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Sample records for phosphoenolpyruvate induced starvation

  1. Root architecture remodeling induced by phosphate starvation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Aiko; Miura, Kenji

    2011-08-01

    Plants have evolved efficient strategies for utilizing nutrients in the soil in order to survive, grow, and reproduce. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is a major macroelement source for plant growth; however, the availability and distribution of Pi are varying widely across locations. Thus, plants in many areas experience Pi deficiency. To maintain cellular Pi homeostasis, plants have developed a series of adaptive responses to facilitate external Pi acquisition, limit Pi consumption, and adjust Pi recycling internally under Pi starvation conditions. This review focuses on the molecular regulators that modulate Pi starvation-induced root architectural changes.

  2. Starvation-induced dormancy in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simsek, Emrah; Kim, Minsu

    Isogenic bacterial populations can exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity. Phenotypic heterogeneity is often viewed as a bet-hedging strategy to cope with environmental fluctuations, and believed to be under genetic control. The experimental evidence of this view, however, is limited. Here, we report experimental evidence that prompts reconsideration of this view. Observing how starved E. coli cells resume growth upon nutrient upshift at the single-cell level in real time, we revealed that physiological and metabolic state of starved cells, as well as growth resumption kinetics, vary from cell to cell. Upon nutrient upshift, a majority of cells resume growth instantly, but a small fraction maintain a non-growth state for several hours or days (i.e., long lag time). Hence they are dormant cells. The fraction strongly depends on the duration of starvation. The dormancy does not confer resistance to starvation. Oxidative damage accumulated during starvation leads to the appearance of dormant cells. Taken together, our data suggests that a dormant subpopulation appears as an inevitable consequence of starvation, rather than cellular decision to cope with starvation. Hence, the existence of a genetic program and adaptive value as a bet-hedging strategy to cope with starvation stress may not be needed to explain the emergence of bacterial dormancy.

  3. Octopamine mediates starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhe; Yu, Yue; Zhang, Vivian; Tian, Yinjun; Qi, Wei; Wang, Liming

    2015-04-21

    Starved animals often exhibit elevated locomotion, which has been speculated to partly resemble foraging behavior and facilitate food acquisition and energy intake. Despite its importance, the neural mechanism underlying this behavior remains unknown in any species. In this study we confirmed and extended previous findings that starvation induced locomotor activity in adult fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. We also showed that starvation-induced hyperactivity was directed toward the localization and acquisition of food sources, because it could be suppressed upon the detection of food cues via both central nutrient-sensing and peripheral sweet-sensing mechanisms, via induction of food ingestion. We further found that octopamine, the insect counterpart of vertebrate norepinephrine, as well as the neurons expressing octopamine, were both necessary and sufficient for starvation-induced hyperactivity. Octopamine was not required for starvation-induced changes in feeding behaviors, suggesting independent regulations of energy intake behaviors upon starvation. Taken together, our results establish a quantitative behavioral paradigm to investigate the regulation of energy homeostasis by the CNS and identify a conserved neural substrate that links organismal metabolic state to a specific behavioral output.

  4. A Phosphate Starvation-Inducible Ribonuclease of Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Trung; Nguyen, Minh Hung; Nguyen, Huy Thuan; Nguyen, Hoang Anh; Le, Thi Hoi; Schweder, Thomas; Jürgen, Britta

    2016-08-28

    The BLi03719 protein of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 belongs to the most abundant extracellular proteins under phosphate starvation conditions. In this study, the function of this phosphate starvation inducible protein was determined. An amino-acid sequence analysis of the BLi03719-encoding gene showed a high similarity with genes encoding the barnase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 and binase-like RNase of Bacillus pumilus SARF-032. The comparison of the control strain and a BLi03719-deficient strain revealed a strongly reduced extracellular ribonuclease activity of the mutant. Furthermore, this knockout mutant exhibited delayed growth with yeast RNA as an alternative phosphate and carbon source. These results suggest that BLi03719 is an extracellular ribonuclease expressed in B. licheniformis under phosphate starvation conditions. Finally, a BLi03719 mutant showed an advantageous effect on the overexpression of the heterologous amyE gene under phosphate-limited growth conditions.

  5. Alternative scenarios of starvation-induced adaptation in Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Olga; Gorshkov, Vladimir; Sergeeva, Iuliia; Daminova, Amina; Ageeva, Marina; Gogolev, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria have high adaptive potential that ensures their survival during various environmental challenges. To adapt, bacteria activate a physiological program of stress response that makes them able to persist under adverse conditions. The present study sought to examine the ability of a particular bacterial species to induce a stress response in alternative scenarios. Cells of the phytopathogenic microorganism Pectobacterium atrosepticum were taken as a model. The cells were exposed to starvation in different physiological states (actively growing exponential phase and stationary phase cells), and the resulting starving cultures were monitored using CFU counting, quantitative PCR and electron microscopy. When exponential phase cells were subjected to starvation, the nucleoids of the cells became condensed and their DNA was detected by qPCR less effectively than that of cells growing in nutrient-rich medium, or stationary phase cells after starvation. Exponential phase cells subjected to starvation showed increased expression of genes encoding DNA binding histone-like proteins, whereas, in cultures inoculated by stationary phase cells, cell-wall-deficient forms that were inefficient at colony forming and that had a non-culturable phenotype were formed. The cell-wall-deficient forms displayed reduced expression of genes encoding synthases of cell wall components.

  6. Sugar-Starvation-Induced Changes of Carbon Metabolism in Excised Maize Root Tips.

    PubMed Central

    Dieuaide-Noubhani, M.; Canioni, P.; Raymond, P.

    1997-01-01

    Excised maize (Zea mays L.) root tips were used to study the early metabolic effects of glucose (Glc) starvation. Root tips were prelabeled with [1-13C]Glc so that carbohydrates and metabolic intermediates were close to steady-state labeling, but lipids and proteins were scarcely labeled. They were then incubated in a sugar-deprived medium for carbon starvation. Changes in the level of soluble sugars, the respiratory quotient, and the 13C enrichment of intermediates, as measured by 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, were studied to detect changes in carbon fluxes through glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Labeling of glutamate carbons revealed two major changes in carbon input into the tricarboxylic acid cycle: (a) the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase flux stopped early after the start of Glc starvation, and (b) the contribution of glycolysis as the source of acetyl-coenzyme A for respiration decreased progressively, indicating an increasing contribution of the catabolism of protein amino acids, fatty acids, or both. The enrichment of glutamate carbons gave no evidence for proteolysis in the early steps of starvation, indicating that the catabolism of proteins was delayed compared with that of fatty acids. Labeling of carbohydrates showed that sucrose turnover continues during sugar starvation, but gave no indication for any significant flux through gluconeogenesis. PMID:12223877

  7. Regulation of starvation-induced hyperactivity by insulin and glucagon signaling in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Huang, Rui; Ye, Jie; Zhang, Vivian; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Guo; Jia, Junling; Wang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Starvation induces sustained increase in locomotion, which facilitates food localization and acquisition and hence composes an important aspect of food-seeking behavior. We investigated how nutritional states modulated starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila. The receptor of the adipokinetic hormone (AKHR), the insect analog of glucagon, was required for starvation-induced hyperactivity. AKHR was expressed in a small group of octopaminergic neurons in the brain. Silencing AKHR+ neurons and blocking octopamine signaling in these neurons eliminated starvation-induced hyperactivity, whereas activation of these neurons accelerated the onset of hyperactivity upon starvation. Neither AKHR nor AKHR+ neurons were involved in increased food consumption upon starvation, suggesting that starvation-induced hyperactivity and food consumption are independently regulated. Single cell analysis of AKHR+ neurons identified the co-expression of Drosophila insulin-like receptor (dInR), which imposed suppressive effect on starvation-induced hyperactivity. Therefore, insulin and glucagon signaling exert opposite effects on starvation-induced hyperactivity via a common neural target in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15693.001 PMID:27612383

  8. Starvation-induced collective behavior in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Yim, Joshua J.; Cheong Cheong, Mi; Avery, Leon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new type of collective behavior in C. elegans nematodes, aggregation of starved L1 larvae. Shortly after hatching in the absence of food, L1 larvae arrest their development and disperse in search for food. In contrast, after two or more days without food, the worms change their behavior—they start to aggregate. The aggregation requires a small amount of ethanol or acetate in the environment. In the case of ethanol, it has to be metabolized, which requires functional alcohol dehydrogenase sodh-1. The resulting acetate is used in de novo fatty acid synthesis, and some of the newly made fatty acids are then derivatized to glycerophosphoethanolamides and released into the surrounding medium. We examined several other Caenorhabditis species and found an apparent correlation between propensity of starved L1s to aggregate and density dependence of their survival in starvation. Aggregation locally concentrates worms and may help the larvae to survive long starvation. This work demonstrates how presence of ethanol or acetate, relatively abundant small molecules in the environment, induces collective behavior in C. elegans associated with different survival strategies. PMID:26013573

  9. Phosphate Starvation Inducible Metabolism in Lycopersicon esculentum1

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Alan H.; Baertlein, Dawn A.; McDaniel, Robert G.

    1988-01-01

    Both tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv VF 36) plants and suspension cultured cells show phosphate starvation inducible (psi) excretion of acid phosphatase (Apase). Apase excretion in vitro was proportional to the level of exogenous orthophosphate (Pi). Intracellular Apase activity remained the same in both Pi-starved and sufficient cells, while Apase excreted by the starved cells increased by as much as six times over unstressed control cells on a dry weight basis. At peak induction, 50% of total Apase was excreted. Ten day old tomato seedlings grown without Pi showed slight growth reduction versus unstressed control plants. The Pi-depleted roots showed psi enhancement of Apase activity. Severely starved seedlings (17 days) reached only one-third of the biomass of unstressed control plants but, because of a combination of psi Apase excretion by roots and a shift in biomass to this organ, they excreted 5.5 times the Apase activity of the unstressed control. Observed psi Apase excretion may be part of a phosphate starvation rescue system in plants. The utility of the visible indicator dye 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-phosphate-p-toluidine as a phenotypic marker for plant Apase excretion is demonstrated. Images Fig. 5 PMID:16666212

  10. Mitochondrial myopathy induces a starvation-like response.

    PubMed

    Tyynismaa, Henna; Carroll, Christopher J; Raimundo, Nuno; Ahola-Erkkilä, Sofia; Wenz, Tina; Ruhanen, Heini; Guse, Kilian; Hemminki, Akseli; Peltola-Mjøsund, Katja E; Tulkki, Valtteri; Oresic, Matej; Moraes, Carlos T; Pietiläinen, Kirsi; Hovatta, Iiris; Suomalainen, Anu

    2010-10-15

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) deficiency is among the most common causes of inherited metabolic disease, but its physiological consequences are poorly characterized. We studied the skeletal muscle gene expression profiles of mice with late-onset mitochondrial myopathy. These animals express a dominant patient mutation in the mitochondrial replicative helicase Twinkle, leading to accumulation of multiple mtDNA deletions and progressive subtle RC deficiency in the skeletal muscle. The global gene expression pattern of the mouse skeletal muscle showed induction of pathways involved in amino acid starvation response and activation of Akt signaling. Furthermore, the muscle showed induction of a fasting-related hormone, fibroblast growth factor 21 (Fgf21). This secreted regulator of lipid metabolism was also elevated in the mouse serum, and the animals showed widespread changes in their lipid metabolism: small adipocyte size, low fat content in the liver and resistance to high-fat diet. We propose that RC deficiency induces a mitochondrial stress response, with local and global changes mimicking starvation, in a normal nutritional state. These results may have important implications for understanding the metabolic consequences of mitochondrial myopathies.

  11. Infestation and hydraulic consequences of induced carbon starvation.

    PubMed

    Anderegg, William R L; Callaway, Elizabeth S

    2012-08-01

    Drought impacts on forests, including widespread die-off, are likely to increase with future climate change, although the physiological responses of trees to lethal drought are poorly understood. In particular, in situ examinations of carbon starvation and its interactions with and effects on infestation and hydraulic vulnerability are largely lacking. In this study, we conducted a controlled, in situ, repeated defoliation experiment to induce carbon stress in isolated trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) ramets. We monitored leaf morphology, leaves per branch, and multitissue carbohydrate concentrations during canopy defoliation. We examined the subsequent effects of defoliation and defoliation-induced carbon stress on vulnerability to insect/fungus infestation and hydraulic vulnerability the following year. Defoliated ramets flushed multiple canopies, which coincided with moderate drawdown of nonstructural carbohydrate reserves. Infestation frequency greatly increased and hydraulic conductivity decreased 1 year after defoliation. Despite incomplete carbohydrate drawdown from defoliation and relatively rapid carbohydrate recovery, suggesting considerable carbohydrate reserves in aspen, defoliation-induced carbon stress held significant consequences for vulnerability to mortality agents and hydraulic performance. Our results indicate that multiyear consequences of drought via feedbacks are likely important for understanding forests' responses to drought and climate change over the coming decades.

  12. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  13. LIMITING ACCRETION ONTO MASSIVE STARS BY FRAGMENTATION-INDUCED STARVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2010-12-10

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform and analyze simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  14. Systems-level analysis of nitrogen starvation-induced modifications of carbon metabolism in a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii starchless mutant.

    PubMed

    Blaby, Ian K; Glaesener, Anne G; Mettler, Tabea; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T; Gallaher, Sean D; Liu, Bensheng; Boyle, Nanette R; Kropat, Janette; Stitt, Mark; Johnson, Shannon; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Casero, David; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2013-11-01

    To understand the molecular basis underlying increased triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless (sta) Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants, we undertook comparative time-course transcriptomics of strains CC-4348 (sta6 mutant), CC-4349, a cell wall-deficient (cw) strain purported to represent the parental STA6 strain, and three independent STA6 strains generated by complementation of sta6 (CC-4565/STA6-C2, CC-4566/STA6-C4, and CC-4567/STA6-C6) in the context of N deprivation. Despite N starvation-induced dramatic remodeling of the transcriptome, there were relatively few differences (5 × 10(2)) observed between sta6 and STA6, the most dramatic of which were increased abundance of transcripts encoding key regulated or rate-limiting steps in central carbon metabolism, specifically isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, transaldolase, fructose bisphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (encoded by ICL1, MAS1, TAL1, FBP1, and PCK1 respectively), suggestive of increased carbon movement toward hexose-phosphate in sta6 by upregulation of the glyoxylate pathway and gluconeogenesis. Enzyme assays validated the increase in isocitrate lyase and malate synthase activities. Targeted metabolite analysis indicated increased succinate, malate, and Glc-6-P and decreased Fru-1,6-bisphosphate, illustrating the effect of these changes. Comparisons of independent data sets in multiple strains allowed the delineation of a sequence of events in the global N starvation response in C. reinhardtii, starting within minutes with the upregulation of alternative N assimilation routes and carbohydrate synthesis and subsequently a more gradual upregulation of genes encoding enzymes of TAG synthesis. Finally, genome resequencing analysis indicated that (1) the deletion in sta6 extends into the neighboring gene encoding respiratory burst oxidase, and (2) a commonly used STA6 strain (CC-4349) as well as the sequenced reference (CC-503) are not congenic with respect to sta6 (CC-4348

  15. Iron starvation induces apoptosis in Rhizopus oryzae in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Ibrahim, Ashraf S

    2015-01-01

    Mortality associated with mucormycosis remains high despite current antifungals. Iron-starvation strategies have been shown to have promising activity against Mucorales. We hypothesized that iron starvation enhances apoptosis in Rhizopus oryzae. Apoptosis was characterized in R. oryzae transformed with RNAi plasmid targeting FTR1 expression (iron permease mutant) or empty plasmid grown in iron rich (0.125% FeCl3) and iron depleted media (YNB+1mM ferrozine and 1 mM ascorbic acid). Increased apoptosis was observed with dihydrorhodamine-123 and rhodamine-123 staining in the iron starved mutant FTR1 when compared to empty plasmid, followed by increased extracellular ATP levels. In addition, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity were prominent in FTR1. In contrast, Rhizopus strains grown in iron-rich medium displayed minimal apoptosis. Our results demonstrate a metacaspase dependent apoptotic process in iron deprived condition and further support the role of iron starvation strategies as an adjunct treatment for mucormycosis, a mechanism by which iron starvation affects R. oryzae.

  16. The tumor suppressor Rb critically regulates starvation-induced stress response in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mingxue; Cohen, Max L; Teng, Cindy; Han, Min

    2013-06-03

    How animals coordinate gene expression in response to starvation is an outstanding problem closely linked to aging, obesity, and cancer. Newly hatched Caenorhabditis elegans respond to food deprivation by halting development and promoting long-term survival (L1 diapause), thereby providing an excellent model for the study of starvation response. Through a genetic search, we have discovered that the tumor suppressor Rb critically promotes survival during L1 diapause and most likely does so by regulating the expression of genes in both insulin-IGF-1 signaling (IIS)-dependent and -independent pathways mainly in neurons and the intestine. Global gene expression analyses suggested that Rb maintains the "starvation-induced" transcriptome and represses the "refeeding-induced" transcriptome, including the repression of many pathogen-, toxin-, and oxidative-stress-inducible and metabolic genes, as well as the activation of many other stress-resistant genes, mitochondrial respiratory chain genes, and potential IIS receptor antagonists. Notably, the majority of genes dysregulated in starved L1 Rb(-) animals were not found to be dysregulated in fed conditions. Altogether, these findings identify Rb as a critical regulator of the starvation response and suggest a link between functions of tumor suppressors and starvation survival. These results may provide mechanistic insights into why cancer cells are often hypersensitive to starvation treatment.

  17. The Molecular Mechanism of Ethylene-Mediated Root Hair Development Induced by Phosphate Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Yu, Haopeng; Dong, Jinsong; Liu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced root hair production, which increases the root surface area for nutrient uptake, is a typical adaptive response of plants to phosphate (Pi) starvation. Although previous studies have shown that ethylene plays an important role in root hair development induced by Pi starvation, the underlying molecular mechanism is not understood. In this work, we characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, hps5, that displays constitutive ethylene responses and increased sensitivity to Pi starvation due to a mutation in the ethylene receptor ERS1. hps5 accumulates high levels of EIN3 protein, a key transcription factor involved in the ethylene signaling pathway, under both Pi sufficiency and deficiency. Pi starvation also increases the accumulation of EIN3 protein. Combined molecular, genetic, and genomic analyses identified a group of genes that affect root hair development by regulating cell wall modifications. The expression of these genes is induced by Pi starvation and is enhanced in the EIN3-overexpressing line. In contrast, the induction of these genes by Pi starvation is suppressed in ein3 and ein3eil1 mutants. EIN3 protein can directly bind to the promoter of these genes, some of which are also the immediate targets of RSL4, a key transcription factor that regulates root hair development. Based on these results, we propose that under normal growth conditions, the level of ethylene is low in root cells; a group of key transcription factors, including RSL4 and its homologs, trigger the transcription of their target genes to promote root hair development; Pi starvation increases the levels of the protein EIN3, which directly binds to the promoters of the genes targeted by RSL4 and its homologs and further increase their transcription, resulting in the enhanced production of root hairs. This model not only explains how ethylene mediates root hair responses to Pi starvation, but may provide a general mechanism for how ethylene regulates root hair development under both stress

  18. Nitrogen starvation induces expression of Lg-FLO1 and flocculation in bottom-fermenting yeast.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tomoo

    2012-11-01

    When exponentially growing cells of bottom-fermenting yeast were starved for nitrogen or were grown on proline (a non-preferred nitrogen source), flocculation was induced. This flocculation was not induced by starvation for either carbon or amino acids. Expression of Lg-FLO1, which is required for flocculation of bottom-fermenting yeast, was also found to be induced by starvation for nitrogen. This suggests that the flocculation of bottom-fermenting yeast is under the control of a nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-like mechanism.

  19. Constitutive and dark-induced expression of Solanum tuberosum phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase enhances stomatal opening and photosynthetic performance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kebeish, Rashad; Niessen, Markus; Oksaksin, Mehtap; Blume, Christian; Peterhaensel, Christoph

    2012-02-01

    The effect of constitutive and dark-induced expression of Solanum tuberosum phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) on the opening state of stomata and photosynthetic performance in Arabidopsis thaliana plants was studied. Transcript accumulation analyses of the A. thaliana dark-induced (Din10 and Din6) and the Pisum sativum asparagine synthetase 2 promoters (Asn2) in transiently transformed tobacco leaves showed that Din10 promoter induced more DsRed accumulation in the dark compared to the other din genes. Overexpression of PEPC under the control of the constitutive enhanced CaMV 35S (p35SS) and dark-induced Din10 promoter in stably transformed A. thaliana plants increased the number of opened stomata in dark adapted leaves. Gas exchange measurements using A. thaliana plants transgenic for p35SS-PEPC and Din10-PEPC revealed a marked increase in stomatal conductance, transpiration, and dark respiration rates measured in the dark compared to wild-type plants. Moreover, measurement of CO(2) assimilation rates at different external CO(2) concentrations (C(a) ) and different light intensities shows an increase in the CO(2) assimilation rates in transgenic Arabidopsis lines compared to wild-type plants. This is considered as first step towards transferring the aspects of Crassulacean acid metabolism-like photosynthetic mechanism into C3 plants.

  20. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Induced by Chronic Starvation and Selenium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) has been rarely documented as a cause of cardiovascular abnormalities, including dilated cardiomyopathy. Selenium is responsible for antioxidant defense mechanisms in cardiomyocytes, and its deficiency in the setting of PEM and disease related malnutrition (DRM) may lead to exacerbation of the dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a rare case of a fourteen-year-old boy who presented with symptoms of congestive heart failure due to DRM and PEM (secondary to chronic starvation) along with severe selenium deficiency. An initial echocardiogram showed severely depressed systolic function consistent with dilated cardiomyopathy. Aggressive nutritional support and replacement of selenium and congestive heart failure medications that included diuretics and ACE inhibitors with the addition of carvedilol led to normalization of the cardiac function within four weeks. He continues to have significant weight gain and is currently completely asymptomatic from a cardiovascular standpoint. PMID:27994905

  1. Starvation induces apoptosis in the midgut nidi of Periplaneta americana: a histochemical and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Park, Pyoyun; Takeda, Makio

    2009-03-01

    The effects of starvation on cell death in the midgut of Periplaneta americana were studied histochemically and ultrastructurally. TUNEL assays showed that cell death began to increase in the columnar cells and nidi, the nests of stem cells and newborn cells from 2 weeks of starvation. A significant increase in cell death occurred in the nidi after 4 weeks of starvation. Cockroaches starved for 4 weeks showed active-caspase-3-like immuno-reactivity both in the columnar cells and nidi, whereas control cockroaches that were fed for 4 weeks showed this reactivity only in the apical cytoplasm of columnar cells. Electron microscopy revealed no chromatin condensation in the nucleus of columnar cells of cockroaches, whether fed or starved for 4 weeks. Starved cockroaches exhibited many small vacuoles in the cytoplasm of some columnar cells and "floating" organelles including nuclei in the lumen. A 4-week starvation induced the appearance of cytoplasmic fragmentation and secondary lysosomes in the nidi. Each fragment contained nuclear derivatives with condensed chromatin, i.e. apoptotic bodies. Mitotic cells were found in some, but not all nidi, even within the same starved sample. Fragmentation was not observed in the nidi of control cockroaches. Thus, starvation increases cell death not only in the columnar cells, but also in the nidi. The cell death in the nidi is presumably apoptosis executed by caspase 3.

  2. Transcriptional program for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia de Lomana, Adrian Lopez; Schäuble, Sascha; Valenzuela, Jacob; ...

    2015-12-02

    Algae accumulate lipids to endure different kinds of environmental stresses including macronutrient starvation. Although this response has been extensively studied, an in depth understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) that controls the transition into lipid accumulation remains elusive. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to elucidate the transcriptional program that coordinates the nitrogen starvation-induced metabolic readjustments that drive lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that nitrogen starvation triggered differential regulation of 2147 transcripts, which were co-regulated in 215 distinct modules and temporally ordered as 31 transcriptional waves. An early-stage response was triggered within 12 minmore » that initiated growth arrest through activation of key signaling pathways, while simultaneously preparing the intracellular environment for later stages by modulating transport processes and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. Subsequently, central metabolism and carbon fixation were remodeled to trigger the accumulation of triacylglycerols. Further analysis revealed that these waves of genome-wide transcriptional events were coordinated by a regulatory program orchestrated by at least 17 transcriptional regulators, many of which had not been previously implicated in this process. We demonstrate that the TRN coordinates transcriptional downregulation of 57 metabolic enzymes across a period of nearly 4 h to drive an increase in lipid content per unit biomass. Notably, this TRN appears to also drive lipid accumulation during sulfur starvation, while phosphorus starvation induces a different regulatory program. The TRN model described here is available as a community-wide web-resource at http://networks.systemsbiology.net/chlamy-portal. In conclusion, in this work, we have uncovered a comprehensive mechanistic model of the TRN controlling the transition from N starvation to lipid

  3. Transcriptional program for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Lomana, Adrian Lopez; Schäuble, Sascha; Valenzuela, Jacob; Imam, Saheed; Carter, Warren; Bilgin, Damla D.; Yohn, Christopher B.; Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J.; Orellana, Monica V.; Price, Nathan D.; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2015-12-02

    Algae accumulate lipids to endure different kinds of environmental stresses including macronutrient starvation. Although this response has been extensively studied, an in depth understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) that controls the transition into lipid accumulation remains elusive. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to elucidate the transcriptional program that coordinates the nitrogen starvation-induced metabolic readjustments that drive lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that nitrogen starvation triggered differential regulation of 2147 transcripts, which were co-regulated in 215 distinct modules and temporally ordered as 31 transcriptional waves. An early-stage response was triggered within 12 min that initiated growth arrest through activation of key signaling pathways, while simultaneously preparing the intracellular environment for later stages by modulating transport processes and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. Subsequently, central metabolism and carbon fixation were remodeled to trigger the accumulation of triacylglycerols. Further analysis revealed that these waves of genome-wide transcriptional events were coordinated by a regulatory program orchestrated by at least 17 transcriptional regulators, many of which had not been previously implicated in this process. We demonstrate that the TRN coordinates transcriptional downregulation of 57 metabolic enzymes across a period of nearly 4 h to drive an increase in lipid content per unit biomass. Notably, this TRN appears to also drive lipid accumulation during sulfur starvation, while phosphorus starvation induces a different regulatory program. The TRN model described here is available as a community-wide web-resource at http://networks.systemsbiology.net/chlamy-portal. In conclusion, in this work, we have uncovered a comprehensive mechanistic model of the TRN controlling the transition from N starvation to lipid accumulation

  4. Cholesterol starvation induces differentiation of the intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed Central

    Luján, H D; Mowatt, M R; Byrd, L G; Nash, T E

    1996-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, like most human intestinal parasitic protozoa, sustains fundamental morphological and biochemical changes to survive outside the small intestine of its mammalian host by differentiating into an infective cyst. However, the stimulus that triggers this differentiation remains totally undefined. In this work, we demonstrate the induction of cyst formation in vitro when trophozoites are starved for cholesterol. Expression of cyst wall proteins was detected within encystation-specific secretory vesicles 90 min after the cells were placed in lipoprotein-deficient TYI-S-33 medium. Four cloned lines derived from two independent Giardia isolates were tested, and all formed cysts similarly. Addition of cholesterol, low density or very low density lipoproteins to the lipoprotein-deficient culture medium, inhibited the expression of cyst wall proteins, the generation of encystation-specific vesicles, and cyst wall biogenesis. In contrast, high density lipoproteins, phospholipids, bile salts, or fatty acids had little or no effect. These results indicate that cholesterol starvation is necessary and sufficient for the stimulation of Giardia encystation in vitro and, likely, in the intestine of mammalian hosts. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8755526

  5. NS5ATP9 Promotes Beclin 1-Dependent Starvation-Induced Autophagy of Hepatoblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Quan, Min; Liu, Shunai; Wang, Qi; Li, Guoli; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Shenghu; Liang, Jinqiu; Cheng, Jun

    2015-08-01

    NS5ATP9, a gene up-regulated by NS5A, plays a crucial oncogenic role in several types of human tumours. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process, maintains cellular homeostasis under stress conditions, such as starvation, and plays a crucial role in tumour initiation and progression. Here, we report that NS5ATP9 mRNA and protein expression was up-regulated in starved HepG2 cells and that the up-regulated NS5ATP9 played a functional role in starvation-induced autophagy. Overexpression or silencing of this gene showed contrasting effects on Beclin 1 and on starvation-induced autophagy. Furthermore, NS5ATP9-mediated autophagy is required for promotion of tumour cell growth, and this effect could be inhibited with 3-methyladenine, chloroquine or by Beclin 1-silencing. Thus, the mechanism for NS5ATP9-promoted autophagy is Beclin 1-dependent in the condition of starvation, and for hepatoblastoma cell growth is also Beclin 1-dependent.

  6. ArnS, a kinase involved in starvation-induced archaellum expression.

    PubMed

    Haurat, M Florencia; Figueiredo, Ana Sofia; Hoffmann, Lena; Li, Lingling; Herr, Katharina; J Wilson, Amanda; Beeby, Morgan; Schaber, Jörg; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2017-01-01

    Organisms have evolved motility organelles that allow them to move to favourable habitats. Cells integrate environmental stimuli into intracellular signals to motility machineries to direct this migration. Many motility organelles are complex surface appendages that have evolved a tight, hierarchical regulation of expression. In the crenearchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, biosynthesis of the archaellum is regulated by regulatory network proteins that control expression of archaellum components in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. A major trigger for archaellum expression is nutrient starvation, but although some components are known, the regulatory cascade triggered by starvation is poorly understood. In this work, the starvation-induced Ser/Thr protein kinase ArnS (Saci_1181) which is located proximally to the archaellum operon was identified. Deletion of arnS results in reduced motility, though the archaellum is properly assembled. Therefore, our experimental and modelling results indicate that ArnS plays an essential role in the precisely controlled expression of archaellum components during starvation-induced motility in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Furthermore they combined in vivo experiments and mathematical models to describe for the first time in archaea the dynamics of key regulators of archaellum expression.

  7. Glucose starvation-induced dispersal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is cAMP and energy dependent.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tran T; McDougald, Diane; Klebensberger, Janosch; Al Qarni, Budoor; Barraud, Nicolas; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Schleheck, David

    2012-01-01

    Carbon starvation has been shown to induce a massive dispersal event in biofilms of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, the molecular pathways controlling this dispersal response remain unknown. We quantified changes in the proteome of P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm and planktonic cells during glucose starvation by differential peptide-fingerprint mass-spectrometry (iTRAQ). In addition, we monitored dispersal photometrically, as a decrease in turbidity/opacity of biofilms pre-grown and starved in continuous flow-cells, in order to evaluate treatments (e.g. inhibitors CCCP, arsenate, chloramphenicol, L-serine hydroxamate) and key mutants altered in biofilm development and dispersal (e.g. nirS, vfr, bdlA, rpoS, lasRrhlR, Pf4-bacteriophage and cyaA). In wild-type biofilms, dispersal started within five minutes of glucose starvation, was maximal after 2 h, and up to 60% of the original biomass had dispersed after 24 h of starvation. The changes in protein synthesis were generally not more than two fold and indicated that more than 100 proteins belonging to various classes, including carbon and energy metabolism, stress adaptation, and motility, were differentially expressed. For the different treatments, only the proton-ionophore CCCP or arsenate, an inhibitor of ATP synthesis, prevented dispersal of the biofilms. For the different mutants tested, only cyaA, the synthase of the intracellular second messenger cAMP, failed to disperse; complementation of the cyaA mutation restored the wild-type phenotype. Hence, the pathway for carbon starvation-induced biofilm dispersal in P. aeruginosa PAO1 involves ATP production via direct ATP synthesis and proton-motive force dependent step(s) and is mediated through cAMP, which is likely to control the activity of proteins involved in remodeling biofilm cells in preparation for planktonic survival.

  8. Glucose starvation-mediated inhibition of salinomycin induced autophagy amplifies cancer cell specific cell death.

    PubMed

    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R; Jain, Mayur V; Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta; Roberg, Karin; Lotfi, Kourosh; Łos, Marek J

    2015-04-30

    Salinomycin has been used as treatment for malignant tumors in a small number of humans, causing far less side effects than standard chemotherapy. Several studies show that Salinomycin targets cancer-initiating cells (cancer stem cells, or CSC) resistant to conventional therapies. Numerous studies show that Salinomycin not only reduces tumor volume, but also decreases tumor recurrence when used as an adjuvant to standard treatments. In this study we show that starvation triggered different stress responses in cancer cells and primary normal cells, which further improved the preferential targeting of cancer cells by Salinomycin. Our in vitro studies further demonstrate that the combined use of 2-Fluoro 2-deoxy D-glucose, or 2-deoxy D-glucose with Salinomycin is lethal in cancer cells while the use of Oxamate does not improve cell death-inducing properties of Salinomycin. Furthermore, we show that treatment of cancer cells with Salinomycin under starvation conditions not only increases the apoptotic caspase activity, but also diminishes the protective autophagy normally triggered by the treatment with Salinomycin alone. Thus, this study underlines the potential use of Salinomycin as a cancer treatment, possibly in combination with short-term starvation or starvation-mimicking pharmacologic intervention.

  9. Starvation induces FoxO-dependent mitotic-to-endocycle switch pausing during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jouandin, Patrick; Ghiglione, Christian; Noselli, Stéphane

    2014-08-01

    When exposed to nutrient challenge, organisms have to adapt their physiology in order to balance reproduction with adult fitness. In mammals, ovarian follicles enter a massive growth phase during which they become highly dependent on gonadotrophic factors and nutrients. Somatic tissues play a crucial role in integrating these signals, controlling ovarian follicle atresia and eventually leading to the selection of a single follicle for ovulation. We used Drosophila follicles as a model to study the effect of starvation on follicle maturation. Upon starvation, Drosophila vitellogenic follicles adopt an 'atresia-like' behavior, in which some slow down their development whereas others enter degeneration. The mitotic-to-endocycle (M/E) transition is a critical step during Drosophila oogenesis, allowing the entry of egg chambers into vitellogenesis. Here, we describe a specific and transient phase during M/E switching that is paused upon starvation. The Insulin pathway induces the pausing of the M/E switch, blocking the entry of egg chambers into vitellogenesis. Pausing of the M/E switch involves a previously unknown crosstalk between FoxO, Cut and Notch that ensures full reversion of the process and rapid resumption of oogenesis upon refeeding. Our work reveals a novel genetic mechanism controlling the extent of the M/E switch upon starvation, thus integrating metabolic cues with development, growth and reproduction.

  10. Starvation-induced activation of ATM/Chk2/p53 signaling sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Optimizing the safety and efficacy of standard chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin (CDDP) is of clinical relevance. Serum starvation in vitro and short-term food starvation in vivo both stress cells by the sudden depletion of paracrine growth stimulation. Methods The effects of serum starvation on CDDP toxicity were investigated in normal and cancer cells by assessing proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of DNA-damage response and of AMPK, and were compared to effects observed in cells grown in serum-containing medium. The effects of short-term food starvation on CDDP chemotherapy were assessed in xenografts-bearing mice and were compared to effects on tumor growth and/or regression determined in mice with no diet alteration. Results We observed that serum starvation in vitro sensitizes cancer cells to CDDP while protecting normal cells. In detail, in normal cells, serum starvation resulted in a complete arrest of cellular proliferation, i.e. depletion of BrdU-incorporation during S-phase and accumulation of the cells in the G0/G1-phase of the cell cycle. Further analysis revealed that proliferation arrest in normal cells is due to p53/p21 activation, which is AMPK-dependent and ATM-independent. In cancer cells, serum starvation also decreased the fraction of S-phase cells but to a minor extent. In contrast to normal cells, serum starvation-induced p53 activation in cancer cells is both AMPK- and ATM-dependent. Combination of CDDP with serum starvation in vitro increased the activation of ATM/Chk2/p53 signaling pathway compared to either treatment alone resulting in an enhanced sensitization of cancer cells to CDDP. Finally, short-term food starvation dramatically increased the sensitivity of human tumor xenografts to cisplatin as indicated not only by a significant growth delay, but also by the induction of complete remission in 60% of the animals bearing mesothelioma xenografts, and in 40% of the animals with lung carcinoma

  11. Nutrient-regulated Phosphorylation of ATG13 Inhibits Starvation-induced Autophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Cindy; Hendrickson, Ronald C.; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process that utilizes a defined series of membrane trafficking events to generate a de novo double-membrane vesicle termed the autophagosome, which matures by fusing to the lysosome. Subsequently, the lysosome facilitates the degradation and recycling of the cytoplasmic cargo. In yeast, the upstream signals that regulate the induction of starvation-induced autophagy are clearly defined. The nutrient-sensing kinase Tor inhibits the activation of autophagy by regulating the formation of the Atg1-Atg13-Atg17 complex, through hyperphosphorylation of Atg13. However, in mammals, the ortholog complex ULK1-ATG13-FIP200 is constitutively formed. As such, the molecular mechanism by which mTOR regulates mammalian autophagy is unknown. Here we report the identification and characterization of novel nutrient-regulated phosphorylation sites on ATG13: Ser-224 and Ser-258. mTOR directly phosphorylates ATG13 on Ser-258 while Ser-224 is modulated by the AMPK pathway. In ATG13 knock-out cells reconstituted with an unphosphorylatable mutant of ATG13, ULK1 kinase activity is more potent, and amino acid starvation induced more rapid ATG13 and ULK1 translocation. These events culminated in a more rapid starvation-induced autophagy response. Therefore, ATG13 phosphorylation plays a crucial role in autophagy regulation. PMID:26801615

  12. Starvation reveals the cause of infection-induced castration and gigantism.

    PubMed

    Cressler, Clayton E; Nelson, William A; Day, Troy; McCauley, Edward

    2014-10-07

    Parasites often induce life-history changes in their hosts. In many cases, these infection-induced life-history changes are driven by changes in the pattern of energy allocation and utilization within the host. Because these processes will affect both host and parasite fitness, it can be challenging to determine who benefits from them. Determining the causes and consequences of infection-induced life-history changes requires the ability to experimentally manipulate life history and a framework for connecting life history to host and parasite fitness. Here, we combine a novel starvation manipulation with energy budget models to provide new insights into castration and gigantism in the Daphnia magna-Pasteuria ramosa host-parasite system. Our results show that starvation primarily affects investment in reproduction, and increasing starvation stress reduces gigantism and parasite fitness without affecting castration. These results are consistent with an energetic structure where the parasite uses growth energy as a resource. This finding gives us new understanding of the role of castration and gigantism in this system, and how life-history variation will affect infection outcome and epidemiological dynamics. The approach of combining targeted life-history manipulations with energy budget models can be adapted to understand life-history changes in other disease systems.

  13. Nutrient-regulated Phosphorylation of ATG13 Inhibits Starvation-induced Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Puente, Cindy; Hendrickson, Ronald C; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-03-11

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process that utilizes a defined series of membrane trafficking events to generate a de novo double-membrane vesicle termed the autophagosome, which matures by fusing to the lysosome. Subsequently, the lysosome facilitates the degradation and recycling of the cytoplasmic cargo. In yeast, the upstream signals that regulate the induction of starvation-induced autophagy are clearly defined. The nutrient-sensing kinase Tor inhibits the activation of autophagy by regulating the formation of the Atg1-Atg13-Atg17 complex, through hyperphosphorylation of Atg13. However, in mammals, the ortholog complex ULK1-ATG13-FIP200 is constitutively formed. As such, the molecular mechanism by which mTOR regulates mammalian autophagy is unknown. Here we report the identification and characterization of novel nutrient-regulated phosphorylation sites on ATG13: Ser-224 and Ser-258. mTOR directly phosphorylates ATG13 on Ser-258 while Ser-224 is modulated by the AMPK pathway. In ATG13 knock-out cells reconstituted with an unphosphorylatable mutant of ATG13, ULK1 kinase activity is more potent, and amino acid starvation induced more rapid ATG13 and ULK1 translocation. These events culminated in a more rapid starvation-induced autophagy response. Therefore, ATG13 phosphorylation plays a crucial role in autophagy regulation.

  14. Therapeutic inhibition of mitochondrial function induces cell death in starvation-resistant renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Isono, Takahiro; Chano, Tokuhiro; Yonese, Junji; Yuasa, Takeshi

    2016-05-09

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) have two types of cells for carbon metabolism and for cell signaling under nutrient-deprivation conditions, namely starvation-resistant and starvation-sensitive cells. Here, we evaluated the mitochondrial characteristics of these cell types and found that the resistant type possessed higher activities for both mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis than the sensitive types. These higher activities were supported by the stored carbon, lipid and carbohydrate sources, and by a low level of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to sustained SOD2 expression in the resistant RCC cells. In metastatic RCC cases, higher SOD2 expression was associated with a significantly shorter survival period. We found that treatment with the drugs etomoxir and buformin significantly reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and induced cell death under glucose-deprivation conditions in starvation-resistant RCC cells. Our data suggest that inhibitory targeting of mitochondria might offer an effective therapeutic option for metastatic RCC that is resistant to current treatments.

  15. Doxycyclin ameliorates a starvation-induced germline tumor in C. elegans daf-18/PTEN mutant background.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Tim; Qi, Wenjing; Schindler, Verena; Runkel, Eva Diana; Baumeister, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    Managing available resources is a key necessity of each organism to cope with the environment. The nematode C. elegans responds to nutritional deprivation or harsh environmental conditions with a multitude of developmental adaptations, among them a starvation-induced quiescence at early larval development (L1). daf-18, the C. elegans homolog of the human tumor suppressor gene PTEN, is essential for the maintenance of survival and germline stem cell arrest during the L1 diapause. We show here that daf-18 mutants, independently to their failure to maintain G2 arrest of the primordial germ cells, develop a gonad phenotype after refeeding. This highly penetrant gonadal phenotype is further enhanced by a mutation in shc-1, encoding a protein homologous to the human adaptor ShcA. Features of this phenotype are a tumor-like phenotype encompassing hyper-proliferation of germ cell nuclei and disruption/invasion of the basement membrane surrounding the gonad. The penetrance of this phenotype is reduced by decreasing starvation temperature. In addition, it is also ameliorated in a dose-dependent way by exposure to the antibiotic doxycyclin either during starvation or during subsequent refeeding. Since, in eukaryotic cells, doxycyclin specifically blocks mitochondrial translation, our results suggest that daf-18 and shc-1;daf-18 mutants fail to adapt mitochondrial activity to reduced nutritional availability during early larval developing.

  16. Therapeutic inhibition of mitochondrial function induces cell death in starvation-resistant renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Isono, Takahiro; Chano, Tokuhiro; Yonese, Junji; Yuasa, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCC) have two types of cells for carbon metabolism and for cell signaling under nutrient-deprivation conditions, namely starvation-resistant and starvation-sensitive cells. Here, we evaluated the mitochondrial characteristics of these cell types and found that the resistant type possessed higher activities for both mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis than the sensitive types. These higher activities were supported by the stored carbon, lipid and carbohydrate sources, and by a low level of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to sustained SOD2 expression in the resistant RCC cells. In metastatic RCC cases, higher SOD2 expression was associated with a significantly shorter survival period. We found that treatment with the drugs etomoxir and buformin significantly reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and induced cell death under glucose-deprivation conditions in starvation-resistant RCC cells. Our data suggest that inhibitory targeting of mitochondria might offer an effective therapeutic option for metastatic RCC that is resistant to current treatments. PMID:27157976

  17. LEPS2, a Phosphorus Starvation-Induced Novel Acid Phosphatase from Tomato1

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, James C.; Karthikeyan, Athikkattuvalasu S.; Raghothama, Kashchandra G.

    2001-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) is one of the least available plant nutrients found in the soil. A significant amount of phosphate is bound in organic forms in the rhizosphere. Phosphatases produced by plants and microbes are presumed to convert organic phosphorus into available Pi, which is absorbed by plants. In this study we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) phosphate starvation-induced gene (LePS2) representing an acid phosphatase. LePS2 is a member of a small gene family in tomato. The cDNA is 942 bp long and contains an open reading frame encoding a 269-amino acid polypeptide. The amino acid sequence of LePS2 has a significant similarity with a phosphatase from chicken. Distinct regions of the peptide also share significant identity with the members of HAD and DDDD super families of phosphohydrolases. Many plant homologs of LePS2 are found in the databases. The LePS2 transcripts are induced rapidly in tomato plant and cell culture in the absence of Pi. However, the induction is repressible in the presence of Pi. Divided root studies indicate that internal Pi levels regulate the expression of LePS2. The enhanced expression of LePS2 is a specific response to Pi starvation, and it is not affected by starvation of other nutrients or abiotic stresses. The bacterially (Escherichia coli) expressed protein exhibits phosphatase activity against the synthetic substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The pH optimum of the enzyme activity suggests that LePS2 is an acid phosphatase. PMID:11161030

  18. BmATG5 and BmATG6 mediate apoptosis following autophagy induced by 20-hydroxyecdysone or starvation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kun; Tian, Ling; Guo, Xinyu; Li, Kang; Li, Jianping; Deng, Xiaojuan; Li, Qingrong; Xia, Qingyou; Zhong, Yangjin; Huang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiping; Li, Sheng; Yang, Wanying; Cao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis, which could be induced by common stimuli, play crucial roles in development and disease. The functional relationship between autophagy and apoptosis is complex, due to the dual effects of autophagy. In the Bombyx Bm-12 cells, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) treatment or starvation-induced cell death, with autophagy preceding apoptosis. In response to 20E or starvation, BmATG8 was rapidly cleaved and conjugated with PE to form BmATG8-PE; subsequently, BmATG5 and BmATG6 were cleaved into BmATG5-tN and BmATG6-C, respectively. Reduction of expression of BmAtg5 or BmAtg6 by RNAi decreased the proportion of cells undergoing both autophagy and apoptosis after 20E treatment or starvation. Overexpression of BmAtg5 or BmAtg6 induced autophagy but not apoptosis in the absence of the stimuli, but promoted both autophagy and apoptosis induced by 20E or starvation. Notably, overexpression of cleavage site-deleted BmAtg5 or BmAtg6 increased autophagy but not apoptosis induced by 20E or starvation, whereas overexpression of BmAtg5-tN and BmAtg6-C was able to directly trigger apoptosis or promote the induced apoptosis. In conclusion, being cleaved into BmATG5-tN and BmATG6-C, BmATG5 and BmATG6 mediate apoptosis following autophagy induced by 20E or starvation in Bombyx Bm-12 cells, reflecting that autophagy precedes apoptosis in the midgut during Bombyx metamorphosis.

  19. BmATG5 and BmATG6 mediate apoptosis following autophagy induced by 20-hydroxyecdysone or starvation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kun; Tian, Ling; Guo, Xinyu; Li, Kang; Li, Jianping; Deng, Xiaojuan; Li, Qingrong; Xia, Qingyou; Zhong, Yangjin; Huang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiping; Li, Sheng; Yang, Wanying; Cao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy and apoptosis, which could be induced by common stimuli, play crucial roles in development and disease. The functional relationship between autophagy and apoptosis is complex, due to the dual effects of autophagy. In the Bombyx Bm-12 cells, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) treatment or starvation-induced cell death, with autophagy preceding apoptosis. In response to 20E or starvation, BmATG8 was rapidly cleaved and conjugated with PE to form BmATG8–PE; subsequently, BmATG5 and BmATG6 were cleaved into BmATG5-tN and BmATG6-C, respectively. Reduction of expression of BmAtg5 or BmAtg6 by RNAi decreased the proportion of cells undergoing both autophagy and apoptosis after 20E treatment or starvation. Overexpression of BmAtg5 or BmAtg6 induced autophagy but not apoptosis in the absence of the stimuli, but promoted both autophagy and apoptosis induced by 20E or starvation. Notably, overexpression of cleavage site-deleted BmAtg5 or BmAtg6 increased autophagy but not apoptosis induced by 20E or starvation, whereas overexpression of BmAtg5-tN and BmAtg6-C was able to directly trigger apoptosis or promote the induced apoptosis. In conclusion, being cleaved into BmATG5-tN and BmATG6-C, BmATG5 and BmATG6 mediate apoptosis following autophagy induced by 20E or starvation in Bombyx Bm-12 cells, reflecting that autophagy precedes apoptosis in the midgut during Bombyx metamorphosis. PMID:26727186

  20. Starvation-induced MTMR13 and RAB21 activity regulates VAMP8 to promote autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Jean, Steve; Cox, Sarah; Nassari, Sonya; Kiger, Amy A

    2015-03-01

    Autophagy, the process for recycling cytoplasm in the lysosome, depends on membrane trafficking. We previously identified Drosophila Sbf as a Rab21 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that acts with Rab21 in endosomal trafficking. Here, we show that Sbf/MTMR13 and Rab21 have conserved functions required for starvation-induced autophagy. Depletion of Sbf/MTMR13 or Rab21 blocked endolysosomal trafficking of VAMP8, a SNARE required for autophagosome-lysosome fusion. We show that starvation induces Sbf/MTMR13 GEF and RAB21 activity, as well as their induced binding to VAMP8 (or closest Drosophila homolog, Vamp7). MTMR13 is required for RAB21 activation, VAMP8 interaction and VAMP8 endolysosomal trafficking, defining a novel GEF-Rab-effector pathway. These results identify starvation-responsive endosomal regulators and trafficking that tunes membrane demands with changing autophagy status.

  1. Insights into How Longicorn Beetle Larvae Determine the Timing of Metamorphosis: Starvation-Induced Mechanism Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Yukio; Hoshizaki, Sugihiko

    2016-01-01

    Larvae of holometabolous insects must determine the timing of their metamorphosis. How they determine this timing has only been studied in detail for a few insect species. In a few species of Coleoptera, starvation is known to be a cue for metamorphosis, leading to the formation of smaller adults (starvation-induced pupation, SiP). We investigated the occurrence of SiP in the beetle Psacothea hilaris. When P. hilaris larvae were starved late in the feeding phase of the last (5th) instar, they exhibited typical SiP characterized by constancy of the time from food deprivation to pupation (TTP) irrespective of the body weight upon food deprivation or the length of prior feeding. In contrast, when larvae were starved early in the feeding phase, TTP decreased by roughly 1 day as the feeding became 1 day longer. The change in the response to starvation was estimated to occur on day 5.9 in the last instar. A series of refeeding experiments suggested that whereas SiP occurred readily in the larvae starved in the late feeding phase, activation of SiP was suspended until day 5.9 in the larvae starved early in the feeding phase. When P. hilaris larvae were fed continuously, they eventually ceased feeding spontaneously and pupated. The time length between spontaneous cessation of feeding and pupation was approximately equal to the TTP in SiP. This suggests that the same mechanism was activated by food deprivation in the late feeding phase and by spontaneous cessation of ad libitum feeding. PMID:27386861

  2. Arabidopsis NRT1.5 Mediates the Suppression of Nitrate Starvation-Induced Leaf Senescence by Modulating Foliar Potassium Level.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shuan; Peng, Jia-Shi; He, Ya-Ni; Zhang, Guo-Bin; Yi, Hong-Ying; Fu, Yan-Lei; Gong, Ji-Ming

    2016-03-07

    Nitrogen deficiency induces leaf senescence. However, whether or how nitrate might affect this process remains to be investigated. Here, we report an interesting finding that nitrate-instead of nitrogen-starvation induced early leaf senescence in nrt1.5 mutant, and present genetic and physiological data demonstrating that nitrate starvation-induced leaf senescence is suppressed by NRT1.5. NRT1.5 suppresses the senescence process dependent on its function from roots, but not the nitrate transport function. Further analyses using nrt1.5 single and nia1 nia2 nrt1.5-4 triple mutant showed a negative correlation between nitrate concentration and senescence rate in leaves. Moreover, when exposed to nitrate starvation, foliar potassium level decreased in nrt1.5, but adding potassium could essentially restore the early leaf senescence phenotype of nrt1.5 plants. Nitrate starvation also downregulated the expression of HAK5, RAP2.11, and ANN1 in nrt1.5 roots, and appeared to alter potassium level in xylem sap from nrt1.5. These data suggest that NRT1.5 likely perceives nitrate starvation-derived signals to prevent leaf senescence by facilitating foliar potassium accumulation.

  3. The genetic basis for mating-induced sex differences in starvation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Jang, Taehwan; Lee, Kwang Pum

    2015-11-01

    Multiple genetic and environmental factors interact to influence starvation resistance, which is an important determinant of fitness in many organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster. Recent studies have revealed that mating can alter starvation resistance in female D. melanogaster, but little is known about the behavioral and physiological mechanisms underlying such mating-mediated changes in starvation resistance. In the present study, we first investigated whether the effect of mating on starvation resistance is sex-specific in D. melanogaster. As indicated by a significant sex×mating status interaction, mating increased starvation resistance in females but not in males. In female D. melanogaster, post-mating increase in starvation resistance was mainly attributed to increases in food intake and in the level of lipid storage relative to lean body weight. We then performed quantitative genetic analysis to estimate the proportion of the total phenotypic variance attributable to genetic differences (i.e., heritability) for starvation resistance in mated male and female D. melanogaster. The narrow-sense heritability (h(2)) of starvation resistance was 0.235 and 0.155 for males and females, respectively. Mated females were more resistant to starvation than males in all genotypes, but the degree of such sexual dimorphism varied substantially among genotypes, as indicated by a significant sex×genotype interaction for starvation resistance. Cross-sex genetic correlation was greater than 0 but less than l for starvation resistance, implying that the genetic architecture of this trait was partially shared between the two sexes. For both sexes, starvation resistance was positively correlated with longevity and lipid storage at genetic level. The present study suggests that sex differences in starvation resistance depend on mating status and have a genetic basis in D. melanogaster.

  4. Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of FTO Does Not Affect Starvation-Induced Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Aas, Aleksander; Isakson, Pauline; Bindesbøll, Christian; Alemu, Endalkachew A; Klungland, Arne; Simonsen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of the FTO (fat mass and obesity) gene associate with body mass index in humans, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been firmly determined. FTO is linked to energy homeostasis via amino acid sensing and is thought to activate the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, a negative regulator of autophagy. FTO localises both to the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and in this study we identify a functional nuclear localisation signal (NLS) in the N-terminus of FTO, as well as nuclear localization information in its very C-terminus. Inhibition of FTO nuclear transport has no effect on autophagy and in contrast to a previously proposed role of FTO in autophagy, we find no difference in starvation-induced autophagy in control cells compared to a panel of cell types depleted of FTO. Future studies that further characterise the cellular functions of FTO will be important to understand why variants in FTO are associated with body weight.

  5. Metformin Represses Glucose Starvation Induced Autophagic Response in Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Promotes Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Samson Mathews; Ghosh, Suparna; Majeed, Yasser; Arunachalam, Gnanapragasam; Emara, Mohamed M; Ding, Hong; Triggle, Chris R

    2017-03-05

    Metformin, the most frequently administered drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, is being investigated for its potential in the treatment of various types of cancer; however, the cellular basis for this putative anti-cancer action remains controversial. In the current study we examined the effect of metformin on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy in glucose-starved micro-vascular endothelial cells (MECs). The rationale for our experimental protocol is that in a growing tumor MECs are subjected to hypoxia and nutrient/glucose starvation that results from the reduced supply and relatively high consumption of glucose. Mouse MECs (MMECs) were glucose-starved for up to 48h in the absence or presence of metformin (50μM and 2mM) and the status of ER stress, autophagic, cell survival and apoptotic markers were assessed. Activation of ER stress and autophagy was observed in glucose starved MECs as evidenced by the significant increase in the levels of ER stress and autophagic markers while accumulation of LC3B stained punctae in the MECs confirmed autophagic activation. Treatment with 2mM metformin, independent of AMPK, significantly reversed glucose starvation induced ER stress and autophagy in MECs, but, at 24h, did not decrease cell viability; however, at 48h, persistent ER stress and metformin associated inhibition of autophagy decreased cell viability, caused cell cycle arrest in G2/M and increased the number of cells in the sub-G0/G1 phase of cell cycle. Treatment with metformin reduced phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR and inhibited downstream targets of mTOR. Our findings support the argument that treatment with metformin when used in combination with glycolytic inhibitors will inhibit pro-survival autophagy and promote cell death and potentially prove to be the basis for an effective anti-cancer strategy.

  6. Clock and cycle limit starvation-induced sleep loss in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Alex C.; Duboué, Erik R.; McDonald, Daniel M.; Dus, Monica; Suh, Greg S.B.; Waddell, Scott; Blau, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neural systems controlling the vital functions of sleep and feeding in mammals are tightly inter-connected: sleep deprivation promotes feeding, while starvation suppresses sleep. Here we show that starvation in Drosophila potently suppresses sleep suggesting that these two homeostatically regulated behaviors are also integrated in flies. The sleep suppressing effect of starvation is independent of the mushroom bodies, a previously identified sleep locus in the fly brain, and therefore is regulated by distinct neural circuitry. The circadian clock genes Clock (Clk) and cycle (cyc) are critical for proper sleep suppression during starvation. However, the sleep suppression is independent of light cues and of circadian rhythms because starved period mutants sleep like wild type flies. By selectively targeting subpopulations of Clk-expressing neurons we localize the observed sleep phenotype to the dorsally located circadian neurons. These findings show that Clk and cyc act during starvation to modulate the conflict of whether flies sleep or search for food. PMID:20541409

  7. Clock and cycle limit starvation-induced sleep loss in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Keene, Alex C; Duboué, Erik R; McDonald, Daniel M; Dus, Monica; Suh, Greg S B; Waddell, Scott; Blau, Justin

    2010-07-13

    Neural systems controlling the vital functions of sleep and feeding in mammals are tightly interconnected: sleep deprivation promotes feeding, whereas starvation suppresses sleep. Here we show that starvation in Drosophila potently suppresses sleep, suggesting that these two homeostatically regulated behaviors are also integrated in flies. The sleep-suppressing effect of starvation is independent of the mushroom bodies, a previously identified sleep locus in the fly brain, and therefore is regulated by distinct neural circuitry. The circadian clock genes Clock (Clk) and cycle (cyc) are critical for proper sleep suppression during starvation. However, the sleep suppression is independent of light cues and of circadian rhythms as shown by the fact that starved period mutants sleep like wild-type flies. By selectively targeting subpopulations of Clk-expressing neurons, we localize the observed sleep phenotype to the dorsally located circadian neurons. These findings show that Clk and cyc act during starvation to modulate the conflict of whether flies sleep or search for food.

  8. AMP-activated protein kinase supports the NGF-induced viability of human HeLa cells to glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Ting, Luo; Bo, Wan; Li, Ruwei; Chen, Xinya; Wang, Yingli; Jun, Zhou; Yu, Long

    2010-07-01

    As an important cellular energy regulation kinase, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been demonstrated as a key molecule in the development of tolerance to nutrient starvation. Activation of AMPK includes the phosphorylation of Thr172 of the alpha-subunit. Nerve growth factor (NGF) was originally isolated for its ability to stimulate both survival and differentiation in peripheral neurons, but many investigations have shown that the NGF also plays an important role in survival, growth and invasion of many human cancers. In this study, we used CCK-8 cell viability assay to find that NGF could facilitate the viability of HeLa cells following glucose deprivation while not in glucose-normal control groups. This effect of NGF-induced viability promotion to glucose starvation can be suppressed by Compound C, a specific inhibitor of AMPK. Meanwhile, western blot analysis showed that AMPKalpha1/alpha2 Thr172 phosphorylation level in HeLa cells was up-regulated after NGF treatment under glucose starvation, and Compound C was able to reduce the AMPKalpha1/alpha2 Thr172 phosphorylation level which was up-regulated by NGF in HeLa cells. Taken together, these results indicate that AMP-activated protein kinase supports the NGF-induced viability of human HeLa cells to glucose starvation.

  9. Genome-wide siRNA screen reveals amino acid starvation-induced autophagy requires SCOC and WAC

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, Nicole C; Jefferies, Harold B J; Alemu, Endalkachew A; Saunders, Rebecca E; Howell, Michael; Johansen, Terje; Tooze, Sharon A

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process by which cytoplasmic components are sequestered and transported by autophagosomes to lysosomes for degradation, enabling recycling of these components and providing cells with amino acids during starvation. It is a highly regulated process and its deregulation contributes to multiple diseases. Despite its importance in cell homeostasis, autophagy is not fully understood. To find new proteins that modulate starvation-induced autophagy, we performed a genome-wide siRNA screen in a stable human cell line expressing GFP–LC3, the marker-protein for autophagosomes. Using stringent validation criteria, our screen identified nine novel autophagy regulators. Among the hits required for autophagosome formation are SCOC (short coiled-coil protein), a Golgi protein, which interacts with fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1 (FEZ1), an ULK1-binding protein. SCOC forms a starvation-sensitive trimeric complex with UVRAG (UV radiation resistance associated gene) and FEZ1 and may regulate ULK1 and Beclin 1 complex activities. A second candidate WAC is required for starvation-induced autophagy but also acts as a potential negative regulator of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The identification of these novel regulatory proteins with diverse functions in autophagy contributes towards a fuller understanding of autophagosome formation. PMID:22354037

  10. Starvation-induced cross protection against heat or H2O2 challenge in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, D E; Schultz, J E; Matin, A

    1988-09-01

    Glucose- or nitrogen-starved cultures of Escherichia coli exhibited enhanced resistance to heat (57 degrees C) or H2O2 (15 mM) challenge, compared with their exponentially growing counterparts. The degree of resistance increased with the time for which the cells were starved prior to the challenge, with 4 h of starvation providing the maximal protection. Protein synthesis during starvation was essential for these cross protections, since chloramphenicol addition at the onset of starvation prevented the development of thermal or oxidative resistance. Starved cultures also demonstrated stronger thermal and oxidative resistance than did growing cultures adapted to heat, H2O2, or ethanol prior to the heat or H2O2 challenge. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of 35S-pulse-labeled proteins showed that subsets of the 30 glucose starvation proteins were also synthesized during heat or H2O2 adaptation; three proteins were common to all three stresses. Most of the common proteins were among the previously identified Pex proteins (J.E. Schultz, G. I. Latter, and A. Matin, J. Bacteriol. 170:3903-3909, 1988), which are independent of cyclic AMP positive control for their induction during starvation. Induction of starvation proteins dependent on cyclic AMP was not important in these cross protections, since a delta cya strain of E. coli K-12 exhibited the same degree of resistance to heat or H2O2 as the wild-type parent did during both growth and starvation.

  11. SIZ1 regulation of phosphate starvation-induced root architecture remodeling involves the control of auxin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kenji; Lee, Jiyoung; Gong, Qingqiu; Ma, Shisong; Jin, Jing Bo; Yoo, Chan Yul; Miura, Tomoko; Sato, Aiko; Bohnert, Hans J; Hasegawa, Paul M

    2011-02-01

    Phosphate (Pi) limitation causes plants to modulate the architecture of their root systems to facilitate the acquisition of Pi. Previously, we reported that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 regulates root architecture remodeling in response to Pi limitation; namely, the siz1 mutations cause the inhibition of primary root (PR) elongation and the promotion of lateral root (LR) formation. Here, we present evidence that SIZ1 is involved in the negative regulation of auxin patterning to modulate root system architecture in response to Pi starvation. The siz1 mutations caused greater PR growth inhibition and LR development of seedlings in response to Pi limitation. Similar root phenotypes occurred if Pi-deficient wild-type seedlings were supplemented with auxin. N-1-Naphthylphthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux activity, reduced the Pi starvation-induced LR root formation of siz1 seedlings to a level equivalent to that seen in the wild type. Monitoring of the auxin-responsive reporter DR5::uidA indicated that auxin accumulates in PR tips at early stages of the Pi starvation response. Subsequently, DR5::uidA expression was observed in the LR primordia, which was associated with LR elongation. The time-sequential patterning of DR5::uidA expression occurred earlier in the roots of siz1 as compared with the wild type. In addition, microarray analysis revealed that several other auxin-responsive genes, including genes involved in cell wall loosening and biosynthesis, were up-regulated in siz1 relative to wild-type seedlings in response to Pi starvation. Together, these results suggest that SIZ1 negatively regulates Pi starvation-induced root architecture remodeling through the control of auxin patterning.

  12. A Naturally Associated Rhizobacterium of Arabidopsis thaliana Induces a Starvation-Like Transcriptional Response while Promoting Growth

    PubMed Central

    Thormählen, Ina; Bernholz, Carolin; Kunz, Sabine; Brouwer, Stephan; Schwochow, Melanie; Köhl, Karin; van Dongen, Joost T.

    2011-01-01

    Plant growth promotion by rhizobacteria is a known phenomenon but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We searched for plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria that are naturally associated with Arabidopsis thaliana to investigate the molecular mechanisms that are involved in plant growth-promotion. We isolated a Pseudomonas bacterium (Pseudomonas sp. G62) from roots of field-grown Arabidopsis plants that has not been described previously and analyzed its effect on plant growth, gene expression and the level of sugars and amino acids in the host plant. Inoculation with Pseudomonas sp. G62 promoted plant growth under various growth conditions. Microarray analysis revealed rapid changes in transcript levels of genes annotated to energy-, sugar- and cell wall metabolism in plants 6 h after root inoculation with P. sp. G62. The expression of several of these genes remained stable over weeks, but appeared differentially regulated in roots and shoots. The global gene expression profile observed after inoculation with P. sp. G62 showed a striking resemblance with previously described carbohydrate starvation experiments, although plants were not depleted from soluble sugars, and even showed a slight increase of the sucrose level in roots 5 weeks after inoculation. We suggest that the starvation-like transcriptional phenotype - while steady state sucrose levels are not reduced - is induced by a yet unknown signal from the bacterium that simulates sugar starvation. We discuss the potential effects of the sugar starvation signal on plant growth promotion. PMID:22216267

  13. Foxk proteins repress the initiation of starvation-induced atrophy and autophagy programs.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Christopher John; Ayer, Donald E; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy is the primary catabolic process triggered in response to starvation. Although autophagic regulation within the cytosolic compartment is well established, it is becoming clear that nuclear events also regulate the induction or repression of autophagy. Nevertheless, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms by which sequence-specific transcription factors modulate expression of genes required for autophagy is lacking. Here, we identify Foxk proteins (Foxk1 and Foxk2) as transcriptional repressors of autophagy in muscle cells and fibroblasts. Interestingly, Foxk1/2 serve to counter-balance another forkhead transcription factor, Foxo3, which induces an overlapping set of autophagic and atrophic targets in muscle. Foxk1/2 specifically recruits Sin3A-HDAC complexes to restrict acetylation of histone H4 and expression of critical autophagy genes. Remarkably, mTOR promotes the transcriptional activity of Foxk1 by facilitating nuclear entry to specifically limit basal levels of autophagy in nutrient-rich conditions. Our study highlights an ancient, conserved mechanism whereby nutritional status is interpreted by mTOR to restrict autophagy by repressing essential autophagy genes through Foxk-Sin3-mediated transcriptional control.

  14. Foxk proteins repress the initiation of starvation-induced atrophy and autophagy programs

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Christopher John; Ayer, Donald E.; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autophagy is the primary catabolic process triggered in response to starvation. Although autophagic regulation within the cytosolic compartment is well established, it is becoming clear that nuclear events also regulate the induction or repression of autophagy. Nevertheless, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms by which sequence-specific transcription factors modulate expression of genes required for autophagy is lacking. Here, we identify Foxk proteins (Foxk1 and Foxk2) as transcriptional repressors of autophagy in muscle cells and fibroblasts. Interestingly, Foxk1/2 serve to counter-balance another forkhead transcription factor, Foxo3, which induces an overlapping set of autophagic and atrophic targets in muscle. Foxk1/2 specifically recruits Sin3A-HDAC complexes to restrict acetylation of histone H4 and expression of critical autophagy genes. Remarkably, mTOR promotes the transcriptional activity of Foxk1 by facilitating nuclear entry to specifically limit basal levels of autophagy in nutrient-rich conditions. Our study highlights an ancient, conserved mechanism whereby nutritional status is interpreted by mTOR to restrict autophagy by repressing essential autophagy genes via Foxk-Sin3-mediated transcriptional control. PMID:25402684

  15. Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of FTO Does Not Affect Starvation-Induced Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Aas, Aleksander; Isakson, Pauline; Bindesbøll, Christian; Alemu, Endalkachew A.; Klungland, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of the FTO (fat mass and obesity) gene associate with body mass index in humans, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been firmly determined. FTO is linked to energy homeostasis via amino acid sensing and is thought to activate the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, a negative regulator of autophagy. FTO localises both to the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and in this study we identify a functional nuclear localisation signal (NLS) in the N-terminus of FTO, as well as nuclear localization information in its very C-terminus. Inhibition of FTO nuclear transport has no effect on autophagy and in contrast to a previously proposed role of FTO in autophagy, we find no difference in starvation-induced autophagy in control cells compared to a panel of cell types depleted of FTO. Future studies that further characterise the cellular functions of FTO will be important to understand why variants in FTO are associated with body weight. PMID:28288181

  16. CO2 reduction and organic compounds production by photosynthetic bacteria with surface displayed carbonic anhydrase and inducible expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Yong; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2017-01-01

    In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) is a zinc-containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-) while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; 4.1.1.31), an enzyme involved in the carbon metabolism that catalyzed the fixation of CO2 to PEP, is a key factor for biological fixation of CO2 and enhances the production of organic compounds. In this study, the recombinant R. sphaeroides with highly-expressed CA was developed based on a surface displayed system of CA (pJY-OmpCA) on the outer membrane of R. sphaeroides using outer membrane protein (Omp) in R. sphaeroides, Finally, two more different recombinant R. sphaeroides were developed, which transformed with a two-vector system harboring cytosolic expressed CA (pJY-OmpCA-CA)or PEPC (pJY-OMPCA-PEPC) in R. sphaeroides with surface displayed CA on the outer membrane. In case of recombinant R. sphaeroides with the pJY-OmpCA-PEPC, it has shown the highest CO2 reduction efficiency and the production of several organic compounds (carotenoids, polyhydroxybutyrate, malic acid, succinic acid). It means that the surface displayed CA on the R. sphaeroides would accelerate the CO2-bicabonate conversion on the bacterial outer membrane. Moreover, inducible over-expression of PEPC with surface-displayed CA was successfully used to facilitate a rapider CO2 reduction and quicker production of organic compounds.

  17. Induction of fibroblast apolipoprotein E expression during apoptosis, starvation-induced growth arrest and mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Carmel M; Kågedal, Katarina; Terman, Alexei; Stroikin, Uri; Brunk, Ulf T; Jessup, Wendy; Garner, Brett

    2004-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) mediates the hepatic clearance of plasma lipoproteins, facilitates cholesterol efflux from macrophages and aids neuronal lipid transport. ApoE is expressed at high levels in hepatocytes, macrophages and astrocytes. In the present study, we identify nuclear and cytosolic pools of apoE in human fibroblasts. Fibroblast apoE mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated during staurosporine-induced apoptosis and this was correlated with increased caspase-3 activity and apoptotic morphological alterations. Because the transcription of apoE and specific pro-apoptotic genes is regulated by the nuclear receptor LXR (liver X receptor) alpha, we analysed LXRalpha mRNA expression by quantitative real-time PCR and found it to be increased before apoE mRNA induction. The expression of ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) mRNA, which is also regulated by LXRalpha, was increased in parallel with apoE mRNA, indicating that LXRalpha probably promotes apoE and ABCA1 transcription during apoptosis. Fibroblast apoE levels were increased under conditions of serum-starvation-induced growth arrest and hyperoxia-induced senescence. In both cases, an increased nuclear apoE level was observed, particularly in cells that accumulated lipofuscin. Nuclear apoE was translocated to the cytosol when mitotic nuclear disassembly occurred and this was associated with an increase in total cellular apoE levels. ApoE amino acid sequence analysis indicated several potential sites for phosphorylation. In vivo studies, using 32P-labelling and immunoprecipitation, revealed that fibroblast apoE can be phosphorylated. These studies reveal novel associations and potential roles for apoE in fundamental cellular processes. PMID:14656220

  18. The first promoter for conditional gene expression in Acremonium chrysogenum: iron starvation-inducible mir1(P).

    PubMed

    Gsaller, Fabio; Blatzer, Michael; Abt, Beate; Schrettl, Markus; Lindner, Herbert; Haas, Hubertus

    2013-01-10

    The filamentous fungus Acremonium chrysogenum is of enormous biotechnological importance as it represents the natural producer of the beta-lactam antibiotic cephalosporin C. However, a limitation in genetic tools, e.g. promoters for conditional gene expression, impedes genetic engineering of this fungus. Here we demonstrate that in A. chrysogenum iron starvation induces the production of the extracellular siderophores dimerumic acid, coprogen B, 2-N-methylcoprogen B and dimethylcoprogen as well as expression of the putative siderophore transporter gene, mir1. Moreover, we show that the promoter of mir1, mir1(P), is suitable for conditional expression of target genes in A. chrysogenum as shown by mir1(P)-driven and iron starvation-induced expression of genes encoding green fluorescence protein and phleomycin resistance. The obtained iron-starvation dependent phleomycin resistance indicates the potential use of this promoter for selection marker recycling. Together with easy scorable siderophore production, the co-regulation of mir1 expression and siderophore production facilitates the optimization of the inducing conditions of this expression system.

  19. Rice Phytochrome B (OsPhyB) Negatively Regulates Dark- and Starvation-Induced Leaf Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Weilan; Kim, Eun-Young; Han, Su-Hyun; Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-01-01

    Light regulates leaf senescence and light deprivation causes large-scale transcriptional reprogramming to dismantle cellular components and remobilize nutrients to sink organs, such as seeds and storage tissue. We recently reported that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), Phytochrome-Interacting Factor4 (PIF4) and PIF5 promote dark-induced senescence and natural senescence by directly activating the expression of typical senescence-associated genes (SAGs), including ORESARA1 (ORE1) and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3). In contrast, phytochrome B (PhyB) inhibits leaf senescence by repressing PIF4 and PIF5 at the post-translational level. Although we found how red light signaling represses leaf senescence in Arabidopsis, it remains unknown whether PhyB and/or PhyA are involved in leaf senescence in rice (Oryza sativa). Here we show that rice phyB knockout mutants (osphyB-1, -2, and -3) exhibited an early senescence phenotype during dark-induced senescence, but an osphyA knockout mutant (osphyA-3) senesced normally. The RT-qPCR analysis revealed that several senescence-associated genes, including OsORE1 and OsEIN3, were significantly up-regulated in osphyB-2 mutants, indicating that OsPhyB also inhibits leaf senescence, like Arabidopsis PhyB. We also found that leaf segments of osphyB-2 senesced faster even under light conditions. Supplementation with nitrogen compounds, such as KNO3 and NH4NO3, rescued the early senescence phenotype of osphyB-2, indicating that starvation is one of the major signaling factors in the OsPhyB-dependent leaf senescence pathway. PMID:27135344

  20. Metabolomic Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Cells in Response to Autophagy Induced by Acute Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Sensen; Weng, Rui; Li, Linnan; Xu, Xinyuan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) is essential in the formation of the autophagophore and is indispensable for autophagy induction. Autophagy will exist in lower level or even be blocked in cells without Atg7. Even though the possible signaling pathways of Atg7 have been proposed, the metabolomic responses under acute starvation in cells with and without Atg7 have not been elucidated. This study therefore was designed and aimed to reveal the metabolomics of Atg7-dependent autophagy through metabolomic analysis of Atg7−/− mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) and wild-type MEFs along with the starvation time. 30 significantly altered metabolites were identified in response to nutrient stress, which were mainly associated with amino acid, energy, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism. For the wild-type MEFs, the induction of autophagy protected cell survival with some up-regulated lipids during the first two hours’ starvation, while the subsequent apoptosis resulted in the decrease of cell viability after four hours’ starvation. For the Atg7−/− MEFs, apoptosis perhaps led to the deactivation of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle due to the lack of autophagy, which resulted in the immediate drop of cellular viability under starvation. These results contributed to the metabolomic study and provided new insights into the mechanism associated with Atg7-dependent autophagy. PMID:27703171

  1. Starvation induced cholesterogenesis in hepatic and extra hepatic tissues of climbing Perch, Anabas testudineus (Bloch)

    PubMed Central

    Godavarthy, Padmavathi; Sunila Kumari, Y.; Bikshapathy, E.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol is a structural lipid, which may be differentially utilized or synthesized in response to stress or during insulin deficient states such as starvation. In the present investigation we estimated the levels of cholesterol in Anabas testudineus, which was subjected to brief (15 days) and prolonged fasting (60 days). Tissues such as liver, kidney, brain, accessory respiratory organ, pectoral and lateral line muscle were selected for the study. Cholesterol content was estimated by the Crawford method (1958). Both the starvation regimes showed a significant increase in cholesterol levels in almost all the tissues, but for liver, which strangely showed an insignificant decline during the short-term starvation. This overall upsurge in cholesterol levels observed in all extra hepatic tissues may be attributed to the synthesis of stress hormones such as glucocorticoids, which may promote gluconeogenesis and adrenocorticoids, which may help the animal to combat the stressful condition of starvation. Anabas adapted well to starvation stress and survived all throughout the experimental period. PMID:23961210

  2. Selective charging of tRNA isoacceptors induced by amino-acid starvation

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Kimberly A; Sørensen, Michael A; Elf, Johan; Ehrenberg, Måns; Pan, Tao

    2005-01-01

    Aminoacylated (charged) transfer RNA isoacceptors read different messenger RNA codons for the same amino acid. The concentration of an isoacceptor and its charged fraction are principal determinants of the translation rate of its codons. A recent theoretical model predicts that amino-acid starvation results in ‘selective charging' where the charging levels of some tRNA isoacceptors will be low and those of others will remain high. Here, we developed a microarray for the analysis of charged fractions of tRNAs and measured charging for all Escherichia coli tRNAs before and during leucine, threonine or arginine starvation. Before starvation, most tRNAs were fully charged. During starvation, the isoacceptors in the leucine, threonine or arginine families showed selective charging when cells were starved for their cognate amino acid, directly confirming the theoretical prediction. Codons read by isoacceptors that retain high charging can be used for efficient translation of genes that are essential during amino-acid starvation. Selective charging can explain anomalous patterns of codon usage in the genes for different families of proteins. PMID:15678157

  3. The implications of starvation induced psychological changes for the ethical treatment of hunger strikers

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, D

    2003-01-01

    Design: Electronic databases were searched for (a) editorials and ethical proclamations on hunger strikers and their treatment; (b) studies of voluntary and involuntary starvation, and (c) legal cases pertaining to hunger striking. Additional studies were gathered in a snowball fashion from the published material cited in these databases. Material was included if it (a) provided ethical or legal guidelines; (b) shed light on psychological changes accompanying starvation, or (c) illustrated the practice of hunger striking. Authors' observations, opinions, and conclusions were noted. Conclusions: Although the heterogeneous nature of the sources precluded statistical analysis, starvation appears to be accompanied by marked psychological changes. Some changes clearly impair competence, in which case physicians are advised to follow advance directives obtained early in the hunger strike. More problematic are increases in impulsivity and aggressivity, changes which, while not impairing competence, enhance the likelihood that patients will starve themselves to death. PMID:12930863

  4. Ubiquitylation by the Ltn1 E3 ligase protects 60S ribosomes from starvation-induced selective autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ossareh-Nazari, Batool; Niño, Carlos A; Bengtson, Mario H; Lee, Joong-Won; Joazeiro, Claudio A P; Dargemont, Catherine

    2014-03-17

    Autophagy, the process by which proteins or organelles are engulfed by autophagosomes and delivered for vacuolar/lysosomal degradation, is induced to ensure survival under starvation and other stresses. A selective autophagic pathway for 60S ribosomal subunits elicited by nitrogen starvation in yeast-ribophagy-was recently described and requires the Ubp3-Bre5 deubiquitylating enzyme. This discovery implied that an E3 ligases act upstream, whether inhibiting the process or providing an initial required signal. In this paper, we show that Ltn1/Rkr1, a 60S ribosome-associated E3 implicated in translational surveillance, acts as an inhibitor of 60S ribosomal subunit ribophagy and is antagonized by Ubp3. The ribosomal protein Rpl25 is a relevant target. Its ubiquitylation is Ltn1 dependent and Ubp3 reversed, and mutation of its ubiquitylation site rendered ribophagy less dependent on Ubp3. Consistently, the expression of Ltn1-but not Ubp3-rapidly decreased after starvation, presumably to allow ribophagy to proceed. Thus, Ltn1 and Ubp3-Bre5 likely contribute to adapt ribophagy activity to both nutrient supply and protein translation.

  5. Identification and functional characterization of a sulfate transporter induced by both sulfur starvation and mycorrhiza formation in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Marco; Tolosano, Matteo; Volpe, Veronica; Kopriva, Stanislav; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AMs) are one of the most widespread symbioses in the world. They allow plants to receive mineral nutrients from the symbiotic fungus which in turn gets back up to 20% of plant carbon and completes its life cycle. Especially in low-nutrient conditions, AM fungi are capable of significantly improving plant phosphate and nitrogen acquisition, but fewer data are available about sulfur (S) nutrition. We focused on S metabolism in Lotus japonicus upon mycorrhizal colonization under sulfur starvation or repletion. We investigated both tissue sulfate concentrations and S-related gene expression, at cell-type or whole-organ level. Gene expression and sulfate tissue concentration showed that Rhizophagus irregularis colonization can improve plant S nutritional status under S starvation. A group 1 sulfate transporter, LjSultr1;2, induced by both S starvation and mycorrhiza formation, was identified. Its transcript was localized in arbuscule-containing cells, which was confirmed with a promoter-GUS assay, and its function was verified through phenotyping of TILLING mutants in nonmycorrhizal seedlings. LjSultr1;2 thus appears to encode a key protein involved in plant sulfate uptake. In contrast to phosphate transporters, a single gene, LjSultr1;2, seems to mediate both direct and symbiotic pathways of S uptake in L. japonicus.

  6. Carbon dynamics in trees under induced lethal drought and carbon starvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, H.; Trumbore, S.; Ziegler, W.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in precipitation patterns and more frequently occurring heat spells seem to be responsible for tree and forest mortality observed all over the globe. During drought, trees control water consumption by down-regulation stomatal conductance but this also narrows the pathway for diffusion of CO2 into leaves and hence reduces carbon assimilation. During longer droughts, the carbon balance becomes negative and trees have to rely on stored carbon (non-structural carbohydrates, NSC). At the same time, drought potentially decreases phloem functioning by causing declines in plant water potential and this may interfere with carbon storage remobilization and use. Hence, drought not only influences carbon acquisition but also post-photosynthesis carbon storage dynamics. We are currently investigating carbon dynamics in trees subjected to complete and cyclic drought in a field experiment and trees subjected to carbon starvation (partial CO2 withdrawal from atmosphere) in a greenhouse experiment. Both drought and CO2 withdrawal provoke a negative net carbon balance but the latter allows maintaining plant water potentials at adequate levels for carbon translocation. This approach will allow sorting out drought effects on carbon acquisition, remobilization and use. Completely droughted trees (young Norway spruce) died within 3 months. Drought caused a rapid decline in carbon assimilation while the sustained respirational demand forced trees into a negative carbon balance after ~6 weeks. The 13Cδ signature of root-respired CO2 indicated an early onset of carbon storage use (after ~ 2 weeks). Very low root sucrose and starch concentrations at the end of the experiment confirmed a strong decline in root NSC pools. In needles and branches sucrose and starch concentrations were not affected by either treatment but glucose and fructose concentrations increased early in the complete drought and at the end of the season in the cyclic drought. This increase may be interpreted as a

  7. Starvation Induces Proteasome Autophagy with Different Pathways for Core and Regulatory Particles.

    PubMed

    Waite, Kenrick A; De-La Mota-Peynado, Alina; Vontz, Gabrielle; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2016-02-12

    The proteasome is responsible for the degradation of many cellular proteins. If and how this abundant and normally stable complex is degraded by cells is largely unknown. Here we show that in yeast, upon nitrogen starvation, proteasomes are targeted for vacuolar degradation through autophagy. Using GFP-tagged proteasome subunits, we observed that autophagy of a core particle (CP) subunit depends on the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3, although a regulatory particle (RP) subunit does not. Furthermore, upon blocking of autophagy, RP remained largely nuclear, although CP largely localized to the cytosol as well as granular structures within the cytosol. In all, our data reveal a regulated process for the removal of proteasomes upon nitrogen starvation. This process involves CP and RP dissociation, nuclear export, and independent vacuolar targeting of CP and RP. Thus, in addition to the well characterized transcriptional up-regulation of genes encoding proteasome subunits, cells are also capable of down-regulating cellular levels of proteasomes through proteaphagy.

  8. The actin cytoskeleton participates in the early events of autophagosome formation upon starvation induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Milton Osmar; Berón, Walter; Colombo, María Isabel

    2012-11-01

    Autophagy is a process by which cytoplasmic material is sequestered in a double-membrane vesicle destined for degradation. Nutrient deprivation stimulates the pathway and the number of autophagosomes in the cell increases in response to such stimulus. In the current report we have demonstrated that actin is necessary for starvation-mediated autophagy. When the actin cytoskeleton is depolymerized, the increase in autophagic vacuoles in response to the starvation stimulus was abolished without affecting maturation of remaining autophagosomes. In addition, actin filaments colocalized with ATG14, BECN1/Beclin1 and PtdIns3P-rich structures, and some of them have a typical omegasome shape stained with the double FYVE domain or ZFYVE1/DFCP1. In contrast, no major colocalization between actin and ULK1, ULK2, ATG5 or MAP1LC3/LC3 was observed. Taken together, our data indicate that actin has a role at very early stages of autophagosome formation linked to the PtdIns3P generation step. In addition, we have found that two members of the Rho family of proteins, RHOA and RAC1 have a regulatory function on starvation-mediated autophagy, but with opposite roles. Indeed, RHOA has an activatory role whereas Rac has an inhibitory one. We have also found that inhibition of the RHOA effector ROCK impaired the starvation-mediated autophagic response. We propose that actin participates in the initial membrane remodeling stage when cells require an enhanced rate of autophagosome formation, and this actin function would be tightly regulated by different members of the Rho family.

  9. The actin cytoskeleton participates in the early events of autophagosome formation upon starvation induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Milton Osmar; Berón, Walter; Colombo, María Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a process by which cytoplasmic material is sequestered in a double-membrane vesicle destined for degradation. Nutrient deprivation stimulates the pathway and the number of autophagosomes in the cell increases in response to such stimulus. In the current report we have demonstrated that actin is necessary for starvation-mediated autophagy. When the actin cytoskeleton is depolymerized, the increase in autophagic vacuoles in response to the starvation stimulus was abolished without affecting maturation of remaining autophagosomes. In addition, actin filaments colocalized with ATG14, BECN1/Beclin1 and PtdIns3P-rich structures, and some of them have a typical omegasome shape stained with the double FYVE domain or ZFYVE1/DFCP1. In contrast, no major colocalization between actin and ULK1, ULK2, ATG5 or MAP1LC3/LC3 was observed. Taken together, our data indicate that actin has a role at very early stages of autophagosome formation linked to the PtdIns3P generation step. In addition, we have found that two members of the Rho family of proteins, RHOA and RAC1 have a regulatory function on starvation-mediated autophagy, but with opposite roles. Indeed, RHOA has an activatory role whereas Rac has an inhibitory one. We have also found that inhibition of the RHOA effector ROCK impaired the starvation-mediated autophagic response. We propose that actin participates in the initial membrane remodeling stage when cells require an enhanced rate of autophagosome formation, and this actin function would be tightly regulated by different members of the Rho family. PMID:22863730

  10. Three Acyltransferases and Nitrogen-responsive Regulator Are Implicated in Nitrogen Starvation-induced Triacylglycerol Accumulation in Chlamydomonas*

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Nanette R.; Page, Mark Dudley; Liu, Bensheng; Blaby, Ian K.; Casero, David; Kropat, Janette; Cokus, Shawn J.; Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Shaw, Johnathan; Karpowicz, Steven J.; Gallaher, Sean D.; Johnson, Shannon; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Grossman, Arthur; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2012-01-01

    Algae have recently gained attention as a potential source for biodiesel; however, much is still unknown about the biological triggers that cause the production of triacylglycerols. We used RNA-Seq as a tool for discovering genes responsible for triacylglycerol (TAG) production in Chlamydomonas and for the regulatory components that activate the pathway. Three genes encoding acyltransferases, DGAT1, DGTT1, and PDAT1, are induced by nitrogen starvation and are likely to have a role in TAG accumulation based on their patterns of expression. DGAT1 and DGTT1 also show increased mRNA abundance in other TAG-accumulating conditions (minus sulfur, minus phosphorus, minus zinc, and minus iron). Insertional mutants, pdat1-1 and pdat1-2, accumulate 25% less TAG compared with the parent strain, CC-4425, which demonstrates the relevance of the trans-acylation pathway in Chlamydomonas. The biochemical functions of DGTT1 and PDAT1 were validated by rescue of oleic acid sensitivity and restoration of TAG accumulation in a yeast strain lacking all acyltransferase activity. Time course analyses suggest than a SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein domain transcription factor, whose mRNA increases precede that of lipid biosynthesis genes like DGAT1, is a candidate regulator of the nitrogen deficiency responses. An insertional mutant, nrr1-1, accumulates only 50% of the TAG compared with the parental strain in nitrogen-starvation conditions and is unaffected by other nutrient stresses, suggesting the specificity of this regulator for nitrogen-deprivation conditions. PMID:22403401

  11. K+ starvation inhibits water-stress-induced stomatal closure via ethylene synthesis in sunflower plants.

    PubMed

    Benlloch-González, María; Romera, Javier; Cristescu, Simona; Harren, Fran; Fournier, José María; Benlloch, Manuel

    2010-02-01

    The effect of water stress on stomatal closure in sunflower plants has been found to be dependent on K(+) nutrient status. When plants with different internal K(+) content were subjected to a water-stress period, stomatal conductance was reduced more markedly in plants with an adequate K(+) supply than in K(+)-starved plants. K(+) starvation promoted the production of ethylene by detached leaves, as well as by the shoot of whole plants. Water stress had no significant effect on this synthesis. The effect on stomatal conductance of adding 5 microM cobalt (an ethylene synthesis inhibitor) to the growing medium of plants subjected to water stress was also dependent on their K(+) nutritional status: conductance was not significantly affected in normal K(+) plants whereas it was reduced in K(+)-starved plants. Cobalt had no harmful effects on growth, and did not alter the internal K(+) content in the plants. These results suggest that ethylene may play a role in the inhibiting effect of K(+) starvation on stomatal closure.

  12. Induced Morphological Changes in Larval Rock Bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus, under Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Park, In-Seok; Choi, Hee-Jung; Noh, Choong-Hwan; Myoung, Jung-Goo; Park, Hye Jung; Goo, In Bon

    2013-01-01

    Morphological changes in the reared rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus, from hatching to six days after hatching were examined during the early growth stage under starvation. All the larvae died within five days when feeding was delayed for three days after hatching. These results imply that initial larval food should be supplied within two days of hatching. Changes in the pectoral angle and the ratios of eye height to head height, gut height to standard length, and gut height to myotome height in the rock bream are alternative indicators for the identification of starving fish. These indicators might prove useful in evaluating the successful transition from endogenous to exogenous feeding in this species. PMID:25949156

  13. The frontline antibiotic vancomycin induces a zinc starvation response in bacteria by binding to Zn(II)

    PubMed Central

    Zarkan, Ashraf; Macklyne, Heather-Rose; Truman, Andrew W.; Hesketh, Andrew R.; Hong, Hee-Jeon

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin is a front-line antibiotic used for the treatment of nosocomial infections, particularly those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Despite its clinical importance the global effects of vancomycin exposure on bacterial physiology are poorly understood. In a previous transcriptomic analysis we identified a number of Zur regulon genes which were highly but transiently up-regulated by vancomycin in Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, we show that vancomycin also induces similar zinc homeostasis systems in a range of other bacteria and demonstrate that vancomycin binds to Zn(II) in vitro. This implies that vancomycin treatment sequesters zinc from bacterial cells thereby triggering a Zur-dependent zinc starvation response. The Kd value of the binding between vancomycin and Zn(II) was calculated using a novel fluorometric assay, and NMR was used to identify the binding site. These findings highlight a new biologically relevant aspect of the chemical property of vancomycin as a zinc chelator. PMID:26797186

  14. The biofilm environment offers a possible condition for inducing the competency of DNA recipient cells through nutritional starvation.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Motomu; Mashayekhan, Shohreh; Onishi, Kyoko; Taya, Masahito

    2007-09-01

    Transformation phenomena occurring under conditions mimicking the biofilm environment were investigated using Escherichia coli IM302 (as DNA recipient cells) and Providencia sp. WW2 (as surrounding cells in the biofilm model). In the case of planktonic IM302 cells kept at 25 degrees C, the transformation took place exclusively in the absence of organic nutrients (COD = 0), and was not substantially observed in the range of COD = 30-1500 mg O2/L. On the other hand, in the case of biofilm IM302 cells, the transformation occurred at relatively high levels under the examined conditions (temperature = 5 or 25 degrees C and COD = 0-1500 mg O2/L). These results indicated that the competency of biofilm IM302 cells was induced even in the presence of organic nutrients owing to nutritional starvation caused by WW2 cells.

  15. Differences between winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars in nitrogen starvation-induced leaf senescence are governed by leaf-inherent rather than root-derived signals.

    PubMed

    Koeslin-Findeklee, Fabian; Becker, Martin A; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, Walter J

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) efficiency of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) line-cultivars (cvs.), defined as high grain yield under N limitation, has been primarily attributed to maintained N uptake during reproductive growth (N uptake efficiency) in combination with delayed senescence of the older leaves accompanied with maintained photosynthetic capacity (functional stay-green). However, it is not clear whether genotypic variation in N starvation-induced leaf senescence is due to leaf-inherent factors and/or governed by root-mediated signals. Therefore, the N-efficient and stay-green cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex were reciprocally grafted with the N-inefficient and early-senescing cvs. NPZ-2 and Capitol, respectively and grown in hydroponics. The senescence status of older leaves after 12 days of N starvation assessed by SPAD, photosynthesis and the expression of the senescence-specific cysteine protease gene SAG12-1 revealed that the stay-green phenotype of the cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex under N starvation was primarily under the control of leaf-inherent factors. The same four cultivars were submitted to N starvation for up to 12 days in a time-course experiment. The specific leaf contents of biologically active and inactive cytokinins (CKs) and the expression of genes involved in CK homeostasis revealed that under N starvation leaves of early-senescing cultivars were characterized by inactivation of biologically active CKs, whereas in stay-green cultivars synthesis, activation, binding of and response to biologically active CKs were favoured. These results suggest that the homeostasis of biologically active CKs was the predominant leaf-inherent factor for cultivar differences in N starvation-induced leaf senescence and thus N efficiency.

  16. Differences between winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars in nitrogen starvation-induced leaf senescence are governed by leaf-inherent rather than root-derived signals

    PubMed Central

    Koeslin-Findeklee, Fabian; Becker, Martin A.; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) efficiency of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) line-cultivars (cvs.), defined as high grain yield under N limitation, has been primarily attributed to maintained N uptake during reproductive growth (N uptake efficiency) in combination with delayed senescence of the older leaves accompanied with maintained photosynthetic capacity (functional stay-green). However, it is not clear whether genotypic variation in N starvation-induced leaf senescence is due to leaf-inherent factors and/or governed by root-mediated signals. Therefore, the N-efficient and stay-green cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex were reciprocally grafted with the N-inefficient and early-senescing cvs. NPZ-2 and Capitol, respectively and grown in hydroponics. The senescence status of older leaves after 12 days of N starvation assessed by SPAD, photosynthesis and the expression of the senescence-specific cysteine protease gene SAG12-1 revealed that the stay-green phenotype of the cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex under N starvation was primarily under the control of leaf-inherent factors. The same four cultivars were submitted to N starvation for up to 12 days in a time-course experiment. The specific leaf contents of biologically active and inactive cytokinins (CKs) and the expression of genes involved in CK homeostasis revealed that under N starvation leaves of early-senescing cultivars were characterized by inactivation of biologically active CKs, whereas in stay-green cultivars synthesis, activation, binding of and response to biologically active CKs were favoured. These results suggest that the homeostasis of biologically active CKs was the predominant leaf-inherent factor for cultivar differences in N starvation-induced leaf senescence and thus N efficiency. PMID:25944925

  17. Enhancement of extraplastidic oil synthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using a type-2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase with a phosphorus starvation-inducible promoter.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Masako; Ikeda, Keiko; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2014-08-01

    When cultivated under stress conditions, many plants and algae accumulate oil. The unicellular green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates neutral lipids (triacylglycerols; TAGs) during nutrient stress conditions. Temporal changes in TAG levels in nitrogen (N)- and phosphorus (P)-starved cells were examined to compare the effects of nutrient depletion on TAG accumulation in C. reinhardtii. TAG accumulation and fatty acid composition were substantially changed depending on the cultivation stage before nutrient starvation. Profiles of TAG accumulation also differed between N and P starvation. Logarithmic-growth-phase cells diluted into fresh medium showed substantial TAG accumulation with both N and P deprivation. N deprivation induced formation of oil droplets concomitant with the breakdown of thylakoid membranes. In contrast, P deprivation substantially induced accumulation of oil droplets in the cytosol and maintaining thylakoid membranes. As a consequence, P limitation accumulated more TAG both per cell and per culture medium under these conditions. To enhance oil accumulation under P deprivation, we constructed a P deprivation-dependent overexpressor of a Chlamydomonas type-2 diacylglycerol acyl-CoA acyltransferase (DGTT4) using a sulphoquinovosyldiacylglycerol 2 (SQD2) promoter, which was up-regulated during P starvation. The transformant strongly enhanced TAG accumulation with a slight increase in 18 : 1 content, which is a preferred substrate of DGTT4. These results demonstrated enhanced TAG accumulation using a P starvation-inducible promoter.

  18. Sestrin2 is induced by glucose starvation via the unfolded protein response and protects cells from non-canonical necroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Boxiao; Parmigiani, Anita; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Archer, Kellie; Murphy, Anne N.; Budanov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 is a member of a family of stress responsive proteins, which controls cell viability via antioxidant activity and regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin protein kinase (mTOR). Sestrin2 is induced by different stress insults, which diminish ATP production and induce energetic stress in the cells. Glucose is a critical substrate for ATP production utilized via glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration as well as for glycosylation of newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi. Thus, glucose starvation causes both energy deficiency and activation of ER stress followed by the unfolding protein response (UPR). Here, we show that UPR induces Sestrin2 via ATF4 and NRF2 transcription factors and demonstrate that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death. Sestrin2 inactivation sensitizes cells to necroptotic cell death that is associated with a decline in ATP levels and can be suppressed by Necrostatin 7. We propose that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death via regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:26932729

  19. The Fungicide Phosphonate Disrupts the Phosphate-Starvation Response in Brassica nigra Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Carswell, C.; Grant, B. R.; Theodorou, M. E.; Harris, J.; Niere, J. O.; Plaxton, W. C.

    1996-01-01

    The development of Brassica nigra seedlings over 20 d of growth was disrupted by the fungicide phosphonate (Phi) in a manner inversely correlated with nutritional inorganic phosphate (Pi) levels. The growth of Pi-sufficient (1.25 mM Pi) seedlings was suppressed when 10, but not 5, mM Phi was added to the nutrient medium. In contrast, the fresh weights and root:shoot ratios of Pi-limited (0.15 mM) seedlings were significantly reduced at 1.5 mM Phi, and they progressively declined to about 40% of control values as medium Phi concentration was increased to 10 mM. Intracellular Pi levels generally decreased in Phi-treated seedlings, and Phi accumulated in leaves and roots to levels up to 6- and 16-fold that of Pi in Pi-sufficient and Pi-limited plants, respectively. Extractable activities of the Pi-starvation-inducible enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate phosphatase and inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase were unaltered in Pi-sufficient seedlings grown on 5 or 10 mM Phi. However, when Pi-limited seedlings were grown on 1.5 to 10 mM Phi (a) the induction of phosphoenolpyruvate phosphatase and inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase activities by Pi limitation was reduced by 40 to 90%, whereas (b) soluble protein concentrations and the activities of the ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase were unaffacted. It is concluded that Phi specifically interrupts processes involved in regulation of the Pi-starvation response in B. nigra. PMID:12226174

  20. Hemolymph sugar homeostasis and starvation-induced hyperactivity affected by genetic manipulations of the adipokinetic hormone-encoding gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyunghee; Park, Jae H

    2004-01-01

    Adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) are metabolic neuropeptides, mediating mobilization of energy substrates from the fat body in many insects. In delving into the roles of the Drosophila Akh (dAkh) gene, its developmental expression patterns were examined and the physiological functions of the AKH-producing neurons were investigated using animals devoid of AKH neurons and ones with ectopically expressing dAkh. The dAkh gene is expressed exclusively in the corpora cardiaca from late embryos to adult stages. Projections emanating from the AKH neurons indicated that AKH has multiple target tissues as follows: the prothoracic gland and aorta in the larva and the crop and brain in the adult. Studies using transgenic manipulations of the dAkh gene demonstrated that AKH induced both hypertrehalosemia and hyperlipemia. Starved wild-type flies displayed prolonged hyperactivity prior to death; this novel behavioral pattern could be associated with food-searching activities in response to starvation. In contrast, flies devoid of AKH neurons not only lacked this type of hyperactivity, but also displayed strong resistance to starvation-induced death. From these findings, we propose another role for AKH in the regulation of starvation-induced foraging behavior. PMID:15166157

  1. Mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) and serine biosynthetic pathway genes are co-ordinately increased during anabolic agent-induced skeletal muscle growth

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. M.; Williams, H.; Ryan, K. J. P.; Wilson, T. L.; Daniel, Z. C. T. R.; Mareko, M. H. D.; Emes, R. D.; Harris, D. W.; Jones, S.; Wattis, J. A. D.; Dryden, I. L.; Hodgman, T. C.; Brameld, J. M.; Parr, T.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify novel molecular mechanisms for muscle growth during administration of anabolic agents. Growing pigs (Duroc/(Landrace/Large-White)) were administered Ractopamine (a beta-adrenergic agonist; BA; 20 ppm in feed) or Reporcin (recombinant growth hormone; GH; 10 mg/48 hours injected) and compared to a control cohort (feed only; no injections) over a 27-day time course (1, 3, 7, 13 or 27-days). Longissimus Dorsi muscle gene expression was analyzed using Agilent porcine transcriptome microarrays and clusters of genes displaying similar expression profiles were identified using a modified maSigPro clustering algorithm. Anabolic agents increased carcass (p = 0.002) and muscle weights (Vastus Lateralis: p < 0.001; Semitendinosus: p = 0.075). Skeletal muscle mRNA expression of serine/one-carbon/glycine biosynthesis pathway genes (Phgdh, Psat1 and Psph) and the gluconeogenic enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-M (Pck2/PEPCK-M), increased during treatment with BA, and to a lesser extent GH (p < 0.001, treatment x time interaction). Treatment with BA, but not GH, caused a 2-fold increase in phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) protein expression at days 3 (p < 0.05) and 7 (p < 0.01), and a 2-fold increase in PEPCK-M protein expression at day 7 (p < 0.01). BA treated pigs exhibit a profound increase in expression of PHGDH and PEPCK-M in skeletal muscle, implicating a role for biosynthetic metabolic pathways in muscle growth. PMID:27350173

  2. The regulation of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase by autophagy in low-glycolytic hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jeong Yong; Lee, Hyangkyu; Park, Jeayeo; Lee, Misu; Park, Sae Whan; Kim, Ji Sook; Lee, Milim; Cho, Byoungchul; Kim, Kyungsup; Choi, Augustine M K; Kim, Chun K; Yun, Mijin

    2015-07-31

    The glycolytic phenotype is a dominant metabolic phenomenon in cancer and is reflected in becoming aggressive. Certain hepatocellular carcinoma lack increased glycolysis and prefer to uptake acetate than glucose for metabolism. Autophagy plays a role in preserving energies and nutrients when there is limited external nutrient supply and maintains glucose level of blood though supporting gluconeogenesis in the liver. As the role of autophagy and gluconeogenesis in HCC following the glycolic activity was not clear, we cultured HCC cells with different glycolytic levels in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) to induce autophagy and conducted the activity of gluconeogenesis. Both autophagy and gluconeogenesis were induced in low glycolytic HCC cells (HepG2). In glycolytic Hep3B cells, only autophagy without gluconeogenesis was induced upon starvation. When autophagy was blocked, the level of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was reduced in HepG2 cells and not in Hep3B. Altogether, we investigated contribution of hepatic gluconeogenesis to the metabolic phenotype of HCC cells and the role of autophagy as a potential mechanism regulating gluconeogenesis in low glycolytic HCC.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by 2-deoxyglucose but not glucose starvation activates AMPK through CaMKKβ leading to autophagy.

    PubMed

    Xi, Haibin; Barredo, Julio C; Merchan, Jaime R; Lampidis, Theodore J

    2013-05-15

    Autophagy, a well-conserved cellular self-eating process, has been shown to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of cancer. Previously, we reported that under normal O₂ conditions (21% O₂), the dual glucose metabolism inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) activates a cytoprotective autophagic response in cancer cells mainly through the induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress rather than ATP² reduction. However, the pathway(s) by which this occurs was unknown. Here, we find that ER stress induced by 2-DG as well as tunicamycin activates AMPK via Ca²⁺-CaMKKβ leading to stimulation of autophagy. These results suggest a new role for AMPK as a sensor of ER stress. In contrast, we find that although physiologic glucose starvation (GS) leads to ER stress which contributes to autophagy activation, it does so by a different mechanism. In addition to ER stress, GS also stimulates autophagy through lowering ATP and activating the canonical LKB1-AMPK energy sensing pathway as well as through increasing reactive oxygen species resulting in the activation of ERK. Furthermore, under hypoxia we observe that both 2-DG and GS inhibit rather than activate autophagy. This inhibition correlates with dramatically depleted ATP levels, and occurs through reduction of the PI3K III-Beclin1 complex for autophagy initiation, blockage of the conjugation of ATG12 to ATG5 for autophagosome expansion, as well as inhibition of the functional lysosomal compartment for autophagic degradation. Taken together, our data support a model where under normoxia therapeutic (2-DG) and physiologic (GS) glucose restriction differentially activate autophagy, while under hypoxia they similarly inhibit it.

  4. Cap-independent translation is required for starvation-induced differentiation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Wendy V; Zhou, Kaihong; Butler, Tamira K; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-08-31

    Cellular internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are untranslated segments of mRNA transcripts thought to initiate protein synthesis in response to environmental stresses that prevent canonical 5' cap-dependent translation. Although numerous cellular mRNAs are proposed to have IRESs, none has a demonstrated physiological function or molecular mechanism. Here we show that seven yeast genes required for invasive growth, a developmental pathway induced by nutrient limitation, contain potent IRESs that require the initiation factor eIF4G for cap-independent translation. In contrast to the RNA structure-based activity of viral IRESs, we show that an unstructured A-rich element mediates internal initiation via recruitment of the poly(A) binding protein (Pab1) to the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of invasive growth messages. A 5'UTR mutation that impairs IRES activity compromises invasive growth, which indicates that cap-independent translation is required for physiological adaptation to stress.

  5. Limited proteolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L; Encinas, M V; Jabalquinto, A M; Cardemil, E

    1993-08-01

    Incubation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase with trypsin under native conditions cases a time-dependent loss of activity and the production of protein fragments. Cleavage sites determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses identified protease-sensitive peptide bonds between amino acid residues at positions 9-10 and 76-77. Additional fragmentation sites were also detected in a region approximately 70-80 amino acids before the carboxyl end of the protein. These results suggest that the enzyme is formed by a central compact domain comprising more than two thirds of the whole protein structure. From proteolysis experiments carried out in the presence of substrates, it could be inferred that CO2 binding specifically protects position 76-77 from trypsin action. Intrinsic fluorescence measurements demonstrated that CO2 binding induces a protein conformational change, and a dissociation constant for the enzyme CO2 complex of 8.2 +/- 0.6 mM was determined.

  6. Inactivation of the Stress- and Starvation-Inducible gls24 Operon Has a Pleiotrophic Effect on Cell Morphology, Stress Sensitivity, and Gene Expression in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Giard, Jean-Christophe; Rince, Alain; Capiaux, Herve; Auffray, Yanick; Hartke, Axel

    2000-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis induces the synthesis of at least 42 proteins during 24 h of glucose starvation. Because of its induction during carbohydrate and complete starvation (incubation in tap water) and CdCl2 and bile salts stresses, one of these proteins (Gls24) was qualified as a “general stress protein” and was analyzed at the molecular level. Its corresponding gene, gls24, seems to be the penultimate gene of an operon composed, altogether, of six open reading frames (ORFs). The ORF preceding gls24 (orf4) showed very strong identity with gls24. The deduced polypeptides of these two genes showed similarity with a 20-kDa hypothetical protein from Lactococcus lactis and an alkaline stress protein from Staphylococcus aureus with no previously known biological significance. Data from the operon sequence and Northern analysis led to the conclusions that (i) gls24 possesses its own promoter which is especially induced at the onset of starvation and (ii) the operon promoter is stress inducible in exponential-phase cells. A mutation in the gls24 gene led to a severe reduction of growth rate and reduction of survival against 0.3% bile salts in the 24-h-starved cells compared to the wild-type strain. Moreover, the chain length of the mutant is significantly reduced during growth. These results argue strongly for a role of the protein Gls24 and/or GlsB in morphological changes and in stress tolerance in E. faecalis. Comparison of two-dimensional protein gels from wild-type cells with those from gls24 mutant cells revealed a pleiotropic effect of the mutation on gene expression. At least nine proteins were present in larger amounts in the mutant. For six of them, the corresponding N-terminal microsequence has been obtained. Three of these sequences map in genes coding for l-lactate dehydrogenase, lipoamide dehydrogenase, and pyruvate decarboxylase, all involved in pyruvate metabolism. PMID:10913085

  7. spict, a cyst cell-specific gene, regulates starvation-induced spermatogonial cell death in the Drosophila testis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ason C-Y; Yang, Heiko; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2017-01-10

    Tissues are maintained in a homeostatic state by balancing the constant loss of old cells with the continued production of new cells. Tissue homeostasis can shift between high and low turnover states to cope with environmental changes such as nutrient availability. Recently, we discovered that the elimination of transit-amplifying cells plays a critical role in maintaining the stem cell population during protein starvation in the Drosophila testis. Here, we identify spict, a gene expressed specifically in differentiating cyst cells, as a regulator of spermatogonial death. Spict is upregulated in cyst cells that phagocytose dying spermatogonia. We propose that phagocytosis and subsequent clearance of dead spermatogonia, which is partly promoted by Spict, contribute to stem cell maintenance during prolonged protein starvation.

  8. spict, a cyst cell-specific gene, regulates starvation-induced spermatogonial cell death in the Drosophila testis

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ason C.-Y.; Yang, Heiko; Yamashita, Yukiko M.

    2017-01-01

    Tissues are maintained in a homeostatic state by balancing the constant loss of old cells with the continued production of new cells. Tissue homeostasis can shift between high and low turnover states to cope with environmental changes such as nutrient availability. Recently, we discovered that the elimination of transit-amplifying cells plays a critical role in maintaining the stem cell population during protein starvation in the Drosophila testis. Here, we identify spict, a gene expressed specifically in differentiating cyst cells, as a regulator of spermatogonial death. Spict is upregulated in cyst cells that phagocytose dying spermatogonia. We propose that phagocytosis and subsequent clearance of dead spermatogonia, which is partly promoted by Spict, contribute to stem cell maintenance during prolonged protein starvation. PMID:28071722

  9. Short-term starvation with a near-fatal asthma attack induced ketoacidosis in a nondiabetic pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kuang-Yu; Chang, Shan-Yueh; Wang, Sheng-Huei; Su, Her-Young; Tsai, Chen-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Life-threatening refractory metabolic acidosis due to starvation ketoacidosis is rarely reported, even among nondiabetic pregnant women, and may be overlooked. Furthermore, stressful situations may increase the acidosis severity. In the present case, a nondiabetic multiparous woman was admitted for a near-fatal asthma attack and vomiting during the third trimester of pregnancy. She was intubated and rapidly developed high anion gap metabolic acidosis. We diagnosed the patient with starvation ketoacidosis based on vomiting with concomitant periods of stress during pregnancy and the absence of other causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. She responded poorly to standard treatment, although the ketoacidosis and asthma promptly resolved after an emergency caesarean section. The patient and her baby were safely discharged. Short-term starvation, if it occurs during periods of stress and medication, can result in life-threatening ketoacidosis, even among nondiabetic women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Awareness of this condition may facilitate prompt recognition and proactive treatment for dietary and stress control, and emergent interventions may also improve outcomes. PMID:27368034

  10. Emerging role of mammalian autophagy in ketogenesis to overcome starvation.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is essential for the survival of lower organisms under conditions of nutrient depletion. However, whether autophagy plays a physiological role in mammals experiencing starvation is unknown. Ketogenesis is critical for overcoming starvation in mammals. We recently revealed that hepatic and renal autophagy are involved in starvation-induced ketogenesis, by utilizing tissue-specific autophagy-deficient mouse models. The liver is the principal organ to regulate ketogenesis, and a deficiency of liver-specific autophagy partially but significantly attenuates starvation-induced ketogenesis. While deficiency of renal-specific autophagy does not affect starvation-induced ketogenesis, mice with deficiency of both liver and kidney autophagy have even lower blood ketone levels and physical activity under starvation conditions than those lacking autophagy in the liver alone. These results suggest that the kidney can compensate for impaired hepatic ketogenesis. Since ketone bodies are catabolized from fatty acids, the uptake of fatty acids, the formation of intracellular lipid droplets, and fatty acid oxidation are critical for ketogenesis. We found that starvation-induced lipid droplet formation is impaired in autophagy-deficient organs. Thus, hepatic and renal autophagy are required for starvation-induced ketogenesis. This process is essential for maintaining systemic energy homeostasis and physical activity during starvation. Our findings provide a novel insight into mammalian autophagy and the physiology of starvation.

  11. Identification of an anaerobically induced phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent fructose-specific phosphotransferase system and evidence for the Embden-Meyerhof glycolytic pathway in the heterofermentative bacterium Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed Central

    Saier, M H; Ye, J J; Klinke, S; Nino, E

    1996-01-01

    Heterofermentative gram-positive bacteria are believed to metabolize sugars exclusively via the pentose phosphoketolase pathway following uptake via sugar:cation symport. Here we show that anaerobic growth of one such bacterium, Lactobacillus brevis, in the presence of fructose induces the synthesis of a phosphotransferase system and glycolytic enzymes that allow fructose to be metabolized via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. PMID:8550437

  12. A new type of compartment, defined by plant-specific Atg8-interacting proteins, is induced upon exposure of Arabidopsis plants to carbon starvation.

    PubMed

    Honig, Arik; Avin-Wittenberg, Tamar; Ufaz, Shai; Galili, Gad

    2012-01-01

    Atg8 is a central protein in bulk starvation-induced autophagy, but it is also specifically associated with multiple protein targets under various physiological conditions to regulate their selective turnover by the autophagy machinery. Here, we describe two new closely related Arabidopsis thaliana Atg8-interacting proteins (ATI1 and ATI2) that are unique to plants. We show that under favorable growth conditions, ATI1 and ATI2 are partially associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane network, whereas upon exposure to carbon starvation, they become mainly associated with newly identified spherical compartments that dynamically move along the ER network. These compartments are morphologically distinct from previously reported spindle-shaped ER bodies and, in contrast to them, do not contain ER-lumenal markers possessing a C-terminal HDEL sequence. Organelle and autophagosome-specific markers show that the bodies containing ATI1 are distinct from Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and classical autophagosomes. The final destination of the ATI1 bodies is the central vacuole, indicating that they may operate in selective turnover of specific proteins. ATI1 and ATI2 gene expression is elevated during late seed maturation and desiccation. We further demonstrate that ATI1 overexpression or suppression of both ATI1 and ATI2, respectively, stimulate or inhibit seed germination in the presence of the germination-inhibiting hormone abscisic acid.

  13. Modeling of Membrane-Electrode-Assembly Degradation in Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cells - Local H2 Starvation and Start-Stop Induced Carbon-Support Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wenbin; Yu, Paul T.; Carter, Robert N.; Makharia, Rohit; Gasteiger, Hubert A.

    Carbon-support corrosion causes electrode structure damage and thus electrode degradation. This chapter discusses fundamental models developed to predict cathode carbon-support corrosion induced by local H2 starvation and start-stop in a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Kinetic models based on the balance of current among the various electrode reactions are illustrative, yielding much insight on the origin of carbon corrosion and its implications for future materials developments. They are particularly useful in assessing carbon corrosion rates at a quasi-steady-state when an H2-rich region serves as a power source that drives an H2-free region as a load. Coupled kinetic and transport models are essential in predicting when local H2 starvation occurs and how it affects the carbon corrosion rate. They are specifically needed to estimate length scales at which H2 will be depleted and time scales that are valuable for developing mitigation strategies. To predict carbon-support loss distributions over an entire active area, incorporating the electrode pseudo-capacitance appears necessary for situations with shorter residence times such as start-stop events. As carbon-support corrosion is observed under normal transient operations, further model improvement shall be focused on finding the carbon corrosion kinetics associated with voltage cycling and incorporating mechanisms that can quantify voltage decay with carbon-support loss.

  14. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in Plants Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, P.; Campbell, Wilbur H.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has been found in significant activities in a number of plants exhibiting Crassulacean acid metabolism. Thirty-five species were surveyed for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, ribulose diphosphate carboxylase, malic enzyme, and malate dehydrogenase (NAD). Plants which showed high activities of malic enzyme contained no detectable phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, while plants with high activities of the latter enzyme contained little malic enzyme. It is proposed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase acts as a decarboxylase during the light period, furnishing CO2 for the pentose cycle and phosphoenolpyruvate for gluconeogenesis. Some properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in crude extracts of pineapple leaves were investigated. The enzyme required Mn2+, Mg2+, and ATP for maximum activity. About 60% of the activity could be pelleted, along with chloroplasts and mitochondria, in extracts from leaves kept in the dark overnight. PMID:16658562

  15. Transcript level coordination of carbon pathways during silicon starvation-induced lipid accumulation in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah R; Glé, Corine; Abbriano, Raffaela M; Traller, Jesse C; Davis, Aubrey; Trentacoste, Emily; Vernet, Maria; Allen, Andrew E; Hildebrand, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Diatoms are one of the most productive and successful photosynthetic taxa on Earth and possess attributes such as rapid growth rates and production of lipids, making them candidate sources of renewable fuels. Despite their significance, few details of the mechanisms used to regulate growth and carbon metabolism are currently known, hindering metabolic engineering approaches to enhance productivity. To characterize the transcript level component of metabolic regulation, genome-wide changes in transcript abundance were documented in the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana on a time-course of silicon starvation. Growth, cell cycle progression, chloroplast replication, fatty acid composition, pigmentation, and photosynthetic parameters were characterized alongside lipid accumulation. Extensive coordination of large suites of genes was observed, highlighting the existence of clusters of coregulated genes as a key feature of global gene regulation in T. pseudonana. The identity of key enzymes for carbon metabolic pathway inputs (photosynthesis) and outputs (growth and storage) reveals these clusters are organized to synchronize these processes. Coordinated transcript level responses to silicon starvation are probably driven by signals linked to cell cycle progression and shifts in photophysiology. A mechanistic understanding of how this is accomplished will aid efforts to engineer metabolism for development of algal-derived biofuels.

  16. Spatial division of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and nitrate reductase activity and its regulation by cytokinins in CAM-induced leaves of Guzmania monostachia (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Paula Natália; Purgatto, Eduardo; Mercier, Helenice

    2013-08-15

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a physiological adaptation of plants that live in stress environment conditions. A good model of CAM modulation is the epiphytic bromeliad, Guzmania monostachia, which switches between two photosynthetic pathways (C3-CAM) in response to different environmental conditions, such as light stress and water availability. Along the leaf length a gradient of acidity can be observed when G. monostachia plants are kept under water deficiency. Previous studies showed that the apical portions of the leaves present higher expression of CAM, while the basal regions exhibit lower expression of this photosynthetic pathway. The present study has demonstrated that it is possible to induce the CAM pathway in detached leaves of G. monostachia kept under water deficit for 7 d. Also, it was evaluated whether CAM expression can be modulated in detached leaves of Guzmania and whether some spatial separation between NO3(-) reduction and CO2 fixation occurs in basal and apical portions of the leaf. In addition, we analyzed the involvement of endogenous cytokinins (free and ribosylated forms) as possible signal modulating both NO3(-) reduction and CO2 fixation along the leaf blade of this bromeliad. Besides demonstrating a clear spatial and functional separation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism along G. monostachia leaves, the results obtained also indicated a probable negative correlation between endogenous free cytokinins - zeatin (Z) and isopentenyladenine (iP) - concentration and PEPC activity in the apical portions of G. monostachia leaves kept under water deficit. On the other hand, a possible positive correlation between endogenous Z and iP levels and NR activity in basal portions of drought-exposed and control leaves was verified. Together with the observations presented above, results obtained with exogenous cytokinins treatments, strongly suggest that free cytokinins might act as a stimulatory signal involved in NR activity regulation and as

  17. HAb18G/CD147 inhibits starvation-induced autophagy in human hepatoma cell SMMC7721 with an involvement of Beclin 1 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Gou, Xingchun; Ru, Qiang; Zhang, Hongxin; Chen, Yanke; Li, Ling; Yang, Hushan; Xing, Jinliang; Chen, Zhinan

    2009-05-01

    HAb18G/CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein highly expressed in various types of malignant cells, mainly functions as an inducer of matrix metalloproteinases to promote tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. However, whether there are other mechanisms underlying the role of HAb18G/CD147 in tumor progression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the functional effects of HAb18G/CD147 on autophagy in hepatoma cell line SMMC7721 using immunofluorescence staining, Western blot and transmission electronmicroscopy. Our data showed that specific small interference RNA (siRNA) considerably down-regulated the expression of HAb18G/CD147 in SMMC7721 cells at both messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels. The down-regulation of HAb18G/CD147 significantly promoted starvation-induced autophagy in a dose-dependent manner. Using trypan blue exclusion assay, we found that HAb18G/CD147 notably enhanced the survival of SMMC7721 cells through inhibiting starvation-induced autophagy. In addition, we demonstrated that HAb18G/CD147 down-regulated the expression of autophagy-regulating protein Beclin 1 in SMMC7721 cells. Furthermore, our data indicated that HAb18G siRNA-transfected SMMC7721 cells had a significantly decreased level of phosphorylated serine/threonine protein kinase B (pAkt) and the expression of Beclin 1 was inversely associated with the level of pAkt, suggesting that the Class I phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-Akt pathway may be involved in the down-regulation of Beclin 1 by HAb18G/CD147. Overall, we provide the first experimental evidence to show that HAb18G/CD147 may play an important role in the inhibitory regulation of autophagy. Therefore, our data suggest a new molecular mechanism for HAb18G-mediated hepatoma progression.

  18. Phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Postma, P W; Lengeler, J W; Jacobson, G R

    1993-01-01

    Numerous gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria take up carbohydrates through the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). This system transports and phosphorylates carbohydrates at the expense of PEP and is the subject of this review. The PTS consists of two general proteins, enzyme I and HPr, and a number of carbohydrate-specific enzymes, the enzymes II. PTS proteins are phosphoproteins in which the phospho group is attached to either a histidine residue or, in a number of cases, a cysteine residue. After phosphorylation of enzyme I by PEP, the phospho group is transferred to HPr. The enzymes II are required for the transport of the carbohydrates across the membrane and the transfer of the phospho group from phospho-HPr to the carbohydrates. Biochemical, structural, and molecular genetic studies have shown that the various enzymes II have the same basic structure. Each enzyme II consists of domains for specific functions, e.g., binding of the carbohydrate or phosphorylation. Each enzyme II complex can consist of one to four different polypeptides. The enzymes II can be placed into at least four classes on the basis of sequence similarity. The genetics of the PTS is complex, and the expression of PTS proteins is intricately regulated because of the central roles of these proteins in nutrient acquisition. In addition to classical induction-repression mechanisms involving repressor and activator proteins, other types of regulation, such as antitermination, have been observed in some PTSs. Apart from their role in carbohydrate transport, PTS proteins are involved in chemotaxis toward PTS carbohydrates. Furthermore, the IIAGlc protein, part of the glucose-specific PTS, is a central regulatory protein which in its nonphosphorylated form can bind to and inhibit several non-PTS uptake systems and thus prevent entry of inducers. In its phosphorylated form, P-IIAGlc is involved in the activation of adenylate cyclase and thus in the

  19. Differential regulation by cyclic AMP of starvation protein synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J E; Latter, G I; Matin, A

    1988-09-01

    Of the 30 carbon starvation proteins whose induction has been previously shown to be important for starvation survival of Escherichia coli, two-thirds were not induced in cya or crp deletion mutants of E. coli at the onset of carbon starvation. The rest were induced, although not necessarily with the same temporal pattern as exhibited in the wild type. The starvation proteins that were homologous to previously identified heat shock proteins belonged to the latter class and were hyperinduced in delta cya or delta crp mutants during starvation. Most of the cyclic AMP-dependent proteins were synthesized in the delta cya mutant if exogenous cyclic AMP was added at the onset of starvation. Furthermore, beta-galactosidase induction of several carbon starvation response gene fusions occurred only in a cya+ genetic background. Thus, two-thirds of the carbon starvation proteins of E. coli require cyclic AMP and its receptor protein for induction; the rest do not. The former class evidently has no role in starvation survival, since delta cya or delta crp mutants of either E. coli or Salmonella typhimurium survived starvation as well as their wild-type parents did. The latter class, therefore, is likely to have a direct role in starvation survival. This possibility is strengthened by the finding that nearly all of the cya- and crp-independent proteins were also induced during nitrogen starvation and, as shown previously, during phosphate starvation. Proteins whose synthesis is independent of cya- and crp control are referred to as Pex (postexponential).

  20. NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase is essential for the survival of Arabidopsis thaliana during dark-induced carbon starvation.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Yo; Good, Allen G

    2008-01-01

    Interconversion between glutamate and 2-oxoglutarate, which can be catalysed by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), is a key reaction in plant carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism. However, the physiological role of plant GDH has been a controversial issue for several decades. To elucidate the function of GDH, the expression of GDH in various tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana was studied. Results suggested that the expression of two Arabidopsis GDH genes was differently regulated depending on the organ/tissue types and cellular C availability. Moreover, Arabidopsis mutants defective in GDH genes were identified and characterized. The two isolated mutants, gdh1-2 and gdh2-1, were crossed to make a double knockout mutant, gdh1-2/gdh2-1, which contained negligible levels of NAD(H)-dependent GDH activity. Phenotypic analysis on these mutants revealed an increased susceptibility of gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants to C-deficient conditions. This conditional phenotype of the double knockout mutant supports the catabolic role of GDH and its role in fuelling the TCA cycle during C starvation. The reduced rate of glutamate catabolism in the gdh2-1 and gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants was also evident by the growth retardation of these mutants when glutamate was supplied as the alternative N source. Furthermore, amino acid profiles during prolonged dark conditions were significantly different between WT and the gdh mutant plants. For instance, glutamate levels increased in WT plants but decreased in gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants, and aberrant accumulation of several amino acids was detected in the gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants. These results suggest that GDH plays a central role in amino acid breakdown under C-deficient conditions.

  1. Vitamin D fails to prevent serum starvation- or staurosporine-induced apoptosis in human and rat osteosarcoma-derived cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Witasp, Erika; Gustafsson, Ann-Catrin; Cotgreave, Ian; Lind, Monica . E-mail: monica.lind@imm.ki.se; Fadeel, Bengt . E-mail: bengt.fadeel@imm.ki.se

    2005-05-13

    Previous studies have suggested that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, the active form of vitamin D{sub 3}, may increase the survival of bone-forming osteoblasts through an inhibition of apoptosis. On the other hand, vitamin D{sub 3} has also been shown to trigger apoptosis in human cancer cells, including osteosarcoma-derived cell lines. In the present study, we show that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces a time- and dose-dependent loss of cell viability in the rat osteosarcoma cell line, UMR-106, and the human osteosarcoma cell line, TE-85. We were unable, however, to detect nuclear condensation, phosphatidylserine externalization, or other typical signs of apoptosis in this model. Moreover, 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} failed to protect against apoptosis induced by serum starvation or incubation with the protein kinase inhibitor, staurosporine. These in vitro findings are thus at variance with several previous reports in the literature and suggest that induction of or protection against apoptosis of bone-derived cells may not be a primary function of vitamin D{sub 3}.

  2. MicroRNA-212 negatively regulates starvation induced autophagy in prostate cancer cells by inhibiting SIRT1 and is a modulator of angiogenesis and cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Ramalinga, Malathi; Roy, Arpita; Srivastava, Anvesha; Bhattarai, Asmita; Harish, Varsha; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean; Kumar, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Among a number of non-coding RNAs, role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer cell proliferation, cancer initiation, development and metastasis have been extensively studied and miRNA based therapeutic approaches are being pursued. Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major health concern and several deregulated miRNAs have been described in PCa. miR-212 is differentially modulated in multiple cancers however its function remains elusive. In this study, we found that miR-212 is downregulated in PCa tissues when compared with benign adjacent regions (n = 40). Also, we observed reduced levels of circulatory miR-212 in serum from PCa patients (n = 40) when compared with healthy controls (n = 32). Elucidating the functional role of miR-212, we demonstrate that miR-212 negatively modulates starvation induced autophagy in PCa cells by targeting sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). Overexpression of miR-212 also leads to inhibition of angiogenesis and cellular senescence. In conclusion, our study indicates a functional role of miR-212 in PCa and suggests the development of miR-212 based therapies. PMID:26439987

  3. Regulation of mATG9 trafficking by Src- and ULK1-mediated phosphorylation in basal and starvation-induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Changqian; Ma, Kaili; Gao, Ruize; Mu, Chenglong; Chen, Linbo; Liu, Qiangqiang; Luo, Qian; Feng, Du; Zhu, Yushan; Chen, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy requires diverse membrane sources and involves membrane trafficking of mATG9, the only membrane protein in the ATG family. However, the molecular regulation of mATG9 trafficking for autophagy initiation remains unclear. Here we identified two conserved classic adaptor protein sorting signals within the cytosolic N-terminus of mATG9, which mediate trafficking of mATG9 from the plasma membrane and trans-Golgi network (TGN) via interaction with the AP1/2 complex. Src phosphorylates mATG9 at Tyr8 to maintain its endocytic and constitutive trafficking in unstressed conditions. In response to starvation, phosphorylation of mATG9 at Tyr8 by Src and at Ser14 by ULK1 functionally cooperate to promote interactions between mATG9 and the AP1/2 complex, leading to redistribution of mATG9 from the plasma membrane and juxta-nuclear region to the peripheral pool for autophagy initiation. Our findings uncover novel mechanisms of mATG9 trafficking and suggest a coordination of basal and stress-induced autophagy. PMID:27934868

  4. Identification of a phosphoenolpyruvate:fructose 1-phosphotransferase system in Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, K D; Ghosh, S

    1984-01-01

    An inducible phosphoenolpyruvate:fructose phosphotransferase system has been detected in Azospirillum brasilense, which requires a minimum of two components of the crude extracts for activity: (i) a soluble fraction (enzyme I) and (ii) a membrane fraction (enzyme II). The uninduced cells neither show any uptake of fructose nor express activity of either of these two enzyme fractions. C-1 of fructose is the site of phosphorylation. This phosphotransferase system does not accept glucose as a substrate for phosphorylation. PMID:6501230

  5. Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphomutase Activity in an l-Phosphonoalanine-Mineralizing Strain of Burkholderia cepacia

    PubMed Central

    Ternan, Nigel G.; McGrath, John W.; Quinn, John P.

    1998-01-01

    A strain of Burkholderia cepacia isolated by enrichment culture utilized l-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (phosphonoalanine) at concentrations up to 20 mM as a carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus source in a phosphate-insensitive manner. Cells contained phosphoenolpyruvate phosphomutase activity, presumed to be responsible for cleavage of the C—P bond of phosphonopyruvate, the transamination product of l-phosphonoalanine; this was inducible in the presence of phosphonoalanine. PMID:9603854

  6. The glucose and nitrogen starvation response of Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Birgit; Hoi, Le Thi; Jürgen, Britta; Albrecht, Dirk; Ehrenreich, Armin; Veith, Birgit; Evers, Stefan; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Hecker, Michael; Schweder, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    The glucose and nitrogen starvation stimulons of Bacillus licheniformis were determined by transcriptome and proteome analyses. Under both starvation conditions, the main response of B. licheniformis was a switch to the usage of alternative nutrient sources. This was indicated by an induction of genes involved in the metabolism of C-2 substrates during glucose limitation. In addition, B. licheniformis seems to be using other organic substances like amino acids and lipids as carbon sources when subjected to glucose starvation. This observation is supported by the induction of a high number of genes coding for proteins involved in amino acid and lipid degradation. During nitrogen starvation, genes for several proteases and peptidases involved in nitrate and nitrite assimilation were induced, which enables this bacterium to recruit nitrogen from alternative sources. Both starvation conditions led to a down-regulation of transcription of most vegetative genes, which was subsequently reflected by a reduced synthesis of the corresponding proteins. A selected set of genes was induced by both starvation conditions. Among them were yvyD, citA and the putative methylcitrate shunt genes mmgD, mmgE and yqiQ. However, both starvation conditions did not induce a general SigmaB-dependent stress response.

  7. Phosphorus and nitrogen physiology of two contrasting poplar genotypes when exposed to phosphorus and/or nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Gan, Honghao; Jiao, Yu; Jia, Jingbo; Wang, Xinli; Li, Hong; Shi, Wenguang; Peng, Changhui; Polle, Andrea; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) are the two essential macronutrients for tree growth and development. To elucidate the P and N physiology of woody plants during acclimation to P and/or N starvation, we exposed saplings of the slow-growing Populus simonii Carr (Ps) and the fast-growing Populus × euramericana Dode (Pe) to complete nutrients or starvation of P, N or both elements (NP). P. × euramericana had lower P and N concentrations and greater P and N amounts due to higher biomass production, thereby resulting in greater phosphorus use efficiency/N use efficiency (PUE/NUE) compared with Ps. Compared with the roots of Ps, the roots of Pe exhibited higher enzymatic activities in terms of acid phosphatases (APs) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH), which are involved in P mobilization, and nitrate reductase (NR), glutamate synthase (GOGAT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), which participate in N assimilation. The responsiveness of the transcriptional regulation of key genes encoding transporters for phosphate, ammonium and nitrate was stronger in Pe than in Ps. These results suggest that Pe possesses a higher capacity for P/N uptake and assimilation, which promote faster growth compared with Ps. In both poplars, P or NP starvation caused significant decreases in the P concentrations and increases in PUE. Phosphorus deprivation induced the activity levels of APs, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and MDH in both genotypes. Nitrogen or NP deficiency resulted in lower N concentrations, amino acid levels, NR and GOGAT activities, and higher NUE in both poplars. Thus, in Ps and Pe, the mRNA levels of PHT1;5, PHT1;9, PHT2;1, AMT2;1 and NR increased in the roots, while PHT1;9, PHO1;H1, PHO2, AMT1;1 and NRT2;1 increased in the leaves during acclimation to P, N or NP deprivation. These results suggest that both poplars suppress P/N uptake, mobilization and assimilation during acclimation to P, N or NP starvation.

  8. Uric acid-dependent inhibition of AMP kinase induces hepatic glucose production in diabetes and starvation: evolutionary implications of the uricase loss in hominids.

    PubMed

    Cicerchi, Christina; Li, Nanxing; Kratzer, James; Garcia, Gabriela; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Tanabe, Katsuyuki; Hunter, Brandi; Rivard, Christopher J; Sautin, Yuri Y; Gaucher, Eric A; Johnson, Richard J; Lanaspa, Miguel A

    2014-08-01

    Reduced AMP kinase (AMPK) activity has been shown to play a key deleterious role in increased hepatic gluconeogenesis in diabetes, but the mechanism whereby this occurs remains unclear. In this article, we document that another AMP-dependent enzyme, AMP deaminase (AMPD) is activated in the liver of diabetic mice, which parallels with a significant reduction in AMPK activity and a significant increase in intracellular glucose accumulation in human HepG2 cells. AMPD activation is induced by a reduction in intracellular phosphate levels, which is characteristic of insulin resistance and diabetic states. Increased gluconeogenesis is mediated by reduced TORC2 phosphorylation at Ser171 by AMPK in these cells, as well as by the up-regulation of the rate-limiting enzymes PEPCK and G6Pc. The mechanism whereby AMPD controls AMPK activation depends on the production of a specific AMP downstream metabolite through AMPD, uric acid. In this regard, humans have higher uric acid levels than most mammals due to a mutation in uricase, the enzyme involved in uric acid degradation in most mammals, that developed during a period of famine in Europe 1.5 × 10(7) yr ago. Here, working with resurrected ancestral uricases obtained from early hominids, we show that their expression on HepG2 cells is enough to blunt gluconeogenesis in parallel with an up-regulation of AMPK activity. These studies identify a key role AMPD and uric acid in mediating hepatic gluconeogenesis in the diabetic state, via a mechanism involving AMPK down-regulation and overexpression of PEPCK and G6Pc. The uricase mutation in the Miocene likely provided a survival advantage to help maintain glucose levels under conditions of near starvation, but today likely has a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes.

  9. The antimalarial amodiaquine causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade sensitizing human melanoma cells to starvation- and chemotherapy-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuxi; Tao, Shasha; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Park, Sophia L; Vonderfecht, Amanda A; Jacobs, Suesan L; Zhang, Donna D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of autophagic-lysosomal function has recently emerged as a promising strategy for chemotherapeutic intervention targeting cancer cells. Repurposing approved and abandoned non-oncological drugs is an alternative approach to the identification and development of anticancer therapeutics, and antimalarials that target autophagic-lysosomal functions have recently attracted considerable attention as candidates for oncological repurposing. Since cumulative research suggests that dependence on autophagy represents a specific vulnerability of malignant melanoma cells, we screened a focused compound library of antimalarials for antimelanoma activity. Here we report for the first time that amodiaquine (AQ), a clinical 4-aminoquinoline antimalarial with unexplored cancer-directed chemotherapeutic potential, causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade in melanoma cells that surpasses that of its parent compound chloroquine. Monitoring an established set of protein markers (LAMP1, LC3-II, SQSTM1) and cell ultrastructural changes detected by electron microscopy, we observed that AQ treatment caused autophagic-lysosomal blockade in malignant A375 melanoma cells, a finding substantiated by detection of rapid inactivation of lysosomal cathepsins (CTSB, CTSL, CTSD). AQ-treatment was associated with early induction of energy crisis (ATP depletion) and sensitized melanoma cells to either starvation- or chemotherapeutic agent-induced cell death. AQ displayed potent antiproliferative effects, and gene expression array analysis revealed changes at the mRNA (CDKN1A, E2F1) and protein level (TP53, CDKN1A, CCND1, phospho-RB1 [Ser 780]/[Ser 807/811], E2F1) consistent with the observed proliferative blockade in S-phase. Taken together, our data suggest that the clinical antimalarial AQ is a promising candidate for repurposing efforts that aim at targeting autophagic-lysosomal function and proliferative control in malignant melanoma cells.

  10. Effects of heterologous expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase on organic acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Lübeck, Mette; Lübeck, Peter S

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius has a potential as a cell factory for production of various organic acids. In this study, the organic acid profile of A. carbonarius was investigated under different cultivation conditions. Moreover, two heterologous genes, pepck and ppc, which encode phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in Actinobacillus succinogenes and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Escherichia coli, were inserted individually and in combination in A. carbonarius to enhance the carbon flux toward the reductive TCA branch. Results of transcription analysis and measurement of enzyme activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the corresponding single and double transformants demonstrated that the two heterologous genes were successfully expressed in A. carbonarius. The production of citric acid increased in all the transformants in both glucose- and xylose-based media at pH higher than 3 but did not increase in the pH non-buffered cultivation compared with the wild type.

  11. Nicotiana tabacum EIL2 directly regulates expression of at least one tobacco gene induced by sulphur starvation.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Anna; Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2010-03-01

    Sulphur deficiency severely affects plant growth and their agricultural productivity leading to diverse changes in development and metabolisms. Molecular mechanisms regulating gene expression under low sulphur conditions remain largely unknown. AtSLIM1, a member of the EIN3-like (EIL) family was reported to be a central transcriptional regulator of the plant sulphur response, however, no direct interaction of this protein with any sulphur-responsive promoters was demonstrated. The focus of this study was on the analysis of a promoter region of UP9C, a tobacco gene strongly induced by sulphur limitation. Cloning and subsequent examination of this promoter resulted in the identification of a 20-nt sequence (UPE-box), also present in the promoters of several Arabidopsis genes, including three out of four homologues of UP9C. The UPE-box, consisting of two parallel tebs sequences (TEIL binding site), proved to be necessary to bind the transcription factors belonging to the EIL family and of a 5-nt conserved sequence at the 3'-end. The yeast one-hybrid analysis resulted in the identification of one transcription factor (NtEIL2) capable of binding to the UPE-box. The interactions of NtEIL2, and its homologue from Arabidopsis, AtSLIM1, with DNA were affected by mutations within the UPE-box. Transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana have further shown that both factors, NtEIL2 and AtSLIM1, activate the UP9C promoter. Interestingly, activation by NtEIL2, but not by AtSLIM1, was dependent on the sulphur-deficiency of the plants.

  12. Real-time iTRAQ-based proteome profiling revealed the central metabolism involved in nitrogen starvation induced lipid accumulation in microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vineeta; Muthuraj, Muthusivaramapandian; Gandhi, Mayuri N.; Das, Debasish; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2017-01-01

    To understand the post-transcriptional molecular mechanisms attributing to oleaginousness in microalgae challenged with nitrogen starvation (N-starvation), the longitudinal proteome dynamics of Chlorella sp. FC2 IITG was investigated using multipronged quantitative proteomics and multiple reaction monitoring assays. Physiological data suggested a remarkably enhanced lipid accumulation with concomitant reduction in carbon flux towards carbohydrate, protein and chlorophyll biosynthesis. The proteomics-based investigations identified the down-regulation of enzymes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis (porphobilinogen deaminase) and photosynthetic carbon fixation (sedoheptulose-1,7 bisphosphate and phosphoribulokinase). Profound up-regulation of hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrogenase and enoyl-ACP reductase ascertained lipid accumulation. The carbon skeletons to be integrated into lipid precursors were regenerated by glycolysis, β-oxidation and TCA cycle. The enhanced expression of glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway enzymes indicates heightened energy needs of FC2 cells for the sustenance of N-starvation. FC2 cells strategically reserved nitrogen by incorporating it into the TCA-cycle intermediates to form amino acids; particularly the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glutamate, aspartate and arginine were up-regulated. Regulation of arginine, superoxide dismutase, thioredoxin-peroxiredoxin, lipocalin, serine-hydroxymethyltransferase, cysteine synthase, and octanoyltransferase play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis during N-starvation. These findings may provide a rationale for genetic engineering of microalgae, which may enable synchronized biomass and lipid synthesis. PMID:28378827

  13. Real-time iTRAQ-based proteome profiling revealed the central metabolism involved in nitrogen starvation induced lipid accumulation in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vineeta; Muthuraj, Muthusivaramapandian; Gandhi, Mayuri N; Das, Debasish; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2017-04-05

    To understand the post-transcriptional molecular mechanisms attributing to oleaginousness in microalgae challenged with nitrogen starvation (N-starvation), the longitudinal proteome dynamics of Chlorella sp. FC2 IITG was investigated using multipronged quantitative proteomics and multiple reaction monitoring assays. Physiological data suggested a remarkably enhanced lipid accumulation with concomitant reduction in carbon flux towards carbohydrate, protein and chlorophyll biosynthesis. The proteomics-based investigations identified the down-regulation of enzymes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis (porphobilinogen deaminase) and photosynthetic carbon fixation (sedoheptulose-1,7 bisphosphate and phosphoribulokinase). Profound up-regulation of hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydrogenase and enoyl-ACP reductase ascertained lipid accumulation. The carbon skeletons to be integrated into lipid precursors were regenerated by glycolysis, β-oxidation and TCA cycle. The enhanced expression of glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway enzymes indicates heightened energy needs of FC2 cells for the sustenance of N-starvation. FC2 cells strategically reserved nitrogen by incorporating it into the TCA-cycle intermediates to form amino acids; particularly the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glutamate, aspartate and arginine were up-regulated. Regulation of arginine, superoxide dismutase, thioredoxin-peroxiredoxin, lipocalin, serine-hydroxymethyltransferase, cysteine synthase, and octanoyltransferase play a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis during N-starvation. These findings may provide a rationale for genetic engineering of microalgae, which may enable synchronized biomass and lipid synthesis.

  14. Mammalian autophagy is essential for hepatic and renal ketogenesis during starvation

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Kondo, Motoyuki; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Hisazumi; Araki, Shin-ichi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Chano, Tokuhiro; Matsusaka, Taiji; Nagao, Kenji; Adachi, Yusuke; Chan, Lawrence; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system activated, across species, by starvation. Although accumulating evidence has shown that mammalian autophagy is involved in pathogenesis of several modern diseases, its physiological role to combat starvation has not been fully clarified. In this study, we analysed starvation-induced gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis in mouse strains lacking autophagy in liver, skeletal muscle or kidney. Autophagy-deficiency in any tissue had no effect on gluconeogenesis during starvation. Though skeletal muscle- and kidney-specific autophagy-deficiency did not alter starvation-induced increases in blood ketone levels, liver-specific autophagy-deficiency significantly attenuated this effect. Interestingly, renal as well as hepatic expression of HMG-CoA synthase 2 increased with prolonged starvation. Furthermore, during starvation, mice lacking autophagy both in liver and kidney showed even lower blood ketone levels and physical activity than mice lacking autophagy only in liver. Starvation induced massive lipid droplet formation in extra-adipose tissues including liver and kidney, which was essential for ketogenesis. Moreover, this process was impaired in the autophagy-deficient liver and kidney. These findings demonstrate that hepatic and renal autophagy are essential for starvation-induced lipid droplet formation and subsequent ketogenesis and, ultimately, for maintaining systemic energy homeostasis. Our findings provide novel biological insights into adaptive mechanisms to combat starvation in mammals. PMID:26732653

  15. Transcriptomic profiles of the smoke tree wilt fungus Verticillium dahliae under nutrient starvation stresses.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dianguang; Wang, Yonglin; Tian, Chengming

    2015-10-01

    Verticillium dahliae is a notorious plant pathogen that causes vascular wilt on more than 200 plant species. During plant infection, efficient pathogen nutrition during the interaction with the host is a requisite for successful infection. However, little attention has been focused on nutrient uptake and starvation responses in this fungus. Here, we used RNA-Seq to analyze the response of V. dahliae to nutrient starvation, including carbon and nitrogen depletion. Gene expression profile analysis showed that 1854 genes were differentially expressed under carbon starvation (852 upregulated and 539 downregulated genes) and nitrogen starvation (487 upregulated and 291 downregulated genes). Among the differentially expressed genes, genes involved in utilization or production acetyl-CoA, including glycolysis, fatty acid biosynthesis or metabolism, and melanin biosynthesis, were repressed under carbon starvation, whereas melanin biosynthesis genes were strongly induced under nitrogen starvation. These results, combined with VDH1 expression data, suggested that melanin biosynthesis and microsclerotia development were induced under nitrogen starvation, but microsclerotia development was suppressed under carbon starvation. Furthermore, many genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes and secreted proteins were induced under carbon starvation. Overall, the results improve our understanding of the response of V. dahliae to nutrient starvation and help to identify potential virulence factors for the development of novel disease control strategies.

  16. The Two-Component System ArlRS and Alterations in Metabolism Enable Staphylococcus aureus to Resist Calprotectin-Induced Manganese Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Radin, Jana N.; Párraga Solórzano, Paola K.; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    During infection the host imposes manganese and zinc starvation on invading pathogens. Despite this, Staphylococcus aureus and other successful pathogens remain capable of causing devastating disease. However, how these invaders adapt to host-imposed metal starvation and overcome nutritional immunity remains unknown. We report that ArlRS, a global staphylococcal virulence regulator, enhances the ability of S. aureus to grow in the presence of the manganese-and zinc-binding innate immune effector calprotectin. Utilization of calprotectin variants with altered metal binding properties revealed that strains lacking ArlRS are specifically more sensitive to manganese starvation. Loss of ArlRS did not alter the expression of manganese importers or prevent S. aureus from acquiring metals. It did, however, alter staphylococcal metabolism and impair the ability of S. aureus to grow on amino acids. Further studies suggested that relative to consuming glucose, the preferred carbon source of S. aureus, utilizing amino acids reduced the cellular demand for manganese. When forced to use glucose as the sole carbon source S. aureus became more sensitive to calprotectin compared to when amino acids are provided. Infection experiments utilizing wild type and calprotectin-deficient mice, which have defects in manganese sequestration, revealed that ArlRS is important for disease when manganese availability is restricted but not when this essential nutrient is freely available. In total, these results indicate that altering cellular metabolism contributes to the ability of pathogens to resist manganese starvation and that ArlRS enables S. aureus to overcome nutritional immunity by facilitating this adaptation. PMID:27902777

  17. Characterization of the starvation-induced chitinase CfcA and α-1,3-glucanase AgnB of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    van Munster, Jolanda M; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Veloo, Ruud; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2015-03-01

    The common saprophyte Aspergillus niger may experience carbon starvation in nature as well as during industrial fermentations. Starvation survival strategies, such as conidiation or the formation of exploratory hyphae, require energy and building blocks, which may be supplied by autolysis. Glycoside hydrolases are key effectors of autolytic degradation of fungal cell walls, but knowledge on their identity and functionality is still limited. We recently identified agnB and cfcA as two genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes that had notably increased transcription during carbon starvation in A. niger. Here, we report the biochemical and functional characterization of these enzymes. AgnB is an α-1,3-glucanase that releases glucose from α-1,3-glucan substrates with a minimum degree of polymerization of 4. CfcA is a chitinase that releases dimers from the nonreducing end of chitin. These enzymes thus attack polymers that are found in the fungal cell wall and may have a role in autolytic fungal cell wall degradation in A. niger. Indeed, cell wall degradation during carbon starvation was reduced in the double deletion mutant ΔcfcA ΔagnB compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, the cell walls of the carbon-starved mycelium of the mutant contained a higher fraction of chitin or chitosan. The function of at least one of these enzymes, CfcA, therefore appears to be in the recycling of cell wall carbohydrates under carbon limiting conditions. CfcA thus may be a candidate effector for on demand cell lysis, which could be employed in industrial processes for recovery of intracellular products.

  18. The activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in rat tissues. Assay techniques and effects of dietary and hormonal changes

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, Christopher I.; Smith, Stephen A.

    1975-01-01

    1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was assayed by three methods: (i) incorporation of H14CO3− into oxaloacetate: (ii) conversion of oxaloacetate into phosphoenolpyruvate, subsequently assayed enzymically; and (iii) transfer of 32P from [γ-32P]GTP to oxaloacetate. 2. Enzyme activity is increased in liver and epididymal adipose tissue in alloxan-diabetes and starvation, and in kidney in starved, acidotic and steroid-treated animals. 3. The ratios of the `back' to the `forward' reactions in liver, kidney and epididymal adipose tissue are different and characteristic of each tissue; they differ markedly from values reported for the purified mitochondrial enzyme. 4. The ratio of the `back' to `forward' reaction in any one tissue is constant in adrenalectomized, diabetic, acidotic and steroid-treated animals. 5. In starved animals, the ratio is increased in liver and kidney, but decreased in epididymal adipose tissue. 6. Administration of l-tryptophan results in an acute (1h) increase in activity measured in the `forward' direction alone in liver and epididymal adipose tissue, but not in kidney. PMID:1220693

  19. dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR Signaling Mediate Cell-Nonautonomous Effects of daf-16/FOXO on Starvation-Induced Developmental Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brad T.; Jordan, James M.; Maxwell, Colin S.; Schindler, Adam J.; Baugh, L. Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient availability has profound influence on development. In the nematode C. elegans, nutrient availability governs post-embryonic development. L1-stage larvae remain in a state of developmental arrest after hatching until they feed. This “L1 arrest” (or "L1 diapause") is associated with increased stress resistance, supporting starvation survival. Loss of the transcription factor daf-16/FOXO, an effector of insulin/IGF signaling, results in arrest-defective and starvation-sensitive phenotypes. We show that daf-16/FOXO regulates L1 arrest cell-nonautonomously, suggesting that insulin/IGF signaling regulates at least one additional signaling pathway. We used mRNA-seq to identify candidate signaling molecules affected by daf-16/FOXO during L1 arrest. dbl-1/TGF-β, a ligand for the Sma/Mab pathway, daf-12/NHR and daf-36/oxygenase, an upstream component of the daf-12 steroid hormone signaling pathway, were up-regulated during L1 arrest in a daf-16/FOXO mutant. Using genetic epistasis analysis, we show that dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR steroid hormone signaling pathways are required for the daf-16/FOXO arrest-defective phenotype, suggesting that daf-16/FOXO represses dbl-1/TGF-β, daf-12/NHR and daf-36/oxygenase. The dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR pathways have not previously been shown to affect L1 development, but we found that disruption of these pathways delayed L1 development in fed larvae, consistent with these pathways promoting development in starved daf-16/FOXO mutants. Though the dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR pathways are epistatic to daf-16/FOXO for the arrest-defective phenotype, disruption of these pathways does not suppress starvation sensitivity of daf-16/FOXO mutants. This observation uncouples starvation survival from developmental arrest, indicating that DAF-16/FOXO targets distinct effectors for each phenotype and revealing that inappropriate development during starvation does not cause the early demise of daf-16/FOXO mutants. Overall, this study

  20. Stable isotopes may provide evidence for starvation in reptiles.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Pollock, Erik D

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies have attempted to correlate stable isotope signatures of tissues with the nutritional condition of birds, mammals, fishes, and invertebrates. Unfortunately, very little is known about the relationship between food limitation and the isotopic composition of reptiles. We examined the effects that starvation has on delta13C and delta15N signatures in the tissues (excreta, carcass, scales, and claws) of six, distantly related squamate reptiles (gaboon vipers, Bitis gabonica; ball pythons, Python regius; ratsnakes, Elaphe obsoleta; boa constrictors, Boa constrictor; western diamondback rattlesnakes, Crotalus atrox, and savannah monitor lizards, Varanus exanthematicus). Analyses revealed that the isotopic composition of reptile carcasses did not change significantly in response to bouts of starvation lasting up to 168 days. In contrast, the isotopic signatures of reptile excreta became significantly enriched in 15N and depleted in 13C during starvation. The isotopic signatures of reptile scales and lizard claws were less indicative of starvation time than those of excreta. We discuss the physiological mechanisms that might be responsible for the starvation-induced changes in 13C and 15N signatures in the excreta, and present a mixing model to describe the shift in excreted nitrogen source pools (i.e. from a labile source pool to a nonlabile source pool) that apparently occurs during starvation in these animals. The results of this study suggest that naturally occurring stable isotopes might ultimately have some utility for characterizing nitrogen and carbon stress among free-living reptiles.

  1. Regulation of phosphate starvation responses in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao Juan; Finnegan, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting mineral nutrient for plant growth. Many soils worldwide are deficient in soluble inorganic phosphate (Pi), the form of P most readily absorbed and utilized by plants. A network of elaborate developmental and biochemical adaptations has evolved in plants to enhance Pi acquisition and avoid starvation. Scope Controlling the deployment of adaptations used by plants to avoid Pi starvation requires a sophisticated sensing and regulatory system that can integrate external and internal information regarding Pi availability. In this review, the current knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms that control Pi starvation responses and the local and long-distance signals that may trigger Pi starvation responses are discussed. Uncharacterized mutants that have Pi-related phenotypes and their potential to give us additional insights into regulatory pathways and Pi starvation-induced signalling are also highlighted and assessed. Conclusions An impressive list of factors that regulate Pi starvation responses is now available, as is a good deal of knowledge regarding the local and long-distance signals that allow a plant to sense and respond to Pi availability. However, we are only beginning to understand how these factors and signals are integrated with one another in a regulatory web able to control the range of responses demonstrated by plants grown in low Pi environments. Much more knowledge is needed in this agronomically important area before real gains can be made in improving Pi acquisition in crop plants. PMID:20181569

  2. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  3. The carbon starvation response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus.

    PubMed

    Ellström, Magnus; Shah, Firoz; Johansson, Tomas; Ahrén, Dag; Persson, Per; Tunlid, Anders

    2015-04-01

    The amounts of carbon allocated to the fungal partner in ectomycorrhizal associations can vary substantially depending on the plant growth and the soil nutrient conditions, and the fungus may frequently be confronted with limitations in carbon. We used chemical analysis and transcriptome profiling to examine the physiological response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus to carbon starvation during axenic cultivation. Carbon starvation induced a decrease in the biomass. Concomitantly, ammonium, cell wall material (chitin) and proteolytic enzymes were released into the medium, which suggest autolysis. Compared with the transcriptome of actively growing hyphae, about 45% of the transcripts analyzed were differentially regulated during C-starvation. Induced during starvation were transcripts encoding extracellular enzymes such as peptidases, chitinases and laccases. In parallel, transcripts of N-transporters were upregulated, which suggest that some of the released nitrogen compounds were re-assimilated by the mycelium. The observed changes suggest that the carbon starvation response in P. involutus is associated with complex cellular changes that involves autolysis, recycling of intracellular compounds by autophagy and reabsorption of the extracellular released material. The study provides molecular markers that can be used to examine the role of autolysis for the turnover and survival of the ectomycorrhizal mycelium in soils.

  4. The carbon starvation response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus

    PubMed Central

    Ellström, Magnus; Shah, Firoz; Johansson, Tomas; Ahrén, Dag; Persson, Per; Tunlid, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The amounts of carbon allocated to the fungal partner in ectomycorrhizal associations can vary substantially depending on the plant growth and the soil nutrient conditions, and the fungus may frequently be confronted with limitations in carbon. We used chemical analysis and transcriptome profiling to examine the physiological response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus to carbon starvation during axenic cultivation. Carbon starvation induced a decrease in the biomass. Concomitantly, ammonium, cell wall material (chitin) and proteolytic enzymes were released into the medium, which suggest autolysis. Compared with the transcriptome of actively growing hyphae, about 45% of the transcripts analyzed were differentially regulated during C-starvation. Induced during starvation were transcripts encoding extracellular enzymes such as peptidases, chitinases and laccases. In parallel, transcripts of N-transporters were upregulated, which suggest that some of the released nitrogen compounds were re-assimilated by the mycelium. The observed changes suggest that the carbon starvation response in P. involutus is associated with complex cellular changes that involves autolysis, recycling of intracellular compounds by autophagy and reabsorption of the extracellular released material. The study provides molecular markers that can be used to examine the role of autolysis for the turnover and survival of the ectomycorrhizal mycelium in soils. PMID:25778509

  5. The carbon starvation response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus

    DOE PAGES

    Ellstrom, Magnus; Shah, Firoz; Johansson, Tomas; ...

    2015-03-16

    The amounts of carbon allocated to the fungal partner in ectomycorrhizal associations can vary substantially depending on the plant growth and the soil nutrient conditions, and the fungus may frequently be confronted with limitations in carbon. We used chemical analysis and transcriptome profiling to examine the physiological response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus to carbon starvation during axenic cultivation. Carbon starvation induced a decrease in the biomass. Concomitantly, ammonium, cell wall material (chitin) and proteolytic enzymes were released into the medium, which suggest autolysis. Compared with the transcriptome of actively growing hyphae, about 45% of the transcripts analyzed weremore » differentially regulated during C-starvation. Induced during starvation were transcripts encoding extracellular enzymes such as peptidases, chitinases and laccases. In parallel, transcripts of N-transporters were upregulated, which suggest that some of the released nitrogen compounds were re-assimilated by the mycelium. The observed changes suggest that the carbon starvation response in P. involutus is associated with complex cellular changes that involves autolysis, recycling of intracellular compounds by autophagy and reabsorption of the extracellular released material. The study provides molecular markers that can be used to examine the role of autolysis for the turnover and survival of the ectomycorrhizal mycelium in soils.« less

  6. The carbon starvation response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus

    SciTech Connect

    Ellstrom, Magnus; Shah, Firoz; Johansson, Tomas; Ahren, Dag; Persson, Per; Tunlid, Anders

    2015-03-16

    The amounts of carbon allocated to the fungal partner in ectomycorrhizal associations can vary substantially depending on the plant growth and the soil nutrient conditions, and the fungus may frequently be confronted with limitations in carbon. We used chemical analysis and transcriptome profiling to examine the physiological response of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus to carbon starvation during axenic cultivation. Carbon starvation induced a decrease in the biomass. Concomitantly, ammonium, cell wall material (chitin) and proteolytic enzymes were released into the medium, which suggest autolysis. Compared with the transcriptome of actively growing hyphae, about 45% of the transcripts analyzed were differentially regulated during C-starvation. Induced during starvation were transcripts encoding extracellular enzymes such as peptidases, chitinases and laccases. In parallel, transcripts of N-transporters were upregulated, which suggest that some of the released nitrogen compounds were re-assimilated by the mycelium. The observed changes suggest that the carbon starvation response in P. involutus is associated with complex cellular changes that involves autolysis, recycling of intracellular compounds by autophagy and reabsorption of the extracellular released material. The study provides molecular markers that can be used to examine the role of autolysis for the turnover and survival of the ectomycorrhizal mycelium in soils.

  7. Activating Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in Combination for Improvement of Succinate Production

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zaigao; Zhu, Xinna; Chen, Jing; Li, Qingyan

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation is an important step in the production of succinate by Escherichia coli. Two enzymes, PEP carboxylase (PPC) and PEP carboxykinase (PCK), are responsible for PEP carboxylation. PPC has high substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but wastes the high energy of PEP. PCK has low substrate affinity and catalytic velocity but can conserve the high energy of PEP for ATP formation. In this work, the expression of both the ppc and pck genes was modulated, with multiple regulatory parts of different strengths, in order to investigate the relationship between PPC or PCK activity and succinate production. There was a positive correlation between PCK activity and succinate production. In contrast, there was a positive correlation between PPC activity and succinate production only when PPC activity was within a certain range; excessive PPC activity decreased the rates of both cell growth and succinate formation. These two enzymes were also activated in combination in order to recruit the advantages of each for the improvement of succinate production. It was demonstrated that PPC and PCK had a synergistic effect in improving succinate production. PMID:23747698

  8. Severe starvation hypoglycemia and congestive heart failure induced by thyroid crisis, with accidentally induced severe liver dysfunction and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Chiaki; Sasaki, Hideo; Kosuge, Keiichiro; Miyakita, Yasushi; Hayakawa, Masahumi; Suzuki, Akiko; Abe, Eri; Suzuki, Katsunori; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2005-03-01

    A 69-year-old woman caught a cold resulting in nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and severe anorexia. Then she suffered progressively from dyspnea and leg edema, and finally became delirious. On admission severe hypoglycemia, hypothermia, marked tachycardia, generalized edema, mild jaundice and cachexy were noted. EKG showed atrial fibrillation. A chest X-ray, chest CT and echocardiography showed congestive heart failure. Therapeutic use of diuretics induced shock leading to serious liver dysfunction and disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, combined therapy by intravenous glucose, digitalis, diuretics, anti-fibrinolytic drug and hydrocortisone were effective. Addition of antithyroid therapy brought a further favorable outcome.

  9. The starvation-stress response (SSR) of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Spector, M P

    1998-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are common etiologic agents of intestinal-based disease of animals and humans. As a result of their lifestyle, salmonellae occupy and survive in a wide range of niches where they can encounter an even broader range of environmental stresses. One of the most common stresses is starvation for an essential nutrient such as a carbon/energy (C)-source. The genetic and physiologic changes that the bacterium undergoes in response to starvation-stress are referred to as the starvation-stress response or SSR. The genetic loci whose expression increases in response to the starvation-stress compose the SSR stimulon. Several loci of the SSR stimulon have been identified in Salmonella typhimurium and grouped, based on putative or known functions or products, into transport systems, C-compound catabolic enzymes, known protective enzymes, respiratory enzyme systems, regulatory proteins, virulence loci and unclassified products. The majority of loci identified are under positive control by the rpoS-encoded sigma factor, sigma S. However, a few are under (indirect) negative control by sigma S, but only during starvation-induced stationary phase. Most of the loci identified are also under either positive or negative control by the cAMP:CRP complex. For many, additional regulatory proteins (e.g. FadR, OxyR, and RelA and others) play a role in their regulation as well. Furthermore, most of the SSR loci identified are induced during other stresses or environmental conditions. For example, some are induced during P- or N-starvation, in addition to C-starvation; some are induced by extremes in pH or osmolarity; and some are induced in the intracellular environment of epithelial cells, and/or macrophages, and/or medium designed to mimic the intracellular milieu of mammalian cells (ISM). Several SSR loci are required for long-term starvation-survival (core SSR loci), e.g. narZ, dadA, stiC and rpoS. In addition, a few of the core SSR loci are also required for stress-specific-inducible

  10. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit during development.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert P; Battistelli, Alberto; Moscatello, Stefano; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Leegood, Richard C; Famiani, Franco

    2011-11-01

    In this study the abundance and location of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was determined in the flesh and skin of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivar Durone Nero II during development. PEPCK was not present in young fruit but appeared in both tissues as the fruit increased in size. In these there was no net dissimilation of malic acid, which accounts for the bulk of their organic acid contents when PEPCK was present. To assist in understanding the function of PEPCK, the abundance of a number of other enzymes was determined. These enzymes were aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT), glutamine synthetase (GS), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), pyruvate, orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco). A potential role for PEPCK in the regulation of pH and the utilization of malate in gluconeogenesis in the flesh and skin of cherries is presented.

  11. Nitrogen Sparing Induced by a Mixture of Essential Amino Acids Given Chiefly as Their Keto-Analogues during Prolonged Starvation in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sapir, Daniel G.; Owen, Oliver E.; Pozefsky, Thomas; Walser, Mackenzie

    1974-01-01

    11 normal obese subjects were fasted for 33 days. In five, who served as controls, urine urea nitrogen excretion remained constant for 2 wk thereafter. The other six were given seven daily infusions containing 6-8 mmol each of the α-keto-analogues of valine, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, and methionine (as sodium salts) plus 3-4 mmol each of the remaining essential amino acids (lysine, threonine, tryptophan, and histidine). Rapid amination of the infused ketoacids occurred, as indicated by significant increases in plasma concentrations of valine, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, phenylalanine, and methionine. Glutamine, glycine, serine, glutamate, and taurine fell significantly. Blood glucose, ketone bodies, plasma free fatty acids, and serum immunoreactive insulin concentrations were unaltered. Urine urea nitrogen fell from 1.46 to 0.89 g/day on the last day of infusions; 5 days later it was still lower (0.63 g/day) and in two subjects studied for 9 and 17 days postinfusion it remained below preinfusion control values. Urine ammonia, creatinine, and uric acid were unaltered. Nitrogen balance became less negative during and after infusions. The results indicate that this mixture of essential amino acids and their keto-analogues facilitates nitrogen sparing during prolonged starvation, in part by conversion of the ketoacids to amino acids and in part by altering mechanisms of nitrogen conservation. The latter effect persists after the ketoacids are metabolized. PMID:4430727

  12. Global Proteomics Analysis of the Response to Starvation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Larance, Mark; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Wang, Bin; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Kent, Robert; Lamond, Angus I; Gartner, Anton

    2015-07-01

    Periodic starvation of animals induces large shifts in metabolism but may also influence many other cellular systems and can lead to adaption to prolonged starvation conditions. To date, there is limited understanding of how starvation affects gene expression, particularly at the protein level. Here, we have used mass-spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics to identify global changes in the Caenorhabditis elegans proteome due to acute starvation of young adult animals. Measuring changes in the abundance of over 5,000 proteins, we show that acute starvation rapidly alters the levels of hundreds of proteins, many involved in central metabolic pathways, highlighting key regulatory responses. Surprisingly, we also detect changes in the abundance of chromatin-associated proteins, including specific linker histones, histone variants, and histone posttranslational modifications associated with the epigenetic control of gene expression. To maximize community access to these data, they are presented in an online searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/).

  13. Global Proteomics Analysis of the Response to Starvation in C. elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Wang, Bin; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Kent, Robert; Lamond, Angus I.; Gartner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Periodic starvation of animals induces large shifts in metabolism but may also influence many other cellular systems and can lead to adaption to prolonged starvation conditions. To date, there is limited understanding of how starvation affects gene expression, particularly at the protein level. Here, we have used mass-spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics to identify global changes in the Caenorhabditis elegans proteome due to acute starvation of young adult animals. Measuring changes in the abundance of over 5,000 proteins, we show that acute starvation rapidly alters the levels of hundreds of proteins, many involved in central metabolic pathways, highlighting key regulatory responses. Surprisingly, we also detect changes in the abundance of chromatin-associated proteins, including specific linker histones, histone variants, and histone posttranslational modifications associated with the epigenetic control of gene expression. To maximize community access to these data, they are presented in an online searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). PMID:25963834

  14. Amino Acid Starvation Induced by Protease Inhibition Produces Differential Alterations in Redox Status and the Thiol Proteome in Organogenesis-Stage Rat Embryos and Visceral Yolk Sacs

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Craig; Jilek, Joseph L.; Sant, Karilyn E.; Pohl, Jan; Reed, Matthew; Hansen, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    The process of embryonic nutrition in rodent conceptuses during organogenesis has been shown to involve a dominant histiotrophic mechanism where essential developmental substrates and micronutrients are supplied as whole maternal proteins or cargoes associated with proteins. The histiotrophic nutrition pathways (HNP) responsible for uptake and initial processing of proteins across maternal-conceptal interfaces involve uptake via receptor mediated endocytosis and protein degradation via lysosomal proteolysis. Chemical inhibition of either process can lead to growth deficits and malformation in the embryo (EMB), but selective inhibition of either HNP component will elicit a different subset of developmental perturbations. In vitro, whole embryo culture (WEC) exposure of GD10 or GD11 rat conceptuses to the natural protease inhibitor, leupeptin, leads to significant reductions in all measured embryonic growth parameters as well as a myriad of other effects. Leupeptin doses of 10 μM or 20 μM over a 26 hr period (GD10-GD11) and 50 μM over a 3 hr pulse period produced significant decreases in the clearance of FITC-albumin from culture media. The near complete loss of acid soluble fluorescence and increased total visceral yolk sac (VYS) protein content confirmed the selective inhibition of proteolysis. Inhibition of lysosomal proteolysis thus deprives the developing EMB of essential nutrient amino acids producing conditions akin to amino acid starvation, but may also cause direct effects on pathways critical for normal growth and differentiation. Following leupeptin exposure for 26 or 6 hr, total glutathione (GSH) concentrations dropped significantly in the VYS, but only slightly in yolk sac (YSF) and amniotic (AF) fluids. Cys concentrations increased in VYS and EMB, but dropped in YSF and AF fluids. Redox potentials (Eh) for the GSSG/GSH redox couple trended significantly toward the positive, confirming the net oxidation of conceptual tissues following leupeptin

  15. Identification of Phosphatin, a Drug Alleviating Phosphate Starvation Responses in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Carole; Clément, Mathilde; Thibaud, Marie-Christine; Javot, Hélène; Chiarenza, Serge; Delannoy, Etienne; Revol, Julia; Soreau, Paul; Balzergue, Sandrine; Block, Maryse A.; Maréchal, Eric; Desnos, Thierry; Nussaume, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is present in most soils at suboptimal concentrations, strongly limiting plant development. Plants have the ability to sense and adapt to the surrounding ionic environment, and several genes involved in the response to Pi starvation have been identified. However, a global understanding of the regulatory mechanisms involved in this process is still elusive. Here, we have initiated a chemical genetics approach and isolated compounds that inhibit the response to Pi starvation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Molecules were screened for their ability to inhibit the expression of a Pi starvation marker gene (the high-affinity Pi transporter PHT1;4). A drug family named Phosphatin (PTN; Pi starvation inhibitor), whose members act as partial suppressors of Pi starvation responses, was thus identified. PTN addition also reduced various traits of Pi starvation, such as phospholipid/glycolipid conversion, and the accumulation of starch and anthocyanins. A transcriptomic assay revealed a broad impact of PTN on the expression of many genes regulated by low Pi availability. Despite the reduced amount of Pi transporters and resulting reduced Pi uptake capacity, no reduction of Pi content was observed. In addition, PTN improved plant growth; this reveals that the developmental restrictions induced by Pi starvation are not a consequence of metabolic limitation but a result of genetic regulation. This highlights the existence of signal transduction pathway(s) that limit plant development under the Pi starvation condition. PMID:25209983

  16. Nitrate Starvation Induced Changes in Root System Architecture, Carbon:Nitrogen Metabolism, and miRNA Expression in Nitrogen-Responsive Wheat Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Subodh Kumar; Rani, Manju; Bansal, Niketa; Gayatri; Venkatesh, K; Mandal, P K

    2015-11-01

    Improvement of nutrient use efficiency in cereal crops is highly essential not only to reduce the cost of cultivation but also to save the environmental pollution, reduce energy consumption for production of these chemical fertilizers, improve soil health, and ultimately help in mitigating climate change. In the present investigation, we have studied the morphological (with special emphasis on root system architecture) and biochemical responses (in terms of assay of the key enzymes involved in N assimilation) of two N-responsive wheat genotypes, at the seedling stage, under nitrate-optimum and nitrate-starved conditions grown in hydroponics. Expression profile of a few known wheat micro RNAs (miRNAs) was also studied in the root tissue. Total root size, primary root length, and first- and second-order lateral root numbers responded significantly under nitrate-starved condition. Morphological parameters in terms of root and shoot length and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots have also been observed to be significant between N-optimum and N-starved condition for each genotypes. Nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthatase (GS), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity significantly decreased under N-starved condition. Glutamine oxoglutarate amino transferase (GOGAT) and pyruvate kinase (PK) activity was found to be genotype dependent. Most of the selected miRNAs were expressed in root tissues, and some of them showed their differential N-responsive expression. Our studies indicate that one of the N-responsive genotype (NP-890) did not get affected significantly under nitrogen starvation at seedling stage.

  17. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Yaicha D.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Timofeeff, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea—microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich) and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena) sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media) from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation) in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1

  18. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Winters, Yaicha D; Lowenstein, Tim K; Timofeeff, Michael N

    2015-11-12

    Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea-microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich) and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena) sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media) from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation) in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1

  19. Structural and functional studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Machová, Iva; Snášel, Jan; Dostál, Jiří; Brynda, Jiří; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Singh, Mahavir; Tarábek, Ján; Vaněk, Ondřej; Bednárová, Lucie; Pichová, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, the second leading infectious disease killer after HIV, remains a top public health priority. The causative agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which can cause both acute and clinically latent infections, reprograms metabolism in response to the host niche. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck) is the enzyme at the center of the phosphoenolpyruvate-pyruvate-oxaloacetate node, which is involved in regulating the carbon flow distribution to catabolism, anabolism, or respiration in different states of Mtb infection. Under standard growth conditions, Mtb Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis and catalyzes the metal-dependent formation of phosphoenolpyruvate. In non-replicating Mtb, Pck can catalyze anaplerotic biosynthesis of oxaloacetate. Here, we present insights into the regulation of Mtb Pck activity by divalent cations. Through analysis of the X-ray structure of Pck-GDP and Pck-GDP-Mn2+ complexes, mutational analysis of the GDP binding site, and quantum mechanical (QM)-based analysis, we explored the structural determinants of efficient Mtb Pck catalysis. We demonstrate that Mtb Pck requires presence of Mn2+ and Mg2+ cations for efficient catalysis of gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reactions. The anaplerotic reaction, which preferably functions in reducing conditions that are characteristic for slowed or stopped Mtb replication, is also effectively activated by Fe2+ in the presence of Mn2+ or Mg2+ cations. In contrast, simultaneous presence of Fe2+ and Mn2+ or Mg2+ inhibits the gluconeogenic reaction. These results suggest that inorganic ions can contribute to regulation of central carbon metabolism by influencing the activity of Pck. Furthermore, the X-ray structure determination, biochemical characterization, and QM analysis of Pck mutants confirmed the important role of the Phe triad for proper binding of the GDP-Mn2+ complex in the nucleotide binding site and efficient catalysis of the anaplerotic reaction.

  20. Glyceroneogenesis in the hepatopancreas of the crab Neohelice granulata: Diet, starvation and season effects.

    PubMed

    Sarapio, E; Santos, J T; Model, J F A; De Fraga, L S; Vinagre, A S; Martins, T L; Da Silva, R S M; Trapp, M

    2017-02-22

    We determined the activity of glyceroneogenesis from [2-(14)C]-pyruvate, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity, [2-(14)C]-pyruvate oxidation and total lipid levels in the hepatopancreas of the crab Neohelice granulata fed with a carbohydrate-rich (HC) diet or a high-protein (HP) diet and then subjected to 5weeks of starvation, in summer and winter, to determine whether the seasonal adjustments of lipid metabolism to food scarcity are modulated by the composition of the diet previously given to the crabs. The results demonstrated that glyceroneogenesis is an active pathway in N. granulata hepatopancreas, and is regulated by seasonal variations, diet composition and starvation. This study showed that in summer the increase in the hepatopancreas glyceroneogenesis activity is among the strategies used by N. granulata fed an HP diet, to maintain the triglyceride/fatty acid cycle during starvation, a normal condition in the biological cycle of this crab. However, the administration of an HC diet reduced the glyceroneogenesis capacity in response to starvation in summer. In winter, the decrease in the glyceroneogenesis capacity in both fed (HP and HC diets) and starved crabs seems to be a strategy to reduce energy consumption and/or requirement. In contrast to the summer results, the incorporation of [2-(14)C]-pyruvate into (14)CO2 was markedly higher in both diet (HC and HP) groups and in starved crabs during the winter. Four decades after the first study describing the glyceroneogenesis pathway in rat white adipose tissue, this pathway is evidenced for the first time in a crustacean.

  1. Survivorship During Starvation for Cimex lectularius L.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Andrea M; Miller, Dini M; Brewster, Carlyle C

    2011-05-11

    Four bed bug strains (Cimex lectularius) with different levels of pyrethroid resistance were evaluated to determine their ability to survive extended periods of starvation. First instar bed bugs of all strains were the most vulnerable to starvation (13.8-36.3 days mean survival time). Fifth instars and adults survived the longest during starvation (41.5-142.6 days). Significant differences in survivorship during starvation were observed between resistant and susceptible strains of bed bugs. Overall, all immature and adult stages of the resistant bed bug strains had significantly shorter survival times than those of the susceptible strains (P < 0.05).

  2. Survivorship During Starvation for Cimex lectularius L.

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Andrea M.; Miller, Dini M.; Brewster, Carlyle C.

    2011-01-01

    Four bed bug strains (Cimex lectularius) with different levels of pyrethroid resistance were evaluated to determine their ability to survive extended periods of starvation. First instar bed bugs of all strains were the most vulnerable to starvation (13.8–36.3 days mean survival time). Fifth instars and adults survived the longest during starvation (41.5–142.6 days). Significant differences in survivorship during starvation were observed between resistant and susceptible strains of bed bugs. Overall, all immature and adult stages of the resistant bed bug strains had significantly shorter survival times than those of the susceptible strains (P < 0.05). PMID:26467625

  3. Plasmodium falciparum Maf1 Confers Survival upon Amino Acid Starvation

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Kyle Jarrod

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) pathway is a highly conserved signaling pathway across eukaryotes that integrates nutrient and stress signals to regulate the cellular growth rate and the transition into and maintenance of dormancy. The majority of the pathway’s components, including the central TOR kinase, have been lost in the apicomplexan lineage, and it is unknown how these organisms detect and respond to nutrient starvation in its absence. Plasmodium falciparum encodes a putative ortholog of the RNA polymerase (Pol) III repressor Maf1, which has been demonstrated to modulate Pol III transcription in a TOR-dependent manner in a number of organisms. Here, we investigate the role of P. falciparum Maf1 (PfMaf1) in regulating RNA Pol III expression under conditions of nutrient starvation and other stresses. Using a transposon insertion mutant with an altered Maf1 expression profile, we demonstrated that proper Maf1 expression is necessary for survival of the dormancy-like state induced by prolonged amino acid starvation and is needed for full recovery from other stresses that slow or stall the parasite cell cycle. This Maf1 mutant is defective in the downregulation of pre-tRNA synthesis under nutrient-limiting conditions, indicating that the function of Maf1 as a stress-responsive regulator of structural RNA transcription is conserved in P. falciparum. Recent work has demonstrated that parasites carrying artemisinin-resistant K13 alleles display an enhanced ability to recover from drug-induced growth retardation. We show that one such artemisinin-resistant line displays greater regulation of pre-tRNA expression and higher survival upon prolonged amino acid starvation, suggesting that overlapping, PfMaf1-associated pathways may regulate growth recovery from both artemisinin treatment and amino acid starvation. PMID:28351924

  4. Phosphite, an Analog of Phosphate, Suppresses the Coordinated Expression of Genes under Phosphate Starvation1

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, Deepa K.; Karthikeyan, Athikkattuvalasu S.; Matilda, Paino Durzo; Raghothama, Kashchandra G.

    2002-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) and its analog phosphite (Phi) are acquired by plants via Pi transporters. Although the uptake and mobility of Phi and Pi are similar, there is no evidence suggesting that plants can utilize Phi as a sole source of phosphorus. Phi is also known to interfere with many of the Pi starvation responses in plants and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). In this study, effects of Phi on plant growth and coordinated expression of genes induced by Pi starvation were analyzed. Phi suppressed many of the Pi starvation responses that are commonly observed in plants. Enhanced root growth and root to shoot ratio, a hallmark of Pi stress response, was strongly inhibited by Phi. The negative effects of Phi were not obvious in plants supplemented with Pi. The expression of Pi starvation-induced genes such as LePT1, LePT2, AtPT1, and AtPT2 (high-affinity Pi transporters); LePS2 (a novel acid phosphatase); LePS3 and TPSI1 (novel genes); and PAP1 (purple acid phosphatase) was suppressed by Phi in plants and cell cultures. Expression of luciferase reporter gene driven by the Pi starvation-induced AtPT2 promoter was also suppressed by Phi. These analyses showed that suppression of Pi starvation-induced genes is an early response to addition of Phi. These data also provide evidence that Phi interferes with gene expression at the level of transcription. Synchronized suppression of multiple Pi starvation-induced genes by Phi points to its action on the early molecular events, probably signal transduction, in Pi starvation response. PMID:12114577

  5. Transcriptome Analysis of Escherichia coli during dGTP Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Itsko, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our laboratory recently discovered that Escherichia coli cells starved for the DNA precursor dGTP are killed efficiently (dGTP starvation) in a manner similar to that described for thymineless death (TLD). Conditions for specific dGTP starvation can be achieved by depriving an E. coli optA1 gpt strain of the purine nucleotide precursor hypoxanthine (Hx). To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying dGTP starvation, we conducted genome-wide gene expression analyses of actively growing optA1 gpt cells subjected to hypoxanthine deprivation for increasing periods. The data show that upon Hx withdrawal, the optA1 gpt strain displays a diminished ability to derepress the de novo purine biosynthesis genes, likely due to internal guanine accumulation. The impairment in fully inducing the purR regulon may be a contributing factor to the lethality of dGTP starvation. At later time points, and coinciding with cell lethality, strong induction of the SOS response was observed, supporting the concept of replication stress as a final cause of death. No evidence was observed in the starved cells for the participation of other stress responses, including the rpoS-mediated global stress response, reinforcing the lack of feedback of replication stress to the global metabolism of the cell. The genome-wide expression data also provide direct evidence for increased genome complexity during dGTP starvation, as a markedly increased gradient was observed for expression of genes located near the replication origin relative to those located toward the replication terminus. IMPORTANCE Control of the supply of the building blocks (deoxynucleoside triphosphates [dNTPs]) for DNA replication is important for ensuring genome integrity and cell viability. When cells are starved specifically for one of the four dNTPs, dGTP, the process of DNA replication is disturbed in a manner that can lead to eventual death. In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional changes in the

  6. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses to Carbon Starvation in Nongrowing Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Onur; Wels, Michiel; Smid, Eddy J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (μ = 0.0001 h−1) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a recovery period of another 24 h by reinitiating the medium supply to the retentostat culture. During starvation, the viability of the culture was largely retained, and the expression of genes involved in transcription and translational machineries, cell division, and cell membrane energy metabolism was strongly repressed. Expression of these genes was largely recovered following the reinitiation of the medium supply. Starvation triggered the elevated expression of genes associated with synthesis of branched-chain amino acids, histidine, purine, and riboflavin. The expression of these biosynthesis genes was found to remain at an elevated level after reinitiation of the medium supply. In addition, starvation induced the complete gene set predicted to be involved in natural competence in L. lactis KF147, and the elevated expression of these genes was sustained during the subsequent recovery period, but our attempts to experimentally demonstrate natural transformation in these cells failed. Mining the starvation response gene set identified a conserved cis-acting element that resembles the lactococcal CodY motif in the upstream regions of genes associated with transcription and translational machineries, purine biosynthesis, and natural transformation in L. lactis, suggesting a role for CodY in the observed transcriptome adaptations to starvation in nongrowing cells. PMID:25636846

  7. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase and Glucose-6-phosphatase Are Required for Steroidogenesis in Testicular Leydig Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seung Won; Gang, Gil-Tae; Tadi, Surendar; Nedumaran, Balachandar; Kim, Yong Deuk; Park, Ji Hoon; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Lee, Keesook; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Yim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) induces steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and stimulates testosterone production in Leydig cells. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is expressed in Leydig cells, but its role has not been defined. In this study, we found that PEPCK and glucose-6-phosphatase (Glc-6-Pase) are increased significantly following cAMP treatment of mouse Leydig cells. Moreover, cAMP treatment increased recruitment of the cAMP-response element-binding transcription factor and decreased recruitment of the corepressor DAX-1 on the pepck promoter. Furthermore, cAMP induced an increase in ATP that correlated with a decrease in phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In contrast, knockdown or inhibition of PEPCK decreased ATP and increased phospho-AMPK. Treatment with an AMPK activator or overexpression of the constitutively active form of AMPK inhibited cAMP-induced steroidogenic enzyme promoter activities and gene expression. Liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) was involved in cAMP-induced steroidogenic enzyme gene expression but was inhibited by AMPK activation in Leydig cells. Additionally, inhibition or knockdown of PEPCK and Glc-6-Pase decreased cAMP-mediated induction of steroidogenic enzyme gene expression and steroidogenesis. Finally, pubertal mouse (8-week-old) testes and human chorionic gonadotropin-induced prepubertal mouse testes showed increased PEPCK and Glc-6-Pase gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest that induction of PEPCK and Glc-6-Pase by cAMP plays an important role in Leydig cell steroidogenesis. PMID:23074219

  8. Arginine Starvation Impairs Mitochondrial Respiratory Function in ASS1-Deficient Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiyong; Chu, Cheng-Ying; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Xu, Jinghong; Gaur, Shikha; Forman, Henry Jay; Zhang, Hang; Zheng, Shu; Yen, Yun; Huang, Jian; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Ann, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is the principal catabolic response to nutrient starvation and is necessary to clear dysfunctional or damaged organelles, but excessive autophagy can be cytotoxic or cytostatic and contributes to cell death. Depending on the abundance of enzymes involved in molecule biosynthesis, cells can be dependent on uptake of exogenous nutrients to provide these molecules. Argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1) is a key enzyme in arginine biosynthesis, and its abundance is reduced in many solid tumors, making them sensitive to external arginine depletion. We demonstrated that prolonged arginine starvation by exposure to ADI-PEG20 (pegylated arginine deiminase) induced autophagy-dependent death of ASS1-deficient breast cancer cells, because these cells are arginine auxotrophs (dependent on uptake of extracellular arginine). Indeed, these breast cancer cells died in culture when exposed to ADI-PEG20 or cultured in the absence of arginine. Arginine starvation induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, which impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics and integrity. Furthermore, arginine starvation killed breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro only if they were autophagy-competent. Thus, a key mechanism underlying the lethality induced by prolonged arginine starvation was the cytotoxic autophagy that occurred in response to mitochondrial damage. Last, ASS1 was either low in abundance or absent in more than 60% of 149 random breast cancer bio-samples, suggesting that patients with such tumors could be candidates for arginine starvation therapy. PMID:24692592

  9. Octameric structure of Staphylococcus aureus enolase in complex with phosphoenolpyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yunfei; Wang, Chengliang; Lin, Shenglong; Wu, Minhao; Han, Lu; Tian, Changlin; Zhang, Xuan; Zang, Jianye

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium with strong pathogenicity that causes a wide range of infections and diseases. Enolase is an evolutionarily conserved enzyme that plays a key role in energy production through glycolysis. Additionally, enolase is located on the surface of S. aureus and is involved in processes leading to infection. Here, crystal structures of Sa_enolase with and without bound phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) are presented at 1.6 and 2.45 Å resolution, respectively. The structure reveals an octameric arrangement; however, both dimeric and octameric conformations were observed in solution. Furthermore, enzyme-activity assays show that only the octameric variant is catalytically active. Biochemical and structural studies indicate that the octameric form of Sa_enolase is enzymatically active in vitro and likely also in vivo, while the dimeric form is catalytically inactive and may be involved in other biological processes. PMID:26627653

  10. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase as the Sole Anaplerotic Enzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Zelle, Rintze M.; Trueheart, Josh; Harrison, Jacob C.; Pronk, Jack T.; van Maris, Antonius J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase is the sole anaplerotic enzyme in glucose-grown cultures of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pyruvate carboxylase-negative (Pyc−) S. cerevisiae strains cannot grow on glucose unless media are supplemented with C4 compounds, such as aspartic acid. In several succinate-producing prokaryotes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) fulfills this anaplerotic role. However, the S. cerevisiae PEPCK encoded by PCK1 is repressed by glucose and is considered to have a purely decarboxylating and gluconeogenic function. This study investigates whether and under which conditions PEPCK can replace the anaplerotic function of pyruvate carboxylase in S. cerevisiae. Pyc− S. cerevisiae strains constitutively overexpressing the PEPCK either from S. cerevisiae or from Actinobacillus succinogenes did not grow on glucose as the sole carbon source. However, evolutionary engineering yielded mutants able to grow on glucose as the sole carbon source at a maximum specific growth rate of ca. 0.14 h−1, one-half that of the (pyruvate carboxylase-positive) reference strain grown under the same conditions. Growth was dependent on high carbon dioxide concentrations, indicating that the reaction catalyzed by PEPCK operates near thermodynamic equilibrium. Analysis and reverse engineering of two independently evolved strains showed that single point mutations in pyruvate kinase, which competes with PEPCK for phosphoenolpyruvate, were sufficient to enable the use of PEPCK as the sole anaplerotic enzyme. The PEPCK reaction produces one ATP per carboxylation event, whereas the original route through pyruvate kinase and pyruvate carboxylase is ATP neutral. This increased ATP yield may prove crucial for engineering of efficient and low-cost anaerobic production of C4 dicarboxylic acids in S. cerevisiae. PMID:20581175

  11. Role of starvation genes in the survival of deep subsurface bacterial communities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matin, A.; Schmidt, T.; Caldwell, D.

    1998-11-01

    The investigation dealt with several aspects of subsurface bacterial survival and their nature. Mutants of Pseudomonas putida, a common environmental bacterium with counterparts in the subsurface, were isolated by transposon mutagenesis. These mutants were highly sensitive to starvation stress. Reporter gene fusions also showed that these genes were starvation genes since they were induced several fold when the cultures were started. Since the regulatory religions (promoters) of starvation genes are of interest in bioremediation and in experiments designed to understand the roles of starvation genes in the maintenance of microbial community structure, the promoter of one of these genes (pstarv1, contained in strain MK107) was characterized in detail. As a preliminary to these studies, the growth characteristics of Pseudomonas putida MK1 and MK107 were compared for cells growing in batch cultures or as an attached monolayer in microstat cultures.

  12. Resistance of soil microorganisms to starvation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M.; Alexander, M.

    1972-01-01

    Most groups of soil microorganisms died when exposed to prolonged starvation in a carbon-free solution, but the relative abundance of Bacillus and actinomycetes increased with time. Certain nonspore-forming bacteria also persisted. The ability of individual soil isolates to endure starvation in solution was not correlated with their glycogen content or rate of endogenous respiration. However, cells of the resistant populations were rich in poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate, whereas the starvation-susceptible bacteria generally contained little of this substance. Poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate was used rapidly in cells deprived of exogenous sources of carbon.

  13. Cell volume regulates liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase genes.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, S

    1998-03-01

    Hypertonic-induced cell shrinkage increases glucose release in H-4-II-E rat hepatoma cells. This is paralleled by a concomitant increase in the mRNA levels of the rate-limiting enzymes of the pathway of gluconeogenesis, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP), of seven- and fivefold, respectively. In contrast, hypotonic-induced swelling of the cells results in a transient decrease in PCK and FBP mRNAs to 15% and 39% of control levels. The antagonistic effects of hyper- and hypotonicity mimic the counteracting effects of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and insulin on PCK and FBP mRNA levels. The hypertonic-induced increase in mRNA levels is due to an enhanced transcriptional rate, whereas the decrease in mRNAs caused by hypotonicity results from a decrease in transcription as well as mRNA stability. The inductive effect of hypertonicity does not require ongoing protein synthesis and acts independently of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C pathways. These results suggest that cell volume changes in liver cells may play an important role in regulating hepatic glucose metabolism by altered gene expression.

  14. Density dependence in Caenorhabditis larval starvation

    PubMed Central

    Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Avery, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Availability of food is often a limiting factor in nature. Periods of food abundance are followed by times of famine, often in unpredictable patterns. Reliable information about the environment is a critical ingredient of successful survival strategy. One way to improve accuracy is to integrate information communicated by other organisms. To test whether such exchange of information may play a role in determining starvation survival strategies, we studied starvation of L1 larvae in C. elegans and other Caenorhabditis species. We found that some species in genus Caenorhabditis, including C. elegans, survive longer when starved at higher densities, while for others survival is independent of the density. The density effect is mediated by chemical signal(s) that worms release during starvation. This starvation survival signal is independent of ascarosides, a class of small molecules widely used in chemical communication of C. elegans and other nematodes. PMID:24071624

  15. Fermentation of xylose causes inefficient metabolic state due to carbon/energy starvation and reduced glycolytic flux in recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Matsushika, Akinori; Nagashima, Atsushi; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, comprehensive, quantitative metabolome analysis was carried out on the recombinant glucose/xylose-cofermenting S. cerevisiae strain MA-R4 during fermentation with different carbon sources, including glucose, xylose, or glucose/xylose mixtures. Capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to determine the intracellular pools of metabolites from the central carbon pathways, energy metabolism pathways, and the levels of twenty amino acids. When xylose instead of glucose was metabolized by MA-R4, glycolytic metabolites including 3- phosphoglycerate, 2- phosphoglycerate, phosphoenolpyruvate, and pyruvate were dramatically reduced, while conversely, most pentose phosphate pathway metabolites such as sedoheptulose 7- phosphate and ribulose 5-phosphate were greatly increased. These results suggest that the low metabolic activity of glycolysis and the pool of pentose phosphate pathway intermediates are potential limiting factors in xylose utilization. It was further demonstrated that during xylose fermentation, about half of the twenty amino acids declined, and the adenylate/guanylate energy charge was impacted due to markedly decreased adenosine triphosphate/adenosine monophosphate and guanosine triphosphate/guanosine monophosphate ratios, implying that the fermentation of xylose leads to an inefficient metabolic state where the biosynthetic capabilities and energy balance are severely impaired. In addition, fermentation with xylose alone drastically increased the level of citrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and increased the aromatic amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine, strongly supporting the view that carbon starvation was induced. Interestingly, fermentation with xylose alone also increased the synthesis of the polyamine spermidine and its precursor S-adenosylmethionine. Thus, differences in carbon substrates, including glucose and xylose in the fermentation medium, strongly influenced the dynamic metabolism of MA-R4

  16. Transcriptional profile of a myotube starvation model of atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Eric J.; Koncarevic, Alan; Giresi, Paul G.; Jackman, Robert W.; Kandarian, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a pervasive phenomenon that can result from a wide range of pathological conditions as well as from habitual muscular inactivity. The present work describes a cell-culture condition that induces significant atrophy in skeletal muscle C2C12 myotubes. The failure to replenish differentiation media in mature myotubes leads to rapid atrophy (53% in diameter), which is referred to here as starvation. Affymetrix microarrays were used to develop a transcriptional profile of control (fed) vs. atrophied (nonfed) myotubes. Myotube starvation was characterized by an upregulation of genes involved in translational inhibition, amino acid biosynthesis and transport, and cell cycle arrest/apoptosis, among others. Downregulated genes included several structural and regulatory elements of the extracellular matrix as well as several elements of Wnt/frizzled and TGF-beta signaling pathways. Interestingly, the characteristic transcriptional upregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, calpains, and cathepsins known to occur in multiple in vivo models of atrophy were not seen during myotube starvation. With the exception of the downregulation of extracellular matrix genes, serine protease inhibitor genes, and the upregulation of the translation initiation factor PHAS-I, this model of atrophy in cell culture has a transcriptional profile quite distinct from any study published to date with atrophy in whole muscle. These data show that, although the gross morphology of atrophied muscle fibers may be similar in whole muscle vs. myotube culture, the processes by which this phenotype is achieved differ markedly.

  17. Dynamic transition of transcription and chromatin landscape during fission yeast adaptation to glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Oda, Arisa; Takemata, Naomichi; Hirata, Yoshito; Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2015-05-01

    Shortage of glucose, the primary energy source for all organisms, is one of the most critical stresses influencing cell viability. Glucose starvation promptly induces changes in mRNA and noncoding RNA (ncRNA) transcription. We previously reported that glucose starvation induces long ncRNA (lncRNA) transcription in the 5' segment of a fission yeast gluconeogenesis gene (fbp1+), which leads to stepwise chromatin alteration around the fbp1+ promoter and to subsequent robust gene activation. Here, we analyzed genomewide transcription by strand-specific RNA sequencing, together with chromatin landscape by immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Clustering analysis showed that distinct mRNAs and ncRNAs are induced at the early, middle and later stages of cellular response to glucose starvation. The starvation-induced transcription depends substantially on the stress-responsive transcription factor Atf1. Using a new computer program that examines dynamic changes in expression patterns, we identified ncRNAs with similar behavior to the fbp1+ lncRNA. We confirmed that there are continuous lncRNAs associated with local reduction of histone density. Overlapping with the regions for transcription of these lncRNAs, antisense RNAs are antagonistically transcribed under glucose-rich conditions. These results suggest that Atf1-dependent integrated networks of mRNA and lncRNA govern drastic changes in cell physiology in response to glucose starvation.

  18. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Prokesch, Andreas; Graef, Franziska A.; Madl, Tobias; Kahlhofer, Jennifer; Heidenreich, Steffi; Schumann, Anne; Moyschewitz, Elisabeth; Pristoynik, Petra; Blaschitz, Astrid; Knauer, Miriam; Muenzner, Matthias; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G.; Dohr, Gottfried; Schulz, Tim J.; Schupp, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The ability to adapt cellular metabolism to nutrient availability is critical for survival. The liver plays a central role in the adaptation to starvation by switching from glucose-consuming processes and lipid synthesis to providing energy substrates like glucose to the organism. Here we report a previously unrecognized role of the tumor suppressor p53 in the physiologic adaptation to food withdrawal. We found that starvation robustly increases p53 protein in mouse liver. This induction was posttranscriptional and mediated by a hepatocyte-autonomous and AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism. p53 stabilization was required for the adaptive expression of genes involved in amino acid catabolism. Indeed, acute deletion of p53 in livers of adult mice impaired hepatic glycogen storage and induced steatosis. Upon food withdrawal, p53-deleted mice became hypoglycemic and showed defects in the starvation-associated utilization of hepatic amino acids. In summary, we provide novel evidence for a p53-dependent integration of acute changes of cellular energy status and the metabolic adaptation to starvation. Because of its tumor suppressor function, p53 stabilization by starvation could have implications for both metabolic and oncological diseases of the liver.—Prokesch, A., Graef, F. A., Madl, T., Kahlhofer, J., Heidenreich, S., Schumann, A., Moyschewitz, E., Pristoynik, P., Blaschitz, A., Knauer, M., Muenzner, M., Bogner-Strauss, J. G., Dohr, G., Schulz, T. J., Schupp, M. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis. PMID:27811061

  19. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Prokesch, Andreas; Graef, Franziska A; Madl, Tobias; Kahlhofer, Jennifer; Heidenreich, Steffi; Schumann, Anne; Moyschewitz, Elisabeth; Pristoynik, Petra; Blaschitz, Astrid; Knauer, Miriam; Muenzner, Matthias; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Dohr, Gottfried; Schulz, Tim J; Schupp, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The ability to adapt cellular metabolism to nutrient availability is critical for survival. The liver plays a central role in the adaptation to starvation by switching from glucose-consuming processes and lipid synthesis to providing energy substrates like glucose to the organism. Here we report a previously unrecognized role of the tumor suppressor p53 in the physiologic adaptation to food withdrawal. We found that starvation robustly increases p53 protein in mouse liver. This induction was posttranscriptional and mediated by a hepatocyte-autonomous and AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism. p53 stabilization was required for the adaptive expression of genes involved in amino acid catabolism. Indeed, acute deletion of p53 in livers of adult mice impaired hepatic glycogen storage and induced steatosis. Upon food withdrawal, p53-deleted mice became hypoglycemic and showed defects in the starvation-associated utilization of hepatic amino acids. In summary, we provide novel evidence for a p53-dependent integration of acute changes of cellular energy status and the metabolic adaptation to starvation. Because of its tumor suppressor function, p53 stabilization by starvation could have implications for both metabolic and oncological diseases of the liver.-Prokesch, A., Graef, F. A., Madl, T., Kahlhofer, J., Heidenreich, S., Schumann, A., Moyschewitz, E., Pristoynik, P., Blaschitz, A., Knauer, M., Muenzner, M., Bogner-Strauss, J. G., Dohr, G., Schulz, T. J., Schupp, M. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis.

  20. Identification of Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that Are Haploinsufficient for Overcoming Amino Acid Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Nancy S.; Seberg, Andrew P.; Carroll, Leslie P.; Swanson, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to amino acid deprivation by activating a pathway conserved in eukaryotes to overcome the starvation stress. We have screened the entire yeast heterozygous deletion collection to identify strains haploinsufficient for growth in the presence of sulfometuron methyl, which causes starvation for isoleucine and valine. We have discovered that cells devoid of MET15 are sensitive to sulfometuron methyl, and loss of heterozygosity at the MET15 locus can complicate screening the heterozygous deletion collection. We identified 138 cases of loss of heterozygosity in this screen. After eliminating the issues of the MET15 loss of heterozygosity, strains isolated from the collection were retested on sulfometuron methyl. To determine the general effect of the mutations for a starvation response, SMM-sensitive strains were tested for the ability to grow in the presence of canavanine, which induces arginine starvation, and strains that were MET15 were also tested for growth in the presence of ethionine, which causes methionine starvation. Many of the genes identified in our study were not previously identified as starvation-responsive genes, including a number of essential genes that are not easily screened in a systematic way. The genes identified span a broad range of biological functions, including many involved in some level of gene expression. Several unnamed proteins have also been identified, giving a clue as to possible functions of the encoded proteins. PMID:28209762

  1. Cellular, physiological, and molecular adaptive responses of Erwinia amylovora to starvation.

    PubMed

    Santander, Ricardo D; Oliver, James D; Biosca, Elena G

    2014-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight, a destructive disease of rosaceous plants distributed worldwide. This bacterium is a nonobligate pathogen able to survive outside the host under starvation conditions, allowing its spread by various means such as rainwater. We studied E. amylovora responses to starvation using water microcosms to mimic natural oligotrophy. Initially, survivability under optimal (28 °C) and suboptimal (20 °C) growth temperatures was compared. Starvation induced a loss of culturability much more pronounced at 28 °C than at 20 °C. Natural water microcosms at 20 °C were then used to characterize cellular, physiological, and molecular starvation responses of E. amylovora. Challenged cells developed starvation-survival and viable but nonculturable responses, reduced their size, acquired rounded shapes and developed surface vesicles. Starved cells lost motility in a few days, but a fraction retained flagella. The expression of genes related to starvation, oxidative stress, motility, pathogenicity, and virulence was detected during the entire experimental period with different regulation patterns observed during the first 24 h. Further, starved cells remained as virulent as nonstressed cells. Overall, these results provide new knowledge on the biology of E. amylovora under conditions prevailing in nature, which could contribute to a better understanding of the life cycle of this pathogen.

  2. Autophagy is required for G₁/G₀ quiescence in response to nitrogen starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    An, Zhenyi; Tassa, Amina; Thomas, Collin; Zhong, Rui; Xiao, Guanghua; Fotedar, Rati; Tu, Benjamin P; Klionsky, Daniel J; Levine, Beth

    2014-10-01

    In response to starvation, cells undergo increased levels of autophagy and cell cycle arrest but the role of autophagy in starvation-induced cell cycle arrest is not fully understood. Here we show that autophagy genes regulate cell cycle arrest in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during nitrogen starvation. While exponentially growing wild-type yeasts preferentially arrest in G₁/G₀ in response to starvation, yeasts carrying null mutations in autophagy genes show a significantly higher percentage of cells in G₂/M. In these autophagy-deficient yeast strains, starvation elicits physiological properties associated with quiescence, such as Snf1 activation, glycogen and trehalose accumulation as well as heat-shock resistance. However, while nutrient-starved wild-type yeasts finish the G₂/M transition and arrest in G₁/G 0₀ autophagy-deficient yeasts arrest in telophase. Our results suggest that autophagy is crucial for mitotic exit during starvation and appropriate entry into a G₁/G₀ quiescent state.

  3. Inflammation inhibits the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in liver and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Kenneth R; Moser, Arthur; Shigenaga, Judy K; Grunfeld, Carl

    2012-04-01

    Inhibition of adipocyte triglyceride biosynthesis is required for fatty acid mobilization during inflammation. Triglyceride biosynthesis requires glycerol 3-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) plays a key role. We demonstrate that LPS, zymosan, and TNF-α decrease PEPCK in liver and fat. Turpentine decreases PEPCK in liver, but not in fat. The LPS-induced decrease in PEPCK does not occur in TLR4 deficient animals, indicating that this receptor is required. The LPS-induced decrease in hepatic PEPCK does not occur in TNF receptor/IL-1 receptor knockout mice, but occurs in fat, indicating that TNF-α/IL-1 is essential for the decrease in liver but not fat. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and IFNγ inhibit PEPCK indicating that there are multiple pathways by which PEPCK is decreased in adipocytes. The binding of PPARγ and RXRα to the PPARγ response element in the PEPCK promoter is markedly decreased in adipose tissue nuclear extracts from LPS treated animals. Lipopolysaccharide and zymosan reduce PPARγ and RXRα expression in fat, suggesting that a decrease in PPARγ and RXRα accounts for the decrease in PEPCK. Thus, there are multiple cytokine pathways by which inflammation inhibits PEPCK expression in adipose tissue which could contribute to the increased mobilization of fatty acids during inflammation.

  4. Evolution of microorganism locomotion induced by starvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibona, G. J.

    2007-07-01

    The search strategies of many organisms play a fundamental role in their competition to survive in a given environment. In this context, the propulsion systems of microorganisms have evolved during life history, to optimize the suitable use of energy they take from nutrients. Starting from a model for the motion of Brownian objects with internal energy depot, we show that the propulsion system of microorganisms has an optimal regimen while searching for new sources of food. Bacteria with a too low or too high energy expenditure in propulsion, moving in a nutrient-depleted environment, do not reach remote distances. In this sense, the mean square displacement has a maximum for a finite value of the propulsion rate. Species using the most efficient locomotion system have a considerable advantage for survival in hostile environments, a common situation in the ocean. Moreover, we found the existence of a lower size limit for useful locomotion. This suggests that, for organisms whose linear dimensions are below a certain threshold, it is advantageous not to use any propulsion mechanism at all, a result that is in agreement with what is observed in nature.

  5. A conserved MYB transcription factor involved in phosphate starvation signaling both in vascular plants and in unicellular algae

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Vicente; Linhares, Francisco; Solano, Roberto; Martín, Ana C.; Iglesias, Joaquín; Leyva, Antonio; Paz-Ares, Javier

    2001-01-01

    Plants have evolved a number of adaptive responses to cope with growth in conditions of limited phosphate (Pi) supply involving biochemical, metabolic, and developmental changes. We prepared an EMS-mutagenized M2 population of an Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic line harboring a reporter gene specifically responsive to Pi starvation (AtIPS1∷GUS), and screened for mutants altered in Pi starvation regulation. One of the mutants, phr1 (phosphate starvation response 1), displayed reduced response of AtIPS1∷GUS to Pi starvation, and also had a broad range of Pi starvation responses impaired, including the responsiveness of various other Pi starvation-induced genes and metabolic responses, such as the increase in anthocyanin accumulation. PHR1 was positionally cloned and shown be related to the PHOSPHORUS STARVATION RESPONSE 1 (PSR1) gene from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. A GFP∷PHR1 protein fusion was localized in the nucleus independently of Pi status, as is the case for PSR1. PHR1 is expressed in Pi sufficient conditions and, in contrast to PSR1, is only weakly responsive to Pi starvation. PHR1, PSR1, and other members of the protein family share a MYB domain and a predicted coiled–coil (CC) domain, defining a subtype within the MYB superfamily, the MYB–CC family. Therefore, PHR1 was found to bind as a dimer to an imperfect palindromic sequence. PHR1-binding sequences are present in the promoter of Pi starvation-responsive structural genes, indicating that this protein acts downstream in the Pi starvation signaling pathway. PMID:11511543

  6. Epigenetic modification of fetal baboon hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase following exposure to moderately reduced nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Mark J; Mitsuya, Kozoh; Li, Cun; Ford, Stephen; McDonald, Thomas J; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Cox, Laura A

    2010-04-15

    Decreased maternal nutrient availability during pregnancy induces compensatory fetal metabolic and endocrine responses. Knowledge of cellular changes involved is critical to understanding normal and abnormal development. Several studies in rodents and sheep report increased fetal plasma cortisol and associated increased gluconeogenesis in response to maternal nutrient reduction (MNR) but observations in primates are lacking. We determined MNR effects on fetal liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (protein, PEPCK1; gene, PCK1 orthologous/homologous human chromosomal region 20q13.31) at 0.9 gestation (G). Female baboon social groups were fed ad libitum (control, CTR) or 70% CTR (MNR) from 0.16 to 0.9G when fetuses were delivered by caesarean section under general anaesthesia. Plasma cortisol was elevated in fetuses of MNR mothers (P < 0.05). Immunoreactive PEPCK1 protein was located around the liver lobule central vein and was low in CTR fetuses but rose to 63% of adult levels in MNR fetuses. PCK1 mRNA measured by QRT-PCR increased in MNR (2.3-fold; P < 0.05) while the 25% rise in protein by Western blot analysis was not significant. PCK1 promoter methylation analysis using bisulfite sequencing was significantly reduced in six out of nine CpG-dinucleotides evaluated in MNR compared with CTR liver samples. In conclusion, these are the first data from a fetal non-human primate indicating hypomethylation of the PCK1 promoter in the liver following moderate maternal nutrient reduction.

  7. Influence of endotoxin treatment on dexamethasone induction of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, R E; Seale, T W; Stith, R D

    1983-01-01

    Decreased glucocorticoid binding has been observed at a time after endotoxin (3 to 6 h) when imparied liver enzyme induction is known to occur. This study was undertaken to characterize the early time course of hypoglycemia and decreased liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity in intact and adrenalectomized mice given endotoxin. In addition, altered steroid induction of hepatic PEPCK was examined in adrenalectomized mice given dexamethasone at intervals before and after a median lethal dose of endotoxin. Intact mice demonstrated a dramatic hyperglycemia at 1 h after endotoxin treatment, a response absent in adrenalectomized mice. Plasma glucose levels were significantly reduced from control values at 3 and 6 h posttreatment, with the most pronounced endotoxin-induced hypoglycemia seen in adrenalectomized mice. Hepatic PEPCK activity in intact mice given endotoxin was decreased at 3 and 6 h after treatment, although no change from basal, noninduced levels was seen in poisoned adrenalectomized mice. The increased increment in hepatic PEPCK activity due to fasting of intact control mice was reproduced in adrenalectomized control mice by the administration of dexamethasone. Furthermore, the induction of hepatic PEPCK by dexamethasone was inhibited by 1 h after endotoxin treatment, with enzyme activity falling to basal, noninduced levels by 6 h posttreatment. At these same time intervals after endotoxin treatment, no evidence of histopathology in the liver or adrenal glands was seen. These results coincide with changes in steroid binding seen previously and indicate that endotoxin treatment produces significant alterations in glucocorticoid action at the subcellular or molecular level. PMID:6822414

  8. Characterization of lysine acetylation of a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase involved in glutamate overproduction in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Nagano-Shoji, Megumi; Hamamoto, Yuma; Mizuno, Yuta; Yamada, Ayuka; Kikuchi, Masaki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Umehara, Takashi; Yoshida, Minoru; Nishiyama, Makoto; Kosono, Saori

    2017-03-03

    Protein Nε-acylation is emerging as a ubiquitous post-translational modification. In Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is utilized for industrial production of L-glutamate, the levels of protein acetylation and succinylation change drastically under the conditions that induce glutamate overproduction. Here, we characterized the acylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), an anaplerotic enzyme that supplies oxaloacetate for glutamate overproduction. We showed that acetylation of PEPC at lysine 653 decreased enzymatic activity, leading to reduced glutamate production. An acetylation-mimic (KQ) mutant of K653 showed severely reduced glutamate production, while the corresponding KR mutant showed normal production levels. Using an acetyllysine-incorporated PEPC protein, we verified that K653-acetylation negatively regulates PEPC activity. In addition, NCgl0616, a sirtuin-type deacetylase, deacetylated K653-acetylated PEPC in vitro. Interestingly, the specific activity of PEPC was increased during glutamate overproduction, which was blocked by the K653R mutation or deletion of sirtuin-type deacetylase homologues. These findings suggested that deacetylation of K653 by NCgl0616 likely plays a role in the activation of PEPC, which maintains carbon flux under glutamate-producing conditions. PEPC deletion increased protein acetylation levels in cells under glutamate-producing conditions, supporting our hypothesis that PEPC is responsible for a large carbon flux change under glutamate-producing conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. miR-71b regulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling during starvation in planarians.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y Y; Zhao, J M; Liu, Q; Guo, Q; Liu, Z; Wang, X X; Wang, C Y; Li, R Y; Zhang, Y Z; Zhang, S T

    2015-10-05

    Planarians, which have a large population of stem cells called neoblasts, are molecularly tractable model systems used in the study of regeneration. However, planarians have strong resistance to hunger and have developed growth arrest strategies. For example, they can change their size and undergo growth regression during starvation periods. The results of the current study show that the microRNA, miR-71b, and the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway have important functions in the development of starvation-induced planarians. We demonstrate tissue-specific expression of miR-71b using in situ hybridization. By employing real-time polymerase chain reaction, we provide evidence that miR-71b is upregulated in starvation-induced planarians. Furthermore, we validate and verify the target genes of miR-71b.

  10. Geometry and starvation effects in hydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical methods were used to determine the effects of lubricant starvation on the minimum film thickness under conditions of a hydrodynamic point contact. Starvation was effected by varying the fluid inlet level. The Reynolds boundary conditions were applied at the cavitation boundary and zero pressure was stipulated at the meniscus or inlet boundary. A minimum-film-thickness equation as a function of both the ratio of dimensionless load to dimensionless speed and inlet supply level was determined. By comparing the film generated under the starved inlet condition with the film generated from the fully flooded inlet, an expression for the film reduction factor was obtained. Based on this factor a starvation threshold was defined as well as a critically starved inlet. The changes in the inlet pressure buildup due to changing the available lubricant supply are presented in the form of three dimensional isometric plots and also in the form of contour plots.

  11. Light Modulation of Maize Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase 1

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Steven C.; Sugiyama, Tatsuo; Akazawa, Takashi

    1986-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) was extracted from maize (Zea mays L. cv Golden Cross Bantam T51) leaves harvested in the dark or light and was partially purified by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and gel filtration to yield preparations that were 80% homogeneous. Malate sensitivity, PEPC activity, and PEPC protein (measured immunochemically) were monitored during purification. As reported previously, PEPC from dark leaves was more sensitive to malate inhibition compared to enzyme extracted from light leaves. Extraction and purification in the presence of malate stabilized the characteristics of the two forms. During gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300, all of the PEPC activity and PEPC protein emerged in a single high molecular weight peak, indicating that no inactive dissociated forms (dimers, monomers) were present. However, there was a slight difference between the light and dark enzymes in elution volume during gel filtration. In addition, specific activity (units at pH 7/milligram PEPC protein) decreased through the peak for both enzyme samples; because the dark enzyme emerged at a slightly higher elution volume, it contained enzyme with a relatively lower specific activity. The variation in specific activity of the dark enzyme corresponded with changes in malate sensitivity. Immunoblotting of samples with different specific activity and malate sensitivity, obtained from gel filtration, revealed only a single polypeptide with a relative molecular mass of 100,000. When the enzyme was extracted and purified in the absence of malate, characteristic differences of the light and dark enzymes were lost, the enzymes eluted at the same volume during gel filtration, and specific activity was constant through the peak. We conclude that maize leaf PEPC exists in situ as a tetramer of a single polypeptide and that subtle conformation changes can affect both enzymic activity and sensitivity to malate inhibition. Images Fig. 6 PMID:16665065

  12. Larval starvation improves metabolic response to adult starvation in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Campbell, Jacob B; Kaftanoglu, Osman; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V; Harrison, Jon F

    2016-04-01

    Environmental changes during development have long-term effects on adult phenotypes in diverse organisms. Some of the effects play important roles in helping organisms adapt to different environments, such as insect polymorphism. Others, especially those resulting from an adverse developmental environment, have a negative effect on adult health and fitness. However, recent studies have shown that those phenotypes influenced by early environmental adversity have adaptive value under certain (anticipatory) conditions that are similar to the developmental environment, though evidence is mostly from morphological and behavioral observations and it is still rare at physiological and molecular levels. In the companion study, we applied a short-term starvation treatment to fifth instar honey bee larvae and measured changes in adult morphology, starvation resistance, hormonal and metabolic physiology and gene expression. Our results suggest that honey bees can adaptively respond to the predicted nutritional stress. In the present study, we further hypothesized that developmental starvation specifically improves the metabolic response of adult bees to starvation instead of globally affecting metabolism under well-fed conditions. Here, we produced adult honey bees that had experienced a short-term larval starvation, then we starved them for 12 h and monitored metabolic rate, blood sugar concentrations and metabolic reserves. We found that the bees that experienced larval starvation were able to shift to other fuels faster and better maintain stable blood sugar levels during starvation. However, developmental nutritional stress did not change metabolic rates or blood sugar levels in adult bees under normal conditions. Overall, our study provides further evidence that early larval starvation specifically improves the metabolic responses to adult starvation in honey bees.

  13. Effects of Salt Concentrations and Nitrogen and Phosphorus Starvations on Neutral Lipid Contents in the Green Microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Hua; Qv, Xiao-Ying; Chen, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2017-04-10

    Dunaliella tertiolecta, a halotolerant alga, can accumulate large amounts of neutral lipid, which makes it a potential biodiesel feedstock. In this study, neutral lipids of D. tertiolecta induced by different salinities or N or P starvation were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC), flow cytometry (FCM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). High salinities or N or P starvation resulted in a decrease in cell growth and chlorophyll contents of D. tertiolecta. Neutral lipid contents increased markedly after 3-7 days of N starvation or at low NaCl concentrations (0.5-2.0 M). N starvation had a more dramatic effect on the neutral lipid contents of D. tertiolecta than P starvation. Four putative ME isozymes in different conditions can be detected by using isozyme electrophoresis. Two alternative acetyl-CoA producers, ACL and ACS genes, were up-regulated under low salinities and N starvation. It was suggested that low salinities and N starvation are considered efficient ways to stimulate lipid accumulation in D. tertiolecta.

  14. Mechanism of mutation by thymine starvation in Escherichia coli: clues from mutagenic specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, B A; Glickman, B W

    1985-01-01

    To probe the mechanisms of mutagenesis induced by thymine starvation, we examined the mutational specificity of this treatment in strains of Escherichia coli that are wild type (Ung+) or deficient in uracil-DNA-glycosylase (Ung-). An analysis of Ung+ his-4 (ochre) revertants revealed that the majority of induced DNA base substitution events were A:T----G:C transitions. However, characterization of lacI nonsense mutations induced by thymine starvation demonstrated that G:C----A:T transitions and all four possible transversions also occurred. In addition, thymineless episodes led to reversion of the trpE9777 frameshift allele. Although the defect in uracil-DNA-glycosylase did not appear to affect the frequency of total mutations induced in lacI by thymine deprivation, the frequency of nonsense mutations was reduced by 30%, and the spectrum of nonsense mutations was altered. Furthermore, the reversion of trpE9777 was decreased by 90% in the Ung- strain. These findings demonstrate that in E. coli, thymine starvation can induce frameshift mutations and all types of base substitutions. The analysis of mutational specificity indicates that more than a single mechanism is involved in the induction of mutation by thymine depletion. We suggest that deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate pool imbalances, the removal of uracil incorporated into DNA during thymine starvation, and the induction of recA-dependent DNA repair functions all may play a role in thymineless mutagenesis. PMID:3888966

  15. Effects of Infant Starvation on Learning Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Pnina S.

    Explored were the effects of starvation during infancy on the learning abilities of 50 children when evaluated between 5 and 14 years of age. All Ss had suffered from pyloric stenosis, a condition which prevents passage of food from the stomach, in infancy for periods ranging from 2 days to 3 weeks. Ss were given five tests of various learning…

  16. Nitrogen starvation affects bacterial adhesion to soil

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Maria Tereza; Nascimento, Antônio Galvão; Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Tótola, Marcos Rogério

    2008-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting the bioremediation of subsoil environments based on bioaugmentation is the transport of selected microorganisms to the contaminated zones. The characterization of the physiological responses of the inoculated microorganisms to starvation, especially the evaluation of characteristics that affect the adhesion of the cells to soil particles, is fundamental to anticipate the success or failure of bioaugmentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of nitrogen starvation on cell surface hydrophobicity and cell adhesion to soil particles by bacterial strains previously characterized as able to use benzene, toluene or xilenes as carbon and energy sources. The strains LBBMA 18-T (non-identified), Arthrobacter aurescens LBBMA 98, Arthrobacter oxydans LBBMA 201, and Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1 were used in the experiments. Cultivation of the cells in nitrogen-deficient medium caused a significant reduction of the adhesion to soil particles by all the four strains. Nitrogen starvation also reduced significantly the strength of cell adhesion to the soil particles, except for Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1. Two of the four strains showed significant reduction in cell surface hydrophobicity. It is inferred that the efficiency of bacterial transport through soils might be potentially increased by nitrogen starvation. PMID:24031246

  17. MicroRNA399 is involved in multiple nutrient starvation responses in rice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Wang, Wei; Deng, Kun; Li, Hua; Zhang, Zhihua; Zhang, Lianhe; Chu, Chengcai

    2015-01-01

    The increasing evidences have revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) play significant role in nutrient stress response. Previously, miR399 was documented to be induced by phosphorus (P) starvation and involved in regulating P starvation responses. To further investigate the function of miR399 in rice (Oryza sativa L.), we performed GeneChip analysis with OsmiR399 over-expressing plants. Interestingly, our results showed that, besides P starvation responsive genes, the expression of a number of genes involved in iron (Fe), potassium (K), sodium (Na), and calcium (Ca) absorption was dramatically up-regulated in OsmiR399 over-expressing plants. Consistently, the concentrations of Fe, K, Na, and Ca were also increased in OsmiR399 over-expressing plants. The expression of OsmiR399 was also up-regulated by these nutrient starvations, respectively. Moreover, the loss-of-function of LTN1, the down-stream target of OsmiR399, also resulted in the increase of multiple metal elements and the up-regulation of the absorption related genes. These results indicated that OsmiR399 participates in the regulation of multiple nutrient starvation responses, which also gives new view on understanding the interaction among different nutrients mediated by miR399.

  18. Effects of starvation on the expression of feeding related neuropeptides in the larval zebrafish hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Shanshan, Liu; Cuizhen, Zhang; Gang, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Vertebrate feeding behavior is regulated by neuropeptide Y (NPY), GALANIN and GMAP prepropeptide (GAL), agouti related neuropeptide (AGRP) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in the hypothalamus. However, there are few studies on the relationship between these neuropeptides and feeding in zebrafish larvae. In the present study, real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization were applied to examine the expression levels of npy, galanin, agrp and pomca in the hypothalamus of zebrafish larvae after starvation and re-feeding. The results showed the expression of agrp and galanin increased significantly after starvation compared to the control group, whilst the expression of pomca decreased significantly compared to control. If the animals were re-fed for two days after starvation, the expression of pomca, agrp and galanin showed no significant difference from the control. Expression of npy did not alter in either condition. These results indicate that starvation increases expression levels of agrp and galanin, and reduces the pomca expression. In addition, these starvation-induced changes can be reversed by re-feeding.

  19. The carbon starvation response of Aspergillus niger during submerged cultivation: Insights from the transcriptome and secretome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Filamentous fungi are confronted with changes and limitations of their carbon source during growth in their natural habitats and during industrial applications. To survive life-threatening starvation conditions, carbon from endogenous resources becomes mobilized to fuel maintenance and self-propagation. Key to understand the underlying cellular processes is the system-wide analysis of fungal starvation responses in a temporal and spatial resolution. The knowledge deduced is important for the development of optimized industrial production processes. Results This study describes the physiological, morphological and genome-wide transcriptional changes caused by prolonged carbon starvation during submerged batch cultivation of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. Bioreactor cultivation supported highly reproducible growth conditions and monitoring of physiological parameters. Changes in hyphal growth and morphology were analyzed at distinct cultivation phases using automated image analysis. The Affymetrix GeneChip platform was used to establish genome-wide transcriptional profiles for three selected time points during prolonged carbon starvation. Compared to the exponential growth transcriptome, about 50% (7,292) of all genes displayed differential gene expression during at least one of the starvation time points. Enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology, Pfam domain and KEGG pathway annotations uncovered autophagy and asexual reproduction as major global transcriptional trends. Induced transcription of genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes was accompanied by increased secretion of hydrolases including chitinases, glucanases, proteases and phospholipases as identified by mass spectrometry. Conclusions This study is the first system-wide analysis of the carbon starvation response in a filamentous fungus. Morphological, transcriptomic and secretomic analyses identified key events important for fungal survival and their chronology. The dataset obtained forms a

  20. Influence of starvation on heart contractility and corticosterone level in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Ko, Tae Hee; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Marquez, Jubert; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The physiological changes, including cardiac modification, that occur during starvation are not yet completely understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a 2-week starvation period on heart contractility, muscle mass, and irisin and corticosterone levels in rats. Rats in the starved group showed a significant reduction in the body, heart, kidney, and muscle weight (n = 23, p < 0.05). Blood glucose, total protein, and albumin showed a 44, 17.5, and 10.3 % reduction, respectively (p < 0.05). Lipid reserves, such as total lipid, triglyceride, and free fatty acid, were also comparably reduced (p < 0.05). However, the bilirubin, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and creatine kinase levels were higher than in the control group (p < 0.05). The blood irisin level was unchanged, but the stress-related corticosterone level was significantly higher in the starved group. The differences observed in M-mode echocardiography were further compared with the body-weight-matched control group. Starvation reduced the left ventricle mass; however, this difference was not significant compared with the body-weight-matched group (p > 0.05). In the starvation group, the impairment of cardiac output was dependent on the reduction in stroke volume and heart rate. Starvation induced a severe reduction in ejection fraction and fractional shortening when compared with the body-weight-matched control group (p < 0.05). In summary, prolonged starvation, which leads to a deficiency of available nutrition, increases the stress-related corticosterone level, impairs the cardiac output, and is associated with changes in cardiac morphogeometry.

  1. OsWRKY74, a WRKY transcription factor, modulates tolerance to phosphate starvation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family has 109 members in the rice genome, and has been reported to be involved in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stress in plants. Here, we demonstrated that a rice OsWRKY74 belonging to group III of the WRKY transcription factor family was involved in tolerance to phosphate (Pi) starvation. OsWRKY74 was localized in the nucleus and mainly expressed in roots and leaves. Overexpression of OsWRKY74 significantly enhanced tolerance to Pi starvation, whereas transgenic lines with down-regulation of OsWRKY74 were sensitive to Pi starvation. Root and shoot biomass, and phosphorus (P) concentration in rice OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants were ~16% higher than those of wild-type (WT) plants in Pi-deficient hydroponic solution. In soil pot experiments, >24% increases in tiller number, grain weight and P concentration were observed in rice OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants compared to WT plants when grown in P-deficient medium. Furthermore, Pi starvation-induced changes in root system architecture were more profound in OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants than in WT plants. Expression patterns of a number of Pi-responsive genes were altered in the OsWRKY74-overexpressing and RNA interference lines. In addition, OsWRKY74 may also be involved in the response to deficiencies in iron (Fe) and nitrogen (N) as well as cold stress in rice. In Pi-deficient conditions, OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants exhibited greater accumulation of Fe and up-regulation of the cold-responsive genes than WT plants. These findings highlight the role of OsWRKY74 in modulation of Pi homeostasis and potential crosstalk between P starvation and Fe starvation, and cold stress in rice. PMID:26663563

  2. Activities of enzymes of fat and ketone-body metabolism and effects of starvation on blood concentrations of glucose and fat fuels in teleost and elasmobranch fish

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, Victor A.; Newsholme, Eric A.

    1979-01-01

    1. Activities of 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase together with tri- and di-acylglycerol lipase were present in red and heart muscles of the teleost fish. However, d-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase activity was not detectable. These results suggest that the heart and red muscles of the teleosts should be able to utilize the fat fuels triacylglycerol, fatty acids or acetoacetate, but not hydroxybutyrate. The muscles from the elasmobranchs differed in that d-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and 3-oxo acid CoA-transferase activities were present, but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was not detectable. This suggests that ketone bodies are the most important fat fuels in elasmobranchs. 2. The concentrations of acetoacetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, glycerol, non-esterified fatty acids and triacylglycerols were measured in blood or plasma of several species of fish (teleosts and elasmobranchs) in the fed state. Teleosts have a 10-fold higher concentration of plasma non-esterified fatty acids, but a lower blood concentration of ketone bodies; both acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate are present in blood of elasmobranchs, whereas 3-hydroxybutyrate is absent from that of the teleosts. 3. The effects of starvation (up to 150 days) on the concentrations of blood metabolites were studied in a teleost (bass) and an elasmobranch (dogfish). In the bass there was a 60% decrease in blood glucose after 100 and 150 days starvation. In dogfish there was a large increase in the concentration of ketone bodies, whereas in bass the concentration of acetoacetate (the only ketone body present) remained low (<0.04mm) throughout the period of starvation. The concentration of plasma non-esterified fatty acids increased in bass, but decreased in dogfish. These changes are consistent with the predictions based on the enzyme-activity data. 4. Starvation did not change the activities of ketone-body-utilizing enzymes or that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in heart

  3. A carbon starvation survival gene of Pseudomonas putida is regulated by sigma 54.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Watrud, L S; Matin, A

    1995-04-01

    By using mini-Tn5 transposon mutagenesis, two mutants of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 were isolated which showed a marked increase in their sensitivity to carbon starvation; these mutants are presumably affected in the Pex type of proteins that P. putida induces upon carbon starvation (M. Givskov, L. Eberl, and S. Molin, J. Bacteriol. 176:4816-4824, 1994). The affected genes in our mutants were induced about threefold upon carbon starvation. The promoter region of the starvation gene in the mutant MK107 possessed a strong sigma 54-type-promoter sequence, and deletion analysis suggested that this was the major promoter regulating expression; this was confirmed by transcript mapping in rpoN+ and rpoN mutant backgrounds. The deletion analysis implicated a sequence upstream of the sigma 54 promoter, as well as a region downstream of the transcription start site, in the functioning of the promoter. Two sigma 70-type Pribnow boxes were also detected in the promoter region, but their transcriptional activity in the wild type was very weak. However, in a sigma 54-deficient background, these promoters became stronger. The mechanism and possible physiological role of this phenomenon and the possibility that the sequence upstream of the sigma 54 promoter may have a role in carbon sensing are discussed.

  4. Transcription Factor Arabidopsis Activating Factor1 Integrates Carbon Starvation Responses with Trehalose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garapati, Prashanth; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John Edward; Van Dijck, Patrick; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Plants respond to low carbon supply by massive reprogramming of the transcriptome and metabolome. We show here that the carbon starvation-induced NAC (for NO APICAL MERISTEM/ARABIDOPSIS TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATION FACTOR/CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) transcription factor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Transcription Activation Factor1 (ATAF1) plays an important role in this physiological process. We identified TREHALASE1, the only trehalase-encoding gene in Arabidopsis, as a direct downstream target of ATAF1. Overexpression of ATAF1 activates TREHALASE1 expression and leads to reduced trehalose-6-phosphate levels and a sugar starvation metabolome. In accordance with changes in expression of starch biosynthesis- and breakdown-related genes, starch levels are generally reduced in ATAF1 overexpressors but elevated in ataf1 knockout plants. At the global transcriptome level, genes affected by ATAF1 are broadly associated with energy and carbon starvation responses. Furthermore, transcriptional responses triggered by ATAF1 largely overlap with expression patterns observed in plants starved for carbon or energy supply. Collectively, our data highlight the existence of a positively acting feedforward loop between ATAF1 expression, which is induced by carbon starvation, and the depletion of cellular carbon/energy pools that is triggered by the transcriptional regulation of downstream gene regulatory networks by ATAF1.

  5. Bacterial cells carrying synthetic dual-function operon survived starvation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuki; Ito, Yoichiro; Tsuru, Saburo; Ying, Bei-Wen; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    A synthetic dual-function operon with a bistable structure was designed and successfully integrated into the bacterial genome. Bistability was generated by the mutual inhibitory structure comprised of the promoters P(tet) and P(lac) and the repressors LacI and TetR. Dual function essential for cell growth was introduced by replacing the genes (i.e., hisC and leuB) encoding proteins involved in the biosynthesis of histidine and leucine from their native chromosomal locations to the synthetic operon. Both colony formation and population dynamics of the cells carrying this operon showed that the cells survived starvation and the newly formed population transited between the two stable states, representing the induced hisC and leuB levels, in accordance with the nutritional status. The results strongly suggested that the synthetic design of proto-operons sensitive to external perturbations is practical and functional in native cells.

  6. Death from drought in tropical forests is triggered by hydraulics not carbon starvation.

    PubMed

    Rowland, L; da Costa, A C L; Galbraith, D R; Oliveira, R S; Binks, O J; Oliveira, A A R; Pullen, A M; Doughty, C E; Metcalfe, D B; Vasconcelos, S S; Ferreira, L V; Malhi, Y; Grace, J; Mencuccini, M; Meir, P

    2015-12-03

    Drought threatens tropical rainforests over seasonal to decadal timescales, but the drivers of tree mortality following drought remain poorly understood. It has been suggested that reduced availability of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) critically increases mortality risk through insufficient carbon supply to metabolism ('carbon starvation'). However, little is known about how NSC stores are affected by drought, especially over the long term, and whether they are more important than hydraulic processes in determining drought-induced mortality. Using data from the world's longest-running experimental drought study in tropical rainforest (in the Brazilian Amazon), we test whether carbon starvation or deterioration of the water-conducting pathways from soil to leaf trigger tree mortality. Biomass loss from mortality in the experimentally droughted forest increased substantially after >10 years of reduced soil moisture availability. The mortality signal was dominated by the death of large trees, which were at a much greater risk of hydraulic deterioration than smaller trees. However, we find no evidence that the droughted trees suffered carbon starvation, as their NSC concentrations were similar to those of non-droughted trees, and growth rates did not decline in either living or dying trees. Our results indicate that hydraulics, rather than carbon starvation, triggers tree death from drought in tropical rainforest.

  7. NMR-Based Metabonomic Analysis of Physiological Responses to Starvation and Refeeding in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Contreras, José I; García-Pérez, Isabel; Meléndez-Camargo, María E; Zepeda, L Gerardo

    2016-09-02

    Starvation is a postabsorptive condition derived from a limitation on food resources by external factors. Energy homeostasis is maintained under this condition by using sources other than glucose via adaptive mechanisms. After refeeding, when food is available, other adaptive processes are linked to energy balance. However, less has been reported about the physiological mechanisms present as a result of these conditions, considering the rat as a supraorganism. Metabolic profiling using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize the physiological metabolic differences in urine specimens collected under starved, refed, and recovered conditions. In addition, because starvation induced lack of faecal production and not all animals produced faeces during refeeding, 24 h pooled faecal water samples were also analyzed. Urinary metabolites upregulated by starvation included 2-butanamidoacetate, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, ketoleucine, methylmalonate, p-cresyl glucuronide, p-cresyl sulfate, phenylacetylglycine, pseudouridine, creatinine, taurine, and N-acetyl glycoprotein, which were related to renal and skeletal muscle function, β-oxidation, turnover of proteins and RNA, and host-microbial interactions. Food-derived metabolites, including gut microbial cometabolites, and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates were upregulated under refed and recovered conditions, which characterized anabolic urinary metabotypes. The upregulation of creatine and pantothenate indicated an absorptive state after refeeding. Fecal short chain fatty acids, 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionate, lactate, and acetoin provided additional information about the combinatorial metabolism between the host and gut microbiota. This investigation contributes to allow a deeper understanding of physiological responses associated with starvation and refeeding.

  8. Highly Precise Quantification of Protein Molecules per Cell During Stress and Starvation Responses in Bacillus subtilis *

    PubMed Central

    Maaβ, Sandra; Wachlin, Gerhild; Bernhardt, Jörg; Eymann, Christine; Fromion, Vincent; Riedel, Katharina; Becher, Dörte; Hecker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Systems biology based on high quality absolute quantification data, which are mandatory for the simulation of biological processes, successively becomes important for life sciences. We provide protein concentrations on the level of molecules per cell for more than 700 cytosolic proteins of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis during adaptation to changing growth conditions. As glucose starvation and heat stress are typical challenges in B. subtilis' natural environment and induce both, specific and general stress and starvation proteins, these conditions were selected as models for starvation and stress responses. Analyzing samples from numerous time points along the bacterial growth curve yielded reliable and physiologically relevant data suitable for modeling of cellular regulation under altered growth conditions. The analysis of the adaptational processes based on protein molecules per cell revealed stress-specific modulation of general adaptive responses in terms of protein amount and proteome composition. Furthermore, analysis of protein repartition during glucose starvation showed that biomass seems to be redistributed from proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis to enzymes of the central carbon metabolism. In contrast, during heat stress most resources of the cell, namely those from amino acid synthetic pathways, are used to increase the amount of chaperones and proteases. Analysis of dynamical aspects of protein synthesis during heat stress adaptation revealed, that these proteins make up almost 30% of the protein mass accumulated during early phases of this stress. PMID:24878497

  9. Mild Nutrient Starvation Triggers the Development of a Small-Cell Survival Morphotype in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mu-Lu; Gengenbacher, Martin; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria, generally believed to be non-sporulating, are well known to survive shock starvation in saline for extended periods of time in a non-replicating state without any apparent morphological changes. Here, we uncover that mycobacteria can undergo cellular differentiation by exposing Mycobacterium smegmatis to mild starvation conditions. Traces of various carbon sources in saline triggered the development of a novel small resting cell (SMRC) morphotype. Development of SMRCs could also be observed for other mycobacteria, suggesting evolutionary conservation of this differentiation pathway. Fluorescence microscopic analyses showed that development of SMRCs progresses via septated, multi-nucleoided cell intermediates, which divide to generate mono-nucleoided SMRCs. Intriguingly, saline shock-starved large resting cells (LARCs), which did not show cell size or surface changes when observed by scanning electron microscopy, remodeled their internal structure to septated, multi-nucleoided cells, similar to the intermediates seen during differentiation to SMRCs. Our results suggest that mycobacteria harbor a starvation-induced differentiation program in which at first septated, multi-nucleoided cells are generated. Under zero-nutrient conditions bacteria terminate development at this stage as LARCs. In the presence of traces of a carbon source, these multi-nucleoided cells continue differentiation into mono-nucleoided SMRCs. Both SMRCs and LARCs exhibited extreme antibiotic tolerance. SMRCs showed increased long-term starvation survival, which was associated with the presence of lipid inclusion bodies. PMID:27379076

  10. [Functions of plant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and its applications for genetic engineering].

    PubMed

    Wei, Shaowei; Li, Yin

    2011-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) is an important ubiquitous cytosol enzyme that fixes HCO3 together with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and yields oxaloacetate that can be converted to intermediates of the citric acid cycle. In plant cells, PEPC participates in CO2 assimilation and other important metabolic pathways, and it has broad functions in different plant tissues. PEPC is also involved in the regulation of storage product synthesis and metabolism in seeds, such as affecting the metabolic fluxes from sugars/starch towards the synthesis of fatty acids or amino acids and proteins. In this review, we introduced the progress in classification, structure and regulation of PEPC in plant tissues. We discussed the potential applications of plant PEPCs in genetic engineering. The researches in functions and regulation mechanism of plant PEPCs will provide beneficial approaches to applications of plant PEPCs in high-yield crops breeding, energy crop and microbe genetic engineering.

  11. Enzyme I facilitates reverse flux from pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Long, Christopher P.; Au, Jennifer; Sandoval, Nicholas R.; Gebreselassie, Nikodimos A.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) consists of cascading phosphotransferases that couple the simultaneous import and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars to the glycolytic conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate. As the primary route of glucose uptake in E. coli, the PTS plays a key role in regulating central carbon metabolism and carbon catabolite repression, and is a frequent target of metabolic engineering interventions. Here we show that Enzyme I, the terminal phosphotransferase responsible for the conversion of PEP to pyruvate, is responsible for a significant in vivo flux in the reverse direction (pyruvate to PEP) during both gluconeogenic and glycolytic growth. We use 13C alanine tracers to quantify this back-flux in single and double knockouts of genes relating to PEP synthetase and PTS components. Our findings are relevant to metabolic engineering design and add to our understanding of gene-reaction connectivity in E. coli. PMID:28128209

  12. TORC1 activity is partially reduced under nitrogen starvation conditions in sake yeast Kyokai no. 7, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Nobushige; Sato, Aya; Hosaka, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Industrial yeasts are generally unable to sporulate but treatment with the immunosuppressive drug rapamycin restores this ability in a sake yeast strain Kyokai no. 7 (K7), Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding suggests that TORC1 is active under sporulation conditions. Here, using a reporter gene assay, Northern and Western blots, we tried to gain insight into how TORC1 function under nitrogen starvation conditions in K7 cells. Similarly to a laboratory strain, RPS26A transcription was repressed and Npr1 was dephosphorylated in K7 cells, indicative of the expected loss of TORC1 function under nitrogen starvation. The expression of nitrogen catabolite repression-sensitive genes, however, was not induced, the level of Cln3 remained constant, and autophagy was more slowly induced than in a laboratory strain, all suggestive of active TORC1. We conclude that TORC1 activity is partially reduced under nitrogen starvation conditions in K7 cells.

  13. Regulated high-level expression of the mannitol permease of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    van Weeghel, R P; Keck, W; Robillard, G T

    1990-01-01

    The structural gene (mtlA) of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannitol-transport protein (EIImtl) and its upstream promoter region (Pmtl) were subcloned approximately 150 base pairs downstream of a lambda PR promoter on a multicopy mutagenesis/expression vector and used to transform a mutant (MtlA-) E. coli strain. Induction at 42 degrees C led to 50 to 100-fold overproduction of EIImtl (5-10 mg/g of cell wet weight) relative to mannitol-induced levels in a wild-type (Mtl+) strain. Most of the overproduced protein was sequestered as an inactive form in inclusion bodies and cytoplasmic membranous structures. The protein could be extracted in an active form by rupturing the cells with lysozyme and sonication or with a passage through a French pressure cell and incubating the inclusion bodies and membranous structures with detergent (Lubrol PX or deoxycholate) in the presence of Q or S Sepharose ion-exchange resin for several hours. This procedure resulted in a 20- to 25-fold overproduction of active EIImtl compared with mannitol-induced wild-type levels. Images PMID:2181442

  14. CO2-fixing enzymes and phosphoenolpyruvate metabolism in the fish parasite Hysterothylacium aduncum (Ascaridoidea, Anisakidae).

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Benítez, Rocio; Valero, Adela; Adroher, Francisco Javier

    2009-07-23

    CO2 stimulates the development of many of the intestinal helminths that are able to fix CO2 by means of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), such as Hysterothylacium aduncum. We determined the activity of CO2-fixing enzymes such as PEPCK and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), although no significant activity was detected for pyruvate carboxylase or carboxylating-malic enzyme. The former act on phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to yield oxalacetate. In the helminths studied, PEP has a vital role in glucidic metabolism. Consequently, we determined the activity of other enzymes involved in the crossroad of PEP, such as pyruvate kinase (PK), lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase. All enzymes detected showed significant variations in activity during the in vitro development of the parasite from the third larval stage to mature adult. Fixing of CO2 by PEPCK decreased during development (from 228 to 115 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), while that by PEPC increased (from 19 to 46 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein). This enzyme, which is rare in animals, could play a part in detecting levels of free phosphate, releasing it from PEP when required for processes such as glycogenolysis, glycolysis and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. PK, which showed increasing activity during development up to immature adult (from 56 to 82 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), could act in combination with PEPC to obtain energy in the cytosol (in the form of ATP) and in the mitochondria (possible destination of the pyruvate formed), compensating for the decrease in activity of PEPCK.

  15. Studies on the degradative mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Burlini, N; Morandi, S; Pellegrini, R; Tortora, P; Guerritore, A

    1989-11-20

    Previous work carried out in our laboratory (Burlini, N., Lamponi S., Radrizzani, M., Monti, E. and Tortora P. (1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 930, 220-229) led to the immunological identification of a yeast 65-kDa phosphoprotein as a modified form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase; moreover the appearance of this phospho form was proven to be independent of cAMP, whereas the glucose-induced inactivation of the native enzyme is cAMP-dependent. Here, we report further investigations on the mechanism of the glucose-triggered degradation of the enzyme which led to the following results: (a) the aforementioned phospho form displayed a binding pattern to 5 AMP-Sepharose 4B quite similar to that of native enzyme, although it did not retain its oligomeric structure, nor was it catalytically active; (b) its phosphate content was of about two residues per monomer; (c) its isoelectric point was slightly higher than that of native enzyme, this shows that the enzyme undergoes additional modifications besides phosphorylation; (d) it represented about 4% of the native enzyme in glucose-depressed cells; (e) other forms immunologically cross-reactive with the native enzyme were also isolated, whose molecular mass was in the range of 60-62 kDa, and they are probable candidates as degradation products of the phospho form; (f) time courses of the native and phospho forms in the presence and the absence of glucose provided data consistent with a kinetic model involving a strong stimulation of the decay of both forms effected by the sugar; (g) in the mutant ABYS1 (Achstetter, T., Emter, O., Ehmann, C. and Wolf, D.H. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13334-13343) which is devoid of the four major vacuolar proteinases, the decay pattern was essentially the same as in wild-type; (h) effectors lowering intracellular ATP also retarded the first step of enzyme degradation; this points to an ATP-dependence of this step. Based on these results we propose a degradation mechanism consisting of an

  16. Increased Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Gene Expression and Steatosis during Hepatitis C Virus Subgenome Replication

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Ishtiaq; Choudhury, Mahua; Rahman, Shaikh Mizanoor; Knotts, Trina A.; Janssen, Rachel C.; Schaack, Jerome; Iwahashi, Mieko; Puljak, Livia; Simon, Francis R.; Kilic, Gordan; Fitz, J. Gregory; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; however, the pathogenic mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we report gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) transcription and associated transcription factors are dramatically up-regulated in Huh.8 cells, which stably express an HCV subgenome replicon. HCV increased activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPβ), forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and involved activation of the cAMP response element in the PEPCK promoter. Infection with dominant-negative CREB or C/EBPβ-shRNA significantly reduced or normalized PEPCK expression, with no change in PGC-1α or FOXO1 levels. Notably, expression of HCV nonstructural component NS5A in Huh7 or primary hepatocytes stimulated PEPCK gene expression and glucose output in HepG2 cells, whereas a deletion in NS5A reduced PEPCK expression and lowered cellular lipids but was without effect on insulin resistance, as demonstrated by the inability of insulin to stimulate mobilization of a pool of insulin-responsive vesicles to the plasma membrane. HCV-replicating cells demonstrated increases in cellular lipids with insulin resistance at the level of the insulin receptor, increased insulin receptor substrate 1 (Ser-312), and decreased Akt (Ser-473) activation in response to insulin. C/EBPβ-RNAi normalized lipogenic genes sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and liver X receptor α but was unable to reduce accumulation of triglycerides in Huh.8 cells or reverse the increase in ApoB expression, suggesting a role for increased lipid retention in steatotic hepatocytes. Collectively, these data reveal an important role of NS5A, C/EBPβ, and pCREB in promoting HCV-induced gluconeogenic gene expression

  17. Effect of Light and NO3− on Wheat Leaf Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Le Van Quy; Foyer, Christine; Champigny, Marie-Louise

    1991-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPcase) activity was studied in excised leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the dark and in the light, in presence of either N-free (low-NO3− leaves) or 40 millimolar KNO3 (high-NO3− leaves) nutrient solutions. PEPcase activity increased to 2.7-fold higher than that measured in dark-adapted tissue (control) during the first 60 minutes and continued to increase more slowly to 3.8-fold that of the control. This level was reached after 200 minutes exposure of the leaves to light and high NO3−. In contrast, the lower rate of increase recorded for low-NO3− leaves ceased after 60 minutes of exposure to light at 2.3-fold the control level. The short-term NO3− effect increased linearly with the level of NO3− uptake. In immunoprecipitation experiments, the antibody concentration for PEPcase precipitation increased with the protein extracts from the different treatments in the order: control, illuminated low-NO3− leaves, illuminated high-NO3− leaves. This order also applied with regard to a decreasing sensitivity to malate and an increasing stimulation by okadaic acid (an inhibitor of P-protein phosphatases). Following these studies, 32P labeling experiments were carried out in vivo. These showed that the light-induced change in the properties of the PEPcase was due to an alteration in the phosphorylation state of the protein and that this effect was enhanced in high-NO3− conditions. Based on the responses of PEPcase and sucrose phosphate synthase in wheat leaves to light and NO3−, an interpretation of the role of NO3− as either an inhibitor of P-protein phosphatase(s) or activator of protein kinase(s) is inferred. In the presence of NO3−, the phosphorylation state of both PEPcase and sucrose phosphate synthase is increased. This causes activation of the former enzyme and inhibition of the latter. We suggest that NO3− modulates the relative protein kinase/protein phosphatase ratio to favor increased

  18. Renal conservation of ketone bodies during starvation.

    PubMed

    Sapir, D G; Owen, O E

    1975-01-01

    Renal handling of acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate was studied in 12 obese subjects undergoing total starvation. Simultaneously, the acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and inulin clearance rates were measured, and acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate reabsorption rates were calculated. Renal clearance of blood acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate remained constant. In contrast, acetoacetate reabsorption rate increased significantly from 47 plus or minus 10 mumoles/min on day 3 to 106 plus or minus 15, 89 plus or minus 10, and 96 plus or minus 10 mumoles/min on days 10, 17, and 24, respectively. Similarly, beta-hydroxybutyrate reabsorption rate increased significantly from 154 plus or minus 27 mumoles/min on day 3 to 419 plus or minus 53, 399 plus or minus 25, and 436 plus or minus 53 mumoles/min on days 10, 17, and 24, respectively. Both acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate reabsorption rates increased linearly when plotted against their filtered loads. Thus, no tubular maximal transport rate exists for acetoacetate or beta-hydroxybutyrate during physiologic ketonemia. Conservation 450-500 mmoles of ketone bodies/day prevents large urinary losses of cations during prolonged starvation. Since ammonium becomes the major cation excreted during prolonged fasting, the increased renal reabsorption of ketone bodies minimizes body protein loss and aids in maintaining high circulating acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations.

  19. Stimulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (guanosine triphosphate) activity by low concentrations of circulating glucose in perfused rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, F J; Sánchez-Urrutia, L; Medina, J M; Sánchez-Medina, F; Mayor, F

    1975-01-01

    1. After nicotinic acid treatment, rat liver glycogen is depleted and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity increased, to about twice the initial value. 2. The increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity promoted by nicotinic acid is prevented by cycloheximide or actinomycin D, suggesting that this effect is produced by synthesis of the enzyme de novo. 3. Despite the enhancement of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity and glycogen depletion, which occurs 5h after the injection of nicotinic acid, the gluconeogenic capacity of liver is low and considerably less than the values found in rats starved for 48h. 4. When the livers of well-fed rats are perfused in the presence of low concentrations of glucose, the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase significantly increases compared with the control. 5. This increase is not related to the glycogen content, but seems to be also the result of synthesis of the enzyme de novo, since this effect is counteracted by previous treatment with cycloheximide or actinomycin D. 6. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity is not increased in the presence of low concentrations of circulating glucose when 40 mM-imidazole (an activator of phosphodiesterase) is added to the perfusion medium. 7. Addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP to the perfusion medium results in an increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity, in spite of the presence of normal concentrations of circulating glucose. On the other hand, the concentration of cyclic AMP in the liver increases when that of glucose in the medium is low. 8. These results suggest that, in the absence of hormonal factors, the regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase can be accomplished by glucose itself, inadequate concentrations of it resulting in the induction of the enzyme. The mediator in this regulation, as in hormonal regulation, seems to be cyclic AMP. PMID:173301

  20. Photosynthetic and Other Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Isoforms in the Single-Cell, Facultative C4 System of Hydrilla verticillata1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Srinath K.; Magnin, Noël C.; Reiskind, Julia B.; Bowes, George

    2002-01-01

    The submersed monocot Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle is a facultative C4 plant. It typically exhibits C3 photosynthetic characteristics, but exposure to low [CO2] induces a C4 system in which the C4 and Calvin cycles co-exist in the same cell and the initial fixation in the light is catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Three full-length cDNAs encoding PEPC were isolated from H. verticillata, two from leaves and one from root. The sequences were 95% to 99% identical and shared a 75% to 85% similarity with other plant PEPCs. Transcript studies revealed that one isoform, Hvpepc4, was exclusively expressed in leaves during C4 induction. This and enzyme kinetic data were consistent with it being the C4 photosynthesis isoform. However, the C4 signature serine of terrestrial plant C4 isoforms was absent in this and the other H. verticillata sequences. Instead, alanine, typical of C3 sequences, was present. Western analyses of C3 and C4 leaf extracts after anion-exchange chromatography showed similar dominant PEPC-specific bands at 110 kD. In phylogenetic analyses, the sequences grouped with C3, non-graminaceous C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism PEPCs but not with the graminaceous C4, and formed a clade with a gymnosperm, which is consistent with H. verticillata PEPC predating that of other C4 angiosperms. PMID:12376652

  1. Amylin impairment of insulin effects on glycogen synthesis and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression in rat primary cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Baqué, S; Guinovart, J J; Gómez-Foix, A M

    1994-01-01

    The ability of amylin to impair hepatic insulin action is controversial. We have found that the effect of amylin in primary cultured hepatocytes is strongly dependent on the culture conditions. Only in hepatocytes preincubated in the presence of fetal serum did amylin, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 nM, reduce insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis rate and glycogen accumulation without showing direct effects. Neither basal glycogen synthase nor glycogen phosphorylase activity was modified by amylin treatment. Nevertheless, amylin (100 nM) blocked the activation of glycogen synthase by insulin. Amylin also proved capable of opposing the reduction in the expression of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene induced by insulin, whereas the basal mRNA level of PEPCK was unaffected by amylin treatment. Thus, these results show that, in cultured rat hepatocytes, amylin is indeed able to interfere with insulin regulation of glycogenesis and PEPCK gene expression, favouring the hypothesis that amylin may modulate liver sensitivity to insulin. Images Figure 3 PMID:7998979

  2. Genome-wide Analysis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Gene Family and Their Response to Abiotic Stresses in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Zhong, Xiujuan; Cong, Yahui; Wang, Tingting; Yang, Songnan; Li, Yan; Gai, Junyi

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) plays an important role in assimilating atmospheric CO2 during C4 and crassulacean acid metabolism photosynthesis, and also participates in various non-photosynthetic processes, including fruit ripening, stomatal opening, supporting carbon–nitrogen interactions, seed formation and germination, and regulation of plant tolerance to stresses. However, a comprehensive analysis of PEPC family in Glycine max has not been reported. Here, a total of ten PEPC genes were identified in soybean and denominated as GmPEPC1-GmPEPC10. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the PEPC proteins from 13 higher plant species including soybean, PEPC family could be classified into two subfamilies, which was further supported by analyses of their conserved motifs and gene structures. Nineteen cis-regulatory elements related to phytohormones, abiotic and biotic stresses were identified in the promoter regions of GmPEPC genes, indicating their roles in soybean development and stress responses. GmPEPC genes were expressed in various soybean tissues and most of them responded to the exogenously applied phytohormones. GmPEPC6, GmPEPC8 and GmPEPC9 were significantly induced by aluminum toxicity, cold, osmotic and salt stresses. In addition, the enzyme activities of soybean PEPCs were also up-regulated by these treatments, suggesting their potential roles in soybean response to abiotic stresses. PMID:27924923

  3. Insulinotropic effect of cinnamaldehyde on transcriptional regulation of pyruvate kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and GLUT4 translocation in experimental diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Anand, Prachi; Murali, K Y; Tandon, Vibha; Murthy, P S; Chandra, Ramesh

    2010-06-07

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting about 6% of population worldwide with its complications and is rapidly reaching epidemic scale. Cinnamomum zeylanicum is widely used in alternative system of medicine for treatment of diabetes. In the present study, we have performed bioassay guided fractionation of chloroform extract of C. zeylaniucm and identified cinnamaldehyde (CND) as an active principle against diabetes. In continuation to it, a detailed study was undertaken to elucidate its mode of antidiabetic action in STZ induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of CND (20 mg/kg bw) to diabetic rats for 2 months showed significant improvement (p<0.001) in muscle and hepatic glycogen content. In vitro incubation of pancreatic islets with CND enhanced the insulin release compared to glibenclamide. The insulinotropic effect of CND was found to increase the glucose uptake through glucose transporter (GLUT4) translocation in peripheral tissues. The treatment also showed a significant improvement in altered enzyme activities of pyruvate kinase (PK) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and their mRNA expression levels. Furthermore, the median lethal dose (LD(50)) of CND could not be obtained even at 20 times (0.4 g/kg bw) of its effective dose. With the high margin of safety of CND, it can be developed as a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of diabetes.

  4. [Starvation and chemoreception in Antarctic benthic invertebrates].

    PubMed

    Rakusa-Suszczewski, S; Janecki, T; Domanov, M M

    2010-01-01

    Sensitivity (chemoreception) to different amino acids was studied in six invertebrate species: Serolis polita, Glyptonotus antarcticus, Abyssochromene plebs, Waldeckia obesa, Odontaster validus, and Sterechinus neumayeri. The sensitivity was estimated by the changes in basic metabolism (respiration rate). Starvation increased the sensitivity in all the species. The metabolism rates increased in the presence of L-glutamic acid in G. antarcticus, A. plebs, O. validus, and S. neumayeri. The serine and arginine amino acids had a significant impact on the metabolism of the necrophagous species S. polita and W. obesa. The chemical information may be mediated by means of L-glutamic acid via glutamate receptors, which can be blocked by kynurenic acid, as occurs in the experiments with G. antarcticus and A. plebs.

  5. Starvation resistance in lake trout fry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Manny, Bruce A.; Kennedy, Gregory W.

    2003-01-01

    Newly hatched fry were acclimated to 7 or 12A?C and either fed daily (controls) or denied food for varying lengths of time and then fed daily until the end of the study (day 91 at 7A?C and day 43 at 12A?C). Growth was reduced by delays in the onset of feeding of 27 or more days at 7A?C and 7 or more days at 12A?C. Mortality of fry unfed for more than 34 days at 7A?C, or more than 21 days at 12A?C, was higher than among controls. Daily mortality increased with the length of the food deprivation period and did not cease immediately when food was made available, but reached zero by the end of the study. Mortality among unfed fry reached 50% in about 59 days at 7A?C and 32 days at 12A?C. Study results permitted calculation of the 'point-of-no-return' (PNR) mortality, which included the mortality that occurred during the period of food deprivation, and also the delayed component of mortality that was directly attributable to starvation and that occurred after food was made available. The PNR for 50% mortality for food-deprived fry occurred after 52 days at 7A?C and 24 days at 12A?C. Thus, both measures of mortality indicate that lake trout fry would be highly resistant to death by starvation in the thermal habitat they would be expected to occupy in the Great Lakes. We conclude that a more likely adverse effect of reduced food availability would result from a reduction in growth rate that extends the length of time fry remain small and vulnerable to predation by adult alewives and other non-native fishes with which they associate.

  6. Increased bioplastic production with an RNA polymerase sigma factor SigE during nitrogen starvation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Numata, Keiji; Oikawa, Akira; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Kan; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2013-12-01

    Because cyanobacteria directly harvest CO2 and light energy, their carbon metabolism is important for both basic and applied sciences. Here, we show that overexpression of the sigma factor sigE in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 widely changes sugar catabolism and increases production of the biodegradable polyester polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) during nitrogen starvation. sigE overexpression elevates the levels of proteins implicated in glycogen catabolism, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis. PHB accumulation is enhanced by sigE overexpression under nitrogen-limited conditions, yet the molecular weights of PHBs synthesized by the parental glucose-tolerant and sigE overexpression strain are similar. Although gene expression induced by nitrogen starvation is changed and other metabolites (such as GDP-mannose and citrate) accumulate under sigE overexpression, genetic engineering of this sigma factor altered the metabolic pathway from glycogen to PHB during nitrogen starvation.

  7. Genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate in haemocytes and midgut gland cells of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae).

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grażyna; Mędrzak, Monika; Augustyniak, Maria; Wilczek, Piotr; Stalmach, Monika

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic effects of starvation and dimethoate (organophosphate insecticide) in female and male wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to the stressors under laboratory conditions. DNA damage was measured in haemocytes and midgut gland cells using the comet assay. In response to the two stressing factors, both cell types showed %TDNA, tail length (TL) and OTM values higher in males than in females. Level of DNA damage in haemocytes was greater than in midgut gland cells. In both sexes, the strongest genotoxicity was recorded at single application of dimethoate. After five-time exposure to the pesticide, genotoxic effects of a single dose were sustained in males and reduced to the control level in females. Starvation stress was well tolerated by the females, in which neither cell type was affected by DNA damage. However, in male haemocytes food deprivation induced severe DNA damage, what suggests suppression of the defence potential at prolonged starvation periods.

  8. Sul1 and Sul2 Sulfate Transceptors Signal to Protein Kinase A upon Exit of Sulfur Starvation*

    PubMed Central

    Kankipati, Harish Nag; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Castermans, Dries; Diallinas, George; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfate is an essential nutrient with pronounced regulatory effects on cellular metabolism and proliferation. Little is known, however, about how sulfate is sensed by cells. Sul1 and Sul2 are sulfate transporters in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strongly induced upon sulfur starvation and endocytosed upon the addition of sulfate. We reveal Sul1,2-dependent activation of PKA targets upon sulfate-induced exit from growth arrest after sulfur starvation. We provide two major arguments in favor of Sul1 and Sul2 acting as transceptors for signaling to PKA. First, the sulfate analogue, d-glucosamine 2-sulfate, acted as a non-transported agonist of signaling by Sul1 and Sul2. Second, mutagenesis to Gln of putative H+-binding residues, Glu-427 in Sul1 or Glu-443 in Sul2, abolished transport without affecting signaling. Hence, Sul1,2 can function as pure sulfate sensors. Sul1E427Q and Sul2E443Q are also deficient in sulfate-induced endocytosis, which can therefore be uncoupled from signaling. Overall, our data suggest that transceptors can undergo independent conformational changes, each responsible for triggering different downstream processes. The Sul1 and Sul2 transceptors are the first identified plasma membrane sensors for extracellular sulfate. High affinity transporters induced upon starvation for their substrate may generally act as transceptors during exit from starvation. PMID:25724649

  9. The Aspergillus nidulans ATM Kinase Regulates Mitochondrial Function, Glucose Uptake and the Carbon Starvation Response

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, Nadia Graciele; Brown, Neil Andrew; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; Reis, Thaila; Savoldi, Marcela; Dinamarco, Taísa Magnani; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria supply cellular energy and also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress. In mammals, the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase acts as a redox sensor controlling mitochondrial function. Subsequently, transcriptomic and genetic studies were utilized to elucidate the role played by a fungal ATM homolog during carbon starvation. In Aspergillus nidulans, AtmA was shown to control mitochondrial function and glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses that are regulated by target of rapamycin (TOR) were shown to be AtmA-dependent, including autophagy and hydrolytic enzyme secretion. AtmA also regulated a p53-like transcription factor, XprG, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Thus, AtmA possibly represents a direct or indirect link between mitochondrial stress, metabolism, and growth through the influence of TOR and XprG function. The coordination of cell growth and division with nutrient availability is crucial for all microorganisms to successfully proliferate in a heterogeneous environment. Mitochondria supply cellular energy but also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress and the cross-talk between prosurvival and prodeath pathways. The present study of Aspergillus nidulans demonstrated that AtmA also controlled mitochondrial mass, function, and oxidative phosphorylation, which directly or indirectly influenced glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses, including autophagy, shifting metabolism to the glyoxylate cycle, and the secretion of carbon scavenging enzymes were AtmA-dependent. Transcriptomic profiling of the carbon starvation response demonstrated how TOR signaling and the retrograde response, which signals mitochondrial dysfunction, were directly or indirectly influenced by AtmA. The AtmA kinase was also shown to influence a p53-like transcription factor, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Therefore, in response to metabolic

  10. The Aspergillus nidulans ATM kinase regulates mitochondrial function, glucose uptake and the carbon starvation response.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Nadia Graciele; Brown, Neil Andrew; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; Reis, Thaila; Savoldi, Marcela; Dinamarco, Taísa Magnani; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2014-01-10

    Mitochondria supply cellular energy and also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress. In mammals, the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase acts as a redox sensor controlling mitochondrial function. Subsequently, transcriptomic and genetic studies were utilized to elucidate the role played by a fungal ATM homolog during carbon starvation. In Aspergillus nidulans, AtmA was shown to control mitochondrial function and glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses that are regulated by target of rapamycin (TOR) were shown to be AtmA-dependent, including autophagy and hydrolytic enzyme secretion. AtmA also regulated a p53-like transcription factor, XprG, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Thus, AtmA possibly represents a direct or indirect link between mitochondrial stress, metabolism, and growth through the influence of TOR and XprG function. The coordination of cell growth and division with nutrient availability is crucial for all microorganisms to successfully proliferate in a heterogeneous environment. Mitochondria supply cellular energy but also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress and the cross-talk between prosurvival and prodeath pathways. The present study of Aspergillus nidulans demonstrated that AtmA also controlled mitochondrial mass, function, and oxidative phosphorylation, which directly or indirectly influenced glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses, including autophagy, shifting metabolism to the glyoxylate cycle, and the secretion of carbon scavenging enzymes were AtmA-dependent. Transcriptomic profiling of the carbon starvation response demonstrated how TOR signaling and the retrograde response, which signals mitochondrial dysfunction, were directly or indirectly influenced by AtmA. The AtmA kinase was also shown to influence a p53-like transcription factor, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Therefore, in response to metabolic

  11. DNA microarray analysis suggests that zinc pyrithione causes iron starvation to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yasokawa, Daisuke; Murata, Satomi; Iwahashi, Yumiko; Kitagawa, Emiko; Kishi, Katsuyuki; Okumura, Yukihiro; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Zinc pyrithione has been used in anti-dandruff shampoos and in anti-fouling paint on ships. However, little is known of its mode of action. We characterized the effects of sub-lethal concentrations of zinc pyrithione (Zpt) on Saccharomyces cerevisiae using DNA microarrays. The majority of the strongly upregulated genes are related to iron transport, and many of the strongly downregulated genes are related to the biosynthesis of cytochrome (heme). These data suggest that Zpt induces severe iron starvation. To confirm the DNA microarray data, we supplemented cultures containing Zpt with iron, and the growth of the yeast was restored significantly. From these results, we propose that the principal toxicity of zinc pyrithione arises from iron starvation.

  12. FGF21 and the late adaptive response to starvation in humans.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Lun, Mingyue; Kim, Soo M; Bredella, Miriam A; Wright, Spenser; Zhang, Yang; Lee, Hang; Catana, Ciprian; Klibanski, Anne; Patwari, Parth; Steinhauser, Matthew L

    2015-11-03

    In mice, FGF21 is rapidly induced by fasting, mediates critical aspects of the adaptive starvation response, and displays a number of positive metabolic properties when administered pharmacologically. In humans, however, fasting does not consistently increase FGF21, suggesting a possible evolutionary divergence in FGF21 function. Moreover, many key aspects of FGF21 function in mice have been identified in the context of transgenic overexpression or administration of supraphysiologic doses, rather than in a physiologic setting. Here, we explored the dynamics and function of FGF21 in human volunteers during a 10-day fast. Unlike mice, which show an increase in circulating FGF21 after only 6 hours, human subjects did not have a notable surge in FGF21 until 7 to 10 days of fasting. Moreover, we determined that FGF21 induction was associated with decreased thermogenesis and adiponectin, an observation that directly contrasts with previous reports based on supraphysiologic dosing. Additionally, FGF21 levels increased after ketone induction, demonstrating that endogenous FGF21 does not drive starvation-mediated ketogenesis in humans. Instead, a longitudinal analysis of biologically relevant variables identified serum transaminases--markers of tissue breakdown--as predictors of FGF21. These data establish FGF21 as a fasting-induced hormone in humans and indicate that FGF21 contributes to the late stages of adaptive starvation, when it may regulate the utilization of fuel derived from tissue breakdown.

  13. FGF21 and the late adaptive response to starvation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Lun, Mingyue; Kim, Soo M.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Wright, Spenser; Zhang, Yang; Lee, Hang; Catana, Ciprian; Klibanski, Anne; Patwari, Parth; Steinhauser, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    In mice, FGF21 is rapidly induced by fasting, mediates critical aspects of the adaptive starvation response, and displays a number of positive metabolic properties when administered pharmacologically. In humans, however, fasting does not consistently increase FGF21, suggesting a possible evolutionary divergence in FGF21 function. Moreover, many key aspects of FGF21 function in mice have been identified in the context of transgenic overexpression or administration of supraphysiologic doses, rather than in a physiologic setting. Here, we explored the dynamics and function of FGF21 in human volunteers during a 10-day fast. Unlike mice, which show an increase in circulating FGF21 after only 6 hours, human subjects did not have a notable surge in FGF21 until 7 to 10 days of fasting. Moreover, we determined that FGF21 induction was associated with decreased thermogenesis and adiponectin, an observation that directly contrasts with previous reports based on supraphysiologic dosing. Additionally, FGF21 levels increased after ketone induction, demonstrating that endogenous FGF21 does not drive starvation-mediated ketogenesis in humans. Instead, a longitudinal analysis of biologically relevant variables identified serum transaminases — markers of tissue breakdown — as predictors of FGF21. These data establish FGF21 as a fasting-induced hormone in humans and indicate that FGF21 contributes to the late stages of adaptive starvation, when it may regulate the utilization of fuel derived from tissue breakdown. PMID:26529252

  14. Identification of Genes Associated with Resilience/Vulnerability to Sleep Deprivation and Starvation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Thimgan, Matthew S.; Seugnet, Laurent; Turk, John; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives: Flies mutant for the canonical clock protein cycle (cyc01) exhibit a sleep rebound that is ∼10 times larger than wild-type flies and die after only 10 h of sleep deprivation. Surprisingly, when starved, cyc01 mutants can remain awake for 28 h without demonstrating negative outcomes. Thus, we hypothesized that identifying transcripts that are differentially regulated between waking induced by sleep deprivation and waking induced by starvation would identify genes that underlie the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation and/or protect flies from the negative consequences of waking. Design: We used partial complementary DNA microarrays to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between cyc01 mutants that had been sleep deprived or starved for 7 h. We then used genetics to determine whether disrupting genes involved in lipid metabolism would exhibit alterations in their response to sleep deprivation. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Interventions: Sleep deprivation and starvation. Measurements and Results: We identified 84 genes with transcript levels that were differentially modulated by 7 h of sleep deprivation and starvation in cyc01 mutants and were confirmed in independent samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Several of these genes were predicted to be lipid metabolism genes, including bubblegum, cueball, and CG4500, which based on our data we have renamed heimdall (hll). Using lipidomics we confirmed that knockdown of hll using RNA interference significantly decreased lipid stores. Importantly, genetically modifying bubblegum, cueball, or hll resulted in sleep rebound alterations following sleep deprivation compared to genetic background controls. Conclusions: We have identified a set of genes that may confer resilience/vulnerability to sleep deprivation and demonstrate that genes involved in lipid metabolism modulate sleep homeostasis. Citation: Thimgan MS

  15. Conditions for high resistance to starvation periods in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Yolanda; Ribot-Llobet, Edgar; Baeza, Juan Antonio; Guisasola, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The present work aims at understanding the performance of bioelectrochemical systems when subjected to different starvation periods, which is very relevant in view of their industrial application or use as biosensor. The results show that both microbial fuel cells (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cells (MEC) could resist starvation periods up to 10-11 days without any significant decrease in their performance when endogenous consumption was enabled by closing the circuit in MFC or applying an external voltage in MEC. By contrast, starvation periods longer than 5 days in both MFC and MEC when the flow of electrons from the anode to the cathode was not permitted thereby avoiding endogenous consumption, led to a reversible decrease in the cells performance. A longer starvation period of 21-days under open-circuit caused an irreversible performance loss of the MFC.

  16. Induction of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) during Acute Acidosis and Its Role in Acid Secretion by V-ATPase-Expressing Ionocytes

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Fumiya; Tseng, Yung-Che; Liu, Sian-Tai; Chou, Yi-Ling; Lin, Ching-Chun; Sung, Po-Hsuan; Uchida, Katsuhisa; Lin, Li-Yih; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Vacuolar-Type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) takes the central role in pumping H+ through cell membranes of diverse organisms, which is essential for surviving acid-base fluctuating lifestyles or environments. In mammals, although glucose is believed to be an important energy source to drive V-ATPase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a key enzyme for gluconeogenesis, is known to be activated in response to acidosis, the link between acid secretion and PEPCK activation remains unclear. In the present study, we used zebrafish larva as an in vivo model to show the role of acid-inducible PEPCK activity in glucose production to support higher rate of H+ secretion via V-ATPase, by utilizing gene knockdown, glucose supplementation, and non-invasive scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET). Zebrafish larvae increased V-ATPase-mediated acid secretion and transiently expression of Pck1, a zebrafish homolog of PEPCK, in response to acid stress. When pck1 gene was knocked down by specific morpholino, the H+ secretion via V-ATPase decreased, but this effect was rescued by supplementation of glucose into the yolk. By assessing changes in amino acid content and gene expression of respective enzymes, glutamine and glutamate appeared to be the major source for replenishment of Krebs cycle intermediates, which are subtracted by Pck1 activity. Unexpectedly, pck1 knockdown did not affect glutamine/glutamate catalysis, which implies that Pck1 does not necessarily drive this process. The present study provides the first in vivo evidence that acid-induced PEPCK provides glucose for acid-base homeostasis at an individual level, which is supported by rapid pumping of H+ via V-ATPase at the cellular level. PMID:25999794

  17. Life threatening self starvation; a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obsessive compulsive disorders are a complex group that can have a variety of manifestations. Many authors now describe an obsessive compulsive spectrum disorder where many other specific diagnostic entities such as trichotillomania, tic disorders and body dysmorphic disorder are considered to be related and linked disorders. Case presentation We report a case of a twenty two year old Sri Lankan male who presented with life threatening self starvation due to severe obsessive compulsive disorder. The diagnosis was not considered till late due to the atypical presentation of the patient. While his symptoms bordered on a delusional psychosis, a decision was made to treat him as for obsessive compulsive disorder with behavioural therapy which was successful in the end. Conclusions In analysis of a patient with severe anorexia, the psychological causes should not be forgotten. In fact, if the feeding pattern of the patient was observed at the beginning, unnecessary investigating and life threatening worsening of the condition could have been avoided. PMID:23369616

  18. Obesity-associated cardiac dysfunction in starvation-selected Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Christopher M; Birse, Ryan T; Wolf, Matthew J; Yu, Lin; Bodmer, Rolf; Gibbs, Allen G

    2015-09-15

    There is a clear link between obesity and cardiovascular disease, but the complexity of this interaction in mammals makes it difficult to study. Among the animal models used to investigate obesity-associated diseases, Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as an important platform of discovery. In the laboratory, Drosophila can be made obese through lipogenic diets, genetic manipulations, and adaptation to evolutionary stress. While dietary and genetic changes that cause obesity in flies have been demonstrated to induce heart dysfunction, there have been no reports investigating how obesity affects the heart in laboratory-evolved populations. Here, we studied replicated populations of Drosophila that had been selected for starvation resistance for over 65 generations. These populations evolved characteristics that closely resemble hallmarks of metabolic syndrome in mammals. We demonstrate that starvation-selected Drosophila have dilated hearts with impaired contractility. This phenotype appears to be correlated with large fat deposits along the dorsal cuticle, which alter the anatomical position of the heart. We demonstrate a strong relationship between fat storage and heart dysfunction, as dilation and reduced contractility can be rescued through prolonged fasting. Unlike other Drosophila obesity models, the starvation-selected lines do not exhibit excessive intracellular lipid deposition within the myocardium and rather store excess triglycerides in large lipid droplets within the fat body. Our findings provide a new model to investigate obesity-associated heart dysfunction.

  19. Global analysis of the Bacillus subtilis Fur regulon and the iron starvation stimulon.

    PubMed

    Baichoo, Noel; Wang, Tao; Ye, Rick; Helmann, John D

    2002-09-01

    The Bacillus subtilis ferric uptake repressor (Fur) protein coordinates a global transcriptional response to iron starvation. We have used DNA microarrays to define the Fur regulon and the iron starvation stimulon. We identify 20 operons (containing 39 genes) that are derepressed both by mutation of fur and by treatment of cells with the iron chelator 2,2'-dipyridyl. These operons are direct targets of Fur regulation as judged by DNase I footprinting. Analyses of lacZ reporter fusions to six Fur-regulated promoter regions reveal that repression is highly selective for iron. In addition to the Fur regulon, iron starvation induces members of the PerR regulon and leads to reduced expression of cytochromes. However, we did not find any evidence for genes that are directly activated by Fur or repressed by Fur under iron-limiting conditions. Although genome searches using the 19 bp Fur box consensus are useful in identifying candidate Fur-regulated genes, some genes associated with Fur boxes are not demonstrably regulated by Fur, whereas other genes are regulated from sites with little apparent similarity to the conventional Fur consensus.

  20. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Analysis of the Phosphate Starvation Stimulon of Bacillus subtilis†

    PubMed Central

    Allenby, Nicholas E. E.; O'Connor, Nicola; Prágai, Zoltán; Ward, Alan C.; Wipat, Anil; Harwood, Colin R.

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis responds to phosphate starvation stress by inducing the PhoP and SigB regulons. While the PhoP regulon provides a specific response to phosphate starvation stress, maximizing the acquisition of phosphate (Pi) from the environment and reducing the cellular requirement for this essential nutrient, the SigB regulon provides nonspecific resistance to stress by protecting essential cellular components, such as DNA and membranes. We have characterized the phosphate starvation stress response of B. subtilis at a genome-wide level using DNA macroarrays. A combination of outlier and cluster analyses identified putative new members of the PhoP regulon, namely, yfkN (2′,3′ cyclic nucleotide 2′-phosphodiesterase), yurI (RNase), yjdB (unknown), and vpr (extracellular serine protease). YurI is thought to be responsible for the nonspecific degradation of RNA, while the activity of YfkN on various nucleotide phosphates suggests that it could act on substrates liberated by YurI, which produces 3′ or 5′ phosphoribonucleotides. The putative new PhoP regulon members are either known or predicted to be secreted and are likely to be important for the recovery of inorganic phosphate from a variety of organic sources of phosphate in the environment. PMID:16291680

  1. Transfer RNA is highly unstable during early amino acid starvation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Svenningsen, Sine Lo; Kongstad, Mette; Stenum, Thomas Søndergaard; Muñoz-Gómez, Ana J.; Sørensen, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Due to its long half-life compared to messenger RNA, bacterial transfer RNA is known as stable RNA. Here, we show that tRNAs become highly unstable as part of Escherichia coli's response to amino acid starvation. Degradation of the majority of cellular tRNA occurs within twenty minutes of the onset of starvation for each of several amino acids. Both the non-cognate and cognate tRNA for the amino acid that the cell is starving for are degraded, and both charged and uncharged tRNA species are affected. The alarmone ppGpp orchestrates the stringent response to amino acid starvation. However, tRNA degradation occurs in a ppGpp-independent manner, as it occurs with similar kinetics in a relaxed mutant. Further, we also observe rapid tRNA degradation in response to rifampicin treatment, which does not induce the stringent response. We propose a unifying model for these observations, in which the surplus tRNA is degraded whenever the demand for protein synthesis is reduced. Thus, the tRNA pool is a highly regulated, dynamic entity. We propose that degradation of surplus tRNA could function to reduce mistranslation in the stressed cell, because it would reduce competition between cognate and near-cognate charged tRNAs at the ribosomal A-site. PMID:27903898

  2. Induction of Rhizopus oryzae germination under starvation using host metabolites increases spore susceptibility to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Turgeman, Tidhar; Kakongi, Nathan; Schneider, Avishai; Vinokur, Yakov; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Carmeli, Shmuel; Levy, Maggie; Skory, Christopher D; Lichter, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2014-03-01

    Sweetpotato is a nutritional source worldwide. Soft rot caused by Rhizopus spp. is a major limiting factor in the storage of produce, rendering it potentially unsafe for human consumption. In this study, Rhizopus oryzae was used to develop a concept of postharvest disease control by weakening the pathogen through induction of spore germination under starvation conditions. We isolated the sweetpotato active fractions (SPAFs) that induce spore germination and used them at a low dose to enhance spore weakening caused by starvation. Germination in SPAF at 1 mg/ml weakened the pathogen spores by delaying their ability to form colonies on rich media and by increasing their sensitivity to heat stress. The weakening effect was also supported by reduced metabolic activity, as detected by Alarmar Blue fluorescent dye assays. Spores incubated with SPAF at 1 mg/ml showed DNA fragmentation in some of their nuclei, as observed by TUNEL assay. In addition, these spores exhibited changes in ultrastructural morphology (i.e., shrinkage of germ tubes, nucleus deformation, and vacuole formation) which are hallmarks of programmed cell death. We suggest that induction of spore germination under starvation conditions increases their susceptibility to stress and, therefore, might be considered a new strategy for pathogen control.

  3. Death from drought in tropical forests is triggered by hydraulics not carbon starvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, L.; da Costa, A. C. L.; Galbraith, D. R.; Oliveira, R. S.; Binks, O. J.; Oliveira, A. A. R.; Pullen, A. M.; Doughty, C. E.; Metcalfe, D. B.; Vasconcelos, S. S.; Ferreira, L. V.; Malhi, Y.; Grace, J.; Mencuccini, M.; Meir, P.

    2015-12-01

    Drought threatens tropical rainforests over seasonal to decadal timescales, but the drivers of tree mortality following drought remain poorly understood. It has been suggested that reduced availability of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) critically increases mortality risk through insufficient carbon supply to metabolism (‘carbon starvation’). However, little is known about how NSC stores are affected by drought, especially over the long term, and whether they are more important than hydraulic processes in determining drought-induced mortality. Using data from the world’s longest-running experimental drought study in tropical rainforest (in the Brazilian Amazon), we test whether carbon starvation or deterioration of the water-conducting pathways from soil to leaf trigger tree mortality. Biomass loss from mortality in the experimentally droughted forest increased substantially after >10 years of reduced soil moisture availability. The mortality signal was dominated by the death of large trees, which were at a much greater risk of hydraulic deterioration than smaller trees. However, we find no evidence that the droughted trees suffered carbon starvation, as their NSC concentrations were similar to those of non-droughted trees, and growth rates did not decline in either living or dying trees. Our results indicate that hydraulics, rather than carbon starvation, triggers tree death from drought in tropical rainforest.

  4. Inhibition of Pig Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Isoenzymes by 3-Mercaptopicolinic Acid and Novel Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Latorre, Pedro; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier; López-Buesa, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    There exist two isoforms of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in pig populations that differ in a single amino acid (Met139Leu). The isoenzymes have different kinetic properties, affecting more strongly the Km and Vmax of nucleotides. They are associated to different phenotypes modifying traits of considerable economic interest. In this work we use inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity to search for further differences between these isoenzymes. On the one hand we have used the well-known inhibitor 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. Its inhibition patterns were the same for both isoenzymes: a three-fold decrease of the Ki values for GTP in 139Met and 139Leu (273 and 873 μM, respectively). On the other hand, through screening of a chemical library we have found two novel compounds with inhibitory effects of a similar magnitude to that of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid but with less solubility and specificity. One of these novel compounds, (N'1-({5-[1-methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-thienyl}methylidene)-2,4-dichlorobenzene-1-carbohydrazide), exhibited significantly different inhibitory effects on either isoenzyme: it enhanced threefold the apparent Km value for GTP in 139Met, whereas in 139Leu, it reduced it from 99 to 69 μM. The finding of those significant differences in the binding of GTP reinforces the hypothesis that the Met139Leu substitution affects strongly the nucleotide binding site of PEPCK-C.

  5. Inhibition of Pig Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Isoenzymes by 3-Mercaptopicolinic Acid and Novel Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Latorre, Pedro; Carrodeguas, José Alberto; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Sancho, Javier; López-Buesa, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    There exist two isoforms of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) in pig populations that differ in a single amino acid (Met139Leu). The isoenzymes have different kinetic properties, affecting more strongly the Km and Vmax of nucleotides. They are associated to different phenotypes modifying traits of considerable economic interest. In this work we use inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity to search for further differences between these isoenzymes. On the one hand we have used the well-known inhibitor 3-mercaptopicolinic acid. Its inhibition patterns were the same for both isoenzymes: a three-fold decrease of the Ki values for GTP in 139Met and 139Leu (273 and 873 μM, respectively). On the other hand, through screening of a chemical library we have found two novel compounds with inhibitory effects of a similar magnitude to that of 3-mercaptopicolinic acid but with less solubility and specificity. One of these novel compounds, (N'1-({5-[1-methyl-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]-2-thienyl}methylidene)-2,4-dichlorobenzene-1-carbohydrazide), exhibited significantly different inhibitory effects on either isoenzyme: it enhanced threefold the apparent Km value for GTP in 139Met, whereas in 139Leu, it reduced it from 99 to 69 μM. The finding of those significant differences in the binding of GTP reinforces the hypothesis that the Met139Leu substitution affects strongly the nucleotide binding site of PEPCK-C. PMID:27391465

  6. Phosphorylation of Heat Shock Protein 27 is Increased by Cast Immobilization and by Serum-free Starvation in Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Jang, Sung-Ho; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Cast immobilization- and cell starvation-induced loss of muscle mass are closely associated with a dramatic reduction in the structural muscle proteins. Heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones that are constitutively expressed in several eukaryotic cells and have been shown to protect against various stressors. However, the changes in the phosphorylation of atrophy-related heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) are still poorly understood in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examine whether or not phosphorylation of HSP27 is changed in the skeletal muscles after cast immobilization and serum-free starvation with low glucose in a time-dependent manner. [Methods] We undertook a HSP27 expression and high-resolution differential proteomic analysis in skeletal muscles. Furthermore, we used western blotting to examine protein expression and phosphorylation of HSP27 in atrophied gastrocnemius muscle strips and L6 myoblasts. [Results] Cast immobilization and starvation significantly upregulated the phosphorylation of HSP27 in a time-dependent manner, respectively. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that cast immobilization- and serum-free starvation-induced atrophy may be in part related to changes in the phosphorylation of HSP27 in rat skeletal muscles. PMID:25540511

  7. Extracellular signal molecule(s) involved in the carbon starvation response of marine Vibrio sp. strain S14.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S; Ostling, J; Charlton, T; de Nys, R; Takayama, K; Kjelleberg, S

    1998-01-01

    The role of exogenous metabolites as putative signal molecules mediating and/or regulating the carbon starvation adaptation program in Vibrio sp. strain S14 was investigated. Addition of the stationary-phase supernatant extract (SSE) of Vibrio sp. strain S14 to logarithmic-phase cells resulted in a significant number of carbon starvation-induced proteins being up-regulated. Halogenated furanones, putative antagonists of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), inhibited the synthesis of proteins specifically induced upon carbon starvation. The effect of the furanone was the opposite of that caused by SSE with respect to the up- and down-regulation of protein expression, indicating that both the furanone and the putative signalling molecules were acting on the same regulatory pathway. Culturability was rapidly lost when Vibrio sp. strain S14 was starved in the presence of the furanone at a low concentration. The furanone also had a negative effect on the ability of carbon-starved cells to mount resistance against UV irradiation and hydrogen peroxide exposure. The SSE of Vibrio sp. strain S14 had the ability to provide cross-protection against the loss in viability caused by the furanone. We have further demonstrated that the SSE taken from low- as well as high-cell-density cultures of Vibrio sp. strain S14 induced luminescence in Vibrio harveyi. Taken together, the results in this report provide evidence that Vibrio sp. strain S14 produces extracellular signalling metabolites during carbon and energy starvation and that these molecules play an important role in the expression of proteins crucial to the development of starvation- and stress-resistant phenotypes.

  8. The effects of stress and injury on the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the liver of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, J G; Heath, D F

    1986-01-01

    The effects of stress (diethyl ether anaesthesia for 4-8 min, or intravenous injection of 0.05 ml of a dimethyl sulphoxide/water mixture) and of a scald injury given under ether anaesthesia on hepatic PEPCK (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, EC 4.1.1.32) were studied in the post-absorptive rat. Injury raised PEPCK activity by about 70% in 2 h and by over 100% in 4 h, over three times as fast as in animals that had only been handled (controls). The two stresses, both of types commonly imposed in animal experiments, had almost as much effect as injury for the first 2 h, although much less thereafter. The roles of sympathetic stimulation and corticosterone in mediating these rises were studied by using alpha beta-blockers and trilostane respectively as inhibitors. (Trilostane only decreased corticosterone concentrations to a little above control values.) The ether-induced increase was somewhat decreased by alpha beta-blockade, but was only eliminated by combined alpha beta-blockade and trilostane. After injury, however, PEPCK synthesis was unaffected by either alpha beta-blockade or trilostane, although it was decreased by their combined action; and it seems that either corticosterone or sympathetic stimulation was sufficient to stimulate PEPCK synthesis maximally. Stimulation by corticosterone was much greater than reported previously by others, for reasons that are discussed. Sympathetic stimulation may have been mediated by glucagon and cyclic AMP, since injury raised portal glucagon concentrations, and stress and injury raised those of hepatic cyclic AMP. PEPCK synthesis was, however, stimulated despite increases in portal insulin concentration, and was not related to the [insulin]/[glucagon] ratio. Thus stress and injury over-rode normal control mechanisms. PMID:3006659

  9. The pepper phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase CaPEPCK1 is involved in plant immunity against bacterial and oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-09-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a member of the lyase family, is involved in the metabolic pathway of gluconeogenesis in organisms. Although the major function of PEPCK in gluconeogenesis is well established, it is unclear whether this enzyme is involved in plant immunity. Here, we isolated and identified the pepper (Capsicum annuum) PEPCK (CaPEPCK1) gene from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaPEPCK1 was strongly expressed in pepper leaves during the incompatible interaction with avirulent Xcv and in response to environmental stresses, especially salicylic acid (SA) treatment. PEPCK activity was low in healthy leaves but dramatically increased in avirulent Xcv-infected leaves. Knock-down expression of CaPEPCK1 by virus-induced gene silencing resulted in high levels of susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Xcv infection. CaPEPCK1 silencing in pepper compromised induction of the basal defense-marker genes CaPR1 (pathogenesis-related 1 protein), CaPR10 (pathogenesis-related 10 protein) and CaDEF1 (defensin) during Xcv infection. SA accumulation was also significantly suppressed in the CaPEPCK1-silenced pepper leaves infected with Xcv. CaPEPCK1 in an Arabidopsis overexpression (OX) line inhibited the proliferation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa). CaPEPCK1-OX plants developed more rapidly, with enlarged leaves, compared to wild-type plants. The T-DNA insertion Arabidopsis orthologous mutants pck1-3 and pck1-4 were more susceptible to the bacterial Pst and oomycete Hpa pathogens than the wild type. Taken together, these results suggest that CaPEPCK positively contributes to plant innate immunity against hemibiotrophic bacterial and obligate biotrophic oomycete pathogens.

  10. A combined 15N tracing/proteomics study in Brassica napus reveals the chronology of proteomics events associated with N remobilisation during leaf senescence induced by nitrate limitation or starvation.

    PubMed

    Desclos, Marie; Etienne, Philippe; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Bonnefoy, Josette; Segura, Raphaël; Reze, Sandrine; Ourry, Alain; Avice, Jean-Christophe

    2009-07-01

    Our goal was to identify the leaf proteomic changes which appeared during N remobilisation that were associated or not associated with senescence of oilseed rape in response to contrasting nitrate availability. Remobilisation of N and leaf senescence status were followed using (15)N tracing, patterns of chlorophyll level, total protein content and a molecular indicator based on expression of senescence-associated gene 12/Cab genes. Three phases associated with N remobilisation were distinguished. Proteomics revealed that 55 proteins involved in metabolism, energy, detoxification, stress response, proteolysis and protein folding, were significantly induced during N remobilisation. Four proteases were specifically identified. FtsH, a chloroplastic protease, was induced transiently during the early stages of N remobilisation. Considering the dynamics of N remobilisation, chlorophyll and protein content, the pattern of FtsH expression indicated that this protease could be involved in the degradation of chloroplastic proteins. Aspartic protease increased at the beginning of senescence and was maintained at a high level, implicating this protease in proteolysis during the course of leaf senescence. Two proteases, proteasome beta subunit A1 and senescence-associated gene 12, were induced and continued to increase during the later phase of senescence, suggesting that these proteases are more specifically involved in the proteolysis processes occurring at the final stages of leaf senescence.

  11. Dynamics of the Escherichia coli proteome in response to nitrogen starvation and entry into the stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Sanchuki, Heloisa B S; Gravina, Fernanda; Rodrigues, Thiago E; Gerhardt, Edileusa C M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Raittz, Roberto T; Valdameri, Glaucio; de Souza, Gustavo A; Huergo, Luciano F

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen is needed for the biosynthesis of biomolecules including proteins and nucleic acids. In the absence of fixed nitrogen prokaryotes such as E. coli immediately ceases growth. Ammonium is the preferred nitrogen source for E. coli supporting the fastest growth rates. Under conditions of ammonium limitation, E. coli can use alternative nitrogen sources to supply ammonium ions and this reprogramming is led by the induction of the NtrC regulon. Here we used label free proteomics to determine the dynamics of E. coli proteins expression in response to ammonium starvation in both the short (30min) and the longer (60min) starvation. Protein abundances and post-translational modifications confirmed that activation of the NtrC regulon acts as the first line of defense against nitrogen starvation. The ribosome inactivating protein Rmf was induced shortly after ammonium exhaustion and this was preceded by induction of other ribosome inactivating proteins such as Hpf and RaiA supporting the hypothesis that ribosome shut-down is a key process during nitrogen limitation stress. The proteomic data revealed that growth arrest due to nitrogen starvation correlates with the accumulation of proteins involved in DNA condensation, RNA and protein catabolism and ribosome hibernation. Collectively, these proteome adaptations will result in metabolic inactive cells which are likely to exhibit multidrug tolerance.

  12. Compensation phenomena found in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans after starvation stress.

    PubMed

    Tu, Bowen; Li, Juan; Guo, Yueshuai; Guo, Xuejiang; Lu, Xiancai; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-06-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans showed the compensate growth and oxidation after re-feeding with sufficient ferrous materials after starvation. Compensatory phenomena were first detected in chemoautotrophic organisms. Starvation stress of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was achieved via culturing in low concentrations of iron. During compensation, growth and ferrous oxidation took place faster than in controls. In addition, some genes related to ferrous oxidation (such as rus) and carbon assimilation (cbbR, csoS3) were expressed in different patterns in the low energy environments. Their expression patterns can account for this increased growth and oxidation. Other groups of genes (cspAB, feoAB, fur) were suppressed in response to starvation stress. The presence of pyrite and joint cold stress can render compensation nearly undetectable. This may be why the compensation phenomena observed under these conditions was not the same as that observed under single starvation stress conditions. Gene expression reflected a possible mechanism of tolerance to starvation in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, which would allow the organism to adapt and survive in ferrous-limited environments.

  13. Phosphate starvation enhances the pathogenesis of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Somya; Somani, Vikas Kumar; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the factors responsible for survival and virulence of Bacillus anthracis within the host is prerequisite for the development of therapeutics against anthrax. Host provides several stresses as well as many advantages to the invading pathogen. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation within the host has been considered as one of the major contributing factors in the establishment of infection by pathogenic microorganisms. Here, we report for the first time that Pi fluctuation encountered by B. anthracis at different stages of its life cycle within the host, contributes significantly in its pathogenesis. In this study, Pi starvation was found to hasten the onset of infection cycle by promoting spore germination. After germination, it was found to impede cell growth. In addition, phosphate starved bacilli showed more antibiotic tolerance. Interestingly, phosphate starvation enhanced the pathogenicity of B. anthracis by augmenting its invasiveness in macrophages in vitro. B. anthracis grown under phosphate starvation were also found to be more efficient in establishing lethal infections in mouse model as well. Phosphate starvation increased B. anthracis virulence by promoting the secretion of primary virulence factors like protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF). Thus, this study affirms that besides other host mediated factors, phosphate limitation may also contribute B. anthracis for successfully establishing itself within the host. This study is a step forward in delineating its pathophysiology that might help in understanding the pathogenesis of anthrax.

  14. The role of carbon starvation in the induction of enzymes that degrade plant-derived carbohydrates in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    van Munster, Jolanda M.; Daly, Paul; Delmas, Stéphane; Pullan, Steven T.; Blythe, Martin J.; Malla, Sunir; Kokolski, Matthew; Noltorp, Emelie C.M.; Wennberg, Kristin; Fetherston, Richard; Beniston, Richard; Yu, Xiaolan; Dupree, Paul; Archer, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are an important source of enzymes for saccharification of plant polysaccharides and production of biofuels. Understanding of the regulation and induction of expression of genes encoding these enzymes is still incomplete. To explore the induction mechanism, we analysed the response of the industrially important fungus Aspergillus niger to wheat straw, with a focus on events occurring shortly after exposure to the substrate. RNA sequencing showed that the transcriptional response after 6 h of exposure to wheat straw was very different from the response at 24 h of exposure to the same substrate. For example, less than half of the genes encoding carbohydrate active enzymes that were induced after 24 h of exposure to wheat straw, were also induced after 6 h exposure. Importantly, over a third of the genes induced after 6 h of exposure to wheat straw were also induced during 6 h of carbon starvation, indicating that carbon starvation is probably an important factor in the early response to wheat straw. The up-regulation of the expression of a high number of genes encoding CAZymes that are active on plant-derived carbohydrates during early carbon starvation suggests that these enzymes could be involved in a scouting role during starvation, releasing inducing sugars from complex plant polysaccharides. We show, using proteomics, that carbon-starved cultures indeed release CAZymes with predicted activity on plant polysaccharides. Analysis of the enzymatic activity and the reaction products, indicates that these proteins are enzymes that can degrade various plant polysaccharides to generate both known, as well as potentially new, inducers of CAZymes. PMID:24792495

  15. Carbohydrate starvation causes a metabolically active but nonculturable state in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Balasubramanian; Stuart, Mark R; Weimer, Bart C

    2007-04-01

    This study characterized the ability of lactococci to become nonculturable under carbohydrate starvation while maintaining metabolic activity. We determined the changes in physiological parameters and extracellular substrate levels of multiple lactococcal strains under a number of environmental conditions along with whole-genome expression profiles. Three distinct phases were observed, logarithmic growth, sugar exhaustion, and nonculturability. Shortly after carbohydrate starvation, each lactococcal strain lost the ability to form colonies on solid media but maintained an intact cell membrane and metabolic activity for over 3.5 years. ML3, a strain that metabolized lactose rapidly, reached nonculturability within 1 week. Strains that metabolized lactose slowly (SK11) or not at all (IL1403) required 1 to 3 months to become nonculturable. In all cases, the cells contained at least 100 pM of intracellular ATP after 6 months of starvation and remained at that level for the remainder of the study. Aminopeptidase and lipase/esterase activities decreased below detection limits during the nonculturable phase. During sugar exhaustion and entry into nonculturability, serine and methionine were produced, while glutamine and arginine were depleted from the medium. The cells retained the ability to transport amino acids via proton motive force and peptides via ATP-driven translocation. The addition of branched-chain amino acids to the culture medium resulted in increased intracellular ATP levels and new metabolic products, indicating that branched-chain amino acid catabolism resulted in energy and metabolic products to support survival during starvation. Gene expression analysis showed that the genes responsible for sugar metabolism were repressed as the cells entered nonculturability. The genes responsible for cell division were repressed, while autolysis and cell wall metabolism genes were induced neither at starvation nor during nonculturability. Taken together, these

  16. Carbohydrate Starvation Causes a Metabolically Active but Nonculturable State in Lactococcus lactis▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Balasubramanian; Stuart, Mark R.; Weimer, Bart C.

    2007-01-01

    This study characterized the ability of lactococci to become nonculturable under carbohydrate starvation while maintaining metabolic activity. We determined the changes in physiological parameters and extracellular substrate levels of multiple lactococcal strains under a number of environmental conditions along with whole-genome expression profiles. Three distinct phases were observed, logarithmic growth, sugar exhaustion, and nonculturability. Shortly after carbohydrate starvation, each lactococcal strain lost the ability to form colonies on solid media but maintained an intact cell membrane and metabolic activity for over 3.5 years. ML3, a strain that metabolized lactose rapidly, reached nonculturability within 1 week. Strains that metabolized lactose slowly (SK11) or not at all (IL1403) required 1 to 3 months to become nonculturable. In all cases, the cells contained at least 100 pM of intracellular ATP after 6 months of starvation and remained at that level for the remainder of the study. Aminopeptidase and lipase/esterase activities decreased below detection limits during the nonculturable phase. During sugar exhaustion and entry into nonculturability, serine and methionine were produced, while glutamine and arginine were depleted from the medium. The cells retained the ability to transport amino acids via proton motive force and peptides via ATP-driven translocation. The addition of branched-chain amino acids to the culture medium resulted in increased intracellular ATP levels and new metabolic products, indicating that branched-chain amino acid catabolism resulted in energy and metabolic products to support survival during starvation. Gene expression analysis showed that the genes responsible for sugar metabolism were repressed as the cells entered nonculturability. The genes responsible for cell division were repressed, while autolysis and cell wall metabolism genes were induced neither at starvation nor during nonculturability. Taken together, these

  17. The Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System Is Involved in Sensitivity to the Glucosylated Bacteriocin Sublancin

    PubMed Central

    Garcia De Gonzalo, C. V.; Denham, E. L.; Mars, R. A. T.; Stülke, J.

    2015-01-01

    The mode of action of a group of glycosylated antimicrobial peptides known as glycocins remains to be elucidated. In the current study of one glycocin, sublancin, we identified the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) of Bacillus species as a key player in bacterial sensitivity. Sublancin kills several Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus species and Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Unlike other classes of bacteriocins for which the PTS is involved in their mechanism of action, we show that the addition of PTS-requiring sugars leads to increased resistance rather than increased sensitivity, suggesting that sublancin has a distinct mechanism of action. Collectively, our present mutagenesis and genomic studies demonstrate that the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) and domain A of enzyme II (PtsG) in particular are critical determinants for bacterial sensitivity to sublancin. PMID:26282429

  18. Location and characterization of two widely separated glucocorticoid response elements in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, D.D.; Magnuson, M.A.; Granner, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    Chimeric genes were constructed by fusion of various regions of the 5'-flanking sequence from the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK) gene to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase-coding sequence and to simian virus 40 splice and polyadenylation sequences. These were used to demonstrate that two glucocorticoid regulatory elements (GREs) combine to confer glucocorticoid responsiveness upon the PEPCK gene in H4IIE hepatoma cells. Both elements, distal one whose 5' boundary is located between -1264 and -1111 base pairs and a proximal one located between -468 and -420 base pairs relative to the transcription initiation site, act independently, in various positions and orientations, and upon the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter. Each element accounts for half of the maximal response of the chimeric genes. Therefore, two widely separated enhancerlike elements contribute equally to the response of the PEPCK gene to glucocorticoid hormones. Neither of the PEPCK GREs contains the TGTTCT consensus sequence associated with most other GREs.

  19. Cloning, sequencing, and overexpression of the Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pckA) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Laivenieks, M; Vieille, C; Zeikus, J G

    1997-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase-encoding gene from the anaerobic, CO2-fixing, succinate-producing bacterium Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a 532-residue polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 58.7 kDa. The sequence of the A. succiniciproducens PEP carboxykinase was similar to those of all known ATP/ADP-dependent PEP carboxykinases. In particular, the A. succiniciproducens enzyme was 67.3% identical and 79.2% similar to the E. coli enzyme. The A. succiniciproducens pckA transcription start site was determined, and putative promoter regions were identified. The recombinant enzyme was overexpressed in E. coli. The purified enzyme was indiscernible from the native enzyme by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had the same activity as the native enzyme. PMID:9172347

  20. Location and characterization of two widely separated glucocorticoid response elements in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, D D; Magnuson, M A; Granner, D K

    1988-01-01

    Chimeric genes were constructed by fusion of various regions of the 5'-flanking sequence from the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK) gene to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase-coding sequence and to simian virus 40 splice and polyadenylation sequences. These were used to demonstrate that two glucocorticoid regulatory elements (GREs) combine to confer glucocorticoid responsiveness upon the PEPCK gene in H4IIE hepatoma cells. Both elements, a distal one whose 5' boundary is located between -1264 and -1111 base pairs and a proximal one located between -468 and -420 base pairs relative to the transcription initiation site, act independently, in various positions and orientations, and upon the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter. Each element accounts for half of the maximal response of the chimeric genes. Therefore, two widely separated enhancerlike elements contribute equally to the response of the PEPCK gene to glucocorticoid hormones. Neither of the PEPCK GREs contains the TGTTCT consensus sequence associated with most other GREs. Images PMID:3422101

  1. Nitric oxide regulation of leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase activity: implication in sorghum responses to salinity.

    PubMed

    Monreal, José A; Arias-Baldrich, Cirenia; Tossi, Vanesa; Feria, Ana B; Rubio-Casal, Alfredo; García-Mata, Carlos; Lamattina, Lorenzo; García-Mauriño, Sofía

    2013-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule that mediates many plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, including salt stress. Interestingly, salinity increases NO production selectively in mesophyll cells of sorghum leaves, where photosynthetic C₄ phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (C₄ PEPCase) is located. PEPCase is regulated by a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase (PEPCase-k), which levels are greatly enhanced by salinity in sorghum. This work investigated whether NO is involved in this effect. NO donors (SNP, SNAP), the inhibitor of NO synthesis NNA, and the NO scavenger cPTIO were used for long- and short-term treatments. Long-term treatments had multifaceted consequences on both PPCK gene expression and PEPCase-k activity, and they also decreased photosynthetic gas-exchange parameters and plant growth. Nonetheless, it could be observed that SNP increased PEPCase-k activity, resembling salinity effect. Short-term treatments with NO donors, which did not change photosynthetic gas-exchange parameters and PPCK gene expression, increased PEPCase-k activity both in illuminated leaves and in leaves kept at dark. At least in part, these effects were independent on protein synthesis. PEPCase-k activity was not decreased by short-term treatment with cycloheximide in NaCl-treated plants; on the contrary, it was decreased by cPTIO. In summary, NO donors mimicked salt effect on PEPCase-k activity, and scavenging of NO abolished it. Collectively, these results indicate that NO is involved in the complex control of PEPCase-k activity, and it may mediate some of the plant responses to salinity.

  2. Analysis of starvation effects on hydrodynamic lubrication in nonconforming contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical methods were used to determine the effects of lubricant starvation on the minimum film thickness under conditions of a hydrodynamic point contact. Starvation was effected by varying the fluid inlet level. The Reynolds boundary conditions were applied at the cavitation boundary and zero pressure was stipulated at the meniscus or inlet boundary. A minimum-fill-thickness equation as a function of both the ratio of dimensionless load to dimensionless speed and inlet supply level was determined. By comparing the film generated under the starved inlet condition with the film generated from the fully flooded inlet, an expression for the film reduction factor was obtained. Based on this factor a starvation threshold was defined as well as a critically starved inlet. The changes in the inlet pressure buildup due to changing the available lubricant supply are presented in the form of three dimensional isometric plots and also in the form of contour plots.

  3. Starvation driven diffusion as a survival strategy of biological organisms.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunjoo; Kim, Yong-Jung

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce a diffusion model for biological organisms that increase their motility when food or other resource is insufficient. It is shown in this paper that Fick's diffusion law does not explain such a starvation driven diffusion correctly. The diffusion model for nonuniform Brownian motion in Kim (Einstein's random walk and thermal diffusion, preprint http://amath.kaist.ac.kr/papers/Kim/31.pdf , 2013) is employed in this paper and a Fokker-Planck type diffusion law is obtained. Lotka-Volterra type competition systems with spatial heterogeneity are tested, where one species follows the starvation driven diffusion and the other follows the linear diffusion. In heterogeneous environments, the starvation driven diffusion turns out to be a better survival strategy than the linear one. Various issues such as the global asymptotic stability, convergence to an ideal free distribution, the extinction and coexistence of competing species are discussed.

  4. Convergent Starvation Signals and Hormone Crosstalk in Regulating Nutrient Mobilization upon Germination in Cereals[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ya-Fang; Ho, Tuan-Hua David; Wu, Chin-Feng; Ho, Shin-Lon; Yeh, Rong-Hwei; Lu, Chung-An; Chen, Peng-Wen; Yu, Lin-Chih; Chao, Annlin; Yu, Su-May

    2012-01-01

    Germination is a unique developmental transition from metabolically quiescent seed to actively growing seedling that requires an ensemble of hydrolases for coordinated nutrient mobilization to support heterotrophic growth until autotrophic photosynthesis is established. This study reveals two crucial transcription factors, MYBS1 and MYBGA, present in rice (Oryza sativa) and barley (Hordeum vulgare), that function to integrate diverse nutrient starvation and gibberellin (GA) signaling pathways during germination of cereal grains. Sugar represses but sugar starvation induces MYBS1 synthesis and its nuclear translocation. GA antagonizes sugar repression by enhancing conuclear transport of the GA-inducible MYBGA with MYBS1 and the formation of a stable bipartite MYB-DNA complex to activate the α-amylase gene. We further discovered that not only sugar but also nitrogen and phosphate starvation signals converge and interconnect with GA to promote the conuclear import of MYBS1 and MYBGA, resulting in the expression of a large set of GA-inducible but functionally distinct hydrolases, transporters, and regulators associated with mobilization of the full complement of nutrients to support active seedling growth in cereals. PMID:22773748

  5. Fibroblast growth factor rescues brain endothelial cells lacking presenilin 1 from apoptotic cell death following serum starvation

    PubMed Central

    Gama Sosa, Miguel A.; De Gasperi, Rita; Hof, Patrick R.; Elder, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (Psen1) is important for vascular brain development and is known to influence cellular stress responses. To understand the role of Psen1 in endothelial stress responses, we investigated the effects of serum withdrawal on wild type (wt) and Psen1−/− embryonic brain endothelial cells. Serum starvation induced apoptosis in Psen1−/− cells but did not affect wt cells. PI3K/AKT signaling was reduced in serum-starved Psen1−/− cells, and this was associated with elevated levels of phospho-p38 consistent with decreased pro-survival AKT signaling in the absence of Psen1. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF1 and FGF2), but not vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) rescued Psen1−/− cells from serum starvation induced apoptosis. Inhibition of FGF signaling induced apoptosis in wt cells under serum withdrawal, while blocking γ-secretase activity had no effect. In the absence of serum, FGF2 immunoreactivity was distributed diffusely in cytoplasmic and nuclear vesicles of wt and Psen1−/− cells, as levels of FGF2 in nuclear and cytosolic fractions were not significantly different. Thus, sensitivity of Psen1−/− cells to serum starvation is not due to lack of FGF synthesis but likely to effects of Psen1 on FGF release onto the cell surface and impaired activation of the PI3K/AKT survival pathway. PMID:27443835

  6. Dynamics of zonal hepatocyte heterogeneity. Perinatal development and adaptive alterations during regeneration after partial hepatectomy, starvation and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jungermann, K

    1986-01-01

    The liver is the "glucostat" of the organism and serves at the same time as an "ammonia-sink and pH stat". The key enzymes involved in glucose uptake and release and in urea and glutamine formation are reciprocally distributed over the liver parenchyma: The glucogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), fructosebisphosphatase (FBPase) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) as well as the ureagenic enzyme carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CAPS) are predominant in the periportal zone. The glycolytic enzymes glucokinase (GK) and pyruvate kinase type L (PKL) as well as the glutaminogenic enzyme glutamine synthetase (GluNS) are prevalent in the perivenous zone. This heterogeneity appears to be a prerequisite for the normal "glucostat, ammonia-sink and pH-stat" function of the liver. After birth the liver is a gluconeogenic organ, only with weaning it becomes a "glycolytic/gluconeogenic" glucostat. In the rat zonation of PEPCK, G6Pase and CAPS developed gradually after birth and was completed before weaning, i.e. before it would be functionally required. After 2/3 partial hepatectomy the liver looses its normal glucostat function and becomes a gluconeogenic organ. With this change the zonation of PEPCK and PKL were also lost; it was restored only during the second week after operation. During starvation the liver also looses its glucostat function to become the major glucose supplier of the organism. Zonation of PEPCK and PKL were diminished to such an extent that the major function of the perivenous zone was altered from glucose uptake to release. In diabetes the liver does not loose its glucostat function; however, the function is severely impaired. Zonation of PEPCK was increased and that of PKL decreased in such a manner that the major function of the perivenous zone, glucose uptake, was not entirely changed but only diminished. It can be concluded that in the various physiological states studied the zonation of enzymes correlated well with the glucostat

  7. Proteomic adaptations to starvation prepare Escherichia coli for disinfection tolerance.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhe; Nandakumar, Renu; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Li, Xu

    2015-02-01

    Despite the low nutrient level and constant presence of secondary disinfectants, bacterial re-growth still occurs in drinking water distribution systems. The molecular mechanisms that starved bacteria use to survive low-level chlorine-based disinfectants are not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate these molecular mechanisms at the protein level that prepare starved cells for disinfection tolerance. Two commonly used secondary disinfectants chlorine and monochloramine, both at 1 mg/L, were used in this study. The proteomes of normal and starved Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655) cells were studied using quantitative proteomics. Over 60-min disinfection, starved cells showed significantly higher disinfection tolerance than normal cells based on the inactivation curves for both chlorine and monochloramine. Proteomic analyses suggest that starvation may prepare cells for the oxidative stress that chlorine-based disinfection will cause by affecting glutathione metabolism. In addition, proteins involved in stress regulation and stress responses were among the ones up-regulated under both starvation and chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. By comparing the fold changes under different conditions, it is suggested that starvation prepares E. coli for disinfection tolerance by increasing the expression of enzymes that can help cells survive chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. Protein co-expression analyses show that proteins in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway that were up-regulated under starvation are also involved in disinfection tolerance. Finally, the production and detoxification of methylglyoxal may be involved in the chlorine-based disinfection and cell defense mechanisms.

  8. Proteomic Adaptations to Starvation Prepare Escherichia coli for Disinfection Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhe; Nandakumar, Renu; Nickerson, Kenneth; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the low nutrient level and constant presence of secondary disinfectants, bacterial re-growth still occurs in drinking water distribution systems. The molecular mechanisms that starved bacteria use to survive low-level chlorine-based disinfectants are not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate these molecular mechanisms at the protein level that prepare starved cells for disinfection tolerance. Two commonly used secondary disinfectants chlorine and monochloramine, both at 1 mg/L, were used in this study. The proteomes of normal and starved Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655) cells were studied using quantitative proteomics. Over 60-min disinfection, starved cells showed significantly higher disinfection tolerance than normal cells based on the inactivation curves for both chlorine and monochloramine. Proteomic analyses suggest that starvation may prepare cells for the oxidative stress that chlorine-based disinfection will cause by affecting glutathione metabolism. In addition, proteins involved in stress regulation and stress responses were among the ones up-regulated under both starvation and chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. By comparing the fold changes under different conditions, it is suggested that starvation prepares E. coli for disinfection tolerance by increasing the expression of enzymes that can help cells survive chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. Protein co-expression analyses show that proteins in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway that were up-regulated under starvation are also involved in disinfection tolerance. Finally, the production and detoxification of methylglyoxal may be involved in the chlorine-based disinfection and cell defense mechanisms. PMID:25463932

  9. Starvation Improves Survival of Bacteria Introduced into Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kazuya; Miyashita, Mariko; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2000-01-01

    A phenol-degrading bacterium, Ralstonia eutropha E2, was grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium or in an inorganic medium (called MP) supplemented with phenol and harvested at the late-exponential-growth phase. Phenol-acclimated activated sludge was inoculated with the E2 cells immediately after harvest or after starvation in MP for 2 or 7 days. The densities of the E2 populations in the activated sludge were then monitored by quantitative PCR. The E2 cells grown on phenol and starved for 2 days (P-2 cells) survived in the activated sludge better than those treated differently: the population density of the P-2 cells 7 days after their inoculation was 50 to 100 times higher than the population density of E2 cells without starvation or that with 7-day starvation. LB medium-grown cells either starved or nonstarved were rapidly eliminated from the sludge. The P-2 cells showed a high cell surface hydrophobicity and retained metabolic activities. Cells otherwise prepared did not have one of these two features. From these observations, it is assumed that hydrophobic cell surface and metabolic activities higher than certain levels were required for the inoculated bacteria to survive in the activated sludge. Reverse transcriptase PCR analyses showed that the P-2 cells initiated the expression of phenol hydroxylase within 1 day of their inoculation into the sludge. These results suggest the utility of a short starvation treatment for improving the efficacy of bioaugumentation. PMID:10966407

  10. Long Term Effects of Infant Starvation on Learning Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Pnina S.; And Others

    This study investigated the specific learning abilities and general adjustment of 50 children, 5-14 years of age, who had pyloric stenosis (PS) in infancy, compared to 44 siblings and 50 matched control children. PS involves a period of brief starvation in early infancy, unrelated to socioeconomic conditions and is surgically correctable. The…

  11. Transcriptome and metabolome analysis of plant sulfate starvation and resupply provides novel information on transcriptional regulation of metabolism associated with sulfur, nitrogen and phosphorus nutritional responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bielecka, Monika; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Morcuende, Rosa; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; Hesse, Holger; Hoefgen, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. Reaching a thorough understanding of the molecular basis for changes in plant metabolism depending on the sulfur-nutritional status at the systems level will advance our basic knowledge and help target future crop improvement. Although the transcriptional responses induced by sulfate starvation have been studied in the past, knowledge of the regulation of sulfur metabolism is still fragmentary. This work focuses on the discovery of candidates for regulatory genes such as transcription factors (TFs) using ‘omics technologies. For this purpose a short term sulfate-starvation/re-supply approach was used. ATH1 microarray studies and metabolite determinations yielded 21 TFs which responded more than 2-fold at the transcriptional level to sulfate starvation. Categorization by response behaviors under sulfate-starvation/re-supply and other nutrient starvations such as nitrate and phosphate allowed determination of whether the TF genes are specific for or common between distinct mineral nutrient depletions. Extending this co-behavior analysis to the whole transcriptome data set enabled prediction of putative downstream genes. Additionally, combinations of transcriptome and metabolome data allowed identification of relationships between TFs and downstream responses, namely, expression changes in biosynthetic genes and subsequent metabolic responses. Effect chains on glucosinolate and polyamine biosynthesis are discussed in detail. The knowledge gained from this study provides a blueprint for an integrated analysis of transcriptomics and metabolomics and application for the identification of uncharacterized genes. PMID:25674096

  12. Conformational Flexibility Enables the Function of a BECN1 Region Essential for Starvation-Mediated Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yang; Ramanathan, Arvind; Glover, Karen; Stanley, Christopher; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Yang, Zhongyu; Colbert, Christopher L; Sinha, Sangita C

    2016-04-05

    BECN1 is essential for autophagy, a critical eukaryotic cellular homeostasis pathway. Here we delineate a highly conserved BECN1 domain located between previously characterized BH3 and coiled-coil domains and elucidate its structure and role in autophagy. The 2.0 Å sulfur-single-wavelength anomalous dispersion X-ray crystal structure of this domain demonstrates that its N-terminal half is unstructured while its C-terminal half is helical; hence, we name it the flexible helical domain (FHD). Circular dichroism spectroscopy, double electron-electron resonance-electron paramagnetic resonance, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses confirm that the FHD is partially disordered, even in the context of adjacent BECN1 domains. Molecular dynamic simulations fitted to SAXS data indicate that the FHD transiently samples more helical conformations. FHD helicity increases in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, suggesting it may become more helical upon binding. Lastly, cellular studies show that conserved FHD residues are required for starvation-induced autophagy. Thus, the FHD likely undergoes a binding-associated disorder-to-helix transition, and conserved residues critical for this interaction are essential for starvation-induced autophagy.

  13. Effect of nitrogen starvation on desiccation tolerance of Arctic Microcoleus strains (cyanobacteria)

    PubMed Central

    Tashyreva, Daria; Elster, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Although desiccation tolerance of Microcoleus species is a well-known phenomenon, there is very little information about their limits of desiccation tolerance in terms of cellular water content, the survival rate of their cells, and the environmental factors inducing their resistance to drying. We have discovered that three Microcoleus strains, isolated from terrestrial habitats of the High Arctic, survived extensive dehydration (to 0.23 g water g-1 dry mass), but did not tolerate complete desiccation (to 0.03 g water g-1 dry mass) regardless of pre-desiccation treatments. However, these treatments were critical for the survival of incomplete desiccation: cultures grown under optimal conditions failed to survive even incomplete desiccation; a low temperature enabled only 0–15% of cells to survive, while 39.8–65.9% of cells remained alive and intact after nitrogen starvation. Unlike Nostoc, which co-exists with Microcoleus in Arctic terrestrial habitats, Microcoleus strains are not truly anhydrobiotic and do not possess constitutive desiccation tolerance. Instead, it seems that the survival strategy of Microcoleus in periodically dry habitats involves avoidance of complete desiccation, but tolerance to milder desiccation stress, which is induced by suboptimal conditions (e.g., nitrogen starvation). PMID:25904909

  14. Tomato strigolactones are derived from carotenoids and their biosynthesis is promoted by phosphate starvation.

    PubMed

    López-Ráez, Juan Antonio; Charnikhova, Tatsiana; Gómez-Roldán, Victoria; Matusova, Radoslava; Kohlen, Wouter; De Vos, Ric; Verstappen, Francel; Puech-Pages, Virginie; Bécard, Guillaume; Mulder, Patrick; Bouwmeester, Harro

    2008-01-01

    * Strigolactones are rhizosphere signalling compounds that mediate host location in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and parasitic plants. Here, the regulation of the biosynthesis of strigolactones is studied in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). * Strigolactone production under phosphate starvation, in the presence of the carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitor fluridone and in the abscisic acid (ABA) mutant notabilis were assessed using a germination bioassay with seeds of Orobanche ramosa; a hyphal branching assay with Gigaspora spp; and by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. * The root exudates of tomato cv. MoneyMaker induced O. ramosa seed germination and hyphal branching in AM fungi. Phosphate starvation markedly increased, and fluridone strongly decreased, this activity. Exudates of notabilis induced approx. 40% less germination than the wild-type. The LC-MS/MS analysis confirmed that the biological activity and changes therein were due to the presence of several strigolactones; orobanchol, solanacol and two or three didehydro-orobanchol isomers. * These results show that the AM branching factors and parasitic plant germination stimulants in tomato root exudate are strigolactones and that they are biosynthetically derived from carotenoids. The dual activity of these signalling compounds in attracting beneficial AM fungi and detrimental parasitic plants is further strengthened by environmental conditions such as phosphate availability.

  15. Comparison of starvation and elastase models of emphysema in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R.; Mauderly, J.L.; Gregory, R.E.; Pickrell, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Starvation and elastase-induced changes in rat lung structure, biochemistry, and function were compared as models of human pulmonary emphysema. Ten-week-old male rats were instilled intratracheally with either porcine pancreatic elastase in saline (E) or with saline alone. A group of the saline-instilled rats were fed one third of their normal food intake until a 45% loss of body weight occurred (S). The remaining saline-instilled rats served as control animals (C). Post-treatment evaluations included in vivo respiratory function, lung histopathologic and morphometric analyses, lung tissue proteinolytic activity, and lung collagen. The E rats had in vivo respiratory function changes more similar to human emphysema than those of S rats. All lung volume subdivisions were decreased in S rats and increased in E rats. The volume-pressure curve of S rats was shifted to the right of the C curve, whereas that of E rats was shifted to the left. Forced expiratory flow rates of E rats were decreased at all lung volumes, but those of S rats were not. Both E and S rats had larger terminal air spaces and less alveolar surface area than did C rats. The S rats had more collagen per gram lung and higher proteinolytic activity than did C or E rats. These results show that, although starvation induces some changes characteristic of human emphysema, elastase-treatment provides a model more similar to the human disease. 44 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  16. Comparative analyses of secreted proteins from the phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae in response to nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jun; Li, Wei-Fang; Cheng, Wang; Lu, Mo; Zhou, Ke-Hai; Zhu, He-Qin; Li, Fu-Guang; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-05-01

    The soilborne fungus Verticillium dahliae is the major pathogen that causes the verticillium wilt disease of plants, which leads to huge economic loss worldwide. At the early stage of infection, growth of the pathogen is subject to the nutrition stress of limited nitrogen. To investigate the secreted pathogenic proteins that play indispensable roles during invasion at this stage, we compared the profiles of secreted proteins of V. dahliae under nitrogen starvation and normal conditions by using in-gel and in-solution digestion combined with liquid chromatography-nano-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-nanoESI-MS). In total, we identified 212 proteins from the supernatant of liquid medium, including 109 putative secreted proteins. Comparative analysis indicated that the expression of 76 proteins was induced, whereas that of 9 proteins was suppressed under nitrogen starvation. Notably, 24 proteins are constitutively expressed. Further bioinformatic exploration enabled us to classify the stress-induced proteins into seven functional groups: cell wall degradation (10.5%), reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and stress response (11.8%), lipid effectors (5.3%), protein metabolism (21.1%), carbohydrate metabolism (15.8%), electron-proton transport and energy metabolism (14.5%), and other (21.0%). In addition, most stress-suppressed proteins are involved in the cell-wall remodeling. Taken together, our analyses provide insights into the pathogenesis of V. dahliae and might give hints for the development of novel strategy against the verticillium wilt disease.

  17. Acute starvation in C57BL/6J mice increases myocardial UCP2 and UCP3 protein expression levels and decreases mitochondrial bio-energetic function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Ming; Almsherqi, Zakaria A; McLachlan, Craig S; Matthews, Slade; Ramachandran, Malarmathy; Tay, Stacey Kh; Deng, Yuru

    2011-01-01

    Associations between uncoupling protein (UCP) expression and functional changes in myocardial mitochondrial bio-energetics have not been well studied during periods of starvation stress. Our aim was to study the effects of acute starvation, for 24 or 48 h, on combined cardiac mitochondrial function and UCP expression in mice. Isolated heart mitochondria from female mice starved for 48 h compared to that from mice fed revealed a significantly (p < 0.05) decreased adenosine diphosphate-to-oxygen ratio, a significantly increased proton leak and an increased GTP inhibition on palmitic acid-induced state 4 oxygen consumption (p < 0.05). These bio-energetic functional changes were associated with increases in mitochondrial UCP2 and UCP3 protein expression. In conclusion, our findings suggest that increased UCP2 and UCP3 levels may contribute to decreased myocardial mitochondrial bio-energetic function due to starvation.

  18. Starvation Ketoacidosis as a Cause of Unexplained Metabolic Acidosis in the Perioperative Period

    PubMed Central

    Mostert, Monique; Bonavia, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 24 Final Diagnosis: Starvation ketoacidosis Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Lumbar laminectomy Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Besides providing anesthesia for surgery, the anesthesiologist’s role is to optimize the patient for surgery and for post-surgical recovery. This involves timely identification and treatment of medical comorbidities and abnormal laboratory values that could complicate the patient’s perioperative course. There are several potential causes of anion and non-anion gap metabolic acidosis in surgical patients, most of which could profoundly affect a patient’s surgical outcome. Thus, the presence of an acute acid-base disturbance requires a thorough workup, the results of which will influence the patient’s anesthetic management. Case Report: An otherwise-healthy 24-year-old female presented for elective spine surgery and was found to have metabolic acidosis, hypotension, and polyuria intraoperatively. Common causes of acute metabolic acidosis were investigated and systematically ruled out, including lactic acidosis, diabetic ketoacidosis, drug-induced ketoacidosis, ingestion of toxic alcohols (e.g., methanol, ethylene glycol), uremia, and acute renal failure. Laboratory workup was remarkable only for elevated serum and urinary ketone levels, believed to be secondary to starvation ketoacidosis. Due to the patient’s unexplained acid-base disturbance, she was kept intubated postoperatively to allow for further workup and management. Conclusions: Starvation ketoacidosis is not widely recognized as a perioperative entity, and it is not well described in the medical literature. Lack of anesthesiologist awareness about this disorder may complicate the differential diagnosis for acute intraoperative metabolic acidosis and lead to a prolonged postoperative stay and an increase in hospital costs. The short- and long-term implications of perioperative

  19. A Metabolic Widget Adjusts the Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Fructose Influx in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría, Max; Goñi-Moreno, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fructose uptake in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida occurs through a canonical phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent sugar transport system (PTSFru). The logic of the genetic circuit that rules its functioning is puzzling: the transcription of the fruBKA operon, encoding all the components of PTSFru, can escape the repression exerted by the catabolite repressor/activator protein Cra solely in the presence of intracellular fructose-1-P, an agonist formed only when fructose has been already transported. To study this apparently incongruous regulatory architecture, the changes in the transcriptome brought about by a seamless Δcra deletion in P. putida strain KT2440 were inspected under different culture conditions. The few genes found to be upregulated in the cra mutant unexpectedly included PP_3443, encoding a bona fide glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase. An in silico model was developed to explore emergent properties that could result from such connections between sugar uptake with Cra and PEP. Simulation of fructose transport revealed that sugar uptake called for an extra supply of PEP (obtained through the activity of PP_3443) that was kept (i.e., memorized) even when the carbohydrate disappeared from the medium. This feature was traced to the action of two sequential inverters that connect the availability of exogenous fructose to intracellular PEP levels via Cra/PP_3443. The loss of such memory caused a much longer lag phase in cells shifted from one growth condition to another. The term “metabolic widget” is proposed to describe a merged biochemical and regulatory patch that tailors a given node of the cell molecular network to suit species-specific physiological needs. IMPORTANCE The regulatory nodes that govern metabolic traffic in bacteria often show connectivities that could be deemed unnecessarily complex at a first glance. Being a soil dweller and plant colonizer, Pseudomonas putida frequently encounters fructose in the niches that it

  20. Reduced size and starvation resistance in adult mosquitoes, Aedes notoscriptus, exposed to predation cues as larvae.

    PubMed

    van Uitregt, Vincent O; Hurst, Timothy P; Wilson, Robbie S

    2012-01-01

    1. Many prey organisms exhibit adaptive phenotypic plasticity in life-history traits that facilitate a better chance of survival in the presence of predators. The evolution of such plastic traits requires that the defensive phenotype incurs a cost in the absence of predation. 2. Model systems that are used to examine predator-induced defences are often organisms with complex life histories that only induce defences during the larval stage. While many studies have detected costs of inducible defences during the larval stage, detecting the costs of larval defences after metamorphosis is also important. 3. We examine the benefits and costs of inducible larval defences in the urban mosquito, Aedes notoscriptus, by rearing them in the presence and absence of predation cues. We compared survival of larvae inducing behavioural defences, when exposed to predation cues, in predation trials with predatory fish Hypseleotris galii to that of larvae reared in the absence predation cues. We also compared life-history traits of predator-exposed larvae to larvae reared in control conditions. 4. Larvae exposed to chemical predation cues limited activity and were able to avoid predation for longer in trials with H. galii. However, predator-exposed larvae suffered retarded larval growth and development, were smaller at metamorphosis and less resistant to starvation as adults. 5. While it is difficult to understand the 'fitness costs' that poorer starvation resistance might confer to adult mosquitoes, it is likely that smaller adult size of predator-exposed individuals would reduce fitness, particularly for females where body size limits the size of blood meal they could take to facilitate egg production. We suggest that the demonstrable costs of inducible defences in mosquito larvae make this a good system for testing theoretical models for the evolutionary maintenance of adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase counteracted the inhibitory effect of glucose on the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hubert, A; Husson, A; Chédeville, A; Lavoinne, A

    2000-09-22

    The effect of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the regulation of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene expression was studied in isolated rat hepatocytes. Activation of AMPK by AICAR counteracted the inhibitory effect of glucose on the PEPCK gene expression, both at the mRNA and the transcriptional levels. It is proposed that a target for AMPK is involved in the inhibitory effect of glucose on PEPCK gene transcription.

  2. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase, a Key Enzyme That Controls Blood Glucose, Is a Target of Retinoic Acid Receptor-Related Orphan Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Shima, Akiho; Kuramoto, Daisuke; Kikumoto, Daisuke; Matsui, Takashi; Michihara, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) catalyzes a committed and rate-limiting step in hepatic gluconeogenesis, and its activity is tightly regulated to maintain blood glucose levels within normal limits. PEPCK activity is primarily regulated through hormonal control of gene transcription. Transcription is additionally regulated via a cAMP response unit, which includes a cAMP response element and four binding sites for CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP). Notably, the cAMP response unit also contains a putative response element for retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORα). In this paper, we characterize the effect of the RORα response element on cAMP-induced transcription. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay indicates that RORα binds this response element in a sequence-specific manner. Furthermore, luciferase reporter assays indicate that RORα interacts with C/EBP at the PEPCK promoter to synergistically enhance transcription. We also found that cAMP-induced transcription depends in part on RORα and its response element. In addition, we show that suppression of RORα by siRNA significantly decreased PEPCK transcription. Finally, we found that a RORα antagonist inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis in an in vitro glucose production assay. Taken together, the data strongly suggest that PEPCK is a direct RORα target. These results define possible new roles for RORα in hepatic gluconeogenesis. PMID:26383638

  3. Correlation between depression of catabolite control of xylose metabolism and a defect in the phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system in Pediococcus halophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, K; Uchida, K

    1989-01-01

    Pediococcus halophilus X-160 which lacks catabolite control by glucose was isolated from nature (soy moromi mash). Wild-type strains, in xylose-glucose medium, utilized glucose preferentially over xylose and showed diauxic growth. With wild-type strain I-13, xylose isomerase activity was not induced until glucose was consumed from the medium. Strain X-160, however, utilized xylose concurrently with glucose and did not show diauxic growth. In this strain, xylose isomerase was induced even in the presence of glucose. Glucose transport activity in intact cells of strain X-160 was less than 10% of that assayed in strain I-13. Determinations of glycolytic enzymes did not show any difference responsible for the unique behavior of strain X-160, but the rate of glucose-6-phosphate formation with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) as a phosphoryl donor in permeabilized cells was less than 10% of that observed in the wild type. Starved P. halophilus I-13 cells contained the glycolytic intermediates 3-phosphoglycerate, 2-phosphoglycerate, and PEP (PEP pool). These were consumed concomitantly with glucose or 2-deoxyglucose uptake but were not consumed with xylose uptake. The glucose transport system in P. halophilus was identified as a PEP:mannose phosphotransferase system on the basis of the substrate specificity of PEP pool-starved cells. It is concluded that, in P. halophilus, this system is functional as a main glucose transport system and that defects in this system may be responsible for the depression of glucose-mediated catabolite control. Images PMID:2703460

  4. CD147 is increased in HCC cells under starvation and reduces cell death through upregulating p-mTOR in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gou, Xingchun; Tang, Xu; Kong, Derek Kai; He, Xinying; Gao, Xingchun; Guo, Na; Hu, Zhifang; Zhao, Zhaohua; Chen, Yanke

    2016-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the standard of care for treatment of intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), however, key molecules involved in HCC cell survival and tumor metastasis post-TACE remain unclear. CD147 is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is overexpressed on the surface of HCC cells and is associated with malignant potential and poor prognosis in HCC patients. In this study, using an Earle's Balanced Salt Solution medium culture model that mimics nutrient deprivation induced by TACE, we investigated the regulation of CD147 expression on HCC cells under starvation conditions and its functional effects on HCC cell death. During early stages of starvation, the expression of CD147 was considerably upregulated in SMMC7721, HepG2 and HCC9204 hepatoma cell lines at the protein levels. Downregulation of CD147 by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly promoted starvation-induced cell death. In addition, CD147 siRNA-transfected SMMC7721 cells demonstrated significantly increased levels of both apoptosis and autophagy as compared to cells transfected with control siRNA under starvation conditions, whereas no difference was observed between the two treatment groups under normal culture conditions. Furthermore, silencing of CD147 resulted in a remarkable downregulation of phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) in starved SMMC7721 cells. Finally, the combined treatment of starvation and anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody exhibited a synergistic HCC cell killing effect. Our study suggests that upregulation of CD147 under starvation may reduce hepatoma cell death by modulating both apoptosis and autophagy through mTOR signaling, and that CD147 may be a novel potential molecular target to improve the efficacy of TACE.

  5. Multiple Signaling Pathways in Gene Expression during Sugar Starvation. Pharmacological Analysis of din Gene Expression in Suspension-Cultured Cells of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, Yuki; Ito, Masaki; Nishida, Ikuo; Watanabe, Akira

    2000-01-01

    We have identified many dark-inducible (din) genes that are expressed in Arabidopsis leaves kept in the dark. In the present study we addressed the question of how plant cells sense the depletion of sugars, and how sugar starvation triggers din gene expression in suspension-cultured cells of Arabidopsis. Depletion of sucrose in the medium triggered marked accumulation of din transcripts. Suppression of din gene expression by 2-deoxy-Glc, and a non-suppressive effect exerted by 3-O-methyl-Glc, suggested that sugar-repressible expression of din genes is mediated through the phosphorylation of hexose by hexokinase, as exemplified in the repression of photosynthetic genes by sugars. We have further shown that the signaling triggered by sugar starvation involves protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events, and have provided the first evidence that multiple pathways of protein dephosphorylation exist in sugar starvation-induced gene expression. An inhibitor of serine/threonine protein kinase, K-252a, inhibited din gene expression in sugar-depleted cells. Okadaic acid, which may preferentially inhibit type 2A protein phosphatases over type 1, enhanced the transcript levels of all din genes, except din6 and din10, under sugar starvation. Conversely, a more potent inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, calyculin A, increased transcripts from din2 and din9, but decreased those from other din genes, in sugar-depleted cells. On the other hand, calyculin A, but not okadaic acid, completely inhibited the gene expression of chlorophyll a/b-binding protein under sugar starvation. These results indicate that multiple signaling pathways, mediated by different types of protein phosphatases, regulate gene expression during sugar starvation. PMID:11080291

  6. Relative Importance of Sex, Pre-Starvation Body Mass and Structural Body Size in the Determination of Exceptional Starvation Resistance of Anchomenus dorsalis (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Michal

    2016-01-01

    In nature, almost all animals have to cope with periods of food shortage during their lifetimes. Starvation risks are especially high for carnivorous predatory species, which often experience long intervals between stochastic prey capturing events. A laboratory experiment using the common predatory carabid beetle Anchomenus dorsalis revealed an exceptional level of starvation resistance in this species: males survived up to 137 days and females up to 218 days without food at 20°C. Individual starvation resistance was strongly positively affected by pre-starvation body mass but only slightly by beetle structural body size per se. Females outperformed males even when the effect of gender was corrected for the effects of structural body size and pre-starvation body mass. The better performance of females compared to males and of beetles with higher relative pre-starvation body mass could be linked to higher fat content and lean dry mass before starvation, followed by a greater decrease in both during starvation. There was also a difference between the sexes in the extent of body mass changes both during ad libitum feeding and following starvation; the body masses of females fluctuated more compared to males. This study stresses the need to distinguish between body mass and structural body size when investigating the ecological and evolutionary consequences of body size. Investigation of the net effects of body size and sex is necessary to disentangle the causes of differences in individual performances in studies of species with significant sexual size dimorphism. PMID:26978071

  7. Relative Importance of Sex, Pre-Starvation Body Mass and Structural Body Size in the Determination of Exceptional Starvation Resistance of Anchomenus dorsalis (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    PubMed

    Knapp, Michal

    2016-01-01

    In nature, almost all animals have to cope with periods of food shortage during their lifetimes. Starvation risks are especially high for carnivorous predatory species, which often experience long intervals between stochastic prey capturing events. A laboratory experiment using the common predatory carabid beetle Anchomenus dorsalis revealed an exceptional level of starvation resistance in this species: males survived up to 137 days and females up to 218 days without food at 20°C. Individual starvation resistance was strongly positively affected by pre-starvation body mass but only slightly by beetle structural body size per se. Females outperformed males even when the effect of gender was corrected for the effects of structural body size and pre-starvation body mass. The better performance of females compared to males and of beetles with higher relative pre-starvation body mass could be linked to higher fat content and lean dry mass before starvation, followed by a greater decrease in both during starvation. There was also a difference between the sexes in the extent of body mass changes both during ad libitum feeding and following starvation; the body masses of females fluctuated more compared to males. This study stresses the need to distinguish between body mass and structural body size when investigating the ecological and evolutionary consequences of body size. Investigation of the net effects of body size and sex is necessary to disentangle the causes of differences in individual performances in studies of species with significant sexual size dimorphism.

  8. The effect of ram-pressure stripping and starvation on the star formation properties of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Boissier, S.; Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.

    2009-12-01

    We have combined UV to radio centimetric observations of resolved galaxies in the Virgo cluster with multizone, chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution especially tailored to take into account the effects of the cluster environment (ram pressure stripping and starvation). This exercise has shown that anemic spirals with truncated radial profiles of the gas component and of the young stellar populations, typical in rich clusters of galaxies, have been perturbed by a recent (˜100 Myr) ram pressure stripping event induced by their interaction with the cluster intergalactic medium. Starvation is not able to reproduce the observed truncated radial profiles. Both ram pressure and starvation induce a decrease of the stellar surface brightness of the perturbed disc, and thus can hardly be invoked to explain the formation of lenticular galaxies inhabiting rich clusters, which are characterised by higher surface brightnesses than early type spirals of similar luminosity. In dwarfs the ram pressure stripping event is so efficient to totally remove their gas thus stopping on short time scales (<2 Gyr) their star formation activity. Low luminosity star forming discs can be transformed in dE galaxies.

  9. The effect of starvation on the larval behavior of two forensically important species of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Singh, Devinder; Bala, Madhu

    2009-12-15

    The postfeeding larval stage in blow flies is generally an irreversible condition when the fully grown third instar larvae stop feeding and give no response towards food. The larvae of most species then disperse away from their feeding medium and pupariate. There are several cases reported about the use of postfeeding larvae as forensic evidence. It is a matter of common observation that the postfeeding stage can be reached earlier than the expected time if food becomes unavailable. However, no information is available on whether postfeeding stage induced by scarcity of food is also irreversible. Similarly, the minimum period of development required by the larvae of different blow flies species to enable their survival as postfeeding larvae and pupariation in the absence of food is unknown. It was observed during the present studies that the larvae of two Chrysomya species must feed for at least 35 h at 28 degrees C in order to be capable of reaching the postfeeding stage and subsequent pupariation. Duration of the starvation period required to induce postfeeding behavior decreases with increasing age of larvae. In the case of Chrysomya megacephala, 35, 45, 55 and 65 h old larvae attained irreversible postfeeding stage after 30, 20, 12 and 2 h of starvation, respectively. Similarly, larvae of Chrysomya rufifacies that were 35, 45, 55 and 60 h old attained irreversible postfeeding stage after 25, 16, 6 and 2 h of starvation, respectively.

  10. The phosphotransferase protein EIIA(Ntr) modulates the phosphate starvation response through interaction with histidine kinase PhoR in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lüttmann, Denise; Göpel, Yvonne; Görke, Boris

    2012-10-01

    Many Proteobacteria possess the paralogous PTS(Ntr), in addition to the sugar transport phosphotransferase system (PTS). In the PTS(Ntr) phosphoryl-groups are transferred from phosphoenolpyruvate to protein EIIA(Ntr) via the phosphotransferases EI(Ntr) and NPr. The PTS(Ntr) has been implicated in regulation of diverse physiological processes. In Escherichia coli, the PTS(Ntr) plays a role in potassium homeostasis. In particular, EIIA(Ntr) binds to and stimulates activity of a two-component histidine kinase (KdpD) resulting in increased expression of the genes encoding the high-affinity K(+) transporter KdpFABC. Here, we show that the phosphate (pho) regulon is likewise modulated by PTS(Ntr). The pho regulon, which comprises more than 30 genes, is activated by the two-component system PhoR/PhoB under conditions of phosphate starvation. Mutants lacking EIIA(Ntr) are unable to fully activate the pho genes and exhibit a growth delay upon adaptation to phosphate limitation. In contrast, pho expression is increased above the wild-type level in mutants deficient for EIIA(Ntr) phosphorylation suggesting that non-phosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) modulates pho. Protein interaction analyses reveal binding of EIIA(Ntr) to histidine kinase PhoR. This interaction increases the amount of phosphorylated response regulator PhoB. Thus, EIIA(Ntr) is an accessory protein that modulates the activities of two distinct sensor kinases, KdpD and PhoR, in E. coli.

  11. Nur77 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via switching glucose metabolism toward gluconeogenesis through attenuating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xue-Li; Chen, Hang-Zi; Yang, Peng-Bo; Li, Ying-Ping; Zhang, Fen-Na; Zhang, Jia-Yuan; Wang, Wei-Jia; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Qi-Tao; Zheng, Yu; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Min; Chien, Kun-Yi; Wu, Qiao

    2017-02-27

    Gluconeogenesis, an essential metabolic process for hepatocytes, is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we show that the nuclear receptor Nur77 is a tumour suppressor for HCC that regulates gluconeogenesis. Low Nur77 expression in clinical HCC samples correlates with poor prognosis, and a Nur77 deficiency in mice promotes HCC development. Nur77 interacts with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK1), the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, to increase gluconeogenesis and suppress glycolysis, resulting in ATP depletion and cell growth arrest. However, PEPCK1 becomes labile after sumoylation and is degraded via ubiquitination, which is augmented by the p300 acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9). Although Nur77 attenuates sumoylation and stabilizes PEPCK1 via impairing p300 activity and preventing the Ubc9-PEPCK1 interaction, Nur77 is silenced in HCC samples due to Snail-mediated DNA methylation of the Nur77 promoter. Our study reveals a unique mechanism to suppress HCC by switching from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis through Nur77 antagonism of PEPCK1 degradation.

  12. Nur77 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via switching glucose metabolism toward gluconeogenesis through attenuating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase sumoylation

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xue-li; Chen, Hang-zi; Yang, Peng-bo; Li, Ying-ping; Zhang, Fen-na; Zhang, Jia-yuan; Wang, Wei-jia; Zhao, Wen-xiu; Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Qi-tao; Zheng, Yu; Sun, Xiao-yu; Wang, Xiao-min; Chien, Kun-Yi; Wu, Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Gluconeogenesis, an essential metabolic process for hepatocytes, is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we show that the nuclear receptor Nur77 is a tumour suppressor for HCC that regulates gluconeogenesis. Low Nur77 expression in clinical HCC samples correlates with poor prognosis, and a Nur77 deficiency in mice promotes HCC development. Nur77 interacts with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK1), the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, to increase gluconeogenesis and suppress glycolysis, resulting in ATP depletion and cell growth arrest. However, PEPCK1 becomes labile after sumoylation and is degraded via ubiquitination, which is augmented by the p300 acetylation of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9). Although Nur77 attenuates sumoylation and stabilizes PEPCK1 via impairing p300 activity and preventing the Ubc9-PEPCK1 interaction, Nur77 is silenced in HCC samples due to Snail-mediated DNA methylation of the Nur77 promoter. Our study reveals a unique mechanism to suppress HCC by switching from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis through Nur77 antagonism of PEPCK1 degradation. PMID:28240261

  13. Ketogenic diet-fed rats have increased fat mass and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Letícia C; Chittó, Ana L; Müller, Alexandre P; Rocha, Juliana K; Castro da Silva, Mariane; Quincozes-Santos, André; Nardin, Patrícia; Rotta, Liane N; Ziegler, Denize R; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Da Silva, Roselis S M; Perry, Marcos L S; Gottfried, Carmem

    2008-11-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD), characterized by high fat and low carbohydrate and protein contents, has been proposed to be beneficial in children with epilepsy disorders not helped by conventional anti-epileptic drug treatment. Weight loss and inadequate growth is an important drawback of this diet and metabolic causes are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine body weight variation during KD feeding for 6 wk of Wistar rats; fat mass and adipocyte cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity were also observed. PEPCK activity was determined based on the [H(14)CO(3) (-)]-oxaloacetate exchange reaction. KD-fed rats gained weight at a less rapid rate than normal-fed rats, but with a significant increment in fat mass. The fat mass/body weight ratio already differed between ketogenic and control rats after the first week of treatment, and was 2.4 x higher in ketogenic rats. The visceral lipogenesis was supported by an increment in adipocyte PEPCK, aiming to provide glycerol 3-phosphate to triacylglycerol synthesis and this fat accumulation was accompanied by glucose intolerance. These data contribute to our understanding of the metabolic effects of the KD in adipose tissue and liver and suggest some potential risks of this diet, particularly visceral fat accumulation.

  14. An assessment of the capacity for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to contribute to C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Edwards, Gerald E

    2015-06-01

    Three C4 acid decarboxylases, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) were recruited from C3 plants to support C4 photosynthesis. In Poaceae, there are established lineages having PEPCK type species, and some NADP-ME lineages in which PEPCK contributes to C4. Besides family Poaceae, recently PEPCK has been reported to function in C4 photosynthesis in eudicot species including Cleome gynandra (Cleomaceae), Trianthema portulacastrum and Zaleya pentandra (Aizoaceae). We evaluated PEPCK by enzyme assay and western blots in representatives of Poaceae, Aizoaceae, Cleomaceae, and Chenopodiaceae compared to that in the PEPCK type C4 grass Spartina anglica. Eragrostis nutans was identified as the first NAD-ME type C4 grass having substantial amounts of PEPCK. In the eudicots, including C. gynandra, Cleome angustifolia, T. portulacastrum, Z. pentandra, and nine C4 members of family Chenopodiaceae (which has the most C4 species and diversity in forms among eudicot families), amounts of PEPCK were generally very low (barely detectable up to 4% of that in S. anglica). Based on these results, C4 species can be classified biochemically according to the dominant decarboxylase recruited for C4 function; and, Poaceae remains the only family in which PEPCK is known to have a significant role in C4 photosynthesis.

  15. Control of Transposon-mediated Directed Mutation by the Escherichia coli Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.; Zhang, Zhongge

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) has been shown to control transport, cell metabolism and gene expression. We here present results supporting the novel suggestion that in certain instances, it also regulates mutation rate. Directed mutations are defined as mutations that occur at higher frequencies when beneficial than when neutral or detrimental. To date, the occurrence of directed point mutations has not been documented and confirmed, but a few examples of transposon-mediated directed mutation have been reported. Here we focus on the first and best-studied example of directed mutation, which involves the regulation of Insertion Sequence-5 (IS5) hopping into a specific site upstream of the glpFK glycerol utilization operon in Escherichia coli. This insertional event specifically activates expression of the glpFK operon, allowing growth of wild type cells with glycerol as a carbon source in the presence of non-metabolizable glucose analogues which normally block glycerol utilization. The sugar transporting PTS controls this process by regulating levels of cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate and cyclic AMP as established in previous publications. Direct involvement of the glycerol repressor, GlpR, and the cyclic AMP receptor protein, Crp, in the regulation of transposon-mediated directed mutation has been demonstrated. PMID:26159081

  16. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Catalysis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Machová, Iva; Hubálek, Martin; Lepšík, Martin; Bednárová, Lucie; Pazderková, Markéta; Kopecký, Vladimír; Snášel, Jan; Dostál, Jiří; Pichová, Iva

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, can persist in macrophages for decades, maintaining its basic metabolic activities. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck; EC 4.1.1.32) is a key player in central carbon metabolism regulation. In replicating MTb, Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis, but in non-replicating MTb, it also catalyzes the reverse anaplerotic reaction. Here, we explored the role of selected cysteine residues in function of MTb Pck under different redox conditions. Using mass spectrometry analysis we confirmed formation of S–S bridge between cysteines C391 and C397 localized in the C-terminal subdomain. Molecular dynamics simulations of C391-C397 bridged model indicated local conformation changes needed for formation of the disulfide. Further, we used circular dichroism and Raman spectroscopy to analyze the influence of C391 and C397 mutations on Pck secondary and tertiary structures, and on enzyme activity and specificity. We demonstrate the regulatory role of C391 and C397 that form the S–S bridge and in the reduced form stabilize Pck tertiary structure and conformation for gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reactions. PMID:28135343

  17. Improvement of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity of Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 through protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kwang Suk; Jeon, Hancheol; Seo, Seungbeom; Lee, Yew; Jin, EonSeon

    2014-06-10

    In order to mitigate CO2 accumulation and decrease the rate of global warming and climate change, we previously presented a strategy for the development of an efficient CO2 capture and utilization system. The system employs two recombinant enzymes, carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which were originated from microalgae. Although utilization of this integrated system would require a large quantity of high quality PEPCase protein, such quantities could be produced by increasing the solubility of the Phaeodactylum tricornutum PEPCase 1 (PtPEPCase 1) protein in the Escherichia coli heterologous expression system. We first expressed the putative mitochondria targeting peptide- and chloroplast transit peptide-truncated proteins of PtPEPCase 1, mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1, respectively, in E. coli. After affinity chromatography, the amount of purified PEPCase protein from 500mL of E. coli culture was greatest for cPtPEPCase 1 (1.99mg), followed by mPtPEPCase 1 (0.82mg) and PtPEPCase 1 (0.61mg). Furthermore, the enzymatic activity of mPtPEPCase 1 and cPtPEPCase 1 showed approximately 1.6-fold (32.19 units/mg) and 3-fold (59.48 units/mg) increases, respectively. Therefore, cPtPEPCase 1 purified using the E. coli heterogeneous expression system could be a strong candidate for a platform technology to capture CO2 and produce value-added four-carbon platform chemicals.

  18. Allosteric Inhibition of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylases is Determined by a Single Amino Acid Residue in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Takeya, Masahiro; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is an important enzyme for CO2 fixation and primary metabolism in photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria. The kinetics and allosteric regulation of PEPCs have been studied in many organisms, but the biochemical properties of PEPC in the unicellular, non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 have not been clarified. In this study, biochemical analysis revealed that the optimum pH and temperature of Synechocystis 6803 PEPC proteins were 7.3 and 30 °C, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 PEPC was found to be tolerant to allosteric inhibition by several metabolic effectors such as malate, aspartate, and fumarate compared with other cyanobacterial PEPCs. Comparative sequence and biochemical analysis showed that substitution of the glutamate residue at position 954 with lysine altered the enzyme so that it was inhibited by malate, aspartate, and fumarate. PEPC of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was purified, and its activity was inhibited in the presence of malate. Substitution of the lysine at position 946 (equivalent to position 954 in Synechocystis 6803) with glutamate made Anabaena 7120 PEPC tolerant to malate. These results demonstrate that the allosteric regulation of PEPC in cyanobacteria is determined by a single amino acid residue, a characteristic that is conserved in different orders. PMID:28117365

  19. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in mistletoe leaves: Regulation of gene expression, protein content, and covalent modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuemei; Wanek, Wolfgang; Nehls, U.; Popp, Marianne; Hampp, Rüdiger; Rennenberg, Heinz; Einig, Werner

    2001-07-01

    Seasonal changes in the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase, EC 4.1.1.31), a key enzyme in the interaction of carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism, were studied in leaves of the C3 semiparasitic mistletoe, Viscum album, growing on different host trees. Maximum extractable PEPCase activities were higher in leaves of mistletoes growing on Betula pendula and Alnus glutinosa hosts compared with those on the conifers, Abies alba and Larix decidua. Independent of host, maximum extractable PEPCase activities were high in spring and autumn while low in summer. Samples with higher PEPCase activities showed higher amounts of PEPCase protein and higher PEPCase mRNA levels. A curvilinear correlation between leaf total nitrogen content and the maximum extractable PEPCase activity as well as PEPCase mRNA level suggested that nitrogen might affect the activity of PEPCase of mistletoe by up-regulating gene expression. In addition to extractable activity, seasonal changes of the PEPCase activation state, the ratio of activities resulting from limited:non-limited assays, were found, which was correlated to the variation of malate content in leaves of mistletoe. ATP-dependent activation of PEPCase was characterized by an increase in I0.5(L-malate), indicating that PEPCase of leaves of mistletoes is probably regulated via phosphorylation.

  20. Control of Transposon-Mediated Directed Mutation by the Escherichia coli Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System.

    PubMed

    Saier, Milton H; Zhang, Zhongge

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) has been shown to control transport, cell metabolism and gene expression. We here present results supporting the novel suggestion that in certain instances it also regulates the mutation rate. Directed mutations are defined as mutations that occur at higher frequencies when beneficial than when neutral or detrimental. To date, the occurrence of directed point mutations has not been documented and confirmed, but a few examples of transposon-mediated directed mutations have been reported. Here we focus on the first and best-studied example of directed mutation, which involves the regulation of insertion sequence-5 hopping into a specific site upstream of the glpFK glycerol utilization operon in Escherichia coli. This insertional event specifically activates expression of the glpFK operon, allowing the growth of wild-type cells with glycerol as a carbon source in the presence of nonmetabolizable glucose analogues which normally block glycerol utilization. The sugar-transporting PTS controls this process by regulating levels of cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate and cyclic (c)AMP as established in previous publications. Direct involvement of the glycerol repressor, GlpR, and the cAMP receptor protein, Crp, in the regulation of transposon-mediated directed mutation has been demonstrated.

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of nitrogen starvation- and cultivar-specific leaf senescence in winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Koeslin-Findeklee, Fabian; Rizi, Vajiheh Safavi; Becker, Martin A; Parra-Londono, Sebastian; Arif, Muhammad; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Kunze, Reinhard; Horst, Walter J

    2015-04-01

    High nitrogen (N) efficiency, characterized by high grain yield under N limitation, is an important agricultural trait in Brassica napus L. cultivars related to delayed senescence of older leaves during reproductive growth (a syndrome called stay-green). The aim of this study was thus to identify genes whose expression is specifically altered during N starvation-induced leaf senescence and that can be used as markers to distinguish cultivars at early stages of senescence prior to chlorophyll loss. To this end, the transcriptomes of leaves of two B. napus cultivars differing in stay-green characteristics and N efficiency were analyzed 4 days after the induction of senescence by either N starvation, leaf shading or detaching. In addition to N metabolism genes, N starvation mostly (and specifically) repressed genes related to photosynthesis, photorespiration and cell-wall structure, while genes related to mitochondrial electron transport and flavonoid biosynthesis were predominately up-regulated. A kinetic study over a period of 12 days with four B. napus cultivars differing in their stay-green characteristics confirmed the cultivar-specific regulation of six genes in agreement with their senescence behavior: the senescence regulator ANAC029, the anthocyanin synthesis-related genes ANS and DFR-like1, the ammonium transporter AMT1;4, the ureide transporter UPS5, and SPS1 involved in sucrose biosynthesis. The identified genes represent markers for the detection of cultivar-specific differences in N starvation-induced leaf senescence and can thus be employed as valuable tools in B. napus breeding.

  2. AMPK and PKA interaction in the regulation of survival of liver cancer cells subjected to glucose starvation

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Anabela C.; Tonucci, Facundo M.; Hidalgo, Florencia; Almada, Evangelina; Larocca, Maria C.; Favre, Cristián

    2016-01-01

    The signaling pathways that govern survival response in hepatic cancer cells subjected to nutritional restriction have not been clarified yet. In this study we showed that liver cancer cells undergoing glucose deprivation both arrested in G0/G1 and died mainly by apoptosis. Treatment with the AMPK activator AICAR phenocopied the effect of glucose deprivation on cell survival, whereas AMPK silencing in HepG2/C3A, HuH-7 or SK-Hep-1 cells blocked the cell cycle arrest and the increase in apoptotic death induced by glucose starvation. Both AMPK and PKA were promptly activated after glucose withdrawal. PKA signaling had a dual role during glucose starvation: whereas it elicited an early decreased in cell viability, it later improved this parameter. We detected AMPK phosphorylation (AMPKα(Ser173)) by PKA, which was increased in glucose starved cells and was associated with diminution of AMPK activation. To better explore this inhibitory effect, we constructed a hepatocarcinoma derived cell line which stably expressed an AMPK mutant lacking that PKA phosphorylation site: AMPKα1(S173C). Expression of this mutant significantly decreased viability in cells undergoing glucose starvation. Furthermore, after 36 h of glucose deprivation, the index of AMPKα1(S173C) apoptotic cells doubled the apoptotic index observed in control cells. Two main remarks arise: 1. AMPK is the central signaling kinase in the scenario of cell cycle arrest and death induced by glucose starvation in hepatic cancer cells; 2. PKA phosphorylation of Ser173 comes out as a strong control point that limits the antitumor effects of AMPK in this situation. PMID:26894973

  3. Thirst beats hunger - declining hydration during drought prevents carbon starvation in Norway spruce saplings.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Henrik; Ziegler, Waldemar; Kolle, Olaf; Trumbore, Susan

    2013-10-01

    Drought-induced tree mortality results from an interaction of several mechanisms. Plant water and carbon relations are interdependent and assessments of their individual contributions are difficult. Because drought always affects both plant hydration and carbon assimilation, it is challenging to disentangle their concomitant effects on carbon balance and carbon translocation. Here, we report results of a manipulation experiment specifically designed to separate drought effects on carbon and water relations from those on carbon translocation. In a glasshouse experiment, we manipulated the carbon balance of Norway spruce saplings exposed to either drought or carbon starvation (CO2 withdrawal), or both treatments, and compared the dynamics of carbon exchange, allocation and storage in different tissues. Drought killed trees much faster than did carbon starvation. Storage C pools were not depleted at death for droughted trees as they were for starved, well-watered trees. Hence drought has a significant detrimental effect on a plant's ability to utilize stored carbon. Unless they can be transported to where they are needed, sufficient carbon reserves alone will not assure survival of a drought except under specific conditions, such as moderate drought, or in species that maintain plant water relations required for carbon re-mobilization.

  4. Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiling of Aspergillus flavipes in Response to Sulfur Starvation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S. A.; Yassin, Marwa A.; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavipes has received considerable interest due to its potential to produce therapeutic enzymes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. In natural habitats, A. flavipes survives under sulfur limitations by mobilizing endogenous and exogenous sulfur to operate diverse cellular processes. Sulfur limitation affects virulence and pathogenicity, and modulates proteome of sulfur assimilating enzymes of several fungi. However, there are no previous reports aimed at exploring effects of sulfur limitation on the regulation of A. flavipes sulfur metabolism enzymes at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and proteomic levels. In this report, we show that sulfur limitation affects morphological and physiological responses of A. flavipes. Transcription and enzymatic activities of several key sulfur metabolism genes, ATP-sulfurylase, sulfite reductase, methionine permease, cysteine synthase, cystathionine β- and γ-lyase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were increased under sulfur starvation conditions. A 50 kDa protein band was strongly induced by sulfur starvation, and the proteomic analyses of this protein band using LC-MS/MS revealed similarity to many proteins involved in the sulfur metabolism pathway. PMID:26633307

  5. Effects of starvation on bacterial transport through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Alfred B.; Sharp, Robert R.; Caccavo, Frank; Gerlach, Robin

    2007-06-01

    A major problem preventing widespread implementation of microbial injection strategies for bioremediation and/or microbially enhanced oil recovery is the tendency of bacteria to strongly adhere to surfaces in the immediate vicinity of the injection point. Long term (weeks to months) nutrient starvation of bacteria prior to injection can decrease attachment and enhance transport through porous media. This paper summarizes results of starvation-enhanced transport experiments in sand columns of 30 cm, 3 m, and 16 m in length. The 16 m column experiments compared transport, breakthrough and distribution of adhered cells for starved and vegetative cultures of Klebsiella oxytoca, a copious biofilm producer. Results from these experiments were subsequently used to design and construct a field-scale biofilm barrier using starved Pseudomonas fluorescens. The 30 cm and 3 m sand columns experiments investigated starvation-enhanced transport of Shewanella algae BrY, a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. In both cases the vegetative cells adsorbed onto the sand in higher numbers than the starved cells, especially near the entrance of the column. These results, taken together with studies cited in the literature, indicate that starved cells penetrate farther (i.e. higher breakthrough concentration) and adsorb more uniformly along the flow path than vegetative cells.

  6. Natural malaria infection reduces starvation resistance of nutritionally stressed mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Lalubin, Fabrice; Delédevant, Aline; Glaizot, Olivier; Christe, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    In disease ecology, there is growing evidence that environmental quality interacts with parasite and host to determine host susceptibility to an infection. Most studies of malaria parasites have focused on the infection costs incurred by the hosts, and few have investigated the costs on mosquito vectors. The interplay between the environment, the vector and the parasite has therefore mostly been ignored and often relied on unnatural or allopatric Plasmodium/vector associations. Here, we investigated the effects of natural avian malaria infection on both fecundity and survival of field-caught female Culex pipiens mosquitoes, individually maintained in laboratory conditions. We manipulated environmental quality by providing mosquitoes with different concentrations of glucose-feeding solution prior to submitting them to a starvation challenge. We used molecular-based methods to assess mosquitoes' infection status. We found that mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium had lower starvation resistance than uninfected ones only under low nutritional conditions. The effect of nutritional stress varied with time, with the difference of starvation resistance between optimally and suboptimally fed mosquitoes increasing from spring to summer, as shown by a significant interaction between diet treatment and months of capture. Infected and uninfected mosquitoes had similar clutch size, indicating no effect of infection on fecundity. Overall, this study suggests that avian malaria vectors may suffer Plasmodium infection costs in their natural habitat, under certain environmental conditions. This may have major implications for disease transmission in the wild.

  7. Early post-hatching starvation delays p70 S6 kinase activation in the muscle of neonatal chicks.

    PubMed

    Bigot, Karine; Taouis, Mohammed; Picard, Michel; Tesseraud, Sophie

    2003-12-01

    Chicken muscle ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) has been recently characterised and its enzymic activity is regulated by the nutritional and hormonal (insulin) status in vivo. The regulation of S6K1 is still unknown in neonatal chicks. The present study aimed to compare the activation of S6K1 in early-feeding (EF) and 48 h-delayed-feeding (DF) chicks from hatching to 4 d of age. During post-hatching starvation, S6K1 activity remained at the basal level measured in the control-hatched chicks. The maximum S6K1 activity was recorded on the first day of feeding with an increase of about 2.5-fold in the EF and DF chicks (P<0.01). S6K1 activity was correlated with plasma insulin level, suggesting a probable insulin-dependent S6K1 activation. The feeding-induced increase in S6K1 activity was related to its Thr389 residue phosphorylation. A similar pattern for protein kinase B phosphorylation was observed, upstream from S6K1. The S6K1 pathway was stimulated to the same extent in the EF and DF chicks, which indicates that post-hatching starvation did not increase S6K1 activation. It is concluded that muscle S6K1 is activated as soon as food is available without improvement in the response of the S6K1 pathway after post-hatching starvation.

  8. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster.

  9. Sophisticated Regulation of Transcriptional Factors by the Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate: Sugar Phosphotransferase System.

    PubMed

    Galinier, Anne; Deutscher, Josef

    2017-03-24

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) is a carbohydrate transport and phosphorylation system present in bacteria of all different phyla and in archaea. It is usually composed of three proteins or protein complexes, enzyme I, HPr, and enzyme II, which are phosphorylated at histidine or cysteine residues. However, in many bacteria, HPr can also be phosphorylated at a serine residue. The PTS not only functions as a carbohydrate transporter but also regulates numerous cellular processes either by phosphorylating its target proteins or by interacting with them in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The target proteins can be catabolic enzymes, transporters, and signal transduction proteins but are most frequently transcriptional regulators. In this review, we will describe how PTS components interact with or phosphorylate proteins to regulate directly or indirectly the activity of transcriptional repressors, activators, or antiterminators. We will briefly summarize the well-studied mechanism of carbon catabolite repression in firmicutes, where the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A needs to interact with seryl-phosphorylated HPr in order to be functional. We will present new results related to transcriptional activators and antiterminators containing specific PTS regulation domains, which are the phosphorylation targets for three different types of PTS components. Moreover, we will discuss how the phosphorylation level of the PTS components precisely regulates the activity of target transcriptional regulators or antiterminators, with or without PTS regulation domain, and how the availability of PTS substrates and thus the metabolic status of the cell are connected with various cellular processes, such as biofilm formation or virulence of certain pathogens.

  10. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum.

  11. Characterization of a complex glucocorticoid response unit in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, E; Stromstedt, P E; Quinn, P G; Carlstedt-Duke, J; Gustafsson, J A; Granner, D K

    1990-01-01

    The minimal DNA sequence required for glucocorticoid induction of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells was defined. This novel glucocorticoid response unit (GRU) spans about 110 base pairs (bp) and includes two receptor-binding elements plus two accessory factor-binding elements. Purified glucocorticoid receptor bound to two regions (GR1 and GR2) between -395 and -349 bp relative to the transcription start site. Factors in crude rat liver nuclear extract bound to DNA in the regions -455 to -431 and -420 to -403 bp, which are designated accessory factor 1 (AF1) and accessory factor 2 (AF2) elements, respectively. Gel retardation analysis revealed that at least two proteins bound to AF1 and that they were distinct from the protein(s) that bound to AF2. Various combinations of GR1, GR2, AF1, and AF2 were fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene and cotransfected with a glucocorticoid receptor expression plasmid (pSVGR1) into H4IIE cells to identify the functional GRU. Neither the glucocorticoid receptor binding region nor the accessory factor binding region alone was sufficient to confer glucocorticoid responsiveness. The two components of the glucocorticoid receptor binding region functioned independently, and each accounted for half of the maximal response, provided the accessory factor elements were present. Similarly, deletion of either AF1 or AF2 diminished glucocorticoid induction of the PEPCK gene to approximately half of the maximum. We propose that the complex PEPCK gene GRU provides the stringent regulation required of this critical enzyme in liver. Images PMID:2388623

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Components Modulate Gene Transcription and Virulence of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Odeh, Evelyn; Gao, Lihui; Jacobs, Mary B.; Philipp, Mario T.; Lin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) and adenylate cyclase (AC) IV (encoded by BB0723 [cyaB]) are well conserved in different species of Borrelia. However, the functional roles of PEP-PTS and AC in the infectious cycle of Borrelia have not been characterized previously. We examined 12 PEP-PTS transporter component mutants by needle inoculation of mice to assess their ability to cause mouse infection. Transposon mutants with mutations in the EIIBC components (ptsG) (BB0645, thought to be involved in glucose-specific transport) were unable to cause infection in mice, while all other tested PEP-PTS mutants retained infectivity. Infectivity was partially restored in an in trans-complemented strain of the ptsG mutant. While the ptsG mutant survived normally in unfed as well as fed ticks, it was unable to cause infection in mice by tick transmission, suggesting that the function of ptsG is essential to establish infection by either needle inoculation or tick transmission. In Gram-negative organisms, the regulatory effects of the PEP-PTS are mediated by adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. A recombinant protein encoded by B. burgdorferi BB0723 (a putative cyaB homolog) was shown to have adenylate cyclase activity in vitro; however, mutants with mutations in this gene were fully infectious in the tick-mouse infection cycle, indicating that its function is not required in this process. By transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that the ptsG gene may directly or indirectly modulate gene expression of Borrelia burgdorferi. Overall, the PEP-PTS glucose transporter PtsG appears to play important roles in the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi that extend beyond its transport functions. PMID:26712207

  13. In vivo monoubiquitination of anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase occurs at Lys624 in germinating sorghum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an important cytosolic regulatory enzyme that plays a pivotal role in numerous physiological processes in plants, including seed development and germination. Previous studies demonstrated the occurrence of immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides of ~110kDa and 107kDa (p110 and p107, respectively) on immunoblots of clarified extracts of germinating sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) seeds. In order to establish the biochemical basis for this observation, a 460kDa PEPC heterotetramer composed of an equivalent ratio of p110 and p107 subunits was purified to near homogeneity from the germinated seeds. Mass spectrometry established that p110 and p107 are both encoded by the same plant-type PEPC gene (CP21), but that p107 was in vivo monoubiquitinated at Lys624 to form p110. This residue is absolutely conserved in vascular plant PEPCs and is proximal to a PEP-binding/catalytic domain. Anti-ubiquitin IgG immunodetected p110 but not p107, whereas incubation with a deubiquitinating enzyme (USP-2 core) efficiently converted p110 into p107, while relieving the enzyme’s feedback inhibition by l-malate. Partial PEPC monoubiquitination was also detected during sorghum seed development. It is apparent that monoubiquitination at Lys624 is opposed to phosphorylation at Ser7 in terms of regulating the catalytic activity of sorghum seed PEPC. PEPC monoubiquitination is hypothesized to fine-tune anaplerotic carbon flux according to the cell’s immediate physiological requirements for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed in support of biosynthesis and carbon–nitrogen interactions. PMID:24288181

  14. Multiple Inter-Kingdom Horizontal Gene Transfers in the Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Su, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Pepcase is a gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase that exists in bacteria, archaea and plants,playing an important role in plant metabolism and development. Most plants have two or more pepcase genes belonging to two gene sub-families, while only one gene exists in other organisms. Previous research categorized one plant pepcase gene as plant-type pepcase (PTPC) while the other as bacteria-type pepcase (BTPC) because of its similarity with the pepcase gene found in bacteria. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that PTPC is the ancestral lineage of plant pepcase, and that all bacteria, protistpepcase and BTPC in plants are derived from a lineage of pepcase closely related with PTPC in algae. However, their phylogeny contradicts the species tree and traditional chronology of organism evolution. Because the diversification of bacteria occurred much earlier than the origin of plants, presumably all bacterialpepcase derived from the ancestral PTPC of algal plants after divergingfrom the ancestor of vascular plant PTPC. To solve this contradiction, we reconstructed the phylogeny of pepcase gene family. Our result showed that both PTPC and BTPC are derived from an ancestral lineage of gamma-proteobacteriapepcases, possibly via an ancient inter-kingdom horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria to the eukaryotic common ancestor of plants, protists and cellular slime mold. Our phylogenetic analysis also found 48other pepcase genes originated from inter-kingdom HGTs. These results imply that inter-kingdom HGTs played important roles in the evolution of the pepcase gene family and furthermore that HGTsare a more frequent evolutionary event than previouslythought. PMID:23251445

  15. Key role of hydrazine to the interaction between oxaloacetic against phosphoenolpyruvic carboxykinase (PEPCK): ONIOM calculations.

    PubMed

    Prajongtat, Pongthep; Phromyothin, Darinee Sae-Tang; Hannongbua, Supa

    2013-08-01

    The interactions between oxaloacetic (OAA) and phosphoenolpyruvic carboxykinase (PEPCK) binding pocket in the presence and absence of hydrazine were carried out using quantum chemical calculations, based on the two-layered ONIOM (ONIOM2) approach. The complexes were partially optimized by ONIOM2 (B3LYP/6-31G(d):PM6) method while the interaction energies between OAA and individual residues surrounding the pocket were performed at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The calculated interaction energies (INT) indicated that Arg87, Gly237, Ser286, and Arg405 are key residues for binding to OAA with the INT values of -1.93, -2.06, -2.47, and -3.16 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The interactions are mainly due to the formation of hydrogen bonding interactions with OAA. Moreover, using ONIOM2 (B3LYP/6-31G(d):PM6) applied on the PEPCKHS complex, two proton transfers were observed; first, the proton was transferred from the carboxylic group of OAA to hydrazine while the second one was from Asp311 to Lys244. Such reactions cause the generation of binding strength of OAA to the pocket via electrostatic interaction. The orientations of Lys243, Lys244, His264, Asp311, Phe333, and Arg405 were greatly deviated after hydrazine incorporation. These indicate that hydrazine plays an important role in terms of not only changing the conformation of the binding pocket, but is also tightly bound to OAA resulting in its conformation change in the pocket. The understanding of such interaction can be useful for the design of hydrazine-based inhibitor for antichachexia agents.

  16. Phosphoenolpyruvate- and ATP-dependent dihydroxyacetone kinases: covalent substrate-binding and kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alles, Luis F; Siebold, Christian; Nyffeler, Therese Lüthi; Flükiger-Brühwiler, Karin; Schneider, Philipp; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Baumann, Ulrich; Erni, Bernhard

    2004-10-19

    Dihydroxyacetone (Dha) kinases are a sequence-conserved family of enzymes, which utilize two different phosphoryldonors, ATP in animals, plants, and some bacteria, and a multiphosphoprotein of the phosphoenolpyruvate carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) in most bacteria. Here, we compare the PTS-dependent kinase of Escherichia coli and the ATP-dependent kinase of Citrobacter freundii. They display 30% sequence identity. The binding constants of the E. coli kinase for eleven short-chain carbonyl compounds were determined by acetone precipitation of the enzyme-substrate complexes. They are 3.4 microM for Dha, 780 microM for Dha-phosphate (DhaP), 50 microM for D,L-glyceraldehyde (GA), and 90 microM for D,L-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. The k(cat) for Dha of the PTS-dependent kinase is 290 min(-1), and that of the ATP-dependent kinase is 1050 min(-1). The Km for Dha of both kinases is <6 microM. The X-ray structures of the enzyme-GA and the enzyme-DhaP complex show that substrates as well as products are bound in hemiaminal linkage to an active-site histidine. Quantum-mechanical calculations offer no indication for activation of the reacting hydroxyl group by the formation of the hemiaminal. However, the formation of the hemiaminal bond allows selection for short-chain carbonyl compounds and discrimination against structurally similar polyols. The Dha kinase remains fully active in the presence of 2 M glycerol, and phosphorylates trace impurities of carbonyl compounds present in glycerol.

  17. Towards efficient photosynthesis: overexpression of Zea mays phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kandoi, Deepika; Mohanty, Sasmita; Govindjee; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2016-12-01

    Plants with C4 photosynthesis are efficient in carbon assimilation and have an advantage over C3 photosynthesis. In C4 photosynthesis, the primary CO2 fixation is catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Here, we show that overexpression of Zea mays PEPC cDNA, under the control of (35)S promoter, in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in ~7-10 fold higher protein abundance and ~7-10 fold increase in PEPC activity in the transgenic lines than that in the vector control. We suggest that overexpression of PEPC played an anaplerotic role to increase the supply of 4-carbon carboxylic acids, which provided carbon skeletons for increased amino acid and protein synthesis. Higher protein content must have been responsible for increased metabolic processes including chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis, and respiration. Consequently, the PEPC-overexpressed transgenic plants had higher chlorophyll content, enhanced electron transport rate (ETR), lower non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll a fluorescence, and a higher performance index (PI) than the vector control. Consistent with these observations, the rate of CO2 assimilation, the starch content, and the dry weight of PEPC-overexpressed plants increased by 14-18 %, 10-18 %, and 6.5-16 %, respectively. Significantly, transgenics were tolerant to salt stress as they had increased ability to synthesize amino acids, including the osmolyte proline. NaCl (150 mM)-treated transgenic plants had higher variable to maximum Chl a fluorescence (F v/F m) ratio, higher PI, higher ETR, and lower NPQ than the salt-treated vector controls. These results suggest that expression of C4 photosynthesis enzyme(s) in a C3 plant can improve its photosynthetic capacity with enhanced tolerance to salinity stress.

  18. Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Components Modulate Gene Transcription and Virulence of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Khajanchi, Bijay K; Odeh, Evelyn; Gao, Lihui; Jacobs, Mary B; Philipp, Mario T; Lin, Tao; Norris, Steven J

    2015-12-28

    The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) and adenylate cyclase (AC) IV (encoded by BB0723 [cyaB]) are well conserved in different species of Borrelia. However, the functional roles of PEP-PTS and AC in the infectious cycle of Borrelia have not been characterized previously. We examined 12 PEP-PTS transporter component mutants by needle inoculation of mice to assess their ability to cause mouse infection. Transposon mutants with mutations in the EIIBC components (ptsG) (BB0645, thought to be involved in glucose-specific transport) were unable to cause infection in mice, while all other tested PEP-PTS mutants retained infectivity. Infectivity was partially restored in an in trans-complemented strain of the ptsG mutant. While the ptsG mutant survived normally in unfed as well as fed ticks, it was unable to cause infection in mice by tick transmission, suggesting that the function of ptsG is essential to establish infection by either needle inoculation or tick transmission. In Gram-negative organisms, the regulatory effects of the PEP-PTS are mediated by adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. A recombinant protein encoded by B. burgdorferi BB0723 (a putative cyaB homolog) was shown to have adenylate cyclase activity in vitro; however, mutants with mutations in this gene were fully infectious in the tick-mouse infection cycle, indicating that its function is not required in this process. By transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that the ptsG gene may directly or indirectly modulate gene expression of Borrelia burgdorferi. Overall, the PEP-PTS glucose transporter PtsG appears to play important roles in the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi that extend beyond its transport functions.

  19. Functional analysis of putative phosphoenolpyruvate transporters localized to the Golgi apparatus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Higuchi, Yujiro; Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2014-11-01

    The cell surface of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is negatively charged due to the presence of pyruvylated oligosaccharides, which is important for cell-cell recognition. However, the mechanism of pyruvate supply to oligosaccharides is not clearly understood. Here, we analyzed three putative phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) transporter genes (pet1(+) , pet2(+) , and pet3(+) ) in S. pombe, identified by sequence homology search against the Arabidopsis thaliana PEP transporter AtPPT1. Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain carrying a disruption in pet1(+) (pet1Δ) or in pet2(+) (pet2Δ), but not the strain carrying a disruption in pet3(+) (pet3Δ), showed reduced pyruvate level on the cell surface. This reduction in pyruvate level was restored to the control level by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p in respective disruptants. Fluorescence microscope studies revealed that GFP-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p were localized to the Golgi apparatus. Although expression of neither AtPPT1 nor AtPPT2 suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype, that of chimeric constructs, where the N-terminal regions of AtPPT1 and AtPPT2 were replaced by the N-terminal region of Pet1p, partially suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype. Furthermore, the reduction in cell surface negative charge in pet1Δ cells was restored by incubating these cells with recombinant Pvg1p and PEP. Thus, Pet1p and Pet2p are likely involved in transporting PEP from the cytoplasm into the Golgi.

  20. The Ω-loop lid domain of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is essential for catalytic function.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Troy A; Holyoak, Todd

    2012-11-27

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is an essential metabolic enzyme operating in the gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis pathways. Recent studies have demonstrated that the enzyme contains a mobile active site lid domain that undergoes a transition between an open, disorded conformation and a closed, ordered conformation as the enzyme progresses through the catalytic cycle. The understanding of how this mobile domain functions in catalysis is incomplete. Previous studies showed that the closure of the lid domain stabilizes the reaction intermediate and protects the reactive intermediate from spurious protonation and thus contributes to the fidelity of the enzyme. To more fully investigate the roles of the lid domain in PEPCK function, we introduced three mutations that replaced the 11-residue lid domain with one, two, and three glycine residues. Kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes demonstrates that none of the enzyme constructs exhibit any measurable kinetic activity, resulting in a decrease in the catalytic parameters of at least 10(6). Structural characterization of the mutants in complexes representing the catalytic cycle suggests that the inactivity is due to a role for the lid domain in the formation of the fully closed state of the enzyme that is required for catalytic function. In the absence of the lid domain, the enzyme is unable to achieve the fully closed state and is rendered inactive despite possessing all of the residues and substrates required for catalytic function. This work demonstrates how enzyme catalytic function can be abolished through the alteration of conformational equilibria despite all the elements required for chemical conversion of substrates to products remaining intact.

  1. Characterisation of the wheat (triticum aestivum L.) transcriptome by de novo assembly for the discovery of phosphate starvation-responsive genes: gene expression in Pi-stressed wheat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. To modulate their P homeostasis, plants must balance P uptake, mobilisation, and partitioning to various organs. Despite the worldwide importance of wheat as a cultivated food crop, molecular mechanisms associated with phosphate (Pi) starvation in wheat remain unclear. To elucidate these mechanisms, we used RNA-Seq methods to generate transcriptome profiles of the wheat variety ‘Chinese Spring’ responding to 10 days of Pi starvation. Results We carried out de novo assembly on 73.8 million high-quality reads generated from RNA-Seq libraries. We then constructed a transcript dataset containing 29,617 non-redundant wheat transcripts, comprising 15,047 contigs and 14,570 non-redundant full-length cDNAs from the TriFLDB database. When compared with barley full-length cDNAs, 10,656 of the 15,047 contigs were unalignable, suggesting that many might be distinct from barley transcripts. The average expression level of the contigs was lower than that of the known cDNAs, implying that these contigs included transcripts that were rarely represented in the full-length cDNA library. Within the non-redundant transcript set, we identified 892–2,833 responsive transcripts in roots and shoots, corresponding on average to 23.4% of the contigs not covered by cDNAs in TriFLDB under Pi starvation. The relative expression level of the wheat IPS1 (Induced by Phosphate Starvation 1) homologue, TaIPS1, was 341-fold higher in roots and 13-fold higher in shoots; this finding was further confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. A comparative analysis of the wheat- and rice-responsive transcripts for orthologous genes under Pi-starvation revealed commonly upregulated transcripts, most of which appeared to be involved in a general response to Pi starvation, namely, an IPS1-mediated signalling cascade and its downstream functions such as Pi remobilisation, Pi uptake, and changes in Pi metabolism. Conclusions Our

  2. Physiological studies on regulation of glycerol utilization by the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, A H; Saier, M H; Harriott, O T; Reizer, J

    1990-01-01

    In vitro studies with purified glycerol kinase from Enterococcus faecalis have established that this enzyme is activated by phosphorylation of a histidyl residue in the protein, catalyzed by the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS), but the physiological significance of this observation is not known. In the present study, the regulation of glycerol uptake was examined in a wild-type strain of E. faecalis as well as in tight and leaky ptsI mutants, altered with respect to their levels of enzyme I of the PTS. Glycerol kinase was shown to be weakly repressible by lactose and strongly repressible by glucose in the wild-type strain. Greatly reduced levels of glycerol kinase activity were also observed in the ptsI mutants. Uptake of glycerol into intact wild-type and mutant cells paralleled the glycerol kinase activities in extracts. Glycerol uptake in the leaky ptsI mutant was hypersensitive to inhibition by low concentrations of 2-deoxyglucose or glucose even though the rates and extent of 2-deoxyglucose uptake were greatly reduced. These observations provide strong support for the involvement of reversible PTS-mediated phosphorylation of glycerol kinase in the regulation of glycerol uptake in response to the presence or absence of a sugar substrate of the PTS in the medium. Glucose and 2-deoxyglucose were shown to elicit rapid efflux of cytoplasmic [14C]lactate derived from [14C]glycerol. This phenomenon was distinct from the inhibition of glycerol uptake and was due to phosphorylation of the incoming sugar by cytoplasmic phosphoenolpyruvate. Lactate appeared to be generated by sequential dephosphorylation and reduction of cytoplasmic phosphoenolpyruvate present in high concentrations in resting cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2123855

  3. Novel phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent futile cycle in Streptococcus lactis: 2-deoxy-D-glucose uncouples energy production from growth.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J; Chassy, B M

    1982-01-01

    The addition of 2-deoxy-D-glucose to cultures of Streptococcus lactis 133 that were growing exponentially on sucrose or lactose reduced the growth rate by ca. 95%. Inhibition did not occur with glucose or mannose as the growth sugar. The reduction in growth rate was concomitant with rapid accumulation of the analog in phosphorylated form (2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate) via the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose:phosphotransferase system. Within 5 min the intracellular 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate concentration reached a steady-state level of greater than 100 mM. After maximum accumulation of the sugar phosphate, the rate of sucrose metabolism (glycolysis) decreased by only 30%, but the cells were depleted of fructose-1,6-diphosphate. The addition of glucose to 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate preloaded cells caused expulsion of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and a resumption of normal growth. S. lactis 133 contained an intracellular Mg2+-dependent, fluoride-sensitive phosphatase which hydrolyzed 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate (and glucose 6-phosphate) to free sugar and inorganic phosphate. Because of continued dephosphorylation and efflux of the non-metabolizable analog, the maintenance of the intracellular 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate pool during growth stasis was dependent upon continued glycolysis. This steady-state condition represented a dynamic equilibrium of: (i) phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent accumulation of 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate, (ii) intracellular dephosphorylation, and (iii) efflux of free 2-deoxy-D-glucose. This sequence of events constitutes a futile cycle which promotes the dissipation of phosphoenolpyruvate. We conclude that 2-deoxy-D-glucose functions as an uncoupler by dissociating energy production from growth in S. lactis 133. Images PMID:6286601

  4. Starvation-response may not involve Atg1-dependent autophagy induction in non-unikont parasites

    PubMed Central

    Földvári-Nagy, László; Ari, Eszter; Csermely, Péter; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Vellai, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, the lysosome-mediated self-degradation process, is implicated in survival during starvation in yeast, Dictyostelium and animals. In these eukaryotic taxa (collectively called Unikonts), autophagy is induced primarily through the Atg1/ULK1 complex in response to nutrient depletion. Autophagy has also been well-studied in non-unikont parasites, such as Trypanosoma and Plasmodium, and found important in their life-cycle transitions. However, how autophagy is induced in non-unikonts remains largely unrevealed. Using a bioinformatics approach, we examined the presence of Atg1 and of its complex in the genomes of 40 non-unikonts. We found that these genomes do not encode typical Atg1 proteins: BLAST and HMMER queries matched only with the kinase domain of Atg1, while other segments responsible for regulation and protein-binding were missing. Non-unikonts also lacked other components of the Atg1-inducing complex. Orthologs of an alternative autophagy inducer, Atg6 were found only in the half of the species, indicating that the other half may possess other inducing mechanisms. As key autophagy genes have differential expression patterns during life-cycle, we raise the possibility that autophagy in these protists is induced mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Understanding Atg1-independent autophagy induction mechanisms in these parasites may lead to novel pharmacological interventions, not affecting human Atg1-dependent autophagy. PMID:25059978

  5. Secondary taste neurons that convey sweet taste and starvation in the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Kain, Pinky; Dahanukar, Anupama

    2015-02-18

    The gustatory system provides vital sensory information to determine feeding and appetitive learning behaviors. Very little is known, however, about higher-order gustatory circuits in the highly tractable model for neurobiology, Drosophila melanogaster. Here we report second-order sweet gustatory projection neurons (sGPNs) in the Drosophila brain using a powerful behavioral screen. Silencing neuronal activity reduces appetitive behaviors, whereas inducible activation results in food acceptance via proboscis extensions. sGPNs show functional connectivity with Gr5a(+) sweet taste neurons and are activated upon sucrose application to the labellum. By tracing sGPN axons, we identify the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) as an immediate higher-order processing center for sweet taste. Interestingly, starvation increases sucrose sensitivity of the sGPNs in the AMMC, suggesting that hunger modulates the responsiveness of the secondary sweet taste relay. Together, our results provide a foundation for studying gustatory processing and its modulation by the internal nutrient state.

  6. Effect of Nutrient Starvation on the Cellular Composition and Metabolic Capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Eva; Larsson, Christer; Andlid, Thomas; Walsh, Michael C.; Gustafsson, Lena

    2007-01-01

    This investigation addresses the following question: what are the important factors for maintenance of a high catabolic capacity under various starvation conditions? Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultured in aerobic batch cultures, and during the diauxic shift cells were transferred and subjected to 24 h of starvation. The following conditions were used: carbon starvation, nitrogen starvation in the presence of glucose or ethanol, and both carbon starvation and nitrogen starvation. During the starvation period changes in biomass composition (including protein, carbohydrate, lipid, and nucleic acid contents), metabolic activity, sugar transport kinetics, and the levels of selected enzymes were recorded. Subsequent to the starvation period the remaining catabolic capacity was measured by addition of 50 mM glucose. The results showed that the glucose transport capacity is a key factor for maintenance of high metabolic capacity in many, but not all, cases. The results for cells starved of carbon, carbon and nitrogen, or nitrogen in the presence of glucose all indicated that the metabolic capacity was indeed controlled by the glucose transport ability, perhaps with some influence of hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, aldolase, and enolase levels. However, it was also demonstrated that there was no such correlation when nitrogen starvation occurred in the presence of ethanol instead of glucose. PMID:17545328

  7. The Histone Deacetylase Gene Rpd3 Is Required for Starvation Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Ei; Shimaji, Kouhei; Umegawachi, Takanari; Tomida, Saki; Yoshida, Hideki; Yoshimoto, Nana; Izawa, Shingo; Kimura, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation in starvation is important but not fully understood yet. Here we identified the Rpd3 gene, a Drosophila homolog of histone deacetylase 1, as a critical epigenetic regulator for acquiring starvation stress resistance. Immunostaining analyses of Drosophila fat body revealed that the subcellular localization and levels of Rpd3 dynamically changed responding to starvation stress. In response to starvation stress, the level of Rpd3 rapidly increased, and it accumulated in the nucleolus in what appeared to be foci. These observations suggest that Rpd3 plays a role in regulation of rRNA synthesis in the nucleolus. The RT-qPCR and ChIP-qPCR analyses clarified that Rpd3 binds to the genomic region containing the rRNA promoters and activates rRNA synthesis in response to starvation stress. Polysome analyses revealed that the amount of polysomes was decreased in Rpd3 knockdown flies under starvation stress compared with the control flies. Since the autophagy-related proteins are known to be starvation stress tolerance proteins, we examined autophagy activity, and it was reduced in Rpd3 knockdown flies. Taken together, we conclude that Rpd3 accumulates in the nucleolus in the early stage of starvation, upregulates rRNA synthesis, maintains the polysome amount for translation, and finally increases stress tolerance proteins, such as autophagy-related proteins, to acquire starvation stress resistance. PMID:27907135

  8. [Concentration of hydrochloric acid and pepsin in gastric juice in dogs after starvation and refeeding].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Iu V; Polenov, S A

    2005-03-01

    Feeding fogs with meat after a 3-day period of starvation increased hydrochloric acid concentration with subsequent return of the parameter to normal values. Under the same conditions, pepsin concentration decreased and raised up after re-feeding. Histamine administration following the starvation decreased hydrochloric acid concentration with subsequent normalising. In three days after re-feeding and histamine administration, pepsin concentration drooped owing, probably, to a decrease of parietal cell H2-receptor affinity to histamine. Pentagastrin administration after the starvation increased hydrochloric acid concentration. The findings suggest G-cell function inhibition occurring after a 3-day starvation which is important for the stomach mucous membrane protection.

  9. Effect of long term anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation on aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Pijuan, Maite; Werner, Ursula; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-08-01

    The effect of long term anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation on the structure and activity of aerobic granules was studied. Aerobic granular sludge treating abattoir wastewater and achieving high levels of nutrient removal was subjected to 4-5 week starvation under anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic conditions. Microscopic pictures of granules at the beginning of the starvation period presented a round and compact surface morphology with a much defined external perimeter. Under both starvation conditions, the morphology changed at the end of starvation with the external border of the granules surrounded by floppy materials. The loss of granular compactness was faster and more pronounced under anaerobic/aerobic starvation conditions. The release of Ca(2+) at the onset of anaerobic/aerobic starvation suggests a degradation of extracellular polymeric substances. The activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria was reduced by 20 and 36% during anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation, respectively. When fresh wastewater was reintroduced, the granules recovered their initial morphology within 1 week of normal operation and the nutrient removal activity recovered fully in 3 weeks. The results show that both anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic conditions are suitable for maintaining granule structure and activity during starvation.

  10. Enhanced Sleep Is an Evolutionarily Adaptive Response to Starvation Stress in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Slocumb, Melissa E; Regalado, Josue M; Yoshizawa, Masato; Neely, Greg G; Masek, Pavel; Gibbs, Allen G; Keene, Alex C

    2015-01-01

    Animals maximize fitness by modulating sleep and foraging strategies in response to changes in nutrient availability. Wild populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, display highly variable levels of starvation and desiccation resistance that differ in accordance with geographic location, nutrient availability, and evolutionary history. Further, flies potently modulate sleep in response to changes in food availability, and selection for starvation resistance enhances sleep, revealing strong genetic relationships between sleep and nutrient availability. To determine the genetic and evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient deprivation, we assessed sleep in flies selected for desiccation or starvation resistance. While starvation resistant flies have higher levels of triglycerides, desiccation resistant flies have enhanced glycogen stores, indicative of distinct physiological adaptations to food or water scarcity. Strikingly, selection for starvation resistance, but not desiccation resistance, leads to increased sleep, indicating that enhanced sleep is not a generalized consequence of higher energy stores. Thermotolerance is not altered in starvation or desiccation resistant flies, providing further evidence for context-specific adaptation to environmental stressors. F2 hybrid flies were generated by crossing starvation selected flies with desiccation selected flies, and the relationship between nutrient deprivation and sleep was examined. Hybrids exhibit a positive correlation between starvation resistance and sleep, while no interaction was detected between desiccation resistance and sleep, revealing that prolonged sleep provides an adaptive response to starvation stress. Therefore, these findings demonstrate context-specific evolution of enhanced sleep in response to chronic food deprivation, and provide a model for understanding the evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient availability.

  11. Characterization of a sub-family of Arabidopsis genes with the SPX domain reveals their diverse functions in plant tolerance to phosphorus starvation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ke; Yi, Keke; Dang, Lei; Huang, Hongjie; Wu, Wei; Wu, Ping

    2008-06-01

    Four genes of Arabidopsis (At5g20150, At2g26660, At2g45130 and At5g15330) encoding no conservative region other than an SPX domain (SYG1, Pho81 and XPR1) were named AtSPX1-AtSPX4. The various subcellular localizations of their GFP fusion proteins implied function variations for the four genes. Phosphate starvation strongly induced expression of AtSPX1 and AtSPX3 with distinct dynamic patterns, while AtSPX2 was weakly induced and AtSPX4 was suppressed. Expression of the four AtSPX genes was reduced to different extents in the Arabidopsis phr1 and siz1 mutants under phosphate starvation, indicating that they are part of the phosphate-signaling network that involves SIZ1/PHR1. Over-expression of AtSPX1 increased the transcript levels of ACP5, RNS1 and PAP2 under both phosphate-sufficient and phosphate-deficient conditions, suggesting a potential transcriptional regulation role of AtSPX1 in response to phosphate starvation. Partial repression of AtSPX3 by RNA interference led to aggravated phosphate-deficiency symptoms, altered P allocation and enhanced expression of a subset od phosphate-responsive genes including AtSPX1. Our results indicate that both AtSPX1 and AtSPX3 play positive roles in plant adaptation to phosphate starvation, and AtSPX3 may have a negative feedback regulatory role in AtSPX1 response to phosphate starvation.

  12. Transcriptional and Proteomic Responses to Carbon Starvation in Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Casaletti, Luciana; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Paracoccidioides comprises human thermal dimorphic fungi, which cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), an important mycosis in Latin America. Adaptation to environmental conditions is key to fungal survival during human host infection. The adaptability of carbon metabolism is a vital fitness attribute during pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings The fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides spp. is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, in the human host. In this study, a comprehensive response of Paracoccidioides, Pb01, under carbon starvation was investigated using high-resolution transcriptomic (RNAseq) and proteomic (NanoUPLC-MSE) approaches. A total of 1,063 transcripts and 421 proteins were differentially regulated, providing a global view of metabolic reprogramming during carbon starvation. The main changes were those related to cells shifting to gluconeogenesis and ethanol production, supported by the degradation of amino acids and fatty acids and by the modulation of the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic cycles. This proposed carbon flow hypothesis was supported by gene and protein expression profiles assessed using qRT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively, as well as using enzymatic, cell dry weight and fungus-macrophage interaction assays. The carbon source provides a survival advantage to Paracoccidioides inside macrophages. Conclusions/Significance For a complete understanding of the physiological processes in an organism, the integration of approaches addressing different levels of regulation is important. To the best of our knowledge, this report presents the first description of the responses of Paracoccidioides spp. to host-like conditions using large-scale expression approaches. The alternative metabolic pathways that could be adopted by the organism during carbon starvation can be important for a better understanding of the fungal adaptation to the host, because systems for detecting and responding

  13. Hepatic Subcellular Compartmentation of Cytoplasmic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Determined by Immunogold Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kuixiong; Cardell, Emma Lou; Morris, Randal E.; Giffin, Bruce F.; Cardell, Robert R.

    1995-08-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is the rate-limiting gluconeogenic enzyme and in liver occurs in a lobular gradient from periportal to pericentral regions. The subcellular distribution of cytoplasmic PEPCK molecules within hepatocytes and its relationship to organelles have not been determined previously. In this study, we have used immunogold electron microscopy to evaluate the subcellar distribution of the enzyme, in addition to brightfield and epipolarized light microscopy. Cryosections (10 [mu]m) of perfusion-fixed rat liver were collected on silanated slides and immunostained using goat anti-rat PEPCK followed by 5-nm gold-labeled secondary and tertiary antibodies. Additionally, free-floating vibratome sections (25, 50, and 100 [mu]m) of perfusion-immersion-fixed rat liver were immunogold stained using goat anti-rat PEPCK and 5-nm gold-labeled secondary antibody, with and without silver enhancement. The immunogold labeled sections from both procedures were embedded in epoxy resin for the preparation of thin sections for electron microscopy. The results showed that the gold-labeled antibodies penetrated the entire thickness of cryosections, resulting in a high signal for PEPCK, but membranes in general, the smooth endoplasmic reticulum in particular, were not identifiable as electron dense unit membranes. On the other hand, the vibratome sections of well-fixed tissue allowed good visualization of the ultrastructure of cellular organelles, with the smooth endoplasmic reticulum appearing as vesicles and tubules with electron dense unit membranes; however, the penetration of the gold-labeled antibody was limited to cells at the surface of the vibratome sections. In both procedures, PEPCK, as indicated by gold particles, is predominantly in the glycogen areas of the cytosome and not in mitochondria, nuclei, Golgi apparatus, or other cell organelles. Hepatocytes in periportal regions have a compact subcellular distribution of PEPCK shown by gold particles

  14. Insights into possible cell-death markers in the diatom Skeletonema marinoi in response to senescence and silica starvation.

    PubMed

    Orefice, Ida; Lauritano, Chiara; Procaccini, Gabriele; Ianora, Adrianna; Romano, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    Diatoms are a hugely diverse microalgal class, which possesses unique biological features and complex metabolic pathways and may activate sophisticated mechanisms to respond to environmental changes. Abiotic stress factors may limit growth rate of diatoms, but may also trigger intracellular signaling pathways that cause cells to undergo programmed cell death (PCD). Here we investigate the gene expression of different target genes related to cell death, namely programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4), tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101), developmental and cell death (DCD) domain, death specific protein (DSP) and metacaspase (MC), using RT-qPCR in the cosmopolitan coastal centric diatom species Skeletonema marinoi, which contributes significantly to phytoplankton blooms in temperate waters. To this end, we undertook a detailed study of the best reference genes to analyze gene expression in S. marinoi under different experimental conditions (i.e. in different growth phases or under silica starvation). Results showed that DSP gene expression had a clear and constant increase along the S. marinoi growth curve reaching its maximum during the senescent phase. On the contrary, PDCD4, DCD, TSG101 and MC did not show any significant variation. These findings indicate that the DSP gene is a possible PCD marker induced by aging in this diatom species. In contrast, levels of DSP transcripts induced by silica starvation were relatively low compared to those induced by cell aging suggesting differential activation and/or regulation of the PCD machinery in response to different stressful conditions. Our study also expands the list of reference genes available for the diatom S. marinoi for normalization of RT-qPCR data of cells cultivated under different growth phases or under silica starvation.

  15. Water potential and starvation stress in deep subsurface microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.; Rosacker, L.L.; Willcox, D.; Franklin, A.J.

    1990-12-31

    Nine intact core samples, collected aseptically from depths of 10--436 m near the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina, were tested for water potential, microbial numbers, and microbial activity. Although all samples were collected from below the water table, two samples (a Pee Dee clay from 238 m and a Middendorf clay from 324 m) showed unsaturated conditions ({minus}2.7 and {minus}2.1 MPa, respectively). Both of these samples had very low numbers of culturable cells, low microbial biomass (ATP assay), and low microbial activities (measured as respiration), suggesting that low metric waterpotentials in these strata are limiting factors to microorganisms. An Acinetobacter sp. isolated from the 324 m depth was found to maintain viability under starvation conditions in sterilized aquifer material, even when subjected to severe desiccation ({minus}22 MPa). A Pseudomonas sp., with the ability to oxidize thiosulfate to sulfate, was isolated from the 378 m Middendorf clay sample. This organism survived nutrient deprivation reasonably well; however, the presence of thiosulfate appeared to interfere with its normal ability to maintain viability by endogenous metabolism. Cells cultured in the presence of thiosulfate did not undergo dwarfing and cell viability declines. These are two examples of indigenous subsurface microorganisms, each with different adaptations for long-term survival under conditions of desiccation and/or starvation.

  16. Water potential and starvation stress in deep subsurface microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.; Rosacker, L.L.; Willcox, D.; Franklin, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Nine intact core samples, collected aseptically from depths of 10--436 m near the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina, were tested for water potential, microbial numbers, and microbial activity. Although all samples were collected from below the water table, two samples (a Pee Dee clay from 238 m and a Middendorf clay from 324 m) showed unsaturated conditions ({minus}2.7 and {minus}2.1 MPa, respectively). Both of these samples had very low numbers of culturable cells, low microbial biomass (ATP assay), and low microbial activities (measured as respiration), suggesting that low metric waterpotentials in these strata are limiting factors to microorganisms. An Acinetobacter sp. isolated from the 324 m depth was found to maintain viability under starvation conditions in sterilized aquifer material, even when subjected to severe desiccation ({minus}22 MPa). A Pseudomonas sp., with the ability to oxidize thiosulfate to sulfate, was isolated from the 378 m Middendorf clay sample. This organism survived nutrient deprivation reasonably well; however, the presence of thiosulfate appeared to interfere with its normal ability to maintain viability by endogenous metabolism. Cells cultured in the presence of thiosulfate did not undergo dwarfing and cell viability declines. These are two examples of indigenous subsurface microorganisms, each with different adaptations for long-term survival under conditions of desiccation and/or starvation.

  17. Pioneer round of translation occurs during serum starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Nara; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Cho, Hana; Choe, Junho; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2007-10-12

    The pioneer round of translation plays a role in translation initiation of newly spliced and exon junction complex (EJC)-bound mRNAs. Nuclear cap-binding protein complex CBP80/20 binds to those mRNAs at the 5'-end, recruiting translation initiation complex. As a consequence of the pioneer round of translation, the bound EJCs are dissociated from mRNAs and CBP80/20 is replaced by the cytoplasmic cap-binding protein eIF4E. Steady-state translation directed by eIF4E allows for an immediate and rapid response to changes in physiological conditions. Here, we show that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), which restricts only to the pioneer round of translation but not to steady-state translation, efficiently occurs even during serum starvation, in which steady-state translation is drastically abolished. Accordingly, CBP80 remains in the nucleus and processing bodies are unaffected in their abundance and number in serum-starved conditions. These results suggest that mRNAs enter the pioneer round of translation during serum starvation and are targeted for NMD if they contain premature termination codons.

  18. The role of falling leptin levels in the neuroendocrine and metabolic adaptation to short-term starvation in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jean L; Heist, Kathleen; DePaoli, Alex M; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2003-05-01

    To elucidate the role of leptin in regulating neuroendocrine and metabolic function during an acute fast, six to eight healthy, lean men were studied under four separate conditions: a baseline fed state and three 72-hour fasting studies with administration of either placebo, low-dose recombinant-methionyl human leptin (r-metHuLeptin), or replacement-dose r-metHuLeptin designed to maintain serum leptin at levels similar to those in the fed state. Replacement-dose r-metHuLeptin administered during fasting prevents the starvation-induced changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and, in part, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and IGF-1 binding capacity in serum. Thus, in normal men, the fall in leptin with fasting may be both necessary and sufficient for the physiologic adaptations of these axes, which require leptin levels above a certain threshold for activation. In contrast to findings in mice, fasting-induced changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, renin-aldosterone, and growth hormone-IGF-1 axes as well as fuel utilization may be independent of leptin in humans. The role of leptin in normalizing several starvation-induced neuroendocrine changes may have important implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of eating disorders and obesity.

  19. Responsibility of regulatory gene expression and repressed protein synthesis for triacylglycerol accumulation on sulfur-starvation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Matsumura, Rie; Hoshino, Naomi; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Sato, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TG) synthesis is induced for energy and carbon storage in algal cells under nitrogen(N)-starved conditions, and helps prevent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production through fatty acid synthesis that consumes excessive reducing power. Here, the regulatory mechanism for the TG content in sulfur(S)-starved cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was examined, in comparison to that in N- or phosphorus(P)-starved cells. S- and N- starved cells exhibited markedly increased TG contents with up-regulation of mRNA levels of diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) genes. S-Starvation also induced expression of the genes for phosphatidate synthesis. In contrast, P-starved cells exhibited little alteration of the TG content with almost no induction of these genes. The results implied deficient nutrient-specific regulation of the TG content. An arg9 disruptant defective in arginine synthesis, even without nutritional deficiencies, exhibited an increased TG content upon removal of supplemented arginine, which repressed protein synthesis. Repression of protein synthesis thus seemed crucial for TG accumulation in S- or N- starved cells. Meanwhile, the results of inhibitor experiments involving cells inferred that TG accumulation during S-starvation is supported by photosynthesis and de novo fatty acid synthesis. During S-starvation, sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants, which are defective in the response to the ambient S-status, accumulated TG at lower and higher levels, respectively, than the wild type. The sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants showed no or much greater up-regulation of DGAT genes, respectively. In conclusion, TG synthesis would be activated in S-starved cells, through the diversion of metabolic carbon-flow from protein to TG synthesis, and simultaneously through up-regulation of the expression of a particular set of genes for TG synthesis at proper levels through the actions of SAC1 and SNRK2.2.

  20. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking achieved efficient cell cycle synchronization and altered the expression of p27, p53, bcl-2 in canine breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jinjin; Sun, Dongdong; Yang, Chao; Wang, Yingxue; Sun, Sichao; Li, Qing; Bao, Jun; Liu, Yun

    2016-04-01

    Cell synchronization is an approach to obtain cell populations of the same stage, which is a prerequisite to studying the regulation of cell cycle progression in vivo. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking (TdR) are two important practices in studying cell cycle synchronization. However, their effects on canine cancer cells as well as the regulatory mechanisms by these two methods are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the optimum conditions of serum starvation and TdR and their effects on cell cycle synchronization. We further explored the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the cell cycle synchronization by investigating the expression of three key genes (p27, p53 and bcl-2). Serum starvation resulted in a reversible cell cycle arrest and synchronously progress through G0/G1. The highest percentage of CHMm cells (87.47%) in G0/G1 stage was obtained after 42 h incubation with 0.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS). TdR double blocking could arrest 98.9% of CHMm cells in G1/S phase (0 h of release), and could arrest 93.74% of CHMm cells in S phase after 4h of release. We also found that the p27, p53, bcl-2 genes were most highly expressed in G0/G1 phase. Our current work revealed that serum starvation and TdR methods could achieve sufficient synchronization of CHMm cells. Moreover, the expression of p27, p53 and bcl-2 genes was related to cyclical movements and apoptosis. Our results will provide a new insight into cell cycle regulation and reprogramming of canine cancer cells induced by serum starvation and TdR blocking.

  1. Cloning of PaAtg8 and roles of autophagy in adaptation to starvation with respect to the fat body and midgut of the Americana cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Takeda, Makio

    2014-05-01

    Starvation, in particular amino acid deprivation, induces autophagy in trophocytes (adipocytes), the major component of the fat body cell types, in the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the fat body of cockroach has two additional cell types: urocytes depositing uric acid in urate vacuoles as a nitrogen resource and mycetocytes harboring an endosymbiont, Blattabacterium cuenoti, which can synthesize amino acids from the metabolites of the stored uric acid. These cells might complement the roles of autophagy in recycling amino acids in the fat body or other organs of cockroaches under starvation. We investigate the presence of autophagy in tissues such as the fat body and midgut of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, under starvation by immunoblotting with antibody against Atg8, a ubiquitin-like protein required for the formation of autophagosomes and by electron microscopy. Corresponding changes in acid phosphatase activity were also investigated as representing lysosome activity. Starvation increased the level of an autophagic marker, Atg8-II, in both the tissues, extensively stimulating the formation of autophagic compartments in trophocytes of the fat body and columnar cells of the midgut for over 2 weeks. Acid phosphatase showed no significant increase in the fat body of the starved cockroaches but was higher in the midgut of the continuously fed animals. Thus, a distinct autophagic mechanism operates in these tissues under starvation of 2 weeks and longer. The late induction of autophagy implies exhaustion of the stored uric acid in the fat body. High activity of acid phosphatase in the midgut of the fed cockroaches might represent enhanced assimilation and not an autophagy-related function.

  2. Ribosomes exist in large excess over the apparent demand for protein synthesis during carbon starvation in marine Vibrio sp. strain CCUG 15956.

    PubMed Central

    Flärdh, K; Cohen, P S; Kjelleberg, S

    1992-01-01

    Carbon starvation induces the development of a starvation- and stress-resistant cell state in marine Vibrio sp. strain S14 (CCUG 15956). The starved cells remain highly responsive to nutrients during prolonged starvation and exhibit instantaneous severalfold increases in the rates of protein synthesis and RNA synthesis when substrate is added. In order to elucidate the physiological basis for the survival of cells that are starved for a long time, as well as the capacity of these cells for rapid and efficient recovery, we analyzed the ribosome content of carbon-starved Vibrio sp. strain S14 cells. By using direct chemical measurements of the amounts of ribosomal particles in carbon-starved cultures, we demonstrated that ribosomes were lost relatively slowly (half life, 79 h) and that they existed in large excess over the apparent demand for protein synthesis. After 24 h of starvation the total rate of protein synthesis was 2.3% of the rate during growth, and after 3 days this rate was 0.7% of the rate during growth; the relative amounts of ribosomal particles at these times were 81 and 52%, respectively. The ribosome population consisted of 90% 70S monoribosomes, and no polyribosomes were detected in the starved cells. The 70S monoribosomes were responsible for the bulk of the protein synthesis during carbon starvation; some activity was also detected in the polyribosome size region on sucrose density gradients. We suggest that nongrowing carbon-starved Vibrio sp. strain S14 cells possess an excess protein synthesis capacity, which may be essential for their ability to immediately initiate an upshift program when substrate is added. PMID:1383195

  3. Activation of SIRT1 by resveratrol represses transcription of the gene for the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) by deacetylating hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cytosolic isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK-C) is a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis. While this enzyme is often over-expressed in diabetes and obesity, studies showed that decrease in its expression results in lessening the diseases condition in animal...

  4. Role of glucocorticoids in increased muscle glutamine production in starvation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Henriksen, Erik J.; Cook, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The role of glucocorticoids in the synthesis of muscle glutamine during starvation was investigated in adrenalectomized fasted rats injected with cortisol (1 mg/100 g body weight). It was found that administration of cortisol in vivo increased (compared to nontreated starved adrenalectomized controls) the glutamine/glutamate ratio and the activity of glutamine synthetase in the diaphragm and the extensor digitorum muscles, and that these effects were abolished by prior treatment with actinomycin D or proflavine. The results obtained in in vitro experiments, using fresh-frozen soleus, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm muscle preparations, supported the in vivo indications of the cortisol-enhanced glutamine synthesis and protein turnover in starved adrenalectomized animals.

  5. Starvation survival of Candida albicans in various water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Chaieb, Kamel; Kouidhi, Bochra; Zmantar, Tarek; Mahdouani, Kacem; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2011-08-01

    Candida is a major Human pathogen causing a variety of infections and can survive for extended period of time in aquatic environment including marine and fresh water. In this study we compared a colorimetric XTT assay to colony forming units (CFU) count to evaluate the survival potential of Candida albicans incubated in water microcosms. Our results showed that cells maintain cultivability within a long period followed by a decline in cultivability and a drop of plate counts to less than 20 cell ml(-1) after 150 days in tap water, 190 days in rain water and 200 days in seawater. In addition we noted that 10% of cells viability was reached after 150 days in seawater, 180 days in rain water and 210 days in tap water. Molecular method confirms the persistence of C. albicans cells in water during long time starvation period.

  6. Altered regulation of sleep and feeding contributes to starvation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Masek, Pavel; Reynolds, Lauren A; Bollinger, Wesley L; Moody, Catriona; Mehta, Aradhana; Murakami, Kazuma; Yoshizawa, Masato; Gibbs, Allen G; Keene, Alex C

    2014-09-01

    Animals respond to changes in food availability by adjusting sleep and foraging strategies to optimize their fitness. Wild populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, display highly variable levels of starvation resistance that are dependent on geographic location, food availability and evolutionary history. How behaviors that include sleep and feeding vary in Drosophila with increased starvation resistance is unclear. We have generated starvation-resistant flies through experimental evolution to investigate the relationship between foraging behaviors and starvation resistance. Outbred populations of D. melanogaster were selected for starvation resistance over 60 generations. This selection process resulted in flies with a threefold increase in total lipids that survive up to 18 days without food. We tested starvation-selected (S) flies for sleep and feeding behaviors to determine the effect that selection for starvation resistance has had on foraging behavior. Flies from three replicated starvation-selected populations displayed a dramatic reduction in feeding and prolonged sleep duration compared to fed control (F) populations, suggesting that modified sleep and feeding may contribute to starvation resistance. A prolonged larval developmental period contributes to the elevated energy stores present in starvation-selected flies. By preventing S larvae from feeding longer than F larvae, we were able to reduce energy stores in adult S flies to the levels seen in adult F flies, thus allowing us to control for energy storage levels. However, the reduction of energy stores in S flies fails to generate normal sleep and feeding behavior seen in F flies with similar energy stores. These findings suggest that the behavioral changes observed in S flies are due to genetic regulation of behavior rather than elevated lipid levels. Testing S-F hybrid individuals for both feeding and sleep revealed a lack of correlation between food consumption and sleep duration

  7. Purification and comparison of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from the liver and kidney of the Arabian camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, A K; Al-Husayni, H; Power, D M

    1988-01-01

    1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was partially purified from camel liver and kidney by ammonium sulphate fractionation, gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. 2. The specific activity of the purified preparation from liver was 39.2 mumol/min per mg protein. 3. When isolated from the kidney the specific activity of the enzyme was very much higher 155.5 mumol/min per mg protein. 4. The enzyme from the two sources were similar in their pH optimum which was approx. 7.2 and their relative stability to thermal inactivation at 60 degrees C. 5. The mol. wt of the enzyme from both organs was estimated at 80,000 +/- 5000.

  8. Enhancement of porcine intramuscular fat content by overexpression of the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zijian; Wang, Ying; Ren, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhengwei; Gu, Weiwang; Wu, Zhaoting; Chen, Lingyi; Mou, Lisha; Li, Rongfeng; Yang, Haiyuan; Dai, Yifan

    2017-03-02

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content has been generally recognized as a desirable trait in pork meat because of its positive effect on eating quality. An effective approach to enhance IMF content in pork is the generation of transgenic pigs. In this study, we used somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to generate cloned pigs exhibiting ectopic expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) driven by an α-skeletal-actin gene promoter, which was specifically expressed in skeletal muscle. Using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated that PEPCK-C was functionally expressed and had a significant effect on total fatty acid content in the skeletal muscle of the transgenic pigs, while the n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio showed no difference between transgenic and control pigs. Thus, genetically engineered PEPCK-C(mus) pigs may be an effective solution for the production of IMF-enriched pork.

  9. Cytosolic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Does Not Solely Control the Rate of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in the Intact Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Shawn C.; He, Tian Teng; Yan, Zheng; Lindner, Jill; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Magnuson, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY When dietary carbohydrate is unavailable, glucose required to support metabolism in vital tissues is generated via gluconeogenesis in the liver. Expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), commonly considered the control point for liver gluconeogenesis, is normally regulated by circulating hormones to match systemic glucose demand. However, this regulation fails in diabetes. Because other molecular and metabolic factors can also influence gluconeogenesis, the explicit role of PEPCK protein content in the control of gluconeogenesis was unclear. In this study, metabolic control of liver gluconeogenesis was quantified in groups of mice with varying PEPCK protein content. Surprisingly, livers with a 90% reduction in PEPCK content showed only a ~40% reduction in gluconeogenic flux, indicating a lower than expected capacity for PEPCK protein content to control gluconeogenesis. However, PEPCK flux correlated tightly with TCA cycle activity, suggesting that under some conditions in mice, PEPCK expression must coordinate with hepatic energy metabolism to control gluconeogenesis. PMID:17403375

  10. Enhancement of porcine intramuscular fat content by overexpression of the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zijian; Wang, Ying; Ren, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhengwei; Gu, Weiwang; Wu, Zhaoting; Chen, Lingyi; Mou, Lisha; Li, Rongfeng; Yang, Haiyuan; Dai, Yifan

    2017-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content has been generally recognized as a desirable trait in pork meat because of its positive effect on eating quality. An effective approach to enhance IMF content in pork is the generation of transgenic pigs. In this study, we used somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to generate cloned pigs exhibiting ectopic expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) driven by an α-skeletal-actin gene promoter, which was specifically expressed in skeletal muscle. Using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated that PEPCK-C was functionally expressed and had a significant effect on total fatty acid content in the skeletal muscle of the transgenic pigs, while the n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio showed no difference between transgenic and control pigs. Thus, genetically engineered PEPCK-Cmus pigs may be an effective solution for the production of IMF-enriched pork. PMID:28252054

  11. Control of phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase-mediated sugar transport in Escherichia coli by energization of the cell membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Reider, E; Wagner, E F; Schweiger, M

    1979-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase-mediated sugar transport in Escherichia coli is inhibited by the energized of the membrane. This was shown in intact cells as well as in membrane vesicles. Relaxation of the proton gradient by uncouplers stimulated the uptake of sugars via the phosphotransferase system in aerobically cultured cells. No such effect was seen in anaerobic cells, apparently because the cell membrane of these cells is poorly energized. Energization by respiration of D-lactate or ascorbate inhibited the phosphotransferase uptake system in membrane vesicles. This inhibition was reversed by the addition of cyanide. Oxamate, a specific inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase, prevented the inhibitory effect of D-lactate. Membrane vesicles prepared from a cytochrome-less mutant were not energized by D-lactate oxidation and the phosphotransferase uptake system was not inhibited. PMID:392504

  12. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  13. Regulation of Neuronal APL-1 Expression by Cholesterol Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Mary; Antebi, Adam; Zheng, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid plaques composed primarily of the amyloid-β peptide, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). While mutations in APP lead to the development of Familial Alzheimer's Disease (FAD), sporadic AD has only one clear genetic modifier: the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene. Cholesterol starvation in Caenorhabditis elegans leads to molting and arrest phenotypes similar to loss-of-function mutants of the APP ortholog, apl-1 (amyloid precursor-like protein 1), and lrp-1 (lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1), suggesting a potential interaction between apl-1 and cholesterol metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings Previously, we found that RNAi knock-down of apl-1 leads to aldicarb hypersensitivity, indicating a defect in synaptic function. Here we find the same defect is recapitulated during lrp-1 knock-down and by cholesterol starvation. A cholesterol-free diet or loss of lrp-1 directly affects APL-1 levels as both lead to loss of APL-1::GFP fluorescence in neurons. However, loss of cholesterol does not affect global transcription or protein levels as seen by qPCR and Western blot. Conclusions Our results show that cholesterol and lrp-1 are involved in the regulation of synaptic transmission, similar to apl-1. Both are able to modulate APL-1 protein levels in neurons, however cholesterol changes do not affect global apl-1 transcription or APL-1 protein indicating the changes are specific to neurons. Thus, regulation of synaptic transmission and molting by LRP-1 and cholesterol may be mediated by their ability to control APL-1 neuronal protein expression. PMID:22363792

  14. Evolution of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase Family in C3 and C4 Flaveria spp.1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Aldous, Sophia H.; Weise, Sean E.; Sharkey, Thomas D.; Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Stühler, Kai; Mallmann, Julia; Groth, Georg; Gowik, Udo; Westhoff, Peter; Arsova, Borjana

    2014-01-01

    The key enzyme for C4 photosynthesis, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEPC), evolved from nonphotosynthetic PEPC found in C3 ancestors. In all plants, PEPC is phosphorylated by Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Protein Kinase (PPCK). However, differences in the phosphorylation pattern exist among plants with these photosynthetic types, and it is still not clear if they are due to interspecies differences or depend on photosynthetic type. The genus Flaveria contains closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species, which are evolutionarily young and thus well suited for comparative analysis. To characterize the evolutionary differences in PPCK between plants with C3 and C4 photosynthesis, transcriptome libraries from nine Flaveria spp. were used, and a two-member PPCK family (PPCKA and PPCKB) was identified. Sequence analysis identified a number of C3- and C4-specific residues with various occurrences in the intermediates. Quantitative analysis of transcriptome data revealed that PPCKA and PPCKB exhibit inverse diel expression patterns and that C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. differ in the expression levels of these genes. PPCKA has maximal expression levels during the day, whereas PPCKB has maximal expression during the night. Phosphorylation patterns of PEPC varied among C3 and C4 Flaveria spp. too, with PEPC from the C4 species being predominantly phosphorylated throughout the day, while in the C3 species the phosphorylation level was maintained during the entire 24 h. Since C4 Flaveria spp. evolved from C3 ancestors, this work links the evolutionary changes in sequence, PPCK expression, and phosphorylation pattern to an evolutionary phase shift of kinase activity from a C3 to a C4 mode. PMID:24850859

  15. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase regulation in C4-PEPC-expressing transgenic rice during early responses to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolong; Li, Xia; Zhang, Chen; Dai, Chuanchao; Zhou, Jiayu; Ren, Chenggang; Zhang, Jinfei

    2017-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) has important functions in C4 photosynthesis and biosynthesis of intermediate metabolites. In this study, the drought resistance of C4-PEPC-expressing transgenic rice (Oryza sativa, line PC) plants was assessed using simulated drought conditions [i.e. polyethylene glycol (PEG)-6000 treatment]. The dry weight of PC plants was higher than that of wild-type (WT) plants following treatment with 15% PEG-6000 for 16 days. Furthermore, the water use efficiency, relative water content and proline content in PC plants were higher than those of WT plants, as were C4-PEPC activity and transcript levels following treatment with 5% PEG-6000 for 2 h. The protein kinase activities and transcript levels of sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinases (SnRKs) genes, such as SnRK1a, OsK24 and OsK35 were also higher in PC plants than in WT plants following treatment with 5% PEG-6000 for 2 h. Additionally, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK, EC 4.1.1.32) activities and transcript levels (e.g. PPCK1 and PPCK2) increased following drought treatment. These changes were regulated by signaling molecules, such as calcium, nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, the -1095 to -416 region of the C4-PEPC promoter in PC plants was demethylated following exposure to drought conditions for 1 h. The demethylation coincided with an increase in C4-PEPC expression. Our data suggest that the demethylation of the C4-PEPC promoter and the phosphorylation catalyzed by PPCK have key roles in conferring drought tolerance to the transgenic rice plants.

  16. Extreme calorie restriction and energy source starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae represent distinct physiological states.

    PubMed

    Boender, Léonie G M; Almering, Marinka J H; Dijk, Madelon; van Maris, Antonius J A; de Winde, Johannes H; Pronk, Jack T; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2011-12-01

    Cultivation methods used to investigate microbial calorie restriction often result in carbon and energy starvation. This study aims to dissect cellular responses to calorie restriction and starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using retentostat cultivation. In retentostats, cells are continuously supplied with a small, constant carbon and energy supply, sufficient for maintenance of cellular viability and integrity but insufficient for growth. When glucose-limited retentostats cultivated under extreme calorie restriction were subjected to glucose starvation, calorie-restricted and glucose-starved cells were found to share characteristics such as increased heat-shock tolerance and expression of quiescence-related genes. However, they also displayed strikingly different features. While calorie-restricted yeast cultures remained metabolically active and viable for prolonged periods of time, glucose starvation resulted in rapid consumption of reserve carbohydrates, population heterogeneity due to appearance of senescent cells and, ultimately, loss of viability. Moreover, during starvation, calculated rates of ATP synthesis from reserve carbohydrates were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than steady-state ATP-turnover rates calculated under extreme calorie restriction in retentostats. Stringent reduction of ATP turnover during glucose starvation was accompanied by a strong down-regulation of genes involved in protein synthesis. These results demonstrate that extreme calorie restriction and carbon starvation represent different physiological states in S. cerevisiae.

  17. The effects of exopolymers on cell morphology and culturability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides during starvation.

    PubMed

    Kim, D S; Fogler, H S

    1999-11-01

    Biofilm formation by bacterial cells can be used to modify the subsurface permeability for the purpose of microbial enhanced oil recovery, bio-barrier formation, and in situ bioremediation. Once injected into the subsurface, the bacteria undergo starvation due to a decrease in nutrient supply and diffusion limitations in biofilms. To help understand the starvation response of bacteria in biofilms, the relationship between exopolymer formation and cell culturability was examined in a batch culture. The average cell diameter was observed to decrease from 0.8 micron to 0.35 micron 3 days after starvation began. Cell chain fragmentation was also observed during starvation. Cells that underwent starvation in the presence of insoluble exopolymers showed a slower rate of decrease in cell diameter and in cell chain length than cells without insoluble exopolymers. The rate of decrease in the average cell diameter and cell chain length were determined using a first order decay model. Cells starved in the presence of exopolymers showed greater culturability than cells starved without exopolymers. After 200 days starvation, 2.5 x 10(-3)% cells were culturable, but no increase in cell number was observed. During starvation, the exopolymer concentration remained constant, an indication that the exopolymer was not consumed by the starving bacteria as an alternative carbon or energy source.

  18. Starvation response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in anaerobic nitrogen- or carbon-limited chemostat cultures.

    PubMed

    Thomsson, Elisabeth; Gustafsson, Lena; Larsson, Christer

    2005-06-01

    Anaerobic starvation conditions are frequent in industrial fermentation and can affect the performance of the cells. In this study, the anaerobic carbon or nitrogen starvation response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated for cells grown in anaerobic carbon or nitrogen-limited chemostat cultures at a dilution rate of 0.1 h(-1) at pH 3.25 or 5. Lactic or benzoic acid was present in the growth medium at different concentrations, resulting in 16 different growth conditions. At steady state, cells were harvested and then starved for either carbon or nitrogen for 24 h under anaerobic conditions. We measured fermentative capacity, glucose uptake capacity, intracellular ATP content, and reserve carbohydrates and found that the carbon, but not the nitrogen, starvation response was dependent upon the previous growth conditions. All cells subjected to nitrogen starvation retained a large portion of their initial fermentative capacity, independently of previous growth conditions. However, nitrogen-limited cells that were starved for carbon lost almost all their fermentative capacity, while carbon-limited cells managed to preserve a larger portion of their fermentative capacity during carbon starvation. There was a positive correlation between the amount of glycogen before carbon starvation and the fermentative capacity and ATP content of the cells after carbon starvation. Fermentative capacity and glucose uptake capacity were not correlated under any of the conditions tested. Thus, the successful adaptation to sudden carbon starvation requires energy and, under anaerobic conditions, fermentable endogenous resources. In an industrial setting, carbon starvation in anaerobic fermentations should be avoided to maintain a productive yeast population.

  19. 1H NMR metabolomic study of auxotrophic starvation in yeast using Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares for Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Castellví, Francesc; Alfonso, Ignacio; Piña, Benjamin; Tauler, Romà

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of specific metabolic pathways constitutes the mode of action of many known toxicants and it is responsible for the adverse phenotypes associated to human genetic defects. Conversely, many industrial applications rely on metabolic alterations of diverse microorganisms, whereas many therapeutic drugs aim to selectively disrupt pathogens’ metabolism. In this work we analyzed metabolic changes induced by auxotrophic starvation conditions in yeast in a non-targeted approach, using one-dimensional proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and chemometric analyses. Analysis of the raw spectral datasets showed specific changes linked to the different stages during unrestricted yeast growth, as well as specific changes linked to each of the four tested starvation conditions (L-methionine, L-histidine, L-leucine and uracil). Analysis of changes in concentrations of more than 40 metabolites by Multivariate Curve Resolution – Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) showed the normal progression of key metabolites during lag, exponential and stationary unrestricted growth phases, while reflecting the metabolic blockage induced by the starvation conditions. In this case, different metabolic intermediates accumulated over time, allowing identification of the different metabolic pathways specifically affected by each gene disruption. This synergy between NMR metabolomics and molecular biology may have clear implications for both genetic diagnostics and drug development. PMID:27485935

  20. Increase of chromium tolerance in Scenedesmus acutus after sulfur starvation: Chromium uptake and compartmentalization in two strains with different sensitivities to Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Marieschi, M; Gorbi, G; Zanni, C; Sardella, A; Torelli, A

    2015-10-01

    In photosynthetic organisms sulfate constitutes the main sulfur source for the biosynthesis of GSH and its precursor Cys. Hence, sulfur availability can modulate the capacity to cope with environmental stresses, a phenomenon known as SIR/SED (Sulfur Induced Resistance or Sulfur Enhanced Defence). Since chromate may compete for sulfate transport into the cells, in this study chromium accumulation and tolerance were investigated in relation to sulfur availability in two strains of the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus acutus with different Cr-sensitivities. Paradoxically, sulfur deprivation has been demonstrated to induce a transient increase of Cr-tolerance in both strains. Sulfur deprivation is known to enhance the sulfate uptake/assimilation pathway leading to important consequences on Cr-tolerance: (i) reduced chromate uptake due to the induction of high affinity sulfate transporters (ii) higher production of cysteine and GSH which can play a role both through the formation of unsoluble complexes and their sequestration in inert compartments. To investigate the role of the above mentioned mechanisms, Cr accumulation in total cells and in different cell compartments (cell wall, membranes, soluble and miscellaneous fractions) was analyzed in both sulfur-starved and unstarved cells. Both strains mainly accumulated chromium in the soluble fraction, but the uptake was higher in the wild-type. In this type a short period of sulfur starvation before Cr(VI) treatment lowered chromium accumulation to the level observed in the unstarved Cr-tolerant strain, in which Cr uptake seems instead less influenced by S-starvation, since no significant decrease was observed. The increase in Cr-tolerance following S-starvation seems thus to rely on different mechanisms in the two strains, suggesting the induction of a mechanism constitutively active in the Cr-tolerant strain, maybe a high affinity sulfate transporter also in the wild-type. Changes observed in the cell wall and

  1. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    PubMed

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions.

  2. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions. PMID:8597660

  3. Biotin starvation causes mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation and partial rescue by the SIRT3-like deacetylase Hst4p.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Christian T; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Young, Clifford; Larsen, Sara C; Poulsen, Jon W; Andersen, Marianne A; Palmqvist, Eva A; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Jensen, Per B; Treebak, Jonas T; Lisby, Michael; Nielsen, Michael L

    2015-07-09

    The essential vitamin biotin is a covalent and tenaciously attached prosthetic group in several carboxylases that play important roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. Here we describe increased acetyl-CoA levels and mitochondrial hyperacetylation as downstream metabolic effects of biotin deficiency. Upregulated mitochondrial acetylation sites correlate with the cellular deficiency of the Hst4p deacetylase, and a biotin-starvation-induced accumulation of Hst4p in mitochondria supports a role for Hst4p in lowering mitochondrial acetylation. We show that biotin starvation and knockout of Hst4p cause alterations in cellular respiration and an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that Hst4p plays a pivotal role in biotin metabolism and cellular energy homeostasis, and supports that Hst4p is a functional yeast homologue of the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3. With biotin deficiency being involved in various metabolic disorders, this study provides valuable insight into the metabolic effects biotin exerts on eukaryotic cells.

  4. In vivo vizualisation of mono-ADP-ribosylation by dPARP16 upon amino-acid starvation

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera-Gomez, Angelica; van Oorschot, Marinke M; Veenendaal, Tineke; Rabouille, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    PARP catalysed ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification involved in several physiological and pathological processes, including cellular stress. In order to visualise both Poly-, and Mono-, ADP-ribosylation in vivo, we engineered specific fluorescent probes. Using them, we show that amino-acid starvation triggers an unprecedented display of mono-ADP-ribosylation that governs the formation of Sec body, a recently identified stress assembly that forms in Drosophila cells. We show that dPARP16 catalytic activity is necessary and sufficient for both amino-acid starvation induced mono-ADP-ribosylation and subsequent Sec body formation and cell survival. Importantly, dPARP16 catalyses the modification of Sec16, a key Sec body component, and we show that it is a critical event for the formation of this stress assembly. Taken together our findings establish a novel example for the role of mono-ADP-ribosylation in the formation of stress assemblies, and link this modification to a metabolic stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21475.001 PMID:27874829

  5. Balancing the risks of hydraulic failure and carbon starvation: a twig scale analysis in declining Scots pine

    PubMed Central

    Torres‐Ruiz, José M.; Poyatos, Rafael; Martinez‐Vilalta, Jordi; Meir, Patrick; Cochard, Hervé; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Understanding physiological processes involved in drought‐induced mortality is important for predicting the future of forests and for modelling the carbon and water cycles. Recent research has highlighted the variable risks of carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in drought‐exposed trees. However, little is known about the specific responses of leaves and supporting twigs, despite their critical role in balancing carbon acquisition and water loss. Comparing healthy (non‐defoliated) and unhealthy (defoliated) Scots pine at the same site, we measured the physiological variables involved in regulating carbon and water resources. Defoliated trees showed different responses to summer drought compared with non‐defoliated trees. Defoliated trees maintained gas exchange while non‐defoliated trees reduced photosynthesis and transpiration during the drought period. At the branch scale, very few differences were observed in non‐structural carbohydrate concentrations between health classes. However, defoliated trees tended to have lower water potentials and smaller hydraulic safety margins. While non‐defoliated trees showed a typical response to drought for an isohydric species, the physiology appears to be driven in defoliated trees by the need to maintain carbon resources in twigs. These responses put defoliated trees at higher risk of branch hydraulic failure and help explain the interaction between carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in dying trees. PMID:25997464

  6. Biotin starvation causes mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation and partial rescue by the SIRT3-like deacetylase Hst4p

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Christian T.; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B.; Young, Clifford; Larsen, Sara C.; Poulsen, Jon W.; Andersen, Marianne A.; Palmqvist, Eva A.; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Jensen, Per B.; Treebak, Jonas T.; Lisby, Michael; Nielsen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The essential vitamin biotin is a covalent and tenaciously attached prosthetic group in several carboxylases that play important roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. Here we describe increased acetyl-CoA levels and mitochondrial hyperacetylation as downstream metabolic effects of biotin deficiency. Upregulated mitochondrial acetylation sites correlate with the cellular deficiency of the Hst4p deacetylase, and a biotin-starvation-induced accumulation of Hst4p in mitochondria supports a role for Hst4p in lowering mitochondrial acetylation. We show that biotin starvation and knockout of Hst4p cause alterations in cellular respiration and an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that Hst4p plays a pivotal role in biotin metabolism and cellular energy homeostasis, and supports that Hst4p is a functional yeast homologue of the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3. With biotin deficiency being involved in various metabolic disorders, this study provides valuable insight into the metabolic effects biotin exerts on eukaryotic cells. PMID:26158509

  7. [Activation of the expression of the microcin C51 operon upon glucose starvation of cells at the exponential growth phase].

    PubMed

    Veselovskiĭ, A M; Metlitskaia, A Z; Lipasova, V A; Bass, I A; Khmel', I A

    2005-01-01

    It was earlier shown that expression of the microcin C51 operon in Escherichia coli cells is activated upon decelerated growth of cells during their transition to the stationary growth phase and depends on the sigmaS subunit of RNA polymerase. Using a single-copy construct containing the cloned promoter region of the microcin C51 operon and a promoterless lac operon (P(mcc)-lac), it was shown that the promoter of the microcin operon was also induced by stress caused by the transition of cells at the exponential growth phase into the medium without glucose as a sole carbon source. Activation of P(mcc)-lac expression upon severe glucose starvation occurred in rpoS+ and rpoS- strains. In cells carrying the rpoD800 mutation that renders the sigma70 subunit of RNA polymerase temperature-sensitive, an activation of P(mcc)-lac expression was observed at nonpermissive temperature, in contrast to its complete inhibition in E. coli cells at the phase of delayed growth. Other stressors-nitrogen starvation, high temperatures, osmotic shock, tetracycline and chloramphenicol-did not activate P(mcc)-lac expression in cells at the exponential growth phase.

  8. Physiologic mechanisms in the development of starvation ketosis in man.

    PubMed

    Grey, N J; Karl, I; Kipnis, D M

    1975-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether alterations in ketone body utilization and hepatic production, independent of the FFA load, were also involved in the development of fasting ketosis. Plasma Beta-OH butyric acid (Beta-OHB) increased to 2.5-4.5 mM and plasma FFA to 1,000-1,400 muEq/L. in normal weight individuals after five to seven days' starvation and in obese subjects after ten to fourteen days' fasting. Acute elevations fo the plasma FFA greater than 1,500 muEq/L. for sixty minutes in fed normal weight and obese subjects with a fat meal-heparin regimen resulted in peak elevations of plasma Beta-OHB (0.25-0.45mM), only 10 percent of that seen during fasting. When plasma FFA were lowered acutely during fasting with the antilipolytic agent Pyrazole to control levels (400-600 muEq/L.), plasma Beta-OHB decreased 35 plus or minus 5 per cent. Comparable lowering of plasma FFA in normal weight or obese starved subjects given dexamethasone to maintain elevated fasting plasma insulin levels resulted in an 87 plus or minus 3 per cent decrease in plasma Beta-OHB. Similar studies in obese fasted subjects pretreated with an intravenous infusion of insulin (1.0 U/hr. for eight hours) before receiving Pyrazole resulted in a 65 plus or minus 5 per cent decrease in plasma Beta-OHB. Plasma Beta-OHB half-life, determined after injections of 12 gm. Beta-OHB, increased significantly during fasting (110 plus or minus 15 minutes) and was decreased when the fasting subjects were maintained on dexamethasone (65 plus or minus 7 minutes). These studies indicate that accelerated hepatic ketogenesis during starvation is a result of both enhanced activity of the enzymatic system(s) involved in ketone body production as well as an increased FFA load. The increase in plasma Beta-OHB during fasting reflects not only an accelerated rate of hepatic ketogenesis but also an impairment of peripheral utilization, both processes apparently being sensitive to insulin. Diabetes 24

  9. Evidence for the adverse effect of starvation on bone quality: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kueper, Janina; Beyth, Shaul; Liebergall, Meir; Kaplan, Leon; Schroeder, Josh E

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and starvation's possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200-800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality.

  10. Evidence for the Adverse Effect of Starvation on Bone Quality: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kueper, Janina; Beyth, Shaul; Liebergall, Meir; Kaplan, Leon; Schroeder, Josh E.

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and starvation's possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200–800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality. PMID:25810719

  11. Increased Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) Gene Expression and Steatosis During Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Subgenome Replication: Role of Nonstructural Component-5A (NS5A) and CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein ß (C/EBPß)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; however, the pathogenic mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we report gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) transcription and associated tra...

  12. An evolutionarily significant unicellular strategy in response to starvation in Dictyostelium social amoebae

    PubMed Central

    Dubravcic, Darja; van Baalen, Minus; Nizak, Clément

    2014-01-01

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is widely studied for its multicellular development program as a response to starvation. Aggregates of up to 10 6 cells form fruiting bodies containing (i) dormant spores (~80%) that can persist for months in the absence of nutrients, and (ii) dead stalk cells (~20%) that promote the dispersion of the spores towards nutrient-rich areas. It is often overlooked that not all cells aggregate upon starvation. Using a new quantitative approach based on time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and a low ratio of reporting cells, we have quantified this fraction of non-aggregating cells. In realistic starvation conditions, up to 15% of cells do not aggregate, which makes this third cell fate a significant component of the population-level response of social amoebae to starvation. Non-aggregating cells have an advantage over cells in aggregates since they resume growth earlier upon arrival of new nutrients, but have a shorter lifespan under prolonged starvation. We find that phenotypic heterogeneities linked to cell nutritional state bias the representation of cells in the aggregating vs. non-aggregating fractions, and thus affect population partitioning. Next, we report that the fraction of non-aggregating cells depends on genetic factors that regulate the timing of starvation, signal sensing efficiency and aggregation efficiency. In addition, interactions between clones in mixtures of non-isogenic cells affect the partitioning of each clone into both fractions. We further build a numerical model to test the evolutionary significance of the non-aggregating cell fraction. The partitioning of cells into aggregating and non-aggregating fractions is optimal in fluctuating environments with an unpredictable duration of starvation periods. Our study highlights the unicellular component of the response of social amoebae to starvation, and thus extends its evolutionary and ecological framework. PMID:25309731

  13. Hydrodynamic starvation in first-feeding larval fishes

    PubMed Central

    China, Victor; Holzman, Roi

    2014-01-01

    Larval fishes suffer prodigious mortality rates, eliminating 99% of the brood within a few days after first feeding. Hjort (1914) famously attributed this “critical period” of low survival to the larvae’s inability to obtain sufficient food [Hjort (1914) Rapp P-v Réun Cons Int Explor Mer 20:1–228]. However, the cause of this poor feeding success remains to be identified. Here, we show that hydrodynamic constraints on the ubiquitous suction mechanism in first-feeding larvae limit their ability to capture prey, thereby reducing their feeding rates. Dynamic-scaling experiments revealed that larval size is the primary determinant of feeding rate, independent of other ontogenetic effects. We conclude that first-feeding larvae experience “hydrodynamic starvation,” in which low Reynolds numbers mechanistically limit their feeding performance even under high prey densities. Our results provide a hydrodynamic perspective on feeding of larval fishes that focuses on the physical properties of the larvae and prey, rather than on prey concentration and the rate of encounters. PMID:24843180

  14. SAR11 lipid renovation in response to phosphate starvation.

    PubMed

    Carini, Paul; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Thrash, J Cameron; White, Angelicque; Zhao, Yanlin; Campbell, Emily O; Fredricks, Helen F; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2015-06-23

    Phytoplankton inhabiting oligotrophic ocean gyres actively reduce their phosphorus demand by replacing polar membrane phospholipids with those lacking phosphorus. Although the synthesis of nonphosphorus lipids is well documented in some heterotrophic bacterial lineages, phosphorus-free lipid synthesis in oligotrophic marine chemoheterotrophs has not been directly demonstrated, implying they are disadvantaged in phosphate-deplete ecosystems, relative to phytoplankton. Here, we show the SAR11 clade chemoheterotroph Pelagibacter sp. str. HTCC7211 renovates membrane lipids when phosphate starved by replacing a portion of its phospholipids with monoglucosyl- and glucuronosyl-diacylglycerols and by synthesizing new ornithine lipids. Lipid profiles of cells grown with excess phosphate consisted entirely of phospholipids. Conversely, up to 40% of the total lipids were converted to nonphosphorus lipids when cells were starved for phosphate, or when growing on methylphosphonate. Cells sequentially limited by phosphate and methylphosphonate transformed >75% of their lipids to phosphorus-free analogs. During phosphate starvation, a four-gene cluster was significantly up-regulated that likely encodes the enzymes responsible for lipid renovation. These genes were found in Pelagibacterales strains isolated from a phosphate-deficient ocean gyre, but not in other strains from coastal environments, suggesting alternate lipid synthesis is a specific adaptation to phosphate scarcity. Similar gene clusters are found in the genomes of other marine α-proteobacteria, implying lipid renovation is a common strategy used by heterotrophic cells to reduce their requirement for phosphorus in oligotrophic habitats.

  15. Adenylate Energy Charge in Escherichia coli During Growth and Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Astrid G.; Fall, Lana; Atkinson, Daniel E.

    1971-01-01

    The value of the adenylate energy charge, [(adenosine triphosphate) + ½ (adenosine diphosphate)]/[(adenosine triphosphate) + (adenosine diphosphate) + (adenosine monophosphate)], in Escherichia coli cells during growth is about 0.8. During the stationary phase after cessation of growth, or during starvation in carbon-limited cultures, the energy charge declines slowly to a value of about 0.5, and then falls more rapidly. During the slow decline in energy charge, all the cells are capable of forming colonies, but a rapid fall in viability coincides with the steep drop in energy charge. These results suggest that growth can occur only at energy charge values above about 0.8, that viability is maintained at values between 0.8 and 0.5, and that cells die at values below 0.5. Tabulation of adenylate concentrations previously reported for various organisms and tissues supports the prediction, based on enzyme kinetic observations in vitro, that the energy charge is stabilized near 0.85 in intact metabolizing cells of a wide variety of types. PMID:4333317

  16. Relationship between respiratory enzymes and survival of Escherichia coli under starvation stress in lake water.

    PubMed

    Ozkanca, R; Flint, K P

    1997-03-01

    Survival, electron transport system (ETS) activity and the activity of NADH and succinate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli ML30 were studied under starvation stress at different temperatures in a filtered-autoclaved lake water microcosm. ETS activity in E. coli declined rapidly at 30 degrees C but more slowly at 4 degrees and 15 degrees C over a 20 d starvation period. The decrease in ETS activity in E. coli only started after 6 d of incubation at 4 degrees C and 15 degrees C. Viability of E. coli, as determined by plate counts, declined faster at 37 degrees C than at the other temperatures and remained highest at 4 degrees C in filtered-autoclaved lake water. There was also a significant cell size reduction at 37 degrees C in filtered-autoclaved lake water but not at 4 degrees C. ETS activity after up to 16 d of starvation increased after the addition of nutrient broth to the filtered-autoclaved lake water at 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C suggesting that cells were still able to respond to nutrients, even after prolonged starvation. The response to the addition of nutrient broth, however, declined with the length of the starvation period. The activity of both succinate and NADH dehydrogenase declined over a 13 d starvation period. The loss of activity was fastest at 37 degrees C compared to lower incubation temperatures but even at 4 degrees C, a significant proportion of the activity was lost over the 13 d period.

  17. Bioavailability of organic phosphorus to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata as affected by phosphorus starvation: an isotope dilution study.

    PubMed

    Van Moorleghem, Christoff; De Schutter, Nynke; Smolders, Erik; Merckx, Roel

    2013-06-01

    Phosphorus (P) starved algae have a capacity to rapidly take up P when resupplied to P. This study was set-up to measure to what extent P starvation enhances the potential of algae to utilize organic P forms. The initial (<0.5 h) PO4 uptake rates of cells of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata increased up to 18-fold with increasing starvation. Algae from different levels of P starvation were subsequently exposed to different model organic P forms and carrier-free (33)PO4. Uptake (1h) of P from organic P-increased up to 5-fold with increasing P starvation. The bioavailability of organic P, relative to PO4, was calculated from uptake of (31)P and (33)P isotopes assuming no isotopic exchange with organic P-forms. This relative bioavailability ranged from 0 to 57% and remained generally unaffected by the extent of P-starvation. This result was found for cells that were either or not treated by a wash method to remove extracellular phosphatases. Short-term P uptake rate sharply increases with decreasing internal P content of the algal cells but the bioavailability of organic P, relative to PO4, is not enhanced. Such finding suggests that P-starvation enhances PO4 uptake capacity and organic P hydrolysis capacity to about the same extent.

  18. The negative effect of starvation and the positive effect of mild thermal stress on thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, Inon; Wexler, Yonatan; MacMillan, Heath Andrew; Presman, Shira; Simson, Eddie; Rosenstein, Shai

    2016-04-01

    The thermal tolerance of a terrestrial insect species can vary as a result of differences in population origin, developmental stage, age, and sex, as well as via phenotypic plasticity induced in response to changes in the abiotic environment. Here, we studied the effects of both starvation and mild cold and heat shocks on the thermal tolerance of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Starvation led to impaired cold tolerance, measured as chill coma recovery time, and this effect, which was stronger in males than females, persisted for longer than 2 days but less than 7 days. Heat tolerance, measured as heat knockdown time, was not affected by starvation. Our results highlight the difficulty faced by insects when encountering multiple stressors simultaneously and indicate physiological trade-offs. Both mild cold and heat shocks led to improved heat tolerance in both sexes. It could be that both mild shocks lead to the expression of heat shock proteins, enhancing heat tolerance in the short run. Cold tolerance was not affected by previous mild cold shock, suggesting that such a cold shock, as a single event, causes little stress and hence elicits only weak physiological reaction. However, previous mild heat stress led to improved cold tolerance but only in males. Our results point to both hardening and cross-tolerance between cold and heat shocks.

  19. A kinetic study of the effects of phosphate and organic phosphates on the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from Crassula argentea.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C R; Rustin, P; Wedding, R T

    1989-05-15

    The effects of phosphate and several phosphate-containing compounds on the activity of purified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the crassulacean acid metabolism plant, Crassula argentea, were investigated. When assayed at subsaturating phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) concentrations, low concentrations of most of the compounds tested were found to stimulate PEPC activity. This activation, variable in extent, was found in all cases to be competitive with glucose 6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) stimulation, suggesting that these effectors bind to the Glc-6-P site. At higher concentrations, depending upon the effector molecule studied, deactivation, inhibition, or no response was observed. More detailed studies were performed with Glc-6-P, AMP, phosphoglycolate, and phosphate. AMP had previously been shown to be a specific ligand for the Glc-6-P site. The main effect of Glc-6-P and AMP on the kinetic parameters was to decrease the apparent Km and increase Vmax/Km. AMP also caused a decrease in the Vmax of the reaction. In contrast, phosphoglycolate acted essentially as a competitive inhibitor increasing the apparent Km for PEP and decreasing Vmax/Km. Inorganic phosphate had a biphasic effect on the kinetic parameters, resulting in a transient decrease in Km followed by an increase of the apparent Km for PEP with increasing concentration of phosphate. The Vmax also was decreased with increasing phosphate concentrations. Further, the enzyme appeared to respond to the complex of phosphate with magnesium. In the presence of a saturating concentration of AMP, no activation but rather inhibition was observed with increasing phosphate concentration. This is consistent with the binding of phosphate to two separate sites--the Glc-6-P activation site and an inhibitory site, a phenomenon that may be occurring with other phosphate containing compounds. High concentrations of phosphate with magnesium were found to protect enzyme activity when PEPC, previously shown to contain an

  20. Influence of Molting and Starvation on Digestive Enzyme Activities and Energy Storage in Gammarus fossarum

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic) and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity) in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin) decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar) increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities) and physiological (energy reserves) responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs. PMID:24788197

  1. Octopamine controls starvation resistance, life span and metabolic traits in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Hoffmann, Julia; Li, Yang; Stephano, Flora; Bruchhaus, Iris; Fink, Christine; Roeder, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The monoamines octopamine (OA) and tyramine (TA) modulate numerous behaviours and physiological processes in invertebrates. Nevertheless, it is not clear whether these invertebrate counterparts of norepinephrine are important regulators of metabolic and life history traits. We show that flies (Drosophila melanogaster) lacking OA are more resistant to starvation, while their overall life span is substantially reduced compared with control flies. In addition, these animals have increased body fat deposits, reduced physical activity and a reduced metabolic resting rate. Increasing the release of OA from internal stores induced the opposite effects. Flies devoid of both OA and TA had normal body fat and metabolic rates, suggesting that OA and TA act antagonistically. Moreover, OA-deficient flies show increased insulin release rates. We inferred that the OA-mediated control of insulin release accounts for a substantial proportion of the alterations observed in these flies. Apparently, OA levels control the balance between thrifty and expenditure metabolic modes. Thus, changes in OA levels in response to external and internal signals orchestrate behaviour and metabolic processes to meet physiological needs. Moreover, chronic deregulation of the corresponding signalling systems in humans may be associated with metabolic disorders, such as obesity or diabetes. PMID:27759117

  2. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed.

  3. Salmonella typhimurium is pathogenic for Dictyostelium cells and subverts the starvation response.

    PubMed

    Sillo, Alessio; Matthias, Jan; Konertz, Roman; Bozzaro, Salvatore; Eichinger, Ludwig

    2011-11-01

    In unicellular amoebae, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, bacterial phagocytosis is a food hunting device, while in higher organisms it is the first defence barrier against microbial infection. In both cases, pathogenic bacteria exploit phagocytosis to enter the cell and multiply intracellularly. Salmonella typhimurium, the agent of food-borne gastroenteritis, is phagocytosed by both macrophages and Dictyostelium cells. By using cell biological assays and global transcriptional analysis with DNA microarrays covering the Dictyostelium genome, we show here that S. typhimurium is pathogenic for Dictyostelium cells. Depending on the degree of virulence, which in turn depended on bacterial growth conditions, Salmonella could kill Dictyostelium cells or inhibit their growth and development. In the early phase of infection in non-nutrient buffer, the ingested bacteria escaped degradation, induced a starvation-like transcriptional response but inhibited selectively genes required for chemotaxis and aggregation. This way differentiation of the host cells into spore and stalk cells was blocked or delayed, which in turn is likely to be favourable for the establishment of a replicative niche for Salmonella. Inhibition of the aggregation competence and chemotactic streaming of aggregation-competent cells in the presence of Salmonella suggests interference with cAMP signalling.

  4. Glucose starvation as a selective tool for the study of adaptive mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Erich; Steinboeck, Ferdinand

    2017-01-01

    Mutations not only arise in proliferating cells but also in resting - thus non-replicating - cells. Such stationary-phase mutations may occasionally enable an escape from growth repression and e.g. contribute to cancerogenesis or development of drug resistance. The most widely used condition for the study of such adaptive mutations in the eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the starvation for a single amino acid. To overcome some limitations of this experimental setup we developed a new adaptive mutation assay that allows a screening for mutagenic processes during a more regular cell cycle arrest induced by the lack of a fermentable carbon source. We blocked one essential step of gluconeogenesis by inactivation of the FBP1 gene. This drives the cells into a cell cycle arrest when glucose is not available in the medium although a non-fermentable carbon source is present. As another component of the new mutation assay, we established a custom-designed test allele that contains a microsatellite sequence as a target for mutations. We demonstrated the feasibility and validity of this novel experimental setup by the observation and characterization of adaptive mutants.

  5. Changes in plastid proteome and structure in arbuscular mycorrhizal roots display a nutrient starvation signature.

    PubMed

    Daher, Zeina; Recorbet, Ghislaine; Solymosi, Katalin; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Mounier, Arnaud; Morandi, Dominique; Lherminier, Jeannine; Wipf, Daniel; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Schoefs, Benoît

    2017-01-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, arbuscule-containing root cortex cells display a proliferation of plastids, a feature usually ascribed to an increased plant anabolism despite the lack of studies focusing on purified root plastids. In this study, we investigated mycorrhiza-induced changes in plastidic pathways by performing a label-free comparative subcellular quantitative proteomic analysis targeted on plastid-enriched fractions isolated from Medicago truncatula roots, coupled to a cytological analysis of plastid structure. We identified 490 root plastid protein candidates, among which 79 changed in abundance upon mycorrhization, as inferred from spectral counting. According to cross-species sequence homology searches, the mycorrhiza-responsive proteome was enriched in proteins experimentally localized in thylakoids, whereas it was depleted of proteins ascribed predominantly to amyloplasts. Consistently, the analysis of plastid morphology using transmission electron microscopy indicated that starch depletion associated with the proliferation of membrane-free and tubular membrane-containing plastids was a feature specific to arbusculated cells. The loss of enzymes involved in carbon/nitrogen assimilation and provision of reducing power, coupled to macromolecule degradation events in the plastid-enriched fraction of mycorrhizal roots that paralleled lack of starch accumulation in arbusculated cells, lead us to propose that arbuscule functioning elicits a nutrient starvation and an oxidative stress signature that may prime arbuscule breakdown.

  6. Increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression and steatosis during hepatitis C virus subgenome replication: role of nonstructural component 5A and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Ishtiaq; Choudhury, Mahua; Rahman, Shaikh Mizanoor; Knotts, Trina A; Janssen, Rachel C; Schaack, Jerome; Iwahashi, Mieko; Puljak, Livia; Simon, Francis R; Kilic, Gordan; Fitz, J Gregory; Friedman, Jacob E

    2012-10-26

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; however, the pathogenic mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we report gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) transcription and associated transcription factors are dramatically up-regulated in Huh.8 cells, which stably express an HCV subgenome replicon. HCV increased activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPβ), forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and involved activation of the cAMP response element in the PEPCK promoter. Infection with dominant-negative CREB or C/EBPβ-shRNA significantly reduced or normalized PEPCK expression, with no change in PGC-1α or FOXO1 levels. Notably, expression of HCV nonstructural component NS5A in Huh7 or primary hepatocytes stimulated PEPCK gene expression and glucose output in HepG2 cells, whereas a deletion in NS5A reduced PEPCK expression and lowered cellular lipids but was without effect on insulin resistance, as demonstrated by the inability of insulin to stimulate mobilization of a pool of insulin-responsive vesicles to the plasma membrane. HCV-replicating cells demonstrated increases in cellular lipids with insulin resistance at the level of the insulin receptor, increased insulin receptor substrate 1 (Ser-312), and decreased Akt (Ser-473) activation in response to insulin. C/EBPβ-RNAi normalized lipogenic genes sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and liver X receptor α but was unable to reduce accumulation of triglycerides in Huh.8 cells or reverse the increase in ApoB expression, suggesting a role for increased lipid retention in steatotic hepatocytes. Collectively, these data reveal an important role of NS5A, C/EBPβ, and pCREB in promoting HCV-induced gluconeogenic gene expression

  7. Reticulate leaves and stunted roots are independent phenotypes pointing at opposite roles of the phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator defective in cue1 in the plastids of both organs

    PubMed Central

    Staehr, Pia; Löttgert, Tanja; Christmann, Alexander; Krueger, Stephan; Rosar, Christian; Rolčík, Jakub; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Bell, Kirsten; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Häusler, Rainer E.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) serves not only as a high energy carbon compound in glycolysis, but it acts also as precursor for plastidial anabolic sequences like the shikimate pathway, which produces aromatic amino acids (AAA) and subsequently secondary plant products. After conversion to pyruvate, PEP can also enter de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids, and the non-mevalonate way of isoprenoid production. As PEP cannot be generated by glycolysis in chloroplasts and a variety of non-green plastids, it has to be imported from the cytosol by a phosphate translocator (PT) specific for PEP (PPT). A loss of function of PPT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the chlorophyll a/b binding protein underexpressed1 (cue1) mutant, which is characterized by reticulate leaves and stunted roots. Here we dissect the shoot- and root phenotypes, and also address the question whether or not long distance signaling by metabolites is involved in the perturbed mesophyll development of cue1. Reverse grafting experiments showed that the shoot- and root phenotypes develop independently from each other, ruling out long distance metabolite signaling. The leaf phenotype could be transiently modified even in mature leaves, e.g. by an inducible PPT1RNAi approach or by feeding AAA, the cytokinin trans-zeatin (tZ), or the putative signaling molecule dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol glucoside (DCG). Hormones, such as auxins, abscisic acid, gibberellic acid, ethylene, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid did not rescue the cue1 leaf phenotype. The low cell density1 (lcd1) mutant shares the reticulate leaf-, but not the stunted root phenotype with cue1. It could neither be rescued by AAA nor by tZ. In contrast, tZ and AAA further inhibited root growth both in cue1 and wild-type plants. Based on our results, we propose a model that PPT1 acts as a net importer of PEP into chloroplast, but as an overflow valve and hence exporter in root plastids. PMID:24782872

  8. In vivo phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Egeria densa, a submersed aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Lara, M V; Casati, P; Andreo, C S

    2001-04-01

    In vivo phosphorylation of PEPC in Egeria densa was studied using plants at high temperature and in light, and plants kept at low temperature and in light. The isoform induced by high temperature and light was more phosphorylated in the light. Changes in kinetic and regulatory properties correlated with changes in the phosphorylation state of PEPC.

  9. Hormonal regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression is mediated through modulation of an already disrupted chromatin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, Y.T.; Granner, D.K.; Chalkley, R. . School of Medicine)

    1989-03-01

    The authors used indirect end labeling to identify a series of five hypersensitive (HS) sites in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells. These sites were found at -4800 base pairs (bp) (site A), at -1300 bp (site B), over a broad domain between -400 and -30 bp (site C), at +4650 bp (site D), and at +6200 bp (site E). Sites A to D were detected only in cells capable of expressing the PEPCK gene, whereas site E was present in all of the cells examined thus far. The HS sites were present in H4IIE cells even when transcriptional activity was reduced to a minimum by treatment with insulin. Stimulation of transcription by a cyclic AMP analog to a 40-fold increase over the insulin-repressed level did not affect the main features of the HS sites. Furthermore, increased transcription did not disrupt the nucleosomal arrangement of the coding region of the gene, nor did it affect the immediate 5' region (site C), which is always nucleosome-free. In HTC cells, a rat hepatoma line that is hormonally responsive but unable to synthesize PEPCK mRNA, the four expression-specific HS sites were totally absent. The authors experimental results also showed that, although there is a general correlation between lack of DNA methylation and transcriptional competence of the PEPCK gene, the role, if any, of methylation in the regulation of PEPCK gene activity is likely to be exerted at very specific sites.

  10. Multiple isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the Orchidaceae (subtribe Oncidiinae): implications for the evolution of crassulacean acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Silvera, Katia; Winter, Klaus; Rodriguez, B Leticia; Albion, Rebecca L; Cushman, John C

    2014-07-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) catalyses the initial fixation of atmospheric CO2 into oxaloacetate and subsequently malate. Nocturnal accumulation of malic acid within the vacuole of photosynthetic cells is a typical feature of plants that perform crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). PEPC is a ubiquitous plant enzyme encoded by a small gene family, and each member encodes an isoform with specialized function. CAM-specific PEPC isoforms probably evolved from ancestral non-photosynthetic isoforms by gene duplication events and subsequent acquisition of transcriptional control elements that mediate increased leaf-specific or photosynthetic-tissue-specific mRNA expression. To understand the patterns of functional diversification related to the expression of CAM, ppc gene families and photosynthetic patterns were characterized in 11 closely related orchid species from the subtribe Oncidiinae with a range of photosynthetic pathways from C3 photosynthesis (Oncidium cheirophorum, Oncidium maduroi, Rossioglossum krameri, and Oncidium sotoanum) to weak CAM (Oncidium panamense, Oncidium sphacelatum, Gomesa flexuosa and Rossioglossum insleayi) and strong CAM (Rossioglossum ampliatum, Trichocentrum nanum, and Trichocentrum carthagenense). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two main ppc lineages in flowering plants, two main ppc lineages within the eudicots, and three ppc lineages within the Orchidaceae. Our results indicate that ppc gene family expansion within the Orchidaceae is likely to be the result of gene duplication events followed by adaptive sequence divergence. CAM-associated PEPC isoforms in the Orchidaceae probably evolved from several independent origins.

  11. Temperature Responses of C4 Photosynthesis: Biochemical Analysis of Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Carbonic Anhydrase in Setaria viridis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Ryan A.; Gandin, Anthony; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic assimilation of CO2 in C4 plants is potentially limited by the enzymatic rates of Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc), and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Therefore, the activity and kinetic properties of these enzymes are needed to accurately parameterize C4 biochemical models of leaf CO2 exchange in response to changes in CO2 availability and temperature. There are currently no published temperature responses of both Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics from a C4 plant, nor are there known measurements of the temperature dependency of the PEPc Michaelis-Menten constant for its substrate HCO3−, and there is little information on the temperature response of plant CA activity. Here, we used membrane inlet mass spectrometry to measure the temperature responses of Rubisco carboxylation and oxygenation kinetics, PEPc carboxylation kinetics, and the activity and first-order rate constant for the CA hydration reaction from 10°C to 40°C using crude leaf extracts from the C4 plant Setaria viridis. The temperature dependencies of Rubisco, PEPc, and CA kinetic parameters are provided. These findings describe a new method for the investigation of PEPc kinetics, suggest an HCO3− limitation imposed by CA, and show similarities between the Rubisco temperature responses of previously measured C3 species and the C4 plant S. viridis. PMID:26373659

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) deficiency affects the germination, growth and fruit sugar content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong-Xing; Yin, Yong-Gen; Sanuki, Atsuko; Fukuda, Naoya; Ezura, Hiroshi; Matsukura, Chiaki

    2015-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key regulatory enzyme and is utilized in the gluconeogenesis pathway in plants. Although, its catalytic and regulatory properties are quite well understood, there are uncertainties regarding its physiological role in many plants tissues such as the flesh of developing fruits. To further understand the function of PEPCK in fruits and other tissues, RNAi transgenic tomato plants in which SlPEPCK transcription was down-regulated by either CaMV 35S constitutive promoter or the fruit-specific E8 promoter were generated and characterized on the basis of their phenotypic and metabolic aspects. In the PEPCK-deficient lines, prominent growth suppression of germinated seedlings was observed and other vegetative suppression appeared during the early stage of plant growth in the 35S promoter-driven lines. In particular, root elongation was most obviously suppressed in the germinated seedlings, indicating that the gluconeogenesis pathway is involved in the root growth of seedlings. Regarding the primary metabolism in fruit, the soluble sugar content tended to decrease, whereas the malate content tended to increase in ripening fruits of the RNAi lines compared with the wild type. These results indicate that activation of the gluconeogenesis pathway from organic acids to sugars occurs during ripening but is suppressed by the knocking down of the PEPCK gene, suggesting that PEPCK participates in determining the sugar/acid ratio in ripening fruit.

  13. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cucumber plants is increased both by ammonium and by acidification, and is present in the phloem.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Walker, Robert P; Técsi, László I; Lea, Peter J; Leegood, Richard C

    2004-05-01

    In cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was shown by activity measurements and immunoblots to be present in leaves, stems, roots, flowers, fruit and seed. However, immunolocalisation showed that it was present only in certain cell types. PEPCK was present in the companion cells of the adaxial phloem of minor veins, the adaxial and abaxial phloem of larger veins, the internal and external phloem of vascular bundles in petioles and stems, the phloem in roots and the extra-fascicular phloem in leaves, cotyledons, petioles and stems. Immunohistochemical evidence suggests that both the extra-fascicular phloem and the adaxial phloem are involved in the transport of amino acids. In roots and stems, the abundance of PEPCK was greatly increased by watering plants with a solution of ammonium chloride at low, but not at high pH. PEPCK also increased in leaves, but not roots or stems, of seedlings grown in an atmosphere containing 5% CO(2), and in roots and stems of seedlings watered with butyric acid. All these treatments are known to lower the pH of plant cells. Amino acid metabolism in the phloem may produce an excess of carbon skeletons, pH perturbations and an imbalance in the production/utilisation of NADH. This raises the possibility that PEPCK may function in the conversion of these carbon skeletons to PEP, which, depending on the energy requirements of the phloem, is subsequently utilised by either gluconeogenesis or the Krebs cycle, which both consume protons.

  14. Localization and hormonal control of serine dehydratase during metabolic acidosis differ markedly from those of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tohru; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Matsushima, Takako; Kawamata, Seiichi; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Kuroda, Kazunari; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Takata, Yoshimi; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Takusagawa, Fusao; Pitot, Henry C

    2003-08-01

    Serine dehydratase (SDH) is abundant in the rat liver but scarce in the kidney. When administrated with dexamethasone, the renal SDH activity was augmented 20-fold, whereas the hepatic SDH activity was affected little. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that SDH was localized to the proximal straight tubule of the nephron. To address the role of this hormone, rats were made acidotic by gavage of NH(4)Cl. Twenty-two hours later, the SDH activity was increased three-fold along with a six-fold increment in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity, a rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis. PEPCK, which is localized to the proximal tubules under the normal condition, spreads throughout the entire cortex to the outer medullary rays by acidosis, whereas SDH does not change regardless of treatment with dexamethasone or NH(4)Cl. When NH(4)Cl was given to adrenalectomized rats, in contrast to the SDH activity no longer increasing, the PEPCK activity responded to acidosis to the same extent as in the intact rats. A simultaneous administration of dexamethasone and NH(4)Cl into the adrenalectomized rats fully restored the SDH activity, demonstrating that the rise in the SDH activity during acidosis is primarily controlled by glucocorticoids. The present findings clearly indicate that the localization of SDH and its hormonal regulation during acidosis are strikingly different from those of PEPCK.

  15. Reaction of wild-type C365S, and C458S saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinases with fluorescent iodoacetamide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Krautwurst, H; Berti, M; Encinas, M V; Frey, P A

    1996-03-01

    The reactivities of Cys365 and Cys458 of ATP-dependent Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase against a range of sulfhydryl reagents have been investigated. The effect of pH on the second order reaction constants of N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide with mutant C458S and C365S PEP carboxykinases allowed the determination of pKa values of 9.4 and 9.1 for Cys365 and Cys458, respectively. The analysis of the inactivation rates of C458S and C365S mutant enzymes by several sulfhydryl reagents of different hydrophobicity showed that the microenvironment of these residues is rather polar. Anisotrophy measurements and acrylamide quenching experiments carried out with N-(iodoacetyl)-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine-labeled mutant enzymes indicated a higher rotational freedom and solvent exposure for the probe linked to Cys458 than to Cys365. These findings point to differences in the protein microenvironments around Cys365 and Cys458 in S. cerevisiae PEP carboxykinase. A comparison of the results obtained with published data for GTP-dependent PEP carboxykinases, suggest significant differences for the protein region around the reactive cysteinyl residues in these enzymes.

  16. Promotion of photosynthesis in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene by nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pingbo; Li, Xia; Huo, Kai; Wei, Xiaodong; Dai, Chuanchao; Lv, Chuangen

    2014-03-15

    We determined the effects of exogenous nitric oxide on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Seedlings were subjected to treatments with NO donors, an NO scavenger, phospholipase inhibitors, a Ca(2+) chelator, a Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, and a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibitor, individually and in various combinations. The NO donors significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate (PN) of PC and wild-type (WT), especially that of PC. Treatment with an NO scavenger did inhibit the PN of rice plants. The treatments with phospholipase inhibitors and a Ca(2+) chelator decreased the PN of WT and PC, and photosynthesis was more strongly inhibited in WT than in PC. Further analyses showed that the NO donors increased endogenous levels of NO and PLD activity, but decreased endogenous levels of Ca(2+) both WT and PC. However, there was a greater increase in NO in WT and a greater increase in PLD activity and Ca(2+) level in PC. The NO donors also increased both PEPC activity and pepc gene expression in PC. PEPC activity can be increased by SNP alone. But the expression of its encoding gene in PC might be regulated by SNP, together with PA and Ca(2+).

  17. Characterization of mutant histidine-containing proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Waygood, E.B.; Reiche, B.; Hengstenberg, W.; Lee, J.S.

    1987-06-01

    Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) is common to all of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase systems (PTS) in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, except the fructose-specific PTS. Strains which lack HPr activity (ptsH) have been characterized in the past, and it has proved difficult to delineate between tight and leaky mutants. In this study four different parameters of ptsH strains were measured: in vitro sugar phosphorylation activity of the mutant HPr; detection of /sup 32/P-labeled P-HPr; ability of monoclonal antibodies to bind mutant HPr; and sensitivity of ptsH strains to fosfomycin. Tight ptsH strains could be defined; they were fosfomycin resistant and produced no HPr protein or completely inactive mutant HPr. All leaky ptsH strains were fosfomycin sensitive, Usually produced normal amounts of mutant HPr protein, and had low but measurable activity, and HPr was detectable as a phosphoprotein. This indicates that the regulatory functions of the PTS require a very low level of HPr activity (about 1%). The antibodies used to detect mutant HPr in crude extracts were two monoclonal immunoglobulin G antibodies Jel42 and Jel44. Both antibodies, which have different pIs, inhibited PTS sugar phosphorylation assays, but the antibody-JPr complex could still be phosphorylated by enzyme I. Preliminary evidence suggests that the antibodies bind to two different epitopes which are in part located in a ..beta..-sheet structure.

  18. ppc, the gene for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Rhodothermus obamensis: cloning, sequencing and overexpression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Takai, K; Sako, Y; Uchida, A

    1998-05-01

    The ppc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) of an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Rhodothermus obamensis, was directly sequenced by the thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL) PCR method. An ORF for a 937 amino acid polypeptide was found in the gene. The ppc gene had a high G+C content (66.2 mol%) and the third position of the codon exhibited strong preference for G or C usage (85.0 mol%). The calculated molecular mass was 107,848 Da, which was consistent with the molecular mass of the enzyme as determined by SDS-PAGE (100 kDa). The amino acid sequence of R. obamensis PEPC was closely related to that of PEPC from another thermophile, a Thermus sp., and from a mesophile, Corynebacterium glutamicum, exhibiting 45.3% or 37.7% identity and 61.5% or 56.5% similarity, respectively. By Southern analysis, the ppc gene was found to be present in a single copy in the genomic DNA of this organism. The cloned gene was expressed in Escherichia coli using a pET expression vector system and a thermostable recombinant PEPC was obtained. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the thermophilic and mesophilic PEPCs revealed distinct or common preferences for specific amino acid composition and substitutions in the two thermophilic enzymes.

  19. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP): Characterization of the human PCK1 gene and localization distal to MODY on chromosome 20

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Chao Nan; Burgess, D.L.; Chamberlain, J.S.; Meisler, M.H. ); Keith, T.P.; Falls, K. )

    1993-06-01

    The human PCK 1 gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK) was isolated and sequenced. There is 91% amino acid sequence identity (567/622 residues) between the human and the rat proteins, with conservation of intron/exon borders. A polymorphic dinucleotide microsatellite with the structure (CA)[sub 16](TA)[sub 5](CA) was identified in the 3[prime] untranslated region of the cloned human PCK1 gene. This highly informative genetic marker has an estimated PIC value of 0.79 and heterozygosity of 0.81. Analysis of the RW pedigree demonstrated recombination between PCK1 and the MODY gene on chromosome 20. Multipoint linkage analysis of the reference pedigrees of the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain localized PCK1 on the genetic map of chromosome 20 at a position distal to markers that are closely linked to MODY. PCK1 is part of a conserved linkage group on mouse Chromosome 2 with identical gene order but expanded length in the human genome. 34ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Multiple isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the Orchidaceae (subtribe Oncidiinae): implications for the evolution of crassulacean acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Silvera, Katia; Winter, Klaus; Rodriguez, B. Leticia; Albion, Rebecca L.; Cushman, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) catalyses the initial fixation of atmospheric CO2 into oxaloacetate and subsequently malate. Nocturnal accumulation of malic acid within the vacuole of photosynthetic cells is a typical feature of plants that perform crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). PEPC is a ubiquitous plant enzyme encoded by a small gene family, and each member encodes an isoform with specialized function. CAM-specific PEPC isoforms probably evolved from ancestral non-photosynthetic isoforms by gene duplication events and subsequent acquisition of transcriptional control elements that mediate increased leaf-specific or photosynthetic-tissue-specific mRNA expression. To understand the patterns of functional diversification related to the expression of CAM, ppc gene families and photosynthetic patterns were characterized in 11 closely related orchid species from the subtribe Oncidiinae with a range of photosynthetic pathways from C3 photosynthesis (Oncidium cheirophorum, Oncidium maduroi, Rossioglossum krameri, and Oncidium sotoanum) to weak CAM (Oncidium panamense, Oncidium sphacelatum, Gomesa flexuosa and Rossioglossum insleayi) and strong CAM (Rossioglossum ampliatum, Trichocentrum nanum, and Trichocentrum carthagenense). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two main ppc lineages in flowering plants, two main ppc lineages within the eudicots, and three ppc lineages within the Orchidaceae. Our results indicate that ppc gene family expansion within the Orchidaceae is likely to be the result of gene duplication events followed by adaptive sequence divergence. CAM-associated PEPC isoforms in the Orchidaceae probably evolved from several independent origins. PMID:24913627

  1. Reciprocal Changes in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase and Pyruvate Kinase with Age Are a Determinant of Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yiyuan; Hakimi, Parvin; Kao, Clara; Kao, Allison; Liu, Ruifu; Janocha, Allison; Boyd-Tressler, Andrea; Hang, Xi; Alhoraibi, Hanna; Slater, Erin; Xia, Kevin; Cao, Pengxiu; Shue, Quinn; Ching, Tsui-Ting; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Dubyak, George R.; Berger, Nathan A.; Hanson, Richard W.; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Aging involves progressive loss of cellular function and integrity, presumably caused by accumulated stochastic damage to cells. Alterations in energy metabolism contribute to aging, but how energy metabolism changes with age, how these changes affect aging, and whether they can be modified to modulate aging remain unclear. In locomotory muscle of post-fertile Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified a progressive decrease in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C), a longevity-associated metabolic enzyme, and a reciprocal increase in glycolytic pyruvate kinase (PK) that were necessary and sufficient to limit lifespan. Decline in PEPCK-C with age also led to loss of cellular function and integrity including muscle activity, and cellular senescence. Genetic and pharmacologic interventions of PEPCK-C, muscle activity, and AMPK signaling demonstrate that declines in PEPCK-C and muscle function with age interacted to limit reproductive life and lifespan via disrupted energy homeostasis. Quantifications of metabolic flux show that reciprocal changes in PEPCK-C and PK with age shunted energy metabolism toward glycolysis, reducing mitochondrial bioenergetics. Last, calorie restriction countered changes in PEPCK-C and PK with age to elicit anti-aging effects via TOR inhibition. Thus, a programmed metabolic event involving PEPCK-C and PK is a determinant of aging that can be modified to modulate aging. PMID:26631730

  2. Effects of starvation and molting on the metabolic rate of the bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.).

    PubMed

    DeVries, Zachary C; Kells, Stephen A; Appel, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    The bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) is a common hematophagous pest in the urban environment and is capable of surviving extended periods of starvation. However, the relationship between starvation and metabolism in bed bugs is not well understood. To better understand this relationship, we measured the metabolism of all life stages for >900 h after feeding (starvation) using closed-system respirometry. Measurements were made around molting for the immature life stages, which occurs only after a blood meal. In addition, both mated and unmated adults were measured. Starvation and molting had significant effects on the metabolism of the bed bug. Mass-specific metabolic rate (V(O2); mL g(-1) h(-1)) declined in a curvilinear fashion with the period of starvation for adults and with the postmolting period for immature bed bugs (used to standardize all immature life stages). A standard curve was developed to depict the generalized pattern of metabolic decline observed in all life stages that molted. Individual metabolic comparisons among life stages that molted revealed some differences in metabolic rate between unmated males and females. In addition, the mass scaling coefficient was found to decline with starvation time (postmolting time) for all life stages that molted. In most life stages, the ratio of V(CO2) to V(O2) (respiratory exchange ratio) declined over time, indicating a change in metabolic substrate with starvation. Finally, daily percent loss in body mass declined in a pattern similar to that of V(O2). The observed patterns in metabolic decline are evaluated in relation to the life history of bed bugs. In addition, the evolutionary development of these patterns is discussed. The metabolic pattern after feeding was also found to share several similarities with that of other ectothermic species.

  3. Formation of stable bdelloplasts as a starvation-survival strategy of marine bdellovibrios

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Amat, A.; Torrella, F. )

    1990-09-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Bdellovibrio have been isolated from a variety of habitats, including soil (15), rivers (1), estuarine water, seawater, and solar salt concentration ponds. Several wild-type isolates of marine bdellovibrios formed stable bdelloplasts when they infected gram-negative bacterial prey under certain culture conditions. Synchronous predator-prey cultures and low nutrient concentrations increased the yield of stable bdelloplasts. The bdellovibrio cells retained in the stable bdelloplasts showed a high survival capacity in nutrient-depleted saline solution (10% viable Bdellovibrio cells after 3 months at 25{degrees}C), whereas Bdellovibrio attack-phase cells kept under the same starvation conditions lost viability more quickly (1% viable cells after 48 h). The addition of yeast extract to a stable bdelloplast suspension induced lysis of the bdelloplasts and release of motile infecting attack-phase Bdellovibrio cells. Other substances, such as free amino acids, protein hydrolysates, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, carbohydrates, and organic amines, did not induce such a release. Stable bdelloplasts were highly hydrophobic and had a lower endogenous respiration rate than attack-phase cells. In general, stable bdelloplasts were almost as sensitive to temperature changes, desiccation, sonication, tannic acid, and Triton X-100 treatment as attack-phase cells. Electron microscopy of stable bdelloplasts did not reveal any extra cell wall layer, either in the bdelloplast envelope or in the retained Bdellovibrio cells, unlike the bdellocysts of the soil bacterium Bdellovibrio sp. strain W. The authors propose that formation of stable bdelloplasts is a survival strategy of marine bdellovibrios which occurs in response to nutrient- and prey-poor seawater habitats.

  4. Survival of a Psychrophilic Marine Vibrio Under Long-Term Nutrient Starvation 1

    PubMed Central

    Novitsky, James A.; Morita, Richard Y.

    1977-01-01

    Ant-300, a psychrophilic marine vibrio isolated from the surface water of the Antarctic convergence, was starved for periods of more than 1 year. During the first week of starvation, cell numbers increased from 100 to 800% of the initial number of cells. Fifty percent of the starved cells remained viable for 6 to 7 weeks while a portion of the population remained viable for more than 1 year. During the first 2 days of starvation, the endogenous respiration of the cells decreased over 80%. After 7 days, respiration had been reduced to 0.0071% total carbon respired per hour and remained constant thereafter. After 6 weeks of starvation, 46% of the cellular deoxyribonucleic acid had been degraded. Observation of the cellular deoxyribonucleic acid with Feulgen staining before starvation showed the average number of nuclear bodies per cell varied from 1.44 to 4.02 depending on the age of the culture. A linear relationship was found between the number of nuclear bodies per cell and the increase in cell numbers upon starvation. Our data suggest that Ant-300 is capable of surviving long periods of time with little or no nutrients and is therefore well adapted for the sparse nutrient conditions of the colder portions of the open ocean. PMID:16345219

  5. Adenylate nucleotide levels and energy charge in Arthrobacter crystallopoietes during growth and starvation.

    PubMed

    Leps, W T; Ensign, J C

    1979-07-01

    The adenylate nucleotide concentrations, based on internal water space, were determined in cells of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes during growth and starvation and the energy charge of the cells was calculated. The energy charge of spherical cells rose during the first 10 h of growth, then remained nearly constant for as long as 20 h into the stationary phase. The energy charge of rod-shaped cells rose during the first 4 h of growth, then remained constant during subsequent growth and decreased in the stationary growth phase. Both spherical and rod-shaped cells excreted adenosine monophosphate but not adenosine triphosphate or adenosine diphosphate during starvation. The intracellular energy charge of spherical cells declined during the initial 10 h and then remained constant for 1 week of starvation at a value of 0.78. The intracellular energy charge of rod-shaped cells declined during the first 24 h of starvation, remained constant for the next 80 h, then decreased to a value of 0.73 after a total of 168 h starvation. Both cell forms remained more than 90% viable during this time. Addition of a carbon and energy source to starving cells resulted in an increase in the ATP concentration and as a result the energy charge increased to the smae levels as found during growth.

  6. Starvation response and growth in serum of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Prevotella intermedia, and Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus.

    PubMed

    Brundin, Malin; Figdor, David; Sundqvist, Göran; Sjögren, Ulf

    2009-07-01

    The microbiota inhabiting the untreated root canal differ markedly from those found in post-treatment disease, yet there is limited information on the microbial characteristics distinguishing the different infections. We hypothesized that starvation survival is a key microbial property in species selection. This study analyzed starvation-survival behavior over 60 days of species representative of the untreated root canal infection: Fusobacterium nucleatum, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Prevotella intermedia and Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus. All species did not survive 1 day in water. In 1% serum, the 4 species could not survive beyond 2-3 weeks. They required a high initial cell density and >or=10% serum to survive the observation period. The results highlight a poor starvation-survival capacity of these 4 species compared with species prevalent in post-treatment infection, which are well equipped to endure starvation and survive in low numbers on minimal serum. These findings point to starvation-survival capacity as a selection factor for microbial participation in post-treatment disease.

  7. The metabolic effects of prolonged starvation and refeeding in sturgeon and rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Furné, Miriam; Morales, Amalia E; Trenzado, Cristina E; García-Gallego, Manuel; Carmen Hidalgo, M; Domezain, Alberto; Sanz Rus, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines the particular metabolic strategies of the sturgeon Acipenser naccarii in facing a period of prolonged starvation (72 days) and subsequent refeeding (60 days) compared to the trout Oncorhynchus mykiss response under similar conditions. Plasma metabolites, endogenous reserves, and the activity of intermediate enzymes in liver and white muscle were evaluated. This study shows the mobilization of tissue reserves during a starvation period in both species with an associated enzymatic response. The sturgeon displayed an early increase in hepatic glycolysis during starvation. The trout preferentially used lactate for gluconeogenesis in liver and white muscle. The sturgeon had higher lipid-degradation capacity and greater synthesis of hepatic ketone bodies than the trout, although this latter species also showed strong synthesis of ketone bodies during starvation. During refeeding, the metabolic activity present before starvation was recovered in both fish, with a reestablishment of tissue reserves, plasmatic parameters (glucemia and cholesterol), and enzymatic activities in the liver and muscle. A compensatory effect in enzymes regarding lipids, ketone bodies, and oxidative metabolism was displayed in the liver of both species. There are metabolic differences between sturgeon and trout that support the contention that the sturgeon has common characteristics with elasmobranchs and teleosts.

  8. Time-dependent regulation of yeast glycolysis upon nitrogen starvation depends on cell history.

    PubMed

    van Eunen, K; Dool, P; Canelas, A B; Kiewiet, J; Bouwman, J; van Gulik, W M; Westerhoff, H V; Bakker, B M

    2010-03-01

    In this study, the authors investigated how the glycolytic flux was regulated in time upon nitrogen starvation of cells with different growth histories. We have compared cells grown in glucose-limited chemostat cultures under respiratory conditions (low dilution rate of 0.1/h) to cells grown under respirofermentative conditions (high dilution rate of 0.35/h). The fermentative capacity was lower in cells grown under respiratory conditions than in cells grown under respirofermentative conditions, yet more resilient to prolonged nitrogen starvation. The time profiles revealed that the fermentative capacity even increased in cells grown under respiratory conditions during the first hours of nitrogen starvation. In cells grown under respirofermentative conditions the fermentative capacity decreased from the onset of nitrogen starvation. We have applied time-dependent Regulation Analysis to follow the fermentative capacity during nitrogen starvation. In both experiments, diverse categories of regulation were found. However, in the cells grown under respiratory conditions regulation was predominantly metabolic, whereas in the cells grown under respirofermentative conditions hierarchical regulation was dominant. To study the metabolic regulation, concentrations of intracellular metabolites, including allosteric regulators, were measured. The obtained results can explain some aspects of the metabolic regulation, but not all.

  9. Impacts of strigolactone on shoot branching under phosphate starvation in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum cv. Jinba).

    PubMed

    Xi, Lin; Wen, Chao; Fang, Shuang; Chen, Xiaoli; Nie, Jing; Chu, JinFang; Yuan, Cunquan; Yan, Cunyu; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Liangjun

    2015-01-01

    Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum cv. Jinba) shoot branching is determined by bud outgrowth during the vegetative growth stage. The degree of axillary bud outgrowth is highly influenced by environmental conditions, such as nutrient availability. Here, we demonstrated that phosphorus (Pi) starvation significantly reduces axillary bud outgrowth in chrysanthemum. A strigolactone (SL) biosynthesis gene, DgCCD7, was isolated and characterized as an ortholog of MAX3/DAD3/RMS5/D17. By using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), three putative SLs were identified and levels of all three SLs showed strong increase under Pi starvation conditions. Determinations of the distribution of SLs and regulation of DgCCD7/8 in response to Pi changes in root indicate that SL acts systemically. However, temporal expression patterns of biosynthesis and signaling genes in nodes revealed that Pi starvation causes a local response of SL pathway. Treatment of node segments with or without auxin and Pi revealed that in the absence of exogenous auxin, Pi delayed axillary buds outgrowth and up-regulated local SL pathway genes. These data indicated that an auxin-SL regulatory loop responded to Pi starvation for delaying bud outgrowth locally, root biosynthesized SLs were transported acropetally and functioned in shoot branching inhibition under Pi starvation. We proposed that SLs contributed to chrysanthemum shoot branching control in response to Pi-limiting conditions in a systemic way.

  10. Plant, cell, and molecular mechanisms of abscisic-acid regulation of stomatal apertures. In vivo phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in guard cells of Vicia faba L. is enhanced by fusicoccin and suppressed by abscisic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Z.; Aghoram, K.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Plants regulate water loss and CO{sub 2} gain by modulating the aperture sizes of stomata that penetrate the epidermis. Aperture size itself is increased by osmolyte accumulation and consequent turgor increase in the pair of guard cells that flank each stoma. Guard-cell phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, which catalyzes the regulated step leading to malate synthesis, is crucial for charge and pH maintenance during osmolyte accumulation. Regulation of this cytosolic enzyme by effectors is well documented, but additional regulation by posttranslational modification is predicted by the alteration of PEPC kinetics during stomatal opening. In this study, the authors have investigated whether this alteration is associated with the phosphorylation status of this enzyme. Using sonicated epidermal peels (isolated guard cells) pre-loaded with {sub 32}PO{sub 4}, the authors induced stomatal opening and guard-cell malate accumulation by incubation with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with 5 {micro}M fusicoccin (FC). In corroboratory experiments, guard cells were incubated with the FC antagonist, 10 {micro}M abscisic acid (ABA). The phosphorylation status of PEPC was assessed by immunoprecipitation, electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and autoradiography. PEPC was phosphorylated when stomata were stimulated to open, and phosphorylation was lessened by incubation with ABA.

  11. Dietary n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids modify phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity and lipid synthesis from glucose in adipose tissue of rats fed a high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Londero, Lisiane G; Rieger, Débora K; Hansen, Fernanda; Silveira, Simone L; Martins, Tiago L; Lulhier, Francisco; da Silva, Roselis S; Souza, Diogo O; Perry, Marcos L S; de Assis, Adriano M

    2013-12-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFAs) have hypolipidemic effects and modulate intermediary metabolism to prevent or reverse insulin resistance in a way that is not completely elucidated. Here, effects of these fatty acids on the lipid profile, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity, lipid synthesis from glucose in epididymal adipose tissue (Ep-AT) and liver were investigated. Male rats were fed a high-sucrose diet (SU diet), containing either sunflower oil or a mixture of sunflower and fish oil (SU-FO diet), and the control group was fed a standard diet. After 13 weeks, liver, adipose tissue and blood were harvested and analysed. The dietary n-3 LCPUFAs prevented sucrose-induced increase in adiposity and serum free fat acids, serum and hepatic triacylglycerol and insulin levels. Furthermore, these n-3 LCPUFAs decreased lipid synthesis from glucose and increased PEPCK activity in the Ep-AT of rats fed the SU-FO diet compared to those fed the SU diet, besides reducing lipid synthesis from glucose in hepatic tissue. Thus, the inclusion of n-3 LCPUFAs in the diet may be beneficial for the prevention or attenuation of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, and for reducing the risk of related chronic diseases.

  12. The High-Risk Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncogene Exacerbates the Negative Effect of Tryptophan Starvation on the Development of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Sherchand, Shardulendra P.; Ibana, Joyce A.; Zea, Arnold H.; Quayle, Alison J.; Aiyar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen that requires specific essential nutrients from the host cell, one of which is the amino acid tryptophan. In this context interferon gamma (IFNγ) is the major host protective cytokine against chlamydial infections because it induces the expression of the host enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1, that degrades tryptophan, thereby restricting bacterial replication. The mechanism by which IFNγ acts has been dissected in vitro using epithelial cell-lines such as HeLa, HEp-2, or the primary-like endocervical cell-line A2EN. All these cell-lines express the high-risk human papillomavirus oncogenes E6 & E7. While screening cell-lines to identify those suitable for C. trachomatis co-infections with other genital pathogens, we unexpectedly found that tryptophan starvation did not completely block chlamydial development in cell-lines that were HR-HPV negative, such as C33A and 293. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that HR-HPV oncogenes modulate the effect of tryptophan starvation on chlamydial development by comparing chlamydial development in HeLa and C33A cell-lines that were both derived from cervical carcinomas. Our results indicate that during tryptophan depletion, unlike HeLa, C33A cells generate sufficient intracellular tryptophan via proteasomal activity to permit C. trachomatis replication. By generating stable derivatives of C33A that expressed HPV16 E6, E7 or E6 & E7, we found that E6 expression alone was sufficient to convert C33A cells to behave like HeLa during tryptophan starvation. The reduced tryptophan levels in HeLa cells have a biological consequence; akin to the previously described effect of IFNγ, tryptophan starvation protects C. trachomatis from clearance by doxycycline in HeLa but not C33A cells. Curiously, when compared to the known Homo sapiens proteome, the representation of tryptophan in the HR-HPV E6 & E6AP degradome is substantially lower, possibly providing a mechanism that

  13. The effects of starvation and re-feeding on growth and swimming performance of juvenile black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus).

    PubMed

    Pang, Xu; Fu, Shi-Jian; Li, Xiu-Ming; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of starvation and re-feeding on growth and swimming performance and their relationship in juvenile black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus). We measured the specific growth rate (SGR), resting metabolic rate (RMR) and constant acceleration test speed (U CAT, the maximum swimming speed at exhaustion by constant acceleration test with 0.1667 cm s(-2) rate) in a treatment group (21 days of starvation then 21 days of re-feeding) and control group (routine feeding) (n = 20). Starvation resulted in a 17 % decrease in body mass of black carp (P < 0.05). After 21 days of re-feeding, body mass was greater than that of pre-starvation but still less than that of the control group at 42 days. During the re-feeding phase, the SGR of the treatment group was higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Starvation resulted in a significant decrease in the RMR and U CAT. After 21 days of re-feeding, both the RMR and U CAT recovered to the pre-starvation levels. In the control group, individual juvenile black carp displayed strong repeatability of the RMR and U CAT across the measurement periods (P ≤ 0.002). In the treatment group, RMR showed significant repeatability between pre-starvation and re-feeding (P = 0.007), but not between pre-starvation and starvation or between starvation and re-feeding. U CAT showed significant repeatability between pre-starvation and starvation (P = 0.006) and between pre-starvation and re-feeding (P = 0.001), but not between starvation and re-feeding. No correlation or only a weak correlation was found between any two variables of RMR, U CAT and SGR, whereas the increment of the U CAT (ΔU CAT) was negatively correlated with that of SGR during the starvation phase (r = -0.581, n = 20, P = 0.007) and re-feeding phase (r = -0.568, n = 20, P = 0.009). This suggested that within individual black carp, there is a trade-off between growth and maintenance (or development) of swimming

  14. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase 1 Gene (Pck1) Displays Parallel Evolution between Old World and New World Fruit Bats

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Bats are an ideal mammalian group for exploring adaptations to fasting due to their large variety of diets and because fasting is a regular part of their life cycle. Mammals fed on a carbohydrate-rich diet experience a rapid decrease in blood glucose levels during a fast, thus, the development of mechanisms to resist the consequences of regular fasts, experienced on a daily basis, must have been crucial in the evolution of frugivorous bats. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1, encoded by the Pck1 gene) is the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis and is largely responsible for the maintenance of glucose homeostasis during fasting in fruit-eating bats. To test whether Pck1 has experienced adaptive evolution in frugivorous bats, we obtained Pck1 coding sequence from 20 species of bats, including five Old World fruit bats (OWFBs) (Pteropodidae) and two New World fruit bats (NWFBs) (Phyllostomidae). Our molecular evolutionary analyses of these sequences revealed that Pck1 was under purifying selection in both Old World and New World fruit bats with no evidence of positive selection detected in either ancestral branch leading to fruit bats. Interestingly, however, six specific amino acid substitutions were detected on the ancestral lineage of OWFBs. In addition, we found considerable evidence for parallel evolution, at the amino acid level, between the PEPCK1 sequences of Old World fruit bats and New World fruit bats. Test for parallel evolution showed that four parallel substitutions (Q276R, R503H, I558V and Q593R) were driven by natural selection. Our study provides evidence that Pck1 underwent parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats, two lineages of mammals that feed on a carbohydrate-rich diet and experience regular periods of fasting as part of their life cycle. PMID:25807515

  15. Glucose transport by a mutant of Streptococcus mutans unable to accumulate sugars via the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed Central

    Cvitkovitch, D G; Boyd, D A; Thevenot, T; Hamilton, I R

    1995-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans transports glucose via the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). Earlier studies indicated that an alternate glucose transport system functions in this organism under conditions of high growth rates, low pH, or excess glucose. To identify this system, S. mutans BM71 was transformed with integration vector pDC-5 to generate a mutant, DC10, defective in the general PTS protein enzyme I (EI). This mutant expressed a defective EI that had been truncated by approximately 150 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus as revealed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with anti-EI antibody and Southern hybridizations with a fragment of the wild-type EI gene as a probe. Phosphotransfer assays utilizing 32P-PEP indicated that DC10 was incapable of phosphorylating HPr and EIIAMan, indicating a nonfunctional PTS. This was confirmed by the fact that DC10 was able to ferment glucose but not a variety of other PTS substrates and phosphorylated glucose with ATP and not PEP. Kinetic assays indicated that the non-PTS system exhibited an apparent Ks of 125 microM for glucose and a Vmax of 0.87 nmol mg (dry weight) of cells-1 min-1. Sugar competition experiments with DC10 indicated that the non-PTS transport system had high specificity for glucose since glucose transport was not significantly by a 100-fold molar excess of several competing sugar substrates, including 2-deoxyglucose and alpha-methylglucoside. These results demonstrate that S. mutans possesses a glucose transport system that can function independently of the PEP PTS. PMID:7730250

  16. Positive selection of Kranz and non-Kranz C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase amino acids in Suaedoideae (Chenopodiaceae).

    PubMed

    Rosnow, Josh J; Edwards, Gerald E; Roalson, Eric H

    2014-07-01

    In subfamily Suaedoideae, four independent gains of C4 photosynthesis are proposed, which includes two parallel origins of Kranz anatomy (sections Salsina and Schoberia) and two independent origins of single-cell C4 anatomy (Bienertia and Suaeda aralocaspica). Additional phylogenetic support for this hypothesis was generated from sequence data of the C-terminal portion of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene used in C4 photosynthesis (ppc-1) in combination with previous sequence data. ppc-1 sequence was generated for 20 species in Suaedoideae and two outgroup Salsola species that included all types of C4 anatomies as well as two types of C3 anatomies. A branch-site test for positively selected codons was performed using the software package PAML. From labelling of the four branches where C4 is hypothesized to have developed (foreground branches), residue 733 (maize numbering) was identified to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 and residue 868 at the >0.95 interval using Bayes empirical Bayes (BEB). When labelling all the branches within C4 clades, the branch-site test identified 13 codons to be under selection with a posterior probability >0.95 by BEB; this is discussed considering current information on functional residues. The signature C4 substitution of an alanine for a serine at position 780 in the C-terminal end (which is considered a major determinant of affinity for PEP) was only found in four of the C4 species sampled, while eight of the C4 species and all the C3 species have an alanine residue; indicating that this substitution is not a requirement for C4 function.

  17. Identification of tumor necrosis factor as a transcriptional regulator of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene following endotoxin treatment of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, M R; McCallum, R E

    1992-01-01

    The decreased synthesis of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis, that occurs during endotoxemia was shown previously in rats to occur at the transcriptional level. In the current study, the exogenous administration of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a proximal mediator of endotoxic shock, reduced the PEPCK transcription rate, mRNAPEPCK levels, and PEPCK enzyme activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner in CD-1 mice. Comparable amounts of circulating TNF were measured in mice 2 h after injection of human recombinant TNF (10(5) U) or a 50% lethal dose of Escherichia coli endotoxin (20 mg/kg). Direct action of TNF to decrease the PEPCK transcription rate was confirmed in vitro with H-4-II-E Reuber hepatoma cells, in which a dose-dependent inhibition of PEPCK transcription was observed with 1 to 100 U of TNF per ml. A role for TNF-elicited changes in PEPCK gene expression during endotoxemia was confirmed by the protective effect of rabbit polyclonal antibodies to recombinant murine TNF. C57BL/6 mice passively immunized with anti-TNF 4 h prior to endotoxin challenge exhibited normal PEPCK enzyme activity. Neutralization of circulating TNF with anti-TNF failed, however, to prevent the hypoglycemia commonly observed during endotoxemia, suggesting the participation of other mediators. Anti-TNF treatment reduced circulating interleukins 1 and 6 at 3 and 6 h after endotoxin treatment, respectively. These results suggest that during endotoxemia, the development of hypoglycemia is multifaceted and that several cytokines are most likely involved. The findings from the Reuber hepatoma cell model afford an opportunity in future work to map putative cytokine response elements in the PEPCK promoter responsible for perturbed hormonal regulation of the gene during endotoxemia. PMID:1398916

  18. Novel listerial glycerol dehydrogenase- and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent dihydroxyacetone kinase system connected to the pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Monniot, Céline; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Deutscher, Josef; Milohanic, Eliane

    2012-09-01

    Several bacteria use glycerol dehydrogenase to transform glycerol into dihydroxyacetone (Dha). Dha is subsequently converted into Dha phosphate (Dha-P) by an ATP- or phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent Dha kinase. Listeria innocua possesses two potential PEP-dependent Dha kinases. One is encoded by 3 of the 11 genes forming the glycerol (gol) operon. This operon also contains golD (lin0362), which codes for a new type of Dha-forming NAD(+)-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase. The subsequent metabolism of Dha requires its phosphorylation via the PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system components enzyme I, HPr, and EIIA(Dha)-2 (Lin0369). P∼EIIA(Dha)-2 transfers its phosphoryl group to DhaL-2, which phosphorylates Dha bound to DhaK-2. The resulting Dha-P is probably metabolized mainly via the pentose phosphate pathway, because two genes of the gol operon encode proteins resembling transketolases and transaldolases. In addition, purified Lin0363 and Lin0364 exhibit ribose-5-P isomerase (RipB) and triosephosphate isomerase activities, respectively. The latter enzyme converts part of the Dha-P into glyceraldehyde-3-P, which, together with Dha-P, is metabolized via gluconeogenesis to form fructose-6-P. Together with another glyceraldehyde-3-P molecule, the transketolase transforms fructose-6-P into intermediates of the pentose phosphate pathway. The gol operon is preceded by golR, transcribed in the opposite orientation and encoding a DeoR-type repressor. Its inactivation causes the constitutive but glucose-repressible expression of the entire gol operon, including the last gene, encoding a pediocin immunity-like (PedB-like) protein. Its elevated level of synthesis in the golR mutant causes slightly increased immunity against pediocin PA-1 compared to the wild-type strain or a pedB-like deletion mutant.

  19. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 gene (Pck1) displays parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Yin, Qiuyuan; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Bats are an ideal mammalian group for exploring adaptations to fasting due to their large variety of diets and because fasting is a regular part of their life cycle. Mammals fed on a carbohydrate-rich diet experience a rapid decrease in blood glucose levels during a fast, thus, the development of mechanisms to resist the consequences of regular fasts, experienced on a daily basis, must have been crucial in the evolution of frugivorous bats. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1, encoded by the Pck1 gene) is the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis and is largely responsible for the maintenance of glucose homeostasis during fasting in fruit-eating bats. To test whether Pck1 has experienced adaptive evolution in frugivorous bats, we obtained Pck1 coding sequence from 20 species of bats, including five Old World fruit bats (OWFBs) (Pteropodidae) and two New World fruit bats (NWFBs) (Phyllostomidae). Our molecular evolutionary analyses of these sequences revealed that Pck1 was under purifying selection in both Old World and New World fruit bats with no evidence of positive selection detected in either ancestral branch leading to fruit bats. Interestingly, however, six specific amino acid substitutions were detected on the ancestral lineage of OWFBs. In addition, we found considerable evidence for parallel evolution, at the amino acid level, between the PEPCK1 sequences of Old World fruit bats and New World fruit bats. Test for parallel evolution showed that four parallel substitutions (Q276R, R503H, I558V and Q593R) were driven by natural selection. Our study provides evidence that Pck1 underwent parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats, two lineages of mammals that feed on a carbohydrate-rich diet and experience regular periods of fasting as part of their life cycle.

  20. Increasing the conformational entropy of the Omega-loop lid domain in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase impairs catalysis and decreases catalytic fidelity .

    PubMed

    Johnson, Troy A; Holyoak, Todd

    2010-06-29

    Many studies have shown that the dynamic motions of individual protein segments can play an important role in enzyme function. Recent structural studies of the gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) demonstrate that PEPCK contains a 10-residue Omega-loop domain that acts as an active site lid. On the basis of these structural studies, we have previously proposed a model for the mechanism of PEPCK catalysis in which the conformation of this mobile lid domain is energetically coupled to ligand binding, resulting in the closed conformation of the lid, necessary for correct substrate positioning, becoming more energetically favorable as ligands associate with the enzyme. Here we test this model by introducing a point mutation (A467G) into the center of the Omega-loop lid that is designed to increase the entropic penalty for lid closure. Structural and kinetic characterization of this mutant enzyme demonstrates that the mutation has decreased the favorability of the enzyme adapting the closed lid conformation. As a consequence of this shift in the equilibrium defining the conformation of the active site lid, the enzyme's ability to stabilize the reaction intermediate is weakened, resulting in catalytic defect. This stabilization is initially surprising, as the lid domain makes no direct contacts with the enolate intermediate formed during the reaction. Furthermore, during the conversion of OAA to PEP, the destabilization of the lid-closed conformation results in the reaction becoming decoupled as the enolate intermediate is protonated rather than phosphorylated, resulting in the formation of pyruvate. Taken together, the structural and kinetic characterization of A467G-PEPCK supports our model of the role of the active site lid in catalytic function and demonstrates that the shift in the lowest-energy conformation between open and closed lid states is a function of the free energy available to the enzyme through ligand binding and the entropic

  1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein kinase from developing castor oil seeds: partial purification, characterization, and reversible control by photosynthate supply.

    PubMed

    Murmu, Jhadeswar; Plaxton, William C

    2007-10-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) protein kinase (PPCK) was purified approximately 1,500-fold from developing castor oil seeds (COS). Gel filtration and immunoblotting with anti-(rice PPCK2)-immune serum indicated that this Ca2+-insensitive PPCK exists as a 31-kDa monomer. COS PPCK-mediated rephosphorylation of the 107-kDa subunit (p107) of COS PEPC1 (Km = 2.2 microM) activated PEPC1 by approximately 80% when assayed under suboptimal conditions (pH 7.3, 0.2 mM PEP, and 0.125 mM malate). COS PPCK displayed remarkable selectivity for phosphorylating COS PEPC1 (relative to tobacco, sorghum, or maize PEPCs), exhibited a broad pH-activity optima of approximately pH 8.5, and at pH 7.3 was activated 40-65% by 1 mM PEP, or 10 mM Gln or Asn, but inhibited 65% by 10 mM L-malate. The possible control of COS PPCK by disulfide-dithiol interconversion was suggested by its rapid inactivation and subsequent reactivation when incubated with oxidized glutathione and then dithiothreitol. In vitro PPCK activity correlated with in vivo p107 phosphorylation status, with both peaking in mid-cotyledon to full-cotyledon developing COS. Notably, PPCK activity and p107 phosphorylation of developing COS were eliminated following pod excision or prolonged darkness of intact plants. Both effects were fully reversed 12 h following reillumination of darkened plants. These results implicate a direct relationship between the up-regulation of COS PPCK and p107 phosphorylation during the recommencement of photosynthate delivery from illuminated leaves to the non-photosynthetic COS. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that PEPC and PPCK participate in the control of photosynthate partitioning into C-skeletons needed as precursors for key biosynthetic pathways of developing COS.

  2. Systems-Level Analysis of Nitrogen Starvation–Induced Modifications of Carbon Metabolism in a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Starchless Mutant[W

    PubMed Central

    Blaby, Ian K.; Glaesener, Anne G.; Mettler, Tabea; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T.; Gallaher, Sean D.; Liu, Bensheng; Boyle, Nanette R.; Kropat, Janette; Stitt, Mark; Johnson, Shannon; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Casero, David; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis underlying increased triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless (sta) Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants, we undertook comparative time-course transcriptomics of strains CC-4348 (sta6 mutant), CC-4349, a cell wall–deficient (cw) strain purported to represent the parental STA6 strain, and three independent STA6 strains generated by complementation of sta6 (CC-4565/STA6-C2, CC-4566/STA6-C4, and CC-4567/STA6-C6) in the context of N deprivation. Despite N starvation–induced dramatic remodeling of the transcriptome, there were relatively few differences (5 × 102) observed between sta6 and STA6, the most dramatic of which were increased abundance of transcripts encoding key regulated or rate-limiting steps in central carbon metabolism, specifically isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, transaldolase, fructose bisphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (encoded by ICL1, MAS1, TAL1, FBP1, and PCK1 respectively), suggestive of increased carbon movement toward hexose-phosphate in sta6 by upregulation of the glyoxylate pathway and gluconeogenesis. Enzyme assays validated the increase in isocitrate lyase and malate synthase activities. Targeted metabolite analysis indicated increased succinate, malate, and Glc-6-P and decreased Fru-1,6-bisphosphate, illustrating the effect of these changes. Comparisons of independent data sets in multiple strains allowed the delineation of a sequence of events in the global N starvation response in C. reinhardtii, starting within minutes with the upregulation of alternative N assimilation routes and carbohydrate synthesis and subsequently a more gradual upregulation of genes encoding enzymes of TAG synthesis. Finally, genome resequencing analysis indicated that (1) the deletion in sta6 extends into the neighboring gene encoding respiratory burst oxidase, and (2) a commonly used STA6 strain (CC-4349) as well as the sequenced reference (CC-503) are not congenic with respect to sta6 (CC-4348

  3. Membrane glycerolipid remodeling triggered by nitrogen and phosphorus starvation in Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Abida, Heni; Dolch, Lina-Juana; Meï, Coline; Villanova, Valeria; Conte, Melissa; Block, Maryse A; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bastien, Olivier; Tirichine, Leïla; Bowler, Chris; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Jouhet, Juliette; Maréchal, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms constitute a major phylum of phytoplankton biodiversity in ocean water and freshwater ecosystems. They are known to respond to some chemical variations of the environment by the accumulation of triacylglycerol, but the relative changes occurring in membrane glycerolipids have not yet been studied. Our goal was first to define a reference for the glycerolipidome of the marine model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, a necessary prerequisite to characterize and dissect the lipid metabolic routes that are orchestrated and regulated to build up each subcellular membrane compartment. By combining multiple analytical techniques, we determined the glycerolipid profile of P. tricornutum grown with various levels of nitrogen or phosphorus supplies. In different P. tricornutum accessions collected worldwide, a deprivation of either nutrient triggered an accumulation of triacylglycerol, but with different time scales and magnitudes. We investigated in depth the effect of nutrient starvation on the Pt1 strain (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa no. 1055/3). Nitrogen deprivation was the more severe stress, triggering thylakoid senescence and growth arrest. By contrast, phosphorus deprivation induced a stepwise adaptive response. The time scale of the glycerolipidome changes and the comparison with large-scale transcriptome studies were consistent with an exhaustion of unknown primary phosphorus-storage molecules (possibly polyphosphate) and a transcriptional control of some genes coding for specific lipid synthesis enzymes. We propose that phospholipids are secondary phosphorus-storage molecules broken down upon phosphorus deprivation, while nonphosphorus lipids are synthesized consistently with a phosphatidylglycerol-to-sulfolipid and a phosphatidycholine-to-betaine lipid replacement followed by a late accumulation of triacylglycerol.

  4. Membrane Glycerolipid Remodeling Triggered by Nitrogen and Phosphorus Starvation in Phaeodactylum tricornutum1

    PubMed Central

    Abida, Heni; Dolch, Lina-Juana; Meï, Coline; Villanova, Valeria; Conte, Melissa; Block, Maryse A.; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bastien, Olivier; Tirichine, Leïla; Bowler, Chris; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Jouhet, Juliette; Maréchal, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms constitute a major phylum of phytoplankton biodiversity in ocean water and freshwater ecosystems. They are known to respond to some chemical variations of the environment by the accumulation of triacylglycerol, but the relative changes occurring in membrane glycerolipids have not yet been studied. Our goal was first to define a reference for the glycerolipidome of the marine model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, a necessary prerequisite to characterize and dissect the lipid metabolic routes that are orchestrated and regulated to build up each subcellular membrane compartment. By combining multiple analytical techniques, we determined the glycerolipid profile of P. tricornutum grown with various levels of nitrogen or phosphorus supplies. In different P. tricornutum accessions collected worldwide, a deprivation of either nutrient triggered an accumulation of triacylglycerol, but with different time scales and magnitudes. We investigated in depth the effect of nutrient starvation on the Pt1 strain (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa no. 1055/3). Nitrogen deprivation was the more severe stress, triggering thylakoid senescence and growth arrest. By contrast, phosphorus deprivation induced a stepwise adaptive response. The time scale of the glycerolipidome changes and the comparison with large-scale transcriptome studies were consistent with an exhaustion of unknown primary phosphorus-storage molecules (possibly polyphosphate) and a transcriptional control of some genes coding for specific lipid synthesis enzymes. We propose that phospholipids are secondary phosphorus-storage molecules broken down upon phosphorus deprivation, while nonphosphorus lipids are synthesized consistently with a phosphatidylglycerol-to-sulfolipid and a phosphatidycholine-to-betaine lipid replacement followed by a late accumulation of triacylglycerol. PMID:25489020

  5. Lysis of Escherichia coli by Glycine Is Potentiated by Pyridoxine Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, Walter B.

    1973-01-01

    Pyridoxineless mutants of Escherichia coli are lysed in a few hours when starved for pyridoxine in a glucose minimal medium containing glycine at 10 mM. The lysis is prevented equally well by l-alanine and by d-alanine when either is present at 0.1 mM. The lysis is potentiated by 0.5 mM l-methionine. The peculiar susceptibility of E. coli B to glycine-mediated lysis during starvation for pyridoxine suggests that the starvation reduces the availability of some normal antagonist of glycine, presumably alanine. PMID:4583221

  6. Both the autophagy and proteasomal pathways facilitate the Ubp3p-dependent depletion of a subset of translation and RNA turnover factors during nitrogen starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Shane P.; Bedwell, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Protein turnover is an important regulatory mechanism that facilitates cellular adaptation to changing environmental conditions. Previous studies have shown that ribosome abundance is reduced during nitrogen starvation by a selective autophagy mechanism termed ribophagy, which is dependent upon the deubiquitinase Ubp3p. In this study, we asked whether the abundance of various translation and RNA turnover factors are reduced following the onset of nitrogen starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found distinct differences in the abundance of the proteins tested following nitrogen starvation: (1) The level of some did not change; (2) others were reduced with kinetics similar to ribophagy, and (3) a few proteins were rapidly depleted. Furthermore, different pathways differentially degraded the various proteins upon nitrogen starvation. The translation factors eRF3 and eIF4GI, and the decapping enhancer Pat1p, required an intact autophagy pathway for their depletion. In contrast, the deadenylase subunit Pop2p and the decapping enzyme Dcp2p were rapidly depleted by a proteasome-dependent mechanism. The proteasome-dependent depletion of Dcp2p and Pop2p was also induced by rapamycin, suggesting that the TOR1 pathway influences this pathway. Like ribophagy, depletion of eIF4GI, eRF3, Dcp2p, and Pop2p was dependent upon Ubp3p to varying extents. Together, our results suggest that the autophagy and proteasomal pathways degrade distinct translation and RNA turnover factors in a Ubp3p-dependent manner during nitrogen starvation. While ribophagy is thought to mediate the reutilization of scarce resources during nutrient limitation, our results suggest that the selective degradation of specific proteins could also facilitate a broader reprogramming of the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. PMID:25795416

  7. Functional reconstitution of the purified phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannitol-specific transport system of Escherichia coli in phospholipid vesicles: coupling between transport and phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Elferink, M G; Driessen, A J; Robillard, G T

    1990-01-01

    Purified mannitol-specific enzyme II (EII) from Escherichia coli was reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles with the aid of a detergent-dialysis procedure followed by a freeze-thaw sonication step. The orientation of EII in the proteoliposomes was random. The cytoplasmic moiety of the inverted EII could be removed with trypsin without effecting the integrity of the liposomal membrane. This enabled us to study the two different EII orientations independently. The population of inverted EII molecules was monitored by measuring active extrusion of mannitol after the addition of phosphoenolpyruvate, EI, and histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) at the outside of the vesicles. The population of correctly oriented EII molecules was monitored by measuring active uptake of mannitol with internal phosphoenolpyruvate, EI, and HPr. A low rate of facilitated diffusion of mannitol via the unphosphorylated carrier could be measured. On the other hand, a high phosphorylation activity without translocation was observed at the outside of the liposomes. The kinetics of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent transport reaction and the nonvectorial phosphorylation reaction were compared. Transport of mannitol into the liposomes via the correctly oriented EII molecules occurred with a high affinity (Km, lower than 10 microM) and with a relatively low Vmax. Phosphorylation at the outside of the liposomes catalyzed by the inverted EII molecules occurred with a low affinity (Km of about 66 microM), while the maximal velocity was about 10 times faster than the transport reaction. The latter observation is kinetic proof for the lack of strict coupling between transport and phosphorylation in these enzymes. Images PMID:2123863

  8. [Effects of starvation on the consumption of energy sources and swimming performance in juvenile Gambusia affinis and Tanichthys albonubes].

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang-tao; Lin, Xiao-tao; Zhou, Chen-hui; Zeng, Peng; Xu, Zhong-neng; Sun, Jun

    2016-01-01

    To explore the consumption of energy sources and swimming performance of juvenile Gambusia affinis and Tanichthys albonubes after starvation, contents of glycogen, lipid and protein, burst swimming speeds (Uburst), and critical swimming speeds (Ucrit) at different starvation times (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 days) were evaluated. The results showed that, at 0 day, contents of glycogen and lipid were significantly lower in G. affinis than those in T. albonubes, whereas no significant difference in content of protein between two experimental fish was found. Swimming speeds in G. affinis were significantly lower than those in T. albonubes for all swimming performances. After different starvation scenarios, content of glycogen both in G. affinis and T. albonubes decreased significantly in power function trend with starvation time and were close to zero after starvation for 10 days, whereas the contents of lipid and protein were linearly significantly decreased. The slope of line regression equation between content of lipid and starvation time in G. affinis was significantly lower than that in T. albonubes, whereas there was a significantly higher slope of line equation between content of protein and starvation time in G. affinis. 40 days later, the consumption rate of glycogen both in G. affinis and T. albonubes were significantly higher than that of lipid, while the consumption rate of protein was the least. Consumption amounts of glycogen in all experimental fish were the least, G. affinis consumed more protein than lipid, and T. albonubes consumed more lipid than protein. Uburst and Ucrit decreased significantly linearly with starvation time for all experimental fish. Slope of linear equation between Uburst and starvation time was not significantly different between G. affinis and T. albonubes. However, the straight slope between Ucrit and starvation time was significantly lower in G. affinis than that in T. albonubes. These findings indicated that there was close

  9. Requirement of the isocitrate lyase gene ICL1 for VPS41-mediated starvation response in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhe; Zhi, Yafei; Dong, Jianzhang; Lin, Benfeng; Ye, Di; Liu, Xiaoguang

    2016-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a major cause of fungal meningitis in individuals with impaired immunity. Our previous studies have shown that the VPS41 gene plays a critical role in the survival of Cryptococcus neoformans under nitrogen starvation; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying VPS41-mediated starvation response remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we show that, under nitrogen starvation, VPS41 strongly enhanced ICL1 expression in C. neoformans and that overexpression of ICL1 in the vps41 mutant dramatically suppressed its defects in starvation response due to the loss of VPS41 function. Moreover, targeted deletion of ICL1 resulted in a dramatic decline in viability of C. neoformans cells under nitrogen deprivation. Taken together, our data suggest a model in which VPS41 up-regulates ICL1 expression, directly or indirectly, to promote survival of C. neoformans under nitrogen starvation.

  10. Long-term starvation in Xenopus laevis Daudin--II. Effects on several organs.

    PubMed

    Merkle, S; Hanke, W

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of starvation for 12 months on organo-somatic indices, glycogen, protein and water contents of several organs and the Na+/K+ ratio in muscle was studied in the South African clawed toad Xenopus laevis Daudin. 2. The liver- and ovary-somatic index were reduced by 30 and 70% of the initial value after 12 months. Fat bodies had disappeared after approximately 6 months of starvation. The indices of heart and kidney were not changed. 3. Glycogen concentration of the liver, ovaries and muscle were depleted nearly totally during the first half of the experimental time, whereas glycogen in the kidney seemed to be unaffected. 4. Protein concentration increased in the liver, decreased in the muscle and remained constant in the kidney. 5. Starvation caused an increase of the water concentration of the whole animal and different organs, especially at the end of the experiment. 6. The Na+/K+ ratio of the muscle increased significantly after 6 months of starvation and reached a maximum after 10 months.

  11. Mitochondrial leucine tRNA level and PTCD1 are regulated in response to leucine starvation.

    PubMed

    Schild, Christof; Hahn, Dagmar; Schaller, André; Jackson, Christopher Benjamin; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Mirkovitch, Jelena; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc

    2014-07-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat domain protein 1 (PTCD1) is a novel human protein that was recently shown to decrease the levels of mitochondrial leucine tRNAs. The physiological role of this regulation, however, remains unclear. Here we show that amino acid starvation by leucine deprivation significantly increased the mRNA steady-state levels of PTCD1 in human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells. Amino acid starvation also increased the mitochondrially encoded leucine tRNA (tRNA(Leu(CUN))) and the mRNA for the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LARS2). Despite increased PTCD1 mRNA steady-state levels, amino acid starvation decreased PTCD1 on the protein level. Decreasing PTCD1 protein concentration increases the stability of the mitochondrial leucine tRNAs, tRNA(Leu(CUN)) and tRNA(Leu(UUR)) as could be shown by RNAi experiments against PTCD1. Therefore, it is likely that decreased PTCD1 protein contributes to the increased tRNA(Leu(CUN)) levels in amino acid-starved cells. The stabilisation of the mitochondrial leucine tRNAs and the upregulation of the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase LARS2 might play a role in adaptation of mitochondria to amino acid starvation.

  12. Influence of light absorption rate by Nannochloropsis oculata on triglyceride production during nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Kandilian, Razmig; Pruvost, Jérémy; Legrand, Jack; Pilon, Laurent

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to understand the role of light transfer in triglyceride fatty-acid (TG-FA) cell content and productivity from microalgae during nitrogen starvation. Large amounts of TG-FA can be produced via nitrogen starvation of microalgae in photobioreactors exposed to intense light. First, spectral absorption and scattering cross-sections of N. oculata were measured at different times during nitrogen starvation. They were used to relate the mean volumetric rate of energy absorption (MVREA) per unit mass of microalgae to the TG-FA productivity and cell content. TG-FA productivity correlated with the MVREA and reached a maximum for MVREA of 13 μmol hν/gs. This indicated that TG-FA synthesis was limited by the photon absorption rate in the PBR. A minimum MVREA of 13 μmol hν/gs was also necessary at the onset of nitrogen starvation to trigger large accumulation of TG-FA in cells. These results will be instrumental in defining protocols for TG-FA production in scaled-up photobioreactors.

  13. Starvation and recovery in the deep-sea methanotroph Methyloprofundus sedimenti.

    PubMed

    Tavormina, Patricia L; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Antony, Chakkiath Paul; Tocheva, Elitza I; Dalleska, Nathan F; Jensen, Ashley J; Valentine, David L; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Jensen, Grant J; Dubilier, Nicole; Orphan, Victoria J

    2017-01-01

    In the deep ocean, the conversion of methane into derived carbon and energy drives the establishment of diverse faunal communities. Yet specific biological mechanisms underlying the introduction of methane-derived carbon into the food web remain poorly described, due to a lack of cultured representative deep-sea methanotrophic prokaryotes. Here, the response of the deep-sea aerobic methanotroph Methyloprofundus sedimenti to methane starvation and recovery was characterized. By combining lipid analysis, RNA analysis, and electron cryotomography, it was shown that M. sedimenti undergoes discrete cellular shifts in response to methane starvation, including changes in headgroup-specific fatty acid saturation levels, and reductions in cytoplasmic storage granules. Methane starvation is associated with a significant increase in the abundance of gene transcripts pertinent to methane oxidation. Methane reintroduction to starved cells stimulates a rapid, transient extracellular accumulation of methanol, revealing a way in which methane-derived carbon may be routed to community members. This study provides new understanding of methanotrophic responses to methane starvation and recovery, and lays the initial groundwork to develop Methyloprofundus as a model chemosynthesizing bacterium from the deep sea.

  14. Yeast mutant affected for viability upon nutrient starvation: characterization and cloning of the RVS161 gene.

    PubMed

    Crouzet, M; Urdaci, M; Dulau, L; Aigle, M

    1991-10-01

    In yeast, nutrient starvation leads to entry into stationary phase. Mutants that do not respond properly to starvation conditions have been isolated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Among them the rvs161 mutant (RVS for Reduced Viability upon Starvation) is sensitive to carbon, nitrogen and sulphur starvation. When these nutrients are depleted in the medium, mutant cells show cellular viability loss with morphological changes. The mutation rvs161-1 is very pleiotropic, and besides the defects in stationary phase entry, the mutant strain presents other alterations: sensitivity to high salt concentrations, hypersensitivity to amino acid analogs, no growth on lactate or acetate medium. The addition of salts or amino acid analogs leads to the same morphological defects observed in starved cells, suggesting that the gene could be implicated mainly in the control of cellular viability. The gene RVS161 was cloned; it codes for a 30,252 daltons protein. No homology was detected with the proteins contained in the databases. Moreover, Southern analysis revealed the presence of other sequences homologous to the RVS161 gene in the yeast genome.

  15. Cell size and budding during starvation of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, G C

    1977-01-01

    When starved for nitrogen, cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced abnormally small cells. Nonetheless, during starvation, only cells of a size characteristic of growing cells were capable of initiating a bud. Even when growth was severely limited, some event(s) in G1 required growth to a critical size for completion. PMID:334753

  16. HapX-Mediated Adaption to Iron Starvation Is Crucial for Virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Schrettl, Markus; Beckmann, Nicola; Varga, John; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Jöchl, Christoph; Moussa, Tarek A.; Wang, Shaohua; Gsaller, Fabio; Blatzer, Michael; Werner, Ernst R.; Niermann, William C.; Brakhage, Axel A.; Haas, Hubertus

    2010-01-01

    Iron is essential for a wide range of cellular processes. Here we show that the bZIP-type regulator HapX is indispensable for the transcriptional remodeling required for adaption to iron starvation in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. HapX represses iron-dependent and mitochondrial-localized activities including respiration, TCA cycle, amino acid metabolism, iron-sulfur-cluster and heme biosynthesis. In agreement with the impact on mitochondrial metabolism, HapX-deficiency decreases resistance to tetracycline and increases mitochondrial DNA content. Pathways positively affected by HapX include production of the ribotoxin AspF1 and siderophores, which are known virulence determinants. Iron starvation causes a massive remodeling of the amino acid pool and HapX is essential for the coordination of the production of siderophores and their precursor ornithine. Consistent with HapX-function being limited to iron depleted conditions and A. fumigatus facing iron starvation in the host, HapX-deficiency causes significant attenuation of virulence in a murine model of aspergillosis. Taken together, this study demonstrates that HapX-dependent adaption to conditions of iron starvation is crucial for virulence of A. fumigatus. PMID:20941352

  17. The stringent response plays a key role in Bacillus subtilis survival of fatty acid starvation.

    PubMed

    Pulschen, André A; Sastre, Diego E; Machinandiarena, Federico; Crotta Asis, Agostina; Albanesi, Daniela; de Mendoza, Diego; Gueiros-Filho, Frederico J

    2017-02-01

    The stringent response is a universal adaptive mechanism to protect bacteria from nutritional and environmental stresses. The role of the stringent response during lipid starvation has been studied only in Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report that the stringent response also plays a crucial role in the adaptation of the model Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis to fatty acid starvation. B. subtilis lacking all three (p)ppGpp-synthetases (RelBs , RelP and RelQ) or bearing a RelBs variant that no longer synthesizes (p)ppGpp suffer extreme loss of viability on lipid starvation. Loss of viability is paralleled by perturbation of membrane integrity and function, with collapse of membrane potential as the likely cause of death. Although no increment of (p)ppGpp could be detected in lipid starved B. subtilis, we observed a substantial increase in the GTP/ATP ratio of strains incapable of synthesizing (p)ppGpp. Artificially lowering GTP with decoyinine rescued viability of such strains, confirming observations that low intracellular GTP is important for survival of nutritional stresses. Altogether, our results show that activation of the stringent response by lipid starvation is a broadly conserved response of bacteria and that a key role of (p)ppGpp is to couple biosynthetic processes that become detrimental if uncoordinated.

  18. Long-distance movement of phosphate starvation-responsive microRNAs in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huen, Amanda K; Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Ho, Angela Y Y; Atkins, Craig A; Smith, Penelope M C

    2017-03-21

    Plant microRNAs are small RNAs that are important for genetic regulation of processes such as plant development or environmental responses. Specific microRNAs accumulate in the phloem during phosphate starvation, and may act as long-distance signalling molecules. We performed quantitative PCR on Arabidopsis hypocotyl micrograft tissues of wild-type and hen1-6 mutants to assess the mobility of several phosphate starvation-responsive microRNA species. In addition to the previously-confirmed mobile species miR399d, the corresponding microRNA* (miR399d*) was identified for the first time as mobile between shoots and roots. Translocation by phosphate-responsive microRNAs miR827 and miR2111a between shoots and roots during phosphate starvation was evident, while their respective microRNA*s were not mobile. The results suggest that long-distance mobility of microRNA species is selective and can occur without the corresponding duplex strand. Movement of miR399d* and root-localised accumulation of miR2111a* opens the potential for persisting microRNA*s to be mobile and functional in novel pathways during phosphate starvation responses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Promoter sequences direct cytoplasmic localization and translation of mRNAs during starvation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zid, Brian M; O'Shea, Erin K

    2014-10-02

    A universal feature of the response to stress and nutrient limitation is transcriptional upregulation of genes that encode proteins important for survival. Under many such conditions, the overall protein synthesis level is reduced, thereby dampening the stress response at the level of protein expression. For example, during glucose starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), translation is rapidly repressed, yet the transcription of many stress- and glucose-repressed genes is increased. Here we show, using ribosomal profiling and microscopy, that this transcriptionally upregulated gene set consists of two classes: one class produces messenger RNAs that are translated during glucose starvation and are diffusely localized in the cytoplasm, including many heat-shock protein mRNAs; and the other class produces mRNAs that are not efficiently translated during glucose starvation and are concentrated in foci that co-localize with P bodies and stress granules, a class that is enriched for mRNAs involved in glucose metabolism. Surprisingly, the information specifying the differential localization and protein production of these two classes of mRNA is encoded in the promoter sequence: promoter responsiveness to heat-shock factor 1 (Hsf1) specifies diffuse cytoplasmic localization and higher protein production on glucose starvation. Thus, promoter sequences can influence not only the levels of mRNAs but also the subcellular localization of mRNAs and the efficiency with which they are translated, enabling cells to tailor protein production to the environmental conditions.

  20. AMPK acts as a molecular trigger to coordinate glutamatergic signals and adaptive behaviours during acute starvation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Moloud; Roy, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The stress associated with starvation is accompanied by compensatory behaviours that enhance foraging efficiency and increase the probability of encountering food. However, the molecular details of how hunger triggers changes in the activity of neural circuits to elicit these adaptive behavioural outcomes remains to be resolved. We show here that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates neuronal activity to elicit appropriate behavioural outcomes in response to acute starvation, and this effect is mediated by the coordinated modulation of glutamatergic inputs. AMPK targets both the AMPA-type glutamate receptor GLR-1 and the metabotropic glutamate receptor MGL-1 in one of the primary circuits that governs behavioural response to food availability in C. elegans. Overall, our study suggests that AMPK acts as a molecular trigger in the specific starvation-sensitive neurons to modulate glutamatergic inputs and to elicit adaptive behavioural outputs in response to acute starvation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16349.001 PMID:27642785

  1. Metabolic engineering for the production of shikimic acid in an evolved Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) is utilized in the synthesis of oseltamivir-phosphate, an anti-influenza drug. In this work, metabolic engineering approaches were employed to produce SA in Escherichia coli strains derived from an evolved strain (PB12) lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS-) but with capacity to grow on glucose. Derivatives of PB12 strain were constructed to determine the effects of inactivating aroK, aroL, pykF or pykA and the expression of plasmid-coded genes aroGfbr, tktA, aroB and aroE, on SA synthesis. Results Batch cultures were performed to evaluate the effects of genetic modifications on growth, glucose consumption, and aromatic intermediate production. All derivatives showed a two-phase growth behavior with initial high specific growth rate (μ) and specific glucose consumption rate (qs), but low level production of aromatic intermediates. During the second growth phase the μ decreased, whereas aromatic intermediate production reached its maximum. The double aroK- aroL- mutant expressing plasmid-coded genes (strain PB12.SA22) accumulated SA up to 7 g/L with a yield of SA on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol and a total aromatic compound yield (TACY) of 0.38 mol/mol. Single inactivation of pykF or pykA was performed in PB12.SA22 strain. Inactivation of pykF caused a decrease in μ, qs, SA production, and yield; whereas TACY increased by 33% (0.5 mol/mol). Conclusions The effect of increased availability of carbon metabolites, their channeling into the synthesis of aromatic intermediates, and disruption of the SA pathway on SA production was studied. Inactivation of both aroK and aroL, and transformation with plasmid-coded genes resulted in the accumulation of SA up to 7 g/L with a yield on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol PB12.SA22, which represents the highest reported yield. The pykF and pykA genes were inactivated in strain PB12.SA22 to increase the production of aromatic compounds in the PTS- background. Results

  2. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein genes during serum starvation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ojha, Sandeep; Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2015-06-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves all three RNA polymerases which are co-ordinately regulated to produce equimolar amounts of rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (RPs). Unlike model organisms where transcription of rRNA and RP genes slows down during stress, in E. histolytica rDNA transcription continues but pre-rRNA processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during serum starvation. To investigate the regulation of RP genes under stress we measured transcription of six selected RP genes from the small- and large-ribosomal subunits (RPS6, RPS3, RPS19, RPL5, RPL26, RPL30) representing the early-, mid-, and late-stages of ribosomal assembly. Transcripts of these genes persisted in growth-stressed cells. Expression of luciferase reporter under the control of two RP genes (RPS19 and RPL30) was studied during serum starvation and upon serum replenishment. Although luciferase transcript levels remained unchanged during starvation, luciferase activity steadily declined to 7.8% and 15% of control cells, respectively. After serum replenishment the activity increased to normal levels, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Mutations in the sequence -2 to -9 upstream of AUG in the RPL30 gene resulted in the phenotype expected of post-transcriptional regulation. Transcription of luciferase reporter was unaffected in this mutant, and luciferase activity did not decline during serum starvation, showing that this sequence is required to repress translation of RPL30 mRNA, and mutations in this region relieve repression. Our data show that during serum starvation E. histolytica blocks ribosome biogenesis post-transcriptionally by inhibiting pre-rRNA processing on the one hand, and the translation of RP mRNAs on the other.

  3. Two phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinases coexist in the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism plant Ananas comosus. Isolation and characterization of the smaller 65 kDa form.

    PubMed

    Martín, Mariana; Rius, Sebastián Pablo; Podestá, Florencio Esteban

    2011-06-01

    Two phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, EC 4.1.1.49) isoforms of 74 and 65 kDa were found to coexist in vivo in pineapple leaves, a constitutive Crassulacean Acid Metabolism plant. The 65 kDa form was not the result of proteolytic cleavage of the larger form since extraction methods reported to prevent PEPCK proteolysis in other plant tissues failed to yield a single immunoreactive PEPCK polypeptide in leaf extracts. In this work, the smaller form of 65 kDa was purified to homogeneity and physically and kinetically characterized and showed parameters compatible with a fully active enzyme. The specific activity was nearly twice higher for decarboxylation of oxaloacetate when compared to carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. Kinetic parameters fell within the range of those estimated for other plant PEPCKs. Its activity was affected by several metabolites, as shown by inhibition by 3-phosphoglycerate, citrate, malate, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, l-asparagine and activation of the decarboxylating activity by succinate. A break in the Arrhenius plot at about 30°C indicates that PEPCK structure is responsive to changes in temperature. The results indicate that pineapple leaves contain two PEPCK forms. The biochemical characterization of the smaller isoform performed in this work suggests that it could participate in both carbon and nitrogen metabolism in vivo by acting as a decarboxylase.

  4. Regional asymmetry of metabolic and antioxidant profile in the sciaenid fish shi drum (Umbrina cirrosa) white muscle. Response to starvation and refeeding.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, M Carmen; Morales, Amalia E; Arizcun, Marta; Abellán, Emilia; Cardenete, Gabriel

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the present study is to characterize the metabolic and antioxidant profile of white muscle of shi drum in two sites of the body, anterior dorsal (AM) and posterior dorsal (PM) portions. In addition, it will be analyzed the possible effect of starvation and a subsequent refeeding, with two different protocols, pair feeding and ad libitum. Activities of key enzymes of intermediary metabolism and of antioxidant enzymes, as well as lipid peroxidation, as an index of oxidative stress, were evaluated. The results indicate the existence of a regional asymmetry of the metabolic capacities of the white muscle of shi drum, which is likely related to the different contribution to swimming of the body regions examined. Starvation induces a metabolic depression that is more marked in those activities that support burst swimming in PM, while those activities supporting maintenance requirements are conserved. The greatest energy demands during starvation appear to lie in AM, which showed the highest oxidative metabolism rate. The increased use of fatty acids as energy source for AM leads to oxidative stress. A period of more than four weeks of refeeding for full restoration of metabolic capacities in AM is needed, probably related to the higher muscle mass located in this region. On the contrary, all enzyme activities in PM returned to control levels in both refeeding protocols, but pair feeding seems to be advantageous since compensatory growth has been taking place without signs of oxidative stress. This work was addressed to gain knowledge on the physiology of a promising fish species in aquaculture like shi drum. The results displayed here show how the starving and further re-feeding events could generate oxidative stress situations characterized by high lipid peroxidation levels which may influence negatively on the quality of the edible part of the fish. This study opens an interesting field on this fish species which deserves being investigated in the

  5. Thiazolidinediones mimic glucose starvation in facilitating Sp1 degradation through the up-regulation of beta-transducin repeat-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuo; Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Tsai, Wan-Chi; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Ho, Shiuh-Rong; Paterson, Andrew J; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the mechanism by which the transcription factor Sp1 is degraded in prostate cancer cells. We recently developed a thiazolidinedione derivative, (Z)-5-(4-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethylbenzylidene)-3-(1-methylcyclohexyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione (OSU-CG12), that induces Sp1 degradation in a manner paralleling that of glucose starvation. Based on our finding that thiazolidinediones suppress beta-catenin and cyclin D1 by up-regulating the E3 ligase SCF(beta-TrCP), we hypothesized that beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (beta-TrCP) targets Sp1 for proteasomal degradation in response to glucose starvation or OSU-CG12. Here we show that either treatment of LNCaP cells increased specific binding of Sp1 with beta-TrCP. This direct binding was confirmed by in vitro pull-down analysis with bacterially expressed beta-TrCP. Although ectopic expression of beta-TrCP enhanced the ability of OSU-CG12 to facilitate Sp1 degradation, suppression of endogenous beta-TrCP function by a dominant-negative mutant or small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown blocked OSU-CG12-facilitated Sp1 ubiquitination and/or degradation. Sp1 contains a C-terminal conventional DSG destruction box ((727)DSGAGS(732)) that mediates beta-TrCP recognition and encompasses a glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) phosphorylation motif (SXXXS). Pharmacological and molecular genetic approaches and mutational analyses indicate that extracellular signal-regulated kinase-mediated phosphorylation of Thr739 and GSK3beta-mediated phosphorylation of Ser728 and Ser732 were critical for Sp1 degradation. The ability of OSU-CG12 to mimic glucose starvation to activate beta-TrCP-mediated Sp1 degradation has translational potential to foster novel strategies for cancer therapy.

  6. Resistance to starvation of first-stage juveniles of the Caribbean spiny lobster

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Álvarez, Enrique; Briones-Fourzán, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The non-feeding postlarva (puerulus) of spiny lobsters actively swims from the open ocean to the coastal habitats where it settles and molts to the first-stage juvenile (JI). Because pueruli use much of their energy reserves swimming and preparing for the post-settlement molt, the survival of JIs presumably depends on resuming feeding as soon as possible. To test this hypothesis, the resistance to starvation of JIs of the Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus, was evaluated by measuring their point-of-no-return (PNR, minimum time of initial starvation preventing recovery after later feeding) and point-of-reserve-saturation (PRS, minimum time of initial feeding allowing for food-independent development through the rest of the molting cycle) in a warm and a cold season. Each experiment consisted of eight groups: a continuously fed control (FC) group, a continuously starved control (SC) group, and six groups subjected to differential periods of either initial starvation and subsequent feeding (PNR experiments) or initial feeding and subsequent starvation (PSR experiments). No JIs molted under continuous absence of food (SC). In both PNR experiments (temperature in warm season: 29.79 ± 0.07°C, mean ± 95% CI; in cold season: 25.63 ± 0.12°C) mortality increased sharply after 9 d of initial starvation and intermolt periods increased with period of initial starvation, but were longer in the cold season. The PNR50 was longer in the warm season (12.1 ± 1.2 d, mean ± 95% CI) than in the cold season (9.5 ± 2.1 d). In PRS experiments (temperature in warm season: 29.54 ± 0.07 °C; in cold season: 26.20 ± 0.12 °C), JIs that molted did so near the end of the feeding period; all JIs initially fed for up to 6 d succumbed, and no JIs molted after 13 d of starvation despite having fed previously. The PRS50 did not differ between the cold (13.1 ± 0.7 d) and warm seasons (12.1 ± 1.1 d). JIs of P. argus exhibit a remarkable resistance to starvation

  7. Resistance to starvation of first-stage juveniles of the Caribbean spiny lobster.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Magaña, Alí; Lozano-Álvarez, Enrique; Briones-Fourzán, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The non-feeding postlarva (puerulus) of spiny lobsters actively swims from the open ocean to the coastal habitats where it settles and molts to the first-stage juvenile (JI). Because pueruli use much of their energy reserves swimming and preparing for the post-settlement molt, the survival of JIs presumably depends on resuming feeding as soon as possible. To test this hypothesis, the resistance to starvation of JIs of the Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus, was evaluated by measuring their point-of-no-return (PNR, minimum time of initial starvation preventing recovery after later feeding) and point-of-reserve-saturation (PRS, minimum time of initial feeding allowing for food-independent development through the rest of the molting cycle) in a warm and a cold season. Each experiment consisted of eight groups: a continuously fed control (FC) group, a continuously starved control (SC) group, and six groups subjected to differential periods of either initial starvation and subsequent feeding (PNR experiments) or initial feeding and subsequent starvation (PSR experiments). No JIs molted under continuous absence of food (SC). In both PNR experiments (temperature in warm season: 29.79 ± 0.07°C, mean ± 95% CI; in cold season: 25.63 ± 0.12°C) mortality increased sharply after 9 d of initial starvation and intermolt periods increased with period of initial starvation, but were longer in the cold season. The PNR50 was longer in the warm season (12.1 ± 1.2 d, mean ± 95% CI) than in the cold season (9.5 ± 2.1 d). In PRS experiments (temperature in warm season: 29.54 ± 0.07 °C; in cold season: 26.20 ± 0.12 °C), JIs that molted did so near the end of the feeding period; all JIs initially fed for up to 6 d succumbed, and no JIs molted after 13 d of starvation despite having fed previously. The PRS50 did not differ between the cold (13.1 ± 0.7 d) and warm seasons (12.1 ± 1.1 d). JIs of P. argus exhibit a remarkable resistance to starvation

  8. Adaptations of alpha2- and beta-cells of rat and mouse pancreatic islets to starvation, to refeeding after starvation, and to obesity.

    PubMed Central

    Matschinsky, F M; Rujanavech, C; Pagliara, A; Norfleet, W T

    1980-01-01

    The effects of starvation and refeeding and of obesity on pancreatic alpha2- and beta-cell responses to glucose or tolbutamide were studied with the isolated rat or mouse pancreas perfused with an amino acid mixture in the presence and absence of glucose. It was observed that the physiological adaptation to a regimen of fasting and realimentation and to obesity differed greatly in the two types of endocrine cells. Whereas beta-cells of rats showed a dramatic reduction of glucose- and tolbutamide-stimulated insulin release during starvation that was reversed by refeeding, alpha2-cells preserved their response to stimulators and inhibitors during this experimental manipulation. Amino acid stimulation of glucagon release occurred equally well with the pancreas from fed and starved rats and was suppressed efficiently by glucose and tolbutamide in both nutritional states. Surprisingly, the rate of onset of glucose suppression of alpha2-cells was significantly higher in the fasted than in the fed state. This glucose hypersensitivity was apparent 2 d after after food deprivation and had disappeared again on the 2nd d of refeeding. In the pancreas from animals starved for 3 d, glucose and tolbutamide suppression of alpha2-cells took place in the absence of demonstrable changes of insulin release. In the isolated perfused pancreas taken from the hyperphagic obese hyperglycemic mouse (C57 Black/6J; ob/ob), the observed rate of insulin secretion as a result of a combined stimulus of amino acids and glucose and of glucagon release stimulated by amino acids was about four times higher than achieved by the pancreas of lean controls. However, glucose was unable to suppress the alpha2-cells in the pancreas of obese animals, in spite of the hypersection of the beta-cells, again in contrast to the alpha2-cells of controls that were readily inhibited by glucose. These data imply that the acute suppression of alpha2-cells by glucose is largely independent of a concomitant surge of

  9. High-Throughput Profiling of Caenorhabditis elegans Starvation-Responsive microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Segura, Laura; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Hernandez-Mendoza, Armando; Dimitrova Dinkova, Tzvetanka D.; Padilla-Noriega, Luis; Perez-Andrade, Martha Elva; Miranda-Rios, Juan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs of ~22 nucleotides in length that regulate gene expression by interfering with the stability and translation of mRNAs. Their expression is regulated during development, under a wide variety of stress conditions and in several pathological processes. In nature, animals often face feast or famine conditions. We observed that subjecting early L4 larvae from Caenorhabditis elegans to a 12-hr starvation period produced worms that are thinner and shorter than well-fed animals, with a decreased lipid accumulation, diminished progeny, reduced gonad size, and an increased lifespan. Our objective was to identify which of the 302 known miRNAs of C. elegans changed their expression under starvation conditions as compared to well-fed worms by means of deep sequencing in early L4 larvae. Our results indicate that 13 miRNAs (miR-34-3p, the family of miR-35-3p to miR-41-3p, miR-39-5p, miR-41-5p, miR-240-5p, miR-246-3p and miR-4813-5p) were upregulated, while 2 miRNAs (let-7-3p and miR-85-5p) were downregulated in 12-hr starved vs. well-fed early L4 larvae. Some of the predicted targets of the miRNAs that changed their expression in starvation conditions are involved in metabolic or developmental process. In particular, miRNAs of the miR-35 family were upregulated 6–20 fold upon starvation. Additionally, we showed that the expression of gld-1, important in oogenesis, a validated target of miR-35-3p, was downregulated when the expression of miR-35-3p was upregulated. The expression of another reported target, the cell cycle regulator lin-23, was unchanged during starvation. This study represents a starting point for a more comprehensive understanding of the role of miRNAs during starvation in C. elegans. PMID:26554708

  10. Influence of starvation on the larval development of Hyas araneus (Decapoda, Majidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, K.; Dawirs, R. R.

    1981-09-01

    The influence of starvation on larval development of the spider crab Hyas araneus (L.) was studied in laboratory experiments. No larval stage suffering from continual lack of food had sufficient energy reserves to reach the next instar. Maximal survival times were observed at four different constant temperatures (2°, 6°, 12° and 18 °C). In general, starvation resistance decreased as temperatures increased: from 72 to 12days in the zoea-1, from 48 to 18 days in the zoea-2, and from 48 to 15 days in the megalopa stage. The length of maximal survival is of the same order of magnitude as the duration of each instar at a given temperature. “Sublethal limits” of early starvation periods were investigated at 12 °C: Zoea larvae must feed right from the beginning of their stage (at high food concentration) and for more than one fifth, approximately, of that stage to have at least some chance of surviving to the next instar, independent of further prey availability. The minimum time in which enough reserves are accumulated for successfully completing the instar without food is called “point-of-reserve-saturation” (PRS). If only this minimum period of essential initial feeding precedes starvation, development in both zoeal stages is delayed and mortality is greater, when compared to the fed control. Starvation periods beginning right after hatching of the first zoea cause a prolongation of this instar and, surprisingly, a slight shortening of the second stage. The delay in the zoea-1 increases proportionally to the length of the initial fasting period. If more than approximately 70 % of the maximum possible survival time has elapsed without food supply, the larvae become unable to recover and to moult to the second stage even when re-fed (“point-of-no-return”, PNR). The conclusion, based on own observations and on literature data, is that initial feeding is of paramount importance in the early development of planktotrophic decapod larvae. Taking into account

  11. High-Throughput Profiling of Caenorhabditis elegans Starvation-Responsive microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Segura, Laura; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Hernandez-Mendoza, Armando; Dimitrova Dinkova, Tzvetanka D; Padilla-Noriega, Luis; Perez-Andrade, Martha Elva; Miranda-Rios, Juan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs of ~22 nucleotides in length that regulate gene expression by interfering with the stability and translation of mRNAs. Their expression is regulated during development, under a wide variety of stress conditions and in several pathological processes. In nature, animals often face feast or famine conditions. We observed that subjecting early L4 larvae from Caenorhabditis elegans to a 12-hr starvation period produced worms that are thinner and shorter than well-fed animals, with a decreased lipid accumulation, diminished progeny, reduced gonad size, and an increased lifespan. Our objective was to identify which of the 302 known miRNAs of C. elegans changed their expression under starvation conditions as compared to well-fed worms by means of deep sequencing in early L4 larvae. Our results indicate that 13 miRNAs (miR-34-3p, the family of miR-35-3p to miR-41-3p, miR-39-5p, miR-41-5p, miR-240-5p, miR-246-3p and miR-4813-5p) were upregulated, while 2 miRNAs (let-7-3p and miR-85-5p) were downregulated in 12-hr starved vs. well-fed early L4 larvae. Some of the predicted targets of the miRNAs that changed their expression in starvation conditions are involved in metabolic or developmental process. In particular, miRNAs of the miR-35 family were upregulated 6-20 fold upon starvation. Additionally, we showed that the expression of gld-1, important in oogenesis, a validated target of miR-35-3p, was downregulated when the expression of miR-35-3p was upregulated. The expression of another reported target, the cell cycle regulator lin-23, was unchanged during starvation. This study represents a starting point for a more comprehensive understanding of the role of miRNAs during starvation in C. elegans.

  12. Impact of nutrient starvation on the biochemical composition of the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii: from the whole cell to the frustule fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, C.; Claquin, P.; Goutx, M.; Ragueneau, O.; Moriceau, B.

    2010-08-01

    Interactions between carbon and silica in the diatom frustule play an important role in carbon export through their impact on diatom remineralization (carbon degradation and biogenic silica dissolution). To ameliorate model prediction of the fate of Si and organic matter during sedimentation, there is a need to first understand the origin and nature of Si-OC interactions, their impact on diatom remineralization and their variability with environmental conditions. In this study we focus on the impact of nutrient starvations on the formation and nature of these interactions in an ubiquitous diatom, Thalassiosira weissflogii. Fluorescence reveals the strong impact of all starvations on diatom metabolism while Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy clearly showed that starvations altered the composition of the different diatom fractions. The relative compositions of whole cells were almost not impacted by starvations except Si(OH)4 starvation that slightly increased proteins relative contribution while decreasing carbohydrate. Starvation impacts became obvious looking at the composition of the different part of the diatom. The relative biochemical composition of the organic coating, protecting the frustule from the environment, was strongly affected by starvation. Under nitrate starvation, carbohydrate contribution increased while protein contribution decreased. Inversely, phosphate starvation increased the proportion of proteins and decreased carbohydrates contribution. Starvations also modified the different frustule phases. bSiO2 contribution decreased in the less reactive phase under silicate and phosphate starvation whereas nitrate starvation rather increased carbohydrate and protein pools. Phosphate starvation also led to an important shift of dominance among protein groups between amide I and amide II which compounds are suspected to play a key role in the frustule synthesis and architecture. Nutrient starvations affected the relative biochemical

  13. Evolution of C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Flaveria, a conserved serine residue in the carboxyl-terminal part of the enzyme is a major determinant for C4-specific characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bläsing, O E; Westhoff, P; Svensson, P

    2000-09-08

    C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases have evolved from ancestral C3 isoforms during the evolution of angiosperms and gained distinct kinetic and regulatory properties compared with the C3 isozymes. To identify amino acid residues and/or domains responsible for these C4-specific properties the C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase of Flaveria trinervia (C4) was compared with its orthologue in the closely related C3 plant Flaveria pringlei. Reciprocal enzyme chimera were constructed and the kinetic constants, K(0.5) and k(cat), as well as the Hill coefficient, h, were determined for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate both in the presence and absence of the activator glucose 6-phosphate. By this approach two regions were identified which determined most of the kinetic differences of the C4 and C3 ppcA phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases with respect to the substrate PEP. In addition, the experiments suggest that the two regions do not act additively but interact with each other. The region between amino acids 296 and 437 is essential for activation by glucose 6-phosphate. The carboxyl-terminal segment between amino acids 645 and 966 contains a C4 conserved serine or a C3 invariant alanine at position 774 in the respective enzyme isoform. Site-directed mutagenesis shows that this position is a key determinant for the kinetic properties of the two isozymes.

  14. The Mitochondrial Sulfur Dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 Is Required for Amino Acid Catabolism during Carbohydrate Starvation and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Browning, Luke W.; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  15. Durability test with fuel starvation using a Pt/CNF catalyst in PEMFC.

    PubMed

    Jung, Juhae; Park, Byungil; Kim, Junbom

    2012-01-05

    In this study, a catalyst was synthesized on carbon nanofibers [CNFs] with a herringbone-type morphology. The Pt/CNF catalyst exhibited low hydrophilicity, low surface area, high dispersion, and high graphitic behavior on physical analysis. Electrodes (5 cm2) were prepared by a spray method, and the durability of the Pt/CNF was evaluated by fuel starvation. The performance was compared with a commercial catalyst before and after accelerated tests. The fuel starvation caused carbon corrosion with a reverse voltage drop. The polarization curve, EIS, and cyclic voltammetry were analyzed in order to characterize the electrochemical properties of the Pt/CNF. The performance of a membrane electrode assembly fabricated from the Pt/CNF was maintained, and the electrochemical surface area and cell resistance showed the same trend. Therefore, CNFs are expected to be a good support in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  16. Durability test with fuel starvation using a Pt/CNF catalyst in PEMFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Juhae; Park, Byungil; Kim, Junbom

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a catalyst was synthesized on carbon nanofibers [CNFs] with a herringbone-type morphology. The Pt/CNF catalyst exhibited low hydrophilicity, low surface area, high dispersion, and high graphitic behavior on physical analysis. Electrodes (5 cm2) were prepared by a spray method, and the durability of the Pt/CNF was evaluated by fuel starvation. The performance was compared with a commercial catalyst before and after accelerated tests. The fuel starvation caused carbon corrosion with a reverse voltage drop. The polarization curve, EIS, and cyclic voltammetry were analyzed in order to characterize the electrochemical properties of the Pt/CNF. The performance of a membrane electrode assembly fabricated from the Pt/CNF was maintained, and the electrochemical surface area and cell resistance showed the same trend. Therefore, CNFs are expected to be a good support in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  17. Usage of energy reserves in crustaceans during starvation: status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Paz, Arturo; García-Carreño, Fernando; Muhlia-Almazán, Adriana; Peregrino-Uriarte, Alma B; Hernández-López, Jorge; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we review the current knowledge about the usage of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins as energy source by marine crustaceans during starvation. Crustaceans are a large and diverse group including some economically important species. The efforts to culture them for human consumption has prompted the interest to understand the preferences of energy sources to be applied for feed formulation and cost reduction. Important differences have been found among species and appear to be related not only to the biochemistry and physiology of nutrition, but also to the living environment of the crustaceans. Furthermore, crustaceans undergo morphological, physiological and behavioral changes due to their natural growing process that affect their feeding habits, an aspect that should be carefully considered. We discuss the current information on marine crustaceans about energy usage and describe areas of future research, where starvation studies render important insights.

  18. Protein Kinase A Activation Promotes Cancer Cell Resistance to Glucose Starvation and Anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Pirola, Yuri; De Vitto, Humberto; De Palma, Sara; Airoldi, Cristina; Vasso, Michele; Ricciardiello, Francesca; Lombardi, Pietro Paolo; Cirulli, Claudia; Rizzi, Raffaella; Nicotra, Francesco; Hiller, Karsten; Gelfi, Cecilia; Alberghina, Lilia; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells often rely on glycolysis to obtain energy and support anabolic growth. Several studies showed that glycolytic cells are susceptible to cell death when subjected to low glucose availability or to lack of glucose. However, some cancer cells, including glycolytic ones, can efficiently acquire higher tolerance to glucose depletion, leading to their survival and aggressiveness. Although increased resistance to glucose starvation has been shown to be a consequence of signaling pathways and compensatory metabolic routes activation, the full repertoire of the underlying molecular alterations remain elusive. Using omics and computational analyses, we found that cyclic adenosine monophosphate-Protein Kinase A (cAMP-PKA) axis activation is fundamental for cancer cell resistance to glucose starvation and anoikis. Notably, here we show that such a PKA-dependent survival is mediated by parallel activation of autophagy and glutamine utilization that in concert concur to attenuate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and to sustain cell anabolism. Indeed, the inhibition of PKA-mediated autophagy or glutamine metabolism increased the level of cell death, suggesting that the induction of autophagy and metabolic rewiring by PKA is important for cancer cellular survival under glucose starvation. Importantly, both processes actively participate to cancer cell survival mediated by suspension-activated PKA as well. In addition we identify also a PKA/Src mechanism capable to protect cancer cells from anoikis. Our results reveal for the first time the role of the versatile PKA in cancer cells survival under chronic glucose starvation and anoikis and may be a novel potential target for cancer treatment. PMID:26978032

  19. Computational model of in vivo human energy metabolism during semi-starvation and re-feeding

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Kevin D.

    2008-01-01

    Changes of body weight and composition are the result of complex interactions among metabolic fluxes contributing to macronutrient balances. To better understand these interactions, a mathematical model was constructed that used the measured dietary macronutrient intake during semi-starvation and re-feeding as model inputs and computed whole-body energy expenditure, de novo lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, as well as turnover and oxidation of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Published in vivo human data provided the basis for the model components which were integrated by fitting a few unknown parameters to the classic Minnesota human starvation experiment. The model simulated the measured body weight and fat mass changes during semi-starvation and re-feeding and predicted the unmeasured metabolic fluxes underlying the body composition changes. The resting metabolic rate matched the experimental measurements and required a model of adaptive thermogenesis. Re-feeding caused an elevation of de novo lipogenesis which, along with increased fat intake, resulted in a rapid repletion and overshoot of body fat. By continuing the computer simulation with the pre-starvation diet and physical activity, the original body weight and composition was eventually restored, but body fat mass was predicted to take more than one additional year to return to within 5% of its original value. The model was validated by simulating a recently published short-term caloric restriction experiment without changing the model parameters. The predicted changes of body weight, fat mass, resting metabolic rate, and nitrogen balance matched the experimental measurements thereby providing support for the validity of the model. PMID:16449298

  20. Comparison of endogenous metabolism during long-term anaerobic starvation of nitrite/nitrate cultivated denitrifying phosphorus removal sludges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yayi; Zhou, Shuai; Wang, Hong; Ye, Liu; Qin, Jian; Lin, Ximao

    2015-01-01

    Denitrifying phosphorus removal (DPR) by denitrifying phosphorus-accumulating organisms (DPAOs) is a promising approach for reducing energy and carbon usage. However, influent fluctuations or interruptions frequently expose the DPAOs biomass to starvation conditions, reducing biomass activity and amount, and ultimately degrading the performance of DPR. Therefore, a better understanding of the endogenous metabolism and recovery ability of DPAOs is urgently required. In the present study, anaerobic starvation (12 days) and recovery were investigated in nitrite- and nitrate-cultivated DPAOs at 20 ± 1 °C. The cell decay rates in nitrite-DPAOs sludges from the end of the anaerobic and aerobic phase were 0.008 day⁻¹ and 0.007 day⁻¹, respectively, being 64% and 68% lower than those of nitrate-DPAOs sludges. Nitrite-DPAOs sludges also recovered more rapidly than nitrate-DPAOs sludge after 12 days of starvation. The maintenance energy of nitrite-DPAOs sludges from the end of the anaerobic and aerobic phase were approximately 31% and 34% lower, respectively, than those of nitrate-DPAOs sludges. Glycogen and polyphosphate (poly-P) sequentially served as the main maintenance energy sources in both nitrite-and nitrate-DPAOs sludges. However, the transformation pathway of the intracellular polymers during starvation differed between them. Nitrate-DPAOs sludge used extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) (mainly polysaccharides) as an additional maintenance energy source during the first 3 days of starvation. During this phase, EPS appeared to contribute to 19-27% of the ATP production in nitrate-DPAOs, but considerably less to the cell maintenance of nitrite-DPAOs. The high resistance of nitrite-DPAOs to starvation might be attributable to frequent short-term starvation and exposure to toxic substances such as nitrite/free nitrous acids in the parent nitrite-fed reactor. The strong resistance of nitrite-DPAOs sludge to anaerobic starvation may be exploited in P removal

  1. Roles of fat body trophocytes, mycetocytes and urocytes in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana under starvation conditions: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Park, Pyoyun; Takeda, Makio

    2013-07-01

    In insects, trophocytes (adipocytes) are major cells of a storage organ, the fat body, from which stored glycogen and lipids are mobilized under starvation. However, cockroaches have 2 additional types of cell in the fat body: mycetocytes harboring an endosymbiont, Blattabacterium cuenoti, and urocytes depositing uric acid in urate vacuoles. These cells have not been investigated in terms of their roles under starvation conditions. To gain insight into the roles of trophocytes, mycetocytes and urocytes in cockroaches, structural changes were first investigated in the cells associated with starvation in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, by light and electron microscopy. The area of lipid droplets in trophocytes, the endosymbiont population and mitotic activity in mycetocytes, and the area of urate vacuoles in urocytes were analyzed in association with survival rates of the starved cockroaches. After 2 weeks of starvation, trophocytes lost glycogen rosettes and their area of lipid droplets decreased, but almost all cockroaches survived this period. However, further starvation did not reduce the area, but the survival rates dropped rapidly and all cockroaches died in 7 weeks. Endosymbionts were not affected in terms of population size and mitotic activity, even if the cockroaches were dying. The area of urate vacuoles rapidly decreased in a week of starvation and did not recover upon further starvation. These results indicate that starved cockroaches mobilize glycogen and lipids stored in trophocytes to survive for 2 weeks and then die after the exhaustion of nutrients in these cells. Endosymbionts are not digested for the recycling of nutrients, but uric acid is reused under starvation.

  2. Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to nitrogen starvation in wine alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tesnière, Catherine; Brice, Claire; Blondin, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen is an important nutrient in alcoholic fermentation because its starvation affects both fermentation kinetics and the formation of yeast metabolites. In most alcoholic fermentations, yeasts have to ferment in nitrogen-starved conditions, which requires modifications of cell functions to maintain a high sugar flux and enable cell survival for long periods in stressful conditions. In this review, we present an overview of our current understanding of the responses of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to variations of nitrogen availability. Adaptation to nitrogen starvation involves changes in the activity of signaling pathways such as target of rapamycin (TOR) and nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR), which are important for the remodeling of gene expression and the establishment of stress responses. Upon starvation, protein degradation pathways involving autophagy and the proteasome play a major role in nitrogen recycling and the adjustment of cellular activity. Recent progress in the understanding of the role of these mechanisms should enable advances in fermentation management and the design of novel targets for the selection or improvement of yeast strains.

  3. Hematological Responses, Survival, and Respiratory Exchange in the Olive Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, during Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Park, I.-S.; Hur, J. W.; Choi, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    A 12-wk experiment was conducted to examine the hematological changes, survival, and respiratory exchange in the olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, during starvation. The growth, survival and respiratory exchange rates of the starved group were lower than those of the fed group during the experiment. Blood analysis, including hematocrit, hemoglobin, red blood cells, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and mean corpuscular volume, did not differ significantly (p>0.05) between the fed and starved groups at the end of the experiment. There were no significant differences in plasma cortisol, glucose, Na+, Cl−, K+, or aspartate aminotransferase between the fed and starved groups (p>0.05). Alanine aminotransferase levels were higher in the starved group than in the fed group, whereas plasma osmolality was lower in the starved group than in the fed group. It was shown that starved fish had various problems after four weeks, which did not occur in the fed group. Long-term starvation is infrequent in aquaculture farms. However, starvation studies of this kind are very useful for a basic understanding of how physiological changes affect fish health, life expectancy, and growth. PMID:25049691

  4. Daily foraging patterns in free-living birds: exploring the predation–starvation trade-off

    PubMed Central

    Bonter, David N.; Zuckerberg, Benjamin; Sedgwick, Carolyn W.; Hochachka, Wesley M.

    2013-01-01

    Daily patterns in the foraging behaviour of birds are assumed to balance the counteracting risks of predation and starvation. Predation risks are a function of the influence of weight on flight performance and foraging behaviours that may expose individuals to predators. Although recent research sheds light on daily patterns in weight gain, little data exist on daily foraging routines in free-living birds. In order to test the predictions of various hypotheses about daily patterns of foraging, we quantified the activity of four species of passerines in winter using radio-frequency identification receivers built into supplemental feeding stations. From records of 472 368 feeder visits by tagged birds, we found that birds generally started to feed before sunrise and continued to forage at a steady to increasing rate throughout the day. Foraging in most species terminated well before sunset, suggesting their required level of energy reserves was being reached before the end of the day. These results support the risk-spreading theorem over a long-standing hypothesis predicting bimodality in foraging behaviour purportedly driven by a trade-off between the risks of starvation and predation. Given the increased energetic demands experienced by birds during colder weather, our results suggest that birds' perceptions of risk are biased towards starvation avoidance in winter. PMID:23595267

  5. Effects of starvation and body mass on drought tolerance in the soil collembolan Folsomia candida.

    PubMed

    Hilligsøe, H; Holmstrup, M

    2003-01-01

    The effects of starvation and body mass on drought tolerance in Folsomia candida were investigated. Starvation for up to 6 weeks did not reduce tolerance to drought (98.2% RH) compared to a nonstarved control group. Animals starved for 1, 2 or 6 weeks prior to drought exposure showed no systematic differences in the accumulation of sugars and polyols (SP). In all groups exposed to drought SP constituted 9-13% of dry weight and was distributed in myoinositol, glucose and a third unidentified compound. At 97.3% RH large individuals (9 weeks old) survived better than small individuals (2 or 3 weeks old). However, no correlation was found between body mass and drought tolerance at relative humidities above 97.3% RH. The results suggest that starvation for ecologically relevant periods of time does not impair the ability to produce desiccation-protective SP in F. candida, and that both small and large life stages are well adapted to dry soil conditions.

  6. Plasmodium falciparum responds to amino acid starvation by entering into a hibernatory state.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Shalon E; Altenhofen, Lindsey; Cobbold, Simon A; Istvan, Eva S; Fennell, Clare; Doerig, Christian; Llinás, Manuel; Goldberg, Daniel E

    2012-11-20

    The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is auxotrophic for most amino acids. Its amino acid needs are met largely through the degradation of host erythrocyte hemoglobin; however the parasite must acquire isoleucine exogenously, because this amino acid is not present in adult human hemoglobin. We report that when isoleucine is withdrawn from the culture medium of intraerythrocytic P. falciparum, the parasite slows its metabolism and progresses through its developmental cycle at a reduced rate. Isoleucine-starved parasites remain viable for 72 h and resume rapid growth upon resupplementation. Protein degradation during starvation is important for maintenance of this hibernatory state. Microarray analysis of starved parasites revealed a 60% decrease in the rate of progression through the normal transcriptional program but no other apparent stress response. Plasmodium parasites do not possess a TOR nutrient-sensing pathway and have only a rudimentary amino acid starvation-sensing eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) stress response. Isoleucine deprivation results in GCN2-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α, but kinase-knockout clones still are able to hibernate and recover, indicating that this pathway does not directly promote survival during isoleucine starvation. We conclude that P. falciparum, in the absence of canonical eukaryotic nutrient stress-response pathways, can cope with an inconsistent bloodstream amino acid supply by hibernating and waiting for more nutrient to be provided.

  7. Severe protein-calorie malnutrition in two brothers due to abuse by starvation

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Marcela Montenegro Braga; Salvador, Luiza Martins; Fagundes, Ulysses

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the case of two siblings with severe protein-calorie malnutrition due to abuse by starvation. Cases description: The two patients were simultaneously referred to the Hospital Municipal, where they were admitted to the Pediatric Gastroenterology clinic of a university hospital for diagnostic investigation of the cause of severe malnutrition and screening tests for Celiac Disease, Cystic Fibrosis and Environmental enteropathy among others. The exams were all normal, and after detailed research on the interactions of this family, we reached the conclusion that the malnutrition was due to abuse by starvation. The children spent approximately two months in the hospital, receiving a high-protein and high-calorie diet, with significant nutritional recovery. Comments: Abuse by starvation, although rare, should always be considered of as one of the causes of child malnutrition and pediatrician should be aware of the child's development, as well as the family interactions, to prevent more severe nutritional and emotional consequences in the future. PMID:27452429

  8. Starvation-Survival Patterns of Sixteen Freshly Isolated Open-Ocean Bacteria †

    PubMed Central

    Amy, Penny S.; Morita, Richard Y.

    1983-01-01

    Sixteen marine isolates from a NORPAX cruise, which were transferred once on medium after initial isolation, survived nutrient deprivation for at least 8 months (longest period test). All but one isolate remained cellularly intact, although their sizes and shapes changed greatly, and all became smaller, decreasing in size from 40 to 79%. Three starvation-survival patterns were demonstrated, namely (i) an initial increase in viable cells followed by a decrease until a constant number was reached, (ii) an increase in viable cells until a constant number was reached, and (iii) a decrease in viable cells until a constant number was reached. One isolate from each starvation-survival pattern was starved for 8 months and then was tested in comparison with 4-month-starved Ant-300 for [14C]glutamic acid uptake, respiration, and incorporation. The response to glutamic acid was rapid and linear in each case. The data indicate that the starvation-survival of Ant-300 is not an anomalous situation and that open ocean bacteria can withstand nutrient deprivation for long periods of time and still retain the capacity for active metabolism, if the nutrients become available. Images PMID:16346231

  9. Extended longevity and survivorship during amino-acid starvation in a Drosophila Sir2 mutant heterozygote.

    PubMed

    Slade, Jennifer D; Staveley, Brian E

    2016-05-01

    The regulation of energy homeostasis is pivotal to survive periods of inadequate nutrition. A combination of intricate pathways and proteins are responsible for maximizing longevity during such conditions. The sirtuin deacetylase Sir2 is well conserved from single-celled yeast to mammals, and it controls a number of downstream targets that are active during periods of extreme stress. Overexpression of Sir2 has been established to enhance survival of a number of model organisms undergoing calorie restriction, during which insulin receptor signalling (IRS) is reduced, a condition that itself can enhance survivorship during starvation. Increased Sir2 expression and reduced IRS result in an increase in the activity of the transcription factor foxo, an advantageous activation during stress but lethal when overly active. We have found that a lowered gene dosage of Sir2, in mutant heterozygotes, can extend normal longevity and greatly augment survivorship during amino-acid starvation in Drosophila. Additionally, these mutants, in either heterozygous or homozygous form, do not appear to have any disadvantageous effects upon development or cell growth of the organism unlike IRS mutants. These results may advance the understanding of the biological response to starvation and allow for the development of a model organism to mimic the ability of individuals to tolerate nutrient deprivation.

  10. Carbon dioxide starvation, the development of C4 ecosystems, and mammalian evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Cerling, T E; Ehleringer, J R; Harris, J M

    1998-01-01

    The decline of atmospheric CO2 over the last 65 million years (Ma) resulted in the 'CO2-starvation' of terrestrial ecosystems and led to the widespread distribution of C4 plants, which are less sensitive to CO2 levels than are C3 plants. Global expansion of C4 biomass is recorded in the diets of mammals from Asia, Africa, North America, and South America during the interval from about 8 to 5 Ma. This was accompanied by the most significant Cenozoic faunal turnover on each of these continents, indicating that ecological changes at this time were an important factor in mammalian extinction. Further expansion of tropical C4 biomass in Africa also occurred during the last glacial interval confirming the link between atmospheric CO2 levels and C4 biomass response. Changes in fauna and flora at the end of the Miocene, and between the last glacial and interglacial, have previously been attributed to changes in aridity; however, an alternative explanation for a global expansion of C4 biomass is CO2 starvation of C3 plants when atmospheric CO2 levels dropped below a threshold significant to C3 plants. Aridity may also have been a factor in the expansion of C4 ecosystems but one that was secondary to, and perhaps because of, gradually decreasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. Mammalian evolution in the late Neogene, then, may be related to the CO2 starvation of C3 ecosystems. PMID:9507562

  11. Transcriptome landscape of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 for nitrogen starvation responses using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun Young; Park, Byeonghyeok; Choi, In-Geol; Sim, Sang Jun; Lee, Sun-Mi; Um, Youngsoon; Woo, Han Min

    2016-01-01

    The development of high-throughput technology using RNA-seq has allowed understanding of cellular mechanisms and regulations of bacterial transcription. In addition, transcriptome analysis with RNA-seq has been used to accelerate strain improvement through systems metabolic engineering. Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, a photosynthetic bacterium, has remarkable potential for biochemical and biofuel production due to photoautotrophic cell growth and direct CO2 conversion. Here, we performed a transcriptome analysis of S. elongatus PCC 7942 using RNA-seq to understand the changes of cellular metabolism and regulation for nitrogen starvation responses. As a result, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified and functionally categorized. With mapping onto metabolic pathways, we probed transcriptional perturbation and regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolisms relating to nitrogen starvation responses. Experimental evidence such as chlorophyll a and phycobilisome content and the measurement of CO2 uptake rate validated the transcriptome analysis. The analysis suggests that S. elongatus PCC 7942 reacts to nitrogen starvation by not only rearranging the cellular transport capacity involved in carbon and nitrogen assimilation pathways but also by reducing protein synthesis and photosynthesis activities. PMID:27488818

  12. Theoretical lessons for increasing algal biofuel: Evolution of oil accumulation to avert carbon starvation in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Akita, Tetsuya; Kamo, Masashi

    2015-09-07

    Microalgae-derived oil is considered as a feasible alternative to fossil-derived oil. To produce more algal biomass, both algal population size and oil accumulation in algae must be maximized. Most of the previous studies have concentrated on only one of these issues, and relatively little attention has been devoted to considering the tradeoff between them. In this paper, we first theoretically investigated evolutionary reasons for oil accumulation and then by coupling population and evolutionary dynamics, we searched for conditions that may provide better yields. Using our model, we assume that algae allocate assimilated carbon to growth, maintenance, and carbon accumulation as biofuel and that the amount of essential materials (carbon and nitrate) are strongly linked in fixed proportions. Such stoichiometrically explicit models showed that (i) algae with more oil show slower population growth; therefore, the use of such algae results in lower total yields of biofuel and (ii) oil accumulation in algae is caused by carbon and not nitrate starvation. The latter can be interpreted as a strategy for avoiding the risk of increased death rate by carbon starvation. Our model also showed that both strong carbon starvation and moderately limited nitrate will promote total biofuel production. Our results highlight considering the life-history traits for a higher total yields of biofuel, which leads to insight into both establishing a prolonged culture and collection of desired strains from a natural environment.

  13. Quantitative correlation between proteolysis and macro- and microautophagy in mouse hepatocytes during starvation and refeeding.

    PubMed Central

    Mortimore, G E; Hutson, N J; Surmacz, C A

    1983-01-01

    Cytoplasmic protein in hepatocytes is sequestered and degraded by two general classes of lysosomes, overt autophagic vacuoles (macroautophagy) and dense bodies (microautophagy). Volumes of the apparent space in each class that contain the internalized protein, together with estimates of cytoplasmic protein concentration, were used as a basis for predicting rates of protein degradation by the lysosomal system in livers of fed, 48-hr starved, and starved-refed mice. Assuming that the turnover of all sequestered protein is equal to that previously determined in overt autophagic vacuoles (0.087 min-1), we obtained close agreement between predicted and observed rates in the three conditions studied. The two autophagic components, though, exhibited different patterns of regulation. Microautophagy followed a downward course through starvation and into refeeding, a trend that explained fully the fall in absolute rates of protein degradation during starvation. By contrast, macroautophagy remained constant throughout starvation but was virtually abolished with refeeding. Whereas regulation of the latter can be explained largely by immediate responses to the supply of amino acids, present evidence together with results of others indicate that microsequestration could be linked to functional and quantitative alterations in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Both types of regulation contributed equally to the marked suppression of proteolysis during cytoplasmic regrowth. Images PMID:6340116

  14. Establishment of an effective TLC bioautographic method for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra phosphoglucose isomerase inhibition by phosphoenolpyruvate.

    PubMed

    Paradowska, Katarzyna; Polak, Beata; Chomicki, Adam; Ginalska, Grażyna

    2016-12-01

    A bioautographic assay based on thin layer chromatography was developed for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) detecting as a known but rarely studied inhibitor of phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI). The protocol with NADP(+)/NBT/PMS (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate/nitrotetrazolium blue chloride/phenazine methosulfate) staining was capable of detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra PGI inhibition using PEP. According to this method, visibly brighter spots (zones) against purple background are observed in the area of inhibition of the above-mentioned enzyme activity. The detection limit for PEP as an inhibitor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra PGI was 226 μg per spot/zone. Noteworthy is that we are the first authors to have successfully used a bioautographic assay to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra PGI inhibition by PEP.

  15. Cloning, expression, purification and physical and kinetic characterization of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from orange (Citrus sinensis osbeck var. Valencia) fruit juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Valeria E; Figueroa, Carlos M; Andreo, Carlos S; Iglesias, Alberto A; Podestá, Florencio E

    2010-11-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPCase) from orange fruit juice sacs has been cloned and heterogously expressed in high yield. The purified recombinant enzyme displays properties typical of plant PEPCase, including activation by sugar phosphates and inhibition by malate and citrate. Malate inhibition is weak in the physiological pH range, and the enzyme is also poorly affected by Glu and Asp, known inhibitors of C(3) plants PEPCases. However, it is strongly inhibited by citrate. Orange fruit PEPCase phosphorylation by mammalian protein kinase A decreased inhibition by malate. The enzyme presents an unusual high molecular mass in the absence of PEP, while in its presence it displays a more common tetrameric arrangement. The overall properties of the enzyme suggest that it is suited for organic acid synthesis and NADH reoxidation in the mature fruit. The present study provides the first analysis of a recombinant fruit PEPCase.

  16. The bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozyme from developing castor oil seeds is subject to in vivo regulatory phosphorylation at serine-451.

    PubMed

    Dalziel, Katie J; O'Leary, Brendan; Brikis, Carolyne; Rao, Srinath K; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry; Plaxton, William C

    2012-04-05

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a tightly controlled anaplerotic enzyme situated at a pivotal branch point of plant carbohydrate-metabolism. In developing castor oil seeds (COS) a novel allosterically-densensitized 910-kDa Class-2 PEPC hetero-octameric complex arises from a tight interaction between 107-kDa plant-type PEPC and 118-kDa bacterial-type PEPC (BTPC) subunits. Mass spectrometry and immunoblotting with anti-phosphoSer451 specific antibodies established that COS BTPC is in vivo phosphorylated at Ser451, a highly conserved target residue that occurs within an intrinsically disordered region. This phosphorylation was enhanced during COS development or in response to depodding. Kinetic characterization of a phosphomimetic (S451D) mutant indicated that Ser451 phosphorylation inhibits the catalytic activity of BTPC subunits within the Class-2 PEPC complex.

  17. LEAF TIP NECROSIS1 plays a pivotal role in the regulation of multiple phosphate starvation responses in rice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Zhu, Chenguang; Li, Feng; Tang, Jiuyou; Wang, Yiqin; Lin, Aihong; Liu, Linchuan; Che, Ronghui; Chu, Chengcai

    2011-07-01

    Although phosphate (Pi) starvation signaling is well studied in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), it is still largely unknown in rice (Oryza sativa). In this work, a rice leaf tip necrosis1 (ltn1) mutant was identified and characterized. Map-based cloning identified LTN1 as LOC_Os05g48390, the putative ortholog of Arabidopsis PHO2, which plays important roles in Pi starvation signaling. Analysis of transgenic plants harboring a LTN1 promoter::β-glucuronidase construct revealed that LTN1 was preferentially expressed in vascular tissues. The ltn1 mutant exhibited increased Pi uptake and translocation, which led to Pi overaccumulation in shoots. In association with enhanced Pi uptake and transport, some Pi transporters were up-regulated in the ltn1 mutant in the presence of sufficient Pi. Furthermore, the elongation of primary and adventitious roots was enhanced in the ltn1 mutant under Pi starvation, suggesting that LTN1 is involved in Pi-dependent root architecture alteration. Under Pi-sufficient conditions, typical Pi starvation responses such as stimulation of phosphatase and RNase activities, lipid composition alteration, nitrogen assimilation repression, and increased metal uptake were also activated in ltn1. Moreover, analysis of OsmiR399-overexpressing plants showed that LTN1 was down-regulated by OsmiR399. Our results strongly indicate that LTN1 is a crucial Pi starvation signaling component downstream of miR399 involved in the regulation of multiple Pi starvation responses in rice.

  18. Effects of starvation on intermolt development in Calanus finmarchicus copepodites: a comparison between theoretical models and field studies1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Jennifer A.; Miller, Charles B.

    Campbell et al . (Deep Sea Research II, 48 (2001) 531) have shown that there was a localized starvation event affecting Calanus finmarchicus on the southern flank of Georges Bank in April 1997. Growth and molting rates of this dominant copepod were reduced. We have used the morphology of tooth development in field-collected samples to show that this starvation affected animals living continuously in the field, as well as those in Campbell et al .'s experimental tanks. Assuming a point of reserve saturation (PRS) response of Calanus to food limitation, and correspondence between PRS and advance from the postmolt jaw facies, the proportion of individuals with postmolt jaws should increase in all copepodite stages under starvation. Individuals that have developed past PRS should molt to the next stage, acquiring postmolt facies. Thus, the fraction of postmolt jaws should increase, while the fraction of jaws in later phases should decrease. This was observed for a drifter-marked station over five days. Numerical simulations of jaw phase distributions expected under full nutrition, and both total and patchy starvation were generated from individual-based models of development. Proportions of copepodites in postmolt phase do not increase with full nutrition. A simulation of a t