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Sample records for phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase genes

  1. Cloning of cellobiose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase genes: Functional expression in recombinant Escherichia coli and identification of a putative binding region for disaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Xiaokuang; Davis, F.C.; Ingram, L.O.; Hespell, R.B.

    1997-02-01

    Genomic libraries from nine cellobiose-metabolizing bacteria were screened for cellobiose utilization. Positive clones were recovered from six libraries, all of which encode phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins. Clones from Bacillus subtilis, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and Klebsiella oxytoca allowed the growth of recombinant Escherichia coli in cellobiose-M9 minimal medium. The K. oxytoca clone, pLOI1906, exhibited an unusually broad substrate range (cellobiose, arbutin, salicin, and methylumbelliferyl derivatives of glucose, cellobiose, mannose, and xylose) and was sequenced. The insert in this plasmid encoded the carboxy-terminal region of a putative regulatory protein, cellobiose permease (single polypeptide), and phospho-{beta}-glucosidase, which appear to form an operon (casRAB). Subclones allowed both casA and casB to be expressed independently, as evidenced by in vitro complementation. An analysis of the translated sequences from the EIIC domains of cellobiose, aryl-{beta}-glucoside, and other disaccharide permeases allowed the identification of a 50-amino-acid conserved region. A disaccharide consensus sequence is proposed for the most conserved segment (13 amino acids), which may represent part of the EIIC active site for binding and phosphorylation. 63 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Cloning of cellobiose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase genes: functional expression in recombinant Escherichia coli and identification of a putative binding region for disaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, X; Davis, F C; Hespell, R B; Ingram, L O

    1997-01-01

    Genomic libraries from nine cellobiose-metabolizing bacteria were screened for cellobiose utilization. Positive clones were recovered from six libraries, all of which encode phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins. Clones from Bacillus subtilis, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and Klebsiella oxytoca allowed the growth of recombinant Escherichia coli in cellobiose-M9 minimal medium. The K. oxytoca clone, pLOI1906, exhibited an unusually broad substrate range (cellobiose, arbutin, salicin, and methylumbelliferyl derivatives of glucose, cellobiose, mannose, and xylose) and was sequenced. The insert in this plasmid encoded the carboxy-terminal region of a putative regulatory protein, cellobiose permease (single polypeptide), and phospho-beta-glucosidase, which appear to form an operon (casRAB). Subclones allowed both casA and casB to be expressed independently, as evidenced by in vitro complementation. An analysis of the translated sequences from the EIIC domains of cellobiose, aryl-beta-glucoside, and other disaccharide permeases allowed the identification of a 50-amino-acid conserved region. A disaccharide consensus sequence is proposed for the most conserved segment (13 amino acids), which may represent part of the EIIC active site for binding and phosphorylation. PMID:9023916

  3. Control of phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase-mediated sugar transport in Escherichia coli by energization of the cell membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Reider, E; Wagner, E F; Schweiger, M

    1979-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase-mediated sugar transport in Escherichia coli is inhibited by the energized of the membrane. This was shown in intact cells as well as in membrane vesicles. Relaxation of the proton gradient by uncouplers stimulated the uptake of sugars via the phosphotransferase system in aerobically cultured cells. No such effect was seen in anaerobic cells, apparently because the cell membrane of these cells is poorly energized. Energization by respiration of D-lactate or ascorbate inhibited the phosphotransferase uptake system in membrane vesicles. This inhibition was reversed by the addition of cyanide. Oxamate, a specific inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase, prevented the inhibitory effect of D-lactate. Membrane vesicles prepared from a cytochrome-less mutant were not energized by D-lactate oxidation and the phosphotransferase uptake system was not inhibited. PMID:392504

  4. Evidence for a Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Sugar Phosphotransferase in Mycoplasma Strain Y

    PubMed Central

    Van Demark, P. J.; Plackett, P.

    1972-01-01

    The uptake of 14C-α-methyl-d-glucoside (αMG) by washed cells of Mycoplasma strain Y was found to be dependent on the supply of metabolic energy. Glycerol or d-mannose, but not l-lactate, would serve as an energy source. Uptake was inhibited by fluoride, iodoacetate, and arsenate, but not by 2,4-dinitrophenol. d-Glucose was inhibitory, presumably by competing for the transport system. The initial product of accumulation had the properties of a phosphate ester of αMG. The proportion of free αMG in the cells increased with time, until a steady state was reached in which uptake was balanced by the efflux of free αMG from the cells. Broken-cell preparations catalyzed a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphorylation of αMG and of d-glucose. PMID:5053467

  5. Regulated high-level expression of the mannitol permease of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    van Weeghel, R P; Keck, W; Robillard, G T

    1990-01-01

    The structural gene (mtlA) of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannitol-transport protein (EIImtl) and its upstream promoter region (Pmtl) were subcloned approximately 150 base pairs downstream of a lambda PR promoter on a multicopy mutagenesis/expression vector and used to transform a mutant (MtlA-) E. coli strain. Induction at 42 degrees C led to 50 to 100-fold overproduction of EIImtl (5-10 mg/g of cell wet weight) relative to mannitol-induced levels in a wild-type (Mtl+) strain. Most of the overproduced protein was sequestered as an inactive form in inclusion bodies and cytoplasmic membranous structures. The protein could be extracted in an active form by rupturing the cells with lysozyme and sonication or with a passage through a French pressure cell and incubating the inclusion bodies and membranous structures with detergent (Lubrol PX or deoxycholate) in the presence of Q or S Sepharose ion-exchange resin for several hours. This procedure resulted in a 20- to 25-fold overproduction of active EIImtl compared with mannitol-induced wild-type levels. Images PMID:2181442

  6. Cloning and Molecular Analysis of a Mannitol Operon of Phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent Phosphotransferase (PTS) type From Vibrio cholerae O395

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Smith, Kenneth P.; Floyd, Jody L.; Varela, Manuel F.

    2010-01-01

    A putative mannitol operon of the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase (PTS) type was cloned from Vibrio cholerae O395 and its activity studied in Escherichia coli. The 3.9 kb operon comprising of three genes is organized as mtlADR. Based on the sequence analysis, these were identified as genes encoding a putative mannitol-specific enzyme IICBA (EIIMtl) component (MtlA), a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (MtlD) and a mannitol operon repressor (MtlR). The transport of [3H]mannitol by the cloned mannitol operon in E. coli was 13.8±1.4 nmol/min/mg protein. The insertional inactivation of EIIMtl abolished mannitol and sorbitol transport in V. cholerae O395. Comparison of the mannitol utilization apparatus of V. cholerae with those of Gram-negative and Gram positive bacteria suggests highly conserved nature of the system. MtlA and MtlD exhibit 75% similarity with corresponding sequences of E. coli mannitol operon genes, while MtlR has 63% similarity with MtlR of E. coli. The cloning of V. cholerae mannitol utilization system in an E. coli background will help in elucidating the functional properties of this operon. PMID:21184218

  7. Identification of an anaerobically induced phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent fructose-specific phosphotransferase system and evidence for the Embden-Meyerhof glycolytic pathway in the heterofermentative bacterium Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed Central

    Saier, M H; Ye, J J; Klinke, S; Nino, E

    1996-01-01

    Heterofermentative gram-positive bacteria are believed to metabolize sugars exclusively via the pentose phosphoketolase pathway following uptake via sugar:cation symport. Here we show that anaerobic growth of one such bacterium, Lactobacillus brevis, in the presence of fructose induces the synthesis of a phosphotransferase system and glycolytic enzymes that allow fructose to be metabolized via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. PMID:8550437

  8. Xanthone derivatives could be potential antibiotics: virtual screening for the inhibitors of enzyme I of bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Jien; Lin, Shih-Hung; Lin, Meei-Ru; Ku, Hao; Szkaradek, Natalia; Marona, Henryk; Hsu, Alvin; Shiuan, David

    2013-08-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is ubiquitous in eubacteria and absent from eukaryotes. The system consists of two phosphoryl carriers, enzyme I (EI) and the histidine-containing phosphoryl carrier protein (HPr), and several PTS transporters, catalyzing the concomitant uptake and phosphorylation of several carbohydrates. Since a deficiency of EI in bacterial mutants lead to severe growth defects, EI could be a drug target to develop antimicrobial agents. We used the 3D structure PDB 1ZYM of Escherichia coli EI as the target to virtually screen the potential tight binders from NPPEDIA (Natural Product Encyclopedia), ZINC and Super Natural databases. These databases were screened using the docking tools of Discovery Studio 2.0 and the Integrated Drug Design System IDDS. Among the many interesting hits, xanthone derivatives with reasonably high Dock scores received more attentions. Two of the xanthone derivatives were obtained to examine their capabilities to inhibit cell growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. The results indicate that they may exert the inhibition effects by blocking the EI activities. We have demonstrated for the first time that the xanthone derivatives have high potential to be developed as future antibiotics.

  9. Stimulation of dihydroxyacetone and glycerol kinase activity in Streptococcus faecalis by phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphorylation catalyzed by enzyme I and HPr of the phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Deutscher, J; Sauerwald, H

    1986-06-01

    Recently we reported the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent phosphorylation of a 55-kilodalton protein of Streptococcus faecalis catalyzed by enzyme I and histidine-containing protein (HPr) of the phosphotransferase system (J. Deutscher, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 29:237-243, 1985). The purified 55-kilodalton protein was found to exhibit dihydroxyacetone kinase activity. Glycerol was six times more slowly phosphorylated than dihydroxyacetone. The Kms were found to be 0.7 mM for ATP, 0.45 mM for dihydroxyacetone, and 0.9 mM for glycerol. PEP-dependent phosphorylation of dihydroxyacetone kinase stimulated phosphorylation of both substrates about 10-fold. Fructose 1,6-diphosphate at concentrations higher than 2 mM inhibited the activity of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated dihydroxyacetone kinase in a noncompetitive manner. The rate of PEP-dependent phosphorylation of dihydroxyacetone kinase was about 200-fold slower than the phosphorylation rate of III proteins (also called enzyme III or factor III), which so far have been considered the only phosphoryl acceptors of histidyl-phosphorylated HPr. P-Dihydroxyacetone kinase was found to be able to transfer its phosphoryl group in a backward reaction to HPr. Following [32P]PEP-dependent phosphorylation and tryptic digestion of dihydroxyacetone kinase, we isolated a labeled peptide composed of 37 amino acids, as determined by amino acid analysis. The single histidyl residue of this peptide most likely carries the phosphoryl group in phosphorylated dihydroxyacetone kinase.

  10. Staphylococcal phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system: purification and characterization of the mannitol-specific enzyme III/sup mtl/ of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus carnosus and homology with the enzyme II/sup mtl/ of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Reiche, B.; Frank, R.; Deutscher, J.; Meyer, N.; Hengstenberg, W.

    1988-08-23

    Enzyme III/sup mtl/ is part of the mannitol phosphotransferase system of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus carnosus and is phosphorylated by phosphoenolpyruvate in a reaction sequence requiring enzyme I (phosphoenolpyruvate-protein phosphotransferase) and the histidine-containing protein HPr. In this paper, the authors report the isolation of III/sup mtl/ from both S. aureus and S. carnosus and the characterization of the active center. After phosphorylation of III/sup mtl/ with (/sup 32/P)PEP, enzyme I, and HPr, the phosphorylated protein was cleaved with endoproteinase GLu(C). The amino acid sequence of the S. aureus peptide carrying the phosphoryl group was found to be Gln-Val-Val-Ser-Thr-Phe-Met-Gly-Asn-Gly-Leu-Ala-Ile-Pro-His-Gly-Thr-Asp-Asp. The corresponding peptide from S. carnosus shows an equal sequence except that the first residue is Ala instead of Gln. These peptides both contain a single histidyl residue which they assume to carry the phosphoryl group. All proteins of the PTS so far investigated indeed carry the phosphoryl group attached to a histidyl residue. According to sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, the molecular weight of the III/sup mtl/ proteins was found to be 15,000. They have also determined the N-terminal sequence of both proteins. Comparison of the III/sup mtl/ peptide sequences and the C-terminal part of the enzyme II/sup mtl/ of Escherichia coli reveals considerable sequence homology, which supports the suggestion that II/sup mtl/ of E. coli is a fusion protein of a soluble III protein with a membrane-bound enzyme II.

  11. Isolation and mapping of phosphotransferase mutants in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Epstein, W; Jewett, S; Fox, C F

    1970-11-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 defective in enzyme I or Hpr, the two common components of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system, were isolated by a simple, direct method. The ptsI locus, the structural gene for enzyme I, and the ptsH locus, the site of mutations leading to loss of Hpr activity, are adjacent genes and could be part of a single operon. These two genes lie between the purC and supN markers in the order: strA... guaB-purC-ptsI-ptsH-supN-dsdA... his.

  12. Isolation and Mapping of Phosphotransferase Mutants in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Wolfgang; Jewett, Susan; Fox, C. Fred

    1970-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 defective in enzyme I or Hpr, the two common components of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system, were isolated by a simple, direct method. The ptsI locus, the structural gene for enzyme I, and the ptsH locus, the site of mutations leading to loss of Hpr activity, are adjacent genes and could be part of a single operon. These two genes lie between the purC and supN markers in the order: strA... guaB-purC-ptsI-ptsH-supN-dsdA... his. PMID:4923073

  13. Isolation of a gene encoding a novel spectinomycin phosphotransferase from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Suter, T M; Viswanathan, V K; Cianciotto, N P

    1997-01-01

    A gene capable of conferring spectinomycin resistance was isolated from Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease. The gene (aph) encoded a 36-kDa protein which has similarity to aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. Biochemical analysis confirmed that aph encodes a phosphotransferase which modifies spectinomycin but not hygromycin, kanamycin, or streptomycin. The strain that was the source of aph demonstrated resistance to spectinomycin, and Southern hybridizations determined that aph also exists in other legionellae. PMID:9174205

  14. Expression of the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene confers tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Peñaloza-Vázquez, A; Oropeza, A; Mena, G L; Bailey, A M

    1995-05-01

    Escherichia coli cells and tobacco (cv. Xanthi) plants transformed with the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene were able to grow in culture medium containing glyphosate at 2.0 mM. The growth of tobacco calli in media containing increasing glyphosate concentrations was measured. The ID50 for glyphosate was 1.70±0.03 mM for hygromycin-B resistant plants, and 0.45±0.02 mM for control plants. Regenerated plants and progeny selected for resistance to hygromycin B were tested for glyphosate tolerance by spraying them with Faena herbicide (formulated glyphosate with surfactant) at a dose equal to 0.24 kg/ha. This was two times the dose required to kill 100 percent of the control plants. Phosphotransferase activity was measured in the extracts of the transformed leaves by the incorporation of (32)P from [γ(-32)P]ATP and it was observed that hygromycin B phosphotransferase was able to recognize the molecule of glyphosate as substrate.

  15. Novel phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent futile cycle in Streptococcus lactis: 2-deoxy-D-glucose uncouples energy production from growth.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J; Chassy, B M

    1982-01-01

    The addition of 2-deoxy-D-glucose to cultures of Streptococcus lactis 133 that were growing exponentially on sucrose or lactose reduced the growth rate by ca. 95%. Inhibition did not occur with glucose or mannose as the growth sugar. The reduction in growth rate was concomitant with rapid accumulation of the analog in phosphorylated form (2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate) via the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose:phosphotransferase system. Within 5 min the intracellular 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate concentration reached a steady-state level of greater than 100 mM. After maximum accumulation of the sugar phosphate, the rate of sucrose metabolism (glycolysis) decreased by only 30%, but the cells were depleted of fructose-1,6-diphosphate. The addition of glucose to 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate preloaded cells caused expulsion of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and a resumption of normal growth. S. lactis 133 contained an intracellular Mg2+-dependent, fluoride-sensitive phosphatase which hydrolyzed 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate (and glucose 6-phosphate) to free sugar and inorganic phosphate. Because of continued dephosphorylation and efflux of the non-metabolizable analog, the maintenance of the intracellular 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate pool during growth stasis was dependent upon continued glycolysis. This steady-state condition represented a dynamic equilibrium of: (i) phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent accumulation of 2-deoxy-D-glucose 6-phosphate, (ii) intracellular dephosphorylation, and (iii) efflux of free 2-deoxy-D-glucose. This sequence of events constitutes a futile cycle which promotes the dissipation of phosphoenolpyruvate. We conclude that 2-deoxy-D-glucose functions as an uncoupler by dissociating energy production from growth in S. lactis 133. Images PMID:6286601

  16. Synthetic neomycin-kanamycin phosphotransferase, type II coding sequence for gene targeting in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seung-Gi; Mann, Jeffrey R

    2005-07-01

    The bacterial neomycin-kanamycin phosphotransferase, type II enzyme is encoded by the neo gene and confers resistance to aminoglycoside drugs such as neomycin and kanamycin-bacterial selection and G418-eukaryotic cell selection. Although widely used in gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells, the neo coding sequence contains numerous cryptic splice sites and has a high CpG content. At least the former can cause unwanted effects in cis at the targeted locus. We describe a synthetic sequence, sneo, which encodes the same protein as that encoded by neo. This synthetic sequence has no predicted splice sites in either strand, low CpG content, and increased mammalian codon usage. In mouse embryonic stem cells sneo expressability is similar to neo. The use of sneo in gene targeting experiments should substantially reduce the probability of unwanted effects in cis due to splicing, and perhaps CpG methylation, within the coding sequence of the selectable marker.

  17. Genome-wide analysis suggests divergent evolution of lipid phosphotases/phosphotransferase genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Zhenxi; Kasimu, Rena; Chen, Yinhua; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Gai, Jiangtao

    2016-08-01

    Genes of the LPPT (lipid phosphatase/phosphotransferase) family play important roles in lipid phosphorous transfer and triacylglycerol accumulation in plants. To provide overviews of the plant LPPT family and their overall relationships, here we carried out genome-wide identifications and analyses of plant LPPT family members. A total of 643 putative LPPT genes were identified from 48 sequenced plant genomes, among which 205 genes from 14 plants were chosen for further analyses. Plant LPPT genes belonged to three distinctive groups, namely the LPT (lipid phosphotransfease), LPP (lipid phosphatase), and pLPP (plastidic lipid phosphotransfease) groups. Genes of the LPT group could be further partitioned into three groups, two of which were only identified in terrestrial plants. Genes in the LPP and pLPP groups experienced duplications in early stages of plant evolution. Among 17 Zea mays LPPT genes, divergence of temporal-spatial expression patterns was revealed based on microarray data analysis. Peptide sequences of plant LPPT genes harbored different conserved motifs. A test of Branch Model versus One-ratio Model did not support significant selective pressures acting on different groups of LPPT genes, although quite different nonsynonymous evolutionary rates and selective pressures were observed. The complete picture of the plant LPPT family provided here should facilitate further investigations of plant LPPT genes and offer a better understanding of lipid biosynthesis in plants.

  18. Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Components Modulate Gene Transcription and Virulence of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Khajanchi, Bijay K; Odeh, Evelyn; Gao, Lihui; Jacobs, Mary B; Philipp, Mario T; Lin, Tao; Norris, Steven J

    2015-12-28

    The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) and adenylate cyclase (AC) IV (encoded by BB0723 [cyaB]) are well conserved in different species of Borrelia. However, the functional roles of PEP-PTS and AC in the infectious cycle of Borrelia have not been characterized previously. We examined 12 PEP-PTS transporter component mutants by needle inoculation of mice to assess their ability to cause mouse infection. Transposon mutants with mutations in the EIIBC components (ptsG) (BB0645, thought to be involved in glucose-specific transport) were unable to cause infection in mice, while all other tested PEP-PTS mutants retained infectivity. Infectivity was partially restored in an in trans-complemented strain of the ptsG mutant. While the ptsG mutant survived normally in unfed as well as fed ticks, it was unable to cause infection in mice by tick transmission, suggesting that the function of ptsG is essential to establish infection by either needle inoculation or tick transmission. In Gram-negative organisms, the regulatory effects of the PEP-PTS are mediated by adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. A recombinant protein encoded by B. burgdorferi BB0723 (a putative cyaB homolog) was shown to have adenylate cyclase activity in vitro; however, mutants with mutations in this gene were fully infectious in the tick-mouse infection cycle, indicating that its function is not required in this process. By transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that the ptsG gene may directly or indirectly modulate gene expression of Borrelia burgdorferi. Overall, the PEP-PTS glucose transporter PtsG appears to play important roles in the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi that extend beyond its transport functions.

  19. Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Components Modulate Gene Transcription and Virulence of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Odeh, Evelyn; Gao, Lihui; Jacobs, Mary B.; Philipp, Mario T.; Lin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) and adenylate cyclase (AC) IV (encoded by BB0723 [cyaB]) are well conserved in different species of Borrelia. However, the functional roles of PEP-PTS and AC in the infectious cycle of Borrelia have not been characterized previously. We examined 12 PEP-PTS transporter component mutants by needle inoculation of mice to assess their ability to cause mouse infection. Transposon mutants with mutations in the EIIBC components (ptsG) (BB0645, thought to be involved in glucose-specific transport) were unable to cause infection in mice, while all other tested PEP-PTS mutants retained infectivity. Infectivity was partially restored in an in trans-complemented strain of the ptsG mutant. While the ptsG mutant survived normally in unfed as well as fed ticks, it was unable to cause infection in mice by tick transmission, suggesting that the function of ptsG is essential to establish infection by either needle inoculation or tick transmission. In Gram-negative organisms, the regulatory effects of the PEP-PTS are mediated by adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. A recombinant protein encoded by B. burgdorferi BB0723 (a putative cyaB homolog) was shown to have adenylate cyclase activity in vitro; however, mutants with mutations in this gene were fully infectious in the tick-mouse infection cycle, indicating that its function is not required in this process. By transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that the ptsG gene may directly or indirectly modulate gene expression of Borrelia burgdorferi. Overall, the PEP-PTS glucose transporter PtsG appears to play important roles in the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi that extend beyond its transport functions. PMID:26712207

  20. Phosphotransferase activity in Clostridium acetobutylicum from acidogenic and solventogenic phases of growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.W.; Kashket, E.R.

    1986-05-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum cells, when energized with fructose, transported and phosphorylated the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose by a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase (PT) system. Butanol up to 2% did not inhibit PT activity, although its chaotropic effect on the cell membrane caused cellular phosphoenolpyruvate and the 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate to leak out. Cells harvested from the solventogenic phase of batch growth had a significantly lower PT activity than did cells from the acidogenic phase.

  1. Distribution and Functions of Phosphotransferase System Genes in the Genome of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Oenococcus oeni

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Zohra; Miot-Sertier, Cécile; Thibau, François; Dutilh, Lucie; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline; Ballestra, Patricia; Le Marrec, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni, the lactic acid bacterium primarily responsible for malolactic fermentation in wine, is able to grow on a large variety of carbohydrates, but the pathways by which substrates are transported and phosphorylated in this species have been poorly studied. We show that the genes encoding the general phosphotransferase proteins, enzyme I (EI) and histidine protein (HPr), as well as 21 permease genes (3 isolated ones and 18 clustered into 6 distinct loci), are highly conserved among the strains studied and may form part of the O. oeni core genome. Additional permease genes differentiate the strains and may have been acquired or lost by horizontal gene transfer events. The core pts genes are expressed, and permease gene expression is modulated by the nature of the bacterial growth substrate. Decryptified O. oeni cells are able to phosphorylate glucose, cellobiose, trehalose, and mannose at the expense of phosphoenolpyruvate. These substrates are present at low concentrations in wine at the end of alcoholic fermentation. The phosphotransferase system (PTS) may contribute to the perfect adaptation of O. oeni to its singular ecological niche. PMID:23524676

  2. Characterization of suppressible mutations in the viomycin phosphotransferase gene of the Streptomyces enteric plasmid pVE138.

    PubMed Central

    Paradiso, M J; Roberts, G; Streicher, S L; Goldberg, R B

    1987-01-01

    The viomycin phosphotransferase gene (vph) is expressed and confers resistance to viomycin in both Streptomyces spp. and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. We report the isolation of UGA (opal) and UAG (amber) mutations in the vph gene of shuttle plasmid pVE138. We found that the five UGA mutations in vph resulted in a temperature-sensitive phenotype in Salmonella typhimurium. Su- strains are Vior at 28 degrees C and Vios at 37 degrees C, whereas Su+UGA strains are Vior at both 28 and 37 degrees C. The single amber mutation isolated was not temperature sensitive and resulted in the expected Vios phenotype in Su- strains and Vior in Su+UAG strains. PMID:3029035

  3. A Genome-Wide Screen Reveals that the Vibrio cholerae Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Yves A.; Chao, Michael C.; Sasabe, Jumpei; Davis, Brigid M.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli and a complex network of regulatory factors are known to modulate expression of Vibrio cholerae's principal virulence factors. However, there is relatively little known about how metabolic factors impinge upon the pathogen's well-characterized cascade of transcription factors that induce expression of cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). Here, we used a transposon insertion site (TIS) sequencing-based strategy to identify new factors required for expression of tcpA, which encodes the major subunit of TCP, the organism's chief intestinal colonization factor. Besides identifying most of the genes known to modulate tcpA expression, the screen yielded ptsI and ptsH, which encode the enzyme I (EI) and Hpr components of the V. cholerae phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS). In addition to reduced expression of TcpA, strains lacking EI, Hpr, or the associated EIIAGlc protein produced less cholera toxin (CT) and had a diminished capacity to colonize the infant mouse intestine. The PTS modulates virulence gene expression by regulating expression of tcpPH and aphAB, which themselves control expression of toxT, the central activator of virulence gene expression. One mechanism by which PTS promotes virulence gene expression appears to be by modulating the amounts of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our findings reveal that the V. cholerae PTS is an additional modulator of the ToxT regulon and demonstrate the potency of loss-of-function TIS sequencing screens for defining regulatory networks. PMID:26056384

  4. Large number of phosphotransferase genes in the Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 genome and the study on their evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium beijerinckii is a valuable bacteria species which has the ability of ABE (acetone, butanol and ethanol) production. It has been shown that Phosphotransferase (PTS) is an important and common system for both carbohydrate uptake and phosphorylation in bacteria, but detailed study of the system, especially its fructose/mannose/sorbose family is scant. Results In the genome of Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052, a model strain recently sequenced, there are large number of PTS genes, among them 9 complete sets belong to the fructose/mannose/sorbose family of its enzyme II complex. Our study, based on evidences provided by phylogenetic relationship, analyses of gene contents and clusters, as well as synteny examination, indicates that it is possible to further classify this PTS family into three sub-groups, which are corresponding to the three sugar substrates. Furthermore, we proposed a model how these PTS systems are evolved in bacteria. Conclusion This work may explain the experimental result that Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 can better utilize fructose as substrate, thus could lead to a better understanding of the ABE-producing mechanism in Clostridium beijerinckii and other microbial species. It may help to illustrate a higher butanol-productivity future. PMID:21172059

  5. Gene Expression and Activity Profiling Reveal a Significant Contribution of Exo-Phosphotransferases to the Extracellular Nucleotides Metabolism in HUVEC Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wujak, Magdalena; Hetmann, Anna; Porowińska, Dorota; Roszek, Katarzyna

    2016-11-11

    Purinergic signaling maintains local tissue homeostasis in blood vessels via the regulation of vascular tone, blood platelet aggregation, cell proliferation, and differentiation as well as inflammatory responses. Extracellular purines are important signaling molecules in the vasculature, and both purine-hydrolysing as well as -phosphorylating enzymes are considered to selectively govern extracellular nucleotide/nucleoside metabolism. Recent studies have provided some evidence for the existence of these enzymes in a soluble form in human blood and their secretion into the extracellular space under physiological and pathological conditions. However, the comprehensive analysis of endothelium-derived enzymes involved in purine metabolic pathways has received no attention so far. In the presented study, in vitro cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) are shown to be an abundant source of exo-nucleotidases comprising 5'-nucleotidase (exo-5'-NT), and nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (exo-NTPDase) as well as phosphotransferases, represented by nucleoside diphosphate kinase (exo-NDPK) and adenylate kinase (exo-AK). An attempt is also made to demonstrate that, in contrast to the metabolic pattern determined on the endothelial cell surface, exo-phosphorylating activities markedly predominate over exo-hydrolytic ones. We present for the first time the expression profiles of genes encoding isoenzymes belonging to distinct nucleotide kinase and nucleotidase families. The genes encoding NDPK1, NDPK2, AK1, and AK2 phosphotransferases have been shown to be expressed at the highest level in HUVEC cells. The data indicate the coexistence of secreted and cell-associated factors of endothelial origin mediating ATP-consuming and ATP-generating pathways with the predominance of exo-phosphotransferases activity. The described enzymes contribute to the regulation of purinergic signal duration and extent in the venous vasculature. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1

  6. Construction of an Escherichia-Pseudomonas shuttle vector containing an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene and a lacZ'' Gene for alpha-complementation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bheong-Uk; Hong, Ja-Heon; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel; Oh, Kye-Heon

    2006-12-01

    A new 4.87 kb Escherichia-Pseudomonas shuttle vector has been constructed by inserting a 1.27 kb DNA fragment with a replication origin of a Pseudomonas plasmid pRO1614 into the 3.6 kb E. coli plasmid pBGS18. This vector, designated pJH1, contains an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene (aph) from Tn903, a lacZ'' gene for alpha-complementation and a versatile multiple cloning site possessing unique restriction sites for EcoRI, SacI, KpnI, SmaI, BamHI, XbaI, SalI, BspMI, PstI, SphI, and HindIII. When pJH1 was transformed into E. coli DH5alpha and into P. putida HK-6, it was episomally and stably maintained in both strains. In addition, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene which was transcriptionally cloned into pJH1 rendered E. coli cells fluorescence when its transformants were illuminated at 488 nm.

  7. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene specifying the bifunctional 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase 2"-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase enzyme in Streptococcus faecalis and identification and cloning of gene regions specifying the two activities.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, J J; Gilmore, K S; Courvalin, P

    1986-08-01

    The gene specifying the bifunctional 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase [AAC(6')] 2"-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase [APH(2")] enzyme from the Streptococcus faecalis plasmid pIP800 was cloned in Escherichia coli. A single protein with an apparent molecular weight of 56,000 was specified by this cloned determinant as detected in minicell experiments. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the presence of an open reading frame capable of specifying a protein of 479 amino acids and with a molecular weight of 56,850. The deduced amino acid sequence of the bifunctional AAC(6')-APH(2") gene product possessed two regions of homology with other sequenced resistance proteins. The N-terminal region contained a sequence that was homologous to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase of Bacillus pumilus, and the C-terminal region contained a sequence homologous to the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase of Streptomyces fradiae. Subcloning experiments were performed with the AAC(6')-APH(2") resistance determinant, and it was possible to obtain gene segments independently specifying the acetyltransferase and phosphotransferase activities. These data suggest that the gene specifying the AAC(6')-APH(2") resistance enzyme arose as a result of a gene fusion.

  8. Characterization of the Interaction Between the Small Regulatory Peptide SgrT and the EIICBGlc of the Glucose-Phosphotransferase System of E. coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Kosfeld, Anne; Jahreis, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a widely used microorganism in biotechnological processes. An obvious goal for current scientific and technical research in this field is the search for new tools to optimize productivity. Usually glucose is the preferred carbon source in biotechnological applications. In E. coli, glucose is taken up by the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent glucose phosphotransferase system (PTS). The regulation of the ptsG gene for the glucose transporter is very complex and involves several regulatory proteins. Recently, a novel posttranscriptional regulation system has been identified which consists of a small regulatory RNA SgrS and a small regulatory polypeptide called SgrT. During the accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate or fructose-6-phosphate, SgrS is involved in downregulation of ptsG mRNA stability, whereas SgrT inhibits glucose transport activity by a yet unknown mechanism. The function of SgrS has been studied intensively. In contrast, the knowledge about the function of SgrT is still limited. Therefore, in this paper, we focused our interest on the regulation of glucose transport activity by SgrT. We identified the SgrT target sequence within the glucose transporter and characterized the interaction in great detail. Finally, we suggest a novel experimental approach to regulate artificially carbohydrate uptake in E. coli to minimize metabolic overflow in biotechnological applications. PMID:24957761

  9. Novel listerial glycerol dehydrogenase- and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent dihydroxyacetone kinase system connected to the pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Monniot, Céline; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Deutscher, Josef; Milohanic, Eliane

    2012-09-01

    Several bacteria use glycerol dehydrogenase to transform glycerol into dihydroxyacetone (Dha). Dha is subsequently converted into Dha phosphate (Dha-P) by an ATP- or phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent Dha kinase. Listeria innocua possesses two potential PEP-dependent Dha kinases. One is encoded by 3 of the 11 genes forming the glycerol (gol) operon. This operon also contains golD (lin0362), which codes for a new type of Dha-forming NAD(+)-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase. The subsequent metabolism of Dha requires its phosphorylation via the PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system components enzyme I, HPr, and EIIA(Dha)-2 (Lin0369). P∼EIIA(Dha)-2 transfers its phosphoryl group to DhaL-2, which phosphorylates Dha bound to DhaK-2. The resulting Dha-P is probably metabolized mainly via the pentose phosphate pathway, because two genes of the gol operon encode proteins resembling transketolases and transaldolases. In addition, purified Lin0363 and Lin0364 exhibit ribose-5-P isomerase (RipB) and triosephosphate isomerase activities, respectively. The latter enzyme converts part of the Dha-P into glyceraldehyde-3-P, which, together with Dha-P, is metabolized via gluconeogenesis to form fructose-6-P. Together with another glyceraldehyde-3-P molecule, the transketolase transforms fructose-6-P into intermediates of the pentose phosphate pathway. The gol operon is preceded by golR, transcribed in the opposite orientation and encoding a DeoR-type repressor. Its inactivation causes the constitutive but glucose-repressible expression of the entire gol operon, including the last gene, encoding a pediocin immunity-like (PedB-like) protein. Its elevated level of synthesis in the golR mutant causes slightly increased immunity against pediocin PA-1 compared to the wild-type strain or a pedB-like deletion mutant.

  10. Novel Listerial Glycerol Dehydrogenase- and Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Dihydroxyacetone Kinase System Connected to the Pentose Phosphate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Monniot, Céline; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Milohanic, Eliane

    2012-01-01

    Several bacteria use glycerol dehydrogenase to transform glycerol into dihydroxyacetone (Dha). Dha is subsequently converted into Dha phosphate (Dha-P) by an ATP- or phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent Dha kinase. Listeria innocua possesses two potential PEP-dependent Dha kinases. One is encoded by 3 of the 11 genes forming the glycerol (gol) operon. This operon also contains golD (lin0362), which codes for a new type of Dha-forming NAD+-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase. The subsequent metabolism of Dha requires its phosphorylation via the PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system components enzyme I, HPr, and EIIADha-2 (Lin0369). P∼EIIADha-2 transfers its phosphoryl group to DhaL-2, which phosphorylates Dha bound to DhaK-2. The resulting Dha-P is probably metabolized mainly via the pentose phosphate pathway, because two genes of the gol operon encode proteins resembling transketolases and transaldolases. In addition, purified Lin0363 and Lin0364 exhibit ribose-5-P isomerase (RipB) and triosephosphate isomerase activities, respectively. The latter enzyme converts part of the Dha-P into glyceraldehyde-3-P, which, together with Dha-P, is metabolized via gluconeogenesis to form fructose-6-P. Together with another glyceraldehyde-3-P molecule, the transketolase transforms fructose-6-P into intermediates of the pentose phosphate pathway. The gol operon is preceded by golR, transcribed in the opposite orientation and encoding a DeoR-type repressor. Its inactivation causes the constitutive but glucose-repressible expression of the entire gol operon, including the last gene, encoding a pediocin immunity-like (PedB-like) protein. Its elevated level of synthesis in the golR mutant causes slightly increased immunity against pediocin PA-1 compared to the wild-type strain or a pedB-like deletion mutant. PMID:22773791

  11. Construction and uses of a new transposable element whose insertion is able to produce gene fusions with the neomycin-phosphotransferase-coding region of Tn903.

    PubMed

    Ratet, P; Richaud, F

    1986-01-01

    We describe the construction of a transposable element derived from the Mu phage that upon insertion is able to create a gene fusion between the region of Tn903 coding for neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT I), which confers resistance to aminoglycosides including kanamycin (KmR), neomycin and G418, and the control elements of the gene where the insertion occurs. A chloramphenicol (Cm) transacetylase gene (cat) that confers resistance to Cm is present in the transposon so that transposition events can be monitored even when no active fusions with the nptI coding region occur. The transposase gene is deleted and, therefore, this transposon is perfectly stable upon insertion. The properties of this new transposable element were studied by obtaining gene fusions between the Escherichia coli L-arabinose operon and 'nptI gene. In some of them the KmR phenotype is induced by arabinose. Insertions of this element in cloned fragments of the T-DNA region of Agrobacterium rhizogenes were also isolated. Some of them confer a KmR phenotype upon its E. coli carriers, which indicates that portions of the T-DNA are expressed in these cells.

  12. The phosphotransferase VanU represses expression of four qrr genes antagonizing VanO-mediated quorum-sensing regulation in Vibrio anguillarum

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Barbara; Lindell, Kristoffer; El Qaidi, Samir; Hjerde, Erik; Willassen, Nils-Peder

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum utilizes quorum sensing to regulate stress responses required for survival in the aquatic environment. Like other Vibrio species, V. anguillarum contains the gene qrr1, which encodes the ancestral quorum regulatory RNA Qrr1, and phosphorelay quorum-sensing systems that modulate the expression of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that destabilize mRNA encoding the transcriptional regulator VanT. In this study, three additional Qrr sRNAs were identified. All four sRNAs were positively regulated by σ54 and the σ54-dependent response regulator VanO, and showed a redundant activity. The Qrr sRNAs, together with the RNA chaperone Hfq, destabilized vanT mRNA and modulated expression of VanT-regulated genes. Unexpectedly, expression of all four qrr genes peaked at high cell density, and exogenously added N-acylhomoserine lactone molecules induced expression of the qrr genes at low cell density. The phosphotransferase VanU, which phosphorylates and activates VanO, repressed expression of the Qrr sRNAs and stabilized vanT mRNA. A model is presented proposing that VanU acts as a branch point, aiding cross-regulation between two independent phosphorelay systems that activate or repress expression of the Qrr sRNAs, giving flexibility and precision in modulating VanT expression and inducing a quorum-sensing response to stresses found in a constantly changing aquatic environment. PMID:21948044

  13. Functional genomics to discover antibiotic resistance genes: The paradigm of resistance to colistin mediated by ethanolamine phosphotransferase in Shewanella algae MARS 14.

    PubMed

    Telke, Amar A; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2015-12-01

    Shewanella algae MARS 14 is a colistin-resistant clinical isolate retrieved from bronchoalveolar lavage of a hospitalised patient. A functional genomics strategy was employed to discover the molecular support for colistin resistance in S. algae MARS 14. A pZE21 MCS-1 plasmid-based genomic expression library was constructed in Escherichia coli TOP10. The estimated library size was 1.30×10(8) bp. Functional screening of colistin-resistant clones was carried out on Luria-Bertani agar containing 8 mg/L colistin. Five colistin-resistant clones were obtained after complete screening of the genomic expression library. Analysis of DNA sequencing results found a unique gene in all selected clones. Amino acid sequence analysis of this unique gene using the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) and KEGG databases revealed that this gene encodes ethanolamine phosphotransferase (EptA, or so-called PmrC). Reverse transcription PCR analysis indicated that resistance to colistin in S. algae MARS 14 was associated with overexpression of EptA (27-fold increase), which plays a crucial role in the arrangement of outer membrane lipopolysaccharide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. In70 of Plasmid pAX22, a blaVIM-1-Containing Integron Carrying a New Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase Gene Cassette

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Maria Letizia; Pallecchi, Lucia; Fontana, Roberta; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2001-01-01

    An Achromobacter xylosoxydans strain showing broad-spectrum resistance to β-lactams (including carbapenems) and aminoglycosides was isolated at the University Hospital of Verona (Verona, Italy). This strain was found to produce metallo-β-lactamase activity and to harbor a 30-kb nonconjugative plasmid, named pAX22, carrying a blaVIM-1 determinant inserted into a class 1 integron. Characterization of this integron, named In70, revealed an original array of four gene cassettes containing, respectively, the blaVIM-1 gene and three different aminoglycoside resistance determinants, including an aacA4 allele, a new aph-like gene named aphA15, and an aadA1 allele. The aphA15 gene is the first example of an aph-like gene carried on a mobile gene cassette, and its product exhibits close similarity to the APH(3′)-IIa aminoglycoside phosphotransferase encoded by Tn5 (36% amino acid identity) and to an APH(3′)-IIb enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (38% amino acid identity). Expression of the cloned aphA15 gene in Escherichia coli reduced the susceptibility to kanamycin and neomycin as well as (slightly) to amikacin, netilmicin, and streptomycin. Characterization of the 5′ and 3′ conserved segments of In70 and of their flanking regions showed that In70 belongs to the group of class 1 integrons associated with defective transposon derivatives originating from Tn402-like elements. The structure of the 3′ conserved segment indicates the closest ancestry with members of the In0-In2 lineage. In70, with its array of cassette-borne resistance genes, can mediate broad-spectrum resistance to most β-lactams and aminoglycosides. PMID:11257042

  15. Involvement of an inducible fructose phosphotransferase operon in Streptococcus gordonii biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Loo, C Y; Mitrakul, K; Voss, I B; Hughes, C V; Ganeshkumar, N

    2003-11-01

    Oral streptococci, such as Streptococcus gordonii, are the predominant early colonizers that initiate biofilm formation on tooth surfaces. Investigation of an S. gordonii::Tn917-lac biofilm-defective mutant isolated by using an in vitro biofilm formation assay showed that the transposon insertion is near the 3' end of an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein homologous to Streptococcus mutans FruK. Three genes, fruR, fruK, and fruI, were predicted to encode polypeptides that are part of the fructose phosphotransferase system (PTS) in S. gordonii. These proteins, FruR, FruK, and FruI, are homologous to proteins encoded by the inducible fruRKI operon of S. mutans. In S. mutans, FruR is a transcriptional repressor, FruK is a fructose-1-phosphate kinase, and FruI is the fructose-specific enzyme II (fructose permease) of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar PTS. Reverse transcription-PCR confirmed that fruR, fruK, and fruI are cotranscribed as an operon in S. gordonii, and the transposon insertion in S. gordonii fruK::Tn917-lac resulted in a nonpolar mutation. Nonpolar inactivation of either fruK or fruI generated by allelic replacement resulted in a biofilm-defective phenotype, whereas a nonpolar mutant with an inactivated fruR gene retained the ability to form a biofilm. Expression of fruK, as measured by the beta-galactosidase activity of the fruK::Tn917-lac mutant, was observed to be growth phase dependent and was enhanced when the mutant was grown in media with high levels of fructose, sucrose, xylitol, and human serum, indicating that the fructose PTS operon was fructose and xylitol inducible, similar to the S. mutans fructose PTS. The induction by fructose was inhibited by the presence of glucose, indicating that glucose is able to catabolite repress fruK expression. Nonpolar inactivation of the fruR gene in the fruK::Tn917-lac mutant resulted in a greater increase in beta-galactosidase activity when the organism was grown in media supplemented with

  16. The phosphotransferase system gene ptsI in the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus is required for biofilm formation, colonization, and biocontrol against wheat sharp eyespot.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Bin; Chen, Mai; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Miao; Wang, Ying; Huang, Qiu-bin; Wang, Xue; Wang, Gang

    2014-05-01

    Natural resistance of wheat plants to wheat sharp eyespot is inadequate, and new strategies for controlling the disease are required. Biological control is an alternative and attractive way of reducing the use of chemicals in agriculture. In this study, we investigated the biocontrol properties of endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus strain 0-9, which was isolated from the root systems of healthy wheat varieties. The phosphotransferase system is a major regulator of carbohydrate metabolism in bacteria. Enzyme I is one of the protein components of this system. Specific disruption and complementation of the enzyme I-coding gene ptsI from B. cereus was achieved through homologous recombination. Disruption of ptsI in B. cereus caused a 70% reduction in biofilm formation, a 30.4% decrease in biocontrol efficacy, and a 1000-fold reduction in colonization. The growth of ΔptsI mutant strain on G-tris synthetic medium containing glucose as the exclusive carbon source was also reduced. Wild-type properties could be restored to the ΔptsI mutant strain by ptsI complementation. These results suggested that ptsI may be one of the key genes involved in biofilm formation, colonization, and biocontrol of B. cereus and that B. cereus wild-type strain 0-9 may be an ideal biocontrol agent for controlling wheat sharp eyespot.

  17. A Metabolic Widget Adjusts the Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Fructose Influx in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría, Max; Goñi-Moreno, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fructose uptake in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida occurs through a canonical phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent sugar transport system (PTSFru). The logic of the genetic circuit that rules its functioning is puzzling: the transcription of the fruBKA operon, encoding all the components of PTSFru, can escape the repression exerted by the catabolite repressor/activator protein Cra solely in the presence of intracellular fructose-1-P, an agonist formed only when fructose has been already transported. To study this apparently incongruous regulatory architecture, the changes in the transcriptome brought about by a seamless Δcra deletion in P. putida strain KT2440 were inspected under different culture conditions. The few genes found to be upregulated in the cra mutant unexpectedly included PP_3443, encoding a bona fide glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase. An in silico model was developed to explore emergent properties that could result from such connections between sugar uptake with Cra and PEP. Simulation of fructose transport revealed that sugar uptake called for an extra supply of PEP (obtained through the activity of PP_3443) that was kept (i.e., memorized) even when the carbohydrate disappeared from the medium. This feature was traced to the action of two sequential inverters that connect the availability of exogenous fructose to intracellular PEP levels via Cra/PP_3443. The loss of such memory caused a much longer lag phase in cells shifted from one growth condition to another. The term “metabolic widget” is proposed to describe a merged biochemical and regulatory patch that tailors a given node of the cell molecular network to suit species-specific physiological needs. IMPORTANCE The regulatory nodes that govern metabolic traffic in bacteria often show connectivities that could be deemed unnecessarily complex at a first glance. Being a soil dweller and plant colonizer, Pseudomonas putida frequently encounters fructose in the niches that it

  18. Translation efficiency of antiterminator proteins is a determinant for the difference in glucose repression of two β-glucoside phosphotransferase system gene clusters in Corynebacterium glutamicum R.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuya; Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum R has two β-glucoside phosphoenolpyruvate, carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems (PTS) encoded by bglF and bglF2 located in the respective clusters, bglF-bglA-bglG and bglF2-bglA2-bglG2. Previously, we reported that whereas β-glucoside-dependent induction of bglF is strongly repressed by glucose, glucose repression of bglF2 is very weak. Here, we reveal the mechanism behind the different effects of glucose on the two bgl genes. Deletion of the ribonucleic antiterminator sequence and transcriptional terminator located upstream of the translation initiation codon of bglF markedly relieved the glucose repression of a bglF-lacZ fusion, indicating that glucose affects the antitermination mechanism that is responsible for the β-glucoside-dependent induction of the bglF cluster. The glucose repression of bglF mRNA was also relieved by introducing a multicopy plasmid carrying the bglG gene encoding an antiterminator of the bglF cluster. Moreover, replacement of the GUG translation initiation codon of bglG with AUG was effective in relieving the glucose repression of bglF and bglG. Inversely, expression of bglF2 and bglG2 was subject to strict glucose repression in a mutant strain in which the AUG translation initiation codon of bglG2 encoding antiterminator of the bglF2 cluster was replaced with GUG. These results suggest that the translation initiation efficiency of the antiterminator proteins, at least in part, determines whether the target genes are subject to glucose repression. We also found that bglF expression was induced by glucose in the BglG-overexpressing strains, which may be explained by the ability of BglF to transport glucose.

  19. An esterase gene from Lactobacillus casei cotranscribed with genes encoding a phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system and regulated by a LevR-like activator and sigma54 factor.

    PubMed

    Yebra, María J; Viana, Rosa; Monedero, Vicente; Deutscher, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2004-01-01

    A new esterase-encoding gene was found in the draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei BL23 (CECT5275). It is located in an operon together with genes encoding the EIIA, EIIB, EIIC, and EIID proteins of a mannose class phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system. After overproduction in Escherichia coli and purification, the esterase could hydrolyze acetyl sugars, hence the operon was named esu for esterase-sugar uptake genes. Upstream of the genes encoding the EII components (esuABCD) and the esterase (esuE), two genes transcribed in the opposite sense were found which encode a Bacillus subtilis LevR-like transcriptional activator (esuR) and a sigma54-like transcriptional factor (rpoN). As compared with the wild-type strain, elevated fructose phosphorylation was detected in L. casei mutants constitutively expressing the esu operon. However, none of the many sugars tested could induce the esu operon. The fact that EsuE exhibits esterase activity on acetyl sugars suggests that this operon could be involved in the uptake and metabolism of esterified sugars. Expression of the esu operon is similar to that of the B. subtilis lev operon: it contains a -12,-24 consensus promoter typical of sigma54-regulated genes, and EsuR and RpoN are essential for its transcription which is negatively regulated by EIIB(Esu). The esuABCDE transcription unit represents the first sigma54-regulated operon in lactobacilli. Furthermore, replacement of His852 in the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system regulation domain II of EsuR with Ala indicated that the transcription activator function of EsuR is inhibited by EIIB(Esu)-mediated phosphorylation at His852.

  20. The DeoR-type transcriptional regulator SugR acts as a repressor for genes encoding the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalat, Lars; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Hartmann, Michelle; Mormann, Sascha; Tauch, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2007-01-01

    Background The major uptake system responsible for the transport of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 is the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The genes encoding PTS components, namely ptsI, ptsH, and ptsF belong to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, whereas ptsG and ptsS are located in two separate regions of the C. glutamicum genome. Due to the localization within and adjacent to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, two genes coding for DeoR-type transcriptional regulators, cg2118 and sugR, are putative candidates involved in the transcriptional regulation of the fructose-PTS cluster genes. Results Four transcripts of the extended fructose-PTS gene cluster that comprise the genes sugR-cg2116, ptsI, cg2118-fruK-ptsF, and ptsH, respectively, were characterized. In addition, it was shown that transcription of the fructose-PTS gene cluster is enhanced during growth on glucose or fructose when compared to acetate. Subsequently, the two genes sugR and cg2118 encoding for DeoR-type regulators were mutated and PTS gene transcription was found to be strongly enhanced in the presence of acetate only in the sugR deletion mutant. The SugR regulon was further characterized by microarray hybridizations using the sugR mutant and its parental strain, revealing that also the PTS genes ptsG and ptsS belong to this regulon. Binding of purified SugR repressor protein to a 21 bp sequence identified the SugR binding site as an AC-rich motif. The two experimentally identified SugR binding sites in the fructose-PTS gene cluster are located within or downstream of the mapped promoters, typical for transcriptional repressors. Effector studies using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) revealed the fructose PTS-specific metabolite fructose-1-phosphate (F-1-P) as a highly efficient, negative effector of the SugR repressor, acting in the micromolar range. Beside F-1-P, other sugar-phosphates like fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P

  1. Acid phosphatase/phosphotransferases from enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Y; Utagawa, T; Yamada, H; Asano, Y

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the enzymatic phosphorylation of nucleosides and found that Morganella morganii phoC acid phosphatase exhibits regioselective pyrophosphate (PP(i))-nucleoside phosphotransferase activity. In this study, we isolated genes encoding an acid phosphatase with regioselective phosphotransferase activity (AP/PTase) from Providencia stuartii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia blattae and Klebsiella planticola, and compared the primary structures and enzymatic characteristics of these enzymes with those of AP/PTase (PhoC acid phosphatase) from M. morganii. The enzymes were highly homologous in primary structure with M. morganii AP/PTase, and are classified as class A1 acid phosphatases. The synthesis of inosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-IMP) by E. coli overproducing each acid phosphatase was investigated. The P. stuartii enzyme, which is most closely related to the M. morganii enzyme, exhibited high 5'-IMP productivity, similar to the M. morganii enzyme. The 5'-IMP productivities of the E. aerogenes, E. blattae and K. planticola enzymes were inferior to those of the former two enzymes. This result underlines the importance of lower K(m) values for efficient nucleotide production. As these enzymes exhibited a very high degree of homology at the amino acid sequence level, it is likely that local sequence differences in the binding pocket are responsible for the differences in the nucleoside-PP(i) phosphotransferase reaction.

  2. Increased glucose utilization and cell growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum by modifying the glucose-specific phosphotransferase system (PTS(Glc)) genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Junlan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Weiguo

    2016-12-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:glucose phosphotransferase system (PTS(Glc)) is the major pathway of glucose uptake in Corynebacterium glutamicum. This study investigated glucose consumption rate, cell growth, and metabolite changes resulting from modification of PTS(Glc). The classical l-lysine producer C. glutamicum XQ-8 exhibited low glucose consumption, cell growth, and l-lysine production rates, whereas these parameters were significantly increased during cultivating on glucose plus maltose, through inactivation of SugR, or by overexpression of PTS(Glc) genes. XQ-8sugR::cat/pDXW-8-ptsI exhibited the highest increase in glucose consumption, growth rate, and l-lysine production, followed by XQ-8sugR::cat/pDXW-8-ptsG. However, overexpression of ptsH had little effect on the above-mentioned factors. Although co-overexpression of ptsGHI led to the highest glucose consumption, growth rate, and final l-lysine production; the l-lysine production rate was lower than that of XQ-8sugR::cat/pDXW-8-ptsIH. In fed-batch fermentation, XQ-8sugR::cat/pDXW-8-ptsIH had a higher growth rate of 0.54 h(-1) to a dry cell mass of 66 g·L(-1) after 16 h, and had a higher l-lysine production rate of 159.2 g·L(-1) after 36 h. These results indicate that modification of the sugar transport systems improves amino acid production, especially for mutants obtained by repeated physical and (or) chemical mutagenesis. However, modification of these systems needs to be performed on a case-by-case basis.

  3. Substrate-driven gene expression in Roseburia inulinivorans: Importance of inducible enzymes in the utilization of inulin and starch

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Karen P.; Martin, Jenny C.; Chassard, Christophe; Clerget, Marlene; Potrykus, Joanna; Campbell, Gill; Mayer, Claus-Dieter; Young, Pauline; Rucklidge, Garry; Ramsay, Alan G.; Flint, Harry J.

    2011-01-01

    Roseburia inulinivorans is a recently identified motile representative of the Firmicutes that contributes to butyrate formation from a variety of dietary polysaccharide substrates in the human large intestine. Microarray analysis was used here to investigate substrate-driven gene-expression changes in R. inulinivorans A2-194. A cluster of fructo-oligosaccharide/inulin utilization genes induced during growth on inulin included one encoding a β-fructofuranosidase protein that was prominent in the proteome of inulin-grown cells. This cluster also included a 6-phosphofructokinase and an ABC transport system, whereas a distinct inulin-induced 1-phosphofructokinase was linked to a fructose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS II transport enzyme). Real-time PCR analysis showed that the β-fructofuranosidase and adjacent ABC transport protein showed greatest induction during growth on inulin, whereas the 1-phosphofructokinase enzyme and linked sugar phosphotransferase transport system were most strongly up-regulated during growth on fructose, indicating that these two clusters play distinct roles in the use of inulin. The R. inulinivorans β-fructofuranosidase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and shown to hydrolyze fructans ranging from inulin down to sucrose, with greatest activity on fructo-oligosaccharides. Genes induced on starch included the major extracellular α-amylase and two distinct α-glucanotransferases together with a gene encoding a flagellin protein. The latter response may be concerned with improving bacterial access to insoluble starch particles. PMID:20679207

  4. The Phosphotransferase System of Streptomyces coelicolor Is Biased for N-Acetylglucosamine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nothaft, Harald; Dresel, Dagmar; Willimek, Andreas; Mahr, Kerstin; Niederweis, Michael; Titgemeyer, Fritz

    2003-01-01

    Mutation of the crr-ptsI gene locus revealed that Streptomyces coelicolor uses the phosphotransferase system (PTS) for N-acetylglucosamine uptake. crr, ptsI, and ptsH, which encode the three general PTS phosphotransferases, are induced by N-acetylglucosamine but not by other PTS substrates. Thus, the S. coelicolor PTS is biased for N-acetylglucosamine utilization, a novel feature that distinguishes this PTS from others. PMID:14617669

  5. Mucolipidosis II: a single causal mutation in the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase gene (GNPTAB) in a French Canadian founder population.

    PubMed

    Plante, M; Claveau, S; Lepage, P; Lavoie, E-M; Brunet, S; Roquis, D; Morin, C; Vézina, H; Laprise, C

    2008-03-01

    Mucolipidosis (ML) II (I-cell disease) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. MLII is an autosomal recessive disease with a carrier rate estimated at 1/39 in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (SLSJ) (Quebec, Canada), which is the highest frequency documented worldwide. To identify the causing mutation, we sequenced GNPTAB exons in 27 parents of 16 MLII-deceased children from the SLSJ region as obligatory and potential carriers. We also performed a genealogical reconstruction for each parent to evaluate consanguinity levels and genetic contribution of ancestors. Our goal was to identify which parameters could explain the high MLII frequency observed in the SLSJ population. A single mutation (c.3503_3504delTC) was found in all obligatory carriers. In addition, 11 apparent polymorphisms were identified. The mutation was not detected in genomic DNA of 50 unrelated controls. Genealogical data show six founders (three couples) with a higher probability of having introduced the mutation in the population. The frequency of the mutation was increased as a consequence of this founder effect and of the resulting population structure. We suggest that c.3503_3504delTC is the allele causing MLII in the SLSJ population, and its high carrier rate is most likely explained by a founder effect.

  6. Functional reconstitution of the purified phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannitol-specific transport system of Escherichia coli in phospholipid vesicles: coupling between transport and phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Elferink, M G; Driessen, A J; Robillard, G T

    1990-01-01

    Purified mannitol-specific enzyme II (EII) from Escherichia coli was reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles with the aid of a detergent-dialysis procedure followed by a freeze-thaw sonication step. The orientation of EII in the proteoliposomes was random. The cytoplasmic moiety of the inverted EII could be removed with trypsin without effecting the integrity of the liposomal membrane. This enabled us to study the two different EII orientations independently. The population of inverted EII molecules was monitored by measuring active extrusion of mannitol after the addition of phosphoenolpyruvate, EI, and histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) at the outside of the vesicles. The population of correctly oriented EII molecules was monitored by measuring active uptake of mannitol with internal phosphoenolpyruvate, EI, and HPr. A low rate of facilitated diffusion of mannitol via the unphosphorylated carrier could be measured. On the other hand, a high phosphorylation activity without translocation was observed at the outside of the liposomes. The kinetics of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent transport reaction and the nonvectorial phosphorylation reaction were compared. Transport of mannitol into the liposomes via the correctly oriented EII molecules occurred with a high affinity (Km, lower than 10 microM) and with a relatively low Vmax. Phosphorylation at the outside of the liposomes catalyzed by the inverted EII molecules occurred with a low affinity (Km of about 66 microM), while the maximal velocity was about 10 times faster than the transport reaction. The latter observation is kinetic proof for the lack of strict coupling between transport and phosphorylation in these enzymes. Images PMID:2123863

  7. Adaptation for fast growth on glucose by differential expression of central carbon metabolism and gal regulon genes in an Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Flores, Noemí; Flores, Salvador; Escalante, Adelfo; de Anda, Ramón; Leal, Lidia; Malpica, Roxana; Georgellis, Dimitris; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco

    2005-03-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) is a key intermediate of cellular metabolism and a precursor of commercially relevant products. In Escherichia coli 50% of the glucose-derived PEP is consumed by the PEP:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) for glucose transport. PTS, encoded by the ptsHIcrr operon, was deleted from JM101 to generate strain PB11 (PTS-Glc-). PB12, a mutant derived from PB11, grows faster than the parental strain on glucose (PTS-Glc+ phenotype). This strain can redirect some of the PEP not utilized by PTS into the high yield synthesis of aromatic compounds from glucose. Here, we report a comparative transcription analysis among these strains of more than 100 genes involved in central carbon metabolism during growth on glucose. It was found that in the PTS- strains that have reduced glucose transport capacities, several genes encoding proteins with functions related to carbon transport and metabolism were upregulated. Therefore, it could be inferred that these strains synthesize autoinducers of these genes when sensing very low internal glucose concentrations, probably for scavenging purposes. This condition that is permanently present in the PTS- strains even when growing in high glucose concentrations allowed the simultaneous utilization of glucose and acetate as carbon sources. It was found that the gal operon is upregulated in these strains, as well as the aceBAK, poxB and acs genes among others. In PB12, glk, pgi, the TCA cycle and certain respiratory genes are also upregulated. A mutation in arcB in PB12 is apparently responsible for the upregulation of the TCA cycle and certain respiratory genes.

  8. Loss of catabolite repression function of HPr, the phosphocarrier protein of the bacterial phosphotransferase system, affects expression of the cry4A toxin gene in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sharik R; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, Nirupama

    2002-10-01

    HPr, the phosphocarrier protein of the bacterial phosphotransferase system, mediates catabolite repression of a number of operons in gram-positive bacteria. In order to participate in the regulatory process, HPr is activated by phosphorylation of a conserved serine-46 residue. To study the potential role of HPr in the regulation of Cry4A protoxin synthesis in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, we produced a catabolite repression-negative mutant by replacing the wild-type copy of the ptsH gene with a mutated copy in which the conserved serine residue of HPr was replaced with an alanine. HPr isolated from the mutant strain was not phosphorylated at Ser-45 by HPr kinase, but phosphorylation at His-14 was found to occur normally. The enzyme I and HPr kinase activities of the mutant were not affected. Analysis of the B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis mutant harboring ptsH-S45A in the chromosome showed that cry4A expression was derepressed from the inhibitory effect of glucose. The mutant strain produced both cry4A and sigma(35) gene transcripts 4 h ahead of the parent strain, but there was no effect on sigma(28) synthesis. In wild-type B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis cells, cry4A mRNA was observed from 12 h onwards, while in the mutant it appeared at 8 h and was produced for a longer period. The total amount of cry4A transcripts produced by the mutant was higher than by the parent strain. There was a 60 to 70% reduction in the sporulation efficiency of the mutant B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain compared to the wild-type strain.

  9. Expression of hygromycin phosphotransferase alters virulence of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Smulian, A George; Gibbons, Reta S; Demland, Jeffery A; Spaulding, Deborah T; Deepe, George S

    2007-11-01

    The Escherichia coli hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph) gene, which confers hygromycin resistance, is commonly used as a dominant selectable marker in genetically modified bacteria, fungi, plants, insects, and mammalian cells. Expression of the hph gene has rarely been reported to induce effects other than those expected. Hygromycin B is the most common dominant selectable marker used in the molecular manipulation of Histoplasma capsulatum in the generation of knockout strains of H. capsulatum or as a marker in mutant strains. hph-expressing organisms appear to have no defect in long-term in vitro growth and survival and have been successfully used to exploit host-parasite interaction in short-term cell culture systems and animal experiments. We introduced the hph gene as a selectable marker together with the gene encoding green fluorescent protein into wild-type strains of H. capsulatum. Infection of mice with hph-expressing H. capsulatum yeast cells at sublethal doses resulted in lethality. The lethality was not attributable to the site of integration of the hph construct into the genomes or to the method of integration and was not H. capsulatum strain related. Death of mice was not caused by altered cytokine profiles or an overwhelming fungal burden. The lethality was dependent on the kinase activity of hygromycin phosphotransferase. These results should raise awareness of the potential detrimental effects of the hph gene.

  10. Integration and gene replacement in the Lactococcus lactis lac operon: induction of a cryptic phospho-beta-glucosidase in LacG-deficient strains.

    PubMed Central

    Simons, G; Nijhuis, M; de Vos, W M

    1993-01-01

    Insertions, replacement mutations, and deletions were introduced via single or double crossover recombination into the lacE (enzyme IIlac) and lacG (phospho-beta-galactosidase) genes of the Lactococcus lactis chromosomal lacABCDFEGX operon. LacG production was abolished in strains missing the lacG gene or carrying multicopy insertions in the lacE gene that affected expression of the lacG gene. However, these LacG-deficient strains could still ferment lactose slowly and were found to contain an enzymatic activity that hydrolyzed the chromogenic substrate o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside phosphate. Induction of this phospho-beta-glycohydrolase activity coincided with the appearance of a new 55-kDa protein cross-reacting with anti-LacG antibodies that had a size similar to that of LacG but a higher isoelectric point (pI 5.2) and was not found in wild-type cells during growth on lactose. Since the phospho-beta-glycohydrolase activity and this protein with a pI of 5.2 were highly induced in both mutant and wild-type cells during growth on cellobiose that is likely to be transported via a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system, we propose that this induced activity is a phospho-beta-glucosidase that also hydrolyzes lactose-6-phosphate. Images PMID:8349556

  11. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: studies with a mutant lacking glucokinase and mannose-phosphotransferase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B.M.; Egan, W.

    1985-04-01

    A mutant of Streptococcus lactis 133 has been isolated that lacks both glucokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose- phosphotransferase (mannose-PTS) activities. The double mutant S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- is unable to utilize either exogenously supplied or intracellularly generated glucose for growth. Fluorographic analyses of metabolites formed during the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)lactose labeled specifically in the glucose or galactosyl moiety established that the cells were unable to phosphorylate intracellular glucose. However, cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- readily metabolized intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, and the growth rates and cell yield of the mutant and parental strains on sucrose were the same. During growth on lactose, S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- fermented only the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, and 1 mol of glucose was generated per mol of lactose consumed. For an equivalent concentration of lactose, the cell yield of the mutant was 50% that of the wild type. The specific rate of lactose utilization by growing cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- was ca. 50% greater than that of the wild type, but the cell doubling times were 70 and 47 min, respectively. High-resolution /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lactose transport by starved cells of S. lactis 133 and S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- showed that the latter cells contained elevated lactose-PTS activity. Throughout exponential growth on lactose, the mutant maintained an intracellular steady-state glucose concentration of 100 mM.

  12. Global gene expression of Listeria monocytogenes to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Bae, Dongryeoul; Liu, Connie; Zhang, Ting; Jones, Marcus; Peterson, Scott N; Wang, Chinling

    2012-05-01

    Outbreaks of listeriosis caused by the ingestion of Listeria-contaminated ready-to-eat foods have been reported worldwide. Many ready-to-eat foods, such as deli meat products, contain high amounts of salt, which can disrupt the maintenance of osmotic balance within bacterial cells. To understand how Listeria monocytogenes adapts to salt stress, we examined the growth and global gene expression profiles of L. monocytogenes strain F2365 under salt stress using oligonucleotide probe-based DNA array and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses. The growth of L. monocytogenes in brain heart infusion (BHI) medium with various concentrations of NaCl (2.5, 5, and 10%) was significantly inhibited (P < 0.01) when compared with growth in BHI with no NaCl supplementation. Microarray data indicated that growth in BHI medium with 1.2% NaCl upregulated 4 genes and down-regulated 24 genes in L. monocytogenes, which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. The transcript levels of genes involved in the uptake of glycine betaine/(L)-proline were increased, whereas genes associated with a putative phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), metabolic enzymes, and virulence factor were down-regulated. Specifically, the expression levels of PTS transport genes were shown to be dependent on NaCl concentration. To further examine whether the down-regulation of PTS genes is related to decreased cell growth, the transcript levels of genes encoding components of enzyme II, involved in the uptake of various sugars used as the primary carbon source in bacteria, were also measured using qRT-PCR. Our results suggest that the decreased transcript levels of PTS genes may be caused by salt stress or reduced cell growth through salt stress. Here, we report global transcriptional profiles of L. monocytogenes in response to salt stress, contributing to an improved understanding of osmotolerance in this bacterium.

  13. Functional Analysis of the N-Acetylglucosamine Metabolic Genes of Streptomyces coelicolor and Role in Control of Development and Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Świątek, Magdalena A.; Tenconi, Elodie; Rigali, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosamine, the monomer of chitin, is a favored carbon and nitrogen source for streptomycetes. Its intracellular catabolism requires the combined actions of the N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc-6P) deacetylase NagA and the glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6P) deaminase/isomerase NagB. GlcNAc acts as a signaling molecule in the DasR-mediated nutrient sensing system, activating development and antibiotic production under poor growth conditions (famine) and blocking these processes under rich conditions (feast). In order to understand how a single nutrient can deliver opposite information according to the nutritional context, we carried out a mutational analysis of the nag metabolic genes nagA, nagB, and nagK. Here we show that the nag genes are part of the DasR regulon in Streptomyces coelicolor, which explains their transcriptional induction by GlcNAc. Most likely as the result of the intracellular accumulation of GlcN-6P, nagB deletion mutants fail to grow in the presence of GlcNAc. This toxicity can be alleviated by the additional deletion of nagA. We recently showed that in S. coelicolor, GlcNAc is internalized as GlcNAc-6P via the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). Considering the relevance of GlcNAc for the control of antibiotic production, improved insight into GlcNAc metabolism in Streptomyces may provide new leads toward biotechnological applications. PMID:22194457

  14. Cloning and characterization of the NapA acid phosphatase/phosphotransferase of Morganella morganii: identification of a new family of bacterial acid-phosphatase-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Thaller, M C; Lombardi, G; Berlutti, F; Schippa, S; Rossolini, G M

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding a minor phosphate-irrepressible acid phosphatase (named NapA) of Morganella morganii was cloned and sequenced, and its product characterized. NapA is a secreted acid phosphatase composed of four 27 kDa polypeptide subunits. The enzyme is active on several organic phosphate monoesters but not on diesters, and is also endowed with transphosphorylating activity from organic phosphoric acid esters to nucleosides and other compounds with free hydroxyl groups. Its activity is inhibited by EDTA, inorganic phosphate, nucleosides and Ca2+, but not by fluoride or tartrate, and is enhanced by Mg2+, Co2+ and Zn2+. At the sequence level, the NapA enzyme did not show similarities to any other sequenced bacterial phosphatases. However, a search for homologous genes in sequence databases allowed identification of two open reading frames located within sequenced regions of the Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis genomes respectively, encoding proteins of unknown function which are highly homologous to the Morganella enzyme. Moreover, the properties of the NapA enzyme are very similar to those reported for the periplasmic nonspecific acid phosphatase II of Salmonella typhimurium (for which no sequence data are available). These data point to the existence of a new family of bacterial acid phosphatases, which we propose designating class B bacterial acid phosphatases.

  15. Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Analysis of Aminoglycoside-2 ''-Phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2 '')-Ic] From Enterococcus Gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, L.J.; Badarau, A.; Vakulenko, S.B.; Smith, C.A.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2{double_prime}-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2{double_prime})-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2{double_prime})-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14-20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 {angstrom}, {beta} = 108.8{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 {angstrom} resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  16. Phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Postma, P W; Lengeler, J W; Jacobson, G R

    1993-01-01

    Numerous gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria take up carbohydrates through the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). This system transports and phosphorylates carbohydrates at the expense of PEP and is the subject of this review. The PTS consists of two general proteins, enzyme I and HPr, and a number of carbohydrate-specific enzymes, the enzymes II. PTS proteins are phosphoproteins in which the phospho group is attached to either a histidine residue or, in a number of cases, a cysteine residue. After phosphorylation of enzyme I by PEP, the phospho group is transferred to HPr. The enzymes II are required for the transport of the carbohydrates across the membrane and the transfer of the phospho group from phospho-HPr to the carbohydrates. Biochemical, structural, and molecular genetic studies have shown that the various enzymes II have the same basic structure. Each enzyme II consists of domains for specific functions, e.g., binding of the carbohydrate or phosphorylation. Each enzyme II complex can consist of one to four different polypeptides. The enzymes II can be placed into at least four classes on the basis of sequence similarity. The genetics of the PTS is complex, and the expression of PTS proteins is intricately regulated because of the central roles of these proteins in nutrient acquisition. In addition to classical induction-repression mechanisms involving repressor and activator proteins, other types of regulation, such as antitermination, have been observed in some PTSs. Apart from their role in carbohydrate transport, PTS proteins are involved in chemotaxis toward PTS carbohydrates. Furthermore, the IIAGlc protein, part of the glucose-specific PTS, is a central regulatory protein which in its nonphosphorylated form can bind to and inhibit several non-PTS uptake systems and thus prevent entry of inducers. In its phosphorylated form, P-IIAGlc is involved in the activation of adenylate cyclase and thus in the

  17. Physiological studies on regulation of glycerol utilization by the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, A H; Saier, M H; Harriott, O T; Reizer, J

    1990-01-01

    In vitro studies with purified glycerol kinase from Enterococcus faecalis have established that this enzyme is activated by phosphorylation of a histidyl residue in the protein, catalyzed by the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS), but the physiological significance of this observation is not known. In the present study, the regulation of glycerol uptake was examined in a wild-type strain of E. faecalis as well as in tight and leaky ptsI mutants, altered with respect to their levels of enzyme I of the PTS. Glycerol kinase was shown to be weakly repressible by lactose and strongly repressible by glucose in the wild-type strain. Greatly reduced levels of glycerol kinase activity were also observed in the ptsI mutants. Uptake of glycerol into intact wild-type and mutant cells paralleled the glycerol kinase activities in extracts. Glycerol uptake in the leaky ptsI mutant was hypersensitive to inhibition by low concentrations of 2-deoxyglucose or glucose even though the rates and extent of 2-deoxyglucose uptake were greatly reduced. These observations provide strong support for the involvement of reversible PTS-mediated phosphorylation of glycerol kinase in the regulation of glycerol uptake in response to the presence or absence of a sugar substrate of the PTS in the medium. Glucose and 2-deoxyglucose were shown to elicit rapid efflux of cytoplasmic [14C]lactate derived from [14C]glycerol. This phenomenon was distinct from the inhibition of glycerol uptake and was due to phosphorylation of the incoming sugar by cytoplasmic phosphoenolpyruvate. Lactate appeared to be generated by sequential dephosphorylation and reduction of cytoplasmic phosphoenolpyruvate present in high concentrations in resting cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2123855

  18. The Transport of Carbohydrates by a Bacterial Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Roseman, Saul

    1969-01-01

    The components and properties of a phosphoenolpyruvate: glucose phosphotransferase system are reviewed, along with the evidence implicating this system in sugar transport across bacterial membranes. Some possible physiological implications of sugar transport mediated by the phosphotransferase system are also considered. PMID:19873641

  19. The crystal structure of aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa, an enzyme responsible for antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Nurizzo, Didier; Shewry, Steven C; Perlin, Michael H; Brown, Scott A; Dholakia, Jaydev N; Fuchs, Roy L; Deva, Taru; Baker, Edward N; Smith, Clyde A

    2003-03-21

    A major factor in the emergence of antibiotic resistance is the existence of enzymes that chemically modify common antibiotics. The genes for these enzymes are commonly carried on mobile genetic elements, facilitating their spread. One such class of enzymes is the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (APH) family, which uses ATP-mediated phosphate transfer to chemically modify and inactivate aminoglycoside antibiotics such as streptomycin and kanamycin. As part of a program to define the molecular basis for aminoglycoside recognition and inactivation by such enzymes, we have determined the high resolution (2.1A) crystal structure of aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa (APH(3')-IIa) in complex with kanamycin. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using multiple models derived from the related aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-III enzyme (APH(3')-III), and refined to an R factor of 0.206 (R(free) 0.238). The bound kanamycin molecule is very well defined and occupies a highly negatively charged cleft formed by the C-terminal domain of the enzyme. Adjacent to this is the binding site for ATP, which can be modeled on the basis of nucleotide complexes of APH(3')-III; only one change is apparent with a loop, residues 28-34, in a position where it could fold over an incoming nucleotide. The three rings of the kanamycin occupy distinct sub-pockets in which a highly acidic loop, residues 151-166, and the C-terminal residues 260-264 play important parts in recognition. The A ring, the site of phosphoryl transfer, is adjacent to the catalytic base Asp190. These results give new information on the basis of aminoglycoside recognition, and on the relationship between this phosphotransferase family and the protein kinases.

  20. Regulation of Lactobacillus casei Sorbitol Utilization Genes Requires DNA-Binding Transcriptional Activator GutR and the Conserved Protein GutM▿

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara, Cristina; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Monedero, Vicente; Deutscher, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the five genes (gutRMCBA) downstream from the previously described sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding Lactobacillus casei gutF gene revealed that they constitute a sorbitol (glucitol) utilization operon. The gutRM genes encode putative regulators, while the gutCBA genes encode the EIIC, EIIBC, and EIIA proteins of a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTSGut). The gut operon is transcribed as a polycistronic gutFRMCBA messenger, the expression of which is induced by sorbitol and repressed by glucose. gutR encodes a transcriptional regulator with two PTS-regulated domains, a galactitol-specific EIIB-like domain (EIIBGat domain) and a mannitol/fructose-specific EIIA-like domain (EIIAMtl domain). Its inactivation abolished gut operon transcription and sorbitol uptake, indicating that it acts as a transcriptional activator. In contrast, cells carrying a gutB mutation expressed the gut operon constitutively, but they failed to transport sorbitol, indicating that EIIBCGut negatively regulates GutR. A footprint analysis showed that GutR binds to a 35-bp sequence upstream from the gut promoter. A sequence comparison with the presumed promoter region of gut operons from various firmicutes revealed a GutR consensus motif that includes an inverted repeat. The regulation mechanism of the L. casei gut operon is therefore likely to be operative in other firmicutes. Finally, gutM codes for a conserved protein of unknown function present in all sequenced gut operons. A gutM mutant, the first constructed in a firmicute, showed drastically reduced gut operon expression and sorbitol uptake, indicating a regulatory role also for GutM. PMID:18676710

  1. Regulation of Lactobacillus casei sorbitol utilization genes requires DNA-binding transcriptional activator GutR and the conserved protein GutM.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Cristina; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Monedero, Vicente; Deutscher, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2008-09-01

    Sequence analysis of the five genes (gutRMCBA) downstream from the previously described sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding Lactobacillus casei gutF gene revealed that they constitute a sorbitol (glucitol) utilization operon. The gutRM genes encode putative regulators, while the gutCBA genes encode the EIIC, EIIBC, and EIIA proteins of a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTS(Gut)). The gut operon is transcribed as a polycistronic gutFRMCBA messenger, the expression of which is induced by sorbitol and repressed by glucose. gutR encodes a transcriptional regulator with two PTS-regulated domains, a galactitol-specific EIIB-like domain (EIIB(Gat) domain) and a mannitol/fructose-specific EIIA-like domain (EIIA(Mtl) domain). Its inactivation abolished gut operon transcription and sorbitol uptake, indicating that it acts as a transcriptional activator. In contrast, cells carrying a gutB mutation expressed the gut operon constitutively, but they failed to transport sorbitol, indicating that EIIBC(Gut) negatively regulates GutR. A footprint analysis showed that GutR binds to a 35-bp sequence upstream from the gut promoter. A sequence comparison with the presumed promoter region of gut operons from various firmicutes revealed a GutR consensus motif that includes an inverted repeat. The regulation mechanism of the L. casei gut operon is therefore likely to be operative in other firmicutes. Finally, gutM codes for a conserved protein of unknown function present in all sequenced gut operons. A gutM mutant, the first constructed in a firmicute, showed drastically reduced gut operon expression and sorbitol uptake, indicating a regulatory role also for GutM.

  2. Mechanisms of resistance to bacteriocins targeting the mannose phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Kjos, Morten; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2011-05-01

    The membrane proteins IIC and IID of the mannose phosphotransferase system (Man-PTS) together form a membrane-located complex that serves as a receptor for several different bacteriocins, including the pediocin-like class IIa bacteriocins and the class IIc bacteriocin lactococcin A. Bacterial strains sensitive to class IIa bacteriocins readily give rise to resistant mutants upon bacteriocin exposure. In the present study, we have therefore investigated lactococcin A-resistant mutants of Lactococcus lactis as well as natural food isolates of Listeria monocytogenes with different susceptibilities to class IIa bacteriocins. We found two major mechanisms of resistance. The first involves downregulation of Man-PTS gene expression, which takes place both in spontaneous resistant mutants and in natural resistant isolates. The second involves normal expression of the Man-PTS system, but the underlying mechanism of resistance for these cells is unknown. In some cases, the resistant phenotype was linked to a shift in the metabolism; i.e., reduced growth on glucose due to reduction in Man-PTS expression was accompanied by enhanced growth on another sugar, such as galactose. The implications of these findings in terms of metabolic heterogeneity are discussed.

  3. A rifamycin inactivating phosphotransferase family shared by environmental and pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Waglechner, Nicholas; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard D.

    2014-01-01

    Many environmental bacteria are multidrug-resistant and represent a reservoir of ancient antibiotic resistance determinants, which have been linked to genes found in pathogens. Exploring the environmental antibiotic resistome, therefore, reveals the diversity and evolution of antibiotic resistance and also provides insight into the vulnerability of clinically used antibiotics. In this study, we describe the identification of a highly conserved regulatory motif, the rifampin (RIF) -associated element (RAE), which is found upstream of genes encoding RIF-inactivating enzymes from a diverse collection of actinomycetes. Using gene expression assays, we confirmed that the RAE is involved in RIF-responsive regulation. By using the RAE as a probe for new RIF-associated genes in several actinomycete genomes, we identified a heretofore unknown RIF resistance gene, RIF phosphotransferase (rph). The RPH enzyme is a RIF-inactivating phosphotransferase and represents a new protein family in antibiotic resistance. RPH orthologs are widespread and found in RIF-sensitive bacteria, including Bacillus cereus and the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Heterologous expression and in vitro enzyme assays with purified RPHs from diverse bacterial genera show that these enzymes are capable of conferring high-level resistance to a variety of clinically used rifamycin antibiotics. This work identifies a new antibiotic resistance protein family and reinforces the fact that the study of resistance in environmental organisms can serve to identify resistance elements with relevance to pathogens. PMID:24778229

  4. A rifamycin inactivating phosphotransferase family shared by environmental and pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Waglechner, Nicholas; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard D

    2014-05-13

    Many environmental bacteria are multidrug-resistant and represent a reservoir of ancient antibiotic resistance determinants, which have been linked to genes found in pathogens. Exploring the environmental antibiotic resistome, therefore, reveals the diversity and evolution of antibiotic resistance and also provides insight into the vulnerability of clinically used antibiotics. In this study, we describe the identification of a highly conserved regulatory motif, the rifampin (RIF) -associated element (RAE), which is found upstream of genes encoding RIF-inactivating enzymes from a diverse collection of actinomycetes. Using gene expression assays, we confirmed that the RAE is involved in RIF-responsive regulation. By using the RAE as a probe for new RIF-associated genes in several actinomycete genomes, we identified a heretofore unknown RIF resistance gene, RIF phosphotransferase (rph). The RPH enzyme is a RIF-inactivating phosphotransferase and represents a new protein family in antibiotic resistance. RPH orthologs are widespread and found in RIF-sensitive bacteria, including Bacillus cereus and the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Heterologous expression and in vitro enzyme assays with purified RPHs from diverse bacterial genera show that these enzymes are capable of conferring high-level resistance to a variety of clinically used rifamycin antibiotics. This work identifies a new antibiotic resistance protein family and reinforces the fact that the study of resistance in environmental organisms can serve to identify resistance elements with relevance to pathogens.

  5. Expression of the Xylulose 5-Phosphate Phosphoketolase Gene, xpkA, from Lactobacillus pentosus MD363 Is Induced by Sugars That Are Fermented via the Phosphoketolase Pathway and Is Repressed by Glucose Mediated by CcpA and the Mannose Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Posthuma, Clara C.; Bader, Rechien; Engelmann, Roswitha; Postma, Pieter W.; Hengstenberg, Wolfgang; Pouwels, Peter H.

    2002-01-01

    Purification of xylulose 5-phosphate phosphoketolase (XpkA), the central enzyme of the phosphoketolase pathway (PKP) in lactic acid bacteria, and cloning and sequence analysis of the encoding gene, xpkA, from Lactobacillus pentosus MD363 are described. xpkA encodes a 788-amino-acid protein with a calculated mass of 88,705 Da. Expression of xpkA in Escherichia coli led to an increase in XpkA activity, while an xpkA knockout mutant of L. pentosus lost XpkA activity and was not able to grow on energy sources that are fermented via the PKP, indicating that xpkA encodes an enzyme with phosphoketolase activity. A database search revealed that there are high levels of similarity between XpkA and a phosphoketolase from Bifidobacterium lactis and between XpkA and a (putative) protein present in a number of evolutionarily distantly related organisms (up to 54% identical residues). Expression of xpkA in L. pentosus was induced by sugars that are fermented via the PKP and was repressed by glucose mediated by carbon catabolite protein A (CcpA) and by the mannose phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system. Most of the residues involved in correct binding of the cofactor thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) that are conserved in transketolase, pyruvate decarboxylase, and pyruvate oxidase were also conserved at a similar position in XpkA, implying that there is a similar TPP-binding fold in XpkA. PMID:11823225

  6. Singular Features of Trypanosomatids' Phosphotransferases Involved in Cell Energy Management

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Claudio A.; Bouvier, León A.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Miranda, Mariana R.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are responsible for economically important veterinary affections and severe human diseases. In Africa, Trypanosoma brucei causes sleeping sickness or African trypanosomiasis, while in America, Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. These parasites have complex life cycles which involve a wide variety of environments with very different compositions, physicochemical properties, and availability of metabolites. As the environment changes there is a need to maintain the nucleoside homeostasis, requiring a quick and regulated response. Most of the enzymes required for energy management are phosphotransferases. These enzymes present a nitrogenous group or a phosphate as acceptors, and the most clear examples are arginine kinase, nucleoside diphosphate kinase, and adenylate kinase. Trypanosoma and Leishmania have the largest number of phosphotransferase isoforms ever found in a single cell; some of them are absent in mammals, suggesting that these enzymes are required in many cellular compartments associated to different biological processes. The presence of such number of phosphotransferases support the hypothesis of the existence of an intracellular enzymatic phosphotransfer network that communicates the spatially separated intracellular ATP consumption and production processes. All these unique features make phosphotransferases a promising start point for rational drug design for the treatment of human trypanosomiasis. PMID:21603267

  7. New enzymes from environmental cassette arrays: Functional attributes of a phosphotransferase and an RNA-methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Nield, Blair S.; Willows, Robert D.; Torda, Andrew E.; Gillings, Michael R.; Holmes, Andrew J.; Nevalainen, K.M. Helena; Stokes, H.W.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.

    2004-01-01

    By targeting gene cassettes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) directly from environmentally derived DNA, we are able to amplify entire open reading frames (ORFs) independently of prior sequence knowledge. Approximately 10% of the mobile genes recovered by these means can be attributed to known protein families. Here we describe the characterization of two ORFs which show moderate homology to known proteins: (1) an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase displaying 25% sequence identity with APH(7″) from Streptomyces hygroscopicus, and (2) an RNA methyltransferase sharing 25%–28% identity with a group of recently defined bacterial RNA methyltransferases distinct from the SpoU enzyme family. Our novel genes were expressed as recombinant products and assayed for appropriate enzyme activity. The aminoglycoside phosphotransferase displayed ATPase activity, consistent with the presence of characteristic Mg2+-binding residues. Unlike related APH(4) or APH(7″) enzymes, however, this activity was not enhanced by hygromycin B or kanamycin, suggesting the normal substrate to be a different aminoglycoside. The RNA methyltransferase contains sequence motifs of the RNA methyltransferase superfamily, and our recombinant version showed methyltransferase activity with RNA. Our data confirm that gene cassettes present in the environment encode folded enzymes with novel sequence variation and demonstrable catalytic activity. Our PCR approach (cassette PCR) may be used to identify a diverse range of ORFs from any environmental sample, as well as to directly access the gene pool found in mobile gene cassettes commonly associated with integrons. This gene pool can be accessed from both cultured and uncultured microbial samples as a source of new enzymes and proteins. PMID:15152095

  8. Source of Phosphate in the Enzymic Reaction as a Point of Distinction among Aminoglycoside 2″-Phosphotransferases*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Chow, Joseph W.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2009-01-01

    Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferases are clinically important enzymes that cause high levels of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics by the organisms that harbor them. These enzymes phosphorylate aminoglycosides, and the modified antibiotics show significant reduction in the binding ability to target the bacterial ribosome. This report presents a detailed characterization of the antibiotic resistance profile and the aminoglycoside and nucleotide triphosphate substrate profiles of four common aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferases widely distributed in clinically important Gram-positive microorganisms. Although the antibiotic resistance phenotypes exhibited by these enzymes are similar, their aminoglycoside and nucleotide triphosphate substrate profiles are distinctive. Contrary to the dogma that these enzymes use ATP as the source of phosphate in their reactions, two of the four aminoglycoside 2′-phosphotransferases utilize GTP as the phosphate donor. Of the other two enzymes, one exhibits preference for ATP, and the other can utilize either ATP or GTP as nucleotide triphosphate substrate. A new nomenclature for these enzymes is put forth that takes into account the differences among these enzymes based on their respective substrate preferences. These nucleotide triphosphate preferences should have ramifications for understanding of the evolution, selection, and dissemination of the genes for these important resistance enzymes. PMID:19158087

  9. The Bacterial Phosphotransferase System: New frontiers 50 years after its discovery

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In 1964, Kundig, Ghosh and Roseman reported the discovery of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), which they subsequently proposed might catalyze sugar transport as well as sugar phosphorylation. What we have learned in the past 50 years, since its discovery, is that in addition to these primary functions, the PTS serves as a complex protein kinase system that regulates a wide variety of transport, metabolic and mutagenic processes as well as the expression of numerous genes. Recent operon- and genome-sequencing projects have revealed novel PTS protein-encoding genes, many of which have yet to be functionally defined. The current picture of the PTS is that of a complex system with ramifications in all aspects of cellular physiology. Moreover, its mosaic evolutionary history is unusual and intriguing. The PTS can be considered to serve many prokaryotes in capacities of communication and coordination as do the nervous systems of animals. PMID:26159069

  10. A rapid immunoprecipitation assay for neomycin phosphotransferase II expression in transformed bacteria and plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Baszczynski, C L

    1990-06-01

    Anti-kanamycin antibodies produced in rabbits, following coupling of the antibiotic to bovine serum albumin, were used to immunoprecipitate radioactively labelled phosphorylated kanamycin from transformed bacterial or plant extracts in a novel assay system, for the detection of neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) activity. Radioactive counts in the immunoprecipitated pellet give a semiquantitative measure of the kanamycin phosphorylation and hence the amount of NPTII activity. This assay is sensitive, uses very small amounts of radioactivity, and is very rapid, allowing many samples to be processed within a few hours. Immunoprecipitated counts from reactions with bacteria carrying a kanamycin resistance gene or from tobacco and Brassica napus plants transformed with NPTII gene-containing vectors were consistently higher than counts from nontransformed controls. Results obtained with this assay correlate well with those from the previously described gel overlay and dot-blot assays, but can be obtained in an appreciably shorter time frame.

  11. Rv3168 phosphotransferase activity mediates kanamycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Woo; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2013-11-28

    Tuberculosis is a worldwide epidemic disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with an estimated one-third of the human population currently affected. Treatment of this disease with aminoglycoside antibiotics has become less effective owing to antibiotic resistance. Recent determination of the crystal structure of the M. tuberculosis Rv3168 protein suggests a structure similar to that of Enterococcus faecalis APH(3')-IIIa, and that this protein may be an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase. To determine whether Rv3168 confers antibiotic resistance against kanamycin, we performed dose-response antibiotic resistance experiments using kanamycin. Expression of the Rv3168 protein in Escherichia coli conferred antibiotic resistance against 100 μM kanamycin, a concentration that effected cell growth arrest in the parental E. coli strain and an E. coli strain expressing the Rv3168(D249A) mutant, in which the catalytic Asp249 residue was mutated to alanine. Furthermore, we detected phosphotransferase activity of Rv3168 against kanamycin as a substrate. Moreover, docking simulation of kanamycin into the Rv3168 structure suggests that kanamycin fits well into the substrate binding pocket of the protein, and that the phosphorylation-hydroxyl-group of kanamycin was located at a position similar to that in E. faecalis APH(3')-IIIa. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the Rv3168 mediates kanamycin resistance in M. tuberculosis, likely through phosphotransferase targeting of kanamycin.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exopolyphosphatase Is Also a Polyphosphate: ADP Phosphotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Beassoni, Paola R.; Gallarato, Lucas A.; Boetsch, Cristhian; Garrido, Mónica N.; Lisa, Angela T.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exopolyphosphatase (paPpx; EC 3.6.1.11) catalyzes the hydrolysis of polyphosphates (polyP), producing polyPn−1 plus inorganic phosphate (Pi). In a recent work we have shown that paPpx is involved in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. The present study was aimed at performing the biochemical characterization of this enzyme. We found some properties that were already described for E. coli Ppx (ecPpx) but we also discovered new and original characteristics of paPpx: (i) the peptide that connects subdomains II and III is essential for enzyme activity; (ii) NH4 + is an activator of the enzyme and may function at concentrations lower than those of K+; (iii) Zn2+ is also an activator of paPpx and may substitute Mg2+ in the catalytic site; and (iv) paPpx also has phosphotransferase activity, dependent on Mg2+ and capable of producing ATP regardless of the presence or absence of K+ or NH4 + ions. In addition, we detected that the active site responsible for the phosphatase activity is also responsible for the phosphotransferase activity. Through the combination of molecular modeling and docking techniques, we propose a model of the paPpx N-terminal domain in complex with a polyP chain of 7 residues long and a molecule of ADP to explain the phosphotransferase activity. PMID:26576296

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exopolyphosphatase Is Also a Polyphosphate: ADP Phosphotransferase.

    PubMed

    Beassoni, Paola R; Gallarato, Lucas A; Boetsch, Cristhian; Garrido, Mónica N; Lisa, Angela T

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exopolyphosphatase (paPpx; EC 3.6.1.11) catalyzes the hydrolysis of polyphosphates (polyP), producing polyPn-1 plus inorganic phosphate (Pi). In a recent work we have shown that paPpx is involved in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. The present study was aimed at performing the biochemical characterization of this enzyme. We found some properties that were already described for E. coli Ppx (ecPpx) but we also discovered new and original characteristics of paPpx: (i) the peptide that connects subdomains II and III is essential for enzyme activity; (ii) NH4 (+) is an activator of the enzyme and may function at concentrations lower than those of K(+); (iii) Zn(2+) is also an activator of paPpx and may substitute Mg(2+) in the catalytic site; and (iv) paPpx also has phosphotransferase activity, dependent on Mg(2+) and capable of producing ATP regardless of the presence or absence of K(+) or NH4 (+) ions. In addition, we detected that the active site responsible for the phosphatase activity is also responsible for the phosphotransferase activity. Through the combination of molecular modeling and docking techniques, we propose a model of the paPpx N-terminal domain in complex with a polyP chain of 7 residues long and a molecule of ADP to explain the phosphotransferase activity.

  14. Functional and Kinetic Analysis of the Phosphotransferase CapP Conferring Selective Self-resistance to Capuramycin Antibiotics*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaoyong; Funabashi, Masanori; Nonaka, Koichi; Hosobuchi, Masahiko; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Pahari, Pallab; Van Lanen, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Capuramycin-related compounds, including A-500359s and A-503083s, are nucleoside antibiotics that inhibit the enzyme bacterial translocase I involved in peptidoglycan cell wall biosynthesis. Within the biosynthetic gene cluster for the A-500359s exists a gene encoding a putative aminoglycoside 3-phosphotransferase that was previously demonstrated to be highly expressed during the production of A-500359s and confers selective resistance to capuramycins when expressed in heterologous hosts. A similar gene (capP) was identified within the biosynthetic gene cluster for the A-503083s, and CapP is now shown to similarly confer selective resistance to capuramycins. Recombinant CapP was produced and purified from Escherichia coli, and the function of CapP is established as an ATP-dependent capuramycin phosphotransferase that regio-specifically transfers the γ-phosphate to the 3″-hydroxyl of the unsaturated hexuronic acid moiety of A-503083 B. Kinetic analysis with the three major A-503083 congeners suggests that CapP preferentially phosphorylates A-503083s containing an aminocaprolactam moiety attached to the hexuronic acid, and bi-substrate kinetic analysis was consistent with CapP employing a sequential kinetic mechanism similar to most known aminoglycoside 3-phosphotransferases. The purified CapP product lost its antibiotic activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis, and this loss in bioactivity is primarily due to a 272-fold increase in the IC50 in the bacterial translocase I-catalyzed reaction. The results establish CapP-mediated phosphorylation as a mechanism of resistance to capuramycins and now set the stage to explore this strategy of resistance as a potential mechanism inherent to pathogens and provide the impetus for preparing second generation analogues as a preemptive strike to such resistance strategies. PMID:20202936

  15. Functional and kinetic analysis of the phosphotransferase CapP conferring selective self-resistance to capuramycin antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoyong; Funabashi, Masanori; Nonaka, Koichi; Hosobuchi, Masahiko; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Pahari, Pallab; Van Lanen, Steven G

    2010-04-23

    Capuramycin-related compounds, including A-500359s and A-503083s, are nucleoside antibiotics that inhibit the enzyme bacterial translocase I involved in peptidoglycan cell wall biosynthesis. Within the biosynthetic gene cluster for the A-500359s exists a gene encoding a putative aminoglycoside 3-phosphotransferase that was previously demonstrated to be highly expressed during the production of A-500359s and confers selective resistance to capuramycins when expressed in heterologous hosts. A similar gene (capP) was identified within the biosynthetic gene cluster for the A-503083s, and CapP is now shown to similarly confer selective resistance to capuramycins. Recombinant CapP was produced and purified from Escherichia coli, and the function of CapP is established as an ATP-dependent capuramycin phosphotransferase that regio-specifically transfers the gamma-phosphate to the 3''-hydroxyl of the unsaturated hexuronic acid moiety of A-503083 B. Kinetic analysis with the three major A-503083 congeners suggests that CapP preferentially phosphorylates A-503083s containing an aminocaprolactam moiety attached to the hexuronic acid, and bi-substrate kinetic analysis was consistent with CapP employing a sequential kinetic mechanism similar to most known aminoglycoside 3-phosphotransferases. The purified CapP product lost its antibiotic activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis, and this loss in bioactivity is primarily due to a 272-fold increase in the IC(50) in the bacterial translocase I-catalyzed reaction. The results establish CapP-mediated phosphorylation as a mechanism of resistance to capuramycins and now set the stage to explore this strategy of resistance as a potential mechanism inherent to pathogens and provide the impetus for preparing second generation analogues as a preemptive strike to such resistance strategies.

  16. Functional characterization and phylogenetic analysis of acquired and intrinsic macrolide phosphotransferases in the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Sui, Zhihai; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Zhang, Gang; Zhao, Meilin; Chen, Weiqi; Feng, Jie

    2015-05-01

    The Bacillus cereus group is composed of Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria of clinical and ecological importance. More than 200 B. cereus group isolates have been sequenced. However, there are few reports of B. cereus group antibiotic resistance genes. This study identified two functional classes of macrolide phosphotransferases (Mphs) in the B. cereus group. Cluster A Mphs inactivate 14- and 15-membered macrolides while Cluster B Mphs inactivate 14-, 15- and 16-membered compounds. The genomic region surrounding the Cluster B Mph gene is related to various plasmid sequences, suggesting that this gene is an acquired resistance gene. In contrast, the Cluster A Mph gene is located in a chromosomal region conserved among all B. cereus group isolates, and data indicated that it was acquired early in the evolution of the group. Therefore, the Cluster A gene can be considered an intrinsic resistance gene. However, the gene itself is not present in all strains and our comparative genomics analyses showed that it is exchanged among strains of the B. cereus group by the mean of homologous recombination. These results provide an alternative mechanism to intrinsic resistance. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Biochemical characterization of two cloned resistance determinants encoding a paromomycin acetyltransferase and a paromomycin phosphotransferase from Streptomyces rimosus forma paromomycinus.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-González, J A; López-Cabrera, M; Pardo, J M; Jiménez, A

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism conferring resistance to paromomycin in Streptomyces rimosus forma paromomycinus, the producing organism, was studied at the level of both protein synthesis and drug-inactivating enzymes. Ribosomes prepared from this organism grown in either production or nonproduction medium were fully sensitive to paromomycin. A paromomycin acetyltransferase and a paromomycin phosphotransferase, both characteristic of the producer, were highly purified from extracts prepared from two Streptomyces lividans transformants harboring the relevant genes inserted in pIJ702-derived plasmids. In vitro, paromomycin was inactivated by either activity. In vivo, however, S. lividans clones containing the gene for either enzyme inserted in the low-copy-number plasmid pIJ41 were resistant to only low levels of paromomycin. In contrast, an S. lividans transformant containing both genes inserted in the same pIJ41-derived plasmid displayed high levels of resistance to paromomycin. These results indicate that both genes are required to determine the high levels of resistance to this drug in the producing organism. Paromomycin is doubly modified by the enzymes. However, whereas acetylparomomycin was a poorer substrate than paromomycin for the phosphotransferase, phosphorylparomomycin was modified more actively than was the intact drug by the acetyltransferase. These findings are discussed in terms of both a permeability barrier to paromomycin and the possible role(s) of the two enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of this antibiotic. PMID:2536659

  18. Changes in Gene Expression during Adaptation of Listeria monocytogenes to the Soil Environment

    PubMed Central

    Piveteau, Pascal; Depret, Géraldine; Pivato, Barbara; Garmyn, Dominique; Hartmann, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen responsible for listeriosis. In order to study the processes underlying its ability to adapt to the soil environment, whole-genome arrays were used to analyse transcriptome modifications 15 minutes, 30 minutes and 18 h after inoculation of L. monocytogenes EGD-e in soil extracts. Growth was observed within the first day of incubation and large numbers were still detected in soil extract and soil microcosms one year after the start of the experiment. Major transcriptional reprofiling was observed. Nutrient acquisition mechanisms (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems and ABC transporters) and enzymes involved in catabolism of specific carbohydrates (β-glucosidases; chitinases) were prevalent. This is consistent with the overrepresentation of the CodY regulon that suggests that in a nutrient depleted environment, L. monocytogenes recruits its extensive repertoire of transporters to acquire a range of substrates for energy production. PMID:21966375

  19. Overexpression and Initial Characterization of the Chromosomal Aminoglycoside 3′-O-Phosphotransferase APH(3′)-IIb from Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿†

    PubMed Central

    Hainrichson, Mariana; Yaniv, Orit; Cherniavsky, Marina; Nudelman, Igor; Shallom-Shezifi, Dalia; Yaron, Sima; Baasov, Timor

    2007-01-01

    The chromosomal gene aph(3′)-IIb, encoding an aminoglycoside 3′-phosphotransferase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The APH(3′)-IIb enzyme was purified as a monomer in a two-step procedure and was shown to phosphorylate its substrates at the C-3′-OH position, with kcat/Km values of 0.4 × 104 to 36 × 104 M−1 s−1. PMID:17088479

  20. Interaction of arylsulfatase A with UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:Lysosomal enzyme-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase.

    PubMed

    Schierau, A; Dietz, F; Lange, H; Schestag, F; Parastar, A; Gieselmann, V

    1999-02-05

    The critical step in lysosomal targeting of soluble lysosomal enzymes is the recognition by an UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:lysosomal enzyme-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. The structure of the determinant common to all lysosomal enzymes for proper recognition by the phosphotransferase is not completely understood. Our current knowledge is largely based on the introduction of targeted amino acid substitutions into lysosomal enzymes and analysis of their effects on phosphotransferase recognition. We have investigated the effect of eight anti-arylsulfatase A monoclonal antibodies on the interaction of arylsulfatase A with the lysosomal enzyme phosphotransferase in vitro. We also show that a lysine-rich surface area of arylsulfatases A and B is essential for proper recognition by the phosphotransferase. Monoclonal antibodies bind to at least six different epitopes at different locations on the surface of arylsulfatase A. All antibodies bind outside the lysine-rich recognition area, but nevertheless Fab fragments of these antibodies prevent interaction of arylsulfatase A with the phosphotransferase. Our data support a model in which binding of arylsulfatase A to the phosphotransferase is not restricted to a limited surface area but involves the simultaneous recognition of large parts of arylsulfatase A.

  1. Rifampin phosphotransferase is an unusual antibiotic resistance kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stogios, Peter J.; Cox, Georgina; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Pillon, Monica C.; Waglechner, Nicholas; Skarina, Tatiana; Koteva, Kalinka; Guarné, Alba; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D.

    2016-01-01

    Rifampin (RIF) phosphotransferase (RPH) confers antibiotic resistance by conversion of RIF and ATP, to inactive phospho-RIF, AMP and Pi. Here we present the crystal structure of RPH from Listeria monocytogenes (RPH-Lm), which reveals that the enzyme is comprised of three domains: two substrate-binding domains (ATP-grasp and RIF-binding domains); and a smaller phosphate-carrying His swivel domain. Using solution small-angle X-ray scattering and mutagenesis, we reveal a mechanism where the swivel domain transits between the spatially distinct substrate-binding sites during catalysis. RPHs are previously uncharacterized dikinases that are widespread in environmental and pathogenic bacteria. These enzymes are members of a large unexplored group of bacterial enzymes with substrate affinities that have yet to be fully explored. Such an enzymatically complex mechanism of antibiotic resistance augments the spectrum of strategies used by bacteria to evade antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27103605

  2. Rifampin phosphotransferase is an unusual antibiotic resistance kinase.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Cox, Georgina; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Pillon, Monica C; Waglechner, Nicholas; Skarina, Tatiana; Koteva, Kalinka; Guarné, Alba; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-04-22

    Rifampin (RIF) phosphotransferase (RPH) confers antibiotic resistance by conversion of RIF and ATP, to inactive phospho-RIF, AMP and Pi. Here we present the crystal structure of RPH from Listeria monocytogenes (RPH-Lm), which reveals that the enzyme is comprised of three domains: two substrate-binding domains (ATP-grasp and RIF-binding domains); and a smaller phosphate-carrying His swivel domain. Using solution small-angle X-ray scattering and mutagenesis, we reveal a mechanism where the swivel domain transits between the spatially distinct substrate-binding sites during catalysis. RPHs are previously uncharacterized dikinases that are widespread in environmental and pathogenic bacteria. These enzymes are members of a large unexplored group of bacterial enzymes with substrate affinities that have yet to be fully explored. Such an enzymatically complex mechanism of antibiotic resistance augments the spectrum of strategies used by bacteria to evade antimicrobial compounds.

  3. Fungal histidine phosphotransferase plays a crucial role in photomorphogenesis and pathogenesis in Magnaporthe oryzae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanan, Varsha C.; Chandarana, Pinal M.; Chattoo, Bharat. B.; Patkar, Rajesh N.; Manjrekar, Johannes

    2017-05-01

    Two-component signal transduction (TCST) pathways play crucial roles in many cellular functions such as stress responses, biofilm formation and sporulation. The histidine phosphotransferase (HPt), which is an intermediate phosphotransfer protein in a two-component system, transfers a phosphate group to a phosphorylatable aspartate residue in the target protein(s), and up-regulates stress-activated MAP kinase cascades. Most fungal genomes carry a single copy of the gene coding for HPt, which are potential antifungal targets. However, unlike the histidine kinases (HK) or the downstream response regulators (RR) in two-component system, the HPts have not been well studied in phytopathogenic fungi. In this study, we investigated the role of HPt in the model rice-blast fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. We found that in M. oryzae an additional isoform of the HPT gene YPD1 was expressed specifically in response to light. Further, the expression of light-regulated genes such as those encoding envoy and blue-light-harvesting protein, and PAS domain containing HKs was significantly reduced upon down-regulation of YPD1 in M. oryzae. Importantly, down-regulation of YPD1 led to a significant decrease in the ability to penetrate the host cuticle and in light-dependent conidiation in M. oryzae. Thus, our results indicate that Ypd1 plays an important role in asexual development and host invasion, and suggest that YPD1 isoforms likely have distinct roles to play in the rice-blast pathogen M. oryzae.

  4. Fludarabine resistance mediated by aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa and the structurally related eukaryotic cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carrera, Dámaso; Bravo-Navas, Sara; Cabezón, Elena; Arechaga, Ignacio; Cabezas, Matilde; Yáñez, Lucrecia; Pipaón, Carlos

    2017-04-03

    While working with G418-resistant stably transfected cells, we realized the neomycin resistance gene (NeoR), which encodes the aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa [APH(3')-IIa], also confers resistance to the nucleoside analog fludarabine. Fludarabine is a cytostatic drug widely used in the treatment of hematologic and solid tumors as well as in the conditioning of patients before transplantation of hematopoietic progenitors. We present evidence that NeoR-transfected cells do not incorporate fludarabine, thus avoiding DNA damage caused by the drug, evidenced by a lack of FANCD2 monoubiquitination and impaired apoptosis. A screening of other nucleoside analogs revealed that APH(3')-IIa only protects against ATP purine analogs. Moreover, APH(3')-IIa ATPase activity is inhibited by fludarabine monophosphate, suggesting that APH(3')-IIa blocks fludarabine incorporation into DNA by dephosphorylating its active fludarabine triphosphate form. Furthermore, overexpression of the catalytic subunit of the eukaryotic kinase PKA, which is structurally related to APHs, also provides resistance to fludarabine, anticipating its putative utility as a response marker to the drug. Our results preclude the use of Neo marker plasmids in the study of purine analogs and unveils a new resistance mechanism against these chemotherapeuticals.-Sánchez-Carrera, D., Bravo-Navas, S., Cabezón, E., Arechaga, I., Cabezas, M., Yáñez, L., Pipaón, C. Fludarabine resistance mediated by aminoglycoside-3'-phosphotransferase-IIa and the structurally related eukaryotic cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  5. Identification of a phosphoenolpyruvate:fructose 1-phosphotransferase system in Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, K D; Ghosh, S

    1984-01-01

    An inducible phosphoenolpyruvate:fructose phosphotransferase system has been detected in Azospirillum brasilense, which requires a minimum of two components of the crude extracts for activity: (i) a soluble fraction (enzyme I) and (ii) a membrane fraction (enzyme II). The uninduced cells neither show any uptake of fructose nor express activity of either of these two enzyme fractions. C-1 of fructose is the site of phosphorylation. This phosphotransferase system does not accept glucose as a substrate for phosphorylation. PMID:6501230

  6. Lcp1 Is a Phosphotransferase Responsible for Ligating Arabinogalactan to Peptidoglycan in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, James; Lloyd, Georgina; Joe, Maju; Lowary, Todd L.; Reynolds, Edward; Walters-Morgan, Hannah; Bhatt, Apoorva; Lovering, Andrew; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), has a unique cell envelope which accounts for its unusual low permeability and contributes to resistance against common antibiotics. The main structural elements of the cell wall consist of a cross-linked network of peptidoglycan (PG) in which some of the muramic acid residues are covalently attached to a complex polysaccharide, arabinogalactan (AG), via a unique α-l-rhamnopyranose–(1→3)-α-d-GlcNAc-(1→P) linker unit. While the molecular genetics associated with PG and AG biosynthetic pathways have been largely delineated, the mechanism by which these two major pathways converge has remained elusive. In Gram-positive organisms, the LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) family of proteins are responsible for ligating cell wall teichoic acids to peptidoglycan, through a linker unit that bears a striking resemblance to that found in mycobacterial arabinogalactan. In this study, we have identified Rv3267 as a mycobacterial LCP homolog gene that encodes a phosphotransferase which we have named Lcp1. We demonstrate that lcp1 is an essential gene required for cell viability and show that recombinant Lcp1 is capable of ligating AG to PG in a cell-free radiolabeling assay. PMID:27486192

  7. The global regulatory system Csr senses glucose through the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2016-02-01

    A novel connection between two regulatory systems controlling crucial biological processes in bacteria, the carbon storage regulator (Csr) system and the glucose-specific phosphotransferase system (PTS), is reported by Leng et al. in this issue. This involves the interaction of unphosphorylated EIIA(Glc), a component of the glucose-specific PTS, with the CsrD protein, which accelerates the decay of the CsrB and CsrC small RNAs via RNase E in Escherichia coli. As unphosphorylated EIIA(G) (lc) is generated in the presence of glucose, the PTS thus acts as a sensor of glucose for the Csr system. Interestingly, another pathway can operate for communication between the Csr system and the glucose-specific PTS. The absence of glucose generates phosphorylated EIIA(Glc) , which activates the enzyme adenylate cyclase to produce cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) that, in turn, binds to the regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP). Leng et al. show that the complex cAMP-CRP modestly reduces CsrB decay independently of CsrD. On the other hand, a previous study indicates that the complex cAMP-CRP positively regulates the transcription of CsrB and CsrC in Salmonella enterica. Therefore, EIIA(G) (lc) could work as a molecular switch that regulates the activity of the Csr system, in response to its phosphorylation state determined by the presence or absence of glucose, in order to control gene expression.

  8. Control of Transposon-mediated Directed Mutation by the Escherichia coli Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.; Zhang, Zhongge

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) has been shown to control transport, cell metabolism and gene expression. We here present results supporting the novel suggestion that in certain instances, it also regulates mutation rate. Directed mutations are defined as mutations that occur at higher frequencies when beneficial than when neutral or detrimental. To date, the occurrence of directed point mutations has not been documented and confirmed, but a few examples of transposon-mediated directed mutation have been reported. Here we focus on the first and best-studied example of directed mutation, which involves the regulation of Insertion Sequence-5 (IS5) hopping into a specific site upstream of the glpFK glycerol utilization operon in Escherichia coli. This insertional event specifically activates expression of the glpFK operon, allowing growth of wild type cells with glycerol as a carbon source in the presence of non-metabolizable glucose analogues which normally block glycerol utilization. The sugar transporting PTS controls this process by regulating levels of cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate and cyclic AMP as established in previous publications. Direct involvement of the glycerol repressor, GlpR, and the cyclic AMP receptor protein, Crp, in the regulation of transposon-mediated directed mutation has been demonstrated. PMID:26159081

  9. Regulatory Tasks of the Phosphoenolpyruvate-Phosphotransferase System of Pseudomonas putida in Central Carbon Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría, Max; Kleijn, Roelco J.; Sauer, Uwe; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Two branches of the phosphoenolpyruvate-phosphotransferase system (PTS) operate in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. One branch encompasses a complete set of enzymes for fructose intake (PTSFru), while the other (N-related PTS, or PTSNtr) controls various cellular functions unrelated to the transport of carbohydrates. The potential of these two systems for regulating central carbon catabolism has been investigated by measuring the metabolic fluxes of isogenic strains bearing nonpolar mutations in PTSFru or PTSNtr genes and grown on either fructose (a PTS substrate) or glucose, the transport of which is not governed by the PTS in this bacterium. The flow of carbon from each sugar was distinctly split between the Entner-Doudoroff, pentose phosphate, and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathways in a ratio that was maintained in each of the PTS mutants examined. However, strains lacking PtsN (EIIANtr) displayed significantly higher fluxes in the reactions of the pyruvate shunt, which bypasses malate dehydrogenase in the TCA cycle. This was consistent with the increased activity of the malic enzyme and the pyruvate carboxylase found in the corresponding PTS mutants. Genetic evidence suggested that such a metabolic effect of PtsN required the transfer of high-energy phosphate through the system. The EIIANtr protein of the PTSNtr thus helps adjust central metabolic fluxes to satisfy the anabolic and energetic demands of the overall cell physiology. PMID:22434849

  10. Control of Transposon-Mediated Directed Mutation by the Escherichia coli Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System.

    PubMed

    Saier, Milton H; Zhang, Zhongge

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) has been shown to control transport, cell metabolism and gene expression. We here present results supporting the novel suggestion that in certain instances it also regulates the mutation rate. Directed mutations are defined as mutations that occur at higher frequencies when beneficial than when neutral or detrimental. To date, the occurrence of directed point mutations has not been documented and confirmed, but a few examples of transposon-mediated directed mutations have been reported. Here we focus on the first and best-studied example of directed mutation, which involves the regulation of insertion sequence-5 hopping into a specific site upstream of the glpFK glycerol utilization operon in Escherichia coli. This insertional event specifically activates expression of the glpFK operon, allowing the growth of wild-type cells with glycerol as a carbon source in the presence of nonmetabolizable glucose analogues which normally block glycerol utilization. The sugar-transporting PTS controls this process by regulating levels of cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate and cyclic (c)AMP as established in previous publications. Direct involvement of the glycerol repressor, GlpR, and the cAMP receptor protein, Crp, in the regulation of transposon-mediated directed mutation has been demonstrated.

  11. Salmonella Utilizes d-Glucosaminate via a Mannose Family Phosphotransferase System Permease and Associated Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Katherine A.; Phillips, Robert S.; Mrázek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a globally significant bacterial food-borne pathogen that utilizes a variety of carbon sources. We report here that Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) uses d-glucosaminate (2-amino-2-deoxy-d-gluconic acid) as a carbon and nitrogen source via a previously uncharacterized mannose family phosphotransferase system (PTS) permease, and we designate the genes encoding the permease dgaABCD (d-glucosaminate PTS permease components EIIA, EIIB, EIIC, and EIID). Two other genes in the dga operon (dgaE and dgaF) were required for wild-type growth of S. Typhimurium with d-glucosaminate. Transcription of dgaABCDEF was dependent on RpoN (σ54) and an RpoN-dependent activator gene we designate dgaR. Introduction of a plasmid bearing dgaABCDEF under the control of the lac promoter into Escherichia coli strains DH5α, BL21, and JM101 allowed these strains to grow on minimal medium containing d-glucosaminate as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Biochemical and genetic data support a catabolic pathway in which d-glucosaminate, as it is transported across the cell membrane, is phosphorylated at the C-6 position by DgaABCD. DgaE converts the resulting d-glucosaminate-6-phosphate to 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate 6-phosphate (KDGP), which is subsequently cleaved by the aldolase DgaF to form glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and pyruvate. DgaF catalyzes the same reaction as that catalyzed by Eda, a KDGP aldolase in the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, and the two enzymes can substitute for each other in their respective pathways. Examination of the Integrated Microbial Genomes database revealed that orthologs of the dga genes are largely restricted to certain enteric bacteria and a few species in the phylum Firmicutes. PMID:23836865

  12. Structural basis for catalysis in a CDP-alcohol phosphotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Sciara, Giuliano; Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Kloss, Brian; Tabuso, Shantelle; Byfield, Rushelle; Cohn, Raphael; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Slavkovic, Vesna; Graziano, Joseph H.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mancia, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    The CDP-alcohol phosphotransferase (CDP-AP) family of integral membrane enzymes catalyzes the transfer of a substituted phosphate group from a CDP-linked donor to an alcohol-acceptor. This is an essential reaction for phospholipid biosynthesis across all kingdoms of life, and it is catalyzed solely by CDP-APs. Here we report the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of a representative CDP-AP from Archaeoglobus fulgidus. The enzyme (AF2299) is a homodimer, with each protomer consisting of six transmembrane helices and an N-terminal cytosolic domain. A polar cavity within the membrane accommodates the active site, lined with the residues from an absolutely conserved CDP-AP signature motif (D1xxD2G1xxAR…G2xxxD3xxxD4). Structures in the apo, CMP-bound, CDP-bound and CDP-glycerol-bound states define functional roles for each of these eight conserved residues and allow us to propose a sequential, base-catalyzed mechanism universal for CDP-APs, in which the fourth aspartate (D4) acts as the catalytic base. PMID:24923293

  13. Sugar Influx Sensing by the Phosphotransferase System of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Somavanshi, Rahul; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Sourjik, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The phosphotransferase system (PTS) plays a pivotal role in the uptake of multiple sugars in Escherichia coli and many other bacteria. In the cell, individual sugar-specific PTS branches are interconnected through a series of phosphotransfer reactions, thus creating a global network that not only phosphorylates incoming sugars but also regulates a number of cellular processes. Despite the apparent importance of the PTS network in bacterial physiology, the holistic function of the network in the cell remains unclear. Here we used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to investigate the PTS network in E. coli, including the dynamics of protein interactions and the processing of different stimuli and their transmission to the chemotaxis pathway. Our results demonstrate that despite the seeming complexity of the cellular PTS network, its core part operates in a strikingly simple way, sensing the overall influx of PTS sugars irrespective of the sugar identity and distributing this information equally through all studied branches of the network. Moreover, it also integrates several other specific metabolic inputs. The integrated output of the PTS network is then transmitted linearly to the chemotaxis pathway, in stark contrast to the amplification of conventional chemotactic stimuli. Finally, we observe that default uptake through the uninduced PTS network correlates well with the quality of the carbon source, apparently representing an optimal regulatory strategy. PMID:27557415

  14. 40 CFR 174.526 - Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.526 Section 174.526... phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues...

  15. 40 CFR 174.526 - Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.526 Section 174.526... phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues...

  16. 40 CFR 174.526 - Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.526 Section 174.526... phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues...

  17. 40 CFR 174.526 - Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.526 Section 174.526... phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues...

  18. 40 CFR 174.526 - Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.526 Section 174.526... phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues...

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus casseliflavus aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei; Smith, Clyde A.

    2010-01-01

    The deactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by chemical modification is one of the major sources of bacterial resistance to this family of therapeutic compounds, which includes the clinically relevant drugs streptomycin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) form one such family of enzymes responsible for this resistance. The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IVa [APH(2′′)-IVa] from Enterococcus casseliflavus, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 306 amino-acid residues) has been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The enzyme was crystallized in three substrate-free forms. Two of the crystal forms belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121 with similar unit-cell parameters, although one of the crystal forms had a unit-cell volume that was approximately 13% smaller than the other and a very low solvent content of around 38%. The third crystal form belonged to the monoclinic space group P21 and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The orthorhombic crystal forms of apo APH(2′′)-IVa both diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and the monoclinic crystal form diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution; synchrotron diffraction data were collected from these crystals at SSRL (Stanford, California, USA). Structure determination by molecular replacement using the structure of the related enzyme APH(2′′)-IIa is proceeding. PMID:20057078

  20. The phosphotransferase protein EIIA(Ntr) modulates the phosphate starvation response through interaction with histidine kinase PhoR in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lüttmann, Denise; Göpel, Yvonne; Görke, Boris

    2012-10-01

    Many Proteobacteria possess the paralogous PTS(Ntr), in addition to the sugar transport phosphotransferase system (PTS). In the PTS(Ntr) phosphoryl-groups are transferred from phosphoenolpyruvate to protein EIIA(Ntr) via the phosphotransferases EI(Ntr) and NPr. The PTS(Ntr) has been implicated in regulation of diverse physiological processes. In Escherichia coli, the PTS(Ntr) plays a role in potassium homeostasis. In particular, EIIA(Ntr) binds to and stimulates activity of a two-component histidine kinase (KdpD) resulting in increased expression of the genes encoding the high-affinity K(+) transporter KdpFABC. Here, we show that the phosphate (pho) regulon is likewise modulated by PTS(Ntr). The pho regulon, which comprises more than 30 genes, is activated by the two-component system PhoR/PhoB under conditions of phosphate starvation. Mutants lacking EIIA(Ntr) are unable to fully activate the pho genes and exhibit a growth delay upon adaptation to phosphate limitation. In contrast, pho expression is increased above the wild-type level in mutants deficient for EIIA(Ntr) phosphorylation suggesting that non-phosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) modulates pho. Protein interaction analyses reveal binding of EIIA(Ntr) to histidine kinase PhoR. This interaction increases the amount of phosphorylated response regulator PhoB. Thus, EIIA(Ntr) is an accessory protein that modulates the activities of two distinct sensor kinases, KdpD and PhoR, in E. coli.

  1. Regulatory tasks of the phosphoenolpyruvate-phosphotransferase system of Pseudomonas putida in central carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chavarría, Max; Kleijn, Roelco J; Sauer, Uwe; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    Two branches of the phosphoenolpyruvate-phosphotransferase system (PTS) operate in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. One branch encompasses a complete set of enzymes for fructose intake (PTS(Fru)), while the other (N-related PTS, or PTS(Ntr)) controls various cellular functions unrelated to the transport of carbohydrates. The potential of these two systems for regulating central carbon catabolism has been investigated by measuring the metabolic fluxes of isogenic strains bearing nonpolar mutations in PTS(Fru) or PTS(Ntr) genes and grown on either fructose (a PTS substrate) or glucose, the transport of which is not governed by the PTS in this bacterium. The flow of carbon from each sugar was distinctly split between the Entner-Doudoroff, pentose phosphate, and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathways in a ratio that was maintained in each of the PTS mutants examined. However, strains lacking PtsN (EIIA(Ntr)) displayed significantly higher fluxes in the reactions of the pyruvate shunt, which bypasses malate dehydrogenase in the TCA cycle. This was consistent with the increased activity of the malic enzyme and the pyruvate carboxylase found in the corresponding PTS mutants. Genetic evidence suggested that such a metabolic effect of PtsN required the transfer of high-energy phosphate through the system. The EIIA(Ntr) protein of the PTS(Ntr) thus helps adjust central metabolic fluxes to satisfy the anabolic and energetic demands of the overall cell physiology. This study demonstrates that EIIA(Ntr) influences the biochemical reactions that deliver carbon between the upper and lower central metabolic domains for the consumption of sugars by P. putida. These findings indicate that the EIIA(Ntr) protein is a key player for orchestrating the fate of carbon in various physiological destinations in this bacterium. Additionally, these results highlight the importance of the posttranslational regulation of extant enzymatic complexes for increasing the robustness of the

  2. Dominant selectable markers for Penicillium spp. transformation and gene function studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Penicillium spp. has been genetically manipulated and gene function studies have utilized single gene deletion strains for phenotypic analysis. Fungal transformation experiments have relied on hygromycin and hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph) as the main dominant selectable marker (DSM) system in P...

  3. Nitrogen regulator GlnR controls uptake and utilization of non-phosphotransferase-system carbon sources in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Cheng-Heng; Yao, Lili; Xu, Ya; Liu, Wei-Bing; Zhou, Ying; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-12-22

    The regulatory mechanisms underlying the uptake and utilization of multiple types of carbohydrates in actinomycetes remain poorly understood. In this study, we show that GlnR (central regulator of nitrogen metabolism) serves as a universal regulator of nitrogen metabolism and plays an important, previously unknown role in controlling the transport of non-phosphotransferase-system (PTS) carbon sources in actinomycetes. It was observed that GlnR can directly interact with the promoters of most (13 of 20) carbohydrate ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter loci and can activate the transcription of these genes in response to nitrogen availability in industrial, erythromycin-producing Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Deletion of the glnR gene resulted in severe growth retardation under the culture conditions used, with select ABC-transported carbohydrates (maltose, sorbitol, mannitol, cellobiose, trehalose, or mannose) used as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, we found that GlnR-mediated regulation of carbohydrate transport was highly conserved in actinomycetes. These results demonstrate that GlnR serves a role beyond nitrogen metabolism, mediating critical functions in carbon metabolism and crosstalk of nitrogen- and carbon-metabolism pathways in response to the nutritional states of cells. These findings provide insights into the molecular regulation of transport and metabolism of non-PTS carbohydrates and reveal potential applications for the cofermentation of biomass-derived sugars in the production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals.

  4. Nitrogen regulator GlnR controls uptake and utilization of non-phosphotransferase-system carbon sources in actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Cheng-Heng; Yao, Lili; Xu, Ya; Liu, Wei-Bing; Zhou, Ying; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms underlying the uptake and utilization of multiple types of carbohydrates in actinomycetes remain poorly understood. In this study, we show that GlnR (central regulator of nitrogen metabolism) serves as a universal regulator of nitrogen metabolism and plays an important, previously unknown role in controlling the transport of non-phosphotransferase-system (PTS) carbon sources in actinomycetes. It was observed that GlnR can directly interact with the promoters of most (13 of 20) carbohydrate ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter loci and can activate the transcription of these genes in response to nitrogen availability in industrial, erythromycin-producing Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Deletion of the glnR gene resulted in severe growth retardation under the culture conditions used, with select ABC-transported carbohydrates (maltose, sorbitol, mannitol, cellobiose, trehalose, or mannose) used as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, we found that GlnR-mediated regulation of carbohydrate transport was highly conserved in actinomycetes. These results demonstrate that GlnR serves a role beyond nitrogen metabolism, mediating critical functions in carbon metabolism and crosstalk of nitrogen- and carbon-metabolism pathways in response to the nutritional states of cells. These findings provide insights into the molecular regulation of transport and metabolism of non-PTS carbohydrates and reveal potential applications for the cofermentation of biomass-derived sugars in the production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals. PMID:26644570

  5. Novel Aminoglycoside 2″-Phosphotransferase Identified in a Gram-Negative Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Frase, Hilary; Antunes, Nuno T.

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferases are the major aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in clinical isolates of enterococci and staphylococci. We describe a novel aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase from the Gram-negative pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, which shares 78% amino acid sequence identity with the APH(2″)-Ia domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme aminoglycoside (6′) acetyltransferase-Ie/aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase-Ia or AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia from Gram-positive cocci, which we called APH(2″)-If. This enzyme confers resistance to the 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides kanamycin, tobramycin, dibekacin, gentamicin, and sisomicin, but not to arbekacin, amikacin, isepamicin, or netilmicin, but not to any of the 4,5-disubstituted antibiotics tested. Steady-state kinetic studies demonstrated that GTP, and not ATP, is the preferred cosubstrate for APH(2″)-If. The enzyme phosphorylates the majority of 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides with high catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km = 105 to 107 M−1 s−1), while the catalytic efficiencies against the 4,6-disubstituted antibiotics amikacin and isepamicin are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower, due mainly to the low apparent affinities of these substrates for the enzyme. Both 4,5-disubstituted antibiotics and the atypical aminoglycoside neamine are not substrates of APH(2″)-If, but are inhibitors. The antibiotic susceptibility and substrate profiles of APH(2″)-If are very similar to those of the APH(2″)-Ia phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia enzyme. PMID:23129050

  6. Evidence for regulation of gluconeogenesis by the fructose phosphotransferase system in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Chin, A M; Feucht, B U; Saier, M H

    1987-01-01

    A genetic locus designated fruR, previously mapped to min 3 on the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome, gave rise to constitutive expression of the fructose (fru) regulon and pleiotropically prevented growth on all Krebs cycle intermediates. Regulatory effects of fruR were independent of cyclic AMP and its receptor protein and did not prevent uptake of Krebs cycle intermediates. Instead, the phosphotransferase system appeared to regulate gluconeogenesis by controlling the activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and phosphoenolpyruvate synthase. PMID:3542978

  7. Action of nucleotide phosphotransferase of Escherichia coli on nicotinamide riboside and nicotinamide mononucleotide.

    PubMed

    Brunngraber, E F; Chargaff, E

    1977-10-01

    The action of the nucleotide phosphotransferase of Escherichia coli on nicotinamide riboside and on its 5'-phosphate results in the addition of one phosphate moiety to each of the substrates. Although the proof is not conclusive, it is likely that the phosphate group is transferred to the 3'-hydroxyl of the ribose. This is in contrast to the behavior of the enzyme toward NAD in which only the adenylic acid portion is phosphorylated enzymically.

  8. Crystal structure and kinetic mechanism of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase-2″-IVa

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Frase, Hilary; Antunes, Nuno Tiago; Smith, Clyde A; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2010-01-01

    Acquired resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics primarily results from deactivation by three families of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Here, we report the kinetic mechanism and structure of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase 2″-IVa (APH(2″)-IVa), an enzyme responsible for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical enterococcal and staphylococcal isolates. The enzyme operates via a Bi-Bi sequential mechanism in which the two substrates (ATP or GTP and an aminoglycoside) bind in a random manner. The APH(2″)-IVa enzyme phosphorylates various 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycoside antibiotics with catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) of 1.5 × 103 to 1.2 × 106 (M−1 s−1). The enzyme uses both ATP and GTP as the phosphate source, an extremely rare occurrence in the phosphotransferase and protein kinase enzymes. Based on an analysis of the APH(2″)-IVa structure, two overlapping binding templates specifically tuned for hydrogen bonding to either ATP or GTP have been identified and described. A detailed understanding of the structure and mechanism of the GTP-utilizing phosphotransferases is crucial for the development of either novel aminoglycosides or, more importantly, GTP-based enzyme inhibitors which would not be expected to interfere with crucial ATP-dependent enzymes. PMID:20556826

  9. Purification and Characterization of Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase APH(6)-Id, a Streptomycin Inactivating Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ashenafi, Meseret; Ammosova, Tatiana; Nekhai, Sergei; Byrnes, W. Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    As part of an overall project to characterize the streptomycin phosphotransferase enzyme APH(6)-Id, which confers bacterial resistance to streptomycin, we cloned, expressed, purified and characterized the enzyme. When expressed in E. coli, the recombinant enzyme increased by up to 70-fold the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) needed to inhibit cell growth. Size exclusion chromatography gave a molecular mass of 31.4 ± 1.3 kDa for the enzyme, showing that it functions as a monomer. Activity was assayed using three methods: (1) an HPLC-based method that measures the consumption of streptomycin over time; (2) a spectrophotometric method that utilizes a coupled assay; and (3) a radioenzymatic method that detects production of 32P-labeled streptomycin phosphate. Altogether, the three methods demonstrated that streptomycin was consumed in the APH(6)-Id-catalyzed reaction, ATP was hydrolyzed, and streptomycin phosphate was produced in a substrate-dependent manner, demonstrating that APH(6)-Id is a streptomycin phosphotransferase. Steady state kinetic analysis gave the following results: Km(streptomycin) of 0.38 ± 0.13 mM, Km(ATP) of 1.03 ± 0.1 mM, Vmax of 3.2 ± 1.1 μmol/min/mg and kcat of 1.7 ± 0.6 s−1. Our study demonstrates that APH(6)-Id is a bona fide streptomycin phosphotransferase, functions as a monomer, and confers resistance to streptomycin. PMID:24248535

  10. Phosphorylation of streptozotocin during uptake via the phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ammer, J; Brennenstuhl, M; Schindler, P; Höltje, J V; Zähner, H

    1979-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis defective in the general components (enzyme I, or HPr, or both) of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system are shown to be resistant to the antibiotic streptozotocin. It is shown here, employing 32P-labeled phosphoenolpyruvate, that wild-type cells of E. coli phosphorylate streptozotocin, whereas with a phosphotransferase system-defective mutant of E. coli the drug is recovered in an unaltered, free form. The internal accumulation of streptozotocin at the steady-state level was about 70 times that of the concentration in the external medium. The antibacterial action of streptozotocin, as well as the uptake of the drug, was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The uptake of the antibiotic was extremely sensitive to p-chloromercuribenzoate. It is concluded that streptozotocin is taken up by E. coli via the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system and consequently accumulates in the cell at first as streptozotocin-phosphate. PMID:161156

  11. Purification and characterization of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(6)-Id, a streptomycin-inactivating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ashenafi, Meseret; Ammosova, Tatiana; Nekhai, Sergei; Byrnes, W Malcolm

    2014-02-01

    As part of an overall project to characterize the streptomycin phosphotransferase enzyme APH(6)-Id, which confers bacterial resistance to streptomycin, we cloned, expressed, purified, and characterized the enzyme. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant enzyme increased by up to 70-fold the minimum inhibitory concentration needed to inhibit cell growth. Size-exclusion chromatography gave a molecular mass of 31.4 ± 1.3 kDa for the enzyme, showing that it functions as a monomer. Activity was assayed using three methods: (1) an HPLC-based method that measures the consumption of streptomycin over time; (2) a spectrophotometric method that utilizes a coupled assay; and (3) a radioenzymatic method that detects production of (32)P-labeled streptomycin phosphate. Altogether, the three methods demonstrated that streptomycin was consumed in the APH(6)-Id-catalyzed reaction, ATP was hydrolyzed, and streptomycin phosphate was produced in a substrate-dependent manner, demonstrating that APH(6)-Id is a streptomycin phosphotransferase. Steady-state kinetic analysis gave the following results: K(m)(streptomycin) of 0.38 ± 0.13 mM, K(m)(ATP) of 1.03 ± 0.1 mM, V(max) of 3.2 ± 1.1 μmol/min/mg, and k(cat) of 1.7 ± 0.6 s(-1). Our study demonstrates that APH(6)-Id is a bona fide streptomycin phosphotransferase, functions as a monomer, and confers resistance to streptomycin.

  12. Ceramide Phosphoethanolamine Biosynthesis in Drosophila Is Mediated by a Unique Ethanolamine Phosphotransferase in the Golgi Lumen♦

    PubMed Central

    Vacaru, Ana M.; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; Ternes, Philipp; Holthuis, Joost C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) is a vital component of mammalian membranes, providing mechanical stability and a structural framework for plasma membrane organization. Its production involves the transfer of phosphocholine from phosphatidylcholine onto ceramide, a reaction catalyzed by SM synthase in the Golgi lumen. Drosophila lacks SM and instead synthesizes the SM analogue ceramide phosphoethanolamine (CPE) as the principal membrane sphingolipid. The corresponding CPE synthase shares mechanistic features with enzymes mediating phospholipid biosynthesis via the Kennedy pathway. Using a functional cloning strategy, we here identified a CDP-ethanolamine:ceramide ethanolamine phosphotransferase as the enzyme responsible for CPE production in Drosophila. CPE synthase constitutes a new branch within the CDP-alcohol phosphotransferase superfamily with homologues in Arthropoda (insects, spiders, mites, scorpions), Cnidaria (Hydra, sea anemones), and Mollusca (oysters) but not in most other animal phyla. The enzyme resides in the Golgi complex with its active site facing the lumen, contrary to the membrane topology of other CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases. Our findings open up an important new avenue to address the biological role of CPE, an enigmatic membrane constituent of a wide variety of invertebrate and marine organisms. PMID:23449981

  13. Urkinase: Structure of Acetate Kinase, a Member of the ASKHA Superfamily of Phosphotransferases

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Kathryn A.; Cooper, David R.; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl; Ferry, James G.; Sanders, David Avram; Hasson, Miriam S.

    2001-01-01

    Acetate kinase, an enzyme widely distributed in the Bacteria and Archaea domains, catalyzes the phosphorylation of acetate. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of Methanosarcina thermophila acetate kinase bound to ADP through crystallography. As we previously predicted, acetate kinase contains a core fold that is topologically identical to that of the ADP-binding domains of glycerol kinase, hexokinase, the 70-kDa heat shock cognate (Hsc70), and actin. Numerous charged active-site residues are conserved within acetate kinases, but few are conserved within the phosphotransferase superfamily. The identity of the points of insertion of polypeptide segments into the core fold of the superfamily members indicates that the insertions existed in the common ancestor of the phosphotransferases. Another remarkable shared feature is the unusual, epsilon conformation of the residue that directly precedes a conserved glycine residue (Gly-331 in acetate kinase) that binds the α-phosphate of ADP. Structural, biochemical, and geochemical considerations indicate that an acetate kinase may be the ancestral enzyme of the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/Hsc70/actin) superfamily of phosphotransferases. PMID:11133963

  14. Urkinase: structure of acetate kinase, a member of the ASKHA superfamily of phosphotransferases.

    PubMed

    Buss, K A; Cooper, D R; Ingram-Smith, C; Ferry, J G; Sanders, D A; Hasson, M S

    2001-01-01

    Acetate kinase, an enzyme widely distributed in the Bacteria and Archaea domains, catalyzes the phosphorylation of acetate. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of Methanosarcina thermophila acetate kinase bound to ADP through crystallography. As we previously predicted, acetate kinase contains a core fold that is topologically identical to that of the ADP-binding domains of glycerol kinase, hexokinase, the 70-kDa heat shock cognate (Hsc70), and actin. Numerous charged active-site residues are conserved within acetate kinases, but few are conserved within the phosphotransferase superfamily. The identity of the points of insertion of polypeptide segments into the core fold of the superfamily members indicates that the insertions existed in the common ancestor of the phosphotransferases. Another remarkable shared feature is the unusual, epsilon conformation of the residue that directly precedes a conserved glycine residue (Gly-331 in acetate kinase) that binds the alpha-phosphate of ADP. Structural, biochemical, and geochemical considerations indicate that an acetate kinase may be the ancestral enzyme of the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/Hsc70/actin) superfamily of phosphotransferases.

  15. The Histidine-Phosphocarrier Protein of the Phosphoenolpyruvate: Sugar Phosphotransferase System of Bacillus sphaericus Self-Associates

    PubMed Central

    Doménech, Rosa; Hernández-Cifre, José G.; Bacarizo, Julio; Díez-Peña, Ana I.; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; de la Torre, José García; Cámara-Artigás, Ana; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Neira, José L.

    2013-01-01

    The phosphotransferase system (PTS) is involved in the use of carbon sources in bacteria. Bacillus sphaericus, a bacterium with the ability to produce insecticidal proteins, is unable to use hexoses and pentoses as the sole carbon source, but it has ptsHI genes encoding the two general proteins of the PTS: enzyme I (EI) and the histidine phosphocarrier (HPr). In this work, we describe the biophysical and structural properties of HPr from B. sphaericus, HPrbs, and its affinity towards EI of other species to find out whether there is inter-species binding. Conversely to what happens to other members of the HPr family, HPrbs forms several self-associated species. The conformational stability of the protein is low, and it unfolds irreversibly during heating. The protein binds to the N-terminal domain of EI from Streptomyces coelicolor, EINsc, with a higher affinity than that of the natural partner of EINsc, HPrsc. Modelling of the complex between EINsc and HPrbs suggests that binding occurs similarly to that observed in other HPr species. We discuss the functional implications of the oligomeric states of HPrbs for the glycolytic activity of B. sphaericus, as well as a strategy to inhibit binding between HPrsc and EINsc. PMID:23922699

  16. Recombinant organisms capable of fermenting cellobiose

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Lai, Xiaokuang; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; York, Sean W.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant microorganism which expresses pyruvate decarboxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase, Klebsiella phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and Klebsiella (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II, wherein said phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and said (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II are heterologous to said microorganism and wherein said microorganism is capable of utilizing both hemicellulose and cellulose, including cellobiose, in the production of ethanol.

  17. Comprehensive Mutational Analysis of Sucrose-Metabolizing Pathways in Streptococcus mutans Reveals Novel Roles for the Sucrose Phosphotransferase System Permease

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Sucrose is perhaps the most efficient carbohydrate for the promotion of dental caries in humans, and the primary caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans encodes multiple enzymes involved in the metabolism of this disaccharide. Here, we engineered a series of mutants lacking individual or combinations of sucrolytic pathways to understand the control of sucrose catabolism and to determine whether as-yet-undisclosed pathways for sucrose utilization were present in S. mutans. Growth phenotypes indicated that gtfBCD (encoding glucan exopolysaccharide synthases), ftf (encoding the fructan exopolysaccharide synthase), and the scrAB pathway (sugar-phosphotransferase system [PTS] permease and sucrose-6-PO4 hydrolase) constitute the majority of the sucrose-catabolizing activity; however, mutations in any one of these genes alone did not affect planktonic growth on sucrose. The multiple-sugar metabolism pathway (msm) contributed minimally to growth on sucrose. Notably, a mutant lacking gtfBC, which cannot produce water-insoluble glucan, displayed improved planktonic growth on sucrose. Meanwhile, loss of scrA led to growth stimulation on fructooligosaccharides, due in large part to increased expression of the fruAB (fructanase) operon. Using the LevQRST four-component signal transduction system as a model for carbohydrate-dependent gene expression in strains lacking extracellular sucrases, a PlevD-cat (EIIALev) reporter was activated by pulsing with sucrose. Interestingly, ScrA was required for activation of levD expression by sucrose through components of the LevQRST complex, but not for activation by the cognate LevQRST sugars fructose or mannose. Sucrose-dependent catabolite repression was also evident in strains containing an intact sucrose PTS. Collectively, these results reveal a novel regulatory circuitry for the control of sucrose catabolism, with a central role for ScrA. PMID:23222725

  18. Nutritional control of antibiotic resistance via an interface between the phosphotransferase system and a two-component signaling system.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Holly; Kellogg, Stephanie L; Skarda, Laura M; Little, Jaime L; Kristich, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are ubiquitous inhabitants of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, antibiotic-resistant enterococci are also major causes of hospital-acquired infections. Enterococci are intrinsically resistant to cephalosporins, enabling growth to abnormally high densities in the GI tract in patients during cephalosporin therapy, thereby promoting dissemination to other sites where they cause infection. Despite its importance, many questions about the underlying basis for cephalosporin resistance remain. A specific two-component signaling system, composed of the CroS sensor kinase and its cognate response regulator (CroR), is required for cephalosporin resistance in Enterococcus faecalis, but little is known about the factors that control this signaling system to modulate resistance. To explore the signaling network in which CroR participates to influence cephalosporin resistance, we employed a protein fragment complementation assay to detect protein-protein interactions in E. faecalis cells, revealing a previously unknown association of CroR with the HPr protein of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) responsible for carbohydrate uptake and catabolite control of gene expression. Genetic and physiological analyses indicate that association with HPr restricts the ability of CroR to promote cephalosporin resistance and gene expression in a nutrient-dependent manner. Mutational analysis suggests that the interface used by HPr to associate with CroR is distinct from the interface used to associate with other cellular partners. Our results define a physical and functional connection between a critical nutrient-responsive signaling system (the PTS) and a two-component signaling system that drives antibiotic resistance in E. faecalis, and they suggest a general strategy by which bacteria can integrate their nutritional status with diverse environmental stimuli.

  19. Transient kinetics of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3′)-IIIa reveals a potential drug target in the antibiotic resistance mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand, Perrine; Leban, Nadia; Kunzelmann, Simone; Chaloin, Laurent; Serpersu, Engin H.; Webb, Martin R.; Barman, Tom; Lionne, Corinne

    2012-01-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases are bacterial enzymes responsible for the inactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by O-phosphorylation. It is important to understand the mechanism of enzymes in order to find efficient drugs. Using rapid-mixing methods, we studied the transient kinetics of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3′)-IIIa. We show that an ADP-enzyme complex is the main steady state intermediate. This intermediate interacts strongly with kanamycin A to form an abortive complex that traps the enzyme in an inactive state. A good strategy to prevent the inactivation of aminoglycosides would be to develop uncompetitive inhibitors that interact with this key ADP-enzyme complex. PMID:23108046

  20. Transient kinetics of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3')-IIIa reveals a potential drug target in the antibiotic resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lallemand, Perrine; Leban, Nadia; Kunzelmann, Simone; Chaloin, Laurent; Serpersu, Engin H; Webb, Martin R; Barman, Tom; Lionne, Corinne

    2012-11-30

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases are bacterial enzymes responsible for the inactivation of aminoglycoside antibiotics by O-phosphorylation. It is important to understand the mechanism of enzymes in order to find efficient drugs. Using rapid-mixing methods, we studied the transient kinetics of aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3')-IIIa. We show that an ADP-enzyme complex is the main steady state intermediate. This intermediate interacts strongly with kanamycin A to form an abortive complex that traps the enzyme in an inactive state. A good strategy to prevent the inactivation of aminoglycosides would be to develop uncompetitive inhibitors that interact with this key ADP-enzyme complex.

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Laura J.; Badarau, Adriana; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Smith, Clyde A.

    2008-02-01

    APH(2′′)-Ic is an enzyme that is responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. gallinarum isolates. Crystals of the wild-type enzyme and three mutants have been prepared and a complete X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal. Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2′′)-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2′′)-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14–20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 Å, β = 108.8°. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 Å resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  2. Thermodynamic mechanism for inhibition of lactose permease by the phosphotransferase protein IIAGlc

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Parameswaran; Balasubramaniam, Dhandayuthapani; Peterkofsky, Alan; Kaback, H. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    In a variety of bacteria, the phosphotransferase protein IIAGlc plays a key regulatory role in catabolite repression in addition to its role in the vectorial phosphorylation of glucose catalyzed by the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). The lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli catalyzes stoichiometric symport of a galactoside with an H+, using a mechanism in which sugar- and H+-binding sites become alternatively accessible to either side of the membrane. Both the expression (via regulation of cAMP levels) and the activity of LacY are subject to regulation by IIAGlc (inducer exclusion). Here we report the thermodynamic features of the IIAGlc–LacY interaction as measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The studies show that IIAGlc binds to LacY with a Kd of about 5 μM and a stoichiometry of unity and that binding is driven by solvation entropy and opposed by enthalpy. Upon IIAGlc binding, the conformational entropy of LacY is restrained, which leads to a significant decrease in sugar affinity. By suppressing conformational dynamics, IIAGlc blocks inducer entry into cells and favors constitutive glucose uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the studies support the notion that sugar binding involves an induced-fit mechanism that is inhibited by IIAGlc binding. The precise mechanism of the inhibition of LacY by IIAGlc elucidated by ITC differs from the inhibition of melibiose permease (MelB), supporting the idea that permeases can differ in their thermodynamic response to binding IIAGlc. PMID:25675534

  3. Deciphering interactions of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3')-IIIa with its ligands.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingzhi; Serpersu, Engin H

    2009-09-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3')-IIIa (APH) is the enzyme with broadest substrate range among the phosphotransferases that cause resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. In this study, the thermodynamic characterization of interactions of APH with its ligands are done by determining dissociation constants of enzyme-substrate complexes using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy. Metal binding studies showed that three divalent cations bind to the apo-enzyme with low affinity. In the presence of AMPPCP, binding of the divalent cations occurs with 7-to-37-fold higher affinity to three additional sites dependent on the presence and absence of different aminoglycosides. Surprisingly, when both ligands, AMPPCP and aminoglycoside, are present, the number of high affinity metal binding sites is reduced to two with a 2-fold increase in binding affinity. The presence of divalent cations, with or without aminoglycoside present, shows only a small effect (<3-fold) on binding affinity of the nucleotide to the enzyme. The presence of metal-nucleotide, but not nucleotide alone, increases the binding affinity of aminoglycosides to APH. Replacement of magnesium (II) with manganese (II) lowered the catalytic rates significantly while affecting the substrate selectivity of the enzyme such that the aminoglycosides with 2'-NH(2) become better substrates (higher V(max)) than those with 2'-OH.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of hygromycin B phosphotransferase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Iino, Daisuke; Takakura, Yasuaki; Kuroiwa, Mika; Kawakami, Ryouta; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hoshino, Takayuki; Ohsawa, Kanju; Nakamura, Akira; Yajima, Shunsuke

    2007-08-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of the aminoglycoside antibiotic-modifying enzyme hygromycin B phosphotransferase from E. coli are reported. Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as hygromycin, kanamycin, neomycin, spectinomycin and streptomycin, inhibit protein synthesis by acting on bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes. Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (Hph; EC 2.7.1.119) converts hygromycin B to 7′′-O-phosphohygromycin using a phosphate moiety from ATP, resulting in the loss of its cell-killing activity. The Hph protein has been crystallized for the first time using a thermostable mutant and the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal provided diffraction data to a resolution of 2.1 Å and belongs to space group P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 71.0, c = 125.0 Å. Crystals of complexes of Hph with hygromycin B and AMP-PNP or ADP have also been obtained in the same crystal form as that of the apoprotein.

  5. Structure of phosphorylated enzyme I, the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system sugar translocation signal protein.

    PubMed

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Lim, Kap; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Kapadia, Geeta; Chen, Celia C H; Schwartz, Jennifer; Howard, Andrew; Reddy, Prasad T; Peterkofsky, Alan; Herzberg, Osnat

    2006-10-31

    Bacterial transport of many sugars, coupled to their phosphorylation, is carried out by the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):sugar phosphotransferase system and involves five phosphoryl group transfer reactions. Sugar translocation initiates with the Mg(2+)-dependent phosphorylation of enzyme I (EI) by PEP. Crystals of Escherichia coli EI were obtained by mixing the protein with Mg(2+) and PEP, followed by oxalate, an EI inhibitor. The crystal structure reveals a dimeric protein where each subunit comprises three domains: a domain that binds the partner PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system protein, HPr; a domain that carries the phosphorylated histidine residue, His-189; and a PEP-binding domain. The PEP-binding site is occupied by Mg(2+) and oxalate, and the phosphorylated His-189 is in-line for phosphotransfer to/from the ligand. Thus, the structure represents an enzyme intermediate just after phosphotransfer from PEP and before a conformational transition that brings His-189 approximately P in proximity to the phosphoryl group acceptor, His-15 of HPr. A model of this conformational transition is proposed whereby swiveling around an alpha-helical linker disengages the His domain from the PEP-binding domain. Assuming that HPr binds to the HPr-binding domain as observed by NMR spectroscopy of an EI fragment, a rotation around two linker segments orients the His domain relative to the HPr-binding domain so that His-189 approximately P and His-15 are appropriately stationed for an in-line phosphotransfer reaction.

  6. Synbiotic impact of tagatose on viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG mediated by the phosphotransferase system (PTS).

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Hoon; Choi, Seung Hye; Park, Seung Won; Choi, Nag-Jin; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun

    2013-10-01

    Synbiotics, the combination of prebiotics and probiotics, has been shown to produce synergistic effects that promote gastrointestinal well-being of host. Tagatose is a low calorie food ingredient with putative health-promoting benefits. Herein, we investigated its synbiotic impact on the viability of Lactobacillus casei 01 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and the potential mechanism involved. Tagatose, as a synbiotic substrate, enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG compared to other prebiotics. Other gut-indigenous such as Clostridium spp. readily utilized fructooligosaccharide (FOS), the most widely used functional prebiotics, but not tagatose. Additionally, tagatose enhanced probiotic functions of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG by reinforcing their attachment on HT-29 intestine epithelial cells and enhancing their cholesterol-lowering activities. Whole transcriptome study and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) test showed that the presence of tagatose in L. rhamnosus strain GG caused induction of a large number of genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism including the phosphotransferase system (PTS). Collectively, these results indicate the tagatose enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG and their probiotic activities by activating tagatose-associated PTS networks. Importantly, this study highlights the potential application of tagatose and L. casei 01 and/or L. rhamnosus strain GG as a synbiotic partner in functional dairy foods (i.e. yogurt and cheese) and therapeutic dietary supplements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Glucose transport by a mutant of Streptococcus mutans unable to accumulate sugars via the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed Central

    Cvitkovitch, D G; Boyd, D A; Thevenot, T; Hamilton, I R

    1995-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans transports glucose via the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). Earlier studies indicated that an alternate glucose transport system functions in this organism under conditions of high growth rates, low pH, or excess glucose. To identify this system, S. mutans BM71 was transformed with integration vector pDC-5 to generate a mutant, DC10, defective in the general PTS protein enzyme I (EI). This mutant expressed a defective EI that had been truncated by approximately 150 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus as revealed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with anti-EI antibody and Southern hybridizations with a fragment of the wild-type EI gene as a probe. Phosphotransfer assays utilizing 32P-PEP indicated that DC10 was incapable of phosphorylating HPr and EIIAMan, indicating a nonfunctional PTS. This was confirmed by the fact that DC10 was able to ferment glucose but not a variety of other PTS substrates and phosphorylated glucose with ATP and not PEP. Kinetic assays indicated that the non-PTS system exhibited an apparent Ks of 125 microM for glucose and a Vmax of 0.87 nmol mg (dry weight) of cells-1 min-1. Sugar competition experiments with DC10 indicated that the non-PTS transport system had high specificity for glucose since glucose transport was not significantly by a 100-fold molar excess of several competing sugar substrates, including 2-deoxyglucose and alpha-methylglucoside. These results demonstrate that S. mutans possesses a glucose transport system that can function independently of the PEP PTS. PMID:7730250

  8. Insight into the phosphoryl transfer of the Escherichia coli glucose phosphotransferase system from QM/MM simulations.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Christophe; Horn, Anselm H C; Schürer, Gudrun; Sticht, Heinrich

    2008-10-23

    Phosphoryl transfer is a key reaction in many aspects of metabolism, gene regulation, and signal transduction. One prominent example is the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), which represents an integral part of the bacterial sugar metabolism. The transfer between the enzymes IIA (Glc) and IIB (Glc) in the glucose-specific branch of the PTS is of particular interest due to the unusual combination of donor and acceptor residues involved in phosphoryl transfer: The phosphoryl group is initially attached to the Nepsilon2 atom of His 90 in IIA (Glc) and then transferred to the S gamma atom of Cys 35 in IIB (Glc). To gain insight into the details of the transfer mechanism, we have performed a QM/MM simulation which treats the entire active site quantum-mechanically. The transfer has a high dissociative character, and the Nepsilon2-P bond gets immediately destabilized after complex formation by numerous interactions formed between residues of IIB (Glc) and the phosphoryl group. The final formation of a tight S gamma-P bond is accompanied by a reorientation of the side chain of the phosphoryl donor. This reorientation results in the loss of interaction between the imidazole ring and the phosphate group thus hindering the reverse transfer. A comparison to the transfer in protein tyrosine phosphatases, which also use a cysteine as acceptor of the phosphoryl group, reveals significant similarities in the conformation of the active site, the energy profile of the reaction, and in the pattern of interactions that stabilize the phosphoryl group during the transfer.

  9. Crystal Structure of Butyrate Kinase 2 from Thermotoga maritima, a Member of the ASKHA Superfamily of Phosphotransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Diao, Jiasheng; Hasson, Miriam S.

    2009-04-01

    The enzymatic transfer of phosphoryl groups is central to the control of many cellular processes. One of the phosphoryl transfer mechanisms, that of acetate kinase, is not completely understood. Besides better understanding of the mechanism of acetate kinase, knowledge of the structure of butyrate kinase 2 (Buk2) will aid in the interpretation of active-site structure and provide information on the structural basis of substrate specificity. The gene buk2 from Thermotoga maritima encodes a member of the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/heat shock cognate/actin) superfamily of phosphotransferases. The encoded protein Buk2 catalyzes the phosphorylation of butyrate and isobutyrate. We have determined the 2.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of Buk2 complexed with ({beta},{gamma}-methylene) adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Buk2 folds like an open-shelled clam, with each of the two domains representing one of the two shells. In the open active-site cleft between the N- and C-terminal domains, the active-site residues consist of two histidines, two arginines, and a cluster of hydrophobic residues. The ATP binding region of Buk2 in the C-terminal domain consists of abundant glycines for nucleotide binding, and the ATP binding motif is similar to those of other members of the ASKHA superfamily. The enzyme exists as an octamer, in which four disulfide bonds form between intermolecular cysteines. Sequence alignment and structure superposition identify the simplicity of the monomeric Buk2 structure, a probable substrate binding site, the key residues in catalyzing phosphoryl transfer, and the substrate specificity differences among Buk2, acetate, and propionate kinases. The possible enzyme mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Crystal structure of butyrate kinase 2 from Thermotoga maritima, a member of the ASKHA superfamily of phosphotransferases.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jiasheng; Hasson, Miriam S

    2009-04-01

    The enzymatic transfer of phosphoryl groups is central to the control of many cellular processes. One of the phosphoryl transfer mechanisms, that of acetate kinase, is not completely understood. Besides better understanding of the mechanism of acetate kinase, knowledge of the structure of butyrate kinase 2 (Buk2) will aid in the interpretation of active-site structure and provide information on the structural basis of substrate specificity. The gene buk2 from Thermotoga maritima encodes a member of the ASKHA (acetate and sugar kinases/heat shock cognate/actin) superfamily of phosphotransferases. The encoded protein Buk2 catalyzes the phosphorylation of butyrate and isobutyrate. We have determined the 2.5-A crystal structure of Buk2 complexed with (beta,gamma-methylene) adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Buk2 folds like an open-shelled clam, with each of the two domains representing one of the two shells. In the open active-site cleft between the N- and C-terminal domains, the active-site residues consist of two histidines, two arginines, and a cluster of hydrophobic residues. The ATP binding region of Buk2 in the C-terminal domain consists of abundant glycines for nucleotide binding, and the ATP binding motif is similar to those of other members of the ASKHA superfamily. The enzyme exists as an octamer, in which four disulfide bonds form between intermolecular cysteines. Sequence alignment and structure superposition identify the simplicity of the monomeric Buk2 structure, a probable substrate binding site, the key residues in catalyzing phosphoryl transfer, and the substrate specificity differences among Buk2, acetate, and propionate kinases. The possible enzyme mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Analysis of mucolipidosis II/III GNPTAB missense mutations identifies domains of UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase involved in catalytic function and lysosomal enzyme recognition.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi; van Meel, Eline; Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Yox, Alex; Steet, Richard; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2015-01-30

    UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase tags newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes with mannose 6-phosphate recognition markers, which are required for their targeting to the endolysosomal system. GNPTAB encodes the α and β subunits of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase, and mutations in this gene cause the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and III αβ. Prior investigation of missense mutations in GNPTAB uncovered amino acids in the N-terminal region and within the DMAP domain involved in Golgi retention of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase and its ability to specifically recognize lysosomal hydrolases, respectively. Here, we undertook a comprehensive analysis of the remaining missense mutations in GNPTAB reported in mucolipidosis II and III αβ patients using cell- and zebrafish-based approaches. We show that the Stealth domain harbors the catalytic site, as some mutations in these regions greatly impaired the activity of the enzyme without affecting its Golgi localization and proteolytic processing. We also demonstrate a role for the Notch repeat 1 in lysosomal hydrolase recognition, as missense mutations in conserved cysteine residues in this domain do not affect the catalytic activity but impair mannose phosphorylation of certain lysosomal hydrolases. Rescue experiments using mRNA bearing Notch repeat 1 mutations in GNPTAB-deficient zebrafish revealed selective effects on hydrolase recognition that differ from the DMAP mutation. Finally, the mutant R587P, located in the spacer between Notch 2 and DMAP, was partially rescued by overexpression of the γ subunit, suggesting a role for this region in γ subunit binding. These studies provide new insight into the functions of the different domains of the α and β subunits.

  12. Recognition of aminoglycoside antibiotics by enterococcal-staphylococcal aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase type IIIa: role of substrate amino groups.

    PubMed Central

    McKay, G A; Roestamadji, J; Mobashery, S; Wright, G D

    1996-01-01

    The interactions of the aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase IIIa with aminoglycoside antibiotics lacking specific amino groups were examined by steady-state kinetic analyses. The results demonstrate that an amino group on C-1 and either an amino or a hydroxyl group at the 2' and 6' positions are important for detoxification of aminoglycosides by this enzyme. PMID:8913482

  13. Structural characterization of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII from Streptomyces rimosus with enzymatic activity modulated by phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyko, Konstantin M.; Gorbacheva, Marina A.; Korzhenevskiy, Dmitry A.; Alekseeva, Maria G.; Mavletova, Dilara A.; Zakharevich, Natalia V.; Elizarov, Sergey M.; Rudakova, Natalia N.; Danilenko, Valery N.; Popov, Vladimir O.

    2016-09-02

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases represent a broad class of enzymes that promote bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics via the phosphorylation of hydroxyl groups in the latter. Here we report the spatial structure of the 3′-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase of novel VIII class (AphVIII) solved by X-ray diffraction method with a resolution of 2.15 Å. Deep analysis of APHVIII structure and its comparison with known structures of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases of various types reveals that AphVIII has a typical two-domain fold and, however, possesses some unique characteristics that distinguish the enzyme from its known homologues. The most important difference is the presence of the activation loop with unique Ser146 residue. We demonstrate that in the apo-state of the enzyme the activation loop does not interact with other parts of the enzyme and seems to adopt catalytically competent state only after substrate binding. - Highlights: • 3D structure of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII was obtained. • AphVIII activation loop is clearly identified in the electron density. • AphVIII has some unique structural features in its substrate C-ring binding pocket.

  14. Metabolic engineering for the production of shikimic acid in an evolved Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) is utilized in the synthesis of oseltamivir-phosphate, an anti-influenza drug. In this work, metabolic engineering approaches were employed to produce SA in Escherichia coli strains derived from an evolved strain (PB12) lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS-) but with capacity to grow on glucose. Derivatives of PB12 strain were constructed to determine the effects of inactivating aroK, aroL, pykF or pykA and the expression of plasmid-coded genes aroGfbr, tktA, aroB and aroE, on SA synthesis. Results Batch cultures were performed to evaluate the effects of genetic modifications on growth, glucose consumption, and aromatic intermediate production. All derivatives showed a two-phase growth behavior with initial high specific growth rate (μ) and specific glucose consumption rate (qs), but low level production of aromatic intermediates. During the second growth phase the μ decreased, whereas aromatic intermediate production reached its maximum. The double aroK- aroL- mutant expressing plasmid-coded genes (strain PB12.SA22) accumulated SA up to 7 g/L with a yield of SA on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol and a total aromatic compound yield (TACY) of 0.38 mol/mol. Single inactivation of pykF or pykA was performed in PB12.SA22 strain. Inactivation of pykF caused a decrease in μ, qs, SA production, and yield; whereas TACY increased by 33% (0.5 mol/mol). Conclusions The effect of increased availability of carbon metabolites, their channeling into the synthesis of aromatic intermediates, and disruption of the SA pathway on SA production was studied. Inactivation of both aroK and aroL, and transformation with plasmid-coded genes resulted in the accumulation of SA up to 7 g/L with a yield on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol PB12.SA22, which represents the highest reported yield. The pykF and pykA genes were inactivated in strain PB12.SA22 to increase the production of aromatic compounds in the PTS- background. Results

  15. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of hygromycin B phosphotransferase from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Iino, Daisuke; Takakura, Yasuaki; Kuroiwa, Mika; Kawakami, Ryouta; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hoshino, Takayuki; Ohsawa, Kanju; Nakamura, Akira; Yajima, Shunsuke

    2007-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as hygromycin, kanamycin, neomycin, spectinomycin and streptomycin, inhibit protein synthesis by acting on bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes. Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (Hph; EC 2.7.1.119) converts hygromycin B to 7′′-O-phosphohygromycin using a phosphate moiety from ATP, resulting in the loss of its cell-killing activity. The Hph protein has been crystallized for the first time using a thermostable mutant and the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal provided diffraction data to a resolution of 2.1 Å and belongs to space group P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 71.0, c = 125.0 Å. Crystals of complexes of Hph with hygromycin B and AMP-PNP or ADP have also been obtained in the same crystal form as that of the apoprotein. PMID:17671368

  16. The Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System Is Involved in Sensitivity to the Glucosylated Bacteriocin Sublancin

    PubMed Central

    Garcia De Gonzalo, C. V.; Denham, E. L.; Mars, R. A. T.; Stülke, J.

    2015-01-01

    The mode of action of a group of glycosylated antimicrobial peptides known as glycocins remains to be elucidated. In the current study of one glycocin, sublancin, we identified the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) of Bacillus species as a key player in bacterial sensitivity. Sublancin kills several Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus species and Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Unlike other classes of bacteriocins for which the PTS is involved in their mechanism of action, we show that the addition of PTS-requiring sugars leads to increased resistance rather than increased sensitivity, suggesting that sublancin has a distinct mechanism of action. Collectively, our present mutagenesis and genomic studies demonstrate that the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) and domain A of enzyme II (PtsG) in particular are critical determinants for bacterial sensitivity to sublancin. PMID:26282429

  17. Structural basis for chloramphenicol tolerance in Streptomyces venezuelae by chloramphenicol phosphotransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Izard, T

    2001-08-01

    Streptomyces venezuelae synthesizes chloramphenicol (Cm), an inhibitor of ribosomal peptidyl transferase activity, thereby inhibiting bacterial growth. The producer escapes autoinhibition by its own secondary metabolite through phosphorylation of Cm by chloramphenicol phosphotransferase (CPT). In addition to active site binding, CPT binds its product 3-phosphoryl-Cm, in an alternate product binding site. To address the mechanisms of Cm tolerance of the producer, the crystal structures of CPT were determined in complex with either the nonchlorinated Cm (2-N-Ac-Cm) at 3.1 A resolution or the antibiotic's immediate precursor, the p-amino analog p-NH(2)-Cm, at 2.9 A resolution. Surprisingly, p-NH(2)-Cm binds CPT in a novel fashion. Additionally, neither 2-N-Ac-Cm nor p-NH(2)-Cm binds to the secondary product binding site.

  18. Studies of endogenous UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucose-1-phosphotransferase acceptors in embryonic chick neural tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, A.M.S.

    1986-01-01

    UPD-glucose: glycoprotein glucose-1-phosphotransferase (GlcPTase) catalyzes the transfer of a Glc-1-P from UDP-Glc to high mannose-type oligosaccharides on a class of embryonic chick neutral retinal glycoproteins. The primary acceptors for this glycosylphosphotransferase were determined by incubating embryonic chick tissue sonicates with (B-/sup 32/P)UDP-Glc followed by SDS-polyacrylamine gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. The primary GlcPT ase acceptors in brain tissue have apparent subunit molecular weights of 66 and 62 kilodaltons (kd). /sup 32/P incorporation into these peptides was eliminated by excess levels of unlabeled UDP-Glc and unaffected by the inclusion of other phosphate-containing compounds, with the exception of UDP-galactose which can be converted to UDP-Glc by an endogenous epimerase.

  19. Ketohexokinase (ATP:D-fructose 1-phosphotransferase) from a halophilic archaebacterium, Haloarcula vallismortis: purification and properties.

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswamy, V; Altekar, W

    1994-01-01

    Ketohexokinase (ATP:D-fructose 1-phosphotransferase [EC 2.7.1.3]), detected for the first time in a prokaryote, i.e., the extreme halophile Haloarcula vallismortis, was isolated and characterized from the same archaebacterium. This enzyme was characterized with respect to its molecular mass, amino acid composition, salt dependency, immunological cross-reactivity, and kinetic properties. Gel filtration and sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed a native molecular mass of 100 kDa for halobacterial ketohexokinase, which is larger than its mammalian counterpart. The enzyme could be labeled by UV irradiation in the presence of [ gamma-32P]ATP, suggesting the involvement of a phosphoenzyme intermediate. Other catalytic features of the enzyme were similar to those of its mammalian counterparts. No antigenic cross-reactivity could be detected between the H. vallismortis ketohexokinase and the ketohexokinases from different rat tissues. Images PMID:8071229

  20. UDP-GlcNAc:Glycoprotein N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase mediates the initial step in the formation of the methylphosphomannosyl residues on the high mannose oligosaccharides of Dictyostelium discoideum glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi; West, Christopher M; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2010-03-19

    The Dictyostelium discoideum gene gpt1 encodes a protein XP_638036 with sequence similarity to the alpha/beta subunits of mammalian UDP-GlcNAc:Glycoprotein N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. We now demonstrate that extracts of D. discoideum clones with mutations in this gene transfer GlcNAc-P from UDP-GlcNAc to mannose residues at less than 5% the wild type value. Further, the lysosomal hydrolases of these mutant clones fail to bind to a cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor affinity column, indicating a lack of methylphosphomannosyl residues on the high mannose oligosaccharides of these proteins. We conclude that the gpt1 gene product catalyzes the initial step in the formation of methylphosphomannosyl residues on D. discoideum lysosomal hydrolases.

  1. Sinorhizobium meliloti mutants lacking phosphotransferase system enzyme HPr or EIIA are altered in diverse processes, including carbon metabolism, cobalt requirements, and succinoglycan production.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, Catalina Arango; Bringhurst, Ryan M; Gage, Daniel J

    2008-04-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is a member of the Alphaproteobacteria that fixes nitrogen when it is in a symbiotic relationship. Genes for an incomplete phosphotransferase system (PTS) have been found in the genome of S. meliloti. The genes present code for Hpr and ManX (an EIIA(Man)-type enzyme). HPr and EIIA regulate carbon utilization in other bacteria. hpr and manX in-frame deletion mutants exhibited altered carbon metabolism and other phenotypes. Loss of HPr resulted in partial relief of succinate-mediated catabolite repression, extreme sensitivity to cobalt limitation, rapid die-off during stationary phase, and altered succinoglycan production. Loss of ManX decreased expression of melA-agp and lac, the operons needed for utilization of alpha- and beta-galactosides, slowed growth on diverse carbon sources, and enhanced accumulation of high-molecular-weight succinoglycan. A strain with both hpr and manX deletions exhibited phenotypes similar to those of the strain with a single hpr deletion. Despite these strong phenotypes, deletion mutants exhibited wild-type nodulation and nitrogen fixation when they were inoculated onto Medicago sativa. The results show that HPr and ManX (EIIA(Man)) are involved in more than carbon regulation in S. meliloti and suggest that the phenotypes observed occur due to activity of HPr or one of its phosphorylated forms.

  2. Genome-wide Screening Identifies Phosphotransferase System Permease BepA to Be Involved in Enterococcus faecium Endocarditis and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Fernanda L; Huebner, Johannes; Singh, Kavindra V; Zhang, Xinglin; van Schaik, Willem; Wobser, Dominique; Braat, Johanna C; Murray, Barbara E; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; Leavis, Helen L

    2016-07-15

    Enterococcus faecium is a common cause of nosocomial infections, of which infective endocarditis is associated with substantial mortality. In this study, we used a microarray-based transposon mapping (M-TraM) approach to evaluate a rat endocarditis model and identified a gene, originally annotated as "fruA" and renamed "bepA," putatively encoding a carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) permease (biofilm and endocarditis-associated permease A [BepA]), as important in infective endocarditis. This gene is highly enriched in E. faecium clinical isolates and absent in commensal isolates that are not associated with infection. Confirmation of the phenotype was established in a competition experiment of wild-type and a markerless bepA mutant in a rat endocarditis model. In addition, deletion of bepA impaired biofilm formation in vitro in the presence of 100% human serum and metabolism of β-methyl-D-glucoside. β-glucoside metabolism has been linked to the metabolism of glycosaminoglycans that are exposed on injured heart valves, where bacteria attach and form vegetations. Therefore, we propose that the PTS permease BepA is directly implicated in E. faecium pathogenesis.

  3. Evidence for the presence of heat-stable protein (HPr) and ATP-dependent HPr kinase in heterofermentative lactobacilli lacking phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Reizer, J; Peterkofsky, A; Romano, A H

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the biochemical basis for the lack of phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase activity in heterofermentative lactobacilli was carried out. Extracts of Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus buchneri failed to reconstitute phosphotransferase activity of extracts of Staphylococcus aureus mutants impaired in the phosphotransferase system due to the absence of enzyme I, enzyme IILac, or enzyme IIILac activity, suggesting that these lactobacilli lack those phosphotransferase system components. In contrast, complementation tests with an extract of a S. aureus mutant deficient in heat-stable protein (HPr) indicated the presence of HPr activity in heterofermentative lactobacilli. The HPr of L. brevis was purified and shown to have properties similar to those of a typical HPr. In addition, L. brevis possesses an ATP-dependent protein kinase that phosphorylates a serine residue of the endogenous HPr as well as other HPrs of Gram-positive origin. The kinase activity is markedly stimulated by phosphorylated compounds related to sugar metabolism and is negatively modulated by orthophosphate, pyrophosphate, or arsenate and by a low molecular weight endogenous factor. In keeping with the idea of a regulatory role for the phosphorylation of HPr in lactobacilli, a HPr[Ser(P)] phosphatase activity in L. brevis was also demonstrated. On the basis of the finding of HPr and a system for its reversible covalent modification in an organism devoid of a functional phosphotransferase system we propose that, in lactobacilli, HPr has a role in the regulation of pathways other than the phosphotransferase system. Images PMID:2832843

  4. Engineering of GlcNAc-1-Phosphotransferase for Production of Highly Phosphorylated Lysosomal Enzymes for Enzyme Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Lee, Wang-Sik; Doray, Balraj; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2017-06-16

    Several lysosomal enzymes currently used for enzyme replacement therapy in patients with lysosomal storage diseases contain very low levels of mannose 6-phosphate, limiting their uptake via mannose 6-phosphate receptors on the surface of the deficient cells. These enzymes are produced at high levels by mammalian cells and depend on endogenous GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase α/β precursor to phosphorylate the mannose residues on their glycan chains. We show that co-expression of an engineered truncated GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase α/β precursor and the lysosomal enzyme of interest in the producing cells resulted in markedly increased phosphorylation and cellular uptake of the secreted lysosomal enzyme. This method also results in the production of highly phosphorylated acid β-glucocerebrosidase, a lysosomal enzyme that normally has just trace amounts of this modification.

  5. Glucose-Specific Enzyme IIA of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Chitin Signaling Pathways in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shouji; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2017-09-15

    In Vibrio cholerae, the genes required for chitin utilization and natural competence are governed by the chitin-responsive two-component system (TCS) sensor kinase ChiS. In the classical TCS paradigm, a sensor kinase specifically phosphorylates a cognate response regulator to activate gene expression. However, our previous genetic study suggested that ChiS stimulates the non-TCS transcriptional regulator TfoS by using mechanisms distinct from classical phosphorylation reactions (S. Yamamoto, J. Mitobe, T. Ishikawa, S. N. Wai, M. Ohnishi, H. Watanabe, and H. Izumiya, Mol Microbiol 91:326-347, 2014, https://doi.org/10.1111/mmi.12462). TfoS specifically activates the transcription of tfoR, encoding a small regulatory RNA essential for competence gene expression. Whether ChiS and TfoS interact directly remains unknown. To determine if other factors mediate the communication between ChiS and TfoS, we isolated transposon mutants that turned off tfoR::lacZ expression but possessed intact chiS and tfoS genes. We demonstrated an unexpected association of chitin-induced signaling pathways with the glucose-specific enzyme IIA (EIIA(glc)) of the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) for carbohydrate uptake and catabolite control of gene expression. Genetic and physiological analyses revealed that dephosphorylated EIIA(glc) inactivated natural competence and tfoR transcription. Chitin-induced expression of the chb operon, which is required for chitin transport and catabolism, was also repressed by dephosphorylated EIIA(glc) Furthermore, the regulation of tfoR and chb expression by EIIA(glc) was dependent on ChiS and intracellular levels of ChiS were not affected by disruption of the gene encoding EIIA(glc) These results define a previously unknown connection between the PTS and chitin signaling pathways in V. cholerae and suggest a strategy whereby this bacterium can physiologically adapt to the existing nutrient status.IMPORTANCE The EIIA

  6. Enterococcus faecalis Uses a Phosphotransferase System Permease and a Host Colonization-Related ABC Transporter for Maltodextrin Uptake.

    PubMed

    Sauvageot, Nicolas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Joyet, Philippe; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Blancato, Víctor S; Repizo, Guillermo D; Henry, Céline; Pikis, Andreas; Thompson, John; Magni, Christian; Hartke, Axel; Deutscher, Josef

    2017-05-01

    Maltodextrin is a mixture of maltooligosaccharides, which are produced by the degradation of starch or glycogen. They are mostly composed of α-1,4- and some α-1,6-linked glucose residues. Genes presumed to code for the Enterococcus faecalis maltodextrin transporter were induced during enterococcal infection. We therefore carried out a detailed study of maltodextrin transport in this organism. Depending on their length (3 to 7 glucose residues), E. faecalis takes up maltodextrins either via MalT, a maltose-specific permease of the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS), or the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter MdxEFG-MsmX. Maltotriose, the smallest maltodextrin, is primarily transported by the PTS permease. A malT mutant therefore exhibits significantly reduced growth on maltose and maltotriose. The residual uptake of the trisaccharide is catalyzed by the ABC transporter, because a malT mdxF double mutant no longer grows on maltotriose. The trisaccharide arrives as maltotriose-6″-P in the cell. MapP, which dephosphorylates maltose-6'-P, also releases Pi from maltotriose-6″-P. Maltotetraose and longer maltodextrins are mainly (or exclusively) taken up via the ABC transporter, because inactivation of the membrane protein MdxF prevents growth on maltotetraose and longer maltodextrins up to at least maltoheptaose. E. faecalis also utilizes panose and isopanose, and we show for the first time, to our knowledge, that in contrast to maltotriose, its two isomers are primarily transported via the ABC transporter. We confirm that maltodextrin utilization via MdxEFG-MsmX affects the colonization capacity of E. faecalis, because inactivation of mdxF significantly reduced enterococcal colonization and/or survival in kidneys and liver of mice after intraperitoneal infection.IMPORTANCE Infections by enterococci, which are major health care-associated pathogens, are difficult to treat due to their increasing resistance to clinically

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus faecium aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ib [APH(2′′)-Ib

    PubMed Central

    Walanj, Rupa; Young, Paul; Baker, Heather M.; Baker, Edward N.; Metcalf, Peter; Chow, Joseph W.; Lerner, Stephen; Vakulenko, Sergei; Smith, Clyde A.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, APH(2′′)-Ib, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 299 amino-acid residues) expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in the presence of 16%(w/v) PEG 3350 and gentamicin. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P21, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 79.7, b = 58.8, c = 81.4 Å, β = 98.4°, and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis is consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron diffraction data to approximately 2.65 Å resolution were collected from a native APH(2′′)-Ib crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL (Stanford, CA, USA). Selenium-substituted crystals have also been produced and structure determination is proceeding. PMID:16511055

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus faecium aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ib [APH(2′′)-Ib

    SciTech Connect

    Walanj, Rupa; Young, Paul; Baker, Heather M.; Baker, Edward N.; Metcalf, Peter; Chow, Joseph W.; Lerner, Stephen; Vakulenko, Sergei; Smith, Clyde A.

    2005-04-01

    APH(2′′)-Ib is an enzyme responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. faecium isolates. Native crystals of this enzyme have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken. Bacterial resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, APH(2′′)-Ib, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 299 amino-acid residues) expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in the presence of 16%(w/v) PEG 3350 and gentamicin. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 79.7, b = 58.8, c = 81.4 Å, β = 98.4°, and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis is consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron diffraction data to approximately 2.65 Å resolution were collected from a native APH(2′′)-Ib crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL (Stanford, CA, USA). Selenium-substituted crystals have also been produced and structure determination is proceeding.

  9. Effects of Homologous Phosphoenolpyruvate-Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System Proteins on Carbohydrate Uptake and Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) Accumulation in Ralstonia eutropha H16▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kaddor, Chlud; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Seven gene loci encoding putative proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) were identified in the genome of Ralstonia eutropha H16 by in silico analysis. Except the N-acetylglucosamine-specific PEP-PTS, an additional complete PEP-PTS is lacking in strain H16. Based on these findings, we generated single and multiple deletion mutants defective mainly in the PEP-PTS genes to investigate their influence on carbon source utilization, growth behavior, and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) accumulation. As supposed, the H16 ΔfrcACB and H16 ΔnagFEC mutants exhibited no growth when cultivated on fructose and N-acetylglucosamine, respectively. Furthermore, a transposon mutant with a ptsM-ptsH insertion site did not grow on both carbon sources. The observed phenotype was not complemented, suggesting that it results from an interaction of genes or a polar effect caused by the Tn5::mob insertion. ptsM, ptsH, and ptsI single, double, and triple mutants stored much less PHB than the wild type (about 10 to 39% [wt/wt] of cell dry weight) and caused reduced PHB production in mutants lacking the H16_A2203, H16_A0384, frcACB, or nagFEC genes. In contrast, mutant H16 ΔH16_A0384 accumulated 11.5% (wt/wt) more PHB than the wild type when grown on gluconate and suppressed partially the negative effect of the ptsMHI deletion on PHB synthesis. Based on our experimental data, we discussed whether the PEP-PTS homologous proteins in R. eutropha H16 are exclusively involved in the complex sugar transport system or whether they are also involved in cellular regulatory functions of carbon and PHB metabolism. PMID:21478317

  10. Aggregation of banana pyrophosphate fructose 6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase by glycerol.

    PubMed

    Surendranathan, K K; Kanulkar, S U; Nair, P M

    1996-12-01

    Addition of glycerol during purification of banana (Musaceae, Musa cavendishii) pyrophosphate fructose 6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase [(PFP), EC 2.7.1.90] initiated molecular aggregation of the enzyme. The aggregation process was dependent on the glycerol concentration. The native enzyme (66 kDa molecular mass) showed enhanced activity at 3% (V/V) or less of glycerol concentration. Glycerol concentration between 4 and 5% (V/V) affected a gradual and sequential aggregation of native form of the enzyme. These aggregated forms had molecular masses of 135, 200 and 270 kDa. The 135 and 200 kDa forms were stable for about 72 hrs and prolonged storage over 2 weeks resulted in the formation of the 270 kDa form. Concentration over 5% could reduce the time required for aggregation. Fru2.6 bis P activated the enzyme over ten fold, but did not help in the aggregation process. Studies on the role of glycerol on PFP specific activity suggested a difference in the activation process compared to that by Fru2.6bis P. Replacement of Hepes buffer by Tris increased the Fru2.6 bis P requirement for maximum activation by around 10 fold. Removal of glycerol from the buffer media resulted in almost complete inactivation of the enzyme.

  11. Bulky “Gatekeeper” Residue Changes the Cosubstrate Specificity of Aminoglycoside 2″-Phosphotransferase IIa

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Toth, Marta; Smith, Clyde A.

    2013-01-01

    The aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferases APH(2″)-IIa and APH(2″)-IVa can utilize ATP and GTP as cosubstrates, since both enzymes possess overlapping but discrete structural templates for ATP and GTP binding. APH(2″)-IIIa uses GTP exclusively, because its ATP-binding template is blocked by a bulky tyrosine “gatekeeper” residue. Replacement of the “gatekeeper” residues M85 and F95 in APH(2″)-IIa and APH(2″)-IVa, respectively, by tyrosine does not significantly change the antibiotic susceptibility profiles produced by the enzymes. In APH(2″)-IIa, M85Y substitution results in an ∼10-fold decrease in the Km value of GTP and an ∼320-fold increase in the Km value of ATP. In APH(2″)-IVa, F95Y substitution results in a modest decrease in the Km values of both GTP and ATP. Structural analysis indicates that in the APH(2″)-IIa M85Y mutant, tyrosine blocks access of ATP to the correct position in the binding site, while the larger nucleoside triphosphate (NTP)-binding pocket of the APH(2″)-IVa F95Y mutant allows the tyrosine to move away, thus giving access to the ATP-binding template. PMID:23716051

  12. An 18 kDa acid phosphatase from chicken heart possesses phosphotransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Naz, Rubina; Saeed, Asma; Saeed, Ahmad

    2006-02-01

    A low molecular weight acid phosphatase was purified to homogeneity from chicken heart with a specific activity of 42 U/mg and a recovery of about 1%. Nearly 800 fold purification was achieved. The molecular weight was estimated to be 18 kDa by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Para-nitrophenyl phosphate, phenyl phosphate and flavin mononucleotide were efficiently hydrolysed by the enzyme and found to be good substrates. Fluoride and tartrate had no inhibitory effect while phosphate, vanadate and molybdate strongly inhibited the enzyme. The acid phosphatase was stimulated in the presence of glycerol, ethylene glycol, methanol, ethanol and acetone, which reflected the phosphotransferase activity. When phosphate acceptors such as ethylene glycol concentrations were increased, the ratio of phosphate transfer to hydrolysis was also increased, demonstrating the presence of a transphosphorylation reaction where an acceptor can compete with water in the rate limiting step involving hydrolysis of a covalent phospho enzyme intermediate. Partition experiments carried out with two substrates, para-nitrophenyl phosphate and phenyl phosphate, revealed a constant product ratio of 1.7 for phosphotransfer to ethylene glycol versus hydrolysis, strongly supporting the existence of common covalent phospho enzyme intermediate. A constant ratio of K (cat)/K (m), 4.3 x 10(4), found at different ethylene glycol concentrations, also supported the idea that the rate limiting step was the hydrolysis of the phospho enzyme intermediate.

  13. Structure of the Antibiotic Resistance Factor Spectinomycin Phosphotransferase from Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, D.; Lemke, C; Huang, J; Xiong, B; Berghuis, A

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) constitute a diverse group of enzymes that are often the underlying cause of aminoglycoside resistance in the clinical setting. Several APHs have been extensively characterized, including the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of two APH(3{prime}) isozymes and an APH(2{double_prime}) enzyme. Although many APHs are plasmid-encoded and are capable of inactivating numerous 2-deoxystreptmaine aminoglycosides with multiple regiospecificity, APH(9)-Ia, isolated from Legionella pneumophila, is an unusual enzyme among the APH family for its chromosomal origin and its specificity for a single non-2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside substrate, spectinomycin. We describe here the crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia in its apo form, its binary complex with the nucleotide, AMP, and its ternary complex bound with ADP and spectinomycin. The structures reveal that APH(9)-Ia adopts the bilobal protein kinase-fold, analogous to the APH(3{prime}) and APH(2{double_prime}) enzymes. However, APH(9)-Ia differs significantly from the other two types of APH enzymes in its substrate binding area and that it undergoes a conformation change upon ligand binding. Moreover, kinetic assay experiments indicate that APH(9)-Ia has stringent substrate specificity as it is unable to phosphorylate substrates of choline kinase or methylthioribose kinase despite high structural resemblance. The crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia demonstrate and expand our understanding of the diversity of the APH family, which in turn will facilitate the development of new antibiotics and inhibitors.

  14. The General Phosphotransferase System Proteins Localize to Sites of Strong Negative Curvature in Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Sutharsan; Elisha, Yair; Nevo-Dinur, Keren; Amster-Choder, Orna

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial cell poles are emerging as subdomains where many cellular activities take place, but the mechanisms for polar localization are just beginning to unravel. The general phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins, enzyme I (EI) and HPr, which control preferential use of carbon sources in bacteria, were recently shown to localize near the Escherichia coli cell poles. Here, we show that EI localization does not depend on known polar constituents, such as anionic lipids or the chemotaxis receptors, and on the cell division machinery, nor can it be explained by nucleoid occlusion or localized translation. Detection of the general PTS proteins at the budding sites of endocytotic-like membrane invaginations in spherical cells and their colocalization with the negative curvature sensor protein DivIVA suggest that geometric cues underlie localization of the PTS system. Notably, the kinetics of glucose uptake by spherical and rod-shaped E. coli cells are comparable, implying that negatively curved “pole-like” sites support not only the localization but also the proper functioning of the PTS system in cells with different shapes. Consistent with the curvature-mediated localization model, we observed the EI protein from Bacillus subtilis at strongly curved sites in both B. subtilis and E. coli. Taken together, we propose that changes in cell architecture correlate with dynamic survival strategies that localize central metabolic systems like the PTS to subcellular domains where they remain active, thus maintaining cell viability and metabolic alertness. PMID:24129255

  15. Stereochemical course of the reactions catalyzed by the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate: Mannitol phosphotransferase system

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, E.G.; Knowles, J.R. ); Khandekar, S.S.; Jacobson, G.R. )

    1990-07-24

    The authors have determined the overall stereochemical course of the reactions leading to the phosphorylation of D-mannitol by mannitol-specific enzyme II (EII{sup Mtl}) of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate- (PEP) dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS). In the presence of enzyme I and HPr of the PTS, and of membranes containing EII{sup Mtl}, the phospho group from ((R)-{sup 16}O, {sup 17}O, {sup 18}O)PEP was transferred to D-mannitol to form mannitol 1-phosphate with overall inversion of the configuration at phosphorus with respect to that of PEP. Since in the course of these reactions enzyme I and HPr are each covalently phosphorylated at a single site and inversion of the chiral phospho group from PEP indicates an odd number of transfer steps overall, transfer from phospho-HPr to mannitol via EII{sup Mtl} must also occur in an odd number of steps. Taken together with the fact that catalytically important phospho-EII{sup Mtl} intermediates have been demonstrated biochemically, the results imply that EII{sup Mtl} is sequentially phosphorylated at two different sites during phospho transfer from phospho-HPr to mannitol. This conclusion is consistent with the available evidence on phospho-EII{sup Mtl} intermediates and in particular with the recent report that two different phospho peptides can be isolated from the fully phosphorylated protein.

  16. A UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucose-1-phosphotransferase in embryonic chicken neural retina

    SciTech Connect

    Koro, L.A.; Marchase, R.B.

    1982-12-01

    A subclass of cell-surface glycoproteins from embryonic chicken neural retina contains a high mannose-type oligosaccharide that terminates with glucose linked via a phosphodiester bond to penultimate mannose. This unusual oligosaccharide seems responsible for the glycoprotein attachments to the cell-surface baseplate ligatin. Using beta-/sup 32/P-UDP-/sup 3/H-glucose, we demonstrate in retinal homogenates the existence of a UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucose-1-phosphotransferase (GlcPTase) that catalyzes the synthesis of such a linkage. Characterization of the doubly labeled product resulting from activity of the transferase reveals a family of endoglycosidase H-sensitive oligosaccharides displaying a cation-exchange profile similar to that of oligosaccharides derived from ligatin-associated proteins synthesized in vivo. Further analysis confirms that the incorporation of label is due to a terminal /sup 3/H-glucose joined via a /sup 32/P-phosphodiester linkage to carbon 6 of a penultimate mannose. We propose that GlcPTase may be a controlling enzyme for the targeting of certain newly synthesized proteins to the cell surface.

  17. Unraveling the evolutionary history of the phosphoryl-transfer chain of the phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase system through phylogenetic analyses and genome context

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) plays a major role in sugar transport and in the regulation of essential physiological processes in many bacteria. The PTS couples solute transport to its phosphorylation at the expense of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and it consists of general cytoplasmic phosphoryl transfer proteins and specific enzyme II complexes which catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of solutes. Previous studies have suggested that the evolution of the constituents of the enzyme II complexes has been driven largely by horizontal gene transfer whereas vertical inheritance has been prevalent in the general phosphoryl transfer proteins in some bacterial groups. The aim of this work is to test this hypothesis by studying the evolution of the phosphoryl transfer proteins of the PTS. Results We have analyzed the evolutionary history of the PTS phosphoryl transfer chain (PTS-ptc) components in 222 complete genomes by combining phylogenetic methods and analysis of genomic context. Phylogenetic analyses alone were not conclusive for the deepest nodes but when complemented with analyses of genomic context and functional information, the main evolutionary trends of this system could be depicted. Conclusion The PTS-ptc evolved in bacteria after the divergence of early lineages such as Aquificales, Thermotogales and Thermus/Deinococcus. The subsequent evolutionary history of the PTS-ptc varied in different bacterial lineages: vertical inheritance and lineage-specific gene losses mainly explain the current situation in Actinobacteria and Firmicutes whereas horizontal gene transfer (HGT) also played a major role in Proteobacteria. Most remarkably, we have identified a HGT event from Firmicutes or Fusobacteria to the last common ancestor of the Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae, Shewanellaceae and Vibrionaceae. This transfer led to extensive changes in the metabolic and regulatory networks of these bacteria including the development of a

  18. In Vivo Analysis of HPr Reveals a Fructose-Specific Phosphotransferase System That Confers High-Affinity Uptake in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Nothaft, Harald; Parche, Stephan; Kamionka, Annette; Titgemeyer, Fritz

    2003-01-01

    HPr, the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein of the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS), serves multiple functions in carbohydrate uptake and carbon source regulation in low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria and in gram-negative bacteria. To assess the role of HPr in the high-G+C-content gram-positive organism Streptomyces coelicolor, the encoding gene, ptsH, was deleted. The ptsH mutant BAP1 was impaired in fructose utilization, while growth on other carbon sources was not affected. Uptake assays revealed that BAP1 could not transport appreciable amounts of fructose, while the wild type showed inducible high-affinity fructose transport with an apparent Km of 2 μM. Complementation and reconstitution experiments demonstrated that HPr is indispensable for a fructose-specific PTS activity. Investigation of the putative fruKA gene locus led to identification of the fructose-specific enzyme II permease encoded by the fruA gene. Synthesis of HPr was not specifically enhanced in fructose-grown cells and occurred also in the presence of non-PTS carbon sources. Transcriptional analysis of ptsH revealed two promoters that are carbon source regulated. In contrast to what happens in other bacteria, glucose repression of glycerol kinase was still operative in a ptsH background, which suggests that HPr is not involved in general carbon regulation. However, fructose repression of glycerol kinase was lost in BAP1, indicating that the fructose-PTS is required for transduction of the signal. This study provides the first molecular genetic evidence of a physiological role of the PTS in S. coelicolor. PMID:12533468

  19. Sophisticated Regulation of Transcriptional Factors by the Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate: Sugar Phosphotransferase System.

    PubMed

    Galinier, Anne; Deutscher, Josef

    2017-03-24

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) is a carbohydrate transport and phosphorylation system present in bacteria of all different phyla and in archaea. It is usually composed of three proteins or protein complexes, enzyme I, HPr, and enzyme II, which are phosphorylated at histidine or cysteine residues. However, in many bacteria, HPr can also be phosphorylated at a serine residue. The PTS not only functions as a carbohydrate transporter but also regulates numerous cellular processes either by phosphorylating its target proteins or by interacting with them in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The target proteins can be catabolic enzymes, transporters, and signal transduction proteins but are most frequently transcriptional regulators. In this review, we will describe how PTS components interact with or phosphorylate proteins to regulate directly or indirectly the activity of transcriptional repressors, activators, or antiterminators. We will briefly summarize the well-studied mechanism of carbon catabolite repression in firmicutes, where the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A needs to interact with seryl-phosphorylated HPr in order to be functional. We will present new results related to transcriptional activators and antiterminators containing specific PTS regulation domains, which are the phosphorylation targets for three different types of PTS components. Moreover, we will discuss how the phosphorylation level of the PTS components precisely regulates the activity of target transcriptional regulators or antiterminators, with or without PTS regulation domain, and how the availability of PTS substrates and thus the metabolic status of the cell are connected with various cellular processes, such as biofilm formation or virulence of certain pathogens.

  20. Differential proteolysis of the subunits of pyrophosphate-dependent 6-phosphofructo-1-phosphotransferase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H F; Tao, M

    1990-02-05

    Antibodies against the alpha (Mr 67,000) and beta (Mr 60,000) subunits of wheat seedling Fru-2,6-P2-stimulated pyrophosphate-dependent 6-phosphofructo-1-phosphotransferase (PFP) were used to probe the subunit structures of several partially purified plant PFPs after tryptic digestion. Antisera to the alpha and beta subunits of wheat seedling PFP cross-reacted with the corresponding alpha and beta subunits of PFP preparations from wheat germ, potato tubers, and lettuce leaves. With the mung bean PFP, both antisera reacted with a protein band of Mr 60,000. A protein band corresponding to the Mr 67,000 alpha subunit was not detected in the mung bean PFP preparation. Tryptic digestion of wheat seedling and potato tuber PFPs resulted in the preferential cleavage of the alpha subunit. The trypsinized PFP retained most of its Fru-2,6-P2-stimulated activity but not its basal activity. The proteolyzed enzyme also exhibited a 2-fold increase in Ka for Fru-2,6-P2. Studies with the mung bean enzyme revealed that the anti-alpha immunoreactive component was more sensitive to trypsinization than the anti-beta immunoreactive component of the Mr 60,000 protein band. Thus, the Mr 60,000 protein band of the mung bean PFP appears to be heterogeneous and contains both alpha and beta-like proteins. The above observations indicate that the alpha and beta subunits of PFP are two distinct polypeptides and that alpha acts as a regulatory protein in regulating both the catalytic activity and the Fru-2,6-P2-binding affinity of the beta subunit.

  1. How Phosphotransferase System-Related Protein Phosphorylation Regulates Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Deutscher, Josef; Francke, Christof; Postma, Pieter W.

    2006-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate(PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is found only in bacteria, where it catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of numerous monosaccharides, disaccharides, amino sugars, polyols, and other sugar derivatives. To carry out its catalytic function in sugar transport and phosphorylation, the PTS uses PEP as an energy source and phosphoryl donor. The phosphoryl group of PEP is usually transferred via four distinct proteins (domains) to the transported sugar bound to the respective membrane component(s) (EIIC and EIID) of the PTS. The organization of the PTS as a four-step phosphoryl transfer system, in which all P derivatives exhibit similar energy (phosphorylation occurs at histidyl or cysteyl residues), is surprising, as a single protein (or domain) coupling energy transfer and sugar phosphorylation would be sufficient for PTS function. A possible explanation for the complexity of the PTS was provided by the discovery that the PTS also carries out numerous regulatory functions. Depending on their phosphorylation state, the four proteins (domains) forming the PTS phosphorylation cascade (EI, HPr, EIIA, and EIIB) can phosphorylate or interact with numerous non-PTS proteins and thereby regulate their activity. In addition, in certain bacteria, one of the PTS components (HPr) is phosphorylated by ATP at a seryl residue, which increases the complexity of PTS-mediated regulation. In this review, we try to summarize the known protein phosphorylation-related regulatory functions of the PTS. As we shall see, the PTS regulation network not only controls carbohydrate uptake and metabolism but also interferes with the utilization of nitrogen and phosphorus and the virulence of certain pathogens. PMID:17158705

  2. Pyrophosphate Fructose-6-P 1-Phosphotransferase from Tomato Fruit : Evidence for Change during Ripening.

    PubMed

    Wong, J H; Kiss, F; Wu, M X; Buchanan, B B

    1990-10-01

    Three forms of pyrophosphate fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase (PFP) were purified from both green and red tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit: (a) a classical form (designated Q(2)) containing alpha- (66 kilodalton) and beta- (60 kilodalton) subunits; (b) a form (Q(1)) containing a beta-doublet subunit; and (c) a form (Q(0)) that appeared to contain a beta-singlet subunit. Several lines of evidence suggested that the different forms occur under physiological conditions. Q(2) was purified to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity; Q(1) and Q(0) were highly purified, but not to homogeneity. The distribution of the PFP forms from red (versus green) tomato was: Q(2), 29% (90%); Q(1), 47% (6%); and Q(0), 24% (4%). The major difference distinguishing the red from the green tomato enzymes was the fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P(2))-induced change in K(m) for fructose-6-phosphate (Fru-6-P), the ;green forms' showing markedly enhanced affinity on activation (K(m) decrease of 7-9-fold) and the ;red forms' showing either little change (Q(0), Q(1)) or a relatively small (2.5-fold) affinity increase (Q(2)). The results extend our earlier findings with carrot root to another tissue and indicate that forms of PFP showing low or no affinity increase for Fru 6-P on activation by Fru-2,6-P(2) (here Q(1) and Q(0)) are associated with sugar storage, whereas the classical form (Q(2)), which shows a pronounced affinity increase, is more important for starch storage.

  3. The mechanism of the reaction catalysed by adenosine triphosphate–creatine phosphotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, J. F.; James, Elizabeth

    1965-01-01

    1. The forward and reverse reactions catalysed by ATP–creatine phosphotransferase have been studied kinetically at pH8·0 in the presence and absence of products, under conditions in which the free Mg2+ concentration was maintained constant at 1mm. Thus at fixed pH the reaction may be considered as being bireactant and expressed as:MgATP2−+creatine0⇌MgADP−+phosphocreatine2−2. The initial-velocity pattern in the absence of products and the product-inhibition pattern have been determined. These are consistent with a random mechanism in which all steps are in rapid equilibrium except that concerned with the interconversion of the central ternary complexes, and in which two dead-end complexes (enzyme–MgADP–creatine and enzyme–MgATP–phosphocreatine) are formed. The results are in accord with previous suggestions that the enzyme possesses distinct sites for the combination of the nucleotide and guanidino substrates. 3. Values have been determined for the Michaelis and dissociation constants involved in the combination of each substrate with various enzyme forms. Although these values cannot be regarded as absolute, they appear to indicate that the presence of one substrate on the enzyme enhances the combination of the second substrate. In addition, it would seem that in the formation of the enzyme–MgADP–creatine complex the concentration of one reactant does not affect the combination of the other. This contrasts with the formation of the enzyme–MgATP–phosphocreatine complex, where each reactant hinders the combination of the other. PMID:16749122

  4. Revisiting the nucleotide and aminoglycoside substrate specificity of the bifunctional aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6')-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2'')-Ia enzyme.

    PubMed

    Frase, Hilary; Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2012-12-21

    The bifunctional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6')-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia, or AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia, is the major source of aminoglycoside resistance in gram-positive bacterial pathogens. In previous studies, using ATP as the cosubstrate, it was reported that the APH(2″)-Ia domain of this enzyme is unique among aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having the ability to inactivate an unusually broad spectrum of aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-disubstituted and atypical. We recently demonstrated that GTP, and not ATP, is the preferred cosubstrate of this enzyme. We now show, using competition assays between ATP and GTP, that GTP is the exclusive phosphate donor at intracellular nucleotide levels. In light of these findings, we reevaluated the substrate profile of the phosphotransferase domain of this clinically important enzyme. Steady-state kinetic characterization using the phosphate donor GTP demonstrates that AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia phosphorylates 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides with high efficiency (k(cat)/K(m) = 10(5)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Despite this proficiency, no resistance is conferred to some of these antibiotics by the enzyme in vivo. We now show that phosphorylation of 4,5-disubstituted and atypical aminoglycosides are negligible and thus these antibiotics are not substrates. Instead, these aminoglycosides tend to stimulate an intrinsic GTPase activity of the enzyme. Taken together, our data show that the bifunctional enzyme efficiently phosphorylates only 4,6-disubstituted antibiotics; however, phosphorylation does not necessarily result in bacterial resistance. Hence, the APH(2″)-Ia domain of the bifunctional AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia enzyme is a bona fide GTP-dependent kinase with a narrow substrate profile, including only 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides.

  5. Efficient production of xylitol from hemicellulosic hydrolysate using engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Su, Buli; Wu, Mianbin; Zhang, Zhe; Lin, Jianping; Yang, Lirong

    2015-09-01

    A metabolically engineered Escherichia coli has been constructed for the production of xylitol, one of the top 12 platform chemicals from agricultural sources identified by the US Department of Energy. An optimal plasmid was constructed to express xylose reductase from Neurospora crassa with almost no inclusion bodies at relatively high temperature. The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent glucose phosphotransferase system (ptsG) was disrupted to eliminate catabolite repression and allow simultaneous uptake of glucose and xylose. The native pathway for D-xylose catabolism in E. coli W3110 was blocked by deleting the xylose isomerase (xylA) and xylulose kinase (xylB) genes. The putative pathway for xylitol phosphorylation was also blocked by disrupting the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent fructose phosphotransferase system (ptsF). The xylitol producing recombinant E. coli allowed production of 172.4 g L(-1) xylitol after 110 h of fed-batch cultivation with an average productivity of 1.57 g L(-1) h(-1). The molar yield of xylitol to glucose reached approximately 2.2 (mol xylitol mol(-1) glucose). Furthermore, the recombinant strain also produced about 150 g L(-1) xylitol from hemicellulosic sugars in modified M9 minimal medium and the overall productivity was 1.40 g L(-1) h(-1), representing the highest xylitol concentration and productivity reported to date from hemicellulosic sugars using bacteria. Thus, this engineered E. coli is a candidate for the development of efficient industrial-scale production of xylitol from hemicellulosic hydrolysate.

  6. QUANTIFICATION OF TRANSGENIC PLANT MARKER GENE PERSISTENCE IN THE FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods were developed to monitor persistence of genomic DNA in decaying plants in the field. As a model, we used recombinant neomycin phosphotransferase II (rNPT-II) marker genes present in genetically engineered plants. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed, com...

  7. QUANTIFICATION OF TRANSGENIC PLANT MARKER GENE PERSISTENCE IN THE FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods were developed to monitor persistence of genomic DNA in decaying plants in the field. As a model, we used recombinant neomycin phosphotransferase II (rNPT-II) marker genes present in genetically engineered plants. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed, com...

  8. Recognition of arylsulfatase A and B by the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-phosphotransferase.

    PubMed

    Yaghootfam, Afshin; Schestag, Frank; Dierks, Thomas; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2003-08-29

    The critical step for sorting of lysosomal enzymes is the recognition by a Golgi-located phosphotransferase. The topogenic structure common to all lysosomal enzymes essential for this recognition is still not well defined, except that lysine residues seem to play a critical role. Here we have substituted surface-located lysine residues of lysosomal arylsulfatases A and B. In lysosomal arylsulfatase A only substitution of lysine residue 457 caused a reduction of phosphorylation to 33% and increased secretion of the mutant enzyme. In contrast to critical lysines in various other lysosomal enzymes, lysine 457 is not located in an unstructured loop region but in a helix. It is not strictly conserved among six homologous lysosomal sulfatases. Based on three-dimensional structure comparison, lysines 497 and 507 in arylsulfatase B are in a similar position as lysine 457 of arylsulfatase A. Also, the position of oligosaccharide side chains phosphorylated in arylsulfatase A is similar in arylsulfatase B. Despite the high degree of structural homology between these two sulfatases substitution of lysines 497 and 507 in arylsulfatase B has no effect on the sorting and phosphorylation of this sulfatase. Thus, highly homologous lysosomal arylsulfatases A and B did not develop a single conserved phosphotransferase recognition signal, demonstrating the high variability of this signal even in evolutionary closely related enzymes.

  9. The Trehalose Phosphotransferase System (PTS) in E. coli W Can Transport Low Levels of Sucrose that Are Sufficient to Facilitate Induction of the csc Sucrose Catabolism Operon

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Jennifer A.; Bohlke, Nina; Vickers, Claudia E.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2014-01-01

    Plasticity in substrate acceptance is a well-characterised phenomenon for disaccharide transporters. Sucrose, a non-reducing disaccharide, is usually metabolised via either the permease-mediated chromosomally-encoded sucrose catabolism (csc) regulon or the sucrose phosphotransferase system (PTS). E. coli W is a fast-growing strain which efficiently utilises sucrose at concentrations above 1% via the csc regulon. To examine if sucrose could be metabolised via other routes, a library of transposon mutants was generated and screened on 0.2% sucrose. One mutant identified from this library had an insertion in the repressor for the regulon controlling catabolism of the disaccharide trehalose (treR). A series of mutants was constructed to elucidate the mechanism of sucrose utilization in the treR insertion strain. Analysis of these mutants provided evidence that deletion of TreR enables uptake of sucrose via TreB, an enzyme II protein required for PTS-mediated uptake of trehalose. Once inside the cell, this sucrose is not processed by the TreC hydrolase, nor is it sufficient for growth of the strain. QRT-PCR analysis showed that levels of cscA (invertase) transcript increased in the WΔtreR mutant relative to the wild-type strain when grown under low sucrose conditions. This result suggests that the intracellular sucrose provided by TreB can facilitate de-repression of the csc regulon, leading to increased gene expression, sucrose uptake and sucrose utilization in the treR mutant. PMID:24586369

  10. Coutilization of glucose and glycerol enhances the production of aromatic compounds in an Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Karla; de Anda, Ramón; Hernández, Georgina; Escalante, Adelfo; Gosset, Guillermo; Ramírez, Octavio T; Bolívar, Francisco G

    2008-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli strains lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) are capable of coutilizing glucose and other carbon sources due to the absence of catabolite repression by glucose. In these strains, the lack of this important regulatory and transport system allows the coexistence of glycolytic and gluconeogenic pathways. Strains lacking PTS have been constructed with the goal of canalizing part of the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) not consumed in glucose transport to the aromatic pathway. The deletion of the ptsHIcrr operon inactivates PTS causing poor growth on this sugar; nonetheless, fast growing mutants on glucose have been isolated (PB12 strain). However, there are no reported studies concerning the growth potential of a PTS- strain in mixtures of different carbon sources to enhance the production of aromatics compounds. Results PB12 strain is capable of coutilizing mixtures of glucose-arabinose, glucose-gluconate and glucose-glycerol. This capacity increases its specific growth rate (μ) given that this strain metabolizes more moles of carbon source per unit time. The presence of plasmids pRW300aroGfbr and pCLtktA reduces the μ of strain PB12 in all mixtures of carbon sources, but enhances the productivity and yield of aromatic compounds, especially in the glucose-glycerol mixture, as compared to glucose or glycerol cultures. No acetate was detected in the glycerol and the glucose-glycerol batch fermentations. Conclusion Due to the lack of catabolite repression, PB12 strain carrying multicopy plasmids containing tktA and aroGfbr genes is capable of coutilizing glucose and other carbon sources; this capacity, reduces its μ but increases the production of aromatic compounds. PMID:18211716

  11. Implications of various phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system mutations on glycerol utilization and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) accumulation in Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The enhanced global biodiesel production is also yielding increased quantities of glycerol as main coproduct. An effective application of glycerol, for example, as low-cost substrate for microbial growth in industrial fermentation processes to specific products will reduce the production costs for biodiesel. Our study focuses on the utilization of glycerol as a cheap carbon source during cultivation of the thermoplastic producing bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, and on the investigation of carbohydrate transport proteins involved herein. Seven open reading frames were identified in the genome of strain H16 to encode for putative proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS). Although the core components of PEP-PTS, enzyme I (ptsI) and histidine phosphocarrier protein (ptsH), are available in strain H16, a complete PTS-mediated carbohydrate transport is lacking. Growth experiments employing several PEP-PTS mutants indicate that the putative ptsMHI operon, comprising ptsM (a fructose-specific EIIA component of PTS), ptsH, and ptsI, is responsible for limited cell growth and reduced PHB accumulation (53%, w/w, less PHB than the wild type) of this strain in media containing glycerol as a sole carbon source. Otherwise, the deletion of gene H16_A0384 (ptsN, nitrogen regulatory EIIA component of PTS) seemed to largely compensate the effect of the deleted ptsMHI operon (49%, w/w, PHB). The involvement of the PTS homologous proteins on the utilization of the non-PTS sugar alcohol glycerol and its effect on cell growth as well as PHB and carbon metabolism of R. eutropha will be discussed. PMID:21906371

  12. Utilization of d-Ribitol by Lactobacillus casei BL23 Requires a Mannose-Type Phosphotransferase System and Three Catabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Bourand, A.; Yebra, M. J.; Boël, G.; Mazé, A.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains 64H and BL23, but not ATCC 334, are able to ferment d-ribitol (also called d-adonitol). However, a BL23-derived ptsI mutant lacking enzyme I of the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) was not able to utilize this pentitol, suggesting that strain BL23 transports and phosphorylates d-ribitol via a PTS. We identified an 11-kb region in the genome sequence of L. casei strain BL23 (LCABL_29160 to LCABL_29270) which is absent from strain ATCC 334 and which contains the genes for a GlpR/IolR-like repressor, the four components of a mannose-type PTS, and six metabolic enzymes potentially involved in d-ribitol metabolism. Deletion of the gene encoding the EIIB component of the presumed ribitol PTS indeed prevented d-ribitol fermentation. In addition, we overexpressed the six catabolic genes, purified the encoded enzymes, and determined the activities of four of them. They encode a d-ribitol-5-phosphate (d-ribitol-5-P) 2-dehydrogenase, a d-ribulose-5-P 3-epimerase, a d-ribose-5-P isomerase, and a d-xylulose-5-P phosphoketolase. In the first catabolic step, the protein d-ribitol-5-P 2-dehydrogenase uses NAD+ to oxidize d-ribitol-5-P formed during PTS-catalyzed transport to d-ribulose-5-P, which, in turn, is converted to d-xylulose-5-P by the enzyme d-ribulose-5-P 3-epimerase. Finally, the resulting d-xylulose-5-P is split by d-xylulose-5-P phosphoketolase in an inorganic phosphate-requiring reaction into acetylphosphate and the glycolytic intermediate d-glyceraldehyde-3-P. The three remaining enzymes, one of which was identified as d-ribose-5-P-isomerase, probably catalyze an alternative ribitol degradation pathway, which might be functional in L. casei strain 64H but not in BL23, because one of the BL23 genes carries a frameshift mutation. PMID:23564164

  13. Utilization of D-ribitol by Lactobacillus casei BL23 requires a mannose-type phosphotransferase system and three catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bourand, A; Yebra, M J; Boël, G; Mazé, A; Deutscher, J

    2013-06-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains 64H and BL23, but not ATCC 334, are able to ferment D-ribitol (also called D-adonitol). However, a BL23-derived ptsI mutant lacking enzyme I of the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) was not able to utilize this pentitol, suggesting that strain BL23 transports and phosphorylates D-ribitol via a PTS. We identified an 11-kb region in the genome sequence of L. casei strain BL23 (LCABL_29160 to LCABL_29270) which is absent from strain ATCC 334 and which contains the genes for a GlpR/IolR-like repressor, the four components of a mannose-type PTS, and six metabolic enzymes potentially involved in D-ribitol metabolism. Deletion of the gene encoding the EIIB component of the presumed ribitol PTS indeed prevented D-ribitol fermentation. In addition, we overexpressed the six catabolic genes, purified the encoded enzymes, and determined the activities of four of them. They encode a D-ribitol-5-phosphate (D-ribitol-5-P) 2-dehydrogenase, a D-ribulose-5-P 3-epimerase, a D-ribose-5-P isomerase, and a D-xylulose-5-P phosphoketolase. In the first catabolic step, the protein D-ribitol-5-P 2-dehydrogenase uses NAD(+) to oxidize D-ribitol-5-P formed during PTS-catalyzed transport to D-ribulose-5-P, which, in turn, is converted to D-xylulose-5-P by the enzyme D-ribulose-5-P 3-epimerase. Finally, the resulting D-xylulose-5-P is split by D-xylulose-5-P phosphoketolase in an inorganic phosphate-requiring reaction into acetylphosphate and the glycolytic intermediate D-glyceraldehyde-3-P. The three remaining enzymes, one of which was identified as D-ribose-5-P-isomerase, probably catalyze an alternative ribitol degradation pathway, which might be functional in L. casei strain 64H but not in BL23, because one of the BL23 genes carries a frameshift mutation.

  14. Genetic Engineering of the Phosphocarrier Protein NPr of the Escherichia coli Phosphotransferase System Selectively Improves Sugar Uptake Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-de los Santos, Yossef; Chan, Henry; Cantu, Vito A.; Rettner, Rachael; Sanchez, Filiberto; Zhang, Zhongge; Saier, Milton H.; Soberon, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    The Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) in prokaryotes mediates the uptake and phosphorylation of its numerous substrates through a phosphoryl transfer chain where a phosphoryl transfer protein, HPr, transfers its phosphoryl group to any of several sugar-specific Enzyme IIA proteins in preparation for sugar transport. A phosphoryl transfer protein of the PTS, NPr, homologous to HPr, functions to regulate nitrogen metabolism and shows virtually no enzymatic cross-reactivity with HPr. Here we describe the genetic engineering of a “chimeric” HPr/NPr protein, termed CPr14 because 14 amino acid residues of the interface were replaced. CPr14 shows decreased activity with most PTS permeases relative to HPr, but increases activity with the broad specificity mannose permease. The results lead to the proposal that HPr is not optimal for most PTS permeases but instead represents a compromise with suboptimal activity for most PTS permeases. The evolutionary implications are discussed. PMID:22767600

  15. Lipid dependencies, biogenesis and cytoplasmic micellar forms of integral membrane sugar transport proteins of the bacterial phosphotransferase system

    PubMed Central

    Aboulwafa, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Permeases of the prokaryotic phosphoenolpyruvate–sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) catalyse sugar transport coupled to sugar phosphorylation. The lipid composition of a membrane determines the activities of these enzyme/transporters as well as the degree of coupling of phosphorylation to transport. We have investigated mechanisms of PTS permease biogenesis and identified cytoplasmic (soluble) forms of these integral membrane proteins. We found that the catalytic activities of the soluble forms differ from those of the membrane-embedded forms. Transport via the latter is much more sensitive to lipid composition than to phosphorylation, and some of these enzymes are much more sensitive to the lipid environment than others. While the membrane-embedded PTS permeases are always dimeric, the cytoplasmic forms are micellar, either monomeric or dimeric. Scattered published evidence suggests that other integral membrane proteins also exist in cytoplasmic micellar forms. The possible functions of cytoplasmic PTS permeases in biogenesis, intracellular sugar phosphorylation and permease storage are discussed. PMID:23985145

  16. Release of the phosphodiesterase activator by cyclic AMP-dependent ATP:protein phosphotransferase from subcellular fractions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gnegy, M E; Nathanson, J A; Uzunov, P

    1977-03-29

    The subcellular distribution of the endogenous phosphodiesterase activator and its release from membranes by a cyclic AMP-dependent ATP:protein phosphotransferase was studied in fractions and subfractions of rat brain homogenate. These fractions were obtained by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient; their identity was ascertained by electron microscopy and specific enzyme markers. In the subcellular particulate fractions, the concentration of activator is highest in the microsomal fraction, followed by the mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. Gradient centrifugation of the main mitochondrial subfraction revealed that activator was concentrated in those fractions containing mainly synaptic membranes. Activator was releasted from membranes by a cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of membrane protein. The release of activator occurred mainly from the mitochondrial subfractions containing synaptic membranes and synaptic vesicles. The data support the view that a release of activator from membranes may be important in normalizing the elevated concentration of cyclic AMP following persistent transsynaptic activation of adenylate cyclase.

  17. Structural insights into ChpT, an essential dimeric histidine phosphotransferase regulating the cell cycle in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Clantin, Bernard; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Verger, Alexis; Biondi, Emanuele G.; Villeret, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Two-component and phosphorelay signal-transduction proteins are crucial for bacterial cell-cycle regulation in Caulobacter crescentus. ChpT is an essential histidine phosphotransferase that controls the activity of the master cell-cycle regulator CtrA by phosphorylation. Here, the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of ChpT is reported. ChpT is a homodimer and adopts the domain architecture of the intracellular part of class I histidine kinases. Each subunit consists of two distinct domains: an N-terminal helical hairpin domain and a C-terminal α/β domain. The two N-terminal domains are adjacent within the dimer, forming a four-helix bundle. The ChpT C-terminal domain adopts an atypical Bergerat ATP-binding fold. PMID:22949187

  18. Purification and characterization of macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase from a strain of Escherichia coli that is highly resistant to erythromycin.

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, K; Kanda, T; Ohmiya, K; Ebisu, T; Kono, M

    1989-01-01

    Macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase [MPH(2')] was purified 90-fold from an erythromycin-resistant strain of Escherichia coli, and its enzymatic properties were investigated. MPH(2') is an inducible intracellular enzyme which showed high levels of activity with 14-member-ring macrolides and extremely low levels with 16-member-ring macrolides. The optimum pH for inactivation of oleandomycin was 8.2, and the optimum temperature of the reaction was 40 degrees C. Enzyme activity was lost by heat treatment at 50 degrees C for 1 min. The isoelectric point and molecular weight of the enzyme were 5.3 and 34,000, respectively. Purine nucleotides, such as GTP, ITP, and ATP, were effective as cofactors in the inactivation of macrolides. Iodine, EDTA, or divalent cations inhibited MPH(2') activity. Images PMID:2478074

  19. Structure, dynamics and biophysics of the cytoplasmic protein–protein complexes of the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate: Sugar phosphotransferase system

    SciTech Connect

    Clore, G. Marius; Venditti, Vincenzo

    2013-10-01

    The bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS) couples phosphoryl transfer, via a series of bimolecular protein–protein interactions, to sugar transport across the membrane. The multitude of complexes in the PTS provides a paradigm for studying protein interactions, and for understanding how the same binding surface can specifically recognize a diverse array of targets. Fifteen years of work aimed at solving the solution structures of all soluble protein–protein complexes of the PTS has served as a test bed for developing NMR and integrated hybrid approaches to study larger complexes in solution and to probe transient, spectroscopically invisible states, including encounter complexes. We review these approaches, highlighting the problems that can be tackled with these methods, and summarize the current findings on protein interactions.

  20. Characterization of ATP-Dependent Fructose 6-Phosphate 1-Phosphotransferase Isozymes from Leaf and Endosperm Tissues of Ricinus communis1

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Vicki L.; Greyson, Maureen F.; Dennis, David T.

    1990-01-01

    Plastid and cytosolic isozymes of ATP:fructose 6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase (PFKp and PFKc, respectively) have been isolated from leaves and developing endosperm tissues of the castor oil plant (Ricinus communis L). Endosperm PFKp has been purified to apparent homogeneity. Polyclonal antibodies raised against one of the four polypeptides associated with potato tuber PFK (molecular mass, 46 kilodaltons) immunoprecipitated developing endosperm and leaf PFKp, but not PFKc isozymes. Western blots, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and analytical gel filtration show that PFKp from developing endosperm is a 220 kilodalton homotetramer composed of 57 kilodalton subunits. Kinetic studies of leaf PFKp and PFKc isozymes reveal both similarities and differences to the characteristics of the respective endosperm isozymes studied previously (WJ Garland, DT Dennis [1980] Arch Biochem Biophys 204: 302-317). The immunological and kinetic data suggest that leaf and developing endosperm PFKp are different but structurally related proteins. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667239

  1. Aminoglycoside binding and catalysis specificity of aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa: A thermodynamic, structural and kinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Elise; Guichou, Jean-François; Chaloin, Laurent; Kunzelmann, Simone; Leban, Nadia; Serpersu, Engin H.; Lionne, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background Aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases make up a large class of bacterial enzymes that is widely distributed among pathogens and confer a high resistance to several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa, APH(2″)-IVa, is an important member of this class, but there is little information on the thermodynamics of aminoglycoside binding and on the nature of its rate-limiting step. Methods We used isothermal titration calorimetry, electrostatic potential calculations, molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystallography to study the interactions between the enzyme and different aminoglycosides. We determined the rate-limiting step of the reaction by the means of transient kinetic measurements. Results For the first time, Kd values were determined directly for APH(2″)-IVa and different aminoglycosides. The affinity of the enzyme seems to anti-correlate with the molecular weight of the ligand, suggesting a limited degree of freedom in the binding site. The main interactions are electrostatic bonds between the positively charged amino groups of aminoglycosides and Glu or Asp residues of APH. In spite of the significantly different ratio Kd/Km, there is no large difference in the transient kinetics obtained with the different aminoglycosides. We show that a product release step is rate-limiting for the overall reaction. Conclusions APH(2″)-IVa has a higher affinity for aminoglycosides carrying an amino group in 2′ and 6′, but tighter bindings do not correlate with higher catalytic efficiencies. As with APH(3′)-IIIa, an intermediate containing product is preponderant during the steady state. General significance This intermediate may constitute a good target for future drug design. PMID:26802312

  2. Aminoglycoside binding and catalysis specificity of aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa: A thermodynamic, structural and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Elise; Guichou, Jean-François; Chaloin, Laurent; Kunzelmann, Simone; Leban, Nadia; Serpersu, Engin H; Lionne, Corinne

    2016-04-01

    Aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases make up a large class of bacterial enzymes that is widely distributed among pathogens and confer a high resistance to several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa, APH(2″)-IVa, is an important member of this class, but there is little information on the thermodynamics of aminoglycoside binding and on the nature of its rate-limiting step. We used isothermal titration calorimetry, electrostatic potential calculations, molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystallography to study the interactions between the enzyme and different aminoglycosides. We determined the rate-limiting step of the reaction by the means of transient kinetic measurements. For the first time, Kd values were determined directly for APH(2″)-IVa and different aminoglycosides. The affinity of the enzyme seems to anti-correlate with the molecular weight of the ligand, suggesting a limited degree of freedom in the binding site. The main interactions are electrostatic bonds between the positively charged amino groups of aminoglycosides and Glu or Asp residues of APH. In spite of the significantly different ratio Kd/Km, there is no large difference in the transient kinetics obtained with the different aminoglycosides. We show that a product release step is rate-limiting for the overall reaction. APH(2″)-IVa has a higher affinity for aminoglycosides carrying an amino group in 2' and 6', but tighter bindings do not correlate with higher catalytic efficiencies. As with APH(3')-IIIa, an intermediate containing product is preponderant during the steady state. This intermediate may constitute a good target for future drug design. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure of the phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clyde A; Toth, Marta; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2014-06-01

    The bifunctional acetyltransferase(6')-Ie-phosphotransferase(2'')-Ia [AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia] is the most important aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria, conferring resistance to almost all known aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical use. Owing to its importance, this enzyme has been the focus of intensive research since its isolation in the mid-1980s but, despite much effort, structural details of AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia have remained elusive. The structure of the Mg2GDP complex of the APH(2'')-Ia domain of the bifunctional enzyme has now been determined at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure of APH(2'')-Ia is reminiscent of the structures of other aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having a two-domain architecture with the nucleotide-binding site located at the junction of the two domains. Unlike the previously characterized APH(2'')-IIa and APH(2'')-IVa enzymes, which are capable of utilizing both ATP and GTP as the phosphate donors, APH(2'')-Ia uses GTP exclusively in the phosphorylation of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, and in this regard closely resembles the GTP-dependent APH(2'')-IIIa enzyme. In APH(2'')-Ia this GTP selectivity is governed by the presence of a `gatekeeper' residue, Tyr100, the side chain of which projects into the active site and effectively blocks access to the adenine-binding template. Mutation of this tyrosine residue to a less bulky phenylalanine provides better access for ATP to the NTP-binding template and converts APH(2'')-Ia into a dual-specificity enzyme.

  4. Mutations in the aph(2")-Ic Gene Are Responsible for Increased Levels of Aminoglycoside Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae Kyung; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Clewell, Don B.; Lerner, Stephen A.; Chow, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    Random PCR mutagenesis of the enterococcal aph(2")-Ic gene followed by selection for mutant enzymes that confer enhanced levels of aminoglycoside resistance resulted in mutants of APH(2")-Ic with His-258-Leu and Phe-108-Leu substitutions, all of which conferred rises in the MICs of several aminoglycosides. The mutated residues are located outside conserved regions of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. PMID:12234853

  5. Mobilization properties of small ColE1-like plasmids carrying kanamycin resistance gene isolated from Salmonella enterica serotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Previously we isolated and characterized various groups of small kanamycin resistance (KanR) ColE1-like plasmids from different serotypes of Salmonella enterica isolates. These plasmids all carried the aph(3)-I gene encoding the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase responsible for the kanam...

  6. Effect of Trehalose and Trehalose Transport on the Tolerance of Clostridium perfringens to Environmental Stress in a Wild Type Strain and Its Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miseon; Mitchell, Wilfrid J.

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose has been shown to protect bacterial cells from environmental stress. Its uptake and osmoprotective effect in Clostridium perfringens were investigated by comparing wild type C. perfringens ATCC 13124 with a fluoroquinolone- (gatifloxacin-) resistant mutant. In a chemically defined medium, trehalose and sucrose supported the growth of the wild type but not that of the mutant. Microarray data and qRT-PCR showed that putative genes for the phosphorylation and transport of sucrose and trehalose (via phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems, PTS) and some regulatory genes were downregulated in the mutant. The wild type had greater tolerance than the mutant to salts and low pH; trehalose and sucrose further enhanced the osmotolerance of the wild type to NaCl. Expression of the trehalose-specific PTS was lower in the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant. Protection of C. perfringens from environmental stress could therefore be correlated with the ability to take up trehalose. PMID:28058047

  7. Autoinducer 2 Signaling via the Phosphotransferase FruA Drives Galactose Utilization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Resulting in Hypervirulence

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Lauren J.; Chen, Austen; Wang, Hui; Paton, Adrienne W.; Oggioni, Marco R.; McDevitt, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Communication between bacterial cells is crucial for the coordination of diverse cellular processes that facilitate environmental adaptation and, in the case of pathogenic species, virulence. This is achieved by the secretion and detection of small signaling molecules called autoinducers, a process termed quorum sensing. To date, the only signaling molecule recognized by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is autoinducer 2 (AI-2), synthesized by the metabolic enzyme LuxS (S-ribosylhomocysteine lyase) as a by-product of the activated methyl cycle. Homologues of LuxS are ubiquitous in bacteria, suggesting a key role in interspecies, as well as intraspecies, communication. Gram-negative bacteria sense and respond to AI-2 via the Lsr ABC transporter system or by the LuxP/LuxQ phosphorelay system. However, homologues of these systems are absent from Gram-positive bacteria and the AI-2 receptor is unknown. Here we show that in the major human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, sensing of exogenous AI-2 is dependent on FruA, a fructose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-phosphotransferase system that is highly conserved in Gram-positive pathogens. Importantly, AI-2 signaling via FruA enables the bacterium to utilize galactose as a carbon source and upregulates the Leloir pathway, thereby leading to increased production of capsular polysaccharide and a hypervirulent phenotype. PMID:28119473

  8. Aminoglycoside 2′′-Phosphotransferase IIIa (APH(2′′)-IIIa) Prefers GTP over ATP

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Frase, Hilary; Byrnes, Laura J.; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2012-01-01

    Contrary to the accepted dogma that ATP is the canonical phosphate donor in aminoglycoside kinases and protein kinases, it was recently demonstrated that all members of the bacterial aminoglycoside 2′′-phosphotransferase IIIa (APH(2′′)) aminoglycoside kinase family are unique in their ability to utilize GTP as a cofactor for antibiotic modification. Here we describe the structural determinants for GTP recognition in these enzymes. The crystal structure of the GTP-dependent APH(2′′)-IIIa shows that although this enzyme has templates for both ATP and GTP binding superimposed on a single nucleotide specificity motif, access to the ATP-binding template is blocked by a bulky tyrosine residue. Substitution of this tyrosine by a smaller amino acid opens access to the ATP template. Similar GTP binding templates are conserved in other bacterial aminoglycoside kinases, whereas in the structurally related eukaryotic protein kinases this template is less conserved. The aminoglycoside kinases are important antibiotic resistance enzymes in bacteria, whose wide dissemination severely limits available therapeutic options, and the GTP binding templates could be exploited as new, previously unexplored targets for inhibitors of these clinically important enzymes. PMID:22367198

  9. Crystallographic Studies of Two Bacterial AntibioticResistance Enzymes: Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase (2')-Ic and GES-1\\beta-lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    Brynes, Laura; /Rensselaer Poly.

    2007-10-31

    Guiana Extended-Spectrum-1 (GES-1) and Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase (2')-Ic (APH(2')-Ic) are two bacteria-produced enzymes that essentially perform the same task: they provide resistance to an array of antibiotics. Both enzymes are part of a growing resistance problem in the medical world. In order to overcome the ever-growing arsenal of antibiotic-resistance enzymes, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of their action. Accurate structures of these proteins have become an invaluable tool to do this. Using protein crystallography techniques and X-ray diffraction, the protein structure of GES-1 bound to imipenem (an inhibitor) has been solved. Also, APH(2')-Ic has been successfully crystallized, but its structure was unable to be solved using molecular replacement using APH(2')-Ib as a search model. The structure of GES-1, with bound imipenem was solved to a resolution of 1.89A, and though the inhibitor is bound with only moderate occupancy, the structure shows crucial interactions inside the active site that render the enzyme unable to complete the hydrolysis of the {beta}-lactam ring. The APH(2')-Ic dataset could not be matched to the model, APH(2')-Ib, with which it shares 25% sequence identity. The structural information gained from GES-1, and future studies using isomorphous replacement to solve the APH(2')-Ic structure can aid directly to the creation of novel drugs to combat both of these classes of resistance enzymes.

  10. Phosphotransferase-dependent accumulation of (p)ppGpp in response to glutamine deprivation in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Ronneau, Séverin; Petit, Kenny; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    The alarmone (p)ppGpp is commonly used by bacteria to quickly respond to nutrient starvation. Although (p)ppGpp synthetases such as SpoT have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms stimulating alarmone synthesis upon starvation. Here, we describe an essential role of the nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTSNtr) in controlling (p)ppGpp accumulation in Caulobacter crescentus. We show that cells sense nitrogen starvation by way of detecting glutamine deprivation using the first enzyme (EINtr) of PTSNtr. Decreasing intracellular glutamine concentration triggers phosphorylation of EINtr and its downstream components HPr and EIIANtr. Once phosphorylated, both HPr∼P and EIIANtr∼P stimulate (p)ppGpp accumulation by modulating SpoT activities. This burst of second messenger primarily impacts the non-replicative phase of the cell cycle by extending the G1 phase. This work highlights a new role for bacterial PTS systems in stimulating (p)ppGpp accumulation in response to metabolic cues and in controlling cell cycle progression and cell growth. PMID:27109061

  11. Insight into the mechanism of chemical modification of antibacterial agents by antibiotic resistance enzyme O-phosphotransferase-IIIA.

    PubMed

    Power, Blake Hollett; Smith, Nathan; Downer, Brandon; Alisaraie, Laleh

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, the mechanism of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics was investigated. We examined the conformational changes of the O-phosphotransferase-IIIa enzyme, complexed with the antibiotics using MD simulations. The inhibitory effects of a group of antibacterial peptides against the enzyme were also examined, among which CP10A showed the highest affinity and the results correlated with the measured IC50 values. The regioselectivity of the phosphorylation reaction was shown to be in favor of the OH at the 5″ position versus the 3' of the antibiotic. The binding mode of CP10A was evaluated by means of MD simulation that resulted in recognizing its Trp8 and Arg13 residues binding near to where residues at the 3' and 5″ positions of the antibiotic would bind; thus, they are essential for the peptide inhibitory effect. The major open, semi-open, and closed conformations of the binding sites were identified throughout the MD trajectory, which enable the enzyme to regulate the influx of molecules into these sites. Based on the enzyme crystal structure, it was assumed that the 'antibiotic loop' of the enzyme is stable in its liganded mode; however, MD results revealed that the loop is highly flexible in both liganded and ligand-free modes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Characterization of mutant histidine-containing proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Waygood, E.B.; Reiche, B.; Hengstenberg, W.; Lee, J.S.

    1987-06-01

    Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) is common to all of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase systems (PTS) in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, except the fructose-specific PTS. Strains which lack HPr activity (ptsH) have been characterized in the past, and it has proved difficult to delineate between tight and leaky mutants. In this study four different parameters of ptsH strains were measured: in vitro sugar phosphorylation activity of the mutant HPr; detection of /sup 32/P-labeled P-HPr; ability of monoclonal antibodies to bind mutant HPr; and sensitivity of ptsH strains to fosfomycin. Tight ptsH strains could be defined; they were fosfomycin resistant and produced no HPr protein or completely inactive mutant HPr. All leaky ptsH strains were fosfomycin sensitive, Usually produced normal amounts of mutant HPr protein, and had low but measurable activity, and HPr was detectable as a phosphoprotein. This indicates that the regulatory functions of the PTS require a very low level of HPr activity (about 1%). The antibodies used to detect mutant HPr in crude extracts were two monoclonal immunoglobulin G antibodies Jel42 and Jel44. Both antibodies, which have different pIs, inhibited PTS sugar phosphorylation assays, but the antibody-JPr complex could still be phosphorylated by enzyme I. Preliminary evidence suggests that the antibodies bind to two different epitopes which are in part located in a ..beta..-sheet structure.

  13. Kinetics of the phosphotransferase reaction of the catalytic subunit of the tick salivary gland cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.D.; Essenberg, R.C.; Sauer, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    The catalytic subunit of the cAMP dependent protein kinase was purified 100-fold from tick salivary glands. The enzyme mechanism of the phosphotransferase reaction catalyzed by this subunit was investigated. Highly purified enzyme did not show ATP-ase activity in the absence of protein substrates. Initial velocities were measured using histone H-1 or a synthetic heptapeptide, Kemptide, as P/sub i/ acceptors and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P) ATP as a phosphodonor. Patterns were consistent with a sequential, but not a ping pong mechanism. At high concentration (>2Km), histone showed substrate inhibition which was noncompetitive versus ATP. Product inhibition by Mg.ADP was competitive versus ATP and noncompetitive with respect to H-1. Phosphohistone on the other hand was noncompetitive with respect to H-1, but gave parabolic competitive inhibition against ATP. Dead-end inhibition by AMP-PNP, an analogue of ATP, was competitive and noncompetitive against ATP and H-1, respectively. The inhibitory of cAMP dependent protein kinase was noncompetitive with ATP and competitive with histone. These studies strongly suggest that the tick salivary gland protein kinase has a sequential mechanism with primarily ordered addition of ATP followed by protein substrate and ordered release of phosphoprotein and ADP, but some random character.

  14. Pathogenic Forms of Tau Inhibit Kinesin-Dependent Axonal Transport through a Mechanism Involving Activation of Axonal Phosphotransferases

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Nicholas M.; Morfini, Gerardo A.; LaPointe, Nichole E.; Pigino, Gustavo F.; Patterson, Kristina R.; Song, Yuyu; Andreadis, Athena; Fu, Yifan; Brady, Scott T.; Binder, Lester I.

    2012-01-01

    Aggregated filamentous forms of hyperphosphorylated tau (a microtubule-associated protein) represent pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other tauopathies. While axonal transport dysfunction is thought to represent a primary pathogenic factor in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases, the direct molecular link between pathogenic forms of tau and deficits in axonal transport remain unclear. Recently, we demonstrated that filamentous, but not soluble, forms of wild-type tau inhibit anterograde, kinesin-based fast axonal transport (FAT) by activating axonal protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), independent of microtubule binding. Here, we demonstrate that amino acids 2–18 of tau, comprising a phosphatase-activating domain (PAD), are necessary and sufficient for activation of this pathway in axoplasms isolated from squid giant axons. Various pathogenic forms of tau displaying increased exposure of PAD inhibited anterograde FAT in squid axoplasm. Importantly, immunohistochemical studies using a novel PAD-specific monoclonal antibody in human postmortem tissue indicated that increased PAD exposure represents an early pathogenic event in AD that closely associates in time with AT8 immunoreactivity, an early marker of pathological tau. We propose a model of pathogenesis in which disease-associated changes in tau conformation lead to increased exposure of PAD, activation of PP1-GSK3, and inhibition of FAT. Results from these studies reveal a novel role for tau in modulating axonal phosphotransferases and provide a molecular basis for a toxic gain-of-function associated with pathogenic forms of tau. PMID:21734277

  15. Pathogenic forms of tau inhibit kinesin-dependent axonal transport through a mechanism involving activation of axonal phosphotransferases.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Nicholas M; Morfini, Gerardo A; LaPointe, Nichole E; Pigino, Gustavo F; Patterson, Kristina R; Song, Yuyu; Andreadis, Athena; Fu, Yifan; Brady, Scott T; Binder, Lester I

    2011-07-06

    Aggregated filamentous forms of hyperphosphorylated tau (a microtubule-associated protein) represent pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies. While axonal transport dysfunction is thought to represent a primary pathogenic factor in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases, the direct molecular link between pathogenic forms of tau and deficits in axonal transport remain unclear. Recently, we demonstrated that filamentous, but not soluble, forms of wild-type tau inhibit anterograde, kinesin-based fast axonal transport (FAT) by activating axonal protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), independent of microtubule binding. Here, we demonstrate that amino acids 2-18 of tau, comprising a phosphatase-activating domain (PAD), are necessary and sufficient for activation of this pathway in axoplasms isolated from squid giant axons. Various pathogenic forms of tau displaying increased exposure of PAD inhibited anterograde FAT in squid axoplasm. Importantly, immunohistochemical studies using a novel PAD-specific monoclonal antibody in human postmortem tissue indicated that increased PAD exposure represents an early pathogenic event in AD that closely associates in time with AT8 immunoreactivity, an early marker of pathological tau. We propose a model of pathogenesis in which disease-associated changes in tau conformation lead to increased exposure of PAD, activation of PP1-GSK3, and inhibition of FAT. Results from these studies reveal a novel role for tau in modulating axonal phosphotransferases and provide a molecular basis for a toxic gain-of-function associated with pathogenic forms of tau.

  16. Detection of Specific Solvent Rearrangement Regions of an Enzyme: NMR and ITC Studies with Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase(3??)-IIIa

    SciTech Connect

    Ozen, C.; Norris, Adrianne; Land, Miriam L; Tjioe, Elina; Serpersu, Engin H

    2008-01-01

    This work describes differential effects of solvent in complexes of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(3¢)-IIIa (APH) with different aminoglycosides and the detection of change in solvent structure at specific sites away from substrates. Binding of kanamycins to APH occurs with a larger negative ¢H in H2O relative to D2O (¢¢H(H2O-D2O) < 0), while the reverse is true for neomycins. Unusually large negative ¢Cp values were observed for binding of aminoglycosides to APH. ¢Cp for the APHneomycin complex was -1.6 kcalâmol-1âdeg-1. A break at 30 C was observed in the APH-kanamycin complex yielding ¢Cp values of -0.7 kcalâmol-1âdeg-1 and -3.8 kcalâmol-1âdeg-1 below and above 30 C, respectively. Neither the change in accessible surface area (¢ASA) nor contributions from heats of ionization were sufficient to explain the large negative ¢Cp values. Most significantly, 15N-1H HSQC experiments showed that temperature-dependent shifts of the backbone amide protons of Leu 88, Ser 91, Cys 98, and Leu143 revealed a break at 30 C only in the APH-kanamycin complex in spectra collected between 21 C and 38 C. These amino acids represent solVent reorganization sites that experience a change in solvent structure in their immediate environment as structurally different ligands bind to the enzyme. These residues were away from the substrate binding site and distributed in three hydrophobic patches in APH. Overall, our results show that a large number of factors affect ¢Cp and binding of structurally different ligand groups cause different solvent structure in the active site as well as differentially affecting specific sites away from the ligand binding site.

  17. Phosphotransferase protein EIIANtr interacts with SpoT, a key enzyme of the stringent response, in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Karstens, Katja; Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Bowien, Botho; Stülke, Jörg; Görke, Boris

    2014-04-01

    EIIA(Ntr) is a member of a truncated phosphotransferase (PTS) system that serves regulatory functions and exists in many Proteobacteria in addition to the sugar transport PTS. In Escherichia coli, EIIA(Ntr) regulates K(+) homeostasis through interaction with the K(+) transporter TrkA and sensor kinase KdpD. In the β-Proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, EIIA(Ntr) influences formation of the industrially important bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). PHB accumulation is controlled by the stringent response and induced under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. Knockout of EIIA(Ntr) increases the PHB content. In contrast, absence of enzyme I or HPr, which deliver phosphoryl groups to EIIA(Ntr), has the opposite effect. To clarify the role of EIIA(Ntr) in PHB formation, we screened for interacting proteins that co-purify with Strep-tagged EIIA(Ntr) from R. eutropha cells. This approach identified the bifunctional ppGpp synthase/hydrolase SpoT1, a key enzyme of the stringent response. Two-hybrid and far-Western analyses confirmed the interaction and indicated that only non-phosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) interacts with SpoT1. Interestingly, this interaction does not occur between the corresponding proteins of E. coli. Vice versa, interaction of EIIA(Ntr) with KdpD appears to be absent in R. eutropha, although R. eutropha EIIA(Ntr) can perfectly substitute its homologue in E. coli in regulation of KdpD activity. Thus, interaction with KdpD might be an evolutionary 'ancient' task of EIIA(Ntr) that was subsequently replaced by interaction with SpoT1 in R. eutropha. In conclusion, EIIA(Ntr) might integrate information about nutritional status, as reflected by its phosphorylation state, into the stringent response, thereby controlling cellular PHB content in R. eutropha.

  18. The Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System: Regulation by Protein Phosphorylation and Phosphorylation-Dependent Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  19. Revisiting the Nucleotide and Aminoglycoside Substrate Specificity of the Bifunctional Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie/Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Frase, Hilary; Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2012-01-01

    The bifunctional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia, or AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia, is the major source of aminoglycoside resistance in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. In previous studies, using ATP as the cosubstrate, it was reported that the APH(2″)-Ia domain of this enzyme is unique among aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having the ability to inactivate an unusually broad spectrum of aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-disubstituted and atypical. We recently demonstrated that GTP, and not ATP, is the preferred cosubstrate of this enzyme. We now show, using competition assays between ATP and GTP, that GTP is the exclusive phosphate donor at intracellular nucleotide levels. In light of these findings, we reevaluated the substrate profile of the phosphotransferase domain of this clinically important enzyme. Steady-state kinetic characterization using the phosphate donor GTP demonstrates that AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia phosphorylates 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides with high efficiency (kcat/Km = 105-107 m−1 s−1). Despite this proficiency, no resistance is conferred to some of these antibiotics by the enzyme in vivo. We now show that phosphorylation of 4,5-disubstituted and atypical aminoglycosides are negligible and thus these antibiotics are not substrates. Instead, these aminoglycosides tend to stimulate an intrinsic GTPase activity of the enzyme. Taken together, our data show that the bifunctional enzyme efficiently phosphorylates only 4,6-disubstituted antibiotics; however, phosphorylation does not necessarily result in bacterial resistance. Hence, the APH(2″)-Ia domain of the bifunctional AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia enzyme is a bona fide GTP-dependent kinase with a narrow substrate profile, including only 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides. PMID:23115238

  20. Streptococcus salivarius mutants defective in mannose phosphotransferase systems show reduced sensitivity to mutacins I-T9 and R-3B.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Guillaume G; Frenette, Michel; Lavoie, Marc C

    2010-08-01

    Twenty-four mutacin-producing Streptococcus mutans strains were screened for their propensity to produce class II one-peptide bacteriocin using a deferred antagonism assay. Streptococcus salivarius and 3 mutants defective in their mannose phosphotransferase systems (mannose-PTS) were used as sensitive strains to identify which mannose-PTS could act as the docking site for class II one-peptide bacteriocin activity. We observed that only 2 strains of S. mutans, T9 and 3B, potentially produce class II one-peptide bacteriocin, namely mutacins I-T9 and R-3B, but with no preference for any mannose-PTS complex as a target.

  1. Structure of the NPr:EIN(Ntr) Complex: Mechanism for Specificity in Paralogous Phosphotransferase Systems.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Madeleine; Stanley, Ann Marie; Wang, Guangshun; Botos, Istvan; Schwieters, Charles D; Buchanan, Susan K; Peterkofsky, Alan; Tjandra, Nico

    2016-12-06

    Paralogous enzymes arise from gene duplication events that confer a novel function, although it is unclear how cross-reaction between the original and duplicate protein interaction network is minimized. We investigated HPr:EI(sugar) and NPr:EI(Ntr), the initial complexes of paralogous phosphorylation cascades involved in sugar import and nitrogen regulation in bacteria, respectively. Although the HPr:EI(sugar) interaction has been well characterized, involving multiple complexes and transient interactions, the exact nature of the NPr:EI(Ntr) complex was unknown. We set out to identify the key features of the interaction by performing binding assays and elucidating the structure of NPr in complex with the phosphorylation domain of EI(Ntr) (EIN(Ntr)), using a hybrid approach involving X-ray, homology, and sparse nuclear magnetic resonance. We found that the overall fold and active-site structure of the two complexes are conserved in order to maintain productive phosphorylation, however, the interface surface potential differs between the two complexes, which prevents cross-reaction.

  2. Structure of the NPr:EINNtr Complex: Mechanism for Specificity in Paralogous Phosphotransferase Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, Madeleine; Stanley, Ann Marie; Wang, Guangshun; Botos, Istvan; Schwieters, Charles D.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Peterkofsky, Alan; Tjandra, Nico

    2016-12-01

    Paralogous enzymes arise from gene duplication events that confer a novel function, although it is unclear how cross-reaction between the original and duplicate protein interaction network is minimized. We investigated HPr:EIsugar and NPr:EINtr, the initial complexes of paralogous phosphorylation cascades involved in sugar import and nitrogen regulation in bacteria, respectively. Although the HPr:EIsugar interaction has been well characterized, involving multiple complexes and transient interactions, the exact nature of the NPr:EINtr complex was unknown. We set out to identify the key features of the interaction by performing binding assays and elucidating the structure of NPr in complex with the phosphorylation domain of EINtr (EINNtr), using a hybrid approach involving X-ray, homology, and sparse nuclear magnetic resonance. We found that the overall fold and active-site structure of the two complexes are conserved in order to maintain productive phosphorylation, however, the interface surface potential differs between the two complexes, which prevents cross-reaction.

  3. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  4. Cloning of the two pyruvate kinase isoenzyme structural genes from Escherichia coli: the relative roles of these enzymes in pyruvate biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, E; Flores, N; Martinez, A; Valle, F; Bolívar, F

    1995-01-01

    We report the cloning of the pykA and pykF genes from Escherichia coli, which code for the two pyruvate kinase isoenzymes (ATP:pyruvate 2-O-phosphotransferases; EC 2.7.1.40) in this microorganism. These genes were insertionally inactivated with antibiotic resistance markers and utilized to interrupt one or both pyk genes in the E. coli chromosome. With these constructions, we were able to study the role of these isoenzymes in pyruvate biosynthesis. PMID:7559366

  5. [Synthesis of 11-phenoxyundecyl phosphate and its use as an acceptor substrate in the reaction with UDP-GlcNAc : polyprenyl phosphate GlcNAc-phosphotransferase from Salmonella arizona O:59].

    PubMed

    Danilov, L L; Veselovskiĭ, V V; Balagurova, N M; Druzhinina, T N

    2009-01-01

    A new scheme of synthesis of 11-phenoxyundecyl phosphate from 11-bromoundecanoic acid was suggested for its ability to react as an acceptor of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl phosphate in a reaction catalyzed by UDP-N-acetylglucosamine : polyprenyl phosphate N-acetylglucosamine phosphotransferase from Salmonella arizona O:59.

  6. AglH, a thermophilic UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate:dolichyl phosphate GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase initiating protein N-glycosylation pathway in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, is capable of complementing the eukaryal Alg7.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Benjamin H; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2017-01-01

    AglH, a predicted UDP-GlcNAc-1-phosphate:dolichyl phosphate GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase, is initiating the protein N-glycosylation pathway in the thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. AglH successfully replaced the endogenous GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase activity of Alg7 in a conditional lethal Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, in which the first step of the eukaryal protein N-glycosylation process was repressed. This study is one of the few examples of cross-domain complementation demonstrating a conserved polyprenyl phosphate transferase reaction within the eukaryal and archaeal domain like it was demonstrated for Methanococcus voltae (Shams-Eldin et al. 2008). The topology prediction and the alignment of the AglH membrane protein with GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferases from the three domains of life show significant conservation of amino acids within the different proposed cytoplasmic loops. Alanine mutations of selected conserved amino acids in the putative cytoplasmic loops II (D100), IV (F220) and V (F264) demonstrated the importance of these amino acids for cross-domain AlgH activity in in vitro complementation assays in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment interfering directly with the activity of dolichyl phosphate GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferases confirmed the essentiality of N-glycosylation for cell survival.

  7. Studies on the transfer techniques of three maize genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Zhang, H; Ding, Q; Xie, Y; Dai, J

    1996-01-01

    Maize transformation has been carried out through microprojectile bombardment, ultrasonication in a DNA buffer, and ovary-injection with a self-made microinjector. The plasmid pB48.415, which carries a 3'-truncated Bt-toxin protein gene and a hygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt) gene, was used in the transformation. Transgenic maize plants were obtained from immature embryos and embryogenic calli bombarded with a particle gun, embryogenic calli ultrasonicated under different conditions of ovaries injected 10-20 hours after pollination. The results of Dot blotting and Southern blotting analyses proved the integration of the Bt gene into maize genome.

  8. Engineering of self-sustaining systems: substituting the yeast glucose transporter plus hexokinase for the Lactococcus lactis phosphotransferase system in a Lactococcus lactis network in silico.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Malgorzata; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2012-07-01

    The success rate of introducing new functions into a living species is still rather unsatisfactory. Much of this is due to the very essence of the living state, i.e. its robustness towards perturbations. Living cells are bound to notice that metabolic engineering is being effected, through changes in metabolite concentrations. In this study, we asked whether one could engage in such engineering without changing metabolite concentrations. We have illustrated that, in silico, one can do so in principle. We have done this for the case of substituting the yeast glucose transporter plus hexokinase for the Lactococcus lactis phosphotransferase system, in an L. lactis network, this engineering is 'silent' in terms of metabolite concentrations and almost all fluxes. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. NMR-restrained docking of a peptidic inhibitor to the N-terminal domain of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase enzyme I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognan, Didier; Mukhija, Seema; Folkers, Gerd; Zerbe, Oliver

    2001-02-01

    Starting from the NMR structure of the binary complex between the N-terminal domain of the unphosphorylated enzyme I (EIN) of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase (PTS) and the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr), a molecular model of the phosphorylated transition state of the related complex was established using constrained simulated annealing. The coordinates of the phosphorylated EIN enzyme were then used in a second step for flexible docking of a decapeptide inhibitor of EIN whose enzyme-bound conformation itself was determined by NMR using transferred nuclear Overhauser effects. Two phosphorylation models of the peptide inhibitor were investigated and shown to be both functional. Interestingly, one model is very similar to that of the complex between EIN and its natural substrate HPr. The present study demonstrates that NMR-guided flexible docking constitutes an interesting tool for docking highly flexible peptide ligands and facilitates the upcoming protein-based design of nonpeptide EIN inhibitors for discovering new antibiotics.

  10. Kinetic studies of the reverse reaction catalysed by adenosine triphosphate–creatine phosphotransferase. The inhibition by magnesium ions and adenosine diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, J. F.; O'Sullivan, W. J.

    1965-01-01

    1. Kinetic investigations of the reaction catalysed by ATP–creatine phosphotransferase have been carried out. 2. No firm conclusions could be reached about the reaction of Mg2+ at the nucleotide-binding site of the enzyme. The value of the kinetic constant for this reaction depends on the value used for the apparent stability constant of the metal ion–nucleotide complex and, to a smaller extent, on the method of plotting the results. 3. At higher concentrations Mg2+ is a non-competitive inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to both MgADP− and phosphocreatine. 4. ADP3− is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to MgADP− and a non-competitive inhibitor with respect to phosphocreatine. 5. The concentration of phosphocreatine has little, if any, effect on the kinetic constants for the nucleotide reactants. PMID:14342234

  11. Properties of Lactose Plasmid pLY101 in Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko

    1987-01-01

    A starter strain, Lactobacillus casei C257, was found to carry a lactose plasmid, pLY101. Restriction mapping showed that pLY101 DNA was 68.2 kilobases long. Since a non-lactose-utilizing variant of C257, MSK248, lost phospho-β-galactosidase (P-β-gal) activity and pLY101 DNA had a sequence(s) homologous to the streptococcal fragment including a P-β-gal gene, pLY101 is likely to encode a P-β-gal gene required for lactose metabolism in C257. MSK248 grew in galactose medium at a rate identical to that of C257 and retained phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system activity for lactose similar to that of C257. Therefore, the C257 chromosome appears to encode a complete set of genes for the lactose-phosphotransferase system and the predominant galactose metabolic pathway in C257. pLY101 DNA had a sequence homologous to a lactobacillus insertion sequence, ISL1, which mapped more than 12 kilobases from the sequence homologous to the streptococcal P-β-gal fragment. Images PMID:16347515

  12. Both IIC and IID Components of Mannose Phosphotransferase System Are Involved in the Specific Recognition between Immunity Protein PedB and Bacteriocin-Receptor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunmei; Ren, Fazheng; Hao, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Upon exposure to exogenous pediocin-like bacteriocins, immunity proteins specifically bind to the target receptor of the mannose phosphotransferase system components (man-PTS IIC and IID), therefore preventing bacterial cell death. However, the specific recognition of immunity proteins and its associated target receptors remains poorly understood. In this study, we constructed hybrid receptors to identify the domains of IIC and/or IID recognized by the immunity protein PedB, which confers immunity to pediocin PA-1. Using Lactobacillus plantarum man-PTS EII mutant W903, the IICD components of four pediocin PA-1-sensitive strains (L. plantarum WQ0815, Leuconostoc mesenteroides 05–43, Lactobacillus salivarius REN and Lactobacillus acidophilus 05–172) were respectively co-expressed with the immunity protein PedB. Well-diffusions assays showed that only the complex formed by LpIICD from L. plantarum WQ0815 with pediocin PA-1 could be recognized by PedB. In addition, a two-step PCR approach was used to construct hybrid receptors by combining LpIIC or LpIID recognized by PedB with the other three heterologous IID or IIC compounds unrecognized by PedB, respectively. The results showed that all six hybrid receptors were recognized by pediocin PA-1. However, when IIC or IID of L. plantarum WQ0815 was replaced with any corresponding IIC or IID component from L. mesenteroides 05–43, L. salivarius REN and L. acidophilus 05–172, all the hybrid receptors could not be recognized by PedB. Taken altogether, we concluded that both IIC and IID components of the mannose phosphotransferase system play an important role in the specific recognition between the bacteriocin-receptor complex and the immunity protein PedB. PMID:27776158

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae Cell-Wall-Localized Phosphoenolpyruvate Protein Phosphotransferase Can Function as an Adhesin: Identification of Its Host Target Molecules and Evaluation of Its Potential as a Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mizrachi Nebenzahl, Yaffa; Blau, Karin; Kushnir, Tatyana; Shagan, Marilou; Portnoi, Maxim; Cohen, Aviad; Azriel, Shalhevet; Malka, Itai; Adawi, Asad; Kafka, Daniel; Dotan, Shahar; Guterman, Gali; Troib, Shany; Fishilevich, Tali; Gershoni, Jonathan M; Braiman, Alex; Mitchell, Andrea M; Mitchell, Timothy J; Porat, Nurith; Goliand, Inna; Chalifa Caspi, Vered; Swiatlo, Edwin; Tal, Michael; Ellis, Ronald; Elia, Natalie; Dagan, Ron

    2016-01-01

    In Streptococcus pneumonia, phosphoenolpyruvate protein phosphotransferase (PtsA) is an intracellular protein of the monosaccharide phosphotransferase systems. Biochemical and immunostaining methods were applied to show that PtsA also localizes to the bacterial cell-wall. Thus, it was suspected that PtsA has functions other than its main cytoplasmic enzymatic role. Indeed, recombinant PtsA and anti-rPtsA antiserum were shown to inhibit adhesion of S. pneumoniae to cultured human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Screening of a combinatorial peptide library expressed in a filamentous phage with rPtsA identified epitopes that were capable of inhibiting S. pneumoniae adhesion to A549 cells. The insert peptides in the phages were sequenced, and homologous sequences were found in human BMPER, multimerin1, protocadherin19, integrinβ4, epsin1 and collagen type VIIα1 proteins, all of which can be found in A549 cells except the latter. Six peptides, synthesized according to the homologous sequences in the human proteins, specifically bound rPtsA in the micromolar range and significantly inhibited pneumococcal adhesion in vitro to lung- and tracheal-derived cell lines. In addition, the tested peptides inhibited lung colonization after intranasal inoculation of mice with S. pneumoniae. Immunization with rPtsA protected the mice against a sublethal intranasal and a lethal intravenous pneumococcal challenge. In addition, mouse anti rPtsA antiserum reduced bacterial virulence in the intravenous inoculation mouse model. These findings showed that the surface-localized PtsA functions as an adhesin, PtsA binding peptides derived from its putative target molecules can be considered for future development of therapeutics, and rPtsA should be regarded as a candidate for vaccine development. PMID:26990554

  14. Structural Basis for Dual Nucleotide Selectivity of Aminoglycoside 2″-Phosphotransferase IVa Provides Insight on Determinants of Nucleotide Specificity of Aminoglycoside Kinases*♦

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kun; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic phosphorylation through a family of enzymes called aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases (APHs) is a major mechanism by which bacteria confer resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Members of the APH(2″) subfamily are of particular clinical interest because of their prevalence in pathogenic strains and their broad substrate spectra. APH(2″) enzymes display differential preferences between ATP or GTP as the phosphate donor, with aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa (APH(2″)-IVa) being a member that utilizes both nucleotides at comparable efficiencies. We report here four crystal structures of APH(2″)-IVa, two of the wild type enzyme and two of single amino acid mutants, each in complex with either adenosine or guanosine. Together, these structures afford a detailed look at the nucleoside-binding site architecture for this enzyme and reveal key elements that confer dual nucleotide specificity, including a solvent network in the interior of the nucleoside-binding pocket and the conformation of an interdomain linker loop. Steady state kinetic studies, as well as sequence and structural comparisons with members of the APH(2″) subfamily and other aminoglycoside kinases, rationalize the different substrate preferences for these enzymes. Finally, despite poor overall sequence similarity and structural homology, analysis of the nucleoside-binding pocket of APH(2″)-IVa shows a striking resemblance to that of eukaryotic casein kinase 2 (CK2), which also exhibits dual nucleotide specificity. These results, in complement with the multitude of existing inhibitors against CK2, can serve as a structural basis for the design of nucleotide-competitive inhibitors against clinically relevant APH enzymes. PMID:22371504

  15. Analyses of disease-related GNPTAB mutations define a novel GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase interaction domain and an alternative site-1 protease cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Renata Voltolini; De Pace, Raffaella; Klünder, Sarah; Sperb-Ludwig, Fernanda; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Schwartz, Ida V. D.; Braulke, Thomas; Pohl, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (MLII) and III alpha/beta are autosomal-recessive diseases of childhood caused by mutations in GNPTAB encoding the α/β-subunit precursor protein of the GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase complex. This enzyme modifies lysosomal hydrolases with mannose 6-phosphate targeting signals. Upon arrival in the Golgi apparatus, the newly synthesized α/β-subunit precursor is catalytically activated by site-1 protease (S1P). Here we performed comprehensive expression studies of GNPTAB mutations, including two novel mutations T644M and T1223del, identified in Brazilian MLII/MLIII alpha/beta patients. We show that the frameshift E757KfsX1 and the non-sense R587X mutations result in the retention of enzymatically inactive truncated precursor proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) due to loss of cytosolic ER exit motifs consistent with a severe clinical phenotype in homozygosity. The luminal missense mutations, C505Y, G575R and T644M, partially impaired ER exit and proteolytic activation in accordance with less severe MLIII alpha/beta disease symptoms. Analogous to the previously characterized S399F mutant, we found that the missense mutation I403T led to retention in the ER and loss of catalytic activity. Substitution of further conserved residues in stealth domain 2 (I346 and W357) revealed similar biochemical properties and allowed us to define a putative binding site for accessory proteins required for ER exit of α/β-subunit precursors. Interestingly, the analysis of the Y937_M972del mutant revealed partial Golgi localization and formation of abnormal inactive β-subunits generated by S1P which correlate with a clinical MLII phenotype. Expression analyses of mutations identified in patients underline genotype–phenotype correlations in MLII/MLIII alpha/beta and provide novel insights into structural requirements of proper GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase activity. PMID:25788519

  16. Solution structure of the phosphoryl transfer complex between the cytoplasmic A domain of the mannitol transporter IIMannitol and HPr of the Escherichia coli phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Cornilescu, Gabriel; Lee, Byeong Ryong; Cornilescu, Claudia C; Wang, Guangshun; Peterkofsky, Alan; Clore, G Marius

    2002-11-01

    The solution structure of the complex between the cytoplasmic A domain (IIA(Mtl)) of the mannitol transporter II(Mannitol) and the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr) of the Escherichia coli phosphotransferase system has been solved by NMR, including the use of conjoined rigid body/torsion angle dynamics, and residual dipolar couplings, coupled with cross-validation, to permit accurate orientation of the two proteins. A convex surface on HPr, formed by helices 1 and 2, interacts with a complementary concave depression on the surface of IIA(Mtl) formed by helix 3, portions of helices 2 and 4, and beta-strands 2 and 3. The majority of intermolecular contacts are hydrophobic, with a small number of electrostatic interactions at the periphery of the interface. The active site histidines, His-15 of HPr and His-65 of IIA(Mtl), are in close spatial proximity, and a pentacoordinate phosphoryl transition state can be readily accommodated with no change in protein-protein orientation and only minimal perturbations of the backbone immediately adjacent to the histidines. Comparison with two previously solved structures of complexes of HPr with partner proteins of the phosphotransferase system, the N-terminal domain of enzyme I (EIN) and enzyme IIA(Glucose) (IIA(Glc)), reveals a number of common features despite the fact that EIN, IIA(Glc), and IIA(Mtl) bear no structural resemblance to one another. Thus, entirely different underlying structural elements can form binding surfaces for HPr that are similar in terms of both shape and residue composition. These structural comparisons illustrate the roles of surface and residue complementarity, redundancy, incremental build-up of specificity and conformational side chain plasticity in the formation of transient specific protein-protein complexes in signal transduction pathways.

  17. Both IIC and IID Components of Mannose Phosphotransferase System Are Involved in the Specific Recognition between Immunity Protein PedB and Bacteriocin-Receptor Complex.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wanli; Wang, Guohong; Wang, Chunmei; Ren, Fazheng; Hao, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Upon exposure to exogenous pediocin-like bacteriocins, immunity proteins specifically bind to the target receptor of the mannose phosphotransferase system components (man-PTS IIC and IID), therefore preventing bacterial cell death. However, the specific recognition of immunity proteins and its associated target receptors remains poorly understood. In this study, we constructed hybrid receptors to identify the domains of IIC and/or IID recognized by the immunity protein PedB, which confers immunity to pediocin PA-1. Using Lactobacillus plantarum man-PTS EII mutant W903, the IICD components of four pediocin PA-1-sensitive strains (L. plantarum WQ0815, Leuconostoc mesenteroides 05-43, Lactobacillus salivarius REN and Lactobacillus acidophilus 05-172) were respectively co-expressed with the immunity protein PedB. Well-diffusions assays showed that only the complex formed by LpIICD from L. plantarum WQ0815 with pediocin PA-1 could be recognized by PedB. In addition, a two-step PCR approach was used to construct hybrid receptors by combining LpIIC or LpIID recognized by PedB with the other three heterologous IID or IIC compounds unrecognized by PedB, respectively. The results showed that all six hybrid receptors were recognized by pediocin PA-1. However, when IIC or IID of L. plantarum WQ0815 was replaced with any corresponding IIC or IID component from L. mesenteroides 05-43, L. salivarius REN and L. acidophilus 05-172, all the hybrid receptors could not be recognized by PedB. Taken altogether, we concluded that both IIC and IID components of the mannose phosphotransferase system play an important role in the specific recognition between the bacteriocin-receptor complex and the immunity protein PedB.

  18. Structural basis for dual nucleotide selectivity of aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa provides insight on determinants of nucleotide specificity of aminoglycoside kinases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Berghuis, Albert M

    2012-04-13

    Enzymatic phosphorylation through a family of enzymes called aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases (APHs) is a major mechanism by which bacteria confer resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Members of the APH(2″) subfamily are of particular clinical interest because of their prevalence in pathogenic strains and their broad substrate spectra. APH(2″) enzymes display differential preferences between ATP or GTP as the phosphate donor, with aminoglycoside 2″-phosphotransferase IVa (APH(2″)-IVa) being a member that utilizes both nucleotides at comparable efficiencies. We report here four crystal structures of APH(2″)-IVa, two of the wild type enzyme and two of single amino acid mutants, each in complex with either adenosine or guanosine. Together, these structures afford a detailed look at the nucleoside-binding site architecture for this enzyme and reveal key elements that confer dual nucleotide specificity, including a solvent network in the interior of the nucleoside-binding pocket and the conformation of an interdomain linker loop. Steady state kinetic studies, as well as sequence and structural comparisons with members of the APH(2″) subfamily and other aminoglycoside kinases, rationalize the different substrate preferences for these enzymes. Finally, despite poor overall sequence similarity and structural homology, analysis of the nucleoside-binding pocket of APH(2″)-IVa shows a striking resemblance to that of eukaryotic casein kinase 2 (CK2), which also exhibits dual nucleotide specificity. These results, in complement with the multitude of existing inhibitors against CK2, can serve as a structural basis for the design of nucleotide-competitive inhibitors against clinically relevant APH enzymes.

  19. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus combines intrinsic phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities: A sup 31 P NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Shashidhar, M.S.; Kuppe, A. ); Volwerk, J.J.; Griffith, O.H.

    1990-09-04

    The inositol phosphate products formed during the cleavage of phosphatidylinositol by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus were analyzed by {sup 31}P NMR. {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy can distinguish between the inositol phosphate species and phosphatidylinositol. Chemical shift values (with reference to phosphoric acid) observed are {minus}0.41, 3.62, 4.45, and 16.30 ppm for phosphatidylinositol, myo-inositol 1-monophosphate, myo-inositol 2-monophosphate, and myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate, respectively. It is shown that under a variety of experimental conditions this phospholipase C cleaves phosphatidylinositol via an intramolecular phosphotransfer reaction producing diacylglycerol and D-myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate. The authors also report the new and unexpected observation that the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from B. cereus is able to hydrolyze the inositol cyclic phosphate to form D-myo-inositol 1-monophosphate. The enzyme, therefore, possesses phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities. The second reaction requires thousandfold higher enzyme concentrations to be observed by {sup 31}P NMR. This reaction was shown to be regiospecific in that only the 1-phosphate was produced and stereospecific in that only D-myo-inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate was hydrolyzed. Inhibition with a monoclonal antibody specific for the B.cereus phospholipase C showed that the cyclic phosphodiesterase activity is intrinsic to the bacterial enzyme. They propose a two-step mechanism for the phosphatidyl-inositol-specific phospholipase C from B. cereus involving sequential phosphotransferase and cyclic phosphodiesterase activities. This mechanism bears a resemblance to the well-known two-step mechanism of pancreatic ribonuclease, RNase A.

  20. Double targeted gene replacement for creating null mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, A; Coburn, C M; Beverley, S M

    1991-01-01

    We have used double gene targeting to create homozygous gene replacements in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major, an asexual diploid. This method uses two independent selectable markers in successive rounds of gene targeting to replace both alleles of an endogenous gene. We developed an improved hygromycin B-resistance cassette encoding hygromycin phosphotransferase (HYG) for use as a selectable marker for Leishmania. HYG-containing vectors functioned equivalently to those containing the neomycin phosphotransferase (NEO) cassette previously used for extrachromosomal transformation or gene targeting. Drug resistances conferred by the NEO and HYG markers were independent, allowing simultaneous selection for both markers. A HYG targeting vector was utilized to replace the single dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene remaining in a line heterozygous for a NEO replacement at the dhfr-ts locus (+/neo), with a targeting efficiency comparable to that seen with wild-type recipients. The resultant dhfr-ts- line (hyg/neo) was auxotrophic for thymidine. The double targeted replacement method will enable functional genetic testing in a variety of asexual diploids, including cultured mammalian cells and fungi such as Candida albicans. Additionally, it may be possible to use Leishmania bearing conditionally auxotrophic gene replacements as safe, improved live vaccines for leishmaniasis. Images PMID:1651496

  1. Double targeted gene replacement for creating null mutants.

    PubMed

    Cruz, A; Coburn, C M; Beverley, S M

    1991-08-15

    We have used double gene targeting to create homozygous gene replacements in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major, an asexual diploid. This method uses two independent selectable markers in successive rounds of gene targeting to replace both alleles of an endogenous gene. We developed an improved hygromycin B-resistance cassette encoding hygromycin phosphotransferase (HYG) for use as a selectable marker for Leishmania. HYG-containing vectors functioned equivalently to those containing the neomycin phosphotransferase (NEO) cassette previously used for extrachromosomal transformation or gene targeting. Drug resistances conferred by the NEO and HYG markers were independent, allowing simultaneous selection for both markers. A HYG targeting vector was utilized to replace the single dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene remaining in a line heterozygous for a NEO replacement at the dhfr-ts locus (+/neo), with a targeting efficiency comparable to that seen with wild-type recipients. The resultant dhfr-ts- line (hyg/neo) was auxotrophic for thymidine. The double targeted replacement method will enable functional genetic testing in a variety of asexual diploids, including cultured mammalian cells and fungi such as Candida albicans. Additionally, it may be possible to use Leishmania bearing conditionally auxotrophic gene replacements as safe, improved live vaccines for leishmaniasis.

  2. Marker-free plasmids for gene therapeutic applications--lack of antibiotic resistance gene substantially improves the manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Jürgen; Cserjan-Puschmann, Monika; Striedner, Gerald; Nöbauer, Katharina; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Grabherr, Reingard

    2010-04-01

    Plasmid DNA is being considered as a promising alternative to traditional protein vaccines or viral delivery methods for gene therapeutic applications. DNA-based products are highly flexible, stable, are easily stored and can be manufactured on a large scale. Although, much safer than viral approaches, issues have been raised with regard to safety due to possible integration of plasmid DNA into cellular DNA or spread of antibiotic resistance genes to intestinal bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Accordingly, there is interest in methods for the production of plasmid DNA that lacks the antibiotic resistance gene to further improve their safety profile. Here, we report for the first time the gram-scale manufacturing of a minimized plasmid that is devoid of any additional sequence elements on the plasmid backbone, and merely consists of the target expression cassette and the bacterial origin of replication. Three different host/vector combinations were cultivated in a fed-batch fermentation process, comparing the progenitor strain JM108 to modified strains JM108murselect, hosting a plasmid either containing the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase which provides kanamycin resistance, or a marker-free variant of the same plasmid. The metabolic load exerted by expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase was monitored by measuring ppGpp- and cAMP-levels. Moreover, we revealed that JM108 is deficient of the Lon protease and thereby refined the genotype of JM108. The main consequences of Lon-deficiency with regard to plasmid DNA production are discussed herein. Additionally, we found that the expression of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase, conferring resistance to kanamycin, was very high in plasmid DNA producing processes that actually inclusion bodies were formed. Thereby, a severe metabolic load on the host cell was imposed, detrimental for overall plasmid yield. Hence, deleting the antibiotic resistance gene from the vector backbone is not only beneficial

  3. New Construct Approaches for Efficient Gene Silencing in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hua; Chretien, Robert; Ye, Jingsong; Rommens, Caius M.

    2006-01-01

    An important component of conventional sense, antisense, and double-strand RNA-based gene silencing constructs is the transcriptional terminator. Here, we show that this regulatory element becomes obsolete when gene fragments are positioned between two oppositely oriented and functionally active promoters. The resulting convergent transcription triggers gene silencing that is at least as effective as unidirectional promoter-to-terminator transcription. In addition to short, variably sized, and nonpolyadenylated RNAs, terminator-free cassette produced rare, longer transcripts that reach into the flanking promoter. These read-through products did not influence the efficacy and expression levels of the neighboring hygromycin phosphotransferase gene. Replacement of gene fragments by promoter-derived sequences further increased the extent of gene silencing. This finding indicates that genomic DNA may be a more efficient target for gene silencing than gene transcripts. PMID:16766670

  4. Diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH Mutants That Can Be Isolated in the Presence of 2-Deoxyglucose and Galactose and Characterization of Two Mutants Synthesizing Reduced Levels of HPr, a Phosphocarrier of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne; Brochu, Denis; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2001-01-01

    In streptococci, HPr, a phosphocarrier of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS), undergoes multiple posttranslational chemical modifications resulting in the formation of HPr(His∼P), HPr(Ser-P), and HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P), whose cellular concentrations vary with growth conditions. Distinct physiological functions are associated with specific forms of HPr. We do not know, however, the cellular thresholds below which these forms become unable to fulfill their functions and to what extent modifications in the cellular concentrations of the different forms of HPr modify cellular physiology. In this study, we present a glimpse of the diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH mutants that can be isolated by positive selection on a solid medium containing 2-deoxyglucose and galactose and identify 13 amino acids that are essential for HPr to properly accomplish its physiological functions. We also report the characterization of two S. salivarius mutants that produced approximately two- and threefoldless HPr and enzyme I (EI) respectively. The data indicated that (i) a reduction in the synthesis of HPr due to a mutation in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of ptsH reduced ptsI expression; (ii) a threefold reduction in EI and HPr cellular levels did not affect PTS transport capacity; (iii) a twofold reduction in HPr synthesis was sufficient to reduce the rate at which cells metabolized PTS sugars, increase generation times on PTS sugars and to a lesser extent on non-PTS sugars, and impede the exclusion of non-PTS sugars by PTS sugars; (iv) a threefold reduction in HPr synthesis caused a strong derepression of the genes coding for α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase when the cells were grown at the expense of a PTS sugar but did not affect the synthesis of α-galactosidase when cells were grown at the expense of lactose, a noninducing non-PTS sugar; and (v) no correlation was found between the magnitude of enzyme derepression and

  5. Replacement of the glucose phosphotransferase transport system by galactose permease reduces acetate accumulation and improves process performance of Escherichia coli for recombinant protein production without impairment of growth rate.

    PubMed

    De Anda, Ramón; Lara, Alvaro R; Hernández, Vanessa; Hernández-Montalvo, Verónica; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2006-05-01

    Acetate accumulation under aerobic conditions is a common problem in Escherichia coli cultures, as it causes a reduction in both growth rate and recombinant protein productivity. In this study, the effect of replacing the glucose phosphotransferase transport system (PTS) with an alternate glucose transport activity on growth kinetics, acetate accumulation and production of two model recombinant proteins, was determined. Strain VH32 is a W3110 derivative with an inactive PTS. The promoter region of the chromosomal galactose permease gene galP of VH32 was replaced by the strong trc promoter. The resulting strain, VH32GalP+ acquired the capacity to utilize glucose as a carbon source. Strains W3110 and VH32GalP+ were transformed for the production of recombinant TrpLE-proinsulin accumulated as inclusion bodies (W3110-PI and VH32GalP+-PI) and for production of soluble intracellular green fluorescent protein (W3110-pV21 and VH32GalP+-pV21). W3110-pV21 and VH32GalP+-pV21 were grown in batch cultures. Maximum recombinant protein concentration, as determined from fluorescence, was almost four-fold higher in VH32GalP+-pV21, relative to W3110-pV21. Maximum acetate concentration reached 2.8 g/L for W3110-pV21 cultures, whereas a maximum of 0.39 g/L accumulated in VH32GalP+-pV21. W3110-PI and VH32GalP+-PI were grown in batch and fed-batch cultures. Compared to W3110-PI, the engineered strain maintained similar production and growth rate capabilities while reducing acetate accumulation. Specific glucose consumption rate was lower and product yield on glucose was higher in VH32GalP+-PI fed-batch cultures. Altogether, strains with the engineered glucose uptake system showed improved process performance parameters for recombinant protein production over the wild-type strain.

  6. Plasmid linkage of the D-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway in Streptococcus lactis: effect on lactose and galactose metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Crow, V L; Davey, G P; Pearce, L E; Thomas, T D

    1983-01-01

    The three enzymes of the D-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway (galactose 6-phosphate isomerase, D-tagatose 6-phosphate kinase, and tagatose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase) were absent in lactose-negative (Lac-) derivatives of Streptococcus lactis C10, H1, and 133 grown on galactose. The lactose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system and phospho-beta-galactosidase activities were also absent in Lac- derivatives of strains H1 and 133 and were low (possibly absent) in C10 Lac-. In all three Lac- derivatives, low galactose phosphotransferase system activity was found. On galactose, Lac- derivatives grew more slowly (presumably using the Leloir pathway) than the wild-type strains and accumulated high intracellular concentrations of galactose 6-phosphate (up to 49 mM); no intracellular tagatose 1,6-diphosphate was detected. The data suggest that the Lac phenotype is plasmid linked in the three strains studied, with the evidence being more substantial for strain H1. A Lac- derivative of H1 contained a single plasmid (33 megadaltons) which was absent from the Lac- mutant. We suggest that the genes linked to the lactose plasmid in S. lactis are more numerous than previously envisaged, coding for all of the enzymes involved in lactose metabolism from initial transport to the formation of triose phosphates via the D-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway. Images PMID:6294064

  7. Identification of a site in the phosphocarrier protein, HPr, which influences its interactions with sugar permeases of the bacterial phosphotransferase system: kinetic analyses employing site-specific mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, S; Sutrina, S L; Wu, L F; Reizer, J; Schnetz, K; Rak, B; Saier, M H

    1996-01-01

    The permeases of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), the sugar-specific enzymes II, are energized by sequential phosphoryl transfer from phosphoenolpyruvate to (i) enzyme I, (ii) the phosphocarrier protein HPr, (iii) the enzyme IIA domains of the permeases, and (iv) the enzyme IIBC domains of the permeases which transport and phosphorylate their sugar substrates. A number of site-specific mutants of HPr were examined by using kinetic approaches. Most of the mutations exerted minimal effects on the kinetic parameters characterizing reactions involving phosphoryl transfer from phospho-HPr to various sugars. However, when the well-conserved aspartyl 69 residue in HPr was changed to a glutamyl residue, the affinities for phospho-HPr of the enzymes II specific for mannitol, N-acetylglucosamine, and beta-glucosides decreased markedly without changing the maximal reaction rates. The same mutation reduced the spontaneous rate of phosphohistidyl HPr hydrolysis but did not appear to alter the rate of phosphoryl transfer from phospho-enzyme I to HPr. When the adjacent glutamyl residue 70 in HPr was changed to a lysyl residue, the Vmax values of the reactions catalyzed by the enzymes II were reduced, but the Km values remained unaltered. Changing this residue to alanine exerted little effect. Site-specific alterations in the C terminus of the beta-glucoside enzyme II which reduced the maximal reaction rate of phosphoryl transfer about 20-fold did not alter the relative kinetic parameters because of the aforementioned mutations in HPr. Published three-dimensional structural analyses of HPr and the complex of HPr with the glucose-specific enzyme IIA (IIAGlc) (homologous to the beta-glucoside and N-acetylglucosamine enzyme IIA domains) have revealed that residues 69 and 70 in HPr are distant from the active phosphorylation site and the IIAGlc binding interface in HPr. The results reported therefore suggest that residues D-69 and E-70 in

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of dha regulon and related genes for anaerobic glycerol metabolism in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jibin; van den Heuvel, Joop; Soucaille, Philippe; Qu, Yinbo; Zeng, An-Ping

    2003-01-01

    The dihydroxyacetone (dha) regulon of bacteria encodes genes for the anaerobic metabolism of glycerol. In this work, genomic data are used to analyze and compare the dha regulon and related genes in different organisms in silico with respect to gene organization, sequence similarity, and possible functions. Database searches showed that among the organisms, the genomes of which have been sequenced so far, only two, i.e., Klebsiella pneumoniae MGH 78578 and Clostridium perfringens contain a complete dha regulon bearing all known enzymes. The components and their organization in the dha regulon of these two organisms differ considerably from each other and also from the previously partially sequenced dha regulons in Citrobacter freundii, Clostridium pasteurianum, and Clostridium butyricum. Unlike all of the other organisms, genes for the oxidative and reductive pathways of anaerobic glycerol metabolism in C. perfringens are located in two separate organization units on the chromosome. Comparisons of deduced protein sequences of genes with similar functions showed that the dha regulon components in K. pneumoniae and C. freundii have high similarities (80-95%) but lower similarities to those of the Clostridium species (30-80%). Interestingly, the protein sequence similarities among the dha genes of the Clostridium species are in many cases even lower than those between the Clostridium species and K. pneumoniae or C. freundii, suggesting two different types of dha regulon in the Clostridium species studied. The in silico reconstruction and comparison of dha regulons revealed several new genes in the microorganisms studied. In particular, a novel dha kinase that is phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent is identified and experimentally confirmed for K. pneumoniae in addition to the known ATP-dependent dha kinase. This finding gives new insights into the regulation of glycerol metabolism in K. pneumoniae and explains some hitherto not well understood experimental observations.

  9. Biochemical characterization of a nitrogen-type phosphotransferase system reveals that enzyme EI(Ntr) integrates carbon and nitrogen signaling in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Reed A; Gage, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    In Sinorhizobium meliloti, catabolite repression is influenced by a noncanonical nitrogen-type phosphotransferase system (PTS(Ntr)). In this PTS(Ntr), the protein HPr is phosphorylated on histidine-22 by the enzyme EI(Ntr) and the flux of phosphate through this residue onto downstream proteins leads to an increase in succinate-mediated catabolite repression (SMCR). In order to explore the molecular determinants of HPr phosphorylation by EI(Ntr), both proteins were purified and the activity of EI(Ntr) was measured. Experimentally determined kinetic parameters of EI(Ntr) activity were significantly slower than those determined for the carbohydrate-type EI in Escherichia coli. Enzymatic assays showed that glutamine, a signal of nitrogen availability in many Gram-negative bacteria, strongly inhibits EI(Ntr). Binding experiments using the isolated GAF domain of EI(Ntr) (EIGAF) showed that it is the domain responsible for detection of glutamine. EI(Ntr) activity was not affected by α-ketoglutarate, and no binding between the EIGAF and α-ketoglutarate could be detected. These data suggest that in S. melilloti, EI(Ntr) phosphorylation of HPr is regulated by signals from both carbon metabolism (phosphoenolpyruvate) and nitrogen metabolism (glutamine).

  10. A comparative study on phosphotransferase activity of acid phosphatases from Raoultella planticola and Enterobacter aerogenes on nucleosides, sugars, and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Médici, Rosario; Garaycoechea, Juan I; Valino, Ana L; Pereira, Claudio A; Lewkowicz, Elizabeth S; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2014-04-01

    Natural and modified nucleoside-5'-monophosphates and their precursors are valuable compounds widely used in biochemical studies. Bacterial nonspecific acid phosphatases (NSAPs) are a group of enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of phosphoester bonds, and some of them exhibit phosphotransferase activity. NSAP containing Enterobacter aerogenes and Raoultella planticola whole cells were evaluated in the phosphorylation of a wide range of nucleosides and nucleoside precursors using pyrophosphate as phosphate donor. To increase the productivity of the process, we developed two genetically modified strains of Escherichia coli which overexpressed NSAPs of E. aerogenes and R. planticola. These new recombinant microorganisms (E. coli BL21 pET22b-phoEa and E. coli BL21 pET22b-phoRp) showed higher activity than the corresponding wild-type strains. Reductions in the reaction times from 21 h to 60 min, from 4 h to 15 min, and from 24 h to 40 min in cases of dihydroxyacetone, inosine, and fludarabine, respectively, were obtained.

  11. Crystal structures of antibiotic-bound complexes of aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa highlight the diversity in substrate binding modes among aminoglycoside kinases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Houston, Douglas R; Berghuis, Albert M

    2011-07-19

    Aminoglycoside 2''-phosphotransferase IVa [APH(2'')-IVa] is a member of a family of bacterial enzymes responsible for medically relevant resistance to antibiotics. APH(2'')-IVa confers high-level resistance against several clinically used aminoglycoside antibiotics in various pathogenic Enterococcus species by phosphorylating the drug, thereby preventing it from binding to its ribosomal target and producing a bactericidal effect. We describe here three crystal structures of APH(2'')-IVa, one in its apo form and two in complex with a bound antibiotic, tobramycin and kanamycin A. The apo structure was refined to a resolution of 2.05 Å, and the APH(2'')-IVa structures with tobramycin and kanamycin A bound were refined to resolutions of 1.80 and 2.15 Å, respectively. Comparison among the structures provides insight concerning the substrate selectivity of this enzyme. In particular, conformational changes upon substrate binding, involving rotational shifts of two distinct segments of the enzyme, are observed. These substrate-induced shifts may also rationalize the altered substrate preference of APH(2'')-IVa in comparison to those of other members of the APH(2'') subfamily, which are structurally closely related. Finally, analysis of the interactions between the enzyme and aminoglycoside reveals a distinct binding mode as compared to the intended ribosomal target. The differences in the pattern of interactions can be utilized as a structural basis for the development of improved aminoglycosides that are not susceptible to these resistance factors.

  12. Enzyme IIBcellobiose of the phosphoenol-pyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli: backbone assignment and secondary structure determined by three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ab, E.; Schuurman-Wolters, G. K.; Saier, M. H.; Reizer, J.; Jacuinod, M.; Roepstorff, P.; Dijkstra, K.; Scheek, R. M.; Robillard, G. T.

    1994-01-01

    The assignment of backbone resonances and the secondary structure determination of the Cys 10 Ser mutant of enzyme IIBcellobiose of the Escherichia coli cellobiose-specific phosphoenol-pyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system are presented. The backbone resonances were assigned using 4 triple resonance experiments, the HNCA and HN(CO)CA experiments, correlating backbone 1H, 15N, and 13C alpha resonances, and the HN(CA)CO and HNCO experiments, correlating backbone 1H,15N and 13CO resonances. Heteronuclear 1H-NOE 1H-15N single quantum coherence (15N-NOESY-HSQC) spectroscopy and heteronuclear 1H total correlation 1H-15N single quantum coherence (15N-TOCSY-HSQC) spectroscopy were used to resolve ambiguities arising from overlapping 13C alpha and 13CO frequencies and to check the assignments from the triple resonance experiments. This procedure, together with a 3-dimensional 1H alpha-13C alpha-13CO experiment (COCAH), yielded the assignment for all observed backbone resonances. The secondary structure was determined using information both from the deviation of observed 1H alpha and 13C alpha chemical shifts from their random coil values and 1H-NOE information from the 15N-NOESY-HSQC. These data show that enzyme IIBcellobiose consists of a 4-stranded parallel beta-sheet and 5 alpha-helices. In the wild-type enzyme IIBcellobiose, the catalytic residue appears to be located at the end of a beta-strand. PMID:8003964

  13. Correlation between depression of catabolite control of xylose metabolism and a defect in the phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system in Pediococcus halophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, K; Uchida, K

    1989-01-01

    Pediococcus halophilus X-160 which lacks catabolite control by glucose was isolated from nature (soy moromi mash). Wild-type strains, in xylose-glucose medium, utilized glucose preferentially over xylose and showed diauxic growth. With wild-type strain I-13, xylose isomerase activity was not induced until glucose was consumed from the medium. Strain X-160, however, utilized xylose concurrently with glucose and did not show diauxic growth. In this strain, xylose isomerase was induced even in the presence of glucose. Glucose transport activity in intact cells of strain X-160 was less than 10% of that assayed in strain I-13. Determinations of glycolytic enzymes did not show any difference responsible for the unique behavior of strain X-160, but the rate of glucose-6-phosphate formation with phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) as a phosphoryl donor in permeabilized cells was less than 10% of that observed in the wild type. Starved P. halophilus I-13 cells contained the glycolytic intermediates 3-phosphoglycerate, 2-phosphoglycerate, and PEP (PEP pool). These were consumed concomitantly with glucose or 2-deoxyglucose uptake but were not consumed with xylose uptake. The glucose transport system in P. halophilus was identified as a PEP:mannose phosphotransferase system on the basis of the substrate specificity of PEP pool-starved cells. It is concluded that, in P. halophilus, this system is functional as a main glucose transport system and that defects in this system may be responsible for the depression of glucose-mediated catabolite control. Images PMID:2703460

  14. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  15. Stable transformation of maize after gene transfer by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Fromm, M E; Taylor, L P; Walbot, V

    The graminaceous monocots, including the economically important cereals, seem to be refractory to infection by Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a natural gene transfer system that has been successfully exploited for transferring foreign genes into higher plants. Therefore, direct transfer techniques that are potentially applicable to all plant species have been developed using a few dicot and monocot species as model systems. One of these techniques, electroporation, uses electrical pulses of high field strength to permeabilize cell membranes reversibly so as to facilitate the transfer of DNA into cells. Electroporation-mediated gene transfer has resulted in stably transformed animal cells and transient gene expression in monocot and dicot plant cells. Here we report that electroporation-mediated DNA transfer of a chimaeric gene encoding neomycin phosphotransferase results in stably transformed maize cells that are resistant to kanamycin.

  16. Futile xylitol cycle in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed Central

    Hausman, S Z; Thompson, J; London, J

    1984-01-01

    A futile xylitol cycle appears to be responsible for xylitol-mediated inhibition of growth of Lactobacillus casei Cl-16 at the expense of ribitol. The gratuitously induced xylitol-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase accumulates the pentitol as xylitol-5-phosphate, a phosphatase cleaves the latter, and an export system expels the xylitol. Operation of the cycle rapidly dissipates the ribitol-5-phosphate pool (and ultimately the energy supply of the cell), thereby producing bacteriostasis. Images PMID:6090413

  17. Transport of the GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase α/β-subunit precursor protein to the Golgi apparatus requires a combinatorial sorting motif.

    PubMed

    Franke, Mine; Braulke, Thomas; Storch, Stephan

    2013-01-11

    The Golgi-resident N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase (PT) complex is composed of two α-, β-, and γ-subunits and represents the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker on soluble lysosomal proteins. Mutations in the PT complex cause the lysosomal storage diseases mucolipidosis II and III. A prerequisite for the enzymatic activity is the site-1 protease-mediated cleavage of the PT α/β-subunit precursor protein in the Golgi apparatus. Here, we have investigated structural requirements of the PT α/β-subunit precursor protein for its efficient export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Both wild-type and a cleavage-resistant type III membrane PT α/β-subunit precursor protein are exported whereas coexpressed separate α- and β-subunits failed to reach the cis-Golgi compartment. Mutational analyses revealed combinatorial, non-exchangeable dileucine and dibasic motifs located in a defined sequence context in the cytosolic N- and C-terminal domains that are required for efficient ER exit and subsequent proteolytic activation of the α/β-subunit precursor protein in the Golgi. In the presence of a dominant negative Sar1 mutant the ER exit of the PT α/β-subunit precursor protein is inhibited indicating its transport in coat protein complex II-coated vesicles. Expression studies of missense mutations identified in mucolipidosis III patients that alter amino acids in the N- and C-terminal domains demonstrated that the substitution of a lysine residue in close proximity to the dileucine sorting motif impaired ER-Golgi transport and subsequent activation of the PT α/β-subunit precursor protein. The data suggest that the oligomeric type III membrane protein PT complex requires a combinatorial sorting motif that forms a tertiary epitope to be recognized by distinct sites within the coat protein complex II machinery.

  18. Solution structure of the IIAChitobiose-IIBChitobiose complex of the N,N'-diacetylchitobiose branch of the Escherichia coli phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Sang; Cai, Mengli; Clore, G Marius

    2010-02-05

    The solution structure of the IIA-IIB complex of the N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (Chb) transporter of the Escherichia coli phosphotransferase system has been solved by NMR. The active site His-89 of IIA(Chb) was mutated to Glu to mimic the phosphorylated state and the active site Cys-10 of IIB(Chb) was substituted by serine to prevent intermolecular disulfide bond formation. Binding is weak with a K(D) of approximately 1.3 mm. The two complementary interaction surfaces are largely hydrophobic, with the protruding active site loop (residues 9-16) of IIB(Chb) buried deep within the active site cleft formed at the interface of two adjacent subunits of the IIA(Chb) trimer. The central hydrophobic portion of the interface is surrounded by a ring of polar and charged residues that provide a relatively small number of electrostatic intermolecular interactions that serve to correctly align the two proteins. The conformation of the active site loop in unphosphorylated IIB(Chb) is inconsistent with the formation of a phosphoryl transition state intermediate because of steric hindrance, especially from the methyl group of Ala-12 of IIB(Chb). Phosphorylation of IIB(Chb) is accompanied by a conformational change within the active site loop such that its path from residues 11-13 follows a mirror-like image relative to that in the unphosphorylated state. This involves a transition of the phi/psi angles of Gly-13 from the right to left alpha-helical region, as well as smaller changes in the backbone torsion angles of Ala-12 and Met-14. The resulting active site conformation is fully compatible with the formation of the His-89-P-Cys-10 phosphoryl transition state without necessitating any change in relative translation or orientation of the two proteins within the complex.

  19. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Essential Role of Nitrogen Phosphotransferase System Components in Sinorhizobium fredii CCBAU 45436 Symbioses with Soybean and Pigeonpea Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue Zhen; Wang, Dan; Feng, Xue Ying; Jiao, Jian; Chen, Wen Xin

    2015-01-01

    The nitrogen phosphotransferase system (PTSNtr) consists of EINtr, NPr, and EIIANtr. The active phosphate moiety derived from phosphoenolpyruvate is transferred through EINtr and NPr to EIIANtr. Sinorhizobium fredii can establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the legume crops soybean (as determinate nodules) and pigeonpea (as indeterminate nodules). In this study, S. fredii strains with mutations in ptsP and ptsO (encoding EINtr and NPr, respectively) formed ineffective nodules on soybeans, while a strain with a ptsN mutation (encoding EIIANtr) was not defective in symbiosis with soybeans. Notable reductions in the numbers of bacteroids within each symbiosome and of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate granules in bacteroids were observed in nodules infected by the ptsP or ptsO mutant strains but not in those infected with the ptsN mutant strain. However, these defects of the ptsP and ptsO mutant strains were recovered in ptsP ptsN and ptsO ptsN double-mutant strains, implying a negative role of unphosphorylated EIIANtr in symbiosis. Moreover, the symbiotic defect of the ptsP mutant was also recovered by expressing EINtr with or without the GAF domain, indicating that the putative glutamine-sensing domain GAF is dispensable in symbiotic interactions. The critical role of PTSNtr in symbiosis was also observed when related PTSNtr mutant strains of S. fredii were inoculated on pigeonpea plants. Furthermore, nodule occupancy and carbon utilization tests suggested that multiple outputs could be derived from components of PTSNtr in addition to the negative role of unphosphorylated EIIANtr. PMID:26682851

  20. Modulation of Escherichia coli Adenylyl Cyclase Activity by Catalytic-Site Mutants of Protein IIAGlc of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Prasad; Kamireddi, Madhavi

    1998-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated form of the glucose-specific phosphocarrier protein IIAGlc of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system is an activator of adenylyl cyclase and that unphosphorylated IIAGlc has no effect on the basal activity of adenylyl cyclase. To elucidate the specific role of IIAGlc phosphorylation in the regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity, both the phosphorylatable histidine (H90) and the interactive histidine (H75) of IIAGlc were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to glutamine and glutamate. Wild-type IIAGlc and the H75Q mutant, in which the histidine in position 75 has been replaced by glutamine, were phosphorylated by the phosphohistidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr∼P) and were equally potent activators of adenylyl cyclase. Neither the H90Q nor the H90E mutant of IIAGlc was phosphorylated by HPr∼P, and both failed to activate adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, replacement of H75 by glutamate inhibited the appearance of a steady-state level of phosphorylation of H90 of this mutant protein by HPr∼P, yet the H75E mutant of IIAGlc was a partial activator of adenylyl cyclase. The H75E H90A double mutant, which cannot be phosphorylated, did not activate adenylyl cyclase. This suggests that the H75E mutant was transiently phosphorylated by HPr∼P but the steady-state level of the phosphorylated form of the mutant protein was decreased due to the repulsive forces of the negatively charged glutamate at position 75 in the catalytic pocket. These results are discussed in the context of the proximity of H75 and H90 in the IIAGlc structure and the disposition of the negative charge in the modeled glutamate mutants. PMID:9457881

  1. The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system in group A Streptococcus acts to reduce streptolysin S activity and lesion severity during soft tissue infection.

    PubMed

    Gera, Kanika; Le, Tuquynh; Jamin, Rebecca; Eichenbaum, Zehava; McIver, Kevin S

    2014-03-01

    Obtaining essential nutrients, such as carbohydrates, is an important process for bacterial pathogens to successfully colonize host tissues. The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is the primary mechanism by which bacteria transport sugars and sense the carbon state of the cell. The group A streptococcus (GAS) is a fastidious microorganism that has adapted to a variety of niches in the human body to elicit a wide array of diseases. A ΔptsI mutant (enzyme I [EI] deficient) generated in three different strains of M1T1 GAS was unable to grow on multiple carbon sources (PTS and non-PTS). Complementation with ptsI expressed under its native promoter in single copy was able to rescue the growth defect of the mutant. In a mouse model of GAS soft tissue infection, all ΔptsI mutants exhibited a significantly larger and more severe ulcerative lesion than mice infected with the wild type. Increased transcript levels of sagA and streptolysin S (SLS) activity during exponential-phase growth was observed. We hypothesized that early onset of SLS activity would correlate with the severity of the lesions induced by the ΔptsI mutant. In fact, infection of mice with a ΔptsI sagB double mutant resulted in a lesion comparable to that of either the wild type or a sagB mutant alone. Therefore, a functional PTS is not required for subcutaneous skin infection in mice; however, it does play a role in coordinating virulence factor expression and disease progression.

  2. Structure of the phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2014-01-01

    The bifunctional acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie-phosphotransfer­ase(2′′)-Ia [AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia] is the most important aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria, conferring resistance to almost all known aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical use. Owing to its importance, this enzyme has been the focus of intensive research since its isolation in the mid-1980s but, despite much effort, structural details of AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia have remained elusive. The structure of the Mg2GDP complex of the APH(2′′)-Ia domain of the bifunctional enzyme has now been determined at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure of APH(2′′)-Ia is reminiscent of the structures of other aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having a two-domain architecture with the nucleotide-binding site located at the junction of the two domains. Unlike the previously characterized APH(2′′)-IIa and APH(2′′)-IVa enzymes, which are capable of utilizing both ATP and GTP as the phosphate donors, APH(2′′)-Ia uses GTP exclusively in the phosphorylation of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, and in this regard closely resembles the GTP-dependent APH(2′′)-IIIa enzyme. In APH(2′′)-Ia this GTP selectivity is governed by the presence of a ‘gatekeeper’ residue, Tyr100, the side chain of which projects into the active site and effectively blocks access to the adenine-binding template. Mutation of this tyrosine residue to a less bulky phenylalanine provides better access for ATP to the NTP-binding template and converts APH(2′′)-Ia into a dual-specificity enzyme. PMID:24914967

  3. The Crystal Structures of Substrate and Nucleotide Complexes of Enterococcus faecium Aminoglycoside-2′′-Phosphotransferase-IIa [APH(2′′)-IIa] Provide Insights into Substrate Selectivity in the APH(2′′) Subfamily▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Young, Paul G.; Walanj, Rupa; Lakshmi, Vendula; Byrnes, Laura J.; Metcalf, Peter; Baker, Edward N.; Vakulenko, Sergei B.; Smith, Clyde A.

    2009-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-IIa [APH(2′′)-IIa] is one of a number of homologous bacterial enzymes responsible for the deactivation of the aminoglycoside family of antibiotics and is thus a major component in bacterial resistance to these compounds. APH(2′′)-IIa produces resistance to several clinically important aminoglycosides (including kanamycin and gentamicin) in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, most notably in Enterococcus species. We have determined the structures of two complexes of APH(2′′)-IIa, the binary gentamicin complex and a ternary complex containing adenosine-5′-(β,γ-methylene)triphosphate (AMPPCP) and streptomycin. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the APH(2′′) family of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. The structure of the gentamicin-APH(2′′)-IIa complex was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction methods from a single selenomethionine-substituted crystal and was refined to a crystallographic R factor of 0.210 (Rfree, 0.271) at a resolution of 2.5 Å. The structure of the AMPPCP-streptomycin complex was solved by molecular replacement using the gentamicin-APH(2′′)-IIa complex as the starting model. The enzyme has a two-domain structure with the substrate binding site located in a cleft in the C-terminal domain. Gentamicin binding is facilitated by a number of conserved acidic residues lining the binding cleft, with the A and B rings of the substrate forming the majority of the interactions. The inhibitor streptomycin, although binding in the same pocket as gentamicin, is orientated such that no potential phosphorylation sites are adjacent to the catalytic aspartate residue. The binding of gentamicin and streptomycin provides structural insights into the substrate selectivity of the APH(2′′) subfamily of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, specifically, the selectivity between the 4,6-disubstituted and the 4,5-disubstituted aminoglycosides. PMID:19429619

  4. HAD superfamily phosphotransferase substrate diversification: structure and function analysis of HAD subclass IIB sugar phosphatase BT4131.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhibing; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N

    2005-06-21

    The BT4131 gene from the bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The protein, a member of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily (subfamily IIB), was purified to homogeneity, and its X-ray crystal structure was determined to1.9 A resolution using the molecular replacement phasing method. BT4131 was shown by an extensive substrate screen to be a broad-range sugar phosphate phosphatase. On the basis of substrate specificity and gene context, the physiological function of BT4131 in chitin metabolism has been tentatively assigned. Comparison of the BT4131 structure alpha/beta cap domain structure with those of other type IIB enzymes (phosphoglycolate phosphatase, trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase, and proteins of unknown function known as PDB entries , , and ) identified two conserved loops (BT4131 residues 172-182 and 118-130) in the alphabetabeta(alphabetaalphabeta)alphabetabeta type caps and one conserved loop in the alphabetabetaalphabetabeta type caps, which contribute residues for contact with the substrate leaving group. In BT4131, the two loops contribute one polar and two nonpolar residues to encase the displaced sugar. This finding is consistent with the lax specificity BT4131 has for the ring size and stereochemistry of the sugar phosphate. In contrast, substrate docking showed that the high-specificity phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PDB entry ) uses a single substrate specificity loop to position three polar residues for interaction with the glycolate leaving group. We show how active site "solvent cages" derived from analysis of the structures of the type IIB HAD phosphatases could be used in conjunction with the identity of the residues stationed along the cap domain substrate specificity loops, as a means of substrate identification.

  5. Synthesis of methyl 6-(ammonium 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl phosphate)-alpha-D-mannopyranoside and use of this compound for the determination of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase.

    PubMed

    Madiyalakan, R; An, S H; Jain, R K; Matta, K L

    1985-12-15

    Methyl 6-(ammonium 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl phosphate)-alpha-D-mannopyranoside was synthesized and identified by 1H-n.m.r. and 13C-n.m.r. data, acid hydrolysis, and elemental analysis. It was utilized for the determination of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase in an assay procedure that employed methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside as an acceptor. The assay product was identified and characterized by thin-layer chromatography with the title reference compound. The present technique does not require [32P]UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, but effectively uses commercially available UDP-[14C]GlcNAc.

  6. Isolation and characterization of genes encoding two chitinase enzymes from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Grady, Karen L.; Suslow, Trevor V.; Bedbrook, John R.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of clones isolated from a cosmid DNA library indicates that the Serratia marcescens chromosome contains at least two genes, chiA and chiB, which encode distinct secreted forms of the enzyme chitinase. These genes have been characterized by inspection of chitinase activity and secreted proteins in Escherichia coli strains containing subclones of these cosmids. The two chitinase genes show no detectable homology to each other. DNA sequence analysis of one of the genes predicts an amino acid sequence with an N-terminal signal peptide typical of genes encoding secreted bacterial proteins. This gene was mutagenized by cloning a neomycin phosphotransferase gene within its coding region, and the insertion mutation was recombined into the parental S. marcescens strain. The resulting chiA mutant transconjugant showed reduced chitinase production, reduced inhibition of fungal spore germination and reduced biological control of a fungal plant pathogen. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:16453672

  7. Phosphoenolpyruvate-sugar phosphotransferase transport system of Streptococcus mutans: purification of HPr and enzyme I and determination of their intracellular concentrations by rocket immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, L; Vadeboncoeur, C

    1985-01-01

    Enzyme I and HPr, the general proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-sugar phosphotransferase system, play a pivotal role in the control of sugar utilization in gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. To determine whether growth conditions could modify the rate of biosynthesis of these proteins in Streptococcus mutans, we first purified to homogeneity enzyme I and HPr from S. mutans ATCC 27352. Using specific antibodies obtained against these proteins, we determined by rocket electrophoresis the intracellular levels of enzyme I and HPr in cells of S. mutans 27352 grown under various batch culture conditions and in a number of glucose-grown cells of other strains of S. mutans. HPr was purified by the procedure reported by Gauthier et al. (L. Gauthier, D. Mayrand, and C. Vadeboncoeur, J. Bacteriol. 160:755-763, 1984) and displayed a single band with a molecular weight of 6,650 when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea gel electrophoresis. Enzyme I was purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, affinity chromatography on an anti-Streptococcus salivarius column, and preparative electrophoresis. The protein migrated as a single band in native and denaturating gel electrophoresis. The subunit molecular weight of enzyme I determined by electrophoresis under denaturating conditions was 68,000. In gel filtration chromatography at 4 degrees C, the enzyme migrated as a 135,000- to 160,000-molecular-weight species, suggesting that enzyme I is a dimer. In double immunodiffusion experiments, antibodies against HPr reacted with several oral streptococci, Streptococcus lactis, Streptococcus faecium, and Lactobacillus casei, but not with Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. Antibodies against enzyme I of S. mutans 27352 cross-reacted with enzyme I from all the other oral streptococci tested. No cross-reaction was observed with other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The levels of enzyme I and HPr determined by rocket electrophoresis in S. mutans

  8. Regulation of the putative bglPH operon for aryl-beta-glucoside utilization in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, S; Hecker, M

    1995-01-01

    The expression of the putative operon bglPH of Bacillus subtilis was studied by using bglP'-lacZ transcriptional fusions. The bglP gene encodes an aryl-beta-glucoside-specific enzyme II of the phosphoenolpyruvate sugar:phosphotransferase system, whereas the bglH gene product functions as a phospho-beta-glucosidase. Expression of bglPH is regulated by at least two different mechanisms: (i) carbon catabolite repression and (ii) induction via an antitermination mechanism. Distinct deletions of the promoter region were created to determine cis-acting sites for regulation. An operatorlike structure partially overlapping the -35 box of the promoter of bglP appears to be the catabolite-responsive element of this operon. The motif is similar to that of amyO and shows no mismatches with respect to the consensus sequence established as the target of carbon catabolite repression in B. subtilis. Catabolite repression is abolished in both ccpA and ptsH1 mutants. The target of the induction by the substrate, salicin or arbutin, is a transcriptional terminator located downstream from the promoter of bglP. This structure is very similar to that of transcriptional terminators which regulate the induction of the B. subtilis sacB gene, the sacPA operon, and the Escherichia coli bgl operon. The licT gene product, a member of the BglG-SacY family of antitermination proteins, is essential for the induction process. Expression of bglP is under the negative control of its own gene product. The general proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system are required for bglP expression. Furthermore, the region upstream from bglP, which reveals a high AT content, exerts a negative regulatory effect on bglP expression. PMID:7559347

  9. Enzymes are enriched in bacterial essential genes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Zhang, Randy Ren

    2011-01-01

    Essential genes, those indispensable for the survival of an organism, play a key role in the emerging field, synthetic biology. Characterization of functions encoded by essential genes not only has important practical implications, such as in identifying antibiotic drug targets, but can also enhance our understanding of basic biology, such as functions needed to support cellular life. Enzymes are critical for almost all cellular activities. However, essential genes have not been systematically examined from the aspect of enzymes and the chemical reactions that they catalyze. Here, by comprehensively analyzing essential genes in 14 bacterial genomes in which large-scale gene essentiality screens have been performed, we found that enzymes are enriched in essential genes. Essential enzymes have overrepresented ligases (especially those forming carbon-oxygen bonds and carbon-nitrogen bonds), nucleotidyltransferases and phosphotransferases, while have underrepresented oxidoreductases. Furthermore, essential enzymes tend to associate with more gene ontology domains. These results, from the aspect of chemical reactions, provide further insights into the understanding of functions needed to support natural cellular life, as well as synthetic cells, and provide additional parameters that can be integrated into gene essentiality prediction algorithms.

  10. Genomic characterization of symbiotic mycoplasmas from the stomach of deep-sea isopod bathynomus sp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Huang, Jiao-Mei; Wang, Shao-Lu; Gao, Zhao-Ming; Zhang, Ai-Qun; Danchin, Antoine; He, Li-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Deep-sea isopod scavengers such as Bathynomus sp. are able to live in nutrient-poor environments, which is likely attributable to the presence of symbiotic microbes in their stomach. In this study we recovered two draft genomes of mycoplasmas, Bg1 and Bg2, from the metagenomes of the stomach contents and stomach sac of a Bathynomus sp. sample from the South China Sea (depth of 898 m). Phylogenetic trees revealed a considerable genetic distance to other mycoplasma species for Bg1 and Bg2. Compared with terrestrial symbiotic mycoplasmas, the Bg1 and Bg2 genomes were enriched with genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTSs) and sodium-driven symporters responsible for the uptake of sugars, amino acids and other carbohydrates. The genome of mycoplasma Bg1 contained sialic acid lyase and transporter genes, potentially enabling the bacteria to attach to the stomach sac and obtain organic carbons from various cell walls. Both of the mycoplasma genomes contained multiple copies of genes related to proteolysis and oligosaccharide degradation, which may help the host survive in low-nutrient conditions. The discovery of the different types of mycoplasma bacteria in the stomach of this deep-sea isopod affords insights into symbiotic model of deep-sea animals and genomic plasticity of mycoplasma bacteria. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Transient state kinetics of enzyme IICBGlc, a glucose transporter of the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli: equilibrium and second order rate constants for the glucose binding and phosphotransfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Meadow, Norman D; Savtchenko, Regina S; Nezami, Azin; Roseman, Saul

    2005-12-23

    During translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli, glucose is phosphorylated by phospho-IIA(Glc) and Enzyme IICB(Glc), the last two proteins in the phosphotransfer sequence of the phosphoenolpyruvate:glucose phosphotransferase system. Transient state (rapid quench) methods were used to determine the second order rate constants that describe the phosphotransfer reactions (phospho-IIA(Glc) to IICB(Glc) to Glc) and also the second order rate constants for the transfer from phospho-IIA(Glc) to molecularly cloned IIB(Glc), the soluble, cytoplasmic domain of IICB(Glc). The rate constants for the forward and reverse phosphotransfer reactions between IIA(Glc) and IICB(Glc) were 3.9 x 10(6) and 0.31 x 10(6) m(-1) s(-1), respectively, and the rate constant for the physiologically irreversible reaction between [P]IICB(Glc) and Glc was 3.2 x 10(6) m(-1) s(-1). From the rate constants, the equilibrium constants for the transfer of the phospho-group from His90 of [P]IIA(Glc) to the phosphorylation site Cys of IIB(Glc) or IICB(Glc) were found to be 3.5 and 12, respectively. These equilibrium constants signify that the thiophospho-group in these proteins has a high phosphotransfer potential, similar to that of the phosphohistidinyl phosphotransferase system proteins. In these studies, preparations of IICB(Glc) were invariably found to contain endogenous, firmly bound Glc (estimated K'(D) approximately 10(-7) m). The bound Glc was kinetically competent and was rapidly phosphorylated, indicating that IICB(Glc) has a random order, Bi Bi, substituted enzyme mechanism. The equilibrium constant for the binding of Glc was deduced from differences in the statistical goodness of fit of the phosphotransfer data to the kinetic model.

  12. Genetic transformation and gene expression in white pine (pinus strobus)

    SciTech Connect

    Minocha, R.

    1987-10-01

    The objectives of the study were: (1) to develop protocols for transformation of white pine (Pinus strobus) embryonic tissue; and (2) to analyze the regulation of foreign gene expression in Pinus strobus. A number of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains containing chimeric genes for neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII for kanamycin resistance) and chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) under the control of either a constitutive promoter (NOS-nopaline synthase) or light-inducible promoters (RuBisCO small subunit and chlorophyll a/b binding protein) were used. A variety of tissues from white pine seedlings and mature trees was used. The techniques for transformation were modified from those used for tobacco transformation. The results show that white pine tissue from young seedlings is high suitable for transformation by A. tumefaciens. Whereas the normal tissues are very sensitive to kanamycin, transformed callus was quite resistant to this antibiotic.

  13. The reversed terminator of octopine synthase gene on the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid has a weak promoter activity in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jun-Li; Long, Yue-Sheng; Chen, Gu; Xie, Jun; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2010-06-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens transfers DNA from its Ti plasmid to plant host cells. The genes located within the transferred DNA of Ti plasmid including the octopine synthase gene (OCS) are expressed in plant host cells. The 3'-flanking region of OCS gene, known as OCS terminator, is widely used as a transcriptional terminator of the transgenes in plant expression vectors. In this study, we found the reversed OCS terminator (3'-OCS-r) could drive expression of hygromycin phosphotransferase II gene (hpt II) and beta-glucuronidase gene in Escherichia coli, and expression of hpt II in A. tumefaciens. Furthermore, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that an open reading frame (ORF12) that is located downstream to the 3'-OCS-r was transcribed in A. tumefaciens, which overlaps in reverse with the coding region of the OCS gene in octopine Ti plasmid.

  14. [Recombinant Escherichia coli strains deficient in mixed acid fermentation pathways and capable of rapid aerobic growth on glucose with a reduced Crabtree effect].

    PubMed

    Morzhakova, A A; Skorokhodova, A Iu; Gulevich, A Iu; Debabov, V G

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we constructed and characterized Escherichia coli strains deficient for mixed acid fermentation pathways, which are capable of rapid aerobic growth on glucose without pronounced bacterial Crabtree effect. The main pathways of production of acetic and lactic acids and ethanol in these strains were inactivated by a deletion of the ackA, pta, poxB, IdhA, and adhEgenes. The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system of glucose transport and phosphorylation was inactivated in the strains by a deletion of the ptsG gene. The possibility of alternative transport and phosphorylation of the carbohydrate substrate was ensured in recombinants by constitutive expression of the galP and glk genes, which encode the low-affinity H+-symporter of D-galactose and glucokinase, respectively. SGMI.0DeltaptsG PtacgalP and SG M1.0DeltaptsG PIglk PtacgalP strains were capable of rapid aerobic growth in a minimal medium containing 2.0 and 10.0 g/l of glucose and secreted only small amounts of acetic acid and trace amounts of pyruvic acid.

  15. Transcriptional analysis of prebiotic uptake and catabolism by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Joakim Mark; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Hachem, Maher Abou; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Goh, Yong-Jun; Svensson, Birte; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract can be positively modulated by dietary supplementation of probiotic bacteria in combination with prebiotic carbohydrates. Here differential transcriptomics and functional genomics were used to identify genes in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM involved in the uptake and catabolism of 11 potential prebiotic compounds consisting of α- and β-linked galactosides and glucosides. These oligosaccharides induced genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase systems (PTS), galactoside pentose hexuronide (GPH) permease, and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. PTS systems were upregulated primarily by di- and tri-saccharides such as cellobiose, isomaltose, isomaltulose, panose and gentiobiose, while ABC transporters were upregulated by raffinose, Polydextrose, and stachyose. A single GPH transporter was induced by lactitol and galactooligosaccharides (GOS). The various transporters were associated with a number of glycoside hydrolases from families 1, 2, 4, 13, 32, 36, 42, and 65, involved in the catabolism of various α- and β-linked glucosides and galactosides. Further subfamily specialization was also observed for different PTS-associated GH1 6-phospho-β-glucosidases implicated in the catabolism of gentiobiose and cellobiose. These findings highlight the broad oligosaccharide metabolic repertoire of L. acidophilus NCFM and establish a platform for selection and screening of both probiotic bacteria and prebiotic compounds that may positively influence the gastrointestinal microbiota.

  16. The Mannitol Operon Repressor MTIR belongs to a new class of transcription regulators in bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Borovilos, M.; Zhou, M; Horer, S; Clancy, S; Moy, S; Volkart, LL; Sassoon, J; Baumann, U; Joachimiak, A

    2009-12-25

    Many bacteria express phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTS). The mannitol-specific PTS catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of d-mannitol. The uptake system comprises several genes encoded in the single operon. The expression of the mannitol operon is regulated by a proposed transcriptional factor, mannitol operon repressor (MtlR) that was first studied in Escherichia coli. Here we report the first crystal structures of MtlR from Vibrio parahemeolyticus (Vp-MtlR) and its homolog YggD protein from Shigella flexneri (Sf-YggD). MtlR and YggD belong to the same protein family (Pfam05068). Although Vp-MtlR and Sf-YggD share low sequence identity (22%), their overall structures are very similar, representing a novel all {alpha}-helical fold, and indicate similar function. However, their lack of any known DNA-binding structural motifs and their unfavorable electrostatic properties imply that MtlR/YggD are unlikely to bind a specific DNA operator directly as proposed earlier. This structural observation is further corroborated by in vitro DNA-binding studies of E. coli MtlR (Ec-MtlR), which detected no interaction of Ec-MtlR with the well characterized mannitol operator/promoter region. Therefore, MtlR/YggD belongs to a new class of transcription factors in bacteria that may regulate gene expression indirectly as a part of a larger transcriptional complex.

  17. Transcriptional Analysis of Prebiotic Uptake and Catabolism by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Joakim Mark; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Hachem, Maher Abou; Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Goh, Yong-Jun; Svensson, Birte; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract can be positively modulated by dietary supplementation of probiotic bacteria in combination with prebiotic carbohydrates. Here differential transcriptomics and functional genomics were used to identify genes in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM involved in the uptake and catabolism of 11 potential prebiotic compounds consisting of α- and β- linked galactosides and glucosides. These oligosaccharides induced genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase systems (PTS), galactoside pentose hexuronide (GPH) permease, and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. PTS systems were upregulated primarily by di- and tri-saccharides such as cellobiose, isomaltose, isomaltulose, panose and gentiobiose, while ABC transporters were upregulated by raffinose, Polydextrose, and stachyose. A single GPH transporter was induced by lactitol and galactooligosaccharides (GOS). The various transporters were associated with a number of glycoside hydrolases from families 1, 2, 4, 13, 32, 36, 42, and 65, involved in the catabolism of various α- and β-linked glucosides and galactosides. Further subfamily specialization was also observed for different PTS-associated GH1 6-phospho-β-glucosidases implicated in the catabolism of gentiobiose and cellobiose. These findings highlight the broad oligosaccharide metabolic repertoire of L. acidophilus NCFM and establish a platform for selection and screening of both probiotic bacteria and prebiotic compounds that may positively influence the gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:23028535

  18. Activation of cryptic 3' splice sites within introns of cellular genes following gene entrapment.

    PubMed

    Osipovich, Anna B; White-Grindley, Erica K; Hicks, Geoffrey G; Roshon, Michael J; Shaffer, Christian; Moore, Jason H; Ruley, H Earl

    2004-01-01

    Gene trap vectors developed for genome-wide mutagenesis can be used to study factors governing the expression of exons inserted throughout the genome. For example, entrapment vectors consisting of a partial 3'-terminal exon [i.e. a neomycin resistance gene (Neo), a poly(A) site, but no 3' splice site] were typically expressed following insertion into introns, from cellular transcripts that spliced to cryptic 3' splice sites present either within the targeting vector or in the adjacent intron. A vector (U3NeoSV1) containing the wild-type Neo sequence preferentially disrupted genes that spliced in-frame to a cryptic 3' splice site in the Neo coding sequence and expressed functional neomycin phosphotransferase fusion proteins. Removal of the cryptic Neo 3' splice site did not reduce the proportion of clones with inserts in introns; rather, the fusion transcripts utilized cryptic 3' splice sites present in the adjacent intron or generated by virus integration. However, gene entrapment with U3NeoSV2 was considerably more random than with U3NeoSV1, consistent with the widespread occurrence of potential 3' splice site sequences in the introns of cellular genes. These results clarify the mechanisms of gene entrapment by U3 gene trap vectors and illustrate features of exon definition required for 3' processing and polyadenylation of cellular transcripts.

  19. Activation of cryptic 3′ splice sites within introns of cellular genes following gene entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Osipovich, Anna B.; White-Grindley, Erica K.; Hicks, Geoffrey G.; Roshon, Michael J.; Shaffer, Christian; Moore, Jason H.; Ruley, H. Earl

    2004-01-01

    Gene trap vectors developed for genome-wide mutagenesis can be used to study factors governing the expression of exons inserted throughout the genome. For example, entrapment vectors consisting of a partial 3′-terminal exon [i.e. a neomycin resistance gene (Neo), a poly(A) site, but no 3′ splice site] were typically expressed following insertion into introns, from cellular transcripts that spliced to cryptic 3′ splice sites present either within the targeting vector or in the adjacent intron. A vector (U3NeoSV1) containing the wild-type Neo sequence preferentially disrupted genes that spliced in-frame to a cryptic 3′ splice site in the Neo coding sequence and expressed functional neomycin phosphotransferase fusion proteins. Removal of the cryptic Neo 3′ splice site did not reduce the proportion of clones with inserts in introns; rather, the fusion transcripts utilized cryptic 3′ splice sites present in the adjacent intron or generated by virus integration. However, gene entrapment with U3NeoSV2 was considerably more random than with U3NeoSV1, consistent with the widespread occurrence of potential 3′ splice site sequences in the introns of cellular genes. These results clarify the mechanisms of gene entrapment by U3 gene trap vectors and illustrate features of exon definition required for 3′ processing and polyadenylation of cellular transcripts. PMID:15155860

  20. Selectable marker genes and unintended changes to the plant transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Miki, Brian; Abdeen, Ashraf; Manabe, Yuzuki; MacDonald, Phil

    2009-04-01

    The intended effect of a selectable marker gene is to confer a novel trait that allows for the selection and recovery of transgenic plants. Unintended effects may also occur as a result of interactions between the selectable marker gene or its regulatory elements and genetic elements at the site of insertion. These are called position effects. Other unintended effects may occur if the selectable marker gene has a range of pleiotropic effects related to the functional and regulatory domains within the coding region or the regulatory elements used to drive expression. Both pleiotropic and position effects may generate unpredictable events depending on the process used for transgenesis and the state of knowledge associated with the selectable marker gene. Although some selectable marker genes, such as the neomycin phosphotransferase type II gene (nptII), have no pleiotropic effects on the transcriptomes of transgenic plants, others, such as the bialaphos resistance gene (bar), have pleiotropic effects. These must be clearly understood and accounted for when evaluating the expression patterns conferred by other co-transforming transgenes under study. The number and kinds of selectable marker genes are large. A detailed understanding of their unintended effects is needed to develop transgenic strategies that will minimize or eliminate unintended and unpredictable changes to plants with newly inserted genes.

  1. Multiplex PCR-based simultaneous amplification of selectable marker and reporter genes for the screening of genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Gurinder Jit; Chhabra, Rashmi; Singh, Monika

    2009-06-24

    The development and commercialization of genetically modified (GM) crops with enhanced insect and herbicide resistance, abiotic stress tolerance, and improved nutritional quality has expanded dramatically. Notwithstanding the huge potential benefits of GM crops, the perceived environmental risks associated with these crops need to be addressed in proper perspective. One critical concern is the adventitious presence or unintentional mixing of GM seed in non-GM seed lots, which can seriously affect the global seed market. It would therefore be necessary though a challenging task to develop reliable, efficient, and economical assays for GM detection, identification, and quantification in non-GM seed lots. This can be systematically undertaken by preliminary screening for control elements and selectable or scorable (reporter) marker genes. In this study, simplex and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays individually as well as simultaneously amplifying the commonly used selectable marker genes, i.e., aadA, bar, hpt, nptII, pat encoding, respectively, for aminoglycoside-3'-adenyltransferase, Streptococcus viridochromogenes phosphinothricin-N-acetyltransferase, hygromycin phosphotransferase, neomycin phosphotransferase, Streptococcus hygroscopicus phosphinothricin-N-acetyltransferase, and a reporter gene uidA encoding beta-d-glucuronidase, were developed as a reliable tool for qualitative screening of GM crops. The efficiency of the assays was also standardized in the test samples prepared by artificial mixing of transgenic seed samples in different proportions. The developed multiplex PCR assays will be useful in verifying the GM status of a sample irrespective of the crop and GM trait.

  2. Transposon-mediated directed mutation in bacteria and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Saier, Milton H; Kukita, Chika; Zhang, Zhongge

    2017-03-01

    Transposon-mediated "directed" mutations occur at higher frequencies when beneficial than when detrimental and relieve the stress that causes them. The first and best-studied example involves regulation of Insertion Sequence-5 (IS5) insertion into a specific activating site upstream of the glycerol utilization operon in Escherichia coli, glpFK. This event promotes high level expression of the glpFK operon, allowing glycerol utilization in wild type cells under inhibitory conditions. The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent, sugar transporting, phosphotransferase system (PTS) influences this process by regulating cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate and cyclic AMP concentrations. Insertion frequencies are determined by IS5-specific tetranucleotide target sequences in stress-induced (DNA) duplex destabilization (SIDD) structures counteracted by two DNA binding proteins, GlpR and Crp which directly inhibit insertion, responding to cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate and cyclic AMP, respectively. Expression of the E. coli master regulator of flagellar gene control, flhDC, is subject to activation by IS elements by a directed mechanism, and zinc-induced transposon-mediated zinc resistance has been demonstrated in Cupriavidus metallidurans. The use of DNA conformation and DNA binding proteins to control transposon hopping also occurs in eukaryotes.

  3. A PTS EII mutant library in Group A Streptococcus identifies a promiscuous man-family PTS transporter influencing SLS-mediated hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Ganesh S; Islam, Emrul; Gera, Kanika; Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S

    2017-02-01

    The Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is a Gram-positive human pathogen that must adapt to unique host environments in order to survive. Links between sugar metabolism and virulence have been demonstrated in GAS, where mutants in the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) exhibited Streptolysin S (SLS)-mediated hemolysis during exponential growth. This early onset hemolysis correlated with an increased lesion size and severity in a murine soft tissue infection model when compared with parental M1T1 MGAS5005. To identify the PTS components responsible for this phenotype, we insertionally inactivated the 14 annotated PTS EIIC-encoding genes in the GAS MGAS5005 genome and subjected this library to metabolic and hemolysis assays to functionally characterize each EIIC. It was found that a few EIIs had a very limited influence on PTS sugar metabolism, whereas others were fairly promiscuous. The mannose-specific EII locus, encoded by manLMN, was expressed as a mannose-inducible operon that exhibited the most influence on PTS sugar metabolism, including mannose. Importantly, components of the mannose-specific EII also acted to prevent the early onset of SLS-mediated hemolysis. Interestingly, these roles were not identical in two different M1T1 GAS strains, highlighting the possible versatility of the PTS to adapt to strain-specific needs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A shuttle vector which facilitates the expression of transfected genes in Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J M; Ward, H M; Miles, M A; Kendall, G

    1992-01-01

    A Trypanosoma cruzi expression vector has been constructed using sequences derived from the flanking regions of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) genes. The neomycin phosphotransferase (neor) gene was incorporated as a selectable marker. Using electroporation we have introduced this vector into both T. cruzi and Leishmania cells and conferred G418 resistance. Transformation is mediated by large extrachromosomal circular elements composed of head-to-tail tandem repeats of the vector. The transformed phenotype is stable for at least 6 months in the absence of G418 and can be maintained during passage through the T. cruzi life-cycle. Foreign genes inserted into an expression site within the vector (pTEX) can be expressed at high levels in transformed cells. To our knowledge this paper describes the first trypanosome shuttle vector and the first vector which functions in both trypanosomes and Leishmania. Images PMID:1324472

  5. Functional assessment of plant and microalgal lipid pathway genes in yeast to enhance microbial industrial oil production.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huadong; Moghaddam, Lalehvash; Brinin, Anthony; Williams, Brett; Mundree, Sagadevan; Haritos, Victoria S

    2017-06-25

    As promising alternatives to fossil-derived oils, microbial lipids are important as industrial feedstocks for biofuels and oleochemicals. Our broad aim is to increase lipid content in oleaginous yeast through expression of lipid accumulation genes and use Saccharomyces cerevisiae to functionally assess genes obtained from oil-producing plants and microalgae. Lipid accumulation genes DGAT (diacylglycerol acyltransferase), PDAT (phospholipid: diacylglycerol acyltransferase), and ROD1 (phosphatidylcholine: diacylglycerol choline-phosphotransferase) were separately expressed in yeast and lipid production measured by fluorescence, solvent extraction, thin layer chromatography, and gas chromatography (GC) of fatty acid methyl esters. Expression of DGAT1 from Arabidopsis thaliana effectively increased total fatty acids by 1.81-fold above control, and ROD1 led to increased unsaturated fatty acid content of yeast lipid. The functional assessment approach enabled the fast selection of candidate genes for metabolic engineering of yeast for production of lipid feedstocks. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Development of a transformation system for Trichoderma longibrachiatum and its use for constructing multicopy transformants for the egl1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Torres, P; González, R; Pérez-González, J A; González-Candelas, L; Ramón, D

    1994-06-01

    An efficient transformation system for the fungus Trichoderma longibrachiatum has been developed. Transformation was obtained both by electroporation and polyethyleneglycol treatment, using a plasmid carrying the Escherichia coli hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene as a dominant selectable marker. The transformation frequency was 0.5 to 5 transformants/micrograms plasmid DNA. Transformation normally occurred by tandem integration of the transforming DNA. A high percentage of the transformants were mitotically unstable. The efficiency of co-transformation was very high (around 90%), and several co-transformants containing multiple copies of the egl1 gene encoding a beta-(1,4)-endoglucanase were obtained. Some of them secrete increased levels of endoglucanase to the culture medium. In addition, the E. coli lacZ gene was expressed in an active form under control of the Aspergillus nidulans gpdA gene promoter.

  7. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of the bifunctional antibiotic resistance enzyme aminoglycoside (6') acetyltransferase-ie/aminoglycoside (2'') phosphotransferase-ia reveals a rigid solution structure.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Shane J; Berghuis, Albert M

    2012-04-01

    Aminoglycoside (6') acetyltransferase-Ie/aminoglycoside (2″) phosphotransferase-Ia [AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia] is one of the most problematic aminoglycoside resistance factors in clinical pathogens, conferring resistance to almost every aminoglycoside antibiotic available to modern medicine. Despite 3 decades of research, our understanding of the structure of this bifunctional enzyme remains limited. We used small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to model the structure of this bifunctional enzyme in solution and to study the impact of substrate binding on the enzyme. It was observed that the enzyme adopts a rigid conformation in solution, where the N-terminal AAC domain is fixed to the C-terminal APH domain and not loosely tethered. The addition of acetyl-coenzyme A, coenzyme A, GDP, guanosine 5'-[β,γ-imido]triphosphate (GMPPNP), and combinations thereof to the protein resulted in only modest changes to the radius of gyration (R(G)) of the enzyme, which were not consistent with any large changes in enzyme structure upon binding. These results imply some selective advantage to the bifunctional enzyme beyond coexpression as a single polypeptide, likely linked to an improvement in enzymatic properties. We propose that the rigid structure contributes to improved electrostatic steering of aminoglycoside substrates toward the two active sites, which may provide such an advantage.

  8. Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Analysis of the Bifunctional Antibiotic Resistance Enzyme Aminoglycoside (6′) Acetyltransferase-Ie/Aminoglycoside (2″) Phosphotransferase-Ia Reveals a Rigid Solution Structure

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Shane J.

    2012-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (6′) acetyltransferase-Ie/aminoglycoside (2″) phosphotransferase-Ia [AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia] is one of the most problematic aminoglycoside resistance factors in clinical pathogens, conferring resistance to almost every aminoglycoside antibiotic available to modern medicine. Despite 3 decades of research, our understanding of the structure of this bifunctional enzyme remains limited. We used small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to model the structure of this bifunctional enzyme in solution and to study the impact of substrate binding on the enzyme. It was observed that the enzyme adopts a rigid conformation in solution, where the N-terminal AAC domain is fixed to the C-terminal APH domain and not loosely tethered. The addition of acetyl-coenzyme A, coenzyme A, GDP, guanosine 5′-[β,γ-imido]triphosphate (GMPPNP), and combinations thereof to the protein resulted in only modest changes to the radius of gyration (RG) of the enzyme, which were not consistent with any large changes in enzyme structure upon binding. These results imply some selective advantage to the bifunctional enzyme beyond coexpression as a single polypeptide, likely linked to an improvement in enzymatic properties. We propose that the rigid structure contributes to improved electrostatic steering of aminoglycoside substrates toward the two active sites, which may provide such an advantage. PMID:22290965

  9. Synthesis and Physicochemical Characterization of D-Tagatose-1-Phosphate: The Substrate of the Tagatose-1-Phosphate Kinase in the Phosphotransferase System-Mediated D-Tagatose Catabolic Pathway of Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Simon, Patricia; Counson, Melody; Galleni, Moreno; Freedberg, Darón I; Thompson, John; Joris, Bernard; Battistel, Marcos D

    2015-01-01

    We report the first enzymatic synthesis of D-tagatose-1-phosphate (Tag-1P) by the multicomponent phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) present in tagatose-grown cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Physicochemical characterization by (31)P and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that, in solution, this derivative is primarily in the pyranose form. Tag-1P was used to characterize the putative tagatose-1-phosphate kinase (TagK) of the Bacillus licheniformis PTS-mediated D-tagatose catabolic pathway (Bli-TagP). For this purpose, a soluble protein fusion was obtained with the 6 His-tagged trigger factor (TF(His6)) of Escherichia coli. The active fusion enzyme was named TagK-TF(His6). Tag-1P and D-fructose-1-phosphate are substrates for the TagK-TF(His6) enzyme, whereas the isomeric derivatives D-tagatose-6-phosphate and D-fructose-6-phosphate are inhibitors. Studies of catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) reveal that the enzyme specificity is markedly in favor of Tag-1P as the substrate. Importantly, we show in vivo that the transfer of the phosphate moiety from PEP to the B. licheniformis tagatose-specific Enzyme II in E. coli is inefficient. The capability of the PTS general cytoplasmic components of B. subtilis, HPr and Enzyme I to restore the phosphate transfer is demonstrated. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Cotransformation and gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, L H; Shesely, E G; Kim, H S; Smithies, O

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated cotransformation in mammalian cells and its potential for identifying cells that have been modified by gene targeting. Selectable genes on separate DNA fragments were simultaneously introduced into cells by coelectroporation. When the introduced fragments were scored for random integration, 75% of the transformed cells integrated both fragments within the genome of the same cell. When one of the cointroduced fragments was scored for integration at a specific locus by gene targeting, only 4% of the targeted cells cointegrated the second fragment. Apparently, cells that have been modified by gene targeting with one DNA fragment rarely incorporate a second DNA fragment. Despite this limitation, we were able to use the cotransformation protocol to identify targeted cells by screening populations of colonies that had been transformed with a cointroduced selectable gene. When hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) targeting DNA was coelectroporated with a selectable neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) gene into embryonic stem (ES) cells, hprt-targeted colonies were isolated from the population of neo transformants at a frequency of 1 per 70 G418-resistant colonies. In parallel experiments with the same targeting construct, hprt-targeted cells were found at a frequency of 1 per 5,500 nonselected colonies. Thus, an 80-fold enrichment for targeted cells was observed within the population of colonies transformed with the cointroduced DNA compared with the population of nonselected colonies. This enrichment for targeted cells after cotransformation should be useful in the isolation of colonies that contain targeted but nonselectable gene alterations. Images PMID:1850104

  11. Human gene transfer: Characterization of human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes as vehicles for retroviral-mediated gene transfer in man

    SciTech Connect

    Kasid, A.; Morecki, S.; Aebersold, P.; Cornetta, K.; Culver, K.; Freeman, S.; Director, E.; Lotze, M.T.; Blaese, R.M.; Anderson, W.F.; Rosenberg, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are cells generated from tumor suspensions cultured in interleukin 2 that can mediate cancer regression when adoptively transferred into mice or humans. Since TILs proliferate rapidly in vitro, recirculate, and preferentially localize at the tumor site in vivo, they provide an attractive model for delivery of exogenous genetic material into man. To determine whether efficient gene transfer into TILs is feasible. The authors transduced human TILs with the bacterial gene for neomycin-resistance (Neo{sup R}) using the retroviral vector N2. The transduced TIL populations were stable and polyclonal with respect to the intact Neo{sup R} gene integration and expressed high levels of neomycin phosphotransferase activity. The Neo{sup R} gene insertion did not alter the in vitro growth pattern and interleukin 2 dependence of the transduced TILs. Analyses of T-cell receptor gene rearrangement for {beta}- and {gamma}-chain genes revealed the oligoclonal nature of the TIL populations with no major change in the DNA rearrangement patterns or the levels of mRNA expression of the {beta} and {gamma} chains following transduction and selection of TILs in the neomycin analog G418. Human TILs expressed mRNA for tumor necrosis factors ({alpha} and {beta}) and interleukin 2 receptor P55. This pattern of cytokine-mRNA expression was not significantly altered following the transduction of TILs. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of TILs as suitable cellular vehicles for the introduction of therapeutic genes into patients receiving autologous TILs.

  12. Global transcriptomic analysis of an engineered Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system during shikimic acid production in rich culture medium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficient production of SA in Escherichia coli has been achieved by modifying key genes of the central carbon metabolism and SA pathway, resulting in overproducing strains grown in batch- or fed-batch-fermentor cultures using a complex broth including glucose and YE. In this study, we performed a GTA to identify those genes significantly upregulated in an engineered E. coli strain, PB12.SA22, in mid EXP (5 h), early STA (STA1, 9 h), and late STA (STA2, 44 h) phases, grown in complex fermentation broth in batch-fermentor cultures. Results Growth of E. coli PB12.SA22 in complex fermentation broth for SA production resulted in an EXP growth during the first 9 h of cultivation depending of supernatant available aromatic amino acids provided by YE because, when tryptophan was totally consumed, cells entered into a second, low-growth phase (even in the presence of glucose) until 26 h of cultivation. At this point, glucose was completely consumed but SA production continued until the end of the fermentation (50 h) achieving the highest accumulation (7.63 g/L of SA). GTA between EXP/STA1, EXP/STA2 and STA1/STA2 comparisons showed no significant differences in the regulation of genes encoding enzymes of central carbon metabolism as in SA pathway, but those genes encoding enzymes involved in sugar, amino acid, nucleotide/nucleoside, iron and sulfur transport; amino acid catabolism and biosynthesis; nucleotide/nucleoside salvage; acid stress response and modification of IM and OM were upregulated between comparisons. Conclusions GTA during SA production in batch-fermentor cultures of strain PB12.SA22 grown in complex fermentation broth during the EXP, STA1 and STA2 phases was studied. Significantly, upregulated genes during the EXP and STA1 phases were associated with transport, amino acid catabolism, biosynthesis, and nucleotide/nucleoside salvage. In STA2, upregulation of genes encoding transporters and enzymes involved in the synthesis and catabolism of

  13. Centromere formation in mouse cells cotransformed with human DNA and a dominant marker gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hadlaczky, G; Praznovszky, T; Cserpán, I; Keresö, J; Péterfy, M; Kelemen, I; Atalay, E; Szeles, A; Szelei, J; Tubak, V

    1991-01-01

    A 13,863-base-pair (bp) putative centromeric DNA fragment has been isolated from a human genomic library by using a probe obtained from metaphase chromosomes of human colon carcinoma cells. The abundance of this DNA was estimated to be 16-32 copies per genome. Cotransfection of mouse cells with this sequence and a selectable marker gene (aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase type II, APH-II) resulted in a transformed cell line carrying an additional centromere in a dicentric chromosome. This centromere was capable of binding an anti-centromere antibody. In situ hybridization demonstrated that the human DNA sequence as well as the APH-II gene and vector DNA sequences were located only in the additional centromere of the dicentric chromosome. The extra centromere separated from the dicentric chromosome, forming a stable minichromosome. This functional centromere linked to a dominant selectable marker may be a step toward the construction of an artificial mammalian chromosome. Images PMID:1654558

  14. Efficient plastid transformation in tobacco using the aphA-6 gene and kanamycin selection.

    PubMed

    Huang, F-C; Klaus, S M J; Herz, S; Zou, Z; Koop, H-U; Golds, T J

    2002-09-01

    Here we report on the development of a new dominant selection marker for plastid transformation in higher plants using the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene aphA-6 from Acinetobacter baumannii. Vectors containing chimeric aphA-6 gene constructs were introduced into the tobacco chloroplast using particle bombardment of alginate-embedded protoplast-derived micro colonies or polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated DNA uptake. Targeted insertion into the plastome was achieved via homologous recombination, and plastid transformants were recovered on the basis of their resistance to kanamycin. Variations in kanamycin resistance in transplastomic lines were observed depending on the 5' and 3' regulatory elements associated with the aphA-6 coding region. Transplastomic plants were fertile and showed maternal inheritance of the transplastome in the progeny.

  15. Mutations affecting transport of the hexitols D-mannitol, D-glucitol, and galactitol in Escherichia coli K-12: isolation and mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Lengeler, J

    1975-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 unable to grow on any of the three naturally occurring hexitols D-manitol, D-glucitol, and galactitol and, among these specifically, mutants with altered transport and phosphorylating activity have been isolated. Different isolation procedures have been utilized, including suicide by D-[3H]mannitol, chemotaxis, and resistance to the toxic hexitol analogue 2-deoxy-arabino-hexitol. Mutations thus obtained have been mapped in four distinct operons. (i) Mutations affecting an enzyme II-complexmt1 activity of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system all map in gene mtlA. This gene has previously been shown (Solomon and Lin, 1972) to be part of an operon, mtl, located at 71 min on the E. coli linkage map containing, in addition to mtlA, the cis-dominant regulatory gene mtlC and mtlD, the structural gene for the enzyme D-mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase. The gene order in this operon, induced by D-mannitol, is mtlC A D. (ii) Mutations in gene gutA affecting a second enzyme II-complexgut of the phosphotransferase system map at 51 min, clustered in operon gutC A D together with the cis-dominant regulatory gene gutC and the structural gene gutD for the enzyme D-glucitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The gut operon, previously called sbl or srl, is induced by D-glucitol. (iii) Mutations affecting the transport and catabolism of galactitol are clustered in a third operon, gatC A D, located at 40.5 min. This operon again contains a cis-dominant regulatory gene, gatC, the structural gene gatD for galactitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase, and gene gatA coding for a thrid hexitol-specific enzyme II-complexgat. Other genes coding for two additional enzymes involved in galactitol catabolism apparently are not linked to gatC A D. (iv) A fourth class of mutants pleiotropically negative for hexitol growth and transport maps in the pts operon. Triple-negative mutants (mtlA gutA gatA) do not have further transport or phosphorylating activity

  16. Comparative Genomics of cpn60-Defined Enterococcus hirae Ecotypes and Relationship of Gene Content Differences to Competitive Fitness.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Isha; Chaban, Bonnie; Hill, Janet E

    2016-11-01

    Natural microbial communities undergo selection-driven succession with changes in environmental conditions and available nutrients. In a previous study of the pig faecal Enterococcus community, we demonstrated that cpn60 universal target (UT) sequences could resolve phenotypically and genotypically distinct ecotypes of Enterococcus spp. that emerged over time in the faecal microbiome of growing pigs. In this study, we characterized genomic diversity in the identified Enterococcus hirae ecotypes in order to define further the nature and degree of genome content differences between taxa resolved by cpn60 UT sequences. Genome sequences for six representative isolates (two from each of three ecotypes) were compared. Differences in phosphotransferase systems and amino acid metabolism pathways for glutamine, proline and selenocysteine were observed. Differences in the lac family phosphotransferase system corresponded to lactose utilization phenotypes of the isolates. Competitive fitness of the E. hirae ecotypes was evaluated by in vitro growth competition assays in pig faecal extract medium. Isolates from E. hirae-1 and E. hirae-2 ecotypes were able to out-compete isolates from the E. hirae-3 ecotype, consistent with the relatively low abundance of E. hirae-3 relative to E. hirae-1 and E. hirae-2 previously observed in the pig faecal microbiome, and with observed differences between the ecotypes in gene content related to biosynthetic capacity. Results of this study provide a genomic basis for the definition of ecotypes within E. hirae and confirm the utility of the cpn60 UT sequence for high-resolution profiling of complex microbial communities.

  17. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, Bertinellys; RODULFO, Hectorina; CARREÑO, Numirin; GUZMÁN, Militza; SALAZAR, Elsa; DONATO, Marcos DE

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America. PMID:27007556

  18. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  19. Global Microarray Analysis of Carbohydrate Use in Alkaliphilic Hemicellulolytic Bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yajian; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-01-01

    The alkaliphilic hemicellulolytic bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5 has a broad substrate spectrum and exhibits the capacity to utilize complex carbohydrates such as galactomannan, xylan, and pectin. In the monosaccharide mixture, sequential utilization by Bacillus sp. N16-5 was observed. Glucose appeared to be its preferential monosaccharide, followed by fructose, mannose, arabinose, xylose, and galactose. Global transcription profiles of the strain were determined separately for growth on six monosaccharides (glucose, fructose, mannose, galactose, arabinose, and xylose) and four polysaccharides (galactomannan, xylan, pectin, and sodium carboxymethylcellulose) using one-color microarrays. Numerous genes potentially related to polysaccharide degradation, sugar transport, and monosaccharide metabolism were found to respond to a specific substrate. Putative gene clusters for different carbohydrates were identified according to transcriptional patterns and genome annotation. Identification and analysis of these gene clusters contributed to pathway reconstruction for carbohydrate utilization in Bacillus sp. N16-5. Several genes encoding putative sugar transporters were highly expressed during growth on specific sugars, suggesting their functional roles. Two phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems were identified as candidate transporters for mannose and fructose, and a major facilitator superfamily transporter was identified as a candidate transporter for arabinose and xylose. Five carbohydrate uptake transporter 1 family ATP-binding cassette transporters were predicted to participate in the uptake of hemicellulose and pectin degradation products. Collectively, microarray data improved the pathway reconstruction involved in carbohydrate utilization of Bacillus sp. N16-5 and revealed that the organism precisely regulates gene transcription in response to fluctuations in energy resources. PMID:23326578

  20. Histidine biosynthesis genes in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, C; Ehrlich, S D; Renault, P

    1992-01-01

    The genes of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis involved in histidine biosynthesis were cloned and characterized by complementation of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis mutants and DNA sequencing. Complementation of E. coli hisA, hisB, hisC, hisD, hisF, hisG, and hisIE genes and the B. subtilis hisH gene (the E. coli hisC equivalent) allowed localization of the corresponding lactococcal genes. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the 11.5-kb lactococcal region revealed 14 open reading frames (ORFs), 12 of which might form an operon. The putative operon includes eight ORFs which encode proteins homologous to enzymes involved in histidine biosynthesis. The operon also contains (i) an ORF encoding a protein homologous to the histidyl-tRNA synthetases but lacking a motif implicated in synthetase activity, which suggests that it has a role different from tRNA aminoacylation, and (ii) an ORF encoding a protein that is homologous to the 3'-aminoglycoside phosphotransferases but does not confer antibiotic resistance. The remaining ORFs specify products which have no homology with proteins in the EMBL and GenBank data bases. PMID:1400209

  1. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) shoot apex with a fungal phytase gene improves phosphorus acquisition.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiying; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Xingfen

    2013-01-01

    Cotton is an important world economic crop plant. It is considered that cotton is recalcitrant to in vitro proliferation. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration has been successful by using hypocotyl, whereas it is highly genotype dependent. Here, a genotype-independent cotton regeneration protocol from shoot apices is presented. Shoot apices from 3- to 5-day-old seedlings of cotton are infected with an Agrobacterium strain, EHA105, carrying the binary vector pC-KSA contained phytase gene (phyA) and the marker gene neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII), and directly regenerated as shoots in vitro. Rooted shoots can be obtained within 6-8 weeks. Plants that survived by leaf painting kanamycin (kan) were -further analyzed by DNA and RNA blottings. The transgenic plants with increased the phosphorus (P) acquisition efficiency were obtained following the transformation method.

  2. Gene fusion vehicles for the analysis of gene expression in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, M L; Timblin, C R

    1984-01-01

    A set of plasmid cloning vehicles was developed to facilitate the construction of gene or operon fusions in Rhizobium meliloti. The vehicles also contain a broad-host-range replicon and could be introduced into bacteria either by transformation or by transduction, using bacteriophage P2. Insertion of foreign DNA into a unique restriction endonuclease cleavage site promotes the synthesis of either the Escherichia coli lactose operon or the kanamycin phosphotransferase gene from transposon Tn5. Expression of the lactose operon could be detected by observing the color of Rhizobium colonies on medium that contained a chromogenic indicator. We also determined the growth conditions that make it possible to select either for or against the expression of the E. coli lactose operon in R. meliloti. Recombinant plasmids were constructed by inserting MboI restriction fragments of R. meliloti DNA into one of the vehicles, pMK353 . Expression of beta-galactosidase by a number of these recombinants was measured in both R. meliloti and E. coli. PMID:6327625

  3. Possible peptide chain termination mutants in thymide kinase gene of a mammalian virus, herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Summers, W P; Wagner, M; Summers, W C

    1975-10-01

    Mutations in the viral gene coding for the thymidine kinase (ATP:thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.75) induced by herpes simplex virus have been obtained by selection of virus resistant to bromodeoxyuridine when grown in thymidine-kinase-deficient LMTK- mouse cells. Proteins labeled after infection of Vero (monkey) cells with herpes simplex virus were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and one protein of about 40,000 daltons was consistently altered in a number of thymidine-kinase-deficient mutants. Many viral mutants lacked this peptide and one class of these mutants induced the synthesis of new shorter peptides. Revertant virus could be selected which simultaneously regained the ability to induce thymidine kinase activity, regained the intact thymidine kinase peptide, and lost the ability to synthesize the shorter peptide fragment. These mutants comprise a class of animal virus mutants which have the properties expected of peptide chain termination mutants.

  4. Possible peptide chain termination mutants in thymide kinase gene of a mammalian virus, herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, W P; Wagner, M; Summers, W C

    1975-01-01

    Mutations in the viral gene coding for the thymidine kinase (ATP:thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.75) induced by herpes simplex virus have been obtained by selection of virus resistant to bromodeoxyuridine when grown in thymidine-kinase-deficient LMTK- mouse cells. Proteins labeled after infection of Vero (monkey) cells with herpes simplex virus were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and one protein of about 40,000 daltons was consistently altered in a number of thymidine-kinase-deficient mutants. Many viral mutants lacked this peptide and one class of these mutants induced the synthesis of new shorter peptides. Revertant virus could be selected which simultaneously regained the ability to induce thymidine kinase activity, regained the intact thymidine kinase peptide, and lost the ability to synthesize the shorter peptide fragment. These mutants comprise a class of animal virus mutants which have the properties expected of peptide chain termination mutants. Images PMID:172894

  5. Protein fusions with the kanamycin resistance gene from transposon Tn5.

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, B; Sprengel, R; Schaller, H

    1984-01-01

    The gene for the neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPT II) from transposon Tn5 was fused at the amino or carboxy terminus to foreign DNA sequences coding for 3-300 amino acids and the properties of the fused proteins were investigated. All amino-terminal fusions examined conferred kanamycin resistance to their host cell, but profound differences in their enzymatic activity and stability were detected. Short additions to the amino terminus of the NPT II resulted in highly enzymatically active fusion proteins whereas long amino-terminal fusions often had to be proteolytically degraded to release active proteins. Fusions at the carboxy-terminal end of the NPT II protein did not always induce kanamycin resistance and their enzymatic activity depended more stringently on the nature of the junction sequence. Images Fig. 4. PMID:6098471

  6. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  7. Successive silencing of tandem reporter genes in potato (Solanum tuberosum) over 5 years of vegetative propagation.

    PubMed

    Nocarova, Eva; Opatrny, Zdenek; Fischer, Lukas

    2010-10-01

    Transgenic plants represent an excellent tool for experimental plant biology and are an important component of modern agriculture. Fully understanding the stability of transgene expression is critical in this regard. Most changes in transgene expression occur soon after transformation and thus unwanted lines can be discarded easily; however, transgenes can be silenced long after their integration. To study the long-term changes in transgene expression in potato (Solanum tuberosum), the activity of two reporter genes, encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) and neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII), was monitored in a set of 17 transgenic lines over 5 years of vegetative propagation in vitro. A decrease in transgene expression was observed mainly in lines with higher initial GFP expression and a greater number of T-DNA insertions. Complete silencing of the reporter genes was observed in four lines (nearly 25 %), all of which successively silenced the two reporter genes, indicating an interconnection between their silencing. The loss of GFP fluorescence always preceded the loss of kanamycin resistance. Treatment with the demethylation drug 5-azacytidine indicated that silencing of the NPTII gene, but probably not of GFP, occurred directly at the transcriptional level. Successive silencing of the two reporter genes was also reproduced in lines with reactivated expression of previously silenced transgenes. We suggest a hypothetical mechanism involving the successive silencing of the two reporter genes that involves the switch of GFP silencing from the post-transcriptional to transcriptional level and subsequent spreading of methylation to the NPTII gene.

  8. Germline transmission of exogenous genes in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Bosselman, R A; Hsu, R Y; Boggs, T; Hu, S; Bruszewski, J; Ou, S; Kozar, L; Martin, F; Green, C; Jacobsen, F

    1989-01-27

    Difficulties associated with in vitro manipulation and culture of the early chicken embryo have restricted generation of transgenic chickens to approaches that use replication-competent retroviruses. The need to produce transgenic chickens in the absence of replicating virus prompted development of a new method of gene transfer into the chicken. Microinjection of the replication-defective reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) vector ME111 beneath unincubated chicken embryo blastoderms results in infection of germline stem cells. This vector contains genetic information exogenous to the chicken genome, including both the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene and the Tn5 neomycin phosphotransferase gene. About 8 percent of male birds hatched from injected embryos contained vector DNA in their semen. All four positive males tested passed vector sequences onto their progeny. Analysis of G1 offspring showed that gonads of G0 male birds were mosaic with respect to insertion of vector provirus. Thus, primordial germ cells present in the unincubated chicken embryo blastoderm are susceptible to infection by defective REV vectors.

  9. Stable transfection and continuous expression of heterologous genes in Entamoeba invadens.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nishant; Ojha, Sandeep; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2012-07-01

    Amoebiasis is spread by the ingestion of dormant Entamoeba histolytica cysts. Intervention of encystation could break the transmission cycle, thereby reducing disease burden. The model system used to study trophozoite to cyst differentiation is Entamoeba invadens. Here we describe an electroporation-based method for stable transfection of E. invadens with a plasmid pEiNEO-LUC containing the neomycin phosphotransferase gene under the control of E. invadens ribosomal protein gene S10 promoter. The plasmid also contains luciferase reporter gene expressed from the promoter of ribosomal protein gene L3. After electroporation, cells receiving the plasmid were selected by growth in 10μgml(-1) G418 and stable lines were obtained in four to five weeks. The plasmid was replicated episomally to ∼10 copies per haploid genome. In the absence of drug selection 50% of the plasmid copies were lost in 9-10 days. In cells growing under drug selection the reporter gene was continuously expressed throughout the differentiation process from trophozoite to cyst and back, making this system suitable for analysis of genes involved in differentiation. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Biolistic transformation of chrysanthemum with the nucleocapsid gene of tomato spotted wilt virus.

    PubMed

    Yepes, L M; Mittak, V; Pang, S Z; Gonsalves, C; Slightom, J L; Gonsalves, D

    1995-08-01

    In vitro regeneration and biolistic transformation procedures were developed for several commercial chrysanthemum Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev, syn. Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. cultivars using leaf and stem explants. Studies on the effect of several growth regulators and kanamycin on chrysanthemum regeneration were conducted, and a step-wise procedure to optimize kanamycin selection and recovery of transgenic plants was developed. A population of putative transformed chrysanthemum plants cvs. Blush, Dark Bronze Charm, Iridon, and Tara, was obtained after bombardment with tungsten microprojectiles coated with the binary plasmid pBIN19 containing the nucleocapsid (N) gene of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and the marker gene neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT II). PCR analysis of 82 putative transgenic plants selected on kanamycin indicated that the majority of the lines (89%) were transformed and contained both genes (71%). However, some transgenic lines contained only one of the genes: either the NPT II (15%) or the TSWV (N) gene (14%). Southern blot analysis on selected transgenic lines confirmed the integration of the TSWV (N) gene into the chrysanthemum genome. These results demonstrate the development of an efficient procedure to transfer genetic material into the chrysanthemum genome and selectively regenerate transgenic chrysanthemum plants at frequencies higher than previously reported.

  11. A genome-wide screen for identifying all regulators of a target gene

    PubMed Central

    Baptist, Guillaume; Pinel, Corinne; Ranquet, Caroline; Izard, Jérôme; Ropers, Delphine; de Jong, Hidde; Geiselmann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a new screening methodology for identifying all genes that control the expression of a target gene through genetic or metabolic interactions. The screen combines mutant libraries with luciferase reporter constructs, whose expression can be monitored in vivo and over time in different environmental conditions. We apply the method to identify the genes that control the expression of the gene acs, encoding the acetyl coenzyme A synthetase, in Escherichia coli. We confirm most of the known genetic regulators, including CRP–cAMP, IHF and components of the phosphotransferase system. In addition, we identify new regulatory interactions, many of which involve metabolic intermediates or metabolic sensing, such as the genes pgi, pfkA, sucB and lpdA, encoding enzymes in glycolysis and the TCA cycle. Some of these novel interactions were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. More generally, we observe that a large number of mutants directly or indirectly influence acs expression, an effect confirmed for a second promoter, sdhC. The method is applicable to any promoter fused to a luminescent reporter gene in combination with a deletion mutant library. PMID:23892289

  12. A Universal Positive-Negative Selection System for Gene Targeting in Plants Combining an Antibiotic Resistance Gene and Its Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Nonaka, Satoko; Osakabe, Keishi; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting (GT) is a useful technology for accurate genome engineering in plants. A reproducible approach based on a positive-negative selection system using hygromycin resistance and the diphtheria toxin A subunit gene as positive and negative selection markers, respectively, is now available. However, to date, this selection system has been applied exclusively in rice (Oryza sativa). To establish a universally applicable positive-negative GT system in plants, we designed a selection system using a combination of neomycin phosphotransferaseII (nptII) and an antisense nptII construct. The concomitant transcription of both sense and antisense nptII suppresses significantly the level of expression of the sense nptII gene, and transgenic calli and plants become sensitive to the antibiotic geneticin. In addition, we were able to utilize the sense nptII gene as a positive selection marker and the antisense nptII construct as a negative selection marker for knockout of the endogenous rice genes Waxy and 33-kD globulin through GT, although negative selection with this system is relatively less efficient compared with diphtheria toxin A subunit. The approach developed here, with some additional improvements, could be applied as a universal selection system for the enrichment of GT cells in several plant species.

  13. A temperature-tolerant multiplex elements and genes screening system for genetically modified organisms based on dual priming oligonucleotide primers and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei; Wei, Shuang; Wang, Chenguang; Du, Zhixin; Zhu, Pengyu; Wu, Xiyang; Wu, Gang; Zhu, Shuifang

    2017-08-15

    High throughput screening systems are the preferred solution to meet the urgent requirement of increasing number of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, we have successfully developed a multiplex GMO element screening system with dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) primers. This system can detect the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S), terminator of nopaline synthase gene (NOS), figwort mosaic virus 35S (FMV 35S) promoter, neomycin phosphotransferaseII (NPTII), Bt Cry 1Ab, phosphinothricin acetyltransferase genes (bar) and Streptomyces viridochromogenes (pat) simultaneously, which covers more than 90% of all authorized GMO species worldwide. This system exhibits a high tolerance to annealing temperatures, high specificity and a limit of detection equal to conventional PCR. A total of 214 samples from markets, national entry-exit agencies, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurement (IRMM) and the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) were also tested for applicability. This screening system is therefore suitable for GMO screening.

  14. Nonhomologous end joining-mediated gene replacement in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Weinthal, Dan Michael; Taylor, Roslyn Ann; Tzfira, Tzvi

    2013-05-01

    Stimulation of the homologous recombination DNA-repair pathway via the induction of genomic double-strand breaks (DSBs) by zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) has been deployed for gene replacement in plant cells. Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated repair of DSBs, on the other hand, has been utilized for the induction of site-specific mutagenesis in plants. Since NHEJ is the dominant DSB repair pathway and can also lead to the capture of foreign DNA molecules, we suggest that it can also be deployed for gene replacement. An acceptor DNA molecule in which a green fluorescent protein (GFP) coding sequence (gfp) was flanked by ZFN recognition sequences was used to produce transgenic target plants. A donor DNA molecule in which a promoterless hygromycin B phosphotransferase-encoding gene (hpt) was flanked by ZFN recognition sequences was constructed. The donor DNA molecule and ZFN expression cassette were delivered into target plants. ZFN-mediated site-specific mutagenesis and complete removal of the GFP coding sequence resulted in the recovery of hygromycin-resistant plants that no longer expressed GFP and in which the hpt gene was unlinked to the acceptor DNA. More importantly, ZFN-mediated digestion of both donor and acceptor DNA molecules resulted in NHEJ-mediated replacement of the gfp with hpt and recovery of hygromycin-resistant plants that no longer expressed GFP and in which the hpt gene was physically linked to the acceptor DNA. Sequence and phenotypical analyses, and transmission of the replacement events to the next generation, confirmed the stability of the NHEJ-induced gene exchange, suggesting its use as a novel method for transgene replacement and gene stacking in plants.

  15. The Lcn972 Bacteriocin-Encoding Plasmid pBL1 Impairs Cellobiose Metabolism in Lactococcus lactis▿

    PubMed Central

    Campelo, Ana B.; Gaspar, Paula; Roces, Clara; Rodríguez, Ana; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Neves, Ana Rute; Martínez, Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    pBL1 is a Lactococcus lactis theta-replicating 10.9-kbp plasmid that encodes the synthetic machinery of the bacteriocin Lcn972. In this work, the transcriptomes of exponentially growing L. lactis strains with and without pBL1 were compared. A discrete response was observed, with a total of 10 genes showing significantly changed expression. Upregulation of the lactococcal oligopeptide uptake (opp) system was observed, which was likely linked to a higher nitrogen demand required for Lcn972 biosynthesis. Strikingly, celB, coding for the membrane porter IIC of the cellobiose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS), and the upstream gene llmg0186 were downregulated. Growth profiles for L. lactis strains MG1363, MG1363/pBL1, and MG1363 ΔcelB grown in chemically defined medium (CDM) containing cellobiose confirmed slower growth of MG1363/pBL1 and MG1363 ΔcelB, while no differences were observed with growth on glucose. The presence of pBL1 shifted the fermentation products toward a mixed acid profile and promoted substantial changes in intracellular pool sizes for glycolytic intermediates in cells growing on cellobiose as determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Overall, these data support the genetic evidence of a constriction in cellobiose uptake. Notably, several cell wall precursors accumulated, while other UDP-activated sugar pools were lower, which could reflect rerouting of precursors toward the production of structural or storage polysaccharides. Moreover, cells growing slowly on cellobiose and those lacking celB were more tolerant to Lcn972 than cellobiose-adapted cells. Thus, downregulation of celB could help to build up a response against the antimicrobial activity of Lcn972, enhancing self-immunity of the producer cells. PMID:21890668

  16. The Bacterial iprA Gene Is Conserved across Enterobacteriaceae, Is Involved in Oxidative Stress Resistance, and Influences Gene Expression in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Allison; Serfecz, Jacquelyn; Kinnally, Alexandra; Crosby, Kathleen; Youngman, Matthew; Wykoff, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The iprA gene (formerly known as yaiV or STM0374) is located in a two-gene operon in the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genome and is associated with altered expression during spaceflight and rotating-wall-vessel culture conditions that increase virulence. However, iprA is uncharacterized in the literature. In this report, we present the first targeted characterization of this gene, which revealed that iprA is highly conserved across Enterobacteriaceae. We found that S. Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, and Enterobacter cloacae ΔiprA mutant strains display a multi-log-fold increase in oxidative stress resistance that is complemented using a plasmid-borne wild-type (WT) copy of the S. Typhimurium iprA gene. This observation was also associated with increased catalase activity, increased S. Typhimurium survival in macrophages, and partial dependence on the katE gene and full dependence on the rpoS gene. Our results indicate that IprA protein activity is sensitive to deletion of the N- and C-terminal 10 amino acids, while a region that includes amino acids 56 to 80 is dispensable for activity. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis revealed several genes altered in expression in the S. Typhimurium ΔiprA mutant strain compared to the WT, including those involved in fimbria formation, spvABCD-mediated virulence, ethanolamine utilization, the phosphotransferase system (PTS) transport, and flagellin phase switching from FlgB to FliC (likely a stochastic event) and several genes of hypothetical or putative function. IMPORTANCE Overall, this work reveals that the conserved iprA gene measurably influences bacterial biology and highlights the pool of currently uncharacterized genes that are conserved across bacterial genomes. These genes represent potentially useful targets for bacterial engineering, vaccine design, and other possible applications. PMID:27246569

  17. Thiostrepton-induced gene expression in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, T; Holt, T G; Thompson, C J

    1989-01-01

    Thiostrepton induced the expression of four proteins (17, 19, 30, and 56 kilodaltons) of unknown function in Streptomyces lividans. The chromosomal gene which encoded the 19-kilodalton protein (tipA) was cloned and sequenced. Transcription of the tipA promoter was induced at least 200-fold by thiostrepton. The tipA 200-fold by thiostrepton. The tipA transcriptional start site (located by S1 mapping and primer extension experiments) was preceded by a 45-base-pair imperfect inverted-repeat sequence which included the -10 and -35 regions of the promoter. Under noninducing conditions in vivo, this might form a cruciform structure which is not recognized by RNA polymerase. A 143-base-pair fragment including this region was cloned into a promoter probe vector, pIJ486. In this plasmid, pAK114, the thiostrepton-inducible tipA promoter controlled the expression of a kanamycin resistance gene encoding an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase. As little as 1 ng of thiostrepton spotted on a lawn of S. lividans(pAK114) induced kanamycin-resistant growth. Other thiostreptonlike antibiotics also induced tipA, but structurally unrelated antibiotics which inhibit translation had no effect. In S. lividans, the promoter could be induced by thiostrepton during either growth or stationary phase. The tipA promoter should be a valuable tool for expression studies in streptomycetes. Images PMID:2537819

  18. Metagenomic analysis reveals that bacteriophages are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Jéssica; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis; Simonet, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    A metagenomics approach was applied to explore the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in bacteriophages from hospital wastewater. Metagenomic analysis showed that most phage sequences affiliated to the order Caudovirales, comprising the tailed phage families Podoviridae, Siphoviridae and Myoviridae. Moreover, the relative abundance of ARGs in the phage DNA fraction (0.26%) was higher than in the bacterial DNA fraction (0.18%). These differences were particularly evident for genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) proteins, phosphotransferases, β-lactamases and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Analysis of assembled contigs also revealed that blaOXA-10, blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-24 genes belonging to class D β-lactamases as well as a novel blaTEM (98.9% sequence similarity to the blaTEM-1 gene) belonging to class A β-lactamases were detected in a higher proportion in phage DNA. Although preliminary, these findings corroborate the role of bacteriophages as reservoirs of resistance genes and thus highlight the necessity to include them in future studies on the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase gene in Pseudocercosporella herpotrichoides.

    PubMed Central

    Bunkers, G J

    1991-01-01

    The plant-pathogenic fungus Pseudocercosporella herpotrichoides has been successfully transformed by using two different positive selection systems in combination with the Escherichia coli gusA gene. The selectable markers used in this study were the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene (hph) from E. coli and the gene (bml) for beta-tubulin from a benomyl-resistant mutant of Neurospora crassa. A lower transformation rate was obtained with the bml system than with the hph system. Conversely, cotransformation frequencies, as determined with medium plates containing the chromogenic substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-glucuronic acid, were higher with bml than with hph as the selectable marker. The hygromycin-resistant transformants were mitotically stable, and both the selectable gene and gusA were maintained through conidiation. The vector DNA was integrated into the genome, and the number and sites of insertion varied among transformants. Enzyme assays of mycelial extracts showed that beta-glucuronidase activity was highest in transformants with a high gusA copy number. Expression of gusA during growth of the fungus on plants was easily detectable and did not affect pathogenicity. These results form the basis for construction of a versatile and sensitive reporter gene system for P. herpotrichoides. Images PMID:1746951

  20. Genome-wide enrichment screening reveals multiple targets and resistance genes for triclosan in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yu, Byung Jo; Kim, Jung Ae; Ju, Hyun Mok; Choi, Soo-Kyung; Hwang, Seung Jin; Park, Sungyoo; Kim, Euijoong; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2012-10-01

    Triclosan is a widely used biocide effective against different microorganisms. At bactericidal concentrations, triclosan appears to affect multiple targets, while at bacteriostatic concentrations, triclosan targets FabI. The site-specific antibiotic-like mode-of-action and a widespread use of triclosan in household products claimed to possibly induce cross-resistance to other antibiotics. Thus, we set out to define more systematically the genes conferring resistance to triclosan; A genomic library of Escherichia coli strain W3110 was constructed and enriched in a selective medium containing a lethal concentration of triclosan. The genes enabling growth in the presence of triclosan were identified by using a DNA microarray and confirmed consequently by ASKA clones overexpressing the selected 62 candidate genes. Among these, forty-seven genes were further confirmed to enhance the resistance to triclosan; these genes, including the FabI target, were involved in inner or outer membrane synthesis, cell-surface material synthesis, transcriptional activation, sugar phosphotransferase (PTS) systems, various transporter systems, cell division, and ATPase and reductase/dehydrogenase reactions. In particular, overexpression of pgsA, rcsA, or gapC conferred to E. coli cells a similar level of triclosan resistance induced by fabI overexpression. These results indicate that triclosan may have multiple targets other than well-known FabI and that there are several undefined novel mechanisms for the resistance development to triclosan, thus probably inducing cross antibiotic resistance.

  1. Regeneration of Transgenic Rice with Bacterial ipt Gene Driven by Senescence Specific (SAG12) Promoter by Particle Bombardment.

    PubMed

    Devi, Santosini; Mishra, Manoj K; Elliott, Malcolm

    2012-12-01

    Transgenic rice plants were generated using particle bombardment to introduce the Agrobacterium cytokinin biosynthesis gene driven by Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) senescence specific promoter (SAG12) for delaying leaf senescence. Using two plasmids we co-transformed one week old embryogenic calli derived from mature Japonica rice (Oryza sativa) variety Chin Guang. The selectable marker hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph) gene and the reporter gene B-ß-glucuronidase (uidA), both under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter were placed on the same co-integrate vector whereas the cytokinin biosynthesis gene, isopentenyl transferase (ipt) driven by the SAG12 promoter is supplied in another plasmid. A total of 32 transgenic rice plants were regenerated of which 27 plants were randomly selected for histochemical ß-glucuronidase (GUS) assay, PCR and Southern blot analysis. Co-integration frequencies of 88% and 69% were obtained for two linked genes (uidA and hph) and two unlinked genes (hph and ipt gene) respectively in R0 plants. Southern blot analysis confirmed the results of histochemical GUS assay and PCR amplifications. A complex integration pattern for all the transgenes including the multiple copies integration was predominantly observed.

  2. Phosphorylation Events in the Multiple Gene Regulator of Group A Streptococcus Significantly Influence Global Gene Expression and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sanson, Misu; Makthal, Nishanth; Gavagan, Maire; Cantu, Concepcion; Olsen, Randall J.; Musser, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing analysis of ∼800 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) found that the gene encoding the multiple virulence gene regulator of GAS (mga) is highly polymorphic in serotype M59 strains but not in strains of other serotypes. To help understand the molecular mechanism of gene regulation by Mga and its contribution to GAS pathogenesis in serotype M59 GAS, we constructed an isogenic mga mutant strain. Transcriptome studies indicated a significant regulatory influence of Mga and altered metabolic capabilities conferred by Mga-regulated genes. We assessed the phosphorylation status of Mga in GAS cell lysates with Phos-tag gels. The results revealed that Mga is phosphorylated at histidines in vivo. Using phosphomimetic and nonphosphomimetic substitutions at conserved phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase regulation domain (PRD) histidines of Mga, we demonstrated that phosphorylation-mimicking aspartate replacements at H207 and H273 of PRD-1 and at H327 of PRD-2 are inhibitory to Mga-dependent gene expression. Conversely, non-phosphorylation-mimicking alanine substitutions at H273 and H327 relieved inhibition, and the mutant strains exhibited a wild-type phenotype. The opposing regulatory profiles observed for phosphorylation- and non-phosphorylation-mimicking substitutions at H273 extended to global gene regulation by Mga. Consistent with these observations, the H273D mutant strain attenuated GAS virulence, whereas the H273A strain exhibited a wild-type virulence phenotype in a mouse model of necrotizing fasciitis. Together, our results demonstrate phosphoregulation of Mga and its direct link to virulence in M59 GAS strains. These data also lay a foundation toward understanding how naturally occurring gain-of-function variations in mga, such as H201R, may confer an advantage to the pathogen and contribute to M59 GAS pathogenesis. PMID:25824840

  3. Identification of mutation points in Cupriavidus necator NCIMB 11599 and genetic reconstitution of glucose-utilization ability in wild strain H16 for polyhydroxyalkanoate production.

    PubMed

    Orita, Izumi; Iwazawa, Reiko; Nakamura, Satoshi; Fukui, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Although the facultative chemolithoautotrophic Cupriavidus necator (formerly Ralstonia eutropha) wild strain H16 is potentially useful as a host for metabolic engineering aimed at polyhydroxyalkanoate production, this organism is deficient in assimilating glucose, a major sugar in non-edible cellulosic resources. Growth properties of C. necator H16 harboring heterologous glf (encoding glucose-facilitated diffusion transporter) and glk (encoding glucokinase) from Zymomonas mobilis strongly suggested that the lack of glucose-utilization ability of C. necator H16 was caused by deficiency of both glucose-uptake and phosphorylation abilities. Next examination focused on previously unknown mutation points in a glucose-utilizing mutant of C. necator NCIMB 11599. Direct sequencing of a region of genes for putative N-acetylglucosamine-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system and its upstream region identified a missense mutation in nagE corresponding to Gly265Arg in the EIIC-EIIB component, and a nonsense mutation in nagR encoding a putative GntR-type transcriptional regulator. Further analyses demonstrated that the glucose-utilization ability of C. necator NCIMB 11599 is attributed to extended sugar specificity of the mutated NagE and derepression of nagFE expression by inactivation of NagR. The mutation in nagE and disruption of nagR were then introduced onto chromosome 1 of wild strain H16 by homologous recombination. The resulting engineered strain C. necator nagE_G265R∆nagR exhibited comparable growth and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) accumulation on glucose to those of the wild strain on fructose, demonstrating successful reconstitution of functional glucose-uptake and phosphorylation system. This recombinant strain is expected to be useful in further engineering for efficient production of PHAs from inexpensive biomass resources. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Improved strains of recombinant Escherichia coli for ethanol production from sugar mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, S E; Bothast, R J; Ingram, L O

    1995-04-01

    Hemicellulose hydrolysates of agricultural residues often contain mixtures of hexose and pentose sugars. Ethanologenic Escherichia coli that have been previously investigated preferentially ferment hexose sugars. In some cases, xylose fermentation was slow or incomplete. The purpose of this study was to develop improved ethanologenic E. coli strains for the fermentation of pentoses in sugar mixtures. Using fosfomycin as a selective agent, glucose-negative mutants of E. coli KO11 (containing chromosomally integrated genes encoding the ethanol pathway from Zymomonas mobilis) were isolated that were unable to ferment sugars transported by the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system. These strains (SL31 and SL142) retained the ability to ferment sugars with independent transport systems such as arabinose and xylose and were used to ferment pentose sugars to ethanol selectively in the presence of high concentrations of glucose. Additional fosfomycin-resistant mutants were isolated that were superior to strain KO11 for ethanol production from hexose and pentose sugars. These hyperproductive strains (SL28 and SL40) retained the ability to metabolize all sugars tested, completed fermentations more rapidly, and achieved higher ethanol yields than the parent. Both SL28 and SL40 produced 60 gl-1 ethanol from 120 gl-1 xylose in 60 h, 20% more ethanol than KO11 under identical conditions. Further studies illustrated the feasibility of sequential fermentation. A mixture of hexose and pentose sugars was fermented with near theoretical yield by SL40 in the first step followed by a second fermentation in which yeast and glucose were added. Such a two-step approach can combine the attributes of ethanologenic E. coli for pentoses with the high ethanol tolerance of conventional yeasts in a single vessel.

  5. ScrB (Cg2927) is a sucrose-6-phosphate hydrolase essential for sucrose utilization by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Engels, Verena; Georgi, Tobias; Wendisch, Volker F

    2008-12-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum can grow on a variety of carbohydrates from which glucose, fructose and sucrose are taken up and phosphorylated by the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS). Here, we show that cg2927 (scrB) encodes sucrose-6-phosphate hydrolase. The purified His-tagged protein hydrolyzed sucrose-6-phosphate and sucrose, but not sucrose-6'-phosphate. The Km value for sucrose was 190 mM while the Km for sucrose-6-phosphate was much lower, 0.04 mM. Sucrose-6-phosphate hydrolase activity was stimulated by MgSO4 and fructose-6-phosphate and was inhibited by MnCl2, CaCl2, CuSO4 and ZnSO4. A scrB deletion mutant could not grow on sucrose as the sole carbon source. In addition, growth in the absence of scrB was severely decreased when sucrose was present in addition to glucose, fructose or acetate, suggesting that higher intracellular concentrations of sucrose-6-phosphate are toxic. Transcriptional start sites in the cg2929-cg2928-scrB-ptsS locus could be revealed upstream of cg2929 and upstream of the sucrose-specific PTS gene ptsS. Of these, only ptsS showed increased expression when grown in the presence of sucrose, which was due to control by the transcriptional regulator SugR. The sucrose-6-phosphate hydrolase activity, however, was increased two- to threefold during growth in fructose- or sucrose-containing media, regardless of the presence or absence of SugR.

  6. Emergence of macrolide resistance gene mph(B) in Streptococcus uberis and cooperative effects with rdmC-like gene.

    PubMed

    Achard, Adeline; Guérin-Faublée, Véronique; Pichereau, Vianney; Villers, Corinne; Leclercq, Roland

    2008-08-01

    Streptococcus uberis UCN60 was resistant to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml) but susceptible to erythromycin (MIC = 0.06 microg/ml), azithromycin (MIC = 0.12 microg/ml), josamycin (MIC = 0.25 microg/ml), and tylosin (MIC = 0.5 microg/ml). A 2.5-kb HindIII fragment was cloned from S. uberis UCN60 DNA on plasmid pUC18 and introduced into Escherichia coli AG100A, where it conferred resistance to spiramycin by inactivation. The sequence analysis of the fragment showed the presence of an rdmC-like gene that putatively encoded a protein belonging to the alpha/beta hydrolase family and of the first 196 nucleotides of the mph(B) gene putatively encoding a phosphotransferase known to inactivate 14-, 15-, and 16-membered macrolides in E. coli. The entire mph(B) gene was then identified in S. uberis UCN60. The two genes were expressed alone or in combination in E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Analysis of MICs revealed that rdmC-like alone did not confer resistance to erythromycin, tylosin, and josamycin in those three hosts. It conferred resistance to spiramycin in E. coli and E. faecalis but not in S. aureus. mph(B) conferred resistance in E. coli to erythromycin, tylosin, josamycin, and spiramycin but only low levels of resistance in E. faecalis and S. aureus to spiramycin (MIC = 8 microg/ml). The combination of mph(B) and rdmC-like genes resulted in a resistance to spiramycin and tylosin in the three hosts that significantly exceeded the mere addition of the resistance levels conferred by each resistance mechanism alone.

  7. Genome reconstruction and gene expression of "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" Clade IB performing biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yanping; Yu, Ke; Xia, Yu; Chao, Yuanqing; Zhang, Tong

    2014-09-02

    We report the first integrated metatranscriptomic and metagenomic analysis of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) sludge. A draft genome of Candidatus Accumulibacter spp. strain HKU-1, a member of Clade IB, was retrieved. It was estimated to be ∼90% complete and shared average nucleotide identities of 83% and 88% with the finished genome CAP IIA UW-1 and the draft genome CAP IA UW-2, respectively. Different from CAP IIA UW-1, the phosphotransferase (pap) in polyphosphate metabolism and V-ATPase in orthophosphate transport were absent from CAP IB HKU-1. Additionally, unlike CAP IA UW-2, CAP IB HKU-1 carried the genes for carbon fixation and nitrogen fixation. Despite these differences, the key genes required for acetate uptake, glycolysis and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis were conserved in all these Accumulibacter genomes. The preliminary metatranscriptomic results revealed that the most significantly up-regulated genes of CAP IB HKU-1 from the anaerobic to the aerobic phase were responsible for assimilatory sulfate reduction, genetic information processing and phosphorus absorption, while the down-regulated genes were related to N2O reduction, PHA synthesis and acetyl-CoA formation. This study yielded another important Accumulibacter genome, revealed the functional difference within the Accumulibacter Type I, and uncovered the genetic responses to EBPR stimuli at a higher resolution.

  8. Characterization of the Phosphofructokinase Gene Family in Rice and Its Expression Under Oxygen Deficiency Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mustroph, Angelika; Stock, Johanna; Hess, Natalia; Aldous, Sophia; Dreilich, Anika; Grimm, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Plants possess two types of phosphofructokinase proteins for phosphorylation of fructose-6-phosphate, the ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase (PFK) and the pyrophosphate-(PPi) dependent pyrophosphate-fructose-6-phosphate-phosphotransferase (PFP). During oxygen deficiency ATP levels in rice seedlings are severely reduced, and it is hypothesized that PPi is used as an alternative energy source for the phosphorylation of fructose-6-phosphate during glycolysis. In this study, we analyzed the expression of 15 phosphofructokinase-encoding genes in roots and aerial tissues of anoxia-tolerant rice seedlings in response to anoxic stress and compared our data with transcript profiles obtained from microarray analyses. Furthermore, the intracellular localization of rice PFK proteins was determined, and the PFK and PFP isoforms were grouped in a phylogenetic tree. Two PFK and two PFP transcripts accumulated during anoxic stress, whereas mRNA levels of four PFK and three PFP genes were decreased. The total specific activity of both PFK and PFP changed only slightly during a 24-h anoxia treatment. It is assumed that expression of different isoforms and their catalytic properties differ during normoxic and anoxic conditions and contribute to balanced glycolytic activity during the low-oxygen stress. These characterizations of phosphofructokinase genes and the comparison to other plant species allowed us to suggest candidate rice genes for adaptation to anoxic stress. PMID:23717315

  9. Transient and stable gene expression in mammalian cells transduced with a recombinant baculovirus vector

    PubMed Central

    Condreay, J. Patrick; Witherspoon, Sam M.; Clay, William C.; Kost, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses can serve as gene-transfer vehicles for transient expression of recombinant proteins in a wide range of mammalian cell types. Furthermore, by inclusion of a dominant selectable marker in the viral vector, cell lines can be derived that stably express recombinant genes. A virus was constructed containing two expression cassettes controlled by constitutive mammalian promoters: the cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter/enhancer directing expression of green fluorescent protein and the simian virus 40 (SV40) early promoter controlling neomycin phosphotransferase II. Using this virus, efficient gene delivery and expression was observed and measured in numerous cell types of human, primate, and rodent origin. In addition to commonly used transformed cell lines such as HeLa, CHO, Cos-7, and 293, this list includes primary human keratinocytes and bone marrow fibroblasts. In all cases, addition of butyrate or trichostatin A (a selective histone deacetylase inhibitor) to transduced cells markedly enhanced the levels of reporter protein expression observed. When transduced cells are put under selection with the antibiotic G418, cell lines can be obtained at high frequency that stably maintain the expression cassettes of the vector DNA and exhibit stable, high-level expression of the reporter gene. Stably transduced derivatives have been selected from a substantial number of different cell types, suggesting that stable lines can be derived from any cell type that exhibits transient expression. PMID:9874783

  10. The bacterial paromomycin resistance gene, aphH, as a dominant selectable marker in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Jakobiak, Thomas; Mages, Wolfgang; Scharf, Birgit; Babinger, Patrick; Stark, Klaus; Schmitt, Rüdiger

    2004-12-01

    The aminoglycoside antibiotic paromomycin that is highly toxic to the green alga Volvox carteri is efficiently inactivated by aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase from Streptomyces rimosus. Therefore, we made constructs in which the bacterial aphH gene encoding this enzyme was combined with Volvox cis-regulatory elements in an attempt to develop a new dominant selectable marker--paromomycin resistance (PmR)--for use in Volvox nuclear transformation. The construct that provided the most efficient transformation was one in which aphH was placed between a chimeric promoter that was generated by fusing the Volvox hsp70 and rbcS3 promoters and the 3' UTR of the Volvox rbcS3 gene. When this plasmid was used in combination with a high-impact biolistic device, the frequency of stable PmR transformants ranged about 15 per 106 target cells. Due to rapid and sharp selection, PmR transformants were readily isolated after six days, which is half the time required for previously used markers. Co-transformation of an unselected marker ranged about 30%. The chimeric aphH gene was stably integrated into the Volvox genome, frequently as tandem multiple copies, and was expressed at a level that made selection of PmR transformants simple and unambiguous. This makes the engineered bacterial aphH gene an efficient dominant selection marker for the transformation and co-transformation of a broad range of V. carteri strains without the recurring need for using auxotrophic recipient strains.

  11. Horticultural characteristics of transgenic tobacco expressing the rolC gene from Agrobacterium rhizogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, R.; Zimmerman, T.W.; Cordts, J.M.; Footen, K.J. ); Ravelonandro, M. . Station de Pathologie Vegetale)

    1994-09-01

    Wisconsin 38 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf discs were transformed with the disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 101 carrying the rolC gene from A. rhizogenes and NPT II and GUS genes. Shoots that regenerated on kanamycin-containing medium were confirmed as transgenic through GUS assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot analyses, and transmission of the foreign genes through the sexual cycle. Transgenic plants were as short as half the height of control plants; were earlier flowering by up to 35 days; and had smaller leaves, shorter internodes, smaller seed capsules, fewer seeds, smaller flowers, and reduced pollen viability. The number of seed capsules, leaf number, and specific root length were similar between transgenic and control plants. Transgenic clones varied in the expression of the rolC-induced growth alterations as did the first generation of seedlings from these clones. Such differences suggested the potential for selecting for different levels of expression. Transformation with the rolC gene presents a potentially useful method of genetically modifying horticultural crops, particularly for flowering date, height, and leaf and flower size. Chemical names used: neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII), [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS).

  12. Cloning of the Escherichia coli sor genes for L-sorbose transport and metabolism and physical mapping of the genes near metH and iclR.

    PubMed

    Wehmeier, U F; Nobelmann, B; Lengeler, J W

    1992-12-01

    The sor genes for L-sorbose (Sor) degradation of Escherichia coli EC3132, a wild-type strain, have been cloned on a 10.8-kbp fragment together with parts of the metH gene. The genes were mapped by restriction analysis, by deletion mapping, and by insertion mutagenesis with Tn1725. Seven sor genes with their corresponding gene products have been identified. They form an operon (gene order sorCpCDFBAME) inducible by L-sorbose, and their products have the following functions: SorC (36 kDa), regulatory protein with repressor-activator functions; SorD (29 kDa), D-glucitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase; SorF and SorB (14 and 19 kDa, respectively), and SorA and SorM (27 and 29 kDa, respectively), two soluble and two membrane-bound proteins, respectively, of an L-sorbose phosphotransferase transport system; SorE (45 kDa), sorbose-1-phosphate reductase. The sor operon from E. coli EC3132 thus is identical to the operon from Klebsiella pneumoniae KAY2026. On the basis of restriction mapping followed by Southern hybridization experiments, the sor genes were mapped at 91.2 min on the chromosome, 3.3 kbp downstream of the metH-iclR gene cluster, and shown to be transcribed in a counterclockwise direction. The chromosomal map of the Sor+ strain EC3132 differs from that of the Sor- strain K-12 in approximately 8.6 kbp.

  13. Site-specific integration and constitutive expression of key genes into Escherichia coli chromosome increases shikimic acid yields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianglei; Lin, Jun; Hu, Haifeng; Zhou, Bin; Zhu, Baoquan

    2016-01-01

    As the key starting material for the chemical synthesis of Oseltamivir, shikimic acid (SA) has captured worldwide attention. Many researchers have tried to improve SA production by metabolic engineering, yet expression plasmids were used generally. In recent years, site-specific integration of key genes into chromosome to increase the yield of metabolites showed considerable advantages. The genes could maintain stably and express constitutively without induction. Herein, crucial genes aroG, aroB, tktA, aroE (encoding 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase, dehydroquinate synthase, transketolase and shikimate dehydrogenase, respectively) of SA pathway and glk, galP (encoding glucokinase and galactose permease) were integrated into the locus of ptsHIcrr (phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system operon) in a shikimate kinase genetic defect strain Escherichia coli BW25113 (ΔaroL/aroK, DE3). Furthermore, another key gene ppsA (encoding phosphoenolpyruvate synthase) was integrated into tyrR (encoding Tyr regulator protein). As a result, SA production of the recombinant (SA5/pGBAE) reached to 4.14 g/L in shake flask and 27.41 g/L in a 5-L bioreactor. These data suggested that integration of key genes increased SA yields effectively. This strategy is environmentally friendly for no antibiotic is added, simple to handle without induction, and suitable for industrial production.

  14. Metabolism of Fructooligosaccharides in Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III via Differential Gene Transcription and Alteration of Cell Membrane Fluidity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Zhao, Guozhong

    2015-01-01

    Although fructooligosaccharides (FOS) can selectively stimulate the growth and activity of probiotics and beneficially modulate the balance of intestinal microbiota, knowledge of the molecular mechanism for FOS metabolism by probiotics is still limited. Here a combined transcriptomic and physiological approach was used to survey the global alterations that occurred during the logarithmic growth of Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III using FOS or glucose as the sole carbon source. A total of 363 genes were differentially transcribed; in particular, two gene clusters were induced by FOS. Gene inactivation revealed that both of the clusters participated in the metabolism of FOS, which were transported across the membrane by two phosphotransferase systems (PTSs) and were subsequently hydrolyzed by a β-fructofuranosidase (SacA) in the cytoplasm. Combining the measurements of the transcriptome- and membrane-related features, we discovered that the genes involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids (FAs) were repressed in cells grown on FOS; as a result, the FA profiles were altered by shortening of the carbon chains, after which membrane fluidity increased in response to FOS transport and utilization. Furthermore, incremental production of acetate was observed in both the transcriptomic and the metabolic experiments. Our results provided new insights into gene transcription, the production of metabolites, and membrane alterations that could explain FOS metabolism in L. plantarum. PMID:26319882

  15. Characterization of a multiresistant mosaic plasmid from a fish farm Sediment Exiguobacterium sp. isolate reveals aggregation of functional clinic-associated antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Chao; Wu, Jinyu; Liu, Li; Zhang, Gang; Feng, Jie

    2014-02-01

    The genus Exiguobacterium can adapt readily to, and survive in, diverse environments. Our study demonstrated that Exiguobacterium sp. strain S3-2, isolated from marine sediment, is resistant to five antibiotics. The plasmid pMC1 in this strain carries seven putative resistance genes. We functionally characterized these resistance genes in Escherichia coli, and genes encoding dihydrofolate reductase and macrolide phosphotransferase were considered novel resistance genes based on their low similarities to known resistance genes. The plasmid G+C content distribution was highly heterogeneous. Only the G+C content of one block, which shared significant similarity with a plasmid from Exiguobacterium arabatum, fit well with the mean G+C content of the host. The remainder of the plasmid was composed of mobile elements with a markedly lower G+C ratio than the host. Interestingly, five mobile elements located on pMC1 showed significant similarities to sequences found in pathogens. Our data provided an example of the link between resistance genes in strains from the environment and the clinic and revealed the aggregation of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria isolated from fish farms.

  16. Identification and functional analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium PmrA-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Rita; Prouty, Angela M; Gunn, John S

    2005-02-01

    The PmrA-PmrB two-component regulatory system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is activated in vivo and plays an important role in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Resistance is partly mediated by modifications to the lipopolysaccharide. To identify new PmrA-regulated genes, microarray analysis was undertaken comparing cDNA derived from PmrA-constitutive and PmrA-null strains. A combination of RT-PCR and transcriptional analysis confirmed the inclusion of six new loci in the PmrA-PmrB regulon: STM1253, STM1269, STM4118, STM0459, STM3968 and STM4568. These loci did not affect the ability to grow in high iron conditions, the ability to modify lipid A with aminoarabinose, or virulence. STM4118, a putative phosphoethanolamine phosphotransferase, had a minor effect on polymyxin resistance, whereas the remaining genes had no role in polymyxin resistance. Although several of the identified loci lacked the consensus PmrA binding site, PmrA was demonstrated to bind the promoter of a PmrA-activated gene lacking the consensus site. A more complete definition of the PmrA-PmrB regulon will provide a better understanding of its role in host and non-host environments.

  17. Selectable genes for transformation of the fungal plant pathogen Glomerella cingulata f. sp. phaseoli (Colletotrichum lindemuthianum).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R J; Yoder, O C

    1987-01-01

    Glomerella cingulata f. sp. phaseoli (Gcp) was transformed using either of two selectable markers: the amdS + gene of Aspergillus nidulans, which encodes acetamidase and permits growth on acetamide as the sole nitrogen source and the hygBR gene of Escherichia coli which encodes hygromycin B (Hy) phosphotransferase and permits growth in the presence of the antibiotic Hy. The amdS+ gene functioned in Gcp under control of A. nidulans regulatory signals and hygBR was expressed after fusion to a promoter from Cochliobolus heterostrophus, another filamentous ascomycete. Protoplasts to be transformed were generated with the digestive enzyme complex Novozym 234 and then were exposed to plasmid DNA in the presence of 10 mM CaCl2 and polyethylene glycol. Transformation occurred by integration of single or multiple copies of either the amdS+ or hygBR plasmid into the fungal genome. There was no evidence of autonomous plasmid replication. Transformants were mitotically stable on selective and nonselective media. However, transforming DNA in hygBR transformants was observed to occasionally rearrange during nonselective growth, resulting in fewer copies of the plasmid per genome. These transformants were capable of infecting bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), the Gcp host plant, and after recovery from infected tissue were found to have retained both the transforming DNA unrearranged in their genomes and the Hy resistance phenotype. All single-conidial cultures derived from both amdS+ and hygBR transformants had the transplanted phenotype, suggesting that transformants were homokaryons.

  18. Redox modulation of the expression of bacterial genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Piñeiro, M; García-Olmedo, F; Diaz, I

    1994-01-01

    Activity of neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII; gene, neo; five cysteines) in tobacco protoplasts transfected with fusions of the octopine TR2' or cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the neo gene, with or without a signal peptide, increased up to 8-fold in response to externally added dithiothreitol at concentrations that did not affect protoplast viability (up to 2.5 mM). Activity of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT; gene, bar; one cysteine) expressed under control of the TR1' or 35S promoter was not similarly affected, thus excluding a redox modulation of transcription as the mechanism of NPTII activation by dithiothreitol. Western-blot analyses showed an increase in the amount of protein in response to dithiothreitol, whereas neither the steady-state level of NPTII mRNA nor the specific activity of the purified enzyme was affected. The same type of modulation was observed for transiently expressed beta-glucuronidase (nine cysteines) produced from a fusion with the 35S promoter, with or without a signal peptide. Limitation of cotranslational and/or early posttranslational steps by excessively oxidizing sulfhydryl/disulfide redox potentials is postulated to explain the low net accumulation of cysteine-rich proteins of bacterial origin (i.e., NPTII and beta-glucuronidase) when expressed in plant protoplasts, and the marked increase in such proteins in response to externally added dithiothreitol. Images PMID:8171004

  19. Inhibition of UL54 and UL97 genes of human cytomegalovirus by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Shin, M-C; Hong, S-K; Yoon, J-S; Park, S-S; Lee, S-G; Lee, D-G; Min, W-S; Shin, W-S; Paik, S-Y

    2006-01-01

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), namely siUL54-1 and siU54-2 targeting UL54 (DNA polymerase) gene, and siUL97-1 and siUL97-2 targeting UL97 (phosphotransferase) gene, were used to inhibit respective genes of Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and consequently the virus infection process in human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cultures. The virus infection was monitored by cell morphology (CPE), levels of UL83 and IE86 mRNAs, and virus antigen. The results showed that siUL97-2 remarkably inhibited viral CPE while other siRNAs were less inhibitory. The siRNAs reduced the levels of UL83 mRNA but not that of IE86 mRNA; again, siUL97-2 was most inhibitory. Particularly, siUL97-2 reduced the UL83 mRNA level 14, 19, 203, and 37 times at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hrs post infection (p.i.), respectively. When tested for the effect on viral antigen by immunofluorescent assay (IFA), UL97-2 exerted a marked inhibition. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of siRNAs against experimental HCMV infection and indicate their therapeutic potential.

  20. Investigation on gene transfer from genetically modified corn (Zea mays L.) plants to soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ma, B L; Blackshaw, Robert E; Roy, Julie; He, Tianpei

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about the prevalence and diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in soil bacteria communities is required to evaluate the possibility and ecological consequences of the transfer of these genes carried by genetically modified (GM) plants to soil bacteria. The neomycin phosphotransferase gene (nptII) conferring resistance to kanamycin and neomycin is one of the antibiotic resistance genes commonly present in GM plants. In this study, we investigated kanamycin-resistant (Km(R)) and neomycin-resistant (Nm(R)) soil bacterial populations in a 3-year field trial using a commercial GM corn (Zea mays L.) carrying the nptII gene and its near isogenic line. The results showed that a portion (2.3 - 15.6 %) of cultivable soil bacteria was naturally resistant to kanamycin or neomycin. However, no significant difference in the population level of Km(R) or Nm(R) soil bacteria was observed between the GM and non-GM corn fields. The nptII gene was not detected in any of the total 3000 Km(R) or Nm(R) isolates screened by PCR. Further, total soil bacterial cells were collected through Nycodenz gradient centrifugation and bacterial community DNA was subjected to PCR. Detection limit was about 500 cells per gram of fresh soil. Our study suggests that the nptII gene was relatively rare in the soil bacterial populations and there was no evidence of gene transfer from a GM corn plant to soil bacteria based on the data from total soil bacterial communities.

  1. Identification of stsC, the gene encoding the L-glutamine:scyllo-inosose aminotransferase from streptomycin-producing Streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Ahlert, J; Distler, J; Mansouri, K; Piepersberg, W

    1997-08-01

    Eight new genes, strO-stsABCDEFG, were identified by sequencing DNA in the gene cluster that encodes proteins for streptomycin production of Streptomyces griseus N2-3-11. The StsA (calculated molecular mass 43.5 kDa) and StsC (45.5 kDa) proteins - together with another gene product, StrS (39.8 kDa), encoded in another operon of the same gene cluster - show significant sequence identity and are members of a new class of pyridoxal-phosphate-dependent aminotransferases that have been observed mainly in the biosynthetic pathways for secondary metabolites. The aminotransferase activity was demonstrated for the first time by identification of the overproduced and purified StsC protein as the L-glutamine:scyllo-inosose aminotransferase, which catalyzes the first amino transfer in the biosynthesis of the streptidine subunit of streptomycin. The stsC and stsA genes each hybridized specifically to distinct fragments in the genomic DNA of most actinomycetes tested that produce diaminocyclitolaminoglycosides. In contrast, only stsC, but not stsA, hybridized to the DNA of Streptomyces hygroscopicus ssp. glebosus, which produces the monoaminocyclitol antibiotic bluensomycin; this suggests that both genes are specifically used in the first and second steps of the cyclitol transamination reactions. Sequence comparison studies performed with the deduced polypeptides of the genes adjacent to stsC suggest that the enzymes encoded by some of these genes [strO (putative phosphatase gene), stsB (putative oxidoreductase gene), and stsE (putative phosphotransferase gene)] also could be involved in (di-)aminocyclitol synthesis.

  2. Detection of Gene Expression in Genetically Engineered Microorganisms and Natural Phytoplankton Populations in the Marine Environment by mRNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pichard, Scott L.; Paul, John H.

    1991-01-01

    A simple method that combines guanidinium isothiocyanate RNA extraction and probing with antisense and sense RNA probes is described for analysis of microbial gene expression in planktonic populations. Probing of RNA sample extracts with sense-strand RNA probes was used as a control for nonspecific hybridization or contamination of mRNA with target DNA. This method enabled detection of expression of a plasmid-encoded neomycin phosphotransferase gene (nptII) in as few as 104Vibrio cells per ml in 100 ml of seawater. We have used this method to detect expression of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large-subunit gene (rbcL) in Synechococcus cultures and natural phytoplankton populations in the Dry Tortugas, Florida. During a 36-h diel study, rbcL expression of the indigenous phytoplankton was greatest in the day, least at night (1100, 0300, and 0100 h), and variable at dawn or dusk (0700 and 1900 h). These results are the first report of gene expression in natural populations by mRNA isolation and probing. This methodology should be useful for the study of gene expression in microorganisms released into the environment for agricultural or bioremediation purposes and indigenous populations containing highly conserved target gene sequences. Images PMID:16348507

  3. Detection of Gene Expression in Genetically Engineered Microorganisms and Natural Phytoplankton Populations in the Marine Environment by mRNA Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Scott L; Paul, John H

    1991-06-01

    A simple method that combines guanidinium isothiocyanate RNA extraction and probing with antisense and sense RNA probes is described for analysis of microbial gene expression in planktonic populations. Probing of RNA sample extracts with sense-strand RNA probes was used as a control for nonspecific hybridization or contamination of mRNA with target DNA. This method enabled detection of expression of a plasmid-encoded neomycin phosphotransferase gene (nptII) in as few as 10Vibrio cells per ml in 100 ml of seawater. We have used this method to detect expression of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large-subunit gene (rbcL) in Synechococcus cultures and natural phytoplankton populations in the Dry Tortugas, Florida. During a 36-h diel study, rbcL expression of the indigenous phytoplankton was greatest in the day, least at night (1100, 0300, and 0100 h), and variable at dawn or dusk (0700 and 1900 h). These results are the first report of gene expression in natural populations by mRNA isolation and probing. This methodology should be useful for the study of gene expression in microorganisms released into the environment for agricultural or bioremediation purposes and indigenous populations containing highly conserved target gene sequences.

  4. Characterization of opaque2 modifier QTLs and candidate genes in recombinant inbred lines derived from the K0326Y quality protein maize inbred.

    PubMed

    Holding, David R; Hunter, Brenda G; Klingler, John P; Wu, Song; Guo, Xiaomei; Gibbon, Bryan C; Wu, Rongling; Schulze, Jan-Michele; Jung, Rudolf; Larkins, Brian A

    2011-03-01

    Quality protein maize (QPM) is a high lysine-containing corn that is based on genetic modification of the opaque2 (o2) mutant. In QPM, modifier genes convert the starchy endosperm of o2 to the vitreous phenotype of wild type maize. There are multiple, unlinked o2 modifier loci (Opm) in QPM and their nature and mode of action are unknown. We previously identified seven Opm QTLs and characterized 16 genes that are differentially up-regulated at a significant level in K0326Y QPM, compared to the starchy endosperm mutant W64Ao2. In order to further characterize these Opm QTLs and the genes up-regulated in K0326Y QPM, we created a population of 314 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross between K0326Y QPM and W64Ao2. The RILs were characterized for three traits associated with endosperm texture: vitreousness, density and hardness. Genetic linkage analysis of the RIL population confirmed three of the previously identified QTLs associated with o2 endosperm modification in K0326Y QPM. Many of the genes up-regulated in K0326Y QPM showed substantially higher levels of expression in vitreous compared with opaque RILs. These included genes associated with the upstream regulation of the ethylene response pathway, and a gene encoding a regulatory subunit of pyrophosphate-dependent fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase, an adaptive enzyme of the glycolytic pathway.

  5. aph(3')-IIb, a gene encoding an aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme, is under the positive control of surrogate regulator HpaA.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Jin, Shouguang

    2003-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa harbors a chromosomal aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene, aph(3')-IIb, which confers P. aeruginosa resistance to several important aminoglycoside antibiotics, including kanamycin A and B, neomycin B and C, butirosin, and seldomycin F5. The aph(3')-IIb gene has been found to be regulated by an AraC-type transcriptional regulator (HpaA) encoded by a gene located upstream of the aph(3')-IIb gene. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA), HpaA activates the expression of aph(3')-IIb as well as that of the hpa regulon which encodes metabolic enzymes for the utilization of 4-HPA. hpaA and aph(3')-IIb form an operon, and in response to the presence of 4-HPA, the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain PAK (but not its hpaA mutant strain) displays increased resistance to neomycin. A survey of 39 clinical and 19 environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa demonstrated in all of them the presence of an hpaA-aph gene cluster, while 56 out of the 58 isolates are able to utilize the 4-HPA as a sole carbon source, suggesting a feature common to P. aeruginosa strains. Interestingly, a larger portion of clinical isolates than environmental isolates showed 4-HPA-induced resistance to neomycin. The aph(3')-IIb gene product is likely to function as a metabolic enzyme which has a cross-reactivity with aminoglycosides. These findings provide new insight into the possible mechanism of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance.

  6. Tissue-specifically regulated site-specific excision of selectable marker genes in bivalent insecticidal, genetically-modified rice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhan; Ding, Xuezhi; Hu, Shengbiao; Sun, Yunjun; Xia, Liqiu

    2013-12-01

    Marker-free, genetically-modified rice was created by the tissue-specifically regulated Cre/loxP system, in which the Cre recombinase gene and hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (hpt) were flanked by two directly oriented loxP sites. Cre expression was activated by the tissue-specific promoter OsMADS45 in flower or napin in seed, resulting in simultaneous excision of the recombinase and marker genes. Segregation of T1 progeny was performed to select recombined plants. The excision was confirmed by PCR, Southern blot and sequence analyses indicating that efficiency varied from 10 to 53 % for OsMADS45 and from 12 to 36 % for napin. The expression of cry1Ac and vip3A was detected by RT-PCR analysis in marker-free transgenic rice. These results suggested that our tissue-specifically regulated Cre/loxP system could auto-excise marker genes from transgenic rice and alleviate public concerns about the security of GM crops.

  7. Identification of Salmonella typhimurium Genes Required for Colonization of the Chicken Alimentary Tract and for Virulence in Newly Hatched Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Arthur K.; Lovell, Margaret A.; Hulme, Scott D.; Zhang-Barber, Li; Barrow, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    From a collection of 2,800 Tn5-TC1 transposon mutants of Salmonella typhimurium F98, 18 that showed reduced intestinal colonization of 3-week-old chicks were identified. The sites of transposon insertion were determined for most of the mutants and included insertions in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis genes rfaK, rfaY, rfbK, and rfbB and the genes dksA, clpB, hupA, and sipC. In addition, identification was made of an insertion into a novel gene that encodes a protein showing similarity to the IIC component of the mannose class of phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems, which we putatively called ptsC. Transduction of most of the transposon mutations to a fresh S. typhimurium F98 genetic background and construction of defined mutations in the rfbK, dksA, hupA, sipC, and ptsC genes of S. typhimurium F98 supported the role in colonization of all but the pts locus. The virulence of the rfbK, dksA, hupA, sipC, and ptsC defined mutants and clpB and rfaY transductants in 1-day-old chicks was tested. All but the ptsC and rfaY mutants were attenuated for virulence. A number of other phenotypes associated with some of the mutations are described. PMID:9573095

  8. Identification of a Cellobiose Utilization Gene Cluster with Cryptic β-Galactosidase Activity in Vibrio fischeri▿

    PubMed Central

    Adin, Dawn M.; Visick, Karen L.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2008-01-01

    Cellobiose utilization is a variable trait that is often used to differentiate members of the family Vibrionaceae. We investigated how Vibrio fischeri ES114 utilizes cellobiose and found a cluster of genes required for growth on this β-1,4-linked glucose disaccharide. This cluster includes genes annotated as a phosphotransferase system II (celA, celB, and celC), a glucokinase (celK), and a glucosidase (celG). Directly downstream of celCBGKA is celI, which encodes a LacI family regulator that represses cel transcription in the absence of cellobiose. When the celCBGKAI gene cluster was transferred to cellobiose-negative strains of Vibrio and Photobacterium, the cluster conferred the ability to utilize cellobiose. Genomic analyses of naturally cellobiose-positive Vibrio species revealed that V. salmonicida has a homolog of the celCBGKAI cluster, but V. vulnificus does not. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses revealed that CelG and CelK share the greatest homology with glucosidases and glucokinases in the phylum Firmicutes. These observations suggest that distinct genes for cellobiose utilization have been acquired by different lineages within the family Vibrionaceae. In addition, the loss of the celI regulator, but not the structural genes, attenuated the ability of V. fischeri to compete for colonization of its natural host, Euprymna scolopes, suggesting that repression of the cel gene cluster is important in this symbiosis. Finally, we show that the V. fischeri cellobioase (CelG) preferentially cleaves β-d-glucose linkages but also cleaves β-d-galactose-linked substrates such as 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactoside (X-gal), a finding that has important implications for the use of lacZ as a marker or reporter gene in V. fischeri. PMID:18487409

  9. Genomic structure and chromosomal localization of the human deoxycytidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Walker, S.; Gribbin, T. ); Chen, E. Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill ); Johnson, E.E.; Spychala, J.; Mitchell, B.S. )

    1993-01-15

    Deoxycytidine kinase (NTP:deoxycytidine 5[prime]-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.74) is an enzyme that catalyzes phosphorylation of deoxyribonucleosides and a number of nucleoside analogs that are important in antiviral and cancer chemotherapy. Deficiency of this enzyme activity is associated with resistance to these agents, whereas increased enzyme activity is associated with increased activation of such compounds to cytotoxic nucleoside triphosphate derivatives. To characterize the regulation of expression of this gene, we have isolated genomic clones encompassing its entire coding and 5[prime] flanking regions and delinated all the exon/intron boundaries. The gene extends over more than 34 kilobases on chromosome 4 and the coding region is composed of 7 exons ranging in size from 90 to 1544 base pairs (bp). The 5[prime] flanking region is highly G+C-rich and contains four regions that are potential Sp1 binding sites. A 697-bp fragment encompassing 386 bp of 5[prime] upstream region, the 250-bp first exon, and 61 bp of the first intron was demonstrated to promote chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in a T-lymphoblast cell line and to have >6-fold greater activity in a Jurkat T-lymphoblast than in a Raji B-lymphoblast cell line. Our data suggest that these 5[prime] sequences may contain elements that are important for the tissue-specific differences in deoxycytidine kinase expression. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Two Gene Clusters Coordinate Galactose and Lactose Metabolism in Streptococcus gordonii

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lin; Martino, Nicole C.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii is an early colonizer of the human oral cavity and an abundant constituent of oral biofilms. Two tandemly arranged gene clusters, designated lac and gal, were identified in the S. gordonii DL1 genome, which encode genes of the tagatose pathway (lacABCD) and sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) enzyme II permeases. Genes encoding a predicted phospho-β-galactosidase (LacG), a DeoR family transcriptional regulator (LacR), and a transcriptional antiterminator (LacT) were also present in the clusters. Growth and PTS assays supported that the permease designated EIILac transports lactose and galactose, whereas EIIGal transports galactose. The expression of the gene for EIIGal was markedly upregulated in cells growing on galactose. Using promoter-cat fusions, a role for LacR in the regulation of the expressions of both gene clusters was demonstrated, and the gal cluster was also shown to be sensitive to repression by CcpA. The deletion of lacT caused an inability to grow on lactose, apparently because of its role in the regulation of the expression of the genes for EIILac, but had little effect on galactose utilization. S. gordonii maintained a selective advantage over Streptococcus mutans in a mixed-species competition assay, associated with its possession of a high-affinity galactose PTS, although S. mutans could persist better at low pHs. Collectively, these results support the concept that the galactose and lactose systems of S. gordonii are subject to complex regulation and that a high-affinity galactose PTS may be advantageous when S. gordonii is competing against the caries pathogen S. mutans in oral biofilms. PMID:22660715

  11. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum genes modulating the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modulation of the immune system is one of the most plausible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health. Presently, the specific probiotic cell products responsible for immunomodulation are largely unknown. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic diversity of strains of the Lactobacillus plantarum species were investigated to identify genes of L. plantarum with the potential to influence the amounts of cytokines interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-12 and the ratio of IL-10/IL-12 produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results A total of 42 Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from diverse environmental and human sources were evaluated for their capacity to stimulate cytokine production in PBMCs. The L. plantarum strains induced the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 over an average 14-fold range and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12 over an average 16-fold range. Comparisons of the strain-specific cytokine responses of PBMCs to comparative genome hybridization profiles obtained with L. plantarum WCFS1 DNA microarrays (also termed gene-trait matching) resulted in the identification of 6 candidate genetic loci with immunomodulatory capacities. These loci included genes encoding an N-acetyl-glucosamine/galactosamine phosphotransferase system, the LamBDCA quorum sensing system, and components of the plantaricin (bacteriocin) biosynthesis and transport pathway. Deletion of these genes in L. plantarum WCFS1 resulted in growth phase-dependent changes in the PBMC IL-10 and IL-12 cytokine profiles compared with wild-type cells. Conclusions The altered PBMC cytokine profiles obtained with the L. plantarum WCFS1 mutants were in good agreement with the predictions made by gene-trait matching for the 42 L. plantarum strains. This study therefore resulted in the identification of genes present in certain strains of L. plantarum which might be responsible for the stimulation of anti

  12. Nuclear gene targeting in Chlamydomonas using engineered zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sizova, Irina; Greiner, Andre; Awasthi, Mayanka; Kateriya, Suneel; Hegemann, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a versatile model for fundamental and biotechnological research. A wide range of tools for genetic manipulation have been developed for this alga, but specific modification of nuclear genes is still not routinely possible. Here, we present a nuclear gene targeting strategy for Chlamydomonas that is based on the application of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Our approach includes (i) design of gene-specific ZFNs using available online tools, (ii) evaluation of the designed ZFNs in a Chlamydomonas in situ model system, (iii) optimization of ZFN activity by modification of the nuclease domain, and (iv) application of the most suitable enzymes for mutagenesis of an endogenous gene. Initially, we designed a set of ZFNs to target the COP3 gene that encodes the light-activated ion channel channelrhodopsin-1. To evaluate the designed ZFNs, we constructed a model strain by inserting a non-functional aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase VIII (aphVIII) selection marker interspaced with a short COP3 target sequence into the nuclear genome. Upon co-transformation of this recipient strain with the engineered ZFNs and an aphVIII DNA template, we were able to restore marker activity and select paromomycin-resistant (Pm-R) clones with expressing nucleases. Of these Pm-R clones, 1% also contained a modified COP3 locus. In cases where cells were co-transformed with a modified COP3 template, the COP3 locus was specifically modified by homologous recombination between COP3 and the supplied template DNA. We anticipate that this ZFN technology will be useful for studying the functions of individual genes in Chlamydomonas.

  13. The One-Kilobase DNA Fragment Upstream of the ardC Actin Gene of Physarum polycephalum Is Both a Replicator and a Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Gérard; Pallotta, Dominick; Bénard, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    The 1-kb DNA fragment upstream of the ardC actin gene of Physarum polycephalum promotes the transcription of a reporter gene either in a transient-plasmid assay or as an integrated copy in an ectopic position, defining this region as the transcriptional promoter of the ardC gene (PardC). Since we mapped an origin of replication activated at the onset of S phase within this same fragment, we examined the pattern of replication of a cassette containing the PardC promoter and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene, hph, integrated into two different chromosomal sites. In both cases, we show by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis that an efficient, early activated origin coincides with the ectopic PardC fragment. One of the integration sites was a normally late-replicating region. The presence of the ectopic origin converted this late-replicating domain into an early-replicating domain in which replication forks propagate with kinetics indistinguishable from those of the native PardC replicon. This is the first demonstration that initiation sites for DNA replication in Physarum correspond to cis-acting replicator sequences. This work also confirms the close proximity of a replication origin and a promoter, with both functions being located within the 1-kb proximal region of the ardC actin gene. A more precise location of the replication origin with respect to the transcriptional promoter must await the development of a functional autonomously replicating sequence assay in Physarum. PMID:10207074

  14. Transferring cucumber mosaic virus-white leaf strain coat protein gene into Cucumis melo L. and evaluating transgenic plants for protection against infections

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, C.; Xue, B.; Yepes, M.; Fuchs, M.; Ling, K.; Namba, S. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1994-03-01

    A single regeneration procedure using cotyledon examples effectively regenerated five commercially grown muskmelon cultivars. This regeneration scheme was used to facilitate gene transfers using either Agrobacterium tumefaciens or microprojectile bombardment methods. In both cases, the transferred genes were from the T-DNA region of the binary vector plasmid pGA482GG/cp cucumber mosaic virus-white leaf strain (CMV-WL), which contains genes that encode neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPT II), [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS), and the CMV-WL coat protein (CP). Explants treated with pGA482GG/cpCMV-WL regenerated shoots on Murashige and Skoog medium containing 4.4 [mu]m 6-benzylaminopurine (BA), kanamycin (Km) at 150 mg[center dot]liter[sup [minus]1] and carbenicillin (Cb) at 500 mg[center dot]liter[sup [minus]1]. The authors' comparison of A. tumefaciens- and microprojectile-mediated gene transfer procedures shows that both methods effectively produce nearly the same percentage of transgenic plants. R[sub 0] plants were first tested for GUS or NPT II expression, then the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and other tests were used to verify the transfer of the NPT II, GUS, and CMV-WL CP genes.

  15. Immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Honjo, T. ); Alt, F.W. . Hudson Labs.); Rabbitts, T.H. )

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on the structure, function, and expression of the genes encoding antibodies in normal and neoplastic cells. Topics covered are: B Cells; Organization and rearrangement of immunoglobin genes; Immunoglobin genes in disease; Immunoglobin gene expression; and Immunoglobin-related genes.

  16. Studying Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sheets What are genes? Genes are segments of DNA that contain instructions for building the molecules that ... proteins. Parents pass their genes to their offspring. DNA is shaped like a corkscrew-twisted ladder, called ...

  17. Transformation of Brassica napus and Brassica oleracea Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and the Expression of the bar and neo Genes in the Transgenic Plants

    PubMed Central

    De Block, Marc; De Brouwer, Dirk; Tenning, Paul

    1989-01-01

    An efficient and largely genotype-independent transformation method for Brassica napus and Brassica oleracea was established based on neo or bar as selectable marker genes. Hypocotyl explants of Brassica napus and Brassica oleracea cultivars were infected with Agrobacterium strains containing chimeric neo and bar genes. The use of AgNO3 was a prerequisite for efficient shoot regeneration under selective conditions. Vitrification was avoided by decreasing the water potential of the medium, by decreasing the relative humidity in the tissue culture vessel, and by lowering the cytokinin concentration. In this way, rooted transformed shoots were obtained with a 30% efficiency in 9 to 12 weeks. Southern blottings and genetic analysis of S1-progeny showed that the transformants contained on average between one and three copies of the chimeric genes. A wide range of expression levels of the chimeric genes was observed among independent transformants. Up to 25% of the transformants showed no detectable phosphinotricin acetyltransferase or neomycin phosphotransferase II enzyme activities although Southern blottings demonstrated that these plants were indeed transformed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16667089

  18. Enhanced resistance to blister blight in transgenic tea (Camellia sinensis [L.] O. Kuntze) by overexpression of class I chitinase gene from potato (Solanum tuberosum).

    PubMed

    Singh, H Ranjit; Deka, Manab; Das, Sudripta

    2015-07-01

    Tea is the second most consumed beverage in the world. A crop loss of up to 43 % has been reported due to blister blight disease of tea caused by a fungus, Exobasidium vexans. Thus, it directly affects the tea industry qualitatively and quantitatively. Solanum tuberosum class I chitinase gene (AF153195) is a plant pathogenesis-related gene. It was introduced into tea genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with hygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt) gene conferring hygromycin resistance as plant selectable marker. A total of 41 hygromycin resistant plantlets were obtained, and PCR analysis established 12 plantlets confirming about the stable integration of transgene in the plant genome. Real-time PCR detected transgene expression in four transgenic plantlets (T28, C57, C9, and T31). Resistance to biotrophic fungal pathogen, E. vexans, was tested by detached leaf infection assay of greenhouse acclimated plantlets. An inhibitory activity against the fungal pathogen was evident from the detached leaves from the transformants compared with the control. Fungal lesion formed on control plantlet whereas the transgenic plantlets showed resistance to inoculated fungal pathogen by the formation of hypersensitivity reaction area. This result suggests that constitutive expression of the potato class I chitinase gene can be exploited to improve resistance to fungal pathogen, E. vexans, in economical perennial plantation crop like tea.

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of commercially elite rice restorer line using nptII gene as a plant selection marker.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, M; Sairam Reddy, P; Laxmi Narasu, M; Krishna, Gaurav; Rana, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Transformation of commercially important indica cultivars remains challenging for the scientific community even though Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocols for a few indica rice lines have been well established. We report successful transformation of a commercially important restorer line JK1044R of indica rice hybrid JKRH 401. While following existing protocol, we optimized several parameters for callusing, regeneration and genetic transformation of JK1044R. Calli generated from the rice scutellum tissue were used for transformation by Agrobacterium harboring pCAMBIA2201. A novel two tire selection scheme comprising of Geneticin (G418) and Paramomycin were deployed for selection of transgenic calli as well as regenerated plantlets that expressed neomycin phosphotransferase-II gene encoded by the vector. One specific combination of G418 (30 mg l(-1)) and Paramomycin (70 mg l(-1)) was very effective for calli selection. Transformed and selected calli were detected by monitoring the expression of the reporter gene uidA (GUS). Regenerated plantlets were confirmed through PCR analysis of nptII and gus genes specific primers as well as dot blot using gus gene specific as probe.

  20. Heat-shock-mediated elimination of the nptII marker gene in transgenic apple (Malus×domestica Borkh.).

    PubMed

    Herzog, Katja; Flachowsky, Henryk; Deising, Holger B; Hanke, Magda-Viola

    2012-04-25

    Production of marker-free genetically modified (GM) plants is one of the major challenges of molecular fruit breeding. Employing clean vector technologies, allowing the removal of undesired DNA sequences from GM plants, this goal can be achieved. The present study describes the establishment of a clean vector system in apple Malus×domestica Borkh., which is based on the use of the neomycin phosphotransferase II gene (nptII) as selectable marker gene and kanamycin/paramomycin as selective agent. The nptII gene can be removed after selection of GM shoots via site-specific excision mediated by heat-shock-inducible expression of the budding yeast FLP recombinase driven by the soybean Gmhsp17.5-E promoter. We created a monitoring vector containing the nptII and the flp gene as a box flanked by two direct repeats of the flp recognition target (FRT) sites. The FRT-flanked box separates the gusA reporter gene from the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S (CaMV 35S) promoter. Consequently, GUS expression does only occur after elimination of the FRT-flanked box. Transformation experiments using the monitoring vector resulted in a total of nine transgenic lines. These lines were investigated for transgenicity by PCR, RT-PCR and Southern hybridization. Among different temperature regimes tested, exposure to 42 °C for 3.5 to 4h led to efficient induction of FLP-mediated recombination and removal of the nptII marker gene. A second round of shoot regeneration from leaf explants led to GM apple plants completely free of the nptII gene.

  1. Transport and phosphorylation of disaccharides by the ruminal bacterium Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S A; Russell, J B

    1987-01-01

    Toluene-treated cells of Streptococcus bovis JB1 phosphorylated cellobiose, glucose, maltose, and sucrose by the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system. Glucose phosphorylation was constitutive, while all three disaccharide systems were inducible. Competition experiments indicated that separate phosphotransferase systems (enzymes II) existed for glucose, maltose, and sucrose. [14C]maltose transport was inhibited by excess (10 mM) glucose and to a lesser extent by sucrose (90 and 46%, respectively). [14C]glucose and [14C]sucrose transports were not inhibited by an excess of maltose. Since [14C]maltose phosphorylation in triethanolamine buffer was increased 160-fold as the concentration of Pi was increased from 0 to 100 mM, a maltose phosphorylase (Km for Pi, 9.5 mM) was present, and this activity was inducible. Maltose was also hydrolyzed by an inducible maltase. Glucose 1-phosphate arising from the maltose phosphorylase was metabolized by a constitutive phosphoglucomutase that was specific for alpha-glucose 1-phosphate (Km, 0.8 mM). Only sucrose-grown cells possessed sucrose hydrolase activity (Km, 3.1 mM), and this activity was much lower than the sucrose phosphotransferase system and sucrose-phosphate hydrolase activities. PMID:2827569

  2. Transport and phosphorylation of disaccharides by the ruminal bacterium Streptococcus bovis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.A.; Russell, J.B.

    1987-10-01

    Toluene-treated cells of Streptococcus bovis JB1 phosphorylated cellobiose, glucose, maltose, and sucrose by the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system. Glucose phosphorylation was constitutive, while all three disaccharide systems were inducible. Competition experiments, indicated that separate phosphotransferases systems existed for glucose, maltose, and sucrose. (/sup 14/C)maltose transport was inhibited by excess glucose and to a lesser extent by sucrose. (/sup 14/C)glucose and (/sup 14/C)sucrose transports were not inhibited by an excess of maltose. Since (/sup 14/C)maltose phosphorylation in triethanolamine buffer was increased 160-fold as the concentration of P/sub i/ was increased from 0 to 100 mM, a maltose phosphorylase was present, and this activity was inducible. Maltose was also hydrolyzed by an inducible maltase. Glucose 1-phosphate arising from the maltose phosphorylase was metabolized by a constitutive phosphoglucomutase that was specific for ..cap alpha..-glucose 1-phosphate. Only sucrose-grown cells possessed sucrose hydrolase activity, and this activity was much lower than the sucrose phosphotransferase system and sucrose-phosphate hydrolase activities.

  3. Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your DNA — the code that controls much of your body's form and function, from making you grow taller to regulating your body systems. Genes that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds ...

  4. A New High-Level Gentamicin Resistance Gene, aph(2")-Id, in Enterococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shane F.; Zervos, Marcus J.; Clewell, Don B.; Donabedian, Susan M.; Sahm, Daniel F.; Chow, Joseph W.

    1998-01-01

    Enterococcus casseliflavus UC73 is a clinical blood isolate with high-level resistance to gentamicin. DNA preparations from UC73 failed to hybridize with intragenic probes for aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2")-Ia and aph(2")-Ic. A 4-kb fragment from UC73 was cloned and found to confer resistance to gentamicin in Escherichia coli DH5α transformants. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the presence of a 906-bp open reading frame whose deduced amino acid sequence had a region with homology to the aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme APH(2")-Ic and to the C-terminal domain of the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6′)-APH(2"). The gene is designated aph(2")-Id, and its observed phosphotransferase activity is designated APH(2")-Id. A PCR-generated intragenic probe hybridized to the genomic DNA from 17 of 118 enterococcal clinical isolates (108 with high-level gentamicin resistance) from five hospitals. All 17 were vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates, and pulsed-field typing revealed three distinct clones. The combination of ampicillin plus either amikacin or neomycin exhibited synergistic killing against E. casseliflavus UC73. Screening and interpretation of high-level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococci may need to be modified to include detection of APH(2")-Id. PMID:9593155

  5. Integrative gene transfer in the truffle Tuber borchii by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Brenna, Andrea; Montanini, Barbara; Muggiano, Eleonora; Proietto, Marco; Filetici, Patrizia; Ottonello, Simone; Ballario, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation is a powerful tool for reverse genetics and functional genomic analysis in a wide variety of plants and fungi. Tuber spp. are ecologically important and gastronomically prized fungi ("truffles") with a cryptic life cycle, a subterranean habitat and a symbiotic, but also facultative saprophytic lifestyle. The genome of a representative member of this group of fungi has recently been sequenced. However, because of their poor genetic tractability, including transformation, truffles have so far eluded in-depth functional genomic investigations. Here we report that A. tumefaciens can infect Tuber borchii mycelia, thereby conveying its transfer DNA with the production of stably integrated transformants. We constructed two new binary plasmids (pABr1 and pABr3) and tested them as improved transformation vectors using the green fluorescent protein as reporter gene and hygromycin phosphotransferase as selection marker. Transformants were stable for at least 12 months of in vitro culture propagation and, as revealed by TAIL- PCR analysis, integration sites appear to be heterogeneous, with a preference for repeat element-containing genome sites.

  6. The HPr(Ser) Kinase of Streptococcus salivarius: Purification, Properties, and Cloning of the hprK Gene

    PubMed Central

    Brochu, Denis; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    1999-01-01

    In gram-positive bacteria, HPr, a protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system, is phosphorylated on a serine residue at position 46 by an ATP-dependent protein kinase. The HPr(Ser) kinase of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975 was purified, and the encoding gene (hprK) was cloned by using a nucleotide probe designed from the N-terminal amino acid sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence of the S. salivarius enzyme showed 45% identity with the Bacillus subtilis enzyme, the conserved residues being located mainly in the C-terminal half of the protein. The predicted hprK gene product has a molecular mass of 34,440 Da and a pI of 5.6. These values agree well with those found experimentally by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate, molecular sieve chromatography in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride, and chromatofocusing using the purified protein. The native protein migrates on a Superdex 200 HR column as a 330,000-Da protein, suggesting that the HPr(Ser) kinase is a decamer. The enzyme requires Mg2+ for activity and functions optimally at pH 7.5. Unlike the enzyme from other gram-positive bacteria, the HPr(Ser) kinase from S. salivarius is not stimulated by FDP or other glycolytic intermediates. The enzyme is inhibited by inorganic phosphate, and its Kms for HPr and ATP are 31 μM and 1 mM, respectively. PMID:9922231

  7. Silencing the HaAK gene by transgenic plant-mediated RNAi impairs larval growth of Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Yi-Ying; Li, Yan-Jun; Liu, Yong-Chang; Sun, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests have caused noticeable economic losses in agriculture, and the heavy use of insecticide to control pests not only brings the threats of insecticide resistance but also causes the great pollution to foods and the environment. Transgenic plants producing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directed against insect genes have been is currently developed for protection against insect pests. In this study, we used this technology to silence the arginine kinase (AK) gene of Helicoverpa armigera (HaAK), encoding a phosphotransferase that plays a critical role in cellular energy metabolism in invertebrate. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants producing HaAK dsRNA were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The maximal mortality rate of 55% was reached when H. armigera first-instar larvae were fed with transgenic plant leaves for 3 days, which was dramatically higher than the 18% mortality recorded in the control group. Moreover, the ingestion of transgenic plants significantly retarded larval growth, and the transcript levels of HaAK were also knocked down by up to 52%. The feeding bioassays further indicated that the inhibition efficiency was correlated with the integrity and concentration of the produced HaAK dsRNA in transgenic plants. These results strongly show that the resistance to H. armigera was improved in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, suggesting that the RNAi targeting of AK has the potential for the control of insect pests.

  8. Silencing the HaAK Gene by Transgenic Plant-Mediated RNAi Impairs Larval Growth of Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Yi-Ying; Li, Yan-Jun; Liu, Yong-Chang; Sun, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests have caused noticeable economic losses in agriculture, and the heavy use of insecticide to control pests not only brings the threats of insecticide resistance but also causes the great pollution to foods and the environment. Transgenic plants producing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directed against insect genes have been is currently developed for protection against insect pests. In this study, we used this technology to silence the arginine kinase (AK) gene of Helicoverpa armigera (HaAK), encoding a phosphotransferase that plays a critical role in cellular energy metabolism in invertebrate. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants producing HaAK dsRNA were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The maximal mortality rate of 55% was reached when H. armigera first-instar larvae were fed with transgenic plant leaves for 3 days, which was dramatically higher than the 18% mortality recorded in the control group. Moreover, the ingestion of transgenic plants significantly retarded larval growth, and the transcript levels of HaAK were also knocked down by up to 52%. The feeding bioassays further indicated that the inhibition efficiency was correlated with the integrity and concentration of the produced HaAK dsRNA in transgenic plants. These results strongly show that the resistance to H. armigera was improved in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, suggesting that the RNAi targeting of AK has the potential for the control of insect pests. PMID:25552931

  9. Movement of coat protein genes from a commercial virus-resistant transgenic squash into a wild relative.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Marc; Chirco, Ellen M; Gonsalves, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    We monitored pollen-mediated transgene dissemination from commercial transgenic squash CZW-3 into its wild relative Cucurbita pepo ssp. ovifera var. texana (C. texana). Transgenic squash CZW-3 expresses the neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) gene and the coat protein (CP) genes of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV); thereby, it is resistant to these three aphid-borne viruses. The rate of NPT II and CP transgene introgression increased with overlapping flowering patterns and a high ratio of transgenic F1 hybrids (C. texana x CZW-3) to C. texana. Transgene transfer also readily occurred from transgenic F1 hybrids into C. texana over three generations in field settings where test plants grew sympatrically and viruses were not severely limiting the growth, and fruit and seed production of C. texana. In contrast, introgression of the transgenes into C. texana was not sustained under conditions of high viral disease pressure. As expected, C. texana progeny that acquired the CP transgenes exhibited resistance to CMV, ZYMV, and WMV. This is the first report on transgene dissemination from a transgenic crop that exhibits disease resistance and hybridizes with a wild plant species without loss of fertility.

  10. The glucose transport system of the hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    SciTech Connect

    Galperin, M.Y.; Noll, K.M.; Romano, A.H.

    1996-08-01

    The glucose transport system of the extremely thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana was studied with the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DOG). T. neapolitana accumulated 2-DOG against a concentration gradient in an intracellular free sugar pool that was exchangeable with external D-glucose. This active transport of 2-DOG was dependent upon the presence of sodium ion and an external source of energy, such as pyruvate, and was inhibited by arsenate and gramicidin D. There was no phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphorylation of glucose, 2-DOG, or fructose by cell extracts or toluene-treated cells, indicating the absence of a phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system. These data indicate that D-glucose is taken up by T.neapolitana via an active transport system that is energized by an ion gradient generated by ATP, derived from substrate-level phosphorylation. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Phosphorylation and metabolism of sucrose and its five linkage-isomeric alpha-D-glucosyl-D-fructoses by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J; Robrish, S A; Pikis, A; Brust, A; Lichtenthaler, F W

    2001-03-22

    Not only sucrose but the five isomeric alpha-D-glucosyl-D-fructoses trehalulose, turanose, maltulose, leucrose, and palatinose are utilized by Klebsiella pneumoniae as energy sources for growth, thereby undergoing phosphorylation by a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system uniformly at 0-6 of the glucosyl moiety. Similarly, maltose, isomaltose, and maltitol, when exposed to these conditions, are phosphorylated regiospecifically at O-6 of their non-reducing glucose portion. The structures of these novel compounds have been established unequivocally by enzymatic analysis, acid hydrolysis, FAB negative-ion spectrometry, and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. In cells of K. pneumoniae, hydrolysis of sucrose 6-phosphate is catalyzed by sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase from Family 32 of the glycosylhydrolase superfamily. The five 6'-O-phosphorylated alpha-D-glucosyl-fructoses are hydrolyzed by an inducible (approximately 49-50 Kda) phospho-alpha-glucosidase from Family 4 of the glycosylhydrolase superfamily.

  12. Subunit interactions of the Escherichia coli mannitol permease: correlation with enzymic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, M.M.; Jacobson, G.R.

    1986-07-01

    A fraction of the phosphorylated form of the Escherichia coli mannitol permease (enzyme II/sup Mtl/) of the sugar phosphotransferase system can be extracted from the membrane in a dimeric form. Using E. coli minicells in which this protein can be specifically labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine, it is shown that part of the unphosphorylated form of enzyme II/sup Mtl/ can also be extracted from the membrane as a dimer. Both phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphorylation of the permease and conditions promoting turnover of the enzyme decrease the amount of extractable dimer. Thus, the dimer of these forms of the enzyme appears to be less stable than that of the unmodified form, at least in detergent solution. In contrast, inorganic phosphate, which activates the permease-catalyzed phospho exchange between mannitol 1-phosphate and mannitol (transphosphorylation), stabilizes the dimer. These results support the hypothesis that the mannitol permease dimer is more active in transphosphorylation than the monomer.

  13. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylation-coupled Saccharide Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Y Cao; X Jin; E Levin; H Huang; Y Zong; W Hendrickson; J Javitch; K Rajashankar; M Zhou; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Saccharides have a central role in the nutrition of all living organisms. Whereas several saccharide uptake systems are shared between the different phylogenetic kingdoms, the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system exists almost exclusively in bacteria. This multi-component system includes an integral membrane protein EIIC that transports saccharides and assists in their phosphorylation. Here we present the crystal structure of an EIIC from Bacillus cereus that transports diacetylchitobiose. The EIIC is a homodimer, with an expansive interface formed between the amino-terminal halves of the two protomers. The carboxy-terminal half of each protomer has a large binding pocket that contains a diacetylchitobiose, which is occluded from both sides of the membrane with its site of phosphorylation near the conserved His250 and Glu334 residues. The structure shows the architecture of this important class of transporters, identifies the determinants of substrate binding and phosphorylation, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of sugar translocation.

  14. The capsule biosynthesis locus of Haemophilus influenzae shows conspicuous similarity to the corresponding locus in Haemophilus sputorum and may have been recruited from this species by horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Signe M; de Gier, Camilla; Dimopoulou, Chrysoula; Gupta, Vikas; Hansen, Lars H; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-06-01

    The newly described species Haemophilus sputorum has been cultured from the upper respiratory tract of humans and appears to have little pathogenic potential. The species encodes a capsular biosynthesis locus of approximately 12  kb composed of three distinct regions. Region I and III genes, involved in export and processing of the capsular material, show high similarity to the corresponding genes in capsulate lineages of the pathogenic species Haemophilus influenzae; indeed, standard bexA and bexB PCRs for detection of capsulated strains of H. influenzae give positive results with strains of H. sputorum. Three ORFs are present in region II of the sequenced strain of H. sputorum, of which a putative phosphotransferase showed homology with corresponding genes from H. influenzae serotype c and f. Phylogenetic analysis of housekeeping genes from 24 Pasteurellaceae species showed that H. sputorum was only distantly related to H. influenzae. In contrast to H. influenzae, the capsule locus in H. sputorum is not associated with transposases or other transposable elements. Our data suggest that the capsule locus of capsulate lineages of H. influenzae may have been recruited relatively recently from the commensal species H. sputorum by horizontal gene transfer.

  15. Gene Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Ferrai, Carmelo; de Castro, Inês Jesus; Lavitas, Liron; Chotalia, Mita; Pombo, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is an intricate multistep process, regulated within the cell nucleus through the activation or repression of RNA synthesis, processing, cytoplasmic export, and translation into protein. The major regulators of gene expression are chromatin remodeling and transcription machineries that are locally recruited to genes. However, enzymatic activities that act on genes are not ubiquitously distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, but limited to specific and spatially defined foci that promote preferred higher-order chromatin arrangements. The positioning of genes within the nuclear landscape relative to specific functional landmarks plays an important role in gene regulation and disease. PMID:20484389

  16. A majority of mice show long-term expression of a human. beta. -globin gene after retrovirus transfer into hematopoietic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.A. . Dept. of Pathology); Gelinas, R.E.; Miller )

    1989-04-01

    Murine bone marrow was infected with a high-titer retrovirus vector containing the human {beta}-globin and neomycin phosphotransferase genes. Anemic W/W/sup v/ mice were transplanted with infected marrow which in some cases had been exposed to the selective agent G418. Human {beta}-globin expression was monitored in transplanted animals by using a monoclonal antibody specific for human {beta}-globin polypeptide, and hematopoietic reconstitution was monitored by using donor and recipient mice which differed in hemoglobin type. In some experiments all transplanted mice expressed the human {beta}-globin polypeptide for over 4 months, and up to 50% of peripheral erythrocytes contained detectable levels of polypeptide. DNA analysis of transplanted animals revealed that virtually every myeloid cell contained a provirus. Integration site analysis and reconstitution of secondary marrow recipients suggested that every mouse was reconstituted with at least one infected stem cell which had extensive repopulation capability. The ability to consistently transfer an active {beta}-globin gene into mouse hematopoietic cells improves the feasibility of using these techniques for somatic cell gene therapy in humans.

  17. Agrobacterium-transformed rice plants expressing synthetic cryIA(b) and cryIA(c) genes are highly toxic to striped stem borer and yellow stem borer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, X; Sardana, R; Kaplan, H; Altosaar, I

    1998-03-17

    Over 2,600 transgenic rice plants in nine strains were regenerated from >500 independently selected hygromycin-resistant calli after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The plants were transformed with fully modified (plant codon optimized) versions of two synthetic cryIA(b) and cryIA(c) coding sequences from Bacillus thuringiensis as well as the hph and gus genes, coding for hygromycin phosphotransferase and beta-glucuronidase, respectively. These sequences were placed under control of the maize ubiquitin promoter, the CaMV35S promoter, and the Brassica Bp10 gene promoter to achieve high and tissue-specific expression of the lepidopteran-specific delta-endotoxins. The integration, expression, and inheritance of these genes were demonstrated in R0 and R1 generations by Southern, Northern, and Western analyses and by other techniques. Accumulation of high levels (up to 3% of soluble proteins) of CryIA(b) and CryIA(c) proteins was detected in R0 plants. Bioassays with R1 transgenic plants indicated that the transgenic plants were highly toxic to two major rice insect pests, striped stem borer (Chilo suppressalis) and yellow stem borer (Scirpophaga incertulas), with mortalities of 97-100% within 5 days after infestation, thus offering a potential for effective insect resistance in transgenic rice plants.

  18. ROR1/RPA2A, a Putative Replication Protein A2, Functions in Epigenetic Gene Silencing and in Regulation of Meristem Development in ArabidopsisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ran; Wang, Junguo; Liu, Chunyan; Wang, Yu; Wang, Youqun; Zhai, Jixian; Liu, Jun; Hong, Xuhui; Cao, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2006-01-01

    We screened for suppressors of repressor of silencing1 (ros1) using the silenced 35S promoter-neomycin phosphotransferase II (Pro35S:NPTII) gene as a marker and identified two allelic mutants, ror1-1 and ror1-2 (for suppressor of ros1). Map-based cloning revealed that ROR1 encodes a 31-kD protein similar to DNA replication protein A2 (RPA2A). Mutations in ROR1 reactivate the silenced Pro35S:NPTII gene but not RD29A promoter-luciferase in the ros1 mutant. DNA methylation in rDNA, centromeric DNA, and RD29A promoter regions is not affected by ror1. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation data suggest that histone H3 acetylation is increased and histone H3K9 dimethylation is decreased in the 35S promoter in the ror1 ros1 mutant compared with ros1. These results indicate that release of silenced Pro35S:NPTII by ror1 mutations is independent of DNA methylation. ROR1/RPA2A is strongly expressed in shoot and root meristems. Mutations in ROR1/RPA2A affect cell division in meristems but not final cell sizes. Our work suggests important roles of ROR1/RPA2A in epigenetic gene silencing and in the regulation of plant development. PMID:16326925

  19. Swapped green algal promoters: aphVIII-based gene constructs with Chlamydomonas flanking sequences work as dominant selectable markers in Volvox and vice versa.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, A; Wodniok, S

    2006-06-01

    Production of transgenic organisms is a well-established, versatile course of action in molecular biology. Genetic engineering often requires heterologous, dominant antibiotic resistance genes that have been used as selectable markers in many species. However, as heterologous 5' and 3' flanking sequences often result in very low expression rates, endogenous flanking sequences, especially promoters, are mostly required and are easily obtained in model organisms, but it is much more complicated and time-consuming to get appropriate sequences from less common organisms. In this paper, we show that aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase gene (aphVIII) based constructs with 3' and 5' untranslated flanking sequences (including promoters) from the multicellular green alga Volvox work in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas and flanking sequences from Chlamydomonas work in Volvox, at least if a low expression rate is compensated by an enforced high gene dosage. This strategy might be useful for all investigators that intend to transform species in which genomic sequences are not available, but sequences from related organisms exist.

  20. Characterization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene RtGPD1 and development of genetic transformation method by dominant selection in oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbin; Koh, Chong Mei John; Sun, Longhua; Hlaing, Mya Myintzu; Du, Minge; Peng, Ni; Ji, Lianghui

    2013-01-01

    The oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides, which belongs to the Pucciniomycotina subphylum in the Basidiomycota, has attracted strong interest in the biofuel community recently due to its ability to accumulate more than 60% of dry biomass as lipid under high-density fermentation. A 3,543-nucleotide (nt) DNA fragment of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GPD1) was isolated from R. toruloides ATCC 10657 and characterized in details. The 1,038-nt mRNA derived from seven exons encodes an open reading frame (ORF) of 345 amino acids that shows high identity (80%) to the Ustilago maydis homolog. Notably, the ORF is composed of codons strongly biased towards cytosine at the Wobble position. GPD1 is transcriptionally regulated by temperature shock, osmotic stress, and carbon source. Nested deletion analysis of the GPD1 promoter by GFP reporter assay revealed that two regions, -975 to -1,270 and -1,270 to -1,429, upstream from the translational start site of GPD1 were important for responses to various stress stimuli. Interestingly, a 176-bp short fragment maintained 42.2% promoter activity of the 795-bp version in U. maydis whereas it was reduced to 17.4% in R. toruloides. The GPD1 promoter drove strong expression of a codon-optimized enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (RtGFP) and a codon-optimized hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (hpt-3), which was critical for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation in R. toruloides.

  1. Whole transcriptome RNAseq analysis of Oenococcus oeni reveals distinct intra-specific expression patterns during malolactic fermentation, including genes involved in diacetyl metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sternes, Peter R; Costello, Peter J; Chambers, Paul J; Bartowsky, Eveline J; Borneman, Anthony R

    2017-09-18

    We report the first whole transcriptome RNAseq analysis of the wine-associated lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni using a combination of reference-based mapping and de novo transcript assembly in three distinct strains during malolactic fermentation in Cabernet Sauvignon wine. Two of the strains (AWRIB551 and AWRIB552) exhibited similar transcriptomes relative to the third strain (AWRIB419) which was dissimilar by comparison. Significant intra-specific variation for genes related to glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, purine metabolism, aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, ABC transporters and phosphotransferase systems was observed. Importantly, thirteen genes associated with the production of diacetyl, a commercially valuable aroma and flavour compound, were also found to be differentially expressed between the strains in a manner that correlated positively with total diacetyl production. This included a key strain-specific gene that is predicted to encode a l-lactate dehydrogenase that may enable l-lactic acid to be utilised as a precursor for the production of diacetyl. In conjunction with previous comparative genomic studies of O. oeni, this study progresses the understanding of genetic variations which contribute to the phenotypes of this industrially-important bacterium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A mechanism of covalent substrate binding in the x-ray structure of subunit K of the Escherichia coli dihydroxyacetone kinase.

    PubMed

    Siebold, Christian; García-Alles, Luis Fernando; Erni, Bernhard; Baumann, Ulrich

    2003-07-08

    Dihydroxyacetone (Dha) kinases are homologous proteins that use different phosphoryl donors, a multiphosphoryl protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent carbohydrate:phosphotransferase system in bacteria, ATP in animals, plants, and some bacteria. The Dha kinase of Escherichia coli consists of three subunits, DhaK and DhaL, which are colinear to the ATP-dependent Dha kinases of eukaryotes, and the multiphosphoryl protein DhaM. Here we show the crystal structure of the DhaK subunit in complex with Dha at 1.75 A resolution. DhaK is a homodimer with a fold consisting of two six-stranded mixed beta-sheets surrounded by nine alpha-helices and a beta-ribbon covering the exposed edge strand of one sheet. The core of the N-terminal domain has an alpha/beta fold common to subunits of carbohydrate transporters and transcription regulators of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent carbohydrate:phosphotransferase system. The core of the C-terminal domain has a fold similar to the C-terminal domain of the cell-division protein FtsZ. A molecule of Dha is covalently bound in hemiaminal linkage to the N epsilon 2 of His-230. The hemiaminal does not participate in covalent catalysis but is the chemical basis for discrimination between short-chain carbonyl compounds and polyols. Paralogs of Dha kinases occur in association with transcription regulators of the TetR/QacR and the SorC families, pointing to their biological role as sensors in signaling.

  3. Gene doping.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2010-01-01

    Gene doping abuses the legitimate approach of gene therapy. While gene therapy aims to correct genetic disorders by introducing a foreign gene to replace an existing faulty one or by manipulating existing gene(s) to achieve a therapeutic benefit, gene doping employs the same concepts to bestow performance advantages on athletes over their competitors. Recent developments in genetic engineering have contributed significantly to the progress of gene therapy research and currently numerous clinical trials are underway. Some athletes and their staff are probably watching this progress closely. Any gene that plays a role in muscle development, oxygen delivery to tissues, neuromuscular coordination, or even pain control is considered a candidate for gene dopers. Unfortunately, detecting gene doping is technically very difficult because the transgenic proteins expressed by the introduced genes are similar to their endogenous counterparts. Researchers today are racing the clock because assuring the continued integrity of sports competition depends on their ability to develop effective detection strategies in preparation for the 2012 Olympics, which may mark the appearance of genetically modified athletes.

  4. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Williamson, B

    1982-07-29

    Gene therapy is not yet possible, but may become feasible soon, particularly for well understood gene defects. Although treatment of a patient raises no ethical problems once it can be done well, changing the genes of an early embryo is more difficult, controversial and unlikely to be required clinically.

  5. The usefulness of the gfp reporter gene for monitoring Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of potato dihaploid and tetraploid genotypes.

    PubMed

    Rakosy-Tican, Elena; Aurori, Cristian M; Dijkstra, Camelia; Thieme, Ramona; Aurori, Adriana; Davey, Michael R

    2007-05-01

    Potato is one of the main targets for genetic improvement by gene transfer. The aim of the present study was to establish a robust protocol for the genetic transformation of three dihaploid and four economically important cultivars of potato using Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying the in vivo screenable reporter gene for green fluorescent protein (gfp) and the marker gene for neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII). Stem and leaf explants were used for transformation by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 carrying the binary vector pHB2892. Kanamycin selection, visual screening of GFP by epifluorescent microscopy, PCR amplification of nptII and gfp genes, as well as RT-PCR and Southern blotting of gfp and Northern blotting of nptII, were used for transgenic plant selection, identification and analysis. Genetic transformation was optimized for the best performing genotypes with a mean number of shoots expressing gfp per explant of 13 and 2 (dihaploid line 178/10 and cv. 'Baltica', respectively). The nptII marker and gfp reporter genes permitted selection and excellent visual screening of transgenic tissues and plants. They also revealed the effects of antibiotic selection on organogenesis and transformation frequency, and the identification of escapes and chimeras in all potato genotypes. Silencing of the gfp transgene that may represent site-specific inactivation during cell differentiation, occurred in some transgenic shoots of tetraploid cultivars and in specific chimeric clones of the dihaploid line 178/10. The regeneration of escapes could be attributed to either the protection of non-transformed cells by neighbouring transgenic cells, or the persistence of Agrobacterium cells in plant tissues after co-cultivation.

  6. Purple-leaved Ficus lyrata plants produced by overexpressing a grapevine VvMybA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jietang; Li, Zhijian T; Chen, Juan; Henny, Richard J; Gray, Dennis J; Chen, Jianjun

    2013-11-01

    This study established an efficient method of regenerating plants of Ficus lyrata and producing purple-leaved F. lyrata plants through genetic transformation using a VvMybA1 gene of grapevine. Ficus lyrata, a species with unique violin- or guitar-shaped leaves, was regenerated from leaf-derived calli cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium supplemented with 4.5 μM N-phenyl-N'-1, 2, 3-thiadiazol-5-yl urea (TDZ) and 0.5 μM α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). Leaf discs were inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 105 harboring a binary vector DEAT that contains the VvMybA1 gene and neomycin phosphotransferase (npt II) gene and subsequently cultured on the established regeneration medium supplemented with 100 mg l(-1) kanamycin. Results showed that 87.5 % of the leaf discs produced kanamycin-resistant callus, and 68.8 % of them produced adventitious shoots. Transgenic plants with three leaf colors including green, green-purple, and purple were produced. Regular and quantitative real-time PCR analyses confirmed the integration of transgenes into the host genome. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the VvMybA1 gene was responsible for the purple-colored phenotype. Purple-leaved plants with strong color stability grew vigorously in a greenhouse. This study illustrated the feasibility of using a genetically engineered VvMybA1 gene for drastic modification of leaf color of an important woody ornamental plant.

  7. Increased incorporation of gaseous CO2 into succinate by Escherichia coli overexpressing carbonic anhydrase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase genes.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyun; Lee, Jae-Ung; Cho, Sukhyeong; Kim, Hyeonsoo; Oh, Han Bin; Pack, Seung Pil; Lee, Jinwon

    2017-01-10

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an abundant and cheap carbon source that is partly responsible for global warming in the atmosphere. The objective of this study was to construct a recombinant E. coli strain that can show enhanced production of succinate derived from CO2. In this study, we confirmed the enhancement of utilization by analyzing succinate containing one carbon-13 ((13)C) derived from (13)CO2. Firstly, the carbonic anhydrase gene (SP(-)HCCA) derived from Hahella chejuensis KCTC 2396 was over-expressed to enhance carbon flux toward bicarbonate ion (HCO3(-)) synthesis in E. coli. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene (ppc) was over-expressed to enhance the production of oxaloacetate by enhancing the carbon flux. Compared with the control strain, the percentage of the succinate containing one (13)C (succinate(119)) to total succinate was enhanced by approximately 2.80-fold and the amount of succinate(119) also increased by approximately 4.09-fold in SGJS120. Secondly, the lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhA) was deleted to re-direct the utilization of the carbon source from glucose to enhance succinate production in SGJS120. However, ldhA deletion did not increase CO2 utilization in SJGS120. Finally, the phosphotransferase system gene (ptsG) and pyruvate kinase F gene (pykF) were deleted to increase the amount of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). SGJS126 (pykF deletion strain) showed the highest increase, which was 6.05-fold higher than the control strain. From the results, SP(-)HCCA overexpression and pykF deletion may be useful for enhancing CO2 utilization in E. coli. Additionally, engineered strains showed the potential to reduce the cost of succinate production by using an industrially cheaper carbon source such as CO2 and converting CO2 to a valuable chemical. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. [Prolonging the vase life of carnation "Mabel" through integrating repeated ACC oxidase genes into its genome].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Xun; Bao, Man-Zhu

    2004-10-01

    Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) is one of the most important cut flowers. The cultivar "Mabel" of carnation was transformed with direct repeat gene of ACC oxidase, the key enzyme in ethylene synthesis, driven by the CaMV35S promoter mediated by Agrobacterium tumefacien. Hygromycin phosphotransferase (HPT) gene was used as selection marker. Leaf explants were pre-cultured on shoot-inducing medium for 2 d, then immersed in Agrobacterium suspension for 8-12 min. Co-cultivation was carried out on the medium (MS+BA 1.0 mg/L+NAA 0.3 mg/L +Acetosyringone 100 micromol/L, pH 5.8-6.0) for 3 d. After that transformants were obtained by transferring explants to selection medium supplemented with 5 mg/L hygromycin (Hyg) and 400 mg/L cefotaxime (Cef). Southern blotting detection showed that a foreign gene was integrated into the carnation genome and 3 transgenic lines (T257, T299 and T273 line) obtained. Addition of acetosyringone and the time of co-culture were the main factors that influenced transformation frequency. After being transplanted to soil, transgenic plants were grew normally in greenhouse. Ethylene production of cut flower of transgenic T257 line was 95% lower than that of the control, and that of T299 line was reduced by 90% than that of the control, while that of transgenic T273 line has no of significantly different from control. Vase life of transgenic T257 line was 5 d longer than that of the control line at 25 degrees C.

  9. Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, E.L.; Krebsbach, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is defined as the treatment of disease by transfer of genetic material into cells. This review will explore methods available for gene transfer as well as current and potential applications for craniofacial regeneration, with emphasis on future development and design. Though non-viral gene delivery methods are limited by low gene transfer efficiency, they benefit from relative safety, low immunogenicity, ease of manufacture, and lack of DNA insert size limitation. In contrast, viral vectors are nature’s gene delivery machines that can be optimized to allow for tissue-specific targeting, site-specific chromosomal integration, and efficient long-term infection of dividing and non-dividing cells. In contrast to traditional replacement gene therapy, craniofacial regeneration seeks to use genetic vectors as supplemental building blocks for tissue growth and repair. Synergistic combination of viral gene therapy with craniofacial tissue engineering will significantly enhance our ability to repair and replace tissues in vivo. PMID:19641145

  10. LacR Is a Repressor of lacABCD and LacT Is an Activator of lacTFEG, Constituting the lac Gene Cluster in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of the transcriptome of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain D39 grown in the presence of either lactose or galactose with that of the strain grown in the presence of glucose revealed the elevated expression of various genes and operons, including the lac gene cluster, which is organized into two operons, i.e., lac operon I (lacABCD) and lac operon II (lacTFEG). Deletion of the DeoR family transcriptional regulator lacR that is present downstream of the lac gene cluster revealed elevated expression of lac operon I even in the absence of lactose. This suggests a function of LacR as a transcriptional repressor of lac operon I, which encodes enzymes involved in the phosphorylated tagatose pathway in the absence of lactose or galactose. Deletion of lacR did not affect the expression of lac operon II, which encodes a lactose-specific phosphotransferase. This finding was further confirmed by β-galactosidase assays with PlacA-lacZ and PlacT-lacZ in the presence of either lactose or glucose as the sole carbon source in the medium. This suggests the involvement of another transcriptional regulator in the regulation of lac operon II, which is the BglG-family transcriptional antiterminator LacT. We demonstrate the role of LacT as a transcriptional activator of lac operon II in the presence of lactose and CcpA-independent regulation of the lac gene cluster in S. pneumoniae. PMID:24951784

  11. LacR is a repressor of lacABCD and LacT is an activator of lacTFEG, constituting the lac gene cluster in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2014-09-01

    Comparison of the transcriptome of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain D39 grown in the presence of either lactose or galactose with that of the strain grown in the presence of glucose revealed the elevated expression of various genes and operons, including the lac gene cluster, which is organized into two operons, i.e., lac operon I (lacABCD) and lac operon II (lacTFEG). Deletion of the DeoR family transcriptional regulator lacR that is present downstream of the lac gene cluster revealed elevated expression of lac operon I even in the absence of lactose. This suggests a function of LacR as a transcriptional repressor of lac operon I, which encodes enzymes involved in the phosphorylated tagatose pathway in the absence of lactose or galactose. Deletion of lacR did not affect the expression of lac operon II, which encodes a lactose-specific phosphotransferase. This finding was further confirmed by β-galactosidase assays with PlacA-lacZ and PlacT-lacZ in the presence of either lactose or glucose as the sole carbon source in the medium. This suggests the involvement of another transcriptional regulator in the regulation of lac operon II, which is the BglG-family transcriptional antiterminator LacT. We demonstrate the role of LacT as a transcriptional activator of lac operon II in the presence of lactose and CcpA-independent regulation of the lac gene cluster in S. pneumoniae.

  12. Gene dispensability.

    PubMed

    Korona, Ryszard

    2011-08-01

    Genome-wide mutagenesis studies indicate that up to about 90% of genes in bacteria and 80% in eukaryotes can be inactivated individually leaving an organism viable, often seemingly unaffected. Several strategies are used to learn what these apparently dispensable genes contribute to fitness. Assays of growth under hundreds of physical and chemical stresses are among the most effective experimental approaches. Comparative studies of genomic DNA sequences continue to be valuable in discriminating between the core bacterial genome and the more variable niche-specific genes. The concept of the core genome appears currently unfeasible for eukaryotes but progress has been made in understanding why they contain numerous gene duplicates.

  13. Identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying dilated cardiomyopathy via bioinformatic analysis of gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hu; Yu, Zhuo; He, Jianchao; Hua, Baotong; Zhang, Guiming

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, gene expression profiles of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) were re-analyzed with bioinformatics tools to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying DCM. Gene expression dataset GSE3585 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, which included seven heart biopsy samples obtained from patients with DCM and five healthy controls. Differential analysis was performed using a Limma package in R to screen for differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Functional enrichment analysis was subsequently conducted for DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integration Discovery. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using information from Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes software. A total of 89 DEGs were identified in the patients with DCM, including 67 upregulated and 22 downregulated genes. Functional enrichment analysis demonstrated that the downregulated genes predominantly encoded chromosomal proteins and transport-related proteins, which were significantly associated with the biological processes of ‘nucleosome assembly’, ‘chromatin assembly’, ‘protein-DNA complex assembly’, ‘nucleosome organization’ and ‘DNA packaging’ (H1 histone family member 0, histone cluster 1 H1c, histone cluster 1 H2bd and H2A histone family member Z). The upregulated genes detected in the present study encoded secreted proteins or phosphotransferase, which were associated with biological processes including ‘cell adhesion’ [connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)], ‘skeletal system development’ [CTGF and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3)], ‘muscle organ development’ (SMAD7) and ‘regulation of cell migration’ [SMAD7, IGFBP3 and insulin receptor (INSR)]. Notably, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, SMAD7, INSR, CTGF, exportin 1, IGFBP3 and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha were hub nodes with the

  14. Nucleotide sequences of the arb genes, which control beta-glucoside utilization in Erwinia chrysanthemi: comparison with the Escherichia coli bgl operon and evidence for a new beta-glycohydrolase family including enzymes from eubacteria, archeabacteria, and humans.

    PubMed Central

    el Hassouni, M; Henrissat, B; Chippaux, M; Barras, F

    1992-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi, unlike other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, is able to metabolize the beta-glucosides, arbutin, and salicin. A previous genetic analysis of the E. chrysanthemi arb genes, which mediate beta-glucoside metabolism, suggested that they were homologous to the Escherichia coli K-12 bgl genes. We have now determined the nucleotide sequence of a 5,065-bp DNA fragment containing three genes, arbG, arbF, and arbB. Deletion analysis, expression in minicell systems, and comparison with sequences of other proteins suggest that arbF and arbB encode a beta-glucoside-specific phosphotransferase system-dependent permease and a phospho-beta-glucosidase, respectively. The ArbF amino acid sequence shares 55% identity with that of the E. coli BglF permease and contains most residues thought to be important for a phosphotransferase. One change, however, was noted, since BglF Arg-625, presumably involved in phosphoryl transfer, was replaced by a Cys residue in ArbF. An analysis of the ArbB sequence led to the definition of a protein family which contained enzymes classified as phospho-beta-glucosidases, phospho-beta-galactosidases, beta-glucosidases, and beta-galactosidases and originating from gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, archebacteria, and mammals, including humans. An analysis of this family allowed us (i) to speculate on the ways that these enzymes evolved, (ii) to identify a glutamate residue likely to be a key amino acid in the catalytic activity of each protein, and (iii) to predict that domain II of the human lactate-phlorizin hydrolase, which is involved in lactose intolerance, is catalytically nonactive. A comparison between the untranslated regions of the E. chrysanthemi arb cluster and the E. coli bgl operon revealed the conservation of two regions which, in the latter, are known to terminate transcription under noninducing conditions and be the target of the BglG transcriptional antiterminator under

  15. Trichoderma genes

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Pamela [Los Altos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Van Solingen, Pieter [Naaldwijk, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  16. Characterization of rco-1 of Neurospora crassa, a pleiotropic gene affecting growth and development that encodes a homolog of Tup1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, C T; Ebbole, D J; Lee, B U; Brown, R E; Bourland, C; Madi, L; Yanofsky, C

    1996-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa undergoes a well-defined developmental program, conidiation, that culminates in the production of numerous asexual spores, conidia. Several cloned genes, including con-10, are expressed during conidiation but not during mycelial growth. Using a previously described selection strategy, we isolated mutants that express con-10 during mycelial growth. Selection was based on expression of an integrated DNA fragment containing the con-10 promoter-regulatory region followed by the initial segment of the con-10 open reading frame fused in frame with the bacterial hygromycin B phosphotransferase structural gene (con10'-'hph). Resistance to hygromycin results from mutational alterations that allow mycelial expression of the con-10'-'hph gene fusion. A set of drug-resistant mutants were isolated; several of these had abnormal conidiation phenotypes and were trans-acting, i.e., they allowed mycelial expression of the endogenous con-10 gene. Four of these had alterations at a single locus, designated rco-1 (regulation of conidiation). Strains with the rco-1 mutant alleles were aconidial, female sterile, had reduced growth rates, and formed hyphae that coiled in a counterclockwise direction, opposite that of the wild type. The four rco-1 mutants had distinct conidiation morphologies, suggesting that conidiation was blocked at different stages. Wild-type rco-1 was cloned by a novel procedure employing heterokaryon-assisted transformation and ligation-mediated PCR. The predicted RCO1 polypeptide is a homolog of Tup1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a multidomain protein that mediates transcriptional repression of genes concerned with a variety of processes. Like tup1 mutants, null mutants of rco-1 are viable and pleiotropic. A promoter element was identified that could be responsible for RCO1-mediated vegetative repression of con-10 and other conidiation genes. PMID:8887652

  17. Stable genetic transformation of castor (Ricinus communis L.) via particle gun-mediated gene transfer using embryo axes from mature seeds.

    PubMed

    Sailaja, M; Tarakeswari, M; Sujatha, M

    2008-09-01

    The first successful attempt to produce stably transformed castor plants through direct gene transfer using particle gun (BioRad) is described. Decotyledonated embryos from mature seeds were germinated and the embryonic axis was induced to proliferate on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 0.5 mg l(-1) thidiazuron (TDZ) and subjected to bombardment after 5-7 days of pre-incubation. The physical parameters for transient transformation were optimized using the UidA gene encoding beta-glucuronidase (GUS) as the reporter gene and with hygromycin-phosphotransferase (hptII) gene as selectable marker. Statistical analysis revealed that helium pressure, target distance, osmoticum, microcarrier type and size, DNA quantity, explant type and number of bombardments had significant influence on transformation efficiency, while the effect of genotype was non-significant. Of the different variables evaluated, embryonic axes from mature seeds, a target distance of 6.0 cm, helium pressure of 1,100 psi, 0.6 microm gold microcarriers, single time bombardment and with both pre- and post-osmoticum were found ideal. Selection of putative transformants was done on MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg l(-1) BA and hygromycin (20, 40 and 60 mg l(-1)) for 3 cycles. The stable integration of the incorporated gene into castor genome was confirmed with PCR and Southern analysis of T0 and T1 plants. Transformation frequency in terms of plants grown to maturity and showing the presence of the introduced genes was 1.4%. The present results demonstrate the possibility of transformation of embryonic meristematic tissues of castor through particle delivery system.

  18. aph(3′)-IIb, a Gene Encoding an Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzyme, Is under the Positive Control of Surrogate Regulator HpaA

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lin; Jin, Shouguang

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa harbors a chromosomal aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene, aph(3′)-IIb, which confers P. aeruginosa resistance to several important aminoglycoside antibiotics, including kanamycin A and B, neomycin B and C, butirosin, and seldomycin F5. The aph(3′)-IIb gene has been found to be regulated by an AraC-type transcriptional regulator (HpaA) encoded by a gene located upstream of the aph(3′)-IIb gene. In the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA), HpaA activates the expression of aph(3′)-IIb as well as that of the hpa regulon which encodes metabolic enzymes for the utilization of 4-HPA. hpaA and aph(3′)-IIb form an operon, and in response to the presence of 4-HPA, the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain PAK (but not its hpaA mutant strain) displays increased resistance to neomycin. A survey of 39 clinical and 19 environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa demonstrated in all of them the presence of an hpaA-aph gene cluster, while 56 out of the 58 isolates are able to utilize the 4-HPA as a sole carbon source, suggesting a feature common to P. aeruginosa strains. Interestingly, a larger portion of clinical isolates than environmental isolates showed 4-HPA-induced resistance to neomycin. The aph(3′)-IIb gene product is likely to function as a metabolic enzyme which has a cross-reactivity with aminoglycosides. These findings provide new insight into the possible mechanism of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. PMID:14638496

  19. Gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Drugan, A; Miller, O J; Evans, M I

    1987-01-01

    Severe genetic disorders are potentially correctable by the addition of a normal gene into tissues. Although the technical problems involving integration, stable expression, and insertional damage to the treated cell are not yet fully solved, enough scientific progress has already been made to consider somatic cell gene therapy acceptable from both the ethical and scientific viewpoints. The resolutions to problems evolving from somatic cell gene therapy will help to overcome the technical difficulties encountered presently with germ line gene manipulation. This procedure would then become morally permissible as it will cause, in time, a reduction in the pool of abnormal genes in the population. Enhancement genetic engineering is technically feasible but morally unacceptable. Eugenic genetic engineering is not technically possible or ethically permissible in the foreseeable future.

  20. Regulation of phosphotransferases in glucose- and xylose-fermenting yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, V.W.; Jeffries, T.W.

    1997-12-31

    This research examined the titers of hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), and xylulokinase (XUK) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and two xylose fermenting yeasts, Pachysolen tannophilus and Candida shehatae, following shifts in carbon source and aeration. Xylose-grown C. shehatae, glucose-grown P. tannophilus, and glucose-grown S. cerevisiae, had the highest specific activities of XUK, HK, and PFK, respectively. XUK was induced by xylose to moderate levels in both P. tannophilus and C. shehatae, but was present only in trace levels in S. cerevisiae. HK activities in P. tannophilus were two to three fold higher when cells were grown on glucose than when grown on xylose, but HK levels were less inducible in C. shehatae. The PFK activities in S. cerevisiae were 1.5 to 2 times higher than in the two xylose-fermenting yeasts. Transfer from glucose to xylose rapidly inactivated HK in P. tannophilus, and transfer from xylose to glucose inactivated XUK in C. shehatae. The patterns of induction and inactivation indicate that the basic regulatory mechanisms differ in the two xylose fermenting yeasts. 42 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of the sucrase gene of Staphylococcus xylosus by the repressor ScrR.

    PubMed Central

    Gering, M; Brückner, R

    1996-01-01

    In Staphylococcus xylosus, scrB is one of two genes necessary for sucrose utilization. It encodes a sucrase that hydrolyzes intracellular sucrose-6-phosphate generated by the uptake of sucrose via the sucrose-specific enzyme II of the phosphotransferase system, the gene product of scrA. ScrB sucrase activity is inducible by the presence of sucrose in the culture medium. Primer extension experiments demonstrated that the observed regulation is achieved at the level of scrB transcription initiation. The protein mediating sucrose-specific regulation of scrB was found to be encoded immediately upstream of the sucrase gene. The nucleotide sequence of the regulatory gene scrR comprises an open reading frame that specifies a protein of 35.8 kDa. This protein exhibits similarity to transcriptional regulators of the GalR-LacI family. Inactivation of the scrR reading frame in the genome of S. xylosus led to the constitutive expression of scrB at a high level, identifying ScrR as a repressor of transcription. Sucrose-specific regulation of scrB was also lost upon deletion of 4 bp of a palindromic sequence (OB) covering positions +6 to +21 downstream of the scrB transcriptional start site. These results suggested a direct interaction of the ScrR repressor and the operator OB. Accordingly, a fusion protein consisting of the maltose-binding protein of Escherichia coli and the ScrR protein was able to interact with an scrB promoter fragment in gel mobility shift experiments but failed to bind an scrB fragment carrying the 4-bp deletion derivative of OB. An scrR promoter fragment, which dose not contain a sequence resembling OB, was not shifted by the fusion protein. This result corroborates scrR primer extension analyses showing that transcription of the repressor gene itself is not regulated. Therefore, the sucrase gene operator OB is the target sequence through which the ScrR protein exerts its negative effect on transcription initiation. In the promoter region of scrA, the

  2. [Gene and gene sequence patenting].

    PubMed

    Bergel, S D

    1998-01-01

    According to the author, the patenting of elements isolated or copied from the human body boils down to the issue of genes and gene sequences. He describes the current situation from the comparative law standpoint (U.S. and Spanish law mainly) and then esamines the biotechnology industry's position.

  3. [Sleep genes].

    PubMed

    Prospéro-García, O; Guzmán, K; Méndez-Diaz, M; Herrera-Solís, A; Ruiz-Contreras, A

    Sleep is a non-learned adaptive strategy that depends on the expression of several neurotransmitters and other molecules. The expression of some of these molecules depends on a number of different genes. Sleep disorders are associated with an inadequate expression of some molecules, which therefore indicates that these genes that code for these molecules participate in the regulation of normal sleep. To discuss the evidence on gene regulation over the occurrence of sleep and its architecture, as well as of sleep disorders, which supports the participation of specific genes. We describe the evidence on sleep in mammals, particularly in humans, in addition to studies with twins that demonstrate the influence of genes on sleep regulation. We also discuss several sleep disorders, which in this study only serves to emphasise how certain specific genes, under normal conditions, participate in the expression of sleep. Furthermore, evidence is also provided for other molecules, such as endocannibinoids, involved in sleep regulation. Lastly, we report on studies conducted with different strains of mice that show differences in the amount of sleep they express, possibly as an epiphenomenon of their different genetic loads. A number of different genes have been described as those responsible for making us sleep, although sleeping also depends on our interaction with the environment. This interaction is what makes us express sleep at times that are best suited to favouring our survival.

  4. Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Barb; Takeya, Ryan; Vitelli, Francesca; Swanson, Xin

    2017-03-14

    Gene therapy refers to a rapidly growing field of medicine in which genes are introduced into the body to treat or prevent diseases. Although a variety of methods can be used to deliver the genetic materials into the target cells and tissues, modified viral vectors represent one of the more common delivery routes because of its transduction efficiency for therapeutic genes. Since the introduction of gene therapy concept in the 1970s, the field has advanced considerably with notable clinical successes being demonstrated in many clinical indications in which no standard treatment options are currently available. It is anticipated that the clinical success the field observed in recent years can drive requirements for more scalable, robust, cost effective, and regulatory-compliant manufacturing processes. This review provides a brief overview of the current manufacturing technologies for viral vectors production, drawing attention to the common upstream and downstream production process platform that is applicable across various classes of viral vectors and their unique manufacturing challenges as compared to other biologics. In addition, a case study of an industry-scale cGMP production of an AAV-based gene therapy product performed at 2,000 L-scale is presented. The experience and lessons learned from this largest viral gene therapy vector production run conducted to date as discussed and highlighted in this review should contribute to future development of commercial viable scalable processes for vial gene therapies.

  5. The genes and enzymes for the catabolism of galactitol, D-tagatose, and related carbohydrates in Klebsiella oxytoca M5a1 and other enteric bacteria display convergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Shakeri-Garakani, A; Brinkkötter, A; Schmid, K; Turgut, S; Lengeler, J W

    2004-07-01

    Enteric bacteria (Enteriobacteriaceae) carry on their single chromosome about 4000 genes that all strains have in common (referred to here as "obligatory genes"), and up to 1300 "facultative" genes that vary from strain to strain and from species to species. In closely related species, obligatory and facultative genes are orthologous genes that are found at similar loci. We have analyzed a set of facultative genes involved in the degradation of the carbohydrates galactitol, D-tagatose, D-galactosamine and N-acetyl-galactosamine in various pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of these bacteria. The four carbohydrates are transported into the cell by phosphotransferase (PTS) uptake systems, and are metabolized by closely related or even identical catabolic enzymes via pathways that share several intermediates. In about 60% of Escherichia coli strains the genes for galactitol degradation map to a gat operon at 46.8 min. In strains of Salmonella enterica, Klebsiella pneumoniae and K. oxytoca, the corresponding gat genes, although orthologous to their E. coli counterparts, are found at 70.7 min, clustered in a regulon together with three tag genes for the degradation of D-tagatose, an isomer of D-fructose. In contrast, in all the E. coli strains tested, this chromosomal site was found to be occupied by an aga/kba gene cluster for the degradation of D-galactosamine and N-acetyl-galactosamine. The aga/kba and the tag genes were paralogous either to the gat cluster or to the fru genes for degradation of D-fructose. Finally, in more then 90% of strains of both Klebsiella species, and in about 5% of the E. coli strains, two operons were found at 46.8 min that comprise paralogous genes for catabolism of the isomers D-arabinitol (genes atl or dal) and ribitol (genes rtl or rbt). In these strains gat genes were invariably absent from this location, and they were totally absent in S. enterica. These results strongly indicate that these various gene clusters and metabolic

  6. Genes V.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, B.

    1994-12-31

    This fifth edition book encompasses a wide range of topics covering 1,272 pages. The book is arranged into nine parts with a total of 36 chapters. These nine parts include Introduction; DNA as a Store of Information; Translation; Constructing Cells; Control of Prokaryotypic Gene Expression; Perpetuation of DNA; Organization of the Eukaryotypic Genome; Eukaryotypic Transcription and RNA Processing; The Dynamic Genome; and Genes in Development.

  7. The dominant developmental mutants of tomato, Mouse-ear and Curl, are associated with distinct modes of abnormal transcriptional regulation of a Knotted gene.

    PubMed

    Parnis, A; Cohen, O; Gutfinger, T; Hareven, D; Zamir, D; Lifschitz, E

    1997-12-01

    The Curl (Cu) and Mouse-ear (Me) mutations of tomato cause two seemingly unrelated developmental syndromes with a wide range of pleiotropic phenotypes. Yet, the distinct morphogenic alterations in shoots, leaves, and inflorescences conferred by the two mutations appear to be caused by unchecked meristematic activity that characterizes dominant mutations in Knotted1 (Kn1)-like genes of monocot plants. We have been unable to separate the two closely linked Cu and Me mutations, and they may lie in the same gene. A homeobox-containing class I Kn1-like gene, TKn2, also maps to the same location. Significantly, the dominant mutations are associated with two aberrant modes of TKn2 transcription. Overexpression of the two in-frame wild-type transcripts of TKn2 is associated with the Cu mutation, whereas misexpression of an abundant and oversized fusion mRNA is associated with the Me mutation. Available molecular evidence strongly suggests that the defective Me-TKn2 transcript is generated via a novel splicing event that merges transcripts of two closely linked genes. The translated fusion product is comprised of most of the 5' end of the adjacent PPi-dependent fructose 6-phosphate phosphotransferase (PFP) transcript spliced in-frame to coding position 64 of the TKn2 transcript, leaving the TKn2 homeobox intact. We suggest that class I Kn1-like genes were selected early during evolution to regulate basic programs of aerial meristems and that subtle alterations in their function may be the basis for the wide diversity in growth parameters of shoot systems, leaves, and inflorescences among plant species.

  8. Solving a case of allelic dropout in the GNPTAB gene: implications in the molecular diagnosis of mucolipidosis type III alpha/beta.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Maria Francisca; Encarnação, Marisa; Laranjeira, Francisco; Lacerda, Lúcia; Prata, Maria João; Alves, Sandra

    2016-10-01

    While being well known that the diagnosis of many genetic disorders relies on a combination of clinical suspicion and confirmatory genetic testing, not rarely, however, genetic testing needs much perseverance and cunning strategies to identify the causative mutation(s). Here we present a case of a thorny molecular diagnosis of mucolipidosis type III alpha/beta, which is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder, caused by a defect in the GNPTAB gene that codes for the α/β-subunits of the GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase. We used both cDNA and gDNA analyses to characterize a mucolipidosis type III alpha/beta patient whose clinical diagnosis was already confirmed biochemically. In a first stage only one causal mutation was identified in heterozygosity, the already described missense mutation c.1196C>T(p.S399F), both at cDNA and gDNA levels. Only after conducting inhibition of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) assays and after the utilization of another pair of primers the second mutation, the c.3503_3504delTC deletion, was identified. Our findings illustrate that allelic dropout due to the presence of polymorphisms and/or of mutations that trigger the NMD pathway can cause difficulties in current molecular diagnosis tests.

  9. Attention Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.

    2007-01-01

    A major problem for developmental science is understanding how the cognitive and emotional networks important in carrying out mental processes can be related to individual differences. The last five years have seen major advances in establishing links between alleles of specific genes and the neural networks underlying aspects of attention. These…

  10. Designer Genes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Miller, Mark

    1983-01-01

    Genetic technologies may soon help fill some of the most important needs of humanity from food to energy to health care. The research of major designer genes companies and reasons why the initial mad rush for biotechnology has slowed are reviewed. (SR)

  11. Designer Genes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Miller, Mark

    1983-01-01

    Genetic technologies may soon help fill some of the most important needs of humanity from food to energy to health care. The research of major designer genes companies and reasons why the initial mad rush for biotechnology has slowed are reviewed. (SR)

  12. Attention Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.

    2007-01-01

    A major problem for developmental science is understanding how the cognitive and emotional networks important in carrying out mental processes can be related to individual differences. The last five years have seen major advances in establishing links between alleles of specific genes and the neural networks underlying aspects of attention. These…

  13. Endothelial Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization re- Cancer: principles and practice of oncology. Philadelphia: Lippincott- vealed an RNA sequence (GenBank accession...Lau YC, Campbell AP, et al. Suppression subtractive hybridization : A method for generating differentially regulated or tissue-tissues, EG-1 appears to...this gene, we investigated its interaction with Src and members of the called suppression subtractive hybridization (12). In human mitogen-activated

  14. Vulnerability genes or plasticity genes?

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, J; Jonassaint, C; Pluess, M; Stanton, M; Brummett, B; Williams, R

    2009-01-01

    The classic diathesis–stress framework, which views some individuals as particularly vulnerable to adversity, informs virtually all psychiatric research on behavior–gene–environment (G × E) interaction. An alternative framework of ‘differential susceptibility' is proposed, one which regards those most susceptible to adversity because of their genetic make up as simultaneously most likely to benefit from supportive or enriching experiences—or even just the absence of adversity. Recent G × E findings consistent with this perspective and involving monoamine oxidase-A, 5-HTTLPR (5-hydroxytryptamine-linked polymorphic region polymorphism) and dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) are reviewed for illustrative purposes. Results considered suggest that putative ‘vulnerability genes' or ‘risk alleles' might, at times, be more appropriately conceptualized as ‘plasticity genes', because they seem to make individuals more susceptible to environmental influences—for better and for worse. PMID:19455150

  15. A chimeric gene encoding the methionine-rich 2S albumin of the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.) is stably expressed and inherited in transgenic grain legumes.

    PubMed

    Saalbach, I; Pickardt, T; Machemehl, F; Saalbach, G; Schieder, O; Müntz, K

    1994-01-01

    The coding region of the 2S albumin gene of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.) was completely synthesized, placed under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and inserted into the binary vector plasmid pGSGLUC1, thus giving rise to pGSGLUC1-2S. This was used for transformation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havanna) and of the grain legume Vicia narbonensis L., mediated by the supervirulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 101. Putative transformants were selected by screening for neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT II) and beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activities. Transgenic plants were grown until flowering and fruiting occurred. The presence of the foreign gene was confirmed by Southern analysis. GUS activity was found in all organs of the regenerated transgenic tobacco and legume plants, including the seeds. In the legume, the highest expression levels of the CaMV 35S promoter-controlled 2S albumin gene were observed in leaves and roots. 2S albumin was localized in the vacuoles of leaf mesophyll cells of transgenic tobacco. The Brazil nut protein was present in the 2S fraction after gel filtration chromatography of the legume seed proteins and could be clearly identified by immunoblotting. Analysis of seeds from the R2 progenies of the legume and of transgenic tobacco plants revealed Mendelian inheritance of the foreign gene. Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain RifR 15834 harbouring the binary vector pGSGLUC1-2S was also used to transform Pisum sativum L. and Vicia faba L. Hairy roots expressed the 2S albumin-specific gene. Several shoots were raised but they never completely rooted and no fertile plants were obtained from these transformants.

  16. Yersinia enterocolitica Type III Secretion: yscM1 and yscM2 Regulate yop Gene Expression by a Posttranscriptional Mechanism That Targets the 5′ Untranslated Region of yop mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Cambronne, Eric D.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2002-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia spp. secrete Yops (Yersinia outer proteins) via the type III pathway. The expression of yop genes is regulated in response to environmental cues, which results in a cascade of type III secretion reactions. yscM1 and yscM2 negatively regulate the expression of Yersinia enterocolitica yop genes. It is demonstrated that yopD and lcrH are required for yscM1 and yscM2 function and that all four genes act synergistically at the same regulatory step. Further, SycH binding to the protein products of yscM1 and yscM2 can activate yop gene expression even without promoting type III transport of YscM1 and YscM2. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of yopQ mRNA as well as yopQ and yopE gene fusion experiments with the npt (neomycin phosphotransferase) reporter suggest that yscM1 and yscM2 regulate expression at a posttranscriptional step. The 178-nucleotide 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of yopQ mRNA was sufficient to confer yscM1 and yscM2-mediated regulation on the fused reporter, as was the 28-nucleotide UTR of yopE. The sequence 5′-AUAAA-3′ is located in the 5′ yop UTRs, and mutations that alter the sequence motif either reduced or abolished yscM1- and yscM2-mediated regulation. A model is proposed whereby YopD, LcrH, YscM1, YscM2, and SycH regulate yop expression in response to specific environmental cues and by a mechanism that may involve binding of some of these factors to a specific target sequence within the UTR of yop mRNAs. PMID:12374821

  17. Temperature-Dependent Expression of phzM and Its Regulatory Genes lasI and ptsP in Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas sp. Strain M18▿

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaofang; Xu, Yuquan; Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Yaqian; Huang, Xianqing; Ren, Bin; Zhang, Xuehong

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain M18, an effective biological control agent isolated from the melon rhizosphere, has a genetic background similar to that of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. However, the predominant phenazine produced by strain M18 is phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) rather than pyocyanin (PYO); the quantitative ratio of PCA to PYO is 105 to 1 at 28°C in strain M18, while the ratio is 1 to 2 at 37°C in strain PAO1. We first provided evidence that the differential production of the two phenazines in strains M18 and PAO1 is related to the temperature-dependent and strain-specific expression patterns of phzM, a gene involved in the conversion of PCA to PYO. Transcriptional levels of phzM were measured by quantitative real-time PCR, and the activities of both transcriptional and translational phzM′-′lacZ fusions were determined in strains M18 and PAO1, respectively. Using lasI::Gm and ptsP::Gm inactivation M18 mutants, we further show that expression of the phzM gene is positively regulated by the quorum-sensing protein LasI and negatively regulated by the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase protein PtsP. Surprisingly, the lasI and ptsP regulatory genes were also expressed in a temperature-dependent and strain-specific manner. The differential production of the phenazines PCA and PYO by strains M18 and PAO1 may be a consequence of selective pressure imposed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its relative M18 in the two different niches over a long evolutionary process. PMID:19717631

  18. Defects in ex vivo and in vivo growth and sensitivity to osmotic stress of group A Streptococcus caused by interruption of response regulator gene vicR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengyao; Hanks, Tracey S; Zhang, Jinlian; McClure, Michael J; Siemsen, Daniel W; Elser, Julie L; Quinn, Mark T; Lei, Benfang

    2006-04-01

    The regulator VicR of the two-component regulatory system VicRK is essential in several Gram-positive bacteria. However, the authors were able to generate an unconditional vicR insertional mutant of group A Streptococcus. This mutant grew well in rich media but not in non-immune human blood and serum, had attenuated virulence, and was unstable in mice. Complementation of the mutant with vicR expressed in trans restored its phenotype to wild-type. A vicK deletion mutant had a phenotype similar to that of the vicR mutant. Phagocytosis and killing of the vicR mutant were normal, suggesting that VicRK does not regulate processes involved in evasion of host defence. Microarray analysis showed that vicR inactivation down-regulated the transcription of 13 genes, including putative cell wall hydrolase gene pcsB and spy1058-1060, which encode a putative phosphotransferase system enzyme II for carbohydrate transport, and upregulated the expression of five genes, including spy0183 and spy0184, which encode an osmoprotectant transporter OpuA. Consistent with microarray analysis, the vicR mutant took up more of the osmoprotectants betaine and proline and was sensitive to osmotic stress, indicating that vicR inactivation induced osmotic stress and increased susceptibility to osmotic pressure. Additionally, a spy1060 deletion mutant also displayed attenuated virulence. These results suggest that VicRK regulates processes involved in cell wall metabolism, nutrient uptake, and osmotic protection.

  19. Compare Gene Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linux environment in serial or parallel mode.

  20. Compare Gene Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linux environment in serial or parallel mode.

  1. Gene and enhancer traps for gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Pierce, Marcela; Springer, Patricia S

    2003-01-01

    Gene traps and enhancer traps provide a valuable tool for gene discovery. With this system, genes can be identified based solely on the expression pattern of an inserted reporter gene. The use of a reporter gene, such as beta-glucuoronidase (GUS), provides a very sensitive assay for the identification of tissue- and cell-type specific expression patterns. In this chapter, protocols for examining and documenting GUS reporter gene activity in individual lines are described. Methods for the amplification of sequences flanking transposant insertions and subsequent molecular and genetic characterization of individual insertions are provided.

  2. The bHLH transcription factor SPATULA enables cytokinin signaling, and both activate auxin biosynthesis and transport genes at the medial domain of the gynoecium.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Olalde, J Irepan; Zúñiga-Mayo, Víctor M; Serwatowska, Joanna; Chavez Montes, Ricardo A; Lozano-Sotomayor, Paulina; Herrera-Ubaldo, Humberto; Gonzalez-Aguilera, Karla L; Ballester, Patricia; Ripoll, Juan José; Ezquer, Ignacio; Paolo, Dario; Heyl, Alexander; Colombo, Lucia; Yanofsky, Martin F; Ferrandiz, Cristina; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; de Folter, Stefan

    2017-04-07

    Fruits and seeds are the major food source on earth. Both derive from the gynoecium and, therefore, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms that guide the development of this organ of angiosperm species. In Arabidopsis, the gynoecium is composed of two congenitally fused carpels, where two domains: medial and lateral, can be distinguished. The medial domain includes the carpel margin meristem (CMM) that is key for the production of the internal tissues involved in fertilization, such as septum, ovules, and transmitting tract. Interestingly, the medial domain shows a high cytokinin signaling output, in contrast to the lateral domain, where it is hardly detected. While it is known that cytokinin provides meristematic properties, understanding on the mechanisms that underlie the cytokinin signaling pattern in the young gynoecium is lacking. Moreover, in other tissues, the cytokinin pathway is often connected to the auxin pathway, but we also lack knowledge about these connections in the young gynoecium. Our results reveal that cytokinin signaling, that can provide meristematic properties required for CMM activity and growth, is enabled by the transcription factor SPATULA (SPT) in the medial domain. Meanwhile, cytokinin signaling is confined to the medial domain by the cytokinin response repressor ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE 6 (AHP6), and perhaps by ARR16 (a type-A ARR) as well, both present in the lateral domains (presumptive valves) of the developing gynoecia. Moreover, SPT and cytokinin, probably together, promote the expression of the auxin biosynthetic gene TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS 1 (TAA1) and the gene encoding the auxin efflux transporter PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3), likely creating auxin drainage important for gynoecium growth. This study provides novel insights in the spatiotemporal determination of the cytokinin signaling pattern and its connection to the auxin pathway in the young gynoecium.

  3. Gene gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Vijayachandran, Lakshmi S; Thimiri Govinda Raj, Deepak B; Edelweiss, Evelina; Gupta, Kapil; Maier, Josef; Gordeliy, Valentin; Fitzgerald, Daniel J; Berger, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Most essential activities in eukaryotic cells are catalyzed by large multiprotein assemblies containing up to ten or more interlocking subunits. The vast majority of these protein complexes are not easily accessible for high resolution studies aimed at unlocking their mechanisms, due to their low cellular abundance and high heterogeneity. Recombinant overproduction can resolve this bottleneck and baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS) have emerged as particularly powerful tools for the provision of eukaryotic multiprotein complexes in high quality and quantity. Recently, synthetic biology approaches have begun to make their mark in improving existing BEVS reagents by de novo design of streamlined transfer plasmids and by engineering the baculovirus genome. Here we present OmniBac, comprising new custom designed reagents that further facilitate the integration of heterologous genes into the baculovirus genome for multiprotein expression. Based on comparative genome analysis and data mining, we herein present a blueprint to custom design and engineer the entire baculovirus genome for optimized production properties using a bottom-up synthetic biology approach. PMID:23328086

  4. Detection of a novel aph(2") allele (aph[2"]-Ie) conferring high-level gentamicin resistance and a spectinomycin resistance gene ant(9)-Ia (aad 9) in clinical isolates of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Mahbub Alam, Mohammed; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Ishino, Masaho; Sumi, Ayako; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Uehara, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) are major factors that confer aminoglycoside resistance to enterococci. In an epidemiologic study on distribution of 12 AME genes in 534 recent clinical strains isolated from a Japanese hospital, two uncommon AME genes, ant(9)-Ia and a novel aph(2") allele, aph(2")-Ie, were detected. ant(9)-Ia had been reported only in Staphylococcus aureus and encodes spectinomycin adenylyltransferase ANT(9)-I, which confers resistance to spectinomycin. The ant(9)-Ia gene was detected in three strains, a single strain each of Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, and E. avium. Nucleotide sequences of ant(9)-Ia from these three enterococcal species were identical to that reported for S. aureus and considered to be located on Tn 554. The new aph(2") allele, designated aph(2")-Ie, was identified in three E. faecium strains. The aph(2")-Ie allele was genetically close to aph(2")-Id reported in E. casseliflavus (93.7% amino acid sequence identity; 96.3% similarity), while distant from aph(2")-Ia, aph(2")-Ib, or aph(2")-Ic (26.3-29.5% amino acid sequence identity). Sequence divergence between APH(2")-Id and APH(2")-Ie was mostly located in amino-terminal half. In contrast, sequences corresponding to the three motifs required for aminoglycoside phosphotransferase were conserved except for a single amino acid. Three E. faecium strains having aph(2")-Ie showed high-level resistance to gentamicin and streptomycin, but not to kanamycin, dibekacin, and tobramycin, unlike enzyme specificity described for aph(2")-Id in E. casseliflavus. Such a difference in resistance phenotype was suggested to be related to amino acid sequence divergence between APH(2")-Id and APH(2")-Ie.

  5. Replication inhibition by nucleoside analogues of a recombinant Autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus harboring the herpes thymidine kinase gene driven by the IE-1(0) promoter: a new way to select recombinant baculoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Godeau, F; Saucier, C; Kourilsky, P

    1992-01-01

    The expression of the thymidine-thymidylate kinase (HSV1-TK), (ATP: thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.21) of herpes simplex virus type 1 endows the host cell with a conditional lethal phenotype which depends on the presence of nucleoside analogues metabolized by this enzyme into toxic inhibitors of DNA replication. To generate a recombinant baculovirus that could be selected against by nucleoside analogs, the HSV1-tk coding sequence was placed under the control of the Autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) immediate early promoterm IE-1(0), and this construction was introduced via homologous recombination into the polyhedrin locus of AcMNPV. Two recombinant baculoviruses harboring this gene construct at the polyhedrin locus were isolated and tested for their ability to replicate in the presence of various concentrations of the nucleoside analog 9-(1,3-Dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl)guanine (Ganciclovir). Neither Sf9 lepidopteran cell viability nor replication of wild type or beta-Galactosidase-expressing recombinant AcMNPVs were affected by concentrations of Ganciclovir up to 100 microM. In contrast, replication of the recombinant AcMNPV virus harboring the HSV1-tk gene was inhibited by Ganciclovir in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was detectable at 2 microM and complete at 100 microM. This property was exploited in model isolations aimed at purifying new recombinant viruses having lost this counter-selectable gene marker as a result of homologous recombination at the polyhedrin locus after cotransfection of the viral DNA with a replacement vector. After being propagated in the presence of Ganciclovir, the progeny of such co-transfections contained over 85% recombinant viruses, demonstrating that counter-selection of parental HSV1-tk-containing viruses by Ganciclovir constitutes a novel approach for recombinant baculovirus isolation. Images PMID:1335569

  6. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory.

    PubMed

    Gould, David

    2013-08-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called 'gene doping'. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted from the engineered cells or is retained locally to, or inside engineered cells will, to some extent, determine the likelihood of detection. It is clear that effective gene delivery technologies now exist and it is important that detection and prevention plans are in place.

  7. Gene Cluster Statistics with Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Dannie

    2009-01-01

    Identifying genomic regions that descended from a common ancestor is important for understanding the function and evolution of genomes. In distantly related genomes, clusters of homologous gene pairs are evidence of candidate homologous regions. Demonstrating the statistical significance of such “gene clusters” is an essential component of comparative genomic analyses. However, currently there are no practical statistical tests for gene clusters that model the influence of the number of homologs in each gene family on cluster significance. In this work, we demonstrate empirically that failure to incorporate gene family size in gene cluster statistics results in overestimation of significance, leading to incorrect conclusions. We further present novel analytical methods for estimating gene cluster significance that take gene family size into account. Our methods do not require complete genome data and are suitable for testing individual clusters found in local regions, such as contigs in an unfinished assembly. We consider pairs of regions drawn from the same genome (paralogous clusters), as well as regions drawn from two different genomes (orthologous clusters). Determining cluster significance under general models of gene family size is computationally intractable. By assuming that all gene families are of equal size, we obtain analytical expressions that allow fast approximation of cluster probabilities. We evaluate the accuracy of this approximation by comparing the resulting gene cluster probabilities with cluster probabilities obtained by simulating a realistic, power-law distributed model of gene family size, with parameters inferred from genomic data. Surprisingly, despite the simplicity of the underlying assumption, our method accurately approximates the true cluster probabilities. It slightly overestimates these probabilities, yielding a conservative test. We present additional simulation results indicating the best choice of parameter values for data

  8. Compare Gene Calls

    SciTech Connect

    Ecale Zhou, Carol L.

    2016-07-05

    Compare Gene Calls (CGC) is a Python code used for combining and comparing gene calls from any number of gene callers. A gene caller is a computer program that predicts the extends of open reading frames within genomes of biological organisms.

  9. Autism and Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document defines and discusses autism and how genes play a role in the condition. Answers to the following questions are covered: (1) What are genes? (2) What is autism? (3) What causes autism? (4) Why study genes to learn about autism? (5) How do researchers look for the genes involved in autism? (screen the whole genome; conduct cytogenetic…

  10. Epilepsy-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Lin, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Liu; Xu, Hai-Qing; Shi, Yi-Wu; Yi, Yong-Hong; He, Na; Liao, Wei-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Development in genetic technology has led to the identification of an increasing number of genes associated with epilepsy. These discoveries will both provide the basis for including genetic tests in clinical practice and improve diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy. By searching through several databases (OMIM, HGMD, and EpilepsyGene) and recent publications on PubMed, we found 977 genes that are associated with epilepsy. We classified these genes into 4 categories according to the manifestation of epilepsy in phenotypes. We found 84 genes that are considered as epilepsy genes: genes that cause epilepsies or syndromes with epilepsy as the core symptom. 73 genes were listed as neurodevelopment-associated genes: genes associated with both brain-development malformations and epilepsy. Several genes (536) were epilepsy-related: genes associated with both physical or other systemic abnormalities and epilepsy or seizures. We found 284 additional genes putatively associated with epilepsy; this requires further verification. These integrated data will provide new insights useful for both including genetic tests in the clinical practice and evaluating the results of genetic tests. We also summarized the epilepsy-associated genes according to their function, with the goal to better characterize the association between genes and epilepsies and to further understand the mechanisms underlying epilepsy.

  11. A unique gene cluster for the utilization of the mucosal and human milk-associated glycans galacto-N-biose and lacto-N-biose in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Bidart, Gonzalo N; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Monedero, Vicente; Yebra, María J

    2014-08-01

    The probiotic Lactobacillus casei catabolizes galacto-N-biose (GNB) and lacto-N-biose (LNB) by using a transport system and metabolic routes different from those of Bifidobacterium. L. casei contains a gene cluster, gnbREFGBCDA, involved in the metabolism of GNB, LNB and also N-acetylgalactosamine. Inactivation of gnbC (EIIC) or ptsI (Enzyme I) of the phosphoenolpyruvate : sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) prevented the growth on those three carbohydrates, indicating that they are transported and phosphorylated by the same PTS(Gnb) . Enzyme activities and growth analysis with knockout mutants showed that GnbG (phospho-β-galactosidase) hydrolyses both disaccharides. However, GnbF (N-acetylgalactosamine-6P deacetylase) and GnbE (galactosamine-6P isomerase/deaminase) are involved in GNB but not in LNB fermentation. The utilization of LNB depends on nagA (N-acetylglucosamine-6P deacetylase), showing that the N-acetylhexosamine moieties of GNB and LNB follow different catabolic routes. A lacAB mutant (galactose-6P isomerase) was impaired in GNB and LNB utilization, indicating that their galactose moiety is channelled through the tagatose-6P pathway. Transcriptional analysis showed that the gnb operon is regulated by substrate-specific induction mediated by the transcriptional repressor GnbR, which binds to a 26 bp DNA region containing inverted repeats exhibiting a 2T/2A conserved core. The data represent the first characterization of novel metabolic pathways for human milk oligosaccharides and glycoconjugate structures in Firmicutes.

  12. [Study on the food safety of the marker gene expressed protein HPT].

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Chen; Li, Ying-Hua; Yang, Xiao-Guang; Piao, Jian-Hua

    2005-09-01

    This article studied on the food safety of HPT protein (Hygromycin B Phosphotransferase), a kind of plant selectable marker gene expression product, which mainly included the quantity and quality detection of HPT in the SCK transgenic rice plants, the possible dietary intakes and its stability in the simulative digestive system. HPT cDNA fragment was inserted into the prokaryotic expressing vector pBV222 for the expression of 6His-HPT fusion protein. The inclusion bodies were denatured by 8 mol/L urea and purifiee with metal chelate affinity chromatography on Ni-NTA agarose under denaturing condition. The purified 6His-HPT were used to immunize rabbit and BALB/C mice for the preparation of the polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, and the double-Ab sandwich ELISA to detect HPT was established then. Concerning the sensitivity assessment of HPT protein, the amino acid sequences of HPT was compared with the other allergens and the simulative digestive experiment in vitro was carried out too. 6His-HPT protein was obtained with the purity up to 95%. The specificity of antisera and ascites was detected by Western blot, which showed specific binding reaction between the antibodies to the purified 6His-HPT proteins and their expressed product. The double-Ab sandwich ELISA system was established successfully with the sensitivity of 30 ng/ml. The HPT expression level in the leaves of transgenic rice was proved in the range of 80 - 150 ng/ml, yet we cannot detect HPT protein in the seeds of the same rice. There showed no comparability in the amino acid sequences between HPT and other allergens, and HPT protein was digested quickly in the simulated stomach and intestines liquids. All the results showed that the expression level of HPT in the SCK transgenic rice plants is very low and they are not stable in the simulative digestive system. So we inferred that under the current detection level, HPT protein might not be able to induce any safety problem. Yet further study on the

  13. Transplantations and Cloning of an Immortal Cell Line from Rat SCN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-31

    been transfected with retroviral vector (DOLU) carrying the adenovirus 2-adenovirus 5 hybrid ElA 12S sequence and the neomycin phosphotransferase gene...replication-competent helper virons. Using an assay to test their ability to provide for the transfer of the neomycin phosphotransferase gene to uninfected...infected chicken neuroretinal cells. J. Virolgy66: 6242-6247. 23. Segerson, T.P., Lam, K.S., Cacicedo, L., Minamitani, N., Fink, J.S., Lechan, R.M. and

  14. Speciation genes in plants

    PubMed Central

    Rieseberg, Loren H.; Blackman, Benjamin K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Analyses of speciation genesgenes that contribute to the cessation of gene flow between populations – can offer clues regarding the ecological settings, evolutionary forces and molecular mechanisms that drive the divergence of populations and species. This review discusses the identities and attributes of genes that contribute to reproductive isolation (RI) in plants, compares them with animal speciation genes and investigates what these genes can tell us about speciation. Scope Forty-one candidate speciation genes were identified in the plant literature. Of these, seven contributed to pre-pollination RI, one to post-pollination, prezygotic RI, eight to hybrid inviability, and 25 to hybrid sterility. Genes, gene families and genetic pathways that were frequently found to underlie the evolution of RI in different plant groups include the anthocyanin pathway and its regulators (pollinator isolation), S RNase-SI genes (unilateral incompatibility), disease resistance genes (hybrid necrosis), chimeric mitochondrial genes (cytoplasmic male sterility), and pentatricopeptide repeat family genes (cytoplasmic male sterility). Conclusions The most surprising conclusion from this review is that identities of genes underlying both prezygotic and postzygotic RI are often predictable in a broad sense from the phenotype of the reproductive barrier. Regulatory changes (both cis and trans) dominate the evolution of pre-pollination RI in plants, whereas a mix of regulatory mutations and changes in protein-coding genes underlie intrinsic postzygotic barriers. Also, loss-of-function mutations and copy number variation frequently contribute to RI. Although direct evidence of positive selection on speciation genes is surprisingly scarce in plants, analyses of gene family evolution, along with theoretical considerations, imply an important role for diversifying selection and genetic conflict in the evolution of RI. Unlike in animals, however, most candidate speciation

  15. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  16. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  17. Gene regulation in cancer gene therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Ian; Lehouritis, Panos; Niculescu-Duvaz, Ion; Marais, Richard; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-10-01

    Regulation of expression in gene therapy is considered to be a very desirable goal, preventing toxic effects and improving biological efficacy. A variety of systems have been reported in an ever widening range of applications, this paper describes these systems with specific reference to cancer gene therapy.

  18. Evolution by gene loss.

    PubMed

    Albalat, Ricard; Cañestro, Cristian

    2016-07-01

    The recent increase in genomic data is revealing an unexpected perspective of gene loss as a pervasive source of genetic variation that can cause adaptive phenotypic diversity. This novel perspective of gene loss is raising new fundamental questions. How relevant has gene loss been in the divergence of phyla? How do genes change from being essential to dispensable and finally to being lost? Is gene loss mostly neutral, or can it be an effective way of adaptation? These questions are addressed, and insights are discussed from genomic studies of gene loss in populations and their relevance in evolutionary biology and biomedicine.

  19. Human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, J S; Keating, A; Hozumi, N

    1997-01-01

    Human gene therapy and its application for the treatment of human genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, cancer, and other diseases, are discussed. Gene therapy is a technique in which a functioning gene is inserted into a human cell to correct a genetic error or to introduce a new function to the cell. Many methods, including retroviral vectors and non-viral vectors, have been developed for both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer into cells. Vectors need to be developed that efficiently transfer genes to target cells, and promoter systems are required that regulate gene expression according to physiologic needs of the host cell. There are several safety and ethical issues related to manipulating the human genome that need to be resolved. Current gene therapy efforts focus on gene insertion into somatic cells only. Gene therapy has potential for the effective treatment of genetic disorders, and gene transfer techniques are being used for basic research, for example, in cancer, to examine the underlying mechanism of disease. There are still many technical obstacles to be overcome before human gene therapy can become a routine procedure. The current human genome project provides the sequences of a vast number of human genes, leading to the identification, characterization, and understanding of genes that are responsible for many human diseases.

  20. Gene therapy for blindness.

    PubMed

    Sahel, José-Alain; Roska, Botond

    2013-07-08

    Sight-restoring therapy for the visually impaired and blind is a major unmet medical need. Ocular gene therapy is a rational choice for restoring vision or preventing the loss of vision because most blinding diseases originate in cellular components of the eye, a compartment that is optimally suited for the delivery of genes, and many of these diseases have a genetic origin or genetic component. In recent years we have witnessed major advances in the field of ocular gene therapy, and proof-of-concept studies are under way to evaluate the safety and efficacy of human gene therapies. Here we discuss the concepts and recent advances in gene therapy in the retina. Our review discusses traditional approaches such as gene replacement and neuroprotection and also new avenues such as optogenetic therapies. We conjecture that advances in gene therapy in the retina will pave the way for gene therapies in other parts of the brain.

  1. Myocardial gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isner, Jeffrey M.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy is proving likely to be a viable alternative to conventional therapies in coronary artery disease and heart failure. Phase 1 clinical trials indicate high levels of safety and clinical benefits with gene therapy using angiogenic growth factors in myocardial ischaemia. Although gene therapy for heart failure is still at the pre-clinical stage, experimental data indicate that therapeutic angiogenesis using short-term gene expression may elicit functional improvement in affected individuals.

  2. Two different Bacillus thuringiensis toxin genes confer resistance to beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua Hübner) in transgenic Bt-shallots (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Si-Jun; Henken, Betty; de Maagd, Ruud A; Purwito, Agus; Krens, Frans A; Kik, Chris

    2005-06-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation was applied to produce beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua Hübner) resistant tropical shallots (Allium cepa L. group Aggregatum). A cry1Ca or a H04 hybrid gene from Bacillus thuringiensis, driven by the chrysanthemum ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (Rubisco SSU) promoter, along with the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (hpt) driven by the CaMV 35S promoter, was employed for genetic transformation. An average transformation frequency of 3.68% was obtained from two shallot cultivars, Tropix and Kuning. After transfer of the in vitro plants to the greenhouse 69% of the cry1Ca and 39% of the H04 transgenic shallots survived the first half year. After one year of cultivation in the greenhouse the remaining cry1Ca and H04 transgenic plants grew vigorously and had a normal bulb formation, although the cry1Ca transgenic plants (and controls) had darker green leaves compared to their H04 counterparts. Standard PCR, adaptor ligation PCR and Southern analyses confirmed the integration of T-DNA into the shallot genome. Northern blot and ELISA analyses revealed expression of the cry1Ca or H04 gene in the transgenic plants. The amount of Cry1Ca expressed in transgenic plants was higher than the expression levels of H04 (0.39 vs. 0.16% of the total soluble leaf proteins, respectively). There was a good correlation between protein expression and beet armyworm resistance. Cry1Ca or H04 gene expression of at least 0.22 or 0.08% of the total soluble protein in shallot leaves was sufficient to give a complete resistance against beet armyworm. This confirms earlier observations that the H04 toxin is more toxic to S. exigua than the Cry1Ca toxin. The results from this study suggest that the cry1Ca and H04 transgenic shallots developed could be used for introducing resistance to beet armyworm in (sub) tropical shallot.

  3. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  4. Reading and Generalist Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Harlaar, Nicole; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Twin-study research suggests that many (but not all) of the same genes contribute to genetic influence on diverse learning abilities and disabilities, a hypothesis called "generalist genes". This generalist genes hypothesis was tested using a set of 10 DNA markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) found to be associated with early reading…

  5. Reading and Generalist Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Harlaar, Nicole; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Twin-study research suggests that many (but not all) of the same genes contribute to genetic influence on diverse learning abilities and disabilities, a hypothesis called "generalist genes". This generalist genes hypothesis was tested using a set of 10 DNA markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) found to be associated with early reading…

  6. Gene hunting in autoinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Steady progress in our understanding of the genetic basis of autoinflammatory diseases has been made over the past 16 years. Since the discovery of the familial Mediterranean fever gene MEFV (also known as marenostrin) in 1997, 18 other genes responsible for monogenic autoinflammatory diseases have been identified to date. The discovery of these genes was made through the utilisation of many genetic mapping techniques, including next generation sequencing platforms. This review article clearly describes the gene hunting approaches, methods of data analysis and the technological platforms used, which has relevance to all those working within the field of gene discovery for Mendelian disorders. PMID:24070009

  7. Gene therapy review.

    PubMed

    Moss, Joseph Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The use of genes to treat disease, more commonly known as gene therapy, is a valid and promising tool to manage and treat diseases that conventional drug therapies cannot cure. Gene therapy holds the potential to control a wide range of diseases, including cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and blood diseases. This review assesses the current status of gene therapy, highlighting therapeutic methodologies and applications, terminology, and imaging strategies. This article presents an overview of roadblocks associated with each therapeutic methodology, along with some of the scientific, social, and ethical issues associated with gene therapy.

  8. Gene therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-03-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is 'the use of genes as medicine'. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone.

  9. Regulated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system.

  10. Conventional murine gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Albert G; Sun, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Murine gene knockout models engineered over the last two decades have continued to demonstrate their potential as invaluable tools in understanding the role of gene function in the context of normal human development and disease. The more recent elucidation of the human and mouse genomes through sequencing has opened up the capability to elucidate the function of every human gene. State-of-the-art mouse model generation allows, through a multitude of experimental steps requiring careful standardization, gene function to be reliably and predictably ablated in a live model system. The application of these standardized methodologies to directly target gene function through murine gene knockout has to date provided comprehensive and verifiable genetic models that have contributed tremendously to our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying normal and disease states in humans. The ensuing chapter provides an overview of the latest steps and procedures required to ablate gene function in a murine model.

  11. Retrieval with gene queries.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Aditya K; Srinivasan, Padmini

    2006-04-21

    Accuracy of document retrieval from MEDLINE for gene queries is crucially important for many applications in bioinformatics. We explore five information retrieval-based methods to rank documents retrieved by PubMed gene queries for the human genome. The aim is to rank relevant documents higher in the retrieved list. We address the special challenges faced due to ambiguity in gene nomenclature: gene terms that refer to multiple genes, gene terms that are also English words, and gene terms that have other biological meanings. Our two baseline ranking strategies are quite similar in performance. Two of our three LocusLink-based strategies offer significant improvements. These methods work very well even when there is ambiguity in the gene terms. Our best ranking strategy offers significant improvements on three different kinds of ambiguities over our two baseline strategies (improvements range from 15.9% to 17.7% and 11.7% to 13.3% depending on the baseline). For most genes the best ranking query is one that is built from the LocusLink (now Entrez Gene) summary and product information along with the gene names and aliases. For others, the gene names and aliases suffice. We also present an approach that successfully predicts, for a given gene, which of these two ranking queries is more appropriate. We explore the effect of different post-retrieval strategies on the ranking of documents returned by PubMed for human gene queries. We have successfully applied some of these strategies to improve the ranking of relevant documents in the retrieved sets. This holds true even when various kinds of ambiguity are encountered. We feel that it would be very useful to apply strategies like ours on PubMed search results as these are not ordered by relevance in any way. This is especially so for queries that retrieve a large number of documents.

  12. Human HOX gene disorders.

    PubMed

    Quinonez, Shane C; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The Hox genes are an evolutionarily conserved family of genes, which encode a class of important transcription factors that function in numerous developmental processes. Following their initial discovery, a substantial amount of information has been gained regarding the roles Hox genes play in various physiologic and pathologic processes. These processes range from a central role in anterior-posterior patterning of the developing embryo to roles in oncogenesis that are yet to be fully elucidated. In vertebrates there are a total of 39 Hox genes divided into 4 separate clusters. Of these, mutations in 10 Hox genes have been found to cause human disorders with significant variation in their inheritance patterns, penetrance, expressivity and mechanism of pathogenesis. This review aims to describe the various phenotypes caused by germline mutation in these 10 Hox genes that cause a human phenotype, with specific emphasis paid to the genotypic and phenotypic differences between allelic disorders. As clinical whole exome and genome sequencing is increasingly utilized in the future, we predict that additional Hox gene mutations will likely be identified to cause distinct human phenotypes. As the known human phenotypes closely resemble gene-specific murine models, we also review the homozygous loss-of-function mouse phenotypes for the 29 Hox genes without a known human disease. This review will aid clinicians in identifying and caring for patients affected with a known Hox gene disorder and help recognize the potential for novel mutations in patients with phenotypes informed by mouse knockout studies.

  13. Do Housekeeping Genes Exist?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    The searching of human housekeeping (HK) genes has been a long quest since the emergence of transcriptomics, and is instrumental for us to understand the structure of genome and the fundamentals of biological processes. The resolved genes are frequently used in evolution studies and as normalization standards in quantitative gene-expression analysis. Within the past 20 years, more than a dozen HK-gene studies have been conducted, yet none of them sampled human tissues completely. We believe an integration of these results will help remove false positive genes owing to the inadequate sampling. Surprisingly, we only find one common gene across 15 examined HK-gene datasets comprising 187 different tissue and cell types. Our subsequent analyses suggest that it might not be appropriate to rigidly define HK genes as expressed in all tissue types that have diverse developmental, physiological, and pathological states. It might be beneficial to use more robustly identified HK functions for filtering criteria, in which the representing genes can be a subset of genome. These genes are not necessarily the same, and perhaps need not to be the same, everywhere in our body. PMID:25970694

  14. Primetime for Learning Genes

    PubMed Central

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be “poised” for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli. PMID:28208656

  15. Primetime for Learning Genes.

    PubMed

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-02-11

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be "poised" for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli.

  16. Uncoupler-Resistant Glucose Uptake by the Thermophilic Glycolytic Anaerobe Thermoanaerobacter thermosulfuricus (Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum)

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gregory M.; Janssen, Peter H.; Morgan, Hugh W.

    1993-01-01

    The transport of glucose across the bacterial cell membrane of Thermoanaerobacter thermosulfuricus (Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum) Rt8.B1 was governed by a permease which did not catalyze concomitant substrate transport and phosphorylation and thus was not a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase. Glucose uptake was carrier mediated, could not be driven by an artificial membrane potential (Δψ) in the presence or absence of sodium, and was not sensitive to inhibitors which dissipate the proton motive force (Δp; tetrachlorosalicylanilide, N,N-dicyclohexylcarboiimide, and 2,4-dinitrophenol), and no uptake of the nonmetabolizable analog 2-deoxyglucose could be demonstrated. The glucokinase apparent Km for glucose (0.21 mM) was similar to the Kt (affinity constant) for glucose uptake (0.15 mM), suggesting that glucokinase controls the rate of glucose uptake. Inhibitors of ATP synthesis (iodoacetate and sodium fluoride) also inhibited glucose uptake, and this effect was due to a reduction in the level of ATP available to glucokinase for glucose phosphorylation. These results indicated that T. thermosulfuricus Rt8.B1 lacks a concentrative uptake system for glucose and that uptake is via facilitated diffusion, followed by ATP-dependent phosphorylation by glucokinase. In T. thermosulfuricus Rt8.B1, glucose is metabolized by the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, which yields 2 mol of ATP (G. M. Cook, unpublished data). Since only 1 mol of ATP is used to transport 1 mol of glucose, the energetics of this system are therefore similar to those found in bacteria which possess a phosphotransferase. PMID:16349043

  17. Genetic transformation of European chestnut somatic embryos with a native thaumatin-like protein (CsTL1) gene isolated from Castanea sativa seeds.

    PubMed

    Corredoira, Elena; Valladares, Silvia; Allona, Isabel; Aragoncillo, Cipriano; Vieitez, Ana M; Ballester, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    The availability of a system for direct transfer of antifungal candidate genes into European chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) would offer an alternative approach to conventional breeding for production of chestnut trees tolerant to ink disease caused by Phytophthora spp. For the first time, a chestnut thaumatin-like protein gene (CsTL1), isolated from chestnut cotyledons, has been overexpressed in three chestnut somatic embryogenic lines. Transformation experiments have been performed using an Agrobacterium tumefaciens Smith and Townsend vector harboring the neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII) selectable and the green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter genes. The transformation efficiency, determined on the basis of the fluorescence of surviving explants, was clearly genotype dependent and ranged from 32.5% in the CI-9 line to 7.1% in the CI-3 line. A total of 126 independent transformed lines were obtained. The presence and integration of chestnut CsTL1 in genomic DNA was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that CsTL1 expression was up to 13.5-fold higher in a transgenic line compared with its corresponding untransformed line. In only one of the 11 transformed lines tested, expression of the CsTL1 was lower than the control. The remaining 115 transformed lines were successfully subjected to cryopreservation. Embryo proliferation was achieved in all of the transgenic lines regenerated and the transformed lines showed a higher mean number of cotyledonary stage embryos and total number of embryos per embryo clump than their corresponding untransformed lines. Transgenic plants were regenerated after maturation and germination of transformed somatic embryos. Furthermore, due to the low plantlet conversion achieved, axillary shoot proliferation cultures were established from partially germinated embryos (only shoot development), which were multiplied and rooted according to procedures already

  18. Parkinson's disease: gene therapies.

    PubMed

    Coune, Philippe G; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    With the recent development of effective gene delivery systems, gene therapy for the central nervous system is finding novel applications. Here, we review existing viral vectors and discuss gene therapy strategies that have been proposed for Parkinson's disease. To date, most of the clinical trials were based on viral vectors to deliver therapeutic transgenes to neurons within the basal ganglia. Initial trials used genes to relieve the major motor symptoms caused by nigrostriatal degeneration. Although these new genetic approaches still need to prove more effective than existing symptomatic treatments, there is a need for disease-modifying strategies. The investigation of the genetic factors implicated in Parkinson's disease is providing precious insights in disease pathology that, combined with innovative gene delivery systems, will hopefully offer novel opportunities for gene therapy interventions to slow down, or even halt disease progression.

  19. Green genes gleaned.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2005-07-01

    A recent paper by Ayumi Tanaka and colleagues identifying an Arabidopsis thaliana gene for 3,8-divinyl(proto)chlorophyllide 8-vinyl reductase brings a satisfying conclusion to the hunt for genes encoding enzymes for the steps in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. Now, at least in angiosperm plants represented by Arabidopsis, genes for all 15 steps in the pathway from glutamyl-tRNA to chlorophylls a and b have been identified.

  20. Regulation of carbon metabolism in gram-positive bacteria by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Deutscher, J; Fischer, C; Charrier, V; Galinier, A; Lindner, C; Darbon, E; Dossonnet, V

    1997-01-01

    The main function of the bacterial phosphotransferase system is to transport and to phosphorylate mono- and disaccharides as well as sugar alcohols. However, the phosphotransferase system is also involved in regulation of carbon metabolism. In Gram-positive bacteria, it is implicated in carbon catabolite repression and regulation of expression of catabolic genes by controlling either catabolic enzyme activities, transcriptional activators or antiterminators. All these different regulations follow a protein phosphorylation mechanism.

  1. Identification of PTS(Fru) as the major fructose uptake system of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Christine; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg

    2014-08-01

    As a member of the saccharolytic clostridia, a variety of different carbohydrates like glucose, fructose, or mannose can be used as carbon and energy source by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Thirteen phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTS) have been identified in C. acetobutylicum, which are likely to be responsible for the uptake of hexoses, hexitols, or disaccharides. Here, we focus on three PTS which are expected to be involved in the uptake of fructose, PTS(Fru), PTS(ManI), and PTS(ManII). To analyze their individual functions, each PTS was inactivated via homologous recombination or insertional mutagenesis. Standardized comparative batch fermentations in a synthetic medium with glucose, fructose, or mannose as sole carbon source identified PTS(Fru) as primary uptake system for fructose, whereas growth with fructose was not impaired in PTS(ManI) and slightly altered in PTS(ManII)-deficient strains of C. acetobutylicum. The inactivation of PTS(ManI) resulted in slower growth on mannose whereas the loss of PTS(ManII) revealed no phenotype during growth on mannose. This is the first time that it has been shown that PTS(Fru) and PTS(ManI) of C. acetobutylicum are directly involved in fructose and mannose uptake, respectively. Moreover, comprehensive comparison of the fermentation products revealed that the loss of PTS(Fru) prevents the solvent shift as no butanol and only basic levels of acetone and ethanol could be determined.

  2. Streptococcus pneumoniae Can Utilize Multiple Sources of Hyaluronic Acid for Growth

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Carolyn; Stewart, Jason M.; Tazi, Mia F.; Burnaugh, Amanda M.; Linke, Caroline M.; Woodiga, Shireen A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which Streptococcus pneumoniae obtains carbohydrates for growth during airway colonization remain to be elucidated. The low concentration of free carbohydrates in the normal human airway suggests that pneumococci must utilize complex glycan structures for growth. The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid is present on the apical surface of airway epithelial cells. As pneumococci express a hyaluronate lyase (Hyl) that cleaves hyaluronic acid into disaccharides, we hypothesized that during colonization pneumococci utilize the released carbohydrates for growth. Hyaluronic acid supported significant pneumococcal growth in an hyl-dependent manner. A phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) and an unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (Ugl) encoded downstream of hyl are also essential for growth on hyaluronic acid. This genomic arrangement is present in several other organisms, suggesting conservation of the utilization mechanism between species. In vivo experiments support the hypothesis that S. pneumoniae utilizes hyaluronic acid as a carbon source during colonization. We also demonstrate that pneumococci can utilize the hyaluronic acid capsule of other bacterial species for growth, suggesting an alternative carbohydrate source for pneumococcal growth. Together, these data support a novel function for pneumococcal degradation of hyaluronic acid in vivo and provide mechanistic details of growth on this glycosaminoglycan. PMID:22311922

  3. Streptococcus pneumoniae can utilize multiple sources of hyaluronic acid for growth.

    PubMed

    Marion, Carolyn; Stewart, Jason M; Tazi, Mia F; Burnaugh, Amanda M; Linke, Caroline M; Woodiga, Shireen A; King, Samantha J

    2012-04-01

    The mechanisms by which Streptococcus pneumoniae obtains carbohydrates for growth during airway colonization remain to be elucidated. The low concentration of free carbohydrates in the normal human airway suggests that pneumococci must utilize complex glycan structures for growth. The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid is present on the apical surface of airway epithelial cells. As pneumococci express a hyaluronate lyase (Hyl) that cleaves hyaluronic acid into disaccharides, we hypothesized that during colonization pneumococci utilize the released carbohydrates for growth. Hyaluronic acid supported significant pneumococcal growth in an hyl-dependent manner. A phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) and an unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (Ugl) encoded downstream of hyl are also essential for growth on hyaluronic acid. This genomic arrangement is present in several other organisms, suggesting conservation of the utilization mechanism between species. In vivo experiments support the hypothesis that S. pneumoniae utilizes hyaluronic acid as a carbon source during colonization. We also demonstrate that pneumococci can utilize the hyaluronic acid capsule of other bacterial species for growth, suggesting an alternative carbohydrate source for pneumococcal growth. Together, these data support a novel function for pneumococcal degradation of hyaluronic acid in vivo and provide mechanistic details of growth on this glycosaminoglycan.

  4. Functional Analysis of the Fructooligosaccharide Utilization Operon in Lactobacillus paracasei 1195▿

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yong Jun; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Hutkins, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    The fosABCDXE operon encodes components of a putative fructose/mannose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system and a β-fructosidase precursor (FosE) that are involved in the fructooligosaccharide (FOS) utilization pathway of Lactobacillus paracasei 1195. The presence of an N-terminal signal peptide sequence and an LPQAG cell wall anchor motif in the C-terminal region of the deduced FosE precursor amino acid sequence predicted that the enzyme is cell wall associated, indicating that FOS may be hydrolyzed extracellularly. In this study, cell fractionation experiments demonstrated that the FOS hydrolysis activity was present exclusively in the cell wall extract of L. paracasei previously grown on FOS. In contrast, no measurable FOS hydrolysis activity was detected in the cell wall extract from the isogenic fosE mutant. Induction of β-fructosidase activity was observed when cells were grown on FOS, inulin, sucrose, or fructose but not when cells were grown on glucose. A diauxic growth pattern was observed when cells were grown on FOS in the presence of limiting glucose (0.1%). Analysis of the culture supernatant revealed that glucose was consumed first, followed by the longer-chain FOS species. Transcription analysis further showed that the fos operon was expressed only after glucose was depleted in the medium. Expression of fosE in a non-FOS-fermenting strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, enabled the recombinant strain to metabolize FOS, inulin, sucrose, and levan. PMID:17644636

  5. Uptake and metabolism of sucrose by Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J; Chassy, B M

    1981-08-01

    Transport and metabolism of sucrose in Streptococcus lactis K1 have been examined. Starved cells of S. lactis K1 grown previously on sucrose accumulated [14C]sucrose by a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) (sucrose-PTS; Km, 22 microM; Vmax, 191 mumol transported min-1 g of dry weight of cells-1). The product of group translocation was sucrose 6-phosphate (6-O-phosphoryl-D-glucopyranosyl-1-alpha-beta-2-D-fructofuranoside). A specific sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase was identified which cleaved the disaccharide phosphate (Km, 0.10 mM) to glucose 6-phosphate and fructose. The enzyme did not cleave sucrose 6'-phosphate(D-glucopyranosyl-1-alpha-beta-2-D-fructofuranoside-6'-phosphate). Extracts prepared from sucrose-grown cells also contained an ATP-dependent mannofructokinase which catalyzed the conversion of fructose to fructose 6-phosphate (Km, 0.33 mM). The sucrose-PTS and sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase activities were coordinately induced during growth on sucrose. Mannofructokinase appeared to be regulated independently of the sucrose-PTS and sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase, since expression also occurred when S. lactis K1 was grown on non-PTS sugars. Expression of the mannofructokinase may be negatively regulated by a component (or a derivative) of the PTS.

  6. Uptake and metabolism of sucrose by Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J; Chassy, B M

    1981-01-01

    Transport and metabolism of sucrose in Streptococcus lactis K1 have been examined. Starved cells of S. lactis K1 grown previously on sucrose accumulated [14C]sucrose by a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) (sucrose-PTS; Km, 22 microM; Vmax, 191 mumol transported min-1 g of dry weight of cells-1). The product of group translocation was sucrose 6-phosphate (6-O-phosphoryl-D-glucopyranosyl-1-alpha-beta-2-D-fructofuranoside). A specific sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase was identified which cleaved the disaccharide phosphate (Km, 0.10 mM) to glucose 6-phosphate and fructose. The enzyme did not cleave sucrose 6'-phosphate(D-glucopyranosyl-1-alpha-beta-2-D-fructofuranoside-6'-phosphate). Extracts prepared from sucrose-grown cells also contained an ATP-dependent mannofructokinase which catalyzed the conversion of fructose to fructose 6-phosphate (Km, 0.33 mM). The sucrose-PTS and sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase activities were coordinately induced during growth on sucrose. Mannofructokinase appeared to be regulated independently of the sucrose-PTS and sucrose 6-phosphate hydrolase, since expression also occurred when S. lactis K1 was grown on non-PTS sugars. Expression of the mannofructokinase may be negatively regulated by a component (or a derivative) of the PTS. PMID:6267012

  7. The oligomeric state and stability of the mannitol transporter, EnzymeIImtl, from Escherichia coli: A fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Gertjan; Hink, Mark; Krasnikov, Victor; van den Bogaart, Geert; Hoeboer, Jeroen; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; Broos, Jaap; Poolman, Bert

    2006-01-01

    Numerous membrane proteins function as oligomers both at the structural and functional levels. The mannitol transporter from Escherichia coli, EnzymeIImtl, is a member of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system. During the transport cycle, mannitol is phosphorylated and released into the cytoplasm as mannitol-1-phosphate. Several studies have shown that EIImtl functions as an oligomeric species. However, the oligomerization number and stability of the oligomeric complex during different steps of the catalytic cycle, e.g., substrate binding and/or phosphorylation of the carrier, is still under discussion. In this paper, we have addressed the oligomeric state and stability of EIImtl using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. A functional double-cysteine mutant was site-specifically labeled with either Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 633. The subunit exchange of these two batches of proteins was followed in time during different steps of the catalytic cycle. The most important conclusions are that (1) in a detergent-solubilized state, EIImtl is functional as a very stable dimer; (2) the stability of the complex can be manipulated by changing the intermicellar attractive forces between PEG-based detergent micelles; (3) substrate binding destabilizes the complex whereas phosphorylation increases the stability; and (4) substrate binding to the phosphorylated species partly antagonizes the stabilizing effect. PMID:16823033

  8. GH1-family 6-P-β-glucosidases from human microbiome lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Karolina; Tan, Kemin; Li, Hui; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Bearden, Jessica; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    In lactic acid bacteria and other bacteria, carbohydrate uptake is mostly governed by phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTSs). PTS-dependent translocation through the cell membrane is coupled with phosphorylation of the incoming sugar. After translocation through the bacterial membrane, the β-glycosidic bond in 6′-­P-­β-glucoside is cleaved, releasing 6-P-β-glucose and the respective aglycon. This reaction is catalyzed by 6-P-β-glucosidases, which belong to two glycoside hydrolase (GH) families: GH1 and GH4. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of GH1 6-P-β-glucosidases from Lactobacillus plantarum (LpPbg1) and Streptococcus mutans (SmBgl) and their complexes with ligands are reported. Both enzymes show hydrolytic activity towards 6′-P-β-glucosides. The LpPbg1 structure has been determined in an apo form as well as in a complex with phosphate and a glucose molecule corresponding to the aglycon molecule. The S. mutans homolog contains a sulfate ion in the phosphate-dedicated subcavity. SmBgl was also crystallized in the presence of the reaction product 6-P-β-glucose. For a mutated variant of the S. mutans enzyme (E375Q), the structure of a 6′-P-salicin complex has also been determined. The presence of natural ligands enabled the definition of the structural elements that are responsible for substrate recognition during catalysis. PMID:23519420

  9. Engineering of Escherichia coli to facilitate efficient utilization of isomaltose and panose in industrial glucose feedstock.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kenji; Kuroda, Akio; Takeshita, Ryo

    2017-03-01

    Industrial glucose feedstock prepared by enzymatic digestion of starch typically contains significant amounts of disaccharides such as maltose and isomaltose and trisaccharides such as maltotriose and panose. Maltose and maltosaccharides can be utilized in Escherichia coli fermentation using industrial glucose feedstock because there is an intrinsic assimilation pathway for these sugars. However, saccharides that contain α-1,6 bonds, such as isomaltose and panose, are still present after fermentation because there is no metabolic pathway for these sugars. To facilitate more efficient utilization of glucose feedstock, we introduced glvA, which encodes phospho-α-glucosidase, and glvC, which encodes a subunit of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent maltose phosphotransferase system (PTS) of Bacillus subtilis, into E. coli. The heterologous expression of glvA and glvC conferred upon the recombinant the ability to assimilate isomaltose and panose. The recombinant E. coli assimilated not only other disaccharides but also trisaccharides, including alcohol forms of these saccharides, such as isomaltitol. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to show the involvement of the microbial PTS in the assimilation of trisaccharides. Furthermore, we demonstrated that an L-lysine-producing E. coli harboring glvA and glvC converted isomaltose and panose to L-lysine efficiently. These findings are expected to be beneficial for industrial fermentation.

  10. Cell and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rajesh C; Zacks, David N

    2014-01-01

    Replacement or repair of a dysfunctional gene combined with promoting cell survival is a two-pronged approach that addresses an unmet need in the therapy of retinal degenerative diseases. In this chapter, we discuss various strategies toward achieving both goals: transplantation of wild-type cells to replace degenerating cells and to rescue gene function, sequential gene and cell therapy, and in vivo reprogramming of rods to cones. These approaches highlight cutting-edge advances in cell and gene therapy, and cellular lineage conversion in order to devise new therapies for various retinal degenerative diseases.

  11. Gene-Category Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Gene-category analysis is one important knowledge integration approach in biomedical sciences that combines knowledge bases such as Gene Ontology with lists of genes or their products, which are often the result of high-throughput experiments, gained from either wet-lab or synthetic experiments. In this chapter, we will motivate this class of analyses and describe an often used variant that is based on Fisher's exact test. We show that this approach has some problems in the context of Gene Ontology of which users should be aware. We then describe some more recent algorithms that try to address some of the shortcomings of the standard approach.

  12. Gene therapy for haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akshay; Easow Mathew, Manu; Sriganesh, Vasumathi; Neely, Jessica A; Kalipatnapu, Sasank

    2014-11-14

    Haemophilia is a genetic disorder which is characterized by spontaneous or provoked, often uncontrolled, bleeding into joints, muscles and other soft tissues. Current methods of treatment are expensive, challenging and involve regular administration of clotting factors. Gene therapy has recently been prompted as a curative treatment modality. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of gene therapy for treating people with haemophilia A or B. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis & Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 06 November 2014. Eligible trials included randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials, including controlled clinical trials comparing gene therapy (with or without standard treatment) with standard treatment (factor replacement) or other 'curative' treatment such as stem cell transplantation individuals with haemophilia A or B of all ages who do not have inhibitors to factor VIII or IX. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were found. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. No randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. Thus, we are unable to determine the effects of gene therapy for haemophilia. Gene therapy for haemophilia is still in its nascent stages and there is a need for well-designed clinical trials to assess the long-term feasibility, success and risks of gene therapy for people with haemophilia.

  13. Antiangiogenic Eye Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Corydon, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    The idea of treating disease in humans with genetic material was conceived over two decades ago and with that a promising journey involving development and efficacy studies in cells and animals of a large number of novel therapeutic reagents unfolded. In the footsteps of this process, successful gene therapy treatment of genetic conditions in humans has shown clear signs of efficacy. Notably, significant advancements using gene supplementation and silencing strategies have been made in the field of ocular gene therapy, thereby pinpointing ocular gene therapy as one of the compelling "actors" bringing gene therapy to the clinic. Most of all, this success has been facilitated because of (1) the fact that the eye is an effortlessly accessible, exceedingly compartmentalized, and immune-privileged organ offering a unique advantage as a gene therapy target, and (2) significant progress toward efficient, sustained transduction of cells within the retina having been achieved using nonintegrating vectors based on recombinant adeno-associated virus and nonintegrating lentivirus vectors. The results from in vivo experiments and trials suggest that treatment of inherited retinal dystrophies, ocular angiogenesis, and inflammation with gene therapy can be both safe and effective. Here, the progress of ocular gene therapy is examined with special emphasis on the potential use of RNAi- and protein-based antiangiogenic gene therapy to treat exudative age-related macular degeneration.

  14. History of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality.

  15. Towards Consensus Gene Ages

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; McWhite, Claire D.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Correctly estimating the age of a gene or gene family is important for a variety of fields, including molecular evolution, comparative genomics, and phylogenetics, and increasingly for systems biology and disease genetics. However, most studies use only a point estimate of a gene’s age, neglecting the substantial uncertainty involved in this estimation. Here, we characterize this uncertainty by investigating the effect of algorithm choice on gene-age inference and calculate consensus gene ages with attendant error distributions for a variety of model eukaryotes. We use 13 orthology inference algorithms to create gene-age datasets and then characterize the error around each age-call on a per-gene and per-algorithm basis. Systematic error was found to be a large factor in estimating gene age, suggesting that simple consensus algorithms are not enough to give a reliable point estimate. We also found that different sources of error can affect downstream analyses, such as gene ontology enrichment. Our consensus gene-age datasets, with associated error terms, are made fully available at so that researchers can propagate this uncertainty through their analyses (geneages.org). PMID:27259914

  16. Cucumber gene list 2017

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This is an update of the 2010 version of Cucumber Gene List. Since the release of the cucumber draft genome in 2009, significant progress has been made in developing cucumber genetic and genomics resources. A number of genes or QTLs have been tagged with molecular markers, which provides us a better...

  17. Smart Genes, Stupid Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randerson, Sherman; Mahadeva, Madhu N.

    1983-01-01

    Because many people still believe that specific, identifiable genes dictate the level of human intelligence and that the number/quality of these genes can be evaluated, presents evidence from human genetics (related to nervous system development) to counter this view. Also disputes erroneous assumptions made in "heritability studies" of human…

  18. A victory for genes.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    The ability to patent human genes has been costly to researchers and patients, and has restricted competition in the biotech marketplace. The recent US Supreme Court decision making isolated human genes unpatentable will bring freedom of choice to the patient, and level the playing field for research and development.

  19. Genes, genome and Gestalt.

    PubMed

    Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2005-03-31

    According to Gestalt thinking, biological systems cannot be viewed as the sum of their elements, but as processes of the whole. To understand organisms we must start from the whole, observing how the various parts are related. In genetics, we must observe the genome over and above the sum of its genes. Either loss or addition of one gene in a genome can change the function of the organism. Genomes are organized in networks of genes, which need to be well integrated. In the case of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), for example, soybeans, rats, Anopheles mosquitoes, and pigs, the insertion of an exogenous gene into a receptive organism generally causes disturbance in the networks, resulting in the breakdown of gene interactions. In these cases, genetic modification increased the genetic load of the GMO and consequently decreased its adaptability (fitness). Therefore, it is hard to claim that the production of such organisms with an increased genetic load does not have ethical implications.

  20. [Gene therapy and ethics].

    PubMed

    Müller, H; Rehmann-Sutter, C

    1995-01-10

    Gene therapy represents a new strategy to treat human disorders. It was originally conceived as a cure for severe monogenetic disorders. Since its conception, the spectrum of possible application for gene therapy has been to include the treatment of acquired diseases, such as various forms of cancer and some viral infections, most notably human immune deficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus. Since somatic gene therapy does not cause substantially new ethical problems, it has gained broad approval. This is by no means the case with germ-line gene therapy. Practically all bodies who were evaluating the related ethical aspects wanted to ban its medical application on grounds of fundamental and pragmatic considerations. In this review, practical and ethical views concerning gene therapy are summarized which were presented at the "Junitagung 1994" of the Swiss Society for Biomedical Ethics in Basle.

  1. GIPC gene family (Review).

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2002-06-01

    GIPC1/GIPC/RGS19IP1, GIPC2, and GIPC3 genes constitute the human GIPC gene family. GIPC1 and GIPC2 show 62.0% total-amino-acid identity. GIPC1 and GIPC3 show 59.9% total-amino-acid identity. GIPC2 and GIPC3 show 55.3% total-amino-acid identity. GIPCs are proteins with central PDZ domain and GIPC homology (GH1 and GH2) domains. PDZ, GH1, and GH2 domains are conserved among human GIPCs, Xenopus GIPC/Kermit, and Drosophila GIPC/ LP09416. Bioinformatics revealed that GIPC genes are linked to prostanoid receptor genes and DNAJB genes in the human genome as follows: GIPC1 gene is linked to prostaglandin E receptor 1 (PTGER1) gene and DNAJB1 gene in human chromosome 19p13.2-p13.1 region; GIPC2 gene to prostaglandin F receptor (PTGFR) gene and DNAJB4 gene in human chromosome 1p31.1-p22.3 region; GIPC3 gene to thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R) gene in human chromosome 19p13.3 region. GIPC1 and GIPC2 mRNAs are expressed together in OKAJIMA, TMK1, MKN45 and KATO-III cells derived from diffuse-type of gastric cancer, and are up-regulated in several cases of primary gastric cancer. PDZ domain of GIPC family proteins interact with Frizzled-3 (FZD3) class of WNT receptor, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF1) receptor, receptor tyrosine kinase TrkA, TGF-beta type III receptor (TGF-beta RIII), integrin alpha6A subunit, transmembrane glycoprotein 5T4, and RGS19/RGS-GAIP. Because RGS19 is a member of the RGS family that regulate heterotrimeric G-protein signaling, GIPCs might be scaffold proteins linking heterotrimeric G-proteins to seven-transmembrane-type WNT receptor or to receptor tyrosine kinases. Therefore, GIPC1, GIPC2 and GIPC3 might play key roles in carcinogenesis and embryogenesis through modulation of growth factor signaling and cell adhesion.

  2. 4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW OF GENE WASH RESERVOIR AND GENE CAMP LOOKING SOUTHWEST. DAM AND SPILLWAY VISIBLE IN BOTTOM OF PHOTO. - Gene Wash Reservoir & Dam, 2 miles west of Parker Dam, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. Third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes.

    PubMed

    Premzl, Marko

    2014-12-01

    The eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol annotated most comprehensive eutherian lysozyme gene data set. Among 209 potential coding sequences, the third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes included 116 complete coding sequences that first described seven major gene clusters. As one new framework of future experiments, the present integrated gene annotations, phylogenetic analysis and protein molecular evolution analysis proposed new classification and nomenclature of eutherian lysozyme genes.

  4. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, M K; Evens, H; VandenDriessche, T

    2013-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders resulting from deficiencies of factor VIII and FIX, respectively. Purified clotting factor concentrates are currently intravenously administered to treat hemophilia, but this treatment is non-curative. Therefore, gene-based therapies for hemophilia have been developed to achieve sustained high levels of clotting factor expression to correct the clinical phenotype. Over the past two decades, different types of viral and non-viral gene delivery systems have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy research with a variety of target cells, particularly hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, skeletal muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lentiviral and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. In preclinical hemophilia A and B animal models, the bleeding phenotype was corrected with these vectors. Some of these promising preclinical results prompted clinical translation to patients suffering from a severe hemophilic phenotype. These patients receiving gene therapy with AAV vectors showed long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels, which is a major step forwards in this field. Nevertheless, the levels were insufficient to prevent trauma or injury-induced bleeding episodes. Another challenge that remains is the possible immune destruction of gene-modified cells by effector T cells, which are directed against the AAV vector antigens. It is therefore important to continuously improve the current gene therapy approaches to ultimately establish a real cure for hemophilia.

  5. Fecundity genes in sheep.

    PubMed

    Davis, G H

    2004-07-01

    Since 1980 there has been increasing interest in the identification and utilisation of major genes for prolificacy in sheep. Mutations that increase ovulation rate have been discovered in the BMPR-1B, BMP15 and GDF9 genes, and others are known to exist from the expressed inheritance patterns although the mutations have not yet been located. In the case of BMP15, four different mutations have been discovered but each produces the same phenotype. The modes of inheritance of the different prolificacy genes include autosomal dominant genes with additive effects on ovulation rate (BMPR-1B; Lacaune), autosomal over-dominant genes with infertility in homozygous females (GDF9), X-linked over-dominant genes with infertility in homozygous females (BMP15), and X-linked maternally imprinted genes (FecX2). The size of the effect of one copy of a mutation on ovulation rate ranges from an extra 0.4 ovulations per oestrus for the FecX2 mutation to an extra 1.5 ovulations per oestrus for the BMPR-1B mutation. DNA tests enable some of these mutations to be used in genetic improvement programmes based on marker assisted selection.

  6. Gene therapy for haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akshay; Easow Mathew, Manu; Sriganesh, Vasumathi; Reiss, Ulrike M

    2016-12-20

    Haemophilia is a genetic disorder characterized by spontaneous or provoked, often uncontrolled, bleeding into joints, muscles and other soft tissues. Current methods of treatment are expensive, challenging and involve regular administration of clotting factors. Gene therapy has recently been prompted as a curative treatment modality. This is an update of a published Cochrane Review. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of gene therapy for treating people with haemophilia A or B. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis & Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 18 August 2016. Eligible trials include randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials, including controlled clinical trials comparing gene therapy (with or without standard treatment) with standard treatment (factor replacement) or other 'curative' treatment such as stem cell transplantation for individuals with haemophilia A or B of all ages who do not have inhibitors to factor VIII or IX. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were found. No trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. No randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials of gene therapy for haemophilia were identified. Thus, we are unable to determine the safety and efficacy of gene therapy for haemophilia. Gene therapy for haemophilia is still in its nascent stages and there is a need for well-designed clinical trials to assess the long-term feasibility, success and risks of gene therapy for people with haemophilia.

  7. Constitutive expression of selected genes from the pentose phosphate and aromatic pathways increases the shikimic acid yield in high-glucose batch cultures of an Escherichia coli strain lacking PTS and pykF

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During the last two decades many efforts have been directed towards obtaining efficient microbial processes for the production of shikimic acid (SA); however, feeding high amounts of substrate to increase the titer of this compound has invariably rendered low conversion yields, leaving room for improvement of the producing strains. In this work we report an alternative platform to overproduce SA in a laboratory-evolved Escherichia coli strain, based on plasmid-driven constitutive expression of six genes selected from the pentose phosphate and aromatic amino acid pathways, artificially arranged as an operon. Production strains also carried inactivated genes coding for phosphotransferase system components (ptsHIcrr), shikimate kinases I and II (aroK and aroL), pyruvate kinase I (pykF) and the lactose operon repressor (lacI). Results The strong and constitutive expression of the constructed operon permitted SA production from the beginning of the cultures, as evidenced in 1 L batch-mode fermentors starting with high concentrations of glucose and yeast extract. Inactivation of the pykF gene improved SA production under the evaluated conditions by increasing the titer, yield and productivity of this metabolite compared to the isogenic pykF+ strain. The best producing strain accumulated up to 43 g/L of SA in 30 h and relatively low concentrations of acetate and aromatic byproducts were detected, with SA accounting for 80% of the produced aromatic compounds. These results were consistent with high expression levels of the glycolytic pathway and synthetic operon genes from the beginning of fermentations, as revealed by transcriptomic analysis. Despite the consumption of 100 g/L of glucose, the yields on glucose of SA and of total aromatic compounds were about 50% and 60% of the theoretical maximum, respectively. The obtained yields and specific production and consumption rates proved to be constant with three different substrate concentrations. Conclusions

  8. Specificity of expression of the GUS reporter gene (uidA) driven by the tobacco ASA2 promoter in soybean plants and tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yoshimi; Zhong, Wei Qun; Zhang, Xing-Hai; Widholm, Jack M

    2007-07-01

    Twelve independent lines were transformed by particle bombardment of soybean embryogenic suspension cultures with the tobacco anthranilate synthase (ASA2) promoter driving the uidA (beta-glucuronidase, GUS) reporter gene. ASA2 appears to be expressed in a tissue culture specific manner in tobacco (Song H-S, Brotherton JE, Gonzales RA, Widholm JM. Tissue culture specific expression of a naturally occurring tobacco feedback-insensitive anthranilate synthase. Plant Physiol 1998;117:533-43). The transgenic lines also contained the hygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt) gene and were selected using hygromycin. All the selected cultures or the embryos that were induced from these cultures expressed GUS measured histochemically. However, no histochemical GUS expression could be found in leaves, stems, roots, pods and root nodules of the plants formed from the embryos and their progeny. Pollen from some of the plants and immature and mature seeds and embryogenic cultures initiated from immature cotyledons did show GUS activity. Quantitative 4-methylumbelliferyl-glucuronide (MUG) assays of the GUS activity in various tissues showed that all with observable histochemical GUS activity contained easily measurable activities and leaves and stems that showed no observable histochemical GUS staining did contain very low but measurable MUG activity above that of the untransformed control but orders of magnitude lower than the constitutive 35S-uidA controls used. Low but clearly above background levels of boiling sensitive GUS activity could be observed in the untransformed control immature seeds and embryogenic cultures using the MUG assay. Thus in soybean the ASA2 promoter drives readily observable GUS expression in tissue cultures, pollen and seeds, with only extremely low levels seen in vegetative tissues of the plants. The ASA2 driven expression seen in mature seed was, however, much lower than that seen with the constitutive 35S promoter; less than 2% in seed coats and less than

  9. Altered expression of several genes in IIIManL-defective mutants of Streptococcus salivarius demonstrated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, R; Frenette, M; Vadeboncoeur, C

    1993-05-01

    Mannose, glucose and fructose are transported in Streptococcus salivarius by a phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system (PTS) which consists of a membrane-bound Enzyme II (EII) and two forms of IIIMan having molecular weights of 38,900 (IIIManH) and 35,200 (IIIManL), respectively. We have previously reported the isolation of spontaneous mutants lacking IIIManL and showed that they exhibit higher beta-galactosidase activity than the parental strain after growth on glucose, and that some of them constitutively express a fructose PTS which is induced by fructose in the parental strain. In an attempt to determine whether the expression of other genes is affected by the mutation and what the physiological link is between them, we examined three S. salivarius IIIManL-defective mutants (strains A37, B31 and G29) and the parental strain using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis after growth of the cells on a variety of sugars. After growth on glucose, five new proteins were detected in the cytoplasm of the three mutants. Two of these proteins were induced in the parental strain by galactose or oligosaccharides containing galactose, and one was specifically induced by melibiose. The other two proteins were not detected in the parental strain under any of the growth conditions tested. Two other proteins were only detected in glucose-grown cells of mutant A37, and a protein associated with the metabolism of fructose was constitutively expressed in mutants B31 and G29. Moreover, we have found that under identical growth conditions the amounts of several other proteins which were detected in the parental strain were either increased or decreased in the mutants. Globally, our results have indicated that (1) the expression of several genes was affected in the spontaneous IIIManL-defective mutants; (2) some of the proteins abnormally produced in the mutants were specifically induced in the parental strain by sugars; (3) the phenotypic modifications observed in the

  10. FlyBase: genes and gene models

    PubMed Central

    Drysdale, Rachel A.; Crosby, Madeline A.

    2005-01-01

    FlyBase (http://flybase.org) is the primary repository of genetic and molecular data of the insect family Drosophilidae. For the most extensively studied species, Drosophila melanogaster, a wide range of data are presented in integrated formats. Data types include mutant phenotypes, molecular characterization of mutant alleles and aberrations, cytological maps, wild-type expression patterns, anatomical images, transgenic constructs and insertions, sequence-level gene models and molecular classification of gene product functions. There is a growing body of data for other Drosophila species; this is expected to increase dramatically over the next year, with the completion of draft-quality genomic sequences of an additional 11 Drosphila species. PMID:15608223

  11. Differentially Coexpressed Disease Gene Identification Based on Gene Coexpression Network.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Zhang, Han; Quan, Xiongwen

    2016-01-01

    Screening disease-related genes by analyzing gene expression data has become a popular theme. Traditional disease-related gene selection methods always focus on identifying differentially expressed gene between case samples and a control group. These traditional methods may not fully consider the changes of interactions between genes at different cell states and the dynamic processes of gene expression levels during the disease progression. However, in order to understand the mechanism of disease, it is important to explore the dynamic changes of interactions between genes in biological networks at different cell states. In this study, we designed a novel framework to identify disease-related genes and developed a differentially coexpressed disease-related gene identification method based on gene coexpression network (DCGN) to screen differentially coexpressed genes. We firstly constructed phase-specific gene coexpression network using time-series gene expression data and defined the conception of differential coexpression of genes in coexpression network. Then, we designed two metrics to measure the value of gene differential coexpression according to the change of local topological structures between different phase-specific networks. Finally, we conducted meta-analysis of gene differential coexpression based on the rank-product method. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of DCGN and the superior performance of DCGN over other popular disease-related gene selection methods through real-world gene expression data sets.

  12. Differentially Coexpressed Disease Gene Identification Based on Gene Coexpression Network

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Xiongwen

    2016-01-01

    Screening disease-related genes by analyzing gene expression data has become a popular theme. Traditional disease-related gene selection methods always focus on identifying differentially expressed gene between case samples and a control group. These traditional methods may not fully consider the changes of interactions between genes at different cell states and the dynamic processes of gene expression levels during the disease progression. However, in order to understand the mechanism of disease, it is important to explore the dynamic changes of interactions between genes in biological networks at different cell states. In this study, we designed a novel framework to identify disease-related genes and developed a differentially coexpressed disease-related gene identification method based on gene coexpression network (DCGN) to screen differentially coexpressed genes. We firstly constructed phase-specific gene coexpression network using time-series gene expression data and defined the conception of differential coexpression of genes in coexpression network. Then, we designed two metrics to measure the value of gene differential coexpression according to the change of local topological structures between different phase-specific networks. Finally, we conducted meta-analysis of gene differential coexpression based on the rank-product method. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of DCGN and the superior performance of DCGN over other popular disease-related gene selection methods through real-world gene expression data sets. PMID:28042568

  13. Genes and social behavior.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Gene E; Fernald, Russell D; Clayton, David F

    2008-11-07

    What genes and regulatory sequences contribute to the organization and functioning of neural circuits and molecular pathways in the brain that support social behavior? How does social experience interact with information in the genome to modulate brain activity? Here, we address these questions by highlighting progress that has been made in identifying and understanding two key "vectors of influence" that link genes, the brain, and social behavior: (i) Social information alters gene expression in the brain to influence behavior, and (ii) genetic variation influences brain function and social behavior. We also discuss how evolutionary changes in genomic elements influence social behavior and outline prospects for a systems biology of social behavior.

  14. Genes underlying altruism.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Graham J; Hurd, Peter L; Crespi, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    William D. Hamilton postulated the existence of 'genes underlying altruism', under the rubric of inclusive fitness theory, a half-century ago. Such genes are now poised for discovery. In this article, we develop a set of intuitive criteria for the recognition and analysis of genes for altruism and describe the first candidate genes affecting altruism from social insects and humans. We also provide evidence from a human population for genetically based trade-offs, underlain by oxytocin-system polymorphisms, between alleles for altruism and alleles for non-social cognition. Such trade-offs between self-oriented and altruistic behaviour may influence the evolution of phenotypic diversity across all social animals.

  15. Genes underlying altruism

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Graham J.; Hurd, Peter L.; Crespi, Bernard J.

    2013-01-01

    William D. Hamilton postulated the existence of ‘genes underlying altruism’, under the rubric of inclusive fitness theory, a half-century ago. Such genes are now poised for discovery. In this article, we develop a set of intuitive criteria for the recognition and analysis of genes for altruism and describe the first candidate genes affecting altruism from social insects and humans. We also provide evidence from a human population for genetically based trade-offs, underlain by oxytocin-system polymorphisms, between alleles for altruism and alleles for non-social cognition. Such trade-offs between self-oriented and altruistic behaviour may influence the evolution of phenotypic diversity across all social animals. PMID:24132092

  16. "Bad genes" & criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, María Isabel;