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Sample records for phosphine oxides sulfides

  1. Simple unprecedented conversion of phosphine oxides and sulfides to phosphine boranes using sodium borohydride.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Kamalraj V; Gilheany, Declan G

    2012-01-21

    A variety of phosphine oxides and sulfides can be efficiently converted directly to the corresponding phosphine boranes using oxalyl chloride followed by sodium borohydride. Optically active P-stereogenic phosphine oxides can be converted stereospecifically to phosphine boranes with inversion of configuration by treatment with Meerwein's salt followed by sodium borohydride. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  2. Perfluorinated phosphine oxide and sulfides as extractants for heavy metals and radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert J; Fuchs, Julia; Richards, Amanda J; Ogilvie, Helen V

    2011-10-01

    New highly fluorinated monodentate and bidentate phosphine oxide compounds of the type {CF(3)(CF(2))(n)CH(2)CH(2)}(3)PO (n = 5, 9) and [{CF(3)(CF(2))(5)CH(2)CH(2)}(2)P(O)CH(2)CH(2)P(O){CH(2)CH(2)(CF(2))(5)CF(3)}] have been prepared. Their ability to extract a number of metals and radionuclides from aqueous solutions into perfluorinated solvents has been established and the extractable species investigated. All extractants extract the metals As(V), Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(VI), Hg(II), Pb(II), and Sn(II) with >75% removal. In addition, the radioisotopes (90)Sr(II), (133)Ba(II), and U(VI) have been investigated, whilst (59)Fe(III) has been used to model the extraction of plutonium. (133)Ba(II) shows a high distribution ratio for monodentate phosphine oxides, whilst for UO(2)(2+) and (59)Fe(III) bidentate phosphine oxides are superior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties.

  4. Evaluation of microwave irradiation for analysis of carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, cyanogen, ethyl formate, methyl bromide, sulfuryl fluoride, propylene oxide, and phosphine in hay.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yonglin; Mahon, Daphne

    2007-01-10

    Fumigant residues in hay were "extracted" by microwave irradiation. Hay, in gastight glass flasks, was placed in a domestic microwave oven, and fumigants were released into the headspace by microwave irradiation. Power settings for maximum release of fumigants were determined for carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon disulfide (CS(2)), cyanogen (C(2)N(2)), ethyl formate (EF), methyl bromide (CH(3)Br), sulfuryl fluoride (SF), propylene oxide (PPO), and phosphine (PH(3)). Recoveries of fortified samples were >91% for COS, CS(2), CH(3)Br, SF, PPO, and PH(3) and >76% for C(2)N(2) and EF. Completeness of extraction was assessed from the amount of fumigant retained by the microwaved hay. This amount was determined from further microwave irradiation and was always small (<5% of the amount obtained from the initial procedure). Limits of quantification were <0.1 mg/kg for COS, CS(2), C(2)N(2), EF, and PH(3) and <0.5 mg/kg for CH(3)Br, SF, and PPO. These low limits were essentially due to the absence of interference from solvents and no necessity to inject large-volume gas samples. The microwave method is rapid and solvent-free. However, care is required in selecting the appropriate power setting. The safety implications of heating sealed flasks in microwave ovens should be noted.

  5. Reduction of secondary and tertiary phosphine oxides to phosphines.

    PubMed

    Hérault, Damien; Nguyen, Duc Hanh; Nuel, Didier; Buono, Gérard

    2015-04-21

    Achiral or chiral phosphines are widely used in two main domains: ligands in organometallic catalysis and organocatalysis. For this reason, the obtention of optically pure phosphine has always been challenging in the development of asymmetric catalysis. The simplest method to obtain phosphines is the reduction of phosphine oxides. The essential difficulty is the strength of the P=O bond which involves new procedures to maintain a high chemio- and stereoselectivity. The reduction can occur with retention or inversion of the stereogenic phosphorus atom depending on the nature of the reducing agent and the presence of additives. In fact, the reactivity of the phosphine oxides and the mechanism of the reduction are not always well understood. Since the first work in the 1950's, numerous studies have been realised in order to develop methodologies with different reagents or to understand the mechanism of the reaction. In the last decade, efficient stereospecific methodologies have been developed to obtain optically pure tertiary phosphines from P-stereogenic phosphine oxides. In this review, we intend to provide a comprehensive and critical overview of these methodologies.

  6. New class of phosphine oxide donor-based supramolecular coordination complexes from an in situ phosphine oxidation reaction or phosphine oxide ligands.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Bhaskaran; Elumalai, Palani; Shanmugam, Ramasamy; Singh, Virender; Masram, Dhanraj T; Sathiyendiran, Malaichamy

    2013-09-16

    A one-pot, multicomponent, coordination-driven self-assembly approach was used to synthesize the first examples of neutral bridging phosphine oxide donor-based supramolecular coordination complexes. The complexes were self-assembled from a fac-Re(CO)3 acceptor, an anionic bridging O donor, and a neutral soft phosphine or hard phosphine oxide donor.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10087 - Substituted alkyl phosphine oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted alkyl phosphine oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10087 Substituted alkyl phosphine oxide (generic). (a) Chemical... as substituted alkyl phosphine oxide (PMN P-06-332) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. Palladium-Catalyzed α-Arylation of Benzylic Phosphine Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Montel, Sonia; Jia, Tiezheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to prepare diarylmethyl phosphine oxides from benzyl phosphine oxides via deprotonative cross-coupling processes (DCCP) is reported. The optimization of the reaction was guided by High-Throughput Experimentation (HTE) techniques. The Pd(OAc)2/Xantphos-based catalyst enabled the reaction between benzyl diphenyl or dicyclohexyl phosphine oxide derivatives and aryl bromides in good to excellent yields (51–91%). PMID:24295336

  9. Cs2CO3-promoted one-pot synthesis of alkynylphosphonates, -phosphinates, and -phosphine oxides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulei; Gan, Jiepeng; Liu, Liu; Yuan, Hang; Gao, Yuxing; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Yufen

    2014-04-18

    A novel and efficient Cs2CO3-promoted phosphorylation or phosphinylation of various 1,1-dibromo-1-alkenes with readily available trialkyl phosphites, ethyl diphenylphosphinite, or diethyl phenylphosphonite has been developed under metal-free conditions, providing a practical and powerful tool for one-pot synthesis of valuable alkynylphosphonates, -phosphinates, and -phosphine oxides in good to excellent yields.

  10. Oxidative alkoxylation of phosphine in alcohol solutions of copper halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polimbetova, G. S.; Borangazieva, A. K.; Ibraimova, Zh. U.; Bugubaeva, G. O.; Keynbay, S.

    2016-08-01

    The phosphine oxidation reaction with oxygen in alcohol solutions of copper (I, II) halides is studied. Kinetic parameters, intermediates, and by-products are studied by means of NMR 31P-, IR-, UV-, and ESR- spectroscopy; and by magnetic susceptibility, redox potentiometry, gas chromatography, and elemental analysis. A reaction mechanism is proposed, and the optimum conditions are found for the reaction of oxidative alkoxylation phosphine.

  11. Imide/Arylene Ether Copolymers Containing Phosphine Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Partos, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    Phosphine oxide groups react with oxygen to form protective phosphate surface layers. Series of imide/arylene ether block copolymers containing phosphine oxide units in backbone synthesized and characterized. In comparison with commercial polyimide, these copolymers display better resistance to etching by oxygen plasma. Tensile strengths and tensile moduli greater than those of polyarylene ether homopolymer. Combination of properties makes copolymers attractive for films, coatings, adhesives, and composite matrices where resistance to atomic oxygen needed.

  12. Enantioselective Cu-Catalyzed Arylation of Secondary Phosphine Oxides with Diaryliodonium Salts toward the Synthesis of P-Chiral Phosphines.

    PubMed

    Beaud, Rodolphe; Phipps, Robert J; Gaunt, Matthew J

    2016-10-12

    Catalytic synthesis of nonracemic P-chiral phosphine derivatives remains a significant challenge. Here we report Cu-catalyzed enantioselective arylation of secondary phosphine oxides with diaryliodonium salts for the synthesis of tertiary phosphine oxides with high enantiomeric excess. The new process is demonstrated on a wide range of substrates and leads to products that are well-established P-chiral catalysts and ligands.

  13. Enantioselective Cu-Catalyzed Arylation of Secondary Phosphine Oxides with Diaryliodonium Salts toward the Synthesis of P-Chiral Phosphines

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic synthesis of nonracemic P-chiral phosphine derivatives remains a significant challenge. Here we report Cu-catalyzed enantioselective arylation of secondary phosphine oxides with diaryliodonium salts for the synthesis of tertiary phosphine oxides with high enantiomeric excess. The new process is demonstrated on a wide range of substrates and leads to products that are well-established P-chiral catalysts and ligands. PMID:27689432

  14. Reducing phosphine after the smoking process using an oxidative treatment.

    PubMed

    Nota, G; Naviglio, D; Romano, R; Ugliano, M; Sabia, V

    2000-02-01

    This article gives a description of the setup in a laboratory of a pilot system to reduce phosphine following the smoking process of foodstuffs. At present, this fumigant is released into the atmosphere and causes serious damage to the environment due to its transformation into aggressive compounds. However, phosphine may prove a good alternative to methyl bromide, which will legally be used as a fumigant until the year 2002, provided it is made inert after the smoking process and transformed into nontoxic and easily disposable substances. Oxidant solutions containing potassium permanganate or potassium bichromate in suitable concentrations proved moderately effective in reducing phosphine. The addition of traces of silver nitrate as a catalyst to the oxidant solutions increased the efficiency in reducing the fumigant, although not completely. Thus it was necessary to use a recycling system to decontaminate air from phosphine, as such an apparatus ensures the complete reduction of phosphine. The mathematical function describing how the concentration of phosphine varies in the smoking chamber also makes it possible to estimate the time necessary to reduce a phosphine concentration from any initial value to a fixed final value.

  15. Phosphine and phosphine oxide groups in metal-organic frameworks detected by P K-edge XAS.

    PubMed

    Morel, F L; Pin, S; Huthwelker, T; Ranocchiari, M; van Bokhoven, J A

    2015-02-07

    Phosphine metal-organic frameworks (P-MOFs) are crystalline porous coordination polymers that contain phosphorus functional groups within their pores. We present the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the P K-edge to determine the phosphine to phosphine oxide ratio in two P-MOFs with MIL-101 topology. The phosphorus oxidation state is of particular interest as it strongly influences the coordination affinity of these materials for transition metals. This method can determine the oxidation state of phosphorus even when the material contains paramagnetic nuclei, differently from NMR spectroscopy. We observed that phosphine in LSK-15 accounts for 72 ± 4% of the total phosphorus groups and that LSK-12 contains only phosphine oxide.

  16. Phosphine

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphine ; CASRN 7803 - 51 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and activity of yttrium(III) nitrate complexes bearing tripodal phosphine oxide and mixed phosphine-phosphine oxide ligands.

    PubMed

    Sues, Peter E; Lough, Alan J; Morris, Robert H

    2012-09-03

    A series of four tripodal phosphine oxide ligands, (OPR(2))(2)CHCH(2)POR(2) (1a-1d), and four mixed phosphine-phosphine oxide ligands, (OPR(2))(2)CHCH(2)PR(2) (3a-3d), were synthesized and coordinated to yttrium to produce Y(NO(3))(3)[(OPR(2))(2)CHCH(2)POR(2)] (2a-2d) and Y(NO(3))(3)[(OPR(2))(2)CHCH(2)PR(2)](OPPh(3)) (4a-4d) complexes. The previously reported ligand 1a and unknown phosphine oxide ligands 1b-1d were generated in an unprecedented trisubstitution reaction of bromoacetaldehyde diethyl acetal, while the novel partially reduced ligands 3a-3d were synthesized from 1a-1d according to a known literature protocol for the selective monoreduction of bisphosphine oxides. The neutral yttrium complexes 2a-2d are nine-coordinate and display a tricapped trigonal-prismatic geometry. Complexes 4a-4d are also neutral, nine-coordinate species and have a pendant phosphine functionality, which provides the potential to form bimetallic early-late transition-metal complexes. Additionally, yttrium complexes 2a-2d were activated with base and tested for the ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone, but the results showed that base by itself was significantly more effective than the yttrium species investigated.

  18. A superior method for the reduction of secondary phosphine oxides.

    PubMed

    Busacca, Carl A; Lorenz, Jon C; Grinberg, Nelu; Haddad, Nizar; Hrapchak, Matt; Latli, Bachir; Lee, Heewon; Sabila, Paul; Saha, Anjan; Sarvestani, Max; Shen, Sherry; Varsolona, Richard; Wei, Xudong; Senanayake, Chris H

    2005-09-15

    [reaction: see text] Diisobutylaluminum hydride (DIBAL-H) and triisobutylaluminum have been found to be outstanding reductants for secondary phosphine oxides (SPOs). All classes of SPOs can be readily reduced, including diaryl, arylalkyl, and dialkyl members. Many SPOs can now be reduced at cryogenic temperatures, and conditions for preservation of reducible functional groups have been found. Even the most electron-rich and sterically hindered phosphine oxides can be reduced in a few hours at 50-70 degrees C. This new reduction has distinct advantages over existing technologies.

  19. Sulfides and oxides in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Metal abundances associated with Sun-grazing P/comet Ikeya-Seki 1965f, the mineralogy of chrondritic interplanetary dust particles and cosmochemical affinities of Co, V, Cr, and Ni in extraterrestrial materials and probable vaporization data for nonsilicate minerals are used to evaluate the putative dearth of nonsilicates in short-period comets. It is concluded that sulfides and oxides are common, albeit minor, constituents of these comets. Sulfides and oxides can form in situ during perihelion passage in the nucleus of active short-period comets by sulfidation of Mg, Fe-silicates.

  20. Sulfides and oxides in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Metal abundances associated with Sun-grazing P/comet Ikeya-Seki 1965f, the mineralogy of chrondritic interplanetary dust particles and cosmochemical affinities of Co, V, Cr, and Ni in extraterrestrial materials and probable vaporization data for nonsilicate minerals are used to evaluate the putative dearth of nonsilicates in short-period comets. It is concluded that sulfides and oxides are common, albeit minor, constituents of these comets. Sulfides and oxides can form in situ during perihelion passage in the nucleus of active short-period comets by sulfidation of Mg, Fe-silicates.

  1. Phosphines as Efficient Dioxygen Scavengers in Nitrous Oxide Sensors.

    PubMed

    Sveegaard, Steffen Gralert; Nielsen, Michael; Andersen, Mikkel Holmen; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-05-26

    A current challenge for development of amperometric sensors for the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) is their sensitivity toward dioxygen and trace water. The need for aqueous dioxygen scavengers in front of the sensor implies a background signal from penetrating water vapor. In this paper, we introduce substituted phosphines as dioxygen scavengers and demonstrate the application in a dioxygen-insensitive N2O sensor. Suitably substituted phosphines have been synthesized to achieve good solubility properties in the electrochemically inert solvent propylene carbonate. Several sensors with and without physical separation of the sensing and dioxygen scavenging compartments were made and compared to current commercial sensors. The use of phosphines soluble in organic solvents as dioxygen scavengers yielded a higher sensitivity, albeit with longer response time. Proof-of-concept N2O sensors without the physically separated dioxygen scavenger chamber showed a greatly enhanced sensitivity with a comparable response time, thus demonstrating the possibility for greatly simplified sensor construction.

  2. A high-throughput hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with a charged aerosol detector method to assess trisulfides in IgG1 monoclonal antibodies using tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine reaction products: Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine-oxide and tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine-sulfide.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Christopher; Karanjit, Amish; Chen, Yan; Jacobson, Fredric

    2016-07-29

    A robust, high-throughput method using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled with a charged aerosol detector (CAD) is reported as a novel approach for trisulfide quantitation in monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The products of mAb reduction using tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) include a species (TCEP(S)) that is stoichiometrically produced from trisulfides. The TCEP reaction products are chromatographically separated, detected, and quantified by the HILICCAD method. The method was qualified to quantify trisulfides across a range of 1-40% (mol trisulfide/mol mAb). In all tested matrix components, assay linearity and intermediate precision were established with correlation coefficients (R(2))>0.99, and relative standard deviations (RSD)<10%. A method comparability study was performed using peptide mapping LC-MS as an orthogonal measurement. For the range of 1-40% trisulfides, the analysis demonstrates that, on average, HILICCAD reads between 0.95 and 1.10 times the value of LC-MS with 95% confidence. Applications of the HILICCAD method include trisulfide determination in purified mAbs to be used in the production of cysteine-linked antibody-drug conjugates, and in cell culture development studies to understand sources of, and strategies for control of, trisulfides.

  3. Di(hydroperoxy)alkane Adducts of Phosphine Oxides: Safe, Solid, Stoichiometric, and Soluble Oxidizing Agents.

    PubMed

    Bluemel, Janet; Ahn, Shin Hye; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai

    2017-08-29

    The di(hydroperoxy)alkane adducts of phosphine oxides Ph3PO*(HOO)2CMe2 (1), Cy3PO*(HOO)2CMe2 (2), Ph3PO*(HOO)2CMeEt (3), Cy3PO*(HOO)2CMeEt (4), Cy3PO*(HOO)2CEt2 (5), Cy3PO*(HOO)2C(CH2)5 (6), and Cy3PO*(HOO)2CMePh (7), (Ph2P(O)CH2CH2P(O)Ph2)*((HOO)2CEt2)2 (8), and Ph2P(O)CH2P(O)Ph2*(HOO)2CMe2 (9), are synthesized and fully characterized by 1H, 13C, and 31P NMR and IR spectroscopy. Single crystal X-ray structures are reported for 3-9. Different one-pot synthetic pathways, starting from R3P, R3PO, R3PO*H2O, and R3PO*H2O2 are explored and discussed and a mechanism for the formation of the di(hydroperoxy)alkane adducts of phosphine oxides is suggested. The longevity of the adducts is tested by monitoring the oxidation of Ph3P with quantitative NMR. The solubilities of the adducts in organic solvents are presented, and their applicability as stoichiometric oxidizing agents for the selective oxidation of sulfides to sulfoxides is reported. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Oxygen plasma resistant phosphine oxide containing imide/arylene copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.

    1993-01-01

    A series of oxygen plasma resistant imide/arylene ether copolymers were prepared by reacting anhydride-terminated poly(amide acids) and amine-terminated polyarylene ethers containing phosphine oxide units. Inherent viscosities for these copolymers ranged from 0.42 to 0.80 dL/g. After curing, the resulting copolymers had glass transition temperatures ranging from 224 C to 228 C. Solution cast films of the block copolymers were tough and flexible with tensile strength, tensile moduli, and elongation at break up to 16.1 ksi, 439 ksi, and 23 percent, respectively at 25 C and 9.1 ksi, 308 ksi and 97 percent, respectively at 150 C. The copolymers show a significant improvement in resistance to oxygen plasma when compared to the commercial polyimide Kapton. The imide/arylene ether copolymers containing phosphine oxide units are suitable as coatings, films, adhesives, and composite matrices.

  5. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the stereoselective synthesis of p-stereogenic phosphine oxides.

    PubMed

    Copey, Laurent; Jean-Gérard, Ludivine; Framery, Eric; Pilet, Guillaume; Robert, Vincent; Andrioletti, Bruno

    2015-06-15

    An efficient enantioselective strategy for the synthesis of variously substituted phosphine oxides has been developed, incorporating the use of (1S,2S)-2-aminocyclohexanol as the chiral auxiliary. The method relies on three key steps: 1) Highly diastereoselective formation of P(V) oxazaphospholidine, rationalized by a theoretical study; 2) highly diastereoselective ring-opening of the oxazaphospholidine oxide with organometallic reagents that takes place with inversion of configuration at the P atom; 3) enantioselective synthesis of phosphine oxides by cleavage of the remaining P-O bond. Interestingly, the use of a P(III) phosphine precursor afforded a P-epimer oxazaphospholidine. Hence, the two enantiomeric phosphine oxides can be synthesized starting from either a P(V) or a P(III) phosphine precursor, which constitutes a clear advantage for the stereoselective synthesis of sterically hindered phosphine oxides.

  6. Polyimides Containing Pendent Phosphine Oxide Groups for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Watson, K. A.; Connell, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    As part of an ongoing materials development activity to produce high performance polymers that are durable to the space environment, phosphine oxide containing polyimides have been under investigation. A novel dianhydride was prepared from 2,5-dihydroxyphenyldiphenylphosphine oxide in good yield. The dianhydride was reacted with commercially available diamines, and a previously reported diamine was reacted with commercially available dianhydrides to prepare isomeric polyimides. The physical and mechanical properties, particularly thermal and optical properties, of the polymers were determined. One material exhibited a high glass transition temperature, high tensile properties, and low solar absorptivity. The chemistry, physical, and mechanical properties of these resins will be discussed.

  7. Chiral magnesium BINOL phosphate-catalyzed phosphination of imines: access to enantioenriched α-amino phosphine oxides.

    PubMed

    Ingle, Gajendrasingh K; Liang, Yuxue; Mormino, Michael G; Li, Guilong; Fronczek, Frank R; Antilla, Jon C

    2011-04-15

    A new method to synthesize chiral α-amino phosphine oxides is reported. The reaction combines N-substituted imines and diphenylphosphine oxide and is catalyzed by a chiral magnesium phosphate salt. A wide variety of aliphatic and aromatic aldimines substituted by electron-neutral benzhydryl or dibenzocycloheptene groups were excellent substrates for the addition reaction. The dibenzocycloheptene protected imines afforded improved enantioselectivity in the resulting products. Substituted diphenylphosphine oxide nucleophiles also showed good reactivity.

  8. Chiral Magnesium BINOL Phosphate-Catalyzed Phosphination of Imines: Access to Enantioenriched α-Amino Phosphine Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Gajendrasingh K.; Liang, Yuxue; Mormino, Michael G.; Li, Guilong; Fronczek, Frank R.; Antilla, Jon C.

    2011-01-01

    A new method to synthesize chiral α-amino phosphine oxides is reported. The reaction combines N-substituted imines and diphenylphosphine oxide, and is catalyzed by a chiral magnesium phosphate salt. A wide variety of aliphatic and aromatic aldimines substituted by electron neutral benzhydryl or dibenzocycloheptene groups were excellent substrates for the addition reaction. The dibenzocycloheptene protected imines afforded improved enantioselectivity in the resulting products. Substituted diphenylphosphine oxide nucleophiles also showed good reactivity. PMID:21413695

  9. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  10. Oxidative hydroxylation of phosphine in aqueous alcohol solutions of p-benzoquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polimbetova, G. S.; Borangazieva, A. K.; Ibraimova, Zh. U.; Ergozhin, E. E.; Mukhitdinova, B. A.

    2014-05-01

    The oxidation of phosphine in aqueous alcohol solution of benzoquinone in the presence of iodide ions is studied. Kinetic measurements, redox potentiometry, and gas chromatography are used to determine the kinetic regularities of the oxidative hydroxylation of phosphine, and a single-stage redox mechanism is proposed for this reaction. It is found that the iodine resulting from the oxidation of I- ions by quinone is the reagent responsible for the formation of phosphorus-containing products.

  11. Copper-catalyzed tandem phosphination-decarboxylation-oxidation of alkynyl acids with H-phosphine oxides: a facile synthesis of β-ketophosphine oxides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengbo; Zhang, Liangliang; Gao, Yuzhen; Xu, Jian; Fang, Hua; Tang, Guo; Zhao, Yufen

    2015-05-07

    The general method for the tandem phosphination-decarboxylation-oxidation of alkynyl acids under aerobic conditions has been developed. In the presence of CuSO4·5H2O and TBHP, the reactions provide a novel access to β-ketophosphine oxides in good to excellent yields. This transformation allows the direct formation of a P-C bond and the construction of a keto group in one reaction.

  12. Rationale behind the resistance of dialkylbiaryl phosphines toward oxidation by molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Barder, Timothy E; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2007-04-25

    Electron-rich dialkylbiaryl phosphines, which comprise a common class of supporting ligands for Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions, are highly resistant toward oxidation by molecular oxygen. Presented herein are possible reasons why this class of phosphine ligands manifests this property. Experimental and theoretical data suggest that the two alkyl substituents on the phosphorus center and the 2' and 6' positions of the biaryl backbone play an important role in inhibiting oxidation of this class of ligands.

  13. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric oxidation of sulfides.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Graham E; Ford, Alan; Maguire, Anita R

    2012-04-06

    Copper-catalyzed asymmetric sulfoxidation of aryl benzyl and aryl alkyl sulfides, using aqueous hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant, has been investigated. A relationship between the steric effects of the sulfide substituents and the enantioselectivity of the oxidation has been observed, with up to 93% ee for 2-naphthylmethyl phenyl sulfoxide, in modest yield in this instance (up to 30%). The influence of variation of solvent and ligand structure was examined, and the optimized conditions were then used to oxidize a number of aryl alkyl and aryl benzyl sulfides, producing sulfoxides in excellent yields in most cases (up to 92%), and good enantiopurities in certain cases (up to 84% ee).

  14. Catalyst and process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Ward, J.W.

    1984-04-24

    Catalysts comprising bismuth and vanadium components are highly active and stable, especially in the presence of water vapor, for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to sulfur or SO/sub 2/. Such catalysts have been found to be especially active for the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur by reaction with oxygen or SO/sub 2/.

  15. Effect of initial sulfide concentration on sulfide and phenol oxidation under denitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Beristain-Cardoso, Ricardo; Texier, Anne-Claire; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Razo-Flores, Elías; Field, Jim A; Gómez, J

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of the initial sulfide concentration on the kinetics and metabolism of phenol and sulfide in batch bioassays using nitrate as electron acceptor. Complete oxidation of sulfide (20 mg L(-1) of S(2-)) and phenol (19.6 mg L(-1)) was linked to nitrate reduction when nitrate was supplemented at stoichiometric concentrations. At 32 mg L(-1) of sulfide, oxidation of sulfide and phenol by the organo-lithoautotrophic microbial culture was sequential; first sulfide was rapidly oxidized to elemental sulfur and afterwards to sulfate; phenol oxidation started once sulfate production reached a maximum. When the initial sulfide concentration was increased from 20 to 26 and finally to 32 mg L(-1), sulfide oxidation was inhibited. In contrast phenol consumption by the denitrifying culture was not affected. These results indicated that sulfide affected strongly the sulfide oxidation rate and nitrate reduction.

  16. Enantioselective [4 + 1]-Annulation of α,β-Unsaturated Imines with Allylic Carbonates Catalyzed by a Hybrid P-Chiral Phosphine Oxide-Phosphine.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanyuan; Luo, Jiesi; Li, Bojuan; Yi, Xizhen; He, Zhengjie

    2017-10-03

    A highly enantio- and diastereoselective [4 + 1]-annulation reaction between α,β-unsaturated imines and allylic carbonates has been realized under the catalysis of a novel hybrid P-chiral phosphine oxide-phosphine, providing enantioenriched polysubstituted 2-pyrrolines in good to excellent yields and up to 99% ee. Based on Han's methods, the catalyst featuring a sole P(O)-chirality in the molecule is readily accessible and represents a class of new chiral phosphine organocatalysts. In the plausible catalytic mechanism, an intramolecular Coulombic interaction between the in situ generated phosphonium cation and polar chiral P═O moiety may play a positive role.

  17. Ab initio post-hartree-fock study of molecular structures and vibrational spectra of phosphine oxide, phosphinous acid, and their thio analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, J.S.; Leszczynski, J.

    1992-08-06

    This paper discusses how MP2 theory is used to predict the vibrational IR spectra and molecular parameters of phosphine oxide, phosphinous acid, and their thio analogs. This spectral data agrees well with experimental data, and might be applied to identification of the sulfur species. The calculations also correctly predict the observed shifts of the IR wavenumbers upon isotopic substitution of the molecules. 17 refs., 5 tabs.

  18. Nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria as microbial oxidants for rapid biological sulfide removal.

    PubMed

    De Gusseme, Bart; De Schryver, Peter; De Cooman, Michaël; Verbeken, Kim; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2009-01-01

    The emission of hydrogen sulfide into the atmosphere of sewer systems induces the biological production of sulfuric acid, causing severe concrete corrosion. As a possible preventive solution, a microbial consortium of nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) was enriched in a continuously stirred tank reactor in order to develop a biological technique for the removal of dissolved sulfide. The consortium, dominated by Arcobacter sp., was capable of removing 99% of sulfide. Stable isotope fractioning of the sulfide indicated that the oxidation was a biological process. The capacity of the NR-SOB consortium for rapid removal of sulfide was demonstrated by using it as an inoculum in synthetic and real sewage. Removal rates up to 52 mg sulfide-S g VSS(-1) h(-1) were achieved, to our knowledge the highest removal rate reported so far for freshwater species in the absence of molecular oxygen. Further long-term incubation experiments revealed the capacity of the bacteria to oxidize sulfide without the presence of nitrate, suggesting that an oxidized redox reserve is present in the culture.

  19. Chemoselective Reduction of Phosphine Oxides by 1,3-Diphenyl-Disiloxane.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Eiden, Carter G; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2017-08-24

    Reduction of phosphine oxides to the corresponding phosphines represents the most straightforward method to prepare these valuable reagents. However, existing methods to reduce phosphine oxides suffer from inadequate chemoselectivity due to the strength of the P=O bond and/or poor atom economy. Herein, we report the discovery of the most powerful chemoselective reductant for this transformation to date, 1,3-diphenyl-disiloxane (DPDS). Additive-free DPDS selectively reduces both secondary and tertiary phosphine oxides with retention of configuration even in the presence of aldehyde, nitro, ester, α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, azocarboxylates, and cyano functional groups. Arrhenius analysis indicates that the activation barrier for reduction by DPDS is significantly lower than any previously calculated silane reduction system. Inclusion of a catalytic Brønsted acid further reduced the activation barrier and led to the first silane-mediated reduction of acyclic phosphine oxides at room temperature. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. N-Phosphine Oxide-Substituted Imidazolylidenes (PoxIms): Multifunctional Multipurpose Carbenes.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Sunit; Hoshimoto, Yoichi; Ogoshi, Sensuke

    2017-09-10

    This article discusses the concept of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) equipped with more than one functional moiety, which allows using these NHCs for multiple purposes. A pioneering example for such NHCs is N-phosphine oxide-substituted imidazolylidenes (PoxIms), and their synthesis and strategic use are highlighted. The utility of PoxIms by far exceeds the conventional use as multidentate ligands for metal complexes on account of the synergetic functions of the carbene and the N-phosphine oxide group(s). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Phosphine polymerization by nitric oxide: experimental characterization and theoretical predictions of mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Lei; Flora, Jason W; Thweatt, William David; Garrison, Stephen L; Gonzalez, Carlos; Houk, K N; Marquez, Manuel

    2009-02-02

    A yellow solid material [P(x)H(y)] has been obtained in the reaction of phosphine (PH(3)) and nitric oxide (NO) at room temperature and characterized by thermogravimetric analysis mass spectrometry (TGA-MS) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. In this work using complete basis set (CBS-QB3) methods a plausible mechanism has been investigated for phosphine polymerization in the presence of nitric oxide (NO). Theoretical explorations with the ab initio method suggest (a) instead of the monomer the nitric oxide dimer acts as an initial oxidant, (b) the resulting phosphine oxides (H(3)P=O <--> H(3)P(+)O(-)) in the gas phase draw each other via strong dipolar interactions between the P-O groups, and (c) consequently an autocatalyzed polymerization occurs among the phosphine oxides, forming P-P chemical bonds and losing water. The possible structures of polyhydride phosphorus polymer were discussed. In the calculations a series of cluster models was computed to simulate polymerization.

  2. Oxidation of phosphine and arsine by metal complexes and free and bound oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Ya A.; Yukht, I. M.; Levina, L. V.; Polimbetova, G. S.; Petrova, T. V.; Emel'yanova, V. S.

    1991-06-01

    Data on the oxidation of PH3 and AsH3 by metal complexes and oxygen compounds of metals and non-metals and on their catalytic and coupled oxidation by dioxygen, ozone, and peroxide compounds are analysed. The methods for the activation of oxidants, phosphine, and arsine, ensuring the acceleration of the oxidative reactions in processes involving the elimination of the extremely harmful impurities PH3 and AsH3 from gases, are examined. The bibliography includes 176 references.

  3. Phosphine gas in the upper troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glindemann, Dietmar; Edwards, Marc; Kuschk, Peter

    The gas phosphine (PH 3) is a part of an atmospheric link of the phosphorus cycle on earth. Phosphine was reported elsewhere to be found worldwide in remote air samples in the lower troposphere in the low ng/m 3 range during the night, when oxidation is inhibited. But much less phosphine (pg/m 3 range) was found during daylight around noon in this reactive contaminated atmosphere. Here we found for the first time gaseous phosphine in remote air samples (0.39-2.45 ng/m 3, 16 locations) in the high troposphere above the North-Atlantic in November 1995 during daylight around noontime. The maximum concentration was measured at the highest altitude of 12,500 m. No night measurements could be conducted to compare day and night values. The finding of the reactive phosphine under the sunlight in the high troposphere far from possible terrestric sources is strange. A model experiment shows that phosphine could possibly survive the daylight much longer at high altitudes because of a lack of UV-induced oxidants in the clean and dry air. Additional model experiments indicate that phosphine can easier sustain its mobile gaseous state in the atmosphere compared to gases like hydrogen sulfide and ammonia which stick easier to aerosol and are subject to faster washout and return to Earth's surface. However, the ultimate fate of phosphine is the oxidation to form phosphoric acid as a low pH agent and as possible condensation nuclei for clouds at very high altitudes. The potent sources and atmospheric chemistry which allow phosphine to accumulate in the upper troposphere are still to be discovered.

  4. Crystal structure of poly[(μ3-thio-cyanato-κ(3) N:S:S)(tri-methyl-phosphine sulfide-κS)copper(I)].

    PubMed

    Corfield, Peter W R

    2014-11-01

    In the title compound, [Cu(NCS)(C3H9PS)] n , the thio-cyanate ions bind the Cu(I) atoms covalently, forming infinite -Cu-SCN-Cu- chains parallel to the a axis. Each Cu(I) atom is also coordinated to a tri-methyl-phosphine sulfide group via a Cu-S bond. Two crystallographically independent chains propagate in opposite directions, and are held together in a ribbon arrangement by long bonds between Cu(I) atoms in the first chain and thio-cyanate S atoms in the second, with Cu-S = 2.621 (1) Å. The geometry around the Cu(I) atoms in the first chain is distorted tetra-hedral, with angles involving the long Cu-S bond much less than ideal, and the S-Cu-N angle between the phosphine sulfide S atom and the thio-cyanate N atom opening out to 133.19 (9)°. Each Cu(I) atom in the second chain appears to be disordered between two positions 0.524 (4) Å apart, with occupancy factors of 0.647 (6) and 0.353 (6). The Cu(I) atom in the major site is in a distorted trigonal-planar configuration, with the S-Cu-N angle between the phosphine sulfide and the thio-cyanate N atom again opened out, to 137.01 (15)°. The Cu(I) atom in the minor site, however, forms in addition a long bond [Cu-S = 2.702 (5) Å] to the phosphine sulfide of the first chain, not the thio-cyanate S atom, to provide a further link between the chains.

  5. Method for inhibiting oxidation of metal sulfide-containing material

    DOEpatents

    Elsetinow, Alicia; Borda, Michael J.; Schoonen, Martin A.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2006-12-26

    The present invention provides means for inhibiting the oxidation of a metal sulfide-containing material, such as ore mine waste rock or metal sulfide taiulings, by coating the metal sulfide-containing material with an oxidation-inhibiting two-tail lipid coating (12) thereon, thereby inhibiting oxidation of the metal sulfide-containing material in acid mine drainage conditions. The lipids may be selected from phospholipids, sphingolipids, glycolipids and combinations thereof.

  6. A novel tridentate bis(phosphinic acid)phosphine oxide based europium(III)-selective Nafion membrane luminescent sensor.

    PubMed

    Sainz-Gonzalo, F J; Popovici, C; Casimiro, M; Raya-Barón, A; López-Ortiz, F; Fernández, I; Fernández-Sánchez, J F; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A

    2013-10-21

    A new europium(III) membrane luminescent sensor based on a new tridentate bis(phosphinic acid)phosphine oxide (3) system has been developed. The synthesis of this new ligand is described and its full characterization by NMR, IR and elemental analyses is provided. The luminescent complex formed between europium(III) chloride and ligand 3 was evaluated in solution, observing that its spectroscopic and chemical characteristics are excellent for measuring in polymer inclusion membranes. Included in a Nafion membrane, all the parameters (ligand and ionic additives) that can affect the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensing membrane as well as the instrumental conditions were carefully optimized. The best luminescence signal (λexc = 229.06 nm and λem = 616.02 nm) was exhibited by the sensing film having a Nafion : ligand composition of 262.3 : 0.6 mg mL(-1). The membrane sensor showed a short response time (t95 = 5.0 ± 0.2 min) and an optimum working pH of 5.0 (25 mM acetate buffer solution). The membrane sensor manifested a good selectivity toward europium(III) ions with respect to other trivalent metals (iron, chromium and aluminium) and lanthanide(III) ions (lanthanum, samarium, terbium and ytterbium), although a small positive interference of terbium(III) ions was observed. It provided a linear range from 1.9 × 10(-8) to 5.0 × 10(-6) M with a very low detection limit (5.8 × 10(-9) M) and sensitivity (8.57 × 10(-7) a.u. per M). The applicability of this sensing film has been demonstrated by analyzing different kinds of spiked water samples obtaining recovery percentages of 95-97%.

  7. Synthesis and Lanthanide Coordination Chemistry of Phosphine Oxide Decorated Dibenzothiophene and Dibenzothiophene Sulfone Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario-Amorin, Daniel; Ouizem, Sabrina; Dickie, D. A.; Paine, Robert T.; Cramer, Roger E.; Hay, Benjamin; Podair, Julien; Delmau, Laetitia Helene

    2014-01-01

    Syntheses for new ligands based upon dibenzothiophene and dibenzothiophene sulfone platforms, decorated with phosphine oxide and methylphosphine oxide donor groups, are described. Coordination chem. of 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl) dibenzothiophene (8) , 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl) dibenzothiophene- 5, 5- dioxide (9) and 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoyl) dibenzothiophene- 5, 5- dioxide (10) with lanthanide nitrates, Ln(NO3) 3 (H2O) n is outlined, and crystal structure detns. reveal a range of chelation interactions on Ln(III) ions. The HNO3 dependence of the solvent extn. performance of 9 and 10 in 1, 2- dichloroethane for Eu(III) and Am(III) is described and compared against the extn. behavior of related dibenzofuran ligands (2, 3; R = Ph) and n- octyl(phenyl) - N, N- diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (4) measured under identical conditions.

  8. Insights into amine binding to biaryl phosphine palladium oxidative addition complexes and reductive elimination from biaryl phosphine arylpalladium amido complexes via density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Barder, Timothy E; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2007-10-03

    We present results on the binding of a variety amines to monoligated oxidative addition complexes of the type L1Pd(Ar)Cl, where L is 2-dicyclohexylphosphino-2',6'-dimethoxybiphenyl (SPhos, 1) or 2-dicyclohexylphosphino-2',4',6'-tri-ispropylbiphenyl (XPhos, 2). The binding of an amine to oxidative addition complexes composed of 1 and 2 is more complex than with smaller ligands as intermediate Pd(II) complexes with bulky biaryl phosphine ligands disfavor amine binding to favorable conformations of oxidative addition complexes. Additionally, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for reductive elimination from complexes of the type L1Pd(amido)Ph (where amido = EtNH, Me2N, PhNH) are discussed. From this data, we suggest a possible mechanism for (biaryl phosphine) Pd-catalyzed amination reactions that is more intricate than previously thought.

  9. Syntheses and properties of phosphine-substituted ruthenium(II) polypyridine complexes with nitrogen oxides.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Go; Kondo, Mio; Crisalli, Meredith; Lee, Sze Koon; Shibata, Akane; Ford, Peter C; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2015-10-21

    Four novel phosphine-substituted ruthenium(ii) polypyridine complexes with nitrogen oxides-trans(P,NO2)-[Ru(trpy)(Pqn)(NO2)]PF6 (trans-NO2), cis(P,NO2)-[Ru(trpy)(Pqn)(NO2)]PF6 (cis-NO2), [Ru(trpy)(dppbz)(NO2)]PF6 (PP-NO2), and cis(P,NO)-[Ru(trpy)(Pqn)(NO)](PF6)3 (cis-NO)-were synthesised (trpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine, Pqn = 8-(diphenylphosphanyl)quinoline, and dppbz = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphanyl)benzene). The influence of the number and position of the phosphine group(s) on the electronic structure of these complexes was investigated using single-crystal X-ray structural analysis, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. The substitution lability of the nitrogen oxide ligand of each complex is discussed in comparison with that of the corresponding acetonitrile complexes.

  10. Oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by human liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Nada; Prip-Buus, Carina; Vons, Corinne; Lenoir, Véronique; Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Guedouari-Bounihi, Hala; Lombès, Anne; Bouillaud, Frédéric

    2014-09-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third gasotransmitter discovered. Sulfide shares with the two others (NO and CO) the same inhibiting properties towards mitochondrial respiration. However, in contrast with NO or CO, sulfide at concentrations lower than the toxic (μM) level is an hydrogen donor and a substrate for mitochondrial respiration. This is due to the activity of a sulfide quinone reductase found in a large majority of mitochondria. An ongoing study of the metabolic state of liver in obese patients allowed us to evaluate the sulfide oxidation capacity with twelve preparations of human liver mitochondria. The results indicate relatively high rates of sulfide oxidation with a large variability between individuals. These observations made with isolated mitochondria appear in agreement with the main characteristics of sulfide oxidation as established before with the help of cellular models.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide induces oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in a sulfide-tolerant marine invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L; Stein, Jenny R; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (0-3 mmol L(-1) for 1 h) showed dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress (as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence) and superoxide production (as dihydroethidine fluorescence). Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (up to 0.73 mmol L(-1) for 2 h) also acquired increased oxidative damage to RNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) and DNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine). Worms exposed in vivo to sulfide (0-10 mmol L(-1) for 24 h) acquired elevated oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in both coelomocytes and body wall tissue. While the consequences of RNA and DNA oxidative damage are poorly understood, oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine bases preferentially bind thymine, causing G-T transversions and potentially causing heritable point mutations. This suggests that sulfide can be an environmental mutagen in sulfide-tolerant invertebrates.

  12. Kinetics and stoichiometry of sulfide oxidation by sewer biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2005-10-01

    Oxidation of sulfide under aerobic conditions by biofilms grown on municipal wastewater in 6 identical pipe reactors was investigated. The biofilms were grown at pH 7.6 and temperatures of 20 and 25 degrees C under aerobic-anaerobic transient conditions with pulse dosing of sulfide in the bulk water. The pulse dosing of sulfide served to simulate conditions in a gravity sewer located downstream of a pressure main. During growth of the biofilms, sulfide was pulse dosed in concentrations of 0, 0.5, 2.0 and 5.0 g Sm(-3) with a frequency of 1h(-1). Based on a series of batch experiments, kinetics and stoichiometry of sulfide oxidation by the sewer biofilms was investigated and a rate equation and a stoichiometric constant proposed. Sulfide oxidation kinetics was significantly faster for biofilms grown at sulfide loadings of 0.5, 2.0 and 5.0 g Sm(-3)h(-1) than for biofilms grown in the absence of sulfide. However, the kinetics of sulfide oxidation was relatively constant for biofilms grown at sulfide loadings above 0.5 g Sm(-3)h(-1). Mass balance calculations of dissolved oxygen and sulfur compounds suggested the oxidation product to be elemental sulfur. Further oxidation of elemental sulfur could not be documented.

  13. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation.

  14. Computer-Aided Molecular Design of Bis-phosphine Oxide Lanthanide Extractants

    DOE PAGES

    McCann, Billy W.; Silva, Nuwan De; Windus, Theresa L.; ...

    2016-02-17

    Computer-aided molecular design and high-throughput screening of viable host architectures can significantly reduce the efforts in the design of novel ligands for efficient extraction of rare earth elements. This paper presents a computational approach to the deliberate design of bis-phosphine oxide host architectures that are structurally organized for complexation of trivalent lanthanides. Molecule building software, HostDesigner, was interfaced with molecular mechanics software, PCModel, providing a tool for generating and screening millions of potential R2(O)P-link-P(O)R2 ligand geometries. The molecular mechanics ranking of ligand structures is consistent with both the solution-phase free energies of complexation obtained with density functional theory and themore » performance of known bis-phosphine oxide extractants. For the case where link is -CH2-, evaluation of the ligand geometry provides the first characterization of a steric origin for the ‘anomalous aryl strengthening’ effect. The design approach has identified a number of novel bis-phosphine oxide ligands that are better organized for lanthanide complexation than previously studied examples.« less

  15. Computer-Aided Molecular Design of Bis-phosphine Oxide Lanthanide Extractants

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, Billy W.; Silva, Nuwan De; Windus, Theresa L.; Gordon, Mark S.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2016-02-17

    Computer-aided molecular design and high-throughput screening of viable host architectures can significantly reduce the efforts in the design of novel ligands for efficient extraction of rare earth elements. This paper presents a computational approach to the deliberate design of bis-phosphine oxide host architectures that are structurally organized for complexation of trivalent lanthanides. Molecule building software, HostDesigner, was interfaced with molecular mechanics software, PCModel, providing a tool for generating and screening millions of potential R2(O)P-link-P(O)R2 ligand geometries. The molecular mechanics ranking of ligand structures is consistent with both the solution-phase free energies of complexation obtained with density functional theory and the performance of known bis-phosphine oxide extractants. For the case where link is -CH2-, evaluation of the ligand geometry provides the first characterization of a steric origin for the ‘anomalous aryl strengthening’ effect. The design approach has identified a number of novel bis-phosphine oxide ligands that are better organized for lanthanide complexation than previously studied examples.

  16. Simple phosphinate ligands access zinc clusters identified in the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Sebastian D.; White, Edward R.; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Williams, Charlotte K.

    2016-10-01

    The bottom-up synthesis of ligand-stabilized functional nanoparticles from molecular precursors is widely applied but is difficult to study mechanistically. Here we use 31P NMR spectroscopy to follow the trajectory of phosphinate ligands during the synthesis of a range of ligated zinc oxo clusters, containing 4, 6 and 11 zinc atoms. Using an organometallic route, the clusters interconvert rapidly and self-assemble in solution based on thermodynamic equilibria rather than nucleation kinetics. These clusters are also identified in situ during the synthesis of phosphinate-capped zinc oxide nanoparticles. Unexpectedly, the ligand is sequestered to a stable Zn11 cluster during the majority of the synthesis and only becomes coordinated to the nanoparticle surface, in the final step. In addition to a versatile and accessible route to (optionally doped) zinc clusters, the findings provide an understanding of the role of well-defined molecular precursors during the synthesis of small (2-4 nm) nanoparticles.

  17. Organization of the human mitochondrial hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway.

    PubMed

    Libiad, Marouane; Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Vitvitsky, Victor; Martinov, Michael; Banerjee, Ruma

    2014-11-07

    Sulfide oxidation is expected to play an important role in cellular switching between low steady-state intracellular hydrogen sulfide levels and the higher concentrations where the physiological effects are elicited. Yet despite its significance, fundamental questions regarding how the sulfide oxidation pathway is wired remain unanswered, and competing proposals exist that diverge at the very first step catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR). We demonstrate that, in addition to sulfite, glutathione functions as a persulfide acceptor for human SQR and that rhodanese preferentially synthesizes rather than utilizes thiosulfate. The kinetic behavior of these enzymes provides compelling evidence for the flow of sulfide via SQR to glutathione persulfide, which is then partitioned to thiosulfate or sulfite. Kinetic simulations at physiologically relevant metabolite concentrations provide additional support for the organizational logic of the sulfide oxidation pathway in which glutathione persulfide is the first intermediate formed.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation is coupled to oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria of Solemya reidi

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.A.; Somero, G.N.

    1986-08-01

    Solemya reidi, a gutless clam found in sulfide-rich habitats, contains within its gills bacterial symbionts thought to oxidize sulfur compounds and provide a reduced carbon food source to the clam. However, the initial step or steps in sulfide oxidation occur in the animal tissue, and mitochondria isolated from both gill and symbiont-free foot tissue of the clam coupled the oxidation of sulfide to oxidative phosphorylation (adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis). The ability of Solemya reidi to exploit directly the energy in sulfide for ATP synthesis is unprecedented, and suggests that sulfide-habitat animals that lack bacterial symbionts may also use sulfide as an inorganic energy source.

  19. Investigation on laboratory and pilot-scale airlift sulfide oxidation reactor under varying sulfide loading rate.

    PubMed

    Pokasoowan, Chanya; Kanitchaidecha, Wilawan; K C, Bal Krishna; Annachhatre, Ajit P

    2009-01-01

    Airlift bioreactor was established for recovering sulfur from synthetic sulfide wastewater under controlled dissolved oxygen condition. The maximum recovered sulfur was 14.49 g/day when sulfide loading rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH values were 2.97 kgHS(-)/m(3)-day, 0.2-1.0 mg/L and 7.2-7.8, respectively. On the other hand, the increase in recovered sulfur reduced the contact surface of sulfide oxidizing bacteria which affects the recovery process. This effect caused to reduce the conversion of sulfide to sulfur. More recovered sulfur was produced at high sulfide loading rate due to the change of metabolic pathway of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria which prevented the toxicity of sulfide in the culture. The maximum activity in this system was recorded to be about 3.28 kgS/kgVSS-day. The recovered sulfur contained organic compounds which were confirmed by the results from XRD and CHN analyzer. Afterwards, by annealing the recovered sulfur at 120 degrees C for 24 hrs under ambient Argon, the percentage of carbon reduced from 4.44% to 0.30%. Furthermore, the percentage of nitrogen and hydrogen decreased from 0.79% and 0.48% to 0.00% and 0.14%, respectively. This result showed the success in increasing the purity of recovered sulfur by using the annealing technique. The pilot-scale biological sulfide oxidation process was carried out using real wastewater from Thai Rayon Industry in Thailand. The airlift reactor successfully removed sulfide more than 90% of the influent sulfide at DO concentration of less than 0.1 mg/L, whereas the elementary sulfur production was 2.37 kgS/m(3)-day at sulfide loading rate of 2.14 kgHS(-)/m(3)-day. The sulfur production was still increasing as the reactor had not yet reached its maximum sulfide loading rate.

  20. Analogues of acyclic nucleosides derived from tris-(hydroxymethyl)phosphine oxide or bis-(hydroxymethyl)phosphinic acid coupled to DNA nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Barbara; Michalak, Olga; De Clercq, Erik; Stec, Wojciech J

    2004-11-01

    A series of novel acyclic nucleoside analogues containing bis-(hydroxymethyl)phosphinic acid (BHPA) or tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine oxide (THPO) coupled with DNA nucleobases or with 5-fluorouracil were prepared and their antiviral activity was studied against cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), parainfluenza-virus type 3, reovirus-type 1, sindbis, coxsackie B4, punta toro, vesicular stomatitis and respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus-type 1 (KOS) and type 2 (G), vaccinia virus and herpes simplex virus-1 (TK- KOS ACVr). No specific antiviral effects were noted for any of test compounds against viruses evaluated, except thymine, cytosine and adenine derivatives of BHPA exerting borderline activity against respiratory syncytial virus at the 80 mg/ml concentration.

  1. Hydrogen recovery from hydrogen sulfide by oxidation and by decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.L.; Kung, H.H. . Ipatieff Lab. and Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1994-05-01

    Selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur oxides in a two-step process and the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen sulfide were studied for the recovery of hydrogen from hydrogen sulfide. Platinum, when adequately dispersed on a silica support, was found to be effective in reacting with hydrogen sulfide to produce hydrogen and platinum sulfide at 500 C. The platinum sulfide could then be treated with oxygen at 400 C to release sulfur oxides and regenerate the platinum. However, oxidation of sulfur dioxide to trioxide, retention of oxygen by platinum, and adsorption of hydrogen sulfide by the silica support also occurred, which resulted in a minor loss in hydrogen yield. In the decomposition of hydrogen sulfide, platinum sulfide was found to be catalytically active. The equilibrium hydrogen yields were measured experimentally over the range 350--650 C and compared with the values calculated on the basis of a model that included the S, allotropes, the H[sub 2]S[sub n] sulfanes, and HS. The values agreed well at low temperatures but deviated from each other up to 20% at high temperatures.

  2. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  3. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1989-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  4. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    2001-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  5. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    1999-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  6. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  7. An Experiment in Autotrophic Fermentation: Microbial Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sublette, Kerry L.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which uses an autotrophic bacterium to anaerobically oxidize hydrogen sulfide to sulfate in a batch-stirred tank reactor. Discusses background information, experimental procedure, and sample results of this activity. (CW)

  8. An Experiment in Autotrophic Fermentation: Microbial Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sublette, Kerry L.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which uses an autotrophic bacterium to anaerobically oxidize hydrogen sulfide to sulfate in a batch-stirred tank reactor. Discusses background information, experimental procedure, and sample results of this activity. (CW)

  9. Nanostructured Metal Oxides and Sulfides for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Mai, Liqiang

    2017-05-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries with high energy density and long cycle life are considered to be one of the most promising next-generation energy-storage systems beyond routine lithium-ion batteries. Various approaches have been proposed to break down technical barriers in Li-S battery systems. The use of nanostructured metal oxides and sulfides for high sulfur utilization and long life span of Li-S batteries is reviewed here. The relationships between the intrinsic properties of metal oxide/sulfide hosts and electrochemical performances of Li-S batteries are discussed. Nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides hosts used in solid sulfur cathodes, separators/interlayers, lithium-metal-anode protection, and lithium polysulfides batteries are discussed respectively. Prospects for the future developments of Li-S batteries with nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides are also discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effects of the adsorption characteristics of a carbon-fiber material on the activity of a phosphine oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rakitskaya, T.L.; Litvinskaya, V.V.; Abramova, N.N.; Red'ko, T.D.; Popova, N.A.

    1987-12-01

    The specimens were made from microporous carbon fiber material having various static activity as determined from the sorption of benzene vapor. It was shown that the porous structure is extended at the expense of increase in the micropore volume, which remains almost constant. The specimens were tested in flowing gas with a thermostatic system. Results presented as graphs reflected the phosphine concentration at the exit. Tables indicate that copper (II) and chloride reduces the static activity considerably. The effects of relative water vapor pressure on the uptake in sorption and catalysts performance in the oxidation of phosphine are presented.

  11. Vegetation successfully prevents oxidization of sulfide minerals in mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-07-15

    The oxidization of metal sulfide in tailings causes acid mine drainage. However, it remains unclear whether vegetation prevents the oxidization of metal sulfides. The oxidization characteristics and microbial indices of the tailings in the presence of various plant species were investigated to explore the effects of vegetation on the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. The pH, reducing sulfur, free iron oxides (Fed), chemical oxygen consumption (COC) and biological oxygen consumption (BOC) were measured. Key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Acidithiobacillus spp., Leptospirillum spp. and Thiobacillus spp.) were quantified using real-time PCR. The results indicate that vegetation growing on tailings can effectively prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in tailings. A higher pH and reducing-sulfur content and lower Fed were observed in the 0-30 cm depth interval in the presence of vegetation compared to bare tailings (BT). The COC gradually decreased with depth in all of the soil profiles; specifically, the COC rapidly decreased in the 10-20 cm interval in the presence of vegetation but gradually decreased in the BT profiles. Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanoides (CZ) profiles contained the highest BOC in the 10-20 cm interval. The abundance of key iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the vegetated tailings were significantly lower than in the BT; in particular, IC was associated with the lowest iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacterial abundance. In conclusion, vegetation successfully prevented the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the tailings, and Imperata cylindrica is the most effective in reducing the number of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and helped to prevent the oxidization of sulfide minerals in the long term.

  12. Air-stable secondary phosphine oxide or chloride (Pre)ligands for cross-couplings of unactivated alkyl chlorides.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Lutz; Kapdi, Anant R; Schulzke, Carola

    2010-05-21

    In situ generated and crystallographically well-defined, isolated palladium complexes derived from seven novel air-stable secondary phosphine oxides or chlorides enabled challenging Kumada-Corriu cross-couplings of unactivated alkyl chlorides bearing beta-hydrogens and proved applicable to transformations of alkyl-substituted organometallics.

  13. Sulfide oxidation in fluidized bed bioreactor using nylon support material.

    PubMed

    Midha, Varsha; Jha, M K; Dey, Apurba

    2012-01-01

    A continuous fluidized bed bioreactor (FBBR) with nylon support particles was used to treat synthetic sulfide wastewater at different hydraulic retention time of 25, 50 and 75 min and upflow velocity of 14, 17 and 20 m/hr. The effects of upflow velocity, hydraulic retention time and reactor operation time on sulfide oxidation rate were studied using statistical model. Mixed culture obtained from the activated sludge, taken from tannery effluent treatment plant, was used as a source for microorganisms. The diameter and density of the nylon particles were 2-3 mm and 1140 kg/m3, respectively. Experiments were carried out in the reactor at a temperature of (30 +/- 2) degrees C, at a fixed bed height of 16 cm after the formation of biofilm on the surface of support particles. Biofilm thickness reached (42 +/- 3) microm after 15 days from reactor start-up. The sulfide oxidation, sulfate and sulfur formation is examined at all hydraulic retention times and upflow velocities. The results indicated that almost 90%-92% sulfide oxidation was achieved at all hydraulic retention times. Statistical model could explain 94% of the variability and analysis of variance showed that upflow velocity and hydraulic retention time slightly affected the sulfide oxidation rate. The highest sulfide oxidation of 92% with 70% sulfur was obtained at hydraulic retention time of 75 min and upflow velocity of 14 m/hr.

  14. Nickel Phosphine Catalysts with Pendant Amines for Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Charles J.; Wiedner, Eric S.; Roberts, John A.; Appel, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel phosphine complexes with pendant amines have been found to be electrocatalysts for the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols, with turnover frequencies as high as 3.3 s-1. These complexes are the first electrocatalysts for alcohol oxidation based on non-precious metals, which will be critical for use in fuel cells. The research by CJW, ESW, and AMA was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. The research by JASR was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  15. Simple phosphinate ligands access zinc clusters identified in the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Sebastian D.; White, Edward R.; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Williams, Charlotte K.

    2016-01-01

    The bottom-up synthesis of ligand-stabilized functional nanoparticles from molecular precursors is widely applied but is difficult to study mechanistically. Here we use 31P NMR spectroscopy to follow the trajectory of phosphinate ligands during the synthesis of a range of ligated zinc oxo clusters, containing 4, 6 and 11 zinc atoms. Using an organometallic route, the clusters interconvert rapidly and self-assemble in solution based on thermodynamic equilibria rather than nucleation kinetics. These clusters are also identified in situ during the synthesis of phosphinate-capped zinc oxide nanoparticles. Unexpectedly, the ligand is sequestered to a stable Zn11 cluster during the majority of the synthesis and only becomes coordinated to the nanoparticle surface, in the final step. In addition to a versatile and accessible route to (optionally doped) zinc clusters, the findings provide an understanding of the role of well-defined molecular precursors during the synthesis of small (2–4 nm) nanoparticles. PMID:27734828

  16. Evidence supporting biologically mediated sulfide oxidation in hot spring ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. D.; Shock, E.

    2011-12-01

    The sulfide concentration of fluids in hydrothermal ecosystems is one of several factors determining the transition to microbial photosynthesis (Cox et al., 2011, Chem. Geol. 280, 344-351). To investigate the loss of sulfide in Yellowstone hot spring systems, measurements of total dissolved sulfide with respect to time were made in incubation experiments conducted on 0.2-micron filtered (killed controls) vs. unfiltered hot spring water at locations with three different pH:sulfide combinations (pH 2.5 with 50 μM sulfide, 5.2 with 5.6 μM sulfide, and 8.3 with 86 μM sulfide). At the higher pH values, the experiments yielded similar rates of sulfide loss in filtered and unfiltered water of approximately 0.8 (pH 5.2) and 7.6 nmol sulfide L-1s-1 (pH 8.3). At the acidic spring, the unfiltered water lost sulfide at a rate 1.6 times that of the filtered water (8.2 vs. 5 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). These results suggest that the pelagic biomass at the pH 5.2 and 8.3 springs may not affect sulfide loss, whereas in the pH 2.5 spring there appears to be an effect. In addition, the incubation of filamentous biomass with unfiltered water increased the rate of sulfide loss by approximately two-fold at a pH of 2.5 (59 vs. 31 nmol L-1s-1; Cox et al., 2011), five-fold at a pH of 5.2 (3.9 vs. 0.8 nmol sulfide L-1s-1), and barely increased the rate of sulfide loss at a pH of 8.3 (9.1 vs. 8.4 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). Sulfide is predominately present as HS- at a pH of 8.3, which may not be taken up as easily by microorganisms as the H2S (aq) that dominates sulfide speciation at pH 2.5 and 5.2. That the loss of sulfide at acidic pH is due to biotic rather than abiotic factors is further supported by studies with whole mat samples that show greater sulfide consumption than killed controls (D'Imperio et al., 2008, AEM 74, 5802-5808). Taken together, the results of these experiments suggest that the majority of sulfide oxidation occurs in the filamentous biomass of hot spring ecosystems, although

  17. Synthesis and characterization of aryl phosphine oxide containing thermoplastic polyimides and thermosetting polyimides with controlled reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Hong

    1998-11-01

    Phosphorus containing monomers, bis(3-aminophenyl)methyl phosphine oxide (m-DAMPO) and bis(3-aminophenyl)phenyl phosphine oxide (m-DAPPO), were synthesized and incorporated into a thermoplastic poly(arylene ether imide) based upon 2,2sp'-bis (4-(3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy)phenyl) propane dianhydride and 1,3-phenylene diamine, in order to study their influence on flame resistance and other properties. DAMPO or DAPPO were quantitatively incorporated in concentrations of 25, 50, 75 and 100 mole percent, using the "one pot" ester-acid method. The number average molecular weights of the prepared materials were controlled to 20,000g/mol by off-setting the stoichiometry and endcapping with phthalic anhydride. This strategy enabled one to distinguish the effects of the phosphine oxide incorporation from the influence of molecular weight. The resulting copolymers demonstrated a significant increase in char yield as a function of the phosphine oxide content, thus suggesting improved fire resistance. Glass transition temperatures similar to the control were determined by DSC analysis. Analysis of the mechanical behavior of the DAMPO system at room temperature showed that tensile strength and elongation at failure values were comparable to the control system, while the DAPPO containing copolymers were surprisingly brittle. The influence of the reactive endgroup on the synthesis, cure behavior and network properties of thermosetting polyetherimides was investigated. Reactive phenylacetylene, acetylene and maleimide terminated poly(ether imide) oligomers were prepared and characterized. Optimal reaction conditions were established to produce fully endcapped oligomers with imidized structures and controlled molecular weight. The phenylacetylene endcapped system was synthesized by a conventional ester-acid method. The acetylene endcapped system was prepared via modified ester-acid method and the maleimide endcapped system was fabricated utilizing an amic-acid route. It was determined

  18. Preparation of cadmium selenide-polyolefin composites from functional phosphine oxides and ruthenium-based metathesis.

    PubMed

    Skaff, Habib; Ilker, M Firat; Coughlin, E Bryan; Emrick, Todd

    2002-05-22

    Cadmium selenide nanoparticles, prepared by known methods, were stabilized with functional phosphine oxide 1, then used to support the polymerization of cyclic olefins radially outward from the surface by ruthenium-catalyzed ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). The conversion of compound 1 into the new metathesis catalyst 3 by carbene exchange and the subsequent polymerization of cyclic olefins were observed spectroscopically by (1)H NMR to afford for example CdSe-polycyclooctene composite 6. Transmission electron micrographs on thin films of these composites showed good nanoparticle dispersion. This is in stark contrast to the substantial nanoparticle aggregation observed when similar polymerizations were performed in the presence of conventional TOPO-covered nanoparticles. The methods reported here to prepare composite product 6 are applicable to other cyclic olefins, and suggest that this chemistry will be useful for incorporating CdSe nanoparticles into a wide variety of polymer matrices.

  19. Synthesis and fuel cell characterization of blend membranes from phenyl phosphine oxide containing flourinated novel polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürtekin Seden, Merve; Baştürk, Emre; Inan, Tülay Y.; Kayaman Apohan, Nilhan; Güngör, Atilla

    2014-12-01

    Novel fluorinated poly(arylene ether)'s are synthesized from polycondensation of bis (p-hydroxy-tetrafluoro) phenyl) phenyl phosphine oxide (PFPPO-OH) with 4,4‧-dichlorodiphenyl sulfone (DCDPS) and 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane (Bisfenol A) (Copolymer 1a) or 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane (Bisphenol AF) (Copolymer 1b). The fluorinated copolymers have been blended with sulphonated poly(ether ether ketone)-SPEEK by solvent casting method. The water uptake and proton conductivity of the blend membranes decreases with the increase of copolymer content as expected, but proton conductivity values are still comparable to that of Nafion117® membrane. Addition of hydrophobic copolymer 1b to the SPEEK caused increase in water vapor transmission. Methanol permeability of the membranes is decreased to 8.2 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 and 1.3 × 10-9 cm2 s-1 by addition of Copolymer 1a and 1b, respectively and they are much lower than that of Nafion® 117 (1.21E-06 (cm2 s-1). The blend membranes endure up to 6.5 h before it starts to dissolve. Hydrogen and oxygen permeability of the blend membranes is one-hundredth of the Nafion®. Fluorinated polymer improved chemical, mechanical, and hydrolytic stability and also phenyl phosphine oxide structure in the ionomer increased the thermal stability, gas and methanol permeability and overcomed the drawbacks of the Nafion® type membranes.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and crystal structure of mercury(II) complex containing new phosphine oxide salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiee, Sepideh; Kooti, Nadieh; Gable, Robert W.

    2017-02-01

    The reaction of new phosphonium-phosphine oxide salt [P(O)Ph2(CH2)2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H4NO2]Br (1) with mercury(II) iodide in a methanolic solution yielded [P(O)Ph2(CH2)2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H4NO2]2[Hg2I5Br](2). These two compounds were fully characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H, 31P, and 13C NMR spectra. Crystal and molecular structure of 2 has been determined by means of X-ray diffraction. In mercury compound, the phosphine oxide salt is found as a counter ion letting the mercury(II) ion to bound halides to all four coordination sites and to give dimermercurate(II) ions as the structure-constructing species. The neighboring [P(O)Ph2(CH2)2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H4NO2]2+cations are joined together by intramolecular Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds to give a 1-D chain structure along the crystallographic b-axis. The [Hg2I5Br]2-anions act as cross-linkers between neighbouring strands extending the supramolecular structure into 2D layers in (110) planes as well as balances the charge of the complex. The significant effects of Csbnd H⋯X (Xdbnd O, Br and I) and π⋯π aromatic interactions play a major role in the crystal packing of compound 2.

  1. Rapid water oxidation electrocatalysis by a ruthenium complex of the tripodal ligand tris(2-pyridyl)phosphine oxide.

    PubMed

    Walden, Andrew G; Miller, Alexander J M

    2015-04-16

    The tris(2-pyridyl)phosphine oxide (Py3PO) complex [Ru(Py3PO)(bpy)(OH2)](2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine) is a pH-dependent water oxidation electrocatalyst that accelerates dramatically with increasing pH-up to 780 s(-1) at pH 10 (∼1 V overpotential). Despite retaining the pentakis(pyridine) ligand arrangement common to previously reported catalysts, the tripodal Py3PO ligand framework supports much faster electrocatalysis. The early stages of the catalytic cycle are proposed to follow the typical pattern of single-site ruthenium catalysts, with two sequential 1H(+)/1e(-) proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidations, but the pH-dependent onset of catalysis and rapid rates are distinguishing features of the present system.

  2. Cupriavidus necator H16 uses flavocytochrome c-sulfide dehydrogenase to oxidize self-produced and spiked sulfide.

    PubMed

    Lü, Chuanjuan; Xia, Yongzhen; Liu, Daixi; Zhao, Rui; Gao, Rui; Liu, Honglei; Xun, Luying

    2017-09-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria producing sulfide (H2S, HS(-), and S(2-)) during aerobic growth is a common phenomenon. Some with sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) and persulfide dioxygenase (PDO) can oxidize self-produced sulfide to sulfite and thiosulfate, but others without these enzymes will release sulfide into the medium, from which H2S can volatilize into the gas phase. Here, we report Cupriavidus necator H16 with the fccAB genes, encoding flavocytochrome c-sulfide dehydrogenases (FCSDs), also oxidized self-produced H2S. The mutant with fccAB being deleted accumulated and released H2S. When fccAB were expressed in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain Pa3K with deletions of its sqr and pdo genes, the recombinant rapidly oxidized sulfide to sulfane sulfur. When PDO was also cloned into the recombinant, the recombinant with both FCSD and PDO oxidized sulfide to sulfite and thiosulfate. Thus, the proposed pathway is similar to the pathway catalyzed by SQR and PDO, in which FCSD oxidizes sulfide to polysulfide, polysulfide spontaneously reacts with GSH to produce GSSH, and PDO oxidizes GSSH to sulfite, which chemically reacts with polysulfide to produce thiosulfate. About 20.6% of sequenced bacterial genomes contain SQR, and only 3.9% contain FCSD. This is not a surprise since SQR is more efficient in conserving energy because it passes electrons from sulfide oxidation into the electron transport chain at the quinone level, while FCSD passes electrons to cytochrome c The transport of electrons from the latter to O2 conserves less energy. FCSDs are grouped into three subgroups, well conserved at taxonomic levels. Thus, our data show the diversity in sulfide oxidation by heterotrophic bacteria.Importance Heterotrophic bacteria with SQR and PDO can oxidize self-produced sulfide and do not release H2S into the gas phase. C. necator H16 has FCSD but not SQR, and it does not release H2S. We confirmed that the bacterium used FCSD for the oxidation of self-produced sulfide. The

  3. Respirometric characterization of aerobic sulfide, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur oxidation by S-oxidizing biomass.

    PubMed

    Mora, Mabel; López, Luis R; Lafuente, Javier; Pérez, Julio; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Gamisans, Xavier; Gabriel, David

    2016-02-01

    Respirometry was used to reveal the mechanisms involved in aerobic biological sulfide oxidation and to characterize the kinetics and stoichiometry of a microbial culture obtained from a desulfurizing biotrickling filter. Physical-chemical processes such as stripping and chemical oxidation of hydrogen sulfide were characterized since they contributed significantly to the conversions observed in respirometric tests. Mass transfer coefficient for hydrogen sulfide and the kinetic parameters for chemical oxidation of sulfide with oxygen were estimated. The stoichiometry of the process was determined and the different steps in the sulfide oxidation process were identified. The conversion scheme proposed includes intermediate production of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate and the subsequent oxidation of both compounds to sulfate. A kinetic model describing each of the reactions observed during sulfide oxidation was calibrated and validated. The product selectivity was found to be independent of the dissolved oxygen to hydrogen sulfide concentration ratio in the medium at sulfide concentrations ranging from 3 to 30 mg S L(-1). Sulfide was preferentially consumed (SOURmax = 49.2 mg DO g(-1) VSS min(-1)) and oxidized to elemental sulfur at dissolved oxygen concentrations above 0.8 mg DO L(-1). Substrate inhibition of sulfide oxidation was observed (K(i,S(2-))= 42.4 mg S L(-1)). Intracellular sulfur accumulation also affected negatively the sulfide oxidation rate. The maximum fraction of elemental sulfur accumulated inside cells was estimated (25.6% w/w) and a shrinking particle equation was included in the kinetic model to describe elemental sulfur oxidation. The microbial diversity obtained through pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Thiothrix sp. was the main species present in the culture (>95%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Performance of a sulfide-oxidizing, sulfur-producing membrane biofilm reactor treating sulfide-containing bioreactor effluent.

    PubMed

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Hasar, Halil; Kaksonen, Anna H; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2011-05-01

    Sulfide-containing waste streams are generated in mining, petrochemical plants, tanneries, viscose rayon manufacture, and the gasification of coal. Colorless sulfur bacteria can oxidize sulfide to elemental sulfur (S°), which can be recovered, when oxygen is their electron acceptor. This study evaluated sulfide oxidation and S° recovery in an oxygen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) treating the effluent from a sulfidogenic anaerobic baffled reactor. Sulfide oxidation efficiency (37-99%) and S° recovery (64-89% of oxidized sulfide) could be controlled by manipulating the sulfide loading, oxygen pressure to the fibers, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). For example, too-low oxygen pressure decreased S° recovery due to decreased sulfide oxidation, but too-high oxygen pressure lowered S° recovery due to its oxidation to sulfate. Most importantly, high sulfide oxidation (>98%) and conversion to S° (>75%) could be achieved together when the sulfide loading was less than 1.7 mol/m²·d and the O₂ pressure was sufficient to give an O₂ flux of at least 1.5 mol/m²·d. However, higher sulfide loading could be compensated by a higher O₂ pressure, and the best performance occurred when the sulfide loading was high (2 molS/m²·d), the O₂ pressure was high (∼1 atm), and the HRT was short (1.9 h). Membrane fouling caused a low O₂ flux, which led to low sulfide-oxidation efficiency, but fouling could be reversed by mild acid washing.

  5. Catalytic Oxidation of Alcohol via Nickel Phosphine Complexes with Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Charles J.; Das, Partha Pratim; Higgins, Deanna LM; Helm, Monte L.; Appel, Aaron M.

    2014-09-05

    Nickel complexes were prepared with diphosphine ligands that contain pendant amines, and these complexes catalytically oxidize primary and secondary alcohols to their respective aldehydes and ketones. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of these prospective electrocatalysts were performed to understand what influences the catalytic activity. For the oxidation of diphenylmethanol, the catalytic rates were determined to be dependent on the concentration of both the catalyst and the alcohol. The catalytic rates were found to be independent of the concentration of base and oxidant. The incorporation of pendant amines to the phosphine ligand results in substantial increases in the rate of alcohol oxidation with more electron-donating substituents on the pendant amine exhibiting the fastest rates. We thank Dr. John C. Linehan, Dr. Elliott B. Hulley, Dr. Jonathan M. Darmon, and Dr. Elizabeth L. Tyson for helpful discussions. Research by CJW, PD, DLM, and AMA was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Research by MLH was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  6. High conducting oxide--sulfide composite lithium superionic conductor

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Chengdu; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Dudney, Nancy J.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Rondinone, Adam Justin

    2017-01-17

    A solid electrolyte for a lithium-sulfur battery includes particles of a lithium ion conducting oxide composition embedded within a lithium ion conducting sulfide composition. The lithium ion conducting oxide composition can be Li.sub.7La.sub.3Zr.sub.2O.sub.12 (LLZO). The lithium ion conducting sulfide composition can be .beta.-Li.sub.3PS.sub.4 (LPS). A lithium ion battery and a method of making a solid electrolyte for a lithium ion battery are also disclosed.

  7. Summary of GPC/DV results for space exposed poly(arylene ether phosphine oxide)s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, Emilie

    1995-01-01

    Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) was used to analyze poly(arylene ether phosphine oxide)s whose backbones were identical except for the ketone content and placement. These samples were exposed to low Earth orbit environment (predominantly atomic oxygen) on space shuttle flights. The materials and their unexposed controls were then characterized by GPC to investigate the effect of atomic oxygen on the molecular weight distributions. Analysis of the soluble portion of the samples revealed that there was significant loss of high molecular weight species. The presence of insoluble material also suggested that crosslinking was induced by the atomic oxygen exposure and that this very likely occurred at the high molecular weight portion of the molecular weight distribution.

  8. Laboratory SIP signatures associated with oxidation of disseminated metal sulfides.

    PubMed

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Binley, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Oxidation of metal sulfide minerals is responsible for the generation of acidic waters rich in sulfate and metals. When associated with the oxidation of sulfide ore mine waste deposits the resulting pore water is called acid mine drainage (AMD); AMD is a known environmental problem that affects surface and ground waters. Characterization of oxidation processes in-situ is challenging, particularly at the field scale. Geophysical techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) in particular, may provide a means of such investigation. We performed laboratory experiments to assess the sensitivity of the SIP method to the oxidation mechanisms of common sulfide minerals found in mine waste deposits, i.e., pyrite and pyrrhotite, when the primary oxidant agent is dissolved oxygen. We found that SIP parameters, e.g., phase shift, the imaginary component of electrical conductivity and total chargeability, decrease as the time of exposure to oxidation and oxidation degree increase. This observation suggests that dissolution-depletion of the mineral surface reduces the capacitive properties and polarizability of the sulfide minerals. However, small increases in the phase shift and imaginary conductivity do occur during oxidation. These transient increases appear to correlate with increases of soluble oxidizing products, e.g., Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) in solution; precipitation of secondary minerals and the formation of a passivating layer to oxidation coating the mineral surface may also contribute to these increases. In contrast, the real component of electrical conductivity associated with electrolytic, electronic and interfacial conductance is sensitive to changes in the pore fluid chemistry as a result of the soluble oxidation products released (Fe(2+) and Fe(3+)), particularly for the case of pyrrhotite minerals.

  9. Synthesis and Mossbauer spectroscopic studies of chemically oxidized ferrocenyl(phenyl)phosphines.

    PubMed

    Durfey, D A; Kirss, R U; Frommen, C; Feighery, W

    The electrochemical potentials of Fc3-xPPhx, (1-3, x = 0-2) and (FcPPh)n (4) indicate that iodine should oxidize ferrocenyl(phenyl)phosphines. The molar conductivity of solutions of 1-3 increases sharply when the solutions are titrated with iodine, leveling off after the addition of > 2 equiv of oxidant, consistent with formation of 1:1 electrolytes. Diamagnetic salts 6-9 are observed upon addition of a benzene solution of iodine to a benzene solution of 1-4 at ambient temperature in ratios of I2/metallocene ranging from 1:1 to 2:1. Well-resolved 1H and 31P NMR spectra are obtained for 6-8. Absorptions assigned to the I3- anion dominate the UV-vis spectrum of 6-8, whereas characteristic absorptions for [Fc][I3] are absent. Mossbauer spectra of 7-9 reveal isomer shifts consistent with low-spin iron(II) in ferrocene derivatives rather than those in ferricenium ions. Small amounts of low-spin FeIII appear to be present in 6. Taken together, the results suggest that 6-9 are iodophosphonium salts and not ferricenium salts. Diferrocenyl(phenyl)phosphine oxide (5) reacts with iodine to produce a diamagnetic, dark solid 10. Low-spin FeII is observed at 77 and 293 K in the Mossbauer spectra of 10 with no evidence for oxidation of FeII to FeIII. Compound 10 is proposed to be a neutral complex between 5 and I2. Reactions between 5 and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) yield [Fc2P(=O)][DDQ]2 (11). Mossbauer spectroscopy of 11 indicates the presence of a mixture of low-spin FeII and low-spin FeIII at 77 K, suggesting that some electron transfer occurs from 5 to DDQ. The fraction of low-spin FeIII increases at room temperature.

  10. Catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Srinivas, Girish; Bai, Chuansheng

    2000-08-08

    This invention provides catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. In particular, the invention provides catalysts for the partial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur and water. The catalytically active component of the catalyst comprises a mixture of metal oxides containing titanium oxide and one or more metal oxides which can be selected from the group of metal oxides or mixtures of metal oxides of transition metals or lanthanide metals. Preferred metal oxides for combination with TiO.sub.2 in the catalysts of this invention include oxides of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Au, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Catalysts which comprise a homogeneous mixture of titanium oxide and niobium (Nb) oxide are also provided. A preferred method for preparing the precursor homogenous mixture of metal hydroxides is by coprecipitation of titanium hydroxide with one or more other selected metal hydroxides. Catalysts of this invention have improved activity and/or selectivity for elemental sulfur production. Further improvements of activity and/or selectivity can be obtained by introducing relatively low amounts (up to about 5 mol %)of a promoter metal oxide (preferably of metals other than titanium and that of the selected second metal oxide) into the homogeneous metal/titanium oxide catalysts of this invention.

  11. A new approach to 19-nor-A-ring phosphine oxide for the convergent synthesis of 19-nor-calcitriol.

    PubMed

    Sigüeiro, Rita; Otero, Rocio; González-Berdullas, Patricia; Loureiro, Julian; Mouriño, Antonio; Maestro, Miguel A

    2017-10-01

    A new approach to 19-nor-A-ring phosphine oxide 5 together with a convergent synthesis of the vitamin D3 analogue 1α,25-dihydroxy-19-norvitamin D3 (3) have been developed. The 19-nor-A-ring is constructed from (S)-carvone. The triene system is assembled by a Wittig-Horner coupling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Photopolymerization study and adhesive properties of self-etch adhesives containing bis(acyl)phosphine oxide initiator.

    PubMed

    Besse, Vincent; Derbanne, Mathieu A; Pham, Thi-Nhàn; Cook, Wayne D; Le Pluart, Loïc

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the photo-co-polymerization behavior of a blend of a diacrylamide (DEBAAP) with a phosphonylated acidic monomer using either bis(acyl)phosphine oxide or camphorquinone/amine as photo-initiator and studies the effect of variation of the structure of the phosphonylated acidic monomer on the shear bond strength to human dentin. Photopolymerization kinetics has been assessed through the use of photo-DSC with either initiating system and with and without a phosphonic acid monomer, while the shear bond strengths (SBS) of dentin bonding agents formulated with several phosphonylated acidic monomers have been evaluated by macro SBS testing on human dentin. Photo-DSC results show that bis(acyl)phosphine oxide initiates a faster polymerization than camphorquinone/amine and that both photopolymerizations are accelerated by the phosphonic acid monomer. Similar results were obtained between adhesives based on camphorquinone/amine and a commercial adhesive (AdheSE, Ivoclar-Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein). The best performances were obtained when BAPO was used as the initiator, in many cases far better than the commercial adhesive. Adhesive SEA6 based on difluoromethylphosphonic acid C demonstrated the best adhesion results of this study. Significance The bis(acyl)phosphine oxide photo-initiator causes faster photopolymerization of two-step self-etching dental adhesive, and its use could yield better bonding performance. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Wet oxidation of oil-bearing sulfide wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Hotz, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    Oil-bearing metal sulfide sludges produced in treatment of an industrial wastewater, which includes plating wastes, have yielded to treatment by electrooxidation and hydrogen peroxide processes. The oxidation can be controlled to be mild enough to avoid decomposition of the organic phase while oxidizing the sulfides to sulfates. The pH is controlled to near neutral conditions where iron, aluminum and chromium(III) precipitate as hydrous oxides. Other metals, such as lead and barium, may be present as sulfate precipitates with limited solubility, while metals such as nickel and cadmium would be present as complexed ions in a sulfate solution. The oxidations were found to proceed smoothly, without vigorous reaction; heat liberation was minimal. 2 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    DOEpatents

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  15. Diphen­yl[2-(2-pyridylamino­meth­yl)phen­yl]phosphine oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ortega, Simón; Cuenu Cabeza, Fernando; Cabrera-Ortiz, Armando

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, C24H21N2OP, was obtained by reacting 2-amino­pyridine and 2-(diphenyl­phosphin­yl)benzaldehyde in ethanol. It crystallizes with two crystallographically independent mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit. The amino­pyridine units and the benzene ring bonded to the phosphine oxide P atom form dihedral angles of 88.58 (7) and 82.47 (9)° in the two mol­ecules. The crystal structure displays strong N—H⋯O and weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds along the b axis and C—H⋯π aromatic intra- and inter­molecular inter­actions. PMID:21579222

  16. [Oxidation of sulfide minerals by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans].

    PubMed

    Malakhova, P T; Chebotarev, G M; Kovalenko, E V; Volkov, Iu A

    1981-01-01

    Samples of natural pyrites and sphalerites were subjected to the action of the mineral medium 9K with 1 g of Fe3+ per litre in the presence and in the absence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, and incubated at 28 degrees C under the stationary conditions for 30 days. The chemical composition of the solutions was studied after leaching as well as changes of the surfaces of monoliths. The deepest etching of surfaces with the formation of crusts and films of jarosite, limonite and goslarite occurs upon the combined action of bacteria and Fe3+ in regions of a fine-zonal structure enriched with an isomorphous arsenic admixture which are characterized by a defective weak structure. The pyrite and sphalerite from Charmitan with a higher arsenic and iron content were leached more than the pyrite and sphalerite from Kurgashincan. This was also corroborated by chemical analyses of leaching solutions and by monometric studies of crushed sulfide samples.

  17. Interactions among sulfide-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of different phototrophic bacteria in a competitive experimental system are studied, one in which primary factors such as H2S or light limited photometabolism. Two different types of bacteria shared one limited source of sulfide under specific conditions of light. The selection of a purple and a green sulfur bacteria and the cyanobacterium was based on their physiological similarity and also on the fact that they occur together in microbial mats. They all share anoxygenic photosynthesis, and are thus probably part of an evolutionary continuum of phototrophic organisms that runs from, strictly anaerobic physiology to the ability of some cyanobacteria to shift between anoxygenic bacterial style photosynthesis and the oxygenic kind typical of eukaryotes.

  18. Characterization of secondary phosphine oxide ligands on the surface of iridium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cano, Israel; Martínez-Prieto, Luis M; Fazzini, Pier F; Coppel, Yannick; Chaudret, Bruno; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2017-08-16

    The synthesis of iridium nanoparticles (IrNPs) ligated by various secondary phosphine oxides (SPOs) is described. This highly reproducible and simple method via H2 reduction produces well dispersed, small nanoparticles (NPs), which were characterized by the state-of-the-art techniques, such as TEM, HRTEM, WAXS and ATR FT-IR spectroscopy. In particular, multinuclear solid state MAS-NMR spectroscopy with and without cross polarization (CP) enabled us to investigate the different binding modes adopted by the ligand at the nanoparticle surface, suggesting the presence of three possible types of coordination: as a purely anionic ligand Ir-P(O)R2, as a neutral acid R2P-O-H and as a monoanionic bidentate H-bonded dimer R2P-O-HO[double bond, length as m-dash]PR2. Specifically, the higher basicity of the dicyclohexyl system leads to the formation of IrNPs in which the bidentate binding mode is most abundant. Such cyclohexyl groups are bent towards the edges, as is suggested by the study of (13)CO coordination on the NP surface. This study also showed that the number of surface sites on faces available for bridging CO molecules is higher than the number of sites for terminal CO species on edges and apices, which is unexpected taking into account the small size of the nanoparticles. In addition, the IrNPs present a high chemoselectivity in the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to the unsaturated alcohol.

  19. Molecular determinants of Kv1.5 channel block by diphenyl phosphine oxide-1.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi-mei; Zhang, Xiao-xian; Tu, Dan-na; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Yan-jie; Xiao, Hua; Sanguinetti, Michael C; Zou, Anruo; Liao, Yu-hua

    2010-06-01

    Kv1.5 channels conduct the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier current (I(Kur)) that contributes to action potential repolarization of human atrial myocytes. Block of these channels has been proposed as a treatment for atrial arrhythmias. Diphenyl phosphine oxide-1 (DPO-1) is a novel and potent inhibitor of Kv1.5 potassium channels. The present study was undertaken to characterize the mechanisms and molecular determinants of channel block by DPO-1. Experiments were carried out on wild-type and mutant Kv1.5 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using the standard two microelectrode voltage clamp technique. DPO-1 blocked Kv1.5 current in oocytes with an IC(50) of 0.78+/-0.12 microM at +40 mV. Block was enhanced by higher rates of stimulation, consistent with preferential binding of the drug to the open state of the channel. Ala-scanning mutagenesis of the pore domain of Kv1.5 identified the residues Thr480, Leu499, Leu506, Ile508, Leu510 and Val514 as components of the putative binding site for DPO-1, partially overlapping the site previously defined for the Kv1.5 channel blockers AVE0118 and S0100176. Block of Kv1.5 by DPO-1 was significantly reduced in the presence of Kvbeta1.3.

  20. Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking Materials for Blue Electrophosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Von Ruden, Amber L.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Koech, Phillip K.; Swensen, James S.; Wang, Liang; Darsell, Jens T.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2010-10-26

    We report the design, synthesis, thermal, and photophysical properties of two phosphine oxide based electron transport/hole blocking materials, 2,6-bis(4-(diphenylphosphoryl)phenyl)pyridine (BM-A11) and 2,4-bis(4-(diphenyl-phosphoryl)phenyl)pyridine (BM-A10) for blue electrophosphorescent organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The use of these materials in blue OLED with iridium (III) bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2’]picolinate (Firpic) as the phosphor was demonstrated. Using the dual host device architecture with BM-A10 as the ETM yields a maximum EQE of 8.9% with a power efficiency of 21.5 lm/W (4.0V and 35 cd/m2). When BM-A11 is used as the ETM, the maximum EQE and power efficiency improves to 14.9% and 48.4 lm/W, respectively (3.0V and 40 cd/m2).

  1. Thermal and thermal-oxidative stability of trichloroethanol sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyavina, S.I.; Borshchevskii, S.B.; Medvedovskaya, I.I.; Stepanova, O.N.; Veselovskaya, L.F.; Zorina, E.F.

    1984-03-01

    This article reports on an investigation of the thermal and thermal-oxidative stability of bis(2,2,2-trichloro-1-hydroxyethyl) sulfide CCl/sub 3/-CHOHO-S-CHOH-CCl/sub 3/, which contains trichloromethyl and sulfide groups. The antiscoring effectiveness of this compound in TSp-14.5 oil is considerably better than that given by oils with the presently used commercial additives. The thermal stabilities of the sulfide additive and the IS-45 oil were tested in a stream of nitrogen at 100-150/sup 0/C, analyzing the reaction products by iodometric and mercurimetric titration to determine the quantities of sulfur and chlorine ions and the degree to which the additive had been converted to these ions. The thermal decomposition of the additive begins at 118/sup 0/C and increases with increasing temperature, whether it is tested by itself or in a 1.25% solution in IS-45 oil. The additive and the hydrocarbon oil with and without the additive were oxidized with atmospheric oxygen in a thin layer in a series of sealed ampuls, which were removed sequentially from the thermostat at predetermined time intervals for analysis of the gas phase by gas chromatography. It is concluded that the sulfide, which was studied as an extreme-pressure additive, when blended in IS-45 oil, has a lower thermal stability but a higher thermaloxidative stability in comparison with the straight hydrocarbon oil IS-45.

  2. Kinetic studies of sulfide mineral oxidation and xanthate adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendiratta, Neeraj K.

    2000-10-01

    Sulfide minerals are a major source of metals; however, certain sulfide minerals, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are less desirable. Froth flotation is a commonly used separation technique, which requires the use of several reagents to float and depress different sulfide minerals. Xanthate, a thiol collector, has gained immense usage in sulfide minerals flotation. However, some sulfides are naturally hydrophobic and may float without a collector. Iron sulfides, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are few of the most abundant minerals, yet economically insignificant. Their existence with other sulfide minerals leads to an inefficient separation process as well as environmental problems, such as acid mine drainage during mining and processing and SO 2 emissions during smelting process. A part of the present study is focused on understanding their behavior, which leads to undesired flotation and difficulties in separation. The major reasons for the undesired flotation are attributed to the collectorless hydrophobicity and the activation with heavy metal ions. To better understand the collectorless hydrophobicity of pyrite, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) of freshly fractured pyrite electrodes was used to study the oxidation and reduction of the mineral. The EIS results showed that the rate of reaction increases with oxidation and reduction. At moderate oxidizing potentials, the rate of reaction is too slow to replenish hydrophilic iron species leaving hydrophobic sulfur species on the surface. However, at higher potentials, iron species are replaced fast enough to depress its flotation. Effects of pH and polishing were also explored using EIS. Besides collectorless hydrophobicity, the activation of pyrrhotite with nickel ions and interaction with xanthate ions makes the separation more difficult. DETA and SO2 are commonly used as pyrrhotite depressants; however, the mechanism is not very well understood. Contact angle measurements, cyclic voltammetry and Tafel

  3. Inhibition of Sulfide Mineral Oxidation by Surface Coating Agents: Batch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Ji, M. K.; Yun, H. S.; Park, Y. T.; Gee, E. D.; Lee, W. R.; Jeon, B.-H.

    2012-04-01

    Mining activities and mineral industries have impacted on rapid oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS2) which leads to Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) formation. Some of the abandoned mines discharge polluted water without proper environmental remediation treatments, largely because of financial constraints in treating AMD. Magnitude of the problem is considerable, especially in countries with a long history of mining. As metal sulfides become oxidized during mining activities, the aqueous environment becomes acid and rich in many metals, including iron, lead, mercury, arsenic and many others. The toxic heavy metals are responsible for the environmental deterioration of stream, groundwater and soils. Several strategies to remediate AMD contaminated sites have been proposed. Among the source inhibition and prevention technologies, microencapsulation (coating) has been considered as a promising technology. The encapsulation is based on inhibition of O2 diffusion by surface coating agent and is expected to control the oxidation of pyrite for a long time. Potential of several surface coating agents for preventing oxidation of metal sulfide minerals from both Young-Dong coal mine and Il-Gwang gold mine were examined by conducting batch experiments and field tests. Powdered pyrite as a standard sulfide mineral and rock samples from two mine outcrops were mixed with six coating agents (KH2PO4, MgO and KMnO4 as chemical agents, and apatite, cement and manganite as mineral agents) and incubated with oxidizing agents (H2O2 or NaClO). Batch experiments with Young-Dong coal mine samples showed least SO42- production in presence of KMnO4 (16% sulfate production compared to no surface coating agents) or cement (4%) within 8 days. In the case of Il-Gwang mine samples, least SO42- production was observed in presence of KH2PO4 (8%) or cement (2%) within 8 days. Field-scale pilot tests at Il-Gwang site also showed that addition of KH2PO4 decreased sulfate production from 200 to

  4. Behavior of iron aluminides in oxidizing and sulfidizing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    To date, use of iron aluminides based on Fe/sub 3/Al (less than or equal to30 at. % Al) or FeAl (30--50 at. % Al) for structural applications has been limited by their low ductility and poor fracture toughness at room temperature and inadequate strength above 600/degree/C. However, in recent years, a renewed effort has been devoted to the development of ductile iron aluminides with increased strength, particularly in view of their good potential for use in hostile environments. While it is expected that such aluminides will be able to form oxide scales for corrosion protection in oxidizing high temperature environments, resistance to degradation in oxidizing salt or oxidizing/sulfidizing gas environments has not been adequately addressed as a function of compositional and microstructural changes. This paper reviews and extends results for iron aluminides exposed to an oxidizing/sulfidizing gas and presents the first data for corrosion of this class of materials by an aggressive oxidizing molten nitrate salt of 48.5NaNO/sub 3/--50.5KNO/sub 3/--1Na/sub 2/O/sub 2/. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Modeling of hydrogen sulfide oxidation in concrete corrosion products from sewer pipes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2009-04-01

    Abiotic and biotic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide related to concrete corrosion was studied in corrosion products originating from a sewer manhole. The concrete corrosion products were suspended in an acidic solution, mimicking the conditions in the pore water of corroded concrete. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and dissolved oxygen was measured in parallel in the suspension, upon which the suspension was sterilized and the measurement repeated. The results revealed the biotic oxidation to be fast compared with the abiotic oxidation. The stoichiometry of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation was evaluated using the ratio between oxygen and hydrogen sulfide uptake. The ratio for the biotic oxidation pointed in the direction of elemental sulfur being formed as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfuric acid. The experimental results were applied to suggest a hypothesis and a mathematical model describing the hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway in a matrix of corroded concrete.

  6. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  7. Apparatus for purifying arsine, phosphine, ammonia, and inert gases to remove Lewis acid and oxidant impurities therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1991-01-08

    An apparatus for purifying a gaseous mixture comprising arsine, phosphine, ammonia, and/or inert gases, to remove Lewis acid and/or oxidant impurities therefrom, comprising a vessel containing a bed of a scavenger, the scavenger including a support having associated therewith an anion which is effective to remove such impurities, such anion being selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) carbanions whose corresponding protonated compounds have a pK.sub.a value of from about 22 to about 36; and (ii) anions formed by reaction of such carbanions with the primary component of the mixture.

  8. Glacial weathering, sulfide oxidation, and global carbon cycle feedbacks.

    PubMed

    Torres, Mark A; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Adkins, Jess F; West, A Joshua

    2017-08-15

    Connections between glaciation, chemical weathering, and the global carbon cycle could steer the evolution of global climate over geologic time, but even the directionality of feedbacks in this system remain to be resolved. Here, we assemble a compilation of hydrochemical data from glacierized catchments, use this data to evaluate the dominant chemical reactions associated with glacial weathering, and explore the implications for long-term geochemical cycles. Weathering yields from catchments in our compilation are higher than the global average, which results, in part, from higher runoff in glaciated catchments. Our analysis supports the theory that glacial weathering is characterized predominantly by weathering of trace sulfide and carbonate minerals. To evaluate the effects of glacial weathering on atmospheric pCO2, we use a solute mixing model to predict the ratio of alkalinity to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) generated by weathering reactions. Compared with nonglacial weathering, glacial weathering is more likely to yield alkalinity/DIC ratios less than 1, suggesting that enhanced sulfide oxidation as a result of glaciation may act as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Back-of-the-envelope calculations indicate that oxidative fluxes could change ocean-atmosphere CO2 equilibrium by 25 ppm or more over 10 ky. Over longer timescales, CO2 release could act as a negative feedback, limiting progress of glaciation, dependent on lithology and the concentration of atmospheric O2 Future work on glaciation-weathering-carbon cycle feedbacks should consider weathering of trace sulfide minerals in addition to silicate minerals.

  9. Mechanism of heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Xu, Wenqing; Yu, Yunbo

    2007-05-24

    Heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) under ambient conditions was investigated by in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It reveals that OCS can be catalytically hydrolyzed by surface hydroxyl on MgO to produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and then H2S can be further catalytically oxidized by surface oxygen or gaseous oxygen on MgO to form sulfite (SO3(2-)) and sulfate (SO4(2-)). Hydrogen thiocarbonate (HSCO2-) was found to be the crucial intermediate. Surface hydrogen sulfide (HS), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and surface sulfite (SO3(2-)) were also found to be intermediates for the formation of sulfate. Furthermore, the surface hydroxyl contributes not only to the formation of HSCO2- but also to HSCO2- decomposition. On the basis of experimental results, the heterogeneous reaction mechanism of OCS on MgO was discussed.

  10. Glacial weathering, sulfide oxidation, and global carbon cycle feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Mark A.; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Adkins, Jess F.; West, A. Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Connections between glaciation, chemical weathering, and the global carbon cycle could steer the evolution of global climate over geologic time, but even the directionality of feedbacks in this system remain to be resolved. Here, we assemble a compilation of hydrochemical data from glacierized catchments, use this data to evaluate the dominant chemical reactions associated with glacial weathering, and explore the implications for long-term geochemical cycles. Weathering yields from catchments in our compilation are higher than the global average, which results, in part, from higher runoff in glaciated catchments. Our analysis supports the theory that glacial weathering is characterized predominantly by weathering of trace sulfide and carbonate minerals. To evaluate the effects of glacial weathering on atmospheric pCO2, we use a solute mixing model to predict the ratio of alkalinity to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) generated by weathering reactions. Compared with nonglacial weathering, glacial weathering is more likely to yield alkalinity/DIC ratios less than 1, suggesting that enhanced sulfide oxidation as a result of glaciation may act as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Back-of-the-envelope calculations indicate that oxidative fluxes could change ocean–atmosphere CO2 equilibrium by 25 ppm or more over 10 ky. Over longer timescales, CO2 release could act as a negative feedback, limiting progress of glaciation, dependent on lithology and the concentration of atmospheric O2. Future work on glaciation–weathering–carbon cycle feedbacks should consider weathering of trace sulfide minerals in addition to silicate minerals.

  11. High temperature hydrogen sulfide removal with tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Karpuk, M.E.; Copeland, R.J.; Feinberg, D.; Wickham, D.; Windecker, B.; Yu, J.

    1993-09-01

    The system is based on the absorption of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) by stannic (tin) oxide. Two sorbents are required, the first sorbent is tin oxide and the second sorbent is a zinc oxide based material (i.e., zinc ferrite or zinc titanate) which is regenerated by air producing SO{sub 2}. TDA`s process carries out a modified Claus reaction to reduce the SO{sub 2} from the second sorbent generation to elemental sulfur. In this case the sulfided stannic oxide forms stannous sulfide (SnS) which reduces the SO{sub 2}. The absorption by SnO{sub 2} could remove over 90% of the H{sub 2}S from typical coal gas streams, but we use zinc ferrite (or zinc titanate), (a) to reduce H{sub 2}S to less than 20 ppM and (b) as a source of SO{sub 2} in regeneration. Due to stoichiometry of regeneration we want to remove half of the H{sub 2}S by SnO{sub 2} and the remainder by the second sorbent. The reactions with stannic oxide minimize the heat released during H{sub 2}S removal and regeneration. The absorption by SnO{sub 2} is slightly endothermic and cools the gas stream by less that 5{degrees}F (2.8{degrees}C) during absorption. Regeneration with SO{sub 2} is exothermic but releases only 11% of the heat that is liberated in regenerating the ZnO. For a nominal 6.5:1 steam to air the regeneration of ZnO increases the temperature by {approx_equal}400{degrees}F. The regeneration of SnO{sub 2} increases the temperature by less than 50{degrees}F (28{degrees}C) in the same gas flow.

  12. IR and Raman study of Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes of amino substituted phosphine oxides. Normal coordinate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, N.; Georgieva, I.; Bauer, G.; Varbanov, S.; Dodoff, N.

    1997-06-01

    IR and Raman spectra of Pt(dapo) 2Cl 2 and Pd(dapo) 2Cl 2 (dapo=dimethyl(aminomethyl)phosphine oxide) have been measured in the 200-4000 cm -1 frequency range. Both the IR and Raman spectra show that dimethyl(aminomethyl)phosphine oxide ligands are monodentate coordinate. The results from the normal coordinate analysis calculations confirm the monodentate coordination of the ligands in agreement with some literature data. For Pd(dapo) 2Cl 2 complex the possibility for bidentate coordination of one dapo ligand is also considered.

  13. Silicate-Sulfide-Oxide Phase Equilibria in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. L.; Ellis, D. J.; Christy, A. G.; Arculus, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Classical O2- and S2-dependent equilibria have been extrapolated to high P, showing that fO2 and fS2 in a wide variety of geological environments can be gauged by comparison to fluid buffering reactions. Many of these equilibria involve magnetite, which in intermediate to mafic rock types is eliminated with increasing P during the gabbro to eclogite transition (Green and Ringwood, 1967). It is not generally recognized that traditional buffers, such as QFM (quartz-fayalite-magnetite), are not appropriate for evaluating fluid conditions in subduction zones. This paper will present new fS2 and fO2 equilibria that are consistent with silicate, oxide, and sulfide petrography of the blueschist-eclogite belt in northern New Caledonia (Brown, 2007), and are therefore appropriate for evaluating fluid conditions consistent with subduction zone metamorphism. We evaluate reactions, which are supported by textural evidence in natural specimens, between silicates, oxides, and sulfides (stable at low P) to form garnet (at higher P). Several analogues that eliminate plagioclase +/- magnetite to produce garnet are proposed. A consequence of reacting Fe in sulfide to produce garnet is the concentration of chalcophile elements in the remaining sulfide phase. This is consistent with petrographic observations in the New Caledonian high P belt. Implications of new equilibiria demonstrate that phase relations proposed with garnet cannot be related to classical fS2-fO2 phase diagrams involving QFM. The only reactions involving mineral phases commonly present throughout the range of PT conditions in subducted crust involve ilmenite-rutile-sulfide equilibria. These equilibria can be widely applied to evaluating fluid conditions in the crust and mantle, not just subduction zones. References Brown, J.L. (2007) The Deep Sulfur Cycle: Insights from sulfide metamorphism in blueschist and eclogite, NE New Caledonia. PhD Thesis, The Australian National University. Green, D.H. and Ringwood, A

  14. Phototrophic sulfide oxidation: environmental insights and a method for kinetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Thomas E.; Luther, George W.; Findlay, Alyssa J.; MacDonald, Daniel J.; Hess, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we presented data that indicated microbial sulfide oxidation would out-compete strictly chemical, abiotic sulfide oxidation reactions under nearly all conditions relevant to extant ecosystems (Luther et al., 2011). In particular, we showed how anaerobic microbial sulfide oxidation rates were several orders of magnitude higher than even metal catalyzed aerobic sulfide oxidation processes. The fact that biotic anaerobic sulfide oxidation is kinetically superior to abiotic reactions implies that nearly all anaerobic and sulfidic environments should host microbial populations that oxidize sulfide at appreciable rates. This was likely an important biogeochemical process during long stretches of euxinia in the oceans suggested by the geologic record. In particular, phototrophic sulfide oxidation allows the utilization of carbon dioxide as the electron acceptor suggesting that this process should be particularly widespread rather than relying on the presence of other chemical oxidants. Using the Chesapeake Bay as an example, we argue that phototrophic sulfide oxidation may be more important in many environments than is currently appreciated. Finally, we present methodological considerations to assist other groups that wish to study this process. PMID:24391629

  15. Preparation of methylenediphosphine oxides and carbamoylmethyl-phosphines oxides from trimethylsilyl phosphinites

    SciTech Connect

    Chauzov, V.A.; Studnev, Yu.N.; Iznoskova, M.G.; Fokin, A.V.

    1987-06-20

    The conversion of diorganophosphonous acids to trimethylsilyl esters by the action of trimethylchlorosilane and trimethylamine and subsequent alkylation of the esters obtained by chloromethyldiorganophosphine oxides or N,N-dialkylamides of chloroacetic acid is shown to be a simple and effective method for the preparation of tetraorganomethylenediphosphine oxides and N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides from diorganophosphinous acids. A full analysis of hydrogen 1 and phosphorus 31 NMR spectral data, performed in a number of deuterated solvents, is included.

  16. Biogenesis of reactive sulfur species for signaling by hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Libiad, Marouane; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-01-01

    The chemical species involved in H2S signaling remain elusive despite the profound and pleiotropic physiological effects elicited by this molecule. The dominant candidate mechanism for sulfide signaling is persulfidation of target proteins. However, the relatively poor reactivity of H2S toward oxidized thiols, such as disulfides, the low concentration of disulfides in the reducing milieu of the cell and the low steady-state concentration of H2S raise questions about the plausibility of persulfide formation via reaction between an oxidized thiol and a sulfide anion or a reduced thiol and oxidized hydrogen disulfide. In contrast, sulfide oxidation pathways, considered to be primarily mechanisms for disposing of excess sulfide, generate a series of reactive sulfur species, including persulfides, polysulfides and thiosulfate, that could modify target proteins. We posit that sulfide oxidation pathways mediate sulfide signaling and that sulfurtransferases ensure target specificity. PMID:26083070

  17. Biogenesis of reactive sulfur species for signaling by hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathways.

    PubMed

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Libiad, Marouane; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-07-01

    The chemical species involved in H2S signaling remain elusive despite the profound and pleiotropic physiological effects elicited by this molecule. The dominant candidate mechanism for sulfide signaling is persulfidation of target proteins. However, the relatively poor reactivity of H2S toward oxidized thiols, such as disulfides, the low concentration of disulfides in the reducing milieu of the cell and the low steady-state concentration of H2S raise questions about the plausibility of persulfide formation via reaction between an oxidized thiol and a sulfide anion or a reduced thiol and oxidized hydrogen disulfide. In contrast, sulfide oxidation pathways, considered to be primarily mechanisms for disposing of excess sulfide, generate a series of reactive sulfur species, including persulfides, polysulfides and thiosulfate, that could modify target proteins. We posit that sulfide oxidation pathways mediate sulfide signaling and that sulfurtransferases ensure target specificity.

  18. Synthesis of Nanoporous Metals, Oxides, Carbides, and Sulfides: Beyond Nanocasting.

    PubMed

    Luc, Wesley; Jiao, Feng

    2016-07-19

    metal oxides with bimodal pore size distributions can be obtained. Combining nanocasting with chemical etching, a cobalt oxide with a hierarchical porous structure was synthesized, which possessed a surface area up to 250 m(2) g(-1), representing the highest surface area reported to date for nanoporous cobalt oxides. Lastly, this Account also covers the syntheses of nanoporous metal carbides and sulfides. The combination of in situ carburization and nanocasting enabled the syntheses of two ordered nanoporous metal carbides, Mo2C and W2C. For nanoporous metal sulfides, an "oxide-to-sulfide" synthetic strategy was proposed to address the large volume change issue of converting metal nitrate precursors to metal sulfide products in nanocasting. The successful syntheses of ordered nanoporous FeS2, CoS2, and NiS2 demonstrated the feasibility of the "oxide-to-sulfide" method. Concluding remarks include a summary of recent advances in the syntheses of nanoporous metal-based solids and a brief discussion of future opportunities in the hope of stimulating new interests and ideas.

  19. Discovery of Brigatinib (AP26113), a Phosphine Oxide-Containing, Potent, Orally Active Inhibitor of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Sheng; Liu, Shuangying; Zou, Dong; Thomas, Mathew; Wang, Yihan; Zhou, Tianjun; Romero, Jan; Kohlmann, Anna; Li, Feng; Qi, Jiwei; Cai, Lisi; Dwight, Timothy A; Xu, Yongjin; Xu, Rongsong; Dodd, Rory; Toms, Angela; Parillon, Lois; Lu, Xiaohui; Anjum, Rana; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Frank; Keats, Jeffrey; Wardwell, Scott D; Ning, Yaoyu; Xu, Qihong; Moran, Lauren E; Mohemmad, Qurish K; Jang, Hyun Gyung; Clackson, Tim; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Rivera, Victor M; Zhu, Xiaotian; Dalgarno, David; Shakespeare, William C

    2016-05-26

    In the treatment of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), secondary mutations within the ALK kinase domain have emerged as a major resistance mechanism to both first- and second-generation ALK inhibitors. This report describes the design and synthesis of a series of 2,4-diarylaminopyrimidine-based potent and selective ALK inhibitors culminating in identification of the investigational clinical candidate brigatinib. A unique structural feature of brigatinib is a phosphine oxide, an overlooked but novel hydrogen-bond acceptor that drives potency and selectivity in addition to favorable ADME properties. Brigatinib displayed low nanomolar IC50s against native ALK and all tested clinically relevant ALK mutants in both enzyme-based biochemical and cell-based viability assays and demonstrated efficacy in multiple ALK+ xenografts in mice, including Karpas-299 (anaplastic large-cell lymphomas [ALCL]) and H3122 (NSCLC). Brigatinib represents the most clinically advanced phosphine oxide-containing drug candidate to date and is currently being evaluated in a global phase 2 registration trial.

  20. Biological sulfide oxidation using autotrophic Thiobacillus sp.: evaluation of different immobilization methods and bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ravichandra, P; Gopal, M; Annapurna, J

    2009-04-01

    Evaluation of various immobilization methods and bioreactors for sulfide oxidation using Thiobacillus sp. was studied. Ca-alginate, K-carrageenan and agar gel matrices (entrapment) and polyurethane foam and granular activated carbon (adsorption) efficacy was tested for the sulfide oxidation and biomass leakage using immobilized Thiobacillus sp. Maximum sulfide oxidation of 96% was achieved with alginate matrix followed by K-carrageenan (88%). Different parameters viz. alginate concentration (1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5%), CaCl(2) concentration (1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5%), bead diameter (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm), and curing time (1, 3, 6, 12 and 18 h) were studied for optimal immobilization conditions. Repeated batch experiments were carried out to test reusability of Ca-alginate immobilized beads for sulfide oxidation in stirred tank reactor and fluidized bed reactor (FBR) at different sulfide concentrations. The results proved to be promising for sulfide oxidation using Ca-alginate gel matrix immobilized Thiobacillus sp. for better sulfide oxidation with less biomass leakage. Biological sulfide oxidation is gaining more importance because of its simple operation. Present investigations will help in successful design and operation of pilot and industrial level FBR for sulfide oxidation.

  1. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Ken; Baxter, David J.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  2. Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

    1983-07-26

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

  3. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Phosphine Boronates.

    PubMed

    Hornillos, Valentín; Vila, Carlos; Otten, Edwin; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-06-26

    The first catalytic enantioselective synthesis of ambiphilic phosphine boronate esters is presented. The asymmetric boration of α,β-unsaturated phosphine oxides catalyzed by a copper bisphosphine complex affords optically active organoboronate esters that bear a vicinal phosphine oxide group in good yields and high enantiomeric excess. The synthetic utility of the products is demonstrated through stereospecific transformations into multifunctional optically active compounds. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Sulfidation mechanism for zinc oxide nanoparticles and the effect of sulfidation on their solubility.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Levard, Clément; Michel, F Marc; Brown, Gordon E; Lowry, Gregory V

    2013-03-19

    Environmental transformations of nanoparticles (NPs) affect their properties and toxicity potential. Sulfidation is an important transformation process affecting the fate of NPs containing metal cations with an affinity for sulfide. Here, the extent and mechanism of sulfidation of ZnO NPs were investigated, and the properties of resulting products were carefully characterized. Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis reveal that transformation of ZnO to ZnS occurs readily at ambient temperature in the presence of inorganic sulfide. The extent of sulfidation depends on sulfide concentration, and close to 100% conversion can be obtained in 5 days given sufficient addition of sulfide. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed formation of primarily ZnS NPs smaller than 5 nm, indicating that sulfidation of ZnO NPs occurs by a dissolution and reprecipitation mechanism. The solubility of partially sulfidized ZnO NPs is controlled by the remaining ZnO core and not quenched by a ZnS shell formed as was observed for partially sulfidized Ag NPs. Sulfidation also led to NP aggregation and a decrease of surface charge. These changes suggest that sulfidation of ZnO NPs alters the behavior, fate, and toxicity of ZnO NPs in the environment. The reactivity and fate of the resulting <5 nm ZnS particles remains to be determined.

  5. Corrosion of concrete sewers--the kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Wium-Andersen, Tove; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2008-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide absorption and oxidation by corroding concrete surfaces was quantified in a test rig consisting of 6 concrete pipes operated under sewer conditions. The test rig was placed in an underground sewer monitoring station with access to fresh wastewater. Hydrogen sulfide gas was injected into the pipe every 2nd hour to peak concentrations around 1000 ppm. After some months of operation, the hydrogen sulfide became rapidly oxidized by the corroding concrete surfaces. At hydrogen sulfide concentrations of 1000 ppm, oxidation rates as high as 1 mg S m(-2) s(-1) were observed. The oxidation process followed simple nth order kinetics with a process order of 0.45-0.75. Extrapolating the results to gravity sewer systems showed that hydrogen sulfide oxidation by corroding concrete is a fast process compared to the release of hydrogen sulfide from the bulk water, resulting in low gas concentrations compared with equilibrium. Balancing hydrogen sulfide release with hydrogen sulfide oxidation at steady state conditions demonstrated that significant corrosion rates--several millimeters of concrete per year--can potentially occur at hydrogen sulfide gas phase concentrations well below 5-10 ppm. The results obtained in the study advances the knowledge on prediction of sewer concrete corrosion and the extent of odor problems.

  6. Oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by an enrichment from sour water coproduced with petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.G.; Sublette, K.L.; Raterman, K.

    1995-12-31

    We have previously demonstrated that the chemoautotroph and facultative anaerobe Thiobacillus denitrificans may be readily cultured aerobically or anoxically in batch and continuous reactors on hydrogen sulfide under sulfide-limiting conditions. A sulfide-tolerant strain of T. denitrificans (strain F) was isolated by enrichment and recently used in a successful field test of a microbial process for the treatment of sour water coproduced with petroleum at an Amoco Production Co. site in Wyoming. Prior to the initiation of this field test, it was determined that the sour water at this site contained low concentrations of indigenous autotrophs, which could grow on thiosulfate as an energy source. Samples of this sour water have now been used to produce an enrichment culture for sulfide oxidizers. This enrichment has been characterized with respect to hydrogen sulfide oxidation, response to oxygen, pH and temperature optima, and sulfide tolerance. The enrichment was shown to be strictly aerobic and to grow on sulfide as an energy source with complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. The enrichment has a tolerance of sulfide comparable to that of T. denitrificans strain F. However, the enrichment has a higher optimum temperature (35{degrees}C) than strain F and was shown to oxidize sulfides over a much broader range of pH values.

  7. Abiotic sulfide oxidation via manganese reduction fuels the deep biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrell, S.; Böttcher, M. E.; Schippers, A.; Parkes, R.; Raiswell, R.

    2009-12-01

    The deep biosphere in marine sediments consists of large populations of metabolically active Bacteria and Archaea [1, 2]. Buried organic carbon is the main energy source for the deep biosphere and is anaerobically oxidized via nitrate-, Mn(IV)-, Fe(III)-, sulfate or carbonate-reduction. Sulfate reduction has been identified as the most important of these processes [3, 4] yet sulfate is typically quantitatively removed from pore waters in the upper few meters of marine sediments. A key question remains: “How is continued metabolic activity maintained in the deep biosphere?”. Buried organic carbon remains as an electron donor but the source of electron acceptors is less clear. Stable isotope compositions of sulfur and oxygen in sulfate are particularly useful in the study of biogeochemical processes and sediment-pore fluid interactions e.g. [5, 6]. Here we use stable sulfur and oxygen isotope compositions to show that the oxidant sulfate is generated by anoxic sulfide oxidation in deeply buried sediments of the Cascadia margin and Blake Ridge and controlled anoxic experiments to constrain the mechanisms involved on this reaction. Pore fluid sulfate in deep Cascadia margin and Blake Ridge sediments contained sulfur with similar isotopic composition to diagenetic sulfide in the sediment and oxygen that was depleted in 18O (in some cases depleted in 18O relative to pore water). Experiments with Mn(IV)-containing oxides confirmed that these can abiotically oxidize iron sulfides and also produce sulfate depleted in 18O relative to water. In another set of anoxic experiments, pyrite was mixed with different Fe(III) minerals. Crucially, experiments with synthesized pure Fe(III) minerals produced no sulfate but identical experiments with natural Fe(III) minerals containing trace Mn did. Sulfate concentrations in solution were stoichiometrically balanced by Mn concentrations, showing trace Mn(IV) in the natural minerals to be the oxidizing agent generating sulfate

  8. High temperature hydrogen sulfide removal with tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, R.J.; Feinberg, D.; Wickham, D.; Windecker, B.; Yu, J.

    1993-06-01

    This Phase II SBIR contract is developing a sorbent and process which removes H{sub 2}S from hot gasified coal and generates sulfur during regeneration of the sorbent. The process can be used with any type of reactor (e.g., fixed or moving bed) and any gasifier (e.g., KRW or Texaco) and shows lower costs that competing H{sub 2}S removal processes. TDA Research`s (TDA) process uses a regenerable stannic oxide-based (SnO{sub 2}) sorbent as the first sorbent and zinc ferrite (or zinc titanate) as a second sorbent to remove H{sub 2}S to very low concentrations. The process converts the sulfides from both sorbents to elemental sulfur, a commercial product which is easy to store and transport. The object of this phase is to develop chemically active, high sulfur loadings, and durable stannic oxide sorbents and to demonstrate the process at the bench scale.

  9. Three enzymatic activities catalyze the oxidation of sulfide to thiosulfate in mammalian and invertebrate mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Grieshaber, Manfred K

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a potent toxin of aerobic respiration, but also has physiological functions as a signalling molecule and as a substrate for ATP production. A mitochondrial pathway catalyzing sulfide oxidation to thiosulfate in three consecutive reactions has been identified in rat liver as well as in the body-wall tissue of the lugworm, Arenicola marina. A membrane-bound sulfide : quinone oxidoreductase converts sulfide to persulfides and transfers the electrons to the ubiquinone pool. Subsequently, a putative sulfur dioxygenase in the mitochondrial matrix oxidizes one persulfide molecule to sulfite, consuming molecular oxygen. The final reaction is catalyzed by a sulfur transferase, which adds a second persulfide from the sulfide : quinone oxidoreductase to sulfite, resulting in the final product thiosulfate. This role in sulfide oxidation is an additional physiological function of the mitochondrial sulfur transferase, rhodanese.

  10. Complete oxidation of solid phase sulfides by manganese and bacteria in anoxic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, R.C.; Rude, P.D. )

    1988-03-01

    During the physical or biological reworking of surficial marine sediments, metal oxides are often brought into contact with both solid and dissolved sulfides. Experiments simulating these mixing processes demonstrate that in natural sediments Mn-oxides can completely oxidize solid phase sulfides to SO{sup =}{sub 4} under anoxic conditions. The major source of sulfur is probably acid volatile sulfide. Minerals containing Mn{sup +4} are apparently more effective than Mn{sup +3} in driving the oxidation. There is slight or no evidence for complete sulfide oxidation by Fe-oxides under similar conditions. The reaction is inhibited by DNP (dinitrophenol) and Azide, implying biological mediation by a group of chemolithotrophic bacteria such as the thiobacilli, having a well-organized cytochrome system, oxidative phosphorylation coupled with sulfide oxidation, and possibly autotrophic CO{sub 2} fixation. Lack of sensitivity to chlorate suggests that a NO{sup {minus}}{sub 3} reductase complex is not involved. Because of metal reduction and the overall stoichiometry of reaction, this sulfide oxidation causes a rise in pH in contrast to oxidation by O{sub 2}. Alkalinity is also simultaneously depleted by Mn, Ca carbonate precipitation. Both manganoan kutnahorite and manganoan calcite are observed to form rapidly (days) during Mn reduction. The oxidation of sulfides by Mn-oxides is likely to be important, but highly variable, in organic-rich shelf sediments and environments such as hydrothermal vents where sulfidic plumes contact oxidized metals. A substantial proportion of sedimentary sulfide may be oxidized and Mn reduced by this pathway, particularly in bioturbated sediments. The relative roles of lithotrophic (S) and heterotrophic (C) Mn-reduction in marine sediments are presently unknown.

  11. Removal of phosphine contaminant from carbon monoxide gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, D.; Munday, T.F.; Walden, J.

    1980-01-22

    A method is claimed for removing small concentrations of phosphine contained in a carbon monoxide gas mixture by preferentially oxidizing the phosphine, in which the phosphine is oxidized with air at a temperature of from 500 to 800 to form phosphorus pentoxide, which is recovered from the gas mixture preferably as phosphoric acid.

  12. Evaluation of long-term sulfide oxidation processes within pyrrhotite-rich tailings, Lynn Lake, Manitoba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunsinger, M. R.; Ptacek, C. J.; Blowes, D. W.; Jambor, J. L.

    2006-02-01

    Oxidation reactions have depleted sulfide minerals in the shallow tailings and have generated sulfate- and metal-rich pore water throughout the East Tailings Management Area (ETMA) at Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada. Information concerning the tailings geochemistry and mineralogy suggest the sulfide oxidation processes have reached an advanced stage in the area proximal to the point of tailings discharge. In contrast, the distal tailings, or slimes area, have a higher moisture content close to the impoundment surface, thereby impeding the ingress of oxygen and limiting sulfide oxidation. Numerical modelling of sulfide oxidation indicates the maximum rate of release for sulfate, Fe, and Ni occurred shortly after tailings deposition ceased. Although the sulfide minerals have been depleted in the very shallow tailings, the modelling suggests that sulfide oxidation will continue for hundreds and possibly thousands of years. The combination of sulfide minerals, principally pyrrhotite, that is susceptible to weathering processes and the relatively dry, coarse-grained nature of the tailings have resulted in the formation of a massive-hardpan layer in the proximal area of the ETMA. Because extensive accumulations of secondary oxyhydroxides of ferric iron are already present, remediation strategies for the ETMA should focus on mitigating the release of sulfide oxidation products rather than on preventing further oxidation.

  13. Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide on atmospheric particles and alumina.

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Liu, Junfeng; Mu, Yujing; Yu, Yunbo; Chen, Meixue

    2005-12-15

    Heterogeneous oxidation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) on atmospheric particles and alumina (Al2O3) was investigated in a closed system and a flowed system using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). At room temperature, OCS could be catalytically oxidized on the surface of atmospheric particles and Al2O3 to form gas-phase CO2 and surface sulfate (SO4(2-)), sulfite (HSO3-), and hydrogen carbonate (HCO3-) species. The real atmospheric particles were characterized using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. As a simplified model, Al2O3 was used to study the reaction mechanism of heterogeneous oxidation of OCS. The hydrogen thiocarbonate surface (HSCO2-) species, an intermediate formed in the reaction of OCS with surface hydroxyl (OH), could only be observed on the prereduced Al2O3 sample. The experimental results also indicate that surface oxygen containing species on the atmospheric particle sample and the Al2O3 sample might be the key reactant for OCS oxidation. A reaction mechanism of heterogeneous oxidation of OCS on Al2O3 surface is discussed.

  14. Arsenic Bioremediation by Biogenic Iron Oxides and Sulfides

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Raoul-Marie; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Corkhill, Claire L.; Charnock, John M.; Polya, David A.; Vaughan, David; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Microcosms containing sediment from an aquifer in Cambodia with naturally elevated levels of arsenic in the associated groundwater were used to evaluate the effectiveness of microbially mediated production of iron minerals for in situ As remediation. The microcosms were first incubated without amendments for 28 days, and the release of As and other geogenic chemicals from the sediments into the aqueous phase was monitored. Nitrate or a mixture of sulfate and lactate was then added to stimulate biological Fe(II) oxidation or sulfate reduction, respectively. Without treatment, soluble As concentrations reached 3.9 ± 0.9 μM at the end of the 143-day experiment. However, in the nitrate- and sulfate-plus-lactate-amended microcosms, soluble As levels decreased to 0.01 and 0.41 ± 0.13 μM, respectively, by the end of the experiment. Analyses using a range of biogeochemical and mineralogical tools indicated that sorption onto freshly formed hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and iron sulfide mineral phases are the likely mechanisms for As removal in the respective treatments. Incorporation of the experimental results into a one-dimensional transport-reaction model suggests that, under conditions representative of the Cambodian aquifer, the in situ precipitation of HFO would be effective in bringing groundwater into compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO) provisional guideline value for As (10 ppb or 0.13 μM), although soluble Mn release accompanying microbial Fe(II) oxidation presents a potential health concern. In contrast, production of biogenic iron sulfide minerals would not remediate the groundwater As concentration below the recommended WHO limit. PMID:23666325

  15. Sulfide and ammonium oxidation, acetate mineralization by denitrification in a multipurpose UASB reactor.

    PubMed

    Beristain-Cardoso, Ricardo; Gómez, Jorge; Méndez-Pampín, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    The physiological and kinetic behavior of a denitrifying granular sludge exposed to different sulfide loading rates (55-295 mg/L d) were evaluated in a UASB reactor fed with acetate, ammonium and nitrate. At any sulfide loading rates, the consumption efficiencies of sulfide, acetate and ammonium were above 95%, while nitrate consumption efficiencies were around 62-72%. At the highest sulfide loading rate the ammonium was used as electron donor for N(2) production. The increase of sulfide loading rate also affected the fate of sulfide oxidation, since elemental sulfur was the main end product instead of sulfate. However, the lithotrophic denitrifying kinetic was not affected. FISH oligonucleotide probes for Thiobacillus denitrificans, Thiomiscropira denitrificans, genus Paracoccus and Pseudomonas spp. were used to follow the microbial ecology. The results of this work have shown that four pollutants could simultaneously be removed, namely, sulfide, ammonium, acetate and nitrate under well defined denitrifying conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Oxidation kinetics of zinc sulfide: determination of intrinsic rate constant

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, G.M.

    1983-06-01

    An initial reaction rate study was done with the help of a thermogravimetric technique. Energy dispersive x-ray analyses on partially oxidized zinc sulfide pellets with a sintered porosity of 72.4% indicated flat sulfur intensity profiles within pellets reacted below 560/sup 0/C, which suggested a homogeneous reaction mechanism. Therefore, reaction temperatures below 600/sup 0/C were chosen for the reaction rate studies. Initial reaction rate studies on 72.4, 58.2, and 34.0% porous, cylindrical zinc sulfide pellets and the corresponding Arrhenius plot suggested chemical control in the temperature range from 480 to 565/sup 0/C. The corresponding intrinsic rate constant is correlated as k = 3.45 x 10/sup 17/ exp (- 86051/RT) cm/s. The variation in sulfur intensity within sintered pellets having a porosity of 72.4% that were reacted at temperatures above 560/sup 0/C indicated that the pore diffusion resistance gradually became comparable to the chemical reaction resistance leading to a mixed control mechanism above 570/sup 0/C. The critical temperature at which this shift occurred, increased with pellet porosity.

  17. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Lens, Piet N L; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2011-05-30

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria, were suspended in aqueous solution at pH similar to that of corroded concrete. Hydrogen sulfide was supplied to the reactor to provide the source of reduced sulfur. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen was monitored. The utilization rates of both hydrogen sulfide and oxygen suggested exponential bacterial growth with median growth rates of 1.25 d(-1) and 1.33 d(-1) as determined from the utilization rates of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, respectively. Elemental sulfur was found to be the immediate product of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation. When exponential growth had been achieved, the addition of hydrogen sulfide was terminated leading to elemental sulfur oxidation. The ratio of consumed sulfur to consumed oxygen suggested that sulfuric acid was the ultimate oxidation product. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study to determine the growth rate of bacteria involved in concrete corrosion with hydrogen sulfide as source of reduced sulfur.

  18. Emission Properties, Solubility, Thermodynamic Analysis and NMR Studies of Rare-Earth Complexes with Two Different Phosphine Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    The paper proposes novel molecular designs for rare-earth complexes involving the introduction of two different phosphine oxide structures into one rare-earth ion. These designs are effective for improving solubility and emission intensity. Additionally, the complexes are indispensable for realizing high performances in LEDs and security media. The thermodynamic properties of Eu(III) complexes are correlated with the solubility. Correlations between coordination structures and emission intensity were explained by NMR analysis. The luminous flux of red LED devices with Eu(III) complexes is very high (20 mA, 870 m lumen). A new white LED has its largest spectra intensity in the red region and a human looks much more vividly under this light.

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide, Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Diseases: A Concise Review

    PubMed Central

    Greabu, Maria; Totan, Alexandra; Miricescu, Daniela; Radulescu, Radu; Virlan, Justina; Calenic, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    In the past years, biomedical research has recognized hydrogen sulfide (H2S) not only as an environmental pollutant but also, along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, as an important biological gastransmitter with paramount roles in health and disease. Current research focuses on several aspects of H2S biology such as the biochemical pathways that generate the compound and its functions in human pathology or drug synthesis that block or stimulate its biosynthesis. The present work addresses the knowledge we have to date on H2S production and its biological roles in the general human environment with a special focus on the oral cavity and its involvement in the initiation and development of periodontal diseases. PMID:26805896

  20. Working with nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide in biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are gasotransmitter molecules important in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Although these molecules were first known as environmental toxicants, it is now evident that that they are intricately involved in diverse cellular functions with impact on numerous physiological and pathogenic processes. NO and H2S share some common characteristics but also have unique chemical properties that suggest potential complementary interactions between the two in affecting cellular biochemistry and metabolism. Central among these is the interactions between NO, H2S, and thiols that constitute new ways to regulate protein function, signaling, and cellular responses. In this review, we discuss fundamental biochemical principals, molecular functions, measurement methods, and the pathophysiological relevance of NO and H2S. PMID:25550314

  1. Luminescent sulfides and solution-deposited oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jeremy T.

    Solid state luminescent sulfides are prepared as powders in order to elucidate the relationship between structure and light emission. While the sulfides studied in this dissertation are known phosphors, materials are investigated in a variety of new ways. Elementary properties and structures of MgS are reviewed, and preparation of MgS is described with sufficient detail that it may be reproduced in laboratories worldwide. Luminescence of MgS:Eu is evaluated, primarily by interpretation of published work. Solid pellets of MgS:Eu are created for the purpose of depositing thin-film layers by physical vapor deposition, and incorporating the phosphor layer within ACTFEL structures. Fabricated devices are found to exhibit bright ACTFEL luminescence--the brightest known for MgS. Similarly, MgS films are doped with a variety of lanthanide atoms to investigate the hot-electron distribution in MgS layers during device operation. The system BaGa2S4--SrGa 2S4 is evaluated for mutual solid phase solubility. Addition of Eu2+ causes each of these phases to photoluminescence. The emission energies (and therefore colors) are adjusted according to composition. Thin-film oxides are deposited from solution sources. Solution-deposited ZnO serves as the semiconductor layer in transparent thin-film transistor devices. A new class of dielectric material is also developed by solution methods. HafSOx and ZircSOx films, and derivative compositions, are evaluated in simple capacitor structures and demonstrated in functioning transistor devices. High-resolution nanolaminate structures are also constructed from this class of materials. From the knowledge and experience of developing oxide thin-films, more general chemical strategies are expressed.

  2. Disguised as a Sulfate Reducer: Growth of the Deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus by Sulfide Oxidation with Nitrate.

    PubMed

    Thorup, Casper; Schramm, Andreas; Findlay, Alyssa J; Finster, Kai W; Schreiber, Lars

    2017-07-18

    This study demonstrates that the deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus can grow chemolithotrophically by coupling sulfide oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite to ammonium. Key genes of known sulfide oxidation pathways are absent from the genome of D. alkaliphilus Instead, the genome contains all of the genes necessary for sulfate reduction, including a gene for a reductive-type dissimilatory bisulfite reductase (DSR). Despite this, growth by sulfate reduction was not observed. Transcriptomic analysis revealed a very high expression level of sulfate-reduction genes during growth by sulfide oxidation, while inhibition experiments with molybdate pointed to elemental sulfur/polysulfides as intermediates. Consequently, we propose that D. alkaliphilus initially oxidizes sulfide to elemental sulfur, which is then either disproportionated, or oxidized by a reversal of the sulfate reduction pathway. This is the first study providing evidence that a reductive-type DSR is involved in a sulfide oxidation pathway. Transcriptome sequencing further suggests that nitrate reduction to ammonium is performed by a novel type of periplasmic nitrate reductase and an unusual membrane-anchored nitrite reductase.IMPORTANCE Sulfide oxidation and sulfate reduction, the two major branches of the sulfur cycle, are usually ascribed to distinct sets of microbes with distinct diagnostic genes. Here we show a more complex picture, as D. alkaliphilus, with the genomic setup of a sulfate reducer, grows by sulfide oxidation. The high expression of genes typically involved in the sulfate reduction pathway suggests that these genes, including the reductive-type dissimilatory bisulfite reductases, are also involved in as-yet-unresolved sulfide oxidation pathways. Finally, D. alkaliphilus is closely related to cable bacteria, which grow by electrogenic sulfide oxidation. Since there are no pure cultures of cable bacteria, D. alkaliphilus may represent an

  3. Sulfur isotope effects during sulfide oxidation to sulfate: model meets reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulrahman Beiruti, Zainab; Brunner, Benjamin; Hubert, Casey; Ferdelman, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    The combination of laboratory experiments and numerical models in the study of stable sulfur isotope fractionation is a useful tool that contributes to a better understanding of sulfur transformations in the environment. Because sulfur isotope fractionation during oxidative sulfur cycling is expected to yield much smaller isotope fractionation than sulfate reduction, sulfur isotope effects during sulfide oxidation have not received much attention. Nevertheless, in situations where sulfide oxidation dominates over other sulfur transformations, the imprint of these small isotope effects is preserved. These isotope imprints provide crucial information about the biogeochemical conditions under which sulfide oxidation occurred. Unlike sulfate reduction, where sulfur intermediates are hardly accumulated and rarely released to the environment, sulfide oxidation to sulfate often involves accumulation of intra- and extracellular elemental sulfur as an intermediate, which may be accessed later for oxidation to sulfate by the same or different organisms. The accumulation and consumption of a pool of elemental sulfur complicates the interpretation of sulfur isotope effects during sulfide oxidation, as kinetic sulfur isotope effects from oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur are superimposed by sulfur isotope exchange between sulfide and elemental sulfur, a pool that is simultaneously altered by isotope effects related to the oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfate. We derived a numerical isotope mass balance model that combines the rates for sulfur isotope exchange between sulfide and elemental sulfur, oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur and oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfate with the respective isotope effects. With this model, we can predict the evolution of the isotope composition of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and sulfate during a sulfide oxidation experiment. Sensitivity tests show that these isotope trends not only strongly depend on the size of isotope

  4. Sulfide oxidation by a noncanonical pathway in red blood cells generates thiosulfate and polysulfides.

    PubMed

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Yadav, Pramod K; Kurthen, Angelika; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-03-27

    A cardioprotectant at low concentrations, H2S is a toxin at high concentrations and inhibits cytochrome c oxidase. A conundrum in H2S homeostasis is its fate in red blood cells (RBCs), which produce H2S but lack the canonical mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway for its clearance. The sheer abundance of RBCs in circulation enhances the metabolic significance of their clearance strategy for H2S, necessary to avoid systemic toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that H2S generation by RBCs is catalyzed by mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase. Furthermore, we have discovered the locus of sulfide oxidation in RBCs and describe a new role for an old protein, hemoglobin, which in the ferric or methemoglobin state binds H2S and oxidizes it to a mixture of thiosulfate and hydropolysulfides. Our study reveals a previously undescribed route for the biogenesis of hydropolysulfides, which are increasingly considered important for H2S-based signaling, but their origin in mammalian cells is unknown. An NADPH/flavoprotein oxidoreductase system restores polysulfide-carrying hemoglobin derivatives to ferrous hemoglobin, thus completing the methemoglobin-dependent sulfide oxidation cycle. Methemoglobin-dependent sulfide oxidation in mammals is complex and has similarities to chemistry reported for the dissolution of iron oxides in sulfidic waters and during bioleaching of metal sulfides. The catalytic oxidation of H2S by hemoglobin explains how RBCs maintain low steady-state H2S levels in circulation, and suggests that additional hemeproteins might be involved in sulfide homeostasis in other tissues.

  5. Microbial oxidation of soluble sulfide in produced water from the Bakkeen Sands

    SciTech Connect

    Gevertz, D.; Zimmerman, S.; Jenneman, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    The presence of soluble sulfide in produced water results in problems for the petroleum industry due to its toxicity, odor, corrosive nature, and potential for wellbore plugging. Sulfide oxidation by indigenous nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) present in brine collected from wells at the Coleville Unit (CVU) in Saskatchewan, Canada, was investigated. Sulfide oxidation took place readily when nitrate and phosphate were added to brine enrichment cultures, resulting in a decrease in sulfide levels of 99-165 ppm to nondetectable levels (< 3.3 ppm). Produced water collected from a number of producing wells was screened to determine the time required for complete sulfide oxidation, in order to select candidate wells for treatment. Three wells were chosen, based on sulfide removal in 48 hours or less. These wells were treated down the backside of the annulus with a solution containing 10 mM KNO{sub 3} and 100 {mu}M NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. Following a 24- to 72-hour shut-in, reductions in pretreatment sulfide levels of greater than 90% were observed for two of the wells, as well as sustained sulfide reductions of 50% for at least two days following startup. NRB populations in the produced brine were observed to increase significantly following treatment, but no significant increases in sulfate-reducing bacteria were observed. These results demonstrate the technical feasibility of stimulating indigenous populations of NRB to remediate and control sulfide in produced brine.

  6. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide--IGCC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Stevens, R.W.; Newby, R.A.; Keairns, D.L.

    2006-09-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) to elemental sulfur using activated carbon and NETL-processed metal oxide catalyst systems has been investigated under bench-scale, simulated pressurized IGCC conditions for use in dry and humid gas cleaning process applications. For this technology to be successful, a 20% cost effective advantage and 1 percentage-point plant efficiency gain over current commercial technology, and <10-15 ppm total gas phase sulfur release into the effluent gas stream must be demonstrated. The results of our bench-scale catalyst/sorbent desulfurization and regeneration efforts for both bulk and polishing sulfur removal indicate that direct selective catalytic oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur utilizing current activated carbon systems occurs only under conditions of low syngas temperature (<150°C), and in syngas effluent streams containing a low water and CO content. Thus the SCOHS desulfurization process is considered to be only potentially feasible for use in dry gas cleaning conditions for IGCC applications where syngas-CO is shifted to CO2, and regeneration of the catalyst occurs through heating in warm CO2, with simultaneous CO2 sequestration. SCOHS is not considered as a candidate desulfurization approach for use in humid IGCC gas cleaning applications.

  7. Phosphine oxide derivatives as hosts for blue phosphors: A joint theoretical and experimental study of their electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongwook; Salman, Seyhan; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Salomon, Eric; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Sapochak, Linda S.; Kahn, Antoine; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-12

    We report on a joint theoretical and experimental investigation of the electronic structure of a series of bis(diphenylphosphine oxide) derivatives containing a central aromatic core with high triplet energy. Such molecules can serve as host material in the emissive layer of blue electro-phosphorescent organic devices. The aromatic cores considered in the theoretical study consist of biphenyl, fluorene, dibenzofuran, dibenzothiophene, dibenzothiophenesulfone or carbazole, linked to the two phosphoryl groups in either para or meta positions. With respect to the isolated core molecules, it is found that addition of the diphenylphosphine oxide moieties has hardly any impact on the core geometry and only slightly reduces the energy of the lowest triplet state (by at most ~0.2 eV). However, the diphenylphosphine oxide functionalities significantly impact the ionization potential and electron affinity values, in a way that is different for para and meta substitutions. Excellent comparison is obtained between the experimental UPS and IPES spectra of the para biphenyl and meta dibenzothiophene and dibenzothiophenesulfone compounds and the simulated spectra. In general, the phosphine oxide derivatives present triplet energies that are calculated to be at least 0.2 eV higher than those of currently widely used blue phosphorescent emitters.

  8. Sulfur isotope effects associated with oxidation of sulfide by O2 in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, B.; Ruf, W.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Normal sulfur isotope effects averaging epsilon = -5.2 +/- 1.4% (s.d.) were consistently observed for the oxidation of sulfide in aqueous solution. Reaction products were sulfate, thiosulfate and sulfite at pH 10.8-11 in distilled water; S0 was formed in two experiments with synthetic seawater at pH 8-9.5. Because the -5.2% normal isotope effect differs significantly from the previously measured +2% inverse effect associated with anaerobic oxidation of sulfide by photosynthetic bacteria, stable sulfur isotopic measurements are potentially useful for distinguishing aerobic vs. anaerobic sulfide oxidation in marine and freshwater sulfureta.

  9. Sulfur isotope effects associated with oxidation of sulfide by O2 in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, B.; Ruf, W.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Normal sulfur isotope effects averaging epsilon = -5.2 +/- 1.4% (s.d.) were consistently observed for the oxidation of sulfide in aqueous solution. Reaction products were sulfate, thiosulfate and sulfite at pH 10.8-11 in distilled water; S0 was formed in two experiments with synthetic seawater at pH 8-9.5. Because the -5.2% normal isotope effect differs significantly from the previously measured +2% inverse effect associated with anaerobic oxidation of sulfide by photosynthetic bacteria, stable sulfur isotopic measurements are potentially useful for distinguishing aerobic vs. anaerobic sulfide oxidation in marine and freshwater sulfureta.

  10. Phosphine and solvent effects on oxidative addition of CH3Br to Pd(PR3) and Pd(PR3)2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Besora, Maria; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Yates, Brian; Maseras, Feliu

    2011-11-14

    The reaction between bromomethane CH(3)Br and Pd(0) phosphine complexes Pd(PR(3)) and Pd(PR(3))(2) resulting in the corresponding Pd(II) species Pd(PR(3))(CH(3))Br and Pd(PR(3))(2)(CH(3))Br was studied computationally with DFT methods. The oxidative addition can take place through two different mechanisms: concerted or S(N)2 transition state. The effect of a number of variables on the height of the barrier associated to each of these two mechanisms is systematically analyzed. The variables considered include the number of ligands on the metal (mono- or bis-phosphine), the nature of the phosphine (PF(3), PH(3), PMe(3) or PPh(3)), and the nature of the solvent (gas phase, tetrahydrofuran or dimethylformamide). A number of trends can be identified, resulting in a complex picture where the nature of the phosphine and the solvent can be tuned to favor one of the two possible mechanisms, with the corresponding stereochemical implications that can be extrapolated to the behaviour of more sophisticated substrates.

  11. Potential biological chemistry of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with the nitrogen oxides.

    PubMed

    Bruce King, S

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, an important gaseous signaling agent generated in numerous biological tissues, influences many physiological processes. This biological profile seems reminiscent of nitric oxide, another important endogenously synthesized gaseous signaling molecule. Hydrogen sulfide reacts with nitric oxide or oxidized forms of nitric oxide and nitric oxide donors in vitro to form species that display distinct biology compared to both hydrogen sulfide and NO. The products of these interesting reactions may include small-molecule S-nitrosothiols or nitroxyl, the one-electron-reduced form of nitric oxide. In addition, thionitrous acid or thionitrite, compounds structurally analogous to nitrous acid and nitrite, may constitute a portion of the reaction products. Both the chemistry and the biology of thionitrous acid and thionitrite, compared to nitric oxide or hydrogen sulfide, remain poorly defined. General mechanisms for the formation of S-nitrosothiols, nitroxyl, and thionitrous acid based upon the ability of hydrogen sulfide to act as a nucleophile and a reducing agent with reactive nitric oxide-based intermediates are proposed. Hydrogen sulfide reactivity seems extensive and could have an impact on numerous areas of redox-controlled biology and chemistry, warranting more work in this exciting and developing area.

  12. Sulfur speciation and sulfide oxidation in the water column of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, George W., III; Church, Thomas M.; Powell, David

    We have applied sulfur speciation techniques to understand the chemistry and cycling of sulfur in Black Sea waters. The only reduced dissolved inorganic sulfur species detected (above the low minimum detection limits of the voltammetric methods employed) in the water column was hydrogen sulfide. The maximum concentration of sulfide (423 μM) is similar to previous reports. Using a cathodic stripping square wave voltammetry (CSSWV) method for nanomolar levels of sulfide, we determined the precise boundary between the "free" hydrogen sulfide (sulfidic) zone and the upper (oxic/suboxic) water column at the two stations studied. This boundary has apparently moved up by about 50 m in the past 20 years. Our results help demonstrate three chemically distinct zones of water in the central basin of the Black Sea: (1) the oxic [0-65 m], (2) the anoxic/nonsulfidic [65-100 m] and (3) the sulfidic [>100 m]. Sulfide bound to metals ("complexed" sulfide) is observed in both the oxic and anoxic/nonsulfidic zones of the water column. This supports previous studies on metal sulfide forms. From the electrochemical data, it is possible to estimate the strength of the complexation of sulfide to metals (log K = 10 to 11). Thiosulfate and sulfite were below our minimum detectable limit (MDL) of 50 nM using CSSWV. Elemental sulfur (MDL 5 nM) was detected below the onset of the hydrogen sulfide zone (90-100 m) with a maximum of 30-60 nM near 120 m. The sulfur speciation results for the Black Sea are lower by one order of magnitude or more than other marine systems such as the Cariaco Trench and salt marshes. New HPLC techniques were applied to detect thiols at submicromolar levels. The presence of thiols (2-mercaptoethylamine, 2-mercaptoethanol, N-acetylcysteine and glutathione) is correlated with the remineralization of organic matter at the oxic and anoxic/nonsulfidic interface. Water samples collected from the upper 50 m of the sulfidic zone showed significant sulfide oxidation on

  13. Functional genes based analysis of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria community in sulfide removing bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Fei; Lin, Wei-Tie; Guo, Yong

    2011-04-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) are the main microorganisms that participate in the bioremediation of sulfide-rich wastewater. To reveal the SOB community structure and determine which members of SOB contribute to the sulfide oxidation in a sulfide-rich cloth printing and dyeing wastewater treatment plant, specific primer pairs dsrA 625F/877R, soxB 704F/1199R, and sqr 473F/982R based on the SOB functional genes encoding dissimilatory sulfite reductase, sulfate thioesterase/thiohydrolase, and sulfide: quinone oxidoreductase were designed. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the diversity indices and the abundance of each OTU have no significant changes after time, which suggested the SOB community in the sulfide removing bioreactor have high steady phylogenetic analysis of functional gene-based clone libraries detected the SOB from Chlorobia, α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria, and γ-proteobacteria. The combined clone library showed the presence of dominant members of the SOB species closely related to families Halothiobacillaceae (17%), Hydrogenophilaceae (14%), and Rhodocyclaceae (13%), which may contribute to the sulfide oxidation in wastewater treatment process. This work provides a precise understanding of SOB microbial community within sulfide removing bioreactor, and the result gives assistance for the optimization of the treatment systems for sulfide biological degradation. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  14. A General Route for Growing Metal Sulfides onto Graphene Oxide and Exfoliated Graphite Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Joana L.; Estrada, Ana C.; Fateixa, Sara; Ferro, Marta; Trindade, Tito

    2017-01-01

    Graphene-based materials are elective materials for a number of technologies due to their unique properties. Also, semiconductor nanocrystals have been extensively explored due to their size-dependent properties that make them useful for several applications. By coupling both types of materials, new applications are envisaged that explore the synergistic properties in such hybrid nanostructures. This research reports a general wet chemistry method to prepare graphene oxide (GO) sheets decorated with nanophases of semiconductor metal sulfides. This method allows the in situ growth of metal sulfides onto GO by using metal dialkyldithiocarbamate complexes as single-molecule precursors. In particular, the role of GO as heterogeneous substrate for the growth of semiconductor nanocrystals was investigated by using Raman spectroscopic and imaging methods. The method was further extended to other graphene-based materials, which are easily prepared in a larger scale, such as exfoliated graphite oxide (EGO). PMID:28858234

  15. Oxidative Weathering and Microbial Diversity of an Inactive Seafloor Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiangtao; Cui, Jiamei; Yang, Qunhui; Cui, Guojie; Wei, Bingbing; Wu, Zijun; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Huaiyang

    2017-01-01

    When its hydrothermal supply ceases, hydrothermal sulfide chimneys become inactive and commonly experience oxidative weathering on the seafloor. However, little is known about the oxidative weathering of inactive sulfide chimneys, nor about associated microbial community structures and their succession during this weathering process. In this work, an inactive sulfide chimney and a young chimney in the early sulfate stage of formation were collected from the Main Endeavor Field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. To assess oxidative weathering, the ultrastructures of secondary alteration products accumulating on the chimney surface were examined and the presence of possible Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) was investigated. The results of ultrastructure observation revealed that FeOB-associated ultrastructures with indicative morphologies were abundantly present. Iron oxidizers primarily consisted of members closely related to Gallionella spp. and Mariprofundus spp., indicating Fe-oxidizing species likely promote the oxidative weathering of inactive sulfide chimneys. Abiotic accumulation of Fe-rich substances further indicates that oxidative weathering is a complex, dynamic process, alternately controlled by FeOB and by abiotic oxidization. Although hydrothermal fluid flow had ceased, inactive chimneys still accommodate an abundant and diverse microbiome whose microbial composition and metabolic potential dramatically differ from their counterparts at active vents. Bacterial lineages within current inactive chimney are dominated by members of α-, δ-, and γ-Proteobacteria and they are deduced to be closely involved in a diverse set of geochemical processes including iron oxidation, nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidation and denitrification. At last, by examining microbial communities within hydrothermal chimneys at different formation stages, a general microbial community succession can be deduced from early formation stages of a sulfate chimney to actively mature sulfide

  16. Oxidative Weathering and Microbial Diversity of an Inactive Seafloor Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiangtao; Cui, Jiamei; Yang, Qunhui; Cui, Guojie; Wei, Bingbing; Wu, Zijun; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Huaiyang

    2017-01-01

    When its hydrothermal supply ceases, hydrothermal sulfide chimneys become inactive and commonly experience oxidative weathering on the seafloor. However, little is known about the oxidative weathering of inactive sulfide chimneys, nor about associated microbial community structures and their succession during this weathering process. In this work, an inactive sulfide chimney and a young chimney in the early sulfate stage of formation were collected from the Main Endeavor Field of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. To assess oxidative weathering, the ultrastructures of secondary alteration products accumulating on the chimney surface were examined and the presence of possible Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) was investigated. The results of ultrastructure observation revealed that FeOB-associated ultrastructures with indicative morphologies were abundantly present. Iron oxidizers primarily consisted of members closely related to Gallionella spp. and Mariprofundus spp., indicating Fe-oxidizing species likely promote the oxidative weathering of inactive sulfide chimneys. Abiotic accumulation of Fe-rich substances further indicates that oxidative weathering is a complex, dynamic process, alternately controlled by FeOB and by abiotic oxidization. Although hydrothermal fluid flow had ceased, inactive chimneys still accommodate an abundant and diverse microbiome whose microbial composition and metabolic potential dramatically differ from their counterparts at active vents. Bacterial lineages within current inactive chimney are dominated by members of α-, δ-, and γ-Proteobacteria and they are deduced to be closely involved in a diverse set of geochemical processes including iron oxidation, nitrogen fixation, ammonia oxidation and denitrification. At last, by examining microbial communities within hydrothermal chimneys at different formation stages, a general microbial community succession can be deduced from early formation stages of a sulfate chimney to actively mature sulfide

  17. Catalytic Enantioselective Carbon-Oxygen Bond Formation: Phosphine-Catalyzed Synthesis of Benzylic Ethers via the Oxidation of Benzylic C-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Daniel T; Fu, Gregory C

    2016-09-21

    Benzylic alcohols and ethers are common subunits in bioactive molecules, as well as useful intermediates in organic chemistry. In this Communication, we describe a new approach to the enantioselective synthesis of benzylic ethers through the chiral phosphine-catalyzed coupling of two readily available partners, γ-aryl-substituted alkynoates and alcohols, under mild conditions. In this process, the alkynoate partner undergoes an internal redox reaction. Specifically, the benzylic position is oxidized with good enantioselectivity, and the alkyne is reduced to the alkene.

  18. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF DIMETHYL SULFIDE WITH OZONE: EFFECT OF PROMOTER AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports improved catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a major pollutant of pulp and paper mills. Ozone was used as an oxidant and Cu, Mo, V, Cr and Mn metal oxides, and mixed metal oxides support on y-alumina as catalysts ov...

  19. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF DIMETHYL SULFIDE WITH OZONE: EFFECTS OF PROMOTER AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports improved catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a major pollutant of pulp and paper mills. Ozone was used as an oxidant and activities of Cu, Mo, Cr and Mn oxides, and mixed metal oxides supported on -alumina, were tes...

  20. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF DIMETHYL SULFIDE WITH OZONE: EFFECT OF PROMOTER AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports improved catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a major pollutant of pulp and paper mills. Ozone was used as an oxidant and Cu, Mo, V, Cr and Mn metal oxides, and mixed metal oxides support on y-alumina as catalysts ov...

  1. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF DIMETHYL SULFIDE WITH OZONE: EFFECTS OF PROMOTER AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports improved catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a major pollutant of pulp and paper mills. Ozone was used as an oxidant and activities of Cu, Mo, Cr and Mn oxides, and mixed metal oxides supported on -alumina, were tes...

  2. Selective oxidation of glycosyl sulfides to sulfoxides using magnesium monoperoxyphthalate and microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Yi; Patkar, Laxmikant Narhari; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2004-04-16

    A protocol that uses moist magnesium monoperoxyphthalate (MMPP) as an oxidant under microwave irradiation rapidly yields a variety of glycosyl sulfoxides from corresponding sulfides in high yields with high selectivity.

  3. Flavin-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of sulfides and thiols with formic acid/triethylamine.

    PubMed

    Murahashi, Shun-Ichi; Zhang, Dazhi; Iida, Hiroki; Miyawaki, Toshio; Uenaka, Masaaki; Murano, Kenji; Meguro, Kanji

    2014-09-14

    An efficient and practical catalytic method for the aerobic oxidative transformation of sulfides into sulfoxides, and thiols into disulfides with formic acid/TEA in the presence of a new, readily available, and stable flavin catalyst 5d is described.

  4. Direct Irradiaton of Aryl Sulfides: Homolytic Fragmentation and Sensitized S-Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bonesi, Sergio M; Crespi, Stefano; Merli, Daniele; Manet, Ilse; Albini, Angelo

    2017-09-01

    The direct irradiation of diphenyl sulfide and p-substituted thioanisoles in the presence of oxygen was investigated by means of both steady state and laser flash photolysis experiments. Two competitive pathways took place from the triplet excited state of thioanisoles, C-S bond cleavage, finally leading to aryl sulfinic acid and sensitized oxidation leading to S-oxidation. Co-oxidation of dodecyl methyl sulfide occurred efficiently implying that an S-persulfoxide intermediate is involved during the sensitized oxidation. On the other hand, triplet state of diphenyl sulfide also showed competitive C-S bond cleavage giving phenyl sulfinic acid and ionization to diphenyl sulfide radical cation that in turn led to diphenyl sulfoxide. The rate constants of the above reactions were determined by time-resolved experiments.

  5. Investigation of the radiation-stimulated oxidation of sulfide by molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Muratbekov, M.B.; Beremzhanov, B.A.; Koroleva, G.Y.

    1986-07-01

    In order to determine the possibility of radiation stimulation of the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by molecular oxygen and to consider the mechanism from the standpoint of radiation chemical concepts, the authors investigated the radiation-stimulated oxidation of sulfide by molecular oxygen at pH 13. The kinetics were studied according to the decrease in oxygen with the aid of a gasometric set up.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of organic sulfides by N-bromobenzamide

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, K.; Banerji, K.K. )

    1990-09-14

    Kinetics of oxidation of 34 organic sulfides by N-bromobenzamide (NBB), to yield the corresponding sulfoxides, have been studied. The reaction is first-order with respect to the sulfide, NBB, and hydrogen ions. There is no effect of added benzamide. Protonated NBB has been postulated as the reactive oxidizing species. Reactivity of the sulfides toward NBB was subjected to correlation analysis by using multiparametric equations. The polar reaction constants are negative. Steric effects play a minor inhibitory role. A mechanism involving formulation of a halogenosulfonium cation, in the rate-determining step, has been proposed.

  7. Gas sorption and luminescence properties of a terbium(III)-phosphine oxide coordination material with two-dimensional pore topology.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Ilich A; Hesterberg, Travis W; Holliday, Bradley J; Lynch, Vincent M; Humphrey, Simon M

    2012-07-14

    The structure, stability, gas sorption properties and luminescence behaviour of a new lanthanide-phosphine oxide coordination material are reported. The polymer PCM-15 is based on Tb(III) and tris(p-carboxylated) triphenylphosphine oxide and has a 5,5-connected net topology. It exhibits an infinite three-dimensional structure that incorporates an open, two-dimensional pore structure. The material is thermally robust and remains crystalline under high vacuum at 150 °C. When desolvated, the solid has a CO(2) BET surface area of 1187 m(2) g(-1) and shows the highest reported uptake of both O(2) and H(2) at 77 K and 1 bar for a lanthanide-based coordination polymer. Isolated Tb(III) centres in the as-synthesized polymer exhibit moderate photoluminescence. However, upon removal of coordinated OH(2) ligands, the luminescence intensity was found to approximately double; this process was reversible. Thus, the Tb(III) centre was used as a probe to detect directly the desolvation and resolvation of the polymer.

  8. Stable sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation of anoxic sulfide oxidation by two different enzymatic pathways.

    PubMed

    Poser, Alexander; Vogt, Carsten; Knöller, Kay; Ahlheim, Jörg; Weiss, Holger; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans-H

    2014-08-19

    The microbial oxidation of sulfide is a key reaction of the microbial sulfur cycle, recycling sulfur in its most reduced valence state back to more oxidized forms usable as electron acceptors. Under anoxic conditions, nitrate is a preferential electron acceptor for this process. Two enzymatic pathways have been proposed for sulfide oxidation under nitrate reducing conditions, the sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) pathway and the Sox (sulfur oxidation) system. In experiments with the model strains Thiobacillus denitrificans and Sulfurimonas denitrificans, both pathways resulted in a similar small sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation of -2.4 to -3.6‰ for (34)S and -2.4 to -3.4‰ for (18)O. A similar pattern was detected during the oxidation of sulfide in a column percolated with sulfidic, nitrate amended groundwater. In experiments with (18)O-labeled water, a strong oxygen isotope fractionation was observed for T. denitrificans and S. denitrificans, indicating a preferential incorporation of (18)O-depleted oxygen released as water by nitrate reduction to nitrogen. The study indicates that nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation might be monitored in the environment by analysis of (18)O-depleted sulfate.

  9. Spontaneous electrochemical treatment for sulfur recovery by a sulfide oxidation/vanadium(V) reduction galvanic cell.

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Kijjanapanich, Pairoje; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-02-01

    Sulfide is the product of the biological sulfate reduction process which gives toxicity and odor problems. Wastewaters or bioreactor effluents containing sulfide can cause severe environmental impacts. Electrochemical treatment can be an alternative approach for sulfide removal and sulfur recovery from such sulfide rich solutions. This study aims to develop a spontaneous electrochemical sulfide oxidation/vanadium(V) reduction cell with a graphite electrode system to recover sulfide as elemental sulfur. The effects of the internal and external resistance on the sulfide removal efficiency and electrical current produced were investigated at different pH. A high surface area of the graphite electrode is required in order to have as less internal resistance as possible. In this study, graphite powder was added (contact area >633 cm(2)) in order to reduce the internal resistance. A sulfide removal efficiency up to 91% and electrical charge of more than 400 C were achieved when using five graphite rods supplemented with graphite powder as the electrode at an external resistance of 30 Ω and a sulfide concentration of 250 mg L(-1). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Joint Recovery of f-Elements Using Solvent Based on Carbamoyl-phosphine Oxides Heading Toward ORGA-Process

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, M.; Babain, V.; Shadrin, A.; Strelkov, S.; Kiseleva, R.; Murzin, A.

    2007-07-01

    Development of the recovery system which allows realizing joint recovery of all the actinides from the HLW is one of the relevant questions in radiochemistry. Carbamoyl-phosphine oxides (CMPO) were proposed and studied as extractant for rare-earth and transplutonium elements (RE and TPE) recovery from HLW with high acidity, for example TRUEX- and SETFICS-process. Organic system CMPO with TBP in kerosene is usually used as a solvent. However, low solubility of actinide adducts with CMPO results in third phase formation when the actinides concentration in organic phase is high. Application of fluorinated polar diluents increases the solubility of CMPO adducts with actinides in organic phase. It was shown that solvent based on carbamoyl-phosphonate in fluorinated polar diluents allows to recover both uranium and minor actinides concurrently, and there was no precipitation or third phase formation even at high uranium concentration in organic phase. The f-elements joint recovery process based on this solvent was proposed. Solvent containing octyl-phenyl-N,N-di-isobutyl-carbamoyl-methylene-phosphine oxide (O{phi}D[iB]CMPO) in polar diluent meta-nitro-benzo-trifluoride (fluoro-pole-732) was screened out for these studies. And, combined use of them with TBP modifier allows to provide uranium and europium (americium) high recovery characteristics concurrently with an opportunity of attainment of f-elements high concentration in organic phase. As it was indicated, precipitates or third phase was absent even when uranium content in organic phase was 100 g/l. Recovery efficiency to europium remained sufficiently high for its effective recovery. Organic phase saturation about 100% from theoretical attains in europium recovery with this system. Increasing of (O{phi}D[iB]CMPO) concentration in recovery system from 0.2 to 0.8 M results in europium content increasing in organic phase, but no third phase formation is observed. The highest possible europium content in organic phase

  11. Survival of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria on corroded concrete surfaces of sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Jensen, H S; Nielsen, A H; Hvitved-Jacobsen, T; Vollertsen, J

    2008-01-01

    The activity of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria within corroded concrete from a sewer manhole was investigated. The bacteria were exposed to hydrogen sulfide starvation for up till 18 months, upon which their hydrogen sulfide oxidizing activity was measured. It was tested whether the observed reduction in biological activity was caused by a biological lag phase or by decay of the bacteria. The results showed that the bacterial activity declined with approximately 40% pr. month during the first two months of hydrogen sulfide starvation. After 2-3 months of starvation, the activity stabilized. Even after 6 months of starvation, exposure to hydrogen sulfide for 6 hours a day on three successive days could restore the bacteriological activity to about 80% of the initial activity. After 12 months of starvation, the activity could, however, not be restored, and after 18 months the biological activity approached zero. The long-term survival aspect of concrete corroding bacteria has implications for predicting hydrogen sulfide corrosion in sewer systems subject to irregular hydrogen sulfide loadings, e.g. as they occur in temperate climates where hydrogen sulfide often is a summer-problem only.

  12. Evaluation of Nitrous Oxide Emission from Sulfide- and Sulfur-Based Autotrophic Denitrification Processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Wang, Dongbo; Pan, Yuting; Sun, Jing; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-09-06

    Recent studies have shown that sulfide- and sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification (AD) processes play an important role in contributing to nitrous oxide (N2O) production and emissions. However, N2O production is not recognized in the current AD models, limiting their ability to predict N2O accumulation during AD. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe N2O dynamics during sulfide- and sulfur-based AD processes for the first time. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using N2O data from two independent experimental systems with sulfide or sulfur as electron donors for AD. The model satisfactorily describes nitrogen reductions, sulfide/sulfur oxidation, and N2O accumulation in both systems. Modeling results revealed substantial N2O accumulation due to the relatively low N2O reduction rate during both sulfide- and sulfur-based AD processes. Application of the model to simulate long-term operations of activated sludge systems performing sulfide- and sulfur-based AD processes indicates longer sludge retention time reduced N2O emission. For sulfide-based AD process, higher initial S/N ratio also decreased N2O emission but with a higher operational cost. This model can be a useful tool to support process operation optimization for N2O mitigation during AD with sulfide or sulfur as electron donor.

  13. Polysulfides as Intermediates in the Oxidation of Sulfide to Sulfate by Beggiatoa spp.

    PubMed Central

    Schwedt, Anne; Kreutzmann, Anne-Christin; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Milucka, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Zero-valent sulfur is a key intermediate in the microbial oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. Many sulfide-oxidizing bacteria produce and store large amounts of sulfur intra- or extracellularly. It is still not understood how the stored sulfur is metabolized, as the most stable form of S0 under standard biological conditions, orthorhombic α-sulfur, is most likely inaccessible to bacterial enzymes. Here we analyzed the speciation of sulfur in single cells of living sulfide-oxidizing bacteria via Raman spectroscopy. Our results showed that under various ecological and physiological conditions, all three investigated Beggiatoa strains stored sulfur as a combination of cyclooctasulfur (S8) and inorganic polysulfides (Sn2−). Linear sulfur chains were detected during both the oxidation and reduction of stored sulfur, suggesting that Sn2− species represent a universal pool of bioavailable sulfur. Formation of polysulfides due to the cleavage of sulfur rings could occur biologically by thiol-containing enzymes or chemically by the strong nucleophile HS− as Beggiatoa migrates vertically between oxic and sulfidic zones in the environment. Most Beggiatoa spp. thus far studied can oxidize sulfur further to sulfate. Our results suggest that the ratio of produced sulfur and sulfate varies depending on the sulfide flux. Almost all of the sulfide was oxidized directly to sulfate under low-sulfide-flux conditions, whereas only 50% was oxidized to sulfate under high-sulfide-flux conditions leading to S0 deposition. With Raman spectroscopy we could show that sulfate accumulated in Beggiatoa filaments, reaching intracellular concentrations of 0.72 to 1.73 M. PMID:24212585

  14. New nitric oxide or hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirins.

    PubMed

    Lazzarato, Loretta; Chegaev, Konstantin; Marini, Elisabetta; Rolando, Barbara; Borretto, Emily; Guglielmo, Stefano; Joseph, Sony; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2011-08-11

    A new series of (((R-oxy)carbonyl)oxy)methyl esters of aspirin (ASA), bearing nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) releasing groups, was synthesized, and the compounds were evaluated as new ASA co-drugs. All the products were quite stable in buffered solution at pH 1 and 7.4. Conversely, they were all rapidly metabolized, producing ASA and the NO/H(2)S releasing moiety used for their preparation. Consequent on ASA release, the compounds were capable of inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation of human platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The simple NO/H(2)S donor substructures were able to relax contracted rat aorta strips, with a NO- and H(2)S-dependent mechanism, respectively, but they either did not trigger antiaggregatory activity or displayed antiplatelet potency markedly below that of the related co-drug. The new products might provide a safer and improved alternative to the use of ASA principally in its anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic applications.

  15. Sulfide Oxidation Coupled to Arsenate Reduction by a Diverse Microbial Community in a Soda Lake†

    PubMed Central

    Hollibaugh, James T.; Budinoff, Charles; Hollibaugh, Ryan A.; Ransom, Briana; Bano, Nasreen

    2006-01-01

    We characterized the arsenate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing population of Mono Lake, California, by analyzing the distribution and diversity of rrnA, cbbL, and dissimilatory arsenate reductase (arrA) genes in environmental DNA, arsenate-plus sulfide-amended lake water, mixed cultures, and isolates. The arsenate-reducing community was diverse. An organism represented by an rrnA sequence previously retrieved from Mono Lake and affiliated with the Desulfobulbaceae (Deltaproteobacteria) appears to be an important member of the arsenate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing community. Sulfide oxidation coupled with arsenate reduction appears to proceed via a two-electron transfer, resulting in the production of arsenite and an intermediate S compound that is subsequently disproportionated. A realgar-like As/S mineral was formed in some experiments. PMID:16517653

  16. Sulfide oxidation coupled to arsenate reduction by a diverse microbial community in a soda lake.

    PubMed

    Hollibaugh, James T; Budinoff, Charles; Hollibaugh, Ryan A; Ransom, Briana; Bano, Nasreen

    2006-03-01

    We characterized the arsenate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing population of Mono Lake, California, by analyzing the distribution and diversity of rrnA, cbbL, and dissimilatory arsenate reductase (arrA) genes in environmental DNA, arsenate-plus sulfide-amended lake water, mixed cultures, and isolates. The arsenate-reducing community was diverse. An organism represented by an rrnA sequence previously retrieved from Mono Lake and affiliated with the Desulfobulbaceae (Deltaproteobacteria) appears to be an important member of the arsenate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing community. Sulfide oxidation coupled with arsenate reduction appears to proceed via a two-electron transfer, resulting in the production of arsenite and an intermediate S compound that is subsequently disproportionated. A realgar-like As/S mineral was formed in some experiments.

  17. Microbial communities involved in electricity generation from sulfide oxidation in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Chen, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Wang, Hua-Lin; Zeng, Raymond J; Liu, Xian-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Wei, Li; Ma, Fang

    2010-10-15

    Simultaneous electricity generation and sulfide removal can be achieved in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). In electricity harvesting from sulfide oxidation in such an MFC, various microbial communities are involved. It is essential to elucidate the microbial communities and their roles in the sulfide conversion and electricity generation. In this work, an MFC was constructed to enrich a microbial consortium, which could harvest electricity from sulfide oxidation. Electrochemical analysis demonstrated that microbial catalysis was involved in electricity output in the sulfide-fed MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities could perform catalysis independently, and synergistic interactions occurred when the two communities worked together. A 16S rRNA clone library analysis was employed to characterize the microbial communities in the MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities shared similar richness and diversity, while the LIBSHUFF analysis revealed that the two community structures were significantly different. The exoelectrogenic, sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria were found in the MFC anodic chamber. The discovery of these bacteria was consistent with the community characteristics for electricity generation from sulfide oxidation. The exoelectrogenic bacteria were found both on the anode and in the solution. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were present in greater abundance on the anode than in the solution, while the sulfate-reducing bacteria preferably lived in the solution.

  18. Electric coupling between distant nitrate reduction and sulfide oxidation in marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Marzocchi, Ugo; Trojan, Daniela; Larsen, Steffen; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2014-08-01

    Filamentous bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family can conduct electrons over centimeter-long distances thereby coupling oxygen reduction at the surface of marine sediment to sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers. The ability of these cable bacteria to use alternative electron acceptors is currently unknown. Here we show that these organisms can use also nitrate or nitrite as an electron acceptor thereby coupling the reduction of nitrate to distant oxidation of sulfide. Sulfidic marine sediment was incubated with overlying nitrate-amended anoxic seawater. Within 2 months, electric coupling of spatially segregated nitrate reduction and sulfide oxidation was evident from: (1) the formation of a 4-6-mm-deep zone separating sulfide oxidation from the associated nitrate reduction, and (2) the presence of pH signatures consistent with proton consumption by cathodic nitrate reduction, and proton production by anodic sulfide oxidation. Filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with the longitudinal structures characteristic of cable bacteria were detected in anoxic, nitrate-amended incubations but not in anoxic, nitrate-free controls. Nitrate reduction by cable bacteria using long-distance electron transport to get privileged access to distant electron donors is a hitherto unknown mechanism in nitrogen and sulfur transformations, and the quantitative importance for elements cycling remains to be addressed.

  19. Online oxygen control for sulfide oxidation in anaerobic treatment of high-sulfate wastewater.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Samir Kumar; Huang, Ju-Chang

    2006-04-01

    A new technique for sulfide control was investigated in an upflow-anaerobic filter (UAF) treating high-strength, sulfate-rich wastewater. The technique used periodic oxygen injection using oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) as a controlling parameter to regulate oxygen injection. The UAF was operated at a constant influent total-organic carbon of 6740 mg/L but with different influent sulfates of 1000, 3000, and 6000 mg/L. At 1000 and 3000 mg/L influent sulfates, the produced sulfide did not impose any inhibition to methane-producing bacteria (MPB). However, at 6000 mg/L influent sulfate, the produced dissolved sulfide of 804 mg S/L (free sulfide = 280 mg S/L) severely inhibited the methanogenesis, but not the sulfidogenesis. Upon oxygen injection at elevated ORP of -265 mV, sulfides were almost completely eliminated with a concomitant improvement in methane yield by 46%. If oxygenation was excessive because of an oversetting of ORP, the excess oxygen could be used rapidly by facultative heterotrophs, thereby protecting the MPB from oxygen stress. Regarding online sulfide oxidation, it was found that the biogas and injected oxygen needed to pass through an aqueous layer containing trace metals, which were found to have a significant catalytic effect on abiotic sulfide oxidation.

  20. Silylated Phosphines and Phosphoranimines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-10

    react smoothly with both substrates. Cyclopentadlene, for example, affords a .. ,. Diels - Alder adduct in each case. - *..:*. V.., 7., 7 NSiNe 3 PhPC1 2... condensation with ELECTEm LU ractie phsphies.Some new 2,2-addition and --J oxidation reactions of the P-C systems. Nf-HR.O 2318 LA... R NP(-NR)=CHR...groups, transilylation, and condensation with .. reactive phosphines. Some new 1,2-addition and oxidation reactions of the P=C systems, R2 NP=CHR,R NP(=NR

  1. Synthesis and characterization of hybrid materials containing iron oxide for removal of sulfides from water.

    PubMed

    Jacukowicz-Sobala, Irena; Wilk, Łukasz J; Drabent, Krzysztof; Kociołek-Balawejder, Elżbieta

    2015-12-15

    Hybrid materials containing iron oxides based on macroporous and gel-type sulfonic and carboxylic cation exchangers as supporting materials were obtained. Multiple factors, including the kind of functional groups, ion exchange capacity, and polymer matrix type (chemical constitution and porous structure), affected the amount of iron oxides introduced into their matrix (7.8-35.2% Fe). Products containing the highest iron content were obtained using carboxylic cation exchangers, with their inorganic deposit being mostly a mixture of iron(III) oxides, including maghemite. Obtained hybrid polymers were used for removal of sulfides from anoxic aqueous solutions (50-200mgS(2-)/dm(3)). The research showed that the form (Na(+) or H(+)) of ionic groups of hybrid materials had a crucial impact on the sulfide removal process. Due to high iron oxide content (35% Fe), advantageous chemical constitution and porous structure, the highest removal efficiency (60mgS(2-)/g) was exhibited by a hybrid polymer obtained using a macroporous carboxylic cation exchanger as the host material. The process of sulfide removal was very complex and proceeded with heterogeneous oxidation, iron(III) oxide reductive dissolution and formation of sulfide oxidation and precipitation products such as iron(II) sulfides, thiosulfates and polysulfides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Occurrence and origin of phosphine in landfill gas.

    PubMed

    Roels, Joris; Verstraete, Willy

    2004-07-05

    A landfill (Hooge Maey, Flanders, Belgium) was subjected to an in-depth study in order to explain the origin of phosphine detected in high amounts in landfill gas, in comparison with biogas from other sources, during a previous study. The spatial and temporal variability of the phosphine concentration in landfill gas was assessed. Twenty-four wells were monitored and differences in phosphine concentration up to one log unit were observed (3.2-32.4 microg/m(3)). The phosphine concentration in each well was constant in time over a period of 4 months. No correlation was found between the phosphine concentration and methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, ethene or ethane concentration. In a series of laboratory tests, it was shown that phosphine was emitted during batch fermentation tests inoculated with landfill leachate when Fe(0) or Al(0) specimens were added. Conditions favouring corrosion of iron gave rise to higher emissions of phosphine. The phosphine concentration in the headspace of a batch test rose to 1.43 mg/m(3) after 27 days of incubation. Weight loss of corroding steel coupons correlated with phosphine emission. Calculations showed that all phosphine emitted from the 0.005 km(3) landfill (160 g/year) could be attributed to corrosion of metals. No evidence of de novo synthesis could be established.

  3. Probing the Ag, Au, and Cu electrode/pyridine-α-hydroxymethyl biphenyl phosphine oxide isomer interface with SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pięta, Ewa; Proniewicz, Edyta; Boduszek, Bogdan; Olszewski, Tomasz K.; Nattich-Rak, Małgorzata; Kim, Younkyoo

    2015-04-01

    The potential-dependent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and generalized two-dimensional correlation analysis (G2DCA) methods were used to characterize three pyridine-α-hydroxymethyl biphenyl phosphine oxide isomers: (diphenylphosphoryl)(pyridine-2-yl)methanol (α-Py), (diphenylphosphoryl)(pyridine-3-yl)methanol (β-Py), and (diphenylphosphoryl)(pyridine-4-yl)methanol (γ-Py). The aforementioned compounds were deposited onto Ag, Au, and Cu electrode surfaces under different applied electrode potentials in an aqueous solution at physiological pH. On the basis of the enhancement, broadening, and shift in wavenumbers of individual bands, the geometry of the investigated molecules and influence of substituent position on the adsorption mode (in the α-(2-), β-(3-), and γ-(4-) positions), electrode type, and applied electrode potential were examined. It was found that the SERS spectra are dominated by bands assigned to phenyl (Ph) and pyridine (Py) ring vibrations. However, some differences in the arrangement of the aforementioned fragments were observed with changes to the type of the metal surface and the applied electrode potential.

  4. Oxidative Weathering of Archean Sulfides: Implications for the Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A.; Romaniello, S. J.; Reinhard, C.; Garcia-Robledo, E.; Revsbech, N. P.; Canfield, D. E.; Lyons, T. W.; Anbar, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    The first widely accepted evidence for oxidation of Earth's atmosphere and oceans occurs ~2.45 Ga immediately prior to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). A major line of evidence for this transition includes the abundances and isotopic variations of redox-sensitive transition metals in marine sediments (e.g., Fe, Mo, Re, Cr, and U). It is often assumed that oxidative weathering is required to liberate these redox-sensitive elements from sulfide minerals in the crust, and hence that their presence in early Archean marine sediments signifies that oxidative weathering was stimulated by small and/or transient "whiffs" of O2 in the environment.1 However, studies of crustal sulfide reactivity have not been conducted at O2 concentrations as low as those that would have prevailed when O2 began its rise during the late Archean (estimated at <10-5 present atmospheric O2).2 As a result, it is difficult to quantify O2 concentrations implied by observed trace metal variations. As a first step toward providing more quantitative constraints on late Archean pO2, we conducted laboratory studies of pyrite and molybdenite oxidation kinetics at the nanomolar O2 concentrations that are relevant to late Archean environments. These measurements were made using recently developed, highly sensitive optical O2 sensors to monitor the rates at which the powdered minerals consumed dissolved O2 in a range of pH-buffered solutions.3Our data extend the range of experimental pyrite oxidation rates in the literature by three orders of magnitude from ~10-3 present atmospheric O2 to ~10-6. We find that molybdenite and pyrite oxidation continues to <1 nM O2 (4 x 10-6 present atmospheric O2). This implies that oxidative weathering of sulfides could occur under conditions which preserve MIF S fractionation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the rate law and reaction order of pyrite oxidation kinetics change significantly at nanomolar concentrations of O2 when compared to previous compilations.2 Our

  5. Sulfide Oxidation by a Noncanonical Pathway in Red Blood Cells Generates Thiosulfate and Polysulfides*

    PubMed Central

    Vitvitsky, Victor; Yadav, Pramod K.; Kurthen, Angelika; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    A cardioprotectant at low concentrations, H2S is a toxin at high concentrations and inhibits cytochrome c oxidase. A conundrum in H2S homeostasis is its fate in red blood cells (RBCs), which produce H2S but lack the canonical mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway for its clearance. The sheer abundance of RBCs in circulation enhances the metabolic significance of their clearance strategy for H2S, necessary to avoid systemic toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that H2S generation by RBCs is catalyzed by mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase. Furthermore, we have discovered the locus of sulfide oxidation in RBCs and describe a new role for an old protein, hemoglobin, which in the ferric or methemoglobin state binds H2S and oxidizes it to a mixture of thiosulfate and hydropolysulfides. Our study reveals a previously undescribed route for the biogenesis of hydropolysulfides, which are increasingly considered important for H2S-based signaling, but their origin in mammalian cells is unknown. An NADPH/flavoprotein oxidoreductase system restores polysulfide-carrying hemoglobin derivatives to ferrous hemoglobin, thus completing the methemoglobin-dependent sulfide oxidation cycle. Methemoglobin-dependent sulfide oxidation in mammals is complex and has similarities to chemistry reported for the dissolution of iron oxides in sulfidic waters and during bioleaching of metal sulfides. The catalytic oxidation of H2S by hemoglobin explains how RBCs maintain low steady-state H2S levels in circulation, and suggests that additional hemeproteins might be involved in sulfide homeostasis in other tissues. PMID:25688092

  6. Sulfide and sulfoxide oxidations by mono- and diperoxo complexes of molybdenum. A density functional study.

    PubMed

    Sensato, Fabrício R; Custodio, Rogério; Longo, E; Safont, Vicent S; Andres, Juan

    2003-07-25

    The molecular mechanism for the oxidation of sulfides to sulfoxides and subsequent oxidation to sulfones by diperoxo, MoO(O(2))(2)(OPH(3)) (I), and monoperoxo, MoO(2)(O(2))(OPH(3)) (II), complexes of molybdenum was studied using density functional calculations at the b3lyp level and the transition state theory. Complexes I and II were both found to be active species. Sulfide oxidation by I or II shows similar activation free energy values of 18.5 and 20.9 kcal/mol, respectively, whereas sulfoxides are oxidized by I (deltaG = 20.6 kcal/mol) rather than by II (deltaG = 30.3 kcal/mol). Calculated kinetic and thermodynamic parameters account for the spontaneous overoxidation of sulfides to sulfones as has been experimentally observed. The charge decomposition analysis (CDA) of the calculated transition structures of sulfide and sulfoxide oxidations revealed that I and II are stronger electrophilic oxidants toward sulfides than they are toward sulfoxides.

  7. Kinetics of Indigenous Nitrate Reducing Sulfide Oxidizing Activity in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Villahermosa, Desirée; Corzo, Alfonso; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; González, Juan M; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate decreases sulfide release in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), but little is known on how it affects the microzonation and kinetics of related microbial processes within the biofilm. The effect of nitrate addition on these properties for sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and oxygen respiration were studied with the use of microelectrodes in microaerophilic wastewater biofilms. Mass balance calaculations and community composition analysis were also performed. At basal WWTP conditions, the biofilm presented a double-layer system. The upper microaerophilic layer (~300 μm) showed low sulfide production (0.31 μmol cm-3 h-1) and oxygen consumption rates (0.01 μmol cm-3 h-1). The anoxic lower layer showed high sulfide production (2.7 μmol cm-3 h-1). Nitrate addition decreased net sulfide production rates, caused by an increase in sulfide oxidation rates (SOR) in the upper layer, rather than an inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). This suggests that the indigenous nitrate reducing-sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) were immediately activated by nitrate. The functional vertical structure of the biofilm changed to a triple-layer system, where the previously upper sulfide-producing layer in the absence of nitrate split into two new layers: 1) an upper sulfide-consuming layer, whose thickness is probably determined by the nitrate penetration depth within the biofilm, and 2) a middle layer producing sulfide at an even higher rate than in the absence of nitrate in some cases. Below these layers, the lower net sulfide-producing layer remained unaffected. Net SOR varied from 0.05 to 0.72 μmol cm-3 h-1 depending on nitrate and sulfate availability. Addition of low nitrate concentrations likely increased sulfate availability within the biofilm and resulted in an increase of both net sulfate reduction and net sulfide oxidation by overcoming sulfate diffusional limitation from the water phase and the strong coupling between SRB and NR-SOB syntrophic

  8. Kinetics of Indigenous Nitrate Reducing Sulfide Oxidizing Activity in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Villahermosa, Desirée; Corzo, Alfonso; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; González, Juan M.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate decreases sulfide release in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), but little is known on how it affects the microzonation and kinetics of related microbial processes within the biofilm. The effect of nitrate addition on these properties for sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and oxygen respiration were studied with the use of microelectrodes in microaerophilic wastewater biofilms. Mass balance calaculations and community composition analysis were also performed. At basal WWTP conditions, the biofilm presented a double-layer system. The upper microaerophilic layer (~300 μm) showed low sulfide production (0.31 μmol cm-3 h-1) and oxygen consumption rates (0.01 μmol cm-3 h-1). The anoxic lower layer showed high sulfide production (2.7 μmol cm-3 h-1). Nitrate addition decreased net sulfide production rates, caused by an increase in sulfide oxidation rates (SOR) in the upper layer, rather than an inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). This suggests that the indigenous nitrate reducing-sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) were immediately activated by nitrate. The functional vertical structure of the biofilm changed to a triple-layer system, where the previously upper sulfide-producing layer in the absence of nitrate split into two new layers: 1) an upper sulfide-consuming layer, whose thickness is probably determined by the nitrate penetration depth within the biofilm, and 2) a middle layer producing sulfide at an even higher rate than in the absence of nitrate in some cases. Below these layers, the lower net sulfide-producing layer remained unaffected. Net SOR varied from 0.05 to 0.72 μmol cm-3 h-1 depending on nitrate and sulfate availability. Addition of low nitrate concentrations likely increased sulfate availability within the biofilm and resulted in an increase of both net sulfate reduction and net sulfide oxidation by overcoming sulfate diffusional limitation from the water phase and the strong coupling between SRB and NR-SOB syntrophic

  9. Sulfide-oxidizing activity and bacterial community structure in a fluidized bed reactor from a zero-discharge mariculture system.

    PubMed

    Cytryn, Eddie; Minz, Dror; Gelfand, Ilya; Neori, Amir; Gieseke, Armin; De Beer, Dirk; Van Rijn, Jaap

    2005-03-15

    In the present work we describe a comprehensive analysis of sulfide oxidation in a fluidized bed reactor (FBR) from an environmentally sustainable, zero-discharge mariculture system. The FBR received oxygen-depleted effluent from a digestion basin (DB) that is responsible for gasification of organic matter and nitrogen. The FBR is a crucial component in this recirculating system because it safeguards the fish from the toxic sulfide produced in the DB. Microscale sulfide oxidation potential and bacterial community composition within FBR biofilms were correlated to biofilter performance by integrating bulk chemical, microsensor (O2, pH, and H2S), and molecular microbial community analyses. The FBR consistently oxidized sulfide during two years of continuous operation, with an estimated average sulfide removal rate of 1.3 g of sulfide-S L(FBR)(-1) d(-1). Maximum sulfide oxidation rates within the FBR biofilms were 0.36 and 0.21 mg of sulfide-S cm(-3) h(-1) in the oxic and anoxic layers, respectively, indicating that both oxygen and nitrate serve as electron acceptors for sulfide oxidation. The estimated anoxic sulfide removal rate, as extrapolated from bench scale, autotrophic, nitrate-amended experiments, was 0.7 g of sulfide-S L(FBR)(-1) d(-1), which is approximately 50% of the total estimated sulfide removal in the FBR. Community composition analyses using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments from FBR samples taken at six-month intervals revealed several sequences that were closely affiliated with sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. These included the denitrifying, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria Thiomicrospira denitrificans, members of the filamentous Thiothrix genus, and sulfide-oxidizing symbionts from the Gammaproteobacteria. In addition, marine Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes species were present in all of the DGGE profiles examined. DGGE analyses showed significant shifts in the bacterial community composition between

  10. Effect of temperature and initial dibutyl sulfide concentration in chloroform on its oxidation rate by ozone.

    PubMed

    Popiel, Stanisław; Nalepa, Tomasz; Dzierzak, Dorota; Stankiewicz, Romuald; Witkiewicz, Zygfryd

    2008-09-15

    A scheme of dibutyl sulfide (DBS) oxidation with ozone and generation of transitional products was determined in this study. The main identified intermediate product was dibutyl sulfoxide (DBSO), and the main end product of DBS oxidation was dibutyl sulfone (DBSO2). It was determined that for three temperatures: 0, 10 and 20 degrees C there was certain initial DBS concentration for which half-times observed in experimental conditions were equal and independent from temperature. Generation of phosgene and water as by-products was confirmed for the reaction of DBS with ozone in chloroform. Results of the described study allowed to present generalized mechanism of sulfide oxidation with ozone.

  11. Pathways of sulfide oxidation by haloalkaliphilic bacteria in limited-oxygen gas lift bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Klok, Johannes B M; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Buisman, Cees J N; Stams, Alfons J M; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2012-07-17

    Physicochemical processes, such as the Lo-cat and Amine-Claus process, are commonly used to remove hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gas streams such as landfill gas, natural gas, and synthesis gas. Biodesulfurization offers environmental advantages, but still requires optimization and more insight in the reaction pathways and kinetics. We carried out experiments with gas lift bioreactors inoculated with haloalkaliphilic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. At oxygen-limiting levels, that is, below an O(2)/H(2)S mole ratio of 1, sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur and sulfate. We propose that the bacteria reduce NAD(+) without direct transfer of electrons to oxygen and that this is most likely the main route for oxidizing sulfide to elemental sulfur which is subsequently oxidized to sulfate in oxygen-limited bioreactors. We call this pathway the limited oxygen route (LOR). Biomass growth under these conditions is significantly lower than at higher oxygen levels. These findings emphasize the importance of accurate process control. This work also identifies a need for studies exploring similar pathways in other sulfide oxidizers such as Thiobacillus bacteria.

  12. Sulfide oxidation at halo-alkaline conditions in a fed-batch bioreactor.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Pim L F; van Beusekom, Otto C; Buisman, Cees J N; Janssen, Albert J H

    2007-08-01

    A biotechnological process is described to remove hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) from high-pressure natural gas and sour gases produced in the petrochemical industry. The process operates at halo-alkaline conditions and combines an aerobic sulfide-oxidizing reactor with an anaerobic sulfate (SO(4) (2-)) and thiosulfate (S(2)O(3) (2-)) reducing reactor. The feasibility of biological H(2)S oxidation at pH around 10 and total sodium concentration of 2 mol L(-1) was studied in gas-lift bioreactors, using halo-alkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (HA-SOB). Reactor operation at different oxygen to sulfide (O(2):H(2)S) supply ratios resulted in a stable low redox potential that was directly related with the polysulfide (S(x) (2-)) and total sulfide concentration in the bioreactor. Selectivity for SO(4) (2-) formation decreased with increasing S(x) (2-) and total sulfide concentrations. At total sulfide concentrations above 0.25 mmol L(-1), selectivity for SO(4) (2-) formation approached zero and the end products of H(2)S oxidation were elemental sulfur (S(0)) and S(2)O(3) (2-). Maximum selectivity for S(0) formation (83.3+/-0.7%) during stable reactor operation was obtained at a molar O(2):H(2)S supply ratio of 0.65. Under these conditions, intermediary S(x) (2-) plays a major role in the process. Instead of dissolved sulfide (HS(-)), S(x) (2-) seemed to be the most important electron donor for HA-SOB under S(0) producing conditions. In addition, abiotic oxidation of S(x) (2-) was the main cause of undesirable formation of S(2)O(3) (2-). The observed biomass growth yield under SO(4) (2-) producing conditions was 0.86 g N mol(-1) H(2)S. When selectivity for SO(4) (2-) formation was below 5%, almost no biomass growth was observed. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Metal oxide and mercuric sulfide nanoparticles synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin

    Commercially available and laboratory-synthesized metal based nanoparticles (NPs), iron oxide (Fe2O3), copper oxide (CuO), titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and mercuric sulfide (HgS) were studied by comprehensive characterizations methods. The general synthesis process was modified sol-gel method. The size and morphology of NPs could be influenced by temperature, sonication, calcination, precursor concentration, pH and types of reaction media. All types of the laboratory-synthesized or commercially available NPs were characterized by physical and chemical processes. One characteristic of NP that can lead to ambiguous toxicity test results was the effect of agglomeration of primary nano-sized particles. Laser light scattering was used to measure the aggregated and particle size distribution. Aggregation effects were apparent and often extensive in some synthesis approaches. Electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) gave the images of those laboratory-synthesized particles and aggregation. The average single particle was about 5-20 nm of ZnO; 20-40 nm of CuO; 10-20 nm of TiO2; 20-35 nm of Fe2O3; 10-15 nm of HgS, while the aggregate size was in the range of a hundred nanometers or more. These five types of NPs were obtained with spherical and oblong formation and the agglomeration of ZnO, CuO, HgS and TiO2 was random, but Fe2O3 has web-like aggregation. Other measurements performed on the particles and aggregates include bandgap energies, surface composition, surface area, hydrodynamic radius, and particle surface charge. In aqueous environment, NPs are subject to processes such as solubilization and aggregation. These processes can be controlling factors in the fate of nanomaterials in environmental settings, including bioavailability to organisms. This study has focused primarily on measurement of the solubility in aqueous media of varying composition (pH, ionic strength, and organic carbon), sedimentation and stability. The aggregate size distribution was

  14. Characterization of a newly isolated strain Pseudomonas sp. C27 for sulfide oxidation: Reaction kinetics and stoichiometry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xi-Jun; Chen, Chuan; Guo, Hong-liang; Wang, Ai-jie; Ren, Nan-qi; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Sulfide biooxidation by the novel sulfide-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas sp. C27, which could perform autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification in mixotrophic medium, was studied in batch and continuous systems. Pseudomonas sp. C27 was able to oxidize sulfide at concentrations as high as 17.66 mM. Sulfide biooxidation occurred in two distinct stages, one resulting in the formation of sulfur with nitrate reduction to nitrite, followed by thiosulfate formation with nitrite reduction to N2. The composition of end-products was greatly impacted by the ratio of sulfide to nitrate initial concentrations. At a ratio of 0.23, thiosulfate represented 100% of the reaction products, while only 30% with a ratio of 1.17. In the continuous bioreactor, complete removal of sulfide was observed at sulfide concentration as high as 9.38 mM. Overall sulfide removal efficiency decreased continuously upon further increases in influent sulfide concentrations. Based on the experimental data kinetic parameter values were determined. The value of maximum specific growth rate, half saturation constant, decay coefficient, maintenance coefficient and yield were to be 0.11 h−1, 0.68 mM sulfide, 0.11 h−1, 0.21 mg sulfide/mg biomass h and 0.43 mg biomass/mg sulfide, respectively, which were close to or comparable with those reported in literature by other researches. PMID:26864216

  15. PCN pincer palladium(II) complex catalyzed enantioselective hydrophosphination of enones: synthesis of pyridine-functionalized chiral phosphine oxides as NC(sp(3))O pincer preligands.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xin-Qi; Huang, Juan-Juan; Wang, Tao; Lv, Jing; Gong, Jun-Fang; Song, Mao-Ping

    2014-10-17

    A series of chiral PCN pincer Pd(II) complexes VI-XIII with aryl-based aminophosphine-imidazoline or phosphinite-imidazoline ligands were synthesized and characterized. They were examined as enantioselective catalysts for the hydrophosphination of enones. Among them, complex IX, which features a Ph2PO donor as well as an imidazoline donor with (4S)-phenyl and N-Tol-p groups, was found to be the optimal catalyst. Thus, in the presence of 2-5 mol % of complex IX a wide variety of enones reacted smoothly with diarylphosphines to give the corresponding chiral phosphine derivatives in high yields with enantioselectivities of up to 98% ee. In particular, heteroaryl species such as 2-thienyl-, 2-furyl-, and 2-pyridinyl-containing enones that have a strong coordination ability to the Pd center were also appropriate substrates for the current catalytic system. For example, hydrophosphination of 2-alkenoylpyridines with diphenylphosphine followed by oxidation with H2O2 afforded the corresponding pyridine-functionalized chiral phosphine oxides in good yields with good to excellent enantioselectivities (10 examples, up to 95% ee). Furthermore, it had been demonstrated that the obtained pyridine-containing phosphine oxide acted as a tridentate ligand in the reaction with PdCl2 to form an intriguing NCsp(3)O pincer Pd(II) complex via Csp(3)-H bond activation, which to our knowledge is the first example of a chiral DCsp(3)D' Pd pincer (D ≠ D'; D and D' denote donor atoms such as P, N, etc.).

  16. High-efficiency turquoise-blue electrophosphorescence from a Pt(II)-pyridyltriazolate complex in phosphine oxide host

    SciTech Connect

    Bhansali, Unnat S; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S; Chen, Wei; Jia, Huiping; Gaspar, Daniel J; Gnade, Bruce E; Padmaperuma, Asanga B; Omary, Mohammad A

    2009-12-10

    We have demonstrated high-efficiency turquoise-blue electrophosphorescence from the complex Pt(ptp)2 = bis[3,5–bis(2–pyridyl)–1,2,4–triazolato]platinum(II) doped in the wide band-gap, ambipolar phosphine oxide host HM-A1 = 4-(diphenylphosphoryl)-N,N-diphenylaniline. For devices with 5% Pt(ptp)2 doping in HM-A1, we have achieved a peak external quantum efficiency and power efficiency of (11.8 ± 0.6) % and (61.2 ± 5.9) lm/W with high-pixel values of 13.1 % and 70.6 lm/W, respectively. These parameters maintained (10.6 ± 0.2) % and (40.3 ± 1.2) lm/W at a brightness of 1000 cd/m2 with high-pixel values of 10.8 % and 41.6 lm/W. Examination of several device structures suggests that the high performance is due to improved charge transport and exciton confinement in the emissive region. Devices with 1-10% doping concentration exhibit turquoise-blue emissions (λmax ~ 480 nm) with a monotonic decrease in monomer/excimer intensity ratio upon increasing the doping concentration. Devices with 5% doping exhibit sufficient blue contribution to attain white light upon combination with highly-doped or neat emissive layers of the same phosphor; the work herein represents a significant backdrop toward optimizing such white OLEDs given the performance metrics above, which to our knowledge represent the highest performance for OLEDs that exhibit blue emission maxima.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide poisoning in solid oxide fuel cells under accelerated testing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting Shuai; Wang, Wei Guo; Chen, Tao; Miao, He; Xu, Cheng

    This study investigates the 0.2% hydrogen sulfide poisoning of Ni/YSZ anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The deterioration degrees and recovery extents of the cell current density, cell voltage and operation temperature are monitored. The results of impedance spectroscopy analysis show that hydrogen sulfide poisoning behavior may affect oxygen ion migration and gas diffusion and conversion on the anode side. Microstructural inspection reveals sulfur or sulfide formed on the anode-active area, which accounts for the immediate and severe cell power drop upon the injection of H 2S. The nickel sulfide in the anodic functional layer cannot be completely removed after long-term regeneration and thus may be a key factor in the permanent degradation of the cell.

  18. Geochemical modeling of arsenic sulfide oxidation kinetics in a mining environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengke, Maggy F.; Tempel, Regina N.

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic sulfide (AsS (am), As 2S 3 (am), orpiment, and realgar) oxidation rates increase with increasing pH values. The rates of arsenic sulfide oxidation at higher pH values relative to those at pH˜2 are in the range of 26-4478, 3-17, 8-182, and 4-10 times for As 2S 3 (am), orpiment, AsS (am), and realgar, respectively. Numerical simulations of orpiment and realgar oxidation kinetics were conducted using the geochemical reaction path code EQ3/6 to evaluate the effects of variable DO concentrations and mineral reactivity factors on water chemistry evolution during orpiment and realgar oxidation. The results show that total As concentrations increase by ˜1.14 to 13 times and that pH values decrease by ˜0.6 to 4.2 U over a range of mineral reactivity factors from 1% to 50% after 2000 days (5.5 yr). The As release from orpiment and realgar oxidation exceeds the current U.S. National Drinking Water Standard (0.05 ppm) approximately in 200-300 days at the lowest initial dissolved oxygen concentration (3 ppm) and a reactivity factor of 1%. The results of simulations of orpiment oxidation in the presence of albite and calcite show that calcite can act as an effective buffer to the acid water produced from orpiment oxidation within relatively short periods (days/months), but the release of As continues to increase. Pyrite oxidation rates are faster than orpiment and realgar from pH 2.3 to 8; however, pyrite oxidation rates are slower than As 2S 3 (am) and AsS (am) at pH 8. The activation energies of arsenic sulfide oxidation range from 16 to 124 kJ/mol at pH˜8 and temperature 25 to 40°C, and pyrite activation energies are ˜52 to 88 kJ/mol, depending on pH and temperature range. The magnitude of activation energies for both pyrite and arsenic sulfide solids indicates that the oxidation of these minerals is dominated by surface reactions, except for As 2S 3 (am). Low activation energies of As 2S 3 (am) indicate that diffusion may be rate controlling. Limestone is

  19. Alternatives to Sulfide Dehairing: Use of Oxidative Agents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The dehairing of cattle hides with sodium sulfate generates large quantities of waste that are of environmental concern as they have a large biological and chemical oxygen demand. Additionally, sodium sulfide is a potential workplace hazard. We had worked with industry to develop a rapid dehairing...

  20. The sulfide ore looping oxidation process: An alternative to current roasting and smelting practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, Larry F.; Balliett, Robert; Mozolic, Jean A.

    2008-07-01

    This novel method utilizes the reactions of metal sulfides and metal oxides. It is applicable to single-metal systems such as Mo, Cu, Co, Ni, Fe, and Zn individual sulfides and to mixed sulfides such as chalcopyrite and Mo/Fe. In addition to primary ores, waste stream products such as spent catalysts can be effectively processed. The benchmark work done on MoS2/MoO3 resulted in an MoO2 product with less than 0.095 wt.% sulfur. Other sulfide concentrate materials showed similar results. In the first stage of the looping process, a highly concentrated SO2 off-gas stream is produced that could be directed to an acid plant or converted to liquid. The products from the first process step can be directed down line for further processing or can be used as is. In the second step of looping oxidation, the product is oxidized back to its fully oxidized state and is mainly looped back to drive the oxidation process in the first reaction. There are also several opportunities for energy recovery and conversion, making looping oxidation an energy-efficient process.

  1. Pt(ii) coordination complexes as visible light photocatalysts for the oxidation of sulfides using batch and flow processes.

    PubMed

    Casado-Sánchez, Antonio; Gómez-Ballesteros, Rocío; Tato, Francisco; Soriano, Francisco J; Pascual-Coca, Gustavo; Cabrera, Silvia; Alemán, José

    2016-07-12

    A new catalytic system for the photooxidation of sulfides based on Pt(ii) complexes is presented. The catalyst is capable of oxidizing a large number of sulfides containing aryl, alkyl, allyl, benzyl, as well as more complex structures such as heterocycles and methionine amino acid, with complete chemoselectivity. In addition, the first sulfur oxidation in a continuous flow process has been developed.

  2. Inhibition of microbiological sulfide oxidation by methanethiol and dimethyl polysulfides at natron-alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Pim L F; de Graaff, Marco; Fortuny-Picornell, Marc; van Leerdam, Robin C; Janssen, Albert J H

    2009-06-01

    To avoid problems related to the discharge of sulfidic spent caustics, a biotechnological process is developed for the treatment of gases containing both hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol. The process operates at natron-alkaline conditions (>1 mol L(-1) of sodium- and potassium carbonates and a pH of 8.5-10) to enable the treatment of gases with a high partial CO(2) pressure. In the process, methanethiol reacts with biologically produced sulfur particles to form a complex mixture predominantly consisting of inorganic polysulfides, dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS). The effect of these organic sulfur compounds on the biological oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur was studied with natron-alkaliphilic bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio. Biological oxidation rates were reduced by 50% at 0.05 mM methanethiol, while for DMDS and DMTS, this was estimated to occur at 1.5 and 1.0 mM, respectively. The inhibiting effect of methanethiol on biological sulfide oxidation diminished due to its reaction with biologically produced sulfur particles. This reaction increases the feasibility of biotechnological treatment of gases containing both hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol at natron-alkaline conditions.

  3. Kinetic Constants for Biological Ammonium and Nitrite Oxidation Processes Under Sulfide Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bejarano-Ortiz, Diego Iván; Huerta-Ochoa, Sergio; Thalasso, Frédéric; Cuervo-López, Flor de María; Texier, Anne-Claire

    2015-12-01

    Inhibition of nitrification by sulfide was assessed using sludge obtained from a steady-state nitrifying reactor. Independent batch activity assays were performed with ammonium and nitrite as substrate, in order to discriminate the effect of sulfide on ammonium and nitrite oxidation. In the absence of sulfide, substrate affinity constants (K S,NH4  = 2.41 ± 0.11 mg N/L; K s, NO2  = 0.74 ± 0.03 mg N/L) and maximum specific rates (q max,NH4  = 0.086 ± 0.008 mg N/mg microbial protein h; q max,NO2  = 0.124 ± 0.001 mg N/mg microbial protein h) were determined. Inhibition of ammonium oxidation was no-competitive (inhibition constant (K i , NH4 ) of 2.54 ± 0.12 mg HS(-)-S/L) while inhibition of nitrite oxidation was mixed (competitive inhibition constant (K' i , NO2 ) of 0.22 ± 0.03 mg HS(-)-S/L and no-competitive inhibition constant (K i , NO2 ) of 1.03 ± 0.06 mg HS(-)-S/L). Sulfide has greater inhibitory effect on nitrite oxidation than ammonium oxidation, and its presence in nitrification systems should be avoided to prevent accumulation of nitrite. By simulating the effect of sulfide addition in a continuous nitrifying reactor under steady-state operation, it was shown that the maximum sulfide concentration that the sludge can tolerate without affecting the ammonium consumption efficiency and nitrate yield is 1 mg HS(-)-S/L.

  4. Oxygen and sulfur isotope fractionation during sulfide oxidation by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brabec, Michelle Y.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Mandernack, Kevin W.

    2012-04-01

    Sulfide-mediated anoxygenic photosynthesis (SMAP) carried out by anaerobic phototrophic bacteria may have played an important role in sulfur cycling, formation of sulfate, and, perhaps, primary production in the Earth’s early oceans. Determination of ε34SSO4-Sulfide- and ε18OSO4-H2O values for bacterial sulfide oxidation will permit more refined interpretation of the δ34S and δ18OSO4 values measured in modern anoxic environments, such as meromictic lakes where sulfide commonly extends into the photic zone, and in the ancient rock record, particularly during periods of the Precambrian when anoxic and sulfidic (euxinic) conditions were believed to be more pervasive than today. Laboratory experiments with anaerobic purple and green sulfur phototrophs, Allochromatium vinosum and Chlorobaculum tepidum, respectively, were conducted to determine the sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. Replicate experiments were conducted at 25 °C for A. vinosum and 45 °C for C. tepidum, and in duplicate at three different starting oxygen isotope values for water to determine sulfate-water oxygen isotope fractionations accurately (ε18OSO4-H2O). ε18OSO4-H2O values of 5.6 ± 0.2‰ and 5.4 ± 0.1‰ were obtained for A. vinosum and C. tepidum, respectively. Temperature had no apparent effect on the ε18OSO4-H2O values. By combining all data from both cultures, an average ε18OSO4-H2O value of 5.6 ± 0.3‰ was obtained for SMAP. This value falls between those previously reported for bacterial oxidation of sphalerite and elemental sulfur (7-9‰) and abiotic and biotic oxidation of pyrite and chalcopyrite (2-4‰). Sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfide and sulfate formed by A.vinosum was negligible (0.1 ± 0.2‰) during all experiments. For C. tepidum an apparent fractionation of -2.3 ± 0.5‰ was observed during the earlier stages of oxidation based on bulk δ34S measurements of sulfate and sulfide and became smaller (-0.7

  5. In Situ Gene Expression Responsible for Sulfide Oxidation and CO2 Fixation of an Uncultured Large Sausage-Shaped Aquificae Bacterium in a Sulfidic Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Tamazawa, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Takasaki, Kazuto; Mitani, Yasuo; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tamaki, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the in situ gene expression profile of sulfur-turf microbial mats dominated by an uncultured large sausage-shaped Aquificae bacterium, a key metabolic player in sulfur-turfs in sulfidic hot springs. A reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the genes responsible for sulfide, sulfite, and thiosulfate oxidation and carbon fixation via the reductive TCA cycle were continuously expressed in sulfur-turf mats taken at different sampling points, seasons, and years. These results suggest that the uncultured large sausage-shaped bacterium has the ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically and plays key roles as a primary producer in the sulfidic hot spring ecosystem in situ. PMID:27297893

  6. In Situ Gene Expression Responsible for Sulfide Oxidation and CO2 Fixation of an Uncultured Large Sausage-Shaped Aquificae Bacterium in a Sulfidic Hot Spring.

    PubMed

    Tamazawa, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Takasaki, Kazuto; Mitani, Yasuo; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tamaki, Hideyuki

    2016-06-25

    We investigated the in situ gene expression profile of sulfur-turf microbial mats dominated by an uncultured large sausage-shaped Aquificae bacterium, a key metabolic player in sulfur-turfs in sulfidic hot springs. A reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the genes responsible for sulfide, sulfite, and thiosulfate oxidation and carbon fixation via the reductive TCA cycle were continuously expressed in sulfur-turf mats taken at different sampling points, seasons, and years. These results suggest that the uncultured large sausage-shaped bacterium has the ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically and plays key roles as a primary producer in the sulfidic hot spring ecosystem in situ.

  7. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of aryl methyl sulfides and sulfoxides by dimethyldioxirane; absolute rate constants and activation parameters for 4-nitrophenyl methyl sulfide and sulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Peter; Hendrickx, Ramon A A J; Lindsay Smith, John R

    2008-02-21

    The oxidations of methyl 4-nitrophenyl sulfide and sulfoxide by dimethyldioxirane, in acetone and mixtures of acetone with water, methanol, acetonitrile and hexane, have been followed by UV-Vis spectroscopy to monitor the decay of the substrates. The data show that, under all the conditions studied, both oxidations obey second-order kinetics. Grunwald-Winstein and Kamlet-Taft analyses of the influence of solvents on the second-order rate constants have been used to obtain mechanistic information on the two reactions. Activation parameters for the two oxidations in acetone and aqueous acetone have been calculated from rate constants for reactions in the temperature range 283-313 K and compared with those from sulfide and sulfoxide oxidations with other oxidants. For sulfoxide oxidations in acetone and 1-20% v/v water in acetone, the results support a concerted nucleophilic displacement by sulfur of oxygen from dimethyldioxirane with the rate being dependent on the solvent's polarity. Sulfide oxidations in acetone and 1-5% v/v water in acetone also proceed by a concerted mechanism. However, in the most polar solvent system studied, 20% v/v water in acetone, the mechanism changes in favour of a two-step reaction involving a betaine intermediate. Importantly, the sulfide oxidation shows a different solvent dependence to that of the sulfoxide, with the rate of oxidation being determined by the hydrogen bond donor capacity and electron-pair donicity of the solvent.

  8. [Oxidation Process of Dissolvable Sulfide by Manganite and Its Influencing Factors].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yao; Li, Shan; Tan, Wen-feng; Liu, Fan; Cai, Chong-fa; Qiu, Guo-hong

    2016-04-15

    As one of the manganese oxides, which are easily generated and widely distributed in supergene environment, manganite participates in the oxidation of dissolvable sulfide (S²⁻), and affects the migration, transformation, and the fate of sulfides. In the present work, the redox mechanism was studied by determining the intermediates, and the influence of initial pH and oxygen atmosphere on the processes were studied. The chemical composition, crystal structures and micromorphologies were characterized by XRD, FTIR and TEM. The concentration of S²⁻ and its oxidation products were analyzed using spectrophotometer, high performance liquid chromatograph and ion chromatograph. The results indicated that elemental sulfur was formed as the major oxidation product of S²⁻ oxidation, and decreased pH could accelerate the oxidation rate of S²⁻ in the initial stage, however, there was no significant influence on final products. Elemental S could be further oxidized to S₂O₃²⁻ when the reaction system was bubbled with oxygen, and manganite exhibited excellent catalytic performance and chemical stability during the oxidation of dissolvable sulfide by oxygen. After reaction of more than 10 h, the crystal structure of manganite remained stable.

  9. Electrochemical oxidation of iron and alkalinity generation for efficient sulfide control in sewers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Wen; Kustermans, Caroline; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Prévoteau, Antonin; Rabaey, Korneel; Yuan, Zhiguo; Pikaar, Ilje

    2017-07-01

    The addition of iron salts is one of the most commonly used dosing strategies for sulfide control in sewers. However, iron salts decrease the sewage pH which not only reduces the effectiveness of sulfide precipitation but also enhances the release of residual sulfide to the sewer atmosphere. Equally important, concentrated iron salt solutions are corrosive and their frequent transport, handling, and on-site storage often come with Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) concerns. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a novel sulfide control approach using electrochemical systems with parallel placed iron electrodes. This enabled combining anodic dissolved iron species release with cathodic hydroxyl anion production, which alleviates all the aforementioned concerns. A long-term experiment was successfully carried out achieving an average sulfide removal efficiency of 95.4 ± 4.4% at low voltage input of 2.90 ± 0.54 V over the course of 8 weeks. This electrochemical method was demonstrated to successfully achieve efficient sulfide control. In addition, it increases the sewage pH, thereby overcoming the drawbacks associated with the pH decrease in the case of conventional iron salt dosing. Ferrous ions were produced at an overall coulombic efficiency (CE) of 98.2 ± 1.2%, whereas oxygen evolution and direct sulfide oxidation were not observed. Short-term experiments showed that increasing either inter-electrode gap or current density increased the cell voltage associated with the increase in the ohmic drop of the system. Overall, this study highlights the practical potential of in-situ generation of dissolved iron species and simultaneous hydroxyl anion generation for efficient sulfide control in sewers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Microbially mediated phosphine emission.

    PubMed

    Roels, Joris; Huyghe, Gwen; Verstraete, Willy

    2005-02-15

    There is still a lot of controversy in literature concerning the question whether a biochemical system exists enabling micro-organisms to reduce phosphate to phosphine gas. The search for so-called 'de novo synthesised' phosphine is complicated by the fact that soils, slurries, sludges, etc., which are often used as inocula, usually contain matrix bound phosphine (MBP). Matrix bound phosphine is a general term used to indicate non-gaseous reduced phosphorus compounds that are transformed into phosphine gas upon reaction with bases or acids. A study was carried out to compare the different digestion methods, used to transform matrix bound phosphine into phosphine gas. It was demonstrated that caustic and acidic digestion methods should be used to measure the matrix bound phosphine of the inoculum prior to inoculation to avoid false positive results concerning de novo synthesis. This is especially true if anthropogenically influenced inocula possibly containing minute steel or aluminium particles are used. The comparative study on different digestion methods also revealed that the fraction of phosphorus in mild steel, converted to phosphine during acid corrosion depended on the temperature. Following these preliminary studies, anaerobic growth experiments were set up using different inocula and media to study the emission of phosphine gas. Phosphine was detected in the headspace gases and its quantity and timeframe of emission depended on the medium composition, suggesting microbially mediated formation of the gas. The amount of phosphine emitted during the growth experiments never exceeded the bound phosphine present in inocula, prior to inoculation. Hence, de novo synthesis of phosphine from phosphate could not be demonstrated. Yet, microbially mediated conversion to phosphine of hitherto unknown reduced phosphorus compounds in the inoculum was evidenced.

  11. Magnetite-sulfide chondrules and nodules in CK carbonaceous chondrites - Implications for the timing of CK oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1993-01-01

    CK carbonaceous chondrites contain rare (about 0.1 vol pct) magnetite-sulfide chondrules that range from about 240 to 500 microns in apparent diameter and have ellipsoidal to spheroidal morphologies, granular textures, and concentric layering. They resemble the magnetite-sulfide nodules occurring inside mafic silicate chondrules in CK chondrites. It seems likely that the magnetite-sulfide chondrules constitute the subset of magnetite-sulfide nodules that escaped as immiscible droplets from their molten silicate chondrule hosts during chondrule formation. The intactness of the magnetite-sulfide chondrules and nodules implies that oxidation of CK metal occurred before agglomeration. Hence, the pervasive silicate darkening of CK chondrites was caused by the shock mobilization of magnetite and sulfide, not metallic Fe-Ni and sulfide as in shock-darkened ordinary chondrites.

  12. Progress in bioleaching: fundamentals and mechanisms of bacterial metal sulfide oxidation--part A.

    PubMed

    Vera, Mario; Schippers, Axel; Sand, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    Bioleaching of metal sulfides is performed by a diverse group of microorganisms. The dissolution chemistry of metal sulfides follows two pathways, which are determined by the mineralogy and the acid solubility of the metal sulfides: the thiosulfate and the polysulfide pathways. Bacterial cells can effect this metal sulfide dissolution via iron(II) ion and sulfur compound oxidation. Thereby, iron(III) ions and protons, the metal sulfide-attacking agents, are available. Cells can be active either in planktonic state or in forming biofilms on the mineral surface; however, the latter is much more efficient in terms of bioleaching kinetics. In the case of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, bacterial exopolymers contain iron(III) ions, each complexed by two uronic acid residues. The resulting positive charge allows an electrostatic attachment to the negatively charged pyrite. Thus, the first function of complexed iron(III) ions is the mediation of cell attachment, while their second function is oxidative dissolution of the metal sulfide, similar to the role of free iron(III) ions in non-contact leaching. In both cases, the electrons extracted from the metal sulfide reduce molecular oxygen via a redox chain forming a supercomplex spanning the periplasmic space and connecting both outer and inner membranes. In this review, we summarize some recent discoveries relevant to leaching bacteria which contribute to a better understanding of these fascinating microorganisms. These include surface science, biochemistry of iron and sulfur metabolism, anaerobic metabolism, and biofilm formation. The study of microbial interactions among multispecies leaching consortia, including cell-to-cell communication mechanisms, must be considered in order to reveal more insights into the biology of bioleaching microorganisms and their potential biotechnological use.

  13. FisR activates σ(54) -dependent transcription of sulfide-oxidizing genes in Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanjie; Li, Juan; Lü, Chuanjuan; Xia, Yongzhen; Xin, Yufeng; Liu, Honglei; Xun, Luying; Liu, Huaiwei

    2017-08-01

    Some heterotrophic bacteria are able to oxidize sulfide (H2 S, HS(-) and S(2-) ) to sulfite and thiosulfate via polysulfide. The genes coding for the oxidation enzymes in Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134 have recently been identified; however, their regulation is unknown. A regulator gene is adjacent to the operon of the sulfide-oxidizing genes, encoding a σ(54) -dependent transcription factor (FisR) with three domains: an R domain, an AAA+ domain and a DNA-binding domain. Here it is reported that the regulator responds to the presence of sulfide and activates the sulfide-oxidizing genes. FisR binds to its cognate operator at -114 to -135 bp of the transcription start of the operon. When polysulfide reacts with the R domain of FisR through the three conserved cysteine residues (C53, C64 and C71), FisR activates the expression of the operon. FisR is highly sensitive to polysulfide, activating σ(54) -dependent transcription of sulfide-oxidizing genes for sulfide removal. Further, sequence analysis indicates that FisR-type regulators are relatively common for controlling sulfide-oxidizing genes under sulfide stress in the Proteobacteria. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Microbially mediated re-oxidation of sulfide during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by Desulfobacter latus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, T.; Brunner, B.; Edwards, E. A.; Wortmann, U. G.

    2011-06-01

    Enzymatic reactions during dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) are often treated as unidirectional with respect to dissolved sulfide. However, quantitative models describing kinetic sulfur isotope fractionations during DSR consider the individual enzymatic reactions as reversible ( Rees, 1973). Brunner and Bernasconi (2005) extended this line of thought, and suggested that as long as cell external sulfide (CES) concentrations are high enough, CES may diffuse back across the cytoplasmic cell membrane and may subsequently be re-oxidized to sulfate. Here, we test this hypothesis by measuring the time evolution of the δ34S-sulfate signal during DSR in closed system experiments under different levels of sulfide stress (0-20 mM and 0-40 mM total dissolved sulfide). Our results show that the measured δ34S-sulfate signal is markedly different in the latter case and that the observed sulfate S-isotope time-evolution is incompatible with a Rayleigh type fractionation model. In contrast, our results are consistent with a sulfate reduction and fractionation model that allows for a cell internal oxidation of dissolved sulfide by a sulfate reducer.

  15. Temperature dependence of the oxidative stability of corn oil and polyalphaolefin in the presence of sulfides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of sulfide-modified corn oil (SMCO) and ditertiary dodecyl pentasulfide (PS) additives on the oxidative stability of corn (CO) and polyalphaolefin (PAO) oils was investigated using pressurized differential scanning calorimetry in dynamic (DDSC) and isothermal (IDSC) modes. DDSC showed a ...

  16. Release of dissolved cadmium and sulfur nanoparticles from oxidizing sulfide minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium enrichment (relative to Fe and Zn) in paddy rice grain occurs during the pre-harvest drainage of flooded soil, which causes oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals present in reduced soil. We investigated this process over a range of environmentally realistic Cdcontain...

  17. Release of dissolved cadmium and sulfur nanoparticles from oxidizing sulfide minerals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium enrichment (relative to Fe and Zn) in paddy rice grain occurs during the pre-harvest drainage of flooded soil, which causes oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals present in reduced soil. We investigated this process over a range of environmentally realistic Cdcontain...

  18. Electron and Hole Transport in a Wide Bandgap Organic Phosphine Oxide for Blue Electrophosphorecsence

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Xiuyu; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Sapochak, Linda S.; Vecchi, Paul A.; Burrows, Paul E.

    2008-02-28

    We report blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) using an ambipolar host, N-(4-diphenylphosphoryl phenyl) carbazole (MPO12), doped with iridium (III) bis[4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2´]picolinate (FIrpic). The external quantum efficiency and operating voltage is 9.1±0.1% and 4.8 V, respectively, measured at a brightness of 800 cd/m2 with no outcoupling enhancement. By varying the layer structure of the OLEDs, we show that MPO12 is capable of transporting both electrons and holes, in contrast to previous demonstrations using diphosphine oxides, which only transported electrons. The improved hole transport results in improved device efficiency.

  19. Transformation and destabilization of graphene oxide in reducing aqueous solutions containing sulfide.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Qu, Xiaolei; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2014-12-01

    The colloidal stability of carbon nanomaterials is a key factor controlling their fate and bioavailability in natural aquatic systems. The authors report that graphene oxide nanoparticles could be destabilized in reducing aqueous solutions containing a low concentration (0.5 mM) of sulfide, a naturally occurring reductant. Spectroscopic characterization using combined X-ray photoelectron, Fourier-transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, and Raman analyses revealed that the surface oxygen-containing groups (mainly epoxy groups) of graphene oxide were significantly reduced after reacting with sodium sulfide. The destabilization of graphene oxide was likely caused by the enhanced surface hydrophobicity of the reduced graphene oxide, whereas electrostatic repulsion played a minimal role. Solution pH was found to affect both the deoxygenation process and the aggregation behavior of graphene oxide. Coexisting humic acid reduced the reaction efficiency and stabilized graphene oxide through steric hindrance. These findings suggest for the first time that the colloidal behavior of carbon nanomaterials might change drastically when they enter natural reducing environments containing sulfide such as anaerobic aquifers and sediments. © 2014 SETAC.

  20. A solid oxide fuel cell system fed with hydrogen sulfide and natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yixin; Schaefer, Laura

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) occurs naturally in crude petroleum, natural gas, volcanic gases, hot springs, and some lakes. Hydrogen sulfide can also result as a by-product from industrial activities, such as food processing, coke ovens, paper mills, tanneries, and petroleum refineries. Sometimes, it is considered to be an industrial pollutant. However, hydrogen can be decomposed from H 2S and then used as fuel for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This paper presents an examination of a simple hydrogen sulfide and natural gas-fed solid oxide fuel cell system. The possibility of utilization of hydrogen sulfide as a feedstock in a solid oxide fuel cell is discussed. A system configuration of an SOFC combined with an external H 2S decomposition device is proposed, where a certain amount of natural gas is supplied to the SOFC. The exhaust fuel gas of the SOFC is after-burned with exhaust air from the SOFC, and the heat of the combustion gas is utilized in the decomposition of H 2S in a decomposition reactor (DR) to produce hydrogen to feed the SOFC. The products are electricity and industry-usable sulfur. Through a mass and energy balance, a preliminary thermodynamic analysis of this system is performed, and the system efficiency is calculated. Also in this paper, the challenges in creating the proposed configuration are discussed, and the direction of future work is presented.

  1. Contact doping of silicon wafers and nanostructures with phosphine oxide monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hazut, Ori; Agarwala, Arunava; Amit, Iddo; Subramani, Thangavel; Zaidiner, Seva; Rosenwaks, Yossi; Yerushalmi, Roie

    2012-11-27

    Contact doping method for the controlled surface doping of silicon wafers and nanometer scale structures is presented. The method, monolayer contact doping (MLCD), utilizes the formation of a dopant-containing monolayer on a donor substrate that is brought to contact and annealed with the interface or structure intended for doping. A unique feature of the MLCD method is that the monolayer used for doping is formed on a separate substrate (termed donor substrate), which is distinct from the interface intended for doping (termed acceptor substrate). The doping process is controlled by anneal conditions, details of the interface, and molecular precursor used for the formation of the dopant-containing monolayer. The MLCD process does not involve formation and removal of SiO(2) capping layer, allowing utilization of surface chemistry details for tuning and simplifying the doping process. Surface contact doping of intrinsic Si wafers (i-Si) and intrinsic silicon nanowires (i-SiNWs) is demonstrated and characterized. Nanowire devices were formed using the i-SiNW channel and contact doped using the MLCD process, yielding highly doped SiNWs. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was used to measure the longitudinal dopant distribution of the SiNWs and demonstrated highly uniform distribution in comparison with in situ doped wires. The MLCD process was studied for i-Si substrates with native oxide and H-terminated surface for three types of phosphorus-containing molecules. Sheet resistance measurements reveal the dependency of the doping process on the details of the surface chemistry used and relation to the different chemical environments of the P═O group. Characterization of the thermal decomposition of several monolayer types formed on SiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) using TGA and XPS provides insight regarding the role of phosphorus surface chemistry at the SiO(2) interface in the overall MLCD process. The new MLCD process presented here for controlled surface doping

  2. Soft chemical control of the crystal and magnetic structure of a layered mixed valent manganite oxide sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandy, Jack N.; Abakumov, Artem M.; Christensen, Kirsten E.; Hadermann, Joke; Adamson, Paul; Cassidy, Simon J.; Ramos, Silvia; Free, David G.; Cohen, Harry; Woodruff, Daniel N.; Thompson, Amber L.; Clarke, Simon J.

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative deintercalation of copper ions from the sulfide layers of the layered mixed-valent manganite oxide sulfide Sr2MnO2Cu1.5S2 results in control of the copper-vacancy modulated superstructure and the ordered arrangement of magnetic moments carried by the manganese ions. This soft chemistry enables control of the structures and properties of these complex materials which complement mixed-valent perovskite and perovskite-related transition metal oxides.

  3. Method of removing hydrogen sulfide from gases utilizing a zinc oxide sorbent and regenerating the sorbent

    DOEpatents

    Jalan, Vinod M.; Frost, David G.

    1984-01-01

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500.degree. C. to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent.

  4. Reduced graphene oxide based silver sulfide hybrid films formed at a liquid/liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Bramhaiah, K. John, Neena S.

    2014-04-24

    Free-standing, ultra-thin films of silver sulfide and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) based silver sulfide hybrids are prepared at a liquid/liquid interface employing in situ chemical reaction strategy. Ag{sub 2}S and RGO−Ag{sub 2}S hybrid films are characterized by various techniques such as UV-visible and photo luminescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The morphology of hybrid films consists of Ag{sub 2}S nanocrystals on RGO surface while Ag{sub 2}S films contains branched network of dendritic structures. RGO−Ag{sub 2}S exhibit interesting optical and electrical properties. The hybrid films absorb in the region 500–650 nm and show emission in the red region. A higher conductance is observed for the hybrid films arising from the RGO component. This simple low cost method can be extended to prepare other RGO based metal sulfides.

  5. Kinetic investigation of sulfidizing annealing of scorodite in processing of refractory oxidized gold-containing ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boboev, I. R.; Strizhko, L. S.; Bobozoda, Sh.; Gorbunov, E. P.

    2016-03-01

    The results of kinetic studies on the removal of arsenic from scorodite using sulfidizing annealing are presented. The reaction order with respect to the reactant and the activation energy are established from the experimental data. The rate-determining step of the sulfidizing annealing process is determined. The main reactions that occur during the sulfidizing of arsenic in scorodite are proposed on the basis of the obtained results and confirmed by thermodynamic calculations and chemical analyses. The major results of testing this technology, as applied to the refractory oxidized ores in which arsenic is mainly concentrated in scorodite, are presented. Arsenic removal from this ore is confirmed by chemical and quantitative X-ray diffraction analyses and by qualitative phase analysis. Industrial use of this technology provides safe and efficient processing of refractory gold-containing ores, where arsenic is mainly concentrated in scorodite.

  6. Oxidative Remobilization of Technetium Sequestered by Sulfide-Transformed Nano Zerovalent Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Dimin; Anitori, Roberto; Tebo, Bradley M.; Tratnyek, P. G.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Kovarik, Libor; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bowden, Mark E.

    2014-06-02

    The dissolution of Tc(IV) sulfide and concurrent transformation of sulfidated ZVI during 2 oxidation were examined. Kinetic data obtained with 10 mL batch reactors showed that Tc(VII) 3 reduced by sulfidated nZVI has significantly slower reoxidation rates than Tc(VII) reduced by 4 nZVI only. In a 50 mL batch reactor, initial inhibition of Tc(IV) dissolution was apparent and 5 lasted until 120 hours at S/Fe = 0.112, presumably due to the redox buffer capacity of FeS. This 6 is evidenced by the parallel trends in oxidation-reduction potentials (ORP) and Tc dissolution 7 kinetics. Mӧssbauer spectra and micro X-ray diffraction of S/Fe = 0.112 suggested the 8 persistence of FeS after 24-h oxidation although X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated 9 substantial surface oxidation. After 120-h oxidation, all characterizations showed complete 10 oxidation of FeS, which further indicates that FeS inhibits Tc oxidation. X-ray absorption 11 spectroscopy for S/Fe = 0.011 showed significantly increasing percentage of TcS2 in the solid 12 phase after 24-h oxidation, indicating TcS2 is more resistant to oxidation than TcO2. At S/Fe = 13 0.112, the XAS results revealed significant transformation of Tc speciation from TcS2 to TcO2 14 after 120-h oxidation at S/Fe = 0.112. Given that no apparent Tc dissolution occurred during this 15 period, the speciation transformation might play a secondary role in hindering Tc oxidation, 16 especially as redox buffer capacity approached depletion.

  7. Role of biogenic sulfide in attenuating zinc oxide and copper nanoparticle toxicity to acetoclastic methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Puyol, Daniel; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2015-01-01

    Soluble ions released by zinc oxide (ZnO) and copper (Cu(0)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been associated with toxicity to methanogens. This study evaluated the role of biogenic sulfide in attenuating ZnO and Cu(0) NP toxicity to methanogens. Short- and long-term batch experiments were conducted to explore ZnO and Cu(0) NPs toxicity to acetoclastic methanogens in sulfate-containing (0.4mM) and sulfate-free conditions. ZnO and Cu(0) were respectively 14 and 7-fold less toxic in sulfate-containing than in sulfate-free assays as indicated by inhibitory constants (Ki). The Ki with respect to residual soluble metal indicated that soluble metal was well correlated with toxicity irrespective of the metal ion source or presence of biogenic sulfide. Long-term assays indicated that ZnO and Cu(0) NPs caused different effects on methanogens. ZnO NPs without protection of sulfide caused a chronic effect, whereas Cu(0) NPs caused an acute effect and recovered. This study confirms that biogenic sulfide effectively attenuates ZnO and Cu(0) NPs toxicity to methanogens by the formation of metal sulfides.

  8. Mechanism study on the sulfidation of ZnO with sulfur and iron oxide at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Tianfu; Xue, Kai; Li, Wenhua; Jiao, Fen; Qin, Wenqing

    2017-02-01

    The mechanism of ZnO sulfidation with sulfur and iron oxide at high temperatures was studied. The thermodynamic analysis, sulfidation behavior of zinc, phase transformations, morphology changes, and surface properties were investigated by HSC 5.0 combined with FactSage 7.0, ICP, XRD, optical microscopy coupled with SEM-EDS, and XPS. The results indicate that increasing temperature and adding iron oxide can not only improve the sulfidation of ZnO but also promote the formation and growth of ZnS crystals. Fe2O3 captured the sulfur in the initial sulfidation process as iron sulfides, which then acted as the sulfurizing agent in the late period, thus reducing sulfur escape at high temperatures. The addition of carbon can not only enhance the sulfidation but increase sulfur utilization rate and eliminate the generation of SO2. The surfaces of marmatite and synthetic zinc sulfides contain high oxygen due to oxidation and oxygen adsorption. Hydroxyl easily absorbs on the surface of iron-bearing zinc sulfide (Zn1‑xFexS). The oxidation of synthetic Zn1‑xFexS is easier than marmatite in air.

  9. Mechanism study on the sulfidation of ZnO with sulfur and iron oxide at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Tianfu; Xue, Kai; Li, Wenhua; Jiao, Fen; Qin, Wenqing

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of ZnO sulfidation with sulfur and iron oxide at high temperatures was studied. The thermodynamic analysis, sulfidation behavior of zinc, phase transformations, morphology changes, and surface properties were investigated by HSC 5.0 combined with FactSage 7.0, ICP, XRD, optical microscopy coupled with SEM-EDS, and XPS. The results indicate that increasing temperature and adding iron oxide can not only improve the sulfidation of ZnO but also promote the formation and growth of ZnS crystals. Fe2O3 captured the sulfur in the initial sulfidation process as iron sulfides, which then acted as the sulfurizing agent in the late period, thus reducing sulfur escape at high temperatures. The addition of carbon can not only enhance the sulfidation but increase sulfur utilization rate and eliminate the generation of SO2. The surfaces of marmatite and synthetic zinc sulfides contain high oxygen due to oxidation and oxygen adsorption. Hydroxyl easily absorbs on the surface of iron-bearing zinc sulfide (Zn1−xFexS). The oxidation of synthetic Zn1−xFexS is easier than marmatite in air. PMID:28186156

  10. Analysis of a microbial community oxidizing inorganic sulfide and mercaptans.

    PubMed

    Duncan, K E; Sublette, K L; Rider, P A; Stepp, A; Beitle, R R; Conner, J A; Kolhatkar, R

    2001-01-01

    Successful treatment of refinery spent-sulfidic caustic (which results from the addition of sodium hydroxide solutions to petroleum refinery waste streams) was achieved in a bioreactor containing an enrichment culture immobilized in organic polymer beads with embedded powdered activated carbon (Bio-Sep). The aerobic enrichment culture had previously been selected using a gas mixture of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan (MeSH) as the sole carbon and energy sources. The starting cultures for the enrichment consisted of several different Thiobacilli spp. (T. thioparus, T. denitrificans, T. thiooxidans, and T. neopolitanus), as well as activated sludge from a refinery aerobic wastewater treatment system and sludge from an industrial anaerobic digester. Microscopic examination (light and SEM) of the beads and of microbial growth on the walls of the bioreactor revealed a great diversity of microorganisms. Further characterization was undertaken starting with culturable aerobic heterotrophic microorganisms (sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA coding for 16S rRNA, Gram staining) and by PCR amplification of DNA coding for 16S rRNA extracted directly from the cell mass, followed by the separation of the PCR products by DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). Eight prominent bands from the DGGE gel were sequenced and found to be closest to sequences of uncultured Cytophagales (3 bands), Gram-positive cocci (Micrococcineae), alpha proteobacteria (3 bands), and an unidentified beta proteobacterium. Culturable microbes included several genera of fungi as well as various Gram-positive and Gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria not seen in techniques using direct DNA extraction.

  11. Synthesis of Functionalized Furans via Chemoselective Reduction/Wittig Reaction Using Catalytic Triethylamine and Phosphine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Jui; Chang, Tzu-Hsiu; Yu, Jhen-Kuei; Madhusudhan Reddy, Ganapuram; Hsiao, Ming-Yu; Lin, Wenwei

    2016-08-05

    An efficient protocol for the synthesis of highly functionalized furans via intramolecular Wittig reaction has been developed using catalytic amounts of phosphine and triethylamine. Silyl chloride served as the initial promoter to activate the phosphine oxide. Reduction of the activated phosphine oxide by hydrosilane resulted in generation of phosphine, while decomposition of Et3N·HCl resulted in regeneration of base, which mediated formation of phosphorus ylide. Remarkably, the in situ generated byproduct, Et3N·HCl, also catalyzes reduction of phosphine oxide.

  12. Sulfidogenic biotreatment of synthetic acid mine drainage and sulfide oxidation in anaerobic baffled reactor.

    PubMed

    Bekmezci, Ozan K; Ucar, Deniz; Kaksonen, Anna H; Sahinkaya, Erkan

    2011-05-30

    The treatment of synthetic acid mine drainage (AMD) water (pH 3.0-6.5) containing sulfate (3.0-3.5 g L(-1)) and various metals (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Zn) was studied in an ethanol-fed sulfate-reducing 4-compartment anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) at 32°C. The reactor was operated for 160 days at different chemical oxygen demand (COD)/sulfate ratios, hydraulic retention times (HRT), pH, and metal concentrations to study the robustness of the process. The last compartment of the reactor was aerated at different rates to study the bio-oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur. The highest sulfate reduction efficiency (88%) was obtained with a feed sulfate concentration of 3.5 g L(-1), COD/sulfate mass ratio of 0.737, feed pH of 3.0 and HRT of 2 days without aeration in the 4th compartment. The corresponding COD removal efficiency was about 92%. The alkalinity produced in the sulfidogenic ethanol oxidation neutralized the acidic mine water from pH 3.0-4.5 to pH 7.0-8.0. Effluent soluble and total heavy metal concentrations were substantially reduced with removal efficiencies generally higher than 99%, except for Mn (25-77%). Limited aeration in the 4th compartment of ABR promoted incomplete oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur rather than complete oxidation to sulfate. Depending on the aeration rate and HRT, 32-74% of produced sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur. This study demonstrates that by optimizing operating conditions, sulfate reduction, metal removal, alkalinity generation, and excess sulfide oxidation can be achieved in a single ABR treating AMD.

  13. Characterization of an autotrophic sulfide-oxidizing marine Arcobacter sp. that produces filamentous sulfur.

    PubMed

    Wirsen, C O; Sievert, S M; Cavanaugh, C M; Molyneaux, S J; Ahmad, A; Taylor, L T; DeLong, E F; Taylor, C D

    2002-01-01

    A coastal marine sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic bacterium produces hydrophilic filamentous sulfur as a novel metabolic end product. Phylogenetic analysis placed the organism in the genus Arcobacter in the epsilon subdivision of the Proteobacteria. This motile vibrioid organism can be considered difficult to grow, preferring to grow under microaerophilic conditions in flowing systems in which a sulfide-oxygen gradient has been established. Purified cell cultures were maintained by using this approach. Essentially all 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride-stained cells in a flowing reactor system hybridized with Arcobacter-specific probes as well as with a probe specific for the sequence obtained from reactor-grown cells. The proposed provisional name for the coastal isolate is "Candidatus Arcobacter sulfidicus." For cells cultured in a flowing reactor system, the sulfide optimum was higher than and the CO(2) fixation activity was as high as or higher than those reported for other sulfur oxidizers, such as Thiomicrospira spp. Cells associated with filamentous sulfur material demonstrated nitrogen fixation capability. No ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase could be detected on the basis of radioisotopic activity or by Western blotting techniques, suggesting an alternative pathway of CO(2) fixation. The process of microbial filamentous sulfur formation has been documented in a number of marine environments where both sulfide and oxygen are available. Filamentous sulfur formation by "Candidatus Arcobacter sulfidicus" or similar strains may be an ecologically important process, contributing significantly to primary production in such environments.

  14. Oxidative remobilization of technetium sequestered by sulfide-transformed nano zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dimin; Anitori, Roberto P; Tebo, Bradley M; Tratnyek, Paul G; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Kovarik, Libor; Engelhard, Mark H; Bowden, Mark E

    2014-07-01

    Our previous study showed that formation of TcS2-like phases is favored over TcO2 under sulfidic conditions stimulated by nano zerovalent iron. This study further investigates the stability of Tc(IV) sulfide upon reoxidation by solution chemistry, solid phase characterization, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Tc dissolution data showed that Tc(VII) reduced by sulfide-transformed nZVI has substantially slower reoxidation kinetics than Tc(VII) reduced by nZVI only. The initial inhibition of Tc(IV) dissolution at S/Fe = 0.112 is due to the redox buffer capacity of FeS, which is evidenced by the parallel trends in oxidation-reduction potentials (ORP) and Tc dissolution kinetics. The role of FeS in inhibiting Tc oxidation is further supported by the Mössbauer spectroscopy and micro X-ray diffraction data at S/Fe = 0.112, showing persistence of FeS after 24-h oxidation but complete oxidation after 120-h oxidation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data for S/Fe = 0.011 showed significantly increasing percentages of TcS2 in the solid phase after 24-h oxidation, indicating stronger resistance of TcS2 to oxidation. At S/Fe = 0.112, the XAS results revealed significant transformation of Tc speciation from TcS2 to TcO2 after 120-h oxidation. Given that no apparent Tc dissolution occurred during this period, the speciation transformation might play a secondary role in hindering Tc oxidation. Collectively, the results indicate that sequestrating Tc as TcS2 under stimulated sulfate reduction is a promising strategy to improve the long-term stability of reduced Tc in subsurface remediation.

  15. High-temperature oxidation/sulfidation resistance of iron-aluminide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, I.G.; Goodwin, G.M.; Howell, M.

    1996-04-01

    Iron aluminides containing > 20-25 at. % Al have oxidation and sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. Accordingly, these alloys may find application as coatings or claddings on more conventional higher-strength materials which are generally less corrosion-resistant at high temperatures. To this end, iron-aluminide coatings were prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques. Specimens were cut from weld deposits and exposed to a highly aggressive oxidizing-sulfidizing (H2S-H2-H2O-Ar) environment at 800 C. All the weld overlayers showed good corrosion behavior under isothermal conditions, including a gas metal arc-produced deposit with only 21 at. % Al. Rapid degradation in corrosion resistance was observed under thermal cycling conditions when the initally grown scales spalled and the rate of reaction was then not controlled by formation of slowly growing Al oxide. Higher starting Al concentrations (> {approximately} 25 at. %) are needed to assure overall oxidation-sulfidation resistance of the weld overlays, but hydrogen cracking susceptibility must be minimized in order to physically separate the corrosive species from the reactive substrate material.

  16. Synthesis of bacteria promoted reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide networks for advanced supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiming; Yu, Xinzhi; Guo, Di; Qu, Baihua; Zhang, Ming; Li, Qiuhong; Wang, Taihong

    2013-08-14

    Supercapacitors with potential high power are useful and have attracted much attention recently. Graphene-based composites have been demonstrated to be promising electrode materials for supercapacitors with enhanced properties. To improve the performance of graphene-based composites further and realize their synthesis with large scale, we report a green approach to synthesize bacteria-reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide (BGNS) networks. By using Bacillus subtilis as spacers, we deposited reduced graphene oxide/Ni3S2 nanoparticle composites with submillimeter pores directly onto substrate by a binder-free electrostatic spray approach to form BGNS networks. Their electrochemical capacitor performance was evaluated. Compared with stacked reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide (GNS) prepared without the aid of bacteria, BGNS with unique nm-μm structure exhibited a higher specific capacitance of about 1424 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.75 A g(-1). About 67.5% of the capacitance was retained as the current density increased from 0.75 to 15 A g(-1). At a current density of 75 A g(-1), a specific capacitance of 406 F g(-1) could still remain. The results indicate that the reduced graphene oxide-nickel sulfide network promoted by bacteria is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  17. Intestine oxidative stress and immune response to sulfide stress in Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yafei; Dong, Hongbiao; Wang, Yun; Li, Hua; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Jiasong

    2017-04-01

    The effects of sulfide stress on oxidative stress and immune response in intestine of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei were evaluated in the present study. Oxidative stress parameters, immune enzymes activity and immune gene mRNA expression level were detected in intestine of L. vannamei after the exposure of 5.0 mg/L sulfide stress 72 h. The duration of sulfide stress influenced the shrimp survival, and the cumulative mortality rate was 30.0% and 33.3% at 48 h and 72 h respectively. HE staining showed that sulfide stress caused the intestine tissue damage symptoms. Compared with the control group, after exposed to sulfide stress, the content of lipid peroxidation (LPO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and ROS production (·O2(-) generation capacity) increased. Total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) activity increased at 6 h and decreased at 48 h. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased in the entire experiment. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and nitric oxide (NO) content increased to the highest at 6 h and 12 h respectively, and both decreased at 48 h. The relative mRNA expression level of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene decreased at 6 h and increased to the highest at 48 h. The relative mRNA expression level of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) gene increased at 12 h and decreased to a lower level at 72 h. The relative mRNA expression level of Toll and immune deficiency (Imd) gene increased to the highest at 12 h and 24 h respectively, and both decreased at 48 h. These results revealed that sulfide stress could induce oxidative stress and immune response via confusion of immune enzymes activity and gene expression level in intestine of L. vannamei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Extraction of Am(III), Eu(III) and U(VI) from perchloric acid and mixtures of acids by dialkyl-(diaryl) [diethylcarbamoylmethyl] phosphine oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chmutova, M.K.; Litvina, M.N.; Nesterova, N.P.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Kabachnik, M.I.

    1992-07-01

    Extraction of Am(III), and Eu(III) and U(VI) from perchloric acid solutions by dialkyl(diaryl) [diethyl-carbamoylmethyl] phosphine oxides (CMPO) has been investigated. It has been shown that elements are extracted more effectively from perchloric acid solutions than from nitric acid. An `anomalous aryl effect` increases sufficiently in perchloric media as compared with nitric media. Solvate numbers of elements also increase in perchloric acid, they being extremely high for aryl-substituted reagents and not so high for alkyl-substituted compounds. It has been shown that in HNO{sub 3} and HClO{sub 4} solutions the value of `anomalous aryl effect` directly depends on the difference in values of element solvate numbers in complexes with aryl- and alkyl-substituted CMPO. Am(III), Eu(III) and U(VI) are not practically extracted from phosphoric and sulphuric acids by CMPO solutions. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Third phase formation in the extraction of Nd(III) by octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl carbamoyl methyl phosphine oxide (O{Phi}CMPO)

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, A.; Brahmmananda Rao, C.V.S.; Sabharwal, K.N.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    1999-01-01

    Third phase formation in the extraction of Nd(III) by 0.2 M Octyl(Phenyl)-N,N-Diisobutyl Carbamoyl methyl phosphine oxide (O{Phi}CMPO) in n-dodecane has been studied with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and tri-n-amyl phosphate (TAP) as modifiers to provide a comparison between these two modifier systems. The effect of concentration of TAP as modifier for the extraction of Nd(III) by 0.2 M O{Phi}CMPO has been studied. The extraction of Nd(III) by TAP/n-dodecane in the absence of O{Phi}CMPO has also been studied and the results are reported here.

  20. Tris{N-[bis­(dimethyl­amino)phosphino­yl]-2,2,2-trichloro­acetamido}(triphenyl­phosphine oxide)holmium(III)

    PubMed Central

    Amirkhanov, Oleksiy V.; Marchenko, Ivan O.; Moroz, Olesia V.; Sliva, Tetyana Yu.; Fritsky, Igor O.

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound, [Ho(C6H12Cl3N3O2P)3(C18H15OP)], the HoIII ion is surrounded by six O atoms from the three bidentate N-[bis­(dimethyl­amino)phosphino­yl]-2,2,2-trichloro­acetamido ligands (L −) and by one O atom from the triphenyl­phosphine oxide ligand, with the formation of a distorted monocapped octa­hedron. In one ligand L −, the trichloro­methyl group is rotationally disordered between two orientations in a 1:1 ratio, while two dimethyl­amino groups in another ligand L − are disordered between two conformations, each with the same 1:1 ratio. PMID:21579292

  1. Inhibition of a biological sulfide oxidation under haloalkaline conditions by thiols and diorgano polysulfanes.

    PubMed

    Roman, Pawel; Lipińska, Joanna; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2016-09-15

    A novel approach has been developed for the simultaneous description of reaction kinetics to describe the formation of polysulfide and sulfate anions from the biological oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a quick, sulfide-dependent respiration test. Next to H2S, thiols are commonly present in sour gas streams. We investigated the inhibition mode and the corresponding inhibition constants of six thiols and the corresponding diorgano polysulfanes on the biological oxidation of H2S. A linear relationship was found between the calculated IC50 values and the lipophilicity of the inhibitors. Moreover, a mathematical model was proposed to estimate the biomass activity in the absence and presence of sulfurous inhibitors. The biomass used in the respiration tests originated from a full-scale biodesulfurization reactor. A microbial community analysis of this biomass revealed that two groups of microorganism are abundant, viz. Ectothiorhodospiraceae and Piscirickettsiaceae.

  2. Alteration of Mantle Sulfides: the Effects of Oxidation and Melt Infiltration in a Kilbourne Hole Harzburgite Xenolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, T. J.; Harvey, J.; Warren, J. M.; Klein, F.; Walshaw, R.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfides, while commonly present in volumetrically minor amounts (< 0.1 modal %; e.g.[1]) in the mantle, impart a strong control over many of the highly siderophile and strongly chalcophile elements. The mass balance of some elements, such as Os, are almost completely controlled by heterogeneously distributed sulfide grains[2][3]. Hence, processes that re-distribute sulfides and / or alter their composition can have profound effects on the information preserved within them regarding primary mantle processes. Different generations of interstitial sulfide may partly or completely re-equilibrate with one another or may be exposed to open-system processes that mobilize and / or precipitate sulfides[4]. In mantle xenoliths in particular, supergene weathering at the Earth's surface can oxidize sulfide to soluble sulfate, and its removal affects highly siderophile and strongly chalcophile element abundances [6]. Here we present the initial results from a study of interstitial mantle sulfides (n = 24) recovered from a single harzburgitic xenolith from Kilbourne Hole, NM. Large compositional differences are observed in the sulfides even at the scale of a single xenolith. Mono-sulfide solid solution has exsolved into two Fe-Ni-rich phases, one with a significantly larger Ni content for a given Fe abundance. Occurrences of Cu-rich sulfides are rare, but where present Cu can account for up to 22 weight % of the sulfide. Critically, no fresh, unaltered sulfides were recovered and in all of the sulfides there is evidence for at least two secondary processes. EDS mapping of the sulfides reveals pervasive, but incomplete, oxidation in all of the grains; Raman spectroscopy reveals this oxide to be goethite. In addition, there is also evidence for the interaction of many of the sulfides with a volatile-rich silicate melt. Silicate melt veins cross-cut the original sulfide mineralogy in some areas of the sulfide grain, while leaving other areas virtually untouched. The degree of

  3. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  4. Sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation in anoxic confined aquifers in the northeastern Osaka Basin, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Masaru; Nakano, Takanori; Tase, Norio

    2007-03-01

    SummaryWe used δ 34S values and chemical compositions of groundwater to investigate the influence of sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation processes in a confined aquifer system in the northeastern Osaka Basin (NEOB), central Japan. Shallow confined groundwater (<100 m) in the basin is recharged mainly from mountainous areas to the north, and flows south and southwest through the aquifer system. Anion composition of the groundwater is dominated by HCO3- throughout the basin. However, concentrations of redox-sensitive species such as dissolved oxygen, NO3-, Fe 2+, and Mn 2+ show that groundwater conditions become increasingly anoxic along the flowpaths. Moreover, SO 4/(SO 4 + 2HCO 3) molar ratios decrease with increasing δ 34S along the flowpaths, which demonstrates that sulfate is reduced in the NEOB aquifer system. Groundwater with both high total dissolved solids and high SO 4 content was observed mainly in areas down-flow from faults. Because of the high SO 4 content, the anion composition of this groundwater cannot be adequately explained by a simple sulfate reduction process. A Rayleigh distillation model with ɛ = -20‰, which allows for sulfide oxidation within marine sediments in proximity to faults, explains the chemistry of all groundwater samples, including those with high SO 4 content. The model demonstrates that 76% of initial sulfate is reduced at maximum, and that reduced SO42- content is up to 48.5 mg/L after sulfide oxidation in the NEOB aquifer system.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide adsorption on MOFs and MOF/graphite oxide composites.

    PubMed

    Petit, Camille; Mendoza, Barbara; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2010-12-03

    Composites of a copper-based metal-organic framework (MOF) and graphite oxide (GO) were tested for hydrogen sulfide removal at ambient conditions. In order to understand the mechanisms of adsorption, the initial and exhausted samples were analyzed by various techniques including X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and sorption of nitrogen. Compared to the parent materials, an enhancement in hydrogen sulfide adsorption was found. It was the result of physical adsorption of water and H(2)S in the pore space formed at the interface between the MOF units and the graphene layers where the dispersive forces are the strongest. Besides physisorption, reactive adsorption was found as the main mechanism of retention. H(2)S molecules bind to the copper centers of the MOF. They progressively react with the MOF units resulting in the formation of copper sulfide. This leads to the collapse of the MOF structure. Water enhances adsorption in the composites as it allows the dissolution of hydrogen sulfide.

  6. Iron sulfide oxidation as influenced by calcium carbonate application.

    PubMed

    Hossner, L R; Doolittle, J J

    2003-01-01

    Two overburden materials, with different FeS2 contents (1.9 and 4.1%) and low acid neutralization potential, were limed with CaCO3 at rates of 0, 25, 50, 75, 100, and 125% based on the amount of CaCO3 needed to provide an acid-base account deficit (A/Ba) of zero (A/Ba = neutralization potential--potential acidity--exchangeable acidity). The limed overburden materials were inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and leached weekly with deionized water. Residual FeS2 and CaCO3 were determined in samples over a 378-d period. Oxidation followed zero-order kinetics with respect to FeS2 concentration at pH values greater than 4 and first-order kinetics at pH values less than 4. Zero-order oxidation rates ranged from 0.01 to 0.46 micromol g(-1) d(-1) in the overburden with 1.9% FeS2 and from 0.01 to 0.22 micromol g(-1) d(-1) in the overburden with 4.1% FeS2. Oxidation following the first-order rate law had a first-order rate constant of 0.03 d(-1) in the 1.9% FeS2 overburden and 0.01 d(-1) in the 4.1% FeS2 overburden. The calculated half-life was 23 d for the 1.9% FeS2 overburden and 69 d for the 4.1% FeS2 overburden. Additions of CaCO3 affected FeS2 oxidation by controlling the pH of the system. Liming to greater than 50% of the acid-base account deficit did not significantly affect the zero-order oxidation rate. Dissolution of the applied CaCO3 was found to be faster than the oxidation of FeS2 at pH values greater than 4. It was projected that at lime rates up to 125%, the CaCO3 would dissolve and leach out of the system before all the FeS2 oxidized, leaving the potential for acid minesoil formation.

  7. Oxidation of dimethyl sulfide to dimethyl sulfoxide by phototrophic purple bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zeyer, J.; Eicher, P.; Wakeham, S.G.; Schwarzenbach, R.P.

    1987-09-01

    Enrichment cultures of phototrophic purple bacteria rapidly oxidized up to 10 mM dimethyl sulfide (DMS) to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). DMSO was qualitatively identified by proton nuclear magnetic resonance. By using a biological assay, DMSO was always quantitatively recovered from the culture media. DMS oxidation was not detected in cultures incubated in the dark, and it was slow in cultures exposed to full daylight. Under optimal conditions, the second-order rate constant for DMS oxidation was 6 day/sup -1/ mg of protein/sup -1/ ml/sup -1/. The rate constant was reduced in the presence of high concentration of sulfide (>1 mM), but was not affected by the addition of acetate. DMS was also oxidized to DMSO by a pure strain (tentatively identified as a Thiocystis sp.) isolated from the enrichment cultures. DMS supported growth of the enrichment cultures and of the pure strain by serving as an electron source for photosynthesis. A determination of the amount of protein produced in the cultures and an estimation of the electron balance suggested that the two electrons liberated during the oxidation of DMS to DMSO were quantitatively used to reduce carbon dioxide to biomass. The oxidation of DMS by phototrophic purple bacteria may be an important source of DMSO detected in anaerobic ponds and marshes.

  8. Predicting the Release of Sulfide Oxidation Products at Mine Waste Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowes, D. W.; Ptacek, C. J.; Mayer, K. U.; Bain, J. G.; Moncur, M. C.; Jambor, J. L.

    2004-05-01

    Reactive solute transport models provide sophisticated tools for predicting the magnitude and duration of acid generation and metal release in mine waste disposal facilities. Over the past decade, these models have become increasingly advanced. The ability of reactive solute transport models to simulate integrated biogeochemical and hydrological processes now challenges our ability to characterize these systems on the field and laboratory scale. Application of reactive solute transport models relies on the development of an accurate conceptual model and specification of the chemical, physical and hydrological characteristics of the waste materials. Release of acidic water and dissolved metals from mine waste disposal facilities is controlled by a complex combination of physical, chemical, and biological processes. The oxidation of sulfide minerals is ultimately controlled by the availability of oxygen, which is usually transported in its gaseous form. The reaction between oxygen and sulfide minerals is catalyzed by chemolithotrophic bacteria. The oxidation of individual sulfide minerals occurs at differing rates. Sulfide oxidation reactions release acid, sulfate and dissolved metals. The acid released may be neutralized by reaction with carbonate, hydroxide and aluminosilicate minerals. The metals released may be attenuated by precipitation of secondary minerals, by coprecipitation or by adsorption reactions. Thorough characterization of the waste properties which control gas transport and water flow through the waste materials is required. In addition, a thorough knowledge of the initial composition and mineralogy is required to develop representative estimates of the environmental effects of the waste materials. When sufficient information is available, the results of reactive solute transport simulations show close agreement to measurements made at field sites and in laboratory experiments.

  9. Improvement of Na Ion Electrode Activity of Metal Oxide via Composite Formation with Metal Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Mi; Kim, In Young; Patil, Sharad B; Park, Boyeon; Lee, Jang Mee; Adpakpang, Kanyaporn; Chae, Seen Ae; Han, Oc Hee; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2017-01-25

    The composite formation with a conductive metal sulfide domain can provide an effective methodology to improve the Na-ion electrode functionality of metal oxide. The heat treatment of TiO2(B) under CS2 flow yields an intimately coupled TiO2(B)-TiS2 nanocomposite with intervened TiS2 domain, since the reaction between metal oxide and CS2 leads to the formation of metal sulfide and CO2. The negligible change in lattice parameters and significant enhancement of visible light absorption upon the reaction with CS2 underscore the formation of conductive metal sulfide domains. The resulting TiO2(B)-TiS2 nanocomposites deliver greater discharge capacities with better rate characteristics for electrochemical sodiation-desodiation process than does the pristine TiO2(B). The (23)Na magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance analysis clearly demonstrates that the electrode activities of the present nanocomposites rely on the capacitive storage of Na(+) ions, and the TiS2 domains in TiO2(B)-TiS2 nanocomposites play a role as mediators for Na(+) ions to and from TiO2(B) domains. According to the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the reaction with CS2 leads to the significant enhancement of charge transfer kinetics, which is responsible for the accompanying improvement in electrode performance. The present study provides clear evidence for the usefulness in composite formation between the semiconducting metal oxide and metal sulfide in exploring new efficient NIB electrode materials.

  10. The impact of electrogenic sulfide oxidation on elemental cycling and solute fluxes in coastal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Alexandra M. F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous sulfide oxidizing cable bacteria are capable of linking the oxidation of free sulfide in deep anoxic layers of marine sediments to the reduction of oxygen or nitrate in surface sediments by conducting electrons over centimeter-scale distances. Previous studies have shown that this newly discovered microbial process, referred to as electrogenic sulfide oxidation (e-SOx), may alter elemental cycling in sediments, but the nature and rates of the resulting biogeochemical transformations and their influence on benthic-pelagic coupling remain largely unknown. Here we quantify changes in sediment geochemistry and solute fluxes at the sediment-water interface as e-SOx develops and declines over time in laboratory incubations of organic-rich sediments from a seasonally hypoxic coastal basin (Marine Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands). Our results show that e-SOx enhanced sediment O2 consumption and acidified subsurface sediment, resulting in the dissolution of calcium carbonate and iron sulfide minerals in deeper sediment horizons and the associated accumulation of dissolved iron, manganese, and calcium in porewater. Remobilized Fe diffusing upward was reoxidized at the sediment-water interface, producing an amorphous Fe oxide crust, while dissolved Fe diffusing downward was reprecipitated in the form of FeS as it encountered the free sulfide horizon. The development of e-SOx enhanced the diffusive release of dissolved Mn at the sediment-water interface, capped the phosphate efflux, generated a buildup of organic matter in surface sediments, and strongly stimulated the release of alkalinity from the sediment. About 75% of this alkalinity production was associated with net CaCO3 dissolution, while the remaining 25% was attributed to a pumping mechanism that transfers alkalinity from anodic H2S oxidation (an alkalinity sink) in deeper sediments to cathodic O2 reduction (an alkalinity source) near the sediment-water interface. The resulting sediment alkalinity

  11. Kinetics of the dissolution of zinc sulfide in an oxidizing slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Suresh K.

    1990-10-01

    A new concept has been developed for the production of zinc from zinc and complex zinc concentrates. It is a two-stage process involving oxidation of zinc sulfide to oxide and dissolution into slag and the fuming of zinc from the slag by injecting carbonaceous materials into it to produce zinc vapors which can be subsequently condensed in a lead-splash condenser such as those used in the Imperial Smelting Process (ISP). In this paper, the effects of the quantity of air, temperature, and concentrate feed rate have been discussed on the production of zinc-rich slag, which is the first stage of the proposed process.

  12. High temperature hydrogen sulfide removal with stannic oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Karpuk, M.E.; Copeland, R.J.; Feinberg, D.; Wickham, D.; Windecker, B.; Yu, J.

    1994-10-01

    This contract focuses on the development of sorbents and processes for removal of H{sub 2}S from hot coal gas with the product of sorbent regeneration being elemental sulfur. TDA Research`s process uses a regenerable tin(IV) oxide-based (SnO{sub 2}) sorbent as the first sorbent and zinc ferrite (or zinc titanate) as a second sorbent.

  13. Kinetic and stoichiometric characterization of anoxic sulfide oxidation by SO-NR mixed cultures from anoxic biotrickling filters.

    PubMed

    Mora, Mabel; Fernández, Maikel; Gómez, José Manuel; Cantero, Domingo; Lafuente, Javier; Gamisans, Xavier; Gabriel, David

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the biological activity in biotrickling filters is difficult since it implies estimating biomass concentration and its growth yield, which can hardly be measured in immobilized biomass systems. In this study, the characterization of a sulfide-oxidizing nitrate-reducing biomass obtained from an anoxic biotrickling filter was performed through the application of respirometric and titrimetric techniques. Previously, the biomass was maintained in a continuous stirred tank reactor under steady-state conditions resulting in a growth yield of 0.328 ± 0.045 g VSS/g S. To properly assess biological activity in respirometric tests, abiotic assays were conducted to characterize the stripping of CO2 and sulfide. The global mass transfer coefficient for both processes was estimated. Subsequently, different respirometric tests were performed: (1) to solve the stoichiometry related to the autotrophic denitrification of sulfide using either nitrate or nitrite as electron acceptors, (2) to evaluate the inhibition caused by nitrite and sulfide on sulfide oxidation, and (3) to propose, calibrate, and validate a kinetic model considering both electron acceptors in the overall anoxic biodesulfurization process. The kinetic model considered a Haldane-type equation to describe sulfide and nitrite inhibitions, a non-competitive inhibition to reflect the effect of sulfide on the elemental sulfur oxidation besides single-step denitrification since no nitrite was produced during the biological assays.

  14. Persistency-field Eh-pH diagrams for sulfides and their application to supergene oxidation and enrichment of sulfide ore bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sato, M.

    1992-01-01

    At temperatures prevailing near the Earth's surface, metastable co-existence of chemical substances is common because chemical reactions that would directly lead to the attainment of thermody-namically most stable equilibria are often blocked by high activation energy barriers. The persistency of a metastable assemblage is then governed by alternative reaction paths that provide lower activation energy barriers. Comparison of observed mineral assemblages in the supergene oxidized and enriched sulfide ores with corresponding stability Eh-pH diagrams reveals that the supergene assemblages are mostly metastable due primarily to the persistency of sulfide minerals beyond stability boundaries. A new set of diagrams called persistency-field Eh-pH diagrams has been constructed for binary metal sulfides on the basis of electrochemical and other experimental data. Each diagram delineates the persistency field, which is a combined field of thermodynamic stability and reaction path-controlled metastability, for a specific sulfide mineral. When applied to the supergene assemblages, these new diagrams show much better correspondence to the field observations. Although there may still be room for further refinement, the new diagrams appear to provide a strong visual aid to the understanding of the behavior of sulfide minerals in the supergene conditions. ?? 1992.

  15. Mechanisms of Phosphine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Nisa S.; Bhattacharya, Ishita; Tuck, Andrew G.; Schlipalius, David I.; Ebert, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH3), the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N) and arsenic (As), which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH3 and AsH3. The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity. PMID:21776261

  16. Mechanisms of phosphine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nisa S; Bhattacharya, Ishita; Tuck, Andrew G; Schlipalius, David I; Ebert, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH(3)), the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N) and arsenic (As), which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH(3) and AsH(3). The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity.

  17. The effects of later oxidation and weathering process on the seafloor hydrothermal sulfide: Constrains from Cu isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohu; Wang, Jianqiang; Chu, Fengyou; Wang, Hao; Li, Zhenggang

    2017-04-01

    Significant Cu isotope fractionation occurs during the mineral deposit and oxidative weathering processes of modern seafloor hydrothermal sulfides. In this study, we report the new Cu isotope compositions of Cu-rich and Zn-rich sulfides and oxidation products collected from hydrothermal fields along the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge 13-15°S for the first time. The results show that the δ65Cu value of the sulfides and oxidation products range from -0.58‰ to +1.36‰ and averages δ65Cu=+0.31±0.04‰ (n=17, 2sd). The Cu-rich sulfides have a slightly light Cu isotope composition with average δ65Cu=+0.37±0.05‰ (n=5, 2sd), whereas the Zn-rich sulfides are relatively enriched in heavy Cu isotope with average δ65Cu=+0.80±0.03‰ (n=6, 2sd). Comparing with Cu-rich and Zn-rich sulfides, the oxidation products are most enriched in light isotopes with average δ65Cu=-0.23±0.03‰ (n=6, 2sd). The significant enrichment of the light Cu isotope in the oxidation products indicates that Cu isotope fractionation during the subsequent leaching alteration of seawater, whereas the relatively high δ34S value (up to 14.5‰) of oxidation products also reflect the relatively large contribution of sulfate reduction S coming from the seawater. We think that the light Cu isotope composition of the oxidation products indicate the significant effects of seawater weathering processes on the Cu isotope composition. The sulfide and oxidation products from the seafloor hydrothermal fields with a significant light Cu isotope composition also could be a light output sink to explain the heavy Cu isotopic composition of the oceans.

  18. Effect of bioturbation on metal-sulfide oxidation in surficial freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, G.S.; Ankley, G.T.; Leonard, E.N.

    1996-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the role of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) in controlling the bioavailability of several cationic metals in anoxic sediments. However, metal-sulfide complexes can be relatively labile with respect to oxidation associated with factors such as seasonal changes in rates of oxidation/production of AVS. Another potentially important mechanism of AVS oxidation in surficial sediments is bioturbation. The authors used different densities of the burrowing oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus in a series of laboratory experiments to evaluate the effect of bioturbation on oxidation of AVS and subsequent bioavailability of cadmium and zinc spiked into freshwater sediments. Metal bioavailability was determined directly by bioaccumulation in the test organisms and indirectly through analysis of interstitial (pore) water metal concentrations. In the studies, horizon-specific sediment analyses were conducted to assess spatial differences in AVS and pore-water metal concentrations specifically related to organism activity. Burrowing activity of the oligochaete significantly reduced AVS concentrations in surficial sediments in a density-dependent manner and resulted in elevated interstitial water concentrations of cadmium but not zinc. Concentrations of cadmium in pore water from deeper horizons were consistently lower than those in the surficial sediments. The bioaccumulation of cadmium, but not zinc, but the oligochaetes. Overall, the results indicate that bioturbation can enhance the bioavailability of some cationic metals in surficial sediments, via oxidation of AVS, and demonstrate the importance of analyzing surficial sediments when assessing bioavailability of metals in sediments.

  19. Community Shift from Phototrophic to Chemotrophic Sulfide Oxidation following Anoxic Holomixis in a Stratified Seawater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Korlević, Marino; Berg, Jasmine S.; Bura-Nakić, Elvira; Ciglenečki, Irena; Amann, Rudolf; Orlić, Sandi

    2014-01-01

    Most stratified sulfidic holomictic lakes become oxygenated after annual turnover. In contrast, Lake Rogoznica, on the eastern Adriatic coast, has been observed to undergo a period of water column anoxia after water layer mixing and establishment of holomictic conditions. Although Lake Rogoznica's chemistry and hydrography have been studied extensively, it is unclear how the microbial communities typically inhabiting the oxic epilimnion and a sulfidic hypolimnion respond to such a drastic shift in redox conditions. We investigated the impact of anoxic holomixis on microbial diversity and microbially mediated sulfur cycling in Lake Rogoznica with an array of culture-independent microbiological methods. Our data suggest a tight coupling between the lake's chemistry and occurring microorganisms. During stratification, anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria were dominant at the chemocline and in the hypolimnion. After an anoxic mixing event, the anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria entirely disappeared, and the homogeneous, anoxic water column was dominated by a bloom of gammaproteobacterial sulfur oxidizers related to the GSO/SUP05 clade. This study is the first report of a community shift from phototrophic to chemotrophic sulfide oxidizers as a response to anoxic holomictic conditions in a seasonally stratified seawater lake. PMID:25344237

  20. Bioflotation of sulfide minerals with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in relation to copper activation and surface oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pecina-Treviño, E T; Ramos-Escobedo, G T; Gallegos-Acevedo, P M; López-Saucedo, F J; Orrantia-Borunda, E

    2012-09-01

    Surface oxidation of sulfides and copper (Cu) activation are 2 of the main processes that determine the efficiency of flotation. The present study was developed with the intention to ascertain the role of the phenomena in the biomodification of sulfides by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans culture (cells and growth media) and their impact in bioflotation. Surface characteristics of chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and pyrrhotite, alone and in mixtures, after interaction with A. ferrooxidans were evaluated. Chalcopyrite floatability was increased substantially by biomodification, while bacteria depressed pyrrhotite floatability, favoring separation. The results showed that elemental sulfur concentration increased because of the oxidation generated by bacterial cells, the effect is intensified by the Fe(III) left in the culture and by galvanic contact. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans culture affects the Cu activation of sphalerite. The implications of elemental sulfur concentration and Cu activation of sphalerite are key factors that must be considered for the future development of sulfide bioflotation processes, since the depressive effect of cells could be counteracted by elemental sulfur generation.

  1. Phosphine-induced physiological and biochemical responses in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Mi, Lina; Niu, Xiaojun; Lu, Meiqing; Ma, Jinling; Wu, Jiandong; Zhou, Xingqiu

    2014-04-01

    Paddy fields have been demonstrated to be one of the major resources of atmospheric phosphine and may have both positive and negative effects on rice plants. To elucidate the physiological and biochemical responses of rice plants to phosphine, rice seedlings (30 d old) were selected as a model plant and were treated with different concentrations of phosphine (0, 1.4, 4.2, and 7.0 mg m(-3)). Antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT), and lipid peroxidation measured via malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined as indicators of the physiological and biochemical responses of the rice seedlings to phosphine exposure. Increasing concentrations of phosphine treatment enhanced the activity of SOD, POD, and CAT. In addition, the MDA content increased with increasing concentrations of phosphine. These results suggested that antioxidant enzymes played important roles in protecting rice seedlings from ROS damage. Moreover, rice seedlings were able to cope with the oxidative stress induced by low concentrations of phosphine via an increase in antioxidant enzymatic activities. However, oxidative stress may not fully be prevented when the plants were exposed to higher concentrations of phosphine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Self-template synthesis of hollow ellipsoid Ni-Mn sulfides for supercapacitors, electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose and water treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Kong, Dechen; Wei, Chengzhen; Du, Weimin; Zhao, Jianbo; Feng, Yeqin; Duan, Qingling

    2017-04-19

    In this work, we have successfully developed a simple self-template route for preparation of hollow ellipsoid Ni-Mn sulfides. This route involves the synthesis of solid Ni-Mn ellipsoids via a chemical precipitation method. Then, using thioacetamide (TAA) as the sulfur source, the solid Ni-Mn ellipsoids can be easily converted to hollow ellipsoid Ni-Mn sulfides in ethanol via sulfidation reaction. The as-synthesized hollow ellipsoid Ni-Mn sulfides possess large specific surface areas and porous structures. Benefiting from these structural and compositional advantages, the electrochemical performance of the hollow ellipsoid Ni-Mn sulfides is studied. As expected, the hollow ellipsoid Ni-Mn sulfides show a high specific capacitance of 1636.8 F g(-1) at 2.0 A g(-1) and good cycling stability (only 4.9% loss after 4000 cycles) as electrode materials for supercapacitors. Furthermore, electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose based on the synthesized hollow ellipsoid Ni-Mn sulfides is also performed. The hollow ellipsoid Ni-Mn sulfides present high sensitivity and selectivity, good stability and a low detection limit (0.02 μM). In addition, the as-synthesized hollow ellipsoid Ni-Mn sulfides exhibit good ability to remove the Congo red dyes from water, which gives them potential application in water treatment. The current work makes a major contribution to the design and preparation of hollow metal sulfide structures, as well as their potential applications in supercapacitors, electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose and water treatment.

  3. Use of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as recognition elements in hydrogen sulfide biosensing system.

    PubMed

    Janfada, Behdokht; Yazdian, Fatemeh; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Rahaie, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Four sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus thioparus, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans PTCC1717, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans PTCC1646, and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans PTCC1647) were used as biorecognition elements in a hydrogen sulfide biosensing system. All the experiments were performed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution containing 1-20 ppm H2S with optimum pH and temperature for each species. Although H2 S was applied to the biosensing system, the dissolved O2 content decreased. Dissolved O2 consumed by cells in both free and immobilized forms was measured using a dissolved oxygen sensor. Free bacterial cells exhibit fast response (<200 Sec). Immobilization of the cells on polyvinyl alcohol was optimized using an analytical software. Immobilized A. ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans retained more than 50% of activity after 30 days of immobilization. According to the data, A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans are appropriate species for hydrogen sulfide biosensor. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide oxidation of mustard-model sulfides catalyzed by iron and manganese tetraarylporphyrines. Oxygen transfer to sulfides versus H(2)O(2) dismutation and catalyst breakdown.

    PubMed

    Marques, A; Marin, M; Ruasse, M F

    2001-11-16

    Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-meso-tetraarylporphyrin catalysis of H(2)O(2) oxidation of dibenzyl and phenyl-2-chloroethyl sulfides, 1, is investigated in ethanol with the aim of designing catalytic systems for mustard decontamination. The sulfide conversion, the sulfoxide and sulfone yields, the oxygen transfer from H(2)O(2) to the sulfide, and the catalyst stability depend markedly on the metal, on the substituents of its ligand, and on the presence or the absence of a cocatalyst, imidazole or ammonium acetate. With Fe, sulfones, the only oxidation products, are readily obtained whatever the ligand (TPP, F(20)TPP, or TDCPP) and the cocatalyst; the oxygen transfer is fairly good, up to 95% when the catalyst concentration is small ([1]/[Cat] = 420); the catalyst breakdown is insignificant only in the absence of any cocatalyst. With Mn, the sulfide conversion is achieved completely when the ligand is TDCPP or TSO(3)PP, but not F(20)TPP or TPP; a mixture of sulfoxide, 2, and sulfone, 3, is always obtained with [2]/[3] = 3.5-0.85 depending on the ligand and the cocatalyst (electron withdrawing substituents favor 3 and NH(4)OAc, 2). The catalyst stability is very good, but the oxygen transfer is poor whatever the ligand and the cocatalyst. These results are discussed in terms of a scheme in which sulfide oxygenation, H(2)O(2) dismutation, and oxidative ligand breaking compete. It is shown that the efficiency of the oxygen transfer is related not only to the rate constant of the dismutation route but also to the concentration of the active metal-oxo intermediate, most likely a perferryl or permanganyl species, i.e., to the rate of its formation.

  5. Identification of bacteria potentially responsible for oxic and anoxic sulfide oxidation in biofilters of a recirculating mariculture system.

    PubMed

    Cytryn, Eddie; van Rijn, Jaap; Schramm, Andreas; Gieseke, Armin; de Beer, Dirk; Minz, Dror

    2005-10-01

    Bacteria presumably involved in oxygen- or nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation in the biofilters of a recirculating marine aquaculture system were identified using a new application of reverse transcription-PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis termed differential-transcription (DT)-DGGE. Biofilter samples were incubated in various concentrations of sulfide or thiosulfate (0 to 5 mM) with either oxygen or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. Before and after short-term incubations (10 to 20 h), total DNA and RNA were extracted, and a 550-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA genes was PCR amplified either directly or after reverse transcription. DGGE analysis of DNA showed no significant change of the original microbial consortia upon incubation. In contrast, DGGE of cDNA revealed several phylotypes whose relative band intensities markedly increased or decreased in response to certain incubation conditions, indicating enhanced or suppressed rRNA transcription and thus implying metabolic activity under these conditions. Specifically, species of the gammaproteobacterial genus Thiomicrospira and phylotypes related to symbiotic sulfide oxidizers could be linked to oxygen-dependent sulfide oxidation, while members of the Rhodobacteraceae (genera Roseobacter, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobium) were putatively active in anoxic, nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation. For all these organisms, the physiology of their closest cultured relatives matches their DT-DGGE-inferred function. In addition, higher band intensities following exposure to 5 mM sulfide and nitrate were observed for Thauera-, Hydrogenophaga-, and Dethiosulfovibrio-like phylotypes. For these genera, nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation has not been documented previously and therefore DT-DGGE might indicate a higher relative tolerance to high sulfide concentrations than that of other community members. We anticipate that DT-DGGE will be of general use in tracing functionally equivalent yet

  6. Frustrated Lewis pair modification by 1,1-carboboration: disclosure of a phosphine oxide triggered nitrogen monoxide addition to an intramolecular P/B frustrated Lewis pair.

    PubMed

    Liedtke, René; Scheidt, Felix; Ren, Jinjun; Schirmer, Birgitta; Cardenas, Allan Jay P; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Eckert, Hellmut; Warren, Timothy H; Grimme, Stefan; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard

    2014-06-25

    The vicinal frustrated Lewis pair (FLP) mes2P-CH2CH2-B(C6F5)2 (3) reacts with phenyl(trimethylsilyl)acetylene by 1,1-carboboration to give the extended C3-bridged FLP 6 featuring a substituted vinylborane subunit. The FLP 6 actively cleaves dihydrogen. The FLP 3 also undergoes a 1,1-carboboration reaction with diphenylphosphino(trimethylsilyl)acetylene to give the P/B/P FLP 11 that features a central unsaturated four-membered heterocyclic P/B FLP and a pendant CH2CH2-Pmes2 functional group. Compound 11 reacts with nitric oxide (NO) by oxidation of the pendant Pmes2 unit to the P(O)mes2 phosphine oxide and N,N-addition of the P/B FLP unit to NO to yield the persistent P/B/PO FLPNO aminoxyl radical 14. This reaction is initiated by P(O)mes2 formation and opening of the central Ph2P···B(C6F5)2 linkage triggered by the pendant CH2CH2-P(O)mes2 group.

  7. Alternative waste residue materials for passive in situ prevention of sulfide-mine tailings oxidation: a field evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nason, Peter; Johnson, Raymond H; Neuschütz, Clara; Alakangas, Lena; Öhlander, Björn

    2014-02-28

    Novel solutions for sulfide-mine tailings remediation were evaluated in field-scale experiments on a former tailings repository in northern Sweden. Uncovered sulfide-tailings were compared to sewage-sludge biosolid amended tailings over 2 years. An application of a 0.2m single-layer sewage-sludge amendment was unsuccessful at preventing oxygen ingress to underlying tailings. It merely slowed the sulfide-oxidation rate by 20%. In addition, sludge-derived metals (Cu, Ni, Fe, and Zn) migrated and precipitated at the tailings-to-sludge interface. By using an additional 0.6m thick fly-ash sealing layer underlying the sewage sludge layer, a solution to mitigate oxygen transport to the underlying tailings and minimize sulfide-oxidation was found. The fly-ash acted as a hardened physical barrier that prevented oxygen diffusion and provided a trap for sludge-borne metals. Nevertheless, the biosolid application hampered the application, despite the advances in the effectiveness of the fly-ash layer, as sludge-borne nitrate leached through the cover system into the underlying tailings, oxidizing pyrite. This created a 0.3m deep oxidized zone in 6-years. This study highlights that using sewage sludge in unconventional cover systems is not always a practical solution for the remediation of sulfide-bearing mine tailings to mitigate against sulfide weathering and acid rock drainage formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Alternative waste residue materials for passive in situ prevention of sulfide-mine tailings oxidation: A field evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nason, Peter; Johnson, Raymond H.; Neuschutz, Clara; Alakangas, Lena; Ohlander, Bjorn

    2014-01-01

    Novel solutions for sulfide-mine tailings remediation were evaluated in field-scale experiments on a former tailings repository in northern Sweden. Uncovered sulfide-tailings were compared to sewage-sludge biosolid amended tailings over 2 years. An application of a 0.2 m single-layer sewage-sludge amendment was unsuccessful at preventing oxygen ingress to underlying tailings. It merely slowed the sulfide-oxidation rate by 20%. In addition, sludge-derived metals (Cu, Ni, Fe, and Zn) migrated and precipitated at the tailings-to-sludge interface. By using an additional 0.6 m thick fly-ash sealing layer underlying the sewage sludge layer, a solution to mitigate oxygen transport to the underlying tailings and minimize sulfide-oxidation was found. The fly-ash acted as a hardened physical barrier that prevented oxygen diffusion and provided a trap for sludge-borne metals. Nevertheless, the biosolid application hampered the application, despite the advances in the effectiveness of the fly-ash layer, as sludge-borne nitrate leached through the cover system into the underlying tailings, oxidizing pyrite. This created a 0.3 m deep oxidized zone in 6-years. This study highlights that using sewage sludge in unconventional cover systems is not always a practical solution for the remediation of sulfide-bearing mine tailings to mitigate against sulfide weathering and acid rock drainage formation.

  9. Process for preventing the plugging of installations with metallic sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, K.; Karwat, H.

    1985-01-08

    For preventing the fouling and/or plugging of apparatus with metallic sulfides in the processing and purification of synthesis gases contaminated with metal carbonyls, wherein the synthesis gases are scrubbed with a physical solvent, which solvent is regenerated and reused, an organic phosphite, e.g., trimethyl phosphite, and/or an organic phosphine, e.g., triethyl phosphine or triphenyl phosphine, is added as a complexing agent to the scrubbing media, preferably in between the scrubbing and absorption regenerating steps.

  10. Parameterization of phosphine ligands reveals mechanistic pathways and predicts reaction outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Zachary L.; Milo, Anat; Hickey, David P.; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanistic foundation behind the identity of a phosphine ligand that best promotes a desired reaction outcome is often non-intuitive, and thus has been addressed in numerous experimental and theoretical studies. In this work, multivariate correlations of reaction outcomes using 38 different phosphine ligands were combined with classic potentiometric analyses to study a Suzuki reaction, for which the site selectivity of oxidative addition is highly dependent on the nature of the phosphine. These studies shed light on the generality of hypotheses regarding the structural influence of different classes of phosphine ligands on the reaction mechanism(s), and deliver a methodology that should prove useful in future studies of phosphine ligands.

  11. Parameterization of phosphine ligands reveals mechanistic pathways and predicts reaction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, Zachary L; Milo, Anat; Hickey, David P; Sigman, Matthew S

    2016-06-01

    The mechanistic foundation behind the identity of a phosphine ligand that best promotes a desired reaction outcome is often non-intuitive, and thus has been addressed in numerous experimental and theoretical studies. In this work, multivariate correlations of reaction outcomes using 38 different phosphine ligands were combined with classic potentiometric analyses to study a Suzuki reaction, for which the site selectivity of oxidative addition is highly dependent on the nature of the phosphine. These studies shed light on the generality of hypotheses regarding the structural influence of different classes of phosphine ligands on the reaction mechanism(s), and deliver a methodology that should prove useful in future studies of phosphine ligands.

  12. Oxidation of sulfides and rapid weathering in recent landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emberson, Robert; Hovius, Niels; Galy, Albert; Marc, Odin

    2016-09-01

    Linking together the processes of rapid physical erosion and the resultant chemical dissolution of rock is a crucial step in building an overall deterministic understanding of weathering in mountain belts. Landslides, which are the most volumetrically important geomorphic process at these high rates of erosion, can generate extremely high rates of very localised weathering. To elucidate how this process works we have taken advantage of uniquely intense landsliding, resulting from Typhoon Morakot, in the T'aimali River and surrounds in southern Taiwan. Combining detailed analysis of landslide seepage chemistry with estimates of catchment-by-catchment landslide volumes, we demonstrate that in this setting the primary role of landslides is to introduce fresh, highly labile mineral phases into the surface weathering environment. There, rapid weathering is driven by the oxidation of pyrite and the resultant sulfuric-acid-driven dissolution of primarily carbonate rock. The total dissolved load correlates well with dissolved sulfate - the chief product of this style of weathering - in both landslides and streams draining the area (R2 = 0.841 and 0.929 respectively; p < 0.001 in both cases), with solute chemistry in seepage from landslides and catchments affected by significant landsliding governed by the same weathering reactions. The predominance of coupled carbonate-sulfuric-acid-driven weathering is the key difference between these sites and previously studied landslides in New Zealand (Emberson et al., 2016), but in both settings increasing volumes of landslides drive greater overall solute concentrations in streams. Bedrock landslides, by excavating deep below saprolite-rock interfaces, create conditions for weathering in which all mineral phases in a lithology are initially unweathered within landslide deposits. As a result, the most labile phases dominate the weathering immediately after mobilisation and during a transient period of depletion. This mode of

  13. Microbial Diversity and Population Structure of Extremely Acidic Sulfur-Oxidizing Biofilms From Sulfidic Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.; Stoffer, T.; Lyon, E. H.; Macalady, J. L.

    2005-12-01

    Extremely acidic (pH 0-1) microbial biofilms called snottites form on the walls of sulfidic caves where gypsum replacement crusts isolate sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms from the buffering action of limestone host rock. We investigated the phylogeny and population structure of snottites from sulfidic caves in central Italy using full cycle rRNA methods. A small subunit rRNA bacterial clone library from a Frasassi cave complex snottite sample contained a single sequence group (>60 clones) similar to Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Bacterial and universal rRNA clone libraries from other Frasassi snottites were only slightly more diverse, containing a maximum of 4 bacterial species and probably 2 archaeal species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of snottites from Frasassi and from the much warmer Rio Garrafo cave complex revealed that all of the communities are simple (low-diversity) and dominated by Acidithiobacillus and/or Ferroplasma species, with smaller populations of an Acidimicrobium species, filamentous fungi, and protists. Our results suggest that sulfidic cave snottites will be excellent model microbial ecosystems suited for ecological and metagenomic studies aimed at elucidating geochemical and ecological controls on microbial diversity, and at mapping the spatial history of microbial evolutionary events such as adaptations, recombinations and gene transfers.

  14. Detoxification of H(2)S by differentiated colonic epithelial cells: implication of the sulfide oxidizing unit and of the cell respiratory capacity.

    PubMed

    Mimoun, Sabria; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Chaumontet, Catherine; Atanasiu, Calina; Benamouzig, Robert; Blouin, Jean Marc; Tomé, Daniel; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Blachier, François

    2012-07-01

    Sulfide is released in the large intestine lumen by the microbiota and is an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration and a genotoxic agent in colonocytes when present in excess. Deciphering how colonocytes metabolize sulfide is an important issue. In this study, using the human colonic epithelial HT-29 Glc(-/+) cells, we found that 50 μM sodium hydrogen sulfide represents the threshold of concentration above which respiration is decreased. The capacity of HT-29 Glc(-/+) cells to oxidize lower concentration of sulfide was associated with the expression of transcripts corresponding to the enzymes of the sulfide oxidizing unit (SOU), that is, sulfide quinone reductase (SQR), dioxygenase ethylmalonic encephalopathy, and thiosulfate sulfur transferase (TST). Inhibition of cell O(2) consumption by sulfide was reverted by zinc but not by calcium and iron. When the cells undergo either spontaneous or butyrate-induced differentiation, their capacity to oxidize sulfide was significantly increased. The expression levels of the genes corresponding to the enzymes of the SOU were not increased, whereas increased cellular maximal respiratory capacity and oxygen consumption by the dioxygenase were both measured. In human biopsies recovered from various parts of the large intestine, the three enzymes of the SOU were expressed. SOU and cell respiratory capacity are crucial for sulfide detoxification in colonocytes. Sulfide oxidative capacity in the colonic mucosa is higher in differentiated than in proliferative epithelial cells. The cell respiratory capacity and SOU activity appear to represent major determinants allowing sulfide detoxification in colonic epithelial cells.

  15. Chemical denudation and the role of sulfide oxidation at Werenskioldbreen, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, Łukasz; Majchrowska, Elżbieta; Yde, Jacob C.; Nawrot, Adam P.; Cichała-Kamrowska, Katarzyna; Ignatiuk, Dariusz; Piechota, Agnieszka

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to determine the rate of chemical denudation and the relationships between dominant geochemical reactions operating in the proglacial and subglacial environments of the polythermal glacier Werenskioldbreen (SW Svalbard) during an entire ablation season. Water sampling for major ion chemistry was performed at a proglacial hydrometric station and from subglacial outflows from May to September 2011. These data were combined with measurements of discharge and supraglacial ablation rates. The slopes and intercepts in best-fit regressions of [*Ca2+ + *Mg2+ vs. *SO42-] and [HCO3- vs. *SO42-] in meltwater from ice-marginal subglacial channels were close to the stoichiometric parameters of sulfide oxidation and simple hydrolysis coupled to carbonate dissolution (*concentrations corrected for input of sea-salt). This shows that these relationships predominates the meltwater chemistry. Our findings also show that sulfide oxidation is a better indicator of the configuration of subglacial drainage systems than, for instance, Na+ and K+. In the proglacial area and in sub-artesian outflows, the ion associations represent sulfide oxidation but other processes such as ion exchange and dissolution of Ca and Mg efflorescent salts may also contribute to the solute variations. These processes may cause enhanced fluxes of Ca2+ and HCO3- from glacierized basins during the early ablation and peak flow seasons as the proglacial salts re-dissolve. The overall chemical denudation rate in the basin for 2011 (ranging from 1601 to 1762 meq m-2 yr-1 (121.9 to 132.2 t km-2 yr-1)) was very high when compared to other Svalbard valley glaciers suggesting that the high rate of chemical denudation was mostly caused by the high rates of discharge and ablation. Chemical weathering intensities (876 and 964 meq m-3 yr-1) exceeded previously reported intensities in Svalbard.

  16. First principles search for n-type oxide, nitride, and sulfide thermoelectrics

    PubMed Central

    Garrity, Kevin F.

    2016-01-01

    Oxides have many potentially desirable characteristics for thermoelectric applications, including low cost and stability at high temperatures, but thus far there are few known high zT n-type oxide thermoelectrics. In this work, we use high-throughput first principles calculations to screen transition metal oxides, nitrides, and sulfides for candidate materials with high power factors and low thermal conductivity. We find a variety of promising materials, and we investigate these materials in detail in order to understand the mechanisms that cause them to have high power factors. These materials all combine a high density of states near the Fermi level with dispersive bands, reducing the trade-off between the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductivity, but they do so for several different reasons. In addition, our calculations indicate that many of our candidate materials have low thermal conductivity. PMID:27885361

  17. First principles search for n-type oxide, nitride, and sulfide thermoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Garrity, Kevin F

    2016-07-15

    Oxides have many potentially desirable characteristics for thermoelectric applications, including low cost and stability at high temperatures, but thus far there are few known high zT n-type oxide thermoelectrics. In this work, we use high-throughput first principles calculations to screen transition metal oxides, nitrides, and sulfides for candidate materials with high power factors and low thermal conductivity. We find a variety of promising materials, and we investigate these materials in detail in order to understand the mechanisms that cause them to have high power factors. These materials all combine a high density of states near the Fermi level with dispersive bands, reducing the trade-off between the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductivity, but they do so for several different reasons. In addition, our calculations indicate that many of our candidate materials have low thermal conductivity.

  18. First-principles search for n -type oxide, nitride, and sulfide thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, Kevin F.

    2016-07-01

    Oxides have many potentially desirable characteristics for thermoelectric applications, including low cost and stability at high temperatures, but thus far there are few known high z T n -type oxide thermoelectrics. In this work, we use high-throughput first-principles calculations to screen transition metal oxides, nitrides, and sulfides for candidate materials with high power factors and low thermal conductivity. We find a variety of promising materials, and we investigate these materials in detail in order to understand the mechanisms that cause them to have high power factors. These materials all combine a high density of states near the Fermi level with dispersive bands, reducing the trade-off between the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductivity, but they do so for several different reasons. In addition, our calculations indicate that many of our candidate materials have low thermal conductivity.

  19. Regioselective air oxidation of sulfides to O,S-acetals in a bubble column.

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Fabian; Martens, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the use of a bubble column for a metal-free, selective oxidation of α-alkylthio-imines to O,S-acetals is presented. During the synthesis, which is straightforward to perform, the sulfides are oxidized to α-alkoxy- or, respectively, α-hydroxysulfide by adding activated carbon in the presence of atmospheric oxygen only. We show that the use of the bubble column, which is unusual on laboratory scale, improves the efficiency of the reaction in comparison to common laboratory techniques. As atmospheric oxygen alone is used for oxidation, this method is cost saving, environmentally friendly, and safe. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Spontaneous ignition limits of silane and phosphine

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Shigeo; Tokuhashi, Kazuaki; Nagai, Hidekazu; Iwasaka, Masaji; Kaise, Masahiro

    1995-04-01

    Spontaneous ignition limits of silane and phosphine have been investigated at relatively low concentrations. For silane, the spontaneous ignition occurs if the mixture concentration is such that the silane/oxygen ratio is higher than a certain threshold limit value. In other words, the mixture is not stable if the ratio is higher than a certain value. On the other hand. in the case of phosphine the threshold limit line has been found to be a little curved, though the reason for the fact is not clear. At any rate, it is concluded that the spontaneous ignition of both silane and phosphine occurs as a result of a competition of chain branching and chain breaking reactions, in a way that is qualitatively similar to that in hydrogen oxidation.

  1. Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, D F; Thompson, D N; Noah, K S

    1999-06-01

    Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, Leptospirillum, Ferromicrobium, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30C and 45C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. After acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to the low pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases in atherosclerosis: role of nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide, homocysteine, and polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Vacek, Thomas P; Rehman, Shahnaz; Neamtu, Diana; Yu, Shipeng; Givimani, Srikanth; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process that involves activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs); MMPs degrade collagen and allow for smooth-muscle cell migration within a vessel. Moreover, this begets an accumulation of other cellular material, resulting in occlusion of the vessel and ischemic events to tissues in need of nutrients. Homocysteine has been shown to activate MMPs via an increase in oxidative stress and acting as a signaling molecule on receptors like the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. Nitric oxide has been shown to be beneficial in some cases of deactivating MMPs. However, in other cases, it has been shown to be harmful. Further studies are warranted on the scenarios that are beneficial versus destructive. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been shown to decrease MMP activities in all cases in the literature by acting as an antioxidant and vasodilator. Various MMP-knockout and gene-silencing models have been used to determine the function of the many different MMPs. This has allowed us to discern the role that each MMP has in promoting or alleviating pathological conditions. Furthermore, there has been some study into the MMP polymorphisms that exist in the population. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of MMPs and their polymorphisms on the development of atherosclerosis, with emphasis placed on pathways that involve nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide, and homocysteine. PMID:25767394

  3. Pressure-induced luminescence quenching of terbium-coped oxide sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, J.K.; Offen, H.W. ); Turley, W.D. )

    1993-03-03

    The photoluminescence of Tb[sup 3+]- and Eu[sup 3+]-doped rare earth oxide sulfides has been studied as a function of pressure. The luminescence intensity and lifetime of the [sup 5]D[sub 3] level of Tb[sup 3+] is quenched by pressure as a result of the pressure-induced red shift of the interconfigurational 4f[sup 7]5d band, in agreement with the energy gap law of radiationless transitions. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Hollow nanoparticles of metal oxides and sulfides: fast preparation via laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Niu, K Y; Yang, J; Kulinich, S A; Sun, J; Du, X W

    2010-11-16

    In this work, diverse hollow nanoparticles of metal oxides and sulfides were prepared by simply laser ablating metal targets in properly chosen liquids. The Kirkendall voiding and the selective heating with an infrared laser were shown to work as two independent mechanisms for the formation of such hollow nanoparticles in only one- or two-step synthesis approaches. One of the prepared materials, ZnS hollow nanoparticles, showed high performance in gas sensing. The simple, fast, inexpensive technique that is proposed demonstrates very promising perspectives.

  5. Enrichment, isolation and identification of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from sulfide removing bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianfei; Tian, Guoliang; Lin, Weitie

    2013-07-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) are the main microorganisms that participate in the natural sulfur cycle. To obtain SOB with high sulfur-oxidizing ability under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, aerobic and anaerobic enrichments were carried out. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles showed that the microbial community changed according to the thiosulfate utilization during enrichments, and Rhodopseudomonas and Halothiobacillus were the predominant bacteria in anaerobic enrichment and aerobic enrichment, respectively, which mainly contributed to the thiosulfate oxidization in the enrichments. Based on the enriched cultures, six isolates were isolated from the aerobic enrichment and four isolates were obtained from the anaerobic enrichment. Phylogenetic analysis suggested the 16S rRNA gene of isolates belonged to the genus Acinetobacter, Rhodopseudomonas, Pseudomonas, Halothiobacillus, Ochrobactrum, Paracoccus, Thiobacillus, and Alcaligenes, respectively. The tests suggested isolates related to Halothiobacillus and Rhodopseudomonas had the highest thiosulfate oxidizing ability under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, respectively; Paracoccus and Alcaligenes could aerobically and anaerobically oxidize thiosulfate. Based on the DGGE and thiosulfate oxidizing ability analysis, Rhodopseudomonas and Halothiobacillus were found to be the main SOB in the sulfide-removing reactor, and were responsible for the sulfur-oxidizing in the treatment system.

  6. Sulfidation of rock-salt-type transition metal oxide nanoparticles as an example of a solid state reaction in colloidal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang

    2011-01-28

    The sulfidation of colloidal rock-salt-type MO (M = Fe, Mn and Co) nanocrystals was performed in organic solvents using dissolved elemental sulfur at moderate temperatures. The vacancy defects in these rock-salt-type structures clearly promote complete oxide-sulfide conversion. The conversion products were hollow metal sulfide (pyrrhotite (Fe(1-x)S), Co(1-x)S and α-MnS) nanoparticles. These conversions by sulfidation proceed rapidly, making difficult the isolation of intermediates. The sulfidation intermediates, when the supply of sulfur was insufficient, had interesting structures, in which the metal oxide cores were surrounded by metal sulfide shells or had surfaces that were decorated with metal sulfide islands. Based on the above results, a mechanism of surface nucleation, shell formation, and void formation by diffusion processes is proposed.

  7. Sulfide-oxidizing bacteria establishment in an innovative microaerobic reactor with an internal silicone membrane for sulfur recovery from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Valdés, F; Camiloti, P R; Rodriguez, R P; Delforno, T P; Carrillo-Reyes, J; Zaiat, M; Jeison, D

    2016-06-01

    A novel bioreactor, employing a silicone membrane for microaeration, was studied for partial sulfide oxidation to elemental sulfur. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of using an internal silicone membrane reactor (ISMR) to treat dissolved sulfide and to characterize its microbial community. The ISMR is an effective system to eliminate sulfide produced in anaerobic reactors. Sulfide removal efficiencies reached 96 % in a combined anaerobic/microaerobic reactor and significant sulfate production did not occur. The oxygen transfer was strongly influenced by air pressure and flow. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated various sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) affiliated to the species Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Sulfuricurvum kujiense and Pseudomonas stutzeri attached to the membrane and also indicated similarity between the biomass deposited on the membrane wall and the biomass drawn from the material support, supported the establishment of SOB in an anaerobic sludge under microaerobic conditions. Furthermore, these results showed that the reactor configuration can develop SOB under microaerobic conditions and can improve and reestablish the sulfide conversion to elemental sulfur.

  8. Light-Dependent Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Zone of the Chesapeake Bay Can Be Explained by Small Populations of Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Alexa J.; Hanson, Thomas E.; Luther, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial sulfide oxidation in aquatic environments is an important ecosystem process, as sulfide is potently toxic to aerobic organisms. Sulfide oxidation in anoxic waters can prevent the efflux of sulfide to aerobic water masses, thus mitigating toxicity. The contribution of phototrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria to anaerobic sulfide oxidation in the Chesapeake Bay and the redox chemistry of the stratified water column were investigated in the summers of 2011 to 2014. In 2011 and 2013, phototrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria closely related to Prosthecochloris species of the phylum Chlorobi were cultivated from waters sampled at and below the oxic-anoxic interface, where measured light penetration was sufficient to support populations of low-light-adapted photosynthetic bacteria. In 2012, 2013, and 2014, light-dependent sulfide loss was observed in freshly collected water column samples. In these samples, extremely low light levels caused 2- to 10-fold increases in the sulfide uptake rate over the sulfide uptake rate under dark conditions. An enrichment, CB11, dominated by Prosthecochloris species, oxidized sulfide with a Ks value of 11 μM and a Vmax value of 51 μM min−1 (mg protein−1). Using these kinetic values with in situ sulfide concentrations and light fluxes, we calculated that a small population of Chlorobi similar to those in enrichment CB11 can account for the observed anaerobic light-dependent sulfide consumption activity in natural water samples. We conclude that Chlorobi play a far larger role in the Chesapeake Bay than currently appreciated. This result has potential implications for coastal anoxic waters and expanding oxygen-minimum zones as they begin to impinge on the photic zone. PMID:26296727

  9. Light-dependent sulfide oxidation in the anoxic zone of the Chesapeake Bay can be explained by small populations of phototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Alyssa J; Bennett, Alexa J; Hanson, Thomas E; Luther, George W

    2015-11-01

    Microbial sulfide oxidation in aquatic environments is an important ecosystem process, as sulfide is potently toxic to aerobic organisms. Sulfide oxidation in anoxic waters can prevent the efflux of sulfide to aerobic water masses, thus mitigating toxicity. The contribution of phototrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria to anaerobic sulfide oxidation in the Chesapeake Bay and the redox chemistry of the stratified water column were investigated in the summers of 2011 to 2014. In 2011 and 2013, phototrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria closely related to Prosthecochloris species of the phylum Chlorobi were cultivated from waters sampled at and below the oxic-anoxic interface, where measured light penetration was sufficient to support populations of low-light-adapted photosynthetic bacteria. In 2012, 2013, and 2014, light-dependent sulfide loss was observed in freshly collected water column samples. In these samples, extremely low light levels caused 2- to 10-fold increases in the sulfide uptake rate over the sulfide uptake rate under dark conditions. An enrichment, CB11, dominated by Prosthecochloris species, oxidized sulfide with a Ks value of 11 μM and a Vmax value of 51 μM min(-1) (mg protein(-1)). Using these kinetic values with in situ sulfide concentrations and light fluxes, we calculated that a small population of Chlorobi similar to those in enrichment CB11 can account for the observed anaerobic light-dependent sulfide consumption activity in natural water samples. We conclude that Chlorobi play a far larger role in the Chesapeake Bay than currently appreciated. This result has potential implications for coastal anoxic waters and expanding oxygen-minimum zones as they begin to impinge on the photic zone. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. INVESTIGATION ON DURABILITY AND REACTIVITY OF PROMISING METAL OXIDE SORBENTS DURING SULFIDATION AND REGENERATION. QUARTERLY AND FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. KWON

    1998-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at high pressures and high temperatures. Metal oxides such as zinc titanate oxides, zinc ferrite oxide, copper oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide, were found to be promising sorbents in comparison with other removal methods such as membrane separations and reactive membrane separations. Some metal oxide sorbents exhibited the quite favorable performance in terms of attrition resistance and sulfur capacity. Experiments on removal reaction of H{sub 2}S from coal gas mixtures with formulated metal oxide sorbents were conducted in a batch reactor or a differential reactor. The objectives of this research project are to formulate promising metal oxide sorbents for removal of sulfur from coal gas mixtures, to find initial reaction kinetics for the metal oxide-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to obtain effects of hydrogen, nitrogen and moisture on dynamic absorption and equilibrium absorption at various absorption temperatures. Promising durable metal oxide sorbents with high-sulfur-absorbing capacity were formulated by mixing active metal oxide powders with inert metal oxide powders, and calcining these powder mixtures. The Research Triangle Institute (RTI), a sub-contractor of this research project, will also prepare promising metal oxide sorbents for this research project, plan experiments on removal of sulfur compounds from coal gases with metal oxide, and review experimental results.

  11. Selection and Application of Sulfide Oxidizing Microorganisms Able to Withstand Thiols in Gas Biodesulfurization Systems.

    PubMed

    Roman, Pawel; Klok, Johannes B M; Sousa, João A B; Broman, Elias; Dopson, Mark; Van Zessen, Erik; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Janssen, Albert J H

    2016-12-06

    After the first commercial applications of a new biological process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from low pressure biogas, the need arose to broaden the operating window to also enable the removal of organosulfur compounds from high pressure sour gases. In this study we have selected microorganisms from a full-scale biodesulfurization system that are capable of withstanding the presence of thiols. This full-scale unit has been in stable operation for more than 10 years. We investigated the microbial community by using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons which showed that methanethiol gave a competitive advantage to bacteria belonging to the genera Thioalkalibacter (Halothiobacillaceae family) and Alkalilimnicola (Ectothiorhosdospiraceae family). The sulfide-oxidizing potential of the acclimatized population was investigated under elevated thiol loading rates (4.5-9.1 mM d(-1)), consisting of a mix of methanethiol, ethanethiol, and propanethiol. With this biomass, it was possible to achieve a stable bioreactor operation at which 80% of the supplied H2S (61 mM d(-1)) was biologically oxidized to elemental sulfur. The remainder was chemically produced thiosulfate. Moreover, we found that a conventionally applied method for controlling the oxygen supply to the bioreactor, that is, by maintaining a redox potential set-point value, appeared to be ineffective in the presence of thiols.

  12. Effects of methanethiol on the biological oxidation of sulfide at natron-alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Pim L F; Fortuny-Picornell, Marc; Janssen, Albert J H

    2009-01-15

    The effects of methanethiol (MT) on biological sulfide oxidation were studied in a continuously operated bioreactor, in which chemolithoautotrophic bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio convert hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at natron-alkaline conditions. Previous bioreactor experiments have shown that always a fraction of the H2S is oxidized to sulfate and thiosulfate. This is unwanted, as it leads to caustic requirements for pH control and the formation of a bleed stream to discharge these compounds from the process. The current research shows that due to the addition of MT, sulfate formation is prevented. As a result, all supplied H2S is completely converted into elemental sulfur. Treatment of a continuous supply of 51.0 mM day(-1) H2S and 79 microM day(-1) MT was feasible for a prolonged period, with 99 mol% selectivity for sulfur formation. A part of the MT reacts with the freshly produced sulfur particles to form dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS). Results indicate that MT, DMDS, and DMTS partly adsorb onto the biosulfur particles. At concentrations above 10 microM, these volatile organic sulfur compounds induce biomass decay.

  13. Adsorption/oxidation of hydrogen sulfide on nitrogen-containing activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Adib, F.; Bagreev, A.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2000-02-22

    Wood-based activated carbon was modified by impregnation with urea and heat treatment at 450 and 950 C. The chemical and physical properties of materials were determined using acid/base titration, FTIR, thermal analysis, IGC, and sorption of nitrogen. The surface features were compared to those of a commercial urea-modified carbon. Then, the H{sub 2}S breakthrough capacity tests were carried out, and the sorption capacity was evaluated. The results showed that urea-modified sorbents have a capacity similar to that of the received material; however, the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to a water-soluble species is significantly higher. It happens due to a high dispersion of basic nitrogen compounds in the small pores of carbons, where oxidation of hydrogen sulfide ions to sulfur radicals followed by the creation of sulfur oxides and sulfuric acid occurs. It is proposed that the process proceeds gradually, from small pores to larger, and that the degree of microporosity is an important factor.

  14. Extraction of phenol from aqueous solutions by means of supported liquid membrane (MLS) containing tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO).

    PubMed

    Zidi, Chiraz; Tayeb, Rafik; Dhahbi, Mahmoud

    2011-10-30

    This paper deals with the liquid-liquid extraction and the facilitated transport through a supported liquid membrane (SLM) system of aqueous phenol using tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) dissolved in an appropriate organic solvent. Phenol has been quantitatively extracted from aqueous acidic solutions using TOPO dissolved in kerosene as organic phase. The effect of TOPO concentration dissolved in kerosene on the extraction efficiency reveals that TOPO combined with phenol in the ratio of 1:1. Using a flat-sheet SLM (FSSLM) system, more than 65% of the initial phenol content in the feed phase was extracted and stripped in a NaOH aqueous receiving phase. The important operational variables affecting the facilitated transport of phenol through the FSSLM system studied are concentration of TOPO, membrane viscosity, feed phase pH, initial phenol concentration, polymeric support type and membrane stability. Regardless of its comparatively low extraction efficiency of phenol, the SLM based on TOPO exhibits higher long-term stability as compared to tributyl phosphate (TBP). Elaborated SLM system retained its stability and initial performance during the 5 days long experiment contrary to the TBP-SLM system where a time dependent negative tendency (transport efficiency decline) was observed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Collaborative flowsheet development studies using cobalt dicarbollide and phosphine oxide for the partitioning of radionuclides from Idaho Chemical Processing Plant high-activity liquid waste with centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    Two solvent extraction technologies under development in Russia for the partitioning of radionuclides from radioactive wastes were tested at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) with simulated high-activity liquid waste (HAW) on a continuous basis using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Two flowsheet tests were conducted with chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (ChCoDiC) to evaluate the separation of cesium and strontium from ICPP HAW. Also, a flowsheet test was performed with a derivative of phosphine oxide (POR) to evaluate the separation of actinides, rare earths, and technetium from ICPP HAW. All experiments utilized a non-radioactive HAW simulant prepared to emulate the macro (or matrix) constituents of actual ICPP HAW at their average tank composition. The behavior of the species of interest was monitored using the stable forms of Sr and Cs, europium as a surrogate for americium, and rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. Removal efficiencies and distribution coefficients were determined for each flowsheet at steady-state conditions. Results of this testing indicate the POR and ChCoDiC processes can be used to effectively treat ICPP HAW. This series of tests is a continuation of ongoing efforts to evaluate the applicability of these Russian developed technologies to U.S. nuclear wastes under the auspices of a joint program between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy.

  16. Cuprous Sulfide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials: Solvothermal Synthesis and Enhanced Electrochemical Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhanjun; Zhu, Yabo; Xing, Zheng; Wang, Zhengyuan

    2016-01-01

    The cuprous sulfide nanoparticles (CuS NPs)-decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanocomposites have been successfully prepared via a facile and efficient solvothermal synthesis method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that CuS micronspheres composed of nanosheets and distributed on the rGO layer in well-monodispersed form. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that graphene oxide (GO) had been reduced to rGO. The electrochemical performances of CuS/rGO nanocomposites were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and charge/discharge techniques, which showed that the specific capacitance of CuS/rGO nanocomposites was enhanced because of the introduction of rGO.

  17. On the Influence of Water on the Oxidation of Dimethyl Sulfide by the OH Radical.

    PubMed

    Domin, Dominik; Braïda, Benoît; Bergès, Jacqueline

    2017-09-12

    Oxidative stress of sulfur-containing biological molecules in aqueous environments may lead to the formation of adduct intermediates that are too short lived to be experimentally detectable. In this study we have modeled the simplest of such oxidative reactions: the attack of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) by a hydroxyl radical (OH) to form radical adduct, whose subsequent heterolytic dissociation leads to a radical cation (DMS+) that is important for further reactions. We have modeled the aqueous environment with a limited number of discrete water molecule, selected after an original multistep procedure, and further embedded in a polarizable continuum model, to observe the impact of the water configuration on the heterolytic dissociation of the radical adduct. Molecular dynamics and quantum chemical methods (DFT, MP2 and CCSD) were used to elucidate the lowest energy structures resulting from the OH attack on DMS. Subsequent high level ab initio Valence Bond (BOVB) calculations revealed the possibility for the occurrence of subsequent heterolytic dissociation.

  18. Selectivity of layered double hydroxides and their derivative mixed metal oxides as sorbents of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Othman, Mohamed A; Zahid, Waleed M; Abasaeed, Ahmed E

    2013-06-15

    In the context of finding high efficient sorbent materials for removing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from air stream, a screening study was performed to find the best combination of metals for the synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and their derivative mixed metal oxides. Based on selectivity of 998 natural mineral species of sulfur-containing compounds, Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) were selected as divalent metals, and Fe(3+), Al(3+) and Cr(3+) as trivalent metals to synthesis the LDHs sorbents. 10 LDHs materials and their calcined mixed metal oxides, Ni(0.66)Al(0.34), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.32)Al(0.33), Zn(0.66)Al(0.34), Cu(0.36)Zn(0.32)Al(0.32), Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.31)Fe(0.34), Ni(0.66)Cr(0.34), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.31)Cr(0.34), Zn(0.66)Cr(0.34), Cu(0.33)Zn(0.32)Cr(0.35) were synthesized, characterized chemically and physically, and then tested using breakthrough test to determine their sulfur uptake. Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36) mixed metal oxides was found to have the best uptake of hydrogen sulfide (136 mg H₂S/g). Regeneration of spent Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36) mixed metal oxides was studied using two different mixture solutions, NaCl/NaOH and acetate-buffer/NaCl/NaOH. The latter mixture successfully desorbed the sulfur from the Ni0.64Fe0.36 sorbent for 2 cycles of regeneration/sorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System

    PubMed Central

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-01

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi’s azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. PMID:26347115

  20. Enriching distinctive microbial communities from marine sediments via an electrochemical-sulfide-oxidizing process on carbon electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiue-Lin; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfide is a common product of marine anaerobic respiration, and a potent reactant biologically and geochemically. Here we demonstrate the impact on microbial communities with the removal of sulfide via electrochemical methods. The use of differential pulse voltammetry revealed that the oxidation of soluble sulfide was seen at +30 mV (vs. SHE) at all pH ranges tested (from pH = 4 to 8), while non-ionized sulfide, which dominated at pH = 4 was poorly oxidized via this process. Two mixed cultures (CAT and LA) were enriched from two different marine sediments (from Catalina Island, CAT; from the Port of Los Angeles, LA) in serum bottles using a seawater medium supplemented with lactate, sulfate, and yeast extract, to obtain abundant biomass. Both CAT and LA cultures were inoculated in electrochemical cells (using yeast-extract-free seawater medium as an electrolyte) equipped with carbon-felt electrodes. In both cases, when potentials of +630 or +130 mV (vs. SHE) were applied, currents were consistently higher at +630 then at +130 mV, indicating more sulfide being oxidized at the higher potential. In addition, higher organic-acid and sulfate conversion rates were found at +630 mV with CAT, while no significant differences were found with LA at different potentials. The results of microbial-community analyses revealed a decrease in diversity for both CAT and LA after electrochemical incubation. In addition, some bacteria (e.g., Clostridium and Arcobacter) not well-known to be capable of extracellular electron transfer, were found to be dominant in the electrochemical cells. Thus, even though the different mixed cultures have different tolerances for sulfide, electrochemical-sulfide removal can lead to major population changes. PMID:25741331

  1. Reconciling "Whiffs" of O2 with the Archean MIF S Record: Insights from Sulfide Oxidation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A.; Reinhard, C. T.; Romaniello, S. J.; Greaney, A. T.; Garcia-Robledo, E.; Revsbech, N. P.; Canfield, D. E.; Lyons, T. W.; Anbar, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    The Archean-Proterozoic transition is marked by the first appreciable accumulation of O2 in Earth's oceans and atmosphere at 2.4 billion years ago (Ga). However, this Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is not the first evidence for O2 in Earth's surface environment. Paleoredox proxies preserved in ancient marine shales (Mo, Cr, Re, U) suggest transient episodes of oxidative weathering before the GOE, perhaps as early as 3.0 Ga. One marine shale in particular, the 2.5 Ga Mount McRae Shale of Western Australia, contains a euxinic interval with Mo enrichments up to 50 ppm. This enrichment is classically interpreted as the result of oxidative weathering of sulfides on the continental surface. However, prior weathering models based on experiments suggested that sulfides require large amounts of O2 [>10-4 present atmospheric level (PAL) pO2] to produce this weathering signature, in conflict with estimates of Archean pO2 from non-mass-dependent (NMD) sulfur isotope anomalies (<10-5 PAL pO2). To reconcile these datasets, we conducted aqueous oxidation experiments of pyrite and molybdenite from 3 - 700 nM O2 (equivalent at equilibrium to 10-5 - 10-3 PAL) to measure oxidation kinetics as a function of the concentration of dissolved O2. We measured rates by injecting oxygenated water at a steady flow rate and monitoring dissolved O2 concentrations with LUMOS sensors. Our data extend the O2 range explored in pyrite oxidation experiments by three orders of magnitude and provide the first rates for molybdenite oxidation at O2 concentrations potentially analogous to those characteristic of the Archean atmosphere. Our results show that pyrite and molybdenite oxidize significantly more rapidly at lower O2 levels than previously thought. As a result, our revised weathering model demonstrates that the Mo enrichments observed in late Archean marine shales are potentially attainable at extremely low atmospheric pO2 values (e.g., <10-5 PAL), reconciling large sedimentary Mo enrichments with co

  2. Polystyrene bound oxidovanadium(IV) and dioxidovanadium(V) complexes of histamine derived ligand for the oxidation of methyl phenyl sulfide, diphenyl sulfide and benzoin.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Mannar R; Arya, Aarti; Kumar, Amit; Pessoa, João Costa

    2009-03-28

    Ligand Hsal-his (I) derived from salicylaldehyde and histamine has been covalently bound to chloromethylated polystyrene cross-linked with 5% divinylbenzene. Upon treatment with [VO(acac)(2)] in DMF, the polystyrene-bound ligand (abbreviated as PS-Hsal-his, II) gave the stable polystyrene-bound oxidovanadium(iv) complex PS-[V(IV)O(sal-his)(acac)] , which upon oxidation yielded the dioxidovanadium(v) PS-[V(V)O(2)(sal-his)] complex. The corresponding non polymer-bound complexes [V(IV)O(sal-his)(acac)] and [V(V)O(2)(sal-his)] have also been obtained. These complexes have been characterised by IR, electronic, (51)V NMR and EPR spectral studies, and thermal as well as scanning electron micrograph studies. Complexes and have been used as a catalyst for the oxidation of methyl phenyl sulfide, diphenyl sulfide and benzoin with 30% H(2)O(2) as oxidant. Under the optimised reaction conditions, a maximum of 93.8% conversion of methyl phenyl sulfide with 63.7% selectivity towards methyl phenyl sulfoxide and 36.3% towards methyl phenyl sulfone has been achieved in 2 h with 2 . Under similar conditions, diphenyl sulfide gave 83.4% conversion where selectivity of reaction products varied in the order: diphenyl sulfoxide (71.8%) > diphenyl sulfone (28.2%). A maximum of 91.2% conversion of benzoin has been achieved within 6 h, and the selectivities of reaction products are: methylbenzoate (37.0%) > benzil (30.5%) > benzaldehyde-dimethylacetal (22.5%) > benzoic acid (8.1%). The PS-bound complex, 1 exhibits very comparable catalytic potential. These polymer-anchored heterogeneous catalysts do not leach during catalytic action, are recyclable and show higher catalytic activity and turnover frequency than the corresponding non polymer-bound complexes. EPR and (51)V NMR spectroscopy was used to characterise methanolic solutions of 3 and 4 and to identify species formed upon addition of H(2)O(2) and/or acid and/or methyl phenyl sulfide.

  3. In-Situ Incubation of Iron-Sulfide Mineral in Seawater Reveals Colonization by Iron-Oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and Zetaproteobacteria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barco, R. A.; Ramírez, G. A.; Sylvan, J. B.; Edwards, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfide mineral precipitation occurs at mid-ocean ridge (MOR) spreading centers, both in the form of plume particles and massive sulfide structures. A common constituent of MOR sulfide mineral is pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS). This mineral was chosen as a substrate for in-situ incubation studies in the shallow waters of Catalina Islands, CA to investigate the colonization of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria largely dominated the bacterial community on pyrrhotite samples incubated in the water column. Pyrrhotite samples incubated at the sediment/water column interface showed more even dominance by Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Cultivations that originated from these pyrrhotite samples resulted in the enrichment of Zetaproteobacteria with either twisted-stalks (Mariprofundus) or sheath structures. Additionally, a candidate novel Gammaproteobacterium was isolated and shown to grow autotrophically via the oxidation of iron.

  4. Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, Debby Fox; Thompson, David Neal; Noah, Karl Scott

    1999-06-01

    Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, “Leptospirillum”, “Ferromicrobium”, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30°C and 45°C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. After acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to low the pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.

  5. Sulfidation/oxidation properties of iron-based alloys containing niobium and aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.; Hsu, H.S.; Howell, M.

    1989-05-01

    Compatibility with mixed gases containing S, O, and Cl is a critical requirement for high-temperature alloys used in coal conversion and combustion applications. Comparative corrosion tests of Fe-25Cr-20Ni, Fe-18Cr-6Al, and Fe-9Cr-9Nb-6Al (wt %) at 700 to 800/degree/C in a simulated coal gasification environment led to the development of Fe-Nb-Al alloys and testing of both Fe-Nb-Al and Fe/sub 3/Al alloys. The niobium and aluminum content in the latter alloys ranged from 8 to 18 and 6 to 16 wt %, respectively. The niobium addition was intended as a selective refractory sulfide former. Testing was carried out at 700 to 800/degree/C in H/sub 2/S-H/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O gas mixtures with relatively low oxygen activities (less than or equal to10/sup /minus/22/ atm) and high sulfur activities (greater than or equal to10/sup /minus/6/ atm). Metallographic and chemical analyses of the corrosion product scales and the underlying alloy were performed to determine the role of the respective metallic elements on sulfidation/oxidation processes. 8 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation in extremely steep salinity gradients formed by freshwater springs emerging into the Dead Sea.

    PubMed

    Häusler, Stefan; Weber, Miriam; Siebert, Christian; Holtappels, Moritz; Noriega-Ortega, Beatriz E; De Beer, Dirk; Ionescu, Danny

    2014-12-01

    Abundant microbial mats, recently discovered in underwater freshwater springs in the hypersaline Dead Sea, are mostly dominated by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. We investigated the source of sulfide and the activity of these communities. Isotopic analysis of sulfide and sulfate in the spring water showed a fractionation of 39-50‰ indicative of active sulfate reduction. Sulfate reduction rates (SRR) in the spring sediment (< 2.8 nmol cm(-3) day(-1)) are too low to account for the measured sulfide flux. Thus, sulfide from the springs, locally reduced salinity and O2 from the Dead Sea water are responsible for the abundant microbial biomass around the springs. The springs flow is highly variable and accordingly the local salinities. We speculate that the development of microbial mats dominated by either Sulfurimonas/Sulfurovum-like or Thiobacillus/Acidithiobacillus-like sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, results from different mean salinities in the microenvironment of the mats. SRR of up to 10 nmol cm(-3) day(-1) detected in the Dead Sea sediment are surprisingly higher than in the less saline springs. While this shows the presence of an extremely halophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria community in the Dead Sea sediments, it also suggests that extensive salinity fluctuations limit these communities in the springs due to increased energetic demands for osmoregulation.

  7. Temperature response of sulfide/ferrous oxidation and microbial community in anoxic sediments treated with calcium nitrate addition.

    PubMed

    He, Zihao; Long, Xinxian; Li, Luyao; Yu, Guangwei; Chong, Yunxiao; Xing, Wen; Zhu, Ziao

    2017-04-15

    Nitrate-driven sulfide oxidation has been proved a cost-effective way to control sediments odor which has long been a universal problem for urban rivers in south China areas. In this work, sediments treatment experiments under a dynamic variation of temperature from 5 °C to 35 °C with 3% of calcium nitrate added were conducted to reveal the influence of temperature variation on this process. The results showed that microbial community was remarkably restructured by temperature variation. Pseudomonas (15.56-29.31%), Sulfurimonas (26.81%) and Thiobacillus (37.99%) were dominant genus at temperature of ≤15 °C, 25 °C and 35 °C, respectively. It seemed that species enrichment occurring at different temperature gradient resulted in the distinct variation of microbial community structure and diversity. Moreover, nitrate-driven sulfide and ferrous oxidation were proportionally promoted only when temperature increased above 15 °C. The dominant bacteria at high temperature stage were those genus that closely related to autotrophic nitrate-driven sulfide and ferrous oxidizing bacteria (e.g.Thiobacillus, Sulfurimonas and Thermomonas), revealing that promotion of sulfide/ferrous oxidation could be attributed to the change of dominant bacteria determined by temperature variation. Thus, a higher treatment efficiency by calcium nitrate addition for odor control would be achieved in summer than any other seasons in south China areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reactive removal of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide vapors under visible light irradiation by cerium oxide modified highly porous zirconium (hydr) oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Joshua K.; Arcibar-Orozco, Javier A.; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2016-12-01

    Highly porous cerium oxide modified Zr(OH)4 samples were synthesized using a simple one stage urea precipitation method. The amorphicity level of zirconium hydroxide did not change upon addition of cerium oxide particles. A unique aspect of the cerium oxide-modified materials is the presence of both the oxide (CeO2) and hydroxide (Zr(OH)4) phases resulting in a unique microporous structure of the final material. Extensive characterization using various chemical and physical methods revealed significant differences in the surface features. All synthesized materials were microporous and small additions of cerium oxide affected the surface chemistry. These samples were found as effective catalysts for a decontamination of mustard gas surrogate, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). Cerium oxide addition significantly decreased the band gap of zirconium hydroxide. Ethyl vinyl sulfide and 1,2-bis (Ethyl thio) ethane were identified as surface reaction products.

  9. Growth mechanisms of zinc oxide and zinc sulfide films by mist chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamasaki, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    The growth mechanisms of zinc oxide and zinc sulfide films by mist chemical vapor deposition (mist-CVD) were experimentally investigated from the viewpoint of mist behaviors and chemical reactions. The proper growth model, either vaporization or the Leidenfrost model, was studied by supplying two kinds of mists with different kinds of sources, such as H2 16O and H2 18O for ZnO growth and ZnCl2 and thiourea for ZnS growth. Moreover, the origin of the oxygen atoms of ZnO was investigated using a quantitative analysis. The role of chloro complex of zinc in the growth of ZnS from aqueous solutions was also examined by systematic studies.

  10. Thermochemical, structural and electronic properties of amorphous oxides, nitrides and sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Pawel; Lany, Stephan

    2015-03-01

    Amorphous thin films materials become increasingly important components of many functional devices such as thin film displays, photovoltaic cells or thin film transistors. Due to lack of grain boundaries, they have superior uniformity and smoothest, flexibility and corrosion resistance. Amorphous thin films are typically prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques at temperatures well below the melting point of deposited material (<0.2Tm). Computational models of amorphous structures, however, are almost elusively constructed from a high temperature equilibrated crystal melt using simulated annealing (SA) protocol. To account for low temperature growth conditions of amorphous thin films we recently developed a new simulation technique. The method, kinetically limited minimization (KLM), starts from a randomly initialized structure and minimizes the total energy in a number of local structural perturbation-relaxation events. We apply KLM to model amorphous structures of 20 binary oxides, nitrides and sulfides and compare their thermochemical, structural and electronic properties.

  11. Coating and enhanced photocurrent of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanowire arrays with metal sulfide materials.

    PubMed

    Volokh, Michael; Diab, Mahmud; Magen, Osnat; Jen-La Plante, Ilan; Flomin, Kobi; Rukenstein, Pazit; Tessler, Nir; Mokari, Taleb

    2014-08-27

    Hybrid nanostructures combining zinc oxide (ZnO) and a metal sulfide (MS) semiconductor are highly important for energy-related applications. Controlled filling and coating of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays with different MS materials was achieved via the thermal decomposition approach of single-source precursors in the gas phase by using a simple atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition system. Using different precursors allowed us to synthesize multicomponent structures such as nanowires coated with alloy shell or multishell structures. Herein, we present the synthesis and structural characterization of the different structures, as well as an electrochemical characterization and a photovoltaic response of the ZnO-CdS system, in which the resulting photocurrent upon illumination indicates charge separation at the interface.

  12. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide--Systems Analysis for IGCC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Keairns, D.L.; Alvin, M.A.

    2006-09-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) has been evaluated conceptually for IGCC applications, and the theoretical limits of reaction performance, process performance, and economic potential in IGCC have been estimated. Syngas conditions that have high partial pressures of total sulfur result in substantial liquid sulfur retention within the catalyst bed, with relatively complex processing being required. Applications that have much lower total sulfur partial pressure in the process gas might permit SCOHS operation under conditions where little liquid sulfur is retained in the catalyst, reducing the processing complexity and possibly improving the desulfurization performance. The results from our recent IGCC process evaluations using the SCOHS technology and conventional syngas cleaning are presented, and alternative SCOHS process configurations and applications that provide greater performance and cost potential are identified.

  13. Mössbauer study of electrochemically deposited amorphous iron-sulfide-oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, Masaya; Kajima, Takahiro; Kawai, Shoichi; Mibu, Ko

    2016-03-01

    Iron-sulfide-oxide thin films, which are promising candidates for solar cell materials, were deposited by electrochemical deposition. As-deposited and annealed films were characterized by Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman scattering at room temperature. The as-deposited film is amorphous, and the oxygen content is about 1/4 of the sulfur content (S/Fe ≈ 1.5, O/Fe ≈ 0.4). The Mössbauer spectrum for the as-deposited film is a doublet with a broad line profile having hyperfine parameters similar to those of FeS2 pyrite or marcasite. This indicates that Fe atoms are in the Fe2+ low-spin state, as in FeS2.

  14. Kinetics of catalytic oxidation of sulfide in aqueous solutions on activated carbon and slime of green lye

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, V.A.; Andreev, S.B.

    1993-12-20

    The kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of sulfide ion in alkali solutions by dissolved oxygen with activated carbon and the carbon component of the slime of green lye (the waste of paper and pulp production) as the catalysts has been studied experimentally. The apparent and actual rate constants of the oxidation are measured within the framework of the model of the first order reaction under diffusive limitations.

  15. Impact of isostatic land uplift and artificial drainage on oxidation of brackish-water sediments rich in metastable iron sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boman, Anton; Fröjdö, Sören; Backlund, Krister; Åström, Mats E.

    2010-02-01

    This study examines the dynamics of sulfur and trace elements (As, Co, Mo, Ni, Ti and Zn) when brackish-water sediments, unusually rich in metastable iron sulfide (probably a mixture of mackinawite and greigite), are brought into the oxidation zone by postglacial isostatic land uplift and farmland drainage. When subaqueous sediments approach the sea level, metastable iron sulfide is oxidized in the upmost layers and pyrite preserved and even accumulated concomitantly trapping Co, Ni and Zn but not As and Mo. When the land uplift has brought the sediments above sea level and natural drainage thus is initiated, the pyrite is oxidized and Co, Ni and Zn are released and transported down the profile. If this setting remained undisturbed, the slightly oxidized sediment (unripe soil) would become covered by peat and thus protected from further oxidation and metal translocation. Often these sediments are, however, artificially drained resulting in extensive oxidation and fast soil-profile development. The soil is an acid sulfate (AS) soil, characterized by low pH (<4), extensive leaching of metals and an abundance of disseminated brownish Fe(III) precipitates. We suggest that the fast soil development is due to initial oxidation of metastable iron sulfide, followed by pyrite oxidation. Drain bottom sediment, which in terms of chemistry and S-isotopes resembled that of the surfacing sea bottom strata, acted during the sampling period as a sink for metals. The abundant preservation of metastable iron sulfide below the groundwater table, even long periods after uplift above the sea level, is a puzzling feature. We suggest that it is the net result of sulfur starvation, an abundance of Fe(II) and strongly reducing conditions.

  16. Zinc stable isotope fractionation upon accelerated oxidative weathering of sulfidic mine waste.

    PubMed

    Matthies, R; Krahé, L; Blowes, D W

    2014-07-15

    Accelerated oxidative weathering in a reaction cell (ASTM D 5744 standard protocol) was performed over a 33 week period on well characterized, sulfidic mine waste from the Kidd Creek Cu-Zn volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, Canada. The cell leachate was monitored for physicochemical parameters, ion concentrations and stable isotope ratios of zinc. Filtered zinc concentrations (<0.45 μm) in the leachate ranged between 4.5 mg L(-1) and 1.9 g L(-1)-potentially controlled by pH, mineral solubility kinetics and (de)sorption processes. The zinc stable isotope ratios varied mass-dependently within +0.1 and +0.52‰ relative to IRMM 3702, and were strongly dependent on the pH (rpH-d66Zn=0.65, p<0.005, n=31). At a pH below 5, zinc mobilization was governed by sphalerite oxidation and hydroxide dissolution-pointing to the isotope signature of sphalerite (+0.1 to +0.16‰). Desorption processes resulted in enrichment of (66)Zn in the leachate reaching a maximum offset of +0.32‰ compared to the proposed sphalerite isotope signature. Over a period characterized by pH=6.1 ± 0.6, isotope ratios were significantly more enriched in (66)Zn with an offset of ≈ 0.23‰ compared to sphalerite, suggesting that zinc release may have been derived from a second zinc source, such as carbonate minerals, which compose 8 wt.% of the tailings. This preliminary study confirms the benefit of applying zinc isotopes alongside standard monitoring parameters to track principal zinc sources and weathering processes in complex multi-phase matrices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermithiobacillus plumbiphilus sp. nov., a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from lead sulfide.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomohiro; Miura, Aya; Shinohara, Arisa; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2016-05-01

    A novel sulfur oxidizer, strain wk12T, was isolated from an industrially synthesized lead (II) sulfide. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was around 58.5 mol%. The major components in the cellular fatty acid profile were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c), C16 : 0 and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c). The strain oxidized lead sulfide, thiosulfate and tetrathionate as electron donors to support autotrophic growth. Cells of strain wk12T were motile, rod-shaped (0.5-1.0 × 0.7-2.2 μm), and Gram-stain-negative. For growth, the temperature range was 5-37 °C, and optimum growth was observed at 28-32 °C. The pH range for growth was 5.8-8.7, with optimum growth at pH 6.4-7.1. Optimum growth of the isolate was observed in medium without NaCl, and no growth was observed in the medium containing 0.5 M or more NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolate belongs to the class Acidithiobacillia. The closest relative with a validly published name was Thermithiobacillus tepidarius DSM 3134T, with a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96 %. On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain wk12T represents a novel species of the genus Thermithiobacillus, for which the name Thermithiobacillus plumbiphilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is wk12T ( = NBRC 111508T = DSM 101799T).

  18. Biotreatment of refinery spent sulfidic caustics

    SciTech Connect

    Sublette, K.L.; Rajganesh, B.; Woolsey, M.; Plato, A.

    1995-12-31

    Caustics are used in petroleum refinering to remove hydrogen sulfide from various hydrocarbon streams. Spent sulfidic caustics from two Conoco refineries have been successfully biotreated on bench and pilot scale, resulting in neutralization and removal of active sulfides. Sulfides were completely oxidized to sulfate by Thiobacillus denitrificans. Microbial oxidation of sulfide produced acid, which at least partially neutralized the caustic.

  19. Air-Stable Gold Nanoparticles Ligated by Secondary Phosphine Oxides as Catalyst for the Chemoselective Hydrogenation of Substituted Aldehydes: a Remarkable Ligand Effect.

    PubMed

    Cano, Israel; Huertos, Miguel A; Chapman, Andrew M; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Gutmann, Torsten; Groszewicz, Pedro B; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2015-06-24

    Air-stable and homogeneous gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, 1a-5a) ligated by various secondary phosphine oxides (SPOs), [R(1)R(2)P(O)H] (R(1) = Naph, R(2) = (t)Bu, L1; R(1) = R(2) = Ph, L2; R(1) = Ph, R(2) = Naph, L3; R(1) = R(2) = Et, L4; R(1) = R(2) = Cy, L5; R(1) = R(2) = (t)Bu, L6), with different electronic and steric properties were synthesized via NaBH4 reduction of the corresponding Au(I)-SPO complex. These easily accessible ligands allow the formation of well dispersed and small nanoparticles (size 1.2-2.2 nm), which were characterized by the use of a wide variety of techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-vis, energy-dispersive X-ray, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR), and cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP MAS) NMR spectroscopy. A pronounced ligand effect was found, and CP MAS NMR experiments enabled us to probe important differences in the polarity of the P-O bond of the SPOs coordinated to the nanoparticle surface depending on the type of substituents in the ligand. AuNPs containing aryl SPOs carry only SPO anions and are highly selective for aldehyde hydrogenation. AuNPs of similar size made with alkyl SPOs contain also SPOH, hydrogen bonded to SPO anions. As a consequence they contain less Au(I) and more Au(0), as is also evidenced by XPS. They are less selective and active in aldehyde hydrogenation and now show the typical activity of Au(0)NPs in nitro group hydrogenation.

  20. Investigation on durability and reactivity of promising metal oxide sorbents during sulfidation and regeneration. Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.C.

    1995-07-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at high pressures and high temperatures. Metal oxides such as zinc titanate oxides, zinc ferrite oxide, copper oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide, were found to be promising sorbents in comparison with other removal methods such as membrane separations and reactive membrane separations. Removal reaction of H{sub 2}S from coal gas mixtures with ZT-4 or other promising sorbents of fine solid particles, and regeneration reaction of sulfur-loaded sorbents will be carried on in a batch reactor or a continuous differential reactor. The objectives of this research project are to find intrinsic initial reaction kinetics for the metal oxide-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to obtain effects of concentrations of coal gas components such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen and moisture on equilibrium reaction rate constants of the reaction system at various reaction temperatures and pressures, to identify regeneration kinetics of sulfur-loaded metal oxide sorbents, and to formulate promising metal oxide sorbents for the removal of sulfur from coal gas mixtures. Promising durable metal oxide sorbents of high-sulfur-absorbing capacity will be formulated by mixing active metal oxide powders with inert metal oxide powders and calcining these powder mixtures, or impregnating active metal oxide sorbents on supporting metal oxide matrixes. The Research Triangle Institute, a sub-contractor of this research project, will also prepare promising metal oxide sorbents for this research project, plan experiments on removal of sulfur compounds from coal gases with metal oxide sorbents as well as regeneration of sulfur-loaded metal oxide sorbents, and review experimental results.

  1. Thermodynamic modeling and experimental analysis of oxidation/sulfidation of nickel-chromium-aluminum model alloy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Erik M.

    With the current focus on finding future energy sources, land-based power gas turbines offer a desirable alternative to common coal-fired steam power generation. Ni-Cr-Al-X alloys are the material basis for producing overlay bond coats for the turbine blades used in sections of the turbine engine experiencing the most extreme environments. These overlay coatings are designed to provide environmental protection for the blades and vanes. While the oxidation of such alloys has been investigated and modeled in-depth, the concurrent sulfidation attack has not. This corrosion mode is now being heavily researched with the desire to use gasified coal, biomass, and other renewable fuel sources in gas turbines that often contain significant amounts of sulfur. The purpose of this dissertation was to use thermodynamic calculations to describe and predict the oxidation/sulfidation processes of two Ni-Cr-Al model alloys regarding phase evolution, composition, and component activities. These calculations, in the form of potential and phase fraction diagrams, combined with sulfidation experiments using kinetic measurements and materials characterization techniques, were able to describe and predict the simultaneous oxidation and sulfidation that occurred in these alloys.

  2. Influence of iron sulfides on abiotic oxidation of UO2 by nitrite and dissolved oxygen in natural sediments.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Julian; Bi, Yuqiang; Hayes, Kim F

    2015-01-20

    Iron sulfide precipitates formed under sulfate reducing conditions may buffer U(IV) insoluble solid phases from reoxidation after oxidants re-enter the reducing zone. In this study, sediment column experiments were performed to quantify the effect of biogenic mackinawite on U(IV) stability in the presence of nitrite or dissolved oxygen (DO). Two columns, packed with sediment from an abandoned U contaminated mill tailings site near Rifle, CO, were biostimulated for 62 days with an electron donor (3 mM acetate) in the presence (BRS+) and absence (BRS−) of 7 mM sulfate. The bioreduced sediment was supplemented with synthetic uraninite (UO2(s)), sterilized by gamma-irradiation, and then subjected to a sequential oxidation by nitrite and DO. Biogenic iron sulfides produced in the BRS+ column, mostly as mackinawite, inhibited U(IV) reoxidation and mobilization by both nitrite and oxygen. Most of the influent nitrite (0.53 mM) exited the columns without oxidizing UO2, while a small amount of nitrite was consumed by iron sulfides precipitates. An additional 10-day supply of 0.25 mM DO influent resulted in the release of about 10% and 49% of total U in BRS+ and BRS– columns, respectively. Influent DO was effectively consumed by biogenic iron sulfides in the BRS+ column, while DO and a large U spike were detected after only a brief period in the effluent in the BRS– column.

  3. Continuous sulfidogenic wastewater treatment with iron sulfide sludge oxidation and recycle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dongyang; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the technical feasibility of packed-bed sulfidogenic bioreactors dosed with ferrous chloride for continuous wastewater treatment over a 450-day period. In phase I, the bioreactors were operated under different combinations of carbon, iron, and sulfate mass loads without sludge recycling to identify optimal treatment conditions. A COD/sulfate mass ratio of 2 and a Fe/S molar ratio of 1 yielded the best treatment performance with COD oxidation rate of 786 ± 82 mg/(L⋅d), which resulted in 84 ± 9% COD removal, 94 ± 6% sulfate reduction, and good iron retention (99 ± 1%) under favorable pH conditions (6.2-7.0). In phase II, the bioreactors were operated under this chemical load combination over a 62-day period, during which 7 events of sludge collection, oxidation, and recycling were performed. The collected sludge materials contained both inorganic and organic matter with FeS and FeS2 as the main inorganic constituents. In each event, the sludge materials were oxidized in an oxidizing basin before recycling to mix with the wastewater influent. Sludge recycling yielded enhanced COD removal (90 ± 6% vs. 75 ± 7%), and better effluent quality in terms of pH (6.8 ± 0.1 vs. 6.5 ± 0.2), iron (0.7 ± 0.5 vs. 1.9 ± 1.7 mg/L), and sulfide-S (0.3 ± 0.1 vs. 0.4 ± 0.1 mg/L) removal compared to the baseline operation without sludge recycling during phase II. This process exhibited treatment stability with reasonable variations, and fairly consistent sludge content over long periods of operation under a range of COD/sulfate and Fe/S ratios without sludge recycling. The bioreactors were found to absorb recycling-induced changes efficiently without causing elevated suspended solids in the effluents.

  4. [XRD, FTIR and XPS analysis of oxidized particles from Dongshengmiao pyrite-polymetallic sulfide deposit, inner Mongolia].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue-Ling; Cao, Jian-Jin; Xie, Fang-Yan; Yang, Xiao-Jie; Yan, Hong-Bin; Lai, Pei-Xin; Wang, Zheng-Hai; Zeng, Jian-Nian

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, characteristics of material compositions, phase structures, surface element states, and transformation mechanism of oxidized particles from Dongshengmiao pyrite-polymetallic sulfide deposit were studied using modern analytical testing technology including XRD, FTIR and XPS. The results show that the samples consist of gypsum, calcite, quartz, muscovite, goethite, organic matter, etc. Primary ore in deep oxidation zone mainly under went such processes as oxidization, hydrolysis, dehydration and carbonation. Compared to the surface oxidation zone of arid and extremely arid regions in the northwestern China, the oxidation process and oxidizing condition of the deep oxidation zone were less complex. New mineral type was also not found, and extensively developed sulfate minerals were rare to be seen. The research results can not only be applied to mineral identification of oxidized particles from this type of ore deposit but also play an important role in ore exploration, mining, mineral processing, etc.

  5. Niche differentiation among mat-forming, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria at cold seeps of the Nile Deep Sea Fan (Eastern Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Grünke, S; Felden, J; Lichtschlag, A; Girnth, A-C; De Beer, D; Wenzhöfer, F; Boetius, A

    2011-07-01

    Sulfidic muds of cold seeps on the Nile Deep Sea Fan (NDSF) are populated by different types of mat-forming sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. The predominant sulfide oxidizers of three different mats were identified by microscopic and phylogenetic analyses as (i) Arcobacter species producing cotton-ball-like sulfur precipitates, (ii) large filamentous sulfur bacteria including Beggiatoa species, and (iii) single, spherical Thiomargarita species. High resolution in situ microprofiles revealed different geochemical settings selecting for the different mat types. Arcobacter mats occurred where oxygen and sulfide overlapped above the seafloor in the bottom water interface. Filamentous sulfide oxidizers were associated with steep gradients of oxygen and sulfide in the sediment. A dense population of Thiomargarita was favored by temporarily changing supplies of oxygen and sulfide in the bottom water. These results indicate that the decisive factors in selecting for different mat-forming bacteria within one deep-sea province are spatial or temporal variations in energy supply. Furthermore, the occurrence of Arcobacter spp.-related 16S rRNA genes in the sediments below all three types of mats, as well as on top of brine lakes of the NDSF, indicates that this group of sulfide oxidizers can switch between different life modes depending on the geobiochemical habitat setting.

  6. Investigation on durability and reactivity of promising metal oxide sorbents during sulfidation and regeneration. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.C.

    1995-03-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at high pressures and high temperatures. Metal oxides such as zinc titanate oxides, zinc ferrite oxide, copper oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide, were found to be promising sorbents in comparison with other removal methods such as membrane separations and reactive membrane separations. Some metal oxide sorbents exhibited the quite favorable performance in terms of attrition resistance and sulfur capacity. Removal reaction of H{sub 2}S from coal gas mixtures with ZT-4 or other promising sorbents of fine solid particles, and regeneration reaction of sulfur-loaded sorbents will be carried on in a batch reactor or a continuous differential reactor. The objectives of this research project are to find intrinsic initial reaction kinetics for the metal oxide-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to obtain effects of concentrations of coal gas components such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen and moisture on equilibrium reaction rate constants of the reaction system at various reaction temperatures and pressures, to identify regeneration kinetics of sulfur-loaded metal oxide sorbents, and to formulate promising metal oxide sorbents for the removal of sulfur from coal gas mixtures. Promising durable metal oxide sorbents of high-sulfur-absorbing capacity will be formulated by mixing active metal oxide powders with inert metal oxide powders and calcining these powder mixtures, or impregnating active metal oxide sorbents on supporting metal oxide matrixes.

  7. Investigation on durability and reactivity of promising metal oxide sorbents during sulfidation and regeneration. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.C.

    1995-01-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at high pressures and high temperatures. Metal oxides such as zinc titanate oxides, zinc ferrite oxide, copper oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide, were found to be promising sorbents in comparison with other removal methods such as membrane separations and reactive membrane separations. Some metal oxide sorbents exhibited the quite favorable performance in terms of attrition resistance and sulfur capacity. Removal reaction of H{sub 2}S from coal gas mixtures with ZT-4 or other promising sorbents of fine solid particles, and regeneration reaction of sulfur-loaded sorbents will be carried on in a batch reactor or a continuous differential reactor. The objectives of this research project are to find intrinsic initial reaction kinetics for the metal oxide-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to obtain effects of concentrations of coal gas components such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen and moisture on equilibrium reaction rate constants of the reaction system at various reaction temperatures and pressures, to identify regeneration kinetics of sulfur-loaded metal oxide sorbents, and to formulate promising metal oxide sorbent for the removal of sulfur from coal gas mixtures. Promising durable metal oxide sorbents of high-sulfur-absorbing capacity will be formulated by mixing active metal oxide powders with inert metal oxide powders and calcining these powder mixtures, or impregnating active metal oxide sorbents on supporting metal oxide matrixes.

  8. cis-Bis(nitrato-κ2 O,O′)bis­(triethyl­phosphine oxide-κO)nickel(II)

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Rüdiger W.

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, [Ni(NO3)2(C6H15OP)2], the NiII ion, lying on a crystallographic twofold axis, adopts a distorted octa­hedral coordination, consisting of O-donor atoms of two symmetry-related triethyl­phospine oxide and two bidentate nitrate ligands. PMID:21582983

  9. Oxidation of gas mixtures containing dimethyl sulfide, hydrogen sulfide, and methanethiol using a two-stage biotrickling filter.

    PubMed

    Ruokojärvi, A; Ruuskanen, J; Martikainen, P J; Olkkonen, M

    2001-01-01

    A biofiltration technique was developed for removing a mixture of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanethiol (MeSH), and dimethyl sulfide (Me2S) from waste gases. Since H2S, especially at high concentrations, disturbs the removal of Me2S, two biotrickling filters with different microbes and operating pH levels were connected in series to create a two-stage system. Different loads of these gases were studied in order to determine their impact on the removal capacity of the system. The microbial consortia for these filters were enriched from the sludge of a Finnish refinery with bubbling H2S or Me2S. Acclimation for Me2S took 2 weeks, though no acclimation time was needed for the other gases. The first filter, at a pH of 2, removed most of the H2S and some of the MeSH and Me2S. The second filter, at a pH of approximately 6.5, removed the rest of the MeSH and most of the Me2S. The total maximum loads of the whole two-stage biotrickling filter were 1150 g/m3/day for H2S-S (suffix S indicates the results are counted as sulfur amounts), 879 g/m3/day for Me2S-S, and 66 g/m3/day for MeSH-S treated in a gas mixture. The average removal efficiencies for all gases tested were 99% or higher.

  10. Allenes in Asymmetric Catalysis. Asymmetric Ring-Opening of Meso-Epoxides Catalyzed by Allene-Containing Phosphine Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xiaotao; Qi, Xiangbing; Ready, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Unsymmetrically substituted allenes (1,2 dienes) are inherently chiral and can be prepared in optically pure form. Nonetheless, to date the allene framework has not been incorporated into ligands for asymmetric catalysis. Since allenes project functionality differently than either tetrahedral carbon or chiral biaryls, they may create complementary chiral environments. This study demonstrates that optically active C2 symmetric allene-containing bisphosphine oxides can catalyze the addition of SiCl4 to meso epoxides with high enantioselectivity. The epoxide-opening likely involves generation of a Lewis acidic, cationic (bisphosphine oxide)SiCl3 complex. The fact that high asymmetric induction is observed suggests that allenes may represent a new platform for the development of ligands and catalysts for asymmetric synthesis. PMID:19722613

  11. Semi-Coke–Supported Mixed Metal Oxides for Hydrogen Sulfide Removal at High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Jie, Mi; Yongyan, Zhang; Yongsheng, Zhu; Ting, Guo; Huiling, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract To improve the desulfurization efficiency of sorbents at low cost, modified semi-coke was used as the substrate for mixed metal oxides (ZFM; oxides of zinc [Zn], iron [Fe], and manganese [Mn]) in hot gas desulfurization. Performance of the prepared ZFM/modified semi-coke (MS) sorbents were evaluated in a fixed-bed reactor in the temperature range 400–550°C. Results showed that the molar ratio of Mn to Zn, effect of the substrate, the calcination temperature, and the sulfidation temperature influenced the performance of the sorbents. Optimum conditions for the preparation of the ZFM/MS sorbents were molar ratio of Mn(NO3)2·6H2O, Zn(NO3)2, and Fe(NO3)3, 0.6:1:2; mass ratio of ZFM0.6 to modified semi-coke support, 1:1; and calcination temperature, 600°C. The ZFM0.6/MS sorbent thus prepared exhibited the best sorption sulfur capacity of 27.46% at 450°C. PMID:22783061

  12. Interaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Nitric Oxide in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Nagpure, B V; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Historically acknowledged as toxic gases, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) are now recognized as the predominant members of a new family of signaling molecules, "gasotransmitters" in mammals. While H2S is biosynthesized by three constitutively expressed enzymes (CBS, CSE, and 3-MST) from L-cysteine and homocysteine, NO is generated endogenously from L-arginine by the action of various isoforms of NOS. Both gases have been transpired as the key and independent regulators of many physiological functions in mammalian cardiovascular, nervous, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and immune systems. The analogy between these two gasotransmitters is evident not only from their paracrine mode of signaling, but also from the identical and/or shared signaling transduction pathways. With the plethora of research in the pathophysiological role of gasotransmitters in various systems, the existence of interplay between these gases is being widely accepted. Chemical interaction between NO and H2S may generate nitroxyl (HNO), which plays a specific effective role within the cardiovascular system. In this review article, we have attempted to provide current understanding of the individual and interactive roles of H2S and NO signaling in mammalian cardiovascular system, focusing particularly on heart contractility, cardioprotection, vascular tone, angiogenesis, and oxidative stress.

  13. Oxidative degradation of benzene rings using iron sulfide activated by hydrogen peroxide/ozone.

    PubMed

    Hara, Junko

    2017-09-19

    Mineral pyrites-metal sulfides abundant in the earth's crust-exhibit oxidative ability when exposed to water. This oxidizing ability makes mineral pyrites suitable for the natural and enhanced remediation of environmentally hazardous materials. Herein, we evaluate the benzene ring degradation ability of iron bisulfide activated by H2O2 and O3 and elucidate the corresponding reaction pathways. A set of control experiments was conducted to optimize the reaction conditions, i.e., the FeS2/H2O ratio under aerobic conditions and the H2O2 and/or O3 dosages. Benzene ring was successfully decomposed to CO2 via organic acids even by the simplest FeS2/H2O combination. This process was accelerated by the addition of both O3 and H2O2. The extent of degradation to CO2 increased in the presence of O3, while oxalic acid generation increased in the presence of H2O2. The reaction proceeded via the radicals generated on FeS2/H2O, which is enhanced by O3, and a Fenton-like reaction using the iron obtained from FeS2 dissolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, and nitric oxide as signaling molecules in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Gianrico; Szurszewski, Joseph H

    2014-08-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) used to be thought of simply as lethal and (for H2S) smelly gaseous molecules; now they are known to have important signaling functions in the gastrointestinal tract. CO and H2S, which are produced in the gastrointestinal tract by different enzymes, regulate smooth muscle membrane potential and tone, transmit signals from enteric nerves, and can regulate the immune system. The pathways that produce nitric oxide, H2S, and CO interact; each can inhibit and potentiate the level and activity of the other. However, there are significant differences between these molecules, such as in half-lives; CO is more stable and therefore able to have effects distal to the site of production, whereas nitric oxide and H2S are short lived and act only close to sites of production. We review their signaling functions in the luminal gastrointestinal tract and discuss how their pathways interact. We also describe other physiological functions of CO and H2S and how they might be used as therapeutic agents.

  15. Interaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Nitric Oxide in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Nagpure, B. V.; Bian, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    Historically acknowledged as toxic gases, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) are now recognized as the predominant members of a new family of signaling molecules, “gasotransmitters” in mammals. While H2S is biosynthesized by three constitutively expressed enzymes (CBS, CSE, and 3-MST) from L-cysteine and homocysteine, NO is generated endogenously from L-arginine by the action of various isoforms of NOS. Both gases have been transpired as the key and independent regulators of many physiological functions in mammalian cardiovascular, nervous, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and immune systems. The analogy between these two gasotransmitters is evident not only from their paracrine mode of signaling, but also from the identical and/or shared signaling transduction pathways. With the plethora of research in the pathophysiological role of gasotransmitters in various systems, the existence of interplay between these gases is being widely accepted. Chemical interaction between NO and H2S may generate nitroxyl (HNO), which plays a specific effective role within the cardiovascular system. In this review article, we have attempted to provide current understanding of the individual and interactive roles of H2S and NO signaling in mammalian cardiovascular system, focusing particularly on heart contractility, cardioprotection, vascular tone, angiogenesis, and oxidative stress. PMID:26640616

  16. Photoinduced oxidation of H2S species: A sink for sulfide in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pos, Willer H.; Milne, Peter J.; Riemer, Daniel D.; Zika, Rod G.

    1997-06-01

    Photokinetic studies demonstrate that sulfide is consumed in seawater upon light exposure. The half-life (t1/2) of sulfide (10 μM) added to Biscayne Bay water and Gulf Stream water are 49(±15) and 147(±10) min, respectively. Both UV and visible radiation were shown to accelerate the photodecomposition of sulfide. However, due to a higher amount of radiation in the visible range reaching the sea surface, we predict that this portion of the light spectrum will be most important in inducing photoreaction of sufide in seawater. This as yet unaccounted sink of sulfide in seawater could be responsible for the sulfide daytime low and nighttime high concentration values observed by several investigators. This finding further unbalances the sulfide budget and reinforces the need for systematic research on the role of photochemical processes on sulfur species in seawater.

  17. Tracking photosynthetic sulfide oxidation in a meromictic lake using sulfate δ34S and δ18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilhooly, W. P.; Reinhard, C.; Lyons, T. W.; Glass, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and fix carbon dioxide in the presence of sunlight without producing oxygen. Environmental conditions in the Paleo- and Mesoproterozoic, when atmospheric oxygen concentrations were at low levels and portions of the oceans were anoxic and sulfidic (euxinic), were conducive to widespread carbon fixation by anoxygenic photosynthesis. This pathway may have helped sustain euxinic conditions in the Proterozoic water column. With limited organic biomarker and geochemical evidence for widespread production of anoxygenic phototrophs, however, additional proxies are needed to fingerprint paleoecological and biogeochemical signals associated with photic zone euxinia. Paired δ34S and δ18O from ancient sulfates (gypsum, barite, or CAS) may offer an added constraint on the history and ecological dominance of photosynthetic S-oxidation. Sulfate-oxygen can fractionate during sulfate reduction, but the extent of isotopic enrichment is controlled either by kinetic isotope effects imparted during intracellular enzymatic steps or equilibrium oxygen exchange with ambient water. An improved understanding of these processes can be gained from modern natural environments. Mahoney Lake is a density-stratified lake located within the White Lake Basin of British Columbia. The euxinic water column supports a dense plate of purple sulfur bacteria (Amoebobacter purpureus) that thrives where free sulfide intercepts the photic zone at ~7 m water depth. We analyzed the isotopic composition of sulfate (δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4), sulfide (δ34SH2S), and water (δ18OH2O) to track the potentially coupled processes of dissimilatory sulfate reduction and phototrophic sulfide oxidation within this meromictic lake. Large isotopic offsets observed between sulfate and sulfide within the monimolimnion (δ34SSO4-H2S = 51‰) and within pore waters along the oxic margin (δ34SSO4-H2S >50‰) are consistent with sulfate reduction in both the sediments and the anoxic

  18. Sensitivity of Interfibrillar and Subsarcolemmal Mitochondria to Cobalt Chloride-induced Oxidative Stress and Hydrogen Sulfide Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ayswarya, A.; Kurian, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a significant role not only in cardiovascular disease but also in non-communicable diseases, where it plays a significant role the mortality rate. Hydrogen sulfide, the biological gaseous signaling molecule that preserves mitochondria in its mode of action, is an effective cardioprotective drug. However, cardiac mitochondria comprise of two distinct populations, namely interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria, which respond distinctly in cardiovascular disease. This study was designed to determine the direct impact of cobalt chloride-induced oxidative stress in isolated mitochondrial subpopulations with an intention to examine the efficacy of hydrogen sulfide in preserving interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria functional activities when they were incubated as pretreated, co-treated and post-treated agent. Mitochondrial subpopulations were isolated from the heart of male Wistar rats and subjected to cobalt chloride treatment (500 μM) for 20 min, followed by incubation with 10 μM sodium hydrosulfide in three different ways (Pre, Co, and Post-cobalt chloride treatment). Mitochondrial oxidative stress was measured by the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive species, reduced glutathione and the activities of enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Mitochondrial membrane potential, swelling behavior and enzyme activities were measured to assess its function. The increased level of lipid peroxidation and the decreased level of reduced glutathione in cobalt chloride-induced group confirm the induction of oxidative stress and were more predominant in the subsarcolemmal mitochondria. Hydrogen sulfide treatment to interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria preserved their functional activities, but the effect was prominent only with co-treated group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that subsarcolemmal mitochondria are more prone to oxidative stress and the co-treatment of the

  19. Sensitivity of Interfibrillar and Subsarcolemmal Mitochondria to Cobalt Chloride-induced Oxidative Stress and Hydrogen Sulfide Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ayswarya, A; Kurian, G A

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a significant role not only in cardiovascular disease but also in non-communicable diseases, where it plays a significant role the mortality rate. Hydrogen sulfide, the biological gaseous signaling molecule that preserves mitochondria in its mode of action, is an effective cardioprotective drug. However, cardiac mitochondria comprise of two distinct populations, namely interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria, which respond distinctly in cardiovascular disease. This study was designed to determine the direct impact of cobalt chloride-induced oxidative stress in isolated mitochondrial subpopulations with an intention to examine the efficacy of hydrogen sulfide in preserving interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria functional activities when they were incubated as pretreated, co-treated and post-treated agent. Mitochondrial subpopulations were isolated from the heart of male Wistar rats and subjected to cobalt chloride treatment (500 μM) for 20 min, followed by incubation with 10 μM sodium hydrosulfide in three different ways (Pre, Co, and Post-cobalt chloride treatment). Mitochondrial oxidative stress was measured by the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive species, reduced glutathione and the activities of enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Mitochondrial membrane potential, swelling behavior and enzyme activities were measured to assess its function. The increased level of lipid peroxidation and the decreased level of reduced glutathione in cobalt chloride-induced group confirm the induction of oxidative stress and were more predominant in the subsarcolemmal mitochondria. Hydrogen sulfide treatment to interfibrillar and subsarcolemmal mitochondria preserved their functional activities, but the effect was prominent only with co-treated group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that subsarcolemmal mitochondria are more prone to oxidative stress and the co-treatment of the

  20. Organic-inorganic hybrid polyionic liquid based polyoxometalate as nano porous material for selective oxidation of sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Ezzat; Shahebrahimi, Shabnam

    2017-07-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid nano porous materials based on poly(ionic liquid)-polyoxometalate (PIL-POM) were reported. These hybrid materials were synthesized by the reaction of 4-vinyl pyridine with 1,3-propanesultone, followed by the polymerization and also sulfonate-functionalized cross-linked poly(4-vinylpyridine) and combining these polymers with H5PMo10V2O40 (PMo10V2). Activity of prepared PIL-PMo10V2 hybrids were investigated as catalysts for oxidation of sulfides with H2O2 as oxidant. For understanding catalytic activities of the PIL-PMo10V2 hybrids in oxidation of sulfides, effect of catalyst composition, substrate, and reaction conditions were studied. The results show that the PIL-PMo10V2 hybrids are active as selective heterogeneous catalysts for oxidation of sulfides and can be recovered and reused. The catalyst was characterized by FT-IR, TGA-DSC, XRD, SEM/EDX, BET, CV and zeta potential measurement. Also, average molecular weight of prepared catalysts were measured.

  1. Improving the efficiency of cadmium sulfide-sensitized titanium dioxide/indium tin oxide glass photoelectrodes using silver sulfide as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Zhai, Yong; Li, Chunxi; Li, Fumin

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals are deposited on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystalline film on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate to prepare CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO photoelectrodes through a new method known as the molecular precursor decomposition method. The Ag2S is interposed between the TiO2 nanocrystal film and CdS nanocrystals as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber. As a consequence, the energy conversion efficiency of the CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrodes is significantly improved. Under AM 1.5 G sunlight irradiation, the maximum efficiency achieved for the CdS(4)/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrode is 3.46%, corresponding to an increase of about 150% as compared to the CdS(4)/TiO2/ITO electrode without the Ag2S layer. Our experimental results show that the improved efficiency is mainly due to the formation of Ag2S layer that may increase the light absorbance and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electrons with redox ions from the electrolyte.

  2. Improving the efficiency of cadmium sulfide-sensitized titanium dioxide/indium tin oxide glass photoelectrodes using silver sulfide as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals are deposited on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystalline film on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate to prepare CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO photoelectrodes through a new method known as the molecular precursor decomposition method. The Ag2S is interposed between the TiO2 nanocrystal film and CdS nanocrystals as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber. As a consequence, the energy conversion efficiency of the CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrodes is significantly improved. Under AM 1.5 G sunlight irradiation, the maximum efficiency achieved for the CdS(4)/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrode is 3.46%, corresponding to an increase of about 150% as compared to the CdS(4)/TiO2/ITO electrode without the Ag2S layer. Our experimental results show that the improved efficiency is mainly due to the formation of Ag2S layer that may increase the light absorbance and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electrons with redox ions from the electrolyte. PMID:25411566

  3. Improving the efficiency of cadmium sulfide-sensitized titanium dioxide/indium tin oxide glass photoelectrodes using silver sulfide as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chong; Zhai, Yong; Li, Chunxi; Li, Fumin

    2014-11-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals are deposited on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystalline film on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate to prepare CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO photoelectrodes through a new method known as the molecular precursor decomposition method. The Ag2S is interposed between the TiO2 nanocrystal film and CdS nanocrystals as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber. As a consequence, the energy conversion efficiency of the CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrodes is significantly improved. Under AM 1.5 G sunlight irradiation, the maximum efficiency achieved for the CdS(4)/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrode is 3.46%, corresponding to an increase of about 150% as compared to the CdS(4)/TiO2/ITO electrode without the Ag2S layer. Our experimental results show that the improved efficiency is mainly due to the formation of Ag2S layer that may increase the light absorbance and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electrons with redox ions from the electrolyte.

  4. Calculating the partitioning of the isotopes of Mo between oxidic and sulfidic species in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    2005-06-01

    The fractionation of the isotopes of Mo between different geological environments has recently been determined to high accuracy using mass spectrometry ( Barling et al., 2001). Fractionation is observed between Mo in seawater, where it exists primarily in the form of the Mo(VI) anion molybdate, MoO 4-2, and in oxic sediments, where the Mo is isotopically lighter than in sea water by ˜1.8‰ (in terms of the 97Mo, 95Mo isotope pair). EXAFS evidence exists for a five- or six-coordinate Mo environment in the Fe,Mn oxyhydroxides of ferromanganese nodules ( Kuhn et al., 2003). In sediment regimes which are anoxic and sulfidic (sometimes referred to as euxinic), where the Mo(VI) is expected to exist as a sulfide, no fractionation is observed compared to seawater. This is presumably because of the stoichiometric conversion of the Mo from MoO 4-2 to MoS 4-2 ( Erickson and Helz, 2000) and then to other sulfides. If the conversion is stoichiometrically complete, mass balance requires the same isotopic distribution in reactant and product. This is a result of the very high equilibrium constant for this reaction. Thus, to understand isotopic fractionation processes both the equilibrium constants for the isotopic fractionation reactions and the equilbrium constants for transformation of one chemical compound to another must be considered. We here present quantum mechanical calculations of the isotopic fractionation equilibrium constants for the isotopes 92Mo and 100Mo between MoO 4-2, MoO 3(OH) -, MoO 2(OH) 2, MoO 3, MoO 3(OH 2) 3, MoS 4-2 and a number of other oxidic and sulfidic complexes of Mo. The fractionation equilibrium constants are calculated directly from the computed vibrational, rotational and translational contributions to the free energy in the gas-phase using quantum methods. Calculated vibrational frequencies and ratios of frequencies for different isotopomers are first obtained using a number of different quantum methods and compared with available

  5. Garlic extracts prevent oxidative stress, hypertrophy and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes: a role for nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Louis, Xavier Lieben; Murphy, Ryan; Thandapilly, Sijo Joseph; Yu, Liping; Netticadan, Thomas

    2012-08-29

    In ancient times, plants were recognized for their medicinal properties. Later, the arrival of synthetic drugs pushed it to the backstage. However, from being merely used for food, plants are now been widely explored for their therapeutic value. The current study explores the potential of skin and flesh extracts from a hard-necked Rocambole variety of purple garlic in preventing cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cell death. Norepinephrine (NE) was used to induce hypertrophy in adult rat cardiomyocytes pretreated with garlic skin and flesh extracts. Cell death was measured as ratio of rod to round shaped cardiomyocytes. Fluorescent probes were used to measure apoptosis and oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes treated with and without extracts and NE. Pharmacological blockade of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) were used to elucidate the mechanism of action of garlic extracts. Garlic extract samples were also tested for alliin and allicin concentrations. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to NE induced an increase in cell size and cell death; this increase was significantly prevented upon treatment with garlic skin and flesh extracts. Norepinephrine increased apoptosis and oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes which was prevented upon pretreatment with skin and flesh extracts; NO, and H₂S blockers significantly inhibited this beneficial effect. Allicin and alliin concentration were significantly higher in garlic flesh extract when compared to the skin extract. These results suggest that both skin and flesh garlic extracts are effective in preventing NE induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cell death. Reduction in oxidative stress may also play an important role in the anti-hypertrophic and anti-apoptotic properties of garlic extracts. These beneficial effects may in part be mediated by NO and H₂S.

  6. Garlic extracts prevent oxidative stress, hypertrophy and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes: a role for nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In ancient times, plants were recognized for their medicinal properties. Later, the arrival of synthetic drugs pushed it to the backstage. However, from being merely used for food, plants are now been widely explored for their therapeutic value. The current study explores the potential of skin and flesh extracts from a hard-necked Rocambole variety of purple garlic in preventing cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cell death. Methods Norepinephrine (NE) was used to induce hypertrophy in adult rat cardiomyocytes pretreated with garlic skin and flesh extracts. Cell death was measured as ratio of rod to round shaped cardiomyocytes. Fluorescent probes were used to measure apoptosis and oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes treated with and without extracts and NE. Pharmacological blockade of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were used to elucidate the mechanism of action of garlic extracts. Garlic extract samples were also tested for alliin and allicin concentrations. Results Exposure of cardiomyocytes to NE induced an increase in cell size and cell death; this increase was significantly prevented upon treatment with garlic skin and flesh extracts. Norepinephrine increased apoptosis and oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes which was prevented upon pretreatment with skin and flesh extracts; NO, and H2S blockers significantly inhibited this beneficial effect. Allicin and alliin concentration were significantly higher in garlic flesh extract when compared to the skin extract. Conclusion These results suggest that both skin and flesh garlic extracts are effective in preventing NE induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cell death. Reduction in oxidative stress may also play an important role in the anti-hypertrophic and anti-apoptotic properties of garlic extracts. These beneficial effects may in part be mediated by NO and H2S. PMID:22931510

  7. Proteomic analysis of peach fruit moth larvae treated with phosphine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Li, Baishu; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2012-01-01

    Phosphine has been used worldwide for the control of stored-product insects for many years. However, the molecular mechanism of its toxicity is not clearly understood. In the current study, larvae of the peach fruit moth were fumigated with phosphine. Proteomic analysis was then performed to identify the regulated proteins. Our results confirmed the phosphine toxicity on the peach fruit moth. The median lethal time LT50 was 38.5 h at 330 ppm at 25 degrees C. During fumigation, the respiration of the peach fruit moth was extremely inhibited. Of the 26 regulated proteins, 16 were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry after a 24 h treatment. The proteins were classified as related to metabolism (25 %), anti-oxidation (6 %), signal transduction (38 %), or defense (19 %). The rest (13 %) were unclassified. Phosphine regulation of ATP and glutathione contents, as well as of ATP synthase and glutathione S-transferase 2 activities were confirmed by enzyme activity analysis. These results demonstrate that complex transcriptional regulations underlie phosphine fumigation. New theories on the mechanism of phosphine toxicity may also be established based on these results.

  8. Oxidative stress-dependent conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfite by activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Hideki; Yamashita, Shin; Ikeuchi, Hidekazu; Kuroiwa, Takashi; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Hiromura, Keiju; Ueki, Kazue; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2005-12-01

    Sulfite, which is known as a major constituent of volcanic gas, is endogenously produced in mammals, and its concentration in serum is increased in patients with pneumonia. It has been reported that sulfite is produced by oxidation from hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as an intermediate in the mammalian body. The objective of this study was to investigate the ability of reactive oxygen species from neutrophils to produce sulfite from H2S. Sulfite production from activated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine gradually increased with an increased concentration of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) in the medium. The production of sulfite was markedly suppressed with an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium. When NaHS was added to the supernatant of activated neutrophils, a significant amount of sulfite was synthesized in the test tubes. Furthermore, when a medium containing NaHS was incubated with a water-soluble radical initiator, 2,2'-azobis-(amidinopropane) dihydrochloride, sulfite was formed in the solution and this increase was markedly suppressed by ascorbic acid. Finally, we determined serum concentrations of sulfite and H2S in an in vivo model of neutrophil activation induced by systemic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into rats. We found a significant increase in serum sulfite and H2S after LPS injection. Importantly, coadministration of ascorbic acid with LPS further increased serum H2S but suppressed sulfite levels. This finding implies that oxidative stress-dependent conversion of H2S to sulfite might occur in vivo. Thus, the oxidation of H2S is a novel sulfite production pathway in the inflammatory condition, and this chemical synthesis might be responsible for the upregulation of sulfite production in inflammatory conditions such as pneumonia.

  9. Inhibitory effect of hydrogen sulfide on ozone-induced airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengyu; Li, Feng; Wiegman, Coen H; Zhang, Min; Hong, Yan; Gong, Jicheng; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Adcock, Ian; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhou, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ozone has been associated with airway inflammation, oxidative stress, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. The goal of this study was to examine whether these adverse effects of ozone could be prevented or reversed by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a reducing agent. The H2S donor sodium (NaHS) (2 mg/kg) or vehicle (PBS) was intraperitoneally injected into mice 1 hour before and after 3-hour ozone (2.5 ppm) or air exposure, and the mice were studied 24 hours later. Preventive and therapeutic treatment with NaHS reduced the ozone-induced increases in the total cells, including neutrophils and macrophages; this treatment also reduced levels of cytokines, including TNF-α, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid; inhibited bronchial hyperresponsiveness; and attenuated ozone-induced increases in total malondialdehyde in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreases in the ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione in the lung. Ozone exposure led to decreases in the H2S production rate and in mRNA and protein levels of cystathionine-β-synthetase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in the lung. These effects were prevented and reversed by NaHS treatment. Furthermore, NaHS prevented and reversed the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and heat shock protein 27. H2S may have preventive and therapeutic value in the treatment of airway diseases that have an oxidative stress basis.

  10. The role of Zr and Nb in oxidation/sulfidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K. ); Baxter, D.J. INCO Alloy Ltd., Hereford, England )

    1990-11-01

    05Structural Fe-Cr-Ni alloys may undergo rapid degradation at elevated temperatures unless protective surface oxide scales are formed and maintained. The ability of alloys to resist rapid degradation strongly depends on their Cr content and the chemistry of the exposure environment. Normally, 20 wt % Cr is required for service at temperatures up to 1000{degree}C; the presence of sulfur, however, inhibits formation of a protective surface oxide scale. The oxidation and sulfidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys is examined over a wide temperature range (650 to 1000{degree}C), with particular emphasis on the effects of alloy Cr content and the radiation of reactive elements such as Nb and Zr. Both Nb and Zr are shown to promote protective oxidation behavior on the 12 wt % Cr alloy in oxidizing environments and to suppress sulfidation in mixed oxygen/sulfur environments. Additions of Nb and Zr at 3 wt % level resulted in stabilization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale and led to a barrier layer of Nb- or Zr-rich oxide at the scale/metal interface, which acted to minimize the transport of base metal cations across the scale. Oxide scales were preformed in sulfur-free environments and subsequently exposed to oxygen/sulfur mixed-gas atmospheres. Preformed scales were found to delay the onset of breakaway corrosion. Corrosions test results obtained under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions are presented. 58 refs., 55 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Photopromoted Ru-catalyzed asymmetric aerobic sulfide oxidation and epoxidation using water as a proton transfer mediator.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Haruna; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Uchida, Tatsuya; Katsuki, Tsutomu

    2010-09-01

    Ru(NO)-salen complexes were found to catalyze asymmetric aerobic oxygen atom transfer reactions such as sulfide oxidation and epoxidation in the presence of water under visible light irradiation at room temperature. Oxidation of sulfides including alkyl aryl sulfides and 2-substituted 1,3-dithianes using complex 2 as the catalyst proceeded with moderate to high enantioselectivity of up to 98% ee, and epoxidation of conjugated olefins using complex 3 as the catalyst proceeded with good to high enantioselectivity of 76-92% ee. Unlike biological oxygen atom transfer reactions that need a proton and electron transfer system, this aerobic oxygen atom transfer reaction requires neither such a system nor a sacrificial reductant. Although the mechanism of this oxidation has not been completely clarified, some experimental results support the notion that an aqua ligand coordinated with the ruthenium ion serves as a proton transfer agent for the oxygen activation process, and it is recycled and used as the proton transfer mediator during the process. Thus, we have achieved catalytic asymmetric oxygen atom transfer reaction using molecular oxygen that can be carried out under ambient conditions.

  12. Characterization and kinetics of sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification in batch reactors containing suspended and immobilized cells.

    PubMed

    Moraes, B S; Souza, T S O; Foresti, E

    2011-01-01

    Sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification is an advantageous alternative over heterotrophic denitrification, and may have potential for nitrogen removal of low-strength wastewaters, such as anaerobically pre-treated domestic sewage. This study evaluated the fundamentals and kinetics of this process in batch reactors containing suspended and immobilized cells. Batch tests were performed for different NOx-/S2- ratios and using nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptors. Autotrophic denitrification was observed for both electron acceptors, and NOx-/S2- ratios defined whether sulfide oxidation was complete or not. Kinetic parameter values obtained for nitrate were higher than for nitrite as electron acceptor. Zero-order models were better adjusted to profiles obtained for suspended cell reactors, whereas first-order models were more adequate for immobilized cell reactors. However, in the latter, mass transfer physical phenomena had a significant effect on kinetics based on biochemical reactions. Results showed that sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification can be successfully established for low-strength wastewaters and have potential for nitrogen removal from anaerobically pre-treated domestic sewage.

  13. Highly improved electroluminescence from a series of novel Eu(III) complexes with functional single-coordinate phosphine oxide ligands: tuning the intramolecular energy transfer, morphology, and carrier injection ability of the complexes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Yin, Kun; Huang, Wei

    2007-01-01

    The functional single-coordinate phosphine oxide ligands (4-diphenylaminophenyl)diphenylphosphine oxide (TAPO), (4-naphthalen-1-yl-phenylaminophenyl)diphenylphosphine oxide (NaDAPO), and 9-[4-(diphenylphosphinoyl)phenyl]-9H-carbazole (CPPO), as the direct combinations of hole-transporting moieties, and electron-transporting triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) were designed and synthesized (amines or carbazole), together with their Eu(III) complexes [Eu(tapo)(2)(tta)(3)] (1), [Eu(nadapo)(2)(tta)(3)] (2), and [Eu(cppo)(2)(tta)(3)] (3; TTA: 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate). The investigation indicated that by taking advantage of the modification inertia of the phosphine oxide ligands, the direct introduction of the hole-transport groups as chromophore made TAPO, NaDAPO, and CPPO obtain the most compact structure and mezzo S(1) and T(1) energy levels, which improved the intramolecular energy transfer in their Eu(III) complexes. The amorphous phase of 1-3 proved the weak intermolecular interaction, which resulted in extraordinarily low self-quenching of the complexes. The excellent double-carrier transport ability of the ligands was studied with Gaussian calculations, and the bipolar structure of TAPO and CPPO was proved. The great improvement of the double-carrier transport ability of 1-3 was shown by cyclic voltammetry. Their HOMO and LUMO energy levels of around 5.3 and 3.0 eV, respectively, are the best results for Eu(III) complexes reported so far. A single-layer organic light-emitting diode of 2 had the impressive brightness of 59 cd m(-2) which, to the best of our knowledge, is the highest reported so far. Both of the four-layer devices based on pure 1 and 2 had a maximum brightness of more than 1000 cd m(-2), turn-on voltages lower than 5 V, maximum external quantum yields of more than 3 % and excellent spectral stability.

  14. The Role of Sulfur Oxidation in Carbonate Precipitation and Dissolution Within Sulfidic Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, S. E.; Kapitulčinová, D.; Kotrc, B.; Langerhuus, A. T.; Berelson, W.; Dawson, S.; Corsetti, F.; Hanselmann, K.; Johnson, H.; Spear, J.; Stevenson, B. S.; de La Torre, J.; 2008, G.

    2008-12-01

    Geothermal waters that have interacted with subsurface limestones often precipitate aragonite and calcite (travertine) upon cooling and degassing of CO2, forming terraced travertine deposits like those at Mammoth Hot Springs (MHS) in Yellowstone National Park. It has been shown that surfaces of filamentous microbial "Aquificales-dominated streamer communities" comprising the Apron and Channel Facies in these systems can act as nucleation sites for carbonate precipitation leading to the fine-scale tubular micro-structures consistently observed in travertine terraces, modern and ancient. The expected carbonate precipitates were found on streamer communities on the proximal Slope facies, however, ESEM imaging and EDX analysis revealed sulfur crystals, rather than carbonate precipitates, in association with Aquificales-dominated communities collected near the mouth of Narrow Gauge (pH 6.43, T 73.5°C), a sulfidic bicarbonate spring within the MHS system. Thermodynamic analysis of geochemical spring water datasets (data from Angel Terrace Spring applied to the Narrow Gauge site) demonstrates that lowering of the acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of spring waters can be achieved by sulfur oxidation. Although the first step of oxidation from H2S to S° cannot account for the lack of aragonite on the streamer biofilms, oxidation of even small amounts of S° to S2O32- and further to SO42- markedly decreases ANC. This microbially mediated reaction may lead to a shift in the local pH and a shift in the ion activity product (IAP) for Ca2+ x CO32- to below the solubility product (Ksp) of CaCO3. Our calculations suggest that this reaction, sulfur oxidation with oxygen to sulfate, can liberate sufficient protons to drive aragonite to undersaturation, if the initial sulfur concentration is 5 mM, and the [Ca] and [CO3] concentrations are initially 0.01 M and 1-10 uM, respectively. The potential importance of sulfur oxidation in hot springs, the molecular signatures of this process

  15. Oxidative stress suppresses the cellular bioenergetic effect of the 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase/hydrogen sulfide pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Módis, Katalin; Asimakopoulou, Antonia; Coletta, Ciro; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Oxidative stress impairs 3-MST-derived H{sub 2}S production in isolated enzyme and in isolated mitochondria. •This impairs the stimulatory bioenergetic effects of H{sub 2}S in hepatocytes. •This has implications for the pathophysiology of diseases with oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Recent data show that lower concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), as well as endogenous, intramitochondrial production of H{sub 2}S by the 3-mercaptopyruvate (3-MP)/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST) pathway serves as an electron donor and inorganic source of energy to support mitochondrial electron transport and ATP generation in mammalian cells by donating electrons to Complex II. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of oxidative stress on the activity of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway in vitro. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, 100–500 μM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the activity of recombinant mouse 3-MST enzyme. In mitochondria isolated from murine hepatoma cells, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50–500 μM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in production of H{sub 2}S from 3-MP. In cultured murine hepatoma cells H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, (3–100 μM), did not result in overall cytotoxicity, but caused a partial decrease in basal oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve rapacity. The positive bioenergetic effect of 3-MP (100–300 nM) was completely abolished by pre-treatment of the cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 μM). The current findings demonstrate that oxidative stress inhibits 3-MST activity and interferes with the positive bioenergetic role of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway. These findings may have implications for the pathophysiology of various conditions associated with increased oxidative stress, such as various forms of critical illness, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or physiological aging.

  16. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulfidic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, DR. Jennifer; Yu, DR. Hang; Steele, Joshua; Dawson, Katherine; Sun, S; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Orphan, V

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyze important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulfide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization due to decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulfide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulfidic (>1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5,600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalyzing anaerobic oxidation of methane utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrotolerant microorganisms. Finally, our data suggest that chemical speciation of metals in highly sulfidic porewaters may exert a stronger influence on microbial bioavailability than total concentration

  17. Thermal stability of lead sulfide and lead oxide nano-crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafees, M.; Ikram, M.; Ali, S.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, nano-crystalline lead sulfide (PbS) and lead oxide (PbO) were synthesized using hassle-free and cost-effective chemical route. Lead oxalate (PbC2O4) precursor was thermally decomposed to obtain the nano-crystalline PbO, while PbS nanoparticles were synthesized by microwave irradiation on a mixture of PbC2O4 precursor and sodium thiosulfate. Resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD confirmed the tetragonal structure for PbO and face-centered cubic for PbS with average crystallite sizes varying from 20 to 30 nm for both materials. From UV-Vis spectra, direct band gap energies were calculated to be 2.51 and 2.23 eV for PbO and PbS, respectively. Various decomposition stages during heat treatment of PbO and PbS, as revealed by TGA/DSC, are discussed in detail.

  18. Middle-thermophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Thiomonas sp. RAN5 strain for hydrogen sulfide removal.

    PubMed

    Asano, Ryoki; Hirooka, Kayako; Nakai, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of the most toxic and offensively odorous gases and is generated in anaerobic bioreactors. A middle-thermophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB), Thiomonas sp. strain RAN5, was isolated and applied for H2S removal from both artificial and anaerobically digested gas. When a bioreactor containing medium inoculated with RAN5 was aerated continuously with artificial gas (containing 100 ppm H2S) at 45 degrees C for 156 hr, the H2S concentration in the vented gas was reduced by 99%. This was not affected by the presence of other microbes in the bioreactor The H2S removal efficiency of the RAN5 bioreactor for anaerobically digested gas was greater than 99% at influent H2S concentrations ranging from 2 to 1800 ppm; the efficiency decreased to 90% at influent H2S concentrations greater than 2000 ppm. Thiomonas sp. strain RAN5 cannot survive at room temperature, and thus its leakage from a wastewater treatment plant would not damage sewage systems. These data suggest that Thiomonas sp. strain RAN5 may be a useful microorganism for H2S removal.

  19. Carbon Monoxide, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Nitric Oxide as Signaling Molecules in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Gianrico; Szurszewski, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) used to be thought of simply as lethal and (for H2S) smelly gaseous molecules; now they are known to have important signaling functions in the gastrointestinal tract. CO and H2S, which are produced in the gastrointestinal tract by different enzymes, regulate smooth muscle membrane potential and tone, transmit signals from enteric nerves and can regulate the immune system. The pathways that produce nitric oxide (NO) H2S and CO interact—each can inhibit and potentiate the level and activity of the other. However, there are significant differences between these molecules, such as in half-lives; CO is more stable and therefore able to have effects distal to the site of production, whereas NO and H2S are short lived and act only close to sites of production. We review their signaling functions in the luminal gastrointestinal tract and discuss how their pathways interact. We also describe other physiologic functions of CO and H2S and how they might be used as therapeutic agents. PMID:24798417

  20. Factors affecting activated carbon-based catalysts for selective hydrogen sulfide oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huixing; Monnell, J.D.; Alvin, M.A.; Vidic, R.D.

    2008-09-01

    The primary product of coal gasification processes is synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of CO, H2, CO2, H2O and a number of minor components. Among the most significant minor components in syngas is hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In addition to its adverse environmental impact, H2S poisons the catalysts and hydrogen purification membranes, and causes severe corrosion in gas turbines. Technologies that can remove H2S from syngas and related process streams are, therefore, of considerable practical interest. To meet this need, we work towards understanding the mechanism by which prospective H2S catalysts perform in simulated fuel gas conditions. Specifically, we show that for low-temperature gas clean-up (~1408C) using activated carbon fibers and water plays a significant role in H2S binding and helps to prolong the lifetime of the material. Basic surface functional groups were found to be imperative for significant conversion of H2S to daughter compounds, whereas metal oxides (La and Ce) did little to enhance this catalysis. We show that although thermal regeneration of the material is possible, the regenerated material has a substantially lower catalytic and sorption capacity.

  1. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots induce oxidative stress and behavioral impairments in the marine clam Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Poirier, Laurence; Lopes, Christelle; Risso-de-Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots have a number of current applications in electronics and solar cells and significant future potential in medicine. The aim of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of CdS quantum dots on the marine clam Scrobicularia plana exposed for 14 d to these nanomaterials (10 µg Cd L(-1) ) in natural seawater and to compare them with soluble Cd. Measurement of labile Cd released from CdS quantum dots showed that 52% of CdS quantum dots remained in the nanoparticulate form. Clams accumulated the same levels of Cd regardless of the form in which it was delivered (soluble Cd vs CdS quantum dots). However, significant changes in biochemical responses were observed in clams exposed to CdS quantum dots compared with soluble Cd. Increased activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were significantly higher in clams exposed in seawater to Cd as the nanoparticulate versus the soluble form, suggesting a specific nano effect. The behavior of S. plana in sediment showed impairments of foot movements only in the case of exposure to CdS quantum dots. The results show that oxidative stress and behavior biomarkers are sensitive predictors of CdS quantum dots toxicity in S. plana. Such responses, appearing well before changes might occur at the population level, demonstrate the usefulness of this model species and type of biomarker in the assessment of nanoparticle contamination in estuarine ecosystems. © 2015 SETAC.

  2. Roles of hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide in the alleviation of cadmium-induced oxidative damage in alfalfa seedling roots.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Wang, Yanqin; Shen, Wenbiao

    2012-06-01

    Despite hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and nitric oxide (NO) are important endogenous signals or bioregulators involved in many vital aspects of plant growth and responses against abiotic stresses, little information was known about their interaction. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of H(2)S and NO on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants exposed to cadmium (Cd) stress. Pretreatment with an H(2)S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and well-known NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) decreased the Cd toxicity. This conclusion was supported by the decreases of lipid peroxidation as well as the amelioration of seedling growth inhibition and Cd accumulation, in comparison with the Cd-stressed alone plants. Total activities and corresponding transcripts of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase were modulated differentially, thus leading to the alleviation of oxidative damage. Effects of H(2)S above were reversed by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO), the specific scavenger of NO. By using laser confocal scanning microscope combined with Greiss reagent method, further results showed that NO production increased significantly after the NaHS pretreatment regardless of whether Cd was applied or not, all of which were obviously inhibited by cPTIO. These decreases of NO production were consistent with the exaggerated syndromes associated with Cd toxicity. Together, above results suggested that NO was involved in the NaHS-induced alleviation of Cd toxicity in alfalfa seedlings, and also indicated that there exists a cross-talk between H(2)S and NO responsible for the increased abiotic stress tolerance.

  3. Photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide over TiO2.

    PubMed

    Martyanov, Igor N; Klabunde, Kenneth J

    2003-08-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES, ClCH2CH2SCH2CH3) over TiO2 illuminated with UV light and maintained at 25 or 80 degrees C in air has been investigated. 2-CEES was found to suffer progressive oxidation to yield ethylene (CH2CH2), chloroethylene (ClCHCH2), ethanol (CH3CH2OH), acetaldehyde (CH3C(O)H), chloroacetaldehyde (ClCH2C(O)H), diethyl disulfide (CH3CH2S2CH2CH3), 2-chloroethyl ethyl disulfide (ClCH2CH2S2CH2CH3), and bis(2-chloroethyl) disulfide (ClCH2CH2S2CH2CH2Cl) as the main primary intermediates, and water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), surface sulfate ions (SO4(2-)), and hydrogen chloride (HCl) as the final products. Trace concentrations of gaseous 2-chloroethanol (ClCH2CH2OH), ethanesulfonyl chloride (CH3CH2SO2Cl), ethyl thioacetate (CH3CH2SC(O)CH3), and considerable amounts of acetic acid (CH3C(O)OH), crotonaldehyde (CH3CHCHC(O)H), methyl acetate (CH3C(O)OCH3), and methyl formate (CH3OC(O)H) were also detected in the gas phase during the photooxidation conducted at 80 degrees C. Increase in temperature from 25 to 80 degrees C accelerates formation of gaseous ethanol, acetaldehyde, chloroacetaldehyde, diethyl disulfide, 2-chloroethyl ethyl disulfide, and bis(2-chloroethyl) disulfide but suppresses ethylene and chloroethylene production at initial stages of the process. Some aspects of the possible reaction mechanism leading to this wide array of intermediates and final products are discussed.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide enhances nitric oxide-induced tolerance of hypoxia in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Peng, Renyi; Bian, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Lina; Cheng, Wei; Hai, Na; Yang, Changquan; Yang, Tao; Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Chongying

    2016-11-01

    Our data present H 2 S in a new role, serving as a multi-faceted transducer to different response mechanisms during NO-induced acquisition of tolerance to flooding-induced hypoxia in maize seedling roots. Nitric oxide (NO), serving as a secondary messenger, modulates physiological processes in plants. Recently, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been demonstrated to have similar signaling functions. This study focused on the effects of treatment with H2S on NO-induced hypoxia tolerance in maize seedlings. The results showed that treatment with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) enhanced survival rate of submerged maize roots through induced accumulation of endogenous H2S. The induced H2S then enhanced endogenous Ca(2+) levels as well as the Ca(2+)-dependent activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), improving the capacity for antioxidant defense and, ultimately, the hypoxia tolerance in maize seedlings. In addition, NO induced the activities of key enzymes in H2S biosynthesis, such as L-cysteine desulfhydrases (L-CDs), O-acetyl-L-serine (thiol)lyase (OAS-TL), and β-Cyanoalanine Synthase (CAS). SNP-induced hypoxia tolerance was enhanced by the application of NaHS, but was eliminated by the H2S-synthesis inhibitor hydroxylamine (HA) and the H2S-scavenger hypotaurine (HT). H2S concurrently enhanced the transcriptional levels of relative hypoxia-induced genes. Together, our findings indicated that H2S serves as a multi-faceted transducer that enhances the nitric oxide-induced hypoxia tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.).

  5. Nitric oxide-releasing flurbiprofen reduces formation of proinflammatory hydrogen sulfide in lipopolysaccharide-treated rat.

    PubMed

    Anuar, Farhana; Whiteman, Matthew; Siau, Jia Ling; Kwong, Shing Erl; Bhatia, Madhav; Moore, Philip K

    2006-04-01

    The biosynthesis of both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is increased in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected mice and rats but their interaction in these models is not known. In this study we examined the effect of the NO donor, nitroflurbiprofen (and the parent molecule flurbiprofen) on NO and H2S metabolism in tissues from LPS-pretreated rats. Administration of LPS (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.; 6 h) resulted in an increase (P<0.05) in plasma TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and nitrate/nitrite (NO(x)) concentrations, liver H2S synthesis (from added cysteine), CSE mRNA, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (marker for neutrophil infiltration) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation. Nitroflurbiprofen (3-30 mg kg(-1), i.p.) administration resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of the LPS-mediated increase in plasma TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and NO(x) concentration, liver H2S synthesis (55.00+/-0.95 nmole mg protein(-1), c.f. 62.38+/-0.47 nmole mg protein(-1), n = 5, P<0.05), CSE mRNA, iNOS, MPO activity and NF-kappaB activation. Flurbiprofen (21 mg kg(-1), i.p.) was without effect. These results show for the first time that nitroflurbiprofen downregulates the biosynthesis of proinflammatory H2S and suggest that such an effect may contribute to the augmented anti-inflammatory activity of this compound. These data also highlight the existence of 'crosstalk' between NO and H2S in this model of endotoxic shock.

  6. Surface modifications of steels to improve corrosion resistance in sulfidizing-oxidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrani, Vikas

    Industrial and power generation processes employ units like boilers and gasifiers to burn sulfur containing fuels to produce steam and syn gas (H 2 and CO), which can generate electricity using turbines and fuel cells. These units often operate under environments containing gases such as H 2S, SO2, O2 etc, which can attack the metallic structure and impose serious problems of corrosion. Corrosion control in high temperature sulfur bearing environments is a challenging problem requiring information on local gaseous species at the surface of alloy and mechanisms of degradation in these environments. Coatings have proved to be a better alternative for improving corrosion resistance without compromising the bulk mechanical properties. Changes in process conditions may result in thermal and/or environment cycling between oxidizing and sulfidizing environments at the alloy surface, which can damage the protective scale formed on the alloy surface, leading to increase in corrosion rates. Objective of this study was to understand the effect of fluctuating environments on corrosion kinetics of carbon steels and develop diffusion based coatings to mitigate the high temperatures corrosion under these conditions. More specifically, the focus was: (1) to characterize the local gaseous environments at the surface of alloys in boilers; (2) optimizing diffusion coatings parameters for carbon steel; (3) understand the underlying failure mechanisms in cyclic environments; (4) to improve aluminide coating behavior by co-deposition of reactive elements such as Yttrium and Hafnium; (5) to formulate a plausible mechanism of coating growth and effects of alloying elements on corrosion; and (6) to understand the spallation behavior of scale by measuring stresses in the scales. The understanding of coating mechanism and effects of fluctuating gaseous environments provides information for designing materials with more reliable performance. The study also investigates the mechanism behind

  7. Sulfide oxidation and distribution of metals near abandoned copper mines in coastal environments, Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, R.A.; Munk, L.; Foster, A.L.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Stillings, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of sulfide-rich rocks, mostly leftover debris from Cu mining in the early 20th century, is contributing to metal contamination of local coastal environments in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Analyses of sulfide, water, sediment, precipitate and biological samples from the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites show that acidic surface waters generated from sulfide weathering are pathways for redistribution of environmentally important elements into and beyond the intertidal zone at each site. Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits composed of pyrrhotite and (or) pyrite + chalcopyrite + sphalerite with subordinate galena, arsenopyrite, and cobaltite represent potent sources of Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Co, Cd, and Hg. The resistance to oxidation among the major sulfides increases in the order pyrrhotite ??? sphalerite < chalcopyrite ??? pyrite; thus, pyrrhotite-rich rocks are typically more oxidized than those dominated by pyrite. The pervasive alteration of pyrrhotite begins with rim replacement by marcasite followed by replacement of the core by sulfur, Fe sulfate, and Fe-Al sulfate. The oxidation of chalcopyrite and pyrite involves an encroachment by colloform Fe oxyhydroxides at grain margins and along crosscutting cracks that gradually consumes the entire grain. The complete oxidation of sulfide-rich samples results in a porous aggregate of goethite, lepidocrocite and amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxide enclosing hydrothermal and sedimentary silicates. An inverse correlation between pH and metal concentrations is evident in water data from all three sites. Among all waters sampled, pore waters from Ellamar beach gravels have the lowest pH (???3) and highest concentrations of base metals (to ???25,000 ??g/L), which result from oxidation of abundant sulfide-rich debris in the sediment. High levels of dissolved Hg (to 4100 ng/L) in the pore waters probably result from oxidation of sphalerite-rich rocks. The low-pH and high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Al, and SO4

  8. Theoretical spectroscopic constants for the low-lying states of the oxides and sulfides of Mo and Tc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Siegbahn, Per E. M.

    1989-01-01

    Spectroscopic results were determined for the ground and low-lying states of the oxides and sulfides of Mo and Tc, using the single-reference-based modified coupled pair functional method of Ahlrichs et al. (1985) and Chong et al. (1986) and the multireference-based state-averaged CASSCF/MRCI method. Spectroscopic constants, dipole moments, Mulliken populations, and radiative lifetimes were calculated for selected low-lying states of these molecular systems. The spectroscopy of the MoS and TcS molecules was found to be quite analogous to the corresponding oxides.

  9. Theoretical spectroscopic constants for the low-lying states of the oxides and sulfides of Mo and Tc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Siegbahn, Per E. M.

    1989-01-01

    Spectroscopic results were determined for the ground and low-lying states of the oxides and sulfides of Mo and Tc, using the single-reference-based modified coupled pair functional method of Ahlrichs et al. (1985) and Chong et al. (1986) and the multireference-based state-averaged CASSCF/MRCI method. Spectroscopic constants, dipole moments, Mulliken populations, and radiative lifetimes were calculated for selected low-lying states of these molecular systems. The spectroscopy of the MoS and TcS molecules was found to be quite analogous to the corresponding oxides.

  10. Mitochondrial uncouplers act synergistically with the fumigant phosphine to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential and cause cell death.

    PubMed

    Valmas, Nicholas; Zuryn, Steven; Ebert, Paul R

    2008-10-30

    Phosphine is the most widely used fumigant for the protection of stored commodities against insect pests, especially food products such as grain. However, pest insects are developing resistance to phosphine and thereby threatening its future use. As phosphine inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and reduces the strength of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)), we reasoned that mitochondrial uncouplers should act synergistically with phosphine. The mitochondrial uncouplers FCCP and PCP caused complete mortality in populations of both wild-type and phosphine-resistant lines of Caenorhabditis elegans simultaneously exposed to uncoupler and phosphine at concentrations that were individually nonlethal. Strong synergism was also observed with a third uncoupler DNP. We have also tested an alternative complex IV inhibitor, azide, with FCCP and found that this also caused a synergistic enhancement of toxicity in C. elegans. To investigate potential causes of the synergism, we measured DeltaPsi(m), ATP content, and oxidative damage (lipid hydroperoxides) in nematodes subjected to phosphine-FCCP treatment and found that neither an observed 50% depletion in ATP nor oxidative stress accounted for the synergistic effect. Instead, a synergistic reduction in DeltaPsi(m) was observed upon phosphine-FCCP co-treatment suggesting that this is directly responsible for the subsequent mortality. These results support the hypothesis that phosphine-induced mortality results from the in vivo disruption of normal mitochondrial activity. Furthermore, we have identified a novel pathway that can be targeted to overcome genetic resistance to phosphine.

  11. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal-oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.J.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R.

    2009-09-15

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxides - such as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxide - was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H{sub 2}S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H{sub 2}S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H{sub 2}S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H{sub 2}S for all four metal oxides.

  12. Thermodynamic Modeling of Sulfide Capacity of Na2O-Containing Oxide Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi-Khoonsari, Elmira; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamic modeling of the sulfide dissolution in the Na2O-FetO-CaO-MgO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 multicomponent slags was performed to investigate the desulfurization of hot metal using Na2O-containing fluxes. The dissolution behavior of sulfur in the melts was modeled using the modified quasi-chemical model in the quadruplet approximation. This model can take into account the short-range ordering and the reciprocal exchange reaction of cations and anions in oxy-sulfide slags. Experimental sulfide capacity data were well predicted from the model with only three model parameters.

  13. Enhancing the Performance of the Rechargeable Iron Electrode in Alkaline Batteries with Bismuth Oxide and Iron Sulfide Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-09-07

    Iron-based alkaline rechargeable batteries have the potential of meeting the needs of large-scale electrical energy storage because of their low-cost, robustness and eco-friendliness. However, the widespread commercial deployment of iron-based batteries has been limited by the low charging efficiency and the poor discharge rate capability of the iron electrode. In this study, we have demonstrated iron electrodes containing bismuth oxide and iron sulfide with a charging efficiency of 92% and capable of being discharged at the 3C rate. Such a high value of charging efficiency combined with the ability to discharge at high rates is being reported for the first time. The bismuth oxide additive led to the in situ formation of elemental bismuth and a consequent increase in the overpotential for the hydrogen evolution reaction leading to an increase in the charging efficiency. We observed that the sulfide ions added to the electrolyte and iron sulfide added to the electrode mitigated-electrode passivation and allowed for continuous discharge at high rates. At the 3C discharge rate, a utilization of 0.2 Ah/g was achieved. The performance level of the rechargeable iron electrode demonstrated here is attractive for designing economically-viable large-scale energy storage systems based on alkaline nickel-iron and iron-air batteries. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Zinc oxide nanocubes as a destructive nanoadsorbent for the neutralization chemistry of 2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide: A sulfur mustard simulant.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Armin; Dastafkan, Kamran

    2016-09-15

    Zinc oxide nanocubes were surveyed for their destructive turn-over to decontaminate 2-chloro ethyl phenyl sulfide, a sulfur mustard simulant. Prior to the reaction, nanocubes were prepared through sol-gel method using monoethanolamine, diethylene glycol, and anhydrous citric acid as the stabilizing, cross linking/structure directing agents, respectively. The formation of nanoscale ZnO, the cubic morphology, crystalline structure, and chemical-adsorptive characteristics were certified by FESEM-EDS, TEM-SAED, XRD, FTIR, BET-BJH, H2-TPR, and ESR techniques. Adsorption and destruction reactions were tracked by GC-FID analysis in which the effects of polarity of the media, reaction time, and temperature on the destructive capability of the surface of nanocubes were investigated and discussed. Results demonstrated that maximum neutralization occurred in n-heptane solvent after 1/2h at 55°C. Kinetic study construed that the neutralization reaction followed the pseudo-second order model with a squared correlation coefficient and rate constant of 0.9904 and 0.00004gmg(-1)s(-1), respectively. Furthermore, GC-MS measurement confirmed the formation of 2-hydroxy ethyl phenyl sulfide (2-HEPS) and phenyl vinyl sulfide (PVS) as neutralization products that together with Bronsted and Lewis acid/base approaches exemplify the role of hydrolysis and elimination mechanisms on the surface of zinc oxide nanocubes.

  15. Catalytic oxidation of Li2S on the surface of metal sulfides for Li−S batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangmin; Tian, Hongzhen; Jin, Yang; Tao, Xinyong; Liu, Bofei; Zhang, Rufan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Zhuo, Denys; Liu, Yayuan; Sun, Jie; Zhao, Jie; Zu, Chenxi; Wu, David Sichen; Zhang, Qianfan; Cui, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Polysulfide binding and trapping to prevent dissolution into the electrolyte by a variety of materials has been well studied in Li−S batteries. Here we discover that some of those materials can play an important role as an activation catalyst to facilitate oxidation of the discharge product, Li2S, back to the charge product, sulfur. Combining theoretical calculations and experimental design, we select a series of metal sulfides as a model system to identify the key parameters in determining the energy barrier for Li2S oxidation and polysulfide adsorption. We demonstrate that the Li2S decomposition energy barrier is associated with the binding between isolated Li ions and the sulfur in sulfides; this is the main reason that sulfide materials can induce lower overpotential compared with commonly used carbon materials. Fundamental understanding of this reaction process is a crucial step toward rational design and screening of materials to achieve high reversible capacity and long cycle life in Li−S batteries. PMID:28096362

  16. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 1: Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors as a result of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and low-molecular-weight thiols are commonly encountered in wine production. These odors are usually removed by the process of Cu(II) fining, a process that remains poorly understood. The present study aims to elucidate the underlying mechanisms by which Cu(II) interacts with H2S and thiol compounds (RSH) under wine-like conditions. Copper complex formation was monitored along with H2S, thiol, oxygen, and acetaldehyde concentrations after the addition of Cu(II) (50 or 100 μM) to air-saturated model wine solutions containing H2S, cysteine, 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, or 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (300 μM each). The presence of H2S and thiols in excess to Cu(II) led to the rapid formation of ∼1.4:1 H2S/Cu and ∼2:1 thiol/Cu complexes, resulting in the oxidation of H2S and thiols and reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I), which reacted with oxygen. H2S was observed to initially oxidize rather than form insoluble copper sulfide. The proposed reaction mechanisms provide insight into the extent to which H2S can be selectively removed in the presence of thiols in wine.

  17. Use of ORP (oxidation-reduction potential) to control oxygen dosing for online sulfide oxidation in anaerobic treatment of high sulfate wastewater.

    PubMed

    Khanal, S K; Shang, C; Huang, J C

    2003-01-01

    In this study, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) was used as a controlling parameter to regulate oxygen dosing to the recycled biogas for online sulfide oxidation in an upflow anaerobic filter (UAF) system. The UAF was operated with a constant influent COD of 18,000 mg/L, but with different influent sulfates of 1000, 3000 and 6000 mg/L. The reactor was initially operated under a natural ORP of -290 mV (without oxygen injection), and was then followed by oxygenation to raise its ORP by 25 mV above the natural level for each influent sulfate condition. At 6,000 mg/L sulfate without oxygen injection, the dissolved sulfide reached 733.8 mg S/L with a corresponding free sulfide of 250.3 mg S/L, thus showing a considerable inhibition to methanogens. Upon oxygenation to raise its ORP to -265 mV (i.e., a 25 mV increase), the dissolved sulfide was reduced by more than 98.5% with a concomitant 45.9% increase of the methane yield. Under lower influent sulfate levels of 1,000 and 3,000 mg/L, the levels of sulfides produced, even under the natural ORP, did not impose any noticeable toxicity to methanogens. Upon oxygenation to raise the ORP by +25 mV, the corresponding methane yields were actually reduced by 15.5% and 6.2%, respectively. However, such reductions were not due to the adverse impact of the elevated ORP; instead, they were due to a diversion of some organic carbon to support the facultative activities inside the reactor as a result of excessive oxygenation. In other words, to achieve satisfactory sulfide oxidation for the lower influent sulfate conditions, it was not necessary to raise the ORP by as much as +25 mV. The ORP increase actually needed depended on both the influent sulfate and also actual wastewater characteristics. This study had proved that the ORP controlled oxygenation was reliable for achieving consistent online sulfide control.

  18. Acid volatile sulfides oxidation and metals (Mn, Zn) release upon sediment resuspension: laboratory experiment and model development.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yong Seok; Kinney, Kerry A; Reible, Danny D

    2011-03-01

    Sediment from the Anacostia River (Washington, DC, USA) was suspended in aerobic artificial river water for 14 d to investigate the dynamics of dissolved metals release and related parameters including pH, acid volatile sulfides (AVS), and dissolved/solid phase Fe(2+). To better understand and predict the underlying processes, a mathematical model is developed considering oxidation of reduced species, dissolution of minerals, pH changes, and pH-dependent metals' sorption to sediment. Oxidation rate constants of elemental sulfur and zinc sulfide, and a dissolution rate constant of carbonate minerals, were adjusted to fit observations. The proposed model and parameters were then applied, without further calibration, to literature-reported experimental observations of resuspension in an acid sulfate soil collected in a coastal flood plain. The model provided a good description of the dynamics of AVS, Fe(2+), S(0)((s)), pH, dissolved carbonates concentrations, and the release of Ca((aq)), Mg((aq)), and Zn((aq)) in both sediments. Accurate predictions of Mn((aq)) release required adjustment of sorption partitioning coefficient, presumably due to the presence of Mn scavenging by phases not accounted for in the model. The oxidation of AVS (and the resulting release of sulfide-bound metals) was consistent with a two-step process, a relatively rapid AVS oxidation to elemental sulfur (S(0)((s))) and a slow oxidation of S(0)((s)) to SO(4)(2-)((aq)), with an associated decrease in pH from neutral to acidic conditions. This acidification was the dominant factor for the release of metals into the aqueous phase.

  19. Dimethyl Sulfide-Dimethyl Ether and Ethylene Oxide-Ethylene Sulfide Complexes Investigated by Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy and AB Initio Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Tatamitani, Yoshio; Mase, Takayuki; Hirota, Eizi

    2015-06-01

    The ground-state rotational spectra of the dimethyl sulfide-dimethyl ether (DMS-DME) and the ethylene oxide and ethylene sulfide (EO-ES) complexes were observed by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy, and a-type and c-type transitions were assigned for the normal, 34S, and three 13C species of the DMS-DME and a-type and b-type rotational transitions for the normal, 34S, and two 13C species of the EO-ES. The observed transitions were analyzed by using an S-reduced asymmetric-top rotational Hamiltonian. The rotational parameters thus derived for the DMS-DME were found consistent with a structure of Cs symmetry with the DMS bound to the DME by two C-H(DMS)---O and one S---H-C(DME) hydrogen bonds. The barrier height V3 to internal rotation of the "free" methyl group in the DME was determined to be 915.4 (23) wn, which is smaller than that of the DME monomer, 951.72 (70) wn, and larger than that of the DME dimer, 785.4 (52) wn. For the EO-ES complex the observed data were interpreted in the terms of an antiparallel Cs geometry with the EO bound to the ES by two C-H(ES)---O and two S---H-C(EO) hydrogen bonds. We have applied a natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis to the DMS-DME and EO-ES to calculate the stabilization energy CT (= ΔEσσ*), which were closely correlated with the binding energy EB, as found for other related complexes. Y. Niide and M. Hayashi, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 220, 65-79 (2003). Y. Tatamitani, B. Liu, J. Shimada, T. Ogata, P. Ottaviani, A. Maris, W. Caminati, and J. L. Alonso, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124, 2739-2743 (2002).

  20. Origin and fate of sulfide liquids in hotspot volcanism (La Réunion): Pb isotope constraints from residual Fe-Cu oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlastélic, I.; Gannoun, A.; Di Muro, A.; Gurioli, L.; Bachèlery, P.; Henot, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Immiscible sulfide liquids in basaltic magmas play an important role in trace metal transport and the sulfur budget of volcanic eruptions. However, sulfides are transient phases, whose origin and fate are poorly constrained. We address these issues by analyzing sulfide destabilization products preserved in lavas from La Réunion Island. Iron oxide globules and coatings, typically 20-80 μm in size, were found to occur in vesicles of differentiated lavas from Piton des Neiges, and recent pumice samples from Piton de la Fournaise. Field and mineralogical evidence indicates that the iron oxides are syn-eruptive phases not resulting from hydrothermal processes. Samples were first studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy. The globules were separated, whereas the smaller spherules and coatings were concentrated by magnetic sorting and acid leaching, and samples were processed through wet chemistry. The Fe oxide phases comprise 49-74 wt.% Fe, 26-40 wt.% O, and up to 6 wt.% Cu, 811 ppm Ni, 140 ppm Bi, and 8.5 ppm Pb. Compared to the host lava, Cu, Ni, and Bi are enriched by a factor of 101-103. Systematic Pb isotope disequilibrium (between 500 ppm and 2.9% for 206Pb/204Pb) exists between Fe oxides and host rocks, with Fe oxides generally displaying less radiogenic ratios. Unradiogenic Pb is a typical signature of sulfide, which tends to concentrate Pb, but not its parent elements U and Th. Thus, both the chemical and isotopic compositions of the vesicle-hosted Fe oxides suggest that they are more or less direct products of the destabilization of immiscible sulfide liquids. Although Pb dominantly partitions into the gas phase during sulfide breakdown, the original Pb isotope signature of sulfide is preserved in the residual oxide. The composition estimated for the parent sulfides (206Pb/204Pb = 18.20-18.77, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.575, and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.2-38.8) precludes a genetic link with the La Réunion plume, and suggests a lithospheric or crustal origin. It is estimated

  1. The Diversity of Sulfide Oxidation and Sulfate Reduction Genes Expressed by the Bacterial Communities of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Mora, Maria J.; Edgcomb, Virginia P.; Taylor, Craig; Scranton, Mary I.; Taylor, Gordon T.; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y.

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative expression of dissimilative sulfite reductase (dsrA), a key gene in sulfate reduction, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (sqr), a key gene in sulfide oxidation was investigated. Neither of the two could be amplified from mRNA retrieved with Niskin bottles but were amplified from mRNA retrieved by the Deep SID. The sqr and sqr-like genes retrieved from the Cariaco Basin were related to the sqr genes from a Bradyrhizobium sp., Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum, Sulfurovum sp. NBC37-1, Sulfurimonas autotrophica, Thiorhodospira sibirica and Chlorobium tepidum. The dsrA gene sequences obtained from the redoxcline of the Cariaco Basin belonged to chemoorganotrophic and chemoautotrophic sulfate and sulfur reducers belonging to the class Deltaproteobacteria (phylum Proteobacteria) and the order Clostridiales (phylum Firmicutes). PMID:27651847

  2. Removal of antimony (Sb(V)) from Sb mine drainage: biological sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation-precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huawei; Chen, Fulong; Mu, Shuyong; Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2013-10-01

    Antimony (Sb(V)) in Sb mine drainage has adverse effects on the receiving water environments. This study for the first time demonstrated the feasibility of using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to convert sulfate ions in SMD into sulfides that reduce Sb(V) to Sb(III) and to form complex with Sb(III) as precipitate. The principal compound in the precipitate was stibnite (Sb2S3) at pH 7 and pH 9. The Sb(V) removal mechanism is sulfate-reduction and sulfide oxidization-precipitation, different from the conventional SRB-precipitation processes for heavy metals. The Sb(V)/sulfate ratio is noted an essential parameter affecting the Sb removal efficiency from SMD.

  3. The Diversity of Sulfide Oxidation and Sulfate Reduction Genes Expressed by the Bacterial Communities of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mora, Maria J; Edgcomb, Virginia P; Taylor, Craig; Scranton, Mary I; Taylor, Gordon T; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative expression of dissimilative sulfite reductase (dsrA), a key gene in sulfate reduction, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (sqr), a key gene in sulfide oxidation was investigated. Neither of the two could be amplified from mRNA retrieved with Niskin bottles but were amplified from mRNA retrieved by the Deep SID. The sqr and sqr-like genes retrieved from the Cariaco Basin were related to the sqr genes from a Bradyrhizobium sp., Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum, Sulfurovum sp. NBC37-1, Sulfurimonas autotrophica, Thiorhodospira sibirica and Chlorobium tepidum. The dsrA gene sequences obtained from the redoxcline of the Cariaco Basin belonged to chemoorganotrophic and chemoautotrophic sulfate and sulfur reducers belonging to the class Deltaproteobacteria (phylum Proteobacteria) and the order Clostridiales (phylum Firmicutes).

  4. Hydrogen sulfide ameliorates tobacco smoke-induced oxidative stress and emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Weihong; Dong, Zheng; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Su, Yunchao

    2011-10-15

    The mutual interactions between reactive oxygen species, airway inflammation, and alveolar cell death play crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the present study, we investigated the possibility that hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) might be a novel option for intervention in COPD. We used a mouse model of tobacco smoke (TS)-induced emphysema. Mice were injected with H(2)S donor NaHS (50 μmol/kg in 0.25 ml phosphate buffer saline, intraperitoneally) or vehicle daily before exposed to TS for 1 h/day, 5 days/week for 12 and 24 weeks. We found that NaHS ameliorated TS-induced increase in mean linear intercepts, the thickness of bronchial walls, and the numbers of total cell counts as well as neutrophils, monocytes, and tumor necrosis factor α in bronchial alveolar lavage. Moreover, NaHS reduced increases in right ventricular systolic pressure, the thickness of pulmonary vascular walls, and the ratio of RV/LV+S in TS-exposed mice. Further, TS exposure for 12 and 24 weeks reduced the protein contents of cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL), cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS), nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), P(ser473)-Akt, as well as glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio in the lungs. TS-exposed lungs exhibited large amounts of 8-hydroxyguanine-positive and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells. Treatment with NaHS increased P(ser473)-Akt and attenuated TS-induced reduction of CGL, CBS, and Nrf2 as well as glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio in the lungs. NaHS also reduced amounts of 8-hydroxyguanine-positive, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells and active caspase-3 in TS-exposed lungs. Additionally, knocking-down Akt protein abolished the protective effects of NaHS against TS-induced apoptosis and downregulation of Nrf2, CGL, and CBS in pulmonary artery endothelial cells. These results indicate that NaHS protects

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Ameliorates Tobacco Smoke-Induced Oxidative Stress and Emphysema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Weihong; Dong, Zheng; Dimitropoulou, Christiana

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aims The mutual interactions between reactive oxygen species, airway inflammation, and alveolar cell death play crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the present study, we investigated the possibility that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) might be a novel option for intervention in COPD. Results We used a mouse model of tobacco smoke (TS)-induced emphysema. Mice were injected with H2S donor NaHS (50 μmol/kg in 0.25 ml phosphate buffer saline, intraperitoneally) or vehicle daily before exposed to TS for 1 h/day, 5 days/week for 12 and 24 weeks. We found that NaHS ameliorated TS-induced increase in mean linear intercepts, the thickness of bronchial walls, and the numbers of total cell counts as well as neutrophils, monocytes, and tumor necrosis factor α in bronchial alveolar lavage. Moreover, NaHS reduced increases in right ventricular systolic pressure, the thickness of pulmonary vascular walls, and the ratio of RV/LV+S in TS-exposed mice. Further, TS exposure for 12 and 24 weeks reduced the protein contents of cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL), cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS), nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), Pser473-Akt, as well as glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio in the lungs. TS-exposed lungs exhibited large amounts of 8-hydroxyguanine-positive and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells. Treatment with NaHS increased Pser473-Akt and attenuated TS-induced reduction of CGL, CBS, and Nrf2 as well as glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio in the lungs. NaHS also reduced amounts of 8-hydroxyguanine-positive, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells and active caspase-3 in TS-exposed lungs. Additionally, knocking-down Akt protein abolished the protective effects of NaHS against TS-induced apoptosis and downregulation of Nrf2, CGL, and CBS in pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Conclusion These

  6. Temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide on magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Ma, Qingxin

    2008-04-03

    The experimental determination of rate constants for atmospheric reactions and how these rate constants vary with temperature remain a crucially important part of atmosphere science. In this study, the temperature dependence of the heterogeneous reaction of carbonyl sulfide (COS) on magnesium oxide (MgO) has been investigated using a Knudsen cell reactor and a temperature-programmed reaction apparatus. We found that the adsorption and the heterogeneous reaction are sensitive to temperature. The initial uptake coefficients (gammat(Ini)) of COS on MgO decrease from 1.07 +/- 0.71 x 10-6 to 4.84 +/- 0.60 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 228 to 300 K, and the steady state uptake coefficients (gammat(SS)) increase from 5.31 +/- 0.06 x 10-8 to 1.68 +/- 0.41 x 10-7 with the increasing of temperature from 240 to 300 K. The desorption rate constants (kdes) were also found to increase slightly with the enhancement of temperature. The empirical formula between the uptake coefficients, desorption rate constants and temperature described in the form of Arrhenius expression were obtained. The activation energies for the heterogeneous reaction and desorption of COS on MgO were measured to be 11.02 +/- 0.34 kJ.mol-1 and 6.30 +/- 0.81 kJ.mol-1, respectively. The results demonstrate that the initial uptake of COS on MgO is mainly contributed by an adsorption process and the steady state uptake is due to a catalytic reaction. The environmental implication was also discussed.

  7. Cadmium solubility in paddy soils: effects of soil oxidation, metal sulfides and competitive ions.

    PubMed

    de Livera, Jennifer; McLaughlin, Mike J; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Kirby, Jason K; Beak, Douglas G

    2011-03-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element for human nutrition and is an agricultural soil contaminant. Cadmium solubility in paddy soils affects Cd accumulation in the grain of rice. This is a human health risk, exacerbated by the fact that rice grains are deficient in iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) for human nutrition. To find ways of limiting this potential risk, we investigated factors influencing Cd solubility relative to Fe and Zn during pre-harvest drainage of paddy soils, in which soil oxidation is accompanied by the grain-filling stage of rice growth. This was simulated in temperature-controlled "reaction cell" experiments by first excluding oxygen to incubate soil suspensions anaerobically, then inducing aerobic conditions. In treatments without sulfur addition, the ratios of Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn in solution increased during the aerobic phase while Cd concentrations were unaffected and the Fe and Zn concentrations decreased. However, in treatments with added sulfur (as sulfate), up to 34 % of sulfur (S) was precipitated as sulfide minerals during the anaerobic phase and the Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios in solution during the aerobic phase were lower than for treatments without S addition. When S was added, Cd solubility decreased whereas Fe and Zn were unaffected. When soil was spiked with Zn the Cd:Zn ratio was lower in solution during the aerobic phase, due to higher Zn concentrations. Decreased Cd:Fe and Cd:Zn ratios during the grain filling stage could potentially limit Cd enrichment in paddy rice grain due to competitive ion effects for root uptake. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Equilibriums between Cu, Fe, and Zn sulfides and oxides in chloride solution: A thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strel'Tsova, N. I.

    2009-10-01

    The results of thermodynamic modeling of equilibriums between Cu, Fe, and Zn sulfides and oxides pertaining to the Cu-Fe-Zn-S-O2 system in water and aqueous chloride solution are presented. The system comprises solid phases of constant composition: pyrite, pyrrhotite, hematite, magnetite, wüstite, γ-iron, chalcocite, covellite, cuprite, native copper, chalcopyrite, and bornite, as well as more than 100 ions, complexes, and molecules in an aqueous solution. The GIBBS program with the UNITHERM thermodynamic dataset used in calculations allows numerical analysis of phase assemblages in a dry system and in equilibrium with an aqueous solution. How the temperature, pressure, and the composition of the solution in the system opened for oxygen and sulfur affects the composition of phase assemblages was considered in temperature and pressure ranges of 50-350 C and 100-1000 bar, respectively. Decrease in temperature leads to a shift in stability fields of the studied phases toward the region of elevated oxygen and sulfur partial pressures. Variation of temperature is an important factor affecting precipitation of ore minerals, primarily, Cu- and Zn-bearing. The calculation results are presented in tables and diagrams. Each point in the (log m_{S_{tot} } - log f_{O_2 } ) diagram is characterized by a single possible assemblage of phases equilibrated with a solution of the given composition within the considered temperature and pressure range. Since the composition of the mineral assemblage is controlled by physicochemical conditions at the moment of mineral formation, comparison of the calculation results with mineral assemblages at ore deposits makes it possible to estimate the parameters of ore deposition at the early stage of investigation, including oxygen and sulfur activity and, occasionally, the composition and salinity of the solution. These parameters control the formation of such assemblages.

  9. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal---oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxidesssuch as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxideswas investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H2S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H2S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H2S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H2S for all four metal oxides.

  10. Visible-light-enhanced interactions of hydrogen sulfide with composites of zinc (oxy)hydroxide with graphite oxide and graphene.

    PubMed

    Seredych, Mykola; Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-01-17

    Composites of zinc(oxy)hydroxide-graphite oxide and of zinc(oxy)hydroxide-graphene were used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide under ambient conditions. The initial and exhausted samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, potentiometric titration, EDX, thermal analysis, and nitrogen adsorption. An increase in the amount of H(2)S adsorbed/oxidized on their surfaces in comparison with that of pure Zn(OH)(2) is linked to the structure of the composite, the relative number of terminal hydroxyls, and the kind of graphene-based phase used. Although terminal groups are activated by a photochemical process, the graphite oxide component owing to the chemical bonds with the zinc(oxy)hydroxide phase and conductive properties helps in electron transfer, leading to more efficient oxygen activation via the formation of superoxide ions. Elemental sulfur, zinc sulfide, sulfite, and sulfate are formed on the surface. The formation of sulfur compounds on the surface of zinc(oxy)hydroxide during the course of the breakthrough experiments and thus Zn(OH)(2)-ZnS heterojunctions can also contribute to the increased surface activity of our materials. The results show the superiority of graphite oxide in the formation of composites owing to its active surface chemistry and the possibility of interface bond formation, leading to an increase in the number of electron-transfer reactions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. CONFIRMATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR PHOSPHINE

    SciTech Connect

    Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Encrenaz, P.; Teyssier, D.

    2014-08-01

    Phosphine (PH{sub 3}) was tentatively identified a few years ago in the carbon star envelopes IRC +10216 and CRL 2688 from observations of an emission line at 266.9 GHz attributable to the J = 1-0 rotational transition. We report the detection of the J = 2-1 rotational transition of PH{sub 3} in IRC +10216 using the HIFI instrument on board Herschel, which definitively confirms the identification of PH{sub 3}. Radiative transfer calculations indicate that infrared pumping in excited vibrational states plays an important role in the excitation of PH{sub 3} in the envelope of IRC +10216, and that the observed lines are consistent with phosphine being formed anywhere between the star and 100 R {sub *} from the star, with an abundance of 10{sup –8} relative to H{sub 2}. The detection of PH{sub 3} challenges chemical models, none of which offer a satisfactory formation scenario. Although PH{sub 3} holds just 2% of the total available phosphorus in IRC +10216, it is, together with HCP, one of the major gas phase carriers of phosphorus in the inner circumstellar layers, suggesting that it could also be an important phosphorus species in other astronomical environments. This is the first unambiguous detection of PH{sub 3} outside the solar system, and is a further step toward a better understanding of the chemistry of phosphorus in space.

  12. Confirmation of Circumstellar Phosphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Encrenaz, P.; Teyssier, D.

    2014-08-01

    Phosphine (PH3) was tentatively identified a few years ago in the carbon star envelopes IRC +10216 and CRL 2688 from observations of an emission line at 266.9 GHz attributable to the J = 1-0 rotational transition. We report the detection of the J = 2-1 rotational transition of PH3 in IRC +10216 using the HIFI instrument on board Herschel, which definitively confirms the identification of PH3. Radiative transfer calculations indicate that infrared pumping in excited vibrational states plays an important role in the excitation of PH3 in the envelope of IRC +10216, and that the observed lines are consistent with phosphine being formed anywhere between the star and 100 R * from the star, with an abundance of 10-8 relative to H2. The detection of PH3 challenges chemical models, none of which offer a satisfactory formation scenario. Although PH3 holds just 2% of the total available phosphorus in IRC +10216, it is, together with HCP, one of the major gas phase carriers of phosphorus in the inner circumstellar layers, suggesting that it could also be an important phosphorus species in other astronomical environments. This is the first unambiguous detection of PH3 outside the solar system, and is a further step toward a better understanding of the chemistry of phosphorus in space.

  13. Investigation on durability and reactivity of promising metal oxide sorbents during sulfidation and regeneration. Quarterly report, January 1 - March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Research activities and efforts of this research project were concentrated on conducting experiments on initial reaction rates of hydrogen sulfide with the formulated sorbents, and developing a reaction rate equation containing a reaction rate constant in terms of disappearance of H{sub 2}S, a reaction order with respect to hydrogen sulfide, and a reaction order with respect to the TU-24 metal oxide sorbent.

  14. Catalytic performance and deactivation of precipitated iron catalyst for selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur in the waste gas streams from coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Mashapa, T.N.; Rademan, J.D.; van Vuuren, M.J.J.

    2007-09-15

    The selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur, using a commercial, precipitated silica promoted ferric oxide based catalyst, was investigated in laboratory and pilot-plant reactors. Low levels of hydrogen sulfide (1-3 vol%) can be readily removed, but a continuous slow decrease in catalyst activity was apparent. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the loss of activity was due to the formation of ferrous sulfate, which is known to be less active than the ferric oxide. In addition, studies using a model feed showed that the propene and HCN impurities in the plant feed stocks also act as potent catalyst poisons.

  15. Fe(III) oxides protect fermenter-methanogen syntrophy against interruption by elemental sulfur via stiffening of Fe(II) sulfides produced by sulfur respiration.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kensuke; Kuwabara, Tomohiko

    2014-03-01

    Thermosipho globiformans (rod-shaped thermophilic fermenter) and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (coccal hyperthermophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogen) established H2-mediated syntrophy at 68 °C, forming exopolysaccharide-based aggregates. Electron microscopy showed that the syntrophic partners connected to each other directly or via intercellular bridges made from flagella, which facilitated transfer of H2. Elemental sulfur (S(0)) interrupted syntrophy; polysulfides abiotically formed from S(0) intercepted electrons that were otherwise transferred to H(+) to produce H2, resulting in the generation of sulfide (sulfur respiration). However, Fe(III) oxides significantly reduced the interruption by S(0), accompanied by stiffening of Fe(II) sulfides produced by the reduction of Fe(III) oxides with the sulfur respiration-generated sulfide. Sea sand replacing Fe(III) oxides failed to generate stiffening or protect the syntrophy. Several experimental results indicated that the stiffening of Fe(II) sulfides shielded the liquid from S(0), resulting in methane production in the liquid. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy showed that the stiffened Fe(II) sulfides formed a network of spiny structures in which the microorganisms were buried. The individual fermenter rods likely produced Fe(II) sulfides on their surface and became local centers of a core of spiny structures, and the connection of these cores formed the network, which was macroscopically recognized as stiffening.

  16. Genes related to mitochondrial functions are differentially expressed in phosphine-resistant and -susceptible Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Oppert, Brenda; Guedes, Raul N C; Aikins, Michael J; Perkin, Lindsey; Chen, Zhaorigetu; Phillips, Thomas W; Zhu, Kun Yan; Opit, George P; Hoon, Kelly; Sun, Yongming; Meredith, Gavin; Bramlett, Kelli; Hernandez, Natalie Supunpong; Sanderson, Brian; Taylor, Madison W; Dhingra, Dalia; Blakey, Brandon; Lorenzen, Marcé; Adedipe, Folukemi; Arthur, Frank

    2015-11-18

    Phosphine is a valuable fumigant to control pest populations in stored grains and grain products. However, recent studies indicate a substantial increase in phosphine resistance in stored product pests worldwide. To understand the molecular bases of phosphine resistance in insects, we used RNA-Seq to compare gene expression in phosphine-resistant and susceptible laboratory populations of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Each population was evaluated as either phosphine-exposed or no phosphine (untreated controls) in triplicate biological replicates (12 samples total). Pairwise analysis indicated there were eight genes differentially expressed between susceptible and resistant insects not exposed to phosphine (i.e., basal expression) or those exposed to phopshine (>8-fold expression and 90 % C.I.). However, 214 genes were differentially expressed among all four treatment groups at a statistically significant level (ANOVA, p < 0.05). Increased expression of 44 cytochrome P450 genes was found in resistant vs. susceptible insects, and phosphine exposure resulted in additional increases of 21 of these genes, five of which were significant among all treatment groups (p < 0.05). Expression of two genes encoding anti-diruetic peptide was 2- to 8-fold reduced in phosphine-resistant insects, and when exposed to phosphine, expression was further reduced 36- to 500-fold compared to susceptible. Phosphine-resistant insects also displayed differential expression of cuticle, carbohydrate, protease, transporter, and many mitochondrial genes, among others. Gene ontology terms associated with mitochondrial functions (oxidation biological processes, monooxygenase and catalytic molecular functions, and iron, heme, and tetrapyyrole binding) were enriched in the significantly differentially expressed dataset. Sequence polymorphism was found in transcripts encoding a known phosphine resistance gene, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, in both susceptible and resistant

  17. Hyperspectral Imaging for oxides and sulfides detection and classification in SWIR range by using spectral discrimination and geological considerations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, V.; Liberman, S.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new method to detect and classify ore minerals before metallurgical processing. It consists in the use of hyperspectral images in the SWIR spectral range (1000 - 2500 nm) to characterize sulfides and oxides. Usually oxides are commonly detected in the VNIR and some sulfides in the TIR. We propose that for a local geological setting mineral identification in the SWIR range considerate both the absorption bands and the shape of the reflectance curve in the whole spectral range by using spectral discrimination with appropriated classifiers. We apply this new method to data obtained from Florida Mine, Central Chile. We used the SWIR3.0 Hyperspectral Camera of SPECIM to generate hyperspectral images of drill cores that consist of pollymetalic quartz veins (Au, Ag, Zn, Pb and Cu) hosted in volcano-sedimentary sequence with mainly propilitic hydrothermal alteration. A total of 260 hyperspectral images were obtained with a pixel size of 0.7 mm. The pixels of each image were labeled manually using both spectral information and the geological mapping. the most frequently identified minerals are: quartz, chlorite, epidote, chalcopyrite, pyrite, sphalerite, galena, hematite, magnetite, clays, gypsum and calcite. We selected a representative group of hyperspectral images for training and another for testing the algorithm. We used classifiers based on Logistic Regresions wich correctly classified the 70% of pixels. Best classified minerals are the OH-bearing minerals like chlorites, clays, because of the presence of characteristic absorption bands in the SWIR range. In the case of sulfides, sphalerite is the best classified followed by galena. Pyrite and chalcopyrite sometimes are confused with quartz due to the paragenesis in the mineral deposit. In the case of oxides, hematite is better classified than magnetite.

  18. Oxidation of chlorinated olefins by Escherichia coli transformed with dimethyl sulfide monooxygenase genes or cumene dioxygenase genes.

    PubMed

    Takami, Wako; Yoshida, Takako; Nojiri, Hideaki; Yamane, Hisakazu; Omori, Toshio

    1999-04-01

    In the present work, it was shown that the dimethyl sulfide (DMS) monooxygenase and the cumene dioxygenase catalyzed oxidation of various chlorinated ethenes, propenes, and butenes. The specific activities of these oxygenases were determined for C(2) to C(4) chlorinated olefins, and the oxidation rates ranged from 0.19 to 4.18 nmol.min(-1).mg(-1) of dry cells by the DMS monooxygenase and from 0.19 to 1.29 nmol.min(-1).mg(-1) of dry cells by the cumene dioxygenase. The oxidation products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Most chlorinated olefins were monooxygenated by the DMS monooxygenase to yield chlorinated epoxides. In the case of the cumene dioxygenase, the substrates lacking any chlorine atom on double-bond carbon atoms were dioxygenated, and those with chlorine atoms attaching to double-bond carbon atoms were monooxygenated to yield allyl alcohols.

  19. Mitsunobu Reactions Catalytic in Phosphine and a Fully Catalytic System.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Joseph A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-10-26

    The Mitsunobu reaction is renowned for its mild reaction conditions and broad substrate tolerance, but has limited utility in process chemistry and industrial applications due to poor atom economy and the generation of stoichiometric phosphine oxide and hydrazine by-products that complicate purification. A catalytic Mitsunobu reaction using innocuous reagents to recycle these by-products would overcome both of these shortcomings. Herein we report a protocol that is catalytic in phosphine (1-phenylphospholane) employing phenylsilane to recycle the catalyst. Integration of this phosphine catalytic cycle with Taniguchi's azocarboxylate catalytic system provided the first fully catalytic Mitsunobu reaction. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.

  20. Enhanced reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on the composites of graphene/graphite oxide with copper (hydr)oxychlorides.

    PubMed

    Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-06-27

    Composites of copper (hydr)oxychlorides with graphite oxide or graphene were synthesized and used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide at dynamic conditions at ambient temperatures. The materials were extensively characterized before and after adsorption in order to link their performance to the surface features. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, thermal analysis, TEM, SEM/EDX, and adsorption of nitrogen were used. It was found that the composite with graphene has the most favorable surface features enhancing reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide. The presence of moisture in the H2S stream has a positive effect on the removal process owing to the dissociation process. H2S is retained on the surface via a direct replacement of OH groups and via acid-base reactions with the copper (hydr)oxide. Highly dispersed reduced copper species on the surface of the composite with graphene enhance activation of oxygen and cause formation of sulfites and sulfates. Higher conductivity of the graphene phase than that of graphite oxide helps in electron transfer in redox reactions.

  1. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectra of CO{2}-ETHYLENE Sulfide, CO{2}-ETHYLENE Oxide and CO{2}-PROPYLENE Oxide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orita, Yukari; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Hirota, Eizi

    2010-06-01

    We have previously examined the difference in roles of O and S in structure and dynamics of the CO-ethylene oxide (EO) and CO-ethylene sulfide (ES) complexes. We have extended the investigation to CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES for comparison. We have also observed the CO{2}-propylene oxide (PO) complex, which is an important intermediate in the reaction of PO with CO{2} leading to polycarbonate. Both a-type and b-type transitions were observed for the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES, but no c-type transitions were observed at all. We also detected the {34}S and {13}C isotopic species in natural abundance and the species containing {18}OCO and C{18}O% {2}, which were synthesized by burning paper in an {18}O{2} and{% 16}O{2} mixture. By analyzing the observed spectra we concluded the CO{2} moiety of CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES located in a plane % prependicular to the three-membered ring and bisecting the COC or CSC angle of EO or ES, respectively, as in the case of CO-EO and CO-ES complexes. An % ab initio MO calculation at the level of MP2/6-311G(d, p) yielded an optimized structure in good agreement with the experimental result. We have derived from the observed spectra the distance, the stretching force constant, and the binding energy of the bonds between the constituents of the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES complexes and have found that the distances of the two complexes were shorter by 0.2Å than those in CO-EO and CO-ES, respectively, and that the intermolecular bonds were two times stronger in the CO{2} complexes than in the corresponding CO complexes. We have concluded from the observed spectra that the CO{2} moiety in CO{2}-PO is located on the PO three-membered ring plane opposite to the methyl group. The constituents in CO{2}-PO were more weakly bound than those in CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES. S. Sato, Y. Kawashima, Y. Tatamitani, and E. Hirota, 63rd International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, WF05 (2008).

  2. Dimethyl Sulfide-Dimethyl Ether and Ethylene Oxide-Ethylene Sulfide Complexes Investigated by Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Calculation.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Tatamitani, Yoshio; Mase, Takayuki; Hirota, Eizi

    2015-10-22

    The ground-state rotational spectra of the dimethyl sulfide-dimethyl ether (DMS-DME) and the ethylene oxide-ethylene sulfide (EO-ES) complexes were observed by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy, and a-type and c-type transitions were assigned for the normal, (34)S, and three (13)C species of the DMS-DME and a-type and b-type transitions for the normal, (34)S, and two (13)C species of the EO-ES complexes. The transition frequencies measured for both the complexes were analyzed by using an S-reduced asymmetric-top rotational Hamiltonian. The rotational parameters thus derived for the DMS-DME were found to be consistent with a structure of Cs symmetry with the DMS bound to the DME by two C-H(DMS)···O and one S···H-C(DME) hydrogen bonds. Some high-Ka lines were found to be split, and we have interpreted these splittings in terms of internal rotations of the two methyl groups of the DMS and of the "free", i.e., outer group, of the DME. Some forbidden transitions were also observed in cases where Ka = 3 levels were involved, for the DMS-DME complex in the internal-rotation E state. The barrier height, V3, to internal rotation of the CH3 in the DME thus derived is smaller than that of the DME monomer, while the V3 of the CH3 groups in the DMS is nearly the same as that of the DMS monomer. For the EO-ES complex, the observed data were interpreted in terms of an antiparallel structure of Cs symmetry with the EO bound to the ES by two C-H(ES)···O and two S···H-C(EO) hydrogen bonds. An attempt was also made to observe a-type transitions of the DMS dimer without success. We have applied a natural bond orbital analysis to the DMS-DME and EO-ES to calculate the stabilization energy CT (= ΔEσσ*), which was correlated closely with the binding energy as found for other related complexes.

  3. Phosphonate–Phosphinate Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    LiTMP metalated dimethyl N-Boc-phosphoramidates derived from 1-phenylethylamine and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-ylamine highly selectively at the CH3O group to generate short-lived oxymethyllithiums. These isomerized to diastereomeric hydroxymethylphosphonamidates (phosphate–phosphonate rearrangement). However, s-BuLi converted the dimethyl N-Boc-phosphoramidate derived from 1-phenylethylamine to the N-Boc α-aminophosphonate preferentially. Only s-BuLi deprotonated dimethyl hydroxymethylphosphonamidates at the benzylic position and dimethyl N-Boc α-aminophosphonates at the CH3O group to induce phosphonate–phosphinate rearrangements. In the former case, the migration of the phosphorus substituent from the nitrogen to the carbon atom followed a retentive course with some racemization because of the involvement of a benzyllithium as an intermediate. PMID:25525945

  4. Sodium-ion storage properties of nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/reduced graphene oxide composite powders prepared by a spray drying process and the nanoscale Kirkendall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G. D.; Cho, J. S.; Kang, Y. C.

    2015-10-01

    Spray-drying and the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process are used to prepare nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders with excellent Na-ion storage properties. Metallic Ni nanopowder-decorated rGO powders, formed as intermediate products, are transformed into composite powders of nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/rGO with mixed crystal structures of Ni3S2 and Ni9S8 phases by the sulfidation process under H2S gas. Nickel sulfide/rGO composite powders with the main crystal structure of Ni3S2 are also prepared as comparison samples by the direct sulfidation of nickel acetate-graphene oxide (GO) composite powders obtained by spray-drying. In electrochemical properties, the discharge capacities at the 150th cycle of the nickel sulfide/rGO composite powders prepared by sulfidation of the Ni/rGO composite and nickel acetate/GO composite powders at a current density of 0.3 A g-1 are 449 and 363 mA h g-1, respectively; their capacity retentions, calculated from the tenth cycle, are 100 and 87%. The nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/rGO composite powders possess structural stability over repeated Na-ion insertion and extraction processes, and also show excellent rate performance for Na-ion storage.Spray-drying and the nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process are used to prepare nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composite powders with excellent Na-ion storage properties. Metallic Ni nanopowder-decorated rGO powders, formed as intermediate products, are transformed into composite powders of nickel sulfide hollow nanospheres/rGO with mixed crystal structures of Ni3S2 and Ni9S8 phases by the sulfidation process under H2S gas. Nickel sulfide/rGO composite powders with the main crystal structure of Ni3S2 are also prepared as comparison samples by the direct sulfidation of nickel acetate-graphene oxide (GO) composite powders obtained by spray-drying. In electrochemical properties, the discharge capacities at the

  5. Adhesion of Poly(phenylene sulfide) Resin with Polymeric Film of Triazine Thiol on Aluminum Surface Modified by Anodic Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun Hyuk; Jang, Eun Kyung; Hong, Tae Eun; Kim, Jong Pil; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Jin, Jong Sung; Hyun, Myung Ho; Shin, Dong Su; Bae, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Euh Duck

    2015-01-01

    Various surface modifications have been applied to improve the adhesion properties of aluminum for the cap plate and sealing quality of electrolyte on Li ion batteries. In this study, we have tried to find the effective condition for the polymerization of triazine thiols (TT) on modified aluminum surfaces by anodic aluminum oxide. Characterization of polymerized films on aluminum was explored by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis. Scanning electron microscopy results reveal that meaningful roughness was formed on aluminum surfaces by anodic oxidation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis results represent that the peel strength was found to depend on film thickness and the composition of the adhesion layer. As a result, Al/PPS (polyphenylene sulfide) resin assemblies developed in this study have superior adhesive property. Therefore, these assemblies might be a viable candidate for a sealing technique for Li ion batteries.

  6. Zn isotopes in hydrothermal sulfides and their oxidation products along the south mid-Atlantic ridge: evidence of hydrothermal fluid deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohu; Wang, Jianqiang; Chu, Fengyou; Lei, Jijiang; Wang, Hao; Li, Zhenggang

    2017-07-01

    Significant Zn isotope fractionation occurs during seafloor hydrothermal activities. Therefore, exploring variations in Zn isotope composition affected by hydrothermal fluids and oxidative processes would help to better understand hydrothermal fluid cycling and sulfide deposition on mid-ocean ridges. In this paper, the Zn isotope compositions of different types of sulfides and their oxidation products obtained from hydrothermal fields on the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge (13-15°S) were analyzed using a Neptune plus MC-ICP-MS. The δ66Zn ratios range from -0.14‰ to +0.38‰, and the average δ66Zn ratio is +0.12±0.06‰ (n=21, 2 SD) for all the studied sulfides and oxidation products. The Cu-rich sulfides have a slightly heavier Zn isotope composition (average δ66Zn=+0.19±0.07‰, n=6) than the Zn-rich sulfides (average δ66Zn=-0.02±0.06‰, n=5). The Zn isotope compositions of the oxidation products are similar to those of the Cu-rich sulfides, with an average δ66Zn ratio of 0.14±0.06‰ (n=10, 2 SD). The Zn isotope compositions of all the samples are generally within the ranges of sulfides from hydrothermal fields on other mid-ocean ridges, such as the East Pacific Rise (9°N, 21°N) and the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse. However, the average Zn isotope composition indicates the presence of significantly lighter Zn isotopes relative to those reported in the literature (average δ66Zn=+0.39‰). The significant enrichment of the Zn-rich sulfides with light Zn isotopes reveals that kinetic fractionation likely occurs during mineral deposition. Furthermore, the Zn isotope compositions of the sulfides and their oxidation products (average δ66Zn=+0.12‰) are significantly lighter than the average Zn isotope composition of the ocean (δ66Zn=+0.5‰), which could further constrain the modern Zn isotope cycle in the ocean by serving as a sink for light Zn isotopes.

  7. A rational pre-catalyst design for bis-phosphine mono-oxide palladium catalyzed reactions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedures and characterization data for all new compounds. CCDC 1512973–1512975. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c6sc05472b Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongming; Hyde, Alan M.; Chen, Qinghao; Belyk, Kevin M.; Lexa, Katrina W.; Yin, Jingjun; Sherer, Edward C.; Williamson, R. Thomas; Brunskill, Andrew; Ren, Sumei; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Davies, Ian W.; Ruck, Rebecca T.

    2017-01-01

    Significant catalyst loading reduction and increased reaction robustness have been achieved for a Pd-catalyzed asymmetric intramolecular C–N coupling through comprehensive mechanistic studies. Detailed kinetic, spectroscopic, and crystallographic analyses revealed that the mono-oxidation of the bis-phosphine ligand is critical for a successful transformation. 31P NMR studies provided an understanding of the inefficient activation of the Pd(OAc)2/(R,R)-QuinoxP* pre-catalyst to form the active bis-phosphine mono-oxide–Pd(0) catalyst with competitive formation of a less active (R,R)-QuinoxP*·PdBr2 complex. Based on these detailed mechanistic studies, a new series of bis-phosphine mono-oxides (BPMO)-ligated Pd(ii) pre-catalysts have been rationally developed that allow for reliable and complete catalyst activation which should have general utility in academic and industrial settings. PMID:28553522

  8. 40 CFR 721.6020 - Phosphine, dialkylyphenyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphine, dialkylyphenyl. 721.6020... Substances § 721.6020 Phosphine, dialkylyphenyl. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as phosphine dialkylphenyl (P-83-1023) is...

  9. Controlled oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides under ambient conditions by a series of titanium isopropoxide complexes using environmentally benign H2O2 as an oxidant.

    PubMed

    Panda, Manas K; Shaikh, Mobin M; Ghosh, Prasenjit

    2010-03-07

    Controlled oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides under ambient conditions has been achieved by a series of titanium isopropoxide complexes that use environmentally benign H(2)O(2) as a primary oxidant. Specifically, the [N,N'-bis(2-oxo-3-R(1)-5-R(2)-phenylmethyl)-N,N'-bis(methylene-R(3))-ethylenediamine]Ti(O(i)Pr)(2) [R(1) = t-Bu, R(2) = Me, R(3) = C(7)H(5)O(2) (1b); R(1) = R(2) = t-Bu, R(3) = C(7)H(5)O(2) (2b); R(1) = R(2) = Cl, R(3) = C(7)H(5)O(2) (3b) and R(1) = R(2) = Cl, R(3) = C(6)H(5) (4b)] complexes efficiently catalyzed the sulfoxidation reactions of organic sulfides to sulfoxides at room temperature within 30 min of the reaction time using aqueous H(2)O(2) as an oxidant. A mechanistic pathway, modeled using density functional theory for a representative thioanisole substrate catalyzed by 4b, suggested that the reaction proceeds via a titanium peroxo intermediate 4c', which displays an activation barrier of 22.5 kcal mol(-1) (DeltaG(++)) for the overall catalytic cycle in undergoing an attack by the S atom of the thioanisole substrate at its sigma*-orbital of the peroxo moiety. The formation of the titanium peroxo intermediate was experimentally corroborated by a mild ionization atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometric technique.

  10. Electrochemical deposition of iron sulfide thin films and heterojunction diodes with zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shoichi Sobue, Susumu; Okuno, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Ryuta; Ichimura, Masaya

    2014-03-01

    Iron sulfide thin films were fabricated by the electrochemical deposition method from an aqueous solution containing FeSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The composition ratio obtained was Fe:S:O = 36:56:8. In the photoelectrochemical measurement, a weak negative photo-current was observed for the iron sulfide films, which indicates that its conduction type is p-type. No peaks were observed in X-ray diffraction pattern, and thus the deposited films were considered to be amorphous. For a heterojunction with ZnO, rectification properties were confirmed in the current-voltage characteristics. Moreover, the current was clearly enhanced under AM1.5 illumination.

  11. Diallyl Trisulfide Suppresses Oxidative Stress-Induced Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells through Production of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Jin, Huanhuan; Wu, Li; Shao, Jiangjuan; Zhu, Xiaojing; Chen, Anping; Zheng, Shizhong

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating data reveal that garlic has beneficial effects against chronic liver disease. We previously reported that diallyl trisulfide (DATS), the primary organosulfur compound in garlic, reduced fibrosis and attenuated oxidative stress in rat fibrotic liver. The present study was aimed at elucidating the underlying mechanisms. The primary rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were cultured and stimulated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for inducing HSC activation under oxidative stress. We examined the effects of DATS on the profibrogenic properties and oxidative stress in H2O2-treated HSCs. The results showed that DATS suppressed and reduced fibrotic marker expression in HSCs. DATS arrested cell cycle at G2/M checkpoint associated with downregulating cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1, induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, and reduced migration in HSCs. Moreover, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxide were decreased by DATS, but intracellular levels of glutathione were increased in HSCs. Furthermore, DATS significantly elevated hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels within HSCs, but iodoacetamide (IAM) reduced H2S levels and significantly abrogated DATS production of H2S within HSCs. IAM also abolished all the inhibitory effects of DATS on the profibrogenic properties and oxidative stress in HSCs. Altogether, we demonstrated an H2S-associated mechanism underlying DATS inhibition of profibrogenic properties and alleviation of oxidative stress in HSCs. Modulation of H2S production may represent a therapeutic remedy for liver fibrosis.

  12. Diallyl Trisulfide Suppresses Oxidative Stress-Induced Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells through Production of Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Jin, Huanhuan; Wu, Li; Shao, Jiangjuan; Zhu, Xiaojing; Chen, Anping

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating data reveal that garlic has beneficial effects against chronic liver disease. We previously reported that diallyl trisulfide (DATS), the primary organosulfur compound in garlic, reduced fibrosis and attenuated oxidative stress in rat fibrotic liver. The present study was aimed at elucidating the underlying mechanisms. The primary rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were cultured and stimulated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for inducing HSC activation under oxidative stress. We examined the effects of DATS on the profibrogenic properties and oxidative stress in H2O2-treated HSCs. The results showed that DATS suppressed and reduced fibrotic marker expression in HSCs. DATS arrested cell cycle at G2/M checkpoint associated with downregulating cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1, induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, and reduced migration in HSCs. Moreover, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxide were decreased by DATS, but intracellular levels of glutathione were increased in HSCs. Furthermore, DATS significantly elevated hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels within HSCs, but iodoacetamide (IAM) reduced H2S levels and significantly abrogated DATS production of H2S within HSCs. IAM also abolished all the inhibitory effects of DATS on the profibrogenic properties and oxidative stress in HSCs. Altogether, we demonstrated an H2S-associated mechanism underlying DATS inhibition of profibrogenic properties and alleviation of oxidative stress in HSCs. Modulation of H2S production may represent a therapeutic remedy for liver fibrosis. PMID:28303169

  13. Selective and Efficient Cysteine Conjugation by Maleimides in the Presence of Phosphine Reductants.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Maik; Röckendorf, Niels; Frey, Andreas

    2016-10-19

    Sulfhydryl functions of thiol-containing amino acids are prime attachment sites for conjugation of labels, ligands, or drugs to proteinaceous compounds. Usually the thiol is offered a xenobiotic electrophilic moiety from the molecule to be attached such as a maleimido function. As sulfhydryls tend to oxidize into disulfides they must be reduced before conjugation. A popular thiol reduction reagent in biosciences is the substituted phosphine tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP). Yet, phosphines are nucleophilic, too, and thus potentially compete with thiols for the electron-poor alkene moiety of maleimide resulting in complex product mixtures. To overcome this shortcoming we developed a method to eliminate excess reducing agent in the reaction mixture by selective oxidation of the phosphine with azidobenzoic acid before coupling. This results in a selective and efficient labeling of cysteines by maleimides.

  14. Physiological and biochemical responses of rice seeds to phosphine exposure during germination.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaojun; Mi, Lina; Li, Yadong; Wei, Aishu; Yang, Zhiquan; Wu, Jiandong; Zhang, Di; Song, Xiaofei

    2013-11-01

    Rice seeds (Tianyou, 3618) were used to examine the physiological and biochemical responses to phosphine exposure during germination. A control (0 mg m(-3)) and four concentrations of phosphine (1.4 mg m(-3), 4.2 mg m(-3), 7.0 mg m(-3) and 13.9 mg m(-3)) were used to treat the rice seeds. Each treatment was applied for 90 min once per day for five days. The germination rate (GR); germination potential (GP); germination index (GI); antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT); and lipid peroxidation measured through via malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined as indicators of the physiological and biochemical responses of the rice seeds to phosphine exposure. These indicators were determined once per day for five days. The results indicated that the GR, GP and GI of the rice seeds markedly decreased after phosphine exposure. The changes in the activities of the antioxidant enzymes due to the phosphine exposure were also significant. The exposure lowered the CAT and SOD activities and increased POD activity in the treated rice seeds compared with controls. The MDA content exhibited a slow increase trend with the increase of phosphine concentration. These results suggest that phosphine has inhibitory effects on seed germination. In addition, phosphine exposure caused oxidative stress in the seeds. The antioxidant enzymes could play a pivotal role against oxidative injury. Overall, the effect of phosphine on rice seeds is different from what has been reported previously for insects and mammals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis and structure of tridentate bis(phosphinic amide)-phosphine oxide complexes of yttrium nitrate. Applications of 31P,89Y NMR methods in structural elucidation in solution.

    PubMed

    Popovici, Cristinel; Fernández, Ignacio; Oña-Burgos, Pascual; Roces, Laura; García-Granda, Santiago; Ortiz, Fernando López

    2011-07-07

    The synthesis and characterisation of a tridentate ligand containing two diphenylphosphinic amide side-arms connected through the ortho position to a phenylphosphine oxide moiety and the 1:1 and 2:1 complexes formed with yttrium nitrate are reported for the first time. The free ligand (R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11 is obtained diastereoselectively by reaction of ortho-lithiated N,N-diisopropyl-P,P-diphenylphosphinic amide with phenylphosphonic dichloride. Complexes [Y((R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11)(NO(3))(3)] and [Y((R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11)(2)(NO(3))](NO(3))(2) were isolated by mixing ligand 11 with Y(NO(3))(3)·6H(2)O in acetonitrile at room temperature in a ligand to metal molar ratio of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively. The 1:1 derivative is the product of thermodynamic control when a molar ratio of ligand to yttrium salt of 1:1 is used. The new compounds have been characterised both as the solid (X-ray diffraction) and in solution (multinuclear magnetic resonance). In both yttrium complexes the ligand acts as a tridentate chelate. The arrangement of the two ligands in the 2:1 complex affords a pseudo-meso structure. Tridentate chelation of yttrium(III) in both complexes is retained in solution as evidenced by (89)Y NMR data obtained via(31)P,(89)Y-HMQC, and (89)Y,(31)P-DEPT experiments. The investigation of the solution behaviour of the Y(III) complexes through PGSE NMR diffusion measurements showed that average structures in agreement with the 1:1 and 1:2 stoichiometries are retained in acetonitrile.

  16. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake with an unprecedented high sulfide content.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Foti, Mirjam; Pinkart, Holly C; Muyzer, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent techniques were used to study the diversity of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake containing an unprecedentedly high sulfide concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion. Both approaches revealed the dominance of bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalimicrobium, which are common inhabitants of soda lakes. A dense population of Thioalkalimicrobium (up to 10(7) cells/ml) was found at the chemocline, which is characterized by a steep oxygen-sulfide gradient. Twelve Thioalkalimicrobium strains exhibiting three different phenotypes were isolated in pure culture from various locations in Soap Lake. The isolates fell into two groups according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. One of the groups was closely related to T. cyclicum, which was isolated from Mono Lake (California), a transiently meromictic, haloalkaline lake. The second group, consisting of four isolates, was phylogenetically and phenotypically distinct from known Thioalkalimicrobium species and unique to Soap Lake. It represented a new species, for which we suggest the name Thioalkalimicrobium microaerophilum sp. nov.

  17. Mineral systems and the thermodynamics of selenites and selenates in the oxidation zone of sulfide ores - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charykova, Marina V.; Krivovichev, Vladimir G.

    2016-08-01

    Contemporary mineralogy and geochemistry are concerned with understanding and deciphering processes that occur near the surface of the Earth. These processes are especially important for resolving ecological challenges and developing principles of good environmental management. Selenium oxysalts, selenites and selenates, are relatively rare as minerals; there are presently only 34 known mineral species. Thirty-one "pure" selenites, which contain only selenite anionic groups, are known to occur naturally. The other three minerals each contain two anionic groups: selenate and selenite (schmiederite), selenate and sulphate (olsacherite), and selenate and iodate (carlosruizite). This work is intended to provide a classification of natural selenium oxysalts based on their chemical composition. Selenites belong to a particular mineral system, whose components are chemical elements required to construct the crystal structure of a mineral (species-defining constituents). The number of components represents the minimum number of independent elements necessary to define the composition of the system. All selenites and selenates are divided into two groups: anhydrous selenites (I) and hydrous selenites and selenates (II). The paper also presents systematized data published on the thermodynamics of selenites, which are formed in the weathering zone of sulfide and selenide ores, and determines approaches to the quantitative physicochemical modeling of formation conditions. The Eh-pH diagrams of the Me-Se-H2O systems (Me = Cu, Co, Ni, Fe, Zn, Ca, Al) were calculated and plotted for the average contents of these elements in aqueous weathering solutions in sulfide deposit oxidation zones.

  18. Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a Meromictic, Haloalkaline Lake with an Unprecedented High Sulfide Content▿

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Foti, Mirjam; Pinkart, Holly C.; Muyzer, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent techniques were used to study the diversity of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake containing an unprecedentedly high sulfide concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion. Both approaches revealed the dominance of bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalimicrobium, which are common inhabitants of soda lakes. A dense population of Thioalkalimicrobium (up to 107 cells/ml) was found at the chemocline, which is characterized by a steep oxygen-sulfide gradient. Twelve Thioalkalimicrobium strains exhibiting three different phenotypes were isolated in pure culture from various locations in Soap Lake. The isolates fell into two groups according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. One of the groups was closely related to T. cyclicum, which was isolated from Mono Lake (California), a transiently meromictic, haloalkaline lake. The second group, consisting of four isolates, was phylogenetically and phenotypically distinct from known Thioalkalimicrobium species and unique to Soap Lake. It represented a new species, for which we suggest the name Thioalkalimicrobium microaerophilum sp. nov. PMID:17114324

  19. Sorption of arsenite, arsenate, and thioarsenates to iron oxides and iron sulfides: a kinetic and spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Couture, R-M; Rose, J; Kumar, N; Mitchell, K; Wallschläger, D; Van Cappellen, P

    2013-06-04

    Sorption to iron (Fe) minerals determines the fate of the toxic metalloid arsenic (As) in many subsurface environments. Recently, thiolated As species have been shown to dominate aqueous As speciation under a range of environmentally relevant conditions, thus highlighting the need for a quantitative understanding of their sorption behavior. We conducted batch experiments to measure the time-dependent sorption of two S-substituted arsenate species, mono- and tetrathioarsenate, and compared it to the sorption of arsenite and arsenate, in suspensions containing 2-line ferrihydrite, goethite, mackinawite, or pyrite. All four As species strongly sorbed to ferrihydrite. For the other sorbents, binding of the thiolated As species was generally lower compared to arsenate and arsenite, with the exception of the near instantaneous and complete sorption of monothioarsenate to pyrite. Analysis of the X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) spectra of sorbed complexes implied that monothioarsenate binds to Fe oxides as a monodentate, inner-sphere complex. In the presence of Fe sulfides, mono- and tetrathioarsenate were both unstable and partially reduced to arsenite. Adsorption of the thiolated As species to the Fe sulfide minerals also caused the substitution of surface sulfur (S) atoms by As and the formation of As-Fe bonds.

  20. An investigation by means of correlation analysis into the mechanisms of oxidation of aryl methyl sulfides and sulfoxides by dimethyldioxirane in various solvents.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Peter; Hendrickx, Ramon A A J; Smith, John R Lindsay

    2008-02-21

    Relative rate constants have been measured for the oxidation of aryl methyl sulfides and sulfoxides by dimethyldioxirane in acetone, in mixtures of acetone with aprotic co-solvents of both higher and lower relative permittivity, and in aqueous acetone mixtures. Correlation analyses of the effects of substituents in the different solvents show that, with one exception, reactions take place via a single step mechanism in which the formation of the new SO bond and the elimination of acetone occur concertedly. The exception was oxidation of the sulfides in aqueous acetone containing the highest proportion of water of those studied (20% v/v). Here, the behaviour of the reaction is consistent with a two-step mechanism in which the oxidant reversibly attacks the sulfide to form an open-chain sulfonium betaine that subsequently fragments to sulfoxide and acetone. There is no evidence for the participation of an intermediate dioxathietane as has been found in the case of sulfide oxidations by (trifluoromethyl)methyldioxirane in CH(2)Cl(2) and similar aprotic solvents. It is not justified to generalise a mechanism involving a betaine, with or without a derived dioxathietane, to the reactions of dimethyldioxirane in acetone.

  1. Nickel oxide thin film from electrodeposited nickel sulfide thin film: peroxide sensing and photo-decomposition of phenol.

    PubMed

    Jana, Sumanta; Samai, Subhasis; Mitra, Bibhas C; Bera, Pulakesh; Mondal, Anup

    2014-09-14

    A novel non-enzymatic peroxide sensor has been constructed by using nickel oxide (NiO) thin films as sensing material, which were prepared by a two-step process: (i) electrodeposition of nickel sulfide (NiS) and (ii) thermal air oxidation of as-deposited NiS to NiO. The resultant material is highly porous and comprises interconnected nanofibers. UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were used for a complete characterization of nanostructured NiO thin films. Cyclic voltammetry study shows that NiO/ITO electrode facilitates the oxidation of hydrogen peroxide and exhibits excellent catalytic activity towards its sensing. The amperometric study of NiO/ITO was carried out to determine the sensitivity, linear range, detection limit of the proposed sensor. The sensor exhibits prominent electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of H2O2 with a wide linear range and a low detection limit. The possible use of the synthesized NiO thin films as an effective photocatalyst for the decomposition of phenol is also discussed.

  2. [Phosphine poisoning in healthcare workers].

    PubMed

    Arredondo Trujillo, Francisco; Hurtado Pérez, Martha Patricia; Castañeda Borrayo, Yaocihuatl

    2011-01-01

    Phosphine gas constitutes a potential and serious little-known cause of poisoning of professional nature of the medical staff and nursing care of patients who voluntarily swallow phosphides rodenticides purposes suicide. The objective of this paper is to inform to healthcare workers from urgencies, forensic and occupational health services on this occupational hazard. We present the case of a nurse who suffered from poisoning by gas phosphine confirmed through an environmental monitoring of gases in an emergency department carried out by the government service of civil protection of the State of Jalisco.

  3. Geochemical investigation of the galvanic effects during oxidation of pyrite and base-metals sulfides.

    PubMed

    Chopard, Aurélie; Plante, Benoît; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Bouzahzah, Hassan; Marion, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Predicting the water quality at mine sites is of significant importance for developing mines with respect for the environment. Acid mine drainage (AMD) occurs when sulfides are in contact with oxygen and water, and several parameters and mechanisms influence final drainage quality. Galvanic interactions influence the reactivity of sulfide minerals, which act as semi-conductors. These galvanic interactions have been insufficiently studied in the context of AMD generation. In this study, the influence of pyrite on the reactivity of sphalerite and chalcopyrite was investigated. Five blends, comprised of free grains of quartz/pyrite, quartz/chalcopyrite, quartz/sphalerite, quartz/pyrite/chalcopyrite, and quartz/pyrite/sphalerite, were subjected to geochemical testing. Five weathering cells were monitored over a 200-day period during which they were leached twice weekly. Leachates were analyzed for pH, Eh, electrical conductivity, and sulfate and metal concentrations. The results of these analyses showed that galvanic interactions occurred between free sulfide grains. Pyrite was galvanically protected over the full testing period in the quartz/pyrite/chalcopyrite blend, and partially protected in the quartz/pyrite/sphalerite blend. Moreover, the release of Cu from chalcopyrite and Zn, Mn, and Cd from sphalerite was accelerated in the presence of pyrite. This work provides a better understanding of the influence of pyrite on chalcopyrite and sphalerite reactivity by highlighting the galvanic effects. In the future, to improve the reliability of AMD prediction tests, galvanic interactions should be considered in both the prediction of the acid generation potential and the estimation of metal and metalloid release rates.

  4. Harnessing Evolutionary Toxins for Signaling: Reactive Oxygen Species, Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in Plant Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, John T.

    2017-01-01

    During the early periods of evolution, as well as in niche environments today, organisms have had to learn to tolerate the presence of many reactive compounds, such as reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and hydrogen sulfide. It is now known that such compounds are instrumental in the signaling processes in plant cells. There are enzymes which can make them, while downstream of their signaling pathways are coming to light. These include the production of cGMP, the activation of MAP kinases and transcription factors, and the modification of thiol groups on many proteins. However, organisms have also had to tolerate other reactive compounds such as ammonia, methane, and hydrogen gas, and these too are being found to have profound effects on signaling in cells. Before a holistic view of how such signaling works, the full effects and interactions of all such reactive compounds needs to be embraced. A full understanding will be beneficial to both agriculture and future therapeutic strategies. PMID:28239389

  5. Simple Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Tin Sulfide/N-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Composites as Lithium Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Youn, Duck Hyun; Stauffer, Shannon K; Xiao, Penghao; Park, Hunmin; Nam, Yejin; Dolocan, Andrei; Henkelman, Graeme; Heller, Adam; Mullins, C Buddie

    2016-12-27

    Composites of nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (NRGO) and nanocrystalline tin sulfides were synthesized, and their performance as lithium ion battery anodes was evaluated. Following the first cycle the composite consisted of Li2S/LixSn/NRGO. The conductive NRGO cushions the stress associated with the expansion of lithiation of Sn, and the noncycling Li2S increases the residual Coulombic capacity of the cycled anode because (a) Sn domains in the composite formed of unsupported SnS2 expand only by 63% while those in the composite formed of unsupported SnS expand by 91% and (b) Li percolates rapidly at the boundary between the Li2S and LixSn nanodomains. The best cycling SnS2/NRGO-derived composite retained a specific capacity of 562 mAh g(-1) at the 200th cycle at 0.2 A g(-1) rate.

  6. Investigation on durability and reactivity of promising metal oxide sorbents during sulfidation and regeneration. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle process has been investigated by many to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at high pressures and high temperatures. Metal oxides such as zinc titanate oxides, zinc ferrite oxide, copper oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide, were found to be promising sorbents in comparison with other removal methods such as membrane separations and reactive membrane separations. Some metal oxide sorbents exhibited the quite favorable performance in terms of attrition resistance and sulfur capacity. Removal reaction of H{sub 2}S from coal gas mixtures with ZT-4 or other promising sorbents of fine solid particles, and regeneration reaction of sulfur-loaded sorbents will be carried on in a batch reactor or a continuous differential reactor. The objectives of this project are to find intrinsic initial reaction kinetics for the metal oxide-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to obtain effects of concentrations of coal gas components such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and moisture on equilibrium reaction rate constants of the reaction system at various reaction temperatures and pressures, to identify regeneration kinetics of sulfur-loaded metal oxide sorbents, and to formulate promising metal oxide sorbents for the removal of sulfur from coal gas mixtures. Promising durable metal oxide sorbents of high-sulfur- absorbing capacity will be formulated by mixing active metal oxide powders with inert metal oxide powders and calcining these powder mixtures, or impregnating active metal oxide sorbents on supporting metal oxide matrixes. The Research Triangle Institute will also prepare promising metal oxide sorbents for this research project, plan experiments on removal of sulfur compounds from coal gases with metal oxide sorbents as well as regeneration of sulfur-loaded metal oxide sorbents, and review experimental results. 1 ref., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Microwave opacity of phosphine: Application to remote sensing of the atmospheres of the outer planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick

    2001-08-01

    The pressure-broadened absorption of gaseous phosphine was measured in the laboratory under simulated conditions for outer planet atmospheres. Phosphine absorption was shown to be stronger than theoretical calculations indicate by more than an order of magnitude at long centimeter wavelengths. A new laboratory measurement- based formalism was developed for computation of absorptivity of gaseous phosphine in a hydrogen-helium atmosphere. Application of this formalism has shown that, in equal abundance, phosphine is a stronger absorber at long centimeter wavelengths than is ammonia, contradicting the widely held assumption that ammonia is the single dominant microwave absorber in outer planet atmospheres. Re-examinations of the Voyager radio occultation experiment results at Saturn and Neptune revealed that the inferred ammonia abundance for both planets requires supersaturation if ammonia is assumed to be the only major source of microwave opacity. The new formalism for phosphine opacity has been applied to a reinterpretation of these results at Saturn and Neptune. Results indicate that phosphine mixing ratios of 3-12 ppm and 1-3 ppm for Saturn and Neptune, respectively, account for the additional opacity over ammonia and hydrogen sulfide saturation. An existing disk-average radiative transfer model has been updated to include the new formalism and has been applied to the Saturn and Neptune atmospheres. Results from the updated radiative transfer model indicate best- fit deep abundances that are consistent with those from the re-interpretation of Voyager radio occultation experiments and with those from ground-based radio telescope observations of the microwave emission spectra of those planets. Also, a new ray-tracing-based elliptical-shell local radiative transfer model has been developed to aid in prediction and, eventually, interpretation of measurement results from the Cassini RADAR/radiometer. The ability of the Cassini radiometer to detect phosphine has been

  8. Chiral phosphines in nucleophilic organocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yumei; Sun, Zhanhu

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review discusses the tertiary phosphines possessing various chiral skeletons that have been used in asymmetric nucleophilic organocatalytic reactions, including annulations of allenes, alkynes, and Morita–Baylis–Hillman (MBH) acetates, carbonates, and ketenes with activated alkenes and imines, allylic substitutions of MBH acetates and carbonates, Michael additions, γ-umpolung additions, and acylations of alcohols. PMID:25246969

  9. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 2: Iron- and Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors arising during wine production are frequently removed by Cu(II) fining. In part 1 of this study ( 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b00641 ), the reaction of H2S and thiols with Cu(II) was examined; however, the interaction of iron and copper is also known to play an important synergistic role in mediating non-enzymatic wine oxidation. The interaction of these two metals in the oxidation of H2S and thiols (cysteine, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, and 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol) was therefore examined under wine-like conditions. H2S and thiols (300 μM) were reacted with Fe(III) (100 or 200 μM) alone and in combination with Cu(II) (25 or 50 μM), and concentrations of H2S and thiols, oxygen, and acetaldehyde were monitored over time. H2S and thiols were shown to be slowly oxidized in the presence of Fe(III) alone and were not bound to Fe(III) under model wine conditions. However, Cu(II) added to model wine containing Fe(III) was quickly reduced by H2S and thiols to form Cu(I) complexes, which then rapidly reduced Fe(III) to Fe(II). Oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of oxygen regenerated Fe(III) and completed the iron redox cycle. In addition, sulfur-derived oxidation products were observed, and the formation of organic polysulfanes was demonstrated.

  10. Vibrational study of new Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes with functionalized nitrogen-containing tertiary phosphine oxides. Ab initio study of ortho-, meta- and para-dimethylphosphinylmethyleneoxyaniline.

    PubMed

    Trendafilova, N; Bauer, G; Georgieva, I; Tosheva, T; Varbanov, S

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational study of new Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes of functionalized nitrogen-containing tertiary phosphine oxides, namely ortho-, meta- and para-dimethylphosphinylmethyleneoxyaniline (o-, m- and p-dpmoa), (CH3)2P(O)CH2OC6H4NH2, have been presented. Geometry optimization of the ligands was performed at HF/6-31G* and B3LYP/6-31G* levels of the theory. Harmonic frequencies were calculated at HF/6-31G* optimized geometries. Relative gas-phase and solution-phase (H2O and CH3CN) basicities of o-, m- and p-dpmoa ligands have been determined by ab initio calculations at STO-3G level with the Onsager reaction field model. On the basis of the vibrational study, physical and analytical data it was suggested that the ligands in the complexes studied coordinate through the amino group and form square-planar platinum and palladium complexes of the general formula ML2Cl2 (M = Pt, Pd, L = o-, m- and p-dpmoa).

  11. Vibrational study of new Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes with functionalized nitrogen-containing tertiary phosphine oxides. Ab initio study of ortho-, meta- and para-dimethylphosphinylmethyleneoxyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, N.; Bauer, G.; Georgieva, I.; Tosheva, T.; Varbanov, S.

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational study of new Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes of functionalized nitrogen-containing tertiary phosphine oxides, namely ortho-, meta- and para-dimethylphosphinylmethyleneoxyaniline ( o-, m- and p-dpmoa), (CH 3) 2P(O)CH 2OC 6H 4NH 2, have been presented. Geometry optimization of the ligands was performed at HF/6-31G* and B3LYP/6-31G* levels of the theory. Harmonic frequencies were calculated at HF/6-31G* optimized geometries. Relative gas-phase and solution-phase (H 2O and CH 3CN) basicities of o-, m- and p-dpmoa ligands have been determined by ab initio calculations at STO-3G level with the Onsager reaction field model. On the basis of the vibrational study, physical and analytical data it was suggested that the ligands in the complexes studied coordinate through the amino group and form square-planar platinum and palladium complexes of the general formula ML 2Cl 2 (M=Pt, Pd, L= o-, m- and p-dpmoa).

  12. In-Situ Generation of Oxide Nanowire Arrays from AgCuZn Alloy Sulfide with Enhanced Electrochemical Oxygen-Evolving Performance.

    PubMed

    Xie, Minghao; Ai, Shiqi; Yang, Jian; Yang, Yudi; Chen, Yihan; Jin, Yong

    2015-08-12

    In this study, AgCuZn sulfide is fabricated on the surface of AgCuZn alloys by hydrothermal sulfuration. This ternary metal sulfide is equipped with enhanced activity toward oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in an alkaline electrolyte. Through comparison of the alloys with diverse compositions, we find out the best electrochemical property of a particular alloy sulfide forming on a AgCuZn substrate (Ag:Cu:Zn=43:49:8). The alloy sulfide exhibits an onset overpotential (η) of 0.27 V with a Tafel slope of 95±2 mV dec(-1) and a current density of 130 mA cm(-2) at η of 0.57 V. Moreover, the obtained AgCuZn sulfide displays excellent stability, where the current density can increase to 130% of the initial value after a water electrolysis test for 100,000 s (27.7 h). Through investigating the electrode before and after the electrocatalysis, we find a remarkable activated process during which self-supported copper-silver oxide nanowire (CuO-Ag2O NW) arrays in situ form on the surface of the electrode. This work provides a feasible strategy for synthesis of high performance nonprecious metal electrocatalysts for water splitting.

  13. Selenium Sulfide

    MedlinePlus

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  14. Sulfide oxidation and acid mine drainage formation within two active tailings impoundments in the Golden Quadrangle of the Apuseni Mountains, Romania.

    PubMed

    Sima, Mihaela; Dold, Bernhard; Frei, Linda; Senila, Marin; Balteanu, Dan; Zobrist, Jurg

    2011-05-30

    Sulfidic mine tailings have to be classified as one of the major source of hazardous materials leading to water contamination. This study highlights the processes leading to sulfide oxidation and acid mine drainage (AMD) formation in the active stage of two tailings impoundments located in the southern part of the Apuseni Mountains, in Romania, a well-known region for its long-term gold-silver and metal mining activity. Sampling was undertaken when both impoundments were still in operation in order to assess their actual stage of oxidation and long-term behavior in terms of the potential for acid mine drainage generation. Both tailings have high potential for AMD formation (2.5 and 3.7 wt.% of pyrite equivalent, respectively) with lesser amount of carbonates (5.6 and 3.6 wt.% of calcite equivalent) as neutralization potential (ABA=-55.6 and -85.1 tCaCO(3)/1000 t ) and showed clear signs of sulfide oxidation yet during operation. Sequential extraction results indicate a stronger enrichment and mobility of elements in the oxidized tailings: Fe as Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides and oxides (transformation from sulfide minerals, leaching in oxidation zone), Ca mainly in water soluble and exchangeable form where gypsum and calcite are dissolved and higher mobility of Cu for Ribita and Pb for Mialu. Two processes leading to the formation of mine drainage at this stage could be highlighted (1) a neutral Fe(II) plume forming in the impoundment with ferrihydrite precipitation at its outcrop and (2) acid mine drainage seeping in the unsaturated zone of the active dam, leading to the formation of schwertmannite at its outcrop. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Iron sulfide attenuates the methanogenic toxicity of elemental copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles and their soluble metal ion analogs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    Elemental copper (Cu(0)) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25-75μm) and coarse (500 to 1200μm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu(0) and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu(0) NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excess of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Iron Sulfide Attenuates the Methanogenic Toxicity of Elemental Copper and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and their Soluble Metal Ion Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2016-01-01

    Elemental copper (Cu0) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25–75 µm) and coarse (500 to 1200 µm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu0 and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu0 NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excesses of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens. PMID:26803736

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits High-Salt Diet-Induced Myocardial Oxidative Stress and Myocardial Hypertrophy in Dahl Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pan; Shen, Zhizhou; Yu, Wen; Huang, Yaqian; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on high-salt-induced oxidative stress and myocardial hypertrophy in salt-sensitive (Dahl) rats. Thirty male Dahl rats and 40 SD rats were included in the study. They were randomly divided into Dahl control (Dahl + NS), Dahl high salt (Dahl + HS), Dahl + HS + NaHS, SD + NS, SD + HS, SD + HS + NaHS, and SD + HS + hydroxylamine (HA). Rats in Dahl + NS and SD + NS groups were given chow with 0.5% NaCl and 0.9% normal saline intraperitoneally daily. Myocardial structure, α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) expressions were determined. Endogenous myocardial H2S pathway and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues were tested. Myocardial H2S pathway was downregulated with myocardial hypertrophy featured by increased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, decreased α-MHC and increased β-MHC expressions in Dahl rats with high-salt diet (all P < 0.01), and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues was significantly activated, demonstrated by the increased contents of hydroxyl radical, malondialdehyde and oxidized glutathione and decreased total antioxidant capacity, carbon monoxide, catalase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and decreased SOD1 and SOD2 protein expressions (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). However, H2S reduced myocardial hypertrophy with decreased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, increased α-MHC, decreased β-MHC expressions and inhibited oxidative stress in myocardial tissues of Dahl rats with high-salt diet. However, no significant difference was found in H2S pathway, myocardial structure, α-MHC and β-MHC protein and oxidative status in myocardial tissues among SD + NS, SD + HS, and SD + HS + NaHS groups. HA, an inhibitor of cystathionine β-synthase, inhibited myocardial H2S pathway (P < 0.01), and stimulated myocardial hypertrophy and oxidative stress in SD rats

  18. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits High-Salt Diet-Induced Myocardial Oxidative Stress and Myocardial Hypertrophy in Dahl Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pan; Shen, Zhizhou; Yu, Wen; Huang, Yaqian; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on high-salt-induced oxidative stress and myocardial hypertrophy in salt-sensitive (Dahl) rats. Thirty male Dahl rats and 40 SD rats were included in the study. They were randomly divided into Dahl control (Dahl + NS), Dahl high salt (Dahl + HS), Dahl + HS + NaHS, SD + NS, SD + HS, SD + HS + NaHS, and SD + HS + hydroxylamine (HA). Rats in Dahl + NS and SD + NS groups were given chow with 0.5% NaCl and 0.9% normal saline intraperitoneally daily. Myocardial structure, α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) expressions were determined. Endogenous myocardial H2S pathway and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues were tested. Myocardial H2S pathway was downregulated with myocardial hypertrophy featured by increased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, decreased α-MHC and increased β-MHC expressions in Dahl rats with high-salt diet (all P < 0.01), and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues was significantly activated, demonstrated by the increased contents of hydroxyl radical, malondialdehyde and oxidized glutathione and decreased total antioxidant capacity, carbon monoxide, catalase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and decreased SOD1 and SOD2 protein expressions (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). However, H2S reduced myocardial hypertrophy with decreased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, increased α-MHC, decreased β-MHC expressions and inhibited oxidative stress in myocardial tissues of Dahl rats with high-salt diet. However, no significant difference was found in H2S pathway, myocardial structure, α-MHC and β-MHC protein and oxidative status in myocardial tissues among SD + NS, SD + HS, and SD + HS + NaHS groups. HA, an inhibitor of cystathionine β-synthase, inhibited myocardial H2S pathway (P < 0.01), and stimulated myocardial hypertrophy and oxidative stress in SD rats

  19. Hydrogen sulfide improves survival after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation via a nitric oxide synthase 3 dependent mechanism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Minamishima, Shizuka; Bougaki, Masahiko; Sips, Patrick Y.; De Yu, Jia; Minamishima, Yoji Andrew; Elrod, John W.; Lefer, David J.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito

    2009-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac arrest (CA) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. We sought to evaluate the impact of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the outcome after CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in mouse. Methods and Results Mice were subjected to 8 min of normothermic CA and resuscitated with chest compression and mechanical ventilation. Seven minutes after the onset of CA, mice received sodium sulfide (Na2S, 0.55 mg/kg i.v.) or vehicle 1 min before CPR. There was no difference in the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), CPR time to ROSC, and left ventricular (LV) function at ROSC between groups. Administration of Na2S 1 min before CPR markedly improved survival rate at 24h after CPR (15/15) compared to vehicle (10/26, P=0.0001 vs Na2S). Administration of Na2S prevented CA/CPR-induced oxidative stress and ameliorated LV and neurological dysfunction 24h after CPR. Delayed administration of Na2S at 10 min after CPR did not improve outcomes after CA/CPR. Cardioprotective effects of Na2S were confirmed in isolated-perfused mouse hearts subjected to global ischemia and reperfusion. Cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL, an enzyme that produces H2S) markedly improved outcomes of CA/CPR. Na2S increased phosphorylation of NOS3 in LV and brain cortex, increased serum nitrite/nitrate levels, and attenuated CA-induced mitochondrial injury and cell death. NOS3 deficiency abrogated the protective effects of Na2S on the outcome of CA/CPR. Conclusions These results suggest that administration of Na2S at the time of CPR improves outcome after cardiac arrest possibly via an NOS3-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:19704099

  20. Pyritic event beds and sulfidized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide aggregates in metalliferous black mudstones of the Paleoproterozoic Talvivaara formation, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Laitala, Jaakko J.; Lahtinen, Raimo; Whitehouse, Martin J.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleoproterozoic, 2.0-1.9 Ga Talvivaara formation of Finland was deposited during the Shunga Event, a worldwide episode of enhanced accumulation of organic-rich sediments in the aftermath of the Lomagundi-Jatuli carbon isotope excursion. Sulfidic carbonaceous mudstones in the Talvivaara formation contain one of the largest known shale-hosted nickel deposits. In order to gain new insight into this Shungian sedimentary environment, sedimentological, petrographical and in situ S and Fe isotopic microanalyses were carried out on samples representing depositional and early-diagenetic conditions. The event-bedded lithology with tidal signatures in the organic-rich mudstones strongly indicates deposition from predominantly river-delivered mud on a highly-productive coastal area, below storm-wave base. The riverine supply of phosphorus, sulfate and iron supported high primary productivity and resulted in strong lateral and vertical chemical gradients in the nearshore waters with a shallow oxic surface layer underlain by euxinic water. The stratigraphic upper part of the Talvivaara formation contains banded intervals of thin alternating pyrite beds and carbonaceous mudstone beds. The pyrite beds were deposited by seaward excursions of the concentrated, acidic Fe-rich river plume subsequent to droughts or dry seasons, which led to intense pyrite precipitation upon mixing with euxinic waters. δ34S and δ56Fe values of the bedded pyrite (median δ34S = - 10.3 ‰ and δ56Fe = - 0.79 ‰) are consistent with the reaction of dissolved Fe(II) with H2S from bacterial sulfate reduction. Organic-rich clayey Fe-monosulfide-bearing granules were transported from the muddy estuary, and enclosed in Fe (oxyhydr)oxide aggregates that were forming by wave and current reworking in nearshore accumulations of river-delivered iron. The isotopic composition of these presently pyrrhotitic inclusions (median δ34S = - 3.3 ‰ and δ56Fe = - 1.6 ‰) indicates microbial iron reduction. The Fe

  1. Protective effects of hydrogen sulfide inhalation on oxidative stress in rats with cotton smoke inhalation-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    HAN, ZHI-HAI; JIANG, YI; DUAN, YUN-YOU; WANG, XIAO-YANG; HUANG, YAN; FANG, TING-ZHENG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism by which hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhalation protects against oxidative stress in rats with cotton smoke inhalation-induced lung injury. A total of 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were separated randomly into four groups, which included the control, H2S, smoke and smoke + H2S groups. A rat model of cotton smoke inhalation-induced lung injury was established following inhalation of 30% oxygen for 6 h. In addition, H2S (80 ppm) was inhaled by the rats in the H2S and smoke + H2S groups for 6 h following smoke or sham-smoke inhalation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to measure various indices in the rat lung homogenate, while the levels of nuclear factor (NF)-κBp65 in the lung tissue of the rats were determined and semiquantitatively analyzed using immunohistochemistry. In addition, quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction was employed to detect the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the rat lung tissue. The concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), inducible iNOS and NF-κBp65, as well as the sum-integrated optical density of NF-κBp65 and the relative mRNA expression of iNOS, in the rat lung tissue from the smoke + H2S group were significantly lower when compared with the smoke group. The concentrations of MDA, NO, iNOS and NF-κBp65 in the H2S group were comparable to that of the control group. Therefore, inhalation of 80 ppm H2S may reduce iNOS mRNA transcription and the production of iNOS and NO in rats by inhibiting NF-κBp65 activation, subsequently decreasing oxidative stress and cotton smoke inhalation-induced lung injury. PMID:26170929

  2. Mineralogical and chemical assessment of concrete damaged by the oxidation of sulfide-bearing aggregates: Importance of thaumasite formation on reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A.; Duchesne, J.; Fournier, B.; Durand, B.; Rivard, P.; Shehata, M.

    2012-10-15

    Damages in concrete containing sulfide-bearing aggregates were recently observed in the Trois-Rivieres area (Quebec, Canada), characterized by rapid deterioration within 3 to 5 years after construction. A petrographic examination of concrete core samples was carried out using a combination of tools including: stereomicroscopic evaluation, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. The aggregate used to produce concrete was an intrusive igneous rock with different metamorphism degrees and various proportions of sulfide minerals. In the rock, sulfide minerals were often surrounded by a thin layer of carbonate minerals (siderite). Secondary reaction products observed in the damaged concrete include 'rust' mineral forms (e.g. ferric oxyhydroxides such as goethite, limonite (FeO (OH) nH{sub 2}O) and ferrihydrite), gypsum, ettringite and thaumasite. In the presence of water and oxygen, pyrrhotite oxidizes to form iron oxyhydroxides and sulphuric acid. The acid then reacts with the phases of the cement paste/aggregate and provokes the formation of sulfate minerals. Understanding both mechanisms, oxidation and internal sulfate attack, is important to be able to duplicate the damaging reaction in laboratory conditions, thus allowing the development of a performance test for evaluating the potential for deleterious expansion in concrete associated with sulfide-bearing aggregates.

  3. Single-step co-deposition of nanostructured tungsten oxide supported gold nanoparticles using a gold-phosphine cluster complex as the gold precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molkenova, Anara; Sarip, Rozie; Sathasivam, Sanjay; Umek, Polona; Vallejos, Stella; Blackman, Chris; Hogarth, Graeme; Sankar, Gopinathan

    2014-12-01

    The use of a molecular gold organometallic cluster in chemical vapour deposition is reported, and it is utilized, together with a tungsten oxide precursor, for the single-step co-deposition of (nanostructured) tungsten oxide supported gold nanoparticles (NPs). The deposited gold-NP and tungsten oxide supported gold-NP are highly active catalysts for benzyl alcohol oxidation; both show higher activity than SiO2 supported gold-NP synthesized via a solution-phase method, and tungsten oxide supported gold-NP show excellent selectivity for conversion to benzaldehyde.

  4. Facile covalent immobilization of cadmium sulfide quantum dots on graphene oxide nanosheets: preparation, characterization, and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Choi, Byung Choon; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2010-11-01

    A facile approach for the preparation of a novel hybrid material containing graphene and an inorganic semiconducting material, cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs), is demonstrated for the first time. First, amino-functionalized CdS QDs were prepared by modifications of the kinetic trapping method. Then, pristine graphite was oxidized and exfoliated to obtain graphene oxide nanosheets (GONS), which were then acylated with thionyl chloride to introduce acyl chloride groups on their surface. Subsequently, immobilization of the CdS QDs on the GONS surface was achieved through an amidation reaction between the amino groups located on the CdS QDs surface and the acyl chloride groups bound to the GONS surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy were employed to investigate the changes in the surface functionalities, while high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to study the morphologies and distribution of the CdS QDs on the GONS surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to characterize the weight loss of the samples on heating. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were used to study the optical properties of the prepared CdS QDs and the CdS-graphene hybrid material.

  5. Facile covalent immobilization of cadmium sulfide quantum dots on graphene oxide nanosheets: preparation, characterization, and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Choi, Byung Choon; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2010-11-19

    A facile approach for the preparation of a novel hybrid material containing graphene and an inorganic semiconducting material, cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs), is demonstrated for the first time. First, amino-functionalized CdS QDs were prepared by modifications of the kinetic trapping method. Then, pristine graphite was oxidized and exfoliated to obtain graphene oxide nanosheets (GONS), which were then acylated with thionyl chloride to introduce acyl chloride groups on their surface. Subsequently, immobilization of the CdS QDs on the GONS surface was achieved through an amidation reaction between the amino groups located on the CdS QDs surface and the acyl chloride groups bound to the GONS surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy were employed to investigate the changes in the surface functionalities, while high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and field emission scanning electronic microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to study the morphologies and distribution of the CdS QDs on the GONS surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was employed to characterize the weight loss of the samples on heating. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were used to study the optical properties of the prepared CdS QDs and the CdS-graphene hybrid material.

  6. A Novel Mechanism of Formaldehyde Neurotoxicity: Inhibition of Hydrogen Sulfide Generation by Promoting Overproduction of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cheng-Fang; Zhuang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Ping; Gu, Hong-Feng; Hu, Bi

    2013-01-01

    Background Formaldehyde (FA) induces neurotoxicity by overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increasing studies have shown that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), an endogenous gastransmitter, protects nerve cells against oxidative stress by its antioxidant effect. It has been shown that overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) inhibits the activity of cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS), the predominant H2S-generating enzyme in the central nervous system. Objective We hypothesize that FA-caused neurotoxicity involves the deficiency of this endogenous protective antioxidant gas, which results from excessive generation of NO. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether FA disturbs H2S synthesis in PC12 cells, and whether this disturbance is associated with overproduction of NO. Principal Findings We showed that exposure of PC12 cells to FA causes reduction of viability, inhibition of CBS expression, decrease of endogenous H2S production, and NO production. CBS silencing deteriorates FA-induced decreases in endogenous H2S generation, neurotoxicity, and intracellular ROS accumulation in PC12 cells; while ADMA, a specific inhibitor of NOS significantly attenuates FA-induced decreases in endogenous H2S generation, neurotoxicity, and intracellular ROS accumulation in PC12 cells. Conclusion/Significance Our data indicate that FA induces neurotoxicity by inhibiting the generation of H2S through excess of NO and suggest that strategies to manipulate endogenous H2S could open a suitable novel therapeutic avenue for FA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:23359814

  7. Hydrogen polysulfide (H2S n ) signaling along with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO).

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideo

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a physiological mediator with various roles, including neuro-modulation, vascular tone regulation, and cytoprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injury, angiogenesis, and oxygen sensing. Hydrogen polysulfide (H2S n ), which possesses a higher number of sulfur atoms than H2S, recently emerged as a potential signaling molecule that regulates the activity of ion channels, a tumor suppressor, transcription factors, and protein kinases. Some of the previously reported effects of H2S are now attributed to the more potent H2S n . H2S n is produced by 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST) from 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP) and is generated by the chemical interaction of H2S with nitric oxide (NO). H2S n sulfhydrates (sulfurates) cysteine residues of target proteins and modifies their activity, whereas H2S sulfurates oxidized cysteine residues as well as reduces cysteine disulfide bonds. This review focuses on the recent progress made in studies concerning the production and physiological roles of H2S n and H2S.

  8. A novel mechanism of formaldehyde neurotoxicity: inhibition of hydrogen sulfide generation by promoting overproduction of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Qing; Fang, Heng-Rong; Zhou, Cheng-Fang; Zhuang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Ping; Gu, Hong-Feng; Hu, Bi

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) induces neurotoxicity by overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increasing studies have shown that hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), an endogenous gastransmitter, protects nerve cells against oxidative stress by its antioxidant effect. It has been shown that overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) inhibits the activity of cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS), the predominant H(2)S-generating enzyme in the central nervous system. We hypothesize that FA-caused neurotoxicity involves the deficiency of this endogenous protective antioxidant gas, which results from excessive generation of NO. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether FA disturbs H(2)S synthesis in PC12 cells, and whether this disturbance is associated with overproduction of NO. We showed that exposure of PC12 cells to FA causes reduction of viability, inhibition of CBS expression, decrease of endogenous H(2)S production, and NO production. CBS silencing deteriorates FA-induced decreases in endogenous H(2)S generation, neurotoxicity, and intracellular ROS accumulation in PC12 cells; while ADMA, a specific inhibitor of NOS significantly attenuates FA-induced decreases in endogenous H(2)S generation, neurotoxicity, and intracellular ROS accumulation in PC12 cells. Our data indicate that FA induces neurotoxicity by inhibiting the generation of H(2)S through excess of NO and suggest that strategies to manipulate endogenous H(2)S could open a suitable novel therapeutic avenue for FA-induced neurotoxicity.

  9. Elevating the triplet energy levels of dibenzofuran-based ambipolar phosphine oxide hosts for ultralow-voltage-driven efficient blue electrophosphorescence: from D-A to D-π-A systems.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunmiao; Zhang, Zhensong; Xu, Hui; Li, Jing; Zhao, Yi; Yan, Pengfei; Liu, Shiyong

    2013-01-21

    A series of donor (D)-π-acceptor (A)-type phosphine-oxide hosts (DBF(x) POPhCz(n)), which were composed of phenylcarbazole, dibenzofuran (DBF), and diphenylphosphine-oxide (DPPO) moieties, were designed and synthesized. Phenyl π-spacer groups were inserted between the carbazolyl and DBF groups, which effectively weakened the charge transfer and triplet-excited-state extension. As the result, the first triplet energy levels (T(1)) of DBF(x)POPhCz(n) are elevated to about 3.0 eV, 0.1 eV higher than their D-A-type analogues. Nevertheless, the electrochemical analysis and DFT calculations demonstrated the ambipolar characteristics of DBF(x)POPhCz(n). The phenyl π spacers hardly influenced the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energy levels and the carrier-transporting ability of the materials. Therefore, these D-π-A systems are endowed with higher T(1) states, as well as comparable electrical properties to D-A systems. Phosphorescent blue-light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) that were based on DBF(x)POPhCz(n) not only inherited the ultralow driving voltages (2.4 V for onset, about 2.8 V at 200 cd m(-2), and <3.4 V at 1000 cd m(-2)) but also had much-improved efficiencies, including about 26 cd A(-1) for current efficiency, 30 Lm W(-1) for power efficiency, and 13% for external quantum efficiency, which were more than twice the values of devices that are based on conventional unipolar host materials. This performance makes DBFDPOPhCz(n) among the best hosts for ultralow-voltage-driven blue PHOLEDs reported so far. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Phosphine Catalysis of Allenes with Electrophiles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiming; Xu, Xingzhu; Kwon, Ohyun

    2014-01-01

    Nucleophilic phosphine catalysis of allenes with electrophiles is one of the most powerful and straightforward synthetic strategies for the generation of highly functionalized carbocycle or heterocycle structural motifs, which are present in a wide range of bioactive natural products and medicinally important substances. The reaction topologies can be controlled through judicious choice of the phosphine catalyst and the structural variations of starting materials. This Tutorial Review presents selected examples of nucleophilic phosphine catalysis using allenes and electrophiles. PMID:24663290

  11. Possible role of phosphine in chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raulin, F.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments simulating the formation of organic molecules in model reducing atmospheres including phosphine show that a variety of organic molecules can be synthesized. From the experiments using UV light as an energy source, it appears that the presence of phosphine drastically increases the yield of photolysis of methane and, thus, the yield of the formation of organic matter. The presence of phosphine enhances the formation of organophosphorous compounds, such as methyl and dimethylphosphine.

  12. Electrochemical behavior of silver sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Drouven, B.U.E.

    1982-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of silver sulfide in sulfuric acid as well as in nitric acid was studied using electrodes made from synthetic silver sulfide. The primary techniques used were potentiostatic, potentiodynamic, galvanostatic and corrosion cell experiments. The cathodic reaction of silver sulfide produces silver and hydrogen sulfide. This reaction mechanism is a sequential two step charge transfer involving a single electron in each step. Silver ions are produced from silver sulfide upon applying an anodic potential. The dissolution rate of silver sulfide can be so high that the formation of silver sulfate occurs which partially covers the silver sulfide surface and inhibits a further rate increase. The sulfur from the silver sulfide will be oxidized at low overpotentials to elemental sulfur; at high overpotentials, the oxidation to sulfate or bisulfate is observed. The results suggest that the catalysis of chalcopyrite by the addition of silver ions is caused by the formation and subsequent dissolution of silver sulfide leaving a porous layer behind. The understanding of the reaction mechanism of silver sulfide dissolution and its optimization will significantly improve the economic evaluation of industrial processes using the catalyzed leaching of chalcopyrite. The present knowledge of the catalysis indicates that other ions may be substituted for silver ions which would increase the feasibility of hydrometallurgical processes.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide modulates the release of nitric oxide and VEGF in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Varani, Katia; Fazzi, Debora; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a novel signaling molecule with both pro- or anti-inflammatory effect. The present study aimed to: (i) characterize the in vitro effects of H(2)S on human keratinocyte's proliferation and death; (ii) investigate the ability of H(2)S to modulate VEGF and NO production; (iii) examine the intracellular signaling pathways involved in VEGF and NO modulatory effect. We found that exogenous application of H(2)S (NaHS and GYY4137 as H(2)S donors) significantly enhances NO through increase of iNOS, in a manner Akt-dependent. The increment in NO down-regulates ERK1/2 activation thereby resulting in the decrease of VEGF release. We suggest that H(2)S-releasing agents may be promising therapeutics for chronic inflammatory disorders of the skin, i.e. psoriasis, in which NO increases as well as anti-VEGF treatments have been suggested to be novel effective approaches.

  14. Sulfidation kinetics of silver nanoparticles reacted with metal sulfides.

    PubMed

    Thalmann, Basilius; Voegelin, Andreas; Sinnet, Brian; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Kaegi, Ralf

    2014-05-06

    Recent studies have documented that the sulfidation of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP), possibly released to the environment from consumer products, occurs in anoxic zones of urban wastewater systems and that sulfidized Ag-NP exhibit dramatically reduced toxic effects. However, whether Ag-NP sulfidation also occurs under oxic conditions in the absence of bisulfide has not been addressed, yet. In this study we, therefore, investigated whether metal sulfides that are more resistant toward oxidation than free sulfide, could enable the sulfidation of Ag-NP under oxic conditions. We reacted citrate-stabilized Ag-NP of different sizes (10-100 nm) with freshly precipitated and crystalline CuS and ZnS in oxygenated aqueous suspensions at pH 7.5. The extent of Ag-NP sulfidation was derived from the increase in dissolved Cu(2+) or Zn(2+) over time and linked with results from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis of selected samples. The sulfidation of Ag-NP followed pseudo first-order kinetics, with rate coefficients increasing with decreasing Ag-NP diameter and increasing metal sulfide concentration and depending on the type (CuS and ZnS) and crystallinity of the reacting metal sulfide. Results from analytical electron microscopy revealed the formation of complex sulfidation patterns that seemed to follow preexisting subgrain boundaries in the pristine Ag-NP. The kinetics of Ag-NP sulfidation observed in this study in combination with reported ZnS and CuS concentrations and predicted Ag-NP concentrations in wastewater and urban surface waters indicate that even under oxic conditions and in the absence of free sulfide, Ag-NP can be transformed into Ag2S within a few hours to days by reaction with metal sulfides.

  15. Early diagenetic partial oxidation of organic matter and sulfides in the Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Excello Shale Member of the Fort Scott Limestone and equivalents, northern Midcontinent region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, J.R.; Leventhal, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    A process of early diagenetic partial oxidation of organic matter and sulfides has altered the chemical composition of the Middle Pennsylvanian Excello Shale Member of the Fort Scott Limestone and equivalents in the northern Midcontinent region. This process was identified by comparison of organic carbon contents, Rock-Eval hydrogen indices, organic carbon ??13C and element compositions of core and surface mine samples of the Excello Shale Member with analyses of three other underlying and overlying organic-matter-rich marine shales (offshore shale lithofacies) from southern Iowa, northern Missouri, eastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma. The end product of the partial oxidation process is shale with relatively low contents of hydrogen-poor, C13-enriched organic matter, lower contents of sulfur and sulfide-forming elements, and relatively unchanged contents of phosphorus and many trace elements (e.g. Cr, Ni, and V). However, because of lower organic carbon contents, element/organic carbon ratios are greatly increased. The partial oxidation process apparently took place during subaerial exposure of the overlying marine carbonate member (Blackjack Creek Member of the Fort Scott Limestone) following a marine regression when meteoric waters percolated down to the level of the Excello muds allowing oxidation of organic matter and sulfides. This hypothesis is supported by earlier workers, who have identified meteoric carbonate cements within, and soil horizons at the top of the Blackjack Creek Member. The period of oxidation is constrained in that organic matter and sulfides in the Little Osage Shale Member of the Fort Scott Limestone and equivalents (immediately overlying the Blackjack Creek Member) appear unaltered. Similar alteration of other shales in the Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian sections may be local to regional in extent and would depend on the extent and duration of the marine regression and be influenced by local variations in permeability and topography

  16. Abundances of Hyperthermophilic Autotrophic Fe(III) Oxide Reducers and Heterotrophs in Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimneys of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ver Eecke, Helene C.; Kelley, Deborah S.; Holden, James F.

    2009-01-01

    The abundances of hyperthermophilic heterotrophs, methanogens, and autotrophic reducers of amorphous Fe(III) oxide in 18 samples of deep-sea hydrothermal vent sulfide chimneys of the Endeavour Segment were measured. The results indicate that conditions favor the growth of iron reducers toward the interiors of these deposits and that of heterotrophs toward the outer surfaces near high-temperature polychaete worms (Paralvinella sulfincola). PMID:18978076

  17. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Todd H.; Berry, David A.; Lyons, K. David; Beer, Stephen K.; Monahan, Michael J.

    2001-11-06

    The development of low cost, highly efficient, desulfurization technology with integrated sulfur recovery remains a principle barrier issue for Vision 21 integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants. In this plan, the U. S. Department of Energy will construct ultra-clean, modular, co-production IGCC power plants each with chemical products tailored to meet the demands of specific regional markets. The catalysts employed in these co-production modules, for example water-gas-shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, are readily poisoned by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a sulfur contaminant, present in the coal-derived fuel gases. To prevent poisoning of these catalysts, the removal of H{sub 2}S down to the parts-per-billion level is necessary. Historically, research into the purification of coal-derived fuel gases has focused on dry technologies that offer the prospect of higher combined cycle efficiencies as well as improved thermal integration with co-production modules. Primarily, these concepts rely on a highly selective process separation step to remove low concentrations of H{sub 2}S present in the fuel gases and produce a concentrated stream of sulfur bearing effluent. This effluent must then undergo further processing to be converted to its final form, usually elemental sulfur. Ultimately, desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases may cost as much as 15% of the total fixed capital investment (Chen et al., 1992). It is, therefore, desirable to develop new technology that can accomplish H{sub 2}S separation and direct conversion to elemental sulfur more efficiently and with a lower initial fixed capital investment.

  18. Electrosprayed metal oxide semiconductor films for sensitive and selective detection of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Ghimbeu, Camelia Matei; Lumbreras, Martine; Schoonman, Joop; Siadat, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    Semiconductor metal oxide films of copper-doped tin oxide (Cu-SnO(2)), tungsten oxide (WO(3)) and indium oxide (In(2)O(3)) were deposited on a platinum coated alumina substrate employing the electrostatic spray deposition technique (ESD). The morphology studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows porous homogeneous films comprising uniformly distributed aggregates of nano particles. The X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) proves the formation of crystalline phases with no impurities. Besides, the Raman cartographies provided information about the structural homogeneity. Some of the films are highly sensitive to low concentrations of H(2)S (10 ppm) at low operating temperatures (100 and 200 °C) and the best response in terms of R(air)/R(gas) is given by Cu-SnO(2) films (2500) followed by WO(3) (1200) and In(2)O(3) (75). Moreover, all the films exhibit no cross-sensitivity to other reducing (SO(2)) or oxidizing (NO(2)) gases.

  19. Electrosprayed Metal Oxide Semiconductor Films for Sensitive and Selective Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Ghimbeu, Camelia Matei; Lumbreras, Martine; Schoonman, Joop; Siadat, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    Semiconductor metal oxide films of copper-doped tin oxide (Cu-SnO2), tungsten oxide (WO3) and indium oxide (In2O3) were deposited on a platinum coated alumina substrate employing the electrostatic spray deposition technique (ESD). The morphology studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows porous homogeneous films comprising uniformly distributed aggregates of nano particles. The X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) proves the formation of crystalline phases with no impurities. Besides, the Raman cartographies provided information about the structural homogeneity. Some of the films are highly sensitive to low concentrations of H2S (10 ppm) at low operating temperatures (100 and 200 °C) and the best response in terms of Rair/Rgas is given by Cu-SnO2 films (2500) followed by WO3 (1200) and In2O3 (75). Moreover, all the films exhibit no cross-sensitivity to other reducing (SO2) or oxidizing (NO2) gases. PMID:22291557

  20. Phosphine-catalyzed reductions of alkyl silyl peroxides by titanium hydride reducing agents: development of the method and mechanistic investigations.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jason R; Haynes, M Taylor; Thomas, Andrew M; Woerpel, K A

    2010-08-06

    A method that allows for the reduction of protected hydroperoxides by employing catalytic amounts of phosphine is presented. The combination of a titanium(IV) alkoxide and a siloxane allowed for the chemoselective reduction of phosphine oxides in the presence of alkyl silyl peroxides. Subsequent reduction of the peroxide moiety by phosphine provided the corresponding silylated alcohols in useful yields. Mechanistic experiments, including crossover experiments, support a mechanism in which the peroxide group was reduced and the silyl group was transferred in a concerted step. Labeling studies with (17)O-labeled peroxides demonstrate that the oxygen atom adjacent to the silicon atom is removed from the silyl peroxide.

  1. A mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation of a sulfide ore concentrate.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, S; Dahlstrom, D; Oolman, T

    1994-03-05

    The effect of dilution rate and feed solids concentration on the bacterial leaching of a pyrite/arsenopyrite ore concentrate was studied. A mathematical model was developed for the process based on the steady-state data collected over the range of dilution rates (20 to 110 h) and feed solids concentrations (6 to 18% w/v) studied. A modified Monod model with inhibition by arsenic was used to model bacterial ferrous ion oxidation rates. The model assumes that (i) pyrite and arsenopyrite leaching occurs solely by the action of ferric iron produced from the bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron and (ii) bacterial growth rates are proportional to ferrous ion oxidation rate. The equilibrium among the various ionic species present in the leach solution that are likely to have a significant effect on the bioleach process were included in the model. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Toward the formation of alkylphosphonic acids in phosphine ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Andrew; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo

    2016-10-01

    Phosphorus is one of the elemental building blocks of life on Earth and is important for information storage (RNA/DNA), energy transfer (ATP), cell membranes (phospholipids), and structure (bones & teeth). Due to the poor bioavailability of highly oxidized phosphorus (P(V)) found in ubiquitous phosphate (PO43-) minerals, reduced oxidation state (P(III)) compounds have been proposed as a phosphorus source for early life on Earth. Among these, the alkylphosphonic acids, which are the only phosphorus-containing organic compounds discovered in the Murchison meteorite, are a suggested exogenous source of prebiotic phosphorus. Phosphine (PH3) is a known component of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and the confirmation of circumstellar phosphine in the carbon-rich envelop of IRC +10216 along with the recent detection of phosphorus in the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko provide an additional foundation for studying extraterrestrial phosphorus chemistry and the origins of the alkylphosphonic acids. In the present study, reactions of phosphine ices with water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS), and most notably, reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry using tunable photoionization (PI-ReTOF-MS). Experiments were conducted at ultra-high vacuum pressures and cryogenic temperatures to better understand reaction pathways and products of phosphorus-containing compounds under icy conditions found in comets or the interstellar medium. The results of this study can provide support to the hypothesis that the alkylphosphonic acids were formed from interstellar phosphine and incorporated into meteorites such as Murchison.

  3. Isolation and characterization of strains CVO and FWKO B, two novel nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria isolated from oil field brine.

    PubMed

    Gevertz, D; Telang, A J; Voordouw, G; Jenneman, G E

    2000-06-01

    Bacterial strains CVO and FWKO B were isolated from produced brine at the Coleville oil field in Saskatchewan, Canada. Both strains are obligate chemolithotrophs, with hydrogen, formate, and sulfide serving as the only known energy sources for FWKO B, whereas sulfide and elemental sulfur are the only known electron donors for CVO. Neither strain uses thiosulfate as an energy source. Both strains are microaerophiles (1% O(2)). In addition, CVO grows by denitrification of nitrate or nitrite whereas FWKO B reduces nitrate only to nitrite. Elemental sulfur is the sole product of sulfide oxidation by FWKO B, while CVO produces either elemental sulfur or sulfate, depending on the initial concentration of sulfide. Both strains are capable of growth under strictly autotrophic conditions, but CVO uses acetate as well as CO(2) as its sole carbon source. Neither strain reduces sulfate; however, FWKO B reduces sulfur and displays chemolithoautotrophic growth in the presence of elemental sulfur, hydrogen, and CO(2). Both strains grow at temperatures between 5 and 40 degrees C. CVO is capable of growth at NaCl concentrations as high as 7%. The present 16s rRNA analysis suggests that both strains are members of the epsilon subdivision of the division Proteobacteria, with CVO most closely related to Thiomicrospira denitrifcans and FWKO B most closely related to members of the genus Arcobacter. The isolation of these two novel chemolithotrophic sulfur bacteria from oil field brine suggests the presence of a subterranean sulfur cycle driven entirely by hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and nitrate.

  4. In site bioimaging of hydrogen sulfide uncovers its pivotal role in regulating nitric oxide-induced lateral root formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Jun; Chen, Jian; Xian, Ming; Zhou, Li-Gang; Han, Fengxiang X; Gan, Li-Jun; Shi, Zhi-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gasotransmitter in mammals. Despite physiological changes induced by exogenous H2S donor NaHS to plants, whether and how H2S works as a true cellular signal in plants need to be examined. A self-developed specific fluorescent probe (WSP-1) was applied to track endogenous H2S in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) roots in site. Bioimaging combined with pharmacological and biochemical approaches were used to investigate the cross-talk among H2S, nitric oxide (NO), and Ca(2+) in regulating lateral root formation. Endogenous H2S accumulation was clearly associated with primordium initiation and lateral root emergence. NO donor SNP stimulated the generation of endogenous H2S and the expression of the gene coding for the enzyme responsible for endogenous H2S synthesis. Scavenging H2S or inhibiting H2S synthesis partially blocked SNP-induced lateral root formation and the expression of lateral root-related genes. The stimulatory effect of SNP on Ca(2+) accumulation and CaM1 (calmodulin 1) expression could be abolished by inhibiting H2S synthesis. Ca(2+) chelator or Ca(2+) channel blocker attenuated NaHS-induced lateral root formation. Our study confirmed the role of H2S as a cellular signal in plants being a mediator between NO and Ca(2+) in regulating lateral root formation.

  5. Hard X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization of oxidized surfaces of iron sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhlin, Yuri; Tomashevich, Yevgeny; Vorobyev, Sergey; Saikova, Svetlana; Romanchenko, Alexander; Félix, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) using an excitation energy range of 2 keV to 6 keV in combination with Fe K- and S K-edge XANES, measured simultaneously in total electron (TEY) and partial fluorescence yield (PFY) modes, have been applied to study near-surface regions of natural polycrystalline pyrite FeS2 and pyrrhotite Fe1-xS before and after etching treatments in an acidic ferric chloride solution. It was found that the following near-surface regions are formed owing to the preferential release of iron from oxidized metal sulfide lattices: (i) a thin, no more than 1-4 nm in depth, outer layer containing polysulfide species, (ii) a layer exhibiting less pronounced stoichiometry deviations and low, if any, concentrations of polysulfide, the composition and dimensions of which vary for pyrite and pyrrhotite and depend on the chemical treatment, and (iii) an extended almost stoichiometric underlayer yielding modified TEY XANES spectra, probably, due to a higher content of defects. We suggest that the extended layered structure should heavily affect the near-surface electronic properties, and processes involving the surface and interfacial charge transfer.

  6. Developing sulfide-oxidizing biofilm on H2S-exhausted carbon for sustainable bio-regeneration and biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia; Yan, Rong; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2009-05-30

    The feasibility of developing biofilm on exhausted carbon using pre-deposited sulfur compounds as the sole energy source was studied, aiming to re-use them in odor biofiltration. The exhausted carbon with different properties, including surface pH, sulfur content and porosity, was used. A series of off-line trials were conducted to investigate the release of sulfur compounds from the exhausted carbon and the attachment of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria on the exhausted carbon. Without any pre-treatment, a few bacteria attachment on exhausted carbon was observed by SEM, due to possibly the limitation of reduced sulfur compounds release for bacterial growth. The biofilm development was much improved by adding NaOH solution to partially pre-desorb the deposited sulfur into liquid phase, which provided initial energy for bacterial growth. With the attached bacteria, the further significant release of the deposited sulfur was achieved through an additional driving force: biodegradation. The key issues for developing biofilm on exhausted carbon were concluded, which mainly concerned of desorption of pre-deposited reduced sulfur compounds and porosity of carbon. The sulfur-associated reactions occurring in developing biofilm on exhausted carbon was proposed. Bio-regeneration of exhausted carbon in the course of biofilm development was also preliminarily assessed.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation in novel Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors dominated by an Acidithiobacillus and a Thiobacillus species.

    PubMed

    Gerrity, S; Kennelly, C; Clifford, E; Collins, G

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is an odourous, highly toxic gas commonly encountered in various commercial and municipal sectors. Three novel, laboratory-scale, Horizontal-Flow Biofilm Reactors (HFBRs) were tested for the removal of H2S gas from air streams over a 178-day trial at 10°C. Removal rates of up to 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1) were achieved, demonstrating the HFBRs as a feasible technology for the treatment of H2S-contaminated airstreams at low temperatures. Bio-oxidation of H2S in the reactors led to the production of H(+) and sulfate (SO(2-)4) ions, resulting in the acidification of the liquid phase. Reduced removal efficiency was observed at loading rates of 15.1 g [H2S] m(-3) h(-1). NaHCO3 addition to the liquid nutrient feed (synthetic wastewater (SWW)) resulted in improved H2S removal. Bacterial diversity, which was investigated by sequencing and fingerprinting 16S rRNA genes, was low, likely due to the harsh conditions prevailing in the systems. The HFBRs were dominated by two species from the genus Acidithiobacillus and Thiobacillus. Nonetheless, there were significant differences in microbial community structure between distinct HFBR zones due to the influence of alkalinity, pH and SO4 concentrations. Despite the low temperature, this study indicates HFBRs have an excellent potential to biologically treat H2S-contaminated airstreams.

  8. Biological consilience of hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide in plants: Gases of primordial earth linking plant, microbial and animal physiologies.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hideo; Cohen, Michael F

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced in the mammalian body through the enzymatic activities of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST). A growing number of studies have revealed that biogenic H2S produced in tissues is involved in a variety of physiological responses in mammals including vasorelaxation and neurotransmission. It is now evident that mammals utilize H2S to regulate multiple signaling systems, echoing the research history of the gaseous signaling molecules nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) that had previously only been recognized for their cytotoxicity. In the human diet, meats (mammals, birds and fishes) and vegetables (plants) containing cysteine and other sulfur compounds are the major dietary sources for endogenous production of H2S. Plants are primary producers in ecosystems on the earth and they synthesize organic sulfur compounds through the activity of sulfur assimilation. Although plant H2S-producing activities have been known for a long time, our knowledge of H2S biology in plant systems has not been updated to the extent of mammalian studies. Here we review recent progress on H2S studies, highlighting plants and bacteria. Scoping the future integration of H2S, NO and O2 biology, we discuss a possible linkage between physiology, ecology and evolutional biology of gas metabolisms that may reflect the historical changes of the Earth's atmospheric composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Studies on the Sulfoxidation of Dimethyl Sulfide by Compound I and Compound 0 of Cytochrome P450: Which Is the Better Oxidant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porro, Cristina S.; Sutcliffe, Michael J.; de Visser, Sam P.

    2009-06-01

    The cytochromes P450 are ubiquitous enzymes that are involved in key metabolizing processes in the body through the monoxygenation of substrates; however, their active oxidant is elusive. There have been reports that implicate that two oxidants, namely, the iron(IV)-oxo porphyrin cation radical (compound I) and the iron(III)-hydroperoxo complex (compound 0), both act as oxidants of sulfoxidation reactions, which contrasts theoretical studies on alkene epoxidation by compounds I and 0 that implicated compound 0 as a sluggish oxidant. To resolve this controversy and to establish the potency of compound I and compound 0 in sulfoxidation reactions, we have studied dimethyl sulfide sulfoxidation by both oxidants using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) technique on cytochrome P450 enzymes and have set up a model of two P450 isozymes: P450cam and P450BM3. The calculations support earlier gas-phase density functional theory modeling and show that compound 0 is a sluggish oxidant that is unable to compete with compound I. Furthermore, compound I is shown to react with dimethyl sulfide via single-state reactivity on a dominant quartet spin state surface.

  10. Oxidation of acid-volatile sulfide in surface sediments increases the release and toxicity of copper to the benthic amphipod Melita plumulosa.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stuart L; Ward, Daniel; Strom, David; Jolley, Dianne F

    2012-08-01

    Acid-volatile sulfides (AVS) are an important metal-binding phase in sediments. For sediments that contain an excess of AVS over simultaneously extracted metal (SEM) concentrations, acute or chronic effects should not result from the metals Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. While AVS phases may exist in surface sediments, the exposure to dissolved oxygen may oxidize the AVS and release metals to more bioavailable forms. We investigated the role of oxidation of AVS, and specifically copper sulfide phases, in surface sediments, in the toxicity to juveniles of the epibenthic amphipod, Melita plumulosa. Sediments containing known amounts of copper sulfide were prepared either in situ by reacting dissolved copper with AVS that had formed in field sediments or created in sediments within the laboratory, or by addition of synthesised CuS to sediments. Regardless of the form of the copper sulfide, considerable oxidation of AVS occurred during the 10-d tests. Sediments that had a molar excess of AVS compared to SEM at the start of the tests, did not always have an excess at the end of the tests. Consistent with the AVS-SEM model, no toxicity was observed for sediments with an excess of AVS throughout the tests. However, the study highlights the need to carefully consider the changes in AVS concentrations during tests, and that measurements of AVS and SEM concentrations should carefully target the materials to which the organisms are being exposed throughout tests, which in the case of juvenile M. plumulosa is the top few mm of the sediments.

  11. Triggers on sulfide saturation in Fe-Ti oxide-bearing, mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions in the Tarim large igneous province, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jun; Wang, Christina Yan; Xu, Yi-Gang; Xing, Chang-Ming; Ren, Ming-Hao

    2016-08-01

    Three Fe-Ti oxide-bearing layered intrusions (Mazaertag, Wajilitag, and Piqiang) in the Tarim large igneous province (NW China) have been investigated for understanding the relationship of sulfide saturation, Platinum-group element (PGE) enrichment, and Fe-Ti oxide accumulation in layered intrusions. These mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions have low PGE concentrations (<0.4 ppb Os, <0.7 ppb Ir, <1 ppb Ru, <0.2 ppb Rh, <5 ppb Pt, and <8 ppb Pd) and elevated Cu/Pd (2.2 × 104 to 3.3 × 106). The low PGE concentrations of the rocks are mainly attributed to PGE-depleted, parental magma that was produced by low degrees of partial melting of the mantle. The least contaminated rocks of the Mazaertag and Wajilitag intrusions have slightly enriched Os isotopic compositions with γOs(t = 280 Ma) values ranging from +13 to +23, indicating that the primitive magma may have been generated from a convecting mantle, without appreciable input of lithospheric mantle. The Mazaertag and Wajilitag intrusions have near-chondritic γOs(t) values (+13 to +60) against restricted ɛ Nd(t) values (-0.4 to +2.8), indicating insignificant crustal contamination. Rocks of the Piqiang intrusion have relatively low ɛ Nd(t) values of -3.1 to +1.0, consistent with ˜15 to 25 % assimilation of the upper crust. The rocks of the Mazaertag and Wajilitag intrusions have positive correlation of PGE and S, pointing to the control of PGE by sulfide. Poor correlation of PGE and S for the Piqiang intrusion is attributed to the involvement of multiple sulfide-stage liquids with different PGE compositions or sulfide-oxide reequilibration on cooling. These three layered intrusions have little potential of reef-type PGE mineralization. Four criteria are summarized in this study to help discriminate between PGE-mineralized and PGE-unmineralized mafic-ultramafic intrusions.

  12. Kinetics of reduction of sulfur dioxide by hydrogen sulfide in the presence of sulfoxides, pyridine N-oxide, trioctylphosphine oxide and tributyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Bikbaeva, G.G.; Baranovskaya, E.M.; Nikitin, Yu.E.

    1989-01-01

    The kinetic regularities were studied of the reduction of SO/sub 2/ by hydrogen sulfide in m-xylene containing 0.025 M of aliphatic sulfoxides, (C/sub 1/-C/sub 8/alkyl), diphenyl-, dibenzyl sulfoxides, tributyl phosphate (TBP), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) at 25/degree/C, and 0.001-0.003 M pyridine N-oxide (PyO) at 21-60/degree/C. It was shown that the reaction proceeds with the participation of an SO/sub 2/ complex having the composition of R/sub n/XO...SO/sub 2/ (where X = S, P, N). The kinetic regularities for the reaction taking place in the presence of aromatic sulfoxides are explainable by the contribution to the reaction of intermediate SO/sub 2/ complexes. The equilibrium constants of the complexation of SO/sub 2/ with aliphatic sulfoxides, PyO, TOPO, and TBP and the rate constant of the limiting stage of the reaction were calculated.

  13. Simple synthesis of cobalt sulfide nanorods for efficient electrocatalytic oxidation of vanillin in food samples.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Mani; Sakthivel, Mani; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2017-03-15

    Well-defined CoS nanorods (NR) were synthesized using a simple hydrothermal method, and were tested as an electrode material for electro-oxidation of vanillin. The NR material was characterized with regard to morphology, crystallinity, and electro-activity by use of appropriate analytical techniques. The resulting CoS NR@Nafion modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) exhibited efficient electro-oxidation of vanillin with a considerable linear range of current-vs-concentration (0.5-56μM vanillin) and a detection limit of 0.07μM. Also, food samples containing vanillin were studied to test suitability for commercial applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Microsensor Measurements of Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Oxidation in Compact Microbial Communities of Aerobic Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Michael; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    1992-01-01

    The microzonation of O2 respiration, H2S oxidation, and SO42- reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100 μm) with microsensors for O2, S2-, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured concentration profiles by using a simple one-dimensional diffusion reaction model. The importance of electron acceptor and electron donor availability for the microzonation of respiratory processes and their reaction rates was investigated. Oxygen respiration was found in the upper 0.2 to 0.4 mm of the biofilm, whereas sulfate reduction occurred in deeper, anoxic parts of the biofilm. Sulfate reduction accounted for up to 50% of the total mineralization of organic carbon in the biofilms. All H2S produced from sulfate reduction was reoxidized by O2 in a narrow reaction zone, and no H2S escaped to the overlying water. Turnover times of H2S and O2 in the reaction zone were only a few seconds owing to rapid bacterial H2S oxidation. Anaerobic H2S oxidation with NO3- could be induced by addition of nitrate to the medium. Total sulfate reduction rates increased when the availability of SO42- or organic substrate increased as a result of deepening of the sulfate reduction zone or an increase in the sulfate reduction intensity, respectively. PMID:16348687

  15. Anode materials for hydrogen sulfide containing feeds in a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roushanafshar, Milad

    SOFCs which can directly operate under high concentration of H2S would be economically beneficial as this reduces the cost of gas purification. H2S is highly reactive gas specie which can poison most of the conventional catalysts. As a result, developing anode materials which can tolerate high concentrations of H2S and also display high activity toward electrochemical oxidation of feed is crucial and challenging for this application. The performance of La0.4Sr0.6TiO3+/-delta -Y0.2Ce0.8O2-delta (LST-YDC) composite anodes in solid oxide fuel cells significantly improved when 0.5% H2 S was present in syngas (40% H2, 60% CO) or hydrogen. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses revealed that the rate of electrochemical oxidation of all fuel components improved when H2S containing syngas was present in the fuel. Electrochemical stability tests performed under potentiostatic condition showed that there was no power degradation for different feeds, and that there was power enhancement when 0.5% H2S was present in various feeds. The mechanism of performance improvement by H2S was discussed. Active anodes were synthesized via wet chemical impregnation of different amounts of La0.4Ce0.6O1.8 (LDC) and La 0.4Sr0.6TiO3 (L4ST) into porous yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). Co-impregnation of LDC with LS4T significantly improved the performance of the cell from 48 mW.cm-2 (L4ST) to 161 mW.cm -2 (LDC-L4ST) using hydrogen as fuel at 900 °C. The contribution of LDC to this improvement was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). EIS measurements using symmetrical cells showed that the polarization resistance decreased from 3.1¦O.cm 2 to 0.5 O.cm2 when LDC was co-impregnated with LST, characterized in humidified H2 (3% H2O) at 900 °C. In addition, the microstructure of the cell was modified when LDC was impregnated prior to L4ST into the porous YSZ. TEM and SEM

  16. Hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide metabolites in the blood of free-ranging brown bears and their potential roles in hibernation.

    PubMed

    Revsbech, Inge G; Shen, Xinggui; Chakravarti, Ritu; Jensen, Frank B; Thiel, Bonnie; Evans, Alina L; Kindberg, Jonas; Fröbert, Ole; Stuehr, Dennis J; Kevil, Christopher G; Fago, Angela

    2014-08-01

    During winter hibernation, brown bears (Ursus arctos) lie in dens for half a year without eating while their basal metabolism is largely suppressed. To understand the underlying mechanisms of metabolic depression in hibernation, we measured type and content of blood metabolites of two ubiquitous inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO), in winter-hibernating and summer-active free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears. We found that levels of sulfide metabolites were overall similar in summer-active and hibernating bears but their composition in the plasma differed significantly, with a decrease in bound sulfane sulfur in hibernation. High levels of unbound free sulfide correlated with high levels of cysteine (Cys) and with low levels of bound sulfane sulfur, indicating that during hibernation H2S, in addition to being formed enzymatically from the substrate Cys, may also be regenerated from its oxidation products, including thiosulfate and polysulfides. In the absence of any dietary intake, this shift in the mode of H2S synthesis would help preserve free Cys for synthesis of glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant found at high levels in the red blood cells of hibernating bears. In contrast, circulating nitrite and erythrocytic S-nitrosation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, taken as markers of NO metabolism, did not change appreciably. Our findings reveal that remodeling of H2S metabolism and enhanced intracellular GSH levels are hallmarks of the aerobic metabolic suppression of hibernating bears.

  17. Microsensor measurements of sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation in compact microbial communities of aerobic biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehl, M.; Joergensen, B.B. )

    1992-04-01

    The microzonation of O{sub 2} respiration, H{sub 2}S oxidation, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100 {mu}m) with microsensors for O{sub 2}, S{sup 2{minus}}, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured concentration profiles by using a simple one-dimensional diffusion reaction model. The importance of electron acceptor and electron donor availability for the microzonation of respiratory processes and their reaction rates was investigated. Oxygen respiration was found in the upper 0.2 to 0.4 mm of the biofilm, whereas sulfate reduction occurred in deeper, anoxic parts of the biofilm. Sulfate reduction accounted for up to 50% of the total mineralization of organic carbon in the biofilms. All H{sub 2}S produced from sulfate reduction was reoxidized by O{sub 2} in a narrow reaction zone, and no H{sub 2}S escaped to the overlying water. Turnover times of H{sub 2}S and O{sub 2} in the reaction zone were only a few seconds owing to rapid bacterial H{sub 2}S