled cLac effectively stains early apoptotic cells. The small size and facile conjugation with a variety of imaging tracers make the cLac design promising for imaging cell death in vitro as well as in living organisms.

  10. Delivering Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes to the Nucleus Using Engineered Nuclear Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Patrick D; Ganesh, Sairaam; Qin, Zhao; Holt, Brian D; Buehler, Markus J; Islam, Mohammad F; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-02-10

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential for cell-based therapies due to their unique intrinsic optical and physical characteristics. Consequently, broad classes of dispersants have been identified that individually suspend SWCNTs in water and cell media in addition to reducing nanotube toxicity to cells. Unambiguous control and verification of the localization and distribution of SWCNTs within cells, particularly to the nucleus, is needed to advance subcellular technologies utilizing nanotubes. Here we report delivery of SWCNTs to the nucleus by noncovalently attaching the tail domain of the nuclear protein lamin B1 (LB1), which we engineer from the full-length LMNB1 cDNA. More than half of this low molecular weight globular protein is intrinsically disordered but has an immunoglobulin-fold composed of a central hydrophobic core, which is highly suitable for associating with SWCNTs, stably suspending SWCNTs in water and cell media. In addition, LB1 has an exposed nuclear localization sequence to promote active nuclear import of SWCNTs. These SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions in water and cell media display near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectra with sharp van Hove peaks and an NIR fluorescence spectra, suggesting that LB1 individually disperses nanotubes. The dispersing capability of SWCNTs by LB1 is similar to that by albumin proteins. The SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions with concentrations ≥150 μg/mL (≥30 μg/mL) in water (cell media) remain stable for ≥75 days (≥3 days) at 4 °C (37 °C). Further, molecular dynamics modeling of association of LB1 with SWCNTs reveal that the exposure of the nuclear localization sequence is independent of LB1 binding conformation. Measurements from confocal Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, NIR fluorescence imaging of SWCNTs, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy show that millions of these SWCNTs-LB1 complexes enter HeLa cells, localize to the nucleus of cells, and interact with DNA. We postulate that the

  11. Delivering Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes to the Nucleus Using Engineered Nuclear Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Patrick D; Ganesh, Sairaam; Qin, Zhao; Holt, Brian D; Buehler, Markus J; Islam, Mohammad F; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2016-02-10

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential for cell-based therapies due to their unique intrinsic optical and physical characteristics. Consequently, broad classes of dispersants have been identified that individually suspend SWCNTs in water and cell media in addition to reducing nanotube toxicity to cells. Unambiguous control and verification of the localization and distribution of SWCNTs within cells, particularly to the nucleus, is needed to advance subcellular technologies utilizing nanotubes. Here we report delivery of SWCNTs to the nucleus by noncovalently attaching the tail domain of the nuclear protein lamin B1 (LB1), which we engineer from the full-length LMNB1 cDNA. More than half of this low molecular weight globular protein is intrinsically disordered but has an immunoglobulin-fold composed of a central hydrophobic core, which is highly suitable for associating with SWCNTs, stably suspending SWCNTs in water and cell media. In addition, LB1 has an exposed nuclear localization sequence to promote active nuclear import of SWCNTs. These SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions in water and cell media display near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectra with sharp van Hove peaks and an NIR fluorescence spectra, suggesting that LB1 individually disperses nanotubes. The dispersing capability of SWCNTs by LB1 is similar to that by albumin proteins. The SWCNTs-LB1 dispersions with concentrations ≥150 μg/mL (≥30 μg/mL) in water (cell media) remain stable for ≥75 days (≥3 days) at 4 °C (37 °C). Further, molecular dynamics modeling of association of LB1 with SWCNTs reveal that the exposure of the nuclear localization sequence is independent of LB1 binding conformation. Measurements from confocal Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, NIR fluorescence imaging of SWCNTs, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy show that millions of these SWCNTs-LB1 complexes enter HeLa cells, localize to the nucleus of cells, and interact with DNA. We postulate that the

  12. 40 CFR 721.10277 - Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (generic) (P-10-40).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chemical substance identified generically as single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-10-40... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (generic) (P-10-40). 721.10277 Section 721.10277 Protection of Environment...

  13. Human rhinovirus-induced inflammatory responses are inhibited by phosphatidylserine containing liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, C A; Kaur, R; Edwards, M R; Mondhe, M; Robinson, D; Prestwich, E C; Hume, R D; Marshall, C A; Perrie, Y; O'Donnell, V B; Harwood, J L; Sabroe, I; Parker, L C

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections are major contributors to the healthcare burden associated with acute exacerbations of chronic airway disease, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Cellular responses to HRV are mediated through pattern recognition receptors that may in part signal from membrane microdomains. We previously found Toll-like receptor signaling is reduced, by targeting membrane microdomains with a specific liposomal phosphatidylserine species, 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (SAPS). Here we explored the ability of this approach to target a clinically important pathogen. We determined the biochemical and biophysical properties and stability of SAPS liposomes and studied their ability to modulate rhinovirus-induced inflammation, measured by cytokine production, and rhinovirus replication in both immortalized and normal primary bronchial epithelial cells. SAPS liposomes rapidly partitioned throughout the plasma membrane and internal cellular membranes of epithelial cells. Uptake of liposomes did not cause cell death, but was associated with markedly reduced inflammatory responses to rhinovirus, at the expense of only modest non-significant increases in viral replication, and without impairment of interferon receptor signaling. Thus using liposomes of phosphatidylserine to target membrane microdomains is a feasible mechanism for modulating rhinovirus-induced signaling, and potentially a prototypic new therapy for viral-mediated inflammation. PMID:26906404

  14. An ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor based on a copper oxide nanowires/single-walled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei; Hou, Changjun; Huo, Danqun; Yang, Mei; Fa, Huanbao

    2016-02-01

    Here, we developed a novel and sensitive electrochemical biosensor to detect specific-sequence target DNA. The biosensor was based on a hybrid nanocomposite consisting of copper oxide nanowires (CuO NWs) and carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-COOH). The resulting CuO NWs/SWCNTs layers exhibited a good differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) current response for the target DNA sequences, which we attributed to the properties of CuO NWs and SWCNTs. CuO NWs and SWCNTs hybrid composites with highly conductive and biocompatible nanostructure were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Immobilization of the probe DNA on the electrode surface was largely improved due to the unique synergetic effect of CuO NWs and SWCNTs. DPV was applied to monitor the DNA hybridization event, using adriamycin as an electrochemical indicator. Under optimal conditions, the peak currents of adriamycin were linear with the logarithm of target DNA concentrations (ranging from 1.0 × 10-14 to 1.0 × 10-8 M), with a detection limit of 3.5 × 10-15 M (signal/noise ratio of 3). The biosensor also showed high selectivity to single-base mismatched target DNA. Compared with other electrochemical DNA biosensors, we showed that the proposed biosensor is simple to implement, with good stability and high sensitivity.

  15. Experimental determination of excitonic band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes using circular dichroism spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yomogida, Yohei; Sato, Naomichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-10-01

    Experimental band structure analyses of single-walled carbon nanotubes have not yet been reported, to the best of our knowledge, except for a limited number of reports using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate the experimental determination of the excitonic band structures of single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes using their circular dichroism spectra. In this analysis, we use gel column chromatography combining overloading selective adsorption with stepwise elution to separate 12 different single-chirality enantiomers. Our samples show higher circular dichroism intensities than the highest values reported in previous works, indicating their high enantiomeric purity. Excitonic band structure analysis is performed by assigning all observed Eii and Eij optical transitions in the circular dichroism spectra. The results reproduce the asymmetric structures of the valence and conduction bands predicted by density functional theory. Finally, we demonstrate that an extended empirical formula can estimate Eij optical transition energies for any (n,m) species.

  16. High-current-density field emission display fabricated from single-walled carbon nanotube electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Shang, X. F.; Ma, Y. P.; Zhou, J. J.; Gu, Z. Q.; Li, Z. H.; Xu, Y. B.; Wang, M.

    2008-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes can be used as electron sources in the process of field emission, and have great potential for practical application of the field emission display (FED) panels with large screen size. We fabricated a FED using the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the cathode by the screen-printing process. Test showed that the SWNTs emitters exhibit excellent macroscopic emission properties. It has low turn-on voltage (2.7 V/μ m) and high brightness, with a high current density of good uniformity and stability. It was observed that the field emission qualitatively follows the conventional Fowler Nordheim (F N) theory, and aging treatment played an important role in improving the image uniformity and stability. Compared to other complicated processes, the simple fabrication using screen-printing process seems to be advantageous for practical application.

  17. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Svendsen, Winnie E.; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Boisen, Anja; Martínez, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    This Letter involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple 'one pot' synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own N-layered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6-31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid conjugate presented herein is believed to lead the way to new potential applications as carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems.

  18. Diameter selective electron transfer from encapsulated ferrocenes to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizumi, Yoko; Suzuki, Hironori; Tange, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Toshiya

    2014-10-01

    The diameter selective photoluminescence quenching of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is observed upon ferrocene encapsulation, which can be attributed to electron transfer from the encapsulated ferrocenes to the SWCNTs. Interestingly, the dependence of the electron transfer process on the nanotube diameter is governed by the molecular orientation of the ferrocenes in the SWCNT rather than the reduction potentials of the SWCNT.The diameter selective photoluminescence quenching of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is observed upon ferrocene encapsulation, which can be attributed to electron transfer from the encapsulated ferrocenes to the SWCNTs. Interestingly, the dependence of the electron transfer process on the nanotube diameter is governed by the molecular orientation of the ferrocenes in the SWCNT rather than the reduction potentials of the SWCNT. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Calculated binding energies of FeCp2@SWCNTs and additional spectroscopic characterization are described in ESI. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04398g

  19. Single-walled carbon nanotubes do not pierce aqueous phospholipid bilayers at low salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liu; Shi, Dachuan; Nollert, Matthias U; Resasco, Daniel E; Striolo, Alberto

    2013-06-01

    Because of their unique physical, chemical, and electrical properties, carbon nanotubes are an attractive material for many potential applications. Their interactions with biological entities are, however, not yet completely understood. To fill this knowledge gap, we present experimental results for aqueous systems containing single-walled carbon nanotubes and phospholipid membranes, prepared in the form of liposomes. Our results suggest that dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes, instead of piercing the liposome membranes, adsorb on them at low ionic strength. Transmission electron microscopy and dye-leakage experiments show that the liposomes remain for the most part intact in the presence of the nanotubes. Further, the liposomes are found to stabilize carbon nanotube dispersions when the surfactant sodium dodecylbenezenesulfonate is present at low concentrations. Quantifying the interactions between carbon nanotubes and phospholipid membranes could not only shed light on potential nanotubes cytotoxicity but also open up new research venues for their use in controlled drug delivery and/or gene and cancer therapy.

  20. Photoluminescence imaging of electronic-impurity-induced exciton quenching in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Crochet, Jared J; Duque, Juan G; Werner, James H; Doorn, Stephen K

    2012-02-01

    The electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes can be altered by surface adsorption of electronic impurities or dopants. However, fully understanding the influence of these impurities is difficult because of the inherent complexity of the solution-based colloidal chemistry of nanotubes, and because of a lack of techniques for directly imaging dynamic processes involving these impurities. Here, we show that photoluminescence microscopy can be used to image exciton quenching in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes during the early stages of chemical doping with two different species. The addition of AuCl(3) leads to localized exciton-quenching sites, which are attributed to a mid-gap electronic impurity level, and the adsorbed species are also found sometimes to be mobile on the surface of the nanotubes. The addition of H(2)O(2) leads to delocalized exciton-quenching hole states, which are responsible for long-range photoluminescence blinking, and are also mobile.

  1. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma Arc: Role of Plasma Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhart, Samir; Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are porous objects on the molecular scale and have a low density, which gives them potential applications as adsorbent for molecular hydrogen. Their H2 absorption capacity published in the literature varies from 4 to 10% by mass according to the purity of the materials and storage conditions. Optimization of production methods of SWNTs should permit improving these new materials for storage of hydrogen. In this article, we show the potential of using SWNTs in hydrogen storage. In particular, we pose problems associated with synthesis, purification, and opening up of the nanotubes. We present an electric arc process currently used at laboratory scale to produce single wall carbon nanotubes. We discuss, in particular, operating conditions that permit growth of nanotubes and some plasma parameters that assure control of the material. Analysis of the process is carried out with the aid of local measurements of temperature and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the materials.

  2. Peptide secondary structure modulates single-walled carbon nanotube fluorescence as a chaperone sensor for nitroaromatics

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Daniel A.; Pratt, George W.; Zhang, Jingqing; Nair, Nitish; Hansborough, Adam J.; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Reuel, Nigel F.; Barone, Paul W.; Strano, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    A class of peptides from the bombolitin family, not previously identified for nitroaromatic recognition, allows near-infrared fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes to transduce specific changes in their conformation. In response to the binding of specific nitroaromatic species, such peptide–nanotube complexes form a virtual “chaperone sensor,” which reports modulation of the peptide secondary structure via changes in single-walled carbon nanotubes, near-infrared photoluminescence. A split-channel microscope constructed to image quantized spectral wavelength shifts in real time, in response to nitroaromatic adsorption, results in the first single-nanotube imaging of solvatochromic events. The described indirect detection mechanism, as well as an additional exciton quenching-based optical nitroaromatic detection method, illustrate that functionalization of the carbon nanotube surface can result in completely unique sites for recognition, resolvable at the single-molecule level. PMID:21555544

  3. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ajai Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Johansson, Leena-Sisko

    2015-06-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp{sup 3} bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  4. Structural modeling of dahlia-type single-walled carbon nanohorn aggregates by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hawelek, L; Brodka, A; Dore, John C; Hannon, Alex C; Iijima, S; Yudasaka, M; Ohba, T; Kaneko, K; Burian, A

    2013-09-19

    The structure of dahlia-type single-walled carbon nanohorn aggregates has been modeled by classical molecular dynamics simulations, and the validity of the model has been verified by neutron diffraction. Computer-generated models consisted of an outer part formed from single-walled carbon nanohorns with diameters of 20-50 Å and a length of 400 Å and an inner turbostratic graphite-like core with a diameter of 130 Å. The diffracted intensity and the pair correlation function computed for such a constructed model are in good agreement with the neutron diffraction experimental data. The proposed turbostratic inner core explains the occurrence of the additional (002) and (004) graphitic peaks in the diffraction pattern of the studied sample and provides information about the interior structure of the dahlia-type aggregates. PMID:23978218

  5. Evaluation of the performance of single-walled carbon nanohorns in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Soto, Juan Manuel; Moliner-Martínez, Yolanda; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes for the first time the use of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as pseudostationary and stationary phases for EKC and CEC, respectively, taking advantage of their characteristic features, such as conical-end termination, formation of spherical assemblies dahlia-flower like superstructure and easy functionalization. The use of SWNHs as pseudostationary phase for EKC required the study of their dispersion in different surfactants as well as their compatibility with the electrophoretic system. The carboxylation and subsequent immobilization of carboxylated SWNHs in fused-silica capillary to obtain useful, reproducible and stable stationary phases for CEC has also been investigated, with promising results. The electrophoretic separations obtained for water-soluble vitamins in both modalities (EKC and CEC) have been systematically compared with those obtained with single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:20419702

  6. Dielectric constants of single-wall carbon nanotubes at various frequencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Huei; Lue, Juh-Tzeng

    2007-09-01

    A cylindrical rod composed of a uniform mixture of single-wall carbon nanotubes and alumina powders dissolved in paraffin was inserted in the center of a radio frequency cavity. The complex dielectric constant of carbon tubes at various frequencies was measured by a resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC) meter and a microwave network analyzer. The cylindrical rod benefits the protection of the sample from adsorbing moisture and preventing the rod from filling with air, thus making accuracy experiment values. The real part and the imaginary part of the dielectric constants of single-wall carbon nanotubes are, respectively, increase and decrease in magnitudes as frequency increases satisfactorily in complying with the portray from the free electron Drude model.

  7. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Reporters for the Optical Detection of Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Paul W.; Strano, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews current efforts to make glucose sensors based on the inherent optical properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The advantages of single walled carbon nanotubes over traditional organic and nanoparticle fluorophores for in vivo-sensing applications are discussed. Two recent glucose sensors made by our group are described, with the first being an enzyme-based glucose sensor that couples a reaction mediator, which quenches nanotube fluorescence, on the surface of the nanotube with the reaction of the enzyme. The second sensor is based on competitive equilibrium binding between dextran-coated nanotubes and concanavalin A. The biocompatibility of a model sensor is examined using the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane as a tissue model. The advantages of measuring glucose concentration directly, like most optical sensors, versus measuring the flux in glucose concentration, like most electrochemical sensors, is discussed. PMID:20144355

  8. Atomic layer deposition on suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes via gas-phase noncovalent functionalization.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Damon B; Gordon, Roy G

    2006-04-01

    Alternating exposures of nitrogen dioxide gas and trimethylaluminum vapor are shown to functionalize the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotubes with a self-limited monolayer. Functionalized nanotube surfaces are susceptible to atomic layer deposition of continuous, radially isotropic material. This allows for the creation of coaxial nanotube structures of multiple materials with precisely controlled diameters. Functionalization involves only weak physical bonding, avoiding covalent modification, which should preserve the unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. PMID:16608267

  9. Below-gap excitation of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soavi, G.; Grupp, A.; Budweg, A.; Scotognella, F.; Hefner, T.; Hertel, T.; Lanzani, G.; Leitenstorfer, A.; Cerullo, G.; Brida, D.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the optoelectronic properties of the semiconducting (6,5) species of single-walled carbon nanotubes by measuring ultrafast transient transmission changes with 20 fs time resolution. We demonstrate that photons with energy below the lowest exciton resonance efficiently lead to linear excitation of electronic states. This finding challenges the established picture of a vanishing optical absorption below the fundamental excitonic resonance. Our result points towards below-gap electronic states as an intrinsic property of semiconducting nanotubes.

  10. Dispersionless propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosati, Roberto; Rossi, Fausto; Dolcini, Fabrizio

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes via a Lindblad-based density-matrix approach that enables us to account for both dissipation and decoherence effects induced by various phonon modes. We show that, while in semiconducting nanotubes the wavepacket experiences the typical dispersion of conventional materials, in metallic nanotubes its shape remains essentially unaltered, even in the presence of the electron-phonon coupling, up to micron distances at room temperature.

  11. Conductivity of Thin Films Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, M. S.; Kosobutsky, A. V.; Sevostyanov, O. G.; Russakov, D. M.; Lomakin, M. V.; Chirkova, I. M.; Shandakov, S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Electrical and optical properties of thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) obtained by aerosol chemical vapor deposition using ethanol, ferrocene, and sulfur are studied. Structural and geometrical characteristics of the synthesis products are determined by the methods of Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The effect of sulfur on the properties of the SWCNTs and thin films based on them is found.

  12. Regular chemisorption of hydrogen on achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, D. A.; Bulyarskii, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Regular chemisorption of hydrogen on achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes has been investigated with the use of AM1 quantum-chemical semiempirical method. It has been found that regular hydrogen chemisorption deforms nanotubes, in some cases leading to stable prismatic modifications. The dependence of the adsorption energy on the density of hydrogen coverage has been found. A procedure for determining the adsorption energy by the spectra of thermally stimulated desorption has been proposed.

  13. Growth and characterization of high-density mats of single-walled carbon nanotubes for interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.; Zhong, G.; Telg, H.; Thomsen, C.; Warner, J. H.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Roth, S.

    2008-10-20

    We grow high-density, aligned single wall carbon nanotube mats for use as interconnects in integrated circuits by remote plasma chemical vapor deposition from a Fe-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film catalyst. We carry out extensive Raman characterization of the resulting mats, and find that this catalyst system gives rise to a broad range of nanotube diameters, with no preferential selectivity of semiconducting tubes, but with at least 1/3 of metallic tubes.

  14. Fabrication of Discrete Nanosized Cobalt Particles Encapsulated Inside Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zoican Loebick, C.; Majewska, M; Ren, F; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with encapsulated nanosized cobalt particles have been synthesized by a facile and scalable method. In this approach, SWNT were filled with a cobalt acetylacetonate solution in dichloromethane by ultrasonication. In a second step, exposure to hydrogen at different temperatures released discrete cobalt particles of controllable size inside the SWNT cavity. The SWNT-Co particles systems were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis.

  15. Cycloaddition of benzyne to armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes: [2 + 2] or [4 + 2]?

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhao, Xiang; Nagase, Shigeru

    2013-12-01

    The reaction mechanism and regioselectivity of cycloaddition reactions of benzyne to armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes were investigated with quantum chemical methods. The [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction follows the diradical mechanism, whereas the [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction adopts the concerted mechanism. More importantly, the [2 + 2] product is always more stable thermodynamically than the [4 + 2] ones, regardless of the diameter, while the [4 + 2] cycloaddition becomes kinetically more favored as the diameter goes up.

  16. Chirality-Selective Optical Scattering Force on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton Spesyvtseva, Susan E.; Shoji, Satoru; Kawata, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    We show that optical forces acting on carbon nanotubes are substantially enhanced when the optical wavelength is tuned to resonances in the electronic band structure. Using a tunable laser source, we experimentally demonstrate a resonant optical scattering force on single-walled carbon nanotubes and, by tuning the wavelength, exploit this force to achieve chirality enrichment of four chiralities of nanotubes. Our results represent a significant step towards optical manipulation and sorting of carbon nanotubes based on their chiral vector.

  17. Improving the mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube sheets by intercalation of polymeric adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Jonathan N.; Blau, Werner J.; Dalton, Alan B.; Muñoz, Edgar; Collins, Steve; Kim, Bog G.; Razal, Joselito; Selvidge, Miles; Vieiro, Guillermo; Baughman, Ray H.

    2003-03-01

    Organic polymers, such as poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), and poly(styrene), were intercalated into single-walled carbon nanotube sheets by soaking the sheets in polymer solutions. Even for short soak times, significant polymer intercalation into existing free volume was observed. Tensile tests on intercalated sheets showed that the Young's modulus, strength, and toughness increased by factors of 3, 9, and 28, respectively, indicating that the intercalated polymer enhances load transmission between nanotubes.

  18. Changes in single-walled carbon nanotube chirality during growth and regrowth.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wuming; Rosén, Arne; Bolton, Kim

    2008-03-28

    A simple model for joining two single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with different, arbitrary chiralities is used to systematically label junction structures which contain pentagon-heptagon pairs. The model is also used, together with density functional theory, to study the energetics of diameter and chirality changes of thin SWNTs during catalyzed growth or regrowth. We choose zigzag and armchair SWNTs attached to a Ni(55) cluster for our case studies.

  19. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Alignment Mechanisms for Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Seunghun

    2002-01-01

    As proposed in our original proposal, we developed a new innovative method to assemble millions of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based circuit components as fast as conventional microfabrication processes. This method is based on surface template assembly strategy. The new method solves one of the major bottlenecks in carbon nanotube based electrical applications and, potentially, may allow us to mass produce a large number of SWCNT-based integrated devices of critical interests to NASA.

  20. Tunable MTMs consists of a single-walled nanotube thin film waveguide covered by nonlinear cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Khozondar, Hala J.; El-Khozondar, Rifa J.; Zouhdi, Said

    2015-05-01

    A theoretical approach to study fabrication of tunable metamaterials (MTMs) consists of a single-walled nanotube film sandwiched between nonlinear cladding and linear substrate. In the proposed waveguide, the dispersion equation is derived. Numerical calculation is carried out to draw the effective refractive index for transverse electric modes. The effective refractive index as function of frequency is plotted at different values of nonlinearity. Based on the results, the proposed structure can be used as tunable MTMs.

  1. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  2. Intense photoluminescence from dried double-stranded DNA and single-walled carbon nanotube hybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Ito, Y.; Hayashida, T.; Nii, D.; Umemura, K.; Homma, Y.

    2014-01-27

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) show near-infrared photoluminescence (PL) when they are individually isolated. This was an obstacle to use photonic properties of SWNTs on a solid surface. We show that SWNTs wrapped with DNA maintain intense PL under the dry conditions. SWNTs are well isolated individually by DNA even when the DNA-SWNT hybrids are agglomerated. This finding opens up application of SWNTs to photonic devices.

  3. The Effects of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the Shear Piezoelectricity of Biopolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Conrad; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Shear piezoelectricity was investigated in a series of composites consisting of increased loadings of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in poly (gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate), or PBLG. The effects of the SWCNTs on this material property in PBLG will be discussed. Their influence on the morphology of the polymer (degree of orientation and crystallinity), and electrical and dielectric properties of the composite will be reported

  4. Energy level alignment of single-wall carbon nanotubes on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, Sylvain; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2011-06-01

    We studied the electronic configuration of single-wall carbon nanotubes adsorbed on well-defined Au(111) and Cu(111) surfaces. We found opposite behaviors for their energy-level alignment with metal: nanotubes are p-doped on Au(111) and n-doped on Cu(111). The doping level is not uniquely defined for a particular metal surface but rather exhibits a distribution depending on several uncontrolled factors such as nanotube geometry and adsorption configuration.

  5. Catalytic nanoreactors in continuous flow: hydrogenation inside single-walled carbon nanotubes using supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Thomas W; Earley, James H; Anderson, Daniel P; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Bourne, Richard A

    2014-05-25

    One nanometre wide carbon nanoreactors are utilised as the reaction vessel for catalytic chemical reactions on a preparative scale. Sub-nanometre ruthenium catalytic particles which are encapsulated solely within single-walled carbon nanotubes offering a unique reaction environment are shown to be active when embedded in a supercritical CO2 continuous flow reactor. A range of hydrogenation reactions were tested and the catalyst displayed excellent stability over extended reaction times.

  6. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    DOE PAGES

    Márquez, Francisco; López, Vicente; Morant, Carmen; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Domingo, Concepción; Elizalde, Eduardo; Zamora, Félix

    2010-01-01

    Arrmore » ays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800°C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.« less

  7. Preferential syntheses of semiconducting vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes for direct use in FETs.

    PubMed

    Qu, Liangti; Du, Feng; Dai, Liming

    2008-09-01

    We have combined fast heating with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for preferential growth of semiconducting vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs). Raman spectroscopic estimation indicated a high yield of up to 96% semiconducting SWNTs in the VA-SWNT array. The as-synthesized semiconducting SWNTs can be used directly for fabricating FET devices without the need for any postsynthesis purification or separation. PMID:18665651

  8. Self-Assembly of Subnanometer-Diameter Single-Wall MoS2 Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remskar, Maja; Mrzel, Ales; Skraba, Zora; Jesih, Adolf; Ceh, Miran; Demšar, Jure; Stadelmann, Pierre; Lévy, Francis; Mihailovic, Dragan

    2001-04-01

    We report on the synthesis, structure, and self-assembly of single-wall subnanometer-diameter molybdenum disulfide tubes. The nanotubes are up to hundreds of micrometers long and display diverse self-assembly properties on different length scales, ranging from twisted bundles to regularly shaped ``furry'' forms. The bundles, which contain interstitial iodine, can be readily disassembled into individual molybdenum disulfide nanotubes. The synthesis was performed using a novel type of catalyzed transport reaction including C60 as a growth promoter.

  9. Synthesis, electronic structure, and Raman scattering of phosphorous-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Cruz Silva, Eduardo; Meunier, Vincent; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Jorio, Ado; Pimenta, M. A.; Rao, A. M.; Maciel, I. O.

    2009-01-01

    Substitutional phosphorous doping in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is investigated by density functional theory and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Electronic structure calculations predict charge localization on the phosphorus atom, which is also responsible of generating non-dispersive valence and conduction bands close to the Fermi level. Analysis of electron and phonon renormalization in the double-resonance Raman process confirms the different nature of the phosphorous donor doping (localized) when compared to nitrogen substitutional doping (non-localized) in SWNTs.

  10. Supramolecularly-knitted Tethered Oligopeptide/Single-walled Carbon Nanotube Organogels

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jiong; He, Xun; Fan, Jingwei; Raymond, Jeffery E.

    2014-01-01

    A facile polymerization of an allyl-functional N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomer is utilized to construct an A-B-A type triblock structure containing β-sheet-rich oligomeric peptide segments tethered by a poly(ethylene oxide) chain, which are capable of dispersing and gelating single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) noncovalently in organic solvents, resulting in significant enhancement of the mechanical properties of polypeptide-based organogels. PMID:24961389

  11. Toughening and reinforcing alumina matrix composite with single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jin-Peng; Zhuang, Da-Ming; Zhao, Da-Qing; Zhang, Gong; Wu, Min-Sheng; Wei, Fei; Fan, Zhuang-Jun

    2006-09-01

    The authors report an efficient way of incorporating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into alumina matrix with strong interfaces by heterocoagulation. The fracture toughness of SWNTs/Al2O3 composite reaches 6.40±0.3MPam1/2, which is twice as high as that of unreinforced alumina. The flexure strength of the composite also increases by 20%. The main toughening mechanism is crack bridging of SWNTs, and SWNT pullout takes effect also.

  12. Method for separating single-wall carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Sivarajan, Ramesh (Inventor); Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Bachilo, Sergei M. (Inventor); Weisman, R. Bruce (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a process for sorting and separating a mixture of (n, m) type single-wall carbon nanotubes according to (n, m) type. A mixture of (n, m) type single-wall carbon nanotubes is suspended such that the single-wall carbon nanotubes are individually dispersed. The nanotube suspension can be done in a surfactant-water solution and the surfactant surrounding the nanotubes keeps the nanotube isolated and from aggregating with other nanotubes. The nanotube suspension is acidified to protonate a fraction of the nanotubes. An electric field is applied and the protonated nanotubes migrate in the electric fields at different rates dependent on their (n, m) type. Fractions of nanotubes are collected at different fractionation times. The process of protonation, applying an electric field, and fractionation is repeated at increasingly higher pH to separated the (n, m) nanotube mixture into individual (n, m) nanotube fractions. The separation enables new electronic devices requiring selected (n, m) nanotube types.

  13. Controlled Patterning and Growth of Single Wall and Multi-wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for producing a selected pattern or array of at least one of a single wall nanotube and/or a multi-wall nanotube containing primarily carbon. A substrate is coated with a first layer (optional) of a first selected metal (e.g., Al and/or Ir) and with a second layer of a catalyst (e.g., Fe, Co, Ni and/or Mo), having selected first and second layer thicknesses provided by ion sputtering, arc discharge, laser ablation, evaporation or CVD. The first layer and/or the second layer may be formed in a desired non-uniform pattern, using a mask with suitable aperture(s), to promote growth of carbon nanotubes in a corresponding pattern. A selected heated feed gas (primarily CH4 or C2Hn with n=2 and/or 4) is passed over the coated substrate and forms primarily single wall nanotubes or multiple wall nanotubes, depending upon the selected feed gas and its temperature. Nanofibers, as well as single wall and multi-wall nanotubes, are produced using plasma-aided growth from the second (catalyst) layer. An overcoating of a selected metal or alloy can be deposited, over the second layer, to provide a coating for the carbon nanotubes grown in this manner.

  14. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Fluorescence Biosensors for Pathogen Recognition in Water Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Upadhyayula, Venkata K. K.; Ghoshroy, Soumitra; Nair, Vinod S.; Smith, Geoffrey B.; Mitchell, Martha C.; Deng, Shuguang

    2008-01-01

    Tmore » he possibility of using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) aggregates as fluorescence sensors for pathogen recognition in drinking water treatment applications has been studied. Batch adsorption study is conducted to adsorb large concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus aureus SH 1000 and Escherichia coli pKV-11 on single-walled carbon nanotubes. Subsequently the immobilized bacteria are detected with confocal microscopy by coating the nanotubes with fluorescence emitting antibodies.he Freundlich adsorption equilibrium constant ( k ) for S.aureus and E.coli determined from batch adsorption study was found to be 9 × 10 8 and 2 × 10 8  ml/g, respectively.he visualization of bacterial cells adsorbed on fluorescently modified carbon nanotubes is also clearly seen.he results indicate that hydrophobic single-walled carbon nanotubes have excellent bacterial adsorption capacity and fluorescent detection capability.his is an important advancement in designing fluorescence biosensors for pathogen recognition in water systems.« less

  15. Excitonic optical transitions characterized by Raman excitation profiles in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, H. N.; Blancon, J.-C.; Huntzinger, J.-R.; Arenal, R.; Popov, V. N.; Zahab, A. A.; Ayari, A.; San-Miguel, A.; Vallée, F.; Del Fatti, N.; Sauvajol, J.-L.; Paillet, M.

    2016-08-01

    We examine the excitonic nature of the E33 optical transition of the individual free-standing index-identified (23 ,7 ) single-walled carbon nanotube by means of the measurements of its radial-breathing-mode and G -mode Raman excitation profiles. We confirm that it is impossible to determine unambiguously the nature of its E33 optical transition (excitonic vs band to band) based only on the excitation profiles. Nevertheless, by combining Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and optical absorption measurements on strictly the same individual (23 ,7 ) single-walled carbon nanotube, we show that the absorption, Rayleigh spectra, and Raman excitation profiles of the longitudinal and transverse G modes are best fitted by considering the nature of the E33 transition as excitonic. The fit of the three sets of data gives close values of the transition energy E33 and damping parameter Γ33. This comparison shows that the fit of the Raman excitation profiles provides with good accuracy the energy and damping parameter of the excitonic optical transitions in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  16. High-power supercapacitor electrodes from single-walled carbon nanohorn/nanotube composite.

    PubMed

    Izadi-Najafabadi, Ali; Yamada, Takeo; Futaba, Don N; Yudasaka, Masako; Takagi, Hideyuki; Hatori, Hiroaki; Iijima, Sumio; Hata, Kenji

    2011-02-22

    A novel composite is presented as a supercapacitor electrode with a high maximum power rating (990 kW/kg; 396 kW/l) exceeding power performances of other electrodes. The high-power capability of the electrode stemmed from its unique meso-macro pore structure engineered through the utilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (20 wt %) as scaffolding for single-walled carbon nanohorns (80 wt %). The novel composite electrode also exhibited durable operation (6.5% decline in capacitance over 100 000 cycles) as a result of its monolithic chemical composition and mechanical stability. The novel composite electrode was benchmarked against another high-power electrode made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (Bucky paper electrode). While the composite electrode had a lower surface area compared to the Bucky paper electrode (280 vs 470 m(2)/g from nitrogen adsorption), it had a higher meso-macro pore volume (2.6 vs 1.6 mL/g from mercury porosimetry) which enabled the composite electrode to retain more electrolyte, ensuring facile ion transport, hence achieving a higher maximum power rating (970 vs 400 kW/kg). PMID:21210712

  17. Characterization of Plasmodium phosphatidylserine decarboxylase expressed in yeast and application for inhibitor screening

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Lawres, Lauren; Toh, Justin Y.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phospholipid biosynthesis is critical for the development, differentiation and pathogenesis of several eukaryotic pathogens. Genetic studies have validated the pathway for phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis from phosphatidylserine catalyzed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylase enzymes (PSD) as a suitable target for development of antimicrobials; however no inhibitors of this class of enzymes have been discovered. We show that the Plasmodium falciparum PSD can restore the essential function of the yeast gene in strains requiring PSD for growth. Genetic, biochemical and metabolic analyses demonstrate that amino acids between positions 40 and 70 of the parasite enzyme are critical for proenzyme processing and decarboxylase activity. We used the essential role of Plasmodium PSD in yeast as a tool for screening a library of anti-malarials. One of these compounds is 7-chloro-N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-quinolinamine, an inhibitor with potent activity against P. falciparum, and low toxicity toward mammalian cells. We synthesized an analog of this compound and showed that it inhibits PfPSD activity and eliminates Plasmodium yoelii infection in mice. These results highlight the importance of 4-quinolinamines as a novel class of drugs targeting membrane biogenesis via inhibition of PSD activity PMID:26585333

  18. Role of Calcium in Phosphatidylserine Externalisation in Red Blood Cells from Sickle Cell Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Erwin; Rees, David Charles; Gibson, John Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine exposure occurs in red blood cells (RBCs) from sickle cell disease (SCD) patients and is increased by deoxygenation. The mechanisms responsible remain unclear. RBCs from SCD patients also have elevated cation permeability, and, in particular, a deoxygenation-induced cation conductance which mediates Ca2+ entry, providing an obvious link with phosphatidylserine exposure. The role of Ca2+ was investigated using FITC-labelled annexin. Results confirmed high phosphatidylserine exposure in RBCs from SCD patients increasing upon deoxygenation. When deoxygenated, phosphatidylserine exposure was further elevated as extracellular [Ca2+] was increased. This effect was inhibited by dipyridamole, intracellular Ca2+ chelation, and Gardos channel inhibition. Phosphatidylserine exposure was reduced in high K+ saline. Ca2+ levels required to elicit phosphatidylserine exposure were in the low micromolar range. Findings are consistent with Ca2+ entry through the deoxygenation-induced pathway (Psickle), activating the Gardos channel. [Ca2+] required for phosphatidylserine scrambling are in the range achievable in vivo. PMID:21490763

  19. Helicity-dependent single-walled carbon nanotube alignment on graphite for helical angle and handedness recognition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yabin; Shen, Ziyong; Xu, Ziwei; Hu, Yue; Xu, Haitao; Wang, Sheng; Guo, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yanfeng; Peng, Lianmao; Ding, Feng; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays provide a great potential for the carbon-based nanodevices and circuit integration. Aligning single-walled carbon nanotubes with selected helicities and identifying their helical structures remain a daunting issue. The widely used gas-directed and surface-directed growth modes generally suffer the drawbacks of mixed and unknown helicities of the aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Here we develop a rational approach to anchor the single-walled carbon nanotubes on graphite surfaces, on which the orientation of each single-walled carbon nanotube sensitively depends on its helical angle and handedness. This approach can be exploited to conveniently measure both the helical angle and handedness of the single-walled carbon nanotube simultaneously at a low cost. In addition, by combining with the resonant Raman spectroscopy, the (n,m) index of anchored single-walled carbon nanotube can be further determined from the (d,θ) plot, and the assigned (n,m) values by this approach are validated by both the electronic transition energy Eii measurement and nanodevice application. PMID:23892334

  20. Formation and growth mechanisms of single-walled metal oxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucelen, Gulfem Ipek

    In this thesis, main objectives are to discover the first molecular-level mechanistic framework governing the formation and growth of single-walled metal-oxide nanotubes, apply this framework to demonstrate the engineering of nanotubular materials of controlled dimensions, and to progress towards a quantitative multiscale understanding of nanotube formation. In Chapter 2, the identification and elucidation of the mechanistic role of molecular precursors and nanoscale (1-3 nm) intermediates with intrinsic curvature, in the formation of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes is reported. The structural and compositional evolution of molecular and nanoscale species over a length scale of 0.1-100 nm, are characterized by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. DFT calculations revealed the intrinsic curvature of nanoscale intermediates with bonding environments similar to the structure of the final nanotube product. It is shown that curved nano-intermediates form in aqueous synthesis solutions immediately after initial hydrolysis of reactants at 25 °C, disappear from the solution upon heating to 95 °C due to condensation, and finally rearrange to form ordered single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes. Integration of all results leads to the construction of the first molecular-level mechanism of single-walled metal oxide nanotube formation, incorporating the role of monomeric and polymeric aluminosilicate species as well as larger nanoparticles. Then, in Chapter 3, new molecular-level concepts for constructing nanoscopic metal oxide objects are demonstrated. The diameters of metal oxide nanotubes are shaped with Angstrom-level precision by controlling the shape of nanometer-scale precursors. The subtle relationships between precursor shape and structure and final nanotube curvature are measured (at the molecular level). Anionic ligands (both organic and inorganic) are used to exert fine control over precursor

  1. Organic/hybrid nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes: preparation methods and chiral applications.

    PubMed

    Alhassen, Haysem; Antony, Vijy; Ghanem, Ashraf; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles are molecular-sized solids with at least one dimension measuring between 1-100 nm or 10-1000 nm depending on the individual discipline's perspective. They are aggregates of anywhere from a few hundreds to tens of thousands of atoms which render them larger than molecules but smaller than bulk solids. Consequently, they frequently exhibit physical and chemical properties somewhere between. On the other hand, nanocrystals are a special class of nanoparticles which have started gaining attention recently owing to their unique crystalline structures which provide a larger surface area and promising applications including chiral separations. Hybrid nanoparticles are supported by the growing interest of chemists, physicists, and biologists, who are researching to fully exploit them. These materials can be defined as molecular or nano-composites with mixed (organic or bio) and inorganic components, where at least one of the component domain has a dimension ranging from a few Å to several nanometers. Similarly, and due to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and electrical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research. In this short review, the focus is mainly on the current well-established simple preparation techniques of chiral organic and hybrid nanoparticles as well as single-walled carbon nanotubes and their applications in separation science. Of particular interest, cinchonidine, chitosan, and β-CD-modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are discussed as model examples for organic and hybrid nanoparticles. Likewise, the chemical vapor deposition method, used in the preparation of single-walled carbon nanotubes, is discussed. The enantioseparation applications of these model nanomaterials is also presented.

  2. Organic/hybrid nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes: preparation methods and chiral applications.

    PubMed

    Alhassen, Haysem; Antony, Vijy; Ghanem, Ashraf; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles are molecular-sized solids with at least one dimension measuring between 1-100 nm or 10-1000 nm depending on the individual discipline's perspective. They are aggregates of anywhere from a few hundreds to tens of thousands of atoms which render them larger than molecules but smaller than bulk solids. Consequently, they frequently exhibit physical and chemical properties somewhere between. On the other hand, nanocrystals are a special class of nanoparticles which have started gaining attention recently owing to their unique crystalline structures which provide a larger surface area and promising applications including chiral separations. Hybrid nanoparticles are supported by the growing interest of chemists, physicists, and biologists, who are researching to fully exploit them. These materials can be defined as molecular or nano-composites with mixed (organic or bio) and inorganic components, where at least one of the component domain has a dimension ranging from a few Å to several nanometers. Similarly, and due to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and electrical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research. In this short review, the focus is mainly on the current well-established simple preparation techniques of chiral organic and hybrid nanoparticles as well as single-walled carbon nanotubes and their applications in separation science. Of particular interest, cinchonidine, chitosan, and β-CD-modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are discussed as model examples for organic and hybrid nanoparticles. Likewise, the chemical vapor deposition method, used in the preparation of single-walled carbon nanotubes, is discussed. The enantioseparation applications of these model nanomaterials is also presented. PMID:24811353

  3. Diameter-selective solubilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes by reversible cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Acevedo, Alfonso; Xie, Hui; Zorbas, Vasiliki; Sampson, William M; Dalton, Alan B; Baughman, Ray H; Draper, Rockford K; Musselman, Inga H; Dieckmann, Gregg R

    2005-07-01

    We have utilized reversible cyclic peptides (RCPs)-peptides containing alternating l- and d-amino acids with N- and C-termini derivatized with thiol-containing groups allowing reversible peptide cyclization-to solubilize and noncovalently functionalize carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous solution. Solubilization occurs through wrapping of RCPs around the circumference of a SWNT, followed by the formation of head-to-tail covalent bonds, yielding closed rings on the nanotubes. By controlling the length of the RCPs, we have demonstrated limited diameter-selective solubilization of the SWNTs as revealed by UV/vis/NIR and Raman spectroscopies, as well as atomic force microscopy. PMID:15984878

  4. Ball-milling modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes: purification, cutting, and functionalization.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Noelia; Fabbro, Chiara; Herrero, M Antonia; de la Hoz, Antonio; Meneghetti, Moreno; Fierro, Jose L G; Prato, Maurizio; Vázquez, Ester

    2011-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be successfully cut with relatively homogeneous sizes using a planetary mill. The optimized conditions produce highly dispersible SWNTs that can be efficiently functionalized in a variety of synthetic ways. As clearly shown by Raman spectroscopy, the milling/cutting procedure compares very favorably with the most common way of purifying SWNTs, namely, treatment with strong oxidizing acids. Moreover a similar milling process can be used to functionalize and cut pristine SWNTs by one-step nitrene chemistry. PMID:21290599

  5. Noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes by aromatic diisocyanate molecules: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goclon, Jakub; Kozlowska, Mariana; Rodziewicz, Pawel

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the noncovalent functionalization of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) (6,0) by 4,4‧-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) and toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) molecules using the density functional theory (DFT) method with van der Waals dispersion correction. The obtained local minima show the dependence between the molecular arrangement of the adsorbates on SWCNT surface and their binding energies. We analyze the interplay between the π-π stacking interactions and isocyanate functional groups. For the analysis of the changes in the electronic structure we calculate the density of states (DOS) and charge density plots.

  6. Synthesis and catalytic activity of heteroatom doped metal-free single-wall carbon nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohui; Cui, Longbin; Tang, Pei; Hu, Ziqi; Ma, Ding; Shi, Zujin

    2016-04-01

    Boron-, phosphorus-, nitrogen-doped and co-doped single-wall carbon nanohorns were produced using an arc-vaporization method. These as-prepared doped materials consist of uniform isolated nanohorns and exhibit greatly enhanced catalytic capabilities in the reduction reaction of nitrobenzene and a volcano-shape trend between their activities with a B dopant content is found. Moreover, the B-C3 and P-C3 species in doped nanohorns might act as the acidic and basic sites to promote this reaction. PMID:27006980

  7. Fabrication and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube channel and graphene electrode based transistors arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y. H.; Yun, H.; McAllister, K.; Lee, S. W.; Na, J.; Kim, G. T.; Lee, B. J.; Kim, J. J.; Jeong, G. H.; Lee, I.; Kim, K. S.

    2015-07-20

    A transistor structure composed of an individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) channel with a graphene electrode was demonstrated. The integrated arrays of transistor devices were prepared by transferring patterned graphene electrode patterns on top of the aligned SWNT along one direction. Both single and multi layer graphene were used for the electrode materials; typical p-type transistor and Schottky diode behavior were observed, respectively. Based on our fabrication method and device performances, several issues are suggested and discussed to improve the device reliability and finally to realize all carbon based future electronic systems.

  8. Facile Solubilization Of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Urea Melt Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Adrian; Ford, William; Graupner, Ralf; Wessels, Jurina; Yasuda, Akio; Ley, Lothar; Hirsch, Andreas

    2005-09-01

    In this work we present a simple and effective process to overcome the water insolubility of mildly oxidized Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs). As this insolubility mainly arises from strong van-der Waals and π-π stacking interactions of the nanotubes, we applied a urea-melt process to break up the bundles and simultaneously convert the carboxylic functional groups into primary amides. After intense washing and precipitation steps the urea functionalized nanotubes (U-SWCNTs) show a remarkably increased solubility in water and some alcohols which, makes them accessible for further functionalization and applications in these solvents.

  9. On the charge transfer between single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rahul Pierce, Neal; Dasgupta, Archi

    2014-08-18

    It is important to understand the electronic interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene in order to use them efficiently in multifunctional hybrid devices. Here, we deposited SWNT bundles on graphene-covered copper and SiO{sub 2} substrates by chemical vapor deposition and investigated the charge transfer between them by Raman spectroscopy. Our results revealed that, on both copper and SiO{sub 2} substrates, graphene donates electrons to the SWNTs, resulting in p-type doped graphene and n-type doped SWNTs.

  10. Electronic modulations in a single wall carbon nanotube induced by the Au(111) surface reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Clair, Sylvain; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Yousoo E-mail: maki@riken.jp; Kawai, Maki E-mail: maki@riken.jp

    2015-02-02

    The structural and electronic structure of single wall carbon nanotubes adsorbed on Au(111) has been investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The nanotubes were dry deposited in situ in ultrahigh vacuum onto a perfectly clean substrate. In some cases, the native herringbone reconstruction of the Au(111) surface interacted directly with adsorbed nanotubes and produced long-range periodic oscillations in their local density of states, corresponding to charge transfer modulations along the tube axis. This effect, however, was observed not systematically for all tubes and only for semiconducting tubes.

  11. Stabilities and mechanical and electronic properties on BN doped zigzag single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vongachariya, Arthit; Parasuk, Vudhichai

    2015-12-01

    Electronic structures of undoped and BN doped zigzag (8,0) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) were investigated using density functional theoretical calculations. Their stabilities due to BN doping and spin states were considered and those with the shortest B-N distance and singlet spin is the most stable. The BN substitution also causes the reduction of the band gap energy. While the BN doping reduces the band gap energy from 0.606 to 0.183 eV, it has no effect on the Young's modulus value. The band gap energy of SWCNTs can be varied upon applying stress. At high stress ratio, SWCNT could become metallic.

  12. Transparent and flexible high-performance supercapacitors based on single-walled carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Kanninen, Petri; Luong, Nguyen Dang; Sinh, Le Hoang; Anoshkin, Ilya V; Tsapenko, Alexey; Seppälä, Jukka; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kallio, Tanja

    2016-06-10

    Transparent and flexible energy storage devices have garnered great interest due to their suitability for display, sensor and photovoltaic applications. In this paper, we report the application of aerosol synthesized and dry deposited single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films as electrodes for an electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC). SWCNT films exhibit extremely large specific capacitance (178 F g(-1) or 552 μF cm(-2)), high optical transparency (92%) and stability for 10 000 charge/discharge cycles. A transparent and flexible EDLC prototype is constructed with a polyethylene casing and a gel electrolyte. PMID:27122323

  13. Substrate-induced array of quantum dots in a single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyung-Joon; Clair, Sylvain; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2009-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes are model one-dimensional structures. They can also be made into zero-dimensional structures; quantum wells can be created in nanotubes by inserting metallofullerenes, by mechanical cutting or by the application of mechanical strain. Here, we report that quantum dot arrays can be produced inside nanotubes simply by causing a misalignment between the nanotube and the <100> direction of a supporting silver substrate. This method does not require chemical or physical treatment of either the substrate or the nanotube. A short quantum dot confinement length of 6 nm results in large energy splittings.

  14. All-optical trion generation in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Silvia M; Yuma, Bertrand; Berciaud, Stéphane; Shaver, Jonah; Gallart, Mathieu; Gilliot, Pierre; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2011-10-28

    We present evidence of all-optical trion generation and emission in pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Luminescence spectra, recorded on individual SWCNTs over a large cw excitation intensity range, show trion emission peaks redshifted with respect to the bright exciton peak. Clear chirality dependence is observed for 22 separate SWCNT species, allowing for determination of electron-hole exchange interaction and trion binding energy contributions. Luminescence data together with ultrafast pump-probe experiments on chirality-sorted bulk samples suggest that exciton-exciton annihilation processes generate dissociated carriers that allow for trion creation upon a subsequent photon absorption event.

  15. Macroscopic nanotube fibers spun from single-walled carbon nanotube polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chengmin; Saha, Avishek; Young, Colin C; Hashim, Daniel Paul; Ramirez, Carolyn E; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Pasquali, Matteo; Martí, Angel A

    2014-09-23

    In this work, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) fibers were produced from SWCNT polyelectrolyte dispersions stabilized by crown ether in dimethyl sulfoxide and coagulated into aqueous solutions. The SWCNT polyelectrolyte dispersions had concentrations up to 52 mg/mL and showed liquid crystalline behavior under polarized optical microscopy. The produced SWCNT fibers are neat (i.e., not forming composites with polymers) and showed a tensile strength up to 124 MPa and a Young's modulus of 14 GPa. This tensile strength is comparable to those of SWCNT fibers spun from strong acids. Conductivities on the order of 10(4) S/m were obtained by doping the fibers with iodine.

  16. Single crystals of single-walled carbon nanotubes formed by self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Schlittler, R R; Seo, J W; Gimzewski, J K; Durkan, C; Saifullah, M S; Welland, M E

    2001-05-11

    We report the self-assembly of single crystals of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using thermolysis of nano-patterned precursors. The synthesis of these perfectly ordered, single crystals of SWCNTs results in extended structures with dimension on the micrometer scale. Each crystal is composed of an ordered array of tubes with identical diameters and chirality, although these properties vary between crystals. The results show that SWCNTs can be produced as a perfect bulk material on the micrometer scale and point toward the synthesis of bulk macroscopic crystalline material.

  17. Thermoelectric properties of single-wall carbon nanotube films: Effects of diameter and wet environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Ueda, Tomohiro; Nakai, Yusuke; Kyakuno, Haruka; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Saito, Takeshi; Hata, Kenji; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    The Seebeck coefficient S and the electrical resistivity ρ of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were investigated as a function of the SWCNT diameter and carrier concentration. The S and ρ significantly changed in humid environments through p-type carrier doping. Experiments, combined with theoretical simulations based on the non-equilibrium Green’s function theory, indicated that the power factor P can be increased threefold by the enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs, but the nanotube diameter has little effect. The improvement of the film resistivity strongly enhances the film thermoelectric performance, manifested as increasing the value of P above 1200 µW/(m·K2).

  18. Growth of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by using ceria as catalyst supports.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaojun; Peng, Fei; Yang, Feng; He, Xiaohui; Huang, Huixin; Luo, Da; Yang, Juan; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Haichao; Peng, Lianmao; Li, Yan

    2014-02-12

    The growth of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) on flat substrates is essential for the application of SWNTs in electronic and optoelectronic devices. We developed a flexible strategy to selectively grow s-SWNTs on silicon substrates using a ceria-supported iron or cobalt catalysts. Ceria, which stores active oxygen, plays a crucial role in the selective growth process by inhibiting the formation of metallic SWNTs via oxidation. The so-produced ultralong s-SWNT arrays are immediately ready for building field effect transistors. PMID:24392872

  19. Single-walled carbon nanotubes growing radially from YC2 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dan; Seraphin, Supapan; Wang, Su

    1994-09-01

    In the primary soot produced by arc discharge using an yttrium carbide loaded anode, bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWT) are observed, protruding radially from YC2 particles coated with graphitic multilayers. The graphitic cages separating YC2 particle and SWT bundles fall into the narrow range of 10-20 layers. The morphology of the clusters suggests a two-step growth model: The radial SWT growth pattern is first initiated by catalytic action between the YC2 droplet and the carbon in the gas phase. Second, and upon cooling, the graphitic cage starts by segregating excess carbon from the YC2 bulk, arresting further growth of SWT.

  20. Enhanced thermoelectric power of single-wall carbon nanotube film blended with ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horike, Shohei; Misaki, Masahiro; Koshiba, Yasuko; Saito, Takeshi; Ishida, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the thermoelectric power of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with an ionic liquid (IL). The SWCNT/IL films showed simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient compared with the pristine SWCNT. No thermoelectric power was observed for the IL. The X-ray diffraction pattern and impedance diagram showed a unique behavior with the concentration of IL, which implies that the interaction between the SWCNTs and IL enhances the thermoelectric power of the SWCNTs. As a result of the simultaneous increase in these parameters, the power factor exhibited a 10-fold increase.

  1. Copper chloride functionalization of semiconducting and metallic fractions of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Valentina A.; Fedotov, Pavel V.; Obraztsova, Elena D.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a separation of arc-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) over conductivity type has been performed with an aqueous two-phase separation method. The separated fractions were used to synthesize copper chloride (CuCl) at SWNTs hybrid materials. These nanohybrids were studied using UV-vis-NIR optical absorption and Raman techniques. The changes in electronic and optical properties of functionalized SWNTs were revealed. A significant p-type doping of SWNTs by CuCl was considered as a main reason for modification of nanotube optical properties.

  2. In situ Raman monitoring of single-walled carbon nanotube filling with copper chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Timofei V.; Tonkikh, Alexander A.; Kudryashova, Ekaterina M.

    2016-03-01

    In situ characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes during their gas-phase filling with copper chloride (CuCl) was performed with Raman spectroscopy. The time dependence of positions and intensities of G, 2D, and radial breathing modes was investigated. It was demonstrated that the adsorption of copper chloride from gas phase on the external and internal surfaces of nanotubes leads to the Raman mode shifting. However, this effect is weaker than in case of formation of one-dimensional CuCl crystals inside nanotubes.

  3. The compressive buckling and size effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuzhou Zhu, Yanzhi; Li, Dongxia

    2015-03-10

    A higher-order Bernoulli-Euler beam model is developed to investigate the compressive buckling and size effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes by using a higher-order continuum relationship that has been previously proposed by the present authors. The second-order deformation gradients with respect to the axial direction are also considered, and the beam parameters are obtained by calculating the constitutive response around the circumference. The critical compressive force is analytically provided, and the size effect is studied by estimating the contribution of the higher-order terms.

  4. Bolometric and nonbolometric radio frequency detection in a metallic single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santavicca, Daniel F.; Chudow, Joel D.; Prober, Daniel E.; Purewal, Meninder S.; Kim, Philip

    2011-05-01

    We characterize radio frequency detection in a high-quality metallic single-walled carbon nanotube. At a bath temperature of 77 K, only bolometric (thermal) detection is seen. At a bath temperature of 4.2 K and low bias current, the response is due instead to the electrical nonlinearity of the non-Ohmic contacts. At higher bias currents, the contacts recover Ohmic behavior and the observed response agrees well with the calculated bolometric responsivity. The bolometric response is expected to operate at terahertz frequencies, and we discuss some of the practical issues associated with developing high frequency detectors based on carbon nanotubes.

  5. Detecting the formation of single-walled carbon nanotube rings by photoabsorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Akira; Suzuki, Takayuki; Ishibashi, Koji

    2016-08-01

    Photoabsorption spectroscopy was conducted on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) during the formation of ring structures. The absorption bands observed before starting the formation gradually shifted while broadening in the middle. When they finally disappeared, it was found, via atomic force microscopy observations, that almost all SWNTs were transformed into rings. The spectral changes were assumed to be due to the changes in the electronic states of SWNTs. This idea was supported by the results of an investigation using a scanning tunneling microscope. It could be said that photoabsorption spectroscopy is useful for detecting ring formation in situ.

  6. Red-emitting π-conjugated oligomers infused single-wall carbon nanotube sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Toshihiko; Urita, Koki

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the one-step thermal fusion and infusion of pyrene molecules inside single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Despite the presence of metallic-SWCNTs, which behave as a quencher due to gapless electronic states, the nanohybrids consisting of pyrene and/or azupyrene oligomers infused SWCNT sheets exhibit red fluorescence by the ultraviolet, blue, and green light excitations. The wavelength-independent light-emitting behavior is explained by (1) infused PAH oligomers inside semiconducting-SWCNTs and (2) the peculiar π-π interaction through mixed π-conjugated state between the π-conjugated oligomers and non-armchair metallic-SWCNTs.

  7. Molecular adsorption study of nicotine and caffeine on single-walled carbon nanotubes from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung-June; Kim, Gunn; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2013-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic structures and binding properties of nicotine and caffeine adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes to determine whether CNTs are appropriate for filtering or sensing nicotine and caffeine molecules. We find that caffeine adsorbs more strongly than nicotine. The different binding characteristics are discussed by analyzing the modification of the electronic structure of the molecule-adsorbed CNTs. We also calculate the quantum conductance of the CNTs in the presence of nicotine or caffeine adsorbates and demonstrate that the influence of caffeine is stronger than nicotine on the conductance of the host CNT.

  8. Electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes filled with manganese halogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamova, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were filled with manganese chloride and manganese bromide by a capillary filling method. The electronic properties of the filled SWCNTs were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the encapsulated manganese halogenides led to hole doping of the SWCNTs due to the charge transfer from the nanotubes to the encapsulated compounds. The embedded MnCl2 had stronger doping effect on the SWCNTs than MnBr2.

  9. Tailoring of Single Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Hydrogen Storage and Catalyst Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hui; Zhao, Bin; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Styers-Barnett, David J; Geohegan, David B; Brown, Craig M.; Liu, Yun; Zhou, Wei; Kabbour, Houria; Neumann, Dan

    2007-01-01

    We report the post-processing chemical treatments of single walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as a medium with tunable porosity to optimize hydrogen adsorption. Laser synthesized SWNHs are oxidized in air to achieve surface areas up to 1900 m2/g. Chemistry methods are described for the decoration of SWNHs with 1-3 nm Pt nanoparticles to probe spillover and metal-assisted hydrogen storage mechanisms. Hydrogen storage of opened SWNHs is 2.6 wt% at 77K, which is 3 times as that of as-prepared SWNHs.

  10. Micro/nanopatterning of single-walled carbon nanotube-organic semiconductor composites.

    PubMed

    Baba, Akira; Sato, Fuminobu; Fukuda, Nobuko; Ushijima, Hirobumi; Yase, Kiyoshi

    2009-02-25

    In this study, micro/nanopatterning and assembly of single-walled carbon nanotube-organic semiconductor composites using dip-pen nanolithography, microcontact printing and fountain-pen nanolithography techniques are described. First, the solubilization abilities of carbon nanotubes with Alcian blue-tetrakis(methyl pyridium) chloride (AB) are investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy. The assembly of the composites obtained by microcontact printing technique shows well-ordered monolayers of 1 microm linewidth pattern. Dip-pen nanolithography shows that 11 nm height and 100 nm linewidth can be obtained on silicon wafer substrates. Finally, fountain-pen nanolithography is shown as a possible large-scale carbon nanotube assembly technique.

  11. Electrical transport properties of electrodeposited polypyrrole/single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hun; Oh, Je Seung; Chang, Young Wook; Yoo, Seung Hwan; Choi, Hyang Hee; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2007-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) coated by conducting polypyrrole (PPy) have been synthesized by electrochemical polymerization of pyrrole on CNTs. In order to study the influence of PPy on the electrical transport properties of CNTs, the temperature dependences of the conductivity have been measured on bare CNTs and CNT/PPy. At room temperatures, the conductivity of CNT/PPy was reduced with thin PPy layers, whereas it was enhanced with thick PPy layers. In addition, depending on the PPy thickness, different temperature dependences of conductivity have been observed. Possible electrical transport mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Reinforcement of semicrystalline polymers with collagen-modified single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Salvetat, Jean-Paul; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2006-06-01

    We report on the enhancement of the mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites through functionalization of SWNTs with denatured collagen. In addition to improving compatibility with the matrix, the denatured collagen layer was found to increase the PVA matrix crystallinity, which results in a dramatic enhancement of the Young's modulus (260%), tensile strength (300%), and toughness (700%) well above what can be expected with the classical rule of mixture. A supramolecular organization at the interface is associated with an increase of PVA crystallinity as shown by the x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry.

  13. Fast Characterization of Magnetic Impurities in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Feng; Xue, Y. Y.; Hadijiev, Viktor G.; Chu, C. W.; Nikolaev, Pasha; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2003-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the magnetic susceptibility measurement is a non-destructive, fast and accurate method to determine the residual metal catalysts in a few microgram single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) sample. We have studied magnetic impurities in raw and purified SWCNT by magnetic susceptibility measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and thermogravimetry. The data suggest that the saturation magnetic moment and the effective field, which is caused by the interparticle interactions, decreases and increases respectively with the decrease of the particle size. Methods are suggested to overcome the uncertainty associated.

  14. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on macroscopic single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Miko, Cs.; Milas, M.; Seo, J.W.; Gaal, R.; Kulik, A.; Forro, L.

    2006-04-10

    We have measured the electrical conductivity and the Young modulus of macroscopic oriented ropes containing single-walled carbon nanotubes under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. We found that UV irradiation increases both the electrical conductivity and the strength of the macroscopic bundle. These phenomena are explained by the generation of cross-links between the tubes in the macroscopic bundle due to the UV-induced interaction between the solvent dimethyl-formamide and the free radicals present on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy investigation shows that the wall structure of nanotubes is preserved during this process, which is a valuable advantage compared to electron irradiation.

  15. New Method Developed To Purify Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable attention because of their remarkable mechanical properties and electrical and thermal conductivities. Use of these materials as primary or secondary reinforcements in polymers or ceramics could lead to new materials with significantly enhanced mechanical strength and electrical and thermal conductivity. Use of carbon-nanotube-reinforced materials in aerospace components will enable substantial reductions in component weight and improvements in durability and safety. Potential applications for single wall carbon nanotubes include lightweight components for vehicle structures and propulsion systems, fuel cell components (bipolar plates and electrodes) and battery electrodes, and ultra-lightweight materials for use in solar sails. A major barrier to the successful use of carbon nanotubes in these components is the need for methods to economically produce pure carbon nanotubes in large enough quantities to not only evaluate their suitability for certain applications but also produce actual components. Most carbon nanotube synthesis methods, including the HiPCO (high pressure carbon monoxide) method developed by Smalley and others, employ metal catalysts that remain trapped in the final product. These catalyst impurities can affect nanotube properties and accelerate their decomposition. The development of techniques to remove most, if not all, of these impurities is essential to their successful use in practical applications. A new method has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to purify gram-scale quantities of single wall carbon nanotubes. This method, a modification of a gas phase purification technique previously reported by Smalley and others, uses a combination of high-temperature oxidations and repeated extractions with nitric and hydrochloric acid. This improved procedure significantly reduces the amount of impurities (catalyst and nonnanotube forms of carbon) within the nanotubes, increasing

  16. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Midinfrared Internal Exciton Transitions in Separated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yingzhong; Wang, Jigang; Graham, Matt; Fleming, Graham; Kaindl, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We report a femtosecond midinfrared study of the broadband low-energy response of individually separated (6,5) and (7,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes. Strong photoinduced absorption is observed around 200 meV, whose transition energy, oscillator strength, resonant chirality enhancement, and dynamics manifest the observation of quasi-one-dimensional intraexcitonic transitions. A model of the nanotube 1s-2p cross section agrees well with the signal amplitudes. Our study further reveals saturation of the photoinduced absorption with increasing phase-space filling of the correlated e-h pairs.

  17. Quantum Ion-Acoustic Oscillations in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.; Iqbal, Z.; Wazir, Z.; Aman-ur-Rehman

    2016-05-01

    Quantum ion-acoustic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes are studied by employing a quantum hydrodynamics model. The dispersion equation is obtained by Fourier transformation, which exhibits the existence of quantum ion-acoustic wave affected by change of density balance due to presence of positive or negative heavy species as stationary ion clusters and wave potential at equilibrium. The numerical results are presented, and the role of quantum degeneracy, nanotube geometry, electron exchange-correlation effects, and concentration and polarity of heavy species on wave dispersion is pointed out for typical systems of interest.

  18. A Facile High-speed Vibration Milling Method to Water-disperse Single- walled Carbon Nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Chunying; Zhang, Jianfei; Sim, Jae Hyun; Burke, Brian; Williams, Keith A; Rylander, Nichole M; Campbell, Tom; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; More, Karren Leslie; Esker, Alan R; Gibson, Harry W; Dorn, Harry C

    2010-01-01

    A high-speed vibration milling (HSVM) method was applied to synthesize water dispersible single- walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs). Highly reactive free radicals (HOOCCH2CH2 ) produced from an acyl peroxide under HSVM conditions react with hydrophobic SWNHs to produce a highly water dispersible derivative (f-SWNHs), which has been characterized in detail by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques together with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic light scatter- ing (DLS). The carboxylic acid functionalized, water-dispersible SWNHs material are versatile precursors that have potential applications in the biomedical area.

  19. Identification of nitrogen dopants in single-walled carbon nanotubes by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tison, Yann; Lin, Hong; Lagoute, Jérôme; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Henrard, Luc; Zheng, Bing; Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ducastelle, François; Loiseau, Annick

    2013-08-27

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we investigated the atomic and electronic structure of nitrogen-doped single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The insertion of nitrogen in the carbon lattice induces several types of point defects involving different atomic configurations. Spectroscopic measurements on semiconducting nanotubes reveal that these local structures can induce either extended shallow levels or more localized deep levels. In a metallic tube, a single doping site associated with a donor state was observed in the gap at an energy close to that of the first van Hove singularity. Density functional theory calculations reveal that this feature corresponds to a substitutional nitrogen atom in the carbon network.

  20. Near-infrared fluorescent single walled carbon nanotube-chitosan composite: Interfacial strain transfer efficiency assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol Menamparambath, Mini; Arabale, Girish; Nikolaev, Pavel; Baik, Seunghyun; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2013-04-01

    Effective load transfer at the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-polymer interface is most desirable for mechanically reinforced polymer composites. Versatile layer-by-layer assembly technique achieved dispersion and uniform distribution of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC)-solubilized SWCNTs within the polymer matrix. Electrostatic interaction between positively charged chitosan and negatively charged CMC facilitates design of an optically active biocompatible nanocomposite. Interfacial strain transfer efficiency of SWCNT-chitosan nanocomposite was assessed via SWCNT Raman and photoluminescence band shifts under uniaxial strain. Photoluminescence peak shift rates of individual semiconducting SWCNTs were investigated and compared with tight binding model calculations.

  1. Stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhen; Liu, Chun-Jian; Lv, Hang; Liu, Bing-Bing

    2016-08-01

    The helicity of stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied by calculating the systematic interaction energy. Our results present clear images of stable double helical structures inside SWCNTs. The optimum helical radius and helical angle increase and decrease with increasing diameter, respectively. The tube's diameter plays a leading role in the helicity of encapsulated structures, while the tube's chirality may induce different metastable structures. This study indicates that the observed double helical iodine chains in experiments are not necessarily the optimum structures, but may also be metastable structures.

  2. Transparent and flexible high-performance supercapacitors based on single-walled carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanninen, Petri; Dang Luong, Nguyen; Hoang Sinh, Le; Anoshkin, Ilya V.; Tsapenko, Alexey; Seppälä, Jukka; Nasibulin, Albert G.; Kallio, Tanja

    2016-06-01

    Transparent and flexible energy storage devices have garnered great interest due to their suitability for display, sensor and photovoltaic applications. In this paper, we report the application of aerosol synthesized and dry deposited single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films as electrodes for an electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC). SWCNT films exhibit extremely large specific capacitance (178 F g‑1 or 552 μF cm‑2), high optical transparency (92%) and stability for 10 000 charge/discharge cycles. A transparent and flexible EDLC prototype is constructed with a polyethylene casing and a gel electrolyte.

  3. Carbohydrate conjugation through microwave-assisted functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes using perfluorophenyl azides.

    PubMed

    Kong, Na; Shimpi, Manishkumar R; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-03-20

    Carbohydrate-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized using microwave-assisted reaction of perfluorophenyl azide with the nanotubes. The results showed that microwave radiation provides a rapid and effective means to covalently attach carbohydrates to SWNTs, producing carbohydrate-SWNT conjugates for biorecognition. The carbohydrate-functionalized SWNTs were furthermore shown to interact specifically with cognate carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins), resulting in predicted recognition patterns. The carbohydrate-presenting SWNTs constitute a new platform for sensitive protein- or cell recognition, which pave the way for glycoconjugated carbon nanomaterials in biorecognition applications.

  4. Electronic modulations in a single wall carbon nanotube induced by the Au(111) surface reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, Sylvain; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2015-02-01

    The structural and electronic structure of single wall carbon nanotubes adsorbed on Au(111) has been investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The nanotubes were dry deposited in situ in ultrahigh vacuum onto a perfectly clean substrate. In some cases, the native herringbone reconstruction of the Au(111) surface interacted directly with adsorbed nanotubes and produced long-range periodic oscillations in their local density of states, corresponding to charge transfer modulations along the tube axis. This effect, however, was observed not systematically for all tubes and only for semiconducting tubes.

  5. Step-edge faceting and local metallization of a single-wall semiconducting carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, Sylvain; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2011-10-01

    The adsorption of a single-wall carbon nanotube on a well-defined metal surface produces substantial mutual interaction that can lead to strong effects both on the nanotube and on the substrate side. We report two kinds of step faceting on Au(111) and Cu(111). We observed local metallization of a semiconducting nanotube induced by the deformation pressure of crossing a step edge on Cu(111). The origin of this effect is discussed. Our results illustrate the complexity and the large number of situations encountered for the nanotube-on-metal system.

  6. Interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and chromatography gel during size separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duckjong; Li, Cheng Ai; Choi, Kwang-Min

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the underlying mechanism by which chromatography can be used for the separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the basis of their diameter or length, with a view to optimizing this popular process. Using the knowledge gained through diffusion ordered spectroscopy nuclear magnetic resonance (DOSY NMR) analysis and chromatographic experiments, we demonstrate the feasibility of separating SWNTs on the basis of diameter and length simultaneously within the one chromatography column. These findings are of relevance not just to the understanding of SWNT separation processes, but also to the industrial use of size-separated SWNTs.

  7. Molecule-induced quantum confinement in single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Akira; Ishibashi, Koji

    2015-04-01

    A method of fabricating quantum-confined structures with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy revealed that a parabolic confinement potential appeared when collagen model peptides were attached to both ends of an individual SWNT via the formation of carboxylic anhydrides. On the other hand, the confinement potential was markedly changed by yielding the peptide bonds between the SWNT and the collagen model peptides. Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements showed that a type-II quantum dot was produced in the obtained heterostructure.

  8. [Surface modification and microstructure of single-walled carbon nanotubes for dental composite resin].

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Zhang, Feimin; Xu, Li'na; Gu, Ning

    2006-12-01

    In order to improve its dispersion condition in dental composite resin and enhance its interaction with the matrix, single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) were refluxed and oxidized, then treated by APTE. Their outer surface were coated by nano-SiO2 particles using sol-gel process, then further treated by organosilanes ATES. IR and TEM were used to analyze modification results. TEM pictures showed nano-particles were on the surface of SWNTs; IR showed characteristic adsorbing bands of SiO2. Composite resin specimen with modified SWNTs was prepared and examined by TEM. SWNTs were detected in composite resin matrix among other inorganic fillers.

  9. Finite length and solvent analysis effects on the squash mode of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fréin, C.; Quirke, N.; Zerulla, D.

    2013-10-01

    Nanotube diameters (d) are usually characterized using the radial breathing mode d-1; the squash mode frequency (f) however is predicted to vary as d-2. We demonstrate using the MM+ forcefield that for lengths <9 nm the symmetric squash mode (SSM) and asymmetric squash mode (ASM) ((10,0) SWNT (single wall carbon nanotubes)) are non-degenerate with Δf ≤ 55 cm-1. In solution, the SWNT-water interaction upshifts the ASM by 20 cm-1 and the SSM by 10 cm-1. Such asymmetries could be used to simultaneously characterize the length and diameter of short nanotubes for applications including nanoresonators and biomedical probes.

  10. Surprising synthesis of nanodiamond from single-walled carbon nanotubes by the spark plasma sintering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Ali; Ham, Heon; Na, Han Gil; Kwon, Yong Jung; Kang, Sung Yong; Choi, Myung Sik; Bang, Jae Hoon; Park, No-Hyung; Kang, Inpil; Kim, Hyoun Woo

    2016-10-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) was successfully synthesized using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a pure solid carbon source by means of a spark plasma sintering process. Raman spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns revealed the generation of the cubic diamond phase by means of the SPS process. Lattice-resolved TEM images confirmed that diamond nanoparticles with a diameter of about ˜10 nm existed in the products. The NDs were generated mainly through the gas-phase nucleation of carbon atoms evaporated from the SWCNTs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. The effect of surface heterogeneity on the mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotube carpets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, E. C.; Roth, M. W.

    2010-03-01

    The results presented and discussed involve Material Point Method (MPM) simulations of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) carpets with varying surface heterogeneity. Specifically, we use deterministic MPM simulations to explore the effect of the degree of randomness of the SWNT array on peeling and adhesive properties as well as the degree clumping of the carpets acting under the constraint of guided motion of the carpet substrate. The bulk elastic properties of the tubes and substrate are taken into account and the system's behavior is characterized through calculations involving dynamics and energetics.

  12. Structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes purified and cut using polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Yudasaka, M.; Koshio, A.; Jabs, C.; Ichihashi, T.; Iijima, S.

    2002-01-01

    Following on from our previous report that a monochlorobenzene solution of polymethylmethacrylate is useful for purifying and cutting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and thinning SWNT bundles, we show in this report that polymer and residual amorphous carbon can be removed by burning in oxygen gas. The SWNTs thus obtained had many holes (giving them a worm-eaten look) and were thermally unstable. Such severe damage caused by oxidation is unusual for SWNTs; we think that they were chemically damaged during ultrasonication in the monochlorobenzene solution of polymethylmethacrylate.

  13. Bending and Twisting of Suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Arthur; Xu, Ya-Qiong; McEuen, Paul

    2010-03-01

    We combine suspended, aligned carbon nanotube transistors with optical trapping techniques and scanning photocurrent microscopy to investigate the mechanics of suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes as well as DNA-nanotube systems in solution. We study the movement of nanotubes by monitoring their photocurrent images and measure their thermal fluctuations by imaging microbeads that are tightly attached to nanotubes by single-stranded DNA. By analyzing thermal fluctuations of these microbeads and by using optical tweezers we are able to obtain the torsional and bending stiffness of nanotubes and then calculate their diameters. We can also measure, with subangstrom resolution, the effective attachment point of the microbead to the nanotube.

  14. Influence of cysteine doping on photoluminescence intensity from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Leontiev, V. S.; Linnik, A. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes can be applied for detection of cysteine. It is shown that cysteine doping (from 10-8 to 10-3 M) into aqueous suspension of nanotubes with adsorbed DNA leads to increase of PL intensity. The PL intensity was enhanced by 27% at 10-3 M cysteine concentration in suspension. Most likely, the PL intensity increases due to the passivation of p-defects on the nanotube by the cysteine containing reactive thiol group. The effect of doping with other amino acids without this group (methionine, serine, aspartic acid, lysine, proline) on the PL intensity is essentially weaker.

  15. Characterizations of Enriched Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Bin; Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang; Cinke, Martin; Au, Dyng; Harmon, Julie P.; Muisener, Patricia Anne O.; Clayton, LaNetra; D'Angelo, John

    2003-01-01

    Using different processing conditions, we disperse the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) into the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to form composites. In the melt-blended sample, the SWNTs originally semiconducting - became predominantly metallic after dispersion into the melt-blended composite. The interaction of the PMMA and SWNT is investigated by the polarized Raman studies. The structure changes in the PMMA and SWNT shows that the anisotropic interactions are responsible for SWNT electronic density of states (DOS) changes. The increased metallic SWNT percentage is confirmed by the conductivity and dielectric constant measurements .

  16. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  17. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition of single-wall carbon nanotubes at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Cantoro, Mirco; Hofmann, Stephan; Pisana, Simone; Scardaci, Vittorio; Parvez, Atlus; Ducati, Caterina; Ferrari, Andrea C; Blackburn, Arthur M; Wang, Kai-You; Robertson, John

    2006-06-01

    We report surface-bound growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at temperatures as low as 350 degrees C by catalytic chemical vapor deposition from undiluted C2H2. NH3 or H2 exposure critically facilitates the nanostructuring and activation of sub-nanometer Fe and Al/Fe/Al multilayer catalyst films prior to growth, enabling the SWNT nucleation at lower temperatures. We suggest that carbon nanotube growth is governed by the catalyst surface without the necessity of catalyst liquefaction.

  18. Magnetophoretic continuous purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes from catalytic impurities in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo H; Park, Je-Kyun

    2007-10-01

    A magnetophoretic continuous purification method is presented of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from the superparamagnetic iron-catalyst impurities in a microfluidic device without any influence on inherent SWCNT properties. By employing microfluidics and a magnetic-field-induced saw-tooth nickel microstructure, a highly enhanced magnetic force in adjoining microchannels is exploited. The iron impurities of SWCNTs are attracted towards areas of higher magnetic-flux density in the microchannels where magnetic field was asymmetrically generated perpendicularly to the streamline. We obtained highly purified SWCNTs at a rate of 0.36 mg h(-1) and that are estimated to be about 99% purity.

  19. Dependence of Thermal Conductivity on Thickness in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Shrestha, Ramesh; Dangol, Ashesh; Chang, Won Seok; Coker, Zachary; Choi, Tae-Youl

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report experimentally dependence of thermal conductivity on thickness of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) thin films; the measurements are based on the micropipette thermal sensor technique. Accurate and well resolved measurements of thermal conductivity made by the micropipette sensor showed a correlated behavior of thickness and thermal conductivity of CNT films that thermal conductivity decreased as thickness increased. The thickness dependence is explained by reduction of mean free path (MFP), which is induced by more intertubular junctions in more dense-packed carbon nanotube (CNT) networks; the thicker SWCNT films were revealed to have higher density. PMID:27398564

  20. Practical considerations for the demonstration of a single walled carbon nanotube actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minett, A. I.; Fraysse, J.; Gu, G.; Roth, S.

    2001-11-01

    The conversion of electrical energy into mechanical energy using macro scale sheets of carbon nanotubes (bucky paper) has been shown to exhibit comparable or superior performance to that of human skeletal muscle. This level of performance was not as high as predicted by theoretical calculations. Therefore, working from a bottom-up principle, it is of paramount interest to not only demonstrate a single carbon nanotube actuator, but to gain a better understanding of the process of nanotube actuation. In this paper, practical considerations and approaches to the preparation of suspended single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) structures and the measurement of actuation force are discussed.

  1. Single wall carbon nanohorn as a drug carrier for controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianxun; Yudasaka, Masako; Kouraba, Sachio; Sekido, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Iijima, Sumio

    2008-08-01

    A single wall carbon nanohorn (SWNH) is a new kind of single-graphene tubules with a diameter of 2-5 nm and a length 40-50 nm. In this work, we used oxidized SWNH (SWNHox) to incorporate vancomycin hydrochloride (VCM) for its controlled release by taking advantage of the interactions between VCM and SWNHox. Phospholipid-poly(ethylene glycol) was used to modify the hydrophobic surface of SWNHox to improve its dispersion in aqueous systems. In the release study using this complex, a stable release of VCM was achieved for an extended period.

  2. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin; Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi

    2015-12-15

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  3. Cyclohexane triggers staged growth of pure and vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, P.; Grüneis, A.; Grimm, D.; Kramberger, C.; Engelhard, R.; Rümmeli, M.; Schumann, J.; Kaltofen, R.; Büchner, B.; Schaman, C.; Kuzmany, H.; Gemming, T.; Barreiro, A.; Pichler, T.

    2008-03-01

    An innovative staged chemical vapor deposition (SCVD) approach providing flexible control over the feedstock type during single wall carbon nanotube (SWNTs) growth is proposed. The efficiency of staged growth by means of a cyclohexane/methane system using thin film catalysts is here illustrated. The mechanism involves the nucleation stage efficiently triggered by cyclohexane, followed by methane assisting a growth stage yielding high purity SWNTs vertically aligned with lengths of several hundred μm. In addition, SCVD also facilitates catalyst free SWNT detachment enabling repeated growth.

  4. Kinetics of reactive ion etching upon single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Toshiaki; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2008-01-21

    The remarkable etching reaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been observed in their growth of the parameter-controlled plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The time evolution study of the SWNTs growth leads to establishing a growth equation which can completely express the growth kinetics of SWNTs in the plasma CVD. The growth equation is found to reveal that there are several key parameters which directly affect the etching reaction of SWNTs. Furthermore, such kinetics of the SWNT etching in plasmas can perfectly be explained with a reactive ion etching model.

  5. Pore structure of raw and purified HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinke, Martin; Li, Jing; Chen, Bin; Cassell, Alan; Delzeit, Lance; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-10-01

    Very high purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were obtained from HiPco SWNT samples containing Fe particles by a two-step purification process. The raw and purified samples were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The purified sample consists of ˜0.4% Fe and the process does not seem to introduce any additional defects. The N 2 adsorption isotherm studies at 77 K reveal that the total surface area of the purified sample increases to 1587 m 2/g from 567 m 2/g for the raw material, which is the highest value reported for SWNTs.

  6. A sonochemical route to single-walled carbon nanotubes under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soo-Hwan; Ko, Ju-Hye; Park, Jong-Bong; Park, Wanjun

    2004-12-15

    A chemical route to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under ambient conditions has been developed. Silica powder was immersed in a mixture solution of ferrocene and p-xylene. After sonication at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, we obtained high-purity SWCNTs. Sonochemical effects may lead to producing high-purity SWCNTs. The process could be readily generalized to synthesize other forms of carbon-based materials, such as fullerenes, multiwalled nanotubes, carbon onions, and diamond, in liquid solution under ambient conditions. PMID:15584730

  7. Wafer-scale monodomain films of spontaneously aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaowei; Gao, Weilu; Xie, Lijuan; Li, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Lei, Sidong; Robinson, John M; Hároz, Erik H; Doorn, Stephen K; Wang, Weipeng; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Adams, W Wade; Hauge, Robert H; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional character of electrons, phonons and excitons in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic electronic, thermal and optical properties. However, despite significant efforts to develop ways to produce large-scale architectures of aligned nanotubes, macroscopic manifestations of such properties remain limited. Here, we show that large (>cm(2)) monodomain films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes can be prepared using slow vacuum filtration. The produced films are globally aligned within ±1.5° (a nematic order parameter of ∼1) and are highly packed, containing 1 × 10(6) nanotubes in a cross-sectional area of 1 μm(2). The method works for nanotubes synthesized by various methods, and film thickness is controllable from a few nanometres to ∼100 nm. We use the approach to create ideal polarizers in the terahertz frequency range and, by combining the method with recently developed sorting techniques, highly aligned and chirality-enriched nanotube thin-film devices. Semiconductor-enriched devices exhibit polarized light emission and polarization-dependent photocurrent, as well as anisotropic conductivities and transistor action with high on/off ratios. PMID:27043199

  8. Wafer-scale monodomain films of spontaneously aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaowei; Gao, Weilu; Xie, Lijuan; Li, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Lei, Sidong; Robinson, John M.; Hároz, Erik H.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Wang, Weipeng; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Adams, W. Wade; Hauge, Robert H.; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional character of electrons, phonons and excitons in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic electronic, thermal and optical properties. However, despite significant efforts to develop ways to produce large-scale architectures of aligned nanotubes, macroscopic manifestations of such properties remain limited. Here, we show that large (>cm2) monodomain films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes can be prepared using slow vacuum filtration. The produced films are globally aligned within ±1.5° (a nematic order parameter of ∼1) and are highly packed, containing 1 × 106 nanotubes in a cross-sectional area of 1 μm2. The method works for nanotubes synthesized by various methods, and film thickness is controllable from a few nanometres to ∼100 nm. We use the approach to create ideal polarizers in the terahertz frequency range and, by combining the method with recently developed sorting techniques, highly aligned and chirality-enriched nanotube thin-film devices. Semiconductor-enriched devices exhibit polarized light emission and polarization-dependent photocurrent, as well as anisotropic conductivities and transistor action with high on/off ratios.

  9. Surface electronic structure of nitrogen-doped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran Park, Young; Jae Ko, Min; Song, Yoon-Ho; Jin Lee, Cheol

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the effects of vacuum annealing on the surface electronic structure and the work function of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). We changed the doping type of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (semi-SWCNTs) from p-type to n-type, and investigated their optical properties. The HNO3 treated p-type SWCNT network was converted to n-type after vacuum annealing due to formation of C-N bond. The C 1s sp2 binding energy of the vacuum annealed semi-SWCNTs was shifted toward a higher binding energy about 0.42 eV, which indicates a raising Fermi level as much as 0.42 eV compared with the intrinsic semi-SWCNTs. In addition, the work function of the vacuum annealed semi-SWCNT was observed towards lower energies. It is considered that the C-N bonding of semi-SWCNTs creates a donor level near the bottom of the conduction band, thus raising the Fermi level. The ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the increased binding energy of C 1s sp2 and the decreased work function of semi-SWCNTs are caused by n-type doping after vacuum annealing.

  10. Adsorption kinetics of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus on single-walled carbon nanotube aggregates.

    PubMed

    Upadhyayula, Venkata K K; Deng, Shuguang; Mitchell, Martha C; Smith, Geoffrey B; Nair, Vinod K; Ghoshroy, Soumitra

    2008-01-01

    Batch adsorption studies to determine adsorption kinetics of Escherichia coli (E.coli) K12 and Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) SH 1000 bacterial cells on single-walled carbon nanotube aggregates were performed at two different initial concentrations. The diffusivity of E. coli cells in single-walled carbon nanotube aggregates obtained was 6.54 x 10(-9) and 8.98 x 10(-9) cm(2)/s, whereas that of S. aureus was between 1.00 x 10(-7) and 1.66 x 10(-7) cm(2)/s respectively. In addition to batch adsorption studies, electron microscopy studies were also conducted. The results suggest that diffusion kinetics of bacterial cells is concentration dependent as well as bacteria dependent. Diffusivity of S. aureus is two orders of magnitude greater than E. coli cells. This proves to be beneficial from an adsorption perspective where it is desired to filter microorganisms (water pretreatment and wastewater post treatment) and from nanotube biosensor perspective where it is desired to simultaneously capture and detect biothreat agents in a shorter span of time.

  11. Photoinduced spontaneous free-carrier generation in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaehong; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Rumbles, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Strong quantum confinement and low dielectric screening impart single-walled carbon nanotubes with exciton-binding energies substantially exceeding kBT at room temperature. Despite these large binding energies, reported photoluminescence quantum yields are typically low and some studies suggest that photoexcitation of carbon nanotube excitonic transitions can produce free charge carriers. Here we report the direct measurement of long-lived free-carrier generation in chirality-pure, single-walled carbon nanotubes in a low dielectric solvent. Time-resolved microwave conductivity enables contactless and quantitative measurement of the real and imaginary photoconductance of individually suspended nanotubes. The conditions of the microwave conductivity measurement allow us to avoid the complications of most previous measurements of nanotube free-carrier generation, including tube–tube/tube–electrode contact, dielectric screening by nearby excitons and many-body interactions. Even at low photon fluence (approximately 0.05 excitons per μm length of tubes), we directly observe free carriers on excitation of the first and second carbon nanotube exciton transitions. PMID:26531728

  12. Double Layer Charging for Conductivity Enhancement of Pure Metallic and Semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2011-03-01

    Injecting high electronic charge densities can profoundly change the optical, electrical, and magnetic properties of materials. Evidence suggests a possibility of significantly improving conductivity of carbon nanotubes through double layer charge injection. Double layer charge injection can prove to be a powerful method when applied to carbon nanotubes because of theirs high surface area and chemical stability. Investigation has commenced on the effect of charging on various types of carbon nanotubes, specifically 99% purified single wall semiconducting and single wall metallic tubes. An electrical double layer is electrochemically introduced upon a sheet of carbon nanotubes via application of potential (up to +/- 5 volts) to a sample immersed in ionic-liquid-based electrolyte. Resistance of carbon nanotube as a function of applied charging voltage is recorded to determine the effects of charge injection. Results show that the electrical double layer considerably reduces the resistance across both samples. ESR/LFMA studies combined with low temperature magnetic and transport measurements are conducted to search for charge injection induced superconductivity in carbon nanotubes. Supported by AFOSR grant FA 9550-09-1-0384.

  13. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis. PMID:27502666

  14. Toxicology Study of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxide in Human Sperm.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Waseem; Shafiee, Hadi; Velasco, Vanessa; Sah, Vasu R; Guo, Shirui; El Assal, Rami; Inci, Fatih; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Anchan, Raymond M; Mutter, George L; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide are currently being evaluated for biomedical applications including in vivo drug delivery and tumor imaging. Several reports have studied the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, but their effects on human male reproduction have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is not clear whether the nanomaterial exposure has any effect on sperm sorting procedures used in clinical settings. Here, we show that the presence of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH) and reduced graphene oxide at concentrations of 1-25 μg/mL do not affect sperm viability. However, SWCNT-COOH generate significant reactive superoxide species at a higher concentration (25 μg/mL), while reduced graphene oxide does not initiate reactive species in human sperm. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to these nanomaterials does not hinder the sperm sorting process, and microfluidic sorting systems can select the sperm that show low oxidative stress post-exposure. PMID:27538480

  15. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  16. Multimodal optical sensing and analyte specificity using single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Heller, Daniel A; Jin, Hong; Martinez, Brittany M; Patel, Dhaval; Miller, Brigid M; Yeung, Tsun-Kwan; Jena, Prakrit V; Höbartner, Claudia; Ha, Taekjip; Silverman, Scott K; Strano, Michael S

    2009-02-01

    Nanoscale sensing elements offer promise for single-molecule analyte detection in physically or biologically constrained environments. Single-walled carbon nanotubes have several advantages when used as optical sensors, such as photostable near-infrared emission for prolonged detection through biological media and single-molecule sensitivity. Molecular adsorption can be transduced into an optical signal by perturbing the electronic structure of the nanotubes. Here, we show that a pair of single-walled nanotubes provides at least four modes that can be modulated to uniquely fingerprint agents by the degree to which they alter either the emission band intensity or wavelength. We validate this identification method in vitro by demonstrating the detection of six genotoxic analytes, including chemotherapeutic drugs and reactive oxygen species, which are spectroscopically differentiated into four distinct classes, and also demonstrate single-molecule sensitivity in detecting hydrogen peroxide. Finally, we detect and identify these analytes in real time within live 3T3 cells, demonstrating multiplexed optical detection from a nanoscale biosensor and the first label-free tool to optically discriminate between genotoxins.

  17. Photoinduced Spontaneous Free-Carrier Generation in Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaehong; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Rumbles, Garry

    2015-11-04

    The strong quantum confinement and low dielectric screening impart single-walled carbon nanotubes with exciton-binding energies substantially exceeding kBT at room temperature. Despite these large binding energies, reported photoluminescence quantum yields are typically low and some studies suggest that photoexcitation of carbon nanotube excitonic transitions can produce free charge carriers. Here we report the direct measurement of long-lived free-carrier generation in chirality-pure, single-walled carbon nanotubes in a low dielectric solvent. Time-resolved microwave conductivity enables contactless and quantitative measurement of the real and imaginary photoconductance of individually suspended nanotubes. We found that the conditions of the microwave conductivity measurement allow us to avoid the complications of most previous measurements of nanotube free-carrier generation, including tube–tube/tube–electrode contact, dielectric screening by nearby excitons and many-body interactions. At low photon fluence (approximately 0.05 excitons per μm length of tubes), we directly observe free carriers on excitation of the first and second carbon nanotube exciton transitions.

  18. Growth of single-walled gold nanotubes confined in carbon nanotubes, studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yang; Hu, Ting; Dong, Jinming

    2013-01-01

    Growth of the single-walled gold nanotube (SWGNT), confined in the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) has been studied by using the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, in which two different empirical potentials (the glue and EAM potentials) are used for the interaction between gold atoms. It is found that under the glue potential, three new SWGNTs, (3, 2), (4, 2) and (6, 3) gold tubes can be formed, in addition to the previously found (3, 3), (4, 3) and (5, 3) ones, among which two achiral ones, (4, 2) and (6, 3) gold tubes are particularly interesting because they were thought to be not the tube-like structures, or to have large enough diameter, permitting an extra gold atom chain in it. However, when the EAM potential is used, only four SWGNTs, i.e., (3, 2), (4, 2), (4, 3) and (5, 3) gold tubes could be formed in our MD simulations. After comparing all the MD simulation results with those of the first principles calculations, it is found that the EAM potential is better to describe the interaction between gold atoms than the glue potential for the MD simulation on the growth of gold tubular structure in confined CNT.

  19. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.

  20. Structural stability of transparent conducting films assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Harris; G. R. S. Iyer; D. O. Simien; J. A. Fagan; J. Y. Huh; J. Y. Chung; S. D. Hudson; J. Obrzut; J. F. Douglas; C. M. Stafford; E. K. Hobbie

    2011-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films show significant promise for transparent electronics applications that demand mechanical flexibility, but durability remains an outstanding issue. In this work, thin membranes of length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are uniaxially and isotropically compressed by depositing them on prestrained polymer substrates. Upon release of the strain, the topography, microstructure, and conductivity of the films are characterized using a combination of optical/fluorescence microscopy, light scattering, force microscopy, electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy. Above a critical surface mass density, films assembled from nanotubes of well-defined length exhibit a strongly nonlinear mechanical response. The measured strain dependence reveals a dramatic softening that occurs through an alignment of the SWCNTs normal to the direction of prestrain, which at small strains is also apparent as an anisotropic increase in sheet resistance along the same direction. At higher strains, the membrane conductivities increase due to a compression-induced restoration of conductive pathways. Our measurements reveal the fundamental mode of elasto-plastic deformation in these films and suggest how it might be suppressed.

  1. Toxicology Study of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxide in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Waseem; Shafiee, Hadi; Velasco, Vanessa; Sah, Vasu R.; Guo, Shirui; El Assal, Rami; Inci, Fatih; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Anchan, Raymond M.; Mutter, George L.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide are currently being evaluated for biomedical applications including in vivo drug delivery and tumor imaging. Several reports have studied the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, but their effects on human male reproduction have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is not clear whether the nanomaterial exposure has any effect on sperm sorting procedures used in clinical settings. Here, we show that the presence of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH) and reduced graphene oxide at concentrations of 1–25 μg/mL do not affect sperm viability. However, SWCNT-COOH generate significant reactive superoxide species at a higher concentration (25 μg/mL), while reduced graphene oxide does not initiate reactive species in human sperm. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to these nanomaterials does not hinder the sperm sorting process, and microfluidic sorting systems can select the sperm that show low oxidative stress post-exposure. PMID:27538480

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotube incorporated novel three phase carbon/epoxy composite with enhanced properties.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sohel; Alagirusamy, Ramasamy; Joshi, Mangala

    2011-08-01

    In the present work, single-walled carbon nanotubes were dispersed within the matrix of carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites in order to develop novel three phase carbon/epoxy/single-walled carbon nanotube composites. A combination of ultrasonication and high speed mechanical stirring at 2000 rpm was used to uniformly disperse carbon nanotubes in the epoxy resin. The state of carbon nanotube dispersion in the epoxy resin and within the nanocomposites was characterized with the help of optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Pure carbon/epoxy and three phase composites were characterized for mechanical properties (tensile and compressive) as well as for thermal and electrical conductivity. Fracture surfaces of composites after tensile test were also studied in order to investigate the effect of dispersed carbon nanotubes on the failure behavior of composites. Dispersion of only 0.1 wt% nanotubes in the matrix led to improvements of 95% in Young's modulus, 31% in tensile strength, 76% in compressive modulus and 41% in compressive strength of carbon/epoxy composites. In addition to that, electrical and thermal conductivity also improved significantly with addition of carbon nanotubes.

  3. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Production by the Arc Process: A Parametric Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Gorelik, Olga; Proft, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes are produced using the arc discharge process. Graphite anodes are filled with a mixture of nickel and yttrium metallic powders, then vaporized by creating a high current arc. By varying the current, gap distance, and ambient pressure it is shown that the best yield of single wall carbon nanotubes is obtained within a narrow range of conditions. The relative yield and purity of the product are indicated semi-quantitatively from scanning electric microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Two types of anodes have been investigated. The first is hollow and filled with a powder mixture of graphite, nickel and yttrium. The second is filled with a paste made of a mixture of metal nitrates, graphite powder and carbon adhesive, then reduced in an argon atmosphere at high temperature. Product purity and yield will be compared for the two types of anodes. The graphite in the anodes may have hydrogen attached in the pores. To remove this impurity anodes have been baked up to 1400 - 1500 C. The effect of baking the anodes on impurities in the product will be given.

  4. Photoinduced Spontaneous Free-Carrier Generation in Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Jaehong; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Rumbles, Garry

    2015-11-04

    The strong quantum confinement and low dielectric screening impart single-walled carbon nanotubes with exciton-binding energies substantially exceeding kBT at room temperature. Despite these large binding energies, reported photoluminescence quantum yields are typically low and some studies suggest that photoexcitation of carbon nanotube excitonic transitions can produce free charge carriers. Here we report the direct measurement of long-lived free-carrier generation in chirality-pure, single-walled carbon nanotubes in a low dielectric solvent. Time-resolved microwave conductivity enables contactless and quantitative measurement of the real and imaginary photoconductance of individually suspended nanotubes. We found that the conditions of the microwave conductivity measurement allow us tomore » avoid the complications of most previous measurements of nanotube free-carrier generation, including tube–tube/tube–electrode contact, dielectric screening by nearby excitons and many-body interactions. At low photon fluence (approximately 0.05 excitons per μm length of tubes), we directly observe free carriers on excitation of the first and second carbon nanotube exciton transitions.« less

  5. Advances in NO2 sensing with individual single-walled carbon nanotube transistors

    PubMed Central

    Muoth, Matthias; Roman, Cosmin; Haluska, Miroslav; Hierold, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    Summary The charge carrier transport in carbon nanotubes is highly sensitive to certain molecules attached to their surface. This property has generated interest for their application in sensing gases, chemicals and biomolecules. With over a decade of research, a clearer picture of the interactions between the carbon nanotube and its surroundings has been achieved. In this review, we intend to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, focusing not only on the effect of adsorbates but also the effect of dielectric charge traps on the electrical transport in single-walled carbon nanotube transistors that are to be used in sensing applications. Recently, contact-passivated, open-channel individual single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors have been shown to be operational at room temperature with ultra-low power consumption. Sensor recovery within minutes through UV illumination or self-heating has been shown. Improvements in fabrication processes aimed at reducing the impact of charge traps have reduced the hysteresis, drift and low-frequency noise in carbon nanotube transistors. While open challenges such as large-scale fabrication, selectivity tuning and noise reduction still remain, these results demonstrate considerable progress in transforming the promise of carbon nanotube properties into functional ultra-low power, highly sensitive gas sensors. PMID:25551046

  6. Gel electrophoresis using a selective radical for the separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mesgari, Sara; Sundramoorthy, Ashok Kumar; Loo, Leslie S; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2014-01-01

    We have applied agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) that have been pre-reacted with metallic-selective ionic radicals and then re-suspended with sodium cholate (SC) surfactant to obtain highly purified (up to 98%) semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs). The proposed combination method exploits the preferential reactivity with the metallic nanotube of the radicals generated from an azo naphthalene compound (Direct Blue 71(I)) to preferentially increase the surface charge, and therefore the electrophoretic mobilities, of the metallic nanotube population under the influence of the electric field in AGE. The excellent separation achieved was verified by UV-vis-NIR and Raman spectroscopy as well as by the performance of field effect transistors fabricated with semiconducting-enriched SWNTs. FETs fabricated with -assisted AGE-separated semiconducting nanotubes exhibited mobilities of ∼3.6 to 11.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and on/off ratios from 10(2) to 10(6). PMID:25319125

  7. Mechanism of Synthesis of Ultra-Long Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Arc Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Keidar, Michael

    2013-06-23

    In this project fundamental issues related to synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which is relationship between plasma parameters and SWNT characteristics were investigated. Given that among plasma-based techniques arc discharge stands out as very advantageous in several ways (fewer defects, high flexibility, longer lifetime) this techniques warrants attention from the plasma physics and plasma technology standpoint. Both experimental and theoretical investigations of the plasma and SWNTs synthesis were conducted. Experimental efforts focused on plasma diagnostics, measurements of nanostructures parameters, and nanoparticle characterization. Theoretical efforts focused to focus on multi-dimensional modeling of the arc discharge and single wall nanotube synthesis in arc plasmas. It was demonstrated in experiment and theoretically that controlling plasma parameters can affect nanostucture synthesis altering SWNT properties (length and diameter) and leading to synthesis of new structures such as a few-layer graphene. Among clearly identified parameters affecting synthesis are magnetic and electric fields. Knowledge of the plasma parameters and discharge characteristics is crucial for ability to control synthesis process by virtue of both magnetic and electric fields. New graduate course on plasma engineering was introduced into curriculum. 3 undergraduate students were attracted to the project and 3 graduate students (two are female) were involved in the project. Undergraduate student from Historically Black University was attracted and participated in the project during Summer 2010.

  8. Toxicology Study of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxide in Human Sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghar, Waseem; Shafiee, Hadi; Velasco, Vanessa; Sah, Vasu R.; Guo, Shirui; El Assal, Rami; Inci, Fatih; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Anchan, Raymond M.; Mutter, George L.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-08-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide are currently being evaluated for biomedical applications including in vivo drug delivery and tumor imaging. Several reports have studied the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, but their effects on human male reproduction have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is not clear whether the nanomaterial exposure has any effect on sperm sorting procedures used in clinical settings. Here, we show that the presence of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH) and reduced graphene oxide at concentrations of 1–25 μg/mL do not affect sperm viability. However, SWCNT-COOH generate significant reactive superoxide species at a higher concentration (25 μg/mL), while reduced graphene oxide does not initiate reactive species in human sperm. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to these nanomaterials does not hinder the sperm sorting process, and microfluidic sorting systems can select the sperm that show low oxidative stress post-exposure.

  9. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hengguang; Hu, Shanglian; Huang, Peng; Song, Hua; Wang, Kan; Ruan, Jing; He, Rong; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-12-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis.

  10. Nickel-cobalt nanoparticles supported on single-walled carbon nanotubes and their catalytic hydrogenation activity.

    PubMed

    Lekgoathi, Mpho D S; Augustyn, Willem G; Heveling, Josef

    2011-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized from graphite using the arc discharge technique. A nickel/yttrium/graphite mixture was used as the catalyst. After purification by sonication in a Triton X-100 solution, nickel-cobalt metal nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. The resulting material and/or the nanotubes themselves were characterized by physisorption, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution transition electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the nanotubes, prepared by the arc discharge technique, are semi-conducting with a diameter centering at 1.4 nm. The average nickel-cobalt particle size is estimated to be in the region of 8 nm. The catalytic activity of the material was examined for the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters obtained from avocado oil. The carbon nanotube supported nickel-cobalt particles effectively hydrogenate polyunsaturated methyl linoleate to monounsaturated methyl oleate. In contrast to a conventional nickel on kieselghur catalyst, further hydrogenation of methyl oleate to undesired methyl stearate was not observed. PMID:22103112

  11. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Probe of Luttinger Liquid Physics.

    PubMed

    Chudow, Joel D; Santavicca, Daniel F; Prober, Daniel E

    2016-08-10

    Luttinger liquid theory predicts that collective electron excitations due to strong electron-electron interactions in a one-dimensional (1D) system will result in a modification of the collective charge-propagation velocity. By utilizing a circuit model for an individual metallic single-walled carbon nanotube as a nanotransmission line, it has been shown that the frequency-dependent terahertz impedance of a carbon nanotube can probe this expected 1D Luttinger liquid behavior. We excite terahertz standing-wave resonances on individual antenna-coupled metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes. The terahertz signal is rectified using the nanotube contact nonlinearity, allowing for a low-frequency readout of the coupled terahertz current. The charge velocity on the nanotube is determined from the terahertz spectral response. Our measurements show that a carbon nanotube can behave as a Luttinger liquid system with charge-propagation velocities that are faster than the Fermi velocity. Understanding what determines the charge velocity in low-dimensional conductors is important for the development of next generation nanodevices. PMID:27439013

  12. Composite of single walled carbon nanotube and sulfosalicylic acid doped polyaniline: a thermoelectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana Chatterjee, Mukulika; Banerjee, Dipali; Chatterjee, Krishanu

    2016-08-01

    Nanocomposites containing single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and highly ordered polyaniline (PANI) have been synthesized employing an in situ polymerization using different weight percentages of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as template and aniline as a reactant. The composites show homogeneously dispersed SWCNTs which are uniformly coated with PANI through a strong interface interaction. Structural characterization shows that the PANI cultivated along the surface of the SWCNTs in an ordered manner during the SWCNT-directed polymerization process. Measurements at room temperature displayed a significant enhancement in both the electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power which could be attributed to the more ordered chain structures of the PANI on SWCNT. As a result, the power factor of the composite is improved which increases with temperature. At the same time, the measured value of thermal conductivity at room temperature being lowest among the reported values, has resulted in best ZT at room temperature. The lowest value of thermal conductivity is attributed to the large phonon scattering due to the introduction of nanointerfaces.

  13. Flux-Dependent Growth Kinetics and Diameter Selectivity in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, David B; Puretzky, Alexander A; Jackson, Jeremy Joseph; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; More, Karren Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The nucleation and growth kinetics of single-wall carbon nanotubes in aligned arrays have been measured using fast pulses of acetylene and in situ optical diagnostics in conjunction with low pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Increasing the acetylene partial pressure is shown to decrease nucleation times by three orders of magnitude, permitting aligned nanotube arrays to nucleate and grow to microns lengths within single gas pulses at high (up to 7 micron/s) peak growth rates and short ~ 0.5 s times.Low-frequency Raman scattering (> 10 cm-1) and transmission electron microscopy measurements show that increasing the feedstock flux in both continuous-CVD and pulsed-CVD shifts the product distribution to large single-wall carbon nanotube diameters > 2.5 nm. Sufficiently high acetylene partial pressures in pulsed-CVD appear to temporarily terminate the growth of the fastest- growing, small-diameter nanotubes by overcoating the more catalytically-active, smaller catalyst nanoparticles within the ensemble with non-nanotube carbon in agreement with a growth model. The results indicate that subsets of catalyst nanoparticle ensembles nucleate, grow, and terminate growth within different flux ranges according to their catalytic activity.

  14. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Probe of Luttinger Liquid Physics.

    PubMed

    Chudow, Joel D; Santavicca, Daniel F; Prober, Daniel E

    2016-08-10

    Luttinger liquid theory predicts that collective electron excitations due to strong electron-electron interactions in a one-dimensional (1D) system will result in a modification of the collective charge-propagation velocity. By utilizing a circuit model for an individual metallic single-walled carbon nanotube as a nanotransmission line, it has been shown that the frequency-dependent terahertz impedance of a carbon nanotube can probe this expected 1D Luttinger liquid behavior. We excite terahertz standing-wave resonances on individual antenna-coupled metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes. The terahertz signal is rectified using the nanotube contact nonlinearity, allowing for a low-frequency readout of the coupled terahertz current. The charge velocity on the nanotube is determined from the terahertz spectral response. Our measurements show that a carbon nanotube can behave as a Luttinger liquid system with charge-propagation velocities that are faster than the Fermi velocity. Understanding what determines the charge velocity in low-dimensional conductors is important for the development of next generation nanodevices.

  15. Nitrogen Doping of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube by Using Mass-Separated Low-Energy Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kamimura, Takafumi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2005-04-01

    Mass-separated nitrogen ions with the mass number of 14 were irradiated to the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under an ultra high-vacuum pressure of 10-7 Pa for the purpose of achieving nitrogen doping in nanotubes. The incident angle of the ion beam was normal to the target nanotube, and the ion beam energy was 30 eV, which was close to the displacement energy of graphite. The dependence of the structure of SWCNTs on the ion dose was investigated. The ion dose ranged from 2.8× 1014 to 2.2× 1016 ions/cm2. The nitrogen ions are incorporated into graphite sheets of SWCNTs after irradiation at 2.8× 1014 ions/cm2. The graphite structure is distorted and many defects are induced in the nanotube by the nitrogen incorporation. The structure is changed to amorphous after irradiation at 2.2× 1016 ions/cm2. The nitrogen ions with the ion energy of 25 eV are irradiated to the field effect transistor device with the nanotube channel. The n-type characteristic appears upon ion irradiation, and the device exhibits ambipolar behavior.

  16. Super-high-frequency shielding properties of excimer-laser-synthesized-single-wall-carbon-nanotubes/polyurethane nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    Aiessa, B.; Habib, M. A.; Denidni, T. A.; El Khakani, M. A.; Laberge, L. L.; Therriault, D.

    2011-04-15

    Electromagnetic shielding attenuation (ESA) properties of carbon nanotubes/polymer nanocomposite films, in the super high frequency (SHF) X-band (7-12 GHz) domain are studied. The nanocomposite films consisted of thermoset polyurethane (PU) resin blended with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) mats, and deposited on fused quartz substrates. Two different approaches were used to achieve the nanocomposite films, namely (i) through the on-substrate ''all-laser'' growth approach of SWCNTs directly onto substrate, followed by their infiltration by the PU resin, and (ii) by appropriately dispersing the chemically-purified SWCNTs (in the soot form) into the PU matrix and their subsequent deposition onto quartz substrates by means of a solvent casting process. Characterizations of the ESA properties of the developed nanocomposite films show that they exhibit systematically a deep shielding band, centered at around 9.5 GHz, with an attenuation as high as |- 30| dB, recorded for SWCNT loads of 2.5 wt. % and above. A direct correlation is established between the electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite films and their electromagnetic shielding capacity. The SWCNTs/PU nanocomposites developed here are highly promising shielding materials as SHF notch filters, as their ESA capacity largely exceeds the target value of |- 20| dB generally requested for commercial applications.

  17. Photosensitized Singlet Oxygen Production upon Two-Photon Excitation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Functionalized Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gandra, Naveen; Chiu, Pui Lam; Li, Wenbing; Anderson, Yolanda R.; Mitra, Somenath; He, Huixin; Gao, Ruomei

    2009-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) functionalized with -COOH (along with some sulphonation and nitration), and/or modified with chitosan were prepared and tested for their singlet oxygen (1O2) production. The emission from 1O2 observed upon SWNT irradiation at 532 nm was due to a two-photon process, while 1O2 production via excitation at 355 nm occurred through a conventional one-photon pathway. The relative quantum yield of 1O2 production at excitation wavelength of 532 nm was found to be 0.00, 0.07-0.13 and 0.24-0.54 for highly-functionalized, partially-functionalized and non-functionalized SWNT samples respectively. The nanotube-mediated generation of 1O2 may find applications in both targeted destruction of tumor cells and selective degradation of drug molecules. Our research provides a practical approach to modulate the production of reactive oxygen species from SWNTs via surface functionalization/modification. PMID:20046942

  18. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2014-11-01

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml-1 with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml-1.

  19. Photothermal optical coherence tomography for depth-resolved imaging of mesenchymal stem cells via single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Connolly, Emma; Murphy, Mary; Barron, Valerie; Leahy, Martin

    2014-03-01

    The progress in stem cell research over the past decade holds promise and potential to address many unmet clinical therapeutic needs. Tracking stem cell with modern imaging modalities are critically needed for optimizing stem cell therapy, which offers insight into various underlying biological processes such as cell migration, engraftment, homing, differentiation, and functions etc. In this study we report the feasibility of photothermal optical coherence tomography (PT-OCT) to image human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) labeled with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for in vitro cell tracking in three dimensional scaffolds. PT-OCT is a functional extension of conventional OCT with extended capability of localized detection of absorbing targets from scattering background to provide depth-resolved molecular contrast imaging. A 91 kHz line rate, spectral domain PT-OCT system at 1310nm was developed to detect the photothermal signal generated by 800nm excitation laser. In general, MSCs do not have obvious optical absorption properties and cannot be directly visualized using PT-OCT imaging. However, the optical absorption properties of hMSCs can me modified by labeling with SWNTs. Using this approach, MSC were labeled with SWNT and the cell distribution imaged in a 3D polymer scaffold using PT-OCT.

  20. Single-walled carbon nanotubes based chemiresistive genosensor for label-free detection of human rheumatic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Swati; Kumar, Ashok E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com; Khare, Shashi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh E-mail: ashokigib@rediffmail.com

    2014-11-24

    A specific and ultrasensitive, label free single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) based chemiresistive genosensor was fabricated for the early detection of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in human causing rheumatic heart disease. The mga gene of S. pyogenes specific 24 mer ssDNA probe was covalently immobilized on SWNT through a molecular bilinker, 1-pyrenemethylamine, using carbodiimide coupling reaction. The sensor was characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve and scanning electron microscopy. The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in conductance in SWNT channel based on hybridization of the target S. pyogenes single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) to its complementary 24 mer ssDNA probe. The sensor shows negligible response to non-complementary Staphylococcus aureus ssG-DNA, confirming the specificity of the sensor only with S. pyogenes. The genosensor exhibited a linear response to S. pyogenes G-DNA from 1 to1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a limit of detection of 0.16 ng ml{sup −1}.

  1. Single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with graphene oxide passivation for fast, sensitive, and selective protein detection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jingbo; Mao, Shun; Zhang, Yang; Cui, Shumao; Steeber, Douglas A; Chen, Junhong

    2013-04-15

    We report a novel technique to design an insulating membrane with attachment sites on top of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for achieving high sensitivity and selectivity in an SWNT field-effect transistor (FET) biosensor. Because electronic properties of SWNTs are extremely sensitive to the surface state, direct immobilization of proteins or DNAs onto SWNTs will generate surface defects through chemical reactions or physical adsorption, resulting in degradation of performance and instability of SWNT-FET biosensor devices. Here we demonstrate fabrication of novel FET biosensor devices using SWNTs as semiconducting channels, and a monolayer of graphene oxide (GO) membrane covered on the SWNTs as a passivating layer to avoid direct attachment of biomaterials on SWNTs, thereby preserving intrinsic electrical properties of SWNTs. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are decorated on the GO layer for the covalent attachment of biotin, which is then used to selectively detect the target avidin. The passivation with GO layers can effectively lead to enhanced sensitivity of biosensor devices through increasing the on/off ratio of FET sensors.

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene: Nano-delivery of Gambogic acid increases its cytotoxicty in various cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Lamya M.

    Nanomedicine is a new branch of medicine that has been developed due to the critical need to treat challenging diseases, especially cancer since it remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the second most common cause of death after heart disease in the USA. One of the most important health care applications of nanomedicine concerns the development of drug delivery systems. Graphene (Gn), an atom-thick carbon monolayer of sp2- bonded carbon atoms arranged in a two dimensional (2D) honeycomb crystal lattice, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) (1D, tubular) are among the most promising nanomaterials with the capability of delivering drugs or small therapeutic molecules to cancerous cells. For example, they have been used as vehicles for the anti-cancer, low-toxicity drug Gambogic acid (GA). Here, the cytotoxicity of GA in breast (MCF-7), pancreatic (PANC-1), cervical (HELA), ovarian (NCI/ADR), and prostate (PC3) cancer cells was assessed to determine what effect nanodelivery by either Gn or SWCNTs had on the efficacy of this promising drug. The nanomaterials showed no toxicity at the concentrations used. The inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis of the cells was due to the effects of GA which was significantly enhanced by nanodelivery. Such delivery of GA by either Gn or SWCNTs represents a first step toward assessing their effectiveness in more complex, targeted nano-delivery in vivo settings and signals their potential application in the treatment of cancer.

  3. Tube length and cell type-dependent cellular responses to ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Donkor, David A; Tang, Xiaowu S

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a detailed study on the cellular responses to PEGylated ultra-short (<80 nm) single-walled carbon nanotube (US-SWNT). The experimental results show clearly the tube length and cell-type dependent cellular uptake, intracellular localization, excretion of US-SWNT, as well as US-SWNT partitioning at cell division. Confocal fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry analysis of three cell types (HeLa, human hepatoma, and HUVEC) indicate that PEGylated SWNT below 35 nm might not be suitable for active targeting but could find alternative applications in gene transfection due to the ability to spontaneously traverse the nuclear membrane. While US-SWNT with an average length of 30 nm were rapidly excreted by non-polarized HeLa and hepatoma cells, lysosomal retention was observed by HUVEC, a polarized cell line. Further, HUVEC transferred intracellular US-SWNT to subsequent generations through asymmetric partitioning. These results could have significant implications for the rational design of SWNT carriers for drug delivery, as contrast agents, and for other new niche applications.

  4. Single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with graphene oxide passivation for fast, sensitive, and selective protein detection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jingbo; Mao, Shun; Zhang, Yang; Cui, Shumao; Steeber, Douglas A; Chen, Junhong

    2013-04-15

    We report a novel technique to design an insulating membrane with attachment sites on top of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for achieving high sensitivity and selectivity in an SWNT field-effect transistor (FET) biosensor. Because electronic properties of SWNTs are extremely sensitive to the surface state, direct immobilization of proteins or DNAs onto SWNTs will generate surface defects through chemical reactions or physical adsorption, resulting in degradation of performance and instability of SWNT-FET biosensor devices. Here we demonstrate fabrication of novel FET biosensor devices using SWNTs as semiconducting channels, and a monolayer of graphene oxide (GO) membrane covered on the SWNTs as a passivating layer to avoid direct attachment of biomaterials on SWNTs, thereby preserving intrinsic electrical properties of SWNTs. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are decorated on the GO layer for the covalent attachment of biotin, which is then used to selectively detect the target avidin. The passivation with GO layers can effectively lead to enhanced sensitivity of biosensor devices through increasing the on/off ratio of FET sensors. PMID:23202350

  5. Optical and electrical studies of single walled carbon nanotubes for infrared sensing and photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omari, Mones A.

    Carbon nanotubes are emerging as highly promising opto-electro-mechanical device components essential for the development of a variety of hybrid opto-electronic, electro-mechanical and bio-medical technologies on the nanoscale and have been a subject of continued research. In particular, single-walled carbon nanotubes are predicted to exhibit strong light absorption induced by photon-assisted electronic transitions, free carrier and plasmonic-based absorption. Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been confirmed to exhibit a strong photoconduction response in the infrared range, which can provide many new opportunities in engineering nano-photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. At the same time, the use of strong chemical reagents has been long considered as one of the key processing steps for the separation and purification of single-walled carbon nanotube post-synthesis. In this work, optically-induced voltage in carbon nanotube bundles and thin-films configured as two-terminal resistive elements and operating as junctionless photo-cells in the infrared range as well as the time-dependent wet-processing of HiPCo nanotubes in phosphoric acid and its effect on the structural, transport, infrared light absorption, and photoconduction characteristics were studied. As the photo-voltage generated is found to appear only for asymmetric and off-contact illuminations, the effect is explained based on a photo-generated heat flow model. The engineered cell prototypes were found to yield electrical powers of ˜ 30 pW while demonstrating improved conversion efficiency under high-flux illumination. The cell is also shown to act as an uncooled infrared sensor, with its dark-to-photocurrent ratio improving as temperature increases. The wet-processing of HiPCo nanotubes was done for a nominal time intervals of 1, 2 and 3 hours. The treatment was found to be a two-step process that initially results in the removal and partial replacement of most pre-existing C-O, O-H and CHx groups

  6. Electrochemical analysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with pyrene-pendant transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Eden W; Goldsmith, Jonas I

    2009-12-01

    The noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is important in the development of advanced materials and nanoelectronic sensors and devices. A cobalt-terpyridine transition metal complex with pendant pyrene moieties has been shown to successfully functionalize SWNTs via noncovalent pi-pi stacking interactions. Cyclic voltammetry at SWNT coated platinum electrodes has been utilized to investigate the process of surface modification and provides conclusive evidence of robust surface functionalization. The electrochemical methodology for examining surface functionalization of SWNTs described herein is generalizable to any redox-active system and provides a simple and powerful means for in situ examination of processes occurring at the surface of nanostructured materials. PMID:19919017

  7. Comparison of different functionalization routes for the fabrication of enzyme-single wall carbon nanotube conjugates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Henthorn, David B

    2009-08-01

    In this work, various methods to functionalize single wall carbon nanotubes with immobilized enzyme for bioanalytical application were investigated. Several different conjugation methods, including both covalent and noncovalent methodologies, were compared and the resulting enzyme loading and retained activity were evaluated. After enzymatic modification, the addition of amphiphilic molecules to aid in nanotube dispersability was also studies and its effect on enzyme activity determined. Different characterization tools were employed to observe the morphological changes before and after the functionalization, including FTIR, TEM, and AFM. Both the enzyme loading amount and percent retained activity was greatest for modification when the linker molecule 1-pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester was used to form the enzyme-carbon nanotube conjugate. In addition, several possible mechanisms were proposed to explain the loss of enzymatic activity following immobilization. While the addition of amphiphilic surfactant molecules aided in the ultimate dispersability of the carbon nanotubes in aqueous media, enzymatic activity was further decreased. PMID:19928144

  8. Biocatalytic electrodes based on single-walled carbon nanotube network thin films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Rack, Jeffrey J; Chen, Liwei

    2009-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in CNT paste, multi-walled CNT bundles and vertically aligned single-walled CNT (SWNT) arrays have been used as electrode materials. Recently, it was reported that CNTs facilitate the direct or mediated electron transfer from redox enzymes to glassy carbon electrodes. In this paper, we demonstrate a new form of transparent and conducting SWNT thin film electrochemical electrodes and characterize their performance. The SWNT thin film electrodes exhibit a high surface area, high conductivity and tunable current density without the need for a conducting support. Furthermore, we functionalize the SWNT thin film electrodes with active enzymes. Facile immobilization of redox enzymes on these electrodes reveals great potential for future applications, such as biosensors and biofuel cells. PMID:19437969

  9. Effect of plasma treatment on the gas sensor with single-walled carbon nanotube paste.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ki-Young; Ham, Dae-Jin; Kang, Byung Hyun; Lee, Keunsoo; Choi, Jinnil; Lee, Jin-Woo; Choi, Hyang Hee; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2012-01-30

    The effect of plasma treatment on the gas sensing properties of screen-printed single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) pastes is reported. The gas sensors, using SWCNT pastes as a sensing material, were fabricated by photolithography and screen printing. The SWCNT pastes were deposited between interdigitated electrodes on heater membrane by screen printing. In order to functionalize the pastes, they were plasma treated using several gases which produce defects caused by reactive ion etching. The Ar and O(2) plasma-treated SWCNT pastes exhibited a large response to NO(2) exposure and the fluorinated gas, such as CF(4) and SF(6), plasma-treated SWCNT pastes exhibited a large response to NH(3) exposure. PMID:22284456

  10. Adsorption and properties of aromatic amino acids on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cuihong; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Ruiqin; Lin, Zijing

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the adsorption of three aromatic amino acids--phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan--on the sidewalls of a number of representative single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using density-functional tight-binding calculations, complemented by an empirical dispersion correction. The armchair (n, n) SWNTs (n = 3-12) and zigzag (n, 0) SWNTs (n = 4-12) were thoroughly examined. We found that the most stable amino acid/SWNT complexes for different SWNTs have similar local structures, and that the distance between the amino acid and SWNT is about 3 Å. Owing to the π-π and H-π stacking interactions, the benzene and indole rings are not exactly parallel to the SWNTs but instead lie at a small angle. We also investigated the diameter and chirality dependences of binding energies and found that SWNT (5, 0) has an especially large binding energy that can be used for SWNT identification or selection.

  11. Design and Fabrication of Single-Walled Carbon Nanonet Flexible Strain Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Ting; Huang, Shyh-Chour; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Chao, Ru-Min; Vu, Trung Kien

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a novel flexible strain sensor for real-time strain sensing. The material for strain sensing is single-walled carbon nanonets, grown using the alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition method, that were encapsulated between two layers of Parylene-C, with a polyimide layer as the sensing surface. All of the micro-fabrication was compatible with the standard IC process. Experimental results indicated that the gauge factor of the proposed strain sensor was larger than 4.5, approximately 2.0 times greater than those of commercial gauges. The results also demonstrated that the gauge factor is small when the growth time of SWCNNs is lengthier, and the gauge factor is large when the line width of the serpentine pattern of SWCNNs is small. PMID:22737007

  12. Tailored single-walled carbon nanotube--CdS nanoparticle hybrids for tunable optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianglong; Jia, Yi; Cao, Anyuan

    2010-01-26

    The integration of organic and inorganic building blocks into novel nanohybrids is an important tool to exploit innovative materials with desirable functionalities. For this purpose, carbon nanotube--nanoparticle nanoarchitectures are intensively studied. We report here an efficient noncovalent chemical route to density-controllably and uniformly assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes with CdS nanoparticles. The methodology not only promises the resulting hybrids will be solution-processable but also endows the hybrids with distinct optoelectronic properties including tunable photoresponse mediated by amine molecules. On the basis of these merits, reliable thin-film photoswitches and light-driven chemical sensors are demonstrated, which highlights the potential of tailored hybrids in the development of new tunable optoelectronic devices and sensors.

  13. Optical and thermal response of single-walled carbon nanotube-copper sulfide nanoparticle hybrid nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yi-Hsuan; He, Yuan; Lakshmanan, Santana; Yang, Chang; Chen, Wei; Que, Long

    2012-11-16

    This paper reports the optical and thermal response of a single-walled carbon nanotube-copper sulfide nanoparticle (SWNT-CuS NP) hybrid nanomaterial and its application as a thermoelectric generator. The hybrid nanomaterial was synthesized using oleylamine molecules as the linker molecules between SWNTs and CuS NPs. Measurements found that the hybrid nanomaterial has significantly increased light absorption (up to 80%) compared to the pure SWNT. Measurements also found that the hybrid nanomaterial thin-film devices exhibit a clear optical and thermal switching effect, which can be further enhanced up to 10 ×  by asymmetric illumination of light and thermal radiation on the thin-film devices instead of symmetric illumination. A simple prototype thermoelectric generator enabled by the hybrid nanomaterials is demonstrated, indicating a new route for achieving thermoelectricity. PMID:23089651

  14. Recent Progress in Obtaining Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Transistor Applications.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ahmad E; Rogers, John A; Alam, Muhammad A

    2015-12-22

    High purity semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) with a narrow diameter distribution are required for high-performance transistors. Achieving this goal is extremely challenging because the as-grown material contains mixtures of s-SWCNTs and metallic- (m-) SWCNTs with wide diameter distributions, typically inadequate for integrated circuits. Since 2000, numerous ex situ methods have been proposed to improve the purity of the s-SWCNTs. The majority of these techniques fail to maintain the quality and integrity of the s-SWCNTs with a few notable exceptions. Here, the progress in realizing high purity s-SWCNTs in as-grown and post-processed materials is highlighted. A comparison of transistor parameters (such as on/off ratio and field-effect mobility) obtained from test structures establishes the effectiveness of various methods and suggests opportunities for future improvements.

  15. Hybrid Graphene and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Enhanced Phase-Change Heat Transfer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Han; Yun, Hyung Duk; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Bang, In Cheol

    2016-02-10

    Nucleate boiling is an effective heat transfer method in power generation systems and cooling devices. In this letter, hybrid graphene/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), graphene, and SWCNT films deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces were fabricated to investigate the enhancement of nucleate boiling phenomena described by the critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. The graphene films were grown on Cu foils and transferred to ITO surfaces. Furthermore, SWCNTs were deposited on the graphene layer to fabricate hybrid graphene/SWCNT films. We determined that the hybrid graphene/SWCNT film deposited on an ITO surface is the most effective heat transfer surface in pool boiling because of the interconnected network of carbon structures.

  16. Toughening of epoxy matrices with reduced single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Ashrafi, Behnam; Guan, Jingwen; Kingston, Christopher; Johnston, Andrew; Simard, Benoit; Mirjalili, Vahid; Hubert, Pascal; Deng, Libo; Young, Robert J

    2011-07-01

    Reduced single-walled carbon nanotubes (r-SWCNT) are shown to react readily at room temperature under inert atmosphere conditions with epoxide moieties, such as those in triglycidyl p-amino phenol (TGAP), to produce a soft covalently bonded interface around the SWCNT. The soft interface is compatible with the SWCNT-free cross-linked cured matrix and acts as a toughener for the composite. Incorporation of 0.2 wt % r-SWCNT enhances the ultimate tensile strength, toughness and fracture toughness by 32, 118, and 40%, respectively, without change in modulus. A toughening rate (dK(IC)/dwt(f)) of 200 MPa m(0.5) is obtained. The toughening mechanism is elucidated through dynamic mechanical analyses, Raman spectroscopy and imaging, and stress-strain curve analyses. The method is scalable and applicable to epoxy resins and systems used commercially.

  17. Chirality dependent elastic properties of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes under uniaxial and torsional loading

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M. Ghosh, Debraj

    2014-02-14

    The elastic behavior of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes is studied under axial and torsional loading. Molecular dynamics simulation is carried out with a tersoff potential for modeling the interatomic interactions. Different chiral configurations with similar diameter are considered to study the effect of chirality on the elastic and shear moduli. Furthermore, the effects of tube length on elastic modulus are also studied by considering different aspects ratios. It is observed that both elastic and shear moduli depend upon the chirality of a nanotube. For aspect ratios less than 15, the elastic modulus reduces monotonically with an increase in the chiral angle. For chiral nanotubes, the torsional response shows a dependence on the direction of loading. The difference between the shear moduli against and along the chiral twist directions is maximum for chiral angle of 15°, and zero for zigzag (0°) and armchair (30°) configurations.

  18. Charge trapping in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays induced by ionizing radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Esqueda, Ivan S.; Cress, Cory D.; Che, Yuchi; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-02-07

    The effects of near-interfacial trapping induced by ionizing radiation exposure of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) arrays are investigated via measurements of gate hysteresis in the transfer characteristics of aligned SWCNT field-effect transistors. Gate hysteresis is attributed to charge injection (i.e., trapping) from the SWCNTs into radiation-induced traps in regions near the SWCNT/dielectric interface. Self-consistent calculations of surface-potential, carrier density, and trapped charge are used to describe hysteresis as a function of ionizing radiation exposure. Hysteresis width (h) and its dependence on gate sweep range are investigated analytically. The effects of non-uniform trap energy distributions on the relationship between hysteresis, gate sweep range, and total ionizing dose are demonstrated with simulations and verified experimentally.

  19. Three-dimensional polymeric structures of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Chao-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Tao

    2014-05-28

    We explore by ab initio calculations the possible crystalline phases of polymerized single-wall carbon nanotubes (P-SWNTs) and determine their structural, elastic, and electronic properties. Based on direct cross-linking and intertube sliding-assisted cross-linking mechanisms, we have identified a series of stable three-dimensional polymeric structures for the zigzag nanotubes up to (10,0). Among proposed P-SWNT phases, the structures with favorable diamond-like sp{sup 3} intertube bonding configuration and small tube cross-section distortion are found to be the most energetically stable ones. These polymeric crystalline phases exhibit high bulk and shear moduli superior to SWNT bundles, and show metallic or semiconducting properties depending on the diameter of constituent tubes. We also propose by hydrostatic pressure simulations that the intertube sliding between van der Waals bonded nanotubes may be an effective route to promote the polymerization of SWNTs under pressure.

  20. Photon antibunching in single-walled carbon nanotubes at telecommunication wavelengths and room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Takumi Ishi-Hayase, Junko; Maki, Hideyuki

    2015-03-16

    We investigated the photoluminescence of individual air-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from 6 to 300 K. Time-resolved and antibunching measurements over the telecommunication wavelength range were performed using a superconducting single-photon detector. We detected moderate temperature independent antibunching behavior over the whole temperature range studied. To investigate the exciton dynamics, which is responsible for the antibunching behavior, we measured excitation-power and temperature dependence of the photoluminescence spectra and lifetime decay curves. These measurements suggested an exciton confinement effect that is likely caused by high-dielectric amorphous carbon surrounding the SWNTs. These results indicate that SWNTs are good candidates for light sources in quantum communication technologies operating in the telecommunication wavelength range and at room temperature.

  1. Effects of electron exchange-correlation potential on electrostatic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S. A. Hassan, Sunia

    2014-05-28

    Using macroscopic quantum hydrodynamic formulation, we study the dispersion properties of electrostatic electron plasma oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes. The electrons and ions are considered uniformly distributed over the cylindrical surface of a nanotube thus forming a two-component (electron-ion) quantum plasma system. Electron degeneracy via Fermi-Dirac statistics as well as electron exchange and correlation effects is taken into account. It is found that the quantum (Bohm) potential arising due to fermionic nature of electrons and exchange-correlations effects has significant impact on the wave. The frequency of wave is influenced by variation in azimuthal index and radius of the nanotube. The results are analyzed numerically for typical systems for relatively longer wavelength waves and possible consequences are discussed. The results can be important in general understanding of the role of exchange-correlation potential in quantum hydrodynamic treatment of charge-carriers in nanotubes.

  2. Investigation on optical absorption properties of ion irradiated single walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Vishalli, Dharamvir, Keya; Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K.; Avasthi, D. K.; Jeet, Kiran

    2015-08-28

    In the present study change in the optical absorption properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under nickel ion (60 MeV) irradiation at various fluences has been investigated. Langmuir Blodgett technique is used to deposit SWCNT thin film of uniform thickness. AFM analysis shows a network of interconnected bundles of nanotubes. UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra indicate that the sample mainly contain SWCNTs of semiconducting nature. It has been found in absorption spectra that there is decrease in the intensity of the characteristic SWCNT peaks with increase in fluence. At fluence value 1×10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} there is almost complete suppression of the characteristic SWCNTs peaks.The decrease in the optical absorption with increase in fluence is due to the increase in the disorder in the system which leads to the decrease in optically active states.

  3. Interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes with poly(propyl ether imine) dendrimers

    SciTech Connect

    Jayamurugan, G.; Rajesh, Y. B. R. D.; Jayaraman, N.; Vasu, K. S.; Kumar, S.; Sood, A. K.; Vasumathi, V.; Maiti, P. K.

    2011-03-14

    We study the complexation of nontoxic, native poly(propyl ether imine) dendrimers with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The interaction was monitored by measuring the quenching of inherent fluorescence of the dendrimer. The dendrimer-nanotube binding also resulted in the increased electrical resistance of the hole doped SWNT, due to charge-transfer interaction between dendrimer and nanotube. This charge-transfer interaction was further corroborated by observing a shift in frequency of the tangential Raman modes of SWNT. We also report the effect of acidic and neutral pH conditions on the binding affinities. Experimental studies were supplemented by all atom molecular dynamics simulations to provide a microscopic picture of the dendrimer-nanotube complex. The complexation was achieved through charge transfer and hydrophobic interactions, aided by multitude of oxygen, nitrogen, and n-propyl moieties of the dendrimer.

  4. Atomic configuration of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Arenal, Raul; March, Katia; Ewels, Chris P; Rocquefelte, Xavier; Kociak, Mathieu; Loiseau, Annick; Stéphan, Odile

    2014-10-01

    Having access to the chemical environment at the atomic level of a dopant in a nanostructure is crucial for the understanding of its properties. We have performed atomically resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy to detect individual nitrogen dopants in single-walled carbon nanotubes and compared with first-principles calculations. We demonstrate that nitrogen doping occurs as single atoms in different bonding configurations: graphitic-like and pyrrolic-like substitutional nitrogen neighboring local lattice distortion such as Stone-Thrower-Wales defects. We also show that the largest fraction of nitrogen amount is found in poly aromatic species that are adsorbed on the surface of the nanotube walls. The stability under the electron beam of these nanotubes has been studied in two different cases of nitrogen incorporation content and configuration. These findings provide key information for the applications of these nanostructures.

  5. Effect of substitutionally boron-doped single-walled semiconducting zigzag carbon nanotubes on ammonia adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vikramaditya, Talapunur; Sumithra, Kanakamma

    2014-03-15

    We investigate the binding of ammonia on intrinsic and substitutionally doped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on the side walls using density functional calculations. Ammonia is found to be weakly physisorbed on intrinsic semiconducting nanotubes while on substitutional doping with boron its affinity is enhanced considerably reflected with increase in binding energies and charge transfer. This is attributed to the strong chemical interaction between electron rich nitrogen of ammonia and electron deficient boron of the doped SWCNT. On doping, the density of states are changed compared to the intrinsic case and additional levels are formed near the Fermi level leading to overlap of levels with that of ammonia indicating charge transfer. The doped SWCNTs thus are expected to be a potential candidate for detecting ammonia.

  6. Growth of metal-catalyst-free nitrogen-doped metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Cheng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2014-10-21

    Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using SiOx nanoparticles as a catalyst and ethylenediamine as the source of both carbon and nitrogen. The N-doped SWCNTs have a mean diameter of 1.1 nm and a narrow diameter range, with 92% of them having diameters from 0.7 to 1.4 nm. Multi-wavelength laser Raman spectra and temperature-dependent electrical resistance indicate that the SWCNT sample is enriched with metallic nanotubes. These N-doped SWCNTs showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction and highly selective and sensitive sensing ability for dopamine detection.

  7. X-ray Absorption Improvement of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube through Gadolinium Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimin; Narsito, I.; Kartini; Santosa, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray absorption improvement of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) through gadolinium (Gd) encapsulation has been studied. The liquid phase adsorption using ethanol has been performed for the doping treatment. The Gd-doped SWCNT (Gd@SWCNT) was characterized by nitrogen adsorption isotherms, Raman spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. A relatively high residual weight of Gd@SWCNT compared to non-doped SWCNT (n-SWCNT) indicated that Gd has been doped in the nanotube. Even though Gd nanoparticles could not be observed clearly by TEM image, however, a significant decrease of nitrogen uptakes at low pressure and RBM (Radial Breathing Mode) upshift of Raman spectra of Gd@SWCNT specimen suggest that the metal nanoparticles might be encapsulated in the internal tube spaces of the nanotube. It was found that Gd-doped in the SWCNT increased significantly mass attenuation coefficient of the nanotube.

  8. Rectifying behavior in nitrogen-doped zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Liu, D. S.; Li, S. J.; Chen, G.

    2012-11-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function formalism for quantum transport calculation, we have investigated the electronic transport properties of (8,0), (9,0) and (13,0) zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube junctions with one undoped and one nitrogen-doped zigzag carbon nanotube electrode. Our results show that the transport properties are strongly dependent on the magnitude of energy gap of carbon nanotube. Large rectifying behavior can be obtained in the junction with large energy gap. The observed rectifying behavior are explained in terms of the evolution of the transmission spectra and energy band structures with applied bias voltage combined with molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian eigenstates analysis.

  9. Exciton Radiative Lifetimes and Their Temperature Dependence in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, Yuhei; Matsunaga, Ryusuke; Hirori, Hideki; Matsuda, Kazunari; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2009-03-01

    We have investigated the radiative lifetimes of excitons in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from simultaneous measurements of the photoluminescence (PL) lifetimes [1] and the PL quantum yields. A high-quality sample of PFO dispersed-SWNTs was used for the PL measurements. The evaluated radiative lifetimes were ˜5-15 ns for SWNTs with diameters ˜0.8-1.1 nm at room temperature. The radiative lifetimes increased with the tube diameter. The exciton spatial coherence volume (length) was of the order 10 ^2 nm along the tube axis, as deduced from the radiative lifetimes. Furthermore, we discuss the dynamics of bright and dark excitons [2] from the temperature dependence of the radiative lifetime (10 to 300 K).[3pt] [1] H. Hirori, K. Matsuda, Y. Miyauchi, S. Maruyama, and Y. Kanemitsu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 257401 (2006). [0pt] [2] R. Matsunaga, K. Matsuda, and Y. Kanemitsu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 147404 (2008).

  10. Fabrication of single-walled carbon-nanotube-based pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Stampfer, C; Helbling, T; Obergfell, D; Schöberle, B; Tripp, M K; Jungen, A; Roth, S; Bright, V M; Hierold, C

    2006-02-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of bulk micromachined pressure sensors based on individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the active electromechanical transducer elements. The electromechanical sensor device consists of an individual electrically connected SWNT adsorbed on top of a 100-nm-thick atomic layer deposited (ALD) circular alumina (Al(2)O(3)) membrane with a radius in the range of 50-100 microm. A white light interferometer (WLI) was used to measure the deflection of the membrane due to differential pressure, and the mechanical properties of the device were characterized by bulge testing. Finally, we performed the first electromechanical measurements on strained metallic SWNTs adhering to a membrane and found a piezoresistive gauge factor of approximately 210 for metallic SWNTs.

  11. Sequential Layer Analysis of Protein Immunosensors based on Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Forests

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ruchika; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Rusling, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical immunosensors using vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) forests can provide ultrasensitive, accurate cancer biomarker protein assays. Herein we report a systematic investigation of the structure, thickness and functionality of each layer of these immunosensors using atomic force microscopy (AFM), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and scanning white light interferometry (SWLI). This provides a detailed picture of the surface morphology of each layer along with surface concentration and thickness of each protein layer. Results reveal that the major reasons for sensitivity gain can be assigned to the dense packing of carboxylated SWNT forest tips, which translate to a large surface concentration of capture antibodies, together with the high quality of conductive SWNT forests. PMID:20731335

  12. Transport of metal oxide nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes in human mucus.

    PubMed

    Jachak, Ashish; Lai, Samuel K; Hida, Kaoru; Suk, Jung Soo; Markovic, Nina; Biswal, Shyam; Breysse, Patrick N; Hanes, Justin

    2012-09-01

    Whether mucus layers lining entrance points into the body, including the lung airways, provide protection against the penetration of engineered nanoparticles remains poorly understood. We measured the diffusion coefficients of hundreds of individual nanoparticles of three different metal oxides (nMeOs) and two types of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in undiluted human mucus. We found that the vast majority of these nanoparticles are efficiently trapped in human mucus and, further, that the mechanism of trapping is adhesive interactions as opposed to steric obstruction. However, a small fraction of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles moved at rates fast enough to penetrate airway mucus layers. We conclude that human mucus layers probably provide considerable protection for mucosal tissues from the penetration of most nMeOs and SWCNTs, and suggest that further investigation of the potential health risks of exposure to ZnO nanoparticles is warranted.

  13. Charge Manipulation in Molecules Encapsulated Inside Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Moriya, Rieko; Cuong, Nguyen Thanh; Otani, Minoru; Okada, Susumu

    2013-02-01

    We report clear experimental evidence for the charge manipulation of molecules encapsulated inside single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using electrochemical doping techniques. We encapsulated β-carotene (Car) inside SWCNTs and clarified electrochemical doping characteristics of their Raman spectra. C=C streching modes of encapsulated Car and a G band of SWCNTs showed clearly different doping behaviors as the electrochemical potentials were shifted. Electron extraction from encapsulated Car was clearly achieved. However, electrochemical characteristics of Car inside SWCNTs and doping mechanisms elucidated by calculations based on density-functional theory indicate the difficulty of charge manipulation of molecules inside SWCNTs due to the presence of strong on-site Coulomb repulsion energy at the molecules.

  14. The Effect of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes on Thin Film Dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, J. S.; Shin, K.; Geckeler, K. E.; Ge, S.; Li, S.; Rafailovich, M. H.; Sokolov, J.

    2003-03-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes were dispersed in DMF solution and spun cast onto Si wafers together with monodisperse polymethylmethacrylate of Mw=64k. The thickness of the films was 177nm. The tube concentration was varied from 0.02 to 0.2 weight percent. Monodisperse polystyrene of Mw= 270k was spun cast onto glass slides and floated from DI water over the samples. The bilayers were then annealed at T=175 o C for various times. The dewetting of the samples was then observed with optical and atomic force microscopy. We found that the rate of dewetting decreased rapidly with NT concentration. These results will be interpreted in terms of the change in thin film viscosity and possibly glass transition temperature. Funded in Part by the NSF-MRSEC International Programs and Brain Korea 21 Program.

  15. Mechanism of electrolyte-induced brightening in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Duque, Juan G; Oudjedi, Laura; Crochet, Jared J; Tretiak, Sergei; Lounis, Brahim; Doorn, Stephen K; Cognet, Laurent

    2013-03-01

    While addition of electrolyte to sodium dodecyl sulfate suspensions of single-wall carbon nanotubes has been demonstrated to result in significant brightening of the nanotube photoluminescence (PL), the brightening mechanism has remained unresolved. Here, we probe this mechanism using time-resolved PL decay measurements. We find that PL decay times increase by a factor of 2 on addition of CsCl as the electrolyte. Such an increase directly parallels an observed near-doubling of PL intensity, indicating the brightening results primarily from changes in nonradiative decay rates associated with exciton diffusion to quenching sites. Our findings indicate that a reduced number of these sites results from electrolyte-induced reorientation of the surfactant surface structure that partially removes pockets of water from the tube surface where excitons can dissociate, and thus underscores the contribution of interfacial water in exciton recombination processes. PMID:23421604

  16. Microwave properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes films below percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darne, Chinmay; Xie, Leiming; Zagozdzon-Wosik, Wanda; Schmidt, Howard K.; Wosik, Jarek

    2009-06-01

    A film residue obtained by evaporating surfactant-stabilized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) suspension was characterized at 12 GHz using a scanning-sample dielectric resonator technique. Resonant frequency and quality factor changes were measured and cavity perturbation method was used to calculate the SWNT complex permittivity. The effective permittivity of the SWNT was determined as (3516-j316.5), which provided an average dielectric constant and conductivity for a single SWNT to be 8.1×105 and 8.4×106 S/m, respectively. Microwave induced losses originated only from the electric field, not from the magnetic field, thus indicating an absence of direct electrical contact between nanotubes and a below percolation-limit configuration.

  17. The infinite possible growth ambients that support single-wall carbon nanotube forest growth.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroe; Goto, Jundai; Yasuda, Satoshi; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Yumura, Motoo; Futaba, Don N; Hata, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    We report the virtually infinite possible carbon feedstocks which support the highly efficient growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using on the water-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. Our results demonstrate that diverse varieties of carbon feedstocks, in the form of hydrocarbons, spanning saturated rings (e.g. trans-deca-hydronaphthalene), saturated chains (e.g. propane), unsaturated rings (e.g. dicyclopentadiene), and unsaturated chains (e.g. ethylene) could be used as a carbon feedstocks with SWCNT forests with heights exceeding 100 ums. Further, we found that all the resultant SWCNTs possessed similar average diameter indicating that the diameter was mainly determined by the catalyst rather than the carbon feedstock within this synthetic system. A demonstration of the generality was the synthesis of a carbon nanotube forest from a highly unorthodox combination of gases where trans-decahydronaphthalene acted as the carbon feedstock and benzaldehyde acted as the growth enhancer.

  18. Plasma-Etching of Spray-Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Biointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joon Hyub; Lee, Jun-Yong; Min, Nam Ki

    2012-08-01

    We present an effective method for the batch fabrication of miniaturized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film electrodes using oxygen plasma etching. We adopted the approach of spray-coating for good adhesion of the SWCNT film onto a pre-patterned Pt support and used O2 plasma patterning of the coated films to realize efficient biointerfaces between SWCNT surfaces and biomolecules. By these approaches, the SWCNT film can be easily integrated into miniaturized electrode systems. To demonstrate the effectiveness of plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes as biointerfaces, Legionella antibody was selected as analysis model owing to its considerable importance to electrochemical biosensors and was detected using plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes and a 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-benzidine dihydrochloride/horseradish peroxidase (TMB/HRP) catalytic system. The response currents increased with increasing concentration of Legionella antibody. This result indicates that antibodies were effectively immobilized on plasma-etched and activated SWCNT surfaces.

  19. Biointerfacial Property of Plasma-Treated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Film Electrodes for Electrochemical Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyub Kim, Joon; Lee, Jun-Yong; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Park, Eun Jin; Min, Nam Ki

    2013-01-01

    The single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based thin film was spray-coated on the Pt support and functionalized using O2 plasma. The effects of plasma treatment on the biointerfacial properties of the SWCNT films were analyzed by cyclic voltammogram (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The plasma-functionalized (pf) SWCNT electrodes modified with Legionella pneumophila-specific probe DNA strands showed a much higher peak current and a smaller peak separation in differential pulse voltammetry and a lower charge transfer resistance, compared to the untreated samples. These results suggest that the pf-SWCNT films have a better electrocatalytic character and an electron transfer capability faster than the untreated SWCNTs, due to the fact that the oxygen-containing functional groups promote direct electron transfer in the biointerfacial region of the electrocatalytic activity of redox-active biomolecules.

  20. Interaction between fullerene halves Cn (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amrish; Kaur, Sandeep; Mudahar, Isha

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves Cn (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  1. Selectivity of water-soluble proteins in single-walled carbon nanotube dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Koji; Saito, Takeshi; Okazaki, Toshiya; Ohshima, Satoshi; Yumura, Motoo; Iijima, Sumio

    2006-10-01

    Proteins were screened by preparing dispersions of SWNTs to investigate the driving force of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) of mean diameter 1 nm and water-soluble proteins. Egg white lysozyme (LYS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) dispersed SWNTs, whereas papain and pepsin could not. Far-UV circular dichroism spectra indicated that the LYS and BSA molecules that coat SWNT surfaces were partially denatured. From the amino acid composition, we ascribed the main driving force to the hydrophobic interactions between the side-wall of the SWNT and the inner hydrophobic domain exposed to the solvent during the three-dimensional change of the protein induced by sonication.

  2. Interaction of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases with Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D. S.; McDonald, T. J.; Kim, Y.-H.; Blackburn, J. L.; Heben, M. J.; King, P. W.

    2007-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are promising candidates for use in energy conversion devices as an active photo-collecting elements, for dissociation of bound excitons and charge-transfer from photo-excited chromophores, or as molecular wires to transport charge. Hydrogenases are enzymes that efficiently catalyze the reduction of protons from a variety of electron donors to produce molecular hydrogen. Hydrogenases together with SWNT suggest a novel biohybrid material for direct conversion of sunlight into H{sub 2}. Here, we report changes in SWNT optical properties upon addition of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases from Clostridium acetobutylicum and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We find evidence that novel and stable charge-transfer complexes are formed under conditions of the hydrogenase catalytic turnover, providing spectroscopic handles for further study and application of this hybrid system.

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotube sensors for monitoring partial discharge induced dissociation of SF6.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sehun; Choi, Jaeboong; Kim, Youngjin; Lee, Jongchul; Chang, Yongmoo; Baik, Seunghyun

    2009-12-01

    We proposed to use a miniature single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) sensor, fabricated by alternating current dielectrophoresis, to detect dissociated and oxidized sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas species generated by partial discharge (PD) activity in a concealed chamber such as gas-insulated switchgear (GIS). The SWNT sensor did not react with pure SF6 gas but sensitively responded to the dissociated and oxidized SF6 species. Also, the SWNT sensor could be regenerated by purging with fresh air since the transduction was based on the physisorption of analytes. Therefore, the SWNT sensor is a promising device for the detection of the dissociated and oxidized SF6 species and for the monitoring of the PD activity inside GIS.

  4. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that a nonperturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single-walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. We test this theory explicitly on the data reported by Dukovic et al. [Nano Lett. 5, 2314 (2005), 10.1021/nl0518122] and Sfeir et al. [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.195424] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  5. XPS Protocol for the Characterization of Pristine and Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosa, E. D.; Allada, R.; Huffman, C. B.; Arepalli, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent interest in developing new applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) has fueled the need to use accurate macroscopic and nanoscopic techniques to characterize and understand their chemistry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has proved to be a useful analytical tool for nanoscale surface characterization of materials including carbon nanotubes. Recent nanotechnology research at NASA Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC) helped to establish a characterization protocol for quality assessment for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Here, a review of some of the major factors of the XPS technique that can influence the quality of analytical data, suggestions for methods to maximize the quality of data obtained by XPS, and the development of a protocol for XPS characterization as a complementary technique for analyzing the purity and surface characteristics of SWCNTs is presented. The XPS protocol is then applied to a number of experiments including impurity analysis and the study of chemical modifications for SWCNTs.

  6. A parametric study of single-wall carbon nanotube growth by laser ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William A.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Hadjiev, Victor G.; Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Results of a parametric study of carbon nanotube production by the double-pulse laser oven process are presented. The effect of various operating parameters on the production of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is estimated by characterizing the nanotube material using analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermo gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The study included changing the sequence of the laser pulses, laser energy, pulse separation, type of buffer gas used, operating pressure, flow rate, inner tube diameter, as well as its material, and oven temperature. It was found that the material quality and quantity improve with deviation from normal operation parameters such as laser energy density higher than 1.5 J/cm2, pressure lower than 67 kPa, and flow rates higher than 100 sccm. Use of helium produced mainly small diameter tubes and a lower yield. The diameter of SWCNTs decreases with decreasing oven temperature and lower flow rates.

  7. Multiple helical configuration and quantity threshold of graphene nanoribbons inside a single-walled carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifan; Chen, Wei; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to explore the configuration and quantity threshold of multiple graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). The simulation results showed that several GNRs tangled together to form a perfect spiral structure to maximize the π-π stacking area when filling inside SWCNT. The formation of multiple helical configuration is influenced by the combined effect of structure stability, initial arrangement and tube space, meanwhile its forming time is related to helical angle. The simulated threshold of GNRs in SWCNT decreases with GNR width but increases with SWCNT diameter, and two formulas have come up in this study to estimate the quantity threshold for GNRs. It has been found that multilayered graphite is hard to be stripped in SWCNT because the special helical configuration with incompletely separated GNRs is metastable. This work provides a possibility to control the configuration of GNR@SWCNT. PMID:26374276

  8. Solution phase photolysis of 1,2-dithiane alone and with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Engel, Paul S; Gudimetla, Vittal B; Gancheff, Jorge S; Denis, Pablo A

    2012-08-16

    Photolysis of 1,2-dithiane (1) in acetonitrile with single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was earlier reported to form thiol-functionalized SWCNTs via the butane-1,4-dithiyl diradical (2). The present study shows that 2 instead undergoes a facile rearrangement to thiophane-2-thiol (6). This photoreaction is clean, rapid, and irreversible under 313 nm irradiation. The secondary photolysis of 6 with SWCNTs at a shorter wavelength (254 nm) leads to 2-thiophanyl radicals 8, which derivatize SWCNTs by covalent attachment. Pyrolysis of the resulting "sulfurized SWCNTs" affords a mixture of organosulfur compounds, including thiophene formed by dehydrogenation. An unknown additional mechanism causes high TGA weight loss and a large incorporation of sulfur. PMID:22874092

  9. Aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes attenuate the behavioural and neurochemical effects of methamphetamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xue; Yang, Jing-Yu; He, Yi; Wang, Li-Rong; Liu, Ping; Yu, Li-Sha; Bi, Guo-Hua; Zhu, Ming-Ming; Liu, Yue-Yang; Xiang, Rong-Wu; Yang, Xiao-Ting; Fan, Xin-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Min; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Hong-Jie; Wei, Tuo; Cui, Wei; Ge, Guang-Lu; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a serious social and health problem worldwide. At present, there are no effective medications to treat METH addiction. Here, we report that aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes (aSWNTs) significantly inhibited METH self-administration, METH-induced conditioned place preference and METH- or cue-induced relapse to drug-seeking behaviour in mice. The use of aSWNTs alone did not significantly alter the mesolimbic dopamine system, whereas pretreatment with aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the ventral striatum. Electrochemical assays suggest that aSWNTs facilitated dopamine oxidation. In addition, aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in tyrosine hydroxylase or synaptic protein expression. These findings suggest that aSWNTs may have therapeutic effects for treatment of METH addiction by oxidation of METH-enhanced extracellular dopamine in the striatum.

  10. Aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes attenuate the behavioural and neurochemical effects of methamphetamine in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xue; Yang, Jing-Yu; He, Yi; Wang, Li-Rong; Liu, Ping; Yu, Li-Sha; Bi, Guo-Hua; Zhu, Ming-Ming; Liu, Yue-Yang; Xiang, Rong-Wu; Yang, Xiao-Ting; Fan, Xin-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Min; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Hong-Jie; Wei, Tuo; Cui, Wei; Ge, Guang-Lu; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a serious social and health problem worldwide. At present, there are no effective medications to treat METH addiction. Here, we report that aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes (aSWNTs) significantly inhibited METH self-administration, METH-induced conditioned place preference and METH- or cue-induced relapse to drug-seeking behaviour in mice. The use of aSWNTs alone did not significantly alter the mesolimbic dopamine system, whereas pretreatment with aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the ventral striatum. Electrochemical assays suggest that aSWNTs facilitated dopamine oxidation. In addition, aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in tyrosine hydroxylase or synaptic protein expression. These findings suggest that aSWNTs may have therapeutic effects for treatment of METH addiction by oxidation of METH-enhanced extracellular dopamine in the striatum.

  11. Aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes attenuate the behavioural and neurochemical effects of methamphetamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xue; Yang, Jing-Yu; He, Yi; Wang, Li-Rong; Liu, Ping; Yu, Li-Sha; Bi, Guo-Hua; Zhu, Ming-Ming; Liu, Yue-Yang; Xiang, Rong-Wu; Yang, Xiao-Ting; Fan, Xin-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Min; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Hong-Jie; Wei, Tuo; Cui, Wei; Ge, Guang-Lu; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a serious social and health problem worldwide. At present, there are no effective medications to treat METH addiction. Here, we report that aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes (aSWNTs) significantly inhibited METH self-administration, METH-induced conditioned place preference and METH- or cue-induced relapse to drug-seeking behaviour in mice. The use of aSWNTs alone did not significantly alter the mesolimbic dopamine system, whereas pretreatment with aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the ventral striatum. Electrochemical assays suggest that aSWNTs facilitated dopamine oxidation. In addition, aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in tyrosine hydroxylase or synaptic protein expression. These findings suggest that aSWNTs may have therapeutic effects for treatment of METH addiction by oxidation of METH-enhanced extracellular dopamine in the striatum. PMID:26974957

  12. Affinity-mediated sorting order reversal of single-walled carbon nanotubes in density gradient ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myungsu; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Haneul; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-10-14

    Sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of paramount importance for their utilization in high-end optoelectronic applications. Sodium cholate (SC)-based density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) has been instrumental in isolating small diameter (d t) SWNTs. Here, we show that SWNTs wrapped by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a dispersing agent are sorted in DGU, and show sorting order reversal behavior, departing from prototypical SC-SWNT trends. Larger d t SWNTs are sorted in lower density (ρ), and buoyant ρ distribution of FMN-SWNT ranges from 1.15-1.25 g cm(-3). Such a nanotube layering pattern originates from both the binding affinity between FMN and SWNT and the less-susceptible hydrated volume of remote phosphate sidechains of FMN according to nanotube d t change. PMID:27595315

  13. A new designed π conjugated molecule for stable single walled carbon nanotube dispersion in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, S L; Sahoo, S K; Jarrosson, T; Serein-Spirau, F; Lère-Porte, J-P; Moujaes, E A; Marletta, A; Santos, A P; Fantini, C; Furtado, C A; Silva, R A

    2016-02-15

    A molecule with a π conjugated backbone built from aromatic thiophene and dialkoxyphenylene units and substituted imidazolium groups (TPO) is designed to obtain ultra-stable single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion in aqueous medium. The proposed mechanism of non-covalent interaction is accompanied by individualization of SWCNT and comprises of dominant nondisruptive π-π and cation-π interaction between them and the TPO conjugated oligomer. The individualization of SWCNT and dispersibility and stability of the ultra-stable suspensions were estimated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible-NIR absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence and zeta potential measurement. Nuclear magnetic resonance data provides direct evidence toward possible cation-π interaction.

  14. Growth dynamics of inner tubes inside cobaltocene-filled single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamova, M. V.; Kramberger, Christian; Saito, Takeshi; Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Pichler, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We have synthesized cobaltocene-filled 1.7-nm-mean diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and transformed them into double-walled carbon nanotubes by annealing at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C for 2 h in vacuum. We analyze the temperature-dependent inner tube growth inside the filled SWCNTs by Raman spectroscopy. The changes in intensity of the Raman peaks of inner tubes with the diameters ranging from 0.832 to 1.321 nm with increasing annealing temperature are traced. It is revealed that the growth temperatures of larger diameter inner tubes are higher than the ones of smaller diameter tubes. A decrease in the diameter of the inner tubes by ~0.4 nm leads to a decrease in the growth temperature by ~200 °C.

  15. The first atomistic modelling-aided reproduction of morphologically defective single walled carbon nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Terzyk, Artur P; Kaneko, Katsumi; Gauden, Piotr A; Kowlaczyk, Piotr; Itoh, Tsutomu

    2013-01-28

    A new modelling-aided approach for the atomistic model of single walled carbon nanohorn (SWNH) creation is presented, based on experimental evidence, on realistic potential of carbon-carbon interactions and on molecular simulations. A new model of SWNHs is next used to predict Ar adsorption properties and to check the molecular fundamentals of the adsorption mechanism. The influence of the apex angle value, nanohorn diameter and nanohorn length on the shapes of isotherms, enthalpy, high resolution α(s)-plots and adsorption potential distribution curves is checked. Finally the comparison with new experimental Ar adsorption results is shown and the conclusions on the porosity of real SWNH aggregates are given. PMID:23229231

  16. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range.

  17. Molecular interactions on single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by high-resolution transmission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeyama, Tomokazu; Baek, Jinseok; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Abou-Chahine, Fawzi; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    The close solid-state structure-property relationships of organic π-aromatic molecules have attracted interest due to their implications for the design of organic functional materials. In particular, a dimeric structure, that is, a unit consisting of two molecules, is required for precisely evaluating intermolecular interactions. Here, we show that the sidewall of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) represents a unique molecular dimer platform that can be directly visualized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Pyrene is chosen as the π-aromatic molecule; its dimer is covalently linked to the SWNT sidewalls by aryl addition. Reflecting the orientation and separation of the two molecules, the pyrene dimer on the SWNT exhibits characteristic optical and photophysical properties. The methodology discussed here--form and probe molecular dimers--is highly promising for the creation of unique models and provides indispensable and fundamental information regarding molecular interactions.

  18. Amperometric Low-Potential Detection of Malic Acid Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Based Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Arvinte, Adina; Rotariu, Lucian; Bala, Camelia

    2008-01-01

    The electrocatalytical property of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) modified electrode toward NADH detection was explored by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry techniques. The experimental results show that SWNT decrease the overvoltage required for oxidation of NADH (to +300 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) and this property make them suitable for dehydrogenases based biosensors. The behavior of the SWNT modified biosensor for L-malic acid was studied as an example for dehydrogenases biosensor. The amperometric measurements indicate that malate dehydrogenase (MDH) can be strongly adsorbed on the surface of the SWNT-modified electrode to form an approximate monolayer film. Enzyme immobilization in Nafion membrane can increase the biosensor stability. A linear calibration curve was obtained for L-malic acid concentrations between 0.2 and 1mM.

  19. Zipping, entanglement, and the elastic modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Panzer, Matthew A; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W; Cai, Wei; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2013-12-17

    Reliably routing heat to and from conversion materials is a daunting challenge for a variety of innovative energy technologies--from thermal solar to automotive waste heat recovery systems--whose efficiencies degrade due to massive thermomechanical stresses at interfaces. This problem may soon be addressed by adhesives based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, which promise the revolutionary combination of high through-plane thermal conductivity and vanishing in-plane mechanical stiffness. Here, we report the data for the in-plane modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films using a microfabricated resonator method. Molecular simulations and electron microscopy identify the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for this property. The zipping and unzipping of adjacent nanotubes and the degree of alignment and entanglement are shown to govern the spatially varying local modulus, thereby providing the route to engineered materials with outstanding combinations of mechanical and thermal properties.

  20. Separated metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes: opportunities in transparent electrodes and beyond.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fushen; Meziani, Mohammed J; Cao, Li; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2011-04-19

    Ever since the discovery of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), there have been many reports and predictions on their superior properties for use in a wide variety of potential applications. However, an SWNT is either metallic or semiconducting; these properties are distinctively different in electrical conductivity and many other aspects. The available bulk-production methods generally yield mixtures of metallic and semiconducting SWNTs, despite continuing efforts in metallicity-selective nanotube growth. Presented here are significant advances and major achievements in the development of postproduction separation methods, which are now capable of harvesting separated metallic and semiconducting SWNTs from different production sources with sufficiently high enrichment and quantities for satisfying at least the needs in research and technological explorations. Opportunities and some available examples for the use of metallic SWNTs in transparent electrodes and semiconducting SWNTs in various device nanotechnologies are highlighted and discussed.

  1. Tuning the driving force for exciton dissociation in single-walled carbon nanotube heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihly, Rachelle; Mistry, Kevin S.; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Larson, Bryon W.; Reid, Obadiah; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.; Rumbles, Garry; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the kinetics and energetics of interfacial electron transfer in molecular systems is crucial for the development of a broad array of technologies, including photovoltaics, solar fuel systems and energy storage. The Marcus formulation for electron transfer relates the thermodynamic driving force and reorganization energy for charge transfer between a given donor/acceptor pair to the kinetics and yield of electron transfer. Here we investigated the influence of the thermodynamic driving force for photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and fullerene derivatives by employing time-resolved microwave conductivity as a sensitive probe of interfacial exciton dissociation. For the first time, we observed the Marcus inverted region (in which driving force exceeds reorganization energy) and quantified the reorganization energy for PET for a model SWCNT/acceptor system. The small reorganization energies (about 130 meV, most of which probably arises from the fullerene acceptors) are beneficial in minimizing energy loss in photoconversion schemes.

  2. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field.

    PubMed

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M; Geday, Morten A

    2016-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules.

  3. Mechanical characterization of suspended strips of meshed single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Bo; Hao, Ji; Jung, Yung Joon; Wan, Kai-tak

    2016-01-01

    A thin film of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) mesh has good potential to integrate the existing electromechanical functions with flexible devices. In this paper, SWCNT mats are transferred to a patterned polymer SU-8 substrate using a wet contact print method, forming a suspended bridge over a groove in the substrate. The front edge of a tipless AFM cantilever loads the suspension at the centerline, causing it to deform into a V-shape by mixed bending and stretching. The mechanical response of load versus AFM displacement is fitted to a linear elastic model to extract the average elastic modulus. Reversible loading-unloading shows little or no permanent damage due to mechanical loads.

  4. Single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized by a series of dichlorocarbenes: DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushenko, Igor K.; Petrushenko, Konstantin B.

    2016-02-01

    The structural and elastic properties of neutral and ionized dichlorocarbene (CCl2) functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were studied using density functional theory (DFT). The Young’s modulus of ionized pristine SWCNTs is found to decrease in comparison to that of neutral models. The interesting effect of increase in Young’s modulus values of ionized functionalized SWCNTs is observed. We ascribe this feature to the concurrent processes of the bond elongation on ionization and the local deformation on cycloaddition. The strong dependence of the elasticity modulus on the number of addends is also observed. However, the CCl2-attached SWCNTs in their neutral and ionized forms remain strong enough to be suitable for the reinforcement of composites. In contrast to the elastic properties, the binding energies do not change significantly, irrespective of CCl2 coverage.

  5. Structural and mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichot, V.; Badaire, S.; Albouy, P. A.; Zakri, C.; Poulin, P.; Launois, P.

    2006-12-01

    We report quantitative experimental study correlating the structure and mechanical properties of fibers made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). A post-synthesis solvent drawing treatment is used to vary nanotube alignment, whose detailed understanding is a prerequisite for fiber development. Quantitative analysis of nanotube alignment within the fibers with different draw ratios is performed using x-ray scattering. The method is described in detail, and we also show that the improvement of nanotube alignment with draw ratio can be understood within a model of induced orientation at constant volume. Young’s modulus and tensile strength increase with nanotube alignment. This is modeled using continuum mechanics in qualitative agreement with experiment, however quantitative differences show that nanotube alignment is not the only parameter controlling the fiber mechanical properties. We suggest that interaction between the SWNTs and PVA chains should also play a significant role.

  6. Influence of molecular adsorption on the dielectric properties of a single wall nanotube: a model sensor.

    PubMed

    Langlet, R; Arab, M; Picaud, F; Devel, M; Girardet, C

    2004-11-15

    Recent measurements of the resonance frequency of a copper disk covered with carbon nanotube bundles have shown characteristic resonance shifts during exposure with various gas molecules. The shifts were interpreted as the change of the dielectric permittivity of the system forming the sensor due to the electric properties of the adsorbed molecules. Starting from a simplified sensor model formed by one single wall nanotube, we develop a self-consistent approach to describe the variation of the linear dielectric susceptibility of the tube at the atomic scale when molecules are adsorbed at its external surface. The sensitivity of this model sensor is tested as a function of the apolar or polar nature of the admolecules, their adsorption geometry, their concentration, and the characteristics of the tube (length, diameter,...). The comparison with data on dielectric constant changes vs adsorption, coming from measurements of the resonance frequency shifts, displays striking agreement for most of the molecular species considered. PMID:15538888

  7. Localization of the electronic excitations in single-walled carbon nanotubes with embedded line impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komorowski, P. G.; Cottam, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    A matrix operator formalism is used to study the excitations in long, single-walled carbon nanotubes with the dynamic electronic properties described by a tight-binding model where the interactions between atoms take place via nearest-neighbour hopping. Defects in the form of substitutional impurity atoms are introduced to study the localized electronic modes of the nanotube as well as the propagating modes of the pure (host) material. The impurities are assumed to have the form of one or more line defects parallel to the nanotube axis. Two geometric configurations are investigated corresponding to the longitudinal axis of the nanotube being parallel to either a zigzag or an armchair direction of the graphene lattice. A tridiagonal matrix technique is employed to solve the electronic operator equations that provide a description of the frequencies of the discrete modes of the system and their spatial amplitudes. Numerical examples are presented for different nanotube diameters and spatial configurations of the impurity lines.

  8. Molecular interactions on single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by high-resolution transmission microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Umeyama, Tomokazu; Baek, Jinseok; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Abou-Chahine, Fawzi; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The close solid-state structure–property relationships of organic π−aromatic molecules have attracted interest due to their implications for the design of organic functional materials. In particular, a dimeric structure, that is, a unit consisting of two molecules, is required for precisely evaluating intermolecular interactions. Here, we show that the sidewall of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) represents a unique molecular dimer platform that can be directly visualized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Pyrene is chosen as the π−aromatic molecule; its dimer is covalently linked to the SWNT sidewalls by aryl addition. Reflecting the orientation and separation of the two molecules, the pyrene dimer on the SWNT exhibits characteristic optical and photophysical properties. The methodology discussed here—form and probe molecular dimers—is highly promising for the creation of unique models and provides indispensable and fundamental information regarding molecular interactions. PMID:26173983

  9. Quantitative thermal imaging of single-walled carbon nanotube devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xu; Grosse, Kyle L; Song, Jizhou; Lu, Chaofeng; Dunham, Simon; Du, Frank; Islam, Ahmad E; Li, Yuhang; Zhang, Yihui; Pop, Eric; Huang, Yonggang; King, William P; Rogers, John A

    2012-11-27

    Electrical generation of heat in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and subsequent thermal transport into the surroundings can critically affect the design, operation, and reliability of electronic and optoelectronic devices based on these materials. Here we investigate such heat generation and transport characteristics in perfectly aligned, horizontal arrays of SWNTs integrated into transistor structures. We present quantitative assessments of local thermometry at individual SWNTs in these arrays, evaluated using scanning Joule expansion microscopy. Measurements at different applied voltages reveal electronic behaviors, including metallic and semiconducting responses, spatial variations in diameter or chirality, and localized defect sites. Analytical models, validated by measurements performed on different device structures at various conditions, enable accurate, quantitative extraction of temperature distributions at the level of individual SWNTs. Using current equipment, the spatial resolution and temperature precision are as good as ∼100 nm and ∼0.7 K, respectively.

  10. DFT studies of COOH tip-functionalized zigzag and armchair single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chełmecka, Elżbieta; Pasterny, Karol; Kupka, Teobald; Stobiński, Leszek

    2012-05-01

    Structure and energy calculations of pristine and COOH-modified model single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of different length were performed at B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. From 1 to 9 COOH groups were added at the end of the nanotube. The differences in structure and energetics of partially and fully functionalized SWCNTs at one end of the nanotube are observed. Up to nine COOH groups could be added at one end of (9,0) zigzag SWCNT in case of full functionalization. However, for (5,5) armchair SWCNT, the full functionalization was impossible due to steric crowding and rim deformation. The dependence of substituent attachment energy on the number of substituents at the carbon nanotube rim was observed.

  11. Cell response to single-walled carbon nanotubes in hybrid porous collagen sponges.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hongli; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous collagen sponges incorporated with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared and used for 3D culture of bovine articular chondrocytes (BACs). The pore structures of the sponges were controlled by using ice particulates as a porogen material. The responses of cells to SWCNTs were investigated in this 3D cell culture system by evaluation of cell functions and cellular uptake of SWCNTs. The results showed that cells adhered and spatially distributed in the porous sponges. The incorporation of SWCNTs in the porous sponges promoted cell proliferation and production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG). Confocal Raman imaging revealed that SWCNTs could be internalized by cells. The hybrid porous sponges not only provided nanostructured pore surfaces to facilitate cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion but also supplied nanomaterials for cellular uptake which may be useful for biomedical applications.

  12. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng

    2015-12-15

    The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range.

  13. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-17

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. As a result, we test this theory explicitly on the data reported in [NanoLetters 5, 2314 (2005)] and [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010)] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  14. High rate capacitive performance of single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels

    DOE PAGES

    Van Aken, Katherine L.; Pérez, Carlos R.; Oh, Youngseok; Beidaghi, Majid; Joo Jeong, Yeon; Islam, Mohammad F.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-05-30

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) aerogels produced by critical-point-drying of wet-gel precursors exhibit unique properties, such as high surface-area-to-volume and strength-to-weight ratios. They are free-standing, are binder-free, and can be scaled to thicknesses of more than 1 mm. In this paper, we examine the electric double layer capacitive behavior of these materials using a common room temperature ionic liquid electrolyte, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI). Electrochemical performance is assessed through galvanostatic cycling, cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Results indicate stable capacitive performance over 10,000 cycles as well as an impressive performance at high charge and discharge rates, due to accessible pore networks andmore » enhanced electronic and ionic conductivities of SWCNT aerogels. Finally, these materials can find applications in mechanically compressible and flexible supercapacitor devices with high power requirements.« less

  15. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-17

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. Asmore » a result, we test this theory explicitly on the data reported in [NanoLetters 5, 2314 (2005)] and [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010)] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.« less

  16. Electrical and mechanical characterisation of single wall carbon nanotubes based composites for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Whulanza, Yudan; Battini, Elena; Vannozzi, Lorenzo; Vomero, Maria; Ahluwalia, Arti; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the realisation of conductive matrices for application to tissue engineering research. We used poly(L-lactide (PLLA)), poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) as polymer matrix, because they are biocompatible and biodegradable. The conductive property was integrated to them by adding single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into the polymer matrix. Several SWNTs concentrations were introduced aiming to understand how they influence and modulate mechanical properties, impedance features and electric percolation threshold of polymer matrix. It was observed that a concentration of 0.3% was able to transform insulating matrix into conductive one. Furthermore, a conductive model of the SWNT/polymer was developed by applying power law of percolation threshold.

  17. Acyclic cucurbit[n]uril molecular containers selectively solubilize single-walled carbon nanotubes in water.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cai; Ma, Da; Meany, Brendan; Isaacs, Lyle; Wang, YuHuang

    2012-05-01

    Making single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) soluble in water is a challenging first step to use their remarkable electronic and optical properties in a variety of applications. We report that acyclic cucurbit[n]uril molecular containers 1 and 2 selectively solubilize small-diameter and low chiral angle SWNTs. The selectivity is tunable by increasing the concentration of the molecular containers or by adjusting the ionic strength of the solution. Even at a concentration 1000 times lower than typically required for surfactants, the molecular containers render SWNTs soluble in water. Molecular mechanics simulations suggest that these C-shaped acyclic molecules complex the SWNTs such that a large portion of nanotube sidewalls are exposed to the external environment. These "naked" nanotubes fluoresce upon patching the exposed surface with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate.

  18. Alignment dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes in pulsed ultrahigh magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Jonah; Parra-Vasquez, A Nicholas G; Hansel, Stefan; Portugall, Oliver; Mielke, Charles H; von Ortenberg, Michael; Hauge, Robert H; Pasquali, Matteo; Kono, Junichiro

    2009-01-27

    We have measured the dynamic alignment properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) suspensions in pulsed high magnetic fields through linear dichroism spectroscopy. Millisecond-duration pulsed high magnetic fields up to 56 T as well as microsecond-duration pulsed ultrahigh magnetic fields up to 166 T were used. Because of their anisotropic magnetic properties, SWNTs align in an applied magnetic field, and because of their anisotropic optical properties, aligned SWNTs show linear dichroism. The characteristics of their overall alignment depend on several factors, including the viscosity and temperature of the suspending solvent, the degree of anisotropy of nanotube magnetic susceptibilities, the nanotube length distribution, the degree of nanotube bundling, and the strength and duration of the applied magnetic field. To explain our data, we have developed a theoretical model based on the Smoluchowski equation for rigid rods that accurately reproduces the salient features of the experimental data.

  19. High rate capacitive performance of single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Van Aken, Katherine L.; Pérez, Carlos R.; Oh, Youngseok; Beidaghi, Majid; Joo Jeong, Yeon; Islam, Mohammad F.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-05-30

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) aerogels produced by critical-point-drying of wet-gel precursors exhibit unique properties, such as high surface-area-to-volume and strength-to-weight ratios. They are free-standing, are binder-free, and can be scaled to thicknesses of more than 1 mm. In this paper, we examine the electric double layer capacitive behavior of these materials using a common room temperature ionic liquid electrolyte, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI). Electrochemical performance is assessed through galvanostatic cycling, cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Results indicate stable capacitive performance over 10,000 cycles as well as an impressive performance at high charge and discharge rates, due to accessible pore networks and enhanced electronic and ionic conductivities of SWCNT aerogels. Finally, these materials can find applications in mechanically compressible and flexible supercapacitor devices with high power requirements.

  20. A remote sensor for detecting methane based on palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Li, Guomin

    2013-07-10

    The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID), and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 µm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs) are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI) and the comparative analog identifier (∆AID). Results validate the sensor's ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ∆AID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm.

  1. Mechanism of the initial stages of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotube growth.

    PubMed

    Susi, Toma; Lanzani, Giorgio; Nasibulin, Albert G; Ayala, Paola; Jiang, Tao; Bligaard, Thomas; Laasonen, Kari; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2011-06-21

    We have studied the mechanism of the initial stages of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotube growth illustrated for the case of a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition system, which uses carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH(3)) as precursors and iron as a catalyst. We performed first-principles electronic-structure calculations, fully incorporating the effects of spin polarization and magnetic moments, to investigate the bonding and chemistry of CO, NH(3), and their fragments on a model Fe(55) icosahedral cluster. A possible dissociation path for NH(3) to atomic nitrogen and hydrogen was identified, with a reaction barrier consistent with an experimentally determined value we measured by tandem infrared and mass spectrometry. Both C-C and C-N bond formation reactions were found to be barrierless and exothermic, while a parasitic reaction of HCN formation had a barrier of over 1 eV.

  2. Spin-orbit coupling and the static polarizability of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, Ginetom S. Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2014-07-14

    We calculate the static longitudinal polarizability of single-wall carbon tubes in the long wavelength limit taking into account spin-orbit effects. We use a four-orbital orthogonal tight-binding formalism to describe the electronic states and the random phase approximation to calculate the dielectric function. We study the role of both the Rashba as well as the intrinsic spin-orbit interactions on the longitudinal dielectric response, i.e., when the probing electric field is parallel to the nanotube axis. The spin-orbit interaction modifies the nanotube electronic band dispersions, which may especially result in a small gap opening in otherwise metallic tubes. The bandgap size and state features, the result of competition between Rashba and intrinsic spin-orbit interactions, result in drastic changes in the longitudinal static polarizability of the system. We discuss results for different nanotube types and the dependence on nanotube radius and spin-orbit couplings.

  3. Mechanism of electrolyte-induced brightening in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Duque, Juan G; Oudjedi, Laura; Crochet, Jared J; Tretiak, Sergei; Lounis, Brahim; Doorn, Stephen K; Cognet, Laurent

    2013-03-01

    While addition of electrolyte to sodium dodecyl sulfate suspensions of single-wall carbon nanotubes has been demonstrated to result in significant brightening of the nanotube photoluminescence (PL), the brightening mechanism has remained unresolved. Here, we probe this mechanism using time-resolved PL decay measurements. We find that PL decay times increase by a factor of 2 on addition of CsCl as the electrolyte. Such an increase directly parallels an observed near-doubling of PL intensity, indicating the brightening results primarily from changes in nonradiative decay rates associated with exciton diffusion to quenching sites. Our findings indicate that a reduced number of these sites results from electrolyte-induced reorientation of the surfactant surface structure that partially removes pockets of water from the tube surface where excitons can dissociate, and thus underscores the contribution of interfacial water in exciton recombination processes.

  4. Multiple helical configuration and quantity threshold of graphene nanoribbons inside a single-walled carbon nanotube

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yifan; Chen, Wei; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to explore the configuration and quantity threshold of multiple graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). The simulation results showed that several GNRs tangled together to form a perfect spiral structure to maximize the π-π stacking area when filling inside SWCNT. The formation of multiple helical configuration is influenced by the combined effect of structure stability, initial arrangement and tube space, meanwhile its forming time is related to helical angle. The simulated threshold of GNRs in SWCNT decreases with GNR width but increases with SWCNT diameter, and two formulas have come up in this study to estimate the quantity threshold for GNRs. It has been found that multilayered graphite is hard to be stripped in SWCNT because the special helical configuration with incompletely separated GNRs is metastable. This work provides a possibility to control the configuration of GNR@SWCNT. PMID:26374276

  5. Stable single helical C- and I-chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Z.; Liu, C. J.; Li, Y.; Jing, X. D.; Meng, F. S.; Zheng, S. P.; Zhao, X.; Li, J. H.; Qiu, Z. Y.; Yuan, Q.; Wang, W. X.; Bi, L.; Liu, H.; Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, B. B.

    2016-09-01

    The helicity of stable single helical carbon chains and iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied by calculating the systematic van der Waals interaction energy. The results show that the optimal helical radius increases linearly with increasing tube radius, which produces a constant separation between the chain structure and the tube wall. The helical angle exhibits a ladder-like decrease with increasing tube radius, indicating that a large tube can produce a small helicity in the helical structures. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11504150 and 51320105007), and the Cheung Kong Scholars Program of China.

  6. Adatom complexes and self-healing mechanisms on graphene and single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetseris, Leonidas; Pantelides, Sokrates T

    2009-01-01

    Point defects play a role in the functionalization, chemical activation, carrier transport, and nano-engineering of graphitic systems. Here, we use first-principles calculations to describe several processes that alter the properties of graphene and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the presence of self-interstitials (SI's). We find that, while two or four SI's are stabilized in hillock-like structures that stay idle unless the system is heated to very high temperatures, clustering of three C adatoms leads to the formation of mobile protrusions on graphene and large enough SWCNTs. For different SI concentrations and SWCNT size, the interplay between mobile and immobile species may favor one of the two competing processes, self-healing or formation of adatom superstructures.

  7. Chemisorption and Diffusion of H on a Graphene Sheet and Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor; Menon, Madhu

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiments on hydrogen storage in single wall nanotubes and nanotube bundles have reported large fractional weight of stored molecular hydrogen which are not in agreement with theoretical estimates based of simulation of hydrogen storage by physisorption mechanisms. Hydrogen storage in catalytically doped nanotube bundles indicate that atomic H might undergo chemisorption changing the basic nature of the storage mechanism under investigation by many groups. Using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GTBMD) method for reactive C-H dynamics, we investigate chemisorption and diffusion of atomic H on graphene sheet and C nanotubes. Effective potential energy surfaces (EPS) for chemisorption and diffusion are calculated for graphene sheet and nanotubes of different curvatures. Analysis of the activation barriers and quantum rate constants, computed via wave-packet dynamics method, will be discussed in this presentation.

  8. Diameter-dependent ion transport through the interior of isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wonjoon; Ulissi, Zachary W; Shimizu, Steven F E; Bellisario, Darin O; Ellison, Mark D; Strano, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Nanopores that approach molecular dimensions demonstrate exotic transport behaviour and are theoretically predicted to display discontinuities in the diameter dependence of interior ion transport because of structuring of the internal fluid. No experimental study has been able to probe this diameter dependence in the 0.5-2 nm diameter regime. Here we observe a surprising fivefold enhancement of stochastic ion transport rates for single-walled carbon nanotube centered at a diameter of approximately 1.6 nm. An electrochemical transport model informed from literature simulations is used to understand the phenomenon. We also observe rates that scale with cation type as Li(+)>K(+)>Cs(+)>Na(+) and pore blocking extent as K(+)>Cs(+)>Na(+)>Li(+) potentially reflecting changes in hydration shell size. Across several ion types, the pore-blocking current and inverse dwell time are shown to scale linearly at low electric field. This work opens up new avenues in the study of transport effects at the nanoscale.

  9. Platinum nanoparticles-single-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid based chemiresistive sensor array for myoglobin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vikash; Puri, Nitin K.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    We examined the potential of platinum nanoparticles (PtNP) modified single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) hybrid chemiresistive sensor for detection of antigen myoglobin (Mb) in phosphate buffer saline. Protein antibody, Ab-Mb, was covalently immobilized through site specific binding on PtNP attached over SWNT. A concentration-dependent change in the source-drain current of the hybrid device was observed in the range of 0.1-1000 ng ml-1. The hybrid device response fitted well with the Hill-Langmuir equation with a maximum response of 111.14% and low dissociation constant value (K d = 19.98 ng ml-1), indicating high protein antigen binding affinity at hybrid nanostructure.

  10. Transport spectroscopy of chemical nanostructures: the case of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenjie; Bockrath, Marc; Park, Hongkun

    2005-01-01

    Transport spectroscopy, a technique based on current-voltage measurements of individual nanostructures in a three-terminal transistor geometry, has emerged as a powerful new tool to investigate the electronic properties of chemically derived nanostructures. In this review, we discuss the utility of this approach using the recent studies of single-nanotube transistors as an example. Specifically, we discuss how transport measurements can be used to gain detailed insight into the electronic motion in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes in several distinct regimes, depending on the coupling strength of the contacts to the nanotubes. Measurements of nanotube devices in these different conductance regimes have enabled a detailed analysis of the transport properties, including the experimental determination of all Hartree-Fock parameters that govern the electronic structure of metallic nanotubes and the demonstration of Fabry-Perot resonators based on the interference of electron waves.

  11. Adhesion-driven buckling of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Changhong; Zheng, Meng; Bae, In-Tae; Zhou, Guangwen

    2010-05-01

    Buckling of a thin single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundle that is partially bound on another straight free-standing SWNT bundle is reported. The buckling of the SWNT bundle is purely due to the adhesion interaction between two SWNT bundles. The deformation curvature of the buckled SWNT bundle is experimentally measured by transmission electron microscopy, and is theoretically modeled by a continuum model based on nonlinear elastica theory. Our results reveal that the binding strength of the bundle interface and the bulk elastic modulus of the SWNT bundle can be associated by its buckling curvature. Our results show that the bulk elastic moduli of the tested SWNT bundles are significantly lower than the Young's modulus of individual SWNTs. The reported adhesion-driven nanotube buckling provides a potential new approach to quantify the elastic modulus and the binding strength of bundled nanotubes.

  12. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled

  13. Optical properties of dimeric liquid crystals doped with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, M.; Katranchev, B.; Rafailov, P. M.; Naradikian, H.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Keskinova, E.

    2012-12-01

    Well oriented distinct local single crystals were grown in smectic C liquid crystal (LC) (heptyloxybenzoic acid - 7OBA) using predefined orientation of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The SWCNT/SiOx/ITO/glass surface is found to cause a substantial enlargement of the smectic C distinct local single crystals and to reinforce both surface memory effect and surface anchoring. We synthesized and examined a set of nanocomposites, built of LC with hydrogen-bonded in dimers molecules (7OBA) and SWCNT. We found that the surface orientation strength and the interaction of the dimeric molecules with the carbon nanotubes play a decisive role for the type (symmetry), thermal stability and chirality of the LC states induced in the nanocomposites. As a result, a set of phase transitions and new phases (chiral smectic C, reentrant nematic, reentrant chiral nematic and a unique low-temperature chiral biaxial fluid smectic phase CG) not typical for pristine 7OBA were found.

  14. Photoluminescence of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Role of Stokes Shift and Impurity Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jinglin; Ma, Yuchen; Yin, Huabing; Liu, Chengbu; Rohlfing, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Recent experiments have indicated that dopants and defects can trigger new redshifted photoluminescence (PL) peaks below the E11 peak in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). To understand the origin of the new PL peaks, we study theoretically the excited-state properties of SWCNTs with some typical dopants and defects by ab initio many-body perturbation theory. Our calculations demonstrate that the Stokes shift in doped centers can be as large as 170 meV, which is much larger than that of intact SWCNTs and must be taken into account. We find dipole-allowed transitions from localized midgap and shallow impurity levels, which can give rise to pronounced PL peaks. Dark excitons, on the other hand, seem to have oscillator strengths that are too small to account for the new PL peaks.

  15. Novel Materials Containing Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Wrapped in Polymer Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E.; O'Connell, Michael J.; Smith, Kenneth; Colbert, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    In this design, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been coated in polymer molecules to create a new type of material that has low electrical conductivity, but still contains individual nanotubes, and small ropes of individual nanotubes, which are themselves good electrical conductors and serve as small conducting rods immersed in an electrically insulating matrix. The polymer is attached through weak chemical forces that are primarily non-covalent in nature, caused primarily through polarization rather than the sharing of valence electrons. Therefore, the electronic structure of the SWNT involved is substantially the same as that of free, individual (and small ropes of) SWNT. Their high conductivity makes the individual nanotubes extremely electrically polarizable, and materials containing these individual, highly polarizable molecules exhibit novel electrical properties including a high dielectric constant.

  16. Preparation and Properties of Nanocomposites Prepared From Shortened, Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G., Jr.; Delozier, D. M.; Watson, K. A.; Connell, J. W.; Yu, Aiping; Haddon, R. C.; Bekyarova, E.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a continuing materials development activity, low color space environmentally stable polymeric materials that possess sufficient electrical conductivity for electrostatic charge dissipation (ESD) have been investigated. One method of incorporating sufficient electrical conductivity for ESD without detrimental effects on other polymer properties of interest (i.e., optical and thermo-optical) is through the incorporation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). However, SWNTs are difficult to fully disperse in the polymer matrix. One means of improving dispersion is by shortening and functionalizing SWNTs. While this improves dispersion, other properties (i.e., electrical) of the SWNTs can be affected which can in turn alter the final nanocomposite properties. Additionally, functionalization of the polymer matrix can also influence nanocomposite properties obtained from shortened, functionalized SWNTs. The preparation and characterization of nanocomposites fabricated from a polyimide, both functionalized and unfunctionalized, and shortened, functionalized SWNTs will be presented.

  17. Investigation of Aromatic/Aliphatic Polyimides as Dispersants for Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delozier, Donavon M.; Watson, Kent A.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Clancy, Thomas C.; Connell, John W.

    2006-01-01

    Novel aromatic/aliphatic polyimides were prepared from 2,7-diamino-9,9'- dioctylfluorene (AFDA) and aromatic dianhydrides. Upon investigating the effectiveness of these polyimides for dispersing single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in solution, three were discovered to disperse SWNTs in N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc). Two of these polyimides, one from 3,3',4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride (ODPA) and one from symmetric 3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (s-BPDA), were used to prepare nanocomposites. Homogeneous polyimide/SWNT suspensions from both polymers were used in the preparation of films and fibers containing up to 1 wt% SWNTs. The samples were thermally treated to remove residual solvent and the films were characterized for SWNT dispersion by optical and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). Electrical and mechanical properties of the films were also determined. Electrospun fibers were examined by HRSEM to characterize SWNT alignment and orientation.

  18. Adsorption equilibrium of organic vapors on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Gravimetric techniques were employed to determine the adsorption capacities of commercially available purified electric arc and HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for organic compounds (toluene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), hexane and cyclohexane) at relative pressures, p/p0, ranging from 1 ?? 10-4 to 0.95 and at isothermal conditions of 25, 37 and 50 ??C. The isotherms displayed both type I and type II characteristics. Adsorption isotherm modeling showed that SWNTs are heterogeneous adsorbents, and the Freundlich equation best describes the interaction between organic molecules and SWNTs. The heats of adsorption were 1-4 times the heats of vaporization, which is typical for physical adsorption of organic vapors on porous carbons. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Affinity-mediated sorting order reversal of single-walled carbon nanotubes in density gradient ultracentrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Myungsu; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Haneul; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-10-01

    Sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of paramount importance for their utilization in high-end optoelectronic applications. Sodium cholate (SC)-based density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) has been instrumental in isolating small diameter (d t) SWNTs. Here, we show that SWNTs wrapped by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a dispersing agent are sorted in DGU, and show sorting order reversal behavior, departing from prototypical SC-SWNT trends. Larger d t SWNTs are sorted in lower density (ρ), and buoyant ρ distribution of FMN-SWNT ranges from 1.15-1.25 g cm-3. Such a nanotube layering pattern originates from both the binding affinity between FMN and SWNT and the less-susceptible hydrated volume of remote phosphate sidechains of FMN according to nanotube d t change.

  20. Viscoelastic wave propagation in the viscoelastic single walled carbon nanotubes based on nonlocal strain gradient theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yugang; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Dong

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the viscoelastic wave propagation in an embedded viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is studied based on the nonlocal strain gradient theory. The characteristic equation for the viscoelastic wave in SWCNTs is derived. The emphasis is placed on the influence of the tube diameter on the viscoelastic wave dispersion. A blocking diameter is observed, above which the wave could not propagate in SWCNTs. The results show that the blocking diameter is greatly dependent on the damping coefficient, the nonlocal and the strain gradient length scale parameters, as well as the Winkler modulus of the surrounding elastic medium. These findings may provide a prospective application of SWCNTs in nanodevices and nanocomposites.

  1. Zipping, entanglement, and the elastic modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Panzer, Matthew A.; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W.; Cai, Wei; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Reliably routing heat to and from conversion materials is a daunting challenge for a variety of innovative energy technologies––from thermal solar to automotive waste heat recovery systems––whose efficiencies degrade due to massive thermomechanical stresses at interfaces. This problem may soon be addressed by adhesives based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, which promise the revolutionary combination of high through-plane thermal conductivity and vanishing in-plane mechanical stiffness. Here, we report the data for the in-plane modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films using a microfabricated resonator method. Molecular simulations and electron microscopy identify the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for this property. The zipping and unzipping of adjacent nanotubes and the degree of alignment and entanglement are shown to govern the spatially varying local modulus, thereby providing the route to engineered materials with outstanding combinations of mechanical and thermal properties. PMID:24309375

  2. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field.

    PubMed

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M; Geday, Morten A

    2016-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  3. Electronic structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes on ultrathin insulating films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyung-Joon; Clair, Sylvain; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2008-12-01

    The electronic structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes on Ag(100) and on ultrathin insulating NaCl(100)/Ag(100) were studied using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The Fermi level of the nanotubes was shifted toward the conduction band on Ag(100), while it was shifted toward the valence band on NaCl films. We explain this opposite behavior by different basic mechanisms accounting for the Fermi level shifts. On the metal surface, the work function difference between the tube and the substrate determines the direction of the Fermi level shift. In the case of carbon nanotubes on insulating films, the electric field resulting from the dipole moment formed at the interface between the insulating film and the metal plays a decisive role in determining the Fermi level.

  4. Heteroepitaxial Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes from Boron Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Zhang, Li-Li; Liu, Chang; Yin, Li-Chang; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Jiang, Hua; Zhu, Zhen; Li, Feng; Liu, Bilu; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with predefined structure is of great importance for both fundamental research and their practical applications. Traditionally, SWCNTs are grown from a metal catalyst with a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, where the catalyst is in liquid state with fluctuating structures, and it is intrinsically unfavorable for the structure control of SWCNTs. Here we report the heteroepitaxial growth of SWCNTs from a platelet boron nitride nanofiber (BNNF), which is composed of stacked (002) planes and is stable at high temperatures. SWCNTs are found to grow epitaxially from the open (002) edges of the BNNFs, and the diameters of the SWCNTs are multiples of the BN (002) interplanar distance. In situ transmission electron microscopy observations coupled with first principles calculations reveal that the growth of SWCNTs from the BNNFs follows a vapor-solid-solid mechanism. Our work opens opportunities for the control over the structure of SWCNTs by hetero-crystallographic epitaxy. PMID:23240076

  5. Dysprosium-Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays on Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this letter, we report that dysprosium is an effective catalyst for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) growth via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the first time. Horizontally superlong well-oriented SWNT arrays on SiO2/Si wafer can be fabricated by EtOH-CVD under suitable conditions. The structure and properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the SWNTs from dysprosium have better structural uniformity and better conductivity with fewer defects. This rare earth metal provides not only an alternative catalyst for SWNTs growth, but also a possible method to generate high percentage of superlong semiconducting SWNT arrays for various applications of nanoelectronic device. PMID:20672139

  6. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  7. Induced hydroelectric energy generated by compressing a single-walled carbon nanotube hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhenquan; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Hashishin, Takeshi; Ohara, Satoshi

    2014-07-01

    Using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for energy harvesting and storage have attracted much attention recently because SWCNTs have supercapacity performance. In this paper, we report a simple electromechanical approach for the generation of induced electrical potential by the compression of a SWCNT-triggered sodium deoxycholate hydrogel. This hydrogel enhances the electrical potential generated under compression, and this is mainly because of the generation of hydroelectric power by the flow of water over the SWCNTs. The induced voltage was 63.1 mV upon the compression of a 4% SWCNT hydrogel to a compression ratio of 50%, which is superior to values reported previously. The enhancement in hydroelectric potential increased with SWCNT loading in the hydrogel and with the compression ratio because of an enhancement of the impact frequency between water molecules and the SWCNTs.

  8. Adhesion energy of single wall carbon nanotube loops on various substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianjun; Ayari, Anthony; Bellon, Ludovic

    2015-04-28

    The physics of adhesion of one-dimensional nano structures such as nanotubes, nano wires, and biopolymers on different substrates is of great interest for the study of biological adhesion and the development of nano electronics and nano mechanics. In this paper, we present force spectroscopy experiments of individual single wall carbon nanotube loops using a home-made interferometric atomic force microscope. Characteristic force plateaus during the peeling process allow the quantitative measurement of the adhesion energy per unit length on various substrates: graphite, mica, platinum, gold, and silicon. Moreover, using a time-frequency analysis of the deflection of the cantilever, we estimate the dynamic stiffness of the contact, providing more information on the nanotube configurations and its intrinsic mechanical properties.

  9. Pressure-induced phase transformation and structural resilience of single-wall carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Surinder M.; Karmakar, S.; Sikka, S. K.; Teredesai, Pallavi V.; Sood, A. K.; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C. N.

    2001-05-01

    We report here an in situ x-ray diffraction investigation of the structural changes in carbon single-wall nanotube bundles under quasihydrostatic pressures up to 13 GPa. In contrast with a recent study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1887 (2000)] our results show that the triangular lattice of the carbon nanotube bundles continues to persist up to ~10 GPa. The lattice is seen to relax just before the phase transformation that is observed at ~10 GPa. Further, our results display the reversibility of the two-dimensional lattice symmetry even after compression up to 13 GPa well beyond the 5 GPa value observed recently. These experimental results explicitly validate the predicted remarkable mechanical resilience of the nanotubes.

  10. Periodic alignment of Si quantum dots on hafnium oxide coated single wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Mario; Martinez-Morales, Alfredo A.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Liu Jianlin; Liu Gang; Lau, C.N.; Yengel, Emre; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2009-03-23

    We demonstrate a bottom up approach for the aligned epitaxial growth of Si quantum dots (QDs) on one-dimensional (1D) hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) ridges created by the growth of HfO{sub 2} thin film on single wall carbon nanotubes. This growth process creates a high strain 1D ridge on the HfO{sub 2} film, which favors the formation of Si seeds over the surrounding flat HfO{sub 2} area. Periodic alignment of Si QDs on the 1D HfO{sub 2} ridge was observed, which can be controlled by varying different growth conditions, such as growth temperature, growth time, and disilane flow rate.

  11. Swift heavy ion induced modifications of single walled carbon nanotube thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishalli; Raina, K. K.; Avasthi, D. K.; Srivastava, Alok; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-04-01

    Thin films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method and irradiated with swift heavy ions, carbon and nickel each of energy 60 MeV. The ion beams have different electronic energy loss (Se) values and the samples were exposed to various irradiation doses. The irradiated films were characterized using Raman and optical absorption spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy results indicate the competing processes of defect creation and healing (annealing) of SWCNTs at lower fluences, while at higher fluences defect creation or damage dominates. In UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy we find that there is decrease in the intensity of characteristic peaks with every increasing fluence, indicating decrease in the optically active states with irradiation.

  12. Dispersion of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using a Novel Type of Sonication: Focused Sonication.

    PubMed

    Sachin, Bramhe N; Ae, Hwangbo Seon; Chu, Min Cheol

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the use of novel type of sonication method, focused sonication, with added advantages over bath and probe type of sonication for the dispersion of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Di-chloro benzene was used as the solvent for dispersion of SWNT. Results from focused sonication and bath sonication were compared and found that focused sonication results in better dispersion. Also Raman spectroscopy was analysed to ascertain if focused sonication causes any damage to the tubes and it was found that there was no damage to the SWNT. We believe that with the added advantages like in-situ temperature control and large sample volume processing, focused sonication would prove to be the most proficient method of sonication for dispersion of nanoparticles. PMID:27455717

  13. Highly selective dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes using aromatic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nish, Adrian; Hwang, Jeong-Yuan; Doig, James; Nicholas, Robin J.

    2007-10-01

    Solubilizing and purifying carbon nanotubes remains one of the foremost technological hurdles in their investigation and application. We report a dramatic improvement in the preparation of single-walled carbon nanotube solutions based on the ability of specific aromatic polymers to efficiently disperse certain nanotube species with a high degree of selectivity. Evidence of this is provided by optical absorbance and photoluminescence excitation spectra, which show suspensions corresponding to up to ~60% relative concentration of a single species of isolated nanotubes with fluorescence quantum yields of up to 1.5%. Different polymers show the ability to discriminate between nanotube species in terms of either diameter or chiral angle. Modelling suggests that rigid-backbone polymers form ordered molecular structures surrounding the nanotubes with n-fold symmetry determined by the tube diameter.

  14. Ferromagnetism/antiferromagnetism transition between semihydrogenated and fully-aminated single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qingming; Zhao, Lina; Luo, Youhua; Zhang, Meng; Jing, Long; Zhao, Yuliang

    2011-09-01

    We theoretically studied the ferromagnetism/antiferromagnetism (FM/AFM) transition between single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) induced by chemical modifications of semihydrogenation (SH-) and full-amination (NH(2)-). We found that armchairs with large diameters of SH-CNTs (n > 3) possess FM functions with intense magnetic moments, while armchair NH(2)-CNTs (n = 4, 6, 8) are antiferromagnetic semiconductors. The FM/AFM transition is mainly dominated by different chemical modifications and sizes of SWCNTs whose distance between carbon atoms of unpaired electrons can regulate the intensity of p-p spin interactions. Moreover, the zigzag SH-CNTs and NH(2)-CNTs are NM semiconductors. Thus, the electronic and magnetic properties of the SH- or NH(2)-CNTs can be precisely modulated by controlling the hydrogenation or amination on the different types and diameters of CNTs, which provides a new and also simple process for magnetism optimization design in SWCNTs. PMID:21804988

  15. Ferromagnetism/antiferromagnetism transition between semihydrogenated and fully-aminated single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Qingming; Zhao, Lina; Luo, Youhua; Zhang, Meng; Jing, Long; Zhao, Yuliang

    2011-09-01

    We theoretically studied the ferromagnetism/antiferromagnetism (FM/AFM) transition between single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) induced by chemical modifications of semihydrogenation (SH-) and full-amination (NH2-). We found that armchairs with large diameters of SH-CNTs (n > 3) possess FM functions with intense magnetic moments, while armchair NH2-CNTs (n = 4, 6, 8) are antiferromagnetic semiconductors. The FM/AFM transition is mainly dominated by different chemical modifications and sizes of SWCNTs whose distance between carbon atoms of unpaired electrons can regulate the intensity of p-p spin interactions. Moreover, the zigzag SH-CNTs and NH2-CNTs are NM semiconductors. Thus, the electronic and magnetic properties of the SH- or NH2-CNTs can be precisely modulated by controlling the hydrogenation or amination on the different types and diameters of CNTs, which provides a new and also simple process for magnetism optimization design in SWCNTs.

  16. Spin-orbit coupling and the static polarizability of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, Ginetom S.; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    2014-07-01

    We calculate the static longitudinal polarizability of single-wall carbon tubes in the long wavelength limit taking into account spin-orbit effects. We use a four-orbital orthogonal tight-binding formalism to describe the electronic states and the random phase approximation to calculate the dielectric function. We study the role of both the Rashba as well as the intrinsic spin-orbit interactions on the longitudinal dielectric response, i.e., when the probing electric field is parallel to the nanotube axis. The spin-orbit interaction modifies the nanotube electronic band dispersions, which may especially result in a small gap opening in otherwise metallic tubes. The bandgap size and state features, the result of competition between Rashba and intrinsic spin-orbit interactions, result in drastic changes in the longitudinal static polarizability of the system. We discuss results for different nanotube types and the dependence on nanotube radius and spin-orbit couplings.

  17. Growing and characterizing one-dimensional crystals within single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, John L; Sloan, Jeremy; Kirkland, Angus I; Green, Malcolm L H

    2004-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used as growth templates for spatially confined crystal growth. The comparative crystallization and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging properties of simple binary halides formed by the alkali iodides MI (M = Li, K, Na, Rb and Cs) within SWNTs are described. The most common structure type observed within SWNTs was the rocksalt archetype, although CsI was observed to form both body-centred cubic (bcc) and rocksalt structure types. ThCl4 was found to form a chain structure of Th[Cl]8 polyhedra. HgI2 crystallized within nanotubes with ultra-narrow (i.e. 0.8 nm) capillaries was observed to form helical 2 x 1 layer crystals.

  18. High-sensitivity bolometers from self-oriented single-walled carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Vera-Reveles, Gustavo; Simmons, Trevor J; Bravo-Sánchez, Mariela; Vidal, M A; Navarro-Contreras, Hugo; González, Francisco J

    2011-08-01

    In this work, films of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes were thermally and electrically characterized in order to determine the bolometric performance. An average thermal time constant of τ = 420 μs along with a temperature coefficient of resistance of TCR = -2.94% K(-1) were obtained. The maximum voltage responsivity and detectivity obtained were R(V) =230 V/W and D* = 1.22 × 10(8) cm Hz(1/2)/W, respectively. These values are higher than the maximum voltage responsivity (150 V/W) and maximum temperature coefficient of resistance (1.0% K(-1)) previously reported for carbon nanotube films at room temperature. The maximum detectivity was obtained at a frequency of operation of 1.25 kHz.

  19. A theoretical study on the interaction of amphetamine and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizi, Hamid; Najafi Chermahini, Alireza; Mohammadnezhad, Gholamhossein; Teimouri, Abbas

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of 1-phenyl-2-aminopropane (amphetamine) on the (4,4), (5,5), (6,6), and (7,7) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been theoretically investigated. The molecule has been located in different modes including parallel, perpendicular, and oblique on the outer surface of carbon nanotubes. The physisorption of amphetamine onto SWCNT sidewall is thermodynamically favored; as a consequence, it modulates the electronic properties of pristine nanotube in the vicinity of Fermi region. The adsorption energies for the parallel and oblique modes found in the range of -1.13 to -1.88 and -1.27 to -2.01 kcal/mol, respectively. Projected density of states (PDOS) and frontier orbital analysis in the vicinity of Fermi level region suggest the electronic states to be contributed from SWCNT rather than amphetamine molecule.

  20. Chirality and Diameter Influence on Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ya; Zhu, Jie; Tang, Da-Wei

    2015-04-01

    Influence of chirality and diameter on thermal conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT) with different tube lengths have been investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) method. The tube lengths of the SWNTs studied here are 20, 50 and 100 nm, respectively, and at each length the relationship between chiral angle and thermal conductivity of SWNT has been revealed; the dependence of thermal conductivity on diameter has also been studied. We find that chirality impact on thermal conductivity of SWNT is more obvious when tube length is relatively shorter, while diameter effect is more noticeable when tube gets longer. With larger chiral angle, thermal conductivity of chiral SWNTs is greater than that with smaller chiral angle and thermal conductivity increases with diameter.

  1. Diameter Dependence of Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Study from Ab Initio.

    PubMed

    Yue, Sheng-Ying; Ouyang, Tao; Hu, Ming

    2015-10-22

    The effects of temperature, tube length, defects, and surface functionalization on the thermal conductivity (κ) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were well documented in literature. However, diameter dependence of thermal conductivity of SWCNTs received less attentions. So far, diverse trends of the diameter dependence have been discussed by different methods and all the previous results were based on empirical interatomic potentials. In this paper, we emphasize to clarify accurate κ values of SWCNTs with different diameters and in-plane κ of graphene. All the studies were under the framework of anharmonic lattice dynamics and Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first principle calculations. We try to infer the right trend of diameter dependent thermal conductivity of SWCNTs. We infer that graphene is the limitation as SWCNT with an infinite diameter. We analyzed the thermal conductivity contributions from each phonon mode in SWCNTs to explain the trend. Meanwhile, we also identify the extremely low thermal conductivity of ultra-thin SWCNTs.

  2. Activated sludge microbial community responses to single-walled carbon nanotubes: community structure does matter.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Shen, Wenli; Wang, Jingwei; Zhang, Zhaojing; Zhang, Xuwang; Zhou, Hao; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-01-01

    The ecological effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been a worldwide research focus due to their extensive release and accumulation in environment. Activated sludge acting as an important gathering place will inevitably encounter and interact with CNTs, while the microbial responses have been rarely investigated. Herein, the activated sludges from six wastewater treatment plants were acclimated and treated with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under identical conditions. Illumina high-throughput sequencing was applied to in-depth analyze microbial changes and results showed SWCNTs differently perturbed the alpha diversity of the six groups (one increase, two decrease, three no change). Furthermore, the microbial community structures were shifted, and specific bacterial performance in each group was different. Since the environmental and operational factors were identical in each group, it could be concluded that microbial responses to SWCNTs were highly depended on the original community structures. PMID:25909735

  3. Hierarchical morphology of carbon single-walled nanotubes during sonication in an aliphatic diamine

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Janis M.; Anderson, David P.; Justice, Ryan S.; Lafdi, Khalid; Belfor, Max; Strong, Karla L.; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2010-07-13

    Dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by sonication into diamine curing agents is studied as a means to improve the dispersion of SWNTs in cured epoxy. Cured and uncured specimens are analyzed by light microscopy, electron microscopy, light scattering (LS), ultra small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS), electrical conductivity and Raman spectroscopy. A flexible diamine (D2000) forms a stable SWNT suspension leading to good homogeneity in both the diamine and the cured epoxy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that small ropes of SWNTs (mostly under 15 nm) are present despite the sample's visual homogeneity. Further morphological investigation of cured and uncured D2000 resins using light and small-angle X-ray scattering indicates that the SWNTs are networked into fractal clusters that electrically percolate at low SWNTs loadings (0.05 wt%).

  4. Affinity-mediated sorting order reversal of single-walled carbon nanotubes in density gradient ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myungsu; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Haneul; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-10-14

    Sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of paramount importance for their utilization in high-end optoelectronic applications. Sodium cholate (SC)-based density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) has been instrumental in isolating small diameter (d t) SWNTs. Here, we show that SWNTs wrapped by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a dispersing agent are sorted in DGU, and show sorting order reversal behavior, departing from prototypical SC-SWNT trends. Larger d t SWNTs are sorted in lower density (ρ), and buoyant ρ distribution of FMN-SWNT ranges from 1.15-1.25 g cm(-3). Such a nanotube layering pattern originates from both the binding affinity between FMN and SWNT and the less-susceptible hydrated volume of remote phosphate sidechains of FMN according to nanotube d t change.

  5. 0.8 nm single wall carbon nanotubes for wideband ultrafast pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Z.; Xu, Y.; Jia, Z. X.; Qin, G. S.; Qin, W. P.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate wideband ultrafast optical pulse generation at 1, 1.56 and 2 μm by using single polymer composite saturable absorber (SA) based on 0.8 nm single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The SWCNTs were mixed with sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC) to form SWCNT SA films. The film then integrated into ytterbium-(Yb-), erbium-(Er-) and thulium-(Tm-) doped ring fiber laser cavities. Using this film, we achieve 380 ps, 830 fs, and 1.24 ps mode-locked pulses at 1035, 1560, and 1933 nm, respectively. These results suggest that 0.8 nm SWCNTs are potentially useful as optical elements in wideband fiber lasers.

  6. Photoluminescence Imaging of Oxygen Doped Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Sibel Ebru; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Galande, Charudatta; Crochet, Jared J.; Mohite, Aditya D.; Gupta, Gautam; Ma, Xuedan; Htoon, Han; Doorn, Stephen K.; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration; Rice University Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are attractive candidates for near-IR optoelectronic applications. But they show low fluorescence quantum yield. Recent oxygen doping studies have shown that the quantum yield of the excitons can be enhanced by an order of magnitude due to the formation of local 0D sites on the SWNT surface. However, these studies have been limited to ensemble measurements. Understanding the dopant site, exciton migration and trapping dynamics on individual SWNTs is critical for controllably tuning the photo-physical behavior. We have studied ozonated individual (6,5) nanotubes as a function of progressive ozonation. We spatially resolved the pristine and doped state using visible and NIR sensitive cameras. We demonstrate PL imaging as a probe of the emission dynamics as a function of dopant concentration. The spectral studies show the red-shifted emission in the PL of the NTs due to the ozonated site.

  7. Reinforcement of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles by intertube bridging.

    PubMed

    Kis, A; Csányi, G; Salvetat, J-P; Lee, Thien-Nga; Couteau, E; Kulik, A J; Benoit, W; Brugger, J; Forró, L

    2004-03-01

    During their production, single-walled carbon nanotubes form bundles. Owing to the weak van der Waals interaction that holds them together in the bundle, the tubes can easily slide on each other, resulting in a shear modulus comparable to that of graphite. This low shear modulus is also a major obstacle in the fabrication of macroscopic fibres composed of carbon nanotubes. Here, we have introduced stable links between neighbouring carbon nanotubes within bundles, using moderate electron-beam irradiation inside a transmission electron microscope. Concurrent measurements of the mechanical properties using an atomic force microscope show a 30-fold increase of the bending modulus, due to the formation of stable crosslinks that effectively eliminate sliding between the nanotubes. Crosslinks were modelled using first-principles calculations, showing that interstitial carbon atoms formed during irradiation in addition to carboxyl groups, can independently lead to bridge formation between neighbouring nanotubes. PMID:14991016

  8. Crystallization of Polymers at liquid/liquid interface templated by single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda; Li, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Nanosized single-walled carbon nanotube rings were fabricated by using a Pickering emulsion-based method. By tuning a water/oil/SWNT miniemulsion system, SWNT rings with a diameter of ˜200 nm can be readily achieved. The formation mechanism is attributed to the bending force induced by the curved liquid/liquid interface. Crystallization of polyethylene homo- and copolymers using this unique SWNT rings as the nucleation agent was conducted at the curved liquid/liquid interface. Crystal structure, hybrid morphology and crystallization kinetics were systematically studied. The structure of controlled alternating patterns on SWNT rings has great potential in various applications in large-scale integrated circuits and single-electron devices.

  9. DNA Linked To Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes: Covalent Versus Non-Covalent Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C.-L.; Nguyen, K.; Lyonnais, S.; Streiff, S.; Campidelli, S.; Goux-Capes, L.; Bourgoin, J.-P.; Filoramo, A.

    2008-10-01

    Nanometer-scale structures represent a novel and intriguing field, where scientists and engineers manipulate materials at the atomic and molecular scale levels to produce innovative materials. Carbon nanotubes constitute a relatively new class of materials exhibiting exceptional mechanical and electronic properties and were found to be promising candidates for molecular electronics, sensing or biomedical applications. Considering the bottom-up strategy in nanotechnology, the combination of the recognition properties of DNA with the electronic properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) seems to be a promising approach for the future of electronics. With the aim to assemble DNA with SWNTs, two complementary strategies have been envisioned: the covalent linkage of DNA on carboxylic groups of SWNTs under classical coupling condition and the non-covalent approach based on biotin-streptavidin molecular recognition properties. Here, we present and compare the results that we obtained with these two different methods; we want to objectively show the advantages and disadvantages of each approach.

  10. Passively Q-switching induced by the smallest single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. T.; Zhai, J. P.; Wang, J. S.; Chen, Y. P.; Yu, Y. Q.; Zhang, M.; Li, I. L.; Ruan, S. C.; Tang, Z. K.

    2014-04-28

    We report a passively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) by using the smallest single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a diameter of 0.3 nm as the saturable absorber. These small SWNTs are fabricated in the nanochannels of a ZnAPO-11 (AEL) single crystal. By inserting one of the AEL crystal into an EDFL cavity pumped by a 980 nm laser diode, stable passive Q-switching is achieved for a threshold pump power of 206.2 mW, and 4.73 μs pulses with a repetition rate of 41.78 kHz and an average output power of 3.75 mW are obtained for a pump power of 406 mW.

  11. Improvement of electrical properties of through silicon vias metal interconnector by adding single-walled nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geon Jung, Dong; Sung, Byung Mok; Kong, Seong Ho

    2015-06-01

    A novel through silicon via (TSV) interconnector, which consists of tin (Sn) powder and single-walled nanotube (SWNT) powder, is proposed and characterized. Most conventional TSV structures, which are commercially available to integrate multiple chips on one packaging, utilize electroplated copper as the interconnector. However, the electroplating-based process has some drawbacks, such as highly demanding fabrication processes in high-aspect-ratio vias, numerous voids, and high cost. To avoid these issues, we used Sn powder mixed with SWNTs as TSV interconnector. SWNTs have been added to improve the electrical properties of TSVs filled only with Sn. The electrical resistance of Sn powder-filled TSVs is 44.59 Ω, but it is markedly decreased to 5 Ω when a Sn and SWNTs mixture (weight ratio of \\text{SWNTs}:\\text{Sn} = 0.5:1) was used as the TSV interconnector. In addition, the proposed method could be used for various applications owing to its low process temperature.

  12. Tunable assembly of carbon nanospheres on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Liangti; Zhang, Han; Zhu, Jia; Dai, Liming

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a process for spontaneous assembly of carbon nanospheres on aligned or nonaligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by virtue of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The formation of carbon nanospheres with a uniform size of 30-60 nm is a catalyst-free process and strongly dependent on the applied plasma power and other factors. Both co-deposition and post-deposition approaches have been developed for effective assembly of carbon nanospheres on SWNTs. Furthermore, the method developed here also allows us to tailor the density and size of carbon nanospheres along nanotubes in a controllable way. The heterojunction structure based on different types of carbon demonstrated in this study represents a new hybrid manner for building complex systems which are promising for various applications.

  13. Tunable assembly of carbon nanospheres on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Qu, Liangti; Zhang, Han; Zhu, Jia; Dai, Liming

    2010-07-30

    We have developed a process for spontaneous assembly of carbon nanospheres on aligned or nonaligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by virtue of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The formation of carbon nanospheres with a uniform size of 30-60 nm is a catalyst-free process and strongly dependent on the applied plasma power and other factors. Both co-deposition and post-deposition approaches have been developed for effective assembly of carbon nanospheres on SWNTs. Furthermore, the method developed here also allows us to tailor the density and size of carbon nanospheres along nanotubes in a controllable way. The heterojunction structure based on different types of carbon demonstrated in this study represents a new hybrid manner for building complex systems which are promising for various applications. PMID:20603535

  14. All-printed and transparent single walled carbon nanotube thin film transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajed, Farzam; Rutherglen, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    We present fully transparent single-walled all-carbon nanotube thin film transistors (SWCNT TFT) fabricated using low-cost inkjet printing methods. Such a demonstration provides a platform towards low cost fully printed transparent electronics. The SWCNT TFTs were printed with metallic and semiconducting SWCNT using a room temperature printing process, without the requirement of expensive cleanroom facilities. The unoptimized SWCNT TFTs fabricated exhibited an Ion/off ratio of 92 and mobility of 2.27 cm2V-1s-1 and transmissivity of 82%. The combination of both high electrical performance and high transparency make all-SWCNT TFTs desirable for next generation transparent display backplanes and products such as Google Glass.

  15. Selective Growth of Metallic and Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Textured Silicon.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mira; Lee, Jongtaek; Park, Teahee; Lee, Junyoung; Yang, Jonghee; Yi, Whikun

    2016-03-01

    We fabricated the etched Si substrate having the pyramidal pattern size from 0.5 to 4.2 μm by changing the texturing process parameters, i.e., KOH concentration, etching time, and temperature. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were then synthesized on the etched Si substrates with different pyramidal pattern by chemical vapor deposition. We investigated the optical and electronic properties of SWNT film grown on the etched Si substrates of different morphology by using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and conducting probe atomic force microscopy. We confirmed that the morphology of substrate strongly affected the selective growth of the SWNT film. Semiconducting SWNTs were formed on larger pyramidal sized Si wafer with higher ratio compared with SWNTs on smaller pyramidal sized Si.

  16. 3D Viability Imaging of Tumor Phantoms Treated with Single Walled Carbon Nanohorns and Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Jon; Dewitt, Matthew; Whited, Bryce M.; Carswell, William; Simon, Alex; Rylander, Christopher G.; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2013-01-01

    Objective A new image analysis method called the Spatial Phantom Evaluation of Cellular Thermal Response in Layers (SPECTRL) is presented for assessing spatial viability response to nanoparticle enhanced photothermal therapy in tissue representative phantoms. Materials and Methods Sodium alginate phantoms seeded with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and single walled nanohorns were laser irradiated with an ytterbium fiber laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm and irradiance of 3.8 watts/cm2 for 10–80 seconds. SPECTRL quantitatively assessed and correlated 3D viability with spatiotemporal temperature. Results and Conclusions Based on this analysis, kill and transition zones increased from 3.7 mm3 and 13 mm3 respectively to 44.5 mm3 and 44.3 mm3 as duration was increased from 10–80 seconds. SPECTRL provides a quantitative tool for measuring precise spatial treatment regions, providing information necessary to tailor therapy protocols. PMID:23780336

  17. Transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube transistors after gamma radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Vitusevich, S. A.; Sydoruk, V. A.; Klein, N.; Offenhaeusser, A.; Petrychuk, M. V.; Danilchenko, B. A.; Ural, A.; Bosman, G.

    2010-03-15

    Single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) were characterized before and after gamma radiation treatment using noise spectroscopy. The results obtained demonstrate that in long channel CNT-FETs with a length of 10 {mu}m the contribution of contact regions can be neglected. Moreover, radiation treatment with doses of 1x10{sup 6} and 2x10{sup 6} rad allows a considerable decrease parallel to the nanotube parasitic conductivity and even the shift region with maximal conductivity to the voltage range of nearly zero gate voltage that improves the working point of the FETs. The Hooge parameters obtained before and after gamma radiation treatment with a dose of 1x10{sup 6} rad are found to be about 5x10{sup -3}. The parameters are comparable with typical values for conventional semiconductors.

  18. Molecular scale buckling mechanics in individual aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes on elastomeric substrates.

    PubMed

    Khang, Dahl-Young; Xiao, Jianliang; Kocabas, Coskun; MacLaren, Scott; Banks, Tony; Jiang, Hanqing; Huang, Yonggang Y; Rogers, John A

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the scaling of controlled nonlinear buckling processes in materials with dimensions in the molecular range (i.e., approximately 1 nm) through experimental and theoretical studies of buckling in individual single-wall carbon nanotubes on substrates of poly(dimethylsiloxane). The results show not only the ability to create and manipulate patterns of buckling at these molecular scales, but also, that analytical continuum mechanics theory can explain, quantitatively, all measurable aspects of this system. Inverse calculation applied to measurements of diameter-dependent buckling wavelengths yields accurate values of the Young's moduli of individual SWNTs. As an example of the value of this system beyond its use in this type of molecular scale metrology, we implement parallel arrays of buckled SWNTs as a class of mechanically stretchable conductor.

  19. TRANSPORT SPECTROSCOPY OF CHEMICAL NANOSTRUCTURES: The Case of Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wenjie; Bockrath, Marc; Park, Hongkun

    2005-05-01

    Transport spectroscopy, a technique based on current-voltage measurements of individual nanostructures in a three-terminal transistor geometry, has emerged as a powerful new tool to investigate the electronic properties of chemically derived nanostructures. In this review, we discuss the utility of this approach using the recent studies of single-nanotube transistors as an example. Specifically, we discuss how transport measurements can be used to gain detailed insight into the electronic motion in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes in several distinct regimes, depending on the coupling strength of the contacts to the nanotubes. Measurements of nanotube devices in these different conductance regimes have enabled a detailed analysis of the transport properties, including the experimental determination of all Hartree-Fock parameters that govern the electronic structure of metallic nanotubes and the demonstration of Fabry-Perot resonators based on the interference of electron waves.

  20. Tailoring polyacrylonitrile interfacial morphological structure by crystallization in the presence of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiying; Song, Kenan; Meng, Jiangsha; Minus, Marilyn L

    2013-02-01

    In order to improve stress transfer between polymer matrixes and nanofillers, controlling the structure development in the interphase region during composite processing is a necessity. For polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) composites, the formation of the PAN interphase in the presence of the SWNT as a function of processing conditions is studied. Under these conditions, three distinct interfacial coating morphologies of PAN are observed on SWNT. In the semidilute polymer concentration regime subjected to shearing, PAN extended-chain tubular coatings are formed on SWNT. Dilute PAN/SWNT quiescent solutions subjected to cooling yields hybrid periodic shish-kebab structures (first observation for PAN polymer), and dilute PAN/SWNT quiescent solutions subjected to rapid cooling results in the formation of an irregular PAN crystalline coating on the SWNT. PMID:23286387