Science.gov

Sample records for phospho protein phosphatase

  1. Rhizobiales-like Phosphatase 2 from Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Novel Phospho-tyrosine-specific Phospho-protein Phosphatase (PPP) Family Protein Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Uhrig, R. Glen; Labandera, Anne-Marie; Muhammad, Jamshed; Samuel, Marcus; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular signaling through protein tyrosine phosphorylation is well established in mammalian cells. Although lacking the classic tyrosine kinases present in humans, plants have a tyrosine phospho-proteome that rivals human cells. Here we report a novel plant tyrosine phosphatase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtRLPH2) that, surprisingly, has the sequence hallmarks of a phospho-serine/threonine phosphatase belonging to the PPP family. Rhizobiales/Rhodobacterales/Rhodospirillaceae-like phosphatases (RLPHs) are conserved in plants and several other eukaryotes, but not in animals. We demonstrate that AtRLPH2 is localized to the plant cell cytosol, is resistant to the classic serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin, but is inhibited by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor orthovanadate and is particularly sensitive to inhibition by the adenylates, ATP and ADP. AtRLPH2 displays remarkable selectivity toward tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides versus serine/threonine phospho-peptides and readily dephosphorylates a classic tyrosine phosphatase protein substrate, suggesting that in vivo it is a tyrosine phosphatase. To date, only one other tyrosine phosphatase is known in plants; thus AtRLPH2 represents one of the missing pieces in the plant tyrosine phosphatase repertoire and supports the concept of protein tyrosine phosphorylation as a key regulatory event in plants. PMID:26742850

  2. The B56γ3 regulatory subunit-containing protein phosphatase 2A outcompetes Akt to regulate p27KIP1 subcellular localization by selectively dephosphorylating phospho-Thr157 of p27KIP1

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tai-Yu; Yang, Yu-San; Hong, Wei-Fu; Chiang, Chi-Wu

    2016-01-01

    The B56γ-containing protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-B56γ) has been postulated to have tumor suppressive functions. Here, we report regulation of p27KIP1 subcellular localization by PP2A-B56γ3. B56γ3 overexpression enhanced nuclear localization of p27KIP1, whereas knockdown of B56γ3 decreased p27KIP1 nuclear localization. B56γ3 overexpression decreased phosphorylation at Thr157 (phospho-Thr157), whose phosphorylation promotes cytoplasmic localization of p27KIP1, whereas B56γ3 knockdown significantly increased the level of phospho-Thr157. In vitro, PP2A-B56γ3 catalyzed dephosphorylation of phospho-Thr157 in a dose-dependent and okadaic acid-sensitive manner. B56γ3 did not increase p27KIP1 nuclear localization by down-regulating the upstream kinase Akt activity and outcompeted a myristoylated constitutively active Akt (Aktca) in regulating Thr157 phosphorylation and subcellular localization of p27KIP1. In addition, results of interaction domain mapping revealed that both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of p27 and a domain at the C-terminus of B56γ3 are required for interaction between p27 and B56γ3. Furthermore, we demonstrated that p27KIP1 levels are positively correlated with B56γ levels in both non-tumor and tumor parts of a set of human colon tissue specimens. However, positive correlation between nuclear p27KIP1 levels and B56γ levels was found only in the non-tumor parts, but not in tumor parts of these tissues, implicating a dysregulation in PP2A-B56γ3-regulated p27KIP1 nuclear localization in these tumor tissues. Altogether, this study provides a new mechanism by which the PP2A-B56γ3 holoenzyme plays its tumor suppressor role. PMID:26684356

  3. Sac phosphatase domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W E; Cooke, F T; Parker, P J

    2000-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the roles of phosphatidylinositol phosphates in controlling cellular functions such as endocytosis, exocytosis and the actin cytoskeleton have included new insights into the phosphatases that are responsible for the interconversion of these lipids. One of these is an entirely novel class of phosphatase domain found in a number of well characterized proteins. Proteins containing this Sac phosphatase domain include the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Sac1p and Fig4p. The Sac phosphatase domain is also found within the mammalian phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase synaptojanin and the yeast synaptojanin homologues Inp51p, Inp52p and Inp53p. These proteins therefore contain both Sac phosphatase and 5-phosphatase domains. This review describes the Sac phosphatase domain-containing proteins and their actions, with particular reference to the genetic and biochemical insights provided by study of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:10947947

  4. Teaching resources. Protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Salton, Stephen R

    2005-03-01

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering the structure and function of protein phosphatases and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: A Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of the importance of phosphatases in physiology, recognized by the award of a Nobel Prize in 1992, and then proceeds to describe the two types of protein phosphatases: serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphatases. The information covered includes the structure, regulation, and substrate specificity of protein phosphatases, with an emphasis on their importance in disease and clinical settings.

  5. Human PHOSPHO1 exhibits high specific phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine phosphatase activities

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Human PHOSPHO1 is a phosphatase enzyme for which expression is upregulated in mineralizing cells. This enzyme has been implicated in the generation of Pi for matrix mineralization, a process central to skeletal development. PHOSPHO1 is a member of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily of Mg2+-dependent hydrolases. However, substrates for PHOSPHO1 are, as yet, unidentified and little is known about its activity. We show here that PHOSPHO1 exhibits high specific activities toward phosphoethanolamine (PEA) and phosphocholine (PCho). Optimal enzymic activity was observed at approx. pH 6.7. The enzyme shows a high specific Mg2+-dependence, with apparent Km values of 3.0 μM for PEA and 11.4 μM for PCho. These results provide a novel mechanism for the generation of Pi in mineralizing cells from PEA and PCho. PMID:15175005

  6. Stereochemistry of phospho group transfer catalyzed by a mutant alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Butler-Ransohoff, J.E.; Kendall, D.A.; Freeman, S.; Knowles, J.R.; Kaiser, E.T.

    1988-06-28

    The stereochemical course of the phospho group transfer catalyzed by mutant (S102C) alkaline phosphatase from Escherichia coli was investigated by using /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Transphosphorylation from 4-nitrophenyl (R/sub P/)-/sup 17/O, /sup 16/O, /sup 18/O)phosphate to (S)-propane-1,2-diol occurs with overall retention of configuration at phosphorus. This result is consistent with the view that the hydrolysis of substrates by this mutant enzyme proceeds by way of a covalent phosphoenzyme intermediate in the same manner as the wild-type alkaline phosphatase.

  7. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  8. PhosphoTyrosyl Phosphatase Activator of Plasmodium falciparum: Identification of Its Residues Involved in Binding to and Activation of PP2A

    PubMed Central

    Vandomme, Audrey; Fréville, Aline; Cailliau, Katia; Kalamou, Hadidjatou; Bodart, Jean-François; Khalife, Jamal; Pierrot, Christine

    2014-01-01

    In Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), the causative agent of the deadliest form of malaria, a tight regulation of phosphatase activity is crucial for the development of the parasite. In this study, we have identified and characterized PfPTPA homologous to PhosphoTyrosyl Phosphatase Activator, an activator of protein phosphatase 2A which is a major phosphatase involved in many biological processes in eukaryotic cells. The PfPTPA sequence analysis revealed that five out of six amino acids involved in interaction with PP2A in human are conserved in P. falciparum. Localization studies showed that PfPTPA and PfPP2A are present in the same compartment of blood stage parasites, suggesting a possible interaction of both proteins. In vitro binding and functional studies revealed that PfPTPA binds to and activates PP2A. Mutation studies showed that three residues (V283, G292 and M296) of PfPTPA are indispensable for the interaction and that the G292 residue is essential for its activity. In P. falciparum, genetic studies suggested the essentiality of PfPTPA for the completion of intraerythrocytic parasite lifecycle. Using Xenopus oocytes, we showed that PfPTPA blocked the G2/M transition. Taken together, our data suggest that PfPTPA could play a role in the regulation of the P. falciparum cell cycle through its PfPP2A regulatory activity. PMID:24521882

  9. PhosphoTyrosyl phosphatase activator of Plasmodium falciparum: identification of its residues involved in binding to and activation of PP2A.

    PubMed

    Vandomme, Audrey; Fréville, Aline; Cailliau, Katia; Kalamou, Hadidjatou; Bodart, Jean-François; Khalife, Jamal; Pierrot, Christine

    2014-02-11

    In Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), the causative agent of the deadliest form of malaria, a tight regulation of phosphatase activity is crucial for the development of the parasite. In this study, we have identified and characterized PfPTPA homologous to PhosphoTyrosyl Phosphatase Activator, an activator of protein phosphatase 2A which is a major phosphatase involved in many biological processes in eukaryotic cells. The PfPTPA sequence analysis revealed that five out of six amino acids involved in interaction with PP2A in human are conserved in P. falciparum. Localization studies showed that PfPTPA and PfPP2A are present in the same compartment of blood stage parasites, suggesting a possible interaction of both proteins. In vitro binding and functional studies revealed that PfPTPA binds to and activates PP2A. Mutation studies showed that three residues (V(283), G(292) and M(296)) of PfPTPA are indispensable for the interaction and that the G(292) residue is essential for its activity. In P. falciparum, genetic studies suggested the essentiality of PfPTPA for the completion of intraerythrocytic parasite lifecycle. Using Xenopus oocytes, we showed that PfPTPA blocked the G2/M transition. Taken together, our data suggest that PfPTPA could play a role in the regulation of the P. falciparum cell cycle through its PfPP2A regulatory activity.

  10. S100 Proteins Modulate Protein Phosphatase 5 Function

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Umeda, Yoshinori; Shimamoto, Seiko; Tsuchiya, Mitsumasa; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2012-01-01

    PP5 is a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases comprising a regulatory tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain and functions in signaling pathways that control many cellular responses. We reported previously that Ca2+/S100 proteins directly associate with several TPR-containing proteins and lead to dissociate the interactions of TPR proteins with their client proteins. Here, we identified protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) as a novel target of S100 proteins. In vitro binding studies demonstrated that S100A1, S100A2, S100A6, and S100B proteins specifically interact with PP5-TPR and inhibited the PP5-Hsp90 interaction. In addition, the S100 proteins activate PP5 by using a synthetic phosphopeptide and a physiological protein substrate, Tau. Overexpression of S100A1 in COS-7 cells induced dephosphorylation of Tau. However, S100A1 and permanently active S100P inhibited the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and PP5 interaction, resulting the inhibition of dephosphorylation of phospho-ASK1 by PP5. The association of the S100 proteins with PP5 provides a Ca2+-dependent regulatory mechanism for the phosphorylation status of intracellular proteins through the regulation of PP5 enzymatic activity or PP5-client protein interaction. PMID:22399290

  11. [Protein phosphatases: structure and function].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, E G; Budagian, V M

    1994-01-01

    The process of protein and enzyme systems phosphorylation is necessary for cell growth, differentiation and preparation for division and mitosis. The conformation changes of protein as a result of phosphorylation lead to increased enzyme activity and enhanced affinity to substrates. A large group of enzymes--protein kinases--is responsible for phosphorylation process in cell, which are divided into tyrosine- and serine-threonine-kinases depending on their ability to phosphorylate appropriate amino acid residues. In this review has been considered the functional importance and structure of protein phosphatases--enzymes, which are functional antagonists of protein kinases.

  12. Loss of skeletal mineralization by the simultaneous ablation of PHOSPHO1 and alkaline phosphatase function: a unified model of the mechanisms of initiation of skeletal calcification.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Manisha C; Simão, Ana Maria Sper; Narisawa, Sonoko; Huesa, Carmen; McKee, Marc D; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis

    2011-02-01

    Endochondral ossification is a carefully orchestrated process mediated by promoters and inhibitors of mineralization. Phosphatases are implicated, but their identities and functions remain unclear. Alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) plays a crucial role promoting mineralization of the extracellular matrix by restricting the concentration of the calcification inhibitor inorganic pyrophosphate (PP(i)). Mutations in the TNAP gene cause hypophosphatasia, a heritable form of rickets and osteomalacia. Here we show that PHOSPHO1, a phosphatase with specificity for phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine, plays a functional role in the initiation of calcification and that ablation of PHOSPHO1 and TNAP function prevents skeletal mineralization. Phospho1(-/-) mice display growth plate abnormalities, spontaneous fractures, bowed long bones, osteomalacia, and scoliosis in early life. Primary cultures of Phospho1(-/-) tibial growth plate chondrocytes and chondrocyte-derived matrix vesicles (MVs) show reduced mineralizing ability, and plasma samples from Phospho1(-/-) mice show reduced levels of TNAP and elevated plasma PP(i) concentrations. However, transgenic overexpression of TNAP does not correct the bone phenotype in Phospho1(-/-) mice despite normalization of their plasma PP(i) levels. In contrast, double ablation of PHOSPHO1 and TNAP function leads to the complete absence of skeletal mineralization and perinatal lethality. We conclude that PHOSPHO1 has a nonredundant functional role during endochondral ossification, and based on these data and a review of the current literature, we propose an inclusive model of skeletal calcification that involves intravesicular PHOSPHO1 function and P(i) influx into MVs in the initiation of mineralization and the functions of TNAP, nucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase-1, and collagen in the extravesicular progression of mineralization.

  13. Phospho-tyrosine dependent protein–protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Arndt; Benlasfer, Nouhad; Birth, Petra; Hegele, Anna; Wachsmuth, Franziska; Apelt, Luise; Stelzl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications, such as tyrosine phosphorylation, regulate protein–protein interactions (PPIs) critical for signal processing and cellular phenotypes. We extended an established yeast two-hybrid system employing human protein kinases for the analyses of phospho-tyrosine (pY)-dependent PPIs in a direct experimental, large-scale approach. We identified 292 mostly novel pY-dependent PPIs which showed high specificity with respect to kinases and interacting proteins and validated a large fraction in co-immunoprecipitation experiments from mammalian cells. About one-sixth of the interactions are mediated by known linear sequence binding motifs while the majority of pY-PPIs are mediated by other linear epitopes or governed by alternative recognition modes. Network analysis revealed that pY-mediated recognition events are tied to a highly connected protein module dedicated to signaling and cell growth pathways related to cancer. Using binding assays, protein complementation and phenotypic readouts to characterize the pY-dependent interactions of TSPAN2 (tetraspanin 2) and GRB2 or PIK3R3 (p55γ), we exemplarily provide evidence that the two pY-dependent PPIs dictate cellular cancer phenotypes. PMID:25814554

  14. Protein phosphatases and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Steven P; Stock, Jeffry B; Lombroso, Paul J; Nairn, Angus C

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is characterized by progressive loss of cognitive function, linked to marked neuronal loss. Pathological hallmarks of the disease are the accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the form of amyloid plaques and the intracellular formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Accumulating evidence supports a key role for protein phosphorylation in both the normal and pathological actions of Aβ as well as the formation of NFTs. NFTs contain hyperphosphorylated forms of the microtubule-binding protein tau, and phosphorylation of tau by several different kinases leads to its aggregation. The protein kinases involved in the generation and/or actions of tau or Aβ are viable drug targets to prevent or alleviate AD pathology. However, it has also been recognized that the protein phosphatases that reverse the actions of these protein kinases are equally important. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of serine/threonine and tyrosine protein phosphatases in the pathology of AD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Insulin-receptor phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    King, M J; Sale, G J

    1988-01-01

    Calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase has been proposed to be an important phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase. The ability of the enzyme to attack autophosphorylated insulin receptor was examined and compared with the known ability of the enzyme to act on autophosphorylated epidermal-growth-factor (EGF) receptor. Purified calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase was shown to catalyse the complete dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosyl-(insulin receptor). When compared at similar concentrations, 32P-labelled EGF receptor was dephosphorylated at greater than 3 times the rate of 32P-labelled insulin receptor; both dephosphorylations exhibited similar dependence on metal ions and calmodulin. Native phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatases in cell extracts were also characterized. With rat liver, heart or brain, most (75%) of the native phosphatase activity against both 32P-labelled insulin and EGF receptors was recovered in the particulate fraction of the cell, with only 25% in the soluble fraction. This subcellular distribution contrasts with results of previous studies using artificial substrates, which found most of the phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity in the soluble fraction of the cell. Properties of particulate and soluble phosphatase activity against 32P-labelled insulin and EGF receptors are reported. The contribution of calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase activity to phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity in cell fractions was determined by utilizing the unique metal-ion dependence of calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase. Whereas Ni2+ (1 mM) markedly activated the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, it was found to inhibit potently both particulate and soluble phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity. In fractions from rat liver, brain and heart, total phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activity against both 32P-labelled receptors was inhibited by 99.5 +/- 6% (mean +/- S.E.M., 30 observations) by Ni2+. Results of Ni2+ inhibition

  16. Automated quantitative multiplex immunofluorescence in situ imaging identifies phospho-S6 and phospho-PRAS40 as predictive protein biomarkers for prostate cancer lethality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We have witnessed significant progress in gene-based approaches to cancer prognostication, promising early intervention for high-risk patients and avoidance of overtreatment for low-risk patients. However, there has been less advancement in protein-based approaches, even though perturbed protein levels and post-translational modifications are more directly linked with phenotype. Most current, gene expression-based platforms require tissue lysis resulting in loss of structural and molecular information, and hence are blind to tumor heterogeneity and morphological features. Results Here we report an automated, integrated multiplex immunofluorescence in situ imaging approach that quantitatively measures protein biomarker levels and activity states in defined intact tissue regions where the biomarkers of interest exert their phenotype. Using this approach, we confirm that four previously reported prognostic markers, PTEN, SMAD4, CCND1 and SPP1, can predict lethal outcome of human prostate cancer. Furthermore, we show that two PI3K pathway-regulated protein activities, pS6 (RPS6-phosphoserines 235/236) and pPRAS40 (AKT1S1-phosphothreonine 246), correlate with prostate cancer lethal outcome as well (individual marker hazard ratios of 2.04 and 2.03, respectively). Finally, we incorporate these 2 markers into a novel 5-marker protein signature, SMAD4, CCND1, SPP1, pS6, and pPRAS40, which is highly predictive for prostate cancer-specific death. The ability to substitute PTEN with phospho-markers demonstrates the potential of quantitative protein activity state measurements on intact tissue. Conclusions In summary, our approach can reproducibly and simultaneously quantify and assess multiple protein levels and functional activities on intact tissue specimens. We believe it is broadly applicable to not only cancer but other diseases, and propose that it should be well suited for prognostication at early stages of pathogenesis where key signaling protein levels and

  17. Dephosphorylation of phosphopeptides by calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B).

    PubMed

    Donella-Deana, A; Krinks, M H; Ruzzene, M; Klee, C; Pinna, L A

    1994-01-15

    is strikingly different from that of T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase, a bona fide protein tyrosine phosphatase. In particular while the latter enzyme is especially active toward a number of phosphopeptides reproducing the phosphoacceptor sites of src products and of calmodulin whose N-terminal moieties are predominantly acidic, the artificial substrate phospho-angiotensin II, bearing an arginine residue at position -2, is far preferred by calcineurin over all phosphotyrosyl peptides of similar size. Collectively taken these results show that the specificity of calcineurin, rather than resting on a given consensus sequence, is determined by a variety of primary and higher-order structural features conferring to it an overall selectivity that is different from those of any other known protein phosphatase.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of tau and phospho-tau-181 proteins during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Wolfgang; Dominguez, Cristina Alomar; Popovscaia, Marina; Putz, Günther; Humpel, Christian

    2016-10-01

    During pregnancy various interactions occur between structural alterations of the maternal brain and placental metabolism. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of tau and phospho-tau-181 protein vary during normal pregnancy and in women with preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. We measured cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, tau and phospho-tau-181 protein levels in 90 pregnant women electively assigned for regional anaesthesia during pregnancy or for cesarean section using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations for tau and phospho-tau-181 in 66 women with normal pregnancy were 308.5±117.3pg/mL and 50.5±16.7pg/mL, respectively. Blood pressure, liver function, clotting activity and kidney function were significantly different in eleven women with preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. The weight of the newly born (p<0.001; HR: 0.998), the weight of the placenta (p=0.018) and concentrations for phospho-tau-181 (p=0.043; HR: 1.211) correlated significantly with the disease. Mean concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid tau and phospho-tau-181 protein during pregnancy were evaluated. Phospho-tau-181 protein concentrations correlated with placental function supporting the hypothesis that altered expression of neuronal factors during pregnancy may affect development of the placenta. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Posttranslational protein knockdown coupled to receptor tyrosine kinase activation with phosphoPROTACs

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Gough, Jonathan D.; Corson, Timothy W.; Crews, Craig M.

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational knockdown of a specific protein is an attractive approach for examining its function within a system. Here we introduce phospho-dependent proteolysis targeting chimeras (phosphoPROTACs), a method to couple the conditional degradation of targeted proteins to the activation state of particular kinase-signaling pathways. We generated two phosphoPROTACs that couple the tyrosine phosphorylation sequences of either the nerve growth factor receptor, TrkA (tropomyosin receptor kinase A), or the neuregulin receptor, ErbB3 (erythroblastosis oncogene B3), with a peptide ligand for the E3 ubiquitin ligase von Hippel Lindau protein. These phosphoPROTACs recruit either the neurotrophic signaling effector fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2α or the survival-promoting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, respectively, to be ubiquitinated and degraded upon activation of specific receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphorylation of the phosphoPROTACs. We demonstrate the ability of these phosphoPROTACs to suppress the short- and long-term effects of their respective activating receptor tyrosine kinase pathways both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we show that activation of phosphoPROTACs is entirely dependent on their kinase-mediated phosphorylation, as phenylalanine-containing null variants are inactive. Furthermore, stimulation of unrelated growth factor receptors does not induce target protein knockdown. Although comparable in efficiency to RNAi, this approach has the added advantage of providing a degree of temporal and dosing control as well as cell-type selectivity unavailable using nucleic acid-based strategies. By varying the autophosphorylation sequence of a phosphoPROTAC, it is conceivable that other receptor tyrosine kinase/effector pairings could be similarly exploited to achieve other biological effects. PMID:23674677

  20. Posttranslational protein knockdown coupled to receptor tyrosine kinase activation with phosphoPROTACs.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Gough, Jonathan D; Corson, Timothy W; Crews, Craig M

    2013-05-28

    Posttranslational knockdown of a specific protein is an attractive approach for examining its function within a system. Here we introduce phospho-dependent proteolysis targeting chimeras (phosphoPROTACs), a method to couple the conditional degradation of targeted proteins to the activation state of particular kinase-signaling pathways. We generated two phosphoPROTACs that couple the tyrosine phosphorylation sequences of either the nerve growth factor receptor, TrkA (tropomyosin receptor kinase A), or the neuregulin receptor, ErbB3 (erythroblastosis oncogene B3), with a peptide ligand for the E3 ubiquitin ligase von Hippel Lindau protein. These phosphoPROTACs recruit either the neurotrophic signaling effector fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2α or the survival-promoting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, respectively, to be ubiquitinated and degraded upon activation of specific receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphorylation of the phosphoPROTACs. We demonstrate the ability of these phosphoPROTACs to suppress the short- and long-term effects of their respective activating receptor tyrosine kinase pathways both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we show that activation of phosphoPROTACs is entirely dependent on their kinase-mediated phosphorylation, as phenylalanine-containing null variants are inactive. Furthermore, stimulation of unrelated growth factor receptors does not induce target protein knockdown. Although comparable in efficiency to RNAi, this approach has the added advantage of providing a degree of temporal and dosing control as well as cell-type selectivity unavailable using nucleic acid-based strategies. By varying the autophosphorylation sequence of a phosphoPROTAC, it is conceivable that other receptor tyrosine kinase/effector pairings could be similarly exploited to achieve other biological effects.

  1. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian

  2. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A determines bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Hsiang-Po; Chen, Ming-Huang; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The multiple cellular targets affected by proteasome inhibition implicate a potential role for bortezomib, a first-in-class proteasome inhibitor, in enhancing antitumor activities in hematologic malignancies. Here, we examined the antitumor activity and drug targets of bortezomib in leukemia cells. Human leukemia cell lines were used for in vitro studies. Drug efficacy was evaluated by apoptosis assays and associated molecular events assessed by Western Blot. Gene silencing was performed by small interference RNA. Drug was tested in vivo in xenograft models of human leukemia cell lines and in primary leukemia cells. Clinical samples were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Bortezomib differentially induced apoptosis in leukemia cells that was independent of its proteasome inhibition. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, a cellular inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, mediated the apoptotic effect of bortezomib. Bortezomib increased protein phosphatase 2A activity in sensitive leukemia cells (HL-60 and KG-1), but not in resistant cells (MOLT-3 and K562). Bortezomib’s downregulation of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A and phospho-Akt correlated with its drug sensitivity. Furthermore, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A negatively regulated protein phosphatase 2A activity. Ectopic expression of CIP2A up-regulated phospho-Akt and protected HL-60 cells from bortezomib-induced apoptosis, whereas silencing CIP2A overcame the resistance to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in MOLT3 and K562 cells. Importantly, bortezomib exerted in vivo antitumor activity in HL-60 xenografted tumors and induced cell death in some primary leukemic cells. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A was expressed in leukemic blasts from bone marrow samples. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A plays a major role in mediating bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. PMID:22983581

  3. Molecular mechanism of ERK dephosphorylation by striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Li, Kang-shuai; Su, Jing; Chen, Lai-Zhong; Xu, Yun-Fei; Wang, Hong-Mei; Gong, Zheng; Cui, Guo-Ying; Yu, Xiao; Wang, Kai; Yao, Wei; Xin, Tao; Li, Min-Yong; Xiao, Kun-Hong; An, Xiao-fei; Huo, Yuqing; Xu, Zhi-gang; Sun, Jin-Peng; Pang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is an important regulator of neuronal synaptic plasticity, and its abnormal level or activity contributes to cognitive disorders. One crucial downstream effector and direct substrate of STEP is extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), which has important functions in spine stabilisation and action potential transmission. The inhibition of STEP activity toward phospho-ERK has the potential to treat neuronal diseases, but the detailed mechanism underlying the dephosphorylation of phospho-ERK by STEP is not known. Therefore, we examined STEP activity toward pNPP, phospho-tyrosine-containing peptides, and the full-length phospho-ERK protein using STEP mutants with different structural features. STEP was found to be a highly efficient ERK tyrosine phosphatase that required both its N-terminal regulatory region and key residues in its active site. Specifically, both KIM and KIS of STEP were required for ERK interaction. In addition to the N-terminal KIS region, S245, hydrophobic residues L249/L251, and basic residues R242/R243 located in the KIM region were important in controlling STEP activity toward phospho-ERK. Further kinetic experiments revealed subtle structural differences between STEP and HePTP that affected the interactions of their KIMs with ERK. Moreover, STEP recognised specific positions of a phospho-ERK peptide sequence through its active site, and the contact of STEP F311 with phospho-ERK V205 and T207 were crucial interactions. Taken together, our results not only provide the information for interactions between ERK and STEP, but will also help in the development of specific strategies to target STEP-ERK recognition, which could serve as a potential therapy for neurological disorders. PMID:24117863

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphatases as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    He, Rong-jun; Yu, Zhi-hong; Zhang, Ruo-yu; Zhang, Zhong-yin

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory process in virtually all aspects of cellular functions. Dysregulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a major cause of human diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and neurological diseases. Indeed, protein tyrosine phosphorylation-mediated signaling events offer ample therapeutic targets, and drug discovery efforts to date have brought over two dozen kinase inhibitors to the clinic. Accordingly, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are considered next-generation drug targets. For instance, PTP1B is a well-known targets of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and recent studies indicate that it is also a promising target for breast cancer. SHP2 is a bona-fide oncoprotein, mutations of which cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and solid tumors. In addition, LYP is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes and many other autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes recent findings on several highly recognized PTP family drug targets, including PTP1B, Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2(SHP2), lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), CD45, Fas associated phosphatase-1 (FAP-1), striatal enriched tyrosine phosphatases (STEP), mitogen-activated protein kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), phosphatases of regenerating liver-1 (PRL), low molecular weight PTPs (LMWPTP), and CDC25. Given that there are over 100 family members, we hope this review will serve as a road map for innovative drug discovery targeting PTPs. PMID:25220640

  5. PhosphoGRID: a database of experimentally verified in vivo protein phosphorylation sites from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stark, Chris; Su, Ting-Cheng; Breitkreutz, Ashton; Lourenco, Pedro; Dahabieh, Matthew; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Tyers, Mike; Sadowski, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a central role in cellular regulation. Recent proteomics strategies for identifying phosphopeptides have been developed using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and consequently, when combined with studies of individual gene products, the number of reported specific phosphorylation sites for this organism has expanded enormously. In order to systematically document and integrate these various data types, we have developed a database of experimentally verified in vivo phosphorylation sites curated from the S. cerevisiae primary literature. PhosphoGRID (www.phosphogrid.org) records the positions of over 5000 specific phosphorylated residues on 1495 gene products. Nearly 900 phosphorylated residues are reported from detailed studies of individual proteins; these in vivo phosphorylation sites are documented by a hierarchy of experimental evidence codes. Where available for specific sites, we have also noted the relevant protein kinases and/or phosphatases, the specific condition(s) under which phosphorylation occurs, and the effect(s) that phosphorylation has on protein function. The unique features of PhosphoGRID that assign both function and specific physiological conditions to each phosphorylated residue will provide a valuable benchmark for proteome-level studies and will facilitate bioinformatic analysis of cellular signal transduction networks. Database URL: http://phosphogrid.org/

  6. Measurement of Effector Protein Translocation Using Phosphorylatable Epitope Tags and Phospho-Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bartra, Sara Schesser; Plano, Gregory V

    2017-01-01

    Numerous bacterial pathogens employ specialized protein secretion machineries to directly inject anti-host proteins, termed effector proteins, into eukaryotic cells. Effector proteins carrying small phosphorylatable tags can be used to detect and quantify effector protein injection. Here, we describe the use of the ELK- and GSK-tags to detect the translocation of the Y. pestis YopE effector protein into RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells using immunoblot analysis with phospho-specific antibodies.

  7. Protein interaction network of the mammalian Hippo pathway reveals mechanisms of kinase-phosphatase interactions.

    PubMed

    Couzens, Amber L; Knight, James D R; Kean, Michelle J; Teo, Guoci; Weiss, Alexander; Dunham, Wade H; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Bagshaw, Richard D; Sicheri, Frank; Pawson, Tony; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Choi, Hyungwon; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2013-11-19

    The Hippo pathway regulates organ size and tissue homeostasis in response to multiple stimuli, including cell density and mechanotransduction. Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatases can also stimulate Hippo signaling in cell culture. We defined the Hippo protein-protein interaction network with and without inhibition of serine and threonine phosphatases by okadaic acid. We identified 749 protein interactions, including 599 previously unrecognized interactions, and demonstrated that several interactions with serine and threonine phosphatases were phosphorylation-dependent. Mutation of the T-loop of MST2 (mammalian STE20-like protein kinase 2), which prevented autophosphorylation, disrupted its association with STRIPAK (striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase complex). Deletion of the amino-terminal forkhead-associated domain of SLMAP (sarcolemmal membrane-associated protein), a component of the STRIPAK complex, prevented its association with MST1 and MST2. Phosphatase inhibition produced temporally distinct changes in proteins that interacted with MOB1A and MOB1B (Mps one binder kinase activator-like 1A and 1B) and promoted interactions with upstream Hippo pathway proteins, such as MST1 and MST2, and with the trimeric protein phosphatase 6 complex (PP6). Mutation of three basic amino acids that are part of a phospho-serine- and phospho-threonine-binding domain in human MOB1B prevented its interaction with MST1 and PP6 in cells treated with okadaic acid. Collectively, our results indicated that changes in phosphorylation orchestrate interactions between kinases and phosphatases in Hippo signaling, providing a putative mechanism for pathway regulation.

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatase: enzymatic assays.

    PubMed

    Montalibet, Jacqueline; Skorey, Kathryn I; Kennedy, Brian P

    2005-01-01

    Activity assays for tyrosine phosphatases are based on the hydrolysis of a arylphosphate moiety from a synthetic substrate yielding a spectroscopically active product. Many different substrates can be used for these assays with p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), fluorescein diphosphate (FDP), and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbellyferyl phosphate (DiFMUP) being the most efficient and versatile. Equally, larger molecules such as phosphotyrosyl peptides can also be used to mimic more natural substrates. Activity assays include the determinations of the rate of dephosphorylation and calculations of kinetic constants such as k(cat) and K(M). These assays are useful to identify and characterize tyrosine phosphatases and are commonly used to evaluate the efficiency of inhibitors.

  9. Role of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Alka; Agrawal, Nisha; Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a crucial regulatory mechanism that controls many biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, phosphorylation events primarily occur on serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues, while in certain cases, it was also discovered on tyrosine (Tyr) residues. In contrary to plants, extensive reports on Tyr phosphorylation regulating a large numbers of biological processes exist in animals. Despite of such prodigious function in animals, Tyr phosphorylation is a least studied mechanism of protein regulation in plants. Recently, various chemical analytical procedures have strengthened the view that Tyr phosphorylation is equally prevalent in plants as in animals. However, regardless of Tyr phosphorylation events occuring in plants, no evidence could be found for the existence of gene encoding for Tyr phosphorylation i.e. the typical Tyr kinases. Various methodologies have suggested that plant responses to stress signals and developmental processes involved modifications in protein Tyr phosphorylation. Correspondingly, various reports have established the role of PTPs (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases) in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) hence, in the regulation of MAPK signaling cascade. Besides this, many dual specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs) are also known to bind starch and regulate starch metabolism through reversible phosphorylation. Here, we are emphasizing the significant progress on protein Tyr phosphatases to understand the role of these enzymes in the regulation of post-translational modification in plant physiology and development. PMID:26962298

  10. The use of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and PHOSPHO1 inhibitors to affect mineralization by cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Narisawa, Sonoko

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe methods to evaluate the ability of small molecules inhibitors of TNAP and PHOSPHO1 in preventing mineralization of primary cultures of murine vascular smooth muscle cells. The procedures are also applicable to primary cultures of calvarial osteoblasts. These cell-based assays are used to complement kinetic testing during structure-activity relationship studies aimed at improving scaffolds in the generation of pharmaceuticals for the treatment for medial vascular calcification.

  11. Identification of AKAP79 as a Protein Phosphatase 1 catalytic binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Le, Andrew. V.; Tavalin, Steven. J.

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed and highly promiscuous Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) regulates many cellular processes. Targeting PP1 to specific locations within the cell allows for the regulation of PP1 by conferring substrate specificity. In the present study, we identified AKAP79 as a novel PP1 regulatory subunit. Immunoprecipitaiton of the AKAP from rat brain extract found that the PP1 catalytic subunit co-purified with the anchoring protein. This is a direct interaction, demonstrated by pulldown experiments using purified proteins. Interestingly, the addition of AKAP79 to purified PP1 catalytic subunit decreased phosphatase activity with an IC50 of 811±0.56 nM of the anchoring protein. Analysis of AKAP79 identified a PP1 binding site that conformed to a consensus PP1 binding motif (FxxR/KxR/K) in the first 44 amino acids of the anchoring protein. This was confirmed when a peptide mimicking this region of AKAP79 was able to bind PP1 by both pulldown assay and Surface Plasmon Resonance. However, PP1 was still able to bind to AKAP79 upon deletion of this region, suggestion additional sites of contact between the anchoring protein and the phosphatase. Importantly, this consensus PP1 binding motif was found not to be responsible for PP1 inhibition, but rather enhanced phosphatase activity, as deletion of this domain resulted in an increased inhibition of PP1 activity. Instead, a second interaction domain localized to residues 150–250 of AKAP79 was required for the inhibition of PP1. However, the inhibitory actions of AKAP79 on PP1 are substrate dependent, as the anchoring protein did not inhibit PP1 dephosphorylation of phospho-PSD-95, a substrate found in AKAP79 complexes in the brain. These combined observations suggest that AKAP79 acts as a PP1 regulatory subunit that can direct PP1 activity towards specific targets in the AKAP79 complex. PMID:21561082

  12. Protein Phosphatases and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Steven P.; Stock, Jeffry B.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Nairn, Angus C.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is characterized by progressive loss of cognitive function, linked to marked neuronal loss. Pathological hallmarks of the disease are the accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the form of amyloid plaques and the intracellular formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Accumulating evidence supports a key role for protein phosphorylation in both the normal and pathological actions of Aβ as well as the formation of NFTs. NFTs contain hyperphosphorylated forms of the microtubule-binding protein tau, and phosphorylation of tau by several different kinases leads to its aggregation. The protein kinases involved in the generation and/or actions of tau or Aβ are viable drug targets to prevent or alleviate AD pathology. However, it has also been recognized that the protein phosphatases that reverse the actions of these protein kinases are equally important. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of serine/threonine and tyrosine protein phosphatases in the pathology of AD. PMID:22340724

  13. Changes of phospho-growth-associated protein 43 (phospho-GAP43) in the zebrafish retina after optic nerve injury: a long-term observation.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Manabu; Nagashima, Mikiko; Nunome, Tomoya; Muramatsu, Takanori; Yamada, Yoichi; Kubo, Mamoru; Muramoto, Kenichiro; Matsukawa, Toru; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Sugitani, Kayo; Vachkov, Ivan H; Mawatari, Kazuhiro; Kato, Satoru

    2008-07-01

    The major model animal of optic nerve regeneration in fish is goldfish. A closely related zebrafish is the most popular model system for genetic and developmental studies of vertebrate central nervous system. A few challenging works of optic nerve regeneration have been done with zebrafish. However, knowledge concerning the long term of optic nerve regeneration apparently lacks in zebrafish. In the present study, therefore, we followed changes of zebrafish behavior and phosphorylated form of growth-associated protein 43 (phospho-GAP43) expression in the zebrafish retina over 100 days after optic nerve transection. Optomotor response was fast recovered by 20-25 days after axotomy whereas chasing behavior (a schooling behavior) was slowly recovered by 80-100 days after axotomy. The temporal pattern of phospho-GAP43 expression showed a biphasic increase, a short-peak (12 folds) at 1-2 weeks and a long-plateau (4 folds) at 1-2 months after axotomy. The recovery of optomotor response well correlated with projection of growing axons to the tectum, whereas the recovery of chasing behavior well correlated with synaptic refinement of retinotectal topography. The present data strongly suggest that phospho-GAP43 plays an active role in both the early and late stages of optic nerve regeneration in fish.

  14. Rice_Phospho 1.0: a new rice-specific SVM predictor for protein phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shoukai; Song, Qi; Tao, Huan; Wang, Wei; Wan, Weifeng; Huang, Jian; Xu, Chaoqun; Chebii, Vivien; Kitony, Justine; Que, Shufu; Harrison, Andrew; He, Huaqin

    2015-01-01

    Experimentally-determined or computationally-predicted protein phosphorylation sites for distinctive species are becoming increasingly common. In this paper, we compare the predictive performance of a novel classification algorithm with different encoding schemes to develop a rice-specific protein phosphorylation site predictor. Our results imply that the combination of Amino acid occurrence Frequency with Composition of K-Spaced Amino Acid Pairs (AF-CKSAAP) provides the best description of relevant sequence features that surround a phosphorylation site. A support vector machine (SVM) using AF-CKSAAP achieves the best performance in classifying rice protein phophorylation sites when compared to the other algorithms. We have used SVM with AF-CKSAAP to construct a rice-specific protein phosphorylation sites predictor, Rice_Phospho 1.0 (http://bioinformatics.fafu.edu.cn/rice_phospho1.0). We measure the Accuracy (ACC) and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of Rice_Phospho 1.0 to be 82.0% and 0.64, significantly higher than those measures for other predictors such as Scansite, Musite, PlantPhos and PhosphoRice. Rice_Phospho 1.0 also successfully predicted the experimentally identified phosphorylation sites in LOC_Os03g51600.1, a protein sequence which did not appear in the training dataset. In summary, Rice_phospho 1.0 outputs reliable predictions of protein phosphorylation sites in rice, and will serve as a useful tool to the community. PMID:26149854

  15. Structure of Human Dual Specificity Protein Phosphatase 23, VHZ, Enzyme-Substrate/Product Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal,R.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a crucial role in mitogenic signal transduction and regulation of cell growth and differentiation. Dual specificity protein phosphatase 23 (DUSP23) or VHZ mediates dephosphorylation of phospho-tyrosyl (pTyr) and phospho-seryl/threonyl (pSer/pThr) residues in specific proteins. In vitro, it can dephosphorylate p44ERK1 but not p54SAPK-{beta} and enhance activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. Human VHZ, the smallest of the catalytically active protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) reported to date (150 residues), is a class I Cys-based PTP and bears the distinctive active site signature motif HCXXGXXRS(T). We present the crystal structure of VHZ determined at 1.93 angstrom resolution. The polypeptide chain adopts the typical a{beta}a PTP fold, giving rise to a shallow active site cleft that supports dual phosphorylated substrate specificity. Within our crystals, the Thr-135-Tyr-136 from a symmetry-related molecule bind in the active site with a malate ion, where they mimic the phosphorylated TY motif of the MAPK activation loop in an enzyme-substrate/product complex. Analyses of intermolecular interactions between the enzyme and this pseudo substrate/product along with functional analysis of Phe-66, Leu-97, and Phe-99 residues provide insights into the mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis in VHZ.

  16. Regulated protein kinases and phosphatases in cell cycle decisions.

    PubMed

    Novak, Bela; Kapuy, Orsolya; Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Tyson, John J

    2010-12-01

    Many aspects of cell physiology are controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, which together determine the phosphorylation state of targeted substrates. Some of these target proteins are themselves kinases or phosphatases or other components of a regulatory network characterized by feedback and feed-forward loops. In this review we describe some common regulatory motifs involving kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates, focusing particularly on bistable switches involved in cellular decision processes. These general principles are applied to cell cycle transitions, with special emphasis on the roles of regulated phosphatases in orchestrating progression from one phase to the next of the DNA replication-division cycle.

  17. Regulated protein kinases and phosphatases in cell cycle decisions

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Bela; Kapuy, Orsolya; Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Tyson, John J

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of cell physiology are controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, which together determine the phosphorylation state of targeted substrates. Some of these target proteins are themselves kinases or phosphatases or other components of a regulatory network characterized by feedback and feed-forward loops. In this review we describe some common regulatory motifs involving kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates, focusing particularly on bistable switches involved in cellular decision processes. These general principles are applied to cell cycle transitions, with special emphasis on the roles of regulated phosphatases in orchestrating progression from one phase to the next of the DNA replication-division cycle. PMID:20678910

  18. Regulation of the wheat MAP kinase phosphatase 1 by 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Mouna; Cotelle, Valérie; Ebel, Chantal; Zaidi, Ikram; Ormancey, Mélanie; Galaud, Jean-Philippe; Hanin, Moez

    2017-04-01

    Plant MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) are major regulators of MAPK signaling pathways and play crucial roles in controlling growth, development and stress responses. The presence of several functional domains in plant MKPs such as a dual specificity phosphatase catalytic domain, gelsolin, calmodulin-binding and serine-rich domains, suggests that MKPs can interact with distinct cellular partners, others than MAPKs. In this report, we identified a canonical mode I 14-3-3-binding motif (574KLPSLP579) located at the carboxy-terminal region of the wheat MKP, TMKP1. We found that this motif is well-conserved among other MKPs from monocots including Hordeum vulgare, Brachypodium distachyon and Aegilops taushii. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays, we provide evidence for interaction between TMKP1 and 14-3-3 proteins in wheat. Moreover, the phosphatase activity of TMKP1 is increased in a phospho-dependent manner by either Arabidopsis or yeast 14-3-3 isoforms. TMKP1 activation by 14-3-3 proteins is enhanced by Mn(2+), whereas in the presence of Ca(2+) ions, TMKP1 activation was limited to Arabidopsis 14-3-3φ (phi), an isoform harboring an EF-hand motif. Such findings strongly suggest that 14-3-3 proteins, in conjunction with specific divalent cations, may stimulate TMKP1 activity and point-out that 14-3-3 proteins bind and regulate the activity of a MKP in eukaryotes.

  19. Phosphoregulators: Protein Kinases and Protein Phosphatases of Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Ravasi, Timothy; Taylor, Darrin; Huber, Thomas; Hume, David A.; Grimmond, Sean

    2003-01-01

    With the completion of the human and mouse genome sequences, the task now turns to identifying their encoded transcripts and assigning gene function. In this study, we have undertaken a computational approach to identify and classify all of the protein kinases and phosphatases present in the mouse gene complement. A nonredundant set of these sequences was produced by mining Ensembl gene predictions and publicly available cDNA sequences with a panel of InterPro domains. This approach identified 561 candidate protein kinases and 162 candidate protein phosphatases. This cohort was then analyzed using TribeMCL protein sequence similarity clustering followed by CLUSTALV alignment and hierarchical tree generation. This approach allowed us to (1) distinguish between true members of the protein kinase and phosphatase families and enzymes of related biochemistry, (2) determine the structure of the families, and (3) suggest functions for previously uncharacterized members. The classifications obtained by this approach were in good agreement with previous schemes and allowed us to demonstrate domain associations with a number of clusters. Finally, we comment on the complementary nature of cDNA and genome-based gene detection and the impact of the FANTOM2 transcriptome project. PMID:12819143

  20. Dephosphorylation of Ser-137 in DARPP-32 by protein phosphatases 2A and 2C: different roles in vitro and in striatonigral neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Desdouits, F; Siciliano, J C; Nairn, A C; Greengard, P; Girault, J A

    1998-01-01

    DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, Mr=32000) is highly expressed in striatonigral neurons in which its phosphorylation is regulated by several neurotransmitters including dopamine and glutamate. DARPP-32 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when it is phosphorylated on Thr-34 by cAMP- or cGMP-dependent protein kinases. DARPP-32 is also phosphorylated on Ser-137 by protein kinase CK1 (CK1), in vitro and in vivo. This phosphorylation has an important regulatory role since it inhibits the dephosphorylation of Thr-34 by calcineurin in vitro and in striatonigral neurons. Here, we show that DARPP-32 phosphorylated by CK1 is a substrate in vitro for protein phosphatases 2A and 2C, but not protein phosphatase 1 or calcineurin. However, in substantia nigra slices, dephosphorylation of Ser-137 was markedly sensitive to decreased temperature, and not detectably affected by the presence of okadaic acid under conditions in which dephosphorylation of Thr-34 by protein phosphatase 2A was inhibited. These results suggest that, in neurons, phospho-Ser-137-DARPP-32 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2C, but not 2A. Thus, DARPP-32 appears to be a component of a regulatory cascade of phosphatases in which dephosphorylation of Ser-136 by protein phosphatase 2C facilitates dephosphorylation of Thr-34 by calcineurin, removing the cyclic nucleotide-induced inhibition of protein phosphatase 1. PMID:9461512

  1. Dephosphorylation of Ser-137 in DARPP-32 by protein phosphatases 2A and 2C: different roles in vitro and in striatonigral neurons.

    PubMed

    Desdouits, F; Siciliano, J C; Nairn, A C; Greengard, P; Girault, J A

    1998-02-15

    DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, Mr=32000) is highly expressed in striatonigral neurons in which its phosphorylation is regulated by several neurotransmitters including dopamine and glutamate. DARPP-32 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when it is phosphorylated on Thr-34 by cAMP- or cGMP-dependent protein kinases. DARPP-32 is also phosphorylated on Ser-137 by protein kinase CK1 (CK1), in vitro and in vivo. This phosphorylation has an important regulatory role since it inhibits the dephosphorylation of Thr-34 by calcineurin in vitro and in striatonigral neurons. Here, we show that DARPP-32 phosphorylated by CK1 is a substrate in vitro for protein phosphatases 2A and 2C, but not protein phosphatase 1 or calcineurin. However, in substantia nigra slices, dephosphorylation of Ser-137 was markedly sensitive to decreased temperature, and not detectably affected by the presence of okadaic acid under conditions in which dephosphorylation of Thr-34 by protein phosphatase 2A was inhibited. These results suggest that, in neurons, phospho-Ser-137-DARPP-32 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2C, but not 2A. Thus, DARPP-32 appears to be a component of a regulatory cascade of phosphatases in which dephosphorylation of Ser-136 by protein phosphatase 2C facilitates dephosphorylation of Thr-34 by calcineurin, removing the cyclic nucleotide-induced inhibition of protein phosphatase 1.

  2. Protein tyrosine phosphatases: structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Lydia; Aricescu, A Radu; Jones, E Yvonne; Szedlacsek, Stefan E

    2008-03-01

    Structural analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) has expanded considerably in the last several years, producing more than 200 structures in this class of enzymes (from 35 different proteins and their complexes with ligands). The small-medium size of the catalytic domain of approximately 280 residues plus a very compact fold makes it amenable to cloning and overexpression in bacterial systems thus facilitating crystallographic analysis. The low molecular weight PTPs being even smaller, approximately 150 residues, are also perfect targets for NMR analysis. The availability of different structures and complexes of PTPs with substrates and inhibitors has provided a wealth of information with profound effects in the way we understand their biological functions. Developments in mammalian expression technology recently led to the first crystal structure of a receptor-like PTP extracellular region. Altogether, the PTP structural work significantly advanced our knowledge regarding the architecture, regulation and substrate specificity of these enzymes. In this review, we compile the most prominent structural traits that characterize PTPs and their complexes with ligands. We discuss how the data can be used to design further functional experiments and as a basis for drug design given that many PTPs are now considered strategic therapeutic targets for human diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

  3. Alkaline Phosphatase, an Unconventional Immune Protein.

    PubMed

    Rader, Bethany A

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the number of studies focusing on alkaline phosphatases (APs), revealing an expanding complexity of function of these enzymes. Of the four human AP (hAP) proteins, most is known about tissue non-specific AP (TNAP) and intestinal AP (IAP). This review highlights current understanding of TNAP and IAP in relation to human health and disease. TNAP plays a role in multiple processes, including bone mineralization, vitamin B6 metabolism, and neurogenesis, is the genetic cause of hypophosphatasia, influences inflammation through regulation of purinergic signaling, and has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease. IAP regulates fatty acid absorption and has been implicated in the regulation of diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome. IAP and TNAP can dephosphorylate bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharide, and IAP has been identified as a potential regulator of the composition of the intestinal microbiome, an evolutionarily conserved function. Endogenous and recombinant bovine APs and recombinant hAPs are currently being explored for their potential as pharmacological agents to treat AP-associated diseases and mitigate multiple sources of inflammation. Continued research on these versatile proteins will undoubtedly provide insight into human pathophysiology, biochemistry, and the human holobiont.

  4. Alkaline Phosphatase, an Unconventional Immune Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Bethany A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the number of studies focusing on alkaline phosphatases (APs), revealing an expanding complexity of function of these enzymes. Of the four human AP (hAP) proteins, most is known about tissue non-specific AP (TNAP) and intestinal AP (IAP). This review highlights current understanding of TNAP and IAP in relation to human health and disease. TNAP plays a role in multiple processes, including bone mineralization, vitamin B6 metabolism, and neurogenesis, is the genetic cause of hypophosphatasia, influences inflammation through regulation of purinergic signaling, and has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. IAP regulates fatty acid absorption and has been implicated in the regulation of diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome. IAP and TNAP can dephosphorylate bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharide, and IAP has been identified as a potential regulator of the composition of the intestinal microbiome, an evolutionarily conserved function. Endogenous and recombinant bovine APs and recombinant hAPs are currently being explored for their potential as pharmacological agents to treat AP-associated diseases and mitigate multiple sources of inflammation. Continued research on these versatile proteins will undoubtedly provide insight into human pathophysiology, biochemistry, and the human holobiont. PMID:28824625

  5. Structure of the full-length HPr kinase/phosphatase from Staphylococcus xylosus at 1.95 Å resolution: Mimicking the product/substrate of the phospho transfer reactions

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, José Antonio; Hasenbein, Sonja; Koch, Brigitte; Fieulaine, Sonia; Nessler, Sylvie; Russell, Robert B.; Hengstenberg, Wolfgang; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    The histidine containing phospho carrier protein (HPr) kinase/phosphatase is involved in carbon catabolite repression, mainly in Gram-positive bacteria. It is a bifunctional enzyme that phosphorylates Ser-46-HPr in an ATP-dependent reaction and dephosphorylates P-Ser-46-HPr. X-ray analysis of the full-length crystalline enzyme from Staphylococcus xylosus at a resolution of 1.95 Å shows the enzyme to consist of two clearly separated domains that are assembled in a hexameric structure resembling a three-bladed propeller. The N-terminal domain has a βαβ fold similar to a segment from enzyme I of the sugar phosphotransferase system and to the uridyl-binding portion of MurF; it is structurally organized in three dimeric modules exposed to form the propeller blades. Two unexpected phosphate ions associated with highly conserved residues were found in the N-terminal dimeric interface. The C-terminal kinase domain is similar to that of the Lactobacillus casei enzyme and is assembled in six copies to form the compact central hub of the propeller. Beyond previously reported similarity with adenylate kinase, we suggest evolutionary relationship with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. In addition to a phosphate ion in the phosphate-binding loop of the kinase domain, we have identified a second phosphate-binding site that, by comparison with adenylate kinases, we believe accommodates a product/substrate phosphate, normally covalently linked to Ser-46 of HPr. Thus, we propose that our structure represents a product/substrate mimic of the kinase/phosphatase reaction. PMID:11904409

  6. RBC membrane damage and decreased band 3 phospho-tyrosine phosphatase activity are markers of COPD progression.

    PubMed

    Torres-Ramos, Yessica Dorin; Guzman-Grenfell, Alberto Martin; Montoya-Estrada, Araceli; Ramirez-Venegas, Alejandra; Martinez, Raul Sansores; Flores-Trujillo, Fernando; Ochoa-Cautino, Leticia; Hicks, Juan Jose

    2010-06-01

    Injury to red blood cell (RBC) membrane by oxidative stress is of clinical importance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which leads to oxidative stress (OE) during disease progression. Here, we studied the impact of this stress on injury to RBC membrane. Blood samples from both healthy volunteers (HV, n = 11) and controlled COPD patients (n=43) were divided according to their GOLD disease stage (I=7, II=21, III=10, IV=5). Plasma levels of paraoxonase (PON) activity, protein carbonyls (PC), conjugate dienes, lipohydroperoxides (LPH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined and the PTPase, and the oxidative parameters were measured in RBC ghosts. Plasma from patients with COPD showed an increased oxidation of lipids and proteins, that correlated with the disease progression. PON activity decreased from GOLD stages II to IV and correlated with an increase in LPH (p less than 0.0001, r = -0.8115). There was evidence of an increase in the oxidative biomarkers in RBCs, while the PTPase activity was diminished in stage III and IV of COPD. In conclusion, OE-induced injury associated with COPD is associated with an oxidative damage to the RBC membrane, with a concomitant decrease in the PTPase activity and altered function of anionic exchanger (AE1).

  7. Expression of Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue, phospho-Akt, and p53 in Acral Benign and Malignant Melanocytic Neoplasms (Benign Nevi, Dysplastic Nevi, and Acral Melanomas)

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, So Min; Wu, Ju Yeon; Byun, Ji Yeon; Choi, Hae Young; Park, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling pathway in the development of acral melanoma has recently gained evidence. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), one of the key molecules in the pathway, acts as a tumor suppressor through either an Akt-dependent or Akt-independent pathway. Akt accelerates degradation of p53. Objective We assessed the expression of PTEN, phospho-Akt (p-Akt), and p53 by immunohistochemistry in benign acral nevi, acral dysplastic nevi, and acral melanomas in the radial growth phase and with a vertical growth component. Methods Ten specimens in each group were included. Paraffin-embedded specimens were immunostained with antibodies for PTEN, p-Akt, and p53. We scored both the staining intensity and the proportion of positive cells. The final score was calculated by multiplying the intensity score by the proportion score. Results All specimens of benign acral nevi except one showed some degree of PTEN-negative cells. The numbers of p-Akt and p53-positive cells were higher in acral dysplastic nevi and melanoma than in benign nevi. P-Akt scores were 1.7, 1.8, 2.6, and 4.4, and p53 scores were 2.0, 2.1, 3.8, and 4.1 in each group. PTEN and p-Akt scores in advanced acral melanoma were higher than in the other neoplasms. Conclusion The expression of PTEN was decreased and the expression of p-Akt was increased in acral melanoma, especially in advanced cases. The PTEN-induced pathway appears to affect the late stage of melanomagenesis. Altered expression of p-Akt is thought to be due to secondary changes following the loss of PTEN. PMID:27746632

  8. Post-translational processing of chicken bone phosphoproteins. Identification of bone (phospho)protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Mikuni-Takagaki, Y; Glimcher, M J

    1990-01-01

    We have detected a protein kinase which phosphorylates bone phosphoproteins (BPPs) in the detergent extract of the membranous fractions in the periosteal bone strips of 12-day-embryonic-chick tibia. This enzyme, tentatively named BPP kinase, has a catalytic subunit of Mr approximately 39,000, utilizes GTP as well as ATP as a phospho-group donor, is inhibited by 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate and heparin, and is therefore similar to casein kinase II. The enzyme can phosphorylate dephosphorylated proteins such as casein, phosvitin and chicken BPPs, but the last-named are preferred substrates. The in vitro-phosphorylation-assay products of this enzyme in the extract were indistinguishable on an SDS/polyacrylamide gel from the major [32P]phosphoproteins metabolically labelled in the embryonic-chick bone tissue. The regulatory mechanisms of the phosphorylation process of BPPs by BPP kinase as well as the potential role of this enzyme in mineralization are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:2363697

  9. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events.

  10. Cytoskeletal integrity in interphase cells requires protein phosphatase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, J E; Brautigan, D L; Vallee, R; Olmsted, J; Fujiki, H; Goldman, R D

    1992-01-01

    Phosphorylation by protein kinases has been established as a key factor in the regulation of cytoskeletal structure. However, little is known about the role of protein phosphatases in cytoskeletal regulation. To assess the possible functions of protein phosphatases in this respect, we studied the effects of the phosphatase inhibitors calyculin A, okadaic acid, and dinophysistoxin 1 (35-methylokadaic acid) on BHK-21 fibroblasts. Within minutes of incubation with these inhibitors, changes are seen in the structural organization of intermediate filaments, followed by a loss of microtubules, as assayed by immunofluorescence. These changes in cytoskeletal structure are accompanied by a rapid and selective increase in vimentin phosphorylation on interphase-specific sites, and they are fully reversible after removal of calyculin A. The results indicate that there is a rapid phosphate turnover on cytoskeletal intermediate filaments and further suggest that protein phosphatases are essential for the maintenance and structural integrity of two major cytoskeletal components. Images PMID:1332069

  11. Novel Protein Substrates of the Phospho-Form Modification System in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Their Connection to O-Linked Protein Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Anonsen, Jan Haug; Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang; Aas, Finn Erik; Børud, Bente; Koomey, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The zwitterionic phospho-form moieties phosphoethanolamine (PE) and phosphocholine (PC) are important components of bacterial membranes and cell surfaces. The major type IV pilus subunit protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, PilE, undergoes posttranslational modifications with these moieties via the activity of the pilin phospho-form transferase PptA. A number of observations relating to colocalization of phospho-form and O-linked glycan attachment sites in PilE suggested that these modifications might be either functionally or mechanistically linked or interact directly or indirectly. Moreover, it was unknown whether the phenomenon of phospho-form modification was solely dedicated to PilE or if other neisserial protein targets might exist. In light of these concerns, we screened for evidence of phospho-form modification on other membrane glycoproteins targeted by the broad-spectrum O-linked glycosylation system. In this way, two periplasmic lipoproteins, NGO1043 and NGO1237, were identified as substrates for PE addition. As seen previously for PilE, sites of PE modifications were clustered with those of glycan attachment. In the case of NGO1043, evidence for at least six serine phospho-form attachment sites was found, and further analyses revealed that at least two of these serines were also attachment sites for glycan. Finally, mutations altering glycosylation status led to the presence of pptA-dependent PC modifications on both proteins. Together, these results reinforce the associations established in PilE and provide evidence for dynamic interplay between phospho-form modification and O-linked glycosylation. The observations also suggest that phospho-form modifications likely contribute biologically at both intracellular and extracellular levels. PMID:22083701

  12. Protein Phosphatase 1α Interacting Proteins in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sara L.C.; Domingues, Sara C.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.B.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine-phosphatase whose activity is dependent on its binding to regulatory subunits known as PP1 interacting proteins (PIPs), responsible for targeting PP1 to a specific cellular location, specifying its substrate or regulating its action. Today, more than 200 PIPs have been described involving PP1 in panoply of cellular mechanisms. Moreover, several PIPs have been identified that are tissue and event specific. In addition, the diversity of PP1/PIP complexes can further be achieved by the existence of several PP1 isoforms that can bind preferentially to a certain PIP. Thus, PP1/PIP complexes are highly specific for a particular function in the cell, and as such, they are excellent pharmacological targets. Hence, an in-depth survey was taken to identify specific PP1α PIPs in human brain by a high-throughput Yeast Two-Hybrid approach. Sixty-six proteins were recognized to bind PP1α, 39 being novel PIPs. A large protein interaction databases search was also performed to integrate with the results of the PP1α Human Brain Yeast Two-Hybrid and a total of 246 interactions were retrieved. PMID:22321011

  13. Type 2C Protein Phosphatases in Fungi ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Joaquín; Casamayor, Antonio; González, Asier

    2011-01-01

    Type 2C Ser/Thr phosphatases are a remarkable class of protein phosphatases, which are conserved in eukaryotes and involved in a large variety of functional processes. Unlike in other Ser/Thr phosphatases, the catalytic polypeptide is not usually associated with regulatory subunits, and functional specificity is achieved by encoding multiple isoforms. For fungi, most information comes from the study of type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where seven PP2C-encoding genes (PTC1 to -7) with diverse functions can be found. More recently, data on several Candida albicans PP2C proteins became available, suggesting that some of them can be involved in virulence. In this work we review the available literature on fungal PP2Cs and explore sequence databases to provide a comprehensive overview of these enzymes in fungi. PMID:21076010

  14. Use of intein-mediated phosphoprotein arrays to study substrate specificity of protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kochinyan, Samvel; Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Barshevsky, Tanya; Xu, Jie; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic peptides incorporating various chemical moieties, for example, phosphate groups, are convenient tools for investigating protein modification enzymes, such as protein phosphatases (PPs). However, short peptides are sometimes poor substrates, and their binding to commonly used matrices is unpredictable and variable. In general, protein substrates for PPs are superior for enzymatic assays, binding to various matrices, and Western blot analysis. The preparation and characterization of phosphoproteins, however can be difficult and technically demanding. In this study, the intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) technique was used to readily generate phosphorylated protein substrates by ligating a synthetic phosphopeptide to an intein-generated carrier protein (CP) possessing a carboxyl-terminal thioester with a one-to-one stoichiometry. The ligated phosphoprotein (LPP) substrate was treated with a PP and subsequently subjected to array or Western blot analysis with a phospho-specific antibody. This approach is highly effective in producing arrays of protein substrates containing phosphorylated amino acid residues and has been applied for screening of PPs with specificity toward phosphorylated tyrosine, serine, or threonine residues, resulting in an approximately 240-fold increase in sensitivity in dot blot analysis compared with the use of synthetic peptides. The IPL technique overcomes the disadvantages of current methods and is a versatile system for the facile production of protein substrates containing well-defined structural motifs for the study of protein modification enzymes.

  15. [Interaction of two tumor suppressors: Phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb protein].

    PubMed

    Beniaminov, A D; Krasnov, G S; Dmitriev, A A; Puzanov, G A; Snopok, B A; Senchenko, V N; Kashuba, V I

    2016-01-01

    Earlier we established that CTDSPL gene encoding small carboxy-terminal domain serine phosphatase can be considered a classical tumor suppressor gene. Besides, transfection of tumor cell line MCF-7 with CTDSPL led to the content decrease of inactive phosphorylated form of another tumor suppressor, retinoblastoma protein (Rb), and subsequently to cell cycle arrest at the G1/S boundary. This result implied that small phosphatase CTDSPL is able to specifically dephosphorylate and activate Rb protein. In order to add some fuel to this hypothesis, in the present work we studied the interaction of two tumor suppressors CTDSPL and Rb in vitro. GST pool-down assay revealed that CTDSPL is able to precipitate Rb protein from MCF-7 cell extracts, while surface plasmon resonance technique showed that interaction of the two proteins is direct. Results of this study reassert that phosphatase CTDSPL and Rb could be involved in the common mechanism of cell cycle regulation.

  16. Purification and characterization of two wheat-embryo protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Polya, G M; Haritou, M

    1988-04-15

    Two protein phosphatases (enzymes I and II) were extensively purified from wheat embryo by a procedure involving chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, DEAE-Sephacel and Ultrogel AcA 44. Preparations of enzyme I (Mr 197,000) are heterogeneous. Preparations of enzyme II (Mr 35,000) contain only one major polypeptide (Mr 17,500), which exactly co-purifies with protein phosphatase II on gel filtration and is not present in preparations of enzyme I. However, this major polypeptide has been identified as calmodulin. Calmodulin and protein phosphatase II can be separated by further chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B. Protein phosphatases I and II do not require Mg2+ or Ca2+ for activity. Both enzymes catalyse the dephosphorylation of phosphohistone H1 (phosphorylated by wheat-germ Ca2+-dependent protein kinase) and of phosphocasein (phosphorylated by wheat-germ Ca2+-independent casein kinase), but neither enzyme dephosphorylates a range of non-protein phosphomonoesters tested. Both enzymes are inhibited by Zn2+, Hg2+, vanadate, molybdate, F-, pyrophosphate and ATP.

  17. Translocation of phospho-protein kinase Cs implies their roles in meiotic-spindle organization, polar-body emission and nuclear activity in mouse eggs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen-Yu; Li, Qing-Zhang; Chen, Da-Yuan; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2005-02-01

    The protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are a family of Ser/Thr protein kinases categorized into three subfamilies: classical, novel, and atypical. The phosphorylation of PKC in germ cells is not well defined. In this study, we described the subcellular localization of phopho-PKC in the process of mouse oocyte maturation, fertilization, and early embryonic mitosis. Confocal microscopy revealed that phospho-PKC (pan) was distributed abundantly in the nucleus at the germinal vesicle stage. After germinal vesicle breakdown, phospho-PKC was localized in the vicinity of the condensed chromosomes, distributed in the whole meiotic spindle, and concentrated at the spindle poles. After metaphase I, phospho-PKC was translocated gradually to the spindle mid-zone during emission of the first polar body. After sperm penetration and electrical activation, the distribution of phospho-PKC was moved from the spindle poles to the spindle mid-zone. After the extrusion of the second polar body (PB2) phospho-PKC was localized in the area between the oocyte and the PB2. In fertilized eggs, phospho-PKC was concentrated in the pronuclei except for the nucleolus. Phospho-PKC was dispersed after pronuclear envelope breakdown, but distributed on the entire spindle at mitotic metaphase. The results suggest that PKC activation may play important roles in regulating spindle organization and stabilization, polar-body extrusion, and nuclear activity during mouse oocyte meiosis, fertilization, and early embryonic mitosis.

  18. Individualized Survival and Treatment Response Predictions in Breast Cancer Patients: Involvements of Phospho-EGFR and Phospho-Her2/neu Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lan; Abraham, Jame; Flynn, Daniel C.; Castranova, Vincent; Shi, Xianglin; Qian, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Our robust prediction system for individual breast cancer patients combines three well-known machine-learning classifiers to provide stable and accurate clinical outcome prediction (N=269). The average performance of the selected classifiers is used as the evaluation criterion in breast cancer outcome predictions. A profile (incorporating histology, lymph node status, tumor grade, tumor stage, ER, PR, Her2/neu, patient’s age and smoking status) generated over 95% accuracy in individualized disease-free survival and treatment response predictions. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrated that the measurement of phospho-EGFR and phospho-Her2/neu is more powerful in breast cancer survival prediction than that of total EGFR and total Her2/neu (p < 0.05). The incorporation of hormone receptor status, Her2/neu, patient’s age and smoking status into the traditional pathologic markers creates a powerful standard to perform individualized survival and treatment outcome predictions for breast cancer patients. PMID:25558292

  19. Methods to distinguish various types of protein phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brautigan, D.L.; Shriner, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To distinguish the action of protein Tyr(P) and protein Ser(P)/Thr(P) phosphatases on /sup 32/P-labeled phosphoproteins in subcellular fractions different inhibitors and activators are utilized. Comparison of the effects of added compounds provides a convenient, indirect method to characterize dephosphorylation reactions. Protein Tyr(P) phosphatases are specifically inhibited by micromolar Zn2+ or vanadate, and show maximal activity in the presence of EDTA. The other class of cellular phosphatases, specific for protein Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues, are inhibited by fluoride and EDTA. In this class of enzymes two major functional types can be distinguished: those sensitive to inhibition by the heat-stable protein inhibitor-2 and not stimulated by polycations, and those not sensitive to inhibition and stimulated by polycations. Preparation of /sup 32/P-labeled Tyr(P) and Ser(P) phosphoproteins also is presented for the direct measurement of phosphatase activities in preparations by the release of acid-soluble (/sup 32/P)phosphate.

  20. Translating protein phosphatase research into treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Jeyapriya R; Lee, Irene C J; Shenolikar, Shirish

    2017-02-08

    Many of the major neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by the accumulation of intracellular protein aggregates in neurons and other cells in brain, suggesting that errors in protein quality control mechanisms associated with the aging process play a critical role in the onset and progression of disease. The increased understanding of the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling network and, more specifically, the structure and function of eIF2α phosphatases has enabled the development or discovery of small molecule inhibitors that show great promise in restoring protein homeostasis and ameliorating neuronal damage and death. While this review focuses attention on one or more eIF2α phosphatases, the wide range of UPR proteins that are currently being explored as potential drug targets bodes well for the successful future development of therapies to preserve neuronal function and treat neurodegenerative disease. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Specificity profiling of protein phosphatases toward phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qing; Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Zhai, Yujing; Pei, Dehua

    2013-07-03

    A combinatorial library method was developed to systematically profile the substrate specificity of protein phosphatases toward phosphoseryl (pS) and phosphothreonyl (pT) peptides. Application of this method and a previously reported phosphotyrosyl (pY) library screening technique to dual-specificity phosphatase (DUSP) VH1 of vaccinia virus revealed that VH1 is highly active toward both pS/pT and pY peptides. VH1 exhibits different and more stringent sequence specificity toward pS/pT than pY substrates. Unlike previously characterized protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), the activity and specificity of VH1 are primarily determined by the amino acid residues C-terminal to the pS, pT, or pY residue. In contrast, the mammalian VH1-related (VHR) DUSP has intrinsically low catalytic activity toward pS and pT substrates, suggesting that its primary physiological function is to dephosphorylate pY residues in substrate proteins. This method is applicable to other DUSPs and protein-serine/threonine phosphatases, and the substrate specificity data will be useful for identifying the physiological substrates of these enzymes.

  2. Reduced expression of CD45 Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Pr

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-08

    complex ( MHC ) I (28-14-8), MHC II (M5/114.15.2), CD44 (IM7), and Ly6G (1A8). Cells (1 106) were resuspended in Fc block (anti CD16/CD32 antibody diluted...enzyme (supplemental Fig. 3). Themajority of the phosphatases tested in this panel belong to the class of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (SHP-1, SHP- 2 ...and Sina Bavari‡ 2 From the ‡United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, Maryland 21702-5011, §Target Structure

  3. Okadaic acid: the archetypal serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dounay, A B; Forsyth, C J

    2002-11-01

    As the first recognized member of the "okadaic acid class" of phosphatase inhibitors, the marine natural product okadaic acid is perhaps the most well-known member of a diverse array of secondary metabolites that have emerged as valuable probes for studying the roles of various cellular protein serine/threonine phosphatases. This review provides a historical perspective on the role that okadaic acid has played in stimulating a broad spectrum of modern scientific research as a result of the natural product's ability to bind to and inhibit important classes of protein serine / threonine phosphatases. The relationships between the structure and biological activities of okadaic acid are briefly reviewed, as well as the structural information regarding the particular cellular receptors protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2A. Laboratory syntheses of okadaic acid and its analogs are thoroughly reviewed. Finally, an interpretation of the critical contacts observed between okadaic acid and PP1 by X-ray crystallography is provided, and specific molecular recognition hypotheses that are testable via the synthesis and assay of non-natural analogs of okadaic acid are suggested.

  4. Targeting the Reversibly Oxidized Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Benoit; Yang, Ming; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2010-01-01

    Controlled production of reactive oxygen species leads to reversible oxidation of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and has emerged as an important tier of regulation over phosphorylation-dependent signal transduction. We present a modified cysteinyl-labeling assay that detects reversible oxidation of members of each of the different PTP subclasses. Here, we describe the methods for enriching reversibly oxidized PTPs from complex protein extracts, illustrating the procedure in IMR90 fibroblasts. PMID:20807953

  5. Structural and functional basis of protein phosphatase 5 substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Jasmeen; Dunn, Diana M; Woodford, Mark R; Mariotti, Laura; Schulman, Jacqualyn; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Mollapour, Mehdi; Vaughan, Cara K

    2016-08-09

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) regulates hormone- and stress-induced cellular signaling by association with the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). PP5-mediated dephosphorylation of the cochaperone Cdc37 is essential for activation of Hsp90-dependent kinases. However, the details of this mechanism remain unknown. We determined the crystal structure of a Cdc37 phosphomimetic peptide bound to the catalytic domain of PP5. The structure reveals PP5 utilization of conserved elements of phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) structure to bind substrate and provides a template for many PPP-substrate interactions. Our data show that, despite a highly conserved structure, elements of substrate specificity are determined within the phosphatase catalytic domain itself. Structure-based mutations in vivo reveal that PP5-mediated dephosphorylation is required for kinase and steroid hormone receptor release from the chaperone complex. Finally, our data show that hyper- or hypoactivity of PP5 mutants increases Hsp90 binding to its inhibitor, suggesting a mechanism to enhance the efficacy of Hsp90 inhibitors by regulation of PP5 activity in tumors.

  6. Proteomic analysis of protein phosphatase Z1 from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Márkus, Bernadett; Szabó, Krisztina; Pfliegler, Walter P; Petrényi, Katalin; Boros, Enikő; Pócsi, István; Tőzsér, József; Csősz, Éva; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z is a "novel type" fungus specific serine/threonine protein phosphatase. Previously our research group identified the CaPPZ1 gene in the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans and reported that the gene deletion had several important physiological consequences. In order to reveal the protein targets and the associated mechanisms behind the functions of the phosphatase a proteomic method was adopted for the comparison of the cappz1 deletion mutant and the genetically matching QMY23 control strain. Proteins extracted from the control and deletion mutant strains were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the protein spots were stained with RuBPS and Pro-Q Diamond in order to visualize the total proteome and the phosphoproteome, respectively. The alterations in spot intensities were determined by densitometry and were analysed with the Delta2D (Decodon) software. Spots showing significantly different intensities between the mutant and control strains were excised from the gels and were digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were identified by LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry. As many as 15 protein spots were found that exhibited significant changes in their intensity upon the deletion of the phosphatase and 20 phosphoproteins were identified in which the level of phosphorylation was modified significantly in the mutant. In agreement with previous findings we found that the affected proteins function in protein synthesis, oxidative stress response, regulation of morphology and metabolism. Among these proteins we identified two potential CaPpz1 substrates (Eft2 and Rpp0) that may regulate the elongation step of translation. RT-qPCR experiments revealed that the expression of the genes coding for the affected proteins was not altered significantly. Thus, the absence of CaPpz1 exerted its effects via protein synthesis/degradation and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. In addition, our proteomics data strongly suggested a role for Ca

  7. In vitro enzymatic assays of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Lubben, T; Clampit, J; Stashko, M; Trevillyan, J; Jirousek, M R

    2001-08-01

    Many hormone or growth factor receptors signal via the activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Alteration of the phosphorylation state of tyrosine residues in certain proteins can directly regulate enzyme activity or cause formation of protein complexes necessary for transducing intracellular signals. Genetic and biochemical evidence also implicates protein-tyrosine phosphatases in several disease processes, including negative regulation of insulin receptor signaling at the level of the insulin receptor and perhaps in signaling at the IRS-1 level. The expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is elevated in muscle and adipose tissue in insulin-resistant states both in man and rodents suggesting that PTP1B may play a role in the insulin-resistant state associated with diabetes and obesity. As described in this unit, PTP1B activity can be determined with the small molecule substrate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), in which the cleavage of the phosphate results in production of p-nitrophenol (pNP) and an increase in absorbance at 405 nm. Alternatively, PTP1B activity can be measured as described using model phosphotyrosyl-containing peptide substrates in which the release of free phosphate from the peptide is determined using a malachite green colorimetric assay.

  8. Protein expression of phospho-lim kinase-1 in patients and an experimental rat model with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Wang, Heng; Yuan, Jinxian; Wu, Xuling; Huang, Yunyi; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Yangmei

    2015-01-01

    Lim kinase-1 (LIMK1) plays a critical role in dendritic spine morphogenesis and brain function. The protein expression pattern of phospho-LIMK1 (p-LIMK1), the active form of LIMK1, in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), however, is unknown. Here we measured p-LIMK1 protein expression in thirty temporal neocortex tissue samples from intractable TLE patients, fifteen histologically normal temporal neocortex tissue samples from trauma patients without epilepsy, in the hippocampi of lithium chloride/pilocarpine-induced TLE rats, and in controls. We found that p-LIMK1 was expressed mainly in the cytoplasm of neurons. The protein expression of p-LIMK1 was significantly higher in the TLE patients and rats than in the control groups. Our results suggest that p-LIMK1 might be involved in the pathogenesis of intractable TLE. PMID:25785037

  9. Protein phosphatase 2A family members (PP2A and PP6) associate with U1 snRNP and the spliceosome during pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Kamoun, Malek; Filali, Mohammed; Murray, Michael V.; Awasthi, Sita; Wadzinski, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are both important for multiple steps in the splicing pathway. Members of the PP1 and PP2A subfamilies of phospho-serine/threonine phosphatases play essential but redundant roles in the second step of the splicing reaction. PP6, a member of the PP2A subfamily, is the mammalian homologue of yeast Sit4p and ppe1, which are involved in cell cycle regulation; however, the involvement of PP6 in the splicing pathway remains unclear. Here we show that PP2A family members physically associate with the spliceosome throughout the splicing reaction. PP2A holoenzyme and PP6 were found stably associated with U1 snRNP. Together our findings indicate that these phosphatases regulate splicing catalysis involving U1 snRNP and suggest an important evolutionary conserved role of PP2A family phosphatases in pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:24064353

  10. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  11. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  12. Centromeric binding and activity of Protein Phosphatase 4

    PubMed Central

    Lipinszki, Zoltan; Lefevre, Stephane; Savoian, Matthew S.; Singleton, Martin R.; Glover, David M.; Przewloka, Marcin R.

    2015-01-01

    The cell division cycle requires tight coupling between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. However, understanding the cell cycle roles of multimeric protein phosphatases has been limited by the lack of knowledge of how their diverse regulatory subunits target highly conserved catalytic subunits to their sites of action. Phosphoprotein phosphatase 4 (PP4) has been recently shown to participate in the regulation of cell cycle progression. We now find that the EVH1 domain of the regulatory subunit 3 of Drosophila PP4, Falafel (Flfl), directly interacts with the centromeric protein C (CENP-C). Unlike other EVH1 domains that interact with proline-rich ligands, the crystal structure of the Flfl amino-terminal EVH1 domain bound to a CENP-C peptide reveals a new target-recognition mode for the phosphatase subunit. We also show that binding of Flfl to CENP-C is required to bring PP4 activity to centromeres to maintain CENP-C and attached core kinetochore proteins at chromosomes during mitosis. PMID:25562660

  13. Hypervalent Organochalcogenanes as Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Piovan, Leandro; Wu, Li; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Andrade, Leandro H.

    2011-01-01

    A series of organochalcogenanes was synthesized and evaluated as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) inhibitors. The results indicate that organochalcogenanes inactivate the PTPs in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion, most likely through covalent modification of the active site sulfur-moiety by the chalcogen atom. Consequently, organochalcogenanes represent a new class of mechanism-based probes to modulate the PTP-mediated cellular processes. PMID:21240419

  14. Food extracts consumed in Mediterranean countries and East Asia reduce protein concentrations of androgen receptor, phospho-protein kinase B, and phospho-cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaskirat; Xie, Chanlu; Yao, Mu; Hua, Sheng; Vignarajan, Soma; Jardine, Greg; Hambly, Brett D; Sved, Paul; Dong, Qihan

    2010-04-01

    Active surveillance is an emerging management option for the rising number of men with low-grade, clinically localized prostate cancer. However, 30-40% of men on active surveillance will progress to high-grade disease over 5 y. With the ultimate aim of developing a food-based chemoprevention strategy to retard cancer progression in these otherwise healthy men, we have developed a blend of food extracts commonly consumed in Mediterranean countries and East Asia. The effect of the food extracts known as Blueberry Punch (BBP) on prostate cancer cell growth and key signaling pathways were examined in vitro and in vivo. BBP reduced prostate cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner (0.08-2.5%) at 72 h in vitro due to the reduction in cell proliferation and viability. Prostate cancer cell xenograft-bearing mice, administered 10% BBP in drinking water for 2 wk, had a 25% reduction in tumor volume compared with the control (water only). In vitro, BBP reduced protein concentrations in 3 signaling pathways necessary for the proliferation and survival of prostate cancer cells, namely androgen receptor, phospho-protein kinase B/protein kinase B, and phospho-cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha. The downstream effectors of these pathways, including prostate-specific antigen and glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, were also reduced. Thus, this palatable food supplement is a potential candidate for testing in clinical trials and may ultimately prove effective in retarding the progression of low-grade, early-stage prostate cancer in men managed by active surveillance.

  15. The role of serine/threonine protein phosphatases in exocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Alistair T R; Baldwin, Monique L; Rostas, John A P; Holst, Jeff; Ludowyke, Russell I

    2003-01-01

    Modulation of exocytosis is integral to the regulation of cellular signalling, and a variety of disorders (such as epilepsy, hypertension, diabetes and asthma) are closely associated with pathological modulation of exocytosis. Emerging evidence points to protein phosphatases as key regulators of exocytosis in many cells and, therefore, as potential targets for the design of novel therapies to treat these diseases. Diverse yet exquisite regulatory mechanisms have evolved to direct the specificity of these enzymes in controlling particular cell processes, and functionally driven studies have demonstrated differential regulation of exocytosis by individual protein phosphatases. This Review discusses the evidence for the regulation of exocytosis by protein phosphatases in three major secretory systems, (1) mast cells, in which the regulation of exocytosis of inflammatory mediators plays a major role in the respiratory response to antigens, (2) insulin-secreting cells in which regulation of exocytosis is essential for metabolic control, and (3) neurons, in which regulation of exocytosis is perhaps the most complex and is essential for effective neurotransmission. PMID:12749763

  16. Structural relationship between a bacterial developmental protein and eukaryotic PP2C protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Adler, E; Donella-Deana, A; Arigoni, F; Pinna, L A; Stragler, P

    1997-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis SpoIIE is a Ser protein phosphatase whose action on the phosphoprotein SpoIIAA triggers the cell type-specific activation of a sporulation transcription factor. Here we report that SpoIIE displays sequence similarity to the PP2C family of eukaryotic Ser/Thr protein phosphatases, and that residues common to these proteins are required for the function of both SpoIIE and TPD1, a yeast PP2C. These findings suggest that SpoIIE and the PP2C protein phosphatases are structurally related, and reveal a striking formal similarity between the SpoIIAA regulatory circuit and that of mammalian mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase. This similarity may reflect an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of biological regulation based on the interplay of His protein kinase-like Ser kinases and PP2C-like protein phosphatases.

  17. Protein Phosphatase Methyl-Esterase PME-1 Protects Protein Phosphatase 2A from Ubiquitin/Proteasome Degradation.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Ryotaro; Miura, Akane; Usui, Tatsuya; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon; Ohama, Takashi; Sato, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a conserved essential enzyme that is implicated as a tumor suppressor based on its central role in phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways. Protein phosphatase methyl esterase (PME-1) catalyzes specifically the demethylation of the C-terminal Leu309 residue of PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). It has been shown that PME-1 affects the activity of PP2A by demethylating PP2Ac, but also by directly binding to the phosphatase active site, suggesting loss of PME-1 in cells would enhance PP2A activity. However, here we show that PME-1 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibit lower PP2A activity than wild type MEFs. Loss of PME-1 enhanced poly-ubiquitination of PP2Ac and shortened the half-life of PP2Ac protein resulting in reduced PP2Ac levels. Chemical inhibition of PME-1 and rescue experiments with wild type and mutated PME-1 revealed methyl-esterase activity was necessary to maintain PP2Ac protein levels. Our data demonstrate that PME-1 methyl-esterase activity protects PP2Ac from ubiquitin/proteasome degradation.

  18. Targeting Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases for Anticancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya. M.; Lawrence, Harshani. R.; Sebti, Saïd. M.; Lawrence, Nicholas. J.; Wu, Jie.

    2010-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a diverse family of enzymes encoded by 107 genes in the human genome. Together with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), PTPs regulate various cellular activities essential for the initiation and maintenance of malignant phenotypes. While PTK inhibitors are now used routinely for cancer treatment, the PTP inhibitor development field is still in the discovery phase. In this article, the suitability of targeting PTPs for novel anticancer drug discovery is discussed. Examples are presented for PTPs that have been targeted for anticancer drug discovery as well as potential new PTP targets for novel anticancer drug discovery. PMID:20337577

  19. Expanding the Functional Repertoire of CTD Kinase I and RNA Polymerase II: Novel PhosphoCTD-Associating Proteins in the Yeast Proteome†

    PubMed Central

    Phatnani, Hemali P.; Jones, Janice C.; Greenleaf, Arno L.

    2009-01-01

    CTD kinase I (CTDK-I) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for normal phosphorylation of the C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) on elongating RNA polymerase II. To elucidate cellular roles played by this kinase and the hyperphosphorylated CTD (phosphoCTD) it generates, we systematically searched yeast extracts for proteins that bound to the phosphoCTD made by CTDK-I in vitro. Initially, using a combination of far-western blotting and phosphoCTD affinity chromatography, we discovered a set of novel phosphoCTD-associating proteins (PCAPs) implicated in a variety of nuclear functions. We identified the phosphoCTD-interacting domains of a number of these PCAPs, and in several test cases (namely, Set2, Ssd1, and Hrr25) adduced evidence that phosphoCTD binding is functionally important in vivo. Employing surface plasmon resonance (BIACORE) analysis, we found that recombinant versions of these and other PCAPs bind preferentially to CTD repeat peptides carrying SerPO4 residues at positions 2 and 5 of each seven amino acid repeat, consistent with the positional specificity of CTDK-I in vitro [Jones, J. C., et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 24957–24964]. Subsequently, we used a synthetic CTD peptide with three doubly phosphorylated repeats (2,5P) as an affinity matrix, greatly expanding our search for PCAPs. This resulted in identification of approximately 100 PCAPs and associated proteins representing a wide range of functions (e.g., transcription, RNA processing, chromatin structure, DNA metabolism, protein synthesis and turnover, RNA degradation, snRNA modification, and snoRNP biogenesis). The varied nature of these PCAPs and associated proteins points to an unexpectedly diverse set of connections between Pol II elongation and other processes, conceptually expanding the role played by CTD phosphorylation in functional organization of the nucleus. PMID:15595826

  20. Characterization of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Tapia, Ana Lilia; Baylón-Pacheco, Lidia; Espíritu-Gordillo, Patricia; Rosales-Encina, José Luis

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) is a group of phosphatases that has not been broadly studied in protozoan parasites. In humans, PRLs are involved in metastatic cancer, the promotion of cell migration and invasion. PTPs have been increasingly recognized as important effectors of host-pathogen interactions. We characterized the only putative protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL (PTP EhPRL) in the eukaryotic human intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Here, we reported that the EhPRL protein possessed the classical HCX5R catalytic motif of PTPs and the CAAX box characteristic of the PRL family and exhibited 31-32% homology with the three human PRL isoforms. In amebae, the protein was expressed at low but detectable levels. The recombinant protein (rEhPRL) had enzymatic activity with the 3-o-methyl fluorescein phosphate (OMFP) substrate; this enzymatic activity was inhibited by the PTP inhibitor o-vanadate. Using immunofluorescence we showed that native EhPRL was localized to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. When the trophozoites interacted with collagen, EhPRL relocalized over time to vesicle-like structures. Interaction with fibronectin increased the presence of the enzyme in the cytoplasm. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated that EhPRL mRNA expression was upregulated when the trophozoites interacted with collagen but not with fibronectin. Trophozoites recovered from amoebic liver abscesses showed higher EhPRL mRNA expression levels than normal trophozoites. These results strongly suggest that EhPRL may play an important role in the biology and adaptive response of the parasite to the host environment during amoebic liver abscess development, thereby participating in the pathogenic mechanism.

  1. Phospho-proteomic analyses of B-Raf protein complexes reveal new regulatory principles

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhardt, Anja E.; Sprenger, Adrian; Röring, Michael; Herr, Ricarda; Weinberg, Florian; Köhler, Martin; Braun, Sandra; Orth, Joachim; Diedrich, Britta; Lanner, Ulrike; Tscherwinski, Natalja; Schuster, Simon; Dumaz, Nicolas; Schmidt, Enrico; Baumeister, Ralf; Schlosser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    B-Raf represents a critical physiological regulator of the Ras/RAF/MEK/ERK-pathway and a pharmacological target of growing clinical relevance, in particular in oncology. To understand how B-Raf itself is regulated, we combined mass spectrometry with genetic approaches to map its interactome in MCF-10A cells as well as in B-Raf deficient murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and B-Raf/Raf-1 double deficient DT40 lymphoma cells complemented with wildtype or mutant B-Raf expression vectors. Using a multi-protease digestion approach, we identified a novel ubiquitination site and provide a detailed B-Raf phospho-map. Importantly, we identify two evolutionary conserved phosphorylation clusters around T401 and S419 in the B-Raf hinge region. SILAC labelling and genetic/biochemical follow-up revealed that these clusters are phosphorylated in the contexts of oncogenic Ras, sorafenib induced Raf dimerization and in the background of the V600E mutation. We further show that the vemurafenib sensitive phosphorylation of the T401 cluster occurs in trans within a Raf dimer. Substitution of the Ser/Thr-residues of this cluster by alanine residues enhances the transforming potential of B-Raf, indicating that these phosphorylation sites suppress its signaling output. Moreover, several B-Raf phosphorylation sites, including T401 and S419, are somatically mutated in tumors, further illustrating the importance of phosphorylation for the regulation of this kinase. PMID:27034005

  2. Phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase (MraY) as a target for antibacterial agents and antibacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Bugg, Timothy D H; Lloyd, Adrian J; Roper, David I

    2006-06-01

    Phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase (MraY, translocase I) catalyses the first step of the lipid-linked cycle of reactions of bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. MraY is the target for five families of nucleoside antibacterial natural products: the tunicamycins, the mureidomycins (also pacidamycins, napsamycins), the liposidomycins, the muraymycins, and the capuramycins. Recent structure-activity studies on these families have led to the identification of active pharmacophores, and insight into their mechanisms of action. This step of peptidoglycan biosynthesis is also the target for the bacteriolytic E protein from bacteriophage phiX174, and for cyclic peptides of the amphomycin family which complex the undecaprenyl phosphate co-substrate. The mechanisms of enzyme inhibition by these agents are discussed, and the state of knowledge regarding the transmembrane structure, active site, and catalytic mechanism of MraY. The availability of high throughput assays and prospects of MraY as an antibacterial target are also discussed.

  3. Detailed Structural Characterization of Unbound Protein Phosphatase 1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dancheck, Barbara; Nairn, Angus C.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is an essential and ubiquitous serine/threonine protein phosphatase that is regulated by more than 100 known inhibitor and targeting proteins. It is currently unclear how protein inhibitors distinctly and specifically regulate PP1 to enable rapid responses to cellular alterations. We demonstrate that two PP1 inhibitors, I-2 and DARPP-32, belong to the class of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs). We show that both inhibitors have distinct preferences for transient local and long range structure. These preferences are likely their structural signature for their interaction with PP1. Furthermore, we show that upon phosphorylation of Thr34 in DARPP-32, which turns DARPP-32 into a potent inhibitor of PP1, neither local nor long range structure of DARPP-32 is altered. Therefore, our data suggests a role for these transient 3-dimensional topologies in binding mechanisms that enable extensive contacts with PP1's invariant surfaces. Together, these interactions enable potent and selective inhibition of PP1. PMID:18954090

  4. Inhibition of a protein tyrosine phosphatase using mesoporous oxides.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, S; Girish, T S; Mandal, S S; Gopal, B; Bhattacharyya, A J

    2010-03-11

    The feasibility of utilizing mesoporous matrices of alumina and silica for the inhibition of enzymatic activity is presented here. These studies were performed on a protein tyrosine phosphatase by the name chick retinal tyrosine phosphotase-2 (CRYP-2), a protein that is identical in sequence to the human glomerular epithelial protein-1 and involved in hepatic carcinoma. The inhibition of CRYP-2 is of tremendous therapeutic importance. Inhibition of catalytic activity was examined using the sustained delivery of p-nitrocatechol sulfate (pNCS) from bare and amine functionalized mesoporous silica (MCM-48) and mesoporous alumina (Al(2)O(3)). Among the various mesoporous matrices employed, amine functionalized MCM-48 exhibited the best release of pNCS and also inhibition of CRYP-2. The maximum speed of reaction v(max) (=160 +/- 10 micromol/mnt/mg) and inhibition constant K(i) (=85.0 +/- 5.0 micromol) estimated using a competitive inhibition model were found to be very similar to inhibition activities of protein tyrosine phosphatases using other methods.

  5. Protein kinase and phosphatase activities of thylakoid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Shaw, E.K.; Bennett, J.

    1987-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of the 25 and 27 kDa light-harvesting Chl a/b proteins (LHCII) of the thylakoid membranes is catalyzed by a phosphatase which differs from previously reported thylakoid-bound phosphatases in having an alkaline pH optimum (9.0) and a requirement for Mg/sup 2 +/ ions. Dephosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa psb H gene product requires a Mg/sup 2 +/ ion concentration more than 200 fold higher than that for dephosphorylation of LHC II. The 8.3 kDa and 27 kDa proteins appear to be phosphorylated by two distinct kinases, which differ in substrate specificity and sensitivity to inhibitors. The plastoquinone antagonist 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB) inhibits phosphorylation of the 27 kDa LHC II much more readily than phosphorylation of the 8.3 kDa protein. A similar pattern of inhibition is seen for two synthetic oligopeptides (MRKSATTKKAVC and ATQTLESSSRC) which are analogs of the phosphorylation sites of the two proteins. Possible modes of action of DBMIB are discussed. 45 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Evans Blue and other dyes as protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Suja; Shim, Yi Sup; Kim, Ki Chul; Lee, Keun-Hyeung; Cho, Hyeongjin

    2004-04-19

    Commonly used dyes including Evans Blue and Trypan Blue were examined for their inhibitory activities against protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), all of them showed inhibition of PTPases with different potencies. Of the 13 dyes tested, four exhibited IC(50) value of less than 10 microM, Evans Blue lowest IC(50) of 1.3 microM against PTP1B. Care must be taken in the use of dyes for clinical or biochemical experiments to avoid unwanted side effects. Some of the low molecular weight dyes might be useful as lead compounds for the development of potent and selective PTPase inhibitors.

  7. Regulation of TGF-β Signaling by Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Feng, Xin-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Tight regulation of TGF-β superfamily signaling is important for normal cellular functions and tissue homeostasis. Since TGF-β superfamily signaling pathways are activated by a short phosphorylation cascade, from receptor phosphorylation to subsequent phosphorylation and activation of downstream signal transducer R-Smads, reversible phosphorylation serves as a critical step to assure the proper TGF-β signaling. This article will review the current progress on the understanding of dynamic phosphorylation in TGF-β signaling and the essential role of protein phosphatases in this process. PMID:20704570

  8. The Zds proteins control entry into mitosis and target protein phosphatase 2A to the Cdc25 phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Wicky, Sidonie; Tjandra, Hendri; Schieltz, David; Yates, John; Kellogg, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    The Wee1 kinase restrains entry into mitosis by phosphorylating and inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1). The Cdc25 phosphatase promotes entry into mitosis by removing Cdk1 inhibitory phosphorylation. Experiments in diverse systems have established that Wee1 and Cdc25 are regulated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), but a full understanding of the function and regulation of PP2A in entry into mitosis has remained elusive. In budding yeast, entry into mitosis is controlled by a specific form of PP2A that is associated with the Cdc55 regulatory subunit (PP2ACdc55). We show here that related proteins called Zds1 and Zds2 form a tight stoichiometric complex with PP2ACdc55 and target its activity to Cdc25 but not to Wee1. Conditional inactivation of the Zds proteins revealed that their function is required primarily at entry into mitosis. In addition, Zds1 undergoes cell cycle–dependent changes in phosphorylation. Together, these observations define a role for the Zds proteins in controlling specific functions of PP2ACdc55 and suggest that upstream signals that regulate PP2ACdc55 may play an important role in controlling entry into mitosis. PMID:21119008

  9. Regulation of the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by the PP2C phosphatase PPM1F in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Bohdan P; Banga, Satnam S; Ozer, Harvey L

    2004-06-04

    The regulation of the multifunctional calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) by serine/threonine protein phosphatases has been extensively studied in neuronal cells; however, this regulation has not been investigated previously in fibroblasts. We cloned a cDNA from SV40-transformed human fibroblasts that shares 80% homology to a rat calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase that encodes a PPM1F protein. By using extracts from transfected cells, PPM1F, but not a mutant (R326A) in the conserved catalytic domain, was found to dephosphorylate in vitro a peptide corresponding to the auto-inhibitory region of CaMKII. Further analyses demonstrated that PPM1F specifically dephosphorylates the phospho-Thr-286 in autophosphorylated CaMKII substrate and thus deactivates the CaMKII in vitro. Coimmunoprecipitation of CaMKII with PPM1F indicates that the two proteins can interact intracellularly. Binding of PPM1F to CaMKII involves multiple regions and is not dependent on intact phosphatase activity. Furthermore, overexpression of PPM1F in fibroblasts caused a reduction in the CaMKII-specific phosphorylation of the known substrate vimentin(Ser-82) following induction of the endogenous CaM kinase. These results identify PPM1F as a CaM kinase phosphatase within fibroblasts, although it may have additional functions intracellularly since it has been presented elsewhere as POPX2 and hFEM-2. We conclude that PPM1F, possibly together with the other previously described protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, can regulate the activity of CaMKII. Moreover, because PPM1F dephosphorylates the critical autophosphorylation site of CaMKII, we propose that this phosphatase plays a key role in the regulation of the kinase intracellularly.

  10. Compounded PHOSPHO1/ALPL deficiencies reduce dentin mineralization.

    PubMed

    McKee, M D; Yadav, M C; Foster, B L; Somerman, M J; Farquharson, C; Millán, J L

    2013-08-01

    Phosphatases are involved in bone and tooth mineralization, but their mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP, ALPL) regulates inhibitory extracellular pyrophosphate through its pyrophosphatase activity to control mineral propagation in the matrix; mice without TNAP lack acellular cementum, and have mineralization defects in dentin, enamel, and bone. PHOSPHO1 is a phosphatase found within membrane-bounded matrix vesicles in mineralized tissues, and double ablation of Alpl and Phospho1 in mice leads to a complete absence of skeletal mineralization. Here, we describe mineralization abnormalities in the teeth of Phospho1(-/-) mice, and in compound knockout mice lacking Phospho1 and one allele of Alpl (Phospho1(-/-);Alpl(+/-) ). In wild-type mice, PHOSPHO1 and TNAP co-localized to odontoblasts at early stages of dentinogenesis, coincident with the early mineralization of mantle dentin. In Phospho1 knockout mice, radiography, micro-computed tomography, histology, and transmission electron microscopy all demonstrated mineralization abnormalities of incisor dentin, with the most remarkable findings being reduced overall mineralization coincident with decreased matrix vesicle mineralization in the Phospho1(-/-) mice, and the almost complete absence of matrix vesicles in the Phospho1(-/-);Alpl(+/-) mice, whose incisors showed a further reduction in mineralization. Results from this study support prominent non-redundant roles for both PHOSPHO1 and TNAP in dentin mineralization.

  11. Compounded PHOSPHO1/ALPL Deficiencies Reduce Dentin Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    McKee, M.D.; Yadav, M.C.; Foster, B.L.; Somerman, M.J.; Farquharson, C.; Millán, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatases are involved in bone and tooth mineralization, but their mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP, ALPL) regulates inhibitory extracellular pyrophosphate through its pyrophosphatase activity to control mineral propagation in the matrix; mice without TNAP lack acellular cementum, and have mineralization defects in dentin, enamel, and bone. PHOSPHO1 is a phosphatase found within membrane-bounded matrix vesicles in mineralized tissues, and double ablation of Alpl and Phospho1 in mice leads to a complete absence of skeletal mineralization. Here, we describe mineralization abnormalities in the teeth of Phospho1-/- mice, and in compound knockout mice lacking Phospho1 and one allele of Alpl (Phospho1-/-;Alpl+/-). In wild-type mice, PHOSPHO1 and TNAP co-localized to odontoblasts at early stages of dentinogenesis, coincident with the early mineralization of mantle dentin. In Phospho1 knockout mice, radiography, micro-computed tomography, histology, and transmission electron microscopy all demonstrated mineralization abnormalities of incisor dentin, with the most remarkable findings being reduced overall mineralization coincident with decreased matrix vesicle mineralization in the Phospho1-/- mice, and the almost complete absence of matrix vesicles in the Phospho1-/-;Alpl+/- mice, whose incisors showed a further reduction in mineralization. Results from this study support prominent non-redundant roles for both PHOSPHO1 and TNAP in dentin mineralization. PMID:23694930

  12. Biochemical studies in Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) patients: change in CSF levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP), amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and phospho-tau.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Reyes, Patricio F; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2011-04-01

    Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) is one of the causes of dementia of the elderly characterized by impaired mental function, gait difficulties and urinary incontinence. Previously, it was proposed that some of the NPH patients may develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) like pathology. Aim of this study was to compare levels of different CSF biomarkers, including total secreted β-amyloid precursor protein (sAPP), sAPP-alpha form (sAPPα), amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, total-tau protein and hyperphosphorylated-tau protein in subjects from NPH and Non-NPH Control (NNC). CSF was collected from 23 NPH patients and 13 Non-NPH controls by lumber puncture. Western blot analysis was performed to measure levels of sAPP-total. ELISA was used separately to determine levels of sAPPα, Aβ peptide, total-tau and phospho-tau proteins. We found a significant decrease in levels of total secreted APP, sAPPα and Aβ (1-42) in the CSF sample of NPH patients vs. NNC. We did not observe any change in levels of total-tau or phospho-tau in NPH vs. NNC subjects. Notably, phospho-tau level was significantly increased in the NPH patients, who were suffering from the disease for more than one year, vs. NNC. Among five biomarkers studied, decreased sAPP, sAPPα and Aβ (1-42) levels in CSF can be molecular markers to distinguish NPH cases from NNC. Disease severity can also be assessed by increased levels of CSF phospho-tau protein and the ratio of phospho-tau to Aβ (1-42), which might be a useful tool for predicting conversion of NPH individuals to other neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD).

  13. Identification of the human testis protein phosphatase 1 interactome.

    PubMed

    Fardilha, Margarida; Esteves, Sara L C; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Vintém, Ana Paula; Domingues, Sara C; Rebelo, Sandra; Morrice, Nick; Cohen, Patricia T W; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A B; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F

    2011-11-15

    Protein phosphorylation is a critical regulatory mechanism in cellular signalling. To this end, PP1 is a major eukaryotic serine/threonine-specific phosphatase whose cellular functions, in turn, depend on complexes it forms with PP1 interacting proteins-PIPs. The importance of the testis/sperm-enriched variant, PP1γ2, in sperm motility and spermatogenesis has previously been shown. Given the key role of PIPs, it is imperative to identify the physiologically relevant PIPs in testis and sperm. Hence, we performed Yeast Two-Hybrid screens of a human testis cDNA library using as baits the different PP1 isoforms and also a proteomic approach aimed at identifying PP1γ2 binding proteins. To the best of our knowledge this is the largest data set of the human testis PP1 interactome. We report the identification of 77 proteins in human testis and 7 proteins in human sperm that bind PP1. The data obtained increased the known PP1 interactome by reporting 72 novel interactions. Confirmation of the interaction of PP1 with 5 different proteins was also further validated by co-immunoprecipitation or protein overlays. The data here presented provides important insights towards the function of these proteins and opens new possibilities for future research. In fact, such diversity in PP1 regulators makes them excellent targets for pharmacological intervention.

  14. Spatial control of protein phosphatase 2A (de)methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Longin, Sari; Zwaenepoel, Karen; Martens, Ellen; Louis, Justin V.; Rondelez, Evelien; Goris, Jozef; Janssens, Veerle

    2008-01-01

    Reversible methylation of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A{sub C}) is an important regulatory mechanism playing a crucial role in the selective recruitment of regulatory B subunits. Here, we investigated the subcellular localization of leucine carboxyl methyltransferase (LCMT1) and protein phosphatase methylesterase (PME-1), the two enzymes catalyzing this process. The results show that PME-1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus and harbors a functional nuclear localization signal, whereas LCMT1 is underrepresented in the nucleus and mainly localizes to the cytoplasm, Golgi region and late endosomes. Indirect immunofluorescence with methylation-sensitive anti-PP2A{sub C} antibodies revealed a good correlation with the methylation status of PP2A{sub C}, demethylated PP2A{sub C} being substantially nuclear. Throughout mitosis, demethylated PP2A{sub C} is associated with the mitotic spindle and during cytokinesis with the cleavage furrow. Overexpression of PME-1, but not of an inactive mutant, results in increased demethylation of PP2A{sub C} in the nucleus, whereas overexpression of a cytoplasmic PME-1 mutant lacking the NLS results in increased demethylation in the cytoplasm-in all cases, however, without any obvious functional consequences. PME-1 associates with an inactive PP2A population, regardless of its esterase activity or localization. We propose that stabilization of this inactive, nuclear PP2A pool is a major in vivo function of PME-1.

  15. Key role of succinate dehydrogenase in insulin-induced inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Pomytkin, I A; Kolesova, O E

    2002-06-01

    We studied the role of mitochondria in insulin-induced inactivation of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the liver. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is an insulin-sensitive source of H(2)O(2)that acts as a physiological inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Succinate dehydrogenase plays a key role in insulin-stimulated generation of H(2)O(2)and inactivation of liver protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  16. A Chronoamperometric Screen Printed Carbon Biosensor Based on Alkaline Phosphatase Inhibition for W(VI) Determination in Water, Using 2-Phospho-l-Ascorbic Acid Trisodium Salt as a Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Gámez, Ana Lorena; Alonso-Lomillo, María Asunción; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Arcos-Martínez, María Julia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a chronoamperometric method to determine tungsten in water using screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles and cross linked alkaline phosphatase immobilized in the working electrode. Enzymatic activity over 2-phospho-l-ascorbic acid trisodium salt, used as substrate, was affected by tungsten ions, which resulted in a decrease of chronoamperometric current, when a potential of 200 mV was applied on 10 mM of substrate in a Tris HCl buffer pH 8.00 and 0.36 M of KCl. Calibration curves for the electrochemical method validation, give a reproducibility of 5.2% (n = 3), a repeatability of 9.4% (n = 3) and a detection limit of 0.29 ± 0.01 μM. Enriched tap water, purified laboratory water and bottled drinking water, with a certified tungsten reference solution traceable to NIST, gave a recovery of 97.1%, 99.1% and 99.1% respectively (n = 4 in each case) and a dynamic range from 0.6 to 30 μM. This study was performed by means of a Lineweaver–Burk plot, showing a mixed kinetic inhibition. PMID:25621602

  17. A chronoamperometric screen printed carbon biosensor based on alkaline phosphatase inhibition for W(IV) determination in water, using 2-phospho-L-ascorbic acid trisodium salt as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Gámez, Ana Lorena; Alonso-Lomillo, María Asunción; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Arcos-Martínez, María Julia

    2015-01-22

    This paper presents a chronoamperometric method to determine tungsten in water using screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles and cross linked alkaline phosphatase immobilized in the working electrode. Enzymatic activity over 2-phospho-l-ascorbic acid trisodium salt, used as substrate, was affected by tungsten ions, which resulted in a decrease of chronoamperometric current, when a potential of 200 mV was applied on 10 mM of substrate in a Tris HCl buffer pH 8.00 and 0.36 M of KCl. Calibration curves for the electrochemical method validation, give a reproducibility of 5.2% (n = 3), a repeatability of 9.4% (n = 3) and a detection limit of 0.29 ± 0.01 µM. Enriched tap water, purified laboratory water and bottled drinking water, with a certified tungsten reference solution traceable to NIST, gave a recovery of 97.1%, 99.1% and 99.1% respectively (n = 4 in each case) and a dynamic range from 0.6 to 30 µM. This study was performed by means of a Lineweaver-Burk plot, showing a mixed kinetic inhibition.

  18. Protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Jean-Marie; Sontag, Estelle

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a large family of enzymes that account for the majority of brain Ser/Thr phosphatase activity. While PP2A enzymes collectively modulate most cellular processes, sophisticated regulatory mechanisms are ultimately responsible for ensuring isoform-specific substrate specificity. Of particular interest to the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) field, alterations in PP2A regulators and PP2A catalytic activity, subunit expression, methylation and/or phosphorylation, have been reported in AD-affected brain regions. “PP2A” dysfunction has been linked to tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloidogenesis and synaptic deficits that are pathological hallmarks of this neurodegenerative disorder. Deregulation of PP2A enzymes also affects the activity of many Ser/Thr protein kinases implicated in AD. This review will more specifically discuss the role of the PP2A/Bα holoenzyme and PP2A methylation in AD pathogenesis. The PP2A/Bα isoform binds to tau and is the primary tau phosphatase. Its deregulation correlates with increased tau phosphorylation in vivo and in AD. Disruption of PP2A/Bα-tau protein interactions likely contribute to tau deregulation in AD. Significantly, alterations in one-carbon metabolism that impair PP2A methylation are associated with increased risk for sporadic AD, and enhanced AD-like pathology in animal models. Experimental studies have linked deregulation of PP2A methylation with down-regulation of PP2A/Bα, enhanced phosphorylation of tau and amyloid precursor protein, tau mislocalization, microtubule destabilization and neuritic defects. While it remains unclear what are the primary events that underlie “PP2A” dysfunction in AD, deregulation of PP2A enzymes definitely affects key players in the pathogenic process. As such, there is growing interest in developing PP2A-centric therapies for AD, but this may be a daunting task without a better understanding of the regulation and function of specific PP2A enzymes. PMID:24653673

  19. Stimulation of the ATPase activity of rat brain protein kinase C by phospho acceptor substrates of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    O'Brian, C A; Ward, N E

    1991-03-05

    We recently reported that autophosphorylated rat brain protein kinase C (PKC) catalyzes a Ca2(+)- and phosphatidylserine- (PS-) dependent ATPase reaction. The Ca2(+)- and PS-dependent ATPase and histone kinase reactions of PKC each had a Km app(ATP) of 6 microM. Remarkably, the catalytic fragment of PKC lacked detectable ATPase activity. In this paper, we show that subsaturating concentrations of protein substrates accelerate the ATPase reaction catalyzed by PKC and that protein and peptide substrates of PKC induce ATPase catalysis by the catalytic fragment. At subsaturating concentrations, histone III-S and protamine sulfate each accelerated the ATPase activity of PKC in the presence of Ca2+ and PS by as much as 1.5-fold. At saturating concentrations, the protein substrates were inhibitory. Poly(L-lysine) failed to accelerate the ATPase activity, indicating that the acceleration observed with histone III-S and protamine sulfate was not simply a result of their gross physical properties. Furthermore, histone III-S induced the ATPase activity of the catalytic fragment of PKC, at both subsaturating and saturating histone concentrations. The induction of ATPase activity was also elicited by the peptide substrate Arg-Arg-Lys-Ala-Ser-Gly-Pro-Pro-Val, when the peptide was present at concentrations near its Km app. The induction of the ATPase activity by the nonapeptide provides strong evidence that the binding of phospho acceptor substrates to the active site of PKC can stimulate ATP hydrolysis. Taken together, our results indicate that PKC-catalyzed protein phosphorylation is inefficient, since it is accompanied by Pi production.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Evolution of the metazoan protein phosphatase 2C superfamily.

    PubMed

    Stern, Adi; Privman, Eyal; Rasis, Michal; Lavi, Sara; Pupko, Tal

    2007-01-01

    Members of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) superfamily are Mg(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent serine/threonine phosphatases, which are essential for regulation of cell cycle and stress signaling pathways in cells. In this study, a comprehensive genomic analysis of all available metazoan PP2C sequences was conducted. The phylogeny of PP2C was reconstructed, revealing the existence of 15 vertebrate families which arose following a series of gene duplication events. Relative dating of these duplications showed that they occurred in two active periods: before the divergence of bilaterians and before vertebrate diversification. PP2C families which duplicated during the first period take part in different signaling pathways, whereas PP2C families which diverged in the second period display tissue expression differences yet participate in similar signaling pathways. These differences were found to involve variation of expression in tissues which show higher complexity in vertebrates, such as skeletal muscle and the nervous system. Further analysis was performed with the aim of identifying the functional domains of PP2C. The conservation pattern across the entire PP2C superfamily revealed an extensive domain of more than 50 amino acids which is highly conserved throughout all PP2C members. Several insertion or deletion events were found which may have led to the specialization of each PP2C family.

  1. New functional aspects of the atypical protein tyrosine phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Hengge, Alvan C

    2013-11-12

    LDP3 (VHZ) is the smallest classical protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) known to date and was originally misclassified as an atypical dual-specificity phosphatase. Kinetic isotope effects with steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics of VHZ and mutants with p-nitrophenol phosphate have revealed several unusual properties. VHZ is significantly more active than previously reported but remains one of the least active PTPs. Highly unusual for a PTP, VHZ possesses two acidic residues (E134 and D65) in the active site. D65 occupies the position corresponding to the typical general acid in the PTP family. However, VHZ primarily utilizes E134 as the general acid, with D65 taking over this role when E134 is mutated. This unusual behavior is facilitated by two coexisting, but unequally populated, substrate binding modes. Unlike most classical PTPs, VHZ exhibits phosphotransferase activity. Despite the presence of the Q-loop that normally prevents alcoholysis of the phosphoenzyme intermediate in other classical PTPs, VHZ readily phosphorylates ethylene glycol. Although mutations of Q-loop residues affect this phosphotransferase activity, mutations on the IPD loop that contains the general acid exert more control over this process. A single P68V substitution on this loop completely abolishes phosphotransferase activity. The ability of native VHZ to catalyze transphosphorylation may lead to an imbalance of intracellular phosphorylation, which could explain the correlation of its overexpression with several types of cancer.

  2. Rac GTPase signaling through the PP5 protein phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Saverio; Darden, Thomas; Erxleben, Christian; Romeo, Charles; Russo, Angela; Martin, Negin; Rossie, Sandra; Armstrong, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the Rac-dependent mechanism of KCNH2 channel stimulation by thyroid hormone in a rat pituitary cell line, GH4C1, with the patch-clamp technique. Here we present physiological evidence for the protein serine/threonine phosphatase, PP5, as an effector of Rac GTPase signaling. We also propose and test a specific molecular mechanism for PP5 stimulation by Rac-GTP. Inhibition of PP5 with the microbial toxin, okadaic acid, blocked channel stimulation by thyroid hormone and by Rac, but signaling was restored by expression of a toxin-insensitive mutant of PP5, Y451A, which we engineered. PP5 is unique among protein phosphatases in that it contains an N-terminal regulatory domain with three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) that inhibit its activity. Expression of the TPR domain coupled to GFP blocked channel stimulation by the thyroid hormone. We also show that the published structures of the PP5 TPR domain and the TPR domain of p67, the Rac-binding subunit of NADPH oxidase, superimpose over 92 α carbons. Mutation of the PP5 TPR domain at two predicted contact points with Rac-GTP prevents the TPR domain from functioning as a dominant negative and blocks the ability of Y451A to rescue signaling in the presence of okadaic acid. PP5 stimulation by Rac provides a unique molecular mechanism for the antagonism of Rho-dependent signaling through protein kinases in many cellular processes, including metastasis, immune cell chemotaxis, and neuronal development. PMID:16549782

  3. Molecular enzymology underlying regulation of protein phosphatase-1 by natural toxins.

    PubMed

    Holmes, C F B; Maynes, J T; Perreault, K R; Dawson, J F; James, M N G

    2002-11-01

    The protein serine/threonine phosphatases constitute a unique class of enzymes that are critical for cell regulation, as they must counteract the activities of thousands of protein kinases in human cells. Uncontrolled inhibition of phosphatase activity by toxic inhibitors can lead to widespread catastrophic effects. Over the past decade, a number of natural product toxins have been identified that specifically and potently inhibit protein phosphatase-1 and 2A. Amongst these are the cyanobacteria-derived cyclic heptapeptide microcystin-LR and the polyether fatty acid okadaic acid from dinoflagellate sources. The molecular mechanism underlying potent inhibition of protein phosphatase-1 by these toxins is becoming clear through insights gathered from diverse sources. These include: 1. Comparison of structure-activity relationships amongst the different classes of toxins. 2. Delineation of the structural differences between protein phosphatase-1 and 2A that account for their differing sensitivity to toxins, particularly okadaic acid and microcystin-LR. 3. Determination of the crystal structure of protein phosphatase-1 with microcystin-LR, okadaic acid and calyculin bound. 4. Site-specific mutagenesis and biochemical analysis of protein phosphatase-1 mutants. Taken together, these data point to a common binding site on protein phosphatase-1 for okadaic acid, microcystin-LR and the calyculins. However, careful analysis of these data suggest that each toxin binds to the common binding site in a subtly different way, relying on distinct structural interactions such as hydrophobic binding, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions to different degrees. The insights derived from studying the molecular enzymology of protein phosphatase-1 may help explain the different sensitivities of other structurally conserved protein serine/theonine phosphatases to toxin inhibition. Furthermore, studies on the binding of structurally diverse toxins at the active site of protein

  4. Soybean root nodule acid phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Penheiter, A R; Duff, S M; Sarath, G

    1997-01-01

    Acid phosphatases are ubiquitous enzymes that exhibit activity against a variety of substrates in vitro, although little is known about their intracellular function. In this study, we report the isolation, characterization, and partial sequence of the major acid phosphatase from soybean (Glycine max L.) root nodules. The phosphatase was purified predominantly as a heterodimer with subunits of 28 and 31 kD; homodimers of both subunits were also observed and exhibited phosphatase activity. In addition to the general phosphatase substrate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the heterodimeric form of the enzyme readily hydrolyzed 5'-nucleotides, flavin mononucleotide, and O-phospho-L-Tyr. Low or negligible activity was observed with ATP or polyphosphate. Purified nodule acid phosphatase was stimulated by magnesium, inhibited by calcium and EDTA, and competitively inhibited by cGMP and cAMP with apparent Ki values of 7 and 12 microM, respectively. Partial N-terminal and internal sequencing of the nodule acid phosphatase revealed homology to the soybean vegetative storage proteins. There was a 17-fold increase in enzyme activity and a noticeable increase in protein levels detected by immunoblotting methods during nodule development. Both of these parameters were low in young nodules and reached a peak in mature, functional nodules, suggesting that this enzyme is important for efficient nodule metabolism. PMID:9193092

  5. How it all started: tau and protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Götz, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    This review is dedicated to Inge Grundke-Iqbal who laid the foundations of the tau field, by isolating tau from the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, discovering that tau is hyperphosphorylated, and proving a critical role of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and its endogenous inhibitor I2PP2A in this process. This memorial starts with a few personal notes, and then covers how subcellular fractionation helped in isolating tau. We review in detail the role of PP2A and its endogenous inhibitor in tau phosphorylation. We discuss the role that methylation and phosphorylation have in regulating PP2A activity. We add what we have contributed to understanding the role of tau and PP2A in AD using PP2A transgenic and knockout models, and conclude by addressing two underexplored areas in tau research: tau's non-canonical functions and the role distinct tau isoforms have in a physiological context.

  6. Protein Phosphatase-1 Regulates Expression of Neuregulin-1

    PubMed Central

    Ammosova, Tatiana; Washington, Kareem; Rotimi, Jamie; Kumari, Namita; Smith, Kahli A.; Niu, Xiaomei; Jerebtsova, Marina; Nekhai, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a cellular serine/threonine phosphatase, is targeted to cellular promoters by its major regulatory subunits, PP1 nuclear targeting subunit, nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1) and RepoMan. PP1 is also targeted to RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) by NIPP1 where it can dephosphorylate RNAPII and cycle-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9). Here, we show that treatment of cells with a small molecule activator of PP1 increases the abundance of a neuregulin-1 (NRG-1)-derived peptide. NRG-1 mRNA and protein levels were increased in the cells stably or transiently expressing mutant NIPP1 (mNIPP1) that does not bind PP1, but not in the cells expressing NIPP1. Expression of mNIPP1 also activated the NRG-1 promoter in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Analysis of extracts from mNIPP1 expressing cells by glycerol gradient centrifugation showed a redistribution of PP1 and CDK9 between large and small molecular weight complexes, and increased CDK9 Thr-186 phosphorylation. This correlated with the increased CDK9 activity. Further, RNAPII co-precipitated with mNIPP1, and phosphorylation of RNAPII C-terminal domain (CTD) Ser-2 residues was greater in cells expressing mNIPP1. In mNIPP1 expressing cells, okadaic acid, a cell-permeable inhibitor of PP1, did not increase Ser-2 CTD phosphorylation inhibited by flavopiridol, in contrast to the NIPP1 expressing cells, suggesting that PP1 was no longer involved in RNAPII dephosphorylation. Finally, media conditioned with mNIPP1 cells induced the proliferation of wild type 84-31 cells, consistent with a role of neuregulin-1 as a growth promoting factor. Our study indicates that deregulation of PP1/NIPP1 holoenzyme activates NRG-1 expression through RNAPII and CDK9 phosphorylation in a NF-κB dependent manner. PMID:27918433

  7. Direct activation of protein phosphatase-2A0 by HIV-1 encoded protein complex NCp7:vpr.

    PubMed

    Tung, H Y; De Rocquigny, H; Zhao, L J; Cayla, X; Roques, B P; Ozon, R

    1997-01-20

    The effects of HIV-1 encoded proteins NCp7, vpr and NCp7:vpr complex on the activity of protein phosphatase-2A0 have been tested. We report that NCp7 is an activator of protein phosphatase-2A0 and that vpr activated protein phosphatase-2A0 only slightly. We also report that NCp7 and vpr form a tight complex which becomes a more potent activator of protein phosphatase-2A0 than NCp7 alone. The ability of NCp7 to activate protein phosphatase-2A0 is regulated by vpr. The C-terminal portion of vpr prevents NCp7 from activating protein phosphatase-2A0 while the N-terminal portion of vpr potentiates the effect of NCp7 on the activity of protein phosphatase-2A0. Our findings indicate that vpr may be acting as a targeting subunit which directs NCp7 to activate protein phosphatase-2A0. In view of the fact that protein phosphatase-2A functions as an inhibitor of G0 to M transition of the cell cycle and is involved in other key cellular processes such as the control of RNA transcription, the results presented in this report may explain how HIV-1 causes cell cycle arrest which may lead to CD4+ T cell depletion and also how it disturbs normal cellular processes of its host cell.

  8. Assay of phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatase using synthetic peptide 1142-1153 of the insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    King, M J; Sale, G J

    1988-09-12

    Synthetic peptide 1142-1153 of the insulin receptor was phosphorylated on tyrosine by the insulin receptor and found to be a potent substrate for dephosphorylation by rat liver particulate and soluble phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases. Apparent Km values were approximately 5 microM. Vm values (nmol phosphate removed/min per mg protein) were 0.62 (particulate) and 0.2 (soluble). This corresponds to 80% of total activity being membrane-associated, indicating that membrane-bound phosphatases are important receptor phosphatases. The phosphatase activities were distinct from acid and alkaline phosphatase. In conclusion peptide 1142-1153 provides a useful tool for the further study and characterization of phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases.

  9. Protein phosphatase 2A: a highly regulated family of serine/threonine phosphatases implicated in cell growth and signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, V; Goris, J

    2001-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) comprises a family of serine/threonine phosphatases, minimally containing a well conserved catalytic subunit, the activity of which is highly regulated. Regulation is accomplished mainly by members of a family of regulatory subunits, which determine the substrate specificity, (sub)cellular localization and catalytic activity of the PP2A holoenzymes. Moreover, the catalytic subunit is subject to two types of post-translational modification, phosphorylation and methylation, which are also thought to be important regulatory devices. The regulatory ability of PTPA (PTPase activator), originally identified as a protein stimulating the phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity of PP2A, will also be discussed, alongside the other regulatory inputs. The use of specific PP2A inhibitors and molecular genetics in yeast, Drosophila and mice has revealed roles for PP2A in cell cycle regulation, cell morphology and development. PP2A also plays a prominent role in the regulation of specific signal transduction cascades, as witnessed by its presence in a number of macromolecular signalling modules, where it is often found in association with other phosphatases and kinases. Additionally, PP2A interacts with a substantial number of other cellular and viral proteins, which are PP2A substrates, target PP2A to different subcellular compartments or affect enzyme activity. Finally, the de-regulation of PP2A in some specific pathologies will be touched upon. PMID:11171037

  10. PhosphoSVM: prediction of phosphorylation sites by integrating various protein sequence attributes with a support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yongchao; Yao, Bo; Zhang, Chi

    2014-06-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the most essential post-translational modifications in eukaryotes. Studies on kinases and their substrates are important for understanding cellular signaling networks. Because of the cost in time and labor associated with large-scale wet-bench experiments, computational prediction of phosphorylation sites becomes important and many computational tools have been developed in the recent decades. The prediction tools can be grouped into two categories: kinase-specific and non-kinase-specific tools. With more kinases being discovered by the new sequencing technologies, accurate non-kinase-specific prediction tools are highly desirable for whole-genome annotation in a wider variety of species. In this manuscript, a support vector machine is used to combine eight different sequence level scoring functions to predict phosphorylation sites. The attributes used by this work, including Shannon entropy, relative entropy, predicted protein secondary structure, predicted protein disorder, solvent accessible area, overlapping properties, averaged cumulative hydrophobicity, and k-nearest neighbor, were able to obtain better results than the previously used attributes by other similar methods. This method achieved AUC values of 0.8405/0.8183/0.7383 for serine (S), threonine (T), and tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation sites, respectively, in animals with a tenfold cross-validation. The model trained by the animal phosphorylation sites was also applied to a plant phosphorylation site dataset as an independent test. The AUC values for the independent test dataset were 0.7761/0.6652/0.5958 for S/T/Y phosphorylation sites, which compared favorably with those of several existing methods. A web server based on our method was constructed for public use. The server, trained model, and all datasets used in the current study are available at http://sysbio.unl.edu/PhosphoSVM .

  11. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity by hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fan-Guo; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that transient production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an important signaling event triggered by the activation of various cell surface receptors. Major targets of H(2)O(2) include protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Oxidation of the active site Cys by H(2)O(2) abrogates PTP catalytic activity, thereby potentially furnishing a mechanism to ensure optimal tyrosine phosphorylation in response to a variety of physiological stimuli. Unfortunately, H(2)O(2) is poorly reactive in chemical terms and the second order rate constants for the H(2)O(2)-mediated PTP inactivation are ~10M(-1)s(-1), which is too slow to be compatible with the transient signaling events occurring at the physiological concentrations of H(2)O(2). We find that hydroxyl radical is produced from H(2)O(2) solutions in the absence of metal chelating agent by the Fenton reaction. We show that the hydroxyl radical is capable of inactivating the PTPs and the inactivation is active site directed, through oxidation of the catalytic Cys to sulfenic acid, which can be reduced by low molecular weight thiols. We also show that hydroxyl radical is a kinetically more efficient oxidant than H(2)O(2) for inactivating the PTPs. The second-order rate constants for the hydroxyl radical-mediated PTP inactivation are at least 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those mediated by H(2)O(2) under the same conditions. Thus, hydroxyl radical generated in vivo may serve as a more physiologically relevant oxidizing agent for PTP inactivation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chemistry and mechanism of phosphatases, diesterases and triesterases.

  12. Inhibition of phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase (MraY) by nucleoside natural product antibiotics, bacteriophage ϕX174 lysis protein E, and cationic antibacterial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bugg, Timothy D H; Rodolis, Maria T; Mihalyi, Agnes; Jamshidi, Shirin

    2016-12-15

    This review covers recent developments in the inhibition of translocase MraY and related phospho-GlcNAc transferases WecA and TagO, and insight into the inhibition and catalytic mechanism of this class of integral membrane proteins from the structure of Aquifex aeolicus MraY. Recent studies have also identified a protein-protein interaction site in Escherichia coli MraY, that is targeted by bacteriophage ϕX174 lysis protein E, and also by cationic antimicrobial peptides containing Arg-Trp close to their N- or C-termini. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phosphorylation of the Kinase Interaction Motif in Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Phosphatase-4 Mediates Cross-talk between Protein Kinase A and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Robin J.; Delavaine, Laurent; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Stewart, Graeme; Staples, Christopher J.; Didmon, Mark P.; Trinidad, Antonio Garcia; Alonso, Andrés; Pulido, Rafael; Keyse, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 4 (DUSP9/MKP-4) plays an essential role during placental development and is one of a subfamily of three closely related cytoplasmic dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases, which includes the ERK-specific enzymes DUSP6/MKP-3 and DUSP7/MKP-X. However, unlike DUSP6/MKP-3, DUSP9/MKP-4 also inactivates the p38α MAP kinase both in vitro and in vivo. Here we demonstrate that inactivation of both ERK1/2 and p38α by DUSP9/MKP-4 is mediated by a conserved arginine-rich kinase interaction motif located within the amino-terminal non-catalytic domain of the protein. Furthermore, DUSP9/MKP-4 is unique among these cytoplasmic MKPs in containing a conserved PKA consensus phosphorylation site 55RRXSer-58 immediately adjacent to the kinase interaction motif. DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 by PKA in vitro, and phosphorylation abrogates the binding of DUSP9/MKP-4 to both ERK2 and p38α MAP kinases. In addition, although mutation of Ser-58 to either alanine or glutamic acid does not affect the intrinsic catalytic activity of DUSP9/MKP-4, phospho-mimetic (Ser-58 to Glu) substitution inhibits both the interaction of DUSP9/MKP-4 with ERK2 and p38α in vivo and its ability to dephosphorylate and inactivate these MAP kinases. Finally, the use of a phospho-specific antibody demonstrates that endogenous DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 in response to the PKA agonist forskolin and is also modified in placental tissue. We conclude that DUSP9/MKP-4 is a bona fide target of PKA signaling and that attenuation of DUSP9/MKP-4 function can mediate cross-talk between the PKA pathway and MAPK signaling through both ERK1/2 and p38α in vivo. PMID:21908610

  14. Protein phosphatase-1 modulates the function of Pax-6, a transcription factor controlling brain and eye development.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qin; Liu, Wen-Bin; Qin, Jichao; Liu, Jinping; Chen, He-Ge; Huang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Lili; Sun, Shuming; Deng, Mi; Gong, Lili; Li, Yong; Zhang, Lan; Liu, Yan; Feng, Hao; Xiao, Yamei; Liu, Yun; Li, David W-C

    2007-05-11

    Pax-6 is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor and acts high up in the regulatory hierarchy controlling eye and brain development in humans, mice, zebrafish, and Drosophila. Previous studies have shown that Pax-6 is a phosphoprotein, and its phosphorylation by ERK, p38, and homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 greatly enhances its transactivation activity. However, the protein phosphatases responsible for the dephosphorylation of Pax-6 remain unknown. Here, we present both in vitro and in vivo evidence to show that protein serine/threonine phosphatase-1 is a major phosphatase that directly dephosphorylates Pax-6. First, purified protein phosphatase-1 directly dephosphorylates Pax-6 in vitro. Second, immunoprecipitation-linked Western blot revealed that both protein phosphatase-1alpha and protein phosphatase-1beta interact with Pax-6. Third, overexpression of protein phosphatase-1 in human lens epithelial cells leads to dephosphorylation of Pax-6. Finally, inhibition of protein phosphatase-1 activity by calyculin A or knockdown of protein phosphatase-1alpha and protein phosphatase-1beta by RNA interference leads to enhanced phosphorylation of Pax-6. Moreover, our results also demonstrate that dephosphorylation of Pax-6 by protein phosphatase-1 significantly modulates its function in regulating expression of both exogenous and endogenous genes. These results demonstrate that protein phosphatase 1 acts as a major phosphatase to dephosphorylate Pax-6 and modulate its function.

  15. Purinergic Receptor-mediated Rapid Depletion of Nuclear Phosphorylated Akt Depends on Pleckstrin Homology Domain Leucine-rich Repeat Phosphatase, Calcineurin, Protein Phosphatase 2A, and PTEN Phosphatases*

    PubMed Central

    Mistafa, Oras; Ghalali, Aram; Kadekar, Sandeep; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    Akt is an important oncoprotein, and data suggest a critical role for nuclear Akt in cancer development. We have previously described a rapid (3–5 min) and P2X7-dependent depletion of nuclear phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) and effects on downstream targets, and here we studied mechanisms behind the pAkt depletion. We show that cholesterol-lowering drugs, statins, or extracellular ATP, induced a complex and coordinated response in insulin-stimulated A549 cells leading to depletion of nuclear pAkt. It involved protein/lipid phosphatases PTEN, pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat phosphatase (PHLPP1 and -2), protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), and calcineurin. We employed immunocytology, immunoprecipitation, and proximity ligation assay techniques and show that PHLPP and calcineurin translocated to the nucleus and formed complexes with Akt within 3 min. Also PTEN translocated to the nucleus and then co-localized with pAkt close to the nuclear membrane. An inhibitor of the scaffolding immunophilin FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) and calcineurin, FK506, prevented depletion of nuclear pAkt. Furthermore, okadaic acid, an inhibitor of PP2A, prevented the nuclear pAkt depletion. Chemical inhibition and siRNA indicated that PHLPP, PP2A, and PTEN were required for a robust depletion of nuclear pAkt, and in prostate cancer cells lacking PTEN, transfection of PTEN restored the statin-induced pAkt depletion. The activation of protein and lipid phosphatases was paralleled by a rapid proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) translocation to the nucleus, a PCNA-p21cip1 complex formation, and cyclin D1 degradation. We conclude that these effects reflect a signaling pathway for rapid depletion of pAkt that may stop the cell cycle. PMID:20605778

  16. Purinergic receptor-mediated rapid depletion of nuclear phosphorylated Akt depends on pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat phosphatase, calcineurin, protein phosphatase 2A, and PTEN phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Mistafa, Oras; Ghalali, Aram; Kadekar, Sandeep; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2010-09-03

    Akt is an important oncoprotein, and data suggest a critical role for nuclear Akt in cancer development. We have previously described a rapid (3-5 min) and P2X7-dependent depletion of nuclear phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) and effects on downstream targets, and here we studied mechanisms behind the pAkt depletion. We show that cholesterol-lowering drugs, statins, or extracellular ATP, induced a complex and coordinated response in insulin-stimulated A549 cells leading to depletion of nuclear pAkt. It involved protein/lipid phosphatases PTEN, pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat phosphatase (PHLPP1 and -2), protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), and calcineurin. We employed immunocytology, immunoprecipitation, and proximity ligation assay techniques and show that PHLPP and calcineurin translocated to the nucleus and formed complexes with Akt within 3 min. Also PTEN translocated to the nucleus and then co-localized with pAkt close to the nuclear membrane. An inhibitor of the scaffolding immunophilin FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) and calcineurin, FK506, prevented depletion of nuclear pAkt. Furthermore, okadaic acid, an inhibitor of PP2A, prevented the nuclear pAkt depletion. Chemical inhibition and siRNA indicated that PHLPP, PP2A, and PTEN were required for a robust depletion of nuclear pAkt, and in prostate cancer cells lacking PTEN, transfection of PTEN restored the statin-induced pAkt depletion. The activation of protein and lipid phosphatases was paralleled by a rapid proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) translocation to the nucleus, a PCNA-p21(cip1) complex formation, and cyclin D1 degradation. We conclude that these effects reflect a signaling pathway for rapid depletion of pAkt that may stop the cell cycle.

  17. Substrate analysis of Arabidopsis PP2C-type protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Umbrasaite, Julija; Schweighofer, Alois; Meskiene, Irute

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation by protein kinases can be reversed by the action of protein phosphatases. In plants, the Ser/Thr-specific phosphatases dominate among the protein phosphatase families with the type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) being the most abundant among them. PP2Cs are monomeric enzymes that require metal cations for their activity and are insensitive to known phosphatase inhibitors. PP2Cs were shown to counteract the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase/MAPK) activities in plants and to regulate developmental and stress signaling pathways. Studies of PP2C activities can be performed in vitro using recombinant proteins. The potential substrates of PP2Cs can be tested for dephosphorylation by the phosphatase in vitro. We have found that the stress-induced PP2Cs from alfalfa and Arabidopsis interact with stress-activated MAPKs in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screens. Consequently, recombinant MAPKs were employed as substrates for dephosphorylation by selected PP2Cs from different family clusters. The members of the PP2C phosphatase family demonstrated specificity toward the substrate already in vitro, supporting the notion that protein phosphatases are specific enzymes. The PP2C from Arabidopsis thaliana cluster B, Arabidopsis PP2C-type phosphatase (AP2C1), and its homolog from Medicago sativa, Medicago PP2C-type phosphatase (MP2C), were able to dephosphorylate and inactivate MAPKs, whereas the ABSCISIC ACID (ABA)-INSENSITIVE 2 (ABI2) and HOMOLOGY TO ABI1 (HAB1) PP2Cs from the distinct Arabidopsis cluster A were not able to do so. The method described here can be used for the determination of PP2C protein activity and for studying the effect of mutations introduced into their catalytic domains.

  18. Cellular biochemistry methods for investigating protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Stephanie M; Ahmed, Vanessa; Barrios, Amy M; Bottini, Nunzio

    2014-05-10

    The protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a family of proteins that play critical roles in cellular signaling and influence many aspects of human health and disease. Although a wealth of information has been collected about PTPs since their discovery, many questions regarding their regulation and function still remain. Of particular importance are the elucidation of the biological substrates of individual PTPs and understanding of the chemical and biological basis for temporal and spatial resolution of PTP activity within a cell. Drawing from recent advances in both biology and chemistry, innovative approaches have been developed to study the intracellular biochemistry and physiology of PTPs. We provide a summary of PTP-tailored techniques and approaches, emphasizing methodologies to study PTP activity within a cellular context. We first provide a discussion of methods for identifying PTP substrates, including substrate-trapping mutants and synthetic peptide libraries for substrate selectivity profiling. We next provide an overview of approaches for monitoring intracellular PTP activity, including a discussion of mechanistic-based probes, gel-based assays, substrates that can be used intracellularly, and assays tied to cell growth. Finally, we review approaches used for monitoring PTP oxidation, a key regulatory pathway for these enzymes, discussing the biotin switch method and variants of this approach, along with affinity trapping techniques and probes designed to detect PTP oxidation. Further development of approaches to investigate the intracellular PTP activity and functions will provide specific insight into their mechanisms of action and control of diverse signaling pathways.

  19. Protein Phosphatase-1 Regulates Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Alan; Shafagati, Nazly; Benedict, Ashwini; Ammosova, Tatiana; Ivanov, Andrey; Hakami, Ramin M.; Terasaki, Kaori; Makino, Shinji; Nekhai, Sergei; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), genus Phlebovirus family Bunyaviridae, is an arthropod-borne virus endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Recent outbreaks have resulted in cyclic epidemics with an increasing geographic footprint, devastating both livestock and human populations. Despite being recognized as an emerging threat, relatively little is known about the virulence mechanisms and host interactions of RVFV. To date there are no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines for RVF and there is an urgent need for their development. The Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) has previously been shown to play a significant role in the replication of several viruses. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PP1 plays a prominent role in RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle. Both siRNA knockdown of PP1α and a novel PP1-targeting small molecule compound 1E7-03, resulted in decreased viral titers across several cell lines. Deregulation of PP1 was found to inhibit viral RNA production, potentially through the disruption of viral RNA transcript/protein interactions, and indicates a potential link between PP1α and the viral L polymerase and nucleoprotein. These results indicate that PP1 activity is important for RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle and may prove an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26801627

  20. Carcinogenic Aspects of Protein Phosphatase 1 and 2A Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, Hirota; Suganuma, Masami

    Okadaic acid is functionally a potent tumor promoter working through inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1 and PP2A), resulting in sustained phosphorylation of proteins in cells. The mechanism of tumor promotion with oka-daic acid is thus completely different from that of the classic tumor promoter phorbol ester. Other potent inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A - such as dinophysistoxin-1, calyculins A-H, microcystin-LR and its derivatives, and nodularin - were isolated from marine organisms, and their structural features including the crystal structure of the PP1-inhibitor complex, tumor promoting activities, and biochemical and biological effects, are here reviewed. The compounds induced tumor promoting activity in three different organs, including mouse skin, rat glandular stomach and rat liver, initiated with three different carcinogens. The results indicate that inhibition of PP1 and PP2A is a general mechanism of tumor promotion applicable to various organs. This study supports the concept of endogenous tumor promoters in human cancer development.

  1. Protein Phosphatase-1 regulates Rift Valley fever virus replication.

    PubMed

    Baer, Alan; Shafagati, Nazly; Benedict, Ashwini; Ammosova, Tatiana; Ivanov, Andrey; Hakami, Ramin M; Terasaki, Kaori; Makino, Shinji; Nekhai, Sergei; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-03-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), genus Phlebovirus family Bunyaviridae, is an arthropod-borne virus endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Recent outbreaks have resulted in cyclic epidemics with an increasing geographic footprint, devastating both livestock and human populations. Despite being recognized as an emerging threat, relatively little is known about the virulence mechanisms and host interactions of RVFV. To date there are no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines for RVF and there is an urgent need for their development. The Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) has previously been shown to play a significant role in the replication of several viruses. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PP1 plays a prominent role in RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle. Both siRNA knockdown of PP1α and a novel PP1-targeting small molecule compound 1E7-03, resulted in decreased viral titers across several cell lines. Deregulation of PP1 was found to inhibit viral RNA production, potentially through the disruption of viral RNA transcript/protein interactions, and indicates a potential link between PP1α and the viral L polymerase and nucleoprotein. These results indicate that PP1 activity is important for RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle and may prove an attractive therapeutic target.

  2. Role of protein histidine phosphatase for viability of neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Susanne; Faber, Daniela; Fischer, Daniel; Litterscheid, Sarah; Krieglstein, Josef

    2009-04-06

    We recently found protein histidine phosphatase (PHP) in eukaryotes and identified ATP-citrate lyase (ACL) and the beta-subunit of G-proteins as its substrates. The aim of the present study was to get information on the significance of PHP for cellular function and viability. PHP was overexpressed by a viral vector in SH-SY5Y cells, a human neuroblastoma cell line, and in primary cultures of cortical neurons from embryonic (E19) rats. Furthermore, PHP was downregulated by siRNA in SH-SY5Y cells. We could demonstrate that overexpression of PHP decreased the phosphorylation state of ACL. Accordingly, the activity of ACL seemed to be reduced and subsequently, the viability of the cells was diminished. On the other hand, downregulation of PHP did not clearly influence phosphorylation and activity of ACL as well as viability of the cells. The results suggest that an increased activity of PHP impairs cellular function whereas downregulation of PHP does not.

  3. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase sigma is associated with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Muise, Aleixo M; Walters, Thomas; Wine, Eytan; Griffiths, Anne M; Turner, Dan; Duerr, Richard H; Regueiro, Miguel D; Ngan, Bo-Yee; Xu, Wei; Sherman, Philip M; Silverberg, Mark S; Rotin, Daniela

    2007-07-17

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a relatively common chronic debilitating intestinal illness, is composed of two broadly defined groups, Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Although several susceptibility genes for CD have been recently described, susceptibility genes exclusive for UC have not been forthcoming. Here, we show that receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase sigma (PTPRS-encoding PTPsigma) knockout mice spontaneously develop mild colitis that becomes severe when challenged with two known inducers of colitis. We also demonstrate that E-cadherin and beta-catenin, two important adherens junction proteins involved in maintenance of barrier defense in the colon, act as colonic substrates for PTPsigma. Furthermore, we show that three SNPs (rs886936, rs17130, and rs8100586) that flank exon 8 in the human PTPRS gene are associated with UC. The presence of these SNPs is associated with novel splicing that removes the third immunoglobulin-like domain (exon 9) from the extracellular portion of PTPsigma, possibly altering dimerization or ligand recognition. We propose that polymorphisms in the human PTPRS gene lead to ulcerative colitis.

  4. Peptidyl aldehydes as reversible covalent inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hua; Park, Junguk; Pei, Dehua

    2002-08-27

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a large family of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolytic removal of the phosphoryl group from phosphotyrosyl (pY) proteins. PTP inhibitors provide potential treatment of human diseases/conditions such as diabetes and obesity as well as useful tools for studying the function of PTPs in signaling pathways. In this work, we have shown that certain aryl-substituted aldehydes act as reversible, slow-binding inhibitors of modest potency against PTP1B, SHP-1, and a dual-specificity phosphatase, VHR. Attachment of the tripeptide Gly-Glu-Glu to the para position of cinnamaldehyde resulted in an inhibitor (Cinn-GEE) of substantially increased potency against all three enzymes (e.g., K(I) = 5.4 microM against PTP1B). The mechanism of inhibition was investigated using Cinn-GEE specifically labeled with (13)C at the aldehyde carbon and (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectroscopy. While Cinn-GEE alone showed a single cross-peak at delta 9.64 ((1)H) and delta 201 ((13)C), the PTP1B/Cinn-GEE complex showed three distinct cross-peaks at delta 7.6-7.8 ((1)H) and 130-137 ((13)C). Mutation of the catalytic cysteine (Cys-215 in PTP1B) into alanine had no effect on the cross-peaks, whereas mutation of a conserved active-site arginine (Arg-221 in PTP1B) to alanine abolished all three cross-peaks. Similar experiments with Cinn-GEE that had been labeled with (13)C at the benzylic position revealed a change in the hybridization state (from sp(2) to sp(3)) for the benzylic carbon as a result of binding to PTP1B. These results rule out the possibility of a free aldehyde, aldehyde hydrate, or hemithioacetal as the enzyme-bound inhibitor form. Instead, the data are consistent with the formation of an enamine between the aldehyde group of the inhibitor and the guanidine group of Arg-221 in the PTP1B active site. These aldehydes may provide a general core structure that can be further developed into highly potent and specific PTP

  5. Protein phosphatase 5 promotes hepatocarcinogenesis through interaction with AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Li; Hung, Man-Hsin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chao, Tzu-I; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Li-Ju; Hsiao, Yung-Jen; Shih, Chih-Ting; Hsieh, Feng-Shu; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2017-08-15

    The serine-threonine protein phosphatase family members are known as critical regulators of various cellular functions, such as survival and transformation. Growing evidence suggests that pharmacological manipulation of phosphatase activity exhibits therapeutic benefits. Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is known to participate in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and stress-induced signaling cascades that regulate cell growth and apoptosis, and has been shown to be overexpressed in various human malignant diseases. However, the role of PP5 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and whether PP5 may be a viable therapeutic target for HCC treatment are unknown. Here, by analyzing HCC clinical samples obtained from 215 patients, we found that overexpression of PP5 is tumor specific and associated with worse clinical outcomes. We further characterized the oncogenic properties of PP5 in HCC cells. Importantly, both silencing of PP5 with lentiviral-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and chemical inhibition of PP5 phosphatase activity using the natural compound cantharidin/norcantharidin markedly suppressed the growth of HCC cells and tumors in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we identified AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as a novel downstream target of oncogenic PP5 and demonstrated that the antitumor mechanisms underlying PP5 inhibition involve activation of AMPK signaling. Overall, our results establish a pathological function of PP5 in hepatocarcinogenesis via affecting AMPK signaling and suggest that PP5 inhibition is an attractive therapeutic approach for HCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein Ser/Thr phosphatases with kelch-like repeat domains.

    PubMed

    Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Andreeva, Alexandra V

    2002-09-01

    This report describes the presence in plants of protein Ser/Thr phosphatases of the PPP family, homologous to PfPPalpha phosphatase from Plasmodium falciparum. Like PfPPalpha, they possess large N-terminal domains and catalytic domains that are more closely related to the protein phosphatase 1 group. The N-terminal domains of PfPPalpha and its plant homologues contain tandem kelch-like repeats, not previously identified in any protein phosphatases, suggesting that the N-terminal domains may form beta-propeller structures mediating protein-protein interactions. We therefore suggest that this novel phosphatase group be designated as PPKLs for protein phosphatases with kelch-like repeat domains. Four PPKL isoforms are encoded in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, of which at least three are expressed. PPKLs appear to be ubiquitous in Viridiplantae. The existence of a protein phosphatase group shared by Viridiplantae and Apicomplexa, but not other eukaryotes, is in line with the theory of the origin of Apicomplexa by endosymbiosis of nonphotosynthetic eukaryotes with red algae.

  7. Colorimetric Immuno-Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Assay for Specific Detection of Microcystins and Nodularins of Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, James S.; Bell, Steven G.; Codd, Geoffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    A novel immunoassay was developed for specific detection of cyanobacterial cyclic peptide hepatotoxins which inhibit protein phosphatases. Immunoassay methods currently used for microcystin and nodularin detection and analysis do not provide information on the toxicity of microcystin and/or nodularin variants. Furthermore, protein phosphatase inhibition-based assays for these toxins are not specific and respond to other environmental protein phosphatase inhibitors, such as okadaic acid, calyculin A, and tautomycin. We addressed the problem of specificity in the analysis of protein phosphatase inhibitors by combining immunoassay-based detection of the toxins with a colorimetric protein phosphatase inhibition system in a single assay, designated the colorimetric immuno-protein phosphatase inhibition assay (CIPPIA). Polyclonal antibodies against microcystin-LR were used in conjunction with protein phosphatase inhibition, which enabled seven purified microcystin variants (microcystin-LR, -D-Asp3-RR, -LA, -LF, -LY, -LW, and -YR) and nodularin to be distinguished from okadaic acid, calyculin A, and tautomycin. A range of microcystin- and nodularin-containing laboratory strains and environmental samples of cyanobacteria were assayed by CIPPIA, and the results showed good correlation (R2 = 0.94, P < 0.00001) with the results of high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection for toxin analysis. The CIPPIA procedure combines ease of use and detection of low concentrations with toxicity assessment and specificity for analysis of microcystins and nodularins. PMID:11157261

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibition by metals and metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli

    2014-05-10

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play essential roles in controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, communication, and adhesion. The dysregulated activities of PTPs are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases. Many PTPs have emerged as potential new targets for novel drug discovery. PTP inhibitors have attracted much attention. Many PTP inhibitors have been developed. Some of them have been proven to be efficient in lowering blood glucose levels in vivo or inhibiting tumor xenograft growth. Some metal ions and metal complexes potently inhibit PTPs. The metal atoms within metal complexes play an important role in PTP binding, while ligand structures influence the inhibitory potency and selectivity. Some metal complexes can penetrate the cell membrane and selectively bind to their targeting PTPs, enhancing the phosphorylation of the related substrates and influencing cellular metabolism. PTP inhibition is potentially involved in the pathophysiological and toxicological processes of metals and some PTPs may be cellular targets of certain metal-based therapeutic agents. Investigating the structural basis of the interactions between metal complexes and PTPs would facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the structure-activity relationship and accelerate the development of promising metal-based drugs targeting specific PTPs.

  9. Zinc ions modulate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Elisa; Massarotti, Alberto; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key enzymes in cellular regulation. The 107 human PTPs are regulated by redox signalling, phosphorylation, dimerisation, and proteolysis. Recent findings of very strong inhibition of some PTPs by zinc ions at concentrations relevant in a cellular environment suggest yet another mechanism of regulation. One of the most extensively investigated PTPs is PTP1B (PTPN1). It regulates the insulin and leptin signalling pathway and is implicated in cancer and obesity/diabetes. The development of novel assay conditions to investigate zinc inhibition of PTP1B provides estimates of about 5.6 nM affinity for inhibitory zinc(II) ions. Analysis of three PTP1B 3D structures (PDB id: 2CM2, 3I80 and 1A5Y) identified putative zinc binding sites and supports the kinetic studies in suggesting an inhibitory zinc only in the closed and cysteinyl-phosphate intermediate forms of the enzyme. These observations gain significance with regard to recent findings of regulatory roles of zinc ions released from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  10. The Protein Phosphatase 7 Regulates Phytochrome Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Genoud, Thierry; Treviño Santa Cruz, Marcela; Kulisic, Tea; Sparla, Francesca; Fankhauser, Christian; Métraux, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The psi2 mutant of Arabidopsis displays amplification of the responses controlled by the red/far red light photoreceptors phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) but no apparent defect in blue light perception. We found that loss-of-function alleles of the protein phosphatase 7 (AtPP7) are responsible for the light hypersensitivity in psi2 demonstrating that AtPP7 controls the levels of phytochrome signaling. Plants expressing reduced levels of AtPP7 mRNA display reduced blue-light induced cryptochrome signaling but no noticeable deficiency in phytochrome signaling. Our genetic analysis suggests that phytochrome signaling is enhanced in the AtPP7 loss of function alleles, including in blue light, which masks the reduced cryptochrome signaling. AtPP7 has been found to interact both in yeast and in planta assays with nucleotide-diphosphate kinase 2 (NDPK2), a positive regulator of phytochrome signals. Analysis of ndpk2-psi2 double mutants suggests that NDPK2 plays a critical role in the AtPP7 regulation of the phytochrome pathway and identifies NDPK2 as an upstream element involved in the modulation of the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defense pathway by light. Thus, cryptochrome- and phytochrome-specific light signals synchronously control their relative contribution to the regulation of plant development. Interestingly, PP7 and NDPK are also components of animal light signaling systems. PMID:18628957

  11. Druggability analysis and classification of protein tyrosine phosphatase active sites

    PubMed Central

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Raslan, Noor; Sadeq, Asil; Al Sorkhy, Mohammad; Atatreh, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases. The fact that no PTP inhibitors have reached the market so far has raised many questions about their druggability. In this study, the active sites of 17 PTPs were characterized and assessed for its ability to bind drug-like molecules. Consequently, PTPs were classified according to their druggability scores into four main categories. Only four members showed intermediate to very druggable pocket; interestingly, the rest of them exhibited poor druggability. Particularly focusing on PTP1B, we also demonstrated the influence of several factors on the druggability of PTP active site. For instance, the open conformation showed better druggability than the closed conformation, while the tight-bound water molecules appeared to have minimal effect on the PTP1B druggability. Finally, the allosteric site of PTP1B was found to exhibit superior druggability compared to the catalytic pocket. This analysis can prove useful in the discovery of new PTP inhibitors by assisting researchers in predicting hit rates from high throughput or virtual screening and saving unnecessary cost, time, and efforts via prioritizing PTP targets according to their predicted druggability. PMID:27757011

  12. Comparative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Regulating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyun Jee; Kim, Jaehong; Kim, Jong-Heon; Song, Seungeun; Park, Hana; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulatory factors in inflammatory signaling pathways. Although PTPs have been extensively studied, little is known about their role in neuroinflammation. In the present study, we examined the expression of 6 different PTPs (PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, MEG2, LYP, and RPTPβ) and their role in glial activation and neuroinflammation. All PTPs were expressed in brain and glia. The expression of PTP1B, SHP2, and LYP was enhanced in the inflamed brain. The expression of PTP1B, TC-PTP, and LYP was increased after treating microglia cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To examine the role of PTPs in microglial activation and neuroinflammation, we used specific pharmacological inhibitors of PTPs. Inhibition of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, LYP, and RPTPβ suppressed nitric oxide production in LPS-treated microglial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular injection of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, and RPTPβ inhibitors downregulated microglial activation in an LPS-induced neuroinflammation model. Our results indicate that multiple PTPs are involved in regulating microglial activation and neuroinflammation, with different expression patterns and specific functions. Thus, PTP inhibitors can be exploited for therapeutic modulation of microglial activation in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:27790059

  13. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors isolated from Artemisia roxburghiana.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Raza; Ishtiaq; Hizbullah, Syed Muhammad; Habtemariam, Solomon; Zarrelli, Armando; Muhammad, Akhtar; Collina, Simona; Khan, Inamulllah

    2016-08-01

    Artemisia roxburghiana is used in traditional medicine for treating various diseases including diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of active constituents by using protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a validated target for management of diabetes. Various compounds were isolated as active principles from the crude methanolic extract of aerial parts of A. roxburghiana. All compounds were screened for PTP1B inhibitory activity. Molecular docking simulations were performed to investigate the mechanism behind PTP1B inhibition of the isolated compound and positive control, ursolic acid. Betulinic acid, betulin and taraxeryl acetate were the active PTP1B principles with IC50 values 3.49 ± 0.02, 4.17 ± 0.03 and 87.52 ± 0.03 µM, respectively. Molecular docking studies showed significant molecular interactions of the triterpene inhibitors with Gly220, Cys215, Gly218 and Asp48 inside the active site of PTP1B. The antidiabetic activity of A. roxburghiana could be attributed due to PTP1B inhibition by its triterpene constituents, betulin, betulinic acid and taraxeryl acetate. Computational insights of this study revealed that the C-3 and C-17 positions of the compounds needs extensive optimization for the development of new lead compounds.

  14. Protein phosphatase 2A in stretch-induced endothelial cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, K.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We previously proposed that activation of protein kinase C is a key mechanism for control of cell growth enhanced by cyclic strain [Rosales and Sumpio (1992): Surgery 112:459-466]. Here we examined protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to cyclic stain. Protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cytosol was decreased by 36.1% in response to cyclic strain for 60 min, whereas the activity in the membrane did not change. Treatment with low concentration (0.1 nM) of okadaic acid enhanced proliferation of both static and stretched endothelial cells in 10% fetal bovine serum. These data suggest that protein phosphatase 2A acts as a growth suppressor and cyclic strain may enhance cellular proliferation by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A as well as stimulating protein kinase C.

  15. Protein phosphatase 2A in stretch-induced endothelial cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, K.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We previously proposed that activation of protein kinase C is a key mechanism for control of cell growth enhanced by cyclic strain [Rosales and Sumpio (1992): Surgery 112:459-466]. Here we examined protein phosphatase 1 and 2A activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to cyclic stain. Protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cytosol was decreased by 36.1% in response to cyclic strain for 60 min, whereas the activity in the membrane did not change. Treatment with low concentration (0.1 nM) of okadaic acid enhanced proliferation of both static and stretched endothelial cells in 10% fetal bovine serum. These data suggest that protein phosphatase 2A acts as a growth suppressor and cyclic strain may enhance cellular proliferation by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A as well as stimulating protein kinase C.

  16. Counteracting Protein Kinase Activity in the Heart: The Multiple Roles of Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Silvio; Meyer-Roxlau, Stefanie; Wagner, Michael; Dobrev, Dobromir; El-Armouche, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Decades of cardiovascular research have shown that variable and flexible levels of protein phosphorylation are necessary to maintain cardiac function. A delicate balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states of proteins is guaranteed by a complex interplay of protein kinases (PKs) and phosphatases. Serine/threonine phosphatases, in particular members of the protein phosphatase (PP) family govern dephosphorylation of the majority of these cardiac proteins. Recent findings have however shown that PPs do not only dephosphorylate previously phosphorylated proteins as a passive control mechanism but are capable to actively control PK activity via different direct and indirect signaling pathways. These control mechanisms can take place on (epi-)genetic, (post-)transcriptional, and (post-)translational levels. In addition PPs themselves are targets of a plethora of proteinaceous interaction partner regulating their endogenous activity, thus adding another level of complexity and feedback control toward this system. Finally, novel approaches are underway to achieve spatiotemporal pharmacologic control of PPs which in turn can be used to fine-tune misleaded PK activity in heart disease. Taken together, this review comprehensively summarizes the major aspects of PP-mediated PK regulation and discusses the subsequent consequences of deregulated PP activity for cardiovascular diseases in depth. PMID:26617522

  17. Phosphonate derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles as new inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Shevchuk, Michael V; Lyashenko, Alesya N; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Romanenko, Vadim D; Kobelev, Sergei M; Averin, Alexei D; Beletskaya, Irina P; Vovk, Andriy I; Kukhar, Valery P

    2015-07-21

    α,α-Difluoro-β-ketophosphonated derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles were synthesized and found to be potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. N-Substituted conjugates of cyclam and cyclen with bioisosteric phosphonate groups displayed good activities toward T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase with IC50 values in the micromolar to nanomolar range and showed selectivity over PTP1B, CD45, SHP2, and PTPβ. Kinetic studies indicated that the inhibitors can occupy the region of the active site of TC-PTP. This study demonstrates a new approach which employs tetraazamacrocycles as a molecular platform for designing inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  18. Cellular Biochemistry Methods for Investigating Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Stephanie M.; Ahmed, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a family of proteins that play critical roles in cellular signaling and influence many aspects of human health and disease. Although a wealth of information has been collected about PTPs since their discovery, many questions regarding their regulation and function still remain. Critical Issues: Of particular importance are the elucidation of the biological substrates of individual PTPs and understanding of the chemical and biological basis for temporal and spatial resolution of PTP activity within a cell. Recent Advances: Drawing from recent advances in both biology and chemistry, innovative approaches have been developed to study the intracellular biochemistry and physiology of PTPs. We provide a summary of PTP-tailored techniques and approaches, emphasizing methodologies to study PTP activity within a cellular context. We first provide a discussion of methods for identifying PTP substrates, including substrate-trapping mutants and synthetic peptide libraries for substrate selectivity profiling. We next provide an overview of approaches for monitoring intracellular PTP activity, including a discussion of mechanistic-based probes, gel-based assays, substrates that can be used intracellularly, and assays tied to cell growth. Finally, we review approaches used for monitoring PTP oxidation, a key regulatory pathway for these enzymes, discussing the biotin switch method and variants of this approach, along with affinity trapping techniques and probes designed to detect PTP oxidation. Future Directions: Further development of approaches to investigate the intracellular PTP activity and functions will provide specific insight into their mechanisms of action and control of diverse signaling pathways. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2160–2178. PMID:24294920

  19. Identification of the adipocyte acid phosphatase as a PAO-sensitive tyrosyl phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Shekels, L. L.; Smith, A. J.; Van Etten, R. L.; Bernlohr, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    We have partially purified an 18-kDa cytoplasmic protein from 3T3-L1 cells, which dephosphorylates pNPP and the phosphorylated adipocyte lipid binding protein (ALBP), and have identified it by virtue of kinetic and immunological criteria as an acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2). The cytoplasmic acid phosphatase was inactivated by phenylarsine oxide (PAO) (Kinact = 10 microM), and the inactivation could be reversed by the dithiol, 2,3-dimercaptopropanol (Kreact = 23 microM), but not the monothiol, 2-mercaptoethanol. Cloning of the human adipocyte acid phosphatase revealed that two isoforms exist, termed HAAP alpha and HAAP beta (human adipocyte acid phosphatase), which are distinguished by a 34-amino acid isoform-specific domain. Sequence analysis shows HAAP alpha and HAAP beta share 74% and 90% identity with the bovine liver acid phosphatase, respectively, and 99% identity with both isoenzymes of the human red cell acid phosphatase but no sequence similarity to the protein tyrosine phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.48). HAAP beta has been cloned into Escherichia coli, expressed, and purified as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. Recombinant HAAP beta was shown to dephosphorylate pNPP and phosphoALBP and to be inactivated by PAO and inhibited by vanadate (Ki = 17 microM). These results describe the adipocyte acid phosphatase as a cytoplasmic enzyme containing conformationally vicinal cysteine residues with properties that suggest it may dephosphorylate tyrosyl phosphorylated cellular proteins. PMID:1304913

  20. Yeast Nem1-Spo7 Protein Phosphatase Activity on Pah1 Phosphatidate Phosphatase Is Specific for the Pho85-Pho80 Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wen-Min; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Pah1 is the phosphatidate phosphatase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that produces diacylglycerol for triacylglycerol synthesis and concurrently controls the levels of phosphatidate used for phospholipid synthesis. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Pah1 regulate its subcellular location and phosphatidate phosphatase activity. Compared with its phosphorylation by multiple protein kinases, Pah1 is dephosphorylated by a protein phosphatase complex consisting of Nem1 (catalytic subunit) and Spo7 (regulatory subunit). In this work, we characterized the Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase complex for its enzymological, kinetic, and regulatory properties with phosphorylated Pah1. The dephosphorylation of Pah1 by Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase resulted in the stimulation (6-fold) of phosphatidate phosphatase activity. For Pah1 phosphorylated by the Pho85-Pho80 kinase complex, maximum Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase activity required Mg2+ ions (8 mm) and Triton X-100 (0.25 mm) at pH 5.0. The energy of activation for the reaction was 8.4 kcal/mol, and the enzyme was thermally labile at temperatures above 40 °C. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sodium vanadate, sodium fluoride, N-ethylmaleimide, and phenylglyoxal but was not significantly affected by lipids or nucleotides. Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase activity was dependent on the concentrations of Pah1 phosphorylated by Pho85-Pho80, Cdc28-cyclin B, PKA, and PKC with kcat and Km values of 0.29 s−1 and 81 nm, 0.11 s−1 and 127 nm, 0.10 s−1 and 46 nm, and 0.02 s−1 and 38 nm, respectively. Its specificity constant (kcat/Km) for Pah1 phosphorylated by Pho85-Pho80 was 1.6-, 4-, and 6-fold higher, respectively, than that phosphorylated by PKA, Cdc28-cyclin B, and PKC. PMID:25359770

  1. Yeast Nem1-Spo7 protein phosphatase activity on Pah1 phosphatidate phosphatase is specific for the Pho85-Pho80 protein kinase phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Min; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2014-12-12

    Pah1 is the phosphatidate phosphatase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that produces diacylglycerol for triacylglycerol synthesis and concurrently controls the levels of phosphatidate used for phospholipid synthesis. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Pah1 regulate its subcellular location and phosphatidate phosphatase activity. Compared with its phosphorylation by multiple protein kinases, Pah1 is dephosphorylated by a protein phosphatase complex consisting of Nem1 (catalytic subunit) and Spo7 (regulatory subunit). In this work, we characterized the Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase complex for its enzymological, kinetic, and regulatory properties with phosphorylated Pah1. The dephosphorylation of Pah1 by Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase resulted in the stimulation (6-fold) of phosphatidate phosphatase activity. For Pah1 phosphorylated by the Pho85-Pho80 kinase complex, maximum Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase activity required Mg(2+) ions (8 mm) and Triton X-100 (0.25 mm) at pH 5.0. The energy of activation for the reaction was 8.4 kcal/mol, and the enzyme was thermally labile at temperatures above 40 °C. The enzyme activity was inhibited by sodium vanadate, sodium fluoride, N-ethylmaleimide, and phenylglyoxal but was not significantly affected by lipids or nucleotides. Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase activity was dependent on the concentrations of Pah1 phosphorylated by Pho85-Pho80, Cdc28-cyclin B, PKA, and PKC with kcat and Km values of 0.29 s(-1) and 81 nm, 0.11 s(-1) and 127 nm, 0.10 s(-1) and 46 nm, and 0.02 s(-1) and 38 nm, respectively. Its specificity constant (kcat/Km) for Pah1 phosphorylated by Pho85-Pho80 was 1.6-, 4-, and 6-fold higher, respectively, than that phosphorylated by PKA, Cdc28-cyclin B, and PKC. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. The TriTryp phosphatome: analysis of the protein phosphatase catalytic domains.

    PubMed

    Brenchley, Rachel; Tariq, Humera; McElhinney, Helen; Szöor, Balázs; Huxley-Jones, Julie; Stevens, Robert; Matthews, Keith; Tabernero, Lydia

    2007-11-26

    The genomes of the three parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major are the main subject of this study. These parasites are responsible for devastating human diseases known as Chagas disease, African sleeping sickness and cutaneous Leishmaniasis, respectively, that affect millions of people in the developing world. The prevalence of these neglected diseases results from a combination of poverty, inadequate prevention and difficult treatment. Protein phosphorylation is an important mechanism of controlling the development of these kinetoplastids. With the aim to further our knowledge of the biology of these organisms we present a characterisation of the phosphatase complement (phosphatome) of the three parasites. An ontology-based scan of the three genomes was used to identify 86 phosphatase catalytic domains in T. cruzi, 78 in T. brucei, and 88 in L. major. We found interesting differences with other eukaryotic genomes, such as the low proportion of tyrosine phosphatases and the expansion of the serine/threonine phosphatase family. Additionally, a large number of atypical protein phosphatases were identified in these species, representing more than one third of the total phosphatase complement. Most of the atypical phosphatases belong to the dual-specificity phosphatase (DSP) family and show considerable divergence from classic DSPs in both the domain organisation and sequence features. The analysis of the phosphatome of the three kinetoplastids indicates that they possess orthologues to many of the phosphatases reported in other eukaryotes, including humans. However, novel domain architectures and unusual combinations of accessory domains, suggest distinct functional roles for several of the kinetoplastid phosphatases, which await further experimental exploration. These distinct traits may be exploited in the selection of suitable new targets for drug development to prevent transmission and spread of the diseases, taking

  3. The myeloid leukemia-associated protein SET is a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Makkinje, A; Damuni, Z

    1996-05-10

    Two potent heat-stable protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor proteins designated I1PP2A and I2PP2A have been purified to apparent homogeneity from extracts of bovine kidney (Li, M., Guo, H., and Damuni, Z. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 1988-1996). N-terminal and internal amino acid sequencing indicated that I2PP2A was a truncated form of SET, a largely nuclear protein that is fused to nucleoporin Nup214 in acute non-lymphocytic myeloid leukemia. Experiments using purified preparations of recombinant human SET confirmed that this protein inhibited PP2A. Half-maximal inhibition of the phosphatase occurred at about 2 nM SET. By contrast, SET (up to 20 nM) did not affect the activities of purified preparations of protein phosphatases 1, 2B, and 2C. The results indicate that SET is a potent and specific inhibitor of PP2A and suggest that impaired regulation of PP2A may contribute to acute myeloid leukemogenesis.

  4. Characterization of protein phosphatase 5 from three lepidopteran insects: Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi'en; Lü, Shumin; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases, regulates a variety of biological processes. We obtained full-length PP5 cDNAs from three lepidopteran insects, Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella, encoding predicted proteins of 490 (55.98 kDa), 490 (55.82 kDa) and 491 (56.07 kDa) amino acids, respectively. These sequences shared a high identity with other insect PP5s and contained the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domains at N-terminal regions and highly conserved C-terminal catalytic domains. Tissue- and stage-specific expression pattern analyses revealed these three PP5 genes were constitutively expressed in all stages and in tested tissues with predominant transcription occurring at the egg and adult stages. Activities of Escherichia coli-produced recombinant PP5 proteins could be enhanced by almost 2-fold by a known PP5 activator: arachidonic acid. Kinetic parameters of three recombinant proteins against substrate pNPP were similar both in the absence or presence of arachidonic acid. Protein phosphatases inhibitors, okadaic acid, cantharidin, and endothall strongly impeded the activities of the three recombinant PP5 proteins, as well as exerted an inhibitory effect on crude protein phosphatases extractions from these three insects. In summary, lepidopteran PP5s share similar characteristics and are all sensitive to the protein phosphatases inhibitors. Our results also imply protein phosphatase inhibitors might be used in the management of lepidopteran pests.

  5. Identification of a dual-specificity protein phosphatase that inactivates a MAP kinase from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Huang, Y.; Kieber, J.; Luan, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a key role in plant responses to stress and pathogens. Activation and inactivation of MAPKs involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on both threonine and tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. Here we report the identification of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a dual-specificity protein phosphatase capable of hydrolysing both phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine in protein substrates. This enzyme, designated AtDsPTP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase), dephosphorylated and inactivated AtMPK4, a MAPK member from the same plant. Replacement of a highly conserved cysteine by serine abolished phosphatase activity of AtDsPTP1, indicating a conserved catalytic mechanism of dual-specificity protein phosphatases from all eukaryotes.

  6. Identification of a dual-specificity protein phosphatase that inactivates a MAP kinase from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Huang, Y.; Kieber, J.; Luan, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a key role in plant responses to stress and pathogens. Activation and inactivation of MAPKs involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on both threonine and tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. Here we report the identification of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a dual-specificity protein phosphatase capable of hydrolysing both phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine in protein substrates. This enzyme, designated AtDsPTP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase), dephosphorylated and inactivated AtMPK4, a MAPK member from the same plant. Replacement of a highly conserved cysteine by serine abolished phosphatase activity of AtDsPTP1, indicating a conserved catalytic mechanism of dual-specificity protein phosphatases from all eukaryotes.

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-RR regulates corticosteroid sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Ito, Kazuhiro; Kanda, Akira; Tomoda, Koich; Miller-Larsson, Anna; Barnes, Peter J; Mercado, Nicolas

    2016-03-24

    We have recently reported that protein phosphate 2A (PP2A) inactivation resulted in increased phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) at Ser(226), thereby reducing GR nuclear translocation and causing corticosteroid insensitivity in severe asthmatics. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are also known to be critically involved in the regulation of MAPKs, such as JNK and therefore potentially associated with GR function. The aim of study was to elucidate the involvement of MAPK-PTPs (PTP-RR, PTP-N5 and PTP-N7), which can dephosphorylate MAPKs, in the regulation of corticosteroid sensitivity. Corticosteroid sensitivity, GR nuclear translocation, phosphorylation levels of GR-Ser(226), JNK1 and PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2AC)-Tyr(307) and protein expression levels and activities of PTP-RR and PP2AC were evaluated in U937 cells and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Knock-down effects of MAPK-PTPs using siRNA were also evaluated. Knock-down of PTP-RR, but not of PTP-N5 or PTP-N7 impaired corticosteroid sensitivity, induced GR-Ser(226) phosphorylation and reduced GR nuclear translocation. Under IL-2/IL-4-induced corticosteroid insensitivity, PTP-RR expression, activity and associations with JNK1 and GR were reduced but PTP-RR activity was restored by formoterol. Also in PBMCs from severe asthmatic patients, PTP-RR and JNK1 expression were reduced and GR-Ser(226) phosphorylation increased. Furthermore, PTP-RR was associated with PP2A. PTP-RR reduction enhanced PP2AC-Tyr(307) phosphorylation leading to impairment of PP2A expression and activity. We demonstrated that with corticosteroid insensitivity PTP-RR fails to reduce phosphorylation of JNK1 and GR-Ser(226), resulting in down-regulation of GR nuclear translocation. Reduced PTP-RR may represent a novel cause of corticosteroid insensitivity in severe asthmatics.

  8. Purification and characterization of a low-molecular-weight acid phosphatase--a phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase from bovine heart.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Y; Van Etten, R L

    1990-10-01

    A low-molecular-weight acid phosphatase that is representative of a group recently shown to be phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases was purified to homogeneity from bovine heart. The enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 18 kDa and had an isoelectric point of 7.0. The absorption coefficient, E1% 1cm was 9.65 at 280 nm. The enzyme had pH optima of 5.3 and 6.0 with the substrates p-nitrophenyl phosphate and tyrosine phosphate, respectively. When measured at pH 5 and 37 degrees C, the enzyme had specific activities of 114 and 86 mumol min-1 mg-1 for p-nitrophenyl phosphate and tyrosine O-phosphate, respectively, while the Km values were 0.38 and 14 mM. The enzyme was highly specific for aryl monophosphate esters and showed little or no activity toward aliphatic phosphate esters, with the remarkable exception of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and certain of its structural analogs. As shown by 31P NMR data, the activity toward FMN was due to the hydrolysis of one of the eight components present in the (commercial) sample. Both molybdate and vanadate were potent inhibitors, with inhibition constants of 37 and 29 microM, respectively; tartrate and fluoride had little effect on enzymatic activity. A two-stage reversible denaturation of the enzyme by guanidine HCl was observed with midpoints of 0.25 and 1.75 M, respectively. The amino acid composition was homologous to the low-molecular-weight acid phosphatases from other tissue. The enzyme showed immunological cross-reactivity against low-molecular-weight human liver acid phosphatase. There were 7 or 8 accessible cysteines on the monomeric protein and at least one was essential for enzyme activity. The enzyme also had phosphotransferase activity, for example transferring phosphate from p-nitrophenyl phosphate to a wide variety of alcohol acceptors.

  9. Downregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPL1 alters cell cycle and upregulates invasion-related genes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Carolina; Flores, M Luz; Conde, José M; Medina, Rafael; Torrubia, Francisco J; Japón, Miguel A; Sáez, Carmen

    2012-04-01

    PTPL1, a non-receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase, has been involved in the regulation of apoptosis and invasiveness of various tumour cell types, but its role in prostate cancer remained to be investigated. We report here that downregulation of PTPL1 by small interfering RNA in PC3 cells decreases cell proliferation and concomitantly reduces the expression of cell cycle-related proteins such as cyclins E and B1, PCNA, PTTG1 and phospho-histone H3. PTPL1 downregulation also increases the invasion ability of PC3 cells through Matrigel coated membranes. cDNA array of PTPL1-silenced PC3 cells versus control cells showed an upregulation of invasion-related genes such as uPA, uPAR, tPA, PAI-1, integrin α6 and osteopontin. This increased expression was also confirmed in PTPL1-silenced DU145 prostate cancer cells by quantitative real time PCR and western blot. These findings suggest that PTPL1 is an important mediator of central cellular processes such as proliferation and invasion.

  10. Hypothermic Preconditioning Reverses Tau Ontogenesis in Human Cortical Neurons and is Mimicked by Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rzechorzek, Nina M.; Connick, Peter; Livesey, Matthew R.; Borooah, Shyamanga; Patani, Rickie; Burr, Karen; Story, David; Wyllie, David J.A.; Hardingham, Giles E.; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is potently neuroprotective, but the molecular basis of this effect remains obscure. Changes in neuronal tau protein are of interest, since tau becomes hyperphosphorylated in injury-resistant, hypothermic brains. Noting inter-species differences in tau isoforms, we have used functional cortical neurons differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hCNs) to interrogate tau modulation during hypothermic preconditioning at clinically-relevant temperatures. Key tau developmental transitions (phosphorylation status and splicing shift) are recapitulated during hCN differentiation and subsequently reversed by mild (32 °C) to moderate (28 °C) cooling — conditions which reduce oxidative and excitotoxic stress-mediated injury in hCNs. Blocking a major tau kinase decreases hCN tau phosphorylation and abrogates hypothermic neuroprotection, whilst inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A mimics cooling-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and protects normothermic hCNs from oxidative stress. These findings indicate a possible role for phospho-tau in hypothermic preconditioning, and suggest that cooling drives human tau towards an earlier ontogenic phenotype whilst increasing neuronal resilience to common neurotoxic insults. This work provides a critical step forward in understanding how we might exploit the neuroprotective benefits of cooling without cooling patients. PMID:26870825

  11. Activation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase SLP2 by MIA40 Regulates Seed Germination1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lay-Yin; Goudreault, Marilyn; Yeung, Edward; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Samuel, Marcus A.

    2017-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases represents the most prolific and well-characterized posttranslational modification known. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Shewanella-like protein phosphatase 2 (AtSLP2) is a bona fide Ser/Thr protein phosphatase that is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) where it interacts with the mitochondrial oxidoreductase import and assembly protein 40 (AtMIA40), forming a protein complex. Interaction with AtMIA40 is necessary for the phosphatase activity of AtSLP2 and is dependent on the formation of disulfide bridges on AtSLP2. Furthermore, by utilizing atslp2 null mutant, AtSLP2 complemented and AtSLP2 overexpressing plants, we identify a function for the AtSLP2-AtMIA40 complex in negatively regulating gibberellic acid-related processes during seed germination. Results presented here characterize a mitochondrial IMS-localized protein phosphatase identified in photosynthetic eukaryotes as well as a protein phosphatase target of the highly conserved eukaryotic MIA40 IMS oxidoreductase. PMID:27923987

  12. Tyrosine phosphatases as key regulators of StAR induction and cholesterol transport: SHP2 as a potential tyrosine phosphatase involved in steroid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Mariana; Mele, Pablo; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Poderoso, Cecilia; Orlando, Ulises; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-04-10

    The phospho-dephosphorylation of intermediate proteins is a key event in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis. In this regard, it is well accepted that steroidogenic hormones act through the activation of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein kinases. Although many cellular processes can be regulated by a crosstalk between different kinases and phosphatases, the relationship of Ser/Thr phosphorylation and tyrosine (Tyr)-dephosphorylation is a recently explored field in the regulation of steroid synthesis. Indeed in steroidogenic cells, one of the targets of hormone-induced Ser/Thr phosphorylation is a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Whereas protein tyrosine phosphatases were initially regarded as household enzymes with constitutive activity, dephosphorylating all the substrates they encountered, evidence is now accumulating that protein tyrosine phosphatases are tightly regulated by various mechanisms. Here, we will describe the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis, relating them to steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, arachidonic acid metabolism and mitochondrial rearrangement.

  13. Redox Regulation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity by Hydroxyl Radical

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fan-Guo; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that transient production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important signaling event triggered by the activation of various cell surface receptors. Major targets of H2O2 include protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Oxidation of the active site Cys by H2O2 abrogates PTP catalytic activity, thereby potentially furnishing a mechanism to ensure optimal tyrosine phosphorylation in response to a variety of physiological stimuli. Unfortunately, H2O2 is poorly reactive in chemical terms and the second order rate constants for the H2O2-mediated PTP inactivation are ~10 M−1s−1, which is too slow to be compatible with the transient signaling events occurring at the physiological concentrations of H2O2. We find that hydroxyl radical is produced from H2O2 solutions in the absence of metal chelating agent by the Fenton reaction. We show that hydroxyl radical is capable of inactivating the PTPs and the inactivation is active site directed, through oxidation of the catalytic Cys to sulfenic acid, which can be reduced by low molecular weight thiols. We also show that hydroxyl radical is a kinetically more efficient oxidant than H2O2 for inactivating the PTPs. The second-order rate constants for the hydroxyl radical-mediated PTP inactivation are at least 2–3 orders of magnitude higher than those mediated by H2O2 under the same conditions. Thus, hydroxyl radical generated in vivo may serve as a more physiologically relevant oxidizing agent for PTP inactivation. PMID:22819876

  14. The Role of Bacterial Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Regulation of the Biosynthesis of Secreted Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Morona, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Tyrosine phosphorylation and associated protein tyrosine phosphatases are gaining prominence as critical mechanisms in the regulation of fundamental processes in a wide variety of bacteria. In particular, these phosphatases have been associated with the control of the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides, critically important virulence factors for bacteria. Recent Advances: Deletion and overexpression of the phosphatases result in altered polysaccharide biosynthesis in a range of bacteria. The recent structures of associated auto-phosphorylating tyrosine kinases have suggested that the phosphatases may be critical for the cycling of the kinases between monomers and higher order oligomers. Critical Issues: Additional substrates of the phosphatases apart from cognate kinases are currently being identified. These are likely to be critical to our understanding of the mechanism by which polysaccharide biosynthesis is regulated. Future Directions: Ultimately, these protein tyrosine phosphatases are an attractive target for the development of novel antimicrobials. This is particularly the case for the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase family, which is predominantly found in bacteria. Furthermore, the determination of bacterial tyrosine phosphoproteomes will likely help to uncover the fundamental roles, mechanism, and critical importance of these phosphatases in a wide range of bacteria. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2274–2289. PMID:24295407

  15. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, George; Dudkin, Sergii; Borkin, Dmitry; Ni, Wendi; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2015-04-29

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes.

  16. Identification of a non-purple tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase: an evolutionary link to Ser/Thr protein phosphatases?

    PubMed Central

    Hadler, Kieran S; Huber, Thomas; Cassady, A Ian; Weber, Jane; Robinson, Jodie; Burrows, Allan; Kelly, Gregory; Guddat, Luke W; Hume, David A; Schenk, Gerhard; Flanagan, Jack U

    2008-01-01

    Background Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatases (TRAcPs), also known as purple acid phosphatases (PAPs), are a family of binuclear metallohydrolases that have been identified in plants, animals and fungi. The human enzyme is a major histochemical marker for the diagnosis of bone-related diseases. TRAcPs can occur as a small form possessing only the ~35 kDa catalytic domain, or a larger ~55 kDa form possessing both a catalytic domain and an additional N-terminal domain of unknown function. Due to its role in bone resorption the 35 kDa TRAcP has become a promising target for the development of anti-osteoporotic chemotherapeutics. Findings A new human gene product encoding a metallohydrolase distantly related to the ~55 kDa plant TRAcP was identified and characterised. The gene product is found in a number of animal species, and is present in all tissues sampled by the RIKEN mouse transcriptome project. Construction of a homology model illustrated that six of the seven metal-coordinating ligands in the active site are identical to that observed in the TRAcP family. However, the tyrosine ligand associated with the charge transfer transition and purple color of TRAcPs is replaced by a histidine. Conlusion The gene product identified here may represent an evolutionary link between TRAcPs and Ser/Thr protein phosphatases. Its biological function is currently unknown but is unlikely to be associated with bone metabolism. PMID:18771593

  17. Identification of a non-purple tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase: an evolutionary link to Ser/Thr protein phosphatases?

    PubMed

    Hadler, Kieran S; Huber, Thomas; Cassady, A Ian; Weber, Jane; Robinson, Jodie; Burrows, Allan; Kelly, Gregory; Guddat, Luke W; Hume, David A; Schenk, Gerhard; Flanagan, Jack U

    2008-09-04

    Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatases (TRAcPs), also known as purple acid phosphatases (PAPs), are a family of binuclear metallohydrolases that have been identified in plants, animals and fungi. The human enzyme is a major histochemical marker for the diagnosis of bone-related diseases. TRAcPs can occur as a small form possessing only the ~35 kDa catalytic domain, or a larger ~55 kDa form possessing both a catalytic domain and an additional N-terminal domain of unknown function. Due to its role in bone resorption the 35 kDa TRAcP has become a promising target for the development of anti-osteoporotic chemotherapeutics. A new human gene product encoding a metallohydrolase distantly related to the ~55 kDa plant TRAcP was identified and characterised. The gene product is found in a number of animal species, and is present in all tissues sampled by the RIKEN mouse transcriptome project. Construction of a homology model illustrated that six of the seven metal-coordinating ligands in the active site are identical to that observed in the TRAcP family. However, the tyrosine ligand associated with the charge transfer transition and purple color of TRAcPs is replaced by a histidine. The gene product identified here may represent an evolutionary link between TRAcPs and Ser/Thr protein phosphatases. Its biological function is currently unknown but is unlikely to be associated with bone metabolism.

  18. Adhesion-Linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0496 TITLE: Adhesion-linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL...Adhesion-linked Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, DAMD17-03-1-0496 Morphogenesis and Breast Cancer Progression 6. AUTHOR(S) Valerie M. Weaver, Ph.D. 7...we identified the Band 4.1 PTPs MEG1 and D1 as two candidate PTP metastasis suppressors. Our studies show that during MEC differentiation PTP MEG1

  19. A protein phosphatase methylesterase (PME-1) is one of several novel proteins stably associating with two inactive mutants of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Ogris, E; Du, X; Nelson, K C; Mak, E K; Yu, X X; Lane, W S; Pallas, D C

    1999-05-14

    Carboxymethylation of proteins is a highly conserved means of regulation in eukaryotic cells. The protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic (C) subunit is reversibly methylated at its carboxyl terminus by specific methyltransferase and methylesterase enzymes which have been purified, but not cloned. Carboxymethylation affects PP2A activity and varies during the cell cycle. Here, we report that substitution of glutamine for either of two putative active site histidines in the PP2A C subunit results in inactivation of PP2A and formation of stable complexes between PP2A and several cellular proteins. One of these cellular proteins, herein named protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1), was purified and microsequenced, and its cDNA was cloned. PME-1 is conserved from yeast to human and contains a motif found in lipases having a catalytic triad-activated serine as their active site nucleophile. Bacterially expressed PME-1 demethylated PP2A C subunit in vitro, and okadaic acid, a known inhibitor of the PP2A methylesterase, inhibited this reaction. To our knowledge, PME-1 represents the first mammalian protein methylesterase to be cloned. Several lines of evidence indicate that, although there appears to be a role for C subunit carboxyl-terminal amino acids in PME-1 binding, amino acids other than those at the extreme carboxyl terminus of the C subunit also play an important role in PME-1 binding to a catalytically inactive mutant.

  20. Purification and characterization of a phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase from wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H F; Tao, M

    1989-10-19

    A neutral phosphatase which catalyzes the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate has been purified to homogeneity from wheat seedlings. The enzyme is a monomeric glycoprotein exhibiting a molecular weight of 35,000, frictional ratio of 1.22, Stokes' radius of 260 nm, and sedimentation coefficient of 3.2 S. That the enzyme is a glycoprotein is surmised from its chromatographic property on Concanavalin A-Sepharose column. An examination of the substrate specificity indicates that the enzyme exhibits a preference for phosphotyrosine over a number of phosphocompounds, including p-nitrophenylphosphate and several glycolytic intermediates. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine are not hydrolyzed by the enzyme. The phosphatase activity is not affected by high concentrations of chelating agents and does not require metal ions. Molybdate, orthovanadate, Zn2+, and Hg2+ are all potent inhibitors of the phosphatase activity. The ability of the phosphatase to dephosphorylate protein phosphotyrosine has been investigated. [32P-Tyr]poly(Glu,Tyr)n, [32P-Tyr]alkylated bovine serum albumin, [32P-Tyr]angiotensin-I, and [32P-Tyr]band 3 (from human erythrocyte) are all substrates of the phosphatase. On the other hand, the enzyme has no activity toward protein phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. Our result further indicates that the neutral phosphatase is distinct from the wheat germ acid phosphatase. The latter enzyme is found to dephosphorylate phosphotyrosyl as well as phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl groups in proteins. In light of the many similarities in properties to phosphotyrosyl protein phosphatases isolated from several sources, it is suggested that the wheat seedling phosphatase may participate in cellular regulation involving protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  1. Inositol 5-phosphatases: insights from the Lowe syndrome protein OCRL.

    PubMed

    Pirruccello, Michelle; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-04-01

    The precise regulation of phosphoinositide lipids in cellular membranes is crucial for cellular survival and function. Inositol 5-phosphatases have been implicated in a variety of disorders, including various cancers, obesity, type 2 diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and rare genetic conditions. Despite the obvious impact on human health, relatively little structural and biochemical information is available for this family. Here, we review recent structural and mechanistic work on the 5-phosphatases with a focus on OCRL, whose loss of function results in oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe and Dent 2 disease. Studies of OCRL emphasize how the actions of 5-phosphatases rely on both intrinsic and extrinsic membrane recognition properties for full catalytic function. Additionally, structural analysis of missense mutations in the catalytic domain of OCRL provides insight into the phenotypic heterogeneity observed in Lowe syndrome and Dent disease.

  2. The beta-subunit of G proteins is a substrate of protein histidine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Mäurer, Anette; Wieland, Thomas; Meissl, Florian; Niroomand, Feraydoon; Mehringer, Rebecca; Krieglstein, Josef; Klumpp, Susanne

    2005-09-09

    Increasing evidence suggests that reversible phosphorylation of histidine residues in proteins is important for signaling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Recently, the first eukaryotic protein histidine phosphatase (PHP) was identified. The beta1-subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gbeta) undergoes phosphorylation on His266 which is apparently involved in receptor-independent G protein activation. We studied whether phosphorylated Gbeta-subunits are substrates of PHP. Phosphorylated Gbetagamma dimers of the retinal G protein transducin and Gbeta in membrane preparations of H10 cells (neonatal rat cardiomyocytes) were dephosphorylated by PHP. Overexpression of PHP in H10 cells showed that PHP and Gbeta also interfere within cells. In membranes of cells overexpressing PHP, the amount of phosphorylated Gbeta was largely reduced. Both our in vitro and cell studies indicate that phosphorylated Gbeta-subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins are substrates of PHP. Therefore, PHP might play a role in the regulation of signal transduction via heterotrimeric G proteins.

  3. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the

  4. Estrogen regulates energy metabolic pathway and upstream adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase and phosphatase enzyme expression in dorsal vagal complex metabolosensory neurons during glucostasis and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Pratistha; Ibrahim, Baher A; Gujar, Amit D; Briski, Karen P

    2015-02-01

    The ability of estrogen to shield the brain from the bioenergetic insult hypoglycemia is unclear. Estradiol (E) prevents hypoglycemic activation of the energy deficit sensor adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in hindbrain metabolosensory A2 noradrenergic neurons. This study investigates the hypothesis that estrogen regulates A2 AMPK through control of fuel metabolism and/or upstream protein kinase/phosphatase enzyme expression. A2 cells were harvested by laser microdissection after insulin or vehicle (V) injection of E- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized female rats. Cell lysates were evaluated by immunoblot for glycolytic, tricarboxylic acid cycle, respiratory chain, and acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA pathway enzymes. A2 phosphofructokinase (PFKL), isocitrate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and ATP synthase subunit profiles were elevated in E/V vs. O/V; hypoglycemia augmented PFKL and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase expression in E only. Hypoglycemia increased A2 Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-β in O and reduced protein phosphatase in both groups. A2 phospho-AMPK levels were equivalent in O/V vs. E/V but elevated during hypoglycemia in O only. These results implicate E in compensatory upregulation of substrate catabolism and corresponding maintenance of energy stability of A2 metabolosensory neurons during hypoglycemia, outcomes that support the potential viability of molecular substrates for hormone action as targets for therapies alleviating hypoglycemic brain injury.

  5. Discovery of protein phosphatase inhibitor classes by biology-oriented synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nören-Müller, Andrea; Reis-Corrêa, Ivan; Prinz, Heino; Rosenbaum, Claudia; Saxena, Krishna; Schwalbe, Harald J.; Vestweber, Dietmar; Cagna, Guiseppe; Schunk, Stefan; Schwarz, Oliver; Schiewe, Hajo; Waldmann, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    Protein phosphatases have very recently emerged as important targets for chemical biology and medicinal chemistry research, and new phosphatase inhibitor classes are in high demand. The underlying frameworks of natural products represent the evolutionarily selected fractions of chemical space explored by nature so far and meet the criteria of relevance to nature and biological prevalidation most crucial to inhibitor development. We refer to synthesis efforts and compound collection development based on these criteria as biology-oriented synthesis. For the discovery of phosphatase inhibitor classes by means of this approach, four natural product-derived or -inspired medium-sized compound collections were synthesized and investigated for inhibition of the tyrosine phosphatases VE-PTP, Shp-2, PTP1B, MptpA, and MptpB and the dual-specificity phosphatases Cdc25A and VHR. The screen yielded four unprecedented and selective phosphatase inhibitor classes for four phosphatases with high hit rates. For VE-PTP and MptpB the first inhibitors were discovered. These results demonstrate that biology-oriented synthesis is an efficient approach to the discovery of new compound classes for medicinal chemistry and chemical biology research that opens up new opportunities for the study of phosphatases, which may lead to the development of new drug candidates. PMID:16809424

  6. Structural and mechanistic characterization of L-histidinol phosphate phosphatase from the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghodge, Swapnil V; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2013-02-12

    L-Histidinol phosphate phosphatase (HPP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-histidinol phosphate to L-histidinol and inorganic phosphate, the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of L-histidine. HPP from the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) family of proteins possesses a trinuclear active site and a distorted (β/α)(7)-barrel protein fold. This group of enzymes is closely related to the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes. The mechanism of phosphomonoester bond hydrolysis by the PHP family of HPP enzymes was addressed. Recombinant HPP from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis that was expressed in Escherichia coli contained a mixture of iron and zinc in the active site and had a catalytic efficiency of ~10(3) M(-1) s(-1). Expression of the protein under iron-free conditions resulted in the production of an enzyme with a 2 order of magnitude improvement in catalytic efficiency and a mixture of zinc and manganese in the active site. Solvent isotope and viscosity effects demonstrated that proton transfer steps and product dissociation steps are not rate-limiting. X-ray structures of HPP were determined with sulfate, L-histidinol phosphate, and a complex of L-histidinol and arsenate bound in the active site. These crystal structures and the catalytic properties of variants were used to identify the structural elements required for catalysis and substrate recognition by the HPP family of enzymes within the amidohydrolase superfamily.

  7. Ginkgolic acids induce neuronal death and activate protein phosphatase type-2C.

    PubMed

    Ahlemeyer, B; Selke, D; Schaper, C; Klumpp, S; Krieglstein, J

    2001-10-26

    The standardized extract from Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) is used for the treatment of dementia. Because of allergenic and genotoxic effects, ginkgolic acids are restricted in EGb 761 to 5 ppm. The question arises whether ginkgolic acids also have neurotoxic effects. In the present study, ginkgolic acids caused death of cultured chick embryonic neurons in a concentration-dependent manner, in the presence and in the absence of serum. Ginkgolic acids-induced death showed features of apoptosis as we observed chromatin condensation, shrinkage of the nucleus and reduction of the damage by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, demonstrating an active type of cell death. However, DNA fragmentation detected by the terminal-transferase-mediated ddUTP-digoxigenin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and caspase-3 activation, which are also considered as hallmarks of apoptosis, were not seen after treatment with 150 microM ginkgolic acids in serum-free medium, a dose which increased the percentage of neurons with chromatin condensation and shrunken nuclei to 88% compared with 25% in serum-deprived, vehicle-treated controls. This suggests that ginkgolic acid-induced death showed signs of apoptosis as well as of necrosis. Ginkgolic acids specifically increased the activity of protein phosphatase type-2C, whereas other protein phosphatases such as protein phosphatases 1A, 2A and 2B, tyrosine phosphatase, and unspecific acid- and alkaline phosphatases were inhibited or remained unchanged, suggesting protein phosphatase 2C to play a role in the neurotoxic effect mediated by ginkgolic acids.

  8. Purification of a protein phosphatase from Acanthamoeba that dephosphorylates and activates myosin II.

    PubMed

    McClure, J A; Korn, E D

    1983-12-10

    The actin-activated ATPase activity of myosin II from Acanthamoeba castellanii is inhibited by phosphorylation of 3 serine residues near the carboxyl end of the heavy chain of the molecule. We have purified a protein phosphatase from Acanthamoeba using myosin II as a substrate. This phosphatase has a molecular weight of 39,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an isoelectric point in urea of 5.2. The enzyme also is active against other phosphoserine protein substrates such as turkey gizzard smooth muscle myosin light chain, but not against a synthetic phosphotyrosine protein substrate. It does not hydrolyze ATP or p-nitrophenol phosphate. No effector has been found to increase substantially the activity of the enzyme as isolated, but it is inhibited by ATP, pyrophosphate, and NaF. This inhibition is reduced in the presence of MnCl2. The Mg2+-dependent actin-activated ATPase of myosin II is activated by dephosphorylation of phosphorylated myosin II by the phosphatase. Its broad substrate specificity, molecular weight, and response to protein phosphatase inhibitors suggest that the Acanthamoeba protein phosphatase is a type 2A phosphatase (Cohen, P. (1982) Nature (Lond.) 206, 613-620).

  9. Protein phosphatase 5 is a negative regulator of separase function during cortical granule exocytosis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Richie, Christopher T; Bembenek, Joshua N; Chestnut, Barry; Furuta, Tokiko; Schumacher, Jill M; Wallenfang, Matthew; Golden, Andy

    2011-09-01

    Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans separase gene, sep-1, are embryonic lethal. Newly fertilized mutant embryos have defects in polar body extrusion, fail to undergo cortical granule exocytosis, and subsequently fail to complete cytokinesis. Chromosome nondisjunction during the meiotic divisions is readily apparent after depletion of sep-1 by RNAi treatment, but much less so in hypomorphic mutant embryos. To identify factors that influence the activity of separase in cortical granule exocytosis and cytokinesis, we carried out a genetic suppressor screen. A mutation in the protein phosphatase 5 (pph-5) gene was identified as an extragenic suppressor of sep-1. This mutation suppressed the phenotypes of hypomorphic separase mutants but not RNAi depleted animals. Depletion of pph-5 caused no phenotypes on its own, but was effective in restoring localization of mutant separase to vesicles and suppressing cortical granule exocytosis and cytokinesis phenotypes. The identification of PPH-5 as a suppressor of separase suggests that a new phospho-regulatory pathway plays an important role in regulating anaphase functions of separase.

  10. Store-operated Ca2+ entry in hippocampal neurons: Regulation by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B.

    PubMed

    Koss, David J; Riedel, Gernot; Bence, Kendra; Platt, Bettina

    2013-02-01

    Store operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) replenishes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and activates a number of intracellular signalling pathways. Whilst several molecular components forming store operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCC) have been identified, their modulation in neurons remains poorly understood. Here, we extend on our previous findings and show that neuronal SOCE is modulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. Cyclopiazonic acid induced SOCE was characterised in hippocampal cultures derived from forebrain specific protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B knockout (PTP1B KO) mice and wild type (WT) litter mates using Fura-2 Ca(2+) imaging. PTP1B KO cultures expressed elevated SOCE relative to WT cultures without changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) homeostasis or depolarisation-induced Ca(2+) influx. WT and PTP1B KO cultures displayed similar pharmacological sensitivities towards the SOCE inhibitors gadolinium and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, as well as the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Ag126 indicating an augmentation of native SOCCs by PTP1B. Following store depletion WT culture homogenates showed heightened phospho-tyrosine levels, an increase in Src tyrosine kinase activation and two minor PTP1B species. These data suggest tyrosine phosphorylation gating SOCE, and implicate PTP1B as a key regulatory enzyme. The involvement of PTP1B in SOCE and its relation to SOCC components and mechanism of regulation are discussed.

  11. O-Phospho-L-serine and the Thiocarboxylated Sulfur Carrier Protein CysO-COSH are Substrates for CysM, a Cysteine Synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis†

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Seán E.; Jurgenson, Christopher T.; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2009-01-01

    The kinetic pathway of CysM, a cysteine synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the expression of which is upregulated under conditions of oxidative stress, was studied by transient-state kinetic techniques. This enzyme exhibits extensive homology with the B-isozymes of the well-studied O-acetylserine sulfhydrylases and employs a similar chemical mechanism involving a stable α-aminoacrylate intermediate. However, we show that specificity of CysM for its amino acid substrate is more than 500-fold greater for O-phospho-L-serine than for O-acetyl-L-serine, suggesting that O-phospho-L-serine is the likely substrate in vivo. We also investigated the kinetics of the carbon-sulfur bond-forming reaction between the CysM-bound α-aminoacrylate intermediate and the thiocarboxylated sulfur-carrier protein, CysO-COSH. The specificity of CysM for this physiological sulfide equivalent is more than three orders of magnitude greater than that for bisulfide. Moreover, the kinetics of this latter reaction are limited by association of the proteins, whilst the reaction with bisulfide is consistent with a rapid equilibrium binding model. We interpret this finding to suggest that the CysM active site with the bound aminoacrylate intermediate is protected from solvent and that binding of CysO-COSH produces a conformational change allowing rapid sulfur transfer. This study represents the first detailed kinetic characterization of sulfide transfer from a sulfide carrier protein. PMID:18842002

  12. MKP-7, a novel mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase, functions as a shuttle protein.

    PubMed

    Masuda, K; Shima, H; Watanabe, M; Kikuchi, K

    2001-10-19

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (MKPs) negatively regulate MAPK activity. In the present study, we have identified a novel MKP, designated MKP-7, and mapped it to human chromosome 12p12. MKP-7 possesses a long C-terminal stretch containing both a nuclear export signal and a nuclear localization signal, in addition to the rhodanese-like domain and the dual specificity phosphatase catalytic domain, both of which are conserved among MKP family members. When expressed in mammalian cells MKP-7 protein was localized exclusively in the cytoplasm, but this localization became exclusively nuclear following leptomycin B treatment or introduction of a mutation in the nuclear export signal. These findings indicate that MKP-7 is the first identified leptomycin B-sensitive shuttle MKP. Forced expression of MKP-7 suppressed activation of MAPKs in COS-7 cells in the order of selectivity, JNK p38 > ERK. Furthermore, a mutant form MKP-7 functioned as a dominant negative particularly against the dephosphorylation of JNK, suggesting that MKP-7 works as a JNK-specific phosphatase in vivo. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and histological analysis suggested that MKP-7 determines the localization of MAPKs in the cytoplasm.

  13. Two ancient bacterial-like PPP family phosphatases from Arabidopsis are highly conserved plant proteins that possess unique properties.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases, is a cornerstone of cellular signaling and regulation. Since their discovery, protein phosphatases have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with specificity that rivals their counteracting kinase partners. However, despite years of focused characterization in mammalian and yeast systems, many protein phosphatases in plants remain poorly or incompletely characterized. Here, we describe a bioinformatic, biochemical, and cellular examination of an ancient, Bacterial-like subclass of the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family designated the Shewanella-like protein phosphatases (SLP phosphatases). The SLP phosphatase subcluster is highly conserved in all plants, mosses, and green algae, with members also found in select fungi, protists, and bacteria. As in other plant species, the nucleus-encoded Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SLP phosphatases (AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) lack genetic redundancy and phylogenetically cluster into two distinct groups that maintain different subcellular localizations, with SLP1 being chloroplastic and SLP2 being cytosolic. Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, the enzymatic properties of both AtSLP1 and AtSLP2 were examined, revealing unique metal cation preferences in addition to a complete insensitivity to the classic serine/threonine PPP protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin. The unique properties and high conservation of the plant SLP phosphatases, coupled to their exclusion from animals, red algae, cyanobacteria, archaea, and most bacteria, render understanding the function(s) of this new subclass of PPP family protein phosphatases of particular interest.

  14. Protein Phosphatase 1α Mediates Ceramide-induced ERM Protein Dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Canals, Daniel; Roddy, Patrick; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2012-01-01

    ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) proteins are cytoskeletal interacting proteins that bind cortical actin, the plasma membrane, and membrane proteins, which are found in specialized plasma membrane structures such as microvilli and filopodia. ERM proteins are regulated by phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-biphosphate (PIP2) and by phosphorylation of a C-terminal threonine, and its inactivation involves PIP2 hydrolysis and/or myosin phosphatase (MP). Recently, we demonstrated that ERM proteins are also subject to counter regulation by the bioactive sphingolipids ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate. Plasma membrane ceramide induces ERM dephosphorylation whereas sphingosine 1-phosphate induces their phosphorylation. In this work, we pursue the mechanisms by which ceramide regulates dephosphorylation. We found that this dephosphorylation was independent of hydrolysis and localization of PIP2 and MP. However, the results show that ERM dephosphorylation was blocked by treatment with protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) pharmacological inhibitors and specifically by siRNA to PP1α, whereas okadaic acid, a PP2A inhibitor, failed. Moreover, a catalytic inactive mutant of PP1α acted as dominant negative of the endogenous PP1α. Additional results showed that the ceramide mechanism of PP1α activation is largely independent of PIP2 hydrolysis and MP. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel, acute mechanism of ERM regulation dependent on PP1α and plasma membrane ceramide. PMID:22311981

  15. Involvement of histone phosphorylation in thymocyte apoptosis by protein phosphatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, E; Nakatsuma, A; Hiraoka, R; Ishikawa, E; Enomoto, R; Yamauchi, A

    1999-07-01

    Incubation of rat thymocytes with the inhibitors of protein phosphatase such as calyculin A and okadaic acid resulted in an increase in DNA fragmentation. These effects were dependent on the concentration of the inhibitors and the incubation time. Analyses of the fragmented DNA revealed the production of approximately 50 kbp of DNA and a 180 bp DNA ladder. In addition, a laser scanning-microscopic analysis showed that these compounds caused nuclear condensation. Thus, these results demonstrated that protein phosphatase inhibitors induced thymocyte apoptosis. The inhibitors of protein phosphatase increased the phosphorylation of proteins of approximately 15 kDa. The phosphorylation of proteins preceded the DNA fragmentation induced by these inhibitors. Judging from acetic acid-urea-Triton X-100 gel electrophoresis, the phosphorylated proteins were histone H1 and H2A/H3. Therefore, these results suggest that phosphorylation of histones triggers the DNA fragmentation of thymocytes undergoing apoptosis.

  16. Outer membrane protein e of Escherichia coli K-12 is co-regulated with alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Tommassen, J; Lugtenberg, B

    1980-01-01

    Outer membrane protein e is induced in wild-type cells, just like alkaline phosphatase and some other periplasmic proteins, by growth under phosphatase limitation. nmpA and nmpB mutants, which synthesize protein e constitutively, are shown also to produce the periplasmic enzyme alkaline phosphatase constitutively. Alternatively, individual phoS, phoT, and phoR mutants as well as pit pst double mutants, all of which are known to produce alkaline phosphatase constitutively, were found to be constitutive for protein e. Also, the periplasmic space of most nmpA mutants and of all nmpB mutants grown in excess phosphate was found to contain, in addition to alkaline phosphatase, at least two new proteins, a phenomenon known for individual phoT and phoR mutants as well as for pit pst double mutants. The other nmpA mutants as well as phoS mutants lacked one of these extra periplasmic proteins, namely the phosphate-binding protein. From these data and from the known positions of the mentioned genes on the chromosomal map, it is concluded that nmpB mutants are identical to phoR mutants. Moreover, some nmpA mutants were shown to be identical to phoS mutants, whereas other nmpA mutants are likely to contain mutations in one of the genes phoS, phoT, or pst. Images PMID:6995425

  17. Crystal structure of SP-PTP, a low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Ku, Bonsu; Keum, Chae Won; Lee, Hye Seon; Yun, Hye-Yeoung; Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Bo Yeon; Kim, Seung Jun

    2016-09-23

    Streptococcus pyogenes, or Group A Streptococcus (GAS), is a pathogenic bacterium that causes a variety of infectious diseases. The GAS genome encodes one protein tyrosine phosphatase, SP-PTP, which plays an essential role in the replication and virulence maintenance of GAS. Herein, we present the crystal structure of SP-PTP at 1.9 Å resolution. Although SP-PTP has been reported to have dual phosphatase specificity for both phosphorylated tyrosine and serine/threonine, three-dimensional structural analysis showed that SP-PTP shares high similarity with typical low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMWPTPs), which are specific for phosphotyrosine, but not with dual-specificity phosphatases, in overall folding and active site composition. In the dephosphorylation activity test, SP-PTP consistently acted on phosphotyrosine substrates, but not or only minimally on phosphoserine/phosphothreonine substrates. Collectively, our structural and biochemical analyses verified SP-PTP as a canonical tyrosine-specific LMWPTP.

  18. Potential role for purple acid phosphatase in the dephosphorylation of wall proteins in tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Kaida, Rumi; Serada, Satoshi; Norioka, Naoko; Norioka, Shigemi; Neumetzler, Lutz; Pauly, Markus; Sampedro, Javier; Zarra, Ignacio; Hayashi, Takahisa; Kaneko, Takako S

    2010-06-01

    It is not yet known whether dephosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by phosphatases occurs in the apoplastic space. In this study, we found that tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) purple acid phosphatase could dephosphorylate the phosphoryl residues of three apoplastic proteins, two of which were identified as alpha-xylosidase and beta-glucosidase. The dephosphorylation and phosphorylation of recombinant alpha-xylosidase resulted in a decrease and an increase in its activity, respectively, when xyloglucan heptasaccharide was used as a substrate. Attempted overexpression of the tobacco purple acid phosphatase NtPAP12 in tobacco cells not only decreased the activity levels of the glycosidases but also increased levels of xyloglucan oligosaccharides and cello-oligosaccharides in the apoplast during the exponential phase. We suggest that purple acid phosphatase controls the activity of alpha-xylosidase and beta-glucosidase, which are responsible for the degradation of xyloglucan oligosaccharides and cello-oligosaccharides in the cell walls.

  19. An Overlapping Kinase and Phosphatase Docking Site Regulates Activity of the Retinoblastoma Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hirschi, Alexander; Cecchini, Matthew; Steinhardt, Rachel C.; Dick, Frederick A.; Rubin, Seth M.

    2010-01-01

    The phosphorylation state and corresponding activity of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) are modulated by a balance of kinase and phosphatase activities. Here we characterize the association of Rb with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). A crystal structure identifies an enzyme-docking site in the Rb C-terminal domain that is required for efficient PP1c activity towards Rb. The phosphatase-docking site overlaps with the known docking site for Cyclin dependent kinase, and PP1 competition with Cdk-Cyclins for Rb binding is sufficient to retain Rb activity and block cell cycle advancement. These results provide the first detailed molecular insights into Rb activation and establish a novel mechanism for Rb regulation in which kinase and phosphatase compete for substrate docking. PMID:20694007

  20. Emerging issues in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase function: lifting fog or simply shifting?

    PubMed

    Petrone, A; Sap, J

    2000-07-01

    Transmembrane (receptor) tyrosine phosphatases are intimately involved in responses to cell-cell and cell-matrix contact. Several important issues regarding the targets and regulation of this protein family are now emerging. For example, these phosphatases exhibit complex interactions with signaling pathways involving SRC family kinases, which result from their ability to control phosphorylation of both activating and inhibitory sites in these kinases and possibly also their substrates. Similarly, integrin signaling illustrates how phosphorylation of a single protein, or the activity of a pathway, can be controlled by multiple tyrosine phosphatases, attesting to the intricate integration of these enzymes in cellular regulation. Lastly, we are starting to appreciate the roles of intracellular topology, tyrosine phosphorylation and oligomerization among the many mechanisms regulating tyrosine phosphatase activity.

  1. High sequence homology between protein tyrosine acid phosphatase from boar seminal vesicles and human prostatic acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Paweł; Płucienniczak, Grazyna; Strzezek, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    Boar seminal vesicle protein tyrosine acid phosphatase (PTAP) and human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) show high affinity for protein phosphotyrosine residues. The physico-chemical and kinetic properties of the boar and human enzymes are different. The main objective of this study was to establish the nucleotide sequence of cDNA encoding boar PTAP and compare it with that of human PAP cDNA. Also, the amino-acid sequence of boar PTAP was compared with the sequence of human PAP. PTAP was isolated from boar seminal vesicle fluid and sequenced. cDNA to boar seminal vesicle RNA was synthesized, amplified by PCR, cloned in E. coli and sequenced. The obtained N-terminal amino-acid sequence of boar PTAP showed 92% identity with the N-terminal amino-acid sequence of human PAP. The determined sequence of a 354 bp nucleotide fragment (GenBank accession number: GQ184596) showed 90% identity with the corresponding sequence of human PAP. On the basis of this sequence a 118 amino acid fragment of boar PTAP was predicted. This fragment showed 89% identity with the corresponding fragment of human PAP and had a similar hydropathy profile. The compared sequences differ in terms of their isoelectric points and amino-acid composition. This may explain the differences in substrate specificity and inhibitor resistance of boar PTAP and human PAP.

  2. Archaeal protein kinases and protein phosphatases: insights from genomics and biochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Kennelly, Peter J

    2003-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation has long been considered a recent addition to Nature's regulatory arsenal. Early studies indicated that this molecular regulatory mechanism existed only in higher eukaryotes, suggesting that protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation had emerged to meet the particular signal-transduction requirements of multicellular organisms. Although it has since become apparent that simple eukaryotes and even bacteria are sites of protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, the perception widely persists that this molecular regulatory mechanism emerged late in evolution, i.e. after the divergence of the contemporary phylogenetic domains. Only highly developed cells, it was reasoned, could afford the high 'overhead' costs inherent in the acquisition of dedicated protein kinases and protein phosphatases. The advent of genome sequencing has provided an opportunity to exploit Nature's phylogenetic diversity as a vehicle for critically examining this hypothesis. In tracing the origins and evolution of protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, the members of the Archaea, the so-called 'third domain of life', will play a critical role. Whereas several studies have demonstrated that archaeal proteins are subject to modification by covalent phosphorylation, relatively little is known concerning the identities of the proteins affected, the impact on their functional properties, or the enzymes that catalyse these events. However, examination of several archaeal genomes has revealed the widespread presence of several ostensibly 'eukaryotic' and 'bacterial' protein kinase and protein phosphatase paradigms. Similar findings of 'phylogenetic trespass' in members of the Eucarya (eukaryotes) and the Bacteria suggest that this versatile molecular regulatory mechanism emerged at an unexpectedly early point in development of 'life as we know it'. PMID:12444920

  3. Phosphatase activity against neurofilament proteins from bovine spinal cord: effect of aluminium and neuropsychoactive drugs.

    PubMed

    Shetty, K T; Veeranna; Guru, S C

    1992-03-16

    Protein phosphatase activity associated with neurofilament (NF) rich (Triton X-100 insoluble) fraction was extracted and partially characterised by using known inhibitors of protein phosphatases such as vanadate and fluoride. Protein phosphatase activity was demonstrated with reference to the dephosphorylation of endogenous substrate, NF protein and exogenous protein substrates, casein and phosvitin. Phosphoamino acids and beta-glycerophosphate were found to be poor substrates. Further, new observations have been made regarding the in vitro inhibitory effect of aluminium and the differential effects of some of the neuropsychoactive drugs. The findings could possibly lead to studies explaining the biochemical basis of aluminium induced neurotoxicity as well as the side effects associated with the long term medication of neuropsychoactive drugs.

  4. Protein Phosphatase 2A Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    We observed that LNCaP cells under steroid-depleted condition had ~4.3 fold decreased cell growth as compared to the cells grown in regular ...with ceramide decreased their growth (~34%) in regular media, whereas in steroid-deprived media, ceramide treatment showed even more potent effect...androgen independent) under regular or steroid-reduced conditions. Our immu- noblot and in vitro phosphatase activity data show that both the

  5. Carboxy-terminal modulator protein attenuated extracellular matrix deposit by inhibiting phospho-Akt, TGF-β1 and α-SMA in kidneys of diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Hao, Jun; Li, Lisha; Li, Fan; Liu, Shuxia; Duan, Huijun

    2016-06-10

    Glomerulosclerosis and tubular interstitial extracellular matrix deposit and fibrosis are the main features of diabetic nephropathy, which are mediated by activation of PI3K/Akt signal pathway. Carboxy-terminal modulator protein (CTMP) is known as a negative regulator of PI3K/Akt pathway. Whether CTMP regulates renal extracellular matrix metabolism of diabetic nephropathy is still not known. Here, renal decreased CTMP, enhanced phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1, α-SMA and extracellular matrix deposit are found in diabetic mice. Furthermore, high glucose decreases CTMP expression accompanied by enhanced phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1 and α-SMA in cultured human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HKC), which are effectively prevented by transfection of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector. Moreover, delivery of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector into kidneys via tail vein of diabetic mice increases CTMP expression by 8.84 times followed by 60.00%, 76.50% and 24.37% decreases of phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1 and α-SMA compared with diabetic mice receiving pYr-adshuttle-4 vector. Again, increased renal extracellular matrix accumulation of diabetic mice is also inhibited with delivery of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector. Our results indicate that CTMP attenuates renal extracellular matrix deposit by regulating the phosphorylation of Akt, TGF-β1 and α-SMA expression in diabetic mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. CTL0511 from Chlamydia trachomatis Is a Type 2C Protein Phosphatase with Broad Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Claywell, Ja E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein phosphorylation has become increasingly recognized for its role in regulating bacterial physiology and virulence. Chlamydia spp. encode two validated Hanks'-type Ser/Thr protein kinases, which typically function with cognate protein phosphatases and appear capable of global protein phosphorylation. Consequently, we sought to identify a Ser/Thr protein phosphatase partner for the chlamydial kinases. CTL0511 from Chlamydia trachomatis L2 434/Bu, which has homologs in all sequenced Chlamydia spp., is a predicted type 2C Ser/Thr protein phosphatase (PP2C). Recombinant maltose-binding protein (MBP)-tagged CTL0511 (rCTL0511) hydrolyzed p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), a generic phosphatase substrate, in a MnCl2-dependent manner at physiological pH. Assays using phosphopeptide substrates revealed that rCTL0511 can dephosphorylate phosphorylated serine (P-Ser), P-Thr, and P-Tyr residues using either MnCl2 or MgCl2, indicating that metal usage can alter substrate preference. Phosphatase activity was unaffected by PP1, PP2A, and PP3 phosphatase inhibitors, while mutation of conserved PP2C residues significantly inhibited activity. Finally, phosphatase activity was detected in elementary body (EB) and reticulate body (RB) lysates, supporting a role for protein dephosphorylation in chlamydial development. These findings support that CTL0511 is a metal-dependent protein phosphatase with broad substrate specificity, substantiating a reversible phosphorylation network in C. trachomatis. IMPORTANCE Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases in humans and economically important animal species. Our work demonstrates that Chlamydia spp. produce a PP2C capable of dephosphorylating P-Thr, P-Ser, and P-Tyr and that Chlamydia trachomatis EBs and RBs possess phosphatase activity. In conjunction with the chlamydial Hanks'-type kinases Pkn1 and PknD, validation of CTL0511 fulfills the enzymatic requirements for a

  7. Arabidopsis protein phosphatase DBP1 nucleates a protein network with a role in regulating plant defense.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, José Luis; Castelló, María José; Naumann, Kai; Lassowskat, Ines; Navarrete-Gómez, Marisa; Scheel, Dierk; Vera, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana DBP1 belongs to the plant-specific family of DNA-binding protein phosphatases. Although recently identified as a novel host factor mediating susceptibility to potyvirus, little is known about DBP1 targets and partners and the molecular mechanisms underlying its function. Analyzing changes in the phosphoproteome of a loss-of-function dbp1 mutant enabled the identification of 14-3-3λ isoform (GRF6), a previously reported DBP1 interactor, and MAP kinase (MAPK) MPK11 as components of a small protein network nucleated by DBP1, in which GRF6 stability is modulated by MPK11 through phosphorylation, while DBP1 in turn negatively regulates MPK11 activity. Interestingly, grf6 and mpk11 loss-of-function mutants showed altered response to infection by the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV), and the described molecular mechanism controlling GRF6 stability was recapitulated upon PPV infection. These results not only contribute to a better knowledge of the biology of DBP factors, but also of MAPK signalling in plants, with the identification of GRF6 as a likely MPK11 substrate and of DBP1 as a protein phosphatase regulating MPK11 activity, and unveils the implication of this protein module in the response to PPV infection in Arabidopsis.

  8. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi; Kim, Jee In

    2013-04-26

    CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  9. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A.; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi; Kim, Jee In

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Non-canonical roles of the myosin phosphatase inhibitor (CPI-17) were studied. •CPI-17 is localized in the nucleus of hyperplastic cancer and smooth muscle cells. •CPI-17 Ser12 phosphorylation may regulate the nuclear import. •CPI-17 regulates histone H3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. •The nuclear CPI-17-PP1 axis plays a proliferative role in cells. -- Abstract: CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17 kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  10. Spatio-temporal regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling by protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, M; Mandl, M; Keyse, S M

    2006-11-01

    ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) is a MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), which regulates diverse physiological functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, transformation and survival. It is now clear that in addition to the duration and magnitude of signalling through this MAPK pathway, the spatial restriction of MAPK activity plays a key role in determining the physiological outcome of signalling. Recent work has led to the discovery of MAPK-binding proteins, which contain either nuclear localization signals or nuclear export signals. These include MAPK activators and specific protein phosphatases, which may act to both regulate MAPK activity and the subcellular localization of their substrate. This represents a mechanism by which signalling in response to extracellular stimuli may be modulated in terms of both magnitude/duration and spatial restriction thus allowing differential access of the activated MAPK to target proteins and the interpretation of this information by cells to determine an appropriate physiological response.

  11. An acid phosphatase in the plasma membranes of human astrocytoma showing marked specificity toward phosphotyrosine protein.

    PubMed

    Leis, J F; Kaplan, N O

    1982-11-01

    The plasma membrane from the human tumor astrocytoma contains an active acid phosphatase activity based on hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate. Other acid phosphatase substrates--beta-glycerophosphate, O-phosphorylcholine, and 5'-AMP--are not hydrolyzed significantly. The phosphatase activity is tartrate insensitive and is stimulated by Triton X-100 and EDTA. Of the three known phosphoamino acids, only free O-phosphotyrosine is hydrolyzed by the membrane phosphatase activity. Other acid phosphatases tested from potato, wheat germ, milk, and bovine prostate did not show this degree of specificity. The plasma membrane activity also dephosphorylated phosphotyrosine histone at a much greater rate than did the other acid phosphatases. pH profiles for free O-phosphotyrosine and phosphotyrosine histone showed a shift toward physiological pH, indicating possible physiological significance. Phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation activity was nearly 10 times greater than that seen for phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation, and Km values were much lower for phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (0.5 microM vs. 10 microM). Fluoride and zinc significantly inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation. Vanadate, on the other hand, was a potent inhibitor of phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (50% inhibition at 0.5 microM) but not of phosphoserine histone. ATP stimulated phosphotyrosine histone dephosphorylation (160-250%) but inhibited phosphoserine histone dephosphorylation (95%). These results suggest the existence of a highly specific phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase activity associated with the plasma membrane of human astrocytoma.

  12. [Role of protein phosphatase 2A in renal interstitial fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Xi, Yiyun; Li, Hua; Li, Jun; Li, Ying; Liu, Yuping; You, Yanhua; Duan, Shaobin; Liu, Hong; Sun, Lin; Peng, Youming; Liu, Fuyou

    2015-06-01

    目的:探讨蛋白磷酸酶2A(protein phosphatase 2A,PP2A)在大鼠单侧输尿管梗阻(unilateral ureteral obstruction,UUO)及TGF-β1刺激的人近端肾小管上皮细胞-2(human kidney proximal tubular epithelial-2,HK-2)的肾纤维化模型中的作用。方法:1)15只雄性SD大鼠随机分成假手术组( sham组)、模型组(UUO组)和UUO+冈田酸(okadaic acid,OA)干预组(OA组),每组各5只。术后OA组每日给予1.8%酒精稀释的OA 30 μg/kg,胃管饲喂72 h,对照组和模型组给予相等体积的1.8%酒精胃管饲喂,72 h后处死大鼠,收集血和肾组织,检测肾功能并采用免疫组织化学、Western印迹和RT-PCR法检测肾组织PP2A的c亚基(PP2Ac)、纤维连接蛋白(fibronectin,FN)、胶原-I(collagen-I,Col-I)、E-钙黏蛋白(E-cadherin,E-cad)和α平滑肌肌动蛋白(α-smooth muscle actin,α-SMA)的蛋白及mRNA的表达。2)采用台盼蓝排斥实验及MTT法找出适宜的OA浓度。常规培养HK-2细胞,随机分为对照组、TGF-β1组(TGF-β1 5 ng/mL干预24 h)、TGF-β1+OA组(TGF-β1 5 ng/mL+OA 40 nmol/L,同时干预24 h),Western印迹检测肾小管上皮细胞PP2Ac,FN,Col-I,E-cad和α-SMA 蛋白的表达。结果:1)肾功能表明UUO组尿素氮和肌酐较sham组升高,OA组尿素氮、肌酐均比UUO组下降(均P<0.05)。免疫组织化学、Western印迹和RT-PCR均显示:与sham组比较,UUO组PP2Ac,FN,Col-I和α-SMA表达升高,而E-cad表达下降(均P<0.05);与UUO组比较,OA组PP2Ac,FN,Col-I和α-SMA表达下降,E-cad表达升高(均P<0.05);2) OA 40 nmol/L为最适宜的实验质量浓度;Western印迹显示:与对照组比较,TGF-β1组PP2Ac,FN,Col-I和α-SMA表达升高,E-cad表达下降(均P<0.05);与TGF-β1组比较,TGF-β1+OA组PP2Ac,FN,Col-I和α-SMA表达下降,E-cad表达升高(均P<0.05)。结论:PP2A能促进肾间质纤维化。.

  13. Protein phosphatase and kinase activities possibly involved in exocytosis regulation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Kissmehl, R; Treptau, T; Hofer, H W; Plattner, H

    1996-07-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells synchronous exocytosis induced by aminoethyldextran (AED) is accompanied by an equally rapid dephosphorylation of a 63 kDa phosphoprotein (PP63) within 80 ms. In vivo, rephosphorylation occurs within a few seconds after AED triggering. In homogenates (P)P63 can be solubilized in all three phosphorylation states (phosphorylated, dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated) and thus tested in vitro. By using chelators of different divalent cations, de- and rephosphorylation of PP63 and P63 respectively can be achieved by an endogenous protein phosphatase/kinase system. Dephosphorylation occurs in the presence of EDTA, whereas in the presence of EGTA this was concealed by phosphorylation by endogenous kinase(s), thus indicating that phosphorylation of P63 is calcium-independent. Results obtained with protein phosphatase inhibitors (okadaic acid, calyculin A) allowed us to exclude a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type I (with selective sensitivity in Paramecium). Protein phosphatase 2C is also less likely to be a candidate because of its requirement for high Mg2+ concentrations. According to previous evidence a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type 2B (calcineurin; CaN) is possibly involved. We have now found that bovine brain CaN dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro. Taking into account the specific requirements of this phosphatase in vitro, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate, we have isolated a cytosolic phosphatase of similar characteristics by combined preparative gel electrophoresis and affinity-column chromatography. In Paramecium this phosphatase also dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro (after 32P labelling in vivo). Using various combinations of ion exchange, affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography we have also isolated three different protein kinases from the soluble fraction, i.e. a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and a casein kinase. Among the kinases tested, PKA

  14. Partial purification and characterization of an enzyme from pea nuclei with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Y L; Roux, S J

    1995-01-01

    A pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclear enzyme with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity has been partially purified and characterized. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 90 kD as judged by molecular sieve column chromatography and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Like animal protein tyrosine phosphatases it can be inhibited by low concentrations of molybdate and vanadate. It is also inhibited by heparin and spermine but not by either the acid phosphatase inhibitors citrate and tartrate or the protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. The enzyme does not require Ca2+, Mg2+, or Mn2+ for its activity but is stimulated by ethylenediaminetetraacetate and by ethyleneglycolbis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. It dephosphorylates phosphotyrosine residues on the four different 32P-tyrosine-labeled peptides tested but not the phosphoserine/threonine residues on casein and histone. Like some animal protein tyrosine phosphatases, it has a variable pH optimum depending on the substrate used: the optimum is 5.5 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled lysozyme, but it is 7.0 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled poly(glutamic acid, tyrosine). It has a Km of 4 microM when the lysozyme protein is used as a substrate. PMID:11536662

  15. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human gene of the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) of protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoof, C.; Cayla, X.; Merlevede, W.; Goris, J.

    1995-07-20

    The PTPA gene encodes a specific phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of the dimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A. PTPA, cloned from human genomic libraries, is encoded by one single-copy gene, composed of 10 exons and 9 introns with a total length of about 60 kb. The transcription start site was determined, and the 5{prime} flanking sequence was analyzed for its potential as a promotor. This region lacks a TATA sequence in the appropriate position relative to the transcription start, is very GC-rich, and contains upstream of the transcription start four Sp1 sites, a feature common to many TATA-less promotors. Based on the homology with DNA binding consensus sequences of transcription factors, we identified in this promotor region several putative DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-{kappa}B, Myb, Ets-1, Myc, and ATF. Transfection experiments with a construct containing the PTPA promotor region inserted 5{prime} of a luciferase reporter gene revealed that the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the PTPA gene indeed displayed promotor activity that seems to be cell-line dependent. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding, the PTPA gene was localized to the 9q34 region. The PTPA gene is positioned centromeric of c-abl in a region embracing several genes implicated in oncogenesis. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) tumor suppressor function by PME-1.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-12-15

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays a major role in maintaining cellular signaling homeostasis by dephosphorylation of a variety of signaling proteins and acts as a tumor suppressor. Protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) negatively regulates PP2A activity by highly complex mechanisms that are reviewed here. Importantly, recent studies have shown that PME-1 promotes oncogenic MAPK/ERK and AKT pathway activities in various cancer types. In human glioma, high PME-1 expression correlates with tumor progression and kinase inhibitor resistance. We discuss the emerging cancer-associated function of PME-1 and its potential clinical relevance.

  17. Protein Phosphatases Decrease Their Activity during Capacitation: A New Requirement for This Event

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Janetti R.; Díaz, Emilce S.; Fara, Karla; Barón, Lina; Morales, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    There are few reports on the role of protein phosphatases during capacitation. Here, we report on the role of PP2B, PP1, and PP2A during human sperm capacitation. Motile sperm were resuspended in non-capacitating medium (NCM, Tyrode's medium, albumin- and bicarbonate-free) or in reconstituted medium (RCM, NCM plus 2.6% albumin/25 mM bicarbonate). The presence of the phosphatases was evaluated by western blotting and the subcellular localization by indirect immunofluorescence. The function of these phosphatases was analyzed by incubating the sperm with specific inhibitors: okadaic acid, I2, endothall, and deltamethrin. Different aliquots were incubated in the following media: 1) NCM; 2) NCM plus inhibitors; 3) RCM; and 4) RCM plus inhibitors. The percent capacitated sperm and phosphatase activities were evaluated using the chlortetracycline assay and a phosphatase assay kit, respectively. The results confirm the presence of PP2B and PP1 in human sperm. We also report the presence of PP2A, specifically, the catalytic subunit and the regulatory subunits PR65 and B. PP2B and PP2A were present in the tail, neck, and postacrosomal region, and PP1 was present in the postacrosomal region, neck, middle, and principal piece of human sperm. Treatment with phosphatase inhibitors rapidly (≤1 min) increased the percent of sperm depicting the pattern B, reaching a maximum of ∼40% that was maintained throughout incubation; after 3 h, the percent of capacitated sperm was similar to that of the control. The enzymatic activity of the phosphatases decreased during capacitation without changes in their expression. The pattern of phosphorylation on threonine residues showed a sharp increase upon treatment with the inhibitors. In conclusion, human sperm express PP1, PP2B, and PP2A, and the activity of these phosphatases decreases during capacitation. This decline in phosphatase activities and the subsequent increase in threonine phosphorylation may be an important requirement for the

  18. Gene fusion analysis of membrane protein topology: a direct comparison of alkaline phosphatase and beta-lactamase fusions.

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, W A; Beckwith, J

    1994-01-01

    To compare two approaches to analyzing membrane protein topology, a number of alkaline phosphatase fusions to membrane proteins were converted to beta-lactamase fusions. While some alkaline phosphatase fusions near the N terminus of cytoplasmic loops of membrane proteins have anomalously high levels of activity, the equivalent beta-lactamase fusions do not. This disparity may reflect differences in the folding of beta-lactamase and alkaline phosphatase in the cytoplasm. PMID:7929016

  19. Protein Phosphatase 2A Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    immunoblot and malachite green based assay, respectively. We observe that LNCaP- shPPP2CA cells have low PP2ACα expression (Figure 1A) and activity...regulated family of serine/threonine phosphatases implicated in cell growth and signalling. Biochem J 2001;353:417-39. (6) Jennbacken K, Gustavsson H...cancer cells - - - shPPP2CA. Expression and activity of catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2ACα) was determined by immunoblot and melachite green - based

  20. Protein Phosphatase 2A Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    been shown to be involved in androgen-independent growth of human prostate cancer cells (Carson et al., 1999; Grethe and Porn -Ares, 2006; Murillo et... Porn -Ares MI. (2006). p38 MAPK regulates phosphorylation of Bad via PP2A- dependent suppression of the MEK1/2-ERK1/2 survival pathway in TNF-alpha...threonine phosphatases implicated in cell growth and sig- nalling. Biochem J 2001;353:417–39. 15. Grethe S, Porn -Ares MI. p38 MAPK regulates

  1. Determinants of the tumor suppressor INPP4B protein and lipid phosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Sandra M; Hodgson, Myles C; Packianathan, Charles; Bingol-Ozakpinar, Ozlem; Uras, Fikriye; Rosen, Barry P; Agoulnik, Irina U

    2013-10-18

    The tumor suppressor INPP4B is an important regulator of phosphatidyl-inositol signaling in the cell. Reduced INPP4B expression is associated with poor outcomes for breast, prostate, and ovarian cancer patients. INPP4B contains a CX5R catalytic motif characteristic of dual-specificity phosphatases, such as PTEN. Lipid phosphatase activity of INPP4B has previously been described. In this report we show that INPP4B can dephosphorylate para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl (DiFMUP), synthetic phosphotyrosine analogs, suggesting that INPP4B has protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Using mutagenesis, we examined the functional role of specific amino acids within the INPP4B C842KSAKDR catalytic site. The K843M mutant displayed increased pNPP hydrolysis, the K846M mutant lost lipid phosphatase activity with no effect on PTP activity, and the D847E substitution ablated PTP activity and significantly reduced lipid phosphatase activity. Further, we show that INPP4B but not PTEN is able to reduce tyrosine phosphorylation of Akt1 and both the lipid and PTP activity of INPP4B likely contribute to the reduction of Akt1 phosphorylation. Taken together our data identified key residues in the INPP4B catalytic domain associated with lipid and protein phosphatase activities and found a robust downstream target regulated by INPP4B but not PTEN.

  2. Dephosphorylation of Tyrosine 393 in Argonaute 2 by Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Regulates Gene Silencing in Oncogenic RAS-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Haase, Astrid D.; Huang, Fang-Ke; Coulis, Gérald; Rivera, Keith D.; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Chang, Christopher J.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Boivin, Benoit; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Oncogenic RAS (H-RASV12) induces premature senescence in primary cells by triggering production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the molecular role of ROS in senescence remains elusive. We investigated whether inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by ROS contributed to H-RASV12-induced senescence. We identified protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a major target of H-RASV12-induced ROS. Inactivation of PTP1B was necessary and sufficient to induce premature senescence in H-RASV12-expressing IMR90 fibroblasts. We identified phospho-Tyr 393 of argonaute 2 (AGO2) as a direct substrate of PTP1B. Phosphorylation of AGO2 at Tyr 393 inhibited loading with microRNAs (miRNA) and thus miRNA-mediated gene silencing, which counteracted the function of H-RASV12-induced oncogenic miRNAs. Overall, our data illustrate that premature senescence in H-RASV12-transformed primary cells is a consequence of oxidative inactivation of PTP1B and inhibition of miRNA-mediated gene silencing. PMID:25175024

  3. Protein phosphatase 1 and LTD: synapses are the architects of depression.

    PubMed

    Isaac, J

    2001-12-20

    NMDAR-dependent long-term depression involves the activation of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and 2B (calcineurin) and the subsequent dephosphorylation of synaptic proteins. In this issue of Neuron, Morishita et al. (2001) provide evidence that precise targeting of PP1 to synaptic substrates is critical for the expression of LTD.

  4. Hydroxychloroquine Destabilizes Phospho-S6 in Human Renal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Ok; Mustafa, Aladdin; Hudes, Gary R.; Kruger, Warren D.

    2015-01-01

    mTOR inhibitors are used to treat metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC), but most patients eventually become resistant. One possible mechanism for resistance is upregulation of autophagy, a pathway that helps recycle intracellular proteins and promotes cell survival. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a potent autophagy inhibitor used to treat malaria and autoimmune disorders, is currently being studied in the context of cancer treatment. Here, we have investigated the effects of HCQ on three different renal carcinoma derived cell lines. We found that HCQ treatment inhibits RCC cell growth, promotes apoptosis, inhibits mitochondrial oxygen consumption, and increases rates of glycolysis. To understand the molecular mechanism behind these effects, we examined various nodes in the mTOR pathway and compared the effects of HCQ with the effects of the mTOR inhibitor RAD001. A key downstream readout of the pathway, phospho-S6 protein, was inhibited by both HCQ and RAD001. However, the upstream kinase, P70S6K was only inhibited by RAD001 and not HCQ, suggesting that the block by HCQ was downstream of P70S6K. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib restored phospho-S6 levels, suggesting that the reduction of phospho-S6 is caused by increased degradation of phospho-S6, but not total S6. Surprisingly, treatment with other autophagy inhibitors did not exhibit the same effects. Our findings suggest that HCQ causes the down-regulation of phospho-S6 in RCC cell lines via a novel mechanism that is not shared with other autophagy inhibitors. PMID:26134285

  5. Selective activators of protein phosphatase 5 target the auto-inhibitory mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Haslbeck, Veronika; Drazic, Adrian; Eckl, Julia M.; Alte, Ferdinand; Helmuth, Martin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Schmidt, Werner; Braun, Frank; Weiwad, Matthias; Fischer, Gunter; Gemmecker, Gerd; Sattler, Michael; Striggow, Frank; Groll, Michael; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is an evolutionary conserved serine/threonine phosphatase. Its dephosphorylation activity modulates a diverse set of cellular factors including protein kinases and the microtubule-associated tau protein involved in neurodegenerative disorders. It is auto-regulated by its heat-shock protein (Hsp90)-interacting tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain and its C-terminal α-helix. In the present study, we report the identification of five specific PP5 activators [PP5 small-molecule activators (P5SAs)] that enhance the phosphatase activity up to 8-fold. The compounds are allosteric modulators accelerating efficiently the turnover rate of PP5, but do barely affect substrate binding or the interaction between PP5 and the chaperone Hsp90. Enzymatic studies imply that the compounds bind to the phosphatase domain of PP5. For the most promising compound crystallographic comparisons of the apo PP5 and the PP5–P5SA-2 complex indicate a relaxation of the auto-inhibited state of PP5. Residual electron density and mutation analyses in PP5 suggest activator binding to a pocket in the phosphatase/TPR domain interface, which may exert regulatory functions. These compounds thus may expose regulatory mechanisms in the PP5 enzyme and serve to develop optimized activators based on these scaffolds. PMID:26182372

  6. Hydroxyindole Carboxylic Acid-Based Inhibitors for Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase Beta

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Bai, Yunpeng; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play an important role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. Understanding the role of PTPs within these processes has been hampered by a lack of potent and selective PTP inhibitors. Generating potent and selective probes for PTPs remains a significant challenge because of the highly conserved and positively charged PTP active site that also harbors a redox-sensitive Cys residue. Results: We describe a facile method that uses an appropriate hydroxyindole carboxylic acid to anchor the inhibitor to the PTP active site and relies on the secondary binding elements introduced through an amide-focused library to enhance binding affinity for the target PTP and to impart selectivity against off-target phosphatases. Here, we disclose a novel series of hydroxyindole carboxylic acid-based inhibitors for receptor-type tyrosine protein phosphatase beta (RPTPβ), a potential target that is implicated in blood vessel development. The representative RPTPβ inhibitor 8b-1 (L87B44) has an IC50 of 0.38 μM and at least 14-fold selectivity for RPTPβ over a large panel of PTPs. Moreover, 8b-1 also exhibits excellent cellular activity and augments growth factor signaling in HEK293, MDA-MB-468, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Innovation: The bicyclic salicylic acid pharmacophore-based focused library approach may provide a potential solution to overcome the bioavailability issue that has plagued the PTP drug discovery field for many years. Conclusion: A novel method is described for the development of bioavailable PTP inhibitors that utilizes bicyclic salicylic acid to anchor the inhibitors to the active site and peripheral site interactions to enhance binding affinity and selectivity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2130–2140. PMID:24180557

  7. A G protein-coupled receptor phosphatase required for rhodopsin function.

    PubMed

    Vinós, J; Jalink, K; Hardy, R W; Britt, S G; Zuker, C S

    1997-08-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors are phosphorylated by kinases that mediate agonist-dependent receptor deactivation. Although many receptor kinases have been isolated, the corresponding phosphatases, necessary for restoring the ground state of the receptor, have not been identified. Drosophila RDGC (retinal degeneration C) is a phosphatase required for rhodopsin dephosphorylation in vivo. Loss of RDGC caused severe defects in the termination of the light response as well as extensive light-dependent retinal degeneration. These phenotypes resulted from the hyperphosphorylation of rhodopsin because expression of a truncated rhodopsin lacking the phosphorylation sites restored normal photoreceptor function. These results suggest the existence of a family of receptor phosphatases involved in the regulation of G protein-coupled signaling cascades.

  8. Comparative analysis of eukaryotic-type protein phosphatases in two Streptomyces genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Zhang, Weiwen

    2004-07-01

    Summary - Inspection of the genomes of Streptomyces coelicolor and S. avermitilis reveals that each contains 55 putative eukaryotic-type protein phosphatases (PPs), the largest number ever identified from any single prokaryotic organism. Unlike most other prokaryotic genomes, that have only one or two super-families of protein phosphatases, the Streptomyces genomes possess 4 different super-families of protein phosphatases: 2 PPPs and 2 LMWPTPs in each species, 49 PPMs and 2 CPTPs in S. coelicolor, and 48 PPMs and 3 CPTPs in S. avermitilis. Sixty four percent of the PPs found in S. coelicolor have orthologs in S. avermitilis, indicating that they originated from a common ancestor and may be involved in the regulation of more conversed metabolic activities...

  9. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: Distinct multiple chemistries catalyzed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M.; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. Here, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalyzed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform delta (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C-O-P) with high catalytic efficiency, while the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C-O-C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolyzing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of PTPRΩ, a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbor a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. PMID:27208174

  10. A novel transmembrane Ser/Thr kinase complexes with protein phosphatase-1 and inhibitor-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Brautigan, David L

    2002-12-20

    Protein kinases and protein phosphatases exert coordinated control over many essential cellular processes. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of a novel human transmembrane protein KPI-2 (Kinase/Phosphatase/Inhibitor-2) that was identified by yeast two-hybrid using protein phosphatase inhibitor-2 (Inh2) as bait. KPI-2 mRNA was predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle. KPI-2 is a 1503-residue protein with two predicted transmembrane helices at the N terminus, a kinase domain, followed by a C-terminal domain. The transmembrane helices were sufficient for targeting proteins to the membrane. KPI-2 kinase domain has about 60% identity with its closest relative, a tyrosine kinase. However, it only exhibited serine/threonine kinase activity in autophosphorylation reactions or with added substrates. KPI-2 kinase domain phosphorylated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1C) at Thr(320), which attenuated PP1C activity. KPI-2 C-terminal domain directly associated with PP1C, and this required a VTF motif. Inh2 associated with KPI-2 C-terminal domain with and without PP1C. Thus, KPI-2 is a kinase with sites to associate with PP1C and Inh2 to form a regulatory complex that is localized to membranes.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of protein phosphatase 2C of vomeronasal sensory epithelium of garter snakes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dalton; Liu, Weimin; Liu, Jinming; Chen, Ping; Quan, Wei; Halpern, Mimi

    2002-12-15

    The earthworm-derived chemoattractant ES20 interacts with its G-protein-coupled receptors on the plasma membrane of vomeronasal (VN) sensory neurons of garter snakes, resulting in an increase in inositol trisphosphate [J. Biol. Chem. 269 (1994) 16867] and a rapid phosphorylation of the membrane-bound proteins, p42/44 [Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1450 (1999) 320]. The phosphorylation of p42/44 proteins are countervailingly regulated by a protein kinase and an okadaic acid-insensitive but fluoride-sensitive protein phosphatase (PPase) [J. Liu et al. (loc. cit.)]. The phosphorylation of p42/44 induced by ES20 appears to play a role in the regulation of signal transduction pathways by modulating the GTPase activity [J. Liu et al. (loc. cit.)]. A 564-bp fragment of cDNA was obtained from VN RNA of garter snakes by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction with degenerate primers. The 564-bp fragment was amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Northern blot analysis revealed that both the VN organ (VNO) and brain contained the gene of PPase 2C. A full-length complementary 4119-bp DNA containing an open reading frame of 1146bp that encodes a protein of 382 amino acids with a molecular mass of 49,123Da was obtained from the VN cDNA library of garter snakes. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 88% amino acid identity to bovine protein phosphatase 2C alpha and 87% identity to human and rat PP2C alpha and to Mg(2+)-dependent protein phosphatase 1A of rat and rabbit. In situ hybridization revealed that the mRNA of VN protein phosphatase 2C is expressed in the vomeronasal sensory epithelium. This is the first report of the identification of a type 2C serine/threonine protein phosphatase in the VN system.

  12. Therapeutic relevance of the protein phosphatase 2A in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhanumathy, Kalpana Kalyanasundaram; Lee, Joo Sang; Parameswaran, Sreejit; Furber, Levi; Abuhussein, Omar; Paul, James M.; McDonald, Megan; Templeton, Shaina D.; Shukla, Hersh; El Zawily, Amr M.; Boyd, Frederick; Alli, Nezeka; Mousseau, Darrell D.; Geyer, Ron; Bonham, Keith; Anderson, Deborah H.; Yan, Jiong; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan; Weaver, Beth A.; Uppalapati, Maruti; Ruppin, Eytan; Sablina, Anna; Freywald, Andrew; Vizeacoumar, Franco J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal Instability (CIN) is regarded as a unifying feature of heterogeneous tumor populations, driving intratumoral heterogeneity. Polo-Like Kinase 1 (PLK1), a serine-threonine kinase that is often overexpressed across multiple tumor types, is one of the key regulators of CIN and is considered as a potential therapeutic target. However, targeting PLK1 has remained a challenge due to the off-target effects caused by the inhibition of other members of the polo-like family. Here we use synthetic dosage lethality (SDL), where the overexpression of PLK1 is lethal only when another, normally non-lethal, mutation or deletion is present. Rather than directly inhibiting PLK1, we found that inhibition of PP2A causes selective lethality to PLK1-overexpressing breast, pancreatic, ovarian, glioblastoma, and prostate cancer cells. As PP2A is widely regarded as a tumor suppressor, we resorted to gene expression datasets from cancer patients to functionally dissect its therapeutic relevance. We identified two major classes of PP2A subunits that negatively correlated with each other. Interestingly, most mitotic regulators, including PLK1, exhibited SDL interactions with only one class of PP2A subunits (PPP2R1A, PPP2R2D, PPP2R3B, PPP2R5B and PPP2R5D). Validation studies and other functional cell-based assays showed that inhibition of PPP2R5D affects both levels of phospho-Rb as well as sister chromatid cohesion in PLK1-overexpressing cells. Finally, analysis of clinical data revealed that patients with high expression of mitotic regulators and low expression of Class I subunits of PP2A improved survival. Overall, these observations point to a context-dependent role of PP2A that warrants further exploration for therapeutic benefits. PMID:27557495

  13. Extremely high maternal alkaline phosphatase serum concentration with syncytiotrophoblastic origin

    PubMed Central

    Boronkai, A; Than, N G; Magenheim, R; Bellyei, S; Szigeti, A; Deres, P; Hargitai, B; Sumegi, B; Papp, Z; Rigo, J

    2005-01-01

    An extremely high alkaline phosphatase (AP) concentration (3609 IU/litre) was found in a 20 year old primigravida at 37 week’s gestation, prompting an examination of its histological and cellular origin. Immunohistochemistry and western blots using antibodies against AP, Ki-67, phospho-protein kinase B (Akt), phospho-p44/42 mitogen activated protein kinase/extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (MAPK/Erk1/2), phospho-glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), phospho-stress activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase, total-Akt, total-GSK-3β, and phospho-p38-MAPK were carried out on index and control placental samples of the same gestational age. Compared with controls, staining of the index placenta showed minimal AP labelling of the brush border and remarkable positivity of the intervillous space. Cytotrophoblastic proliferation was 8–10% in the index placenta compared with 1–2% in controls. The index placenta also had raised concentrations of protein kinases with important roles in cell differentiation. The proliferation and differentiation rates of the cytotrophoblasts were found to be five times higher in index samples than in controls. It is hypothesised that loss of syncytial membranes in immature villi led to increased AP concentrations in the maternal circulation and decreased AP staining of the placenta. Loss of the syncytium might also stimulate increased proliferation of villous cytotrophoblasts, which would then fuse and maintain the syncytium. PMID:15623487

  14. The protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) superfamily: detection of bacterial homologues.

    PubMed

    Bork, P; Brown, N P; Hegyi, H; Schultz, J

    1996-07-01

    A thorough sequence analysis of the various members of the eukaryotic protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family revealed the conservation of 11 motifs. These motifs could be identified in numerous other sequences, including fungal adenylate cyclases that are predicted to contain a functionally active PP2C domain, and a family of prokaryotic serine/threonine phosphatases including SpoIIE. Phylogenetic analysis of all the proteins indicates a widespread sequence family for which a considerable number of isoenzymes can be inferred.

  15. Sucrose increases calcium-dependent protein kinase and phosphatase activities in potato plants.

    PubMed

    Raíces, M; MacIntosh, G C; Ulloa, R M; Gargantini, P R; Vozza, N F; Téllez-Inón, M T

    2003-09-01

    The effect of sucrose on tuber formation, calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and phosphatase activities was analysed using in vitro cultured potato plants. In short treatments, sucrose induced CDPK and phosphatase activities. In long treatments, sucrose induced tuber formation in the absence of other tuber inducing stimuli. Sorbitol caused a minor increase in CDPK activity and affected plant morphology but did not induce tuber development. The addition of the protein kinase inhibitor Staurosporine precluded sucrose-induced tuberization. Altogether, our results suggest that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events are involved in sucrose-induced tuber development.

  16. Dephosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinases by type 2C protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Aiyang; Ross, Karen E.; Kaldis, Philipp; Solomon, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Activating phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) is necessary for their kinase activity and cell cycle progression. This phosphorylation is carried out by the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK); in contrast, little is known about the corresponding protein phosphatase. We show that type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) are responsible for this dephosphorylation of Cdc28p, the major budding yeast CDK. Two yeast PP2Cs, Ptc2p and Ptc3p, display Cdc28p phosphatase activity in vitro and in vivo, and account for ∼90% of Cdc28p phosphatase activity in yeast extracts. Overexpression of PTC2 or PTC3 results in synthetic lethality in strains temperature-sensitive for yeast CAK1, and disruptions of PTC2 and PTC3 suppress the growth defect of a cak1 mutant. Furthermore, PP2C-like enzymes are the predominant phosphatases toward human Cdk2 in HeLa cell extracts, indicating that the substrate specificity of PP2Cs toward CDKs is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:10580002

  17. An immunochemical approach to detect oxidized protein tyrosine phosphatases using a selective C-nucleophile tag.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Francisco J; Carroll, Kate S

    2016-05-24

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases are crucial regulators of signal transduction and function as antagonists towards protein tyrosine kinases to control reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, thereby regulating fundamental physiological processes. Growing evidence has supported the notion that reversible oxidative inactivation of the catalytic cysteine residue in protein tyrosine phosphatases serves as an oxidative post-translational modification that regulates its activity to influence downstream signaling by promoting phosphorylation and induction of the signaling cascade. The oxidation of cysteine to the sulfenic acid is often transient and difficult to detect, thus making it problematic in understanding the role that this oxidative post-translational modification plays in redox-biology and pathogenesis. Several methods to detect cysteine oxidation in biological systems have been developed, though targeted approaches to directly detect oxidized phosphatases are still lacking. Herein we describe the development of a novel immunochemical approach to directly profile oxidized phosphatases. This immunochemical approach consists of an antibody designed to recognize the conserved sequence of the PTP active site (VHCDMDSAG) harboring the catalytic cysteine modified with dimedone (CDMD), a nucleophile that chemoselectively reacts with cysteine sulfenic acids to form a stable thioether adduct. Additionally, we provide biochemical and mass spectrometry workflows to be used in conjugation with this newly developed immunochemical approach to assist in the identification and quantification of basal and oxidized phosphatases.

  18. Potent inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli; Wang, Qingming; Yuan, Caixia; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Mei, Yuhua

    2011-12-01

    A series of copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives, including mono- and di-nuclear, were synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The speciation of Cu/NTB in aqueous solution was investigated by potentiometric pH titrations. Their inhibitory effects against human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), megakaryocyte protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (PTP-MEG2), srchomology phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) and srchomology phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) were evaluated in vitro. The five copper complexes exhibit potent inhibition against PTP1B, TCPTP and PTP-MEG2 with almost same inhibitory effects with IC(50) at submicro molar level and about tenfold weaker inhibition versus SHP-1, but almost no inhibition against SHP-2. Kinetic analysis indicates that they are reversible competitive inhibitors of PTP1B. Fluorescence study on the interaction between PTP1B and complex 2 or 4 suggests that the complexes bind to PTP1B with the formation of a 1:1 complex. The binding constant are about 1.14 × 10(6) and 1.87 × 10(6) M(-1) at 310 K for 2 and 4, respectively.

  19. Identification of protein tyrosine phosphatases and dual-specificity phosphatases in mammalian spermatozoa and their role in sperm motility and protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, L; Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Macias-Garcia, B; Salido, G M; Peña, F J; Tapia, J A

    2009-06-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases have important roles in spermatozoa; however, little is known about the presence and regulation in these cells of their counterparts in signaling, namely, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs). The objectives of the present study were to identify PTPs and DSPs in boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa; to characterize their subcellular distribution; and to investigate the roles of tyrosine phosphatases in maintenance of protein tyrosine phosphorylation level and in sperm motility. Using Western blotting with specific antibodies in boar and stallion sperm lysates, we unequivocally identified two PTPs (PTPRB and PTPN11) and two DSPs (DUSP3 and DUSP4). In dog sperm lysates, only PTPN11, DUSP3, and DUSP4 were detected. In all these species, we did not detect the specific signal with anti-PTPRC (CD45), CDKN3, DUSP1, DUSP2, DUSP6, DUSP9, PTPN1, PTPN3, PTPN6, PTPN7, PTPN13, PTPRA, PTPRG, PTPRJ, PTPRK, or PTPRZ antibodies. Positive matches were further investigated by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results showed that PTPRB was associated with the plasma membrane in the head and tail of boar and stallion spermatozoa. In agreement with Western blotting results, PTPRB antibodies did not show immunoreactivity in dog sperm analyzed by immunofluorescence. In the three species, DUSP4 was mainly found in the tail of spermatozoa, with little or no immunoreactivity in the head. PTPN11 was mainly located in the postacrosomal region in the head, whereas DUSP3 immunoreactivity was extended within the acrosome. PTPN11 and DUSP3 showed immunoreactivity in the tail that was restricted to the midpiece. Finally, we incubated boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa with pervanadate and sodium orthovanadate, two PTP inhibitors, and analyzed overall protein tyrosine phosphorylation and assessed sperm motility. Sodium orthovanadate and pervanadate showed concentration-dependent inhibition of sperm motility that was

  20. Tailoring a low-molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase into an efficient reporting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2009-05-15

    Fusion reporter methods are important tools for biology and biotechnology. An ideal reporter protein in a fusion system should have little effects on its fusion partner and provide an easy and accurate readout. Therefore, a small monomeric protein with high activity for detection assays often has advantages as a reporter protein. For this purpose, we have tailored the human B-form low-molecular-weight phosphotyrosyl phosphatase (HPTP-B) to increase its general applicability as a potent reporter protein. With the aim to eliminate interference from cysteine residues in the native HPTP-B, combined with a systematic survey of N- and C-terminal truncated variants, a series of cysteine to serine mutations were introduced, which allowed isolation of an engineered soluble protein with suitable biophysical properties. When we deleted both the first six residues and the last two residues, we still obtained a soluble mutant protein with correct folding and similar activity with wild-type protein. This mutant with two cysteine to serine mutations, HPTP-B{sup N{sub {Delta}}6-C{sub {Delta}}2-C90S-C109S}, has good potential as an optimal reporter.

  1. Involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenesis: New anti-obesity targets?

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Won Kon; Lee, Sang Chul

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic as well as being a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and several types of cancers. Obesity is mainly due to the overgrowth of adipose tissue arising from an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Adipose tissue, primarily composed of adipocytes, plays a key role in maintaining whole body energy homeostasis. In view of the treatment of obesity and obesity-related diseases, it is critical to understand the detailed signal transduction mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation. Adipogenic differentiation is tightly regulated by many key signal cascades, including insulin signaling. These signal cascades generally transfer or amplify the signal by using serial tyrosine phosphorylations. Thus, protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases are closely related to adipogenic differentiation. Compared to protein tyrosine kinases, protein tyrosine phosphatases have received little attention in adipogenic differentiation. This review aims to highlight the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenic differentiation and the possibility of protein tyrosine phosphatases as drugs to target obesity. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(12): 700-706] PMID:23261055

  2. Involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenesis: new anti-obesity targets?

    PubMed

    Bae, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Won Kon; Lee, Sang Chul

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic as well as being a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and several types of cancers. Obesity is mainly due to the overgrowth of adipose tissue arising from an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Adipose tissue, primarily composed of adipocytes, plays a key role in maintaining whole body energy homeostasis. In view of the treatment of obesity and obesity-related diseases, it is critical to understand the detailed signal transduction mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation. Adipogenic differentiation is tightly regulated by many key signal cascades, including insulin signaling. These signal cascades generally transfer or amplify the signal by using serial tyrosine phosphorylations. Thus, protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases are closely related to adipogenic differentiation. Compared to protein tyrosine kinases, protein tyrosine phosphatases have received little attention in adipogenic differentiation. This review aims to highlight the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases in adipogenic differentiation and the possibility of protein tyrosine phosphatases as drugs to target obesity.

  3. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724-837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991-1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998-1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction.

  4. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, III, Walter F.

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724–837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991–1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998–1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction. PMID:26445108

  5. Analysis of Smad Phosphatase Activity In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Qin, Lan; Lin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 at the C-terminal SXS motif by BMP type I receptors is one of the most critical events in BMP signaling. Conversely, protein phosphatases that dephosphorylate phospho-Smad1/5/8 can consequently prevent or terminate BMP signaling. PPM1H is an undercharacterized phosphatase in the PPM family. We recently demonstrated that PPM1H can dephosphorylate Smad1 in the cytoplasm and block BMP signaling responses in cellular assays. Here we describe in vitro method showing that PPM1H is a bona fide phosphatase for Smad1/5/8. PPM1H is produced as GST fusion protein in E. coli, and purified against glutathione sepharose beads. Bacterially purified recombinant PPM1H possesses phosphatase activity toward artificial substrate para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP). Recombinant PPM1H also dephosphorylates immuno-purified phosphorylated Smad1 in test tubes. These direct in vitro phosphatase assays provide convincing evidence demonstrating the role of PPM1H as a specific phosphatase for P-Smad1.

  6. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: From Housekeeping Enzymes to Master-Regulators of Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions surrounding the roles of protein phosphatases in the regulation of signal transduction, perhaps the most damaging of which is the erroneous view that these enzymes exert their effects merely as constitutively active housekeeping enzymes. On the contrary, the phosphatases are critical, specific regulators of signaling in their own right and serve an essential function, in a coordinated manner with the kinases, to determine the response to a physiological stimulus. This review is a personal perspective on the development of our understanding of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family of enzymes. I have discussed various aspects of the structure, regulation and function of the PTP family, which I hope will illustrate the fundamental importance of these enzymes to the control of signal transduction. PMID:23176256

  7. Oleanolic acid and its derivatives: new inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with cellular activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Nan; Zhang, Wei; Hong, Di; Shi, Lei; Shen, Qiang; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Hu, Li-Hong

    2008-09-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a key factor in the negative regulation of insulin pathway and a promising target for treatment of diabetes and obesity. Herein, a series of competitive inhibitors were optimized from oleanolic acid, a natural triterpenoid identified against PTP1B by screening libraries of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs. Modifying at 3 and 28 positions, we obtained compound 13 with a K(i) of 130 nM, which exhibited good selectivity between other phosphatases involved in insulin pathway except T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase. Further evaluation in cell models illustrated that the derivatives enhanced insulin receptor phosphorylation in CHO/hIR cells and also stimulated glucose uptake in L6 myotubes with or addition of without insulin.

  8. An RNAi Screen To Identify Protein Phosphatases That Function Within the Drosophila Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Parul; Hardin, Paul E

    2016-12-07

    Circadian clocks in eukaryotes keep time via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. A well-characterized example of such a transcriptional feedback loop is in Drosophila, where CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes activate transcription of period (per) and timeless (tim) genes, rising levels of PER-TIM complexes feed-back to repress CLK-CYC activity, and degradation of PER and TIM permits the next cycle of CLK-CYC transcription. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated posttranslationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Previous behavioral screens identified several kinases that control CLK, PER, and TIM levels, subcellular localization, and/or activity, but two phosphatases that function within the clock were identified through the analysis of candidate genes from other pathways or model systems. To identify phosphatases that play a role in the clock, we screened clock cell-specific RNA interference (RNAi) knockdowns of all annotated protein phosphatases and protein phosphatase regulators in Drosophila for altered activity rhythms. This screen identified 19 protein phosphatases that lengthened or shortened the circadian period by ≥1 hr (p ≤ 0.05 compared to controls) or were arrhythmic. Additional RNAi lines, transposon inserts, overexpression, and loss-of-function mutants were tested to independently confirm these RNAi phenotypes. Based on genetic validation and molecular analysis, 15 viable protein phosphatases remain for future studies. These candidates are expected to reveal novel features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in Drosophila that are likely to be conserved in all animals including humans.

  9. An RNAi Screen To Identify Protein Phosphatases That Function Within the Drosophila Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Parul; Hardin, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in eukaryotes keep time via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. A well-characterized example of such a transcriptional feedback loop is in Drosophila, where CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes activate transcription of period (per) and timeless (tim) genes, rising levels of PER-TIM complexes feed-back to repress CLK-CYC activity, and degradation of PER and TIM permits the next cycle of CLK-CYC transcription. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated posttranslationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Previous behavioral screens identified several kinases that control CLK, PER, and TIM levels, subcellular localization, and/or activity, but two phosphatases that function within the clock were identified through the analysis of candidate genes from other pathways or model systems. To identify phosphatases that play a role in the clock, we screened clock cell-specific RNA interference (RNAi) knockdowns of all annotated protein phosphatases and protein phosphatase regulators in Drosophila for altered activity rhythms. This screen identified 19 protein phosphatases that lengthened or shortened the circadian period by ≥1 hr (p ≤ 0.05 compared to controls) or were arrhythmic. Additional RNAi lines, transposon inserts, overexpression, and loss-of-function mutants were tested to independently confirm these RNAi phenotypes. Based on genetic validation and molecular analysis, 15 viable protein phosphatases remain for future studies. These candidates are expected to reveal novel features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in Drosophila that are likely to be conserved in all animals including humans. PMID:27784754

  10. Okadaic acid-induced inhibition of B-50 dephosphorylation by presynaptic membrane-associated protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Han, Y F; Dokas, L A

    1991-10-01

    The neuronal tissue-specific protein kinase C (PKC) substrate B-50 can be dephosphorylated by endogenous protein phosphatases (PPs) in synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs). The present study characterizes membrane-associated B-50 phosphatase activity by using okadaic acid (OA) and purified 32P-labeled substrates. At a low concentration of [gamma-32P]ATP, PKC-mediated [32P]phosphate incorporation into B-50 in SPMs reached a maximal value at 30 s, followed by dephosphorylation. OA, added 30 s after the initiation of phosphorylation, partially prevented the dephosphorylation of B-50 at 2 nM, a dose that inhibits PP-2A. At the higher concentration of 1 microM, a dose of OA that inhibits PP-1 as well as PP-2A, a nearly complete blockade of B-50 dephosphorylation was seen. Heat-stable PP inhibitor-2 (I-2) also inhibited dephosphorylation of B-50. The effects of OA and I-2 on B-50 phosphatase activity were additive. Endogenous PP-1- and PP-2A-like activities in SPMs were also demonstrated by their capabilities of dephosphorylating [32P]phosphorylase a and [32P]casein. With these exogenous substrates, sensitivities of the membrane-bound phosphatases to OA and I-2 were found to be similar to those of purified forms of these enzymes. These results indicate that PP-1- and PP-2A-like enzymes are the major B-50 phosphatases in SPMs.

  11. Regulating the regulator: Insights into the cardiac protein phosphatase 1 interactome.

    PubMed

    Chiang, David Y; Heck, Albert J R; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H T

    2016-12-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of proteins is a delicate yet dynamic balancing act between kinases and phosphatases, the disturbance of which underlies numerous disease processes. While our understanding of protein kinases has grown tremendously over the past decades, relatively little is known regarding protein phosphatases. This may be because protein kinases are great in number and relatively specific in function, and thereby amenable to be studied in isolation, whereas protein phosphatases are much less abundant and more nonspecific in their function. To achieve subcellular localization and substrate specificity, phosphatases depend on partnering with a large number of regulatory subunits, protein scaffolds and/or other interactors. This added layer of complexity presents a significant barrier to their study, but holds the key to unexplored opportunities for novel pharmacologic intervention. In this review we focus on serine/threonine protein phosphatase type-1 (PP1), which plays an important role in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Although much work has been done to investigate the role of PP1 in cardiac diseases including atrial fibrillation and heart failure, most of these studies were limited to examining and manipulating the catalytic subunit(s) of PP1 without adequately considering the PP1 interactors, which give specificity to PP1's functions. To complement these studies, three unbiased methods have been developed and applied to the mapping of the PP1 interactome: bioinformatics approaches, yeast two-hybrid screens, and affinity-purification mass spectrometry. The application of these complementary methods has the potential to generate a detailed cardiac PP1 interactome, which is an important step in identifying novel and targeted pharmacological interventions.

  12. A Drosophila protein-tyrosine phosphatase associates with an adapter protein required for axonal guidance.

    PubMed

    Clemens, J C; Ursuliak, Z; Clemens, K K; Price, J V; Dixon, J E

    1996-07-19

    We have used the yeast two-hybrid system to isolate a novel Drosophila adapter protein, which interacts with the Drosophila protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) dPTP61F. Absence of this protein in Drosophila causes the mutant photoreceptor axon phenotype dreadlocks (dock) (Garrity, P. A., Rao, Y., Salecker, I., and Zipursky, S. L.(1996) Cell 85, 639-650). Dock is similar to the mammalian oncoprotein Nck and contains three Src homology 3 (SH3) domains and one Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. The interaction of dPTP61F with Dock was confirmed in vivo by immune precipitation experiments. A sequence containing five PXXP motifs from the non-catalytic domain of the PTP is sufficient for interaction with Dock. This suggests that binding to the PTP is mediated by one or more of the SH3 domains of Dock. Immune precipitations of Dock also co-precipitate two tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins having molecular masses of 190 and 145 kDa. Interactions between Dock and these tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins are likely mediated by the Dock SH2 domain. These findings identify potential signal-transducing partners of Dock and propose a role for dPTP61F and the unidentified phosphoproteins in axonal guidance.

  13. Transcriptional responses to cantharidin a protein phosphatase inhibitor in Arabidopsis thaliana reveal the involvement of multiple signal transduction pathways

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cantharidin is a natural compound isolated from the blister beetle (Epicauta spp.). It is a very potent inhibitor of serine/threonine protein phosphatases PPP, especially PP2A and PP4. Protein phosphatases and kinases maintain a sensitive balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms of ...

  14. Regulation of the phosphatase PP2B by protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, Patrick J.; Scott, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Protein dephosphorylation is important for regulating cellular signaling in a variety of contexts. Protein phosphatase-2B (PP2B), or calcineurin, is a widely expressed serine/threonine phosphatase that acts on a large cross section of potential protein substrates when activated by increased levels of intracellular calcium in concert with calmodulin. PxIxIT and LxVP targeting motifs are important for maintaining specificity in response to elevated calcium. In the present study, we describe the mechanism of PP2B activation, discuss its targeting by conserved binding motifs and review recent advances in the understanding of an A-kinase anchoring protein 79/PP2B/protein kinase A complex’s role in synaptic long-term depression. Finally, we discuss potential for targeting PP2B anchoring motifs for therapeutic benefit. PMID:27911714

  15. Engineering the catalytic domain of human protein tyrosine phosphatase beta for structure-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Artem G; Pokross, Matthew; Walter, Richard; Mekel, Marlene; Cox, Brooke; Li, Chuiying; Bechard, Randy; Genbauffe, Frank; Andrews, Ryan; Diven, Conrad; Howard, Brian; Rastogi, Vinit; Gray, Jeffrey; Maier, Matthew; Peters, Kevin G

    2006-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play roles in many biological processes and are considered to be important targets for drug discovery. As inhibitor development has proven challenging, crystal structure-based design will be very helpful to advance inhibitor potency and selectivity. Successful application of protein crystallography to drug discovery heavily relies on high-quality crystal structures of the protein of interest complexed with pharmaceutically interesting ligands. It is very important to be able to produce protein-ligand crystals rapidly and reproducibly for as many ligands as necessary. This study details our efforts to engineer the catalytic domain of human protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (HPTPbeta-CD) with properties suitable for rapid-turnaround crystallography. Structures of apo HPTPbeta-CD and its complexes with several novel small-molecule inhibitors are presented here for the first time.

  16. MECHANISM OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE INHIBITION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZN2+

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to Zn2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity and leads to activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in ...

  17. Phosphorylation of phosphatase inhibitor-2 (i-2) by a bovine thymus tyrosine protein kinase, p40

    SciTech Connect

    DePaoli-Roach, A.A.; Votaw, P.; Zioncheck, T.F.; Harrison, M.L.; Geahlen, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    Phosphatase inhibitor-2, a heat stable protein of Mr 22,800, is a regulatory component of the ATP-Mg-dependent phosphatase. It has been shown that in the cell tyrosine kinase activation can result in altered phosphorylation at serine and/or threonine residues, but the mechanism involved is unknown. The authors have found that i-2 is a substrate for a tyrosine specific protein kinase, p40, purified from bovine thymus. The purified enzyme is a monomer of Mr 40,000 that is autophosphorylated at tyrosine residue(s). The stoichiometry of phosphorylation of i-2 by this tyrosine protein kinase is up to 1 mol of phosphate per mol of i-2. Phosphoaminoacid analysis revealed that all the phosphate introduced was associated with tyrosine residues. Mapping of TSP-tryptic peptides by TLE and isoelectric focusing showed one major labeled fragment. Using the ATP-Mg-dependent phosphatase, a lesser extent of phosphorylation of i-2 by p40 was obtained although partial activation of the phosphatase was observed. The effect on the activity was not due to FA/GSK-3 contamination. These results could provide an important link between tyrosine protein kinase activity and modulation of phosphorylation at serine and/or threonine residues.

  18. MECHANISM OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE INHIBITION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZN2+

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to Zn2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity and leads to activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in ...

  19. Serine/threonine protein phosphatases: multi-purpose enzymes in control of defense mechanisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases are a group of enzymes involved in the regulation of defense mechanisms in plants. This paper describes the effects of an inhibitor of these enzymes on the expression of all of the genes associated with these defense mechanisms. The results suggest that inhibi...

  20. Serine/threonine protein phosphatases: multi-purpose enzymes in control of defense mechanisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases are a group of enzymes involved in the regulation of defense mechanisms in plants. This paper describes the effects of an inhibitor of these enzymes on the expression of all of the genes associated with these defense mechanisms. The results suggest that inhibi...

  1. TCTEX1D4, a novel protein phosphatase 1 interactor: connecting the phosphatase to the microtubule network

    PubMed Central

    Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Vieira, Sandra I.; Esteves, Sara L. C.; Silva, Joana V.; Freitas, Maria João; Brauns, Ann-Kristin; Luers, Georg; Abrantes, Joana; Esteves, Pedro J.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.; Fardilha, Margarida; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Reversible phosphorylation plays an important role as a mechanism of intracellular control in eukaryotes. PPP1, a major eukaryotic Ser/Thr-protein phosphatase, acquires its specificity by interacting with different protein regulators, also known as PPP1 interacting proteins (PIPs). In the present work we characterized a physiologically relevant PIP in testis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with a human testis cDNA library, we identified a novel PIP of PPP1CC2 isoform, the T-complex testis expressed protein 1 domain containing 4 (TCTEX1D4) that has recently been described as a Tctex1 dynein light chain family member. The overlay assays confirm that TCTEX1D4 interacts with the different spliced isoforms of PPP1CC. Also, the binding domain occurs in the N-terminus, where a consensus PPP1 binding motif (PPP1BM) RVSF is present. The distribution of TCTEX1D4 in testis suggests its involvement in distinct functions, such as TGFβ signaling at the blood–testis barrier and acrosome cap formation. Immunofluorescence in human ejaculated sperm shows that TCTEX1D4 is present in the flagellum and in the acrosome region of the head. Moreover, TCTEX1D4 and PPP1 co-localize in the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and microtubules in cell cultures. Importantly, the TCTEX1D4 PPP1BM seems to be relevant for complex formation, for PPP1 retention in the MTOC and movement along microtubules. These novel results open new avenues to possible roles of this dynein, together with PPP1. In essence TCTEX1D4/PPP1C complex appears to be involved in microtubule dynamics, sperm motility, acrosome reaction and in the regulation of the blood–testis barrier. PMID:23789093

  2. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E.; Rennie, Paul S.; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked. PMID:26378044

  3. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Rennie, Paul S; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-10-20

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked.

  4. Kinetic Characterization of O-Phospho-L-Tyrosine Phosphohydrolase Activity of Two Fungal Phytases.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungal phytases belonging to 'Histidine Acid Phosphatase' or HAP class of phosphomonoesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of phytic acid could also hydrolyze O-phospho-tyrosine. Two phytases from Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus awamori with pH optima 2.5 were tested for phospho-tyrosine hydrola...

  5. Genome-wide identification of phospho-regulators of Wnt signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Sharan; Pradhan-Sundd, Tirthadipa; Verheyen, Esther M

    2015-04-15

    Evolutionarily conserved intercellular signaling pathways regulate embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in metazoans. The precise control of the state and amplitude of signaling pathways is achieved in part through the kinase- and phosphatase-mediated reversible phosphorylation of proteins. In this study, we performed a genome-wide in vivo RNAi screen for kinases and phosphatases that regulate the Wnt pathway under physiological conditions in the Drosophila wing disc. Our analyses have identified 54 high-confidence kinases and phosphatases capable of modulating the Wnt pathway, including 22 novel regulators. These candidates were also assayed for a role in the Notch pathway, and numerous phospho-regulators were identified. Additionally, each regulator of the Wnt pathway was evaluated in the wing disc for its ability to affect the mechanistically similar Hedgehog pathway. We identified 29 dual regulators that have the same effect on the Wnt and Hedgehog pathways. As proof of principle, we established that Cdc37 and Gilgamesh/CK1γ inhibit and promote signaling, respectively, by functioning at analogous levels of these pathways in both Drosophila and mammalian cells. The Wnt and Hedgehog pathways function in tandem in multiple developmental contexts, and the identification of several shared phospho-regulators serve as potential nodes of control under conditions of aberrant signaling and disease. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Immobilized E. coli alkaline phosphatase. Its properties, stability, and utility in studying the dephosphorylation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Basheeruddin, K; Rothman, V; Margolis, S

    1985-04-01

    We have immobilized E. coli alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) by linking it covalently to sepharose 4B. This preparation has several advantages over the soluble enzyme. The immobilized enzyme is easily separable from other constituents in incubation mixtures. The immobilized enzyme can be reused repeatedly and is more stable than the soluble enzyme to heat treatment in the presence of 10 mM Mg2+. The insoluble and soluble phosphatases removed 75 and 77%, respectively, of the inorganic phosphorus from casein. The immobilized enzyme inactivated two enzymes believed to be active in the phosphorylated state, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) by 39% and NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase by 89%. The utility of immobilized alkaline phosphatase for studying the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of soluble or membrane-bound enzymes and proteins is discussed.

  7. Possible protein phosphatase inhibition by bis(hydroxyethyl) sulfide, a hydrolysis product of mustard gas

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, the natural vesicant cantharidin was shown to bind exclusively to and inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mouse tissue extracts (Li and Casida (1992) Proc. Nati. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 11867-11870). To explore the generality of this effect in vesicant action, we measured the protein serinelthreonine phosphatase activity in mouse liver cytosol (in the form of the okadaic acid inhibitable increment of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP) phosphatase activity) in the presence of aqueous sulfur mustard or its hydrolysis product, bis(hydroxyethyl)sulfide (TDG). Sulfur mustard inhibited p-NPP hydrolysis. However, inhibition correlated with the time elapsed between thawing and the addition of mustard to the enzyme preparation, not with concentration. TDG exhibited a direct, concentration-related inhibition of p-NPP hydrolysis between 30 and 300 1LM. We conclude that sulfur mustard also has an inhibitory effect on protein serinelthreonine phosphatases. However, the inhibition is an effect of its non-alkykating hydrolysis product TDG, not of sulfur mustard itself.

  8. Structural Stability of Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ρ Catalytic Domain: Effect of Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Stefan; Alfano, Ivan; Ardini, Matteo; Stefanini, Simonetta; Chiaraluce, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ (PTPρ) belongs to the classical receptor type IIB family of protein tyrosine phosphatase, the most frequently mutated tyrosine phosphatase in human cancer. There are evidences to suggest that PTPρ may act as a tumor suppressor gene and dysregulation of Tyr phosphorylation can be observed in diverse diseases, such as diabetes, immune deficiencies and cancer. PTPρ variants in the catalytic domain have been identified in cancer tissues. These natural variants are nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms, variations of a single nucleotide occurring in the coding region and leading to amino acid substitutions. In this study we investigated the effect of amino acid substitution on the structural stability and on the activity of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ. We expressed and purified as soluble recombinant proteins some of the mutants of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ identified in colorectal cancer and in the single nucleotide polymorphisms database. The mutants show a decreased thermal and thermodynamic stability and decreased activation energy relative to phosphatase activity, when compared to wild- type. All the variants show three-state equilibrium unfolding transitions similar to that of the wild- type, with the accumulation of a folding intermediate populated at ∼4.0 M urea. PMID:22389709

  9. Functional interaction of vascular endothelial-protein-tyrosine phosphatase with the angiopoietin receptor Tie-2.

    PubMed

    Fachinger, G; Deutsch, U; Risau, W

    1999-10-21

    During development of the vertebrate vascular system essential signals are transduced via protein-tyrosine phosphorylation. Null-mutations of receptor-tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes expressed in endothelial cells (ECs) display early lethal vascular phenotypes. We aimed to identify endothelial protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which should have similar importance in EC-biology. A murine receptor-type PTP was identified by a degenerated PCR cloning approach from endothelial cells (VE-PTP). By in situ hybridization this phosphatase was found to be specifically expressed in vascular ECs throughout mouse development. In experiments using GST-fusion proteins, as well as in transient transfections, trapping mutants of VE-PTP co-precipitated with the Angiopoietin receptor Tie-2, but not with the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2/Flk-1). In addition, VE-PTP dephosphorylates Tie-2 but not VEGFR-2. We conclude that VE-PTP is a Tie-2 specific phosphatase expressed in ECs, and VE-PTP phosphatase activity serves to specifically modulate Angiopoietin/Tie-2 function. Based on its potential role as a regulator of blood vessel morphogenesis and maintainance, VE-PTP is a candidate gene for inherited vascular malformations similar to the Tie-2 gene.

  10. Protein Phosphatase 1-α Regulates AS160 Ser588 and Thr642 Dephosphorylation in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pragya; Arias, Edward B; Cartee, Gregory D

    2016-09-01

    Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation on Thr(642) and Ser(588) by Akt is essential for insulin's full effect on glucose transport. However, protein phosphorylation is determined by the balance of actions by kinases and phosphatases, and the specific phosphatase(s) controlling AS160 dephosphorylation is (are) unknown. Accordingly, we assessed roles of highly expressed skeletal muscle serine/threonine phosphatases (PP1, PP2A, PP2B, and PP2C) on AS160 dephosphorylation. Preliminary screening of candidate phosphatases used an AS160 dephosphorylation assay. Lysates from insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle were treated with pharmacological phosphatase inhibitors and assessed for AS160 Ser(588) and Thr(642) dephosphorylation. AS160 dephosphorylation on both phosphorylation sites was unaltered by PP2B or PP2C inhibitors. Okadaic acid (low dose inhibits PP2A; high dose inhibits PP1) delayed AS160 Ser(588) (both doses) and Thr(642) (high dose only) dephosphorylation concomitant with greater Akt phosphorylation (both doses). AS160 was coimmunoprecipitated with PP1-α but not with PP1-β, PP1-γ1, or PP2A. Recombinant inhibitor-2 protein (a selective PP1 inhibitor) delayed AS160 dephosphorylation on both phosphorylation sites without altering Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, knockdown of PP1-α but not PP1-β or PP1-γ1 by small interfering RNA caused greater AS160 Ser(588) and Thr(642) phosphorylation concomitant with unaltered Akt phosphorylation. Together, these results identified PP1-α as a regulator of AS160 Thr(642) and Ser(588) dephosphorylation in skeletal muscle.

  11. Probing Mechanistic Similarities Between Response Regulator Signaling Proteins and HAD Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Immormino, Robert M.; Starbird, Chrystal; Silversmith, Ruth E.; Bourret, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Response regulator signaling proteins and phosphatases of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily share strikingly similar folds, active site geometries, and reaction chemistry. Proteins from both families catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from a substrate to one of their own aspartyl residues, and subsequent hydrolysis of the phosphoprotein. Notable differences include an additional Asp that functions as an acid/base catalyst and an active site well-structured prior to phosphorylation in HAD phosphatases. Both features contribute to substantially faster reactions than for response regulators. To investigate mechanisms underlying the functional differences between response regulators and HAD phosphatases, we characterized five double mutants of the response regulator CheY designed to mimic HAD phosphatases. Each mutant contained the extra Asp paired with a phosphatase-inspired substitution to potentially position the Asp properly. Only CheY DR (Arg as anchor) exhibited enhanced rates of both autophosphorylation with phosphoramidate and autodephosphorylation compared to wild type CheY. Crystal structures of CheY DR complexed with MoO42− or WO42− revealed active site hydrogen-bonding networks similar to those in HAD·substrate complexes, with the extra Asp positioned for direct interaction with a leaving group (phosphorylation) or nucleophile (dephosphorylation). However, CheY DR reaction kinetics did not exhibit the pH sensitivities expected for acid/base catalysis. Biochemical analysis indicated CheY DR had an enhanced propensity to adopt the active conformation without phosphorylation, but a crystal structure revealed unphosphorylated CheY DR was not locked in the active conformation. Thus, the enhanced reactivity of CheY DR reflected partial acquisition of catalytic and structural features of HAD phosphatases. PMID:25928369

  12. Identification of proteins suppressing the functions of oncogenic phosphatase of regenerating liver 1 and 3

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Dong; Jung, Haiyoung; Min, Sang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) family, including PRL-1, PRL-2, and PRL-3, comprises protein tyrosine phosphatases whose deregulation is associated with the tumorigenesis and metastasis of many types of cancer. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, aiming to increase understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the functions of PRL-1 and PRL-3, a yeast two-hybrid system was employed to screen for their interacting proteins. Alignment with the NCBI BLAST database revealed 12 interactive proteins: Synaptic nuclear envelope protein 2, emerin, mannose 6-phosphate receptor-binding protein 1, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10, Rab acceptor 1, tumor protein D52-like 2, selectin P ligand (SELPLG), guanylate binding protein 1, transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain-containing 2, NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit B8, syndecan 4 and FK506-binding protein 8 (FKBP8). These proteins are associated with cell proliferation, apoptosis, immune response, cell fate specification and metabolic process in biological process categories, and involved in various signaling pathways, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cell adhesion molecules. Interactions of PRL-1 with the prey proteins SELPLG and FKBP8 were confirmed by immunoprecipitation or immunostaining. Furthermore, SELPLG and FKBP8 suppressed PRL-1− or PRL-3-mediated p53 activity. Identification of the proteins interacting with PRL family proteins may provide valuable information to better understand the mechanism of PRL-mediated signal transduction in cancer and other diverse diseases. PMID:27882103

  13. The structure of the Tiam1 PDZ domain/ phospho-syndecan1 complex reveals a ligand conformation that modulates protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Shepherd, Tyson R; Murray, Ann M; Xu, Zhen; Fuentes, Ernesto J

    2013-03-05

    PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) domains are protein-protein interaction modules often regulated by ligand phosphorylation. Here, we investigated the specificity, structure, and dynamics of Tiam1 PDZ domain/ligand interactions. We show that the PDZ domain specifically binds syndecan1 (SDC1), phosphorylated SDC1 (pSDC1), and SDC3 but not other syndecan isoforms. The crystal structure of the PDZ/SDC1 complex indicates that syndecan affinity is derived from amino acids beyond the four C-terminal residues. Remarkably, the crystal structure of the PDZ/pSDC1 complex reveals a binding pocket that accommodates the phosphoryl group. Methyl relaxation experiments of PDZ/SCD1 and PDZ/pSDC1 complexes reveal that PDZ-phosphoryl interactions dampen dynamic motions in a distal region of the PDZ domain by decoupling them from the ligand-binding site. Our data are consistent with a selection model by which specificity and phosphorylation regulate PDZ/syndecan interactions and signaling events. Importantly, our relaxation data demonstrate that PDZ/phospho-ligand interactions regulate protein dynamics and their coupling to distal sites.

  14. The Structure of the Tiam1 PDZ Domain/Phospho-Syndecan1 Complex Reveals a Ligand Conformation that Modulates Protein Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Shepherd, Tyson R.; Murray, Ann M.; Xu, Zhen; Fuentes, Ernesto J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) domains are protein-protein interaction modules often regulated by ligand phosphorylation. Here, we investigated the specificity, structure, and dynamics of Tiam1 PDZ domain/ligand interactions. We show that the PDZ domain specifically binds syndecan1 (SDC1), phosphorylated SDC1 (pSDC1), and SDC3 but not other syndecan isoforms. The crystal structure of the PDZ/SDC1 complex indicates that syndecan affinity is derived from amino acids beyond the four C-terminal residues. Remarkably, the crystal structure of the PDZ/pSDC1 complex reveals a binding pocket that accommodates the phosphoryl group. Methyl relaxation experiments of PDZ/SCD1 and PDZ/pSDC1 complexes reveal that PDZ-phosphoryl interactions dampen dynamic motions in a distal region of the PDZ domain by decoupling them from the ligand-binding site. Our data are consistent with a selection model by which specificity and phosphorylation regulate PDZ/syndecan interactions and signaling events. Importantly, our relaxation data demonstrate that PDZ/phospho-ligand interactions regulate protein dynamics and their coupling to distal sites. PMID:23395182

  15. Examination of the transition state of the low-molecular mass small tyrosine phosphatase 1. Comparisons with other protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hengge, A C; Zhao, Y; Wu, L; Zhang, Z Y

    1997-06-24

    The reactions of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) with the low-molecular mass tyrosine phosphatase Stp1 and with the mutants D128N, D128A, D128E, and S18A have been studied by measurement of heavy-atom isotope effects in the substrate. The isotope effects were measured at the nonbridging oxygen atoms [18(V/K)nonbridge], at the bridging oxygen atom (the site of bond cleavage) [18(V/K)bridge], and at the nitrogen atom in the nitrophenol leaving group [15(V/K)]. The results with native Stp1 were 1.0160 +/- 0.0005 for 18(V/K)bridge, 1.0007 +/- 0.0001 for 15(V/K), and 1.0018 +/- 0.0003 for 18(V/K)nonbridge. The values for 18(V/K)nonbridge and 15(V/K) differ from those previously measured with other protein-tyrosine phosphatases and from those of the aqueous hydrolysis reaction of pNPP. The values indicate that in the transition state of the native Stp1 reaction the leaving group bears a partial negative charge, and there is nucleophilic interaction between the Cys nucleophile, and the phosphoryl group, causing some decrease in the nonbridge P-O bond order. The transition state remains highly dissociative with respect to the degree of bond cleavage to the leaving group. Mutation of the general acid from aspartic acid to glutamic acid slows catalysis but causes no change in the isotope effects and thus does not alter the degree of proton transfer to the leaving group in the transition state. Mutations of this residue to asparagine or alanine give values for 18(V/K)bridge of about 1.029, for 15(V/K) of about 1.003, and for 18(V/K)nonbridge of 1.0010 (D128A) to 1.0024 (D128N). These data indicate a dissociative transition state with the leaving group departing as the nitrophenolate anion and indicate more nucleophilic participation than in the aqueous hydrolysis of the pNPP dianion, just as in the native enzyme. The isotope effects with the S18A mutant, in which a hydrogen bonding stabilization of the anionic Cys nucleophile has been removed, were within experimental error of

  16. Interplay of myosin phosphatase and protein phosphatase-2A in the regulation of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase phosphorylation and nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Bátori, Róbert; Bécsi, Bálint; Nagy, Dénes; Kónya, Zoltán; Hegedűs, Csaba; Bordán, Zsuzsanna; Verin, Alexander; Lontay, Beáta; Erdődi, Ferenc

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) at Thr497 (eNOSpThr497) by protein kinase C or RhoA-activated kinase is a major regulatory determinant of eNOS activity. The signalling mechanisms involved in the dephosphorylation of eNOSpThr497 have not yet been clarified. This study identifies myosin phosphatase (MP) holoenzyme consisting of protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) and MP target subunit-1 (MYPT1) as an eNOSpThr497 phosphatase. In support of this finding are: (i) eNOS and MYPT1 interacts in various endothelial cells (ECs) and in in vitro binding assays (ii) MYPT1 targets and stimulates PP1c toward eNOSpThr497 substrate (iii) phosphorylation of MYPT1 at Thr696 (MYPT1pThr696) controls the activity of MP on eNOSpThr497. Phosphatase inhibition suppresses both NO production and transendothelial resistance (TER) of ECs. In contrast, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) signals ECs via the 67 kDa laminin-receptor (67LR) resulting in protein kinase A dependent activation of protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A). PP2A dephosphorylates MYPT1pThr696 and thereby stimulates MP activity inducing dephosphorylation of eNOSpThr497 and the 20 kDa myosin II light chains. Thus an interplay of MP and PP2A is involved in the physiological regulation of EC functions implying that an EGCG dependent activation of these phosphatases leads to enhanced NO production and EC barrier improvement. PMID:28300193

  17. Protein Phosphatase 2A Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    phosphatidylinositol 3’-kinase and Akt/protein kinase B. Cancer Res 1999;59:1449-53. (14) Grethe S, Porn -Ares MI. p38 MAPK regulates phosphorylation of Bad...PMCID: PMC3669395 Free PMC Article Images from this publication. See all images (61 Free text Publication TYpes, MeSH Terms, Substances, Grant

  18. Kinetic Isotope Effects In The Characterization Of Catalysis by Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Hengge, Alvan C.

    2015-01-01

    Although thermodynamically favorable, the uncatalyzed hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters is extraordinarily slow, making phosphatases among the most catalytically efficient enzymes known. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are ubiquitous in biology, and kinetic isotope effects were one of the key mechanistic tools used to discern molecular details of their catalytic mechanism and the transition state for phosphoryl transfer. Later, the unique level of detail KIEs provided led to deeper questions about the potential role of protein motions in PTP catalysis. The recent discovery that such motions are responsible for different catalytic rates between PTPs arose from questions originating from KIE data showing that the transition states and chemical mechanisms are identical, combined with structural data demonstrating superimposable active sites. KIEs also reveal perturbations to the transition state as mutations are made to residues directly involved in chemistry, and to residues that affect protein motions essential for catalysis. PMID:25840000

  19. Molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction of protein phosphatase-1c with ASPP proteins.

    PubMed

    Skene-Arnold, Tamara D; Luu, Hue Anh; Uhrig, R Glen; De Wever, Veerle; Nimick, Mhairi; Maynes, Jason; Fong, Andrea; James, Michael N G; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Moorhead, Greg B; Holmes, Charles F B

    2013-02-01

    The serine/threonine PP-1c (protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit) is regulated by association with multiple regulatory subunits. Human ASPPs (apoptosis-stimulating proteins of p53) comprise three family members: ASPP1, ASPP2 and iASPP (inhibitory ASPP), which is uniquely overexpressed in many cancers. While ASPP2 and iASPP are known to bind PP-1c, we now identify novel and distinct molecular interactions that allow all three ASPPs to bind differentially to PP-1c isoforms and p53. iASPP lacks a PP-1c-binding RVXF motif; however, we show it interacts with PP-1c via a RARL sequence with a Kd value of 26 nM. Molecular modelling and mutagenesis of PP-1c-ASPP protein complexes identified two additional modes of interaction. First, two positively charged residues, Lys260 and Arg261 on PP-1c, interact with all ASPP family members. Secondly, the C-terminus of the PP-1c α, β and γ isoforms contain a type-2 SH3 (Src homology 3) poly-proline motif (PxxPxR), which binds directly to the SH3 domains of ASPP1, ASPP2 and iASPP. In PP-1cγ this comprises residues 309-314 (PVTPPR). When the Px(T)PxR motif is deleted or mutated via insertion of a phosphorylation site mimic (T311D), PP-1c fails to bind to all three ASPP proteins. Overall, we provide the first direct evidence for PP-1c binding via its C-terminus to an SH3 protein domain.

  20. Activation of DNA-PK by Ionizing Radiation Is Mediated by Protein Phosphatase 6

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Jun; Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw; Bolesta, Elzbieta; Brautigan, David L.; Larner, James M.

    2009-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a critical role in DNA damage repair, especially in non-homologous end-joining repair of double-strand breaks such as those formed by ionizing radiation (IR) in the course of radiation therapy. Regulation of DNA-PK involves multisite phosphorylation but this is incompletely understood and little is known about protein phosphatases relative to DNA-PK. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that DNA-PK interacts with the protein phosphatase-6 (PP6) SAPS subunit PP6R1. PP6 is a heterotrimeric enzyme that consists of a catalytic subunit, plus one of three PP6 SAPS regulatory subunits and one of three ankyrin repeat subunits. Endogenous PP6R1 co-immunoprecipitated DNA-PK, and IR enhanced the amount of complex and promoted its import into the nucleus. In addition, siRNA knockdown of either PP6R1 or PP6 significantly decreased IR activation of DNA-PK, suggesting that PP6 activates DNA-PK by association and dephosphorylation. Knockdown of other phosphatases PP5 or PP1γ1 and subunits PP6R3 or ARS-A did not reduce IR activation of DNA-PK, demonstrating specificity for PP6R1. Finally, siRNA knockdown of PP6R1 or PP6 but not other phosphatases increased the sensitivity of glioblastoma cells to radiation-induced cell death to a level similar to DNA-PK deficient cells. Our data demonstrate that PP6 associates with and activates DNA-PK in response to ionizing radiation. Therefore, the PP6/PP6R1 phosphatase is a potential molecular target for radiation sensitization by chemical inhibition. PMID:19198648

  1. Atomic structure of DUSP26, a novel p53 phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Lokareddy, Ravi Kumar; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Cingolani, Gino

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of p53 phosphorylation is critical to control its stability and biological activity. Dual Specificity Phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) is a brain phosphatase highly overexpressed in neuroblastoma, which has been implicated in dephosphorylating phospho-Ser20 and phospho-Ser37 in the p53 transactivation domain (TAD). In this paper, we report the 1.68Å crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant (Cys152Ser) of DUSP26 lacking the first N-terminal 60 residues (ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26). This structure reveals the architecture of a dual-specificity phosphatase domain related in structure to Vaccinia virus VH1. DUSP26 adopts a closed conformation of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-binding loop, which results in an unusually shallow active site pocket and buried catalytic cysteine. A water molecule trapped inside the PTP-binding loop makes close contacts both with main chain and side chain atoms. The hydrodynamic radius (RH) of ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26 measured from velocity sedimentation analysis (RH ~22.7 Å) and gel filtration chromatography (RH ~21.0 Å) is consistent with a globular monomeric protein of ~18 kDa. Instead in crystal, ΔN60-C/S-DUSP26 is more elongated (RH ~37.9 Å), likely due to the extended conformation of C-terminal helix α9, which swings away from the phosphatase core to generate a highly basic surface. As in the case of the phosphatase MKP-4, we propose that a substrate-induced conformational change, possibly involving rearrangement of helix α9 with respect to the phosphatase core, allows DUSP26 to adopt a catalytically active conformation. The structural characterization of DUSP26 presented in this paper provides the first atomic insight into this disease-associated phosphatase. PMID:23298255

  2. Arabidopsis Vegetative Storage Protein Is an Anti-Insect Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yilin; Ahn, Ji-Eun; Datta, Sumana; Salzman, Ron A.; Moon, Jaewoong; Huyghues-Despointes, Beatrice; Pittendrigh, Barry; Murdock, Larry L.; Koiwa, Hisashi; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2005-01-01

    Indirect evidence previously suggested that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) vegetative storage protein (VSP) could play a role in defense against herbivorous insects. To test this hypothesis, other AtVSP-like sequences in Arabidopsis were identified through a Basic Local Alignment Search Tool search, and their transcriptional profiles were investigated. In response to methyl jasmonate application or phosphate starvation, AtVSP and AtVSP-like genes exhibited differential expression patterns, suggesting distinct roles played by each member. Arabidopsis VSP2 (AtVSP2), a gene induced by wounding, methyl jasmonate, insect feeding, and phosphate deprivation, was selected for bacterial expression and functional characterization. The recombinant protein exhibited a divalent cation-dependent phosphatase activity in the acid pH range. When incorporated into the diets of three coleopteran and dipteran insects that have acidic gut lumen, recombinant AtVSP2 significantly delayed development of the insects and increased their mortality. To further determine the biochemical basis of the anti-insect activity of the protein, the nucleophilic aspartic acid-119 residue at the conserved DXDXT signature motif was substituted by glutamic acid via site-directed mutagenesis. This single-amino acid alteration did not compromise the protein's secondary or tertiary structure, but resulted in complete loss of its acid phosphatase activity as well as its anti-insect activity. Collectively, we conclude that AtVSP2 is an anti-insect protein and that its defense function is correlated with its acid phosphatase activity. PMID:16258019

  3. Deletion of conserved protein phosphatases reverses defects associated with mitochondrial DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Garipler, Görkem; Mutlu, Nebibe; Lack, Nathan A; Dunn, Cory D

    2014-01-28

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by signaling pathways sensitive to extracellular conditions and to the internal environment of the cell. Therefore, treatments for disease caused by mutation of mtDNA may emerge from studies of how signal transduction pathways command mitochondrial function. We have examined the role of phosphatases under the control of the conserved α4/Tap42 protein in cells lacking a mitochondrial genome. We found that deletion of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) or of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) protects cells from the reduced proliferation, mitochondrial protein import defects, lower mitochondrial electrochemical potential, and nuclear transcriptional response associated with mtDNA damage. Moreover, PP2A or PP6 deletion allows viability of a sensitized yeast strain after mtDNA loss. Interestingly, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of the mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase was required for the full benefits of PP6 deletion and also for proliferation of otherwise wild-type cells lacking mtDNA. Our work highlights the important role that nutrient-responsive signaling pathways can play in determining the response to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  4. Integrative Transcriptome Profiling of Cognitive Aging and Its Preservation through Ser/Thr Protein Phosphatase Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, C. Sehwan; Valomon, Amandine; Welzl, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enrichment has been reported to delay or restore age-related cognitive deficits, however, a mechanism to account for the cause and progression of normal cognitive decline and its preservation by environmental enrichment is lacking. Using genome-wide SAGE-Seq, we provide a global assessment of differentially expressed genes altered with age and environmental enrichment in the hippocampus. Qualitative and quantitative proteomics in naïve young and aged mice was used to further identify phosphorylated proteins differentially expressed with age. We found that increased expression of endogenous protein phosphatase-1 inhibitors in aged mice may be characteristic of long-term environmental enrichment and improved cognitive status. As such, hippocampus-dependent performances in spatial, recognition, and associative memories, which are sensitive to aging, were preserved by environmental enrichment and accompanied by decreased protein phosphatase activity. Age-associated phosphorylated proteins were also found to correspond to the functional categories of age-associated genes identified through transcriptome analysis. Together, this study provides a comprehensive map of the transcriptome and proteome in the aging brain, and elucidates endogenous protein phosphatase-1 inhibition as a potential means through which environmental enrichment may ameliorate age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:26102285

  5. The SIT4 protein phosphatase functions in late G1 for progression into S phase.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, A; Immanuel, D; Arndt, K T

    1991-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains containing temperature-sensitive mutations in the SIT4 protein phosphatase arrest in late G1 at the nonpermissive temperature. Order-of-function analysis shows that SIT4 is required in late G1 for progression into S phase. While the levels of SIT4 do not change in the cell cycle, SIT4 associates with two high-molecular-weight phosphoproteins in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. In addition, we have identified a polymorphic gene, SSD1, that in some versions can suppress the lethality due to a deletion of SIT4 and can also partially suppress the phenotypic defects due to a null mutation in BCY1. The SSD1 protein is implicated in G1 control and has a region of similarity to the dis3 protein of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We have also identified a gene, PPH2alpha, that in high copy number can partially suppress the growth defect of sit4 strains. The PPH2 alpha gene encodes a predicted protein that is 80% identical to the catalytic domain of mammalian type 2A protein phosphatases but also has an acidic amino-terminal extension not present in other phosphatases. Images PMID:1848673

  6. Deletion of conserved protein phosphatases reverses defects associated with mitochondrial DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Garipler, Görkem; Mutlu, Nebibe; Lack, Nathan A.; Dunn, Cory D.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by signaling pathways sensitive to extracellular conditions and to the internal environment of the cell. Therefore, treatments for disease caused by mutation of mtDNA may emerge from studies of how signal transduction pathways command mitochondrial function. We have examined the role of phosphatases under the control of the conserved α4/Tap42 protein in cells lacking a mitochondrial genome. We found that deletion of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) or of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) protects cells from the reduced proliferation, mitochondrial protein import defects, lower mitochondrial electrochemical potential, and nuclear transcriptional response associated with mtDNA damage. Moreover, PP2A or PP6 deletion allows viability of a sensitized yeast strain after mtDNA loss. Interestingly, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of the mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase was required for the full benefits of PP6 deletion and also for proliferation of otherwise wild-type cells lacking mtDNA. Our work highlights the important role that nutrient-responsive signaling pathways can play in determining the response to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24474773

  7. Crystal structure of the tumor-promoter okadaic acid bound to protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Maynes, J T; Bateman, K S; Cherney, M M; Das, A K; Luu, H A; Holmes, C F; James, M N

    2001-11-23

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) plays a key role in dephosphorylation in numerous biological processes such as glycogen metabolism, cell cycle regulation, smooth muscle contraction, and protein synthesis. Microorganisms produce a variety of inhibitors of PP1, which include the microcystin class of inhibitors and okadaic acid, the latter being the major cause of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning and a powerful tumor promoter. We have determined the crystal structure of the molecular complex of okadaic acid bound to PP1 to a resolution of 1.9 A. This structure reveals that the acid binds in a hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the protein and interacts with basic residues within the active site. Okadaic acid exhibits a cyclic structure, which is maintained via an intramolecular hydrogen bond. This is reminiscent of other macrocyclic protein phosphatase inhibitors. The inhibitor-bound enzyme shows very little conformational change when compared with two other PP1 structures, except in the inhibitor-sensitive beta12-beta13 loop region. The selectivity of okadaic acid for protein phosphatases-1 and -2A but not PP-2B (calcineurin) may be reassessed in light of this study.

  8. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of human platelet surface proteins by an ecto-protein kinase/phosphatase system.

    PubMed

    Naik, U P; Kornecki, E; Ehrlich, Y H

    1991-04-17

    We have characterized a novel ecto-protein kinase activity and a novel ecto-protein phosphatase activity on the membrane surface of human platelets. Washed intact platelets, when incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP in Tyrode's buffer, showed the phosphorylation of a membrane surface protein migrating with an apparent molecular mass of 42 kDa on 5-15% SDS polyacrylamide gradient gels. The 42 kDa protein could be further resolved on 15% SDS gels into two proteins of 39 kDa and 42 kDa. In this gel system, it was found that the 39 kDa protein became rapidly phosphorylated and dephosphorylated, whereas the 42 kDa protein was phosphorylated and dephosphorylated at a much slower rate. NaF inhibited the dephosphorylation of these proteins indicating the involvement of an ecto-protein phosphatase. The platelet membrane ecto-protein kinase responsible for the phosphorylation of both of these proteins was identified as a serine kinase and showed dependency on divalent cations Mg2+ or Mn2+ ions. Ca2+ ions potentiated the Mg(2+)-dependent ecto-protein kinase activity. The ecto-protein kinase rapidly phosphorylated histone and casein added exogenously to the extracellular medium of intact platelets. Following activation of platelets by alpha-thrombin, the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from exogenously added [gamma-32P]ATP by endogenous protein substrates was reduced by 90%, suggesting a role of the ecto-protein kinase system in the regulation of platelet function. The results presented here demonstrate that both protein kinase and protein phosphatase activities reside on the membrane surface of human platelets. These activities are capable of rapidly phosphorylating and dephosphorylating specific surface platelet membrane proteins which may play important roles in early events of platelet activation and secretion.

  9. Chasing Phosphoarginine Proteins: Development of a Selective Enrichment Method Using a Phosphatase Trap*

    PubMed Central

    Trentini, Débora Broch; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Mechtler, Karl; Clausen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Arginine phosphorylation is an emerging post-translational protein modification implicated in the bacterial stress response. Although early reports suggested that arginine phosphorylation also occurs in higher eukaryotes, its overall prevalence was never studied using modern mass spectrometry methods, owing to technical difficulties arising from the acid lability of phosphoarginine. As shown recently, the McsB and YwlE proteins from Bacillus subtilis function as a highly specific protein arginine kinase and phosphatase couple, shaping the phosphoarginine proteome. Using a B. subtilis ΔywlE strain as a source for arginine-phosphorylated proteins, we were able to adapt mass spectrometry (MS) protocols to the special chemical properties of the arginine modification. Despite this progress, the analysis of protein arginine phosphorylation in eukaryotes is still challenging, given the great abundance of serine/threonine phosphorylations that would compete with phosphoarginine during the phosphopeptide enrichment procedure, as well as during data-dependent MS acquisition. We thus set out to establish a method for the selective enrichment of arginine-phosphorylated proteins as an initial step in the phosphoproteomic analysis. For this purpose, we developed a substrate-trapping mutant of the YwlE phosphatase that retains binding affinity toward arginine-phosphorylated proteins but cannot hydrolyze the captured substrates. By testing a number of active site substitutions, we identified a YwlE mutant (C9A) that stably binds to arginine-phosphorylated proteins. We further improved the substrate-trapping efficiency by impeding the oligomerization of the phosphatase mutant. The engineered YwlE trap efficiently captured arginine-phosphorylated proteins from complex B. subtilis ΔywlE cell extracts, thus facilitating identification of phosphoarginine sites in the large pool of cellular protein modifications. In conclusion, we present a novel tool for the selective enrichment and

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein phosphatase 2A performs an essential cellular function and is encoded by two genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, A A; Cohen, P T; Stark, M J

    1990-01-01

    Two genes (PPH21 and PPH22) encoding the yeast homologues of protein serine-threonine phosphatase 2A have been cloned from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic library using a rabbit protein phosphatase 2A cDNA as a hybridization probe. The PPH genes are genetically linked on chromosome IV and are predicted to encode polypeptides each with 74% amino acid sequence identity to rabbit type 2A protein phosphatase, indicating once again the extraordinarily high degree of sequence conservation shown by protein-phosphatases from different species. The two PPH genes show less than 10% amino acid sequence divergence from each other and while disruption of either PPH gene alone is without any major effect, the double disruption is lethal. This indicates that protein phosphatase 2A activity is an essential cellular function in yeast. Measurement of type 2A protein phosphatase activity in yeast strains lacking one or other of the genes indicates that they account for most, if not all, protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2176150

  11. A selective Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for vaccinia H1-related phosphatase--a dual-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kim, Eunha; Kang, Hyo Jin; Choi, Eun Joung; Cho, Alvin R; Chung, Sang J; Park, Seung Bum

    2012-07-04

    We report a Seoul-Fluor-based bioprobe, SfBP, for selective monitoring of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). A rational design based on the structures at the active site of dual-specific PTPs can enable SfBP to selectively monitor the activity of these PTPs with a 93-fold change in brightness. Moreover, screening results of SfBP against 30 classical PTPs and 35 dual-specific PTPs show that it is selective toward vaccinia H1-related (VHR) phosphatase, a dual-specific PTP (DUSP-3).

  12. Gardenia jasminoides Encodes an Inhibitor-2 Protein for Protein Phosphatase Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lan; Li, Hao-Ming

    2017-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) regulates diverse, essential cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, protein synthesis, muscle contraction, carbohydrate metabolism, transcription and neuronal signaling. Inhibitor-2 (I-2) can inhibit the activity of PP1 and has been found in diverse organisms. In this work, a Gardenia jasminoides fruit cDNA library was constructed, and the GjI-2 cDNA was isolated from the cDNA library by sequencing method. The GjI-2 cDNA contains a predicted 543 bp open reading frame that encodes 180 amino acids. The bioinformatics analysis suggested that the GjI-2 has conserved PP1c binding motif, and contains a conserved phosphorylation site, which is important in regulation of its activity. The three-dimensional model structure of GjI-2 was buite, its similar with the structure of I-2 from mouse. The results suggest that GjI-2 has relatively conserved RVxF, FxxR/KxR/K and HYNE motif, and these motifs are involved in interaction with PP1.

  13. NV Proteins of Fish Novirhabdovirus Recruit Cellular PPM1Bb Protein Phosphatase and Antagonize RIG-I-Mediated IFN Induction

    PubMed Central

    Biacchesi, Stéphane; Mérour, Emilie; Chevret, Didier; Lamoureux, Annie; Bernard, Julie; Brémont, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Non virion (NV) protein expression is critical for fish Novirhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in vivo pathogenesis. However, the mechanism by which NV promotes the viral replication is still unclear. We developed an approach based on reverse genetics and interactomic and identified several NV-associated cellular partners underlying cellular pathways as potential viral targets. Among these cell partners, we showed that NV proteins specifically interact with a protein phosphatase, Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent, 1Bb (PPM1Bb) and recruit it in the close vicinity of mitochondria, a subcellular compartment important for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I- (RIG-I)-mediated interferon induction pathway. PPM1B proteins belong to the PP2C family of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase and have recently been shown to negatively regulate the host antiviral response via dephosphorylating Traf family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK)-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). We demonstrated that NV proteins and PPM1Bb counteract RIG-I- and TBK1-dependent interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated gene promoter induction in fish cells and, hence, the establishment of an antiviral state. Furthermore, the expression of VHSV NV strongly reduced TBK1 phosphorylation and thus its activation. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which a viral protein recruits PPM1Bb protein phosphatase to subvert innate immune recognition. PMID:28276468

  14. NV Proteins of Fish Novirhabdovirus Recruit Cellular PPM1Bb Protein Phosphatase and Antagonize RIG-I-Mediated IFN Induction.

    PubMed

    Biacchesi, Stéphane; Mérour, Emilie; Chevret, Didier; Lamoureux, Annie; Bernard, Julie; Brémont, Michel

    2017-03-09

    Non virion (NV) protein expression is critical for fish Novirhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in vivo pathogenesis. However, the mechanism by which NV promotes the viral replication is still unclear. We developed an approach based on reverse genetics and interactomic and identified several NV-associated cellular partners underlying cellular pathways as potential viral targets. Among these cell partners, we showed that NV proteins specifically interact with a protein phosphatase, Mg(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent, 1Bb (PPM1Bb) and recruit it in the close vicinity of mitochondria, a subcellular compartment important for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I- (RIG-I)-mediated interferon induction pathway. PPM1B proteins belong to the PP2C family of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase and have recently been shown to negatively regulate the host antiviral response via dephosphorylating Traf family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK)-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). We demonstrated that NV proteins and PPM1Bb counteract RIG-I- and TBK1-dependent interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated gene promoter induction in fish cells and, hence, the establishment of an antiviral state. Furthermore, the expression of VHSV NV strongly reduced TBK1 phosphorylation and thus its activation. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which a viral protein recruits PPM1Bb protein phosphatase to subvert innate immune recognition.

  15. Interactions of Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue (PTEN) Proteins with Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of PTEN and Voltage Sensitive Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) are both phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) phosphatases that contain a C2 domain. PTEN is a tumor suppressor protein that acts as a phosphatase on PIP3 in mammalian cell membranes. It contains two principal domains: a phosphatase domain (PD) and a C2 domain. Despite detailed structural and functional characterization, less is known about its mechanism of interaction with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Ci-VSP consists of an N-terminal transmembrane voltage sensor domain and a C-terminal PTEN domain, which in turn contains a PD and a C2 domain. The nature of the interaction of the PTEN domain of Ci-VSP with membranes has not been well established. We have used multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to define the interaction mechanisms of PTEN and of the Ci-VSP PTEN domains with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of association of the PTEN with such bilayers, in which an initial electrostatics-driven encounter of the protein and bilayer is followed by reorientation of the protein to optimize its interactions with PIP molecules in the membrane. Although a PIP3 molecule binds close to the active site of PTEN, our simulations suggest a further conformational change of the protein may be required for catalytically productive binding to occur. Ci-VSP interacted with membranes in an orientation comparable to that of PTEN but bound directly to PIP-containing membranes without a subsequent reorientation step. Again, PIP3 bound close to the active site of the Ci-VSP PD, but not in a catalytically productive manner. Interactions of Ci-VSP with the bilayer induced clustering of PIP molecules around the protein. PMID:24588644

  16. Interactions of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) proteins with phosphatidylinositol phosphates: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of PTEN and voltage sensitive phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kalli, Antreas C; Devaney, Isabel; Sansom, Mark S P

    2014-03-25

    The phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) are both phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) phosphatases that contain a C2 domain. PTEN is a tumor suppressor protein that acts as a phosphatase on PIP3 in mammalian cell membranes. It contains two principal domains: a phosphatase domain (PD) and a C2 domain. Despite detailed structural and functional characterization, less is known about its mechanism of interaction with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Ci-VSP consists of an N-terminal transmembrane voltage sensor domain and a C-terminal PTEN domain, which in turn contains a PD and a C2 domain. The nature of the interaction of the PTEN domain of Ci-VSP with membranes has not been well established. We have used multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to define the interaction mechanisms of PTEN and of the Ci-VSP PTEN domains with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of association of the PTEN with such bilayers, in which an initial electrostatics-driven encounter of the protein and bilayer is followed by reorientation of the protein to optimize its interactions with PIP molecules in the membrane. Although a PIP3 molecule binds close to the active site of PTEN, our simulations suggest a further conformational change of the protein may be required for catalytically productive binding to occur. Ci-VSP interacted with membranes in an orientation comparable to that of PTEN but bound directly to PIP-containing membranes without a subsequent reorientation step. Again, PIP3 bound close to the active site of the Ci-VSP PD, but not in a catalytically productive manner. Interactions of Ci-VSP with the bilayer induced clustering of PIP molecules around the protein.

  17. Calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase from Neurospora crassa. Molecular cloning and expression of recombinant catalytic subunit.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, S; Tamura, J; Giri, P R; Polli, J W; Kincaid, R L

    1991-09-25

    A cDNA for the catalytic subunit of a calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein phosphatase was cloned from Neurospora crassa. The open reading frame of 1557 base pairs encoded a protein of Mr approximately 59,580 and was followed by a 3'-untranslated region of 363 base pairs including the poly(A) tail. Based on primer extension analysis, the mRNA transcript in vivo was 2403 base pairs. Expression of this CaM-protein phosphatase mRNA was developmentally regulated, being highest during early mycelial growth; production of the corresponding protein followed mRNA with a time lag of 8-12 h. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA revealed three small introns, the positions of which coincided with those in the mouse gene, indicating evolutionary conservation of these structures. The deduced sequence showed approximately 75% identity with the mammalian homologue, calcineurin, in aligned regions. A region of 40 amino acids preceding the CaM-binding domain was essentially unchanged, suggesting conservation of a crucial interaction site. Three small segments in the carboxyl half of the protein were unrelated to the mammalian gene and may constitute "variable regions" that confer substrate specificity to the enzyme. An active recombinant catalytic subunit was expressed in bacteria and purified by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. This preparation was stimulated 2- 3-fold by CaM and showed a p-nitrophenol phosphatase activity equal to that of the bovine brain holoenzyme, although its dephosphorylation of phosphoprotein substrates was markedly different. These findings demonstrate that the catalytic subunit of this phosphatase can exhibit high activity in the absence of its intrinsic Ca(2+)-binding subunit.

  18. Role of Protein Phosphatase 2A in Osteoblast Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Hirohiko; Yoshida, Kaya; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Teramachi, Jumpei; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Haneji, Tatsuji; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2017-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins plays hugely important roles in a variety of cellular processes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. These processes are strictly controlled by protein kinases (phosphorylation) and phosphatases (de-phosphorylation). Here we provide a brief history of the study of protein phosphorylation, including a summary of different types of protein kinases and phosphatases. One of the most physiologically important serine/threonine phosphatases is PP2A. This review provides a description of the phenotypes of various PP2A transgenic mice and further focuses on the known functions of PP2A in bone formation, including its role in osteoblast differentiation and function. A reduction in PP2A promotes bone formation and osteoblast differentiation through the regulation of bone-related transcription factors such as Osterix. Interestingly, downregulation of PP2A also stimulates adipocyte differentiation from undifferentiated mesenchymal cells under the appropriate adipogenic differentiation conditions. In osteoblasts, PP2A is also involved in the ability to control osteoclastogenesis as well as in the proliferation and metastasis of osteosarcoma cells. Thus, PP2A is considered to be a comprehensive factor in controlling the differentiation and function of cells derived from mesenchymal cells such as osteoblasts and adipocytes. PMID:28241467

  19. A subset of RAB proteins modulates PP2A phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Francesca; Mattioni, Anna; Boldt, Karsten; Panni, Simona; Santonico, Elena; Castagnoli, Luisa; Ueffing, Marius; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-09-09

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is one of the most abundant serine-threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells. PP2A is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme participating in a variety of physiological processes whose deregulation is often associated to cancer. The specificity and activity of this phosphatase is tightly modulated by a family of regulatory B subunits that dock the catalytic subunit to the substrates. Here we characterize a novel and unconventional molecular mechanism controlling the activity of the tumor suppressor PP2A. By applying a mass spectrometry-based interactomics approach, we identified novel PP2A interacting proteins. Unexpectedly we found that a significant number of RAB proteins associate with the PP2A scaffold subunit (PPP2R1A), but not with the catalytic subunit (PPP2CA). Such interactions occur in vitro and in vivo in specific subcellular compartments. Notably we demonstrated that one of these RAB proteins, RAB9, competes with the catalytic subunit PPP2CA in binding to PPP2R1A. This competitive association has an important role in controlling the PP2A catalytic activity, which is compromised in several solid tumors and leukemias.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η

    SciTech Connect

    Matozo, Huita C.; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Santos, Maria A. M.; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-09-01

    In this study, the catalytic domain of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η (rPTPη) is a cysteine-dependent phosphatase which hydrolyzes phosphoester bonds in proteins and other molecules. rPTPη and its human homologue DEP-1 are involved in neoplastic transformations. Thus, expression of the protein is reduced in all oncogene-transformed thyroid cell lines and is absent in highly malignant thyroid cells. Moreover, consistent with the suggested tumour suppression role of PTPη, inhibition of the tumorigenic process occurs after its exogenous reconstitution, suggesting that PTPη might be important for gene therapy of cancers. In this study, the catalytic domain of rPTPη was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.87 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.46, b = 63.07, c = 111.64 Å, and contains one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  1. Protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) function in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, P L

    1998-12-01

    In the past few years, molecular cloning studies have revealed the primary structure of plant protein serine/threonine phosphatases. Two structurally distinct families, the PP1/PP2A family and the PP2C family, are present in plants as well as in animals. This review will focus on the plant PP2C family of protein phosphatases. Biochemical and molecular genetic studies in Arabidopsis have identified PP2C enzymes as key players in plant signal transduction processes. For instance, the ABI1/ABI2 PP2Cs are central components in abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction. Arabidopsis mutants containing a single amino acid exchange in ABI1 or ABI2 show a reduced response to ABA. Another member of the PP2C family, kinase-associated protein phosphatase (KAPP), appears to be an important element in some receptor-like kinase (RLK) signalling pathways. Finally, an alfalfa PP2C acts as a negative regulator of a plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Thus, the plant PP2Cs function as regulators of various signal transduction pathways.

  2. Role of Protein Phosphatase 2A in Osteoblast Differentiation and Function.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hirohiko; Yoshida, Kaya; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Teramachi, Jumpei; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Haneji, Tatsuji; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2017-02-23

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins plays hugely important roles in a variety of cellular processes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. These processes are strictly controlled by protein kinases (phosphorylation) and phosphatases (de-phosphorylation). Here we provide a brief history of the study of protein phosphorylation, including a summary of different types of protein kinases and phosphatases. One of the most physiologically important serine/threonine phosphatases is PP2A. This review provides a description of the phenotypes of various PP2A transgenic mice and further focuses on the known functions of PP2A in bone formation, including its role in osteoblast differentiation and function. A reduction in PP2A promotes bone formation and osteoblast differentiation through the regulation of bone-related transcription factors such as Osterix. Interestingly, downregulation of PP2A also stimulates adipocyte differentiation from undifferentiated mesenchymal cells under the appropriate adipogenic differentiation conditions. In osteoblasts, PP2A is also involved in the ability to control osteoclastogenesis as well as in the proliferation and metastasis of osteosarcoma cells. Thus, PP2A is considered to be a comprehensive factor in controlling the differentiation and function of cells derived from mesenchymal cells such as osteoblasts and adipocytes.

  3. Evaluating transition state structures of vanadium-phosphatase protein complexes using shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Lombardo, Irma; Alvarez, Santiago; McLauchlan, Craig C; Crans, Debbie C

    2015-06-01

    Shape analysis of coordination complexes is well-suited to evaluate the subtle distortions in the trigonal bipyramidal (TBPY-5) geometry of vanadium coordinated in the active site of phosphatases and characterized by X-ray crystallography. Recent studies using the tau (τ) analysis support the assertion that vanadium is best described as a trigonal bipyramid, because this geometry is the ideal transition state geometry of the phosphate ester substrate hydrolysis (C.C. McLauchlan, B.J. Peters, G.R. Willsky, D.C. Crans, Coord. Chem. Rev. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2014.12.012 ; D.C. Crans, M.L. Tarlton, C.C. McLauchlan, Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. 2014, 4450-4468). Here we use continuous shape measures (CShM) analysis to investigate the structural space of the five-coordinate vanadium-phosphatase complexes associated with mechanistic transformations between the tetrahedral geometry and the five-coordinate high energy TBPY-5 geometry was discussed focusing on the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) enzyme. No evidence for square pyramidal geometries was observed in any vanadium-protein complexes. The shape analysis positioned the metal ion and the ligands in the active site reflecting the mechanism of the cleavage of the organic phosphate in a phosphatase. We identified the umbrella distortions to be directly on the reaction path between tetrahedral phosphate and the TBPY-5-types of high-energy species. The umbrella distortions of the trigonal bipyramid are therefore identified as being the most relevant types of transition state structures for the phosphoryl group transfer reactions for phosphatases and this may be related to the possibility that vanadium is an inhibitor for enzymes that support both exploded and five-coordinate transition states.

  4. Systematic Global Analysis of Genes Encoding Protein Phosphatases in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K.; Dolan, Stephen K.; Fernanda dos Reis, Thaila; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Alves de Castro, Patrícia; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Alowni, Raneem; Jones, Gary W.; Doyle, Sean; Brown, Neil Andrew; Goldman, Gustavo H.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that causes several invasive and noninvasive diseases named aspergillosis. This disease is generally regarded as multifactorial, considering that several pathogenicity determinants are present during the establishment of this illness. It is necessary to obtain an increased knowledge of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes. Protein phosphatases are essential to several signal transduction pathways. We identified 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit-encoding genes in A. fumigatus, of which we were able to construct 24 viable deletion mutants. The role of nine phosphatase mutants in the HOG (high osmolarity glycerol response) pathway was evaluated by measuring phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. We were also able to identify 11 phosphatases involved in iron assimilation, six that are related to gliotoxin resistance, and three implicated in gliotoxin production. These results present the creation of a fundamental resource for the study of signaling in A. fumigatus and its implications in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in this important pathogen. PMID:25943523

  5. Inhibitors of the Yersinia protein tyrosine phosphatase through high throughput and virtual screening approaches.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Vujanac, Milos; Southall, Noel; Stebbins, C Erec

    2013-02-15

    The bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH is an essential virulence determinant in Yersinia pestis and a potential antibacterial drug target. Here we report our studies of screening for small molecule inhibitors of YopH using both high throughput and in silico approaches. The identified inhibitors represent a diversity of chemotypes and novel pTyr mimetics, providing a starting point for further development and fragment-based design of multi-site binding inhibitors. We demonstrate that the applications of high throughput and virtual screening, when guided by structural binding mode analysis, is an effective approach for identifying potent and selective inhibitors of YopH and other protein phosphatases for rational drug design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibitors of the Yersinia Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Through High Throughput and Virtual Screening Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Vujanac, Milos; Southall, Noel; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH is an essential virulence determinant in Yersinia pestis and a potential antibacterial drug target. Here we report our studies of screening for small molecule inhibitors of YopH using both high throughput and in silico approaches. The identified inhibitors represent a diversity of chemotypes and novel pTyr mimetics, providing a starting point for further development and fragment-based design of multi-site binding inhibitors. We demonstrate that the applications of high throughput and virtual screening, when guided by structural binding mode analysis, is an effective approach for identifying potent and selective inhibitors of YopH and other protein phosphatases for rational drug design. PMID:23294700

  7. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    Serinehhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth and cellular responses to stress. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 A. From this structure we resolved the mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a con served Aspn-271-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His-427-His-304-Asp-274 catalytic motif. The structure of PPSc provides a structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  8. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human SER/THR Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E.

    2004-01-01

    Serinekhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth. Here we report the 1.6 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of PP5 catalytic domain with metal and phosphate ions in the active site. The structure reveals a mechanism for PPS-mediated catalysis that requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1),-M(sub 2)-His(sup 427)-W(sup 2)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif, and provides a structural basis for the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases placing them among the most powerful catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of PP5 should aid development of specific inhibitors.

  9. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L.; Tong, Liang

    2012-01-01

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 plays a noncatalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation. PMID:22781759

  10. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein–Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, George; Dudkin, Sergii; Borkin, Dmitry; Ni, Wendi; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2014-11-25

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here in this paper, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes.

  11. Positive regulation of TRAF6-dependent innate immune responses by protein phosphatase PP1-γ.

    PubMed

    Opaluch, Amanda M; Schneider, Monika; Chiang, Chih-yuan; Nguyen, Quy T; Maestre, Ana M; Mulder, Lubbertus C F; Secundino, Ismael; De Jesus, Paul D; König, Renate; Simon, Viviana; Nizet, Victor; MacLeod, Graham; Varmuza, Susannah; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Chanda, Sumit K

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune sensors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) differentially utilize adaptor proteins and additional molecular mediators to ensure robust and precise immune responses to pathogen challenge. Through a gain-of-function genetic screen, we identified the gamma catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1-γ) as a positive regulator of MyD88-dependent proinflammatory innate immune activation. PP1-γ physically interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAF6, and enhances the activity of TRAF6 towards itself and substrates such as IKKγ, whereas enzymatically inactive PP1-γ represses these events. Importantly, these activities were found to be critical for cellular innate responses to pathogen challenge and microbial clearance in both mouse macrophages and human monocyte lines. These data indicate that PP1-γ phosphatase activity regulates overall TRAF6 E3 ubiquitin ligase function and promotes NF-κB-mediated innate signaling responses.

  12. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  13. Disruption of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) function in neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase that plays a major role in the development of synaptic plasticity. Recent findings have implicated STEP in several psychiatric and neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, Huntington’s disease, stroke/ischemia, and stress-related psychiatric disorders. In these disorders, STEP protein expression levels and activity are dysregulated, contributing to the cognitive deficits that are present. In this review, we focus on the most recent findings on STEP, discuss how STEP expression and activity are maintained during normal cognitive function, and how disruptions in STEP activity contribute to a number of illnesses. PMID:25218562

  14. FAM122A, a new endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li; Liu, Man-Hua; Guo, Meng; Hu, Chuan-Xi; Yan, Zhao-Wen; Chen, Jing; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of the ubiquitously expressed protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is essential for various cellular functions such as cell proliferation, transformation, and fate determination. In this study, we demonstrate that the highly conserved protein in mammals, designated FAM122A, directly interacts with PP2A-Aα and B55α rather than B56α subunits, and inhibits the phosphatase activity of PP2A-Aα/B55α/Cα complex. Further, FAM122A potentiates the degradation of catalytic subunit PP2A-Cα with the increased poly-ubiquitination. In agreement, FAM122A silencing inhibits while its overexpression enhances cell growth and colony-forming ability. Collectively, we identify FAM122A as a new endogenous PP2A inhibitor and its physiological and pathophysiological significances warrant to be further investigated. PMID:27588481

  15. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human SER/THR Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E.

    2004-01-01

    Serinekhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth. Here we report the 1.6 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of PP5 catalytic domain with metal and phosphate ions in the active site. The structure reveals a mechanism for PPS-mediated catalysis that requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1),-M(sub 2)-His(sup 427)-W(sup 2)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif, and provides a structural basis for the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases placing them among the most powerful catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of PP5 should aid development of specific inhibitors.

  16. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    Serinehhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth and cellular responses to stress. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 A. From this structure we resolved the mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a con served Aspn-271-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His-427-His-304-Asp-274 catalytic motif. The structure of PPSc provides a structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  17. Characterization of protein phosphatase 2A acting on phosphorylated plasma membrane aquaporin of tulip petals.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2004-05-01

    A protein phosphatase holo-type enzyme (38, 65, and 75 kDa) preparation and a free catalytic subunit (38 kDa) purified from tulip petals were characterized as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) by immunological and biochemical approaches. The plasma membrane containing the putative plasma membrane aquaporin (PM-AQP) was prepared from tulip petals, phosphorylated in vitro, and used as the substrate for both of the purified PP2A preparations. Although both preparations dephosphorylated the phosphorylated PM-AQP at 20 degrees C, only the holo-type enzyme preparation acted at 5 degrees C on the phosphorylated PM-AQP with higher substrate specificity, suggesting that regulatory subunits are required for low temperature-dependent dephosphorylation of PM-AQP in tulip petals.

  18. MSG5, a novel protein phosphatase promotes adaptation to pheromone response in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Doi, K; Gartner, A; Ammerer, G; Errede, B; Shinkawa, H; Sugimoto, K; Matsumoto, K

    1994-01-01

    Pheromone-stimulated yeast cells and haploid gpa1 deletion mutants arrest their cell cycle in G1. Overexpression of a novel gene called MSG5 suppresses this inhibition of cell division. Loss of MSG5 function leads to a diminished adaptive response to pheromone. Genetic analysis indicates that MSG5 acts at a stage where the protein kinases STE7 and FUS3 function to transmit the pheromone-induced signal. Since loss of MSG5 function causes an increase in FUS3 enzyme activity but not STE7 activity, we propose that MSG5 impinges on the pathway at FUS3. Sequence analysis suggests that MSG5 encodes a protein tyrosine phosphatase. This is supported by the finding that recombinant MSG5 has phosphatase activity in vitro and is able to inactivate autophosphorylated FUS3. Thus MSG5 might stimulate recovery from pheromone by regulating the phosphorylation state of FUS3. Images PMID:8306972

  19. Dephosphorylation of microtubule-binding sites at the neurofilament-H tail domain by alkaline, acid, and protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hisanaga, S; Yasugawa, S; Yamakawa, T; Miyamoto, E; Ikebe, M; Uchiyama, M; Kishimoto, T

    1993-06-01

    The dephosphorylation-induced interaction of neurofilaments (NFs) with microtubules (MTs) was investigated by using several phosphatases. Escherichia coli alkaline and wheat germ acid phosphatases increased the electrophoretic mobility of NF-H and NF-M by dephosphorylation, and induced the binding of NF-H to MTs. The binding of NFs to MTs was observed only after the electrophoretic mobility of NF-H approached the exhaustively dephosphorylated level when alkaline phosphatase was used. The number of phosphate remaining when NF-H began to bind to MTs was estimated by measuring phosphate bound to NF-H. NF-H did not bind to MTs even when about 40 phosphates from the total of 51 had been removed by alkaline phosphatase. The removal of 6 further phosphates finally resulted in the association of NF-H with MTs. A similar finding, that the restricted phosphorylation sites in the NF-H tail domain, but not the total amount of phosphates, were important for binding to MTs, was also obtained with acid phosphatases. In contrast to alkaline and acid phosphatases, four classes of protein phosphatases (protein phosphatases 1, 2A, 2B, and 2C) were ineffective for shifting the electrophoretic mobility of NF proteins and for inducing the association of NFs to MTs.

  20. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase 1 Disrupts Proinflammatory Protein Synthesis in Endotoxin-Adapted Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brudecki, Laura; Ferguson, Donald A.; McCall, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Autotoxic production of proinflammatory mediators during early sepsis induces excessive inflammation, and their later suppression may limit the immune response. We previously reported that sepsis differentially represses transcription and translation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) to reprogram sepsis inflammation. This switch is gene specific and plays a crucial role in the clinically relevant syndrome of endotoxin adaptation/tolerance, multiorgan failure, and poor sepsis outcome. To further define the mechanisms responsible for translation disruption that follows inflammation induction, we used THP-1 human promonocytes as a model of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) responses found in sepsis. We showed that phosphorylation-dependent activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and translation disruption of TNF-α and IL-6 follow increased MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) expression and that MKP-1 knockdown rephosphorylates p38 and restores the capacity to translate TNF-α and IL-6 mRNAs. We also observed that the RNA-binding protein motif 4 (RBM4), a p38 MAPK target, accumulates in an unphosphorylated form in the cytosol in endotoxin-adapted cells, suggesting that dephosphorylated RBM4 may function as a translational repressor. Moreover, MKP-1 knockdown promotes RBM4 phosphorylation, blocks its transfer from the nucleus to the cytosol, and reverses translation repression. We also found that microRNA 146a (miR-146a) knockdown prevents and miR-146a transfection induces MKP-1 expression, which lead to increases or decreases in TNF-α and IL-6 translation, respectively. We conclude that a TLR4-, miR-146a-, p38 MAPK-, and MKP-1-dependent autoregulatory pathway regulates the translation of proinflammatory genes during the acute inflammatory response by spatially and temporally modifying the phosphorylation state of RBM4 translational repressor protein. PMID:23825193

  1. Purification and characterization of protein phosphatase 2C in rat parotid acinar cells: two forms of Mg(2+)-activated histone phosphatase and phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, N; Kobayashi, T; Tamura, S; Sugiya, H

    1996-07-01

    Two forms of Mg(2+)-activated histone phosphatase activities were partially purified from rat parotid acinar cells using Mono Q and gel filtration chromatography. Both enzymes activities were dependent on the presence of Mg2+, showing little activity in the presence of EDTA. The activities fractionated on the Mono Q column into two peaks: the first was a minor peak of histone phosphatase activity; the second was a major peak. These two peaks eluted at distinct positions on the gel filtration column. The molecular masses of the two peak fractions corresponded to 46 and 55 kDa, respectively on SDS-gels. The first 46-kDa peak immunoreacted with anti-PP2Calpha phosphatase antibody and like PP2Calpha phosphatase could be phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The second 55-kDa peak showed neither reactivity with anti-PP2Calpha phosphatase antibody nor phosphorylability by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, but retained a Mg2+ or Mn2+ dependence for its histone phosphatase activity. Ca2+ showed a strong inhibition on this activity. On the basis of these observations, we have identified the first peak enzyme as PP2Calpha phosphatase and the second peak as a novel PP2C-like phosphatase.

  2. Protein Phosphatase 2A in the Regulatory Network Underlying Biotic Stress Resistance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Durian, Guido; Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stress factors pose a major threat to plant health and can significantly deteriorate plant productivity by impairing the physiological functions of the plant. To combat the wide range of pathogens and insect herbivores, plants deploy converging signaling pathways, where counteracting activities of protein kinases and phosphatases form a basic mechanism for determining appropriate defensive measures. Recent studies have identified Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) as a crucial component that controls pathogenesis responses in various plant species. Genetic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches have underscored the versatile nature of PP2A, which contributes to the regulation of receptor signaling, organellar signaling, gene expression, metabolic pathways, and cell death, all of which essentially impact plant immunity. Associated with this, various PP2A subunits mediate post-translational regulation of metabolic enzymes and signaling components. Here we provide an overview of protein kinase/phosphatase functions in plant immunity signaling, and position the multifaceted functions of PP2A in the tightly inter-connected regulatory network that controls the perception, signaling and responding to biotic stress agents in plants. PMID:27375664

  3. Is Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Responsible for the Toxic Effects of Okadaic Acid in Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Rex

    2013-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and its derivatives, which are produced by dinoflagellates of the genera Prorocentrum and Dinophysis, are responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning in humans. In laboratory animals, these toxins cause epithelial damage and fluid accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract, and at high doses, they cause death. These substances have also been shown to be tumour promoters, and when injected into the brains of rodents, OA induces neuronal damage reminiscent of that seen in Alzheimer’s disease. OA and certain of its derivatives are potent inhibitors of protein phosphatases, which play many roles in cellular metabolism. In 1990, it was suggested that inhibition of these enzymes was responsible for the diarrhetic effect of these toxins. It is now repeatedly stated in the literature that protein phosphatase inhibition is not only responsible for the intestinal effects of OA and derivatives, but also for their acute toxic effects, their tumour promoting activity and their neuronal toxicity. In the present review, the evidence for the involvement of protein phosphatase inhibition in the induction of the toxic effects of OA and its derivatives is examined, with the conclusion that the mechanism of toxicity of these substances requires re-evaluation. PMID:23381142

  4. Activation of SPS from darkened spinach leaves by an endogenous protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, S.C.; Huber, J.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Sucrose-phosphate synthase from darkened spinach leaves has a low activation state but can undergo a time-dependent activation in desalted leaf extracts that is inhibited by Pi, molybdate, okadaic acid and vanadate, but stimulated by fluoride. SPS labeled in vivo with ({sup 32}P)Pi in excised leaves in the dark loses incorporated {sup 32}P with time when extracts are incubated at 25{degree}C. This loss is largely prevented by vanadate, suggesting that an endogenous protein phosphatase can use SPS as substrate. Changes in phosphorylation state are closely paralleled by changes in SPS activation state. The spontaneous activation achieved in the extracts can be reversed by addition of 2 mM MgATP. Feeding okadaic acid to darkened leaves prevents light activation of SPS suggesting that the endogenous protein phosphatase is similar to the type-1 enzyme of animal tissues. Overall, the results are consistent with the notion that light activation of SPS involves dephosphorylation of inhibitory phosphorylation site(s). Regulation of the protein phosphatase by Pi may be of physiological significance.

  5. Expression of I2PP2A, an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, induces c-Jun and AP-1 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Murrani, S W; Woodgett, J R; Damuni, Z

    1999-01-01

    Transient expression of I2PP2A, a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), in HEK-293 cells increased the concentration and DNA binding of the proto-oncogene c-Jun. In contrast, expression of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2AC) markedly decreased the concentration and DNA binding of c-Jun. Expression of I2PP2A also increased the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1, and this effect was diminished in a dose-dependent manner by expression of PP2AC. Densitometric analysis following Western blotting of extracts with antibodies specific for phospho-Ser63 and Ser73 suggests that the effects of I2PP2A and PP2AC expression might be mediated, in part, by changes in the phosphorylation of c-Jun at Ser63. The results indicate that I2PP2A elicits effects that are consistent with it acting as an inhibitor of PP2A in intact cells, and suggest that PP2A might exhibit site selectivity with respect to c-Jun phosphorylation. PMID:10393085

  6. Expression of I2PP2A, an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, induces c-Jun and AP-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Murrani, S W; Woodgett, J R; Damuni, Z

    1999-07-15

    Transient expression of I2PP2A, a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), in HEK-293 cells increased the concentration and DNA binding of the proto-oncogene c-Jun. In contrast, expression of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2AC) markedly decreased the concentration and DNA binding of c-Jun. Expression of I2PP2A also increased the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1, and this effect was diminished in a dose-dependent manner by expression of PP2AC. Densitometric analysis following Western blotting of extracts with antibodies specific for phospho-Ser63 and Ser73 suggests that the effects of I2PP2A and PP2AC expression might be mediated, in part, by changes in the phosphorylation of c-Jun at Ser63. The results indicate that I2PP2A elicits effects that are consistent with it acting as an inhibitor of PP2A in intact cells, and suggest that PP2A might exhibit site selectivity with respect to c-Jun phosphorylation.

  7. Intravenous administration of Factor VIII-O-Phospho-L-Serine (OPLS) complex reduces immunogenicity and preserves pharmacokinetics of the therapeutic protein.

    PubMed

    Gaitonde, Puneet; Purohit, Vivek S; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-01-23

    Hemophilia A is a bleeding disorder caused by the deficiency of an important coagulation factor; Factor VIII (FVIII). Replacement therapy using exogenously administered recombinant FVIII is the most commonly used method of treatment. However, approximately 30% of Hemophilia A patients develop neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) against the recombinant protein. Nabs abolish FVIII activity and drastically influence efficacy of the protein. The immunogenic epitopes of FVIII reside predominantly in the C2 domain of FVIII. However, the C2 domain also contains a lipid binding region. O-Phospho-L-Serine (OPLS) which is the head-group moiety of phosphatidylserine, interacts with the lipid binding region of FVIII. Previous studies have shown that FVIII complexed with OPLS lowered Nab development against FVIII following subcutaneous administration. In dendritic cell-T-cell co-culture studies, OPLS treatment increased the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines (Transforming Growth Factor-β and Interleukin-10), and simultaneously decreased pro-inflammatory IL-17 cytokine. Here, we investigated FVIII immune response and pharmacokinetics upon intravenous administration of FVIII-OPLS complex. We studied the effect of FVIII-OPLS complex on the interaction between a professional antigen presenting cell; dendritic cell and T-cell, and T-cell clonal expansion. Pharmacokinetics parameters were estimated following intravenous administration of FVIII and FVIII-OPLS. The results suggest that OPLS lowers FVIII immune response following intravenous administration. OPLS also hinders FVIII-specific T-cell clonal proliferation and preserves FVIII PK profile. Thus, the ease of protein-lipid complexation, preservation of FVIII activity and in vivo behavior, and improved in vitro FVIII stability, makes OPLS an attractive excipient in the preparation of next generation or biosimilar FVIII products with improved safety profile.

  8. Dimerization and phosphatase activity of calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1 interacting protein: the influence of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Topolska-Woś, Agnieszka M.; Shell, Steven M.; Kilańczyk, Ewa; Szczepanowski, Roman H.; Chazin, Walter J.; Filipek, Anna

    2015-01-01

    CacyBP/SIP [calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1 [seven in absentia homolog 1 (Siah E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1)] interacting protein] is a multifunctional protein whose activity includes acting as an ERK1/2 phosphatase. We analyzed dimerization of mouse CacyBP/SIP in vitro and in mouse neuroblastoma cell line (NB2a) cells, as well as the structure of a full-length protein. Moreover, we searched for the CacyBP/SIP domain important for dimerization and dephosphorylation of ERK2, and we analyzed the role of dimerization in ERK1/2 signaling in NB2a cells. Cell-based assays showed that CacyBP/SIP forms a homodimer in NB2a cell lysate, and biophysical methods demonstrated that CacyBP/SIP forms a stable dimer in vitro. Data obtained using small-angle X-ray scattering supported a model in which CacyBP/SIP occupies an anti-parallel orientation mediated by the N-terminal dimerization domain. Site-directed mutagenesis established that the N-terminal domain is indispensable for full phosphatase activity of CacyBP/SIP. We also demonstrated that the oligomerization state of CacyBP/SIP as well as the level of post-translational modifications and subcellular distribution of CacyBP/SIP change after activation of the ERK1/2 pathway in NB2a cells due to oxidative stress. Together, our results suggest that dimerization is important for controlling phosphatase activity of CacyBP/SIP and for regulating the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.—Topolska-Woś, A. M., Shell, S. M., Kilańczyk, E., Szczepanowski, R. H., Chazin, W. J., Filipek, A. Dimerization and phosphatase activity of calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1 interacting protein: the influence of oxidative stress. PMID:25609429

  9. Protein phosphatase 4 mediates localization of the Miranda complex during Drosophila neuroblast asymmetric divisions.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Nunes, Rita; Chia, William; Somers, W Greg

    2009-02-01

    Asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants is a crucial step in neuroblast asymmetric divisions. Whereas several protein kinases have been shown to mediate this process, no protein phosphatase has so far been implicated. In a clonal screen of larval neuroblasts we identified the evolutionarily conserved Protein Phosphatase 4 (PP4) regulatory subunit PP4R3/Falafel (Flfl) as a key mediator specific for the localization of Miranda (Mira) and associated cell fate determinants during both interphase and mitosis. Flfl is predominantly nuclear during interphase/prophase and cytoplasmic after nuclear envelope breakdown. Analyses of nuclear excluded as well as membrane targeted versions of the protein suggest that the asymmetric cortical localization of Mira and its associated proteins during mitosis depends on cytoplasmic/membrane-associated Flfl, whereas nuclear Flfl is required to exclude the cell fate determinant Prospero (Pros), and consequently Mira, from the nucleus during interphase/prophase. Attenuating the function of either the catalytic subunit of PP4 (PP4C; Pp4-19C in Drosophila) or of another regulatory subunit, PP4R2 (PPP4R2r in Drosophila), leads to similar defects in the localization of Mira and associated proteins. Flfl is capable of directly interacting with Mira, and genetic analyses indicate that flfl acts in parallel to or downstream from the tumor suppressor lethal (2) giant larvae (lgl). Our findings suggest that Flfl may target PP4 to the MIra protein complex to facilitate dephosphorylation step(s) crucial for its cortical association/asymmetric localization.

  10. Phospho-dependent functional modulation of GABAB receptors by the metabolic sensor AMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Wilkins, Megan E; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Warren, Noel; Tamaki, Keisuke; Iemata, Mika; Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew; Horvath, Zsolt; Freeman, Katie; Carling, David; Huang, Lan; Gonzales, Cathleen; Cooper, Edward; Smart, Trevor G.; Pangalos, Menelas N.; Moss., Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors composed of R1 and R2 subunits that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain by activating inwardly-rectifying K+ channels (GIRKs) and inhibiting Ca2+ channels. We demonstrate here that GABAB receptors are intimately associated with 5’AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor that is potently activated by increases in 5’AMP concentration caused by enhanced metabolic activity, anoxia or ischemia. AMPK binds the R1 subunit and directly phosphorylates S783 in the R2 subunit to enhance GABAB receptor activation of GIRKs. Phosphorylation of S783 is evident in many brain regions, and is increased dramatically after ischemic injury. Finally we also reveal that S783 plays a critical role in enhancing neuronal survival after ischemia. Together our results provide evidence of a novel neuroprotective mechanism, which under conditions of metabolic stress or after ischemia increases GABAB receptor function to reduce excitotoxicity and thereby promoting neuronal survival. PMID:17224405

  11. Phospho-dependent functional modulation of GABA(B) receptors by the metabolic sensor AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Wilkins, Megan E; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Tamaki, Keisuke; Iemata, Mika; Warren, Noel; Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew; Horvath, Zsolt; Freeman, Katie; Carling, David; Huang, Lan; Gonzales, Cathleen; Cooper, Edward; Smart, Trevor G; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J

    2007-01-18

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors composed of R1 and R2 subunits that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain by activating inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRKs) and inhibiting Ca(2+) channels. We demonstrate here that GABA(B) receptors are intimately associated with 5'AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor that is potently activated by increases in 5'AMP concentration that are caused by enhanced metabolic activity, anoxia, or ischemia. AMPK binds the R1 subunit and directly phosphorylates S783 in the R2 subunit to enhance GABA(B) receptor activation of GIRKs. Phosphorylation of S783 is evident in many brain regions, and is increased dramatically after ischemic injury. Finally, we also reveal that S783 plays a critical role in enhancing neuronal survival after ischemia. Together our results provide evidence of a neuroprotective mechanism, which, under conditions of metabolic stress or after ischemia, increases GABA(B) receptor function to reduce excitotoxicity and thereby promotes neuronal survival.

  12. INHIBITION OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY MEDIATES EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads t...

  13. INHIBITION OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY MEDIATES EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads t...

  14. Leishmania mexicana: promastigotes and amastigotes secrete protein phosphatases and this correlates with the production of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Escalona-Montaño, A R; Ortiz-Lozano, D M; Rojas-Bernabé, A; Wilkins-Rodriguez, A A; Torres-Guerrero, H; Mondragón-Flores, R; Mondragón-Gonzalez, R; Becker, I; Gutiérrez-Kobeh, L; Aguirre-Garcia, M M

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatase activity of Leishmania spp. has been shown to deregulate the signalling pathways of the host cell. We here show that Leishmania mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes secrete proteins with phosphatase activity to the culture medium, which was higher in the Promastigote Secretion Medium (PSM) as compared with the Amastigote Secretion Medium (ASM) and was not due to cell lysis, since parasite viability was not affected by the secretion process. The biochemical characterization showed that the phosphatase activity present in PSM was higher in dephosphorylating the peptide END (pY) INASL as compared with the peptide RRA (pT)VA. In contrast, the phosphatase activity in ASM showed little dephosphorylating capacity for both peptides. Inhibition assays demonstrated that the phosphatase activity of both PSM and ASM was sensible only to protein tyrosine phosphatases inhibitors. An antibody against a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) of Leishmania major cross-reacted with a 44·9 kDa molecule in different cellular fractions of L. mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes, however, in PSM and ASM, the antibody recognized a protein about 70 kDa. By electron microscopy, the PP2C was localized in the flagellar pocket of amastigotes. PSM and ASM induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1β, IL-12p70 and IL-10 in human macrophages.

  15. Structural diversity in free and bound states of intrinsically disordered protein phosphatase 1 regulators

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Joseph A.; Dancheck, Barbara; Ragusa, Michael J.; Allaire, Marc; Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Complete folding is not a prerequisite for protein function, as disordered and partially folded states of proteins frequently perform essential biological functions. In order to understand their functions at the molecular level, we utilized diverse experimental measurements to calculate ensemble models of three non-homologous, intrinsically disordered proteins: I-2, spinophilin and DARPP-32, which bind to and regulate protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). The models demonstrate that these proteins have dissimilar propensities for secondary and tertiary structure in their unbound forms. Direct comparison of these ensemble models with recently determined PP1 complex structures suggests a significant role for transient, pre-formed structure in the interactions of these proteins with PP1. Finally, we generated an ensemble model of partially disordered I-2 bound to PP1 that provides insight into the relationship between flexibility and biological function in this dynamic complex. PMID:20826336

  16. Structural Diversity in Free and Bound States of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.A.; Allaire, M.; Dancheck, B.; Ragusa, M.J.; Forman-Kay, J.D.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2010-09-08

    Complete folding is not a prerequisite for protein function, as disordered and partially folded states of proteins frequently perform essential biological functions. In order to understand their functions at the molecular level, we utilized diverse experimental measurements to calculate ensemble models of three nonhomologous, intrinsically disordered proteins: I-2, spinophilin, and DARPP-32, which bind to and regulate protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). The models demonstrate that these proteins have dissimilar propensities for secondary and tertiary structure in their unbound forms. Direct comparison of these ensemble models with recently determined PP1 complex structures suggests a significant role for transient, preformed structure in the interactions of these proteins with PP1. Finally, we generated an ensemble model of partially disordered I-2 bound to PP1 that provides insight into the relationship between flexibility and biological function in this dynamic complex.

  17. α1-Antitrypsin Activates Protein Phosphatase 2A to Counter Lung Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Patrick; Eden, Edward; Pillai, Manju; Campos, Michael; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: α1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) was identified as a plasma protease inhibitor; however, it is now recognized as a multifunctional protein that modulates immunity, inflammation, proteostasis, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Like A1AT, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major serine-threonine phosphatase, regulates similar biologic processes and plays a key role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objectives: Given their common effects, this study investigated whether A1AT acts via PP2A to alter tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling, inflammation, and proteolytic responses in this disease. Methods: PP2A activity was measured in peripheral blood neutrophils from A1AT-deficient (PiZZ) and healthy (PiMM) individuals and in alveolar macrophages from normal (60 mg/kg) and high-dose (120 mg/kg) A1AT-treated PiZZ subjects. PP2A activation was assessed in human neutrophils, airway epithelial cells, and peripheral blood monocytes treated with plasma purified A1AT protein. Similarly, lung PP2A activity was measured in mice administered intranasal A1AT. PP2A was silenced in lung epithelial cells treated with A1AT and matrix metalloproteinase and cytokine production was then measured following TNF-α stimulation. Measurements and Main Results: PP2A was significantly lower in neutrophils isolated from PiZZ compared with PiMM subjects. A1AT protein activated PP2A in human alveolar macrophages, monocytes, neutrophils, airway epithelial cells, and in mouse lungs. This activation required functionally active A1AT protein and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B expression. A1AT treatment acted via PP2A to prevent p38 and IκBα phosphorylation and matrix metalloproteinase and cytokine induction in TNF-α–stimulated epithelial cells. Conclusions: Together, these data indicate that A1AT modulates PP2A to counter inflammatory and proteolytic responses induced by TNF signaling in the lung. PMID:25341065

  18. Weak oligomerization of low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase is conserved from mammals to bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Jascha; Bernadó, Pau; Xu, Huimin; Jin, Changwen; Pons, Miquel

    2009-08-01

    The well-characterized self-association of a mammalian low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (lmwPTP) produces inactive oligomers that are in equilibrium with active monomers. A role of the inactive oligomers as supramolecular proenzymes has been suggested. The oligomerization equilibrium of YwlE, a lmwPTP from Bacillus subtilis, was studied by NMR. Chemical shift data and NMR relaxation confirm that dimerization takes place through the enzyme's active site, and is fully equivalent to the dimerization previously characterized in a eukaryotic low-molecular-weight phosphatase, with similarly large dissociation constants. The similarity between the oligomerization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic phosphatases extends beyond the dimer and involves higher order oligomers detected by NMR relaxation analysis at high protein concentrations. The conservation across different kingdoms of life suggests a physiological role for lmwPTP oligomerization in spite of the weak association observed in vitro. Structural data suggest that substrate modulation of the oligomerization equilibrium could be a regulatory mechanism leading to the generation of signaling pulses. The presence of a phenylalanine residue in the dimerization site of YwlE, replacing a tyrosine residue conserved in all eukaryotic lmwPTPs, demonstrates that lmwPTP regulation by oligomerization can be independent from tyrosine phosphorylation.

  19. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activation promotes axonal growth and recovery in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Chen, Kun; Yu, Wei; Gao, Shutao; Hu, Shunze; Sun, Xuying; Huang, Hui

    2015-12-15

    Current treatments to restore neurological deficits caused by axonal disconnection following central nervous system (CNS) injury are extremely limited. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), one of the main serine-threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells, dephosphorylates collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) in the developing CNS. In our study, we found that the major CNS inhibiting substrates, including chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and myelin associated glycoproteins (MAG), activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but inactivated PP2A and downstream CRMP2. Both EGFR inactivation and PP2A activation promoted axon elongation in vitro in the presence of inhibitory substrates. EGFR blockage by AG1478 selectively attenuated the inactive form of PP2A in pY307 phosphorylation, thus increasing PP2A activity. EGFR activation by EGF attenuated PP2A activity, whereas mutation of Y307 to phenylalanine abolished the effect. Furthermore, PP2A activity was down-regulated immediately after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. Chronic application of d-erythro-sphingosine (DES), the PP2A agonist, to spinal cord-lesioned rats enhanced the activity of this phosphatase and dephosphorylated CRMP2 around the lesion. PP2A activation induced significant axon sprouting in the lesioned spinal cord and promoted function recovery after SCI. These findings suggest that PP2A works downstream of EGFR and dephosphorylates CRMP2 after CNS injury. Therefore, therapies targeting PP2A may be effective following SCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase inside protein and polymer structures fabricated via multiphoton excitation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Swarna; Campagnola, Paul J

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate micron scale control of bioactivity through the use of multiphoton excited photochemistry, where this technique has been used to cross-link three-dimensional matrixes of alkaline phosphatase, bovine serum albumin, and polyacrylamide and combinations therein. Using a fluorescence-based assay (ELF-97), the enzymatic activity has been studied using a Michaelis-Menten analysis, and we have measured the specificity constants kcat/KM for alkaline phosphatase in both the protein and polymer matrixes to be on the order of 10(5)-10(6) M(-1) s(-1)and are comparable to known literature values in other environments. It is found that the enzyme is simply entrapped in the polymer matrix, whereas it is completely covalently bound in the protein structures. The relative reaction rate of alkaline phosphatase bound to BSA with the ELF substrate was measured as a function of cross-link density and was found to decrease in the more tightly formed matrixes, indicating a decrease in the diffusion in the matrix.

  1. Modulation of PDT-induced apoptosis by protein kinases and phosphatases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu; Chang, Chi K.; Kessel, David

    1996-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy of neoplastic cell lines can lead to the rapid initiation of apoptosis, a mode of cell death that results in a characteristic pattern of cellular and DNA fragmentation. In this study, we examine the effects of protein tyrosine- and serine/threonine phosphatases and kinases on the fragmentation of DNA to 50 kb and photodynamic effects of lysosomal and mitochondrial photosensitizers on murine leukemia P388 cells. The data are consistent with the proposal that maintenance of phosphorylated tyrosine residues is essential for the PDT- induced processing of 50 kb DNA to nucleosomes, while maintenance of serine phosphorylation inhibits such processing. Factors involved in chromatin fragmentation to 50 kb particles have yet to be elucidated. Several agents which mediate membrane photodamage mimic the effect of protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors, i.e., they inhibit further processing of the 50 kb DNA formed as a consequence of lysosomal or mitochondrial photodamage. These results indicate that even the rapid initiation of apoptosis by PDT is modulated by phosphatase and kinase activities.

  2. The PTEN phosphatase functions cooperatively with the Fanconi anemia proteins in DNA crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Vuono, Elizabeth A.; Mukherjee, Ananda; Vierra, David A.; Adroved, Morganne M.; Hodson, Charlotte; Deans, Andrew J.; Howlett, Niall G.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease characterized by bone marrow failure and increased cancer risk. The FA proteins function primarily in DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair. Here, we have examined the role of the PTEN phosphatase in this process. We have established that PTEN-deficient cells, like FA cells, exhibit increased cytotoxicity, chromosome structural aberrations, and error-prone mutagenic DNA repair following exposure to ICL-inducing agents. The increased ICL sensitivity of PTEN-deficient cells is caused, in part, by elevated PLK1 kinase-mediated phosphorylation of FANCM, constitutive FANCM polyubiquitination and degradation, and the consequent inefficient assembly of the FA core complex, FANCD2, and FANCI into DNA repair foci. We also establish that PTEN function in ICL repair is dependent on its protein phosphatase activity and ability to be SUMOylated, yet is independent of its lipid phosphatase activity. Finally, via epistasis analysis, we demonstrate that PTEN and FANCD2 function cooperatively in ICL repair. PMID:27819275

  3. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PRL2 Mediates Notch and Kit Signals in Early T Cell Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michihiro; Nabinger, Sarah C; Bai, Yunpeng; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Yao, Chonghua; Dong, Yuanshu; Zhang, Lujuan; Rodriguez, Sonia; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; Pear, Warren S; Carlesso, Nadia; Yoder, Mervin C; Kapur, Reuben; Kaplan, Mark H; Daniel Lacorazza, Hugo; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Liu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    The molecular pathways regulating lymphoid priming, fate, and development of multipotent bone marrow hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) that continuously feed thymic progenitors remain largely unknown. While Notch signal is indispensable for T cell specification and differentiation, the downstream effectors are not well understood. PRL2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase that regulates hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and self-renewal, is highly expressed in murine thymocyte progenitors. Here we demonstrate that protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL2 and receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit are critical downstream targets and effectors of the canonical Notch/RBPJ pathway in early T cell progenitors. While PRL2 deficiency resulted in moderate defects of thymopoiesis in the steady state, de novo generation of T cells from Prl2 null hematopoietic stem cells was significantly reduced following transplantation. Prl2 null HSPCs also showed impaired T cell differentiation in vitro. We found that Notch/RBPJ signaling upregulated PRL2 as well as c-Kit expression in T cell progenitors. Further, PRL2 sustains Notch-mediated c-Kit expression and enhances stem cell factor/c-Kit signaling in T cell progenitors, promoting effective DN1-DN2 transition. Thus, we have identified a critical role for PRL2 phosphatase in mediating Notch and c-Kit signals in early T cell progenitors. Stem Cells 2017;35:1053-1064.

  4. Natural products possessing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activity found in the last decades

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cheng-shi; Liang, Lin-fu; Guo, Yue-wei

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of approximately 300 secondary metabolites with inhibitory activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which were isolated from various natural sources or derived from synthetic process in the last decades. The structure-activity relationship and the selectivity of some compounds against other protein phosphatases were also discussed. Potential pharmaceutical applications of several PTP1B inhibitors were presented. PMID:22941286

  5. Inactivation of the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A results in morphological and transcriptional defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    van Zyl, W; Huang, W; Sneddon, A A; Stark, M; Camier, S; Werner, M; Marck, C; Sentenac, A; Broach, J R

    1992-01-01

    We have determined that TPD3, a gene previously identified in a screen for mutants defective in tRNA biosynthesis, most likely encodes the A regulatory subunit of the major protein phosphatase 2A species in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The predicted amino acid sequence of the product of TPD3 is highly homologous to the sequence of the mammalian A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. In addition, antibodies raised against Tpd3p specifically precipitate a significant fraction of the protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell, and extracts of tpd3 strains yield a different chromatographic profile of protein phosphatase 2A than do extracts of isogenic TPD3 strains. tpd3 deletion strains generally grow poorly and have at least two distinct phenotypes. At reduced temperatures, tpd3 strains appear to be defective in cytokinesis, since most cells become multibudded and multinucleate following a shift to 13 degrees C. This is similar to the phenotype obtained by overexpression of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit or by loss of CDC55, a gene that encodes a protein with homology to a second regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. At elevated temperatures, tpd3 strains are defective in transcription by RNA polymerase III. Consistent with this in vivo phenotype, extracts of tpd3 strains fail to support in vitro transcription of tRNA genes, a defect that can be reversed by addition of either purified RNA polymerase III or TFIIIB. These results reinforce the notion that protein phosphatase 2A affects a variety of biological processes in the cell and provide an initial identification of critical substrates for this phosphatase. Images PMID:1328868

  6. Zipper-interacting protein kinase interacts with human cell division cycle 14A phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Hu, Haiying; Ye, Zi; Leong, Mancheong; He, Min; Li, Qin; Hu, Renming; Zhang, Shuo

    2015-04-01

    Zipper‑interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) is a novel serine/threonine protein kinase and a member of a large family of protein kinases, known as the death‑associated protein kinases. However, the function of ZIPK has yet to be fully elucidated, as few physiological substrates have currently been identified. In the present study, a yeast two‑hybrid screen was used and the human cell division cycle 14A (HsCdc14A) phosphatase was identified as a novel ZIPK binding protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report the interaction between these proteins. The interaction between ZIPK and HsCdc14A was confirmed by in vitro experiments. In addition, ZIPK‑mediated phosphorylation was shown to activate the phosphatase activity of HsCdc14A. These findings indicated that ZIPK may also be involved in the regulation of the cell cycle in human cells, by interacting with HsCdc14A.

  7. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  8. Thioredoxin-related protein 32 (TRP32) specifically reduces oxidized phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL).

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tasuku; Funato, Yosuke; Miki, Hiroaki

    2013-03-08

    PRL family constitutes a unique class of phosphatases associated with metastasis. The phosphatase activity of PRL has been reported to be important for promoting metastasis, and it is inactivated by reversible oxidation of its catalytic cysteine. Here, we show that TRP32 specifically reduces PRL. Reduction of oxidized PRL in cells is inhibited by 2,4-dinitro-1-chlorobenzene, an inhibitor of TRX reductase. In vitro assays for the reduction of PRL show that only TRP32 can potently reduce oxidized PRL, whereas other TRX-related proteins linked to TRX reductase show little or no reducing activity. Indeed, TRP32 knockdown significantly prolongs the H2O2-induced oxidation of PRL. Binding analyses reveal that the unique C-terminal domain of TRP32 is required and sufficient for its direct interaction with PRL. These results suggest that TRP32 maintains the reduced state of PRL and thus regulates the biological function of PRL.

  9. PP2C gamma: a human protein phosphatase with a unique acidic domain.

    PubMed

    Travis, S M; Welsh, M J

    1997-08-04

    We have cloned a novel cDNA from human skeletal muscle which encodes a protein phosphatase with a unique acidic domain. It is 34% identical to mammalian PP2C alpha and PP2C beta and we call it PP2C gamma. It more closely resembles PP2Cs from Paramecium tetraurelia and Schizosaccharomyces pombe than mammalian PP2Cs. Northern blot analysis shows that PP2C gamma is widely expressed, and is most abundant in testis, skeletal muscle, and heart. Like known PP2Cs, recombinant PP2C gamma requires Mg2+ or Mn2+ for activity. Unlike any other known phosphatase, PP2C gamma has a highly acidic domain: 75% of the 54 residues are glutamate or aspartate.

  10. Identification of phosphatase that dephosphorylates xylose in the glycosaminoglycan-protein linkage region of proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Koike, Toshiyasu; Izumikawa, Tomomi; Sato, Ban; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-03-07

    Recently, we demonstrated that FAM20B is a kinase that phosphorylates the xylose (Xyl) residue in the glycosaminoglycan-protein linkage region of proteoglycans. The phosphorylation of Xyl residues by FAM20B enhances the formation of the linkage region. Rapid dephosphorylation is probably induced just after synthesis of the linker and just before polymerization initiates. Indeed, in vitro chondroitin or heparan sulfate polymerization does not occur when the Xyl residue of the tetrasaccharide linkage region is phosphorylated. However, the enzyme responsible for the dephosphorylation of Xyl remains unknown. Here, we identified a novel protein that dephosphorylates the Xyl residue and designated it 2-phosphoxylose phosphatase. The phosphatase efficiently removed the phosphate from the phosphorylated trisaccharide, Galβ1-3Galβ1-4Xyl(2-O-phosphate), but not from phosphorylated tetrasaccharide, GlcUAβ1-3Galβ1-3Galβ1-4Xyl(2-O-phosphate). Additionally, RNA interference-mediated inhibition of 2-phosphoxylose phosphatase resulted in increased amounts of GlcNAcα1-4GlcUAβ1-3Galβ1-3Galβ1-4Xyl(2-O-phosphate), Galβ1-3Galβ1-4Xyl(2-O-phosphate), and Galβ1-4Xyl(2-O-phosphate) in the cells. Gel filtration analysis of the glycosaminoglycan chains synthesized in the knockdown cells revealed that these cells produced decreased amounts of glycosaminoglycan chains and that the chains had similar lengths to those in the mock-transfected cells. Transcripts encoding this phosphatase were ubiquitously, but differentially, expressed in human tissues. Moreover, the phosphatase localized to the Golgi and interacted with the glucuronyltransferase-I involved in the completion of the glycosaminoglycan-protein linkage region. Based on these findings, we conclude that transient phosphorylation of the Xyl residue in the glycosaminoglycan-protein linkage region controls the formation of glycosaminoglycan chains of proteoglycans.

  11. Purification and characterization of two potent heat-stable protein inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A from bovine kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Guo, H; Damuni, Z

    1995-02-14

    Two heat-stable protein inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), tentatively designated I1PP2A and I2PP2A, have been purified to apparent homogeneity from extracts of bovine kidney. The purified preparations of I1PP2A exhibited an apparent M(r) approximately 30,000 and 250,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel permeation chromatography on Sephacryl S-300, respectively. In contrast, the purified preparations of I2PP2A exhibited an apparent M(r) approximately 20,000 and 80,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel permeation chromatography on Sephacryl S-200, respectively. The purified preparations of I1PP2A and I2PP2A inhibited PP2A with 32P-labeled myelin basic protein, 32P-labeled histone H1, 32P-labeled pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, 32P-labeled phosphorylase, and protamine kinase as substrates. By contrast, I1PP2A and I2PP2A exhibited little effect, if any, on the activity of PP2A with 32P-labeled casein, and did not prevent the autodephosphorylation of PP2A in incubations with the autophosphorylation-activated protein kinase [Guo, H., & Damuni, Z. (1993) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 2500-2504]. The purified preparations of I1PP2A and I2PP2A had little effect, if any, on the activities of protein phosphatase 1, protein phosphatase 2B, protein phosphatase 2C, and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase. With 32P-labeled MBP as a substrate, kinetic analysis according to Henderson showed that I1PP2A and I2PP2A were noncompetitive and displayed a Ki of about 30 and 25 nM, respectively. Following cleavage with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, I1PP2A and I2PP2A displayed distinct peptide patterns, indicating that these inhibitor proteins are the products of distinct genes. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the purified preparations indicate that I1PP2A and I2PP2A are novel proteins.

  12. Identification of protein phosphatase interacting proteins from normal and UVA-irradiated HaCaT cell lysates by surface plasmon resonance based binding technique using biotin-microcystin-LR as phosphatase capturing molecule.

    PubMed

    Bécsi, Bálint; Dedinszki, Dóra; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Máthé, Csaba; Vasas, Gábor; Lontay, Beáta; Erdődi, Ferenc

    2014-09-05

    Identification of the interacting proteins of protein phosphatases is crucial to understand the cellular roles of these enzymes. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), PP4, PP5 and PP6, was biotinylated, immobilized to streptavidin-coupled sensorchip surface and used in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based binding experiments to isolate phosphatase binding proteins. Biotin-MC-LR captured PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) stably and the biotin-MC-LR-PP1c complex was able to further interact with the regulatory subunit (MYPT1) of myosin phosphatase. Increased biotin-MC-LR coated sensorchip surface in the Surface Prep unit of Biacore 3000 captured PP1c, PP2Ac and their regulatory proteins including MYPT1, MYPT family TIMAP, inhibitor-2 as well as PP2A-A and -Bα-subunits from normal and UVA-irradiated HaCaT cell lysates as revealed by dot blot analysis of the recovered proteins. Biotin-MC-LR was used for the subcellular localization of protein phosphatases in HaCaT cells by identification of phosphatase-bound biotin-MC-LR with fluorescent streptavidin conjugates. Partial colocalization of the biotin-MC-LR signals with those obtained using anti-PP1c and anti-PP2Ac antibodies was apparent as judged by confocal microscopy. Our results imply that biotin-MC-LR is a suitable capture molecule in SPR for isolation of protein phosphatase interacting proteins from cell lysates in sufficient amounts for immunological detection.

  13. Design, preparation and use of ligated phosphoproteins: a novel approach to study protein phosphatases by dot blot array, ELISA and Western blot assays.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Barshevsky, Tanya; Kochinyan, Samvel; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2007-07-01

    The study of substrate specificity of protein phosphatases (PPs) is very challenging since it is difficult to prepare a suitable phosphorylated substrate. Phosphoproteins, phosphorylated by a protein kinase, or chemically synthesized phosphopeptides are commonly used substrates for PPs. Both types of these substrates have their advantages and limitations. Phosphoproteins mimic more closely the physiologically relevant PP substrates, but their preparation is technically demanding. Synthetic phosphopeptides present advantages over proteins because they can be easily produced in large quantity and their amino acid sequence can be designed to contain potential determinants of substrate specificity. However, short peptides are less optimal compared to in vivo PP substrates and often display poor and variable binding to different matrices, resulting in low sensitivity in analysis of PP activity on solid support. In this work we utilize the intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) technique to generate substrates for PPs, combining the advantages of proteins and synthetic peptides in one molecule. The ligation of a synthetic phosphopeptide to an intein-generated carrier protein (CP) with a one-to-one stoichiometry results in the formation of a ligated phosphoprotein (LPP). Three widely used assays, dot blot array, Western blot and ELISA were employed to study the PP activity on LPP substrates. Dephosphorylation was measured by detection of the remaining phosphorylation, or lack of it, with a phospho-specific antibody. The data show the advantage of LPPs over free peptides in assays on solid supports. LPPs exhibited enhanced binding to the matrices used in the study, which significantly improved sensitivity and consistency of the assays. In addition, saturation of the signal was circumvented by serial dilution of the assay samples. This report describes detailed experimental procedures for preparation of LPP substrates and their use in PP assays based on immobilization on

  14. Isolation and characterization of a protein-tyrosine kinase and a phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Preneta, R; Jarraud, S; Vincent, C; Doublet, P; Duclos, B; Etienne, J; Cozzone, A J

    2002-01-01

    Two proteins of Klebsiella pneumoniae, termed Yor5 and Yco6, were analyzed for their capacity to participate in the reversible phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine. First, protein Yco6 was overproduced from its specific gene and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. Upon incubation in the presence of radioactive adenosine triphosphate, it was found to effectively autophosphorylate. Two-dimensional analysis of its phosphoamino acid content revealed that it was modified exclusively at tyrosine. Second, protein Yor5 was also overproduced from the corresponding gene and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. It was shown to contain a phosphatase activity capable of cleaving the synthetic substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate into p-nitrophenol and free phosphate. In addition, it was assayed on individual phosphorylated amino acids and appeared to dephosphorylate specifically phosphotyrosine, with no effect on phosphoserine or phosphothreonine. Such specificity for phosphotyrosine was confirmed by the observation that Yor5 was able to dephosphorylate protein Yco6 previously autophosphorylated. Together, these data demonstrate that similarly to other bacterial species including Acinetobacter johnsonii and Escherichia coli, the cells of K. pneumoniae contain both a protein-tyrosine kinase and a phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase. They also provide evidence that this phosphatase can utilize the kinase as an endogenous substrate, which suggests the occurrence of a regulatory mechanism connected with reversible protein phosphorylation on tyrosine. Since Yco6 and Yor5 are both involved in the synthesis of capsular polysaccharide and since capsules are essential to the virulence of K. pneumoniae, we suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation on tyrosine may be part of the cascade of reactions that determine the pathogenicity of bacteria.

  15. 2C Proteins of Enteroviruses Suppress IKKβ Phosphorylation by Recruiting Protein Phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Zheng, Zhenhua; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Liu, Qingshi; Meng, Jin; Ke, Xianliang; Hu, Qinxue; Wang, Hanzhong

    2016-05-15

    The NF-κB signaling network, which is an ancient signaling pathway, plays a pivotal role in innate immunity and constitutes a first line of defense against invading pathogens, including viruses. However, numerous viruses possess evolved strategies to antagonize the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Our previous study demonstrated that the nonstructural protein 2C of enterovirus 71 (EV71), which is the major pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease, inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-mediated activation of NF-κB by suppressing IκB kinase β (IKKβ) phosphorylation. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the inhibition of IKKβ phosphorylation by EV71 2C remains largely elusive. We demonstrate that EV71 2C interacts with all isoforms of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) catalytic subunit (the PP1α, PP1β, and PP1γ isoforms) through PP1-docking motifs. EV71 2C has no influence on the subcellular localization of PP1. In addition, the PP1-binding-deficient EV71 2C mutant 3E3L nearly completely lost the ability to suppress IKKβ phosphorylation and NF-κB activation was markedly restored in the mutant, thereby indicating that PP1 binding is efficient for EV71 2C-mediated inhibition of IKKβ phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. We further demonstrate that 2C forms a complex with PP1 and IKKβ to dephosphorylate IKKβ. Notably, we reveal that other human enteroviruses, including poliovirus (PV), coxsackie A virus 16 (CVA16), and coxsackie B virus 3 (CVB3), use 2C proteins to recruit PP1, leading to the inhibition of IKKβ phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that enteroviruses exploit a novel mechanism to inhibit IKKβ phosphorylation by recruiting PP1 and IKKβ to form a complex through 2C proteins, which ultimately results in the inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. The innate antiviral immunity system performs an essential function in recognizing and eliminating invading viruses. Enteroviruses include a number of important human

  16. Structural Mechanism of Demethylation and Inactivation of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Xing,Y.; Li, Z.; Chen, Y.; Stock, J.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is an important serine/threonine phosphatase that plays a role in many biological processes. Reversible carboxyl methylation of the PP2A catalytic subunit is an essential regulatory mechanism for its function. Demethylation and negative regulation of PP2A is mediated by a PP2A-specific methylesterase PME-1, which is conserved from yeast to humans. However, the underlying mechanism of PME-1 function remains enigmatic. Here we report the crystal structures of PME-1 by itself and in complex with a PP2A heterodimeric core enzyme. The structures reveal that PME-1 directly binds to the active site of PP2A and that this interaction results in the activation of PME-1 by rearranging the catalytic triad into an active conformation. Strikingly, these interactions also lead to inactivation of PP2A by evicting the manganese ions that are required for the phosphatase activity of PP2A. These observations identify a dual role of PME-1 that regulates PP2A activation, methylation, and holoenzyme assembly in cells.

  17. The protein phosphatases responsible for dephosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase in isolated rat adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S L; Emmison, N; Borthwick, A C; Yeaman, S J

    1993-01-01

    The levels of the cytosolic serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PP) in rat adipocyte extracts have been determined, by using both reference substrates and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) as substrates. Adipocytes contain significant levels of both PP1 and 2A (1.6 and 2.0 m-units/ml of packed cells respectively), with lower levels of PP2C and virtually no PP2B activity. PP2A and 2C exhibit similar degrees of activity against HSL phosphorylated at site 1, together accounting for 92% of the total. In contrast, site 2 is dephosphorylated predominantly by PP2A (over 50% of total activity), whereas PP1 and PP2C contribute approx. 20% and 30% respectively to the total phosphatase activity against that site. Total phosphatase activity in the adipocyte extracts was 2-3-fold higher against site 2 than against site 1. The possible significance of these findings to the regulation of HSL activity in adipose tissue in vivo is discussed. PMID:8240253

  18. Protein phosphatase 1ß limits ring canal constriction during Drosophila germline cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Bayat, Vafa; Bellen, Hugo J; Tan, Change

    2013-01-01

    Germline cyst formation is essential for the propagation of many organisms including humans and flies. The cytoplasm of germline cyst cells communicate with each other directly via large intercellular bridges called ring canals. Ring canals are often derived from arrested contractile rings during incomplete cytokinesis. However how ring canal formation, maintenance and growth are regulated remains unclear. To better understand this process, we carried out an unbiased genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster germ cells and identified multiple alleles of flapwing (flw), a conserved serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase. Flw had previously been reported to be unnecessary for early D. melanogaster oogenesis using a hypomorphic allele. We found that loss of Flw leads to over-constricted nascent ring canals and subsequently tiny mature ring canals, through which cytoplasmic transfer from nurse cells to the oocyte is impaired, resulting in small, non-functional eggs. Flw is expressed in germ cells undergoing incomplete cytokinesis, completely colocalized with the Drosophila myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (DMYPT). This colocalization, together with genetic interaction studies, suggests that Flw functions together with DMYPT to negatively regulate myosin activity during ring canal formation. The identification of two subunits of the tripartite myosin phosphatase as the first two main players required for ring canal constriction indicates that tight regulation of myosin activity is essential for germline cyst formation and reproduction in D. melanogaster and probably other species as well.

  19. TIMAP-protein phosphatase 1-complex controls endothelin-1 production via ECE-1 dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Boratkó, Anita; Veréb, Zoltán; Petrovski, Goran; Csortos, Csilla

    2016-04-01

    Endothelin induced signaling pathways can affect blood pressure and vascular tone, but the influence of endothelins on tumor cells is also significant. We have detected elevated endothelin-1 secretion from TIMAP (TGF-β inhibited membrane associated protein) depleted vascular endothelial cells. The autocrine signaling activated by the elevated endothelin-1 level through the ETB receptors evoked an angiogenic-like phenotype, the cells assumed an elongated morphology, and enhanced tube formation and wound healing abilities. The depleted protein, TIMAP, is a highly specific and abundant protein in the endothelial cells, and it is a regulatory/targeting subunit for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). Protein-protein interaction between the TIMAP-PP1c complex and the endothelin converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) was detected, the latter of which is a transmembrane protein that produces the biologically active 21-amino acid form of endothelin-1 from proendothelin. The results indicate that silencing of TIMAP induces a reduction in TIMAP-PP1c activity connected to ECE-1. This leads to an increase in the amount of ECE-1 protein in the plasma membrane and a consequent increase in endothelin-1 secretion. Similarly, activation of PKC, the kinase responsible for ECE-1 phosphorylation increased ECE-1 protein level in the membrane fraction of the endothelial cells. The elevated ECE-1 level was mitigated in time in normal cells, but was clearly preserved in TIMAP-depleted cells. Overall, our results indicate that PKC-phosphorylated ECE-1 is a TIMAP-PP1c substrate and this phosphatase complex has an important role in endothelin-1 production of EC through the regulation of ECE-1 activity.

  20. No Obvious Abnormality in Mice Deficient in Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β

    PubMed Central

    Harroch, S.; Palmeri, M.; Rosenbluth, J.; Custer, A.; Okigaki, M.; Shrager, P.; Blum, M.; Buxbaum, J. D.; Schlessinger, J.

    2000-01-01

    The development of neurons and glia is governed by a multitude of extracellular signals that control protein tyrosine phosphorylation, a process regulated by the action of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Receptor PTPβ (RPTPβ; also known as PTPζ) is expressed predominantly in the nervous system and exhibits structural features common to cell adhesion proteins, suggesting that this phosphatase participates in cell-cell communication. It has been proposed that the three isoforms of RPTPβ play a role in regulation of neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth, and gliogenesis. To investigate the biological functions of this PTP, we have generated mice deficient in RPTPβ. RPTPβ-deficient mice are viable, are fertile, and showed no gross anatomical alterations in the nervous system or other organs. In contrast to results of in vitro experiments, our study demonstrates that RPTPβ is not essential for neurite outgrowth and node formation in mice. The ultrastructure of nerves of the central nervous system in RPTPβ-deficient mice suggests a fragility of myelin. However, conduction velocity was not altered in RPTPβ-deficient mice. The normal development of neurons and glia in RPTPβ-deficient mice demonstrates that RPTPβ function is not necessary for these processes in vivo or that loss of RPTPβ can be compensated for by other PTPs expressed in the nervous system. PMID:11003666

  1. Physical association of GPR54 C-terminal with protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barry J.; Wang Zixuan; Mobley, La'Tonya; Khosravi, Davood; Fujii, Nobutaka; Navenot, Jean-Marc; Peiper, Stephen C.

    2008-12-26

    KiSS1 was discovered as a metastasis suppressor gene and subsequently found to encode kisspeptins (KP), ligands for a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), GPR54. This ligand-receptor pair was later shown to play a critical role in the neuro-endocrine regulation of puberty. The C-terminal cytoplasmic (C-ter) domain of GPR54 contains a segment rich in proline and arginine residues that corresponds to the primary structure of four overlapping SH3 binding motifs. Yeast two hybrid experiments identified the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-C) as an interacting protein. Pull-down experiments with GST fusion proteins containing the GPR54 C-ter confirmed binding to PP2A-C in cell lysates and these complexes contained phosphatase activity. The proline arginine rich segment is necessary for these interactions. The GPR54 C-ter bound directly to purified recombinant PP2A-C, indicating the GPR54 C-ter may form complexes involving the catalytic subunit of PP2A that regulate phosphorylation of critical signaling intermediates.

  2. Protein phosphatase modulation of somatostatin receptor signaling in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Sarah J.; Armstrong, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Many inhibitory interneurones in the hippocampus release the neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) which inhibits neuronal excitability through Gi/Go-coupled receptors. To investigate the signaling pathways underlying the SST inhibition of neuronal excitability in the hippocampus, we performed perforated patch-clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurones in acute brain slices from P14-P18 mice. Bath application of 1 μM SST reversibly reduces the frequency of action potential firing in response to depolarising current steps, and is associated with neuronal hyperpolarisation and a reduction in membrane resistance. This effect is mediated by potassium channels with KCNK-like pharmacology. In addition, in slices that have been cultured in vitro for seven days or more, SST also produces a hyperpolarisation independent reduction in action potential firing, which can be also observed in acute slices when the Ser/Thr protein phosphatases PP2A and PP4 are inhibited selectively with fostriecin. This hyperpolarisation independent effect of SST appears to be mediated by G-protein activated inwardly rectifying K+ (GIRK) channels. Knockdown of protein phosphatase 5, by Cre recombinase mediated deletion of the floxed Ppp5c gene, blocks the hyperpolarisation independent effect of SST, and reduces the hyperpolarisation dependent effect in a manner consistent with increased SST receptor desensitisation. Thus, reversible protein phosphorylation provides a mechanism to enhance or diminish the inhibitory effect of SST, which could allow system level regulation of circuit excitability in the hippocampus. PMID:26196943

  3. Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase and Kinase Specificity in Regulation of SRC and Breast Tumor Kinase* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Gaofeng; Aleem, Saadat; Yang, Ming; Miller, W. Todd; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant evidence to the contrary, the view that phosphatases are “nonspecific” still pervades the field. Systems biology approaches to defining how signal transduction pathways are integrated at the level of whole organisms also often downplay the contribution of phosphatases, defining them as “erasers” that serve merely to restore the system to its basal state. Here, we present a study that counteracts the idea of “nonspecific phosphatases.” We have characterized two structurally similar and functionally related kinases, BRK and SRC, which are regulated by combinations of activating autophosphorylation and inhibitory C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. We demonstrated specificity at the level of the kinases in that SRMS phosphorylated the C terminus of BRK, but not SRC; in contrast, CSK is the kinase responsible for C-terminal phosphorylation of SRC, but not BRK. For the phosphatases, we observed that RNAi-mediated suppression of PTP1B resulted in opposing effects on the activity of BRK and SRC and have defined the mechanisms underlying this specificity. PTP1B inhibited BRK by directly dephosphorylating the Tyr-342 autophosphorylation site. In contrast, PTP1B potentiated SRC activity, but not by dephosphorylating SRC itself directly; instead, PTP1B regulated the interaction between CBP/PAG and CSK. SRC associated with, and phosphorylated, the transmembrane protein CBP/PAG at Tyr-317, resulting in CSK recruitment. We identified PAG as a substrate of PTP1B, and dephosphorylation abolished recruitment of the inhibitory kinase CSK. Overall, these findings illustrate how the combinatorial effects of PTKs and PTPs may be integrated to regulate signaling, with both classes of enzymes displaying exquisite specificity. PMID:25897081

  4. Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase and Kinase Specificity in Regulation of SRC and Breast Tumor Kinase.

    PubMed

    Fan, Gaofeng; Aleem, Saadat; Yang, Ming; Miller, W Todd; Tonks, Nicholas K

    2015-06-26

    Despite significant evidence to the contrary, the view that phosphatases are "nonspecific" still pervades the field. Systems biology approaches to defining how signal transduction pathways are integrated at the level of whole organisms also often downplay the contribution of phosphatases, defining them as "erasers" that serve merely to restore the system to its basal state. Here, we present a study that counteracts the idea of "nonspecific phosphatases." We have characterized two structurally similar and functionally related kinases, BRK and SRC, which are regulated by combinations of activating autophosphorylation and inhibitory C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. We demonstrated specificity at the level of the kinases in that SRMS phosphorylated the C terminus of BRK, but not SRC; in contrast, CSK is the kinase responsible for C-terminal phosphorylation of SRC, but not BRK. For the phosphatases, we observed that RNAi-mediated suppression of PTP1B resulted in opposing effects on the activity of BRK and SRC and have defined the mechanisms underlying this specificity. PTP1B inhibited BRK by directly dephosphorylating the Tyr-342 autophosphorylation site. In contrast, PTP1B potentiated SRC activity, but not by dephosphorylating SRC itself directly; instead, PTP1B regulated the interaction between CBP/PAG and CSK. SRC associated with, and phosphorylated, the transmembrane protein CBP/PAG at Tyr-317, resulting in CSK recruitment. We identified PAG as a substrate of PTP1B, and dephosphorylation abolished recruitment of the inhibitory kinase CSK. Overall, these findings illustrate how the combinatorial effects of PTKs and PTPs may be integrated to regulate signaling, with both classes of enzymes displaying exquisite specificity. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Molecular cloning of a pancreatic islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein.

    PubMed

    Arden, S D; Zahn, T; Steegers, S; Webb, S; Bergman, B; O'Brien, R M; Hutton, J C

    1999-03-01

    A pancreatic islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase-related protein (IGRP) was cloned using a subtractive cDNA expression cloning procedure from mouse insulinoma tissue. Two alternatively spliced variants that differed by the presence or absence of a 118-bp exon (exon IV) were detected in normal balb/c mice, diabetic ob/ob mice, and insulinoma tissue. The longer, 1901-bp full-length cDNA encoded a 355-amino acid protein (molecular weight 40,684) structurally related (50% overall identity) to the liver glucose-6-phosphatase and exhibited similar predicted transmembrane topology, conservation of catalytically important residues, and the presence of an endoplasmic reticulum retention signal. The shorter transcript encoded two possible open reading frames (ORFs), neither of which possessed His174, a residue thought to be the phosphoryl acceptor (Pan CJ, Lei KJ, Annabi B, Hemrika W, Chou JY: Transmembrane topology of glucose-6-phosphatase. J Biol Chem 273:6144-6148, 1998). Northern blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the mRNA was highly expressed in pancreatic islets and expressed more in beta-cell lines than in an alpha-cell line. It was notably absent in tissues and cell lines of non-islet neuroendocrine origin, and no other major tissue source of the mRNA was found. During development, it was expressed in parallel with insulin mRNA. The mRNA was efficiently translated and glycosylated in an in vitro translation/membrane translocation system and readily transcribed into COS 1, HIT, and CHO cells using cytomegalovirus or Rous sarcoma virus promoters. Whereas the liver glucose-6-phosphatase showed activity in these transfection systems, the IGRP failed to show glucose phosphotransferase or phosphatase activity with p-nitrophenol phosphate, inorganic pyrophosphate, or a range of sugar phosphates hydrolyzed by the liver enzyme. While the metabolic function of the enzyme is not resolved, its remarkable tissue-specific expression

  6. A screen for over-secretion of proteins by yeast based on a dual component cellular phosphatase and immuno-chromogenic stain for exported bacterial alkaline phosphatase reporter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To isolate over-secretors, we subjected to saturation mutagenesis, a strain of P.pastoris exporting E. coli alkaline phosphatase (EAP) fused to the secretory domain of the yeast α factor pheromone through cellular PHO1/KEX2 secretory processing signals as the α-sec-EAP reporter protein. Direct chromogenic staining for α-sec-EAP activity is non-specific as its NBT/BCIP substrate cross-reacts with cellular phosphatases which can be inhibited with Levulinic acid. However, the parental E(P) strain only exports detectable levels of α-sec-EAP at 69 hours and not within the 36 hour period post-seeding required for effective screening with the consequent absence of a reference for secretion. We substituted the endogenous cellular phosphatase activity as a comparative reference for secretion rate and levels as well as for colony alignment while elevating specificity and sensitivity of detection of the exported protein with other innovative modifications of the immuno-chromogenic staining application for screening protein export mutants. Results Raising the specificity and utility of staining for α-sec-EAP activity required 5 modifications including some to published methods. These included, exploitation of endogenous phosphatase activity, reduction of the cell/protein burden, establishment of the direct relation between concentrations of transcriptional inducer and exported membrane immobilized protein and concentrations of protein exported into growth media, amplification of immuno-specificity and sensitivity of detection of α-sec-EAP reporter enzyme signal and restriction of staining to optimal concentrations of antisera and time periods. The resultant immuno-chromogenic screen allows for the detection of early secretion and as little as 1.3 fold over-secretion of α-sec-EAP reporter protein by E(M) mutants in the presence of 10 fold -216 fold higher concentrations of HSA. Conclusions The modified immuno-chromogenic screen is sensitive, specific and has

  7. Cells of Escherichia coli contain a protein-tyrosine kinase, Wzc, and a phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase, Wzb.

    PubMed

    Vincent, C; Doublet, P; Grangeasse, C; Vaganay, E; Cozzone, A J; Duclos, B

    1999-06-01

    Two proteins of Escherichia coli, termed Wzc and Wzb, were analyzed for their capacity to participate in the reversible phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine. First, Wzc was overproduced from its specific gene and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. Upon incubation in the presence of radioactive ATP, it was found to effectively autophosphorylate. Two-dimensional analysis of its phosphoamino acid content revealed that it was modified exclusively at tyrosine. Second, Wzb was also overproduced from the corresponding gene and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. It was shown to contain a phosphatase activity capable of cleaving the synthetic substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate into p-nitrophenol and free phosphate. In addition, it was assayed on individual phosphorylated amino acids and appeared to dephosphorylate specifically phosphotyrosine, with no effect on phosphoserine or phosphothreonine. Such specificity for phosphotyrosine was confirmed by the observation that Wzb was able to dephosphorylate previously autophosphorylated Wzc. Together, these data demonstrate, for the first time, that E. coli cells contain both a protein-tyrosine kinase and a phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase. They also provide evidence that this phosphatase can utilize the kinase as an endogenous substrate, which suggests the occurrence of a regulatory mechanism connected with reversible protein phosphorylation on tyrosine. From comparative analysis of amino acid sequences, Wzc was found to be similar to a number of proteins present in other bacterial species which are all involved in the synthesis or export of exopolysaccharides. Since these polymers are considered important virulence factors, we suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation on tyrosine may be part of the cascade of reactions that determine the pathogenicity of bacteria.

  8. The effect of hibernation on protein phosphatases from ground squirrel organs.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Justin A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2007-12-15

    Protein phosphorylation has been identified as a reversible mechanism for the regulated suppression of metabolism and thermogenesis during mammalian hibernation. The effects of hibernation on the activity of serine/threonine and tyrosine protein phosphatases (PP1, PP2A, PP2C and PTPs) were assessed in five organs of Richardson's ground squirrel. Each phosphatase subfamily responded differently during torpor, and each showed organ-specific patterns of activity changes. The distribution of PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) isoforms (alpha, delta, gamma1) was assessed in five organs, and changes in the subcellular distribution of PP1 were observed during hibernation in liver and muscle. For example, in muscle, cytosolic PP1 content increased and myofibril-associated PP1 decreased during torpor. PP1c from ground squirrel liver was purified to homogeneity and characterized; temperature effects on PP1c maximal activity suggested that temperature had little or no effect on relative dephosphorylation potential at low temperatures. However, nucleotide inhibition of PP1c by ATP, ADP and AMP was much weaker at 5 degrees C compared with 37 degrees C assay temperatures. PP2A activity decreased in three organs (brown adipose, kidney, brain) during hibernation whereas PP2C activity was increased in liver and brain. PTPs were assessed using both a general substrate (ENDpYINASL) and a substrate (DADEpYLIPQQG) specific for PTPs containing the SH2-binding site; both revealed hibernation-associated changes in PTP activities. Changes in protein phosphatase activities suggest the relative importance of these modules in controlling metabolic function and cellular processes during mammalian hibernation.

  9. Abscisic acid sensor RCAR7/PYL13, specific regulator of protein phosphatase coreceptors.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Stefan; Tischer, Stefanie V; Wunschel, Christian; Christmann, Alexander; Grill, Erwin

    2014-04-15

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) acts both as a developmental signal and as an integrator of environmental cues such as drought and cold. ABA perception recruits an ABA-binding regulatory component [regulatory component of ABA receptor (RCAR)/PYR1/PYL] and an associated protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C). Phytohormone binding inactivates the phosphatase activity of the coreceptor, permitting phosphorelay of the ABA signal via downstream protein kinases. RCARs and PP2C coreceptors are represented by small protein families comprising 14 and 9 members in Arabidopsis, respectively. The specificity of the RCAR-PP2C interaction and the constraints contributing to specific combinations are poorly understood. In this contribution, we analyzed RCAR7/PYL13, which is characterized by three variant amino acid residues in the conserved ABA-binding pocket. RCAR7 regulated the phosphatase activity of the PP2Cs ABI1, ABI2, and PP2CA in vitro at nanomolar ABA levels; however, it was unable to regulate the structurally related hypersensitive to ABA 1 (HAB1). Site-directed mutagenesis of HAB1 established ABA-dependent regulation by RCAR7. Conversion of the noncanonical amino acid residues of RCAR7 into the consensus ABA-binding pocket did not perceptibly change receptor function. Ectopic expression of RCAR7 in Arabidopsis resulted in ABA hypersensitivity affecting gene regulation, seed germination, and stomatal closure. The RCAR7 loss-of-function mutant revealed no changes in ABA responses, similar to the RCAR9 knockout line, whereas the combined deficiency of RCAR7 and RCAR9 resulted in ABA-insensitive seed germination. The study shows a role of RCAR7 in early plant development, proves its ABA receptor function, and identifies structural constraints of RCAR7-PP2C interaction.

  10. Structure of thermotoga maritima stationary phase survival protein SurE : a novel acid phosphatase.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.-G; Skarina, T.; Katz, J. E.; Khachatryan, A; Vyas, S.; Arrowsmith, C. H.; Clarke, S.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. of California; Clinical Genomics Centre /Proteomics, Univ. Health Network

    2001-11-01

    Background: The rpoS, nlpD, pcm, and surE genes are among many whose expression is induced during the stationary phase of bacterial growth. rpoS codes for the stationary-phase RNA polymerase {sigma} subunit, and nlpD codes for a lipoprotein. The pcm gene product repairs damaged proteins by converting the atypical isoaspartyl residues back to L-aspartyls. The physiological and biochemical functions of surE are unknown, but its importance in stress is supported by the duplication of the surE gene in E. coli subjected to high-temperature growth. The pcm and surE genes are highly conserved in bacteria, archaea, and plants. Results: The structure of SurE from Thermotoga maritima was determined at 2.0 Angstroms. The SurE monomer is composed of two domains; a conserved N-terminal domain, a Rossman fold, and a C-terminal oligomerization domain, a new fold. Monomers form a dimer that assembles into a tetramer. Biochemical analysis suggests that SurE is an acid phosphatase, with an optimum pH of 5.5-6.2. The active site was identified in the N-terminal domain through analysis of conserved residues. Structure-based site-directed point mutations abolished phosphatase activity. T. maritima SurE intra- and intersubunit salt bridges were identified that may explain the SurE thermostability. Conclusions: The structure of SurE provided information about the protein's fold, oligomeric state, and active site. The protein possessed magnesium-dependent acid phosphatase activity, but the physiologically relevant substrate(s) remains to be identified. The importance of three of the assigned active site residues in catalysis was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis.

  11. Ankyrin domain of myosin 16 influences motor function and decreases protein phosphatase catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kengyel, András; Bécsi, Bálint; Kónya, Zoltán; Sellers, James R; Erdődi, Ferenc; Nyitrai, Miklós

    2015-05-01

    The unconventional myosin 16 (Myo16), which may have a role in regulation of cell cycle and cell proliferation, can be found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. It has a unique, eight ankyrin repeat containing pre-motor domain, the so-called ankyrin domain (My16Ank). Ankyrin repeats are present in several other proteins, e.g., in the regulatory subunit (MYPT1) of the myosin phosphatase holoenzyme, which binds to the protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). My16Ank shows sequence similarity to MYPT1. In this work, the interactions of recombinant and isolated My16Ank were examined in vitro. To test the effects of My16Ank on myosin motor function, we used skeletal muscle myosin or nonmuscle myosin 2B. The results showed that My16Ank bound to skeletal muscle myosin (K D ≈ 2.4 µM) and the actin-activated ATPase activity of heavy meromyosin (HMM) was increased in the presence of My16Ank, suggesting that the ankyrin domain can modulate myosin motor activity. My16Ank showed no direct interaction with either globular or filamentous actin. We found, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding technique, that My16Ank bound to PP1cα (K D ≈ 540 nM) and also to PP1cδ (K D ≈ 600 nM) and decreased its phosphatase activity towards the phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain. Our results suggest that one function of the ankyrin domain is probably to regulate the function of Myo16. It may influence the motor activity, and in complex with the PP1c isoforms, it can play an important role in the targeted dephosphorylation of certain, as yet unidentified, intracellular proteins.

  12. Low-Molecular-Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Predicts Prostate Cancer Outcome by Increasing the Metastatic Potential.

    PubMed

    Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta R; Hoekstra, Elmer; Hoogland, A Marije; Queiroz, Karla C Souza; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Stubbs, Andrew P; Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin; van Leenders, Geert J L H; Jenster, Guido; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Ferreira, Carmen V; Fuhler, Gwenny M

    2016-04-01

    Low-risk patients suffering from prostate cancer (PCa) are currently placed under active surveillance rather than undergoing radical prostatectomy. However, clear parameters for selecting the right patient for each strategy are not available, and new biomarkers and treatment modalities are needed. Low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMWPTP) could present such a target. To correlate expression levels of LMWPTP in primary PCa to clinical outcome, and determine the role of LMWPTP in prostate tumor cell biology. Acid phosphatase 1, soluble (ACP1) expression was analyzed on microarray data sets, which were subsequently used in Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Immunohistochemistry was performed on a tissue microarray containing material of 481 PCa patients whose clinicopathologic data were recorded. PCa cell line models were used to investigate the role of LMWPTP in cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, and anoikis resistance. The association between LMWPTP expression and clinical and pathologic outcomes was calculated using chi-square correlations and multivariable Cox regression analysis. Functional consequences of LMWPTP overexpression or downregulation were determined using migration and adhesion assays, confocal microscopy, Western blotting, and proliferation assays. LMWPTP expression was significantly increased in human PCa and correlated with earlier recurrence of disease (hazard ratio [HR]:1.99; p<0.001) and reduced patient survival (HR: 1.53; p=0.04). Unbiased Ingenuity analysis comparing cancer and normal prostate suggests migratory propensities in PCa. Indeed, overexpression of LMWPTP increases PCa cell migration, anoikis resistance, and reduces activation of focal adhesion kinase/paxillin, corresponding to decreased adherence. Overexpression of LMWPTP in PCa confers a malignant phenotype with worse clinical outcome. Prospective follow-up should determine the clinical potential of LMWPTP overexpression. These findings implicate low

  13. Extracellular regulation of type IIa receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases: mechanistic insights from structural analyses

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Charlotte H.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Aricescu, A. Radu

    2016-01-01

    The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) exhibit a wide repertoire of cellular signalling functions. In particular, type IIa RPTP family members have recently been highlighted as hubs for extracellular interactions in neurons, regulating neuronal extension and guidance, as well as synaptic organisation. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress of structural biology investigations into the architecture of type IIa RPTP ectodomains and their interactions with extracellular ligands. Structural insights, in combination with biophysical and cellular studies, allow us to begin to piece together molecular mechanisms for the transduction and integration of type IIa RPTP signals and to propose hypotheses for future experimental validation. PMID:25234613

  14. Modulation of EGF receptor autophosphorylation by alpha-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus via protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Vandana, Sharma; Navneet, Sangha; Surinder, Kaur; Krishnasastry, M V

    2003-01-30

    In the presence of assembled alpha-hemolysin (alpha-HL) of Staphylococcus aureus, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) is rapidly dephosphorylated. Several obvious possibilities that otherwise would have contributed to the dephosphorylation were ruled out. Instead, an elevation in the activity of a protein tyrosine phosphatase appears to be responsible for the observed loss of phosphorylation signal of EGFr. For this dephosphorylation, the assembly of alpha-HL is necessary while lytic pore formation is not required. In summary, the EGFr is unable to retain its phosphorylation signal in the presence of alpha-HL and the process is irreversible.

  15. Endogenous protein phosphatase 1 runs down gap junctional communication of rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Duthe, F; Plaisance, I; Sarrouilhe, D; Hervé, J C

    2001-11-01

    Gap junctional channels are essential for normal cardiac impulse propagation. In ventricular myocytes of newborn rats, channel opening requires the presence of ATP to allow protein kinase activities; otherwise, channels are rapidly deactivated by the action of endogenous protein phosphatases (PPs). The lack of influence of Mg(2+) and of selective PP2B inhibition is not in favor of the involvements of Mg(2+)-dependent PP2C and PP2B, respectively, in the loss of channel activity. Okadaic acid (1 microM) and calyculin A (100 nM), both inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A activities, significantly retarded the loss of channel activity. However, a better preservation was obtained in the presence of selective PP1 inhibitors heparin (100 microg/ml) or protein phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I2; 100 nM). Conversely, the stimulation of endogenous PP1 activity by p-nitrophenyl phosphate, in the presence of ATP, led to a progressive fading of junctional currents unless I2 was simultaneously added. Together, these results suggest that a basal phosphorylation-dephosphorylation turnover regulates gap junctional communication which is rapidly deactivated by PP1 activity when the phosphorylation pathway is hindered.

  16. Structural and Mechanistic Characterization of L-Histidinol Phosphate Phosphatase from the PHP Family of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ghodge, Swapnil V.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2013-01-01

    l-Histidinol phosphate phosphatase (HPP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-histidinol phosphate to L-histidinol and inorganic phosphate, the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of L-histidine. HPP from the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) family of proteins possesses a trinuclear active site and a distorted (β/α)7-barrel protein fold. This group of enzymes is closely related to the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes. The mechanism of phosphomonoester bond hydrolysis by the PHP family of HPP enzymes was addressed. Recombinant HPP from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis that was expressed in Escherichia coli contained a mixture of iron and zinc in the active site and had a catalytic efficiency of ~103 M−1 s−1. Expression of the protein under iron-free conditions resulted in the production of enzyme with a two orders of magnitude improvement in catalytic efficiency and a mixture of zinc and manganese in the active site. Solvent isotope and viscosity effects demonstrated that proton transfer steps and product dissociation steps are not rate-limiting. X-ray structures of HPP were determined with sulfate, L-histidinol/phosphate, and a complex of L-histidinol and arsenate bound in the active site. These crystal structures and the catalytic properties of variants were used to identify the structural elements required for catalysis and substrate recognition by the HPP family of enzymes within the amidohydrolase superfamily. PMID:23327428

  17. Isolation of protein-tyrosine phosphatase-like member-a variant from cementum.

    PubMed

    Valdés De Hoyos, A; Hoz-Rodríguez, L; Arzate, H; Narayanan, A S

    2012-02-01

    Cementum has been shown to contain unique polypeptides that participate in cell recruitment and differentiation during cementum formation. We report the isolation of a cDNA variant for protein-tyrosine phosphatase-like (proline instead of catalytic arginine) member-a (PTPLA) from cementum. A cementifying fibroma-derived λ-ZAP expression library was screened by panning with a monoclonal antibody to cementum attachment protein (CAP), and 1435 bp cDNA (gb AC093525.3) was isolated. This cDNA encodes a 140-amino-acid polypeptide, and its N-terminal 125 amino acids are identical to those of PTPLA. This isoform, designated as PTPLA-CAP, results from a read-through of the PTPLA exon 2 splice donor site, truncating after the second putative transmembrane domain. It contains 15 amino acids encoded within the intron between PTPLA exons 2 and 3, which replace the active site for PTPLA phosphatase activity. The recombinant protein, rhPTPLA-CAP, has Mr 19 kDa and cross-reacts with anti-CAP antibody. Anti-rhPTPLA-CAP antibody immunostained cementum cells, cementum, heart, and liver. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that PTPLA was expressed in all periodontal cells; however, PTPLA-CAP expression was limited to cementum cells. The rhPTPLA-CAP promoted gingival fibroblast attachment. We conclude that PTPLA-CAP is a splice variant of PTPLA, and that, in the periodontium, cementum and cementum cells express this variant.

  18. HSP105 Recruits Protein Phosphatase 2A To Dephosphorylate β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nancy; Kakunda, Michael; Pham, Victoria; Lill, Jennie R.; Du, Pan; Wongchenko, Matthew; Yan, Yibing; Firestein, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway causes accumulation of β-catenin in the cytoplasm and its subsequent translocation into the nucleus to initiate the transcription of the target genes. Without Wnt stimulation, β-catenin forms a complex with axin (axis inhibitor), adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), casein kinase 1α (CK1α), and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and undergoes phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination. Phosphatases, such as protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), interestingly, also are components of this degradation complex; therefore, a balance must be reached between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. How this balance is regulated is largely unknown. Here we show that a heat shock protein, HSP105, is a previously unidentified component of the β-catenin degradation complex. HSP105 is required for Wnt signaling, since depletion of HSP105 compromises β-catenin accumulation and target gene transcription upon Wnt stimulation. Mechanistically, HSP105 depletion disrupts the integration of PP2A into the β-catenin degradation complex, favoring the hyperphosphorylation and degradation of β-catenin. HSP105 is overexpressed in many types of tumors, correlating with increased nuclear β-catenin protein levels and Wnt target gene upregulation. Furthermore, overexpression of HSP105 is a prognostic biomarker that correlates with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients as well as melanoma patients participating in the BRIM2 clinical study. PMID:25645927

  19. Expression and clinical role of protein of regenerating liver (PRL) phosphatases in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Reich, Reuven; Hadar, Shany; Davidson, Ben

    2011-02-11

    The present study analyzed the expression and clinical role of the protein of regenerating liver (PRL) phosphatase family in ovarian carcinoma. PRL1-3 mRNA expression was studied in 184 tumors (100 effusions, 57 primary carcinomas, 27 solid metastases) using RT-PCR. PRL-3 protein expression was analyzed in 157 tumors by Western blotting. PRL-1 mRNA levels were significantly higher in effusions compared to solid tumors (p < 0.001), and both PRL-1 and PRL-2 were overexpressed in pleural compared to peritoneal effusions (p = 0.001). PRL-3 protein expression was significantly higher in primary diagnosis pre-chemotherapy compared to post-chemotherapy disease recurrence effusions (p = 0.003). PRL-1 mRNA expression in effusions correlated with longer overall survival (p = 0.032), and higher levels of both PRL-1 and PRL-2 mRNA correlated with longer overall survival for patients with pre-chemotherapy effusions (p = 0.022 and p = 0.02, respectively). Analysis of the effect of laminin on PRL-3 expression in ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro showed dose-dependent PRL-3 expression in response to exogenous laminin, mediated by Phospholipase D. In contrast to previous studies associating PRL-3 with poor outcome, our data show that PRL-3 expression has no clinical role in ovarian carcinoma, whereas PRL-1 and PRL-2 expression is associated with longer survival, suggesting that PRL phosphatases may be markers of improved outcome in this cancer.

  20. Mutations in a new Arabidopsis cyclophilin disrupt its interaction with protein phosphatase 2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a component of multiple signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Disruption of PP2A activity in Arabidopsis is known to alter auxin transport and growth response pathways. We demonstrated that the regulatory subunit A of an Arabidopsis PP2A interacts with a novel cyclophilin, ROC7. The gene for this cyclophilin encodes a protein that contains a unique 30-amino acid extension at the N-terminus, which distinguishes the gene product from all previously identified Arabidopsis cyclophilins. Altered forms of ROC7 cyclophilin with mutations in the conserved DENFKL domain did not bind to PP2A. Unlike protein phosphatase 2B, PP2A activity in Arabidopsis extracts was not affected by the presence of the cyclophilin-binding molecule cyclosporin. The ROC7 transcript was expressed to high levels in all tissues tested. Expression of an ROC7 antisense transcript gave rise to increased root growth. These results indicate that cyclophilin may have a role in regulating PP2A activity, by a mechanism that differs from that employed for cyclophilin regulation of PP2B.

  1. Mutations in a new Arabidopsis cyclophilin disrupt its interaction with protein phosphatase 2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a component of multiple signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Disruption of PP2A activity in Arabidopsis is known to alter auxin transport and growth response pathways. We demonstrated that the regulatory subunit A of an Arabidopsis PP2A interacts with a novel cyclophilin, ROC7. The gene for this cyclophilin encodes a protein that contains a unique 30-amino acid extension at the N-terminus, which distinguishes the gene product from all previously identified Arabidopsis cyclophilins. Altered forms of ROC7 cyclophilin with mutations in the conserved DENFKL domain did not bind to PP2A. Unlike protein phosphatase 2B, PP2A activity in Arabidopsis extracts was not affected by the presence of the cyclophilin-binding molecule cyclosporin. The ROC7 transcript was expressed to high levels in all tissues tested. Expression of an ROC7 antisense transcript gave rise to increased root growth. These results indicate that cyclophilin may have a role in regulating PP2A activity, by a mechanism that differs from that employed for cyclophilin regulation of PP2B.

  2. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity regulates osteoclast formation and function: inhibition by alendronate.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A; Rutledge, S J; Endo, N; Opas, E E; Tanaka, H; Wesolowski, G; Leu, C T; Huang, Z; Ramachandaran, C; Rodan, S B; Rodan, G A

    1996-01-01

    Alendronate (ALN), an aminobisphosphonate used in the treatment of osteoporosis, is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption. Its molecular target is still unknown. This study examines the effects of ALN on the activity of osteoclast protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP; protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48), called PTPepsilon. Using osteoclast-like cells generated by coculturing mouse bone marrow cells with mouse calvaria osteoblasts, we found by molecular cloning and RNA blot hybridization that PTPepsilon is highly expressed in osteoclastic cells. A purified fusion protein of PTPepsilon expressed in bacteria was inhibited by ALN with an IC50 of 2 microM. Other PTP inhibitors--orthovanadate and phenylarsine oxide (PAO)-inhibited PTPepsilon with IC50 values of 0.3 microM and 18 microM, respectively. ALN and another bisphosphonate, etidronate, also inhibited the activities of other bacterially expressed PTPs such as PTPsigma and CD45 (also called leukocyte common antigen). The PTP inhibitors ALN, orthovanadate, and PAO suppressed in vitro formation of multinucleated osteoclasts from osteoclast precursors and in vitro bone resorption by isolated rat osteoclasts (pit formation) with estimated IC50 values of 10 microM, 3 microM, and 0.05 microM, respectively. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphatase activity plays an important role in osteoclast formation and function and is a putative molecular target of bisphosphonate action. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8610169

  3. Negative control of BAK1 by protein phosphatase 2A during plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Segonzac, Cécile; Macho, Alberto P; Sanmartín, Maite; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Sánchez-Serrano, José Juan; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-09-17

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by surface-localized pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) activates plant innate immunity, mainly through activation of numerous protein kinases. Appropriate induction of immune responses must be tightly regulated, as many of the kinases involved have an intrinsic high activity and are also regulated by other external and endogenous stimuli. Previous evidences suggest that PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) is under constant negative regulation by protein phosphatases but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that protein Ser/Thr phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) controls the activation of PRR complexes by modulating the phosphostatus of the co-receptor and positive regulator BAK1. A potential PP2A holoenzyme composed of the subunits A1, C4, and B'η/ζ inhibits immune responses triggered by several PAMPs and anti-bacterial immunity. PP2A constitutively associates with BAK1 in planta. Impairment in this PP2A-based regulation leads to increased steady-state BAK1 phosphorylation, which can poise enhanced immune responses. This work identifies PP2A as an important negative regulator of plant innate immunity that controls BAK1 activation in surface-localized immune receptor complexes.

  4. Negative control of BAK1 by protein phosphatase 2A during plant innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Segonzac, Cécile; Macho, Alberto P; Sanmartín, Maite; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Sánchez-Serrano, José Juan; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by surface-localized pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) activates plant innate immunity, mainly through activation of numerous protein kinases. Appropriate induction of immune responses must be tightly regulated, as many of the kinases involved have an intrinsic high activity and are also regulated by other external and endogenous stimuli. Previous evidences suggest that PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) is under constant negative regulation by protein phosphatases but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that protein Ser/Thr phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) controls the activation of PRR complexes by modulating the phosphostatus of the co-receptor and positive regulator BAK1. A potential PP2A holoenzyme composed of the subunits A1, C4, and B’η/ζ inhibits immune responses triggered by several PAMPs and anti-bacterial immunity. PP2A constitutively associates with BAK1 in planta. Impairment in this PP2A-based regulation leads to increased steady-state BAK1 phosphorylation, which can poise enhanced immune responses. This work identifies PP2A as an important negative regulator of plant innate immunity that controls BAK1 activation in surface-localized immune receptor complexes. PMID:25085430

  5. Kinetic isotope effects in the characterization of catalysis by protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Alvan C

    2015-11-01

    Although thermodynamically favorable, the uncatalyzed hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters is extraordinarily slow, making phosphatases among the most catalytically efficient enzymes known. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are ubiquitous in biology, and kinetic isotope effects were one of the key mechanistic tools used to discern molecular details of their catalytic mechanism and the transition state for phosphoryl transfer. Later, the unique level of detail KIEs provided led to deeper questions about the potential role of protein motions in PTP catalysis. The recent discovery that such motions are responsible for different catalytic rates between PTPs arose from questions originating from KIE data showing that the transition states and chemical mechanisms are identical, combined with structural data demonstrating superimposable active sites. KIEs also reveal perturbations to the transition state as mutations are made to residues directly involved in chemistry, and to residues that affect protein motions essential for catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of a Highly Conserved Hypothetical Protein TON_0340 as a Probable Manganese-Dependent Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Young-Sik; Lee, Seong-Gyu; Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Ku, Bonsu; Shin, Ho-Chul; Cha, Sun-Shin; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kang, Sung-Gyun; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2016-01-01

    A hypothetical protein TON_0340 of a Thermococcus species is a protein conserved in a variety of organisms including human. Herein, we present four different crystal structures of TON_0340, leading to the identification of an active-site cavity harboring a metal-binding site composed of six invariant aspartate and glutamate residues that coordinate one to three metal ions. Biochemical and mutational analyses involving many phosphorous compounds show that TON_0340 is a Mn2+-dependent phosphatase. Mg2+ binds to TON_0340 less tightly and activates the phosphatase activity less efficiently than Mn2+. Whereas Ca2+ and Zn2+ are able to bind to the protein, they are unable to activate its enzymatic activity. Since the active-site cavity is small and largely composed of nearly invariant stretches of 11 or 13 amino acids, the physiological substrates of TON_0340 and its homologues are likely to be a small and the same molecule. The Mn2+-bound TON_0340 structure provides a canonical model for the ubiquitously present TON_0340 homologues and lays a strong foundation for the elucidation of their substrate and biological function. PMID:27907125

  7. Identification of a Highly Conserved Hypothetical Protein TON_0340 as a Probable Manganese-Dependent Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Young-Sik; Lee, Seong-Gyu; Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Ku, Bonsu; Shin, Ho-Chul; Cha, Sun-Shin; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kang, Sung-Gyun; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2016-01-01

    A hypothetical protein TON_0340 of a Thermococcus species is a protein conserved in a variety of organisms including human. Herein, we present four different crystal structures of TON_0340, leading to the identification of an active-site cavity harboring a metal-binding site composed of six invariant aspartate and glutamate residues that coordinate one to three metal ions. Biochemical and mutational analyses involving many phosphorous compounds show that TON_0340 is a Mn2+-dependent phosphatase. Mg2+ binds to TON_0340 less tightly and activates the phosphatase activity less efficiently than Mn2+. Whereas Ca2+ and Zn2+ are able to bind to the protein, they are unable to activate its enzymatic activity. Since the active-site cavity is small and largely composed of nearly invariant stretches of 11 or 13 amino acids, the physiological substrates of TON_0340 and its homologues are likely to be a small and the same molecule. The Mn2+-bound TON_0340 structure provides a canonical model for the ubiquitously present TON_0340 homologues and lays a strong foundation for the elucidation of their substrate and biological function.

  8. Isolation of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase-like Member-a Variant from Cementum

    PubMed Central

    Valdés De Hoyos, A.; Hoz-Rodríguez, L.; Arzate, H.; Narayanan, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Cementum has been shown to contain unique polypeptides that participate in cell recruitment and differentiation during cementum formation. We report the isolation of a cDNA variant for protein-tyrosine phosphatase-like (proline instead of catalytic arginine) member-a (PTPLA) from cementum. A cementifying fibroma-derived λ-ZAP expression library was screened by panning with a monoclonal antibody to cementum attachment protein (CAP), and 1435 bp cDNA (gb AC093525.3) was isolated. This cDNA encodes a 140-amino-acid polypeptide, and its N-terminal 125 amino acids are identical to those of PTPLA. This isoform, designated as PTPLA-CAP, results from a read-through of the PTPLA exon 2 splice donor site, truncating after the second putative transmembrane domain. It contains 15 amino acids encoded within the intron between PTPLA exons 2 and 3, which replace the active site for PTPLA phosphatase activity. The recombinant protein, rhPTPLA-CAP, has Mr 19 kDa and cross-reacts with anti-CAP antibody. Anti-rhPTPLA-CAP antibody immunostained cementum cells, cementum, heart, and liver. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that PTPLA was expressed in all periodontal cells; however, PTPLA-CAP expression was limited to cementum cells. The rhPTPLA-CAP promoted gingival fibroblast attachment. We conclude that PTPLA-CAP is a splice variant of PTPLA, and that, in the periodontium, cementum and cementum cells express this variant. PMID:22067203

  9. Monitoring of microcystin-protein phosphatase adduct formation with immunochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, B H; Yu, F Y; Huang, X; Chu, F S

    2000-05-01

    Using anti-microcystin-LR monoclonal antibodies, an immunoblotting procedure was developed to monitor the formation of microcystin-protein phosphatase adducts in vitro and in vivo. The detection limits for the covalent binding of MCYST-LR with the recombinant protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and rabbit liver cytosol proteins were found to be 0.1 ng and 0.3 ng per assay, respectively. MCYST-PP1 adducts were detected 30 s after the addition of MCYST-LR into the reaction mixture. Reduction of the methyldehydroalanine (Mdha) residue of MCYST-LR with ethanethiol totally abolished the covalent binding of the toxin to PP1, but retained its inhibitory toxicity on PP1. Immunoblotting analyses and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay showed that between 5 min to 16 h after i.p. injection of single dose (35 microg/kg) of MCYST-LR into mice, approximately 0-27% of the injected toxin was found covalently bound while 0.2-9.2% existed as free form in liver cytosol.

  10. Protein Phosphatase 4 mediates localization of the Miranda complex during Drosophila neuroblast asymmetric divisions

    PubMed Central

    Sousa-Nunes, Rita; Chia, William; Somers, W. Greg

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants is a crucial step in neuroblast asymmetric divisions. Whereas several protein kinases have been shown to mediate this process, no protein phosphatase has so far been implicated. In a clonal screen of larval neuroblasts we identified the evolutionarily conserved Protein Phosphatase 4 (PP4) regulatory subunit PP4R3/Falafel (Flfl) as a key mediator specific for the localization of Miranda (Mira) and associated cell fate determinants during both interphase and mitosis. Flfl is predominantly nuclear during interphase/prophase and cytoplasmic after nuclear envelope breakdown. Analyses of nuclear excluded as well as membrane targeted versions of the protein suggest that the asymmetric cortical localization of Mira and its associated proteins during mitosis depends on cytoplasmic/membrane-associated Flfl, whereas nuclear Flfl is required to exclude the cell fate determinant Prospero (Pros), and consequently Mira, from the nucleus during interphase/prophase. Attenuating the function of either the catalytic subunit of PP4 (PP4C; Pp4-19C in Drosophila) or of another regulatory subunit, PP4R2 (PPP4R2r in Drosophila), leads to similar defects in the localization of Mira and associated proteins. Flfl is capable of directly interacting with Mira, and genetic analyses indicate that flfl acts in parallel to or downstream from the tumor suppressor lethal (2) giant larvae (lgl). Our findings suggest that Flfl may target PP4 to the MIra protein complex to facilitate dephosphorylation step(s) crucial for its cortical association/asymmetric localization. PMID:19204120

  11. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F; Mori Sequeiros García, M Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M; Orlando, Ulises D; Mele, Pablo G; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the "classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed.

  12. Identification and Biochemical Characterization of Protein Phosphatase 5 from the Cantharidin-Producing Blister Beetle, Epicauta chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi’en; Lü, Shumin; Zhang, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases which has been recognized in regulation of diverse cellular processes. A cDNA fragment encoding PP5 (EcPP5) was cloned and characterized from the cantharidin-producing blister beetle, E. chinensis. EcPP5 contains an open reading frame of 1500 bp that encodes a protein of 56.89 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence shares 88% and 68% identities to the PP5 of Tribolium castaneum and humans, respectively. Analysis of the primary sequence shows that EcPP5 has three TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) motifs at its N-terminal region and contains a highly conserved C-terminal catalytic domain. RT-PCR reveals that EcPP5 is expressed in all developmental stages and in different tissues. The recombinant EcPP5 (rEcPP5) was produced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein exhibited phosphatase activity towards pNPP (p-nitrophenyl phosphate) and phosphopeptides, and its activity can be enhanced by arachidonic acid. In vitro inhibition study revealed that protein phosphatase inhibitors, okadaic acid, cantharidin, norcantharidin and endothall, inhibited its activity. Further, protein phosphatase activity of total soluble protein extract from E. chinensis adults could be impeded by these inhibitors suggesting there might be some mechanism to protect this beetle from being damaged by its self-produced cantharidin. PMID:24351830

  13. TIPRL Inhibits Protein Phosphatase 4 Activity and Promotes H2AX Phosphorylation in the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Kimberly Romero; Reid, Michael A; Yang, Ying; Tran, Thai Q; Wang, Wen-I; Lowman, Xazmin; Pan, Min; Kong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of protein kinase regulation in the DNA damage response, the mechanism that controls protein phosphatase activity in this pathway is unclear. Unlike kinases, the activity and specificity of serine/threonine phosphatases is governed largely by their associated proteins. Here we show that Tip41-like protein (TIPRL), an evolutionarily conserved binding protein for PP2A-family phosphatases, is a negative regulator of protein phosphatase 4 (PP4). Knockdown of TIPRL resulted in increased PP4 phosphatase activity and formation of the active PP4-C/PP4R2 complex known to dephosphorylate γ-H2AX. Thus, overexpression of TIPRL promotes phosphorylation of H2AX, and increases γ-H2AX positive foci in response to DNA damage, whereas knockdown of TIPRL inhibits γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In correlation with γ-H2AX levels, we found that TIPRL overexpression promotes cell death in response to genotoxic stress, and knockdown of TIPRL protects cells from genotoxic agents. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TIPRL inhibits PP4 activity to allow for H2AX phosphorylation and the subsequent DNA damage response.

  14. Bacterial-like PPP protein phosphatases: novel sequence alterations in pathogenic eukaryotes and peculiar features of bacterial sequence similarity.

    PubMed

    Kerk, David; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is a widespread modification affecting the great majority of eukaryotic cellular proteins, and whose effects influence nearly every cellular function. Protein phosphatases are increasingly recognized as exquisitely regulated contributors to these changes. The PPP (phosphoprotein phosphatase) family comprises enzymes, which catalyze dephosphorylation at serine and threonine residues. Nearly a decade ago, "bacterial-like" enzymes were recognized with similarity to proteins from various bacterial sources: SLPs (Shewanella-like phosphatases), RLPHs (Rhizobiales-like phosphatases), and ALPHs (ApaH-like phosphatases). A recent article from our laboratory appearing in Plant Physiology characterizes their extensive organismal distribution, abundance in plant species, predicted subcellular localization, motif organization, and sequence evolution. One salient observation is the distinct evolutionary trajectory followed by SLP genes and proteins in photosynthetic eukaryotes vs. animal and plant pathogens derived from photosynthetic ancestors. We present here a closer look at sequence data that emphasizes the distinctiveness of pathogen SLP proteins and that suggests that they might represent novel drug targets. A second observation in our original report was the high degree of similarity between the bacterial-like PPPs of eukaryotes and closely related proteins of the "eukaryotic-like" phyla Myxococcales and Planctomycetes. We here reflect on the possible implications of these observations and their importance for future research.

  15. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  16. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  17. B56δ-related protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction identified in patients with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Houge, Gunnar; Haesen, Dorien; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Mehta, Sarju; Parker, Michael J.; Wright, Michael; Vogt, Julie; McKee, Shane; Tolmie, John L.; Cordeiro, Nuno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Reijnders, Margot R.F.; Berland, Siren; Hayman, Eli; Lahat, Eli; Brilstra, Eva H.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; de Bie, Charlotte I.; Hoischen, Alexander; Eichler, Evan E.; Holdhus, Rita; Steen, Vidar M.; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Hurles, Matthew E.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Janssens, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia, epileptic susceptibility, frontal bossing, mild hypertelorism, and downslanting palpebral fissures. PP2A comprises catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunits that determine subcellular anchoring, substrate specificity, and physiological function. Ten patients had mutations within a highly conserved acidic loop of the PPP2R5D-encoded B56δ regulatory subunit, with the same E198K mutation present in 6 individuals. Five patients had mutations in the PPP2R1A-encoded scaffolding Aα subunit, with the same R182W mutation in 3 individuals. Some Aα cases presented with large ventricles, causing macrocephaly and hydrocephalus suspicion, and all cases exhibited partial or complete corpus callosum agenesis. Functional evaluation revealed that mutant A and B subunits were stable and uncoupled from phosphatase activity. Mutant B56δ was A and C binding–deficient, while mutant Aα subunits bound B56δ well but were unable to bind C or bound a catalytically impaired C, suggesting a dominant-negative effect where mutant subunits hinder dephosphorylation of B56δ-anchored substrates. Moreover, mutant subunit overexpression resulted in hyperphosphorylation of GSK3β, a B56δ-regulated substrate. This effect was in line with clinical observations, supporting a correlation between the ID degree and biochemical disturbance. PMID:26168268

  18. Structure of Thermotoga maritima Stationary Phase Survival Protein SurE: A Novel Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, R.-G.; Skarina, T.; Katz, J.E.; Beasley, S.; Khachatryan, A.; Vyas, S.; Arrowsmith, C.H.; Clarke, S.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background The rpoS, nlpD, pcm, and surE genes are among many whose expression is induced during the stationary phase of bacterial growth. rpoS codes for the stationary-phase RNA polymerase σ subunit, and nlpD codes for a lipoprotein. The pcm gene product repairs damaged proteins by converting the atypical isoaspartyl residues back to L-aspartyls. The physiological and biochemical functions of surE are unknown, but its importance in stress is supported by the duplication of the surE gene in E. coli subjected to high-temperature growth. The pcm and surE genes are highly conserved in bacteria, archaea, and plants. Results The structure of SurE from Thermotoga maritima was determined at 2.0 Å. The SurE monomer is composed of two domains; a conserved N-terminal domain, a Rossman fold, and a C-terminal oligomerization domain, a new fold. Monomers form a dimer that assembles into a tetramer. Biochemical analysis suggests that SurE is an acid phosphatase, with an optimum pH of 5.5–6.2. The active site was identified in the N-terminal domain through analysis of conserved residues. Structure-based site-directed point mutations abolished phosphatase activity. T. maritima SurE intra- and inter-subunit salt bridges were identified that may explain the SurE thermostability. Conclusions The structure of SurE provided information about the protein’s fold, oligomeric state, and active site. The protein possessed magnesium-dependent acid phosphatase activity, but the physiologically relevant substrate(s) remains to be identified. The importance of three of the assigned active site residues in catalysis was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:11709173

  19. Protein Phosphatase 2A as a Therapeutic Target in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Arriazu, Elena; Pippa, Raffaella; Odero, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous malignant disorder of hematopoietic progenitor cells in which several genetic and epigenetic aberrations have been described. Despite progressive advances in our understanding of the molecular biology of this disease, the outcome for most patients is poor. It is, therefore, necessary to develop more effective treatment strategies. Genetic aberrations affecting kinases have been widely studied in AML; however, the role of phosphatases remains underexplored. Inactivation of the tumor-suppressor protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is frequent in AML patients, making it a promising target for therapy. There are several PP2A inactivating mechanisms reported in this disease. Deregulation or specific post-translational modifications of PP2A subunits have been identified as a cause of PP2A malfunction, which lead to deregulation of proliferation or apoptosis pathways, depending on the subunit affected. Likewise, overexpression of either SET or cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, endogenous inhibitors of PP2A, is a recurrent event in AML that impairs PP2A activity, contributing to leukemogenesis progression. Interestingly, the anticancer activity of several PP2A-activating drugs (PADs) depends on interaction/sequestration of SET. Preclinical studies show that pharmacological restoration of PP2A activity by PADs effectively antagonizes leukemogenesis, and that these drugs have synergistic cytotoxic effects with conventional chemotherapy and kinase inhibitors, opening new possibilities for personalized treatment in AML patients, especially in cases with SET-dependent inactivation of PP2A. Here, we review the role of PP2A as a druggable tumor suppressor in AML. PMID:27092295

  20. Type 1 protein phosphatase acts in opposition to IpL1 protein kinase in regulating yeast chromosome segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, L; Wang, W; Chan, C S

    1994-01-01

    The IPL1 gene is required for high-fidelity chromosome segregation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conditional ipl1ts mutants missegregate chromosomes severely at 37 degrees C. Here, we report that IPL1 encodes an essential putative protein kinase whose function is required during the later part of each cell cycle. At 26 degrees C, the permissive growth temperature, ipl1 mutant cells are defective in the recovery from a transient G2/M-phase arrest caused by the antimicrotubule drug nocodazole. In an effort to identify additional gene products that participate with the Ipl1 protein kinase in regulating chromosome segregation in yeast, a truncated version of the previously identified DIS2S1/GLC7 gene was isolated as a dosage-dependent suppressor of ipl1ts mutations. DIS2S1/GLC7 is predicted to encode a catalytic subunit (PP1C) of type 1 protein phosphatase. Overexpression of the full-length DIS2S1/GLC7 gene results in chromosome missegregation in wild-type cells and exacerbates the mutant phenotype in ipl1 cells. In addition, the glc7-1 mutation can partially suppress the ipl1-1 mutation. These results suggest that type 1 protein phosphatase acts in opposition to the Ipl1 protein kinase in vivo to ensure the high fidelity of chromosome segregation. Images PMID:8007975

  1. Characterization of a novel plant PP2C-like protein Ser/Thr phosphatase as a calmodulin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Daisuke

    2003-09-26

    Protein phosphatases regulated by calmodulin (CaM) mediate the action of intracellular Ca2+ and modulate functions of various target proteins by dephosphorylation. In plants, however, the role of Ca2+ in the regulation of protein dephosphorylation is not well understood due to a lack of information on characteristics of CaM-regulated protein phosphatases. Screening of a cDNA library of the moss Physcomitrella patens by using 35S-labeled calmodulin as a ligand resulted in identification of a gene, PCaMPP, that encodes a protein serine/threonine phosphatase with 373 amino acids. PCaMPP had a catalytic domain with sequence similarity to type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) with six conserved metal-associating amino acid residues and also had an extra C-terminal domain. Recombinant GST fusion proteins of PCaMPP exhibited Mn2+-dependent phosphatase activity, and the activity was inhibited by pyrophosphate and 1 mm Ca2+ but not by okadaic acid, orthovanadate, or beta-glycerophosphate. Furthermore, the PCaMPP activity was increased 1.7-fold by addition of CaM at nanomolar concentrations. CaM binding assays using deletion proteins and a synthetic peptide revealed that the CaM-binding region resides within the basic amphiphilic amino acid region 324-346 in the C-terminal domain. The CaM-binding region had sequence similarity to amino acids in one of three alpha-helices in the C-terminal domain of human PP2Calpha, suggesting a novel role of the C-terminal domains for the phosphatase activity. These results provide the first evidence showing possible regulation of PP2C-related phosphatases by Ca2+/CaM in plants. Genes similar to PCaMPP were found in genomes of various higher plant species, suggesting that PCaMPP-type protein phosphatases are conserved in land plants.

  2. Molecular Mechanism for the Regulation of Microcystin Toxicity to Protein Phosphatase 1 by Glutathione Conjugation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoning; Du, Yonggang; Zhang, Shuhan; Zhang, Ying; Teng, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) conjugation was an important pathway to regulate the toxicity of microcystins (MCs) targeted to protein phosphatases. To explore the specific molecular mechanism for GSH detoxification, two typical MC-GSHs (derived from MCLR and MCRR) were synthesized, prepared, and purified according to previous research. Then, the reduced inhibition effect for MC-GSHs on protein phosphatase 1 was verified by comparing with their original toxins. To further clarify the molecular mechanism for MC-GSHs detoxification, we evaluated the interactions between MCs/MC-GSHs and PP1 with the assistance of MOE molecule simulation. When GSH was introduced to MCs, the covalent binding (Mdha7 to Cys273), the hydrophobic interaction (Adda5 with PP1), the hydrogen bonds (especially for Lys2-Arg96 and Glu6-Tyr272), the covalent combination (between Mdha7 and Cys273), and the ion bonds (between Mn2+ and Asn124/His248/Asp64/His66) of MCLR/MCRR-PP1 complexes weakened to a certain extent, while the ion bonds between Mn2+ and His173/Asp92 residues increased. It was not difficult to find that the toxicity of MCs was closely related to the above sites/interactions and the above key information for MCs-PP1; MC-GSHs-PP1 complexes were important for clarifying the detoxification mechanism of MC-GSHs pathway. This study offers a comprehensive cognition on MCs toxicity regulation and provides valid theoretical support to control their potential risk. PMID:28337461

  3. Zinc binds to and directly inhibits protein phosphatase 2A in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Luo, Dan-Ju; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Qiu, Mei; Yang, Yang; Yan, Xiong; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Ye, Qi-Fa; Liu, Rong

    2015-06-01

    Zinc induces protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inactivation and tau hyperphosphorylation through PP2A (tyrosine 307) phosphorylation in cells and the brain, but whether Zn(2+) has a direct inhibitory effect on PP2A is not clear. Here we explored the effect of Zn(2+) on PP2A and their direct interaction in vitro. The results showed that Zn(2+) mimicked the inhibitory effect of okadaic acid on protein phosphatase and prevented tau dephosphorylation in N2a cell lysates. PP2A activity assays indicated that a low concentration (10 μmol/L) of Zn(2+) inhibited PP2A directly. Further Zn(2+)-IDA-agarose affinity binding assays showed that Zn(2+) bound to and inhibited PP2Ac(51-270) but not PP2Ac(1-50) or PP2Ac(271-309). Taken together, Zn(2+) inhibits PP2A directly through binding to PP2Ac(51-270) in vitro.

  4. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  5. Transcriptome analyses of chronic traumatic encephalopathy show alterations in protein phosphatase expression associated with tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Sun; Lee, Seungbok; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Hwang, Yu Jin; Cho, Hyesun; Yoo, Seong-Keun; Kim, Yunha; Lim, Sungsu; Kim, Yun Kyung; Hwang, Eun Mi; Kim, Su Hyun; Kim, Chong-Hyun; Hyeon, Seung Jae; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Yona; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D; Lee, Junghee; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Jong-Il; Kowall, Neil W; Ryu, Hoon; McKee, Ann C

    2017-05-19

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is associated with repetitive head injury and has distinctive neuropathological features that differentiate this disease from other neurodegenerative diseases. Intraneuronal tau aggregates, although they occur in different patterns, are diagnostic neuropathological features of CTE, but the precise mechanism of tauopathy is not known in CTE. We performed whole RNA sequencing analysis of post-mortem brain tissue from patients with CTE and compared the results to normal controls to determine the transcriptome signature changes associated with CTE. The results showed that the genes related to the MAP kinase and calcium-signaling pathways were significantly downregulated in CTE. The altered expression of protein phosphatases (PPs) in these networks further suggested that the tauopathy observed in CTE involves common pathological mechanisms similar to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using cell lines and animal models, we also showed that reduced PPP3CA/PP2B phosphatase activity is directly associated with increases in phosphorylated (p)-tau proteins. These findings provide important insights into PP-dependent neurodegeneration and may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to reduce the tauopathy associated with CTE.

  6. Targeting inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A as a therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Archana; Tabanor, Kayann; Chaguturu, Rathnam; Aldrich, Jane V

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A (I2PP2A), a biological inhibitor of the cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A, is associated with numerous cellular processes that often lead to the formation and progression of cancer. In this study we hypothesized that targeting the inhibition of I2PP2A’s multiple functions in prostate cancer cells might prevent cancer progression. We have investigated the effect of the small chain C6-ceramide, known to be a bioactive tumor suppressor lipid, on I2PP2A function, thereby affecting c-Myc signaling and histone acetylation in cells. Our data indicated that C6-ceramide treatment of prostate cancer cells induces cell death in PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells, but not normal prostate epithelial cells. C6-ceramide was able to disrupt the association between PP2A and I2PP2A. C6-ceramide inhibits I2PP2A’s upregulation of c-Myc and downregulation of histone acetylation in prostate cancer cells. Our data indicated that targeting cancer related signaling pathways through I2PP2A using ceramide as an anti-I2PP2A agent could have beneficial effects as a therapeutic approach to prevent prostate cancer. PMID:24025258

  7. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  8. Therapeutic Implications for Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Goebel-Goody, Susan M.; Baum, Matthew; Paspalas, Constantinos D.; Fernandez, Stephanie M.; Carty, Niki C.; Kurup, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase that modulates key signaling molecules involved in synaptic plasticity and neuronal function. Targets include extracellular-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), stress-activated protein kinase p38 (p38), the Src family tyrosine kinase Fyn, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs). STEP-mediated dephosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and Fyn leads to inactivation of these enzymes, whereas STEP-mediated dephosphorylation of surface NMDARs and AMPARs promotes their endocytosis. Accordingly, the current model of STEP function posits that it opposes long-term potentiation and promotes long-term depression. Phosphorylation, cleavage, dimerization, ubiquitination, and local translation all converge to maintain an appropriate balance of STEP in the central nervous system. Accumulating evidence over the past decade indicates that STEP dysregulation contributes to the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, fragile X syndrome, epileptogenesis, alcohol-induced memory loss, Huntington's disease, drug abuse, stroke/ischemia, and inflammatory pain. This comprehensive review discusses STEP expression and regulation and highlights how disrupted STEP function contributes to the pathophysiology of diverse neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:22090472

  9. Leveraging Reciprocity to Identify and Characterize Unknown Allosteric Sites in Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Cui, Danica S; Beaumont, Victor; Ginther, Patrick S; Lipchock, James M; Loria, J Patrick

    2017-07-21

    Drug-like molecules targeting allosteric sites in proteins are of great therapeutic interest; however, identification of potential sites is not trivial. A straightforward approach to identify hidden allosteric sites is demonstrated in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) by creation of single alanine mutations in the catalytic acid loop of PTP1B and VHR. This approach relies on the reciprocal interactions between an allosteric site and its coupled orthosteric site. The resulting NMR chemical shift perturbations (CSPs) of each mutant reveal clusters of distal residues affected by acid loop mutation. In PTP1B and VHR, two new allosteric clusters were identified in each enzyme. Mutations in these allosteric clusters altered phosphatase activity with changes in kcat/KM ranging from 30% to nearly 100-fold. This work outlines a simple method for identification of new allosteric sites in PTP, and given the basis of this method in thermodynamics, it is expected to be generally useful in other systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization and genomic mapping of genes and pseudogenes of a new human protein tyrosine phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Monckton, D.G.

    1996-07-01

    Previously described protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are classified into three types according to their sequence homology and structural features. Here we describe the characterization of genes and pseudogenes of a member of a fourth type of PTP, designated protein tyrosine phosphatase 4A (PTP4A). The 167-amino-acid human PTPs, but does not show any other sequence homology to any of the previously described PTPs. Two cDNA encoding PTP4A that differed in their noncoding regions were isolated. Another cDNA that has a high level of sequence identity with these two cDNAs and a deletion in the coding region was also isolated. Northern analysis using a probe from a common 3{prime}-untranslated region of the cDNAs recognized mRNAs of about 2 and 4 kb. Both species of mRNA were seen in all human adult and fetal tissues tested. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of the corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones and sequence-tagged site analysis suggested that one of the PTP4A coding genes is located at 1p35 and the other is on chromosome 11. A processed pseudogene for PTP4A was found in the BRCA1 region of 17q21 and shares 96% sequence identity to one of the PTP4A coding cDNAs. Our studies also suggest the existence of another processed pseudogene on chromosome 11. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-02-11

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity.

  12. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  13. Development and validation of an intact cell assay for protein tyrosine phosphatases using recombinant baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Cromlish, W A; Payette, P; Kennedy, B P

    1999-11-15

    We have developed an intact cell assay to be used in the direct quantitation of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Utilizing the baculovirus expression system, the assay readily allows for a direct activity readout for PTPs such as PTP1B or CD45. Infected Sf9 cells expressing either full-length PTP1B, full-length CD45, CD45 catalytic domain, or hCOX-1 (mock-infected) are harvested 29 hr post-infection, at which time cells are viable and the expressed proteins are processed, as well as localized to their predicted subcellular compartments. Assays are carried out in a 96-well format, with cells expressing the PTP of interest. Cells are preincubated with or without inhibitor and challenged with substrate, and the phosphatase activity is determined spectrophotometrically by monitoring the conversion of p-nitrophenyl phosphate to p-nitrophenol at OD405. Documented PTP inhibitors have been used to validate this assay system. This study demonstrates that a direct readout of PTP activity in intact cells can be achieved, thus providing a useful cell-based screen for determining selective inhibitors of PTPs.

  14. Targeting inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A as a therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Archana; Tabanor, Kayann; Chaguturu, Rathnam; Aldrich, Jane V

    2013-10-01

    Inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A (I2PP2A), a biological inhibitor of the cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A, is associated with numerous cellular processes that often lead to the formation and progression of cancer. In this study we hypothesized that targeting the inhibition of I2PP2A's multiple functions in prostate cancer cells might prevent cancer progression. We have investigated the effect of the small chain C6-ceramide, known to be a bioactive tumor suppressor lipid, on I2PP2A function, thereby affecting c-Myc signaling and histone acetylation in cells. Our data indicated that C6-ceramide treatment of prostate cancer cells induces cell death in PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells, but not normal prostate epithelial cells. C6-ceramide was able to disrupt the association between PP2A and I2PP2A. C6-ceramide inhibits I2PP2A's upregulation of c-Myc and downregulation of histone acetylation in prostate cancer cells. Our data indicated that targeting cancer related signaling pathways through I2PP2A using ceramide as an anti-I2PP2A agent could have beneficial effects as a therapeutic approach to prevent prostate cancer.

  15. Transcriptome analyses of chronic traumatic encephalopathy show alterations in protein phosphatase expression associated with tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jeong-Sun; Lee, Seungbok; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Hwang, Yu Jin; Cho, Hyesun; Yoo, Seong-Keun; Kim, Yunha; Lim, Sungsu; Kim, Yun Kyung; Hwang, Eun Mi; Kim, Su Hyun; Kim, Chong-Hyun; Hyeon, Seung Jae; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Yona; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D; Lee, Junghee; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Jong-Il; Kowall, Neil W; Ryu, Hoon; McKee, Ann C

    2017-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is associated with repetitive head injury and has distinctive neuropathological features that differentiate this disease from other neurodegenerative diseases. Intraneuronal tau aggregates, although they occur in different patterns, are diagnostic neuropathological features of CTE, but the precise mechanism of tauopathy is not known in CTE. We performed whole RNA sequencing analysis of post-mortem brain tissue from patients with CTE and compared the results to normal controls to determine the transcriptome signature changes associated with CTE. The results showed that the genes related to the MAP kinase and calcium-signaling pathways were significantly downregulated in CTE. The altered expression of protein phosphatases (PPs) in these networks further suggested that the tauopathy observed in CTE involves common pathological mechanisms similar to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using cell lines and animal models, we also showed that reduced PPP3CA/PP2B phosphatase activity is directly associated with increases in phosphorylated (p)-tau proteins. These findings provide important insights into PP-dependent neurodegeneration and may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to reduce the tauopathy associated with CTE. PMID:28524178

  16. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRB regulates Src phosphorylation and tumour progression in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yinliang; Dai, Yuanchang; Gui, Shuyu

    2016-10-01

    Protein tyrosine-phosphatases (PTPs) play important roles in various biological processes. Deregulation in PTP function has been implicated in carcinogenesis and tumour progression in many cancer types. However, the role of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type B (PTPRB) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumorigenesis has not been investigated. Lentiviral vector expressing PTPRB cDNA or shRNA was infected into A549 and H1299 cell lines, followed by cell proliferation, colony formation, soft agar and invasion assays. A549 xenograft mouse model was used to evaluate in vivo function of PTPRB. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to measure PTPRB expression in NSCLC patient samples. Kaplan Meier analysis was performed to assess association between PTPRB expression and patient overall survival (OS). Multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic significance of PTPRB. Overexpression of PTPRB reduced cell proliferation rate, colony formation efficiency, soft agar growth and cell invasion in A549 and H1299 cells, as well as tumour growth rate in A549 xenograft. Knockdown of PTPRB increased Src phosphorylation and cell invasion, which was reversed by Src inhibitor PP2. Additionally, PTPRB was down-regulated in NSCLC patient and was associated with patient OS. PTPRB regulates Src phosphorylation and tumorigenesis in NSCLC. PTPRB may serve as an independent prognostic biomarker for NSCLC patients.

  17. STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) Regulates the PTPα/Fyn Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Kurup, Pradeep; Foscue, Ethan; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase Fyn has two regulatory tyrosine residues that when phosphorylated either activate (Tyr420) or inhibit (Tyr531) Fyn activity. Within the central nervous system, two protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) target these regulatory tyrosines in Fyn. PTPα dephosphorylates Tyr531 and activates Fyn, while STEP (STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase) dephosphorylates Tyr420 and inactivates Fyn. Thus, PTPα and STEP have opposing functions in the regulation of Fyn; however, whether there is cross talk between these two PTPs remains unclear. Here, we used molecular techniques in primary neuronal cultures and in vivo to demonstrate that STEP negatively regulates PTPα by directly dephosphorylating PTPα at its regulatory Tyr789. Dephosphorylation of Tyr789 prevents the translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes, blocking its ability to interact with and activate Fyn. Genetic or pharmacologic reduction of STEP61 activity increased the phosphorylation of PTPα at Tyr789, as well as increased translocation of PTPα to synaptic membranes. Activation of PTPα and Fyn and trafficking of GluN2B to synaptic membranes are necessary for ethanol intake behaviors in rodents. We tested the functional significance of STEP61 in this signaling pathway by ethanol administration to primary cultures as well as in vivo, and demonstrated that the inactivation of STEP61 by ethanol leads to the activation of PTPα, its translocation to synaptic membranes, and the activation of Fyn. These findings indicate a novel mechanism by which STEP61 regulates PTPα and suggest that STEP and PTPα coordinate the regulation of Fyn. PMID:25951993

  18. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, C; DeLong, A; Deruére, J; Bernasconi, P; Söll, D

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis. Images PMID:8641277

  19. Differential effects of protein phosphatases in the recycling of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Mahato, P K; Pandey, S; Bhattacharyya, S

    2015-10-15

    The major excitatory neurotransmitter Glutamate acts on both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in the central nervous system. mGluR5, a member of the group I mGluR family is widely expressed throughout the brain and plays important roles in a variety of neuronal processes including various forms of synaptic plasticity. This receptor is also involved in various neuropsychiatric disorders, viz., Fragile X syndrome, autism etc. It has been reported that mGluR5 undergoes desensitization and subsequently internalization on ligand exposure in various cell types. However, the downstream events after the internalization and the molecular players involved in the post-endocytic events of this receptor have not been studied. In the present study, we find that subsequent to internalization mGluR5 enters the recycling compartment. After that the receptor recycles back to the cell surface. We also show here that the recycling of mGluR5 is dependent on protein phosphatases. Our data suggest that mGluR5 recycling is completely dependent on the activity of PP2A whereas, PP2B has partial effect on this process. Thus our study suggests that mGluR5 recycles back to the cell surface after ligand-dependent internalization and protein phosphatases that have been implicated in various forms of synaptic plasticity have differential effects on the recycling of mGluR5.

  20. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein–Protein Interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Lund, George; Dudkin, Sergii; Borkin, Dmitry; ...

    2014-11-25

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here in this paper, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation ofmore » CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes.« less

  1. A RP-UFLC Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: Focus on Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 2 (PTPN2)

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Romain; Bui, Linh-Chi; Berthelet, Jérémy; Dairou, Julien; Mathieu, Cécile; Guidez, Fabien; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Cools, Jan; Chomienne, Christine; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are involved in numerous signaling pathways and dysfunctions of certain of these enzymes have been linked to several human diseases including cancer and autoimmune diseases. PTPN2 is a PTP mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells and involved in growth factor and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Loss of function analyses in patients with mutation/deletion of the PTPN2 gene and knock-out mouse models indicate that PTPN2 acts as a tumor suppressor in T-cell malignancies and as a regulator of inflammation and immunity. The use of sensitive and quantitative assays is of prime importance to better characterize the biochemical properties of PTPN2 and its biological roles. We report a highly sensitive non-radioactive assay that allows the measurement of the activity of purified PTPN2 and of endogenous PTPN2 immunoprecipitated on agarose beads. The assay relies on separation and quantitation by reverse-phase ultra fast liquid chromatography (RP-UFLC) of a fluorescein-labeled phosphotyrosine peptide substrate derived from the sequence of STAT1. The applicability and reliability of this approach is supported by kinetic and mechanistic studies using PTP inhibitors. More broadly, our PTPN2 assay provides the basis for the design of flexible methods for the measurement of other PTPs. PMID:26040922

  2. A RP-UFLC Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: Focus on Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 2 (PTPN2).

    PubMed

    Duval, Romain; Bui, Linh-Chi; Berthelet, Jérémy; Dairou, Julien; Mathieu, Cécile; Guidez, Fabien; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Cools, Jan; Chomienne, Christine; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2015-06-04

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are involved in numerous signaling pathways and dysfunctions of certain of these enzymes have been linked to several human diseases including cancer and autoimmune diseases. PTPN2 is a PTP mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells and involved in growth factor and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Loss of function analyses in patients with mutation/deletion of the PTPN2 gene and knock-out mouse models indicate that PTPN2 acts as a tumor suppressor in T-cell malignancies and as a regulator of inflammation and immunity. The use of sensitive and quantitative assays is of prime importance to better characterize the biochemical properties of PTPN2 and its biological roles. We report a highly sensitive non-radioactive assay that allows the measurement of the activity of purified PTPN2 and of endogenous PTPN2 immunoprecipitated on agarose beads. The assay relies on separation and quantitation by reverse-phase ultra fast liquid chromatography (RP-UFLC) of a fluorescein-labeled phosphotyrosine peptide substrate derived from the sequence of STAT1. The applicability and reliability of this approach is supported by kinetic and mechanistic studies using PTP inhibitors. More broadly, our PTPN2 assay provides the basis for the design of flexible methods for the measurement of other PTPs.

  3. Phosphorylation site of NtrC, a protein phosphatase whose covalent intermediate activates transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, D A; Gillece-Castro, B L; Burlingame, A L; Koshland, D E

    1992-01-01

    The NtrC transcription factor is a member of a family of homologous prokaryotic regulatory proteins that participate in the transduction of extracellular and nutritional signals. It has been demonstrated that the phosphate group from a histidine residue of the phosphorylated NtrB protein autokinase is transferred to the NtrC protein. Phosphorylation of the NtrC protein is transient and activates its transcriptional enhancement activity. We have investigated the site of phosphorylation of the Salmonella typhimurium NtrC protein and find that it is an aspartate residue (Asp-54) that is found within a sequence conserved in all of the members of the family of regulatory proteins. We propose that this phosphorylation is an NtrC protein histidine phosphatase catalytic intermediate. This conclusion suggests that the NtrC family should be viewed not as kinase substrates but as enzymes that can catalyze the hydrolysis of their activated forms in a concentration-independent fashion. They are similar in this sense to eukaryotic signal-transducing GTPases. Images PMID:1321122

  4. Phospho-oligosaccharide dependent phosphorylation of ATP citrate lyase.

    PubMed

    Puerta, J; Mato, J M; Alemany, S

    1990-01-01

    The effect of insulin on ATP citrate lyase phosphorylation has been shown to be mimicked by a phospho-oligosaccharide in intact adipocytes. We demonstrate that the addition of phospho-oligosaccharide to intact adipocytes enhances the phosphorylation of ATP citrate lyase in the same tryptic peptide as insulin does. The addition of phospho-oligosaccharide to an adipocyte extract also results in an increase in ATP citrate lyase phosphorylation but in a different site than that observed in intact cells. The phospho-oligosaccharide-dependent incorporation of phosphate into ATP citrate lyase in intact cells is resistant to isopropanol and acetic acid, but the phosphoenzyme phosphorylated in cell extracts is acid labile. In cell extracts, the addition of phospho-oligosaccharide markedly inhibits ATP hydrolysis, which may explain the effect of this molecule on ATP citrate lyase phosphorylation in broken cells. These results support the hypothesis that this phospho-oligosaccharide mediates some of the effects of insulin on protein phosphorylation. They also indicate that caution should be exercised in interpreting the results obtained by adding phospho-oligosaccharide to broken cell preparations.

  5. Valosin containing protein (VCP/p97) is a novel substrate for the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPL1

    PubMed Central

    Abaan, Ogan D.; Hendriks, Wiljan; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Erkizan, Hayriye V.

    2013-01-01

    Identification of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (PTP) substrates is critical in understanding cellular role in normal cells as well as cancer cells. We have previously shown that reduction of PTPL1 protein levels in Ewings sarcoma (ES) inhibit cell growth and tumorigenesis. Therefore, we sought to identify novel PTPL1 substrates that may be important for tumorigenesis. In this current work, we demonstrated that mouse embryonic fibroblasts without PTPL1 catalytic activity fail to form foci when transfected with oncogenes. We proved that catalytic activity of PTPL1 is important for ES cell growth. Using a substrate-trapping mutant of PTPL1 we identified putative PTPL1 substrates by mass-spectrometry. One of these putative substrates was characterized as Valosin Containing Protein (VCP/p97). Using multiple biochemical assays we validated VCP as a novel substrate of PTPL1. We also provide evidence that tyrosine phosphorylation of VCP might be important for its midbody localization during cytokinesis. In conclusion, our work identifies VCP as a new substrate for PTPL1, which may be important in cellular transformation. Our investigation link an oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1, with a key transcriptional target protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPL1, and its substrate VCP. Given our observation that PTPL1 catalytic activity is important for cell transformation, our results may also suggest that VCP regulation by PTPL1 might be important for tumorigenesis. PMID:23018179

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphatases PTPδ, PTPσ, and LAR: presynaptic hubs for synapse organization

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hideto; Craig, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    Synapse development requires differentiation of presynaptic neurotransmitter release sites and postsynaptic receptive apparatus coordinated by synapse organizing proteins. In addition to the well-characterized neurexins, recent studies identified presynaptic type IIa receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) as mediators of presynaptic differentiation and triggers of postsynaptic differentiation, thus extending the roles of RPTPs from axon outgrowth and guidance. Similarly to neurexins, RPTPs exist in multiple isoforms generated by alternative splicing that interact in a splice-selective code with diverse postsynaptic partners. The parallel RPTP and neurexin hub design facilitates synapse self-assembly through cooperation, pairs presynaptic similarity with postsynaptic diversity, and balances excitation with inhibition. Upon mutation of individual genes in neuropsychiatric disorders, imbalance of this synaptic organizing network may contribute to impaired cognitive function. PMID:23835198

  7. Prediction and verification of novel peptide targets of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Li, Xun; Köhn, Maja

    2016-08-01

    Phosphotyrosine peptides are useful starting points for inhibitor design and for the search for protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) phosphoprotein substrates. To identify novel phosphopeptide substrates of PTP1B, we developed a computational prediction protocol based on a virtual library of protein sequences with known phosphotyrosine sites. To these we applied sequence-based methods, biologically meaningful filters and molecular docking. Five peptides were selected for biochemical testing of their potential as PTP1B substrates. All five peptides were equally good substrates for PTP1B compared to a known peptide substrate whereas appropriate control peptides were not recognized, showing that our protocol can be used to identify novel peptide substrates of PTP1B.

  8. The Ubiquitin E3 Ligase NOSIP Modulates Protein Phosphatase 2A Activity in Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmeister, Meike; Prelle, Carola; Küchler, Philipp; Kovacevic, Igor; Moser, Markus; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Oess, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a common developmental disorder in humans characterised by incomplete brain hemisphere separation and midface anomalies. The etiology of holoprosencephaly is heterogeneous with environmental and genetic causes, but for a majority of holoprosencephaly cases the genes associated with the pathogenesis could not be identified so far. Here we report the generation of knockout mice for the ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP. The loss of NOSIP in mice causes holoprosencephaly and facial anomalies including cleft lip/palate, cyclopia and facial midline clefting. By a mass spectrometry based protein interaction screen we identified NOSIP as a novel interaction partner of protein phosphatase PP2A. NOSIP mediates the monoubiquitination of the PP2A catalytic subunit and the loss of NOSIP results in an increase in PP2A activity in craniofacial tissue in NOSIP knockout mice. We conclude, that NOSIP is a critical modulator of brain and craniofacial development in mice and a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly in humans. PMID:25546391

  9. Modulation of plant HMG-CoA reductase by protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Leivar, Pablo; Arró, Montserrat; Ferrer, Albert; Boronat, Albert

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis, critical not only for normal plant development, but also for the adaptation to demanding environmental conditions. Consistent with this notion, plant HMGR is modulated by many diverse endogenous signals and external stimuli. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is involved in auxin, abscisic acid, ethylene and brassinosteroid signaling and now emerges as a positive and negative multilevel regulator of plant HMGR, both during normal growth and in response to a variety of stress conditions. The interaction with HMGR is mediated by B″ regulatory subunits of PP2A, which are also calcium binding proteins. The new discoveries uncover the potential of PP2A to integrate developmental and calcium-mediated environmental signals in the control of plant HMGR. PMID:21701259

  10. Protein tyrosine phosphatases PTPδ, PTPσ, and LAR: presynaptic hubs for synapse organization.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideto; Craig, Ann Marie

    2013-09-01

    Synapse development requires differentiation of presynaptic neurotransmitter release sites and postsynaptic receptive apparatus coordinated by synapse organizing proteins. In addition to the well-characterized neurexins, recent studies identified presynaptic type IIa receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) as mediators of presynaptic differentiation and triggers of postsynaptic differentiation, thus extending the roles of RPTPs from axon outgrowth and guidance. Similarly to neurexins, RPTPs exist in multiple isoforms generated by alternative splicing that interact in a splice-selective code with diverse postsynaptic partners. The parallel RPTP and neurexin hub design facilitates synapse self-assembly through cooperation, pairs presynaptic similarity with postsynaptic diversity, and balances excitation with inhibition. Upon mutation of individual genes in neuropsychiatric disorders, imbalance of this synaptic organizing network may contribute to impaired cognitive function.

  11. Isolation of a gene from Burkholderia cepacia IS-16 encoding a protein that facilitates phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, H; Rossolini, G M; Gonzalez, T; Li, J; Glick, B R

    2000-06-01

    A genomic library from Burkholderia cepacia IS-16 was constructed in Escherichia coli by partial Sau3AI digestion of the chromosomal DNA, with the plasmid vector Bluescript SK. This library was screened for clones able to grow as green stained colonies on selective medium developed for detecting phosphatase-positive colonies. Three green-stained clones (pFS1, pFS2, and pFS3) carried recombinant plasmids harboring DNA inserts of 5.0, 8.0, and 0.9 kb, respectively. DNA hybridization experiments demonstrated the presence of overlapping DNA fragments in the three clones and that these three clones were all derived from Burkholderia cepacia IS-16 genomic DNA. DNA sequence analysis, together with polyacrylamide gels of proteins encoded by E. coli containing pFS3, suggested that the isolated 0. 9-kb DNA fragment encodes the functional portion of a phosphate transport protein.

  12. The protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL-2 interacts with the magnesium transporter CNNM3 to promote oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hardy, S; Uetani, N; Wong, N; Kostantin, E; Labbé, D P; Bégin, L R; Mes-Masson, A; Miranda-Saavedra, D; Tremblay, M L

    2015-02-19

    The three PRL (phosphatases of regenerating liver) protein tyrosine phosphatases (PRL-1, -2 and -3) have been identified as key contributors to metastasis in several human cancers, yet the molecular basis of their pro-oncogenic property is unclear. Among the subfamily of PRL phosphatases, overexpression of PRL-2 in breast cancer cells has been shown to promote tumor growth by a mechanism that remains to be uncovered. Here we show that PRL-2 regulates intracellular magnesium levels by forming a functional heterodimer with the magnesium transporter CNNM3. We further reveal that CNNM3 is not a phosphorylated substrate of PRL-2, and that the interaction occurs through a loop unique to the CBS pair domains of CNNM3 that exists only in organisms having PRL orthologs. Supporting the role of PRL-2 in cellular magnesium transport is the observation that PRL-2 knockdown results in a substantial decrease of cellular magnesium influx. Furthermore, in PRL-2 knockout mice, serum magnesium levels were significantly elevated as compared with control animals, indicating a pivotal role for PRL-2 in regulating cellular magnesium homeostasis. Although the expression levels of CNNM3 remained unchanged after magnesium depletion of various cancer cell lines, the interaction between endogenous PRL-2 and CNNM3 was markedly increased. Importantly, xenograft tumor assays with CNNM3 and a mutant form that does not associate with PRL-2 confirm that CNNM3 is itself pro-oncogenic, and that the PRL-2/CNNM3 association is important for conferring transforming activities. This finding is further confirmed from data in human breast cancer tissues showing that CNNM3 levels correlate positively with both PRL-2 expression and the tumor proliferative index. In summary, we demonstrate that oncogenic PRL-2 controls tumor growth by modulating intracellular magnesium levels through binding with the CNNM3 magnesium transporter.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Cardiac Protein Phosphatase 2A Regulation in Heart*

    PubMed Central

    DeGrande, Sean T.; Little, Sean C.; Nixon, Derek J.; Wright, Patrick; Snyder, Jedidiah; Dun, Wen; Murphy, Nathaniel; Kilic, Ahmet; Higgins, Robert; Binkley, Philip F.; Boyden, Penelope A.; Carnes, Cynthia A.; Anderson, Mark E.; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Kinase/phosphatase balance governs cardiac excitability in health and disease. Although detailed mechanisms for cardiac kinase regulation are established, far less is known regarding cardiac protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulation. This is largely due to the complexity of the PP2A holoenzyme structure (combinatorial assembly of three subunit enzyme from >17 subunit genes) and the inability to segregate “global” PP2A function from the activities of multiple “local” holoenzyme populations. Here we report that PP2A catalytic, regulatory, and scaffolding subunits are tightly regulated at transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels to tune myocyte function at base line and in disease. We show that past global read-outs of cellular PP2A activity more appropriately represent the collective activity of numerous individual PP2A holoenzymes, each displaying a specific subcellular localization (dictated by select PP2A regulatory subunits) as well as local specific post-translational catalytic subunit methylation and phosphorylation events that regulate local and rapid holoenzyme assembly/disassembly (via leucine carboxymethyltransferase 1/phosphatase methylesterase 1 (LCMT-1/PME-1). We report that PP2A subunits are selectively regulated between human and animal models, across cardiac chambers, and even within specific cardiac cell types. Moreover, this regulation can be rapidly tuned in response to cellular activation. Finally, we report that global PP2A is altered in human and experimental models of heart disease, yet each pathology displays its own distinct molecular signature though specific PP2A subunit modulatory events. These new data provide an initial view into the signaling pathways that govern PP2A function in heart but also establish the first step in defining specific PP2A regulatory targets in health and disease. PMID:23204520

  14. Caspase-dependent protein phosphatase 2A activation contributes to endotoxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Neviere, Remi; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Decoster, Brigitte; Bouazza, Youcef; Montaigne, David; Maréchal, Xavier; Marciniak, Camille; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve

    2010-10-01

    Several studies report calcium mishandling, sarcomere disarray, and caspase activation during heart failure. Although active caspases have been shown to cleave myofibrillar proteins, little is known regarding their effects on calcium handling proteins. Therefore, we aimed to explore how endotoxin-induced caspase activation disrupts intracellular calcium regulation. Randomized controlled trial. Small animal research laboratory. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Sepsis was induced by injection of endotoxin (10 mg/kg, intravenously). Caspase inhibition was achieved by coinjection with zVAD.fmk (3 mg/kg, intravenously). We first isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes from control, endotoxin, and (endotoxin + zVAD)-treated rats to characterize contractile parameters and cellular calcium homeostasis. Underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for calcium mishandling were explored on sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles and mitochondria prepared from treated animals. All experiments were performed 4 hrs postendotoxin treatment. zVAD normalized reductions in fractional cell shortening and relaxation rate triggered by endotoxin treatment. Both sarco-/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase and mitochondria-dependent calcium uptakes were impaired after endotoxin treatment and prevented when myocytes were isolated from zVAD-treated endotoxinic rat hearts. zVAD blocked endotoxin-induced phospholamban dephosphorylation, protein phosphatase 2A activation, and mitochondrial calcium retention capacity reduction. To strengthen these results, control sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles and mitochondria were incubated with active recombinant caspase-3. Although no effects were observed on mitochondria, caspase-3 directly exerts detrimental effects on sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake capacity by activating protein phosphatase 2A, leading to phospholamban dephosphorylation. Caspase inhibition protects from endotoxin-induced sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake capacity reduction and mitochondrial

  15. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Azkue, Jon J.; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP61 protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund’s adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2BTyr1472 and pERK1/2Thr202/Tyr204 levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP61 protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP61 inactivation and increased pGluN2BTyr1472 and pERK1/2Thr202/Tyr204 levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception. PMID:26270590

  16. Kinetics and Mechanism of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) Inactivation by Acrolein

    PubMed Central

    Seiner, Derrick R.; LaButti, Jason N.; Gates, Kent S.

    2010-01-01

    Human cells are exposed to the electrophilic α,β-unsaturated aldehyde acrolein from a variety of sources. Reaction of acrolein with functionally critical protein thiol residues can yield important biological consequences. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are an important class of cysteine-dependent enzymes whose reactivity with acrolein previously has not been well characterized. These enzymes catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine residues on proteins via a phosphocysteine intermediate. PTPs work in tandem with protein tyrosine kinases to regulate a number of critically important mammalian signal transduction pathways. We find that acrolein is a potent time-dependent inactivator of the enzyme PTP1B (kinact = 0.02 ± 0.005 s−1, KI = 2.3 ± 0.6 × 10−4 M). Enzyme activity does not return upon gel filtration of the inactivated enzyme and addition of the competitive phosphatase inhibitor vanadate slows inactivation of PTP1B by acrolein. Together these observations suggest that acrolein covalently modifies the active site of PTP1B. Mass spectrometric analysis reveals that acrolein modifies the catalytic cysteine residue at the active site of the enzyme. Aliphatic aldehydes such as glyoxal, acetaldehyde, and propanal are relatively weak inactivators of PTP1B under the conditions employed here. Similarly, unsaturated aldehydes such as crotonaldehyde and 3-methyl-2-butenal bearing substitution at the alkene terminus are poor inactivators of the enzyme. Overall, the data suggest that enzyme inactivation occurs via conjugate addition of the catalytic cysteine residue to the carbon-carbon double bond of acrolein. The results indicate that inactivation of PTPs should be considered as a possible contributor to the diverse biological activities of acrolein and structurally-related α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. PMID:17655273

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inactivation by acrolein.

    PubMed

    Seiner, Derrick R; LaButti, Jason N; Gates, Kent S

    2007-09-01

    Human cells are exposed to the electrophilic alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde acrolein from a variety of sources. The reaction of acrolein with functionally critical protein thiol residues can yield important biological consequences. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are an important class of cysteine-dependent enzymes whose reactivity with acrolein previously has not been well-characterized. These enzymes catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine residues on proteins via a phosphocysteine intermediate. PTPs work in tandem with protein tyrosine kinases to regulate a number of critically important mammalian signal transduction pathways. We find that acrolein is a potent time-dependent inactivator of the enzyme PTP1B ( k inact = 0.02 +/- 0.005 s (-1) and K I = 2.3 +/- 0.6 x 10 (-4) M). The enzyme activity does not return upon gel filtration of the inactivated enzyme, and addition of the competitive phosphatase inhibitor vanadate slows inactivation of PTP1B by acrolein. Together, these observations suggest that acrolein covalently modifies the active site of PTP1B. Mass spectrometric analysis reveals that acrolein modifies the catalytic cysteine residue at the active site of the enzyme. Aliphatic aldehydes such as glyoxal, acetaldehyde, and propanal are relatively weak inactivators of PTP1B under the conditions employed here. Similarly, unsaturated aldehydes such as crotonaldehyde and 3-methyl-2-butenal bearing substitution at the alkene terminus are poor inactivators of the enzyme. Overall, the data suggest that enzyme inactivation occurs via conjugate addition of the catalytic cysteine residue to the carbon-carbon double bond of acrolein. The results indicate that inactivation of PTPs should be considered as a possible contributor to the diverse biological activities of acrolein and structurally related alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes.

  18. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase modulates nociception: evidence from genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition.

    PubMed

    Azkona, Garikoitz; Saavedra, Ana; Aira, Zigor; Aluja, David; Xifró, Xavier; Baguley, Tyler; Alberch, Jordi; Ellman, Jonathan A; Lombroso, Paul J; Azkue, Jon J; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2016-02-01

    The information from nociceptors is processed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord by complex circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. It is well documented that GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation contributes to central sensitization. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) dephosphorylates GluN2B and ERK1/2, promoting internalization of GluN2B and inactivation of ERK1/2. The activity of STEP was modulated by genetic (STEP knockout mice) and pharmacological (recently synthesized STEP inhibitor, TC-2153) approaches. STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord were determined in male and female mice of different ages. Inflammatory pain was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. Behavioral tests, immunoblotting, and electrophysiology were used to analyze the effect of STEP on nociception. Our results show that both genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of STEP induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, which were accompanied by increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase heterozygous and knockout mice presented a similar phenotype. Furthermore, electrophysiological experiments showed that TC-2153 increased C fiber-evoked spinal field potentials. Interestingly, we found that STEP(61) protein levels in the lumbar spinal cord inversely correlated with thermal hyperalgesia associated with age and female gender in mice. Consistently, STEP knockout mice failed to show age-related thermal hyperalgesia, although gender-related differences were preserved. Moreover, in a model of inflammatory pain, hyperalgesia was associated with increased phosphorylation-mediated STEP(61) inactivation and increased pGluN2B(Tyr1472) and pERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204)levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Collectively, the present results underscore an important role of spinal STEP activity in the modulation of nociception.

  19. Pharmacological inhibition of PHOSPHO1 suppresses vascular smooth muscle cell calcification

    PubMed Central

    Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Yadav, Manisha C; Zhu, Dongxing; Narisawa, Sonoko; Sheen, Campbell; Stec, Boguslaw; Cosford, Nicholas D.; Dahl, Russell; Farquharson, Colin; Hoylaerts, Marc. F.; MacRae, Vicky E.; Millán, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Medial vascular calcification (MVC) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease, obesity, and aging. MVC is an actively regulated process that resembles skeletal mineralization, resulting from chondro-osteogenic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we used mineralizing murine VSMCs to study the expression of PHOSPHO1, a phosphatase that participates in the first step of matrix vesicles-mediated initiation of mineralization during endochondral ossification. Wild-type (WT) VSMCs cultured under calcifying conditions exhibited increased Phospho1 gene expression and Phospho1-/- VSMCs failed to mineralize in vitro. Using natural PHOSPHO1 substrates, potent and specific inhibitors of PHOSPHO1 were identified via high-throughput screening and mechanistic analysis and two, designated MLS-0390838 and MLS-0263839, were selected for further analysis. Their effectiveness in preventing VSMC calcification by targeting PHOSPHO1 function was assessed, alone and in combination with a potent tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) inhibitor MLS-0038949. PHOSPHO1 inhibition by MLS-0263839 in mineralizing WT cells (cultured with added inorganic phosphate) reduced calcification in culture to 41.8% ± 2.0 of control. Combined inhibition of PHOSPHO1 by MLS-0263839 and TNAP by MLS-0038949 significantly reduced calcification to 20.9% ± 0.74 of control. Furthermore, the dual inhibition strategy affected the expression of several mineralization-related enzymes while increasing expression of the smooth muscle cell marker Acta2. We conclude that PHOSPHO1 plays a critical role in VSMC mineralization and that “phosphatase inhibition” may be a useful therapeutic strategy to reduce MVC. PMID:22887744

  20. Pharmacological inhibition of PHOSPHO1 suppresses vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Yadav, Manisha C; Zhu, Dongxing; Narisawa, Sonoko; Sheen, Campbell; Stec, Boguslaw; Cosford, Nicholas D; Dahl, Russell; Farquharson, Colin; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Macrae, Vicky E; Millán, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Medial vascular calcification (MVC) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease, obesity, and aging. MVC is an actively regulated process that resembles skeletal mineralization, resulting from chondro-osteogenic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we used mineralizing murine VSMCs to study the expression of PHOSPHO1, a phosphatase that participates in the first step of matrix vesicles-mediated initiation of mineralization during endochondral ossification. Wild-type (WT) VSMCs cultured under calcifying conditions exhibited increased Phospho1 gene expression and Phospho1(-/-) VSMCs failed to mineralize in vitro. Using natural PHOSPHO1 substrates, potent and specific inhibitors of PHOSPHO1 were identified via high-throughput screening and mechanistic analysis and two of these inhibitors, designated MLS-0390838 and MLS-0263839, were selected for further analysis. Their effectiveness in preventing VSMC calcification by targeting PHOSPHO1 function was assessed, alone and in combination with a potent tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) inhibitor MLS-0038949. PHOSPHO1 inhibition by MLS-0263839 in mineralizing WT cells (cultured with added inorganic phosphate) reduced calcification in culture to 41.8% ± 2.0% of control. Combined inhibition of PHOSPHO1 by MLS-0263839 and TNAP by MLS-0038949 significantly reduced calcification to 20.9% ± 0.74% of control. Furthermore, the dual inhibition strategy affected the expression of several mineralization-related enzymes while increasing expression of the smooth muscle cell marker Acta2. We conclude that PHOSPHO1 plays a critical role in VSMC mineralization and that "phosphatase inhibition" may be a useful therapeutic strategy to reduce MVC.

  1. Inhibition of Phospho-S6 Kinase, a Protein Involved in the Compensatory Adaptive Response, Increases the Efficacy of Paclitaxel in Reducing the Viability of Matrix-Attached Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong In; Park, Sang Hi; Lee, Hee-Jin; Lee, Dae Woo; Lee, Hae Nam

    2016-01-01

    To identify the proteins involved the compensatory adaptive response to paclitaxel in ovarian cancer cells and to determine whether inhibition of the compensatory adaptive response increases the efficacy of paclitaxel in decreasing the viability of cancer cells. We used a reverse-phase protein array and western blot analysis to identify the proteins involved in the compensatory mechanism induced by paclitaxel in HeyA8 and SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. We used a cell viability assay to examine whether inhibition of the proteins involved in the compensatory adaptive response influenced the effects of paclitaxel on cancer cell viability. All experiments were performed in three-dimensional cell cultures. Paclitaxel induced the upregulation of pS6 (S240/S244) and pS6 (S235/S236) in HeyA8 and SKOV3 cells, and pPRAS40 (T246) in HeyA8 cells. BX795 and CCT128930 were chosen as inhibitors of pS6 (S240/S244), pS6 (S235/S236), and pPRAS40 (T246). BX795 and CCT128930 decreased pS6 (S240/S244) and pS6 (S235/S236) expression in HeyA8 and SKOV3 cells. However, pPRAS40 (T246) expression was inhibited only by BX795 and not by CCT128930 in HeyA8 cells. Compared with paclitaxel alone, addition of BX795 or CCT128930 to paclitaxel was more effective in decreasing the viability of HeyA8 and SKOV3 cells. Addition of BX795 or CCT128930 to inhibit pS6 (S240/S244) or pS6 (S235/S236) restricted the compensatory adaptive response to paclitaxel in HeyA8 and SKOV3 cells. These inhibitors increased the efficacy of paclitaxel in reducing cancer cell viability.

  2. The protein phosphatase 2A functions in the spindle position checkpoint by regulating the checkpoint kinase Kin4.

    PubMed

    Chan, Leon Y; Amon, Angelika

    2009-07-15

    In budding yeast, a surveillance mechanism known as the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) ensures accurate genome partitioning. In the event of spindle misposition, the checkpoint delays exit from mitosis by restraining the activity of the mitotic exit network (MEN). To date, the only component of the checkpoint to be identified is the protein kinase Kin4. Furthermore, how the kinase is regulated by spindle position is not known. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in complex with the regulatory subunit Rts1 as a component of the SPOC. Loss of PP2A-Rts1 function abrogates the SPOC but not other mitotic checkpoints. We further show that the protein phosphatase functions upstream of Kin4, regulating the kinase's phosphorylation and localization during an unperturbed cell cycle and during SPOC activation, thus defining the phosphatase as a key regulator of SPOC function.

  3. The protein phosphatase 2A functions in the spindle position checkpoint by regulating the checkpoint kinase Kin4

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Leon Y.; Amon, Angelika

    2009-01-01

    In budding yeast, a surveillance mechanism known as the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) ensures accurate genome partitioning. In the event of spindle misposition, the checkpoint delays exit from mitosis by restraining the activity of the mitotic exit network (MEN). To date, the only component of the checkpoint to be identified is the protein kinase Kin4. Furthermore, how the kinase is regulated by spindle position is not known. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in complex with the regulatory subunit Rts1 as a component of the SPOC. Loss of PP2A-Rts1 function abrogates the SPOC but not other mitotic checkpoints. We further show that the protein phosphatase functions upstream of Kin4, regulating the kinase's phosphorylation and localization during an unperturbed cell cycle and during SPOC activation, thus defining the phosphatase as a key regulator of SPOC function. PMID:19605686

  4. Protein Kinase C Controls Binding of Igo/ENSA Proteins to Protein Phosphatase 2A in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Thai, Vu; Dephoure, Noah; Weiss, Amit; Ferguson, Jacqueline; Leitao, Ricardo; Gygi, Steven P; Kellogg, Douglas R

    2017-03-24

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays important roles in controlling mitosis in all eukaryotic cells. The form of PP2A that controls mitosis is associated with a conserved regulatory subunit that is called B55 in vertebrates and Cdc55 in budding yeast. The activity of this form of PP2A can be inhibited by binding of conserved Igo/ENSA proteins. Although the mechanisms that activate Igo/ENSA to bind and inhibit PP2A are well understood, little is known about how Igo/Ensa are inactivated. Here, we have analyzed regulation of Igo/ENSA in the context of a checkpoint pathway that links mitotic entry to membrane growth in budding yeast. Protein kinase C (Pkc1) relays signals in the pathway by activating PP2A(Cdc55) We discovered that constitutively active Pkc1 can drive cells through a mitotic checkpoint arrest, which suggests that Pkc1-dependent activation of PP2A(Cdc55) plays a critical role in checkpoint signaling. We therefore used mass spectrometry to determine how Pkc1 modifies the PP2A(Cdc55) complex. This revealed that Pkc1 induces changes in the phosphorylation of multiple subunits of the complex, as well as dissociation of Igo/ENSA. Pkc1 directly phosphorylates Cdc55 and Igo/ENSA, and phosphorylation site mapping and mutagenesis indicate that phosphorylation of Cdc55 contributes to Igo/ENSA dissociation. Association of Igo2 with PP2A(Cdc55) is regulated during the cell cycle, yet mutation of Pkc1-dependent phosphorylation sites on Cdc55 and Igo2 did not cause defects in mitotic progression. Together, the data suggest that Pkc1 controls PP2A(Cdc55) by multiple overlapping mechanisms. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor R and Z1 expression as independent prognostic indicators in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Duś-Szachniewicz, Kamila; Woźniak, Marta; Nelke, Kamil; Gamian, Elżbieta; Gerber, Hanna; Ziółkowski, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    The actions of tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are controlled by tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Although substantial previous data have revealed the role of several protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in various cancers, the function of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor R (PTPRR) and protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor-type, Z polypeptide 1 (PTPRZ1) proteins in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has not been studied to date. The PTPRR and PTPRZ1 immunoreactivity in 67 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded oral cancer tissues at different stages were analyzed with the technique of immunohistochemistry (IHC). The presence of PTPRR in cancerous tissue was confirmed by Western blotting. The occurrence of PTPRR and PTPRZ1 proteins in the cancer specimens was more frequent in lower grade tumors. In addition, the association between the immunoreactivity of both examined proteins and improved patients survival was detected. Moreover, the PTPRR expression was found to be related to the absence of synchronous lymph node involvement. The above results indicate that the PTPRR and PTPRZ1 protein expression should be monitored in oral cancer for patients' prognostic stratification. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Stress-activated protein kinase-mediated down-regulation of the cell integrity pathway mitogen-activated protein kinase Pmk1p by protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Marisa; Núñez, Andrés; Soto, Teresa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2007-11-01

    Fission yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1p is involved in morphogenesis, cytokinesis, and ion homeostasis as part of the cell integrity pathway, and it becomes activated under multiple stresses, including hyper- or hypotonic conditions, glucose deprivation, cell wall-damaging compounds, and oxidative stress. The only protein phosphatase known to dephosphorylate and inactivate Pmk1p is Pmp1p. We show here that the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) pathway and its main effector, Sty1p MAPK, are essential for proper deactivation of Pmk1p under hypertonic stress in a process regulated by Atf1p transcription factor. We demonstrate that tyrosine phosphatases Pyp1p and Pyp2p, and serine/threonine phosphatase Ptc1p, that negatively regulate Sty1p activity and whose expression is dependent on Sty1p-Atf1p function, are involved in Pmk1p dephosphorylation under osmostress. Pyp1p and Ptc1p, in addition to Pmp1p, also control the basal level of MAPK Pmk1p activity in growing cells and associate with, and dephosphorylate Pmk1p both in vitro and in vivo. Our results with Ptc1p provide the first biochemical evidence for a PP2C-type phosphatase acting on more than one MAPK in yeast cells. Importantly, the SAPK-dependent down-regulation of Pmk1p through Pyp1p, Pyp2p, and Ptc1p was not complete, and Pyp1p and Ptc1p phosphatases are able to negatively regulate MAPK Pmk1p activity by an alternative regulatory mechanism. Our data also indicate that Pmk1p phosphorylation oscillates as a function of the cell cycle, peaking at cell separation during cytokinesis, and that Pmp1p phosphatase plays a main role in regulating this process.

  7. Stress-activated Protein Kinase-mediated Down-Regulation of the Cell Integrity Pathway Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pmk1p by Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Madrid, Marisa; Núñez, Andrés; Soto, Teresa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Cansado, José

    2007-01-01

    Fission yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1p is involved in morphogenesis, cytokinesis, and ion homeostasis as part of the cell integrity pathway, and it becomes activated under multiple stresses, including hyper- or hypotonic conditions, glucose deprivation, cell wall-damaging compounds, and oxidative stress. The only protein phosphatase known to dephosphorylate and inactivate Pmk1p is Pmp1p. We show here that the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) pathway and its main effector, Sty1p MAPK, are essential for proper deactivation of Pmk1p under hypertonic stress in a process regulated by Atf1p transcription factor. We demonstrate that tyrosine phosphatases Pyp1p and Pyp2p, and serine/threonine phosphatase Ptc1p, that negatively regulate Sty1p activity and whose expression is dependent on Sty1p-Atf1p function, are involved in Pmk1p dephosphorylation under osmostress. Pyp1p and Ptc1p, in addition to Pmp1p, also control the basal level of MAPK Pmk1p activity in growing cells and associate with, and dephosphorylate Pmk1p both in vitro and in vivo. Our results with Ptc1p provide the first biochemical evidence for a PP2C-type phosphatase acting on more than one MAPK in yeast cells. Importantly, the SAPK-dependent down-regulation of Pmk1p through Pyp1p, Pyp2p, and Ptc1p was not complete, and Pyp1p and Ptc1p phosphatases are able to negatively regulate MAPK Pmk1p activity by an alternative regulatory mechanism. Our data also indicate that Pmk1p phosphorylation oscillates as a function of the cell cycle, peaking at cell separation during cytokinesis, and that Pmp1p phosphatase plays a main role in regulating this process. PMID:17761528

  8. Networks of protein kinases and phosphatases in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Mucic, Goran; Sase, Sunetra; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Although protein kinases and phosphatases have been reported to be involved in fear memory, information about these signalling molecules in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning (cFC) is limited. C57BL/6J mice were tested in cFC, sacrificed and hippocampi were used for screening of approximately 800 protein kinases and phosphatases by protein microarrays with subsequent Western blot confirmation of threefold higher or lower hippocampal levels as compared to foot shock controls. Immunoblotting of the protein kinases and phosphatases screened out was carried out by Western blotting. A network of protein kinases and phosphatases was generated (STRING 9.1). Animals learned the task in the paradigm and protein kinase and phosphatase levels were determined in the individual phases acquisition, consolidation and retrieval and compared to foot shock controls. Protein kinases discoidin containing receptor 2 (DDR2), mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase 7 (TAK1), protein phosphatases dual specificity protein phosphatase (PTEN) and protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A) were modulated in the individual phases of cFC. Phosphatidyl-inositol-3,4,5-triphosphate 3-phosphatase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) that is interacting with PTEN were modulated as well. Freezing time was correlating with PP2A levels in the retrieval phase of cFC. The abovementioned protein kinases, phosphatases and inositol-signalling enzymes were not reported so far in cFC and the results are relevant for interpretation of previous and design of future studies in cFC or fear memory. Protein phosphatase PP2A was, however, the only signalling compound tested that was directly linked to retrieval in the cFC.

  9. Protein tyrosine phosphatase α in the dorsomedial striatum promotes excessive ethanol-drinking behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamida, Sami; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wang, Jun; Wu, Su; Phamluong, Khanhky; Kharazia, Viktor; Ron, Dorit

    2013-09-04

    We previously found that excessive ethanol drinking activates Fyn in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) (Wang et al., 2010; Gibb et al., 2011). Ethanol-mediated Fyn activation in the DMS leads to the phosphorylation of the GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, to the enhancement of the channel's activity, and to the development and/or maintenance of ethanol drinking behaviors (Wang et al., 2007, 2010). Protein tyrosine phosphatase α (PTPα) is essential for Fyn kinase activation (Bhandari et al., 1998), and we showed that ethanol-mediated Fyn activation is facilitated by the recruitment of PTPα to synaptic membranes, the compartment where Fyn resides (Gibb et al., 2011). Here we tested the hypothesis that PTPα in the DMS is part of the Fyn/GluN2B pathway and is thus a major contributor to the neuroadaptations underlying excessive ethanol intake behaviors. We found that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated PTPα knockdown in the DMS reduces excessive ethanol intake and preference in rodents. Importantly, no alterations in water, saccharine/sucrose, or quinine intake were observed. Furthermore, downregulation of PTPα in the DMS of mice significantly reduces ethanol-mediated Fyn activation, GluN2B phosphorylation, and ethanol withdrawal-induced long-term facilitation of NMDAR activity without altering the intrinsic features of DMS neurons. Together, these results position PTPα upstream of Fyn within the DMS and demonstrate the important contribution of the phosphatase to the maladaptive synaptic changes that lead to excessive ethanol intake.

  10. Effects of protein tyrosine phosphatase-PEST are reversed by Akt in T cells.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Yutaka; Shimizu, Kazuhiko; Koyanagi, Madoka; Yagi, Junji

    2014-12-01

    T cell activation is regulated by a balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation that is under the control of kinases and phosphatases. Here, we examined the role of a non-receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-PEST, using retrovirus-mediated gene transduction into murine T cells. Based on observations of vector markers (GFP or Thy1.1), exogenous PTP-PEST-positive CD4(+) T cells appeared within 2 days after gene transduction; the percentage of PTP-PEST-positive cells tended to decrease during a resting period in the presence of IL-2 over the next 2 days. These vector markers also showed much lower expression intensities, compared with control cells, suggesting a correlation between the percent reduction and the low marker expression intensity. A catalytically inactive PTP-PEST mutant also showed the same tendency, and stepwise deletion mutants gradually lost their ability to induce the above phenomenon. On the other hand, these PTP-PEST-transduced cells did not have an apoptotic phenotype. No difference in the total cell numbers was found in the wells of a culture plate containing VEC- and PTP-PEST-transduced T cells. Moreover, serine/threonine kinase Akt, but not the anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, reversed the phenotype induced by PTP-PEST. We discuss the novel mechanism by which Akt interferes with PTP-PEST. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Overexpression of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL-2 correlates with breast tumor formation and progression.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Serge; Wong, Nau Nau; Muller, William J; Park, Morag; Tremblay, Michel L

    2010-11-01

    The PRL-1, PRL-2, and PRL-3 phosphatases are prenylated protein tyrosine phosphatases with oncogenic activity that are proposed to drive tumor metastasis. We found that PRL-2 mRNA is elevated in primary breast tumors relative to matched normal tissue, and also dramatically elevated in metastatic lymph nodes compared with primary tumors. PRL-2 knockdown in metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells decreased anchorage-independent growth and cell migration, suggesting that the malignant phenotype of these cells is mediated at least in part through PRL-2 signaling. In different mouse mammary tumor-derived cell lines overexpressing PRL-2, we confirmed its role in anchorage-independent growth and cell migration. Furthermore, injection of PRL-2-overexpressing cells into the mouse mammary fat pad promoted extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation and tumor formation. MMTV-PRL-2 transgenic mice engineered to overexpress the enzyme in mammary tissue did not exhibit spontaneous tumorigenesis, but they exhibited an accelerated development of mammary tumors initiated by introduction of an MMTV-ErbB2 transgene. Together, our results argue that PRL-2 plays a role in breast cancer progression.

  12. Identification of para-Substituted Benzoic Acid Derivatives as Potent Inhibitors of the Protein Phosphatase Slingshot.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang-shuai; Xiao, Peng; Zhang, Dao-lai; Hou, Xu-Ben; Ge, Lin; Yang, Du-xiao; Liu, Hong-da; He, Dong-fang; Chen, Xu; Han, Ke-rui; Song, Xiao-yuan; Yu, Xiao; Fang, Hao; Sun, Jin-peng

    2015-12-01

    Slingshot proteins form a small group of dual-specific phosphatases that modulate cytoskeleton dynamics through dephosphorylation of cofilin and Lim kinases (LIMK). Small chemical compounds with Slingshot-inhibiting activities have therapeutic potential against cancers or infectious diseases. However, only a few Slingshot inhibitors have been investigated and reported, and their cellular activities have not been examined. In this study, we identified two rhodanine-scaffold-based para-substituted benzoic acid derivatives as competitive Slingshot inhibitors. The top compound, (Z)-4-((4-((4-oxo-2-thioxo-3-(o-tolyl)thiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl)phenoxy)methyl)benzoic acid (D3) had an inhibition constant (Ki) of around 4 μm and displayed selectivity over a panel of other phosphatases. Moreover, compound D3 inhibited cell migration and cofilin dephosphorylation after nerve growth factor (NGF) or angiotensin II stimulation. Therefore, our newly identified Slingshot inhibitors provide a starting point for developing Slingshot-targeted therapies. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Structure of Protein Phosphatase 2A Core Enzyme Bound to Tumor-Inducing Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Xing,Y.; Xu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jeffrey, P.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Strack, S.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular functions and has been shown to be an important tumor suppressor. The core enzyme of PP2A comprises a 65 kDa scaffolding subunit and a 36 kDa catalytic subunit. Here we report the crystal structures of the PP2A core enzyme bound to two of its inhibitors, the tumor-inducing agents okadaic acid and microcystin-LR, at 2.6 and 2.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The catalytic subunit recognizes one end of the elongated scaffolding subunit by interacting with the conserved ridges of HEAT repeats 11-15. Formation of the core enzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced structural rearrangement. The scaffolding subunit exhibits considerable conformational flexibility, which is proposed to play an essential role in PP2A function. These structures, together with biochemical analyses, reveal significant insights into PP2A function and serve as a framework for deciphering the diverse roles of PP2A in cellular physiology.

  14. T cell proliferation and adaptive immune responses are critically regulated by protein phosphatase 4

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fang-Hsuean; Hsiao, Wan-Yi; Lin, Yu-Chun; Chan, Yi-Chiao; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clonal expansion of activated T cells is pivotal for the induction of protective immunity. Protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine phosphatase with reported functions in thymocyte development and DNA damage responses. However, the role of PP4 in T cell immunity has not been thoroughly investigated. In this report, our data showed that T cell-specific ablation of PP4 resulted in defective adaptive immunity, impaired T cell homeostatic expansion, and inefficient T cell proliferation. This hypo-proliferation was associated with a partial G1-S cell cycle arrest, enhanced transcriptions of CDK inhibitors and elevated activation of AMPK. In addition, resveratrol, a known AMPK activator, induced similar G1-S arrests, while lentivirally-transduced WT or constitutively-active AMPKα1 retarded the proliferation of WT T cells. Further investigations showed that PP4 co-immunoprecipitated with AMPKα1, and the over-expression of PP4 inhibited AMPK phosphorylation, thereby implicating PP4 for the negative regulation of AMPK. In summary, our results indicate that PP4 is an essential modulator for T cell proliferation and immune responses; they further suggest a potential link between PP4 functions, AMPK activation and G1-S arrest in activated T cells. PMID:26940341

  15. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 promotes invadopodia formation through suppression of Rho signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chen, Hong-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Invadopodia are actin-enriched membrane protrusions that are important for extracellular matrix degradation and invasive cell motility. Src homolog domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2), a non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, has been shown to play an important role in promoting cancer metastasis, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we found that depletion of SHP2 by short-hairpin RNA suppressed invadopodia formation in several cancer cell lines, particularly in the SAS head and neck squamous cell line. In contrast, overexpression of SHP2 promoted invadopodia formation in the CAL27 head and neck squamous cell line, which expresses low levels of endogenous SHP2. The depletion of SHP2 in SAS cells significantly decreased their invasive motility. The suppression of invadopodia formation by SHP2 depletion was restored by the Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme (a Rho GTPase inhibitor) or Y27632 (a specific inhibitor for Rho-associated kinase). Together, our results suggest that SHP2 may promote invadopodia formation through inhibition of Rho signaling in cancer cells. PMID:26204488

  16. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma regulates synapse structure, function and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Katherine E; Xu, Bin; Gobert, Delphine; Hamam, Bassam N; Thompson, Katherine M; Wu, Chia-Lun; Bouchard, Jean-François; Uetani, Noriko; Racine, Ronald J; Tremblay, Michel L; Ruthazer, Edward S; Chapman, C Andrew; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2012-07-01

    The mechanisms that regulate synapse formation and maintenance are incompletely understood. In particular, relatively few inhibitors of synapse formation have been identified. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (RPTPσ), a transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase, is widely expressed by neurons in developing and mature mammalian brain, and functions as a receptor for chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that inhibits axon regeneration following injury. In this study, we address RPTPσ function in the mature brain. We demonstrate increased axon collateral branching in the hippocampus of RPTPσ null mice during normal aging or following chemically induced seizure, indicating that RPTPσ maintains neural circuitry by inhibiting axonal branching. Previous studies demonstrated a role for pre-synaptic RPTPσ promoting synaptic differentiation during development; however, subcellular fractionation revealed enrichment of RPTPσ in post-synaptic densities. We report that neurons lacking RPTPσ have an increased density of pre-synaptic varicosities in vitro and increased dendritic spine density and length in vivo. RPTPσ knockouts exhibit an increased frequency of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents, and greater paired-pulse facilitation, consistent with increased synapse density but reduced synaptic efficiency. Furthermore, RPTPσ nulls exhibit reduced long-term potentiation and enhanced novel object recognition memory. We conclude that RPTPσ limits synapse number and regulates synapse structure and function in the mature CNS.

  17. Protein Phosphatase 6 Protects Prophase I-Arrested Oocytes by Safeguarding Genomic Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zong-Zhe; Dong, Ming-Zhe; Schatten, Heide; Xu, Xingzhi; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes are arrested at prophase of the first meiotic division in the primordial follicle pool for months, even years, after birth depending on species, and only a limited number of oocytes resume meiosis, complete maturation, and ovulate with each reproductive cycle. We recently reported that protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), a member of the PP2A-like subfamily, which accounts for cellular serine/threonine phosphatase activity, functions in completing the second meiosis. Here, we generated mutant mice with a specific deletion of Ppp6c in oocytes from the primordial follicle stage by crossing Ppp6cF/F mice with Gdf9-Cre mice and found that Ppp6cF/F; GCre+ mice are infertile. Depletion of PP6c caused folliculogenesis defects and germ cell loss independent of the traditional AKT/mTOR pathway, but due to persistent phosphorylation of H2AX (a marker of double strand breaks), increased susceptibility to DNA damage and defective DNA repair, which led to massive oocyte elimination and eventually premature ovarian failure (POF). Our findings uncover an important role for PP6 as an indispensable guardian of genomic integrity of the lengthy prophase I oocyte arrest, maintenance of primordial follicle pool, and thus female fertility. PMID:27930667

  18. Inhibition of PHOSPHO1 activity results in impaired skeletal mineralization during limb development of the chick.

    PubMed

    Macrae, Vicky E; Davey, Megan G; McTeir, Lynn; Narisawa, Sonoko; Yadav, Manisha C; Millan, Jose Luis; Farquharson, Colin

    2010-04-01

    PHOSPHO1 is a bone-specific phosphatase implicated in the initiation of inorganic phosphate generation for matrix mineralization. The control of mineralization is attributed to the actions of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). However, matrix vesicles (MVs) containing apatite crystals are present in patients with hypophosphatasia as well as TNAP null (Akp2(-/-)) mice. It is therefore likely that other phosphatases work with TNAP to regulate matrix mineralization. Although PHOSPHO1 and TNAP expression is associated with MVs, it is not known if PHOSPHO1 and TNAP are coexpressed during the early stages of limb development. Furthermore, the functional in vivo role of PHOSPHO1 in matrix mineralization has yet to be established. Here, we studied the temporal expression and functional role of PHOSPHO1 within chick limb bud mesenchymal micromass cultures and also in wild-type and talpid(3) chick mutants. These mutants are characterized by defective hedgehog signalling and the absence of endochondral mineralization. The ability of in vitro micromass cultures to differentiate and mineralize their matrix was temporally associated with increased expression of PHOSPHO1 and TNAP. Comparable changes in expression were noted in developing embryonic legs (developmental stages 23-36HH). Micromass cultures treated with lansoprazole, a small-molecule inhibitor of PHOSPHO1 activity, or FGF2, an inhibitor of chondrocyte differentiation, resulted in reduced alizarin red staining (P<0.05). FGF2 treatment also caused a reduction in PHOSPHO1 (P<0.001) and TNAP (P<0.001) expression. Expression analysis by whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization correlated with qPCR micromass data and demonstrated the existence of a tightly regulated pattern of Phospho1 and Tnap expression which precedes mineralization. Treatment of developing embryos for 5 days with lansoprazole completely inhibited mineralization of all leg and wing long bones as assessed by alcian blue/alizarin red staining

  19. Protein-Protein Interactions in Crystals of the Human Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ICA512 Ectodomain

    PubMed Central

    Primo, María E.; Jakoncic, Jean; Noguera, Martín E.; Risso, Valeria A.; Sosa, Laura; Sica, Mauricio P.; Solimena, Michele; Poskus, Edgardo; Ermácora, Mario R.

    2011-01-01

    ICA512 (or IA-2) is a transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase located in secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Initially, it was identified as one of the main antigens of autoimmune diabetes. Later, it was found that during insulin secretion, the cytoplasmic domain of ICA512 is cleaved and relocated to the nucleus, where it stimulates the transcription of the insulin gene. The role of the other parts of the receptor in insulin secretion is yet to be unveiled. The structures of the intracellular pseudocatalytic and mature extracellular domains are known, but the transmembrane domain and several intracellular and extracellular parts of the receptor are poorly characterized. Moreover the overall structure of the receptor remains to be established. We started to address this issue studying by X-ray crystallography the structure of the mature ectodomain of ICA512 (ME ICA512) and variants thereof. The variants and crystallization conditions were chosen with the purpose of exploring putative association interfaces, metal binding sites and all other structural details that might help, in subsequent works, to build a model of the entire receptor. Several structural features were clarified and three main different association modes of ME ICA512 were identified. The results provide essential pieces of information for the design of new experiments aimed to assess the structure in vivo. PMID:21935384

  20. Protein-Protein Interactions in Crystals of the Human Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ICA512 Ectodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Primo M. E.; Jakoncic J.; Noguera M.E.; Risso V.A.; Sosa L.; Sica M.P.; Solimena M.; Poskus E. and Ermacora M.

    2011-09-15

    ICA512 (or IA-2) is a transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase located in secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Initially, it was identified as one of the main antigens of autoimmune diabetes. Later, it was found that during insulin secretion, the cytoplasmic domain of ICA512 is cleaved and relocated to the nucleus, where it stimulates the transcription of the insulin gene. The role of the other parts of the receptor in insulin secretion is yet to be unveiled. The structures of the intracellular pseudocatalytic and mature extracellular domains are known, but the transmembrane domain and several intracellular and extracellular parts of the receptor are poorly characterized. Moreover the overall structure of the receptor remains to be established. We started to address this issue studying by X-ray crystallography the structure of the mature ectodomain of ICA512 (ME ICA512) and variants thereof. The variants and crystallization conditions were chosen with the purpose of exploring putative association interfaces, metal binding sites and all other structural details that might help, in subsequent works, to build a model of the entire receptor. Several structural features were clarified and three main different association modes of ME ICA512 were identified. The results provide essential pieces of information for the design of new experiments aimed to assess the structure in vivo.

  1. ATF-7, a novel bZIP protein, interacts with the PRL-1 protein-tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Peters, C S; Liang, X; Li, S; Kannan, S; Peng, Y; Taub, R; Diamond, R H

    2001-04-27

    We have identified a novel basic leucine zipper (bZIP) protein, designated ATF-7, that physically interacts with the PRL-1 protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase). PRL-1 is a predominantly nuclear, farnesylated PTPase that has been linked to the control of cellular growth and differentiation. This interaction was initially found using the yeast two-hybrid system. ATF-7 is most closely related to members of the ATF/CREB family of bZIP proteins, with highest homology to ATF-4. ATF-7 homodimers can bind specifically to CRE elements. ATF-7 is expressed in a number of different tissues and is expressed in association with differentiation in the Caco-2 cell model of intestinal differentiation. We have confirmed the PRL-1.ATF-7 interaction and mapped the regions of ATF-7 and PRL-1 important for interaction to ATF-7's bZIP region and PRL-1's phosphatase domain. Finally, we have determined that PRL-1 is able to dephosphorylate ATF-7 in vitro. Further insight into ATF-7's precise cellular roles, transcriptional function, and downstream targets are likely be of importance in understanding the mechanisms underlying the complex processes of maintenance, differentiation, and turnover of epithelial tissues.

  2. Protein phosphatase 5 is necessary for ATR-mediated DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoonsung; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Lee, Jung-Hee; Song, Peter I.; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Sang-Yong; Jun, Jae Yeoul; You, Ho Jin

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) has been shown to participate in ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)- and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related)-mediated checkpoint pathways, which plays an important role in the DNA damage response and maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} However, it is not clear exactly how PP5 participates in this process. {yields} Our results indicate that PP5 is more closely related with ATR-mediated pathway than ATM-mediated pathway in DNA damage repair. -- Abstract: Several recent studies have shown that protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) participates in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage, but its roles in DNA repair have not yet been fully characterized. We investigated the roles of PP5 in the repair of ultraviolet (UV)- and neocarzinostatin (NCS)-induced DNA damage. The results of comet assays revealed different repair patterns in UV- and NCS-exposed U2OS-PS cells. PP5 is only essential for Rad3-related (ATR)-mediated DNA repair. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, important mediators of DNA damage repair, and substrates of ATR and ATM decreased in U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation. In contrast, the cell cycle arrest proteins p53, CHK1, and CHK2 were normally phosphorylated in U2OS and U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation or treated with NCS. In view of these results, we suggest that PP5 plays a crucial role in ATR-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

  3. Generation of Active Protein Phosphatase 2A Is Coupled to Holoenzyme Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hombauer, Hans; Weismann, David; Mudrak, Ingrid; Stanzel, Claudia; Fellner, Thomas; Lackner, Daniel H; Ogris, Egon

    2007-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a prime example of the multisubunit architecture of protein serine/threonine phosphatases. Until substrate-specific PP2A holoenzymes assemble, a constitutively active, but nonspecific, catalytic C subunit would constitute a risk to the cell. While it has been assumed that the severe proliferation impairment of yeast lacking the structural PP2A subunit, TPD3, is due to the unrestricted activity of the C subunit, we recently obtained evidence for the existence of the C subunit in a low-activity conformation that requires the RRD/PTPA proteins for the switch into the active conformation. To study whether and how maturation of the C subunit is coupled with holoenzyme assembly, we analyzed PP2A biogenesis in yeast. Here we show that the generation of the catalytically active C subunit depends on the physical and functional interaction between RRD2 and the structural subunit, TPD3. The phenotype of the tpd3Δ strain is therefore caused by impaired, rather than increased, PP2A activity. TPD3/RRD2-dependent C subunit maturation is under the surveillance of the PP2A methylesterase, PPE1, which upon malfunction of PP2A biogenesis, prevents premature generation of the active C subunit and holoenzyme assembly by counteracting the untimely methylation of the C subunit. We propose a novel model of PP2A biogenesis in which a tightly controlled activation cascade protects cells from untargeted activity of the free catalytic PP2A subunit. PMID:17550305

  4. Identification of the ATP + Mg-dependent and polycation-stimulated protein phosphatases in the germinal vesicle of the Xenopus oocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Jessus, C; Goris, J; Staquet, S; Cayla, X; Ozon, R; Merlevede, W

    1989-01-01

    Two protein phosphatase activities were characterized in the germinal vesicle of Xenopus laevis oocytes after manual dissection of the nucleus. One enzyme can be classified as an active form of the ATP + Mg-dependent (AMD) phosphatase, the other as a polycation-stimulated (PCS) phosphatase. The activity of the PCS phosphatase is localized exclusively in the soluble compartment of the nucleus (nucleoplasm). The catalytic subunit of the AMD phosphatase activity is associated either with the nuclear particulate fraction or with an inhibitory subunit in the nucleoplasm. PMID:2549958

  5. SIPP1, a novel pre-mRNA splicing factor and interactor of protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Llorian, Miriam; Beullens, Monique; Andrés, Isabel; Ortiz, Jose-Miguel; Bollen, Mathieu

    2004-02-15

    We have identified a polypeptide that was already known to interact with polyglutamine-tract-binding protein (PQBP)-1/Npw38 as a novel splicing factor and interactor of protein phosphatase-1, hence the name SIPP1 for splicing factor that interacts with PQBP-1 and PP1 (protein phosphotase 1). SIPP1 was inhibitory to PP1, and its inhibitory potency was increased by phosphorylation with protein kinase CK1. Two-hybrid and co-sedimentation analysis revealed that SIPP1 has two distinct PP1-binding domains and that the binding of SIPP1 with PP1 involves a RVXF (Arg-Val-Xaa-Phe) motif, which functions as a PP1-binding sequence in most interactors of PP1. Enhanced-green-fluorescent-protein-tagged SIPP1 was targeted exclusively to the nucleus and was enriched in the nuclear speckles, which represent storage/assembly sites of splicing factors. We have mapped a nuclear localization signal in the N-terminus of SIPP1, while the proline-rich C-terminal domain appeared to be required for its subnuclear targeting to the speckles. Finally, we found that SIPP1 is also a component of the spliceosomes and that a SIPP1-fragment inhibits splicing catalysis by nuclear extracts independent of its ability to interact with PP1.

  6. Lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes and protein-bound sialic acid in regenerating rat liver.

    PubMed

    Allalouf, D; Schwarzman, S; Levinsky, H; Feller, N; Hart, J; Zoher, S; Menache, R

    1986-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) isoenzyme patterns and protein-bound sialic acid content were compared between normal, regenerating rat liver 10 days after partial hepatectomy and fetal rat liver. For this purpose, liver from ten adult rats and two pools of ten fetal livers each were examined. Isoenzymes were separated by electrophoresis on cellulose acetate and their percent distribution calculated after quantitation by densitometry of the bands. LDH-5 and LDH-4 combined represented in all the tissues examined 90%-94% of the total activity. LDH-5/LDH-4 ratios were nearly equivalent in the normal and regenerated liver (7.14, 6.41), but substantially lower in fetal liver (2.50). Two bands of AP were visualized in electropherograms. AP-1/AP-2 ratio was lower in regenerated liver (1.57) as compared to normal liver (2.27) and still lower in fetal liver (1.06). Protein-bound sialic acid was, on protein basis, slightly but not significantly higher in regenerated liver (1.71 microgram/mg protein) than in normal liver (1.43), and significantly higher in fetal liver (1.87). The relatively small differences in isoenzyme patterns and in protein-bound sialic acid between regenerated and normal liver as compared to those between fetal and normal tissue add support to the view that the cells in regenerated liver are not of embryonic origin.

  7. cdc25+ encodes a protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates p34cdc2.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M S; Ogg, S; Xu, M; Parker, L L; Donoghue, D J; Maller, J L; Piwnica-Worms, H

    1992-01-01

    To determine how the human cdc25 gene product acts to regulate p34cdc2 at the G2 to M transition, we have overproduced the full-length protein (cdc25Hs) as well as several deletion mutants in bacteria as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins. The wild-type cdc25Hs gene product was synthesized as an 80-kDa fusion protein (p80GST-cdc25) and was judged to be functional by several criteria: recombinant p80GST-cdc25 induced meiotic maturation of Xenopus oocytes in the presence of cycloheximide; p80GST-cdc25 activated histone H1 kinase activity upon addition to extracts prepared from Xenopus oocytes; p80GST-cdc25 activated p34cdc2/cyclin B complexes (prematuration promoting factor) in immune complex kinase assays performed in vitro; p80GST-cdc25 stimulated the tyrosine dephosphorylation of p34cdc2/cyclin complexes isolated from Xenopus oocyte extracts as well as from overproducing insect cells; and p80GST-cdc25 hydrolyzed p-nitrophenylphosphate. In addition, deletion analysis defined a functional domain residing within the carboxy-terminus of the cdc25Hs protein. Taken together, these results suggest that the cdc25Hs protein is itself a phosphatase and that it may function directly in the tyrosine dephosphorylation and activation of p34cdc2 at the G2 to M transition. Images PMID:1312880

  8. Protection of epithelial barrier function by the Crohn's disease associated gene protein tyrosine phosphatase n2.

    PubMed

    Scharl, Michael; Paul, Gisela; Weber, Achim; Jung, Barbara C; Docherty, Michael J; Hausmann, Martin; Rogler, Gerhard; Barrett, Kim E; McCole, Declan F

    2009-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 (PTPN2) has been identified as a Crohn's disease (CD) candidate gene. However, a role for PTPN2 in the pathogenesis of CD has not been identified. Increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium is believed to contribute prominently to CD. The aim of this study was to determine a possible role for PTPN2 in CD pathogenesis. Intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lines T(84) and HT29cl.19a were used in all studies. Protein analysis was performed by Western blotting, and protein knockdown was induced by small interfering RNA. Primary samples were from control and CD patients. Here, we demonstrate increased PTPN2 expression in CD intestinal biopsy specimens and that the proinflammatory cy