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Sample records for phospholipid model membranes

  1. Biophysical studies of cholesterol in unsaturated phospholipid model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Justin Adam

    Cellular membranes contain a staggering diversity of lipids. The lipids are heterogeneously distributed to create regions, or domains, whose physical properties differ from the bulk membrane and play an essential role in modulating the function of resident proteins. Many basic questions pertaining to the formation of these lateral assemblies remain. This research employs model membranes of well-defined composition to focus on the potential role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their interaction with cholesterol (chol) in restructuring the membrane environment. Omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs are the main bioactive components of fish oil, whose consumption alleviates a variety of health problems by a molecular mechanism that is unclear. We hypothesize that the incorporation of PUFAs into membrane lipids and the effect they have on molecular organization may be, in part, responsible. Chol is a major constituent in the plasma membrane of mammals. It determines the arrangement and collective properties of neighboring lipids, driving the formation of domains via differential affinity for different lipids. The molecular organization of 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-eicosapentaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PEPC-d31) and 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PDPC-d31) in membranes with sphingomyelin (SM) and chol (1:1:1 mol) was compared by solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are the two major n-3 PUFAs found in fish oil, while PEPC-d31 and PDPC-d31 are phospholipids containing the respective PUFAs at the sn-2 position and a perdeuterated palmitic acid at the sn-1 position. Analysis of spectra recorded as a function of temperature indicates that in both cases, formation of PUFA-rich (less ordered) and SM-rich (more ordered) domains occurred. A surprisingly substantial proportion of PUFA was found to infiltrate the more ordered domain. There was almost twice as much DHA (65%) as EPA (30%). The implication is that n-3

  2. New insights into water-phospholipid model membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Milhaud, Jeannine

    2004-05-27

    Modulating the relative humidity (RH) of the ambient gas phase of a phospholipid/water sample for modifying the activity of phospholipid-sorbed water [humidity-controlled osmotic stress methods, J. Chem. Phys. 92 (1990) 4519 and J. Phys. Chem. 96 (1992) 446] has opened a new field of research of paramount importance. New types of phase transitions, occurring at specific values of this activity, have been then disclosed. Hence, it is become recognized that this activity, like the temperature T, is an intensive parameter of the thermodynamical state of these samples. This state can be therefore changed (phase transition) either, by modulating T at a given water activity (a given hydration level), or, by modulating the water activity, at a given T. The underlying mechanisms of these two types of transition differ, especially when they appear as disorderings of fatty chains. In lyotropic transitions, this disordering follows from two thermodynamical laws. First, acting on the activity (the chemical potential) of water external to a phospholipid/water sample, a transbilayer gradient of water chemical potential is created, leading to a transbilayer flux of water (Fick's law). Second, water molecules present within the hydrocarbon region of this phospholipid bilayer interact with phospholipid molecules through their chemical potential (Gibbs-Duhem relation): the conformational state of fatty chains (the thermodynamical state of the phospholipid molecules) changes. This process is slow, as revealed by osmotic stress time-resolved experiments. In thermal chain-melting transitions, the first rapid step is the disordering of fatty chains of a fraction of phospholipid molecules. It occurs a few degrees before the main transition temperature, T(m), during the pretransition and the sub-main transition. The second step, less rapid, is the redistribution of water molecules between the different parts of the sample, as revealed by T-jump time-resolved experiments. Finally, in

  3. Phospholipid Diffusion Coefficients of Cushioned Model Membranes determined via Z-Scan Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah M.; Allgeyer, Edward S.; Fick, Jörg; Prudovsky, Igor; Mason, Michael D.; Neivandt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Model cellular membranes enable the study of biological processes in a controlled environment and reduce the traditional challenges associated with live or fixed cell studies. However, model membrane systems based on the air/water or oil/solution interface do not allow for incorporation of transmembrane proteins, or for the study of protein transport mechanisms. Conversely, a phospholipid bilayer deposited via the Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir Schaefer method on a hydrogel layer is potentially an effective mimic of the cross-section of a biological membrane, and facilitates both protein incorporation and transport studies. Prior to application, however, such membranes must be fully characterized, particularly with respect to the phospholipid bilayer phase transition temperature. Here we present a detailed characterization of the phase transition temperature of the inner and outer leaflets of a chitosan supported model membrane system. Specifically, the lateral diffusion coefficient of each individual leaflet has been determined as a function of temperature. Measurements were performed utilizing z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a technique that yields calibration-free diffusion information. Analysis via the method of Wawrezinieck and coworkers, revealed that phospholipid diffusion changes from raft-like to free diffusion as the temperature is increased; an insight into the dynamic behavior of hydrogel supported membranes not previously reported. PMID:23705855

  4. Studies on the interactions of bisphenols with anionic phospholipids of decomposer membranes in model systems.

    PubMed

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Sobolewska, Katarzyna; Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and other bisphenols constitute a class of organic pollutants, which because of their estrogenic properties, low dose activity and bioaccumulation pose considerable risk for public health as well as for the environment. Accumulated in the sediment bisphenols can endanger the decomposers' populations being incorporated into their cellular membranes; however, the mechanism of their membrane activity is unknown. Therefore, to study these phenomena we applied anionic phospholipid Langmuir monolayers as simple but versatile models of decomposers biomembranes. Phosphatidylglycerols and cardiolipins are not only the main components of bacterial membranes but also of crucial importance in mitochondrial and thylakoid membranes in eukaryotic cells. In our investigations we applied five compounds of the bisphenol class most commonly detected in the environment. To characterize the bisphenols-model membrane interactions we applied multiple mutually independent methods of physical chemistry; namely: the Langmuir monolayer technique, surface potential measurements, Brewster angle microscopy for the visualization of the monolayers' texture and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction for the discussion of the phospholipids packing within the monolayers. Our studies indicated that all the investigated bisphenols interact with the model membrane, but the strength of the interactions is dependent on the bisphenol structure and hydrophobicity and the fluidity of the model membranes. We proved that bisphenol S often treated as the least toxic BPA analog can also be incorporated to the model membranes changing their structure and fluidity. PMID:26806160

  5. Studies on the interactions of bisphenols with anionic phospholipids of decomposer membranes in model systems.

    PubMed

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Sobolewska, Katarzyna; Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and other bisphenols constitute a class of organic pollutants, which because of their estrogenic properties, low dose activity and bioaccumulation pose considerable risk for public health as well as for the environment. Accumulated in the sediment bisphenols can endanger the decomposers' populations being incorporated into their cellular membranes; however, the mechanism of their membrane activity is unknown. Therefore, to study these phenomena we applied anionic phospholipid Langmuir monolayers as simple but versatile models of decomposers biomembranes. Phosphatidylglycerols and cardiolipins are not only the main components of bacterial membranes but also of crucial importance in mitochondrial and thylakoid membranes in eukaryotic cells. In our investigations we applied five compounds of the bisphenol class most commonly detected in the environment. To characterize the bisphenols-model membrane interactions we applied multiple mutually independent methods of physical chemistry; namely: the Langmuir monolayer technique, surface potential measurements, Brewster angle microscopy for the visualization of the monolayers' texture and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction for the discussion of the phospholipids packing within the monolayers. Our studies indicated that all the investigated bisphenols interact with the model membrane, but the strength of the interactions is dependent on the bisphenol structure and hydrophobicity and the fluidity of the model membranes. We proved that bisphenol S often treated as the least toxic BPA analog can also be incorporated to the model membranes changing their structure and fluidity.

  6. Effects of structure on the interactions between five natural antimicrobial compounds and phospholipids of bacterial cell membrane on model monolayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monolayers composed of bacterial phospholipids were used as model membranes to study interactions of naturally occurring phenolic compounds 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, 2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzaldehyde and the plant essential oil compounds carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and geraniol, previously found to be...

  7. HgCl2 disrupts the structure of the human erythrocyte membrane and model phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Ungerer, B; Villena, F; Cuevas, F; Sotomayor, C P

    2000-10-01

    The structural effects of Hg(II) ions on the erythrocyte membrane were studied through the interactions of HgCl2 with human erythrocytes and their isolated resealed membranes. Studies were carried out by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. Hg(II) induced shape changes in erythrocytes, which took the form of echinocytes and stomatocytes. This finding means that Hg(II) locates in both the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane. Fluorescence spectroscopy results indicate strong interactions of Hg(II) ions with phospholipid amino groups, which also affected the packing of the lipid acyl chains at the deep hydrophobic core of the membrane. HgCl2 also interacted with bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine, representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. X-ray diffraction indicated that Hg(II) ions induced molecular disorder to both phospholipid bilayers, while fluorescence spectroscopy of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine large unilamellar vesicles confirmed the interaction of Hg(II) ions with the lipid polar head groups. All these findings point to the important role of the phospholipid bilayers in the interaction of Hg(II) on cell membranes. PMID:11065190

  8. Interactions of Al(acac)3 with cell membranes and model phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Ungerer, B; Villena, F; Norris, B; Cárdenas, H; Zatta, P

    1999-07-15

    Aluminum is a neurotoxic agent; however, little information has been obtained regarding its molecular cytotoxicity and the effects on the stability of biological membranes. This is mainly due to the ill-defined chemical speciation of the metal compounds. For this reason, the present study used aluminum acetylacetonate, (Al(acac)3), a neutral, chemically well-defined, hydrolytically stable and lipophilic compound. To understand the molecular mechanism of its interaction with cell membranes, Al(acac)3 was incubated with human erythrocytes, isolated toad skin and molecular models of biomembranes. The latter consisted of multilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoyphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The results showed that Al(acac)3 interacted with the erythrocyte membrane modifying its normal discoid morphology to both echinocytic and stomatocytic shapes. This finding indicates that the Al complex was inserted in both the outer and inner layers of the red cell membrane, a conclusion supported by X-ray diffraction analyses of DMPC and DMPE bilayers. Electrophysiological measurements performed on toad skin revealed a significant decrease in the potential difference and short-circuit current responses after application of Al(acac)3, effects interpreted to reflect inhibition of the active transport of ions. Al(acac)3 was active on both surfaces of the skin suggesting that the membrane was permeated by the metal complex. It is concluded that Al(acac)3 both alters the molecular structure of the lipid bilayer, thereby modifying the biophysical properties of the cell membrane, and changes its physiological properties. PMID:10499289

  9. Configuration of polyisoprenoids affects the permeability and thermotropic properties of phospholipid/polyisoprenoid model membranes.

    PubMed

    Ciepichal, Ewa; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Hertel, Jozefina; Swiezewska, Ewa; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2011-05-01

    The influence of α-cis- and α-trans-polyprenols on the structure and properties of model membranes was analyzed. The interaction of Ficaprenol-12 (α-cis-Prenol-12, α-Z-Prenol-12) and Alloprenol-12 (α-trans-Prenol-12, α-E-Prenol-12) with model membranes was compared using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and fluorescent methods. l-α-Phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk (EYPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) as the main lipid components of unilamellar (SUVs) and multilamellar (MLVs) vesicles were used. The two-step extraction procedure (n-pentane and hexane, respectively) allowed to separately analyze the fractions of polyprenol as non-incorporated (Prenol(NonInc)) and incorporated (Prenol(Inc)) into liposomes. Consequently, distribution coefficients, P', describing the equilibrium of prenol content between phospholipid (EYPC) membrane and the aqueous phase gave different logP' for α-cis- and α-trans-Prenol-12, indicating that the configuration of the α-terminal residue significantly alters the hydrophobicity of the polyisoprenoid molecule and consequently the affinity of polyprenols for EYPC membrane. In fluorescence experiments α-trans-Pren-12 increased up to 1.7-fold the permeability of EYPC bilayer for glucose while the effect of α-cis-Pren-12 was almost negligible. Considerable changes of thermotropic behavior of DPPC membranes in the presence of both prenol isomers were observed. α-trans-Pren-12 completely abolished the pretransition while in the case of α-cis-Pren-12 it was noticeably reduced. Furthermore, for both prenol isomers, the temperature of the main phase transition (T(m)) was shifted by about 1°C to lower values and the height of the peak was significantly reduced. The DSC analysis profiles also showed a new peak at 38.7°C, which may suggest the concomitant presence of more that one phase within the membrane. Results of these experiments and the concomitant

  10. Native and dry-heated lysozyme interactions with membrane lipid monolayers: Lipid packing modifications of a phospholipid mixture, model of the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane.

    PubMed

    Derde, Melanie; Nau, Françoise; Guérin-Dubiard, Catherine; Lechevalier, Valérie; Paboeuf, Gilles; Jan, Sophie; Baron, Florence; Gautier, Michel; Vié, Véronique

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is currently an important public health issue. The need for innovative antimicrobials is therefore growing. The ideal antimicrobial compound should limit antimicrobial resistance. Antimicrobial peptides or proteins such as hen egg white lysozyme are promising molecules that act on bacterial membranes. Hen egg white lysozyme has recently been identified as active on Gram-negative bacteria due to disruption of the outer and cytoplasmic membrane integrity. Furthermore, dry-heating (7 days and 80 °C) improves the membrane activity of lysozyme, resulting in higher antimicrobial activity. These in vivo findings suggest interactions between lysozyme and membrane lipids. This is consistent with the findings of several other authors who have shown lysozyme interaction with bacterial phospholipids such as phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. However, until now, the interaction between lysozyme and bacterial cytoplasmic phospholipids has been in need of clarification. This study proposes the use of monolayer models with a realistic bacterial phospholipid composition in physiological conditions. The lysozyme/phospholipid interactions have been studied by surface pressure measurements, ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy. Native lysozyme has proved able to absorb and insert into a bacterial phospholipid monolayer, resulting in lipid packing reorganization, which in turn has lead to lateral cohesion modifications between phospholipids. Dry-heating of lysozyme has increased insertion capacity and ability to induce lipid packing modifications. These in vitro findings are then consistent with the increased membrane disruption potential of dry heated lysozyme in vivo compared to native lysozyme. Moreover, an eggPC monolayer study suggested that lysozyme/phospholipid interactions are specific to bacterial cytoplasmic membranes.

  11. Nature of the charged headgroup determines the fusogenic potential and membrane properties of lithocholic acid phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Priyanshu; Singh, Manish; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-08-01

    Phospholipids play a crucial role in many cellular processes ranging from selective membrane permeability, to membrane fission and fusion, to cellular signaling. Headgroups of phospholipids determine the membrane properties and fusogenicity of these lipids with target cell membranes. We studied the fusogenic and membrane properties of phospholipids possessing unnatural charged headgroups with model membranes using laurdan based membrane hydration studies, DPH based membrane fluidity, and differential scanning calorimetry. We unravel that fusogenicity, membrane hydration, and fluidity of membranes are strongly contingent on the nature of the phospholipid charged headgroup. Our studies unraveled that introduction of bulky headgroups like dimethylamino pyridine induces maximum membrane hydration and perturbations with high fusogenicity as compared to small headgroup based phospholipids. These phospholipids also have the capability of high retention in DPPC membranes. Hydration and fluidity of these phospholipid-doped DPPC membranes are contingent on the nature of the charged headgroup. This study would help in future design of phospholipid based nanomaterials for effective drug delivery.

  12. Arsenite interactions with phospholipid bilayers as molecular models for the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Rivera, Cecilia; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2007-04-01

    There are scanty reports concerning the effects of arsenic compounds on the structure and functions of cell membranes. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of arsenite with cell membranes we have utilized bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of arsenite to perturb the bilayer structures was determined by X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy, whilst the modification of their thermotropic behaviour was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The experiments carried out by X-ray diffraction and calorimetry clearly indicated that NaAsO(2) interacted with DMPE and modified its thermotropic behaviour. No such information has been so far reported in the literature. PMID:17175091

  13. Multi-component modeling of quasielastic neutron scattering from phospholipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wanderlingh, U. D’Angelo, G.; Branca, C.; Trimarchi, A.; Rifici, S.; Finocchiaro, D.; Conti Nibali, V.; Crupi, C.; Ollivier, J.; Middendorf, H. D.

    2014-05-07

    We investigated molecular motions in the 0.3–350 ps time range of D{sub 2}O-hydrated bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-oleoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine in the liquid phase by quasielastic neutron scattering. Model analysis of sets of spectra covering scale lengths from 4.8 to 30 Å revealed the presence of three types of motion taking place on well-separated time scales: (i) slow diffusion of the whole phospholipid molecules in a confined cylindrical region; (ii) conformational motion of the phospholipid chains; and (iii) fast uniaxial rotation of the hydrogen atoms around their carbon atoms. Based on theoretical models for the hydrogen dynamics in phospholipids, the spatial extent of these motions was analysed in detail and the results were compared with existing literature data. The complex dynamics of protons was described in terms of elemental dynamical processes involving different parts of the phospholipid chain on whose motions the hydrogen atoms ride.

  14. The anticancer drug chlorambucil interacts with the human erythrocyte membrane and model phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Hernández, P; Villena, F; Sotomayor, C P

    1999-12-01

    The plasma membrane has gained increasing attention as a possible target of antitumor drugs. It has been reported that they act as growth factor antagonists, growth factor receptor blockers, interfere with mitogenic signal transduction or exert direct cytotoxic effects. Chlorambucil (4-[p-(bis[2-chloroethyl]amino)phenyl]butyric acid) is an alkylating agent widely used in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Contradictory reports have been published concerning its interaction with cell membranes. Whereas a decrease in the fluidity of Ehrlich ascite tumor cells has been adduced, no evidences were found that chlorambucil changes membrane lipid fluidity and alkylating agents had effects in these systems even at highly toxic concentrations. Our results showed that chlorambucil at a dose equivalent to its therapeutical concentration in the plasma (3.6 microM) caused the human erythrocyte membrane to develop cup-shaped forms (stomatocytes). Accordingly to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this means that the drug is inserted into the inner monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane, a conclusion supported by X-ray diffraction performed on multilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. It is concluded that the cytotoxic effect of chlorambucil might be due to alteration of the structure and therefore of the physiological properties of cell membranes such as fluidity, permeability, receptor and channel functions. PMID:10685501

  15. Magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers with positive ordering: a new model membrane system.

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, R S; Hwang, J S; Vold, R R

    1998-01-01

    A stable smectic phospholipid bilayer phase aligned with the director parallel to the magnetic field can be generated by the addition of certain trivalent paramagnetic lanthanide ions to a bicellar solution of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) in water. Suitable lanthanide ions are those with positive anisotropy of their magnetic susceptibility, namely Eu3+, Er3+, Tm3+, and Yb3+. For samples doped with Tm3+, this phase extends over a wide range of Tm3+ concentrations (6-40 mM) and temperatures (35-90 degrees C) and appears to undergo a transition from a fluid nematic discotic to a fluid, but highly ordered, smectic phase at a temperature that depends on the thulium concentration. As a membrane mimetic, these new, positively ordered phospholipid phases have high potential for structural studies using a variety of techniques such as magnetic resonance (EMR and NMR), small-angle x-ray and neutron diffraction, as well as optical and infrared spectroscopy. PMID:9591667

  16. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  18. Partial coverage of phospholipid model membranes with annexin V may completely inhibit their degradation by phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Speijer, H; Jans, S W; Reutelingsperger, C P; Hack, C E; van der Vusse, G J; Hermens, W T

    1997-02-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-mediated hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids was measured by ellipsometry, and the inhibition of this process by annexin V was studied. Planar membranes, consisting of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine (PC/PE/PS; 54:33:13, on molar basis), were degraded by pancreatic PLA2, and the rate of hydrolysis was limited to about 0.7%/min. The influence of graded coverage of the membrane with annexin V was studied. The degree of PLA2 inhibition was nonlinearly related to the amount of membrane-bound annexin V, and binding of only 12% and 54% of full membrane coverage resulted in, respectively, 50% and 93% inhibition. These findings indicate that the inhibition of PLA2-mediated hydrolysis by annexin V cannot be simply explained by shielding of phospholipid substrates from the enzyme. Moreover, the present results leave room for a role of endogenous annexin V in regulating phospholipid turnover in the plasma membrane of parenchymal cells such as cardiomyocytes.

  19. Specific Ion Binding at Phospholipid Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Calero, Carles; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Martí, Jordi

    2015-09-01

    Metal cations are ubiquitous components in biological environments and play an important role in regulating cellular functions and membrane properties. By applying metadynamics simulations, we have performed systematic free energy calculations of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) bound to phospholipid membrane surfaces for the first time. The free energy landscapes unveil specific binding behaviors of metal cations on phospholipid membranes. Na(+) and K(+) are more likely to stay in the aqueous solution and can bind easily to a few lipid oxygens by overcoming low free energy barriers. Ca(2+) is most stable when it is bound to four lipid oxygens of the membrane rather than being hydrated in the aqueous solution. Mg(2+) is tightly hydrated, and it shows hardly any loss of a hydration water or binding directly to the membrane. When bound to the membrane, the cations' most favorable total coordination numbers with water and lipid oxygens are the same as their corresponding hydration numbers in aqueous solution, indicating a competition between ion binding to water and lipids. The binding specificity of metal cations on membranes is highly correlated with the hydration free energy and the size of the hydration shell.

  20. Interaction of abscisic acid with phospholipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stillwell, W.; Brengle, B.; Hester, P.; Wassall, S.T. )

    1989-04-04

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is shown, under certain conditions, to greatly enhance the permeability of phospholipid bilayer membranes to the nonelectrolyte erythritol (followed spectrophotometrically by osmotic swelling) and the anion carboxyfluorescein (followed by fluorescence). The hormone is ineffective with single- and mixed-component phosphatidylcholine membranes in the liquid-crystalline or gel states. In contrast, substantial ABA-induced permeability is measured for two-component membranes containing lipids with different polar head groups or containing phosphatidylcholines with different acyl chains at temperatures where gel and liquid-crystalline phases coexist. Despite the large ABA-induced enhancement in bilayer permeability, no evidence for a substantial change at the molecular level was seen in the membranes by magnetic resonance techniques. {sup 13}C NMR spin-lattice relaxation times, T{sub 1}, in sonicated unilamellar vesicles and ESR of spin-labeled fatty acids intercalated into membranes showed negligible effect on acyl chain order and dynamics within the bilayer, while {sup 31}P NMR of sonicated unilamellar vesicles indicated negligible effect on molecular motion and conformation in the head-group region. The authors propose that, instead of causing a general nonspecific perturbation to the membrane, the hormone acts at membrane defects formed due to mismatch in molecular packing where two different head groups or acyl chain states interface. Increased membrane disruption by ABA at these points of membrane instability could then produce an enhancement in permeability.

  1. Self-reproducing catalyst drives repeated phospholipid synthesis and membrane growth

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Michael D.; Yang, Jun; Selimkhanov, Jangir; Cole, Christian M.; Tsimring, Lev S.; Devaraj, Neal K.

    2015-01-01

    Cell membranes are dynamic structures found in all living organisms. There have been numerous constructs that model phospholipid membranes. However, unlike natural membranes, these biomimetic systems cannot sustain growth owing to an inability to replenish phospholipid-synthesizing catalysts. Here we report on the design and synthesis of artificial membranes embedded with synthetic, self-reproducing catalysts capable of perpetuating phospholipid bilayer formation. Replacing the complex biochemical pathways used in nature with an autocatalyst that also drives lipid synthesis leads to the continual formation of triazole phospholipids and membrane-bound oligotriazole catalysts from simpler starting materials. In addition to continual phospholipid synthesis and vesicle growth, the synthetic membranes are capable of remodeling their physical composition in response to changes in the environment by preferentially incorporating specific precursors. These results demonstrate that complex membranes capable of indefinite self-synthesis can emerge when supplied with simpler chemical building blocks. PMID:26100914

  2. Enhancement by cytidine of membrane phospholipid synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    G-Coviella, I. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Cytidine, as cytidine 5'-diphosphate choline, is a major precursor in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine in cell membranes. In the present study, we examined the relationships between extracellular levels of cytidine, the conversion of [14C]choline to [14C]phosphatidylcholine, and the net syntheses of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine by PC12 cells. The rate at which cytidine (as [3H]cytidine) was incorporated into the PC12 cells followed normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 5 microM; Vmax = 12 x 10(-3) mmol/mg of protein/min) when the cytidine concentrations in the medium were below 50 microM; at higher concentrations, intracellular [3H]cytidine nucleotide levels increased linearly. Once inside the cell, cytidine was converted mainly into cytidine triphosphate. In pulse-chase experiments, addition of cytidine to the medium caused a time- and dose-dependent increase (by up to 30%) in the incorporation of [14C]choline into membrane [14C]-phosphatidylcholine. When the PC12 cells were supplemented with both cytidine and choline for 14 h, small but significant elevations (p less than 0.05) were observed in their absolute contents of membrane phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine, all increasing by 10-15% relative to their levels in cells incubated with choline alone. Exogenous cytidine, acting via cytidine triphosphate, can thus affect the synthesis and levels of cell membrane phospholipids.

  3. Influence of lipids with hydroxyl-containing head groups on Fe2+ (Cu2+)/H2O2-mediated transformation of phospholipids in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Olshyk, Viktoriya N; Melsitova, Inna V; Yurkova, Irina L

    2014-01-01

    Under condition of ROS formation in lipid membranes, free radical reactions can proceed in both hydrophobic (peroxidation of lipids, POL) and polar (free radical fragmentation) parts of the bilayer. Free-radical fragmentation is typical for the lipids containing a hydroxyl group in β-position with respect to an ester or amide bond. The present study has been undertaken to investigate free-radical transformations of phospholipids in model membranes containing lipids able to undergo fragmentation in their polar part. Liposomes from egg yolk lecithin containing saturated or monounsaturated glycero- and sphingolipids were subjected to the action of an HO* - generating system - Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc, and the POL products were investigated. In parallel with this, the effects of monoacylglycerols and scavengers of reactive species on Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc - mediated free-radical fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerols were studied. Hydroxyl-containing sphingolipids and glycerolipids, which undergo free-radical fragmentation under such conditions, manifested antioxidant properties in the model membranes. In the absence of HO groups in the lipid structure, the effect was either pro-oxidant or neutral. Monoacylglycerols slowed down the rate of both peroxidation in the hydrophobic part and free-radical fragmentation in the hydrophilic part of phospholipid membrane. Scavengers of reactive species inhibited the fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerol substantially. Thus, the ability of hydroxyl-containing lipids to undergo free-radical fragmentation in polar part apparently makes a substantial contribution to the mechanism of their protector action. PMID:24189590

  4. Influence of lipids with hydroxyl-containing head groups on Fe2+ (Cu2+)/H2O2-mediated transformation of phospholipids in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Olshyk, Viktoriya N; Melsitova, Inna V; Yurkova, Irina L

    2014-01-01

    Under condition of ROS formation in lipid membranes, free radical reactions can proceed in both hydrophobic (peroxidation of lipids, POL) and polar (free radical fragmentation) parts of the bilayer. Free-radical fragmentation is typical for the lipids containing a hydroxyl group in β-position with respect to an ester or amide bond. The present study has been undertaken to investigate free-radical transformations of phospholipids in model membranes containing lipids able to undergo fragmentation in their polar part. Liposomes from egg yolk lecithin containing saturated or monounsaturated glycero- and sphingolipids were subjected to the action of an HO* - generating system - Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc, and the POL products were investigated. In parallel with this, the effects of monoacylglycerols and scavengers of reactive species on Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc - mediated free-radical fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerols were studied. Hydroxyl-containing sphingolipids and glycerolipids, which undergo free-radical fragmentation under such conditions, manifested antioxidant properties in the model membranes. In the absence of HO groups in the lipid structure, the effect was either pro-oxidant or neutral. Monoacylglycerols slowed down the rate of both peroxidation in the hydrophobic part and free-radical fragmentation in the hydrophilic part of phospholipid membrane. Scavengers of reactive species inhibited the fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerol substantially. Thus, the ability of hydroxyl-containing lipids to undergo free-radical fragmentation in polar part apparently makes a substantial contribution to the mechanism of their protector action.

  5. Surface acoustic wave biosensor as a tool to study the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid and lipopolysaccharide model membranes.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Jörg; Böhling, Arne; Gronewold, Thomas M A; Schlecht, Ulrich; Perpeet, Markus; Gutsmann, Thomas

    2008-08-19

    Surface acoustic wave biosensors are a powerful tool for the study of biomolecular interactions. The modulation of a surface-confined acoustic wave is utilized here for the analysis of surface binding. Phase and amplitude of the wave correspond roughly to mass loading and viscoelastic properties of the surface, respectively. We established a procedure to reconstitute phospholipid and lipopolysaccharide bilayers on the surface of a modified gold sensor chip to study the mode of action of membrane-active peptides. The procedure included the formation of a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanol, covalent coupling of carboxymethyl-dextran, and subsequent coating with a poly- l-lysine layer. The lipid coverage of the surface is highly reproducible and homogeneous as demonstrated in atomic force micrographs. Ethanol/triton treatment removed the lipids completely, which provided the basis for continuous sequences of independent experiments. The setup was applied to investigate the binding of human cathelicidin-derived peptide LL32, as an example for antimicrobial peptides, to immobilized phosphatidylserine membranes. The peptide-membrane interaction results in a positive phase shift and an increase in amplitude, indicating a mass increase along with a loss in viscosity. This suggests that the bilayer becomes more rigid upon interaction with LL32. PMID:18605705

  6. Surface acoustic wave biosensor as a tool to study the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid and lipopolysaccharide model membranes.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Jörg; Böhling, Arne; Gronewold, Thomas M A; Schlecht, Ulrich; Perpeet, Markus; Gutsmann, Thomas

    2008-08-19

    Surface acoustic wave biosensors are a powerful tool for the study of biomolecular interactions. The modulation of a surface-confined acoustic wave is utilized here for the analysis of surface binding. Phase and amplitude of the wave correspond roughly to mass loading and viscoelastic properties of the surface, respectively. We established a procedure to reconstitute phospholipid and lipopolysaccharide bilayers on the surface of a modified gold sensor chip to study the mode of action of membrane-active peptides. The procedure included the formation of a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanol, covalent coupling of carboxymethyl-dextran, and subsequent coating with a poly- l-lysine layer. The lipid coverage of the surface is highly reproducible and homogeneous as demonstrated in atomic force micrographs. Ethanol/triton treatment removed the lipids completely, which provided the basis for continuous sequences of independent experiments. The setup was applied to investigate the binding of human cathelicidin-derived peptide LL32, as an example for antimicrobial peptides, to immobilized phosphatidylserine membranes. The peptide-membrane interaction results in a positive phase shift and an increase in amplitude, indicating a mass increase along with a loss in viscosity. This suggests that the bilayer becomes more rigid upon interaction with LL32.

  7. Computational study of coagulation factor VIIa's affinity for phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Taboureau, Olivier; Olsen, Ole Hvilsted

    2007-02-01

    The interaction between the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-rich domain of coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa), a vitamin-K-dependent enzyme, and phospholipid membranes plays a major role in initiation of blood coagulation. However, despite a high sequence and structural similarity to the Gla domain of other vitamin-K-dependent enzymes with a high membrane affinity, its affinity for negatively charged phospholipids is poor. A few amino acid differences are responsible for this observation. Based on the X-ray structure of lysophosphatidylserine (lysoPS) bound to the Gla domain of bovine prothrombin (Prth), models of the Gla domain of wildtype FVIIa and mutated FVIIa Gla domains in complex with lysoPS were built. Molecular dynamics (MD) and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations on the complexes were applied to investigate the significant difference in the binding affinity. The MD simulation approach provides a structural and dynamic support to the role of P10Q and K32E mutations in the improvement of the membrane contact. Hence, rotation of the Gly11 main chain generated during the MD simulation results in a hydrogen bond with Q10 side chain as well as the appearance of a hydrogen bond between E32 and Q10 forcing the loop harbouring Arg9 and Arg15 to shrink and thereby enhances the accessibility of the phospholipids to the calcium ions. Furthermore, the application of the SMD simulation method to dissociate C6-lysoPS from a series of Gla domain models exhibits a ranking of the rupture force that can be useful in the interpretation of the PS interaction with Gla domains. Finally, adiabatic mapping of Gla6 residue in FVIIa with or without insertion of Tyr4 confirms the critical role of the insertion on the conformation of the side chain Gla6 in FVIIa and the corresponding Gla7 in Prth. PMID:17131117

  8. Effect of Cholesterol on the Structure of a Five-Component Mitochondria-Like Phospholipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, Kelly; Patel, Amit; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.; Fradin, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes have a complex phospholipid composition that varies greatly depending on the organism, cell type and function. In spite of this complexity, most structural data available for phospholipid bilayers concern model systems containing only one or two different phospholipids. Here, we examine the effect of cholesterol on the structure of a complex membrane reflecting the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes, with five different types of headgroups (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin (CL)) and a variety of hydrocarbon tails. This particular system was chosen because elevated cholesterol contents in mitochondrial membranes have been linked to a breaking down of Bax-mediated membrane permeabilization and resistance to cancer treatments. High resolution electron density profiles were determined by X-ray reflectivity, while the area per phospholipid chain, Apc, and the chain order parameter, SX-ray, were determined by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). We show that chain order increases upon the addition of cholesterol, resulting in both a thickening of the lipid bilayer and a reduction in the average surface area per phospholipid chain. This effect, well known as cholesterol’s condensation effect, is similar, but not as pronounced as for single-component phospholipid membranes. We conclude by discussing the relevance of these findings for the insertion of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax in mitochondrial membranes with elevated cholesterol content. PMID:26529029

  9. Influence of membrane phospholipid composition and structural organization on spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes.

    PubMed

    Pankov, R; Markovska, T; Antonov, P; Ivanova, L; Momchilova, A

    2006-09-01

    Investigations were carried out on the influence of phospholipid composition of model membranes on the processes of spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes. Acceptor vesicles were prepared from phospholipids extracted from plasma membranes of control and ras-transformed fibroblasts. Acceptor model membranes with manipulated levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), sphingomyelin and phosphatidic acid were also used in the studies. Donor vesicles were prepared of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and contained two fluorescent lipid analogues, NBD-PC and N-Rh-PE, at a self-quenching concentration. Lipid transfer rate was assessed by measuring the increase of fluorescence in acceptor membranes due to transfer of fluorescent lipid analogues from quenched donor to unquenched acceptor vesicles. The results showed that spontaneous NBD-PC transfer increased upon fluidization of acceptor vesicles. In addition, elevation of PE concentration in model membranes was also accompanied by an increase of lipid transfer to all series of acceptor vesicles. The results are discussed with respect to the role of lipid composition and structural order of cellular plasma membranes in the processes of spontaneous lipid exchange between membrane bilayers. PMID:17197729

  10. Membrane binding of human phospholipid scramblase 1 cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Posada, Itziar M D; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Hervás, Javier H; Alonso, Alicia; Monaco, Hugo L; Goñi, Félix M

    2014-07-01

    Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) consists of a large cytoplasmic domain and a small presumed transmembrane domain near the C-terminal end of the protein. Previous studies with the SCRΔ mutant lacking the C-terminal portion (last 28 aa) revealed the importance of this C-terminal moiety for protein function and calcium-binding affinity. The present contribution is intended to elucidate the effect of the transmembrane domain suppression on SCRΔ binding to model membranes (lipid monolayers and bilayers) and on SCRΔ reconstitution in proteoliposomes. In all cases the protein cytoplasmic domain showed a great affinity for lipid membranes, and behaved in most aspects as an intrinsic membrane protein. Assays have been performed in the presence of phosphatidylserine, presumably important for the SCR cytoplasmic domain to be electrostatically anchored to the plasma membrane inner surface. The fusion protein maltose binding protein-SCR has also been studied as an intermediate case of a molecule that can insert into the bilayer hydrophobic core, yet it is stable in detergent-free buffers. Although the intracellular location of SCR has been the object of debate, the present data support the view of SCR as an integral membrane protein, in which not only the transmembrane domain but also the cytoplasmic moiety play a role in membrane docking of the protein.

  11. Correlation of insulin-enhancing properties of vanadium-dipicolinate complexes in model membrane systems: phospholipid langmuir monolayers and AOT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Sostarecz, Audra G; Gaidamauskas, Ernestas; Distin, Steve; Bonetti, Sandra J; Levinger, Nancy E; Crans, Debbie C

    2014-04-22

    We explore the interactions of V(III) -, V(IV) -, and V(V) -2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (dipic) complexes with model membrane systems and whether these interactions correlate with the blood-glucose-lowering effects of these compounds on STZ-induced diabetic rats. Two model systems, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) Langmuir monolayers and AOT (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate) reverse micelles present controlled environments for the systematic study of these vanadium complexes interacting with self-assembled lipids. Results from the Langmuir monolayer studies show that vanadium complexes in all three oxidation states interact with the DPPC monolayer; the V(III) -phospholipid interactions result in a slight decrease in DPPC molecular area, whereas V(IV) and V(V) -phospholipid interactions appear to increase the DPPC molecular area, an observation consistent with penetration into the interface of this complex. Investigations also examined the interactions of V(III) - and V(IV) -dipic complexes with polar interfaces in AOT reverse micelles. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies of V(IV) complexes in reverse micelles indicate that the neutral and smaller 1:1 V(IV) -dipic complex penetrates the interface, whereas the larger 1:2 V(IV) complex does not. UV/Vis spectroscopy studies of the anionic V(III) -dipic complex show only minor interactions. These results are in contrast to behavior of the V(V) -dipic complex, [VO2 (dipic)](-) , which penetrates the AOT/isooctane reverse micellar interface. These model membrane studies indicate that V(III) -, V(IV) -, and V(V) -dipic complexes interact with and penetrate the lipid interfaces differently, an effect that agrees with the compounds' efficacy at lowering elevated blood glucose levels in diabetic rats.

  12. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  13. Decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Ariyama, Hiroyuki; Kono, Nozomu; Matsuda, Shinji; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-16

    Various kinds of fatty acids are distributed in membrane phospholipids in mammalian cells and tissues. The degree of fatty acid unsaturation in membrane phospholipids affects many membrane-associated functions and can be influenced by diet and by altered activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes such as fatty acid desaturases. However, little is known about how mammalian cells respond to changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition. In this study we showed that stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) knockdown increased the amount of saturated fatty acids and decreased that of monounsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids without affecting the amount or the composition of free fatty acid and induced unfolded protein response (UPR), evidenced by increased expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) mRNAs and splicing of Xbox-binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA. SCD1 knockdown-induced UPR was rescued by various unsaturated fatty acids and was enhanced by saturated fatty acid. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3), which incorporates preferentially polyunsaturated fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine, was up-regulated in SCD1 knockdown cells. Knockdown of LPCAT3 synergistically enhanced UPR with SCD1 knockdown. Finally we showed that palmitic acid-induced UPR was significantly enhanced by LPCAT3 knockdown as well as SCD1 knockdown. These results suggest that a decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces UPR.

  14. Cholesterol autoxidation in phospholipid membrane bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sevanian, A.; McLeod, L.L.

    1987-09-01

    Lipid peroxidation in unilamellar liposomes of known cholesterol-phospholipid composition was monitored under conditions of autoxidation or as induced by a superoxide radical generating system, gamma-irradiation or cumene hydroperoxide. Formation of cholesterol oxidation products was indexed to the level of lipid peroxidation. The major cholesterol oxidation products identified were 7-keto-cholesterol, isomeric cholesterol 5,6-epoxides, isomeric 7-hydroperoxides and isomeric 3,7-cholestane diols. Other commonly encountered products included 3,5-cholestadiene-7-one and cholestane-3 beta, 5 alpha, 6 beta-triol. Superoxide-dependent peroxidation required iron and produced a gradual increase in 7-keto-cholesterol and cholesterol epoxides. Cholesterol oxidation was greatest in liposomes containing high proportions of unsaturated phospholipid to cholesterol (4:1 molar ratio), intermediate with low phospholipid to cholesterol ratios (2:1) and least in liposomes prepared with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. This relationship held regardless of the oxidizing conditions used. Cumene hydroperoxide-dependent lipid peroxidation and/or more prolonged oxidations with other oxidizing systems yielded a variety of products where cholesterol-5 beta,6 beta-epoxide, 7-ketocholesterol and the 7-hydroperoxides were most consistently elevated. Oxyradical initiation of lipid peroxidation produced a pattern of cholesterol oxidation products distinguishable from the pattern derived by cumene hydroperoxide-dependent peroxidation.

  15. Magnetic field alignable domains in phospholipid vesicle membranes containing lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Beck, Paul; Liebi, Marianne; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Ishikawa, Takashi; Rüegger, Heinz; Zepik, Helmut; Fischer, Peter; Walde, Peter; Windhab, Erich

    2010-01-14

    Magnetic fields were applied as a structuring force on phospholipid-based vesicular systems, using paramagnetic lanthanide ions as magnetic handles anchored to the vesicle membrane. Different vesicle formulations were investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) in a magnetic field of up to 8 T, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), (31)P NMR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and permeability measurements with a fluorescent water-soluble marker (calcein). The investigated vesicle formulations consisted usually of 80 mol % of the phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 20 mol % of a chelator lipid (DMPE-DTPA; 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate) with complexed lanthanide ions (Tm(3+), Dy(3+), or La(3+)), and the total lipid concentration was 15 mM. Vesicles containing the paramagnetic lanthanide Tm(3+) or Dy(3+) exhibited a temperature-dependent response to magnetic fields, which can be explained by considering the formation of lipid domains, which upon reaching a critical size become alignable in a magnetic field. The features of this "magnetic field alignable domain model" are as follows: with decreasing temperature (from 30 to 2.5 degrees C) solid domains, consisting mainly of the higher melting phospholipid (DMPE-DTPA.lanthanide), begin to form and grow in size. The domains assemble the large magnetic moments conferred by the lanthanides and orient in magnetic fields. The direction of alignment depends on the type of lanthanide used. The domains orient with their normal parallel to the magnetic field with thulium (Tm(3+)) and perpendicular with dysprosium (Dy(3+)). No magnetic field alignable domains were observed if DMPE-DTPA is replaced either by POPE-DTPA (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetate) or by DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine).

  16. Flagellar membranes are rich in raft-forming phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Serricchio, Mauro; Schmid, Adrien W.; Steinmann, Michael E.; Sigel, Erwin; Rauch, Monika; Julkowska, Daria; Bonnefoy, Serge; Fort, Cécile; Bastin, Philippe; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The observation that the membranes of flagella are enriched in sterols and sphingolipids has led to the hypothesis that flagella might be enriched in raft-forming lipids. However, a detailed lipidomic analysis of flagellar membranes is not available. Novel protocols to detach and isolate intact flagella from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms in combination with reverse-phase liquid chromatography high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry allowed us to determine the phospholipid composition of flagellar membranes relative to whole cells. Our analyses revealed that phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, ceramide and the sphingolipids inositol phosphorylceramide and sphingomyelin are enriched in flagella relative to whole cells. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol are strongly depleted in flagella. Within individual glycerophospholipid classes, we observed a preference for ether-type over diacyl-type molecular species in membranes of flagella. Our study provides direct evidence for a preferential presence of raft-forming phospholipids in flagellar membranes of T. brucei. PMID:26276100

  17. Coverage and disruption of phospholipid membranes by oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pera, Harke; Nolte, Tom M; Leermakers, Frans A M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2014-12-01

    We studied the interactions of silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with phospholipid membranes and show how electrostatics plays an important role. For this, we systematically varied the charge density of both the membranes by changing their lipid composition and the oxide particles by changing the pH. For the silica nanoparticles, results from our recently presented fluorescence vesicle leakage assay are combined with data on particle adsorption onto supported lipid bilayers obtained by optical reflectometry. Because of the strong tendency of the TiO2 nanoparticles to aggregate, the interaction of these particles with the bilayer was studied only in the leakage assay. Self-consistent field (SCF) modeling was applied to interpret the results on a molecular level. At low charge densities of either the silica nanoparticles or the lipid bilayers, no electrostatic barrier to adsorption exists. However, the adsorption rate and adsorbed amounts drop with increasing (negative) charge densities on particles and membranes because of electric double-layer repulsion, which is confirmed by the effect of the ionic strength. SCF calculations show that charged particles change the structure of lipid bilayers by a reorientation of a fraction of the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) headgroups. This explains the affinity of the silica particles for pure PC lipid layers, even at relatively high particle charge densities. Particle adsorption does not always lead to the disruption of the membrane integrity, as is clear from a comparison of the leakage and adsorption data for the silica particles. The attraction should be strong enough, and in line with this, we found that for positively charged TiO2 particles vesicle disruption increases with increasing negative charge density on the membranes. Our results may be extrapolated to a broader range of oxide nanoparticles and ultimately may be used for establishing more accurate nanoparticle toxicity assessments and drug

  18. Influence of ibuprofen on phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Jaksch, Sebastian; Lipfert, Frederik; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Mattauch, Stefan; Holderer, Olaf; Ivanova, Oxana; Frielinghaus, Henrich; Hertrich, Samira; Fischer, Stefan F; Nickel, Bert

    2015-02-01

    A basic understanding of biological membranes is of paramount importance as these membranes comprise the very building blocks of life itself. Cells depend in their function on a range of properties of the membrane, which are important for the stability and function of the cell, information and nutrient transport, waste disposal, and finally the admission of drugs into the cell and also the deflection of bacteria and viruses. We have investigated the influence of ibuprofen on the structure and dynamics of L-α-phosphatidylcholine (SoyPC) membranes by means of grazing incidence small-angle neutron scattering, neutron reflectometry, and grazing incidence neutron spin echo spectroscopy. From the results of these experiments, we were able to determine that ibuprofen induces a two-step structuring behavior in the SoyPC films, where the structure evolves from the purely lamellar phase for pure SoyPC over a superposition of two hexagonal phases to a purely hexagonal phase at high concentrations. A relaxation, which is visible when no ibuprofen is present in the membrane, vanishes upon addition of ibuprofen. This we attribute to a stiffening of the membrane. This behavior may be instrumental in explaining the toxic behavior of ibuprofen in long-term application.

  19. Influence of ibuprofen on phospholipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksch, Sebastian; Lipfert, Frederik; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Mattauch, Stefan; Holderer, Olaf; Ivanova, Oxana; Frielinghaus, Henrich; Hertrich, Samira; Fischer, Stefan F.; Nickel, Bert

    2015-02-01

    A basic understanding of biological membranes is of paramount importance as these membranes comprise the very building blocks of life itself. Cells depend in their function on a range of properties of the membrane, which are important for the stability and function of the cell, information and nutrient transport, waste disposal, and finally the admission of drugs into the cell and also the deflection of bacteria and viruses. We have investigated the influence of ibuprofen on the structure and dynamics of L-α -phosphatidylcholine (SoyPC) membranes by means of grazing incidence small-angle neutron scattering, neutron reflectometry, and grazing incidence neutron spin echo spectroscopy. From the results of these experiments, we were able to determine that ibuprofen induces a two-step structuring behavior in the SoyPC films, where the structure evolves from the purely lamellar phase for pure SoyPC over a superposition of two hexagonal phases to a purely hexagonal phase at high concentrations. A relaxation, which is visible when no ibuprofen is present in the membrane, vanishes upon addition of ibuprofen. This we attribute to a stiffening of the membrane. This behavior may be instrumental in explaining the toxic behavior of ibuprofen in long-term application.

  20. Membrane-derived phospholipids control synaptic neurotransmission and plasticity.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; González-Forero, David; Rodríguez-Bey, Guillermo; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; Medialdea-Wandossell, María Jesús; Domínguez-Vías, Germán; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-05-01

    Synaptic communication is a dynamic process that is key to the regulation of neuronal excitability and information processing in the brain. To date, however, the molecular signals controlling synaptic dynamics have been poorly understood. Membrane-derived bioactive phospholipids are potential candidates to control short-term tuning of synaptic signaling, a plastic event essential for information processing at both the cellular and neuronal network levels in the brain. Here, we showed that phospholipids affect excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by different degrees, loci, and mechanisms of action. Signaling triggered by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked rapid and reversible depression of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. At excitatory synapses, LPA-induced depression depended on LPA1/Gαi/o-protein/phospholipase C/myosin light chain kinase cascade at the presynaptic site. LPA increased myosin light chain phosphorylation, which is known to trigger actomyosin contraction, and reduced the number of synaptic vesicles docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. At inhibitory synapses, postsynaptic LPA signaling led to dephosphorylation, and internalization of the GABAAγ2 subunit through the LPA1/Gα12/13-protein/RhoA/Rho kinase/calcineurin pathway. However, LPA-induced depression of GABAergic transmission was correlated with an endocytosis-independent reduction of GABAA receptors, possibly by GABAAγ2 dephosphorylation and subsequent increased lateral diffusion. Furthermore, endogenous LPA signaling, mainly via LPA1, mediated activity-dependent inhibitory depression in a model of experimental synaptic plasticity. Finally, LPA signaling, most likely restraining the excitatory drive incoming to motoneurons, regulated performance of motor output commands, a basic brain processing task. We propose that lysophospholipids serve as potential local messengers that tune synaptic strength to precedent activity of the neuron.

  1. Membrane-Derived Phospholipids Control Synaptic Neurotransmission and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; González-Forero, David; Rodríguez-Bey, Guillermo; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; Medialdea-Wandossell, María Jesús; Domínguez-Vías, Germán; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic communication is a dynamic process that is key to the regulation of neuronal excitability and information processing in the brain. To date, however, the molecular signals controlling synaptic dynamics have been poorly understood. Membrane-derived bioactive phospholipids are potential candidates to control short-term tuning of synaptic signaling, a plastic event essential for information processing at both the cellular and neuronal network levels in the brain. Here, we showed that phospholipids affect excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by different degrees, loci, and mechanisms of action. Signaling triggered by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked rapid and reversible depression of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. At excitatory synapses, LPA-induced depression depended on LPA1/Gαi/o-protein/phospholipase C/myosin light chain kinase cascade at the presynaptic site. LPA increased myosin light chain phosphorylation, which is known to trigger actomyosin contraction, and reduced the number of synaptic vesicles docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. At inhibitory synapses, postsynaptic LPA signaling led to dephosphorylation, and internalization of the GABAAγ2 subunit through the LPA1/Gα12/13-protein/RhoA/Rho kinase/calcineurin pathway. However, LPA-induced depression of GABAergic transmission was correlated with an endocytosis-independent reduction of GABAA receptors, possibly by GABAAγ2 dephosphorylation and subsequent increased lateral diffusion. Furthermore, endogenous LPA signaling, mainly via LPA1, mediated activity-dependent inhibitory depression in a model of experimental synaptic plasticity. Finally, LPA signaling, most likely restraining the excitatory drive incoming to motoneurons, regulated performance of motor output commands, a basic brain processing task. We propose that lysophospholipids serve as potential local messengers that tune synaptic strength to precedent activity of the neuron. PMID:25996636

  2. Force Spectroscopy Reveals the Effect of Different Ions in the Nanomechanical Behavior of Phospholipid Model Membranes: The Case of Potassium Cation

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Oncins, Gerard; Sanz, Fausto

    2012-01-01

    How do metal cations affect the stability and structure of phospholipid bilayers? What role does ion binding play in the insertion of proteins and the overall mechanical stability of biological membranes? Investigators have used different theoretical and microscopic approaches to study the mechanical properties of lipid bilayers. Although they are crucial for such studies, molecular-dynamics simulations cannot yet span the complexity of biological membranes. In addition, there are still some experimental difficulties when it comes to testing the ion binding to lipid bilayers in an accurate way. Hence, there is a need to establish a new approach from the perspective of the nanometric scale, where most of the specific molecular phenomena take place. Atomic force microscopy has become an essential tool for examining the structure and behavior of lipid bilayers. In this work, we used force spectroscopy to quantitatively characterize nanomechanical resistance as a function of the electrolyte composition by means of a reliable molecular fingerprint that reveals itself as a repetitive jump in the approaching force curve. By systematically probing a set of bilayers of different composition immersed in electrolytes composed of a variety of monovalent and divalent metal cations, we were able to obtain a wealth of information showing that each ion makes an independent and important contribution to the gross mechanical resistance and its plastic properties. This work addresses the need to assess the effects of different ions on the structure of phospholipid membranes, and opens new avenues for characterizing the (nano)mechanical stability of membranes. PMID:22225799

  3. Interaction of general anesthetics with phospholipid vesicles and biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Vanderkooi, J M; Landesberg, R; Selick, H; McDonald, G G

    1977-01-01

    Low concentrations of general anesthetics, including halothane, ethrane, trilene, diethyl ether and chloroform are observed to shift the phase transitions of phospholipid vesicles to lower temperatures, and from these data partition coefficients for the anesthetic between lipid and water can be calculated. In contrast to the anesthetics, high concentrations of ethanol are required to shift the phase transition of lipids and glycerol causes no effect. Above the phase transition general anesthetics alter nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of phospholipid dispersions and increase the rotational and lateral diffusion rates of fluorescent probes located in the hydrocarbon core of the bilayer, indicating that they induce disorder in the structure. In red blood cell membranes and sarcoplasmic reticulum fragments, the rotational diffusion rate of 1-phenyl-6-phenylhexatriene is increased in the presence of general anesthetics. The 220 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of sarcoplasmic reticulum reveal some resolved lines from the lecithin fatty acid protons; addition of general anesthetic increases the contribution of these peaks. The data from the NMR and fluorescence techniques lead to the conclusion that general anesthetics increase the pool size of melted lipids in the bimolecular phospholipid layers of biological membranes; this would account for the ability of general anesthetics to increase passive diffusion rates of various substances in membranes.

  4. Mammalian phospholipid homeostasis: evidence that membrane curvature elastic stress drives homeoviscous adaptation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dymond, Marcus K

    2016-08-01

    Several theories of phospholipid homeostasis have postulated that cells regulate the molecular composition of their bilayer membranes, such that a common biophysical membrane parameter is under homeostatic control. Two commonly cited theories are the intrinsic curvature hypothesis, which states that cells control membrane curvature elastic stress, and the theory of homeoviscous adaptation, which postulates cells control acyl chain packing order (membrane order). In this paper, we present evidence from data-driven modelling studies that these two theories correlate in vivo. We estimate the curvature elastic stress of mammalian cells to be 4-7 × 10(-12) N, a value high enough to suggest that in mammalian cells the preservation of membrane order arises through a mechanism where membrane curvature elastic stress is controlled. These results emerge from analysing the molecular contribution of individual phospholipids to both membrane order and curvature elastic stress in nearly 500 cellular compositionally diverse lipidomes. Our model suggests that the de novo synthesis of lipids is the dominant mechanism by which cells control curvature elastic stress and hence membrane order in vivo These results also suggest that cells can increase membrane curvature elastic stress disproportionately to membrane order by incorporating polyunsaturated fatty acids into lipids. PMID:27534697

  5. Extraction of Phospholipids from Human Erythrocyte Membranes by Hemoglobin Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Brunauer, Linda S; Chen, James Y; Koontz, M Zachary; Davis, Kathryn K; O'Brien, Laura E; Wright, Emily M; Huestis, Wray H

    2016-06-01

    This investigation examines oxidation conditions under which hemoglobin extracts membrane phospholipid from erythrocytes and model membranes. In erythrocytes made echinocytic with exogenous phospholipid, addition of hemoglobin oxidized with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or Vitamin C (conditions that result in the formation of significant quantities of choleglobin), but not ferricyanide (which produces predominantly methemoglobin), induced dose-dependent shape reversion to less echinocytic forms, consistent with extraction of phospholipids from the exofacial side of the membrane. Erythrocytes preloaded with radiolabeled phosphatidylcholine or NBD-labeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid, exhibited greatest extraction of radiolabel or fluorescence signal with exogenous hemoglobin oxidized via H2O2 or Vitamin C, but not ferricyanide. However, with NBD-phosphatidylserine (a preferential inner monolayer intercalator), significantly less extraction of labeled lipid occurred with oxidized hemoglobin prepared under all three oxidizing conditions. In dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes containing radiolabeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylethanolamine, subsequent addition of hemoglobin oxidized with H2O2 or Vitamin C extracted radiolabeled lipid with significantly greater efficiency than ferricyanide-treated hemoglobin, with enhanced extraction detectable at levels approaching physiological plasma oxidant concentrations. Radiolabeled lipid extraction was comparable for phospholipids containing saturated acyl chains between 12 and 18 carbons but diminished significantly for oleoyl-containing phospholipids. Hemoglobin dimerization occurred at very low levels with H2O2 treatment, and even lower levels with Vitamin C treatment, and thus did not correlate to the high efficiency and consistent levels of lipid extraction observed with these treatments. These findings indicate that choleglobin extracts lipids from cell

  6. Trans Fatty Acid Derived Phospholipids Show Increased Membrane Cholesterol and Reduced Receptor Activation as Compared to Their Cis Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shui-Lin; Mitchell, Drake C.; Litman, Burton J.

    2005-01-01

    The consumption of trans fatty acid (TFA) is linked to the elevation of LDL cholesterol and is considered to be a major health risk factor for coronary heart disease. Despite several decades of extensive research on this subject, the underlying mechanism of how TFA modulates serum cholesterol levels remains elusive. In this study, we examined the molecular interaction of TFA-derived phospholipid with cholesterol and the membrane receptor rhodopsin in model membranes. Rhodopsin is a prototypical member of the G-protein coupled receptor family. It has a well-characterized structure and function and serves as a model membrane receptor in this study. Phospholipid–cholesterol affinity was quantified by measuring cholesterol partition coefficients. Phospholipid–receptor interactions were probed by measuring the level of rhodopsin activation. Our study shows that phospholipid derived from TFA had a higher membrane cholesterol affinity than their cis analogues. TFA phospholipid membranes also exhibited a higher acyl chain packing order, which was indicated by the lower acyl chain packing free volume as determined by DPH fluorescence and the higher transition temperature for rhodopsin thermal denaturation. The level of rhodopsin activation was diminished in TFA phospholipids. Since membrane cholesterol level and membrane receptors are involved in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis, the combination of higher cholesterol content and reduced receptor activation associated with the presence of TFA–phospholipid could be factors contributing to the elevation of LDL cholesterol. PMID:15766276

  7. Effect of Trehalose on a Phospholipid Membrane under Mechanical Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Cristina S.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2008-01-01

    Explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate at atomic resolution the effect of trehalose on a hydrated phospholipid bilayer under mechanical stress (stretching forces imposed in the form of negative lateral pressure). Simulations were performed in the absence or presence of trehalose at 325 K, and with different values for negative lateral pressure. In the concentration regime (2 molal) and range of lateral pressures (1 to −250 bar) investigated, trehalose was found to interact directly with the membrane, partially replacing water molecules in the formation of hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroups. Similar to previous findings in the context of thermal stress, the number, degree of bridging, and reaching depth of these hydrogen bonds increased with the magnitude of perturbation. However, at the concentration considered, trehalose was not sufficient to preserve the integrity of the membrane structure and to prevent its extreme elongation (and possible disruption) under the effect of stretching forces. PMID:18599628

  8. Modulation of Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase by Neutral Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, María Florencia; Dodes-Traian, Martín M.; González-Flecha, F. Luis; Sica, Mauricio; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lipids on membrane proteins are likely to be complex and unique for each membrane protein. Here we studied different detergent/phosphatidylcholine reconstitution media and tested their effects on plasma membrane Ca2+ pump (PMCA). We found that Ca2+-ATPase activity shows a biphasic behavior with respect to the detergent/phosphatidylcholine ratio. Moreover, the maximal Ca2+-ATPase activity largely depends on the length and the unsaturation degree of the hydrocarbon chain. Using static light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we monitored the changes in hydrodynamic radius of detergent/phosphatidylcholine particles during the micelle-vesicle transition. We found that, when PMCA is reconstituted in mixed micelles, neutral phospholipids increase the enzyme turnover. The biophysical changes associated with the transition from mixed micelles to bicelles increase the time of residence of the phosphorylated intermediate (EP), decreasing the enzyme turnover. Molecular dynamics simulations analysis of the interactions between PMCA and the phospholipid bilayer in which it is embedded show that in the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, charged residues of the protein are trapped in the hydrophobic core. Conversely, in the 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, the overall hydrophobic-hydrophilic requirements of the protein surface are fulfilled the best, reducing the thermodynamic cost of exposing charged residues to the hydrophobic core. The apparent mismatch produced by a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine thicker bilayer could be a structural foundation to explain its functional effect on PMCA. PMID:25605721

  9. Smoking and red blood cell phospholipid membrane fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Murff, H J; Tindle, H A; Shrubsole, M J; Cai, Q; Smalley, W; Milne, G L; Swift, L L; Ness, R M; Zheng, W

    2016-09-01

    Smoking is associated with lower n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) concentrations; however, limited studies have accounted for dietary PUFA intake or whether tobacco dose or smoking duration influences this association. We measured red blood cell phospholipid (RBC) membrane concentrations of fatty acids in 126 current smokers, 311 former smokers, and 461 never smokers using gas liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Smokers had lower RBC membrane percentages of total n-3 LCPUFAs compared to former smokers or never smokers (median percent: 5.46, [interquartile range (IQR) 4.52, 6.28] versus 6.39; [IQR: 5.18, 7.85] versus 6.59; [IQR 5.34, 8.01]) (p<0.001) and this association remained after adjusting for dietary PUFA intake. Duration of smoking and cigarettes per day were not associated with RBC membrane n-3 LCPUFA differences. Smoking is associated with lower n-3 LCPUFA RBC membrane percentages and this association was not influenced by diet or smoking dose or duration. PMID:27637337

  10. Phospholipid Metabolism and Membrane Synthesis During Sporulation in Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Karen; White, David

    1974-01-01

    In view of previously published reports of localized membrane growth in exponentially growing Bacillus megaterium and in sporulating Bacillus cereus, an attempt was made to describe phospholipid metabolism and the topology of membrane synthesis during sporulation in B. megaterium. The cells were pulsed with radioactive glycerol or acetate at the time of septum formation, and the specific activity of the lipid fraction was measured at various times through the free spore stage. The bulk of the material labeled during septation could not be recovered in the spore. Rather, it was found that the labeled lipid fraction underwent considerable turnover during spore development. Additionally, other experiments revealed that the lipid made before the initiation of sporulation was also subject to extensive turnover. In order to minimize both the confounding effects of lipid turnover and the possible presence of lateral diffusion of labeled lipid in the membrane, autoradiography of cells pulse labeled with radioactive glycerol at the time of septation was performed; a symmetrical grain distribution resulted. Thus, despite previously published suggestions to the contrary, the current experimental techniques could not demonstrate the existence of localized membrane synthesis in B. megaterium during sporulation. PMID:4206872

  11. Probing Lipid Membrane Rafts (Microdomains) with Fluorescent Phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Mitchel, Drake

    2011-10-01

    Membrane rafts are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, they exist in a more ordered state (the liquid-ordered phase; lo) than the bulk membrane (the liquid-disordered phase; ld). Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form membrane rafts over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes, NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions into the lo phase, and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions into the ld phase, to detect these two phases. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the size and stability of POPC/SPM/Chol membrane rafts. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of two fluorescent probes. Data were acquired via frequency-domain measurements from 5 to 250 MHz.

  12. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer–phospholipid hybrid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness. PMID:27547605

  13. Membrane potential modulates plasma membrane phospholipid dynamics and K-Ras signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Wong, Ching-On; Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Liang, Hong; Thakur, Dhananiay P.; Luo, Jialie; Babic, Milos; Zinsmaier, Konrad E.; Zhu, Michael X.; Hu, Hongzhen; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hancock, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras–dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits. PMID:26293964

  14. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer-phospholipid hybrid membranes.

    PubMed

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Nussberger, Stephan; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas; Müller, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness. PMID:27547605

  15. Fatty acid remodeling by LPCAT3 enriches arachidonate in phospholipid membranes and regulates triglyceride transport

    PubMed Central

    Hashidate-Yoshida, Tomomi; Harayama, Takeshi; Hishikawa, Daisuke; Morimoto, Ryo; Hamano, Fumie; Tokuoka, Suzumi M; Eto, Miki; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Yanobu-Takanashi, Rieko; Mukumoto, Yoshiko; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Kita, Yoshihiro; Shindou, Hideo; Shimizu, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in phospholipids affect the physical properties of membranes, but it is unclear which biological processes are influenced by their regulation. For example, the functions of membrane arachidonate that are independent of a precursor role for eicosanoid synthesis remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the lack of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3) leads to drastic reductions in membrane arachidonate levels, and that LPCAT3-deficient mice are neonatally lethal due to an extensive triacylglycerol (TG) accumulation and dysfunction in enterocytes. We found that high levels of PUFAs in membranes enable TGs to locally cluster in high density, and that this clustering promotes efficient TG transfer. We propose a model of local arachidonate enrichment by LPCAT3 to generate a distinct pool of TG in membranes, which is required for normal directionality of TG transfer and lipoprotein assembly in the liver and enterocytes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06328.001 PMID:25898003

  16. Rhamnose Links Moonlighting Proteins to Membrane Phospholipid in Mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Daubenspeck, James M; Liu, Runhua; Dybvig, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins that have a primary function as a cytoplasmic protein are known to have the ability to moonlight on the surface of nearly all organisms. An example is the glycolytic enzyme enolase, which can be found on the surface of many types of cells from bacteria to human. Surface enolase is not enzymatic because it is monomeric and oligomerization is required for glycolytic activity. It can bind various molecules and activate plasminogen. Enolase lacks a signal peptide and the mechanism by which it attaches to the surface is unknown. We found that treatment of whole cells of the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis with phospholipase D released enolase and other common moonlighting proteins. Glycostaining suggested that the released proteins were glycosylated. Cytoplasmic and membrane-bound enolase was isolated by immunoprecipitation. No post-translational modification was detected on cytoplasmic enolase, but membrane enolase was associated with lipid, phosphate and rhamnose. Treatment with phospholipase released the lipid and phosphate from enolase but not the rhamnose. The site of rhamnosylation was identified as a glutamine residue near the C-terminus of the protein. Rhamnose has been found in all species of mycoplasma examined but its function was previously unknown. Mycoplasmas are small bacteria with have no peptidoglycan, and rhamnose in these organisms is also not associated with polysaccharide. We suggest that rhamnose has a central role in anchoring proteins to the membrane by linkage to phospholipid, which may be a general mechanism for the membrane association of moonlighting proteins in mycoplasmas and perhaps other bacteria. PMID:27603308

  17. Rhamnose Links Moonlighting Proteins to Membrane Phospholipid in Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Daubenspeck, James M.; Liu, Runhua; Dybvig, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins that have a primary function as a cytoplasmic protein are known to have the ability to moonlight on the surface of nearly all organisms. An example is the glycolytic enzyme enolase, which can be found on the surface of many types of cells from bacteria to human. Surface enolase is not enzymatic because it is monomeric and oligomerization is required for glycolytic activity. It can bind various molecules and activate plasminogen. Enolase lacks a signal peptide and the mechanism by which it attaches to the surface is unknown. We found that treatment of whole cells of the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis with phospholipase D released enolase and other common moonlighting proteins. Glycostaining suggested that the released proteins were glycosylated. Cytoplasmic and membrane-bound enolase was isolated by immunoprecipitation. No post-translational modification was detected on cytoplasmic enolase, but membrane enolase was associated with lipid, phosphate and rhamnose. Treatment with phospholipase released the lipid and phosphate from enolase but not the rhamnose. The site of rhamnosylation was identified as a glutamine residue near the C-terminus of the protein. Rhamnose has been found in all species of mycoplasma examined but its function was previously unknown. Mycoplasmas are small bacteria with have no peptidoglycan, and rhamnose in these organisms is also not associated with polysaccharide. We suggest that rhamnose has a central role in anchoring proteins to the membrane by linkage to phospholipid, which may be a general mechanism for the membrane association of moonlighting proteins in mycoplasmas and perhaps other bacteria. PMID:27603308

  18. Phospholipid Membrane Protection by Sugar Molecules during Dehydration-Insights into Molecular Mechanisms Using Scattering Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Christopher J.; Lenné, Thomas; Koster, Karen L.; Kent, Ben; Bryant, Gary

    2014-09-24

    Scattering techniques have played a key role in our understanding of the structure and function of phospholipid membranes. These techniques have been applied widely to study how different molecules (e.g., cholesterol) can affect phospholipid membrane structure. However, there has been much less attention paid to the effects of molecules that remain in the aqueous phase. One important example is the role played by small solutes, particularly sugars, in protecting phospholipid membranes during drying or slow freezing. In this paper, we present new results and a general methodology, which illustrate how contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and synchrotron-based X-ray scattering (small angle (SAXS) and wide angle (WAXS)) can be used to quantitatively understand the interactions between solutes and phospholipids. Specifically, we show the assignment of lipid phases with synchrotron SAXS and explain how SANS reveals the exclusion of sugars from the aqueous region in the particular example of hexagonal II phases formed by phospholipids.

  19. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction as an efficient tool for removal of phospholipids from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Ask, Kristine Skoglund; Bardakci, Turgay; Parmer, Marthe Petrine; Halvorsen, Trine Grønhaug; Øiestad, Elisabeth Leere; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2016-09-10

    Generic Parallel Artificial Liquid Membrane Extraction (PALME) methods for non-polar basic and non-polar acidic drugs from human plasma were investigated with respect to phospholipid removal. In both cases, extractions in 96-well format were performed from plasma (125μL), through 4μL organic solvent used as supported liquid membranes (SLMs), and into 50μL aqueous acceptor solutions. The acceptor solutions were subsequently analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using in-source fragmentation and monitoring the m/z 184→184 transition for investigation of phosphatidylcholines (PC), sphingomyelins (SM), and lysophosphatidylcholines (Lyso-PC). In both generic methods, no phospholipids were detected in the acceptor solutions. Thus, PALME appeared to be highly efficient for phospholipid removal. To further support this, qualitative (post-column infusion) and quantitative matrix effects were investigated with fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and quetiapine as model analytes. No signs of matrix effects were observed. Finally, PALME was evaluated for the aforementioned drug substances, and data were in accordance with European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines. PMID:27433988

  20. Variation of the detergent-binding capacity and phospholipid content of membrane proteins when purified in different detergents.

    PubMed

    Ilgü, Hüseyin; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Gachet, María Salomé; Boggavarapu, Rajendra; Ucurum, Zöhre; Gertsch, Jürg; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-04-15

    Purified membrane proteins are ternary complexes consisting of protein, lipid, and detergent. Information about the amounts of detergent and endogenous phospholipid molecules bound to purified membrane proteins is largely lacking. In this systematic study, three model membrane proteins of different oligomeric states were purified in nine different detergents at commonly used concentrations and characterized biochemically and biophysically. Detergent-binding capacities and phospholipid contents of the model proteins were determined and compared. The insights on ternary complexes obtained from the experimental results, when put into a general context, are summarized as follows. 1), The amount of detergent and 2) the amount of endogenous phospholipids bound to purified membrane proteins are dependent on the size of the hydrophobic lipid-accessible protein surface areas and the physicochemical properties of the detergents used. 3), The size of the detergent and lipid belt surrounding the hydrophobic lipid-accessible surface of purified membrane proteins can be tuned by the appropriate choice of detergent. 4), The detergents n-nonyl-β-D-glucopyranoside and Cymal-5 have exceptional delipidating effects on ternary complexes. 5), The types of endogenous phospholipids bound to membrane proteins can vary depending on the detergent used for solubilization and purification. 6), Furthermore, we demonstrate that size-exclusion chromatography can be a suitable method for estimating the molecular mass of ternary complexes. The findings presented suggest a strategy to control and tune the numbers of detergent and endogenous phospholipid molecules bound to membrane proteins. These two parameters are potentially important for the successul crystallization of membrane proteins for structure determination by crystallographic approaches.

  1. Variation of the Detergent-Binding Capacity and Phospholipid Content of Membrane Proteins When Purified in Different Detergents

    PubMed Central

    Ilgü, Hüseyin; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Gachet, María Salomé; Boggavarapu, Rajendra; Ucurum, Zöhre; Gertsch, Jürg; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Purified membrane proteins are ternary complexes consisting of protein, lipid, and detergent. Information about the amounts of detergent and endogenous phospholipid molecules bound to purified membrane proteins is largely lacking. In this systematic study, three model membrane proteins of different oligomeric states were purified in nine different detergents at commonly used concentrations and characterized biochemically and biophysically. Detergent-binding capacities and phospholipid contents of the model proteins were determined and compared. The insights on ternary complexes obtained from the experimental results, when put into a general context, are summarized as follows. 1), The amount of detergent and 2) the amount of endogenous phospholipids bound to purified membrane proteins are dependent on the size of the hydrophobic lipid-accessible protein surface areas and the physicochemical properties of the detergents used. 3), The size of the detergent and lipid belt surrounding the hydrophobic lipid-accessible surface of purified membrane proteins can be tuned by the appropriate choice of detergent. 4), The detergents n-nonyl-β-D-glucopyranoside and Cymal-5 have exceptional delipidating effects on ternary complexes. 5), The types of endogenous phospholipids bound to membrane proteins can vary depending on the detergent used for solubilization and purification. 6), Furthermore, we demonstrate that size-exclusion chromatography can be a suitable method for estimating the molecular mass of ternary complexes. The findings presented suggest a strategy to control and tune the numbers of detergent and endogenous phospholipid molecules bound to membrane proteins. These two parameters are potentially important for the successul crystallization of membrane proteins for structure determination by crystallographic approaches. PMID:24739165

  2. On the formation of a macroscopically flat phospholipid membrane on a hydrosol substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, A. M.; Asadchikov, V. E.; Volkov, Yu. O.

    2015-10-01

    The dependence of the structure of a phospholipid layer (DSPC and SOPC) adsorbed on a hydrosol substrate on the concentration of NaOH in a solution of 5-nm silica particles has been studied by X-ray reflectrometry with the use of synchrotron radiation. Profiles of the electron density (polarizability) have been reconstructed from the experimental data within a model-independent approach. According to these profiles, the thickness of the lipid film can vary from a monolayer (~35 Å) to several bilayers (~450 Å). At the volume concentration of NaOH of ~0.5 mol/L, the film on the hydrosol surface is a macroscopically flat phospholipid membrane (bilayer) with a thickness of ~60 Å and with areas of (45 ± 2) and (49 ± 3) Å2 per DSPC and SOPC molecule, respectively.

  3. Phospholipid fatty acid turnover in erythrocyte membranes from humans exposed to hyperbaric hyperoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine phospholipid fatty acid turnover in erythrocyte membranes from human subjects exposed to hyperbaric, hyperoxic conditions. Seven males breathed 100% oxygen at two atmospheres of pressure for nine hours. Venous blood was collected one hour before the oxygen exposure; one hour, five hours, and nine hours into the exposure; and one hour, 24 hours, 48 hours and one week after the exposure ended. Washed erythrocytes were incubated with ({sup 3}H) oleic acid for thirty minutes at 37{degree}C. Phospholipids were extracted with methanol and chloroform, separated by thin layer chromatography, and quantitated by spectrodensitometry. Radioactivity was measured in four phospholipid classes and incorporation of ({sup 3}H) oleic acid into phospholipids calculated. Phospholipid fatty acid turnover was used as an indicator of membrane metabolism.

  4. Crosstalk between the lipopolysaccharide and phospholipid pathways during outer membrane biogenesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Emiola, Akintunde; Andrews, Steven S.; Heller, Carolin; George, John

    2016-01-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is composed of phospholipids in the inner leaflet and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the outer leaflet. LPS is an endotoxin that elicits a strong immune response from humans, and its biosynthesis is in part regulated via degradation of LpxC (EC 3.5.1.108) and WaaA (EC 2.4.99.12/13) enzymes by the protease FtsH (EC 3.4.24.-). Because the synthetic pathways for both molecules are complex, in addition to being produced in strict ratios, we developed a computational model to interrogate the regulatory mechanisms involved. Our model findings indicate that the catalytic activity of LpxK (EC 2.7.1.130) appears to be dependent on the concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. This is biologically important because it assists in maintaining LPS/phospholipids homeostasis. Further crosstalk between the phospholipid and LPS biosynthetic pathways was revealed by experimental observations that LpxC is additionally regulated by an unidentified protease whose activity is independent of lipid A disaccharide concentration (the feedback source for FtsH-mediated LpxC regulation) but could be induced in vitro by palmitic acid. Further experimental analysis provided evidence on the rationale for WaaA regulation. Overexpression of waaA resulted in increased levels of 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) sugar in membrane extracts, whereas Kdo and heptose levels were not elevated in LPS. This implies that uncontrolled production of WaaA does not increase the LPS production rate but rather reglycosylates lipid A precursors. Overall, the findings of this work provide previously unidentified insights into the complex biogenesis of the Escherichia coli outer membrane. PMID:26929331

  5. Crosstalk between the lipopolysaccharide and phospholipid pathways during outer membrane biogenesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Emiola, Akintunde; Andrews, Steven S; Heller, Carolin; George, John

    2016-03-15

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is composed of phospholipids in the inner leaflet and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the outer leaflet. LPS is an endotoxin that elicits a strong immune response from humans, and its biosynthesis is in part regulated via degradation of LpxC (EC 3.5.1.108) and WaaA (EC 2.4.99.12/13) enzymes by the protease FtsH (EC 3.4.24.-). Because the synthetic pathways for both molecules are complex, in addition to being produced in strict ratios, we developed a computational model to interrogate the regulatory mechanisms involved. Our model findings indicate that the catalytic activity of LpxK (EC 2.7.1.130) appears to be dependent on the concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. This is biologically important because it assists in maintaining LPS/phospholipids homeostasis. Further crosstalk between the phospholipid and LPS biosynthetic pathways was revealed by experimental observations that LpxC is additionally regulated by an unidentified protease whose activity is independent of lipid A disaccharide concentration (the feedback source for FtsH-mediated LpxC regulation) but could be induced in vitro by palmitic acid. Further experimental analysis provided evidence on the rationale for WaaA regulation. Overexpression of waaA resulted in increased levels of 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) sugar in membrane extracts, whereas Kdo and heptose levels were not elevated in LPS. This implies that uncontrolled production of WaaA does not increase the LPS production rate but rather reglycosylates lipid A precursors. Overall, the findings of this work provide previously unidentified insights into the complex biogenesis of the Escherichia coli outer membrane. PMID:26929331

  6. Resonance energy transfer imaging of phospholipid vesicle interaction with a planar phospholipid membrane: undulations and attachment sites in the region of calcium-mediated membrane--membrane adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Membrane fusion of a phospholipid vesicle with a planar lipid bilayer is preceded by an initial prefusion stage in which a region of the vesicle membrane adheres to the planar membrane. A resonance energy transfer (RET) imaging microscope, with measured spectral transfer functions and a pair of radiometrically calibrated video cameras, was used to determine both the area of the contact region and the distances between the membranes within this zone. Large vesicles (5-20 microns diam) were labeled with the donor fluorophore coumarin- phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), while the planar membrane was labeled with the acceptor rhodamine-PE. The donor was excited with 390 nm light, and separate images of donor and acceptor emission were formed by the microscope. Distances between the membranes at each location in the image were determined from the RET rate constant (kt) computed from the acceptor:donor emission intensity ratio. In the absence of an osmotic gradient, the vesicles stably adhered to the planar membrane, and the dyes did not migrate between membranes. The region of contact was detected as an area of planar membrane, coincident with the vesicle image, over which rhodamine fluorescence was sensitized by RET. The total area of the contact region depended biphasically on the Ca2+ concentration, but the distance between the bilayers in this zone decreased with increasing [Ca2+]. The changes in area and separation were probably related to divalent cation effects on electrostatic screening and binding to charged membranes. At each [Ca2+], the intermembrane separation varied between 1 and 6 nm within each contact region, indicating membrane undulation prior to adhesion. Intermembrane separation distances < or = 2 nm were localized to discrete sites that formed in an ordered arrangement throughout the contact region. The area of the contact region occupied by these punctate attachment sites was increased at high [Ca2+]. Membrane fusion may be initiated at these sites of

  7. Hemoglobin oxidation products extract phospholipids from the membrane of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Moxness, M S; Brunauer, L S; Huestis, W H

    1996-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide oxidation of human erythrocytes induces a transfer of phospholipid from the membrane into the cytosol [Brunauer, L.S., Moxness, M.S., & Huestis, W.H. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 4527-4532]. The current study examines the mechanism of lipid reorganization in oxidized cells. Exogenous phosphatidylserine was introduced into the inner monolayer of erythrocytes, and its distribution was monitored by microscopy and radioisotopic labeling. Pretreatment of cells with carbon monoxide prevented both hemoglobin oxidation and the transfer of phosphatidyserine into the cytosolic compartment. The roles of the various hemoglobin oxidation products in lipid extraction were investigated using selective oxidants. Nitrite treatment of intact cells produced almost complete conversion to methemoglobin, but no detectable lipid extraction. Treatments designed to produce the green hemoglobin derivatives, sulfhemoglobin and choleglobin, resulted in cytosolic extraction of phosphatidylserine. Ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography of oxidized cytosolic components revealed a lipid-hemoglobin complex. The interaction between lipid and hemoglobin oxidation products was verified in a model system. Purified hemoglobin, enriched in sulfhemoglobin and choleglobin by treatment with H2O2, H2S, or ascorbate, extracted phospholipid from small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies demonstrated that hemoglobin oxidation products also adsorb fatty acids from solution. This newly described activity of hemoglobin may play a role in the clearance of oxidatively damaged and senescent cells from circulation.

  8. [sup 31]P NMR study of immobilized artificial membrane surfaces. Structure and dynamics of immobilized phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, X.; Pidgeon, C. )

    1993-11-25

    Chromatography surfaces were prepared by immobilizing a single-chain ether phospholipid at approximately a monolayer density on silica particles. The chromatography particles are denoted as [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3], and they are stable to all solvents. The structure and dynamics of the interphase created by immobilizing phospholipids on silica particles were studied by [sup 31]P NMR methods. [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] spontaneously wets when suspended in both aqueous and organic solvents, and [sup 31]P NMR spectra were obtained in water, methanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, and acetone. [sup 31]P NMR spectra were subjected to line-shape analysis. From line-shape analysis, the correlation times for rapid internal motion ([tau]-PLL) and wobbling ([tau]-PRP) of the phospholipid headgroup were calculated for each solvent. Immobilized phospholipid headgroups comprising the IAM interfacial region undergo rapid reorientation similar to the case of the phospholipids forming liposome membranes with [tau]-PLL approximately 1 ns. Phospholipids in liposome membranes exhibit slower wobbling motion ([tau]-PRP approximately 1 ms) in the plane of the membrane. However, the immobilized phospholipids on [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surfaces wobble with correlation times [tau]-PRP that depend on the solvent bathing the [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surface. 41 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Local anesthetics structure-dependently interact with anionic phospholipid membranes to modify the fluidity.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-01-01

    While bupivacaine is more cardiotoxic than other local anesthetics, the mechanistic background for different toxic effects remains unclear. Several cardiotoxic compounds act on lipid bilayers to change the physicochemical properties of membranes. We comparatively studied the interaction of local anesthetics with lipid membranous systems which might be related to their structure-selective cardiotoxicity. Amide local anesthetics (10-300 microM) were reacted with unilamellar vesicles which were prepared with different phospholipids and cholesterol of varying lipid compositions. They were compared on the potencies to modify membrane fluidity by measuring fluorescence polarization. Local anesthetics interacted with liposomal membranes to increase the fluidity. Increasing anionic phospholipids in membranes enhanced the membrane-fluidizing effects of local anesthetics with the potency being cardiolipin>phosphatidic acid>phosphatidylglycerol>phosphatidylserine. Cardiolipin was most effective on bupivacaine, followed by ropivacaine. Local anesthetics interacted differently with biomimetic membranes consisting of 10mol% cardiolipin, 50mol% other phospholipids and 40mol% cholesterol with the potency being bupivacaine>ropivacaine>lidocaine>prilocaine, which agreed with the rank order of cardiotoxicity. Bupivacaine significantly fluidized 2.5-12.5mol% cardiolipin-containing membranes at cardiotoxicologically relevant concentrations. Bupivacaine is considered to affect lipid bilayers by interacting electrostatically with negatively charged cardiolipin head groups and hydrophobically with phospholipid acyl chains. The structure-dependent interaction with lipid membranes containing cardiolipin, which is preferentially localized in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes, may be a mechanistic clue to explain the structure-selective cardiotoxicity of local anesthetics.

  10. Substrate-Supported Phospholipid Membranes Studied by Surface Plasmon Resonance and Surface Plasmon Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tawa, Keiko; Morigaki, Kenichi

    2005-01-01

    Substrate-supported planar lipid bilayer membranes are attractive model cellular membranes for biotechnological applications such as biochips and sensors. However, reliable fabrication of the lipid membranes on solid surfaces still poses significant technological challenges. In this study, simultaneous surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) measurements were applied to the monitoring of adsorption and subsequent reorganization of phospholipid vesicles on solid substrates. The fluorescence intensity of SPFS depends very sensitively on the distance between the gold substrate and the fluorophore because of the excitation energy transfer to gold. By utilizing this distance dependency, we could obtain information about the topography of the adsorbed membranes: Adsorbed vesicles could be clearly distinguished from planar bilayers due to the high fluorescence intensity. SPSF can also incorporate various analytical techniques to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the adsorbed membranes. As an example, we demonstrated that the lateral mobility of lipid molecules could be estimated by observing the recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching. Combined with the film thickness information obtained by SPR, SPR-SPFS proved to be a highly informative technique to monitor the lipid membrane assembly processes on solid substrates. PMID:16040759

  11. Chlamydia trachomatis Relies on Autonomous Phospholipid Synthesis for Membrane Biogenesis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Cherian, Philip T.; Frank, Matthew W.; Rock, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis has a reduced genome and is thought to rely on its mammalian host cell for nutrients. Although several lines of evidence suggest C. trachomatis utilizes host phospholipids, the bacterium encodes all the genes necessary for fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis found in free living Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterially derived phospholipids significantly increased in infected HeLa cell cultures. These new phospholipids had a distinct molecular species composition consisting of saturated and branched-chain fatty acids. Biochemical analysis established the role of C. trachomatis-encoded acyltransferases in producing the new disaturated molecular species. There was no evidence for the remodeling of host phospholipids and no change in the size or molecular species composition of the phosphatidylcholine pool in infected HeLa cells. Host sphingomyelin was associated with C. trachomatis isolated by detergent extraction, but it may represent contamination with detergent-insoluble host lipids rather than being an integral bacterial membrane component. C. trachomatis assembles its membrane systems from the unique phospholipid molecular species produced by its own fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthetic machinery utilizing glucose, isoleucine, and serine. PMID:25995447

  12. Photodynamic activity and binding of sulfonated metallophthalocyanines to phospholipid membranes: contribution of metal-phosphate coordination.

    PubMed

    Pashkovskaya, Alina A; Sokolenko, Elena A; Sokolov, Valeri S; Kotova, Elena A; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2007-10-01

    Photosensitized efficacy of tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines of zinc, aluminum and nickel (ZnPcS(4), AlPcS(4) and NiPcS(4), respectively) as studied by gramicidin channel (gA) photoinactivation was compared with adsorption of the dyes on the surface of a bilayer lipid membrane as measured by the inner field compensation method. The adsorption of the negatively charged phthalocyanines on diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) membranes led to formation of a negative boundary potential difference between the membrane/water interfaces. Good correlation was shown between the photodynamic activity and the membrane binding of the three metallophthalocyanines. ZnPcS(4) appeared to be the most potent of these photosensitizers, while NiPcS(4) was completely ineffective. All of these phthalocyanines displayed no binding and negligible gA photoinactivation with membranes formed of glycerol monooleate (GMO), whereas Rose Bengal exhibited significant binding and photodynamic efficacy with GMO membranes. Gramicidin photoinactivation in the presence of AlPcS(4), being insensitive to the ionic strength of the bathing solution, was inhibited by fluoride and attenuated by phosphate ions. A blue shift of the fluorescence peak position of ZnPcS(4) dissolved in ethanol was elicited by phosphate, similarly to fluoride, which was indicative of the coordination interaction of these ions with the central metal atom of the phthalocyanine macrocycle. This interaction was enhanced in the medium modeling the water-membrane interface. The results obtained imply that binding of tetrasulfonated metallophthalocyanines to phospholipid membranes is determined primarily by metal-phosphate coordination.

  13. Membrane phospholipid organization and vesiculation of erythrocytes in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G M; Schwartz, R S; Chiu, D T; Lubin, B H

    1985-02-01

    This review has examined the lipid composition of the RBC membrane and the methods used to determine the distribution of the phospholipids within the membrane. The importance of the membrane cytoskeletal proteins, in particular spectrin and protein 4.1, in maintaining this distribution has also been described. Membrane vesiculation and altered membrane phospholipid asymmetry in sickle cell anaemia have been reviewed. The relationships between vesiculation and hypercoagulability and an abnormal reticuloendothelial system in sickle cell disease have been examined. It is apparent that the single amino acid substitution leading to the production of sickle haemoglobin has profound effects on the entire erythrocyte, reaching to the limits of the cell, its plasma membrane. PMID:3886236

  14. Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations for Phospholipid Membranes Based on a Four-To-One Coarse-Grained Mapping Scheme.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a new set of parameters compatible with the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) force field is developed for phospholipids. The coarse-grained (CG) models of these molecules are constructed by mapping four heavy atoms and their attached hydrogen atoms to one bead. The beads are divided into types distinguished by charge type, polarizability, and hydrogen-bonding capacity. First, we derive the relationship between the DPD repulsive force and Flory-Huggins χ-parameters based on this four-to-one CG mapping scheme. Then, we optimize the DPD force parameters for phospholipids. The feasibility of this model is demonstrated by simulating the structural and thermodynamic properties of lipid bilayer membranes, including the membrane thickness, the area per lipid, the lipid tail orientation, the bending rigidity, the rupture behavior, and the potential of mean force for lipid flip-flop. PMID:27137463

  15. Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations for Phospholipid Membranes Based on a Four-To-One Coarse-Grained Mapping Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoxu; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a new set of parameters compatible with the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) force field is developed for phospholipids. The coarse-grained (CG) models of these molecules are constructed by mapping four heavy atoms and their attached hydrogen atoms to one bead. The beads are divided into types distinguished by charge type, polarizability, and hydrogen-bonding capacity. First, we derive the relationship between the DPD repulsive force and Flory-Huggins χ-parameters based on this four-to-one CG mapping scheme. Then, we optimize the DPD force parameters for phospholipids. The feasibility of this model is demonstrated by simulating the structural and thermodynamic properties of lipid bilayer membranes, including the membrane thickness, the area per lipid, the lipid tail orientation, the bending rigidity, the rupture behavior, and the potential of mean force for lipid flip-flop. PMID:27137463

  16. Membrane protein crystallization: observations and use of short chain phospholipids as amphiphiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselé, Jean-Luc; Keller, Thomas A.; König, Nicola; Stauffer, Kathrin A.; Rosenbusch, Jürg P.; Low, Philip S.

    1991-03-01

    An integral membrane protein, porin OmpF located in E. coli outer membrane, has been crystallized in the sole presence of short chain phospholipids. Although the amphiphilic characteristics of these molecules are comparable to those of conventional detergents, they appear to be unique probes for the study of the phospholipid-protein interactions by crystallographic methods. Here we also discuss the influence of the detergent head group on the crystal packing, and the role of additives. The stabilization of crystals after termination of growth in protein-free buffer is described.

  17. Proportion of phospholipids in the plasma membrane is an important factor in Al tolerance.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Eriko; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    The negative charge on the plasma membrane (PM) is mainly derived from the phosphate group of phospholipids. One of the mechanisms of aluminum (Al) toxicity is to increase the PM permeability of root cells by binding to the negative sites on the PM. Thus, PM with a higher proportion of phospholipids could be more susceptible to Al toxicity. In our previous study, we showed that tolerance to Al and low-calcium in rice was enhanced by decreasing the proportion of phospholipids in root cells. Both Melastoma malabathricum L. and Melaleuca cajuputi Powell are dominant woody species that grow in tropical acid sulfate soils, and have been reported to be more tolerant to Al than rice. Surprisingly, the proportion of PM phospholipids in root cells of M. malabathricum and M. cajuputi was considerably low. Our present findings suggest that PM lipid composition plays an important role in Al tolerance mechanisms in various plant species. PMID:25763499

  18. Elasticity, strength and stability of bilayer lipid membranes and their changes due to phospholipid modification.

    PubMed

    Passechnik, V I; Hianik, T; Karagodin, V P; Kagan, V E

    1984-12-01

    Elasticity measurements of bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) based on registration of the third harmonic of the membrane current during the application of a periodic tension to the membrane was used to study the effects of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and phospholipase A on BLM. LPO resulted in decreased values of the Young modulus for BLM, while some products of LPO and phospholipid hydrolysis (linolenic acid) were able to increase drastically the modulus. The presence of individual products of LPO and phospholipid hydrolysis in BLM produced non-additive effects on the elasticity, strength and stability of BLM. Lysolecithine strongly affected both the strength and stability of BLM. without changing its elasticity modulus. It was found that the lower the rate of structural changes in lecithine BLM, the longer its lifetime. Membranes having a heterogeneous polar composition form more stable BLM as compared to chemically homogeneous membranes.

  19. Ursodeoxycholate stabilizes phospholipid-rich membranes and mimics the effect of cholesterol: investigations on large unilamellar vesicles.

    PubMed

    Güldütuna, S; Deisinger, B; Weiss, A; Freisleben, H J; Zimmer, G; Sipos, P; Leuschner, U

    1997-06-12

    Ursodeoxycholate is used to treat primary biliary cirrhosis and is incorporated into hepatocyte plasma membranes. Its steroid nucleus binds to the apolar domain of the membrane, in a similar position to cholesterol. Therefore the question arises whether ursodeoxycholate has a similar effect on membrane structure and stability as cholesterol. Using differential scanning calorimetry the thermotropic behavior of egg phosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine were studied after incubation with cholesterol or ursodeoxycholate. Large unilamellar vesicles were prepared with cholesterol contents of 0-50%. Following incubation of these vesicles with different amounts of ursodeoxycholate, vesicle stability in a gravitational field was investigated by measuring the phospholipid and cholesterol release. Vesicle size was studied by laser light scattering after incubation with cheno- and ursodeoxycholate, and the release of entrapped carboxyfluorescein was measured by means of fluorescence spectroscopy. Increasing cholesterol diminished the enthalpy of the phase transition in the membrane. Ursodeoxycholate decreased the enthalpy of the phase transition at even lower concentrations. Lipid release from vesicles in a high gravitational field diminished with increasing cholesterol content of the vesicles. Ursodeoxycholate had a comparable effect, which increased as the cholesterol content of the vesicles was decreased. Chenodeoxycholate damaged vesicles, whereas ursodeoxycholate did not. Cholesterol and ursodeoxycholate (below its critical micellar concentration) decreased the carboxyfluorescein release from vesicles induced by chenodeoxycholate. Thus like cholesterol, ursodeoxycholate is incorporated into phospholipid model membranes and reduces the change in enthalpy of the gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition. Like cholesterol ursodeoxycholate also maintains membrane stability and prevents membrane damage induced by mechanical and chemical stress.

  20. Correlation between fluidising effects on phospholipid membranes and mitochondrial respiration of propofol and p-nitrosophenol homologues.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Wisniewska, Anna; Fiore, Cristina; Bindoli, Alberto; Scutari, Guido; Stevanato, Roberto

    2003-03-25

    Nitrosopropofol (2-6-diisopropyl-4-nitrosophenol) has dramatic consequences for respiration, ATP synthesis and the transmembrane potential of isolated rat liver mitochondria at concentrations at which propofol (2-6-diisopropylphenol) does not cause any apparent effects. These results correlate well with the observation that nitrosopropofol is also a stronger perturbing agent of phospholipid membranes. In this paper we verify the possible biological activity of different phenols and nitrosophenols on mitochondrial respiration. We then discuss their interactions with phospholipid liposomes, studied with differential scanning calorimetry, spin labelling techniques and UV-Vis spectrophotometry, in order to obtain information on drug distribution and the modifications they impose on lipid bilayer. The results of the experiments performed on mitochondria and model membranes prove an interesting correlation between the effects of the molecules on both systems.

  1. The Effect of Trans Unsaturation on Molecular Organization in a Phospholipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Smita; Runyan, Jenniffer; Brich, Garrison; Ward, Jesse; Sen, Stephanie; Feller, Scott; Wassall, Stephen

    2009-05-01

    The ingestion of trans fatty acids (TFA) formed during the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils has been linked to a detrimental impact on health by an, as yet, unknown mechanism. We synthesized deuterated analogs of 1-elaidoyl-2-stearoylphosphatidylcholine (t18:1-18:0PC) that contains a single ``unnatural'' trans double bond and 1-oleoyl-2-stearoylphosphatidylcholine (c18:1-18:0PC) that contains a single ``natural'' cis double bond. Solid state ^2H NMR spectra for model membranes prepared from these phospholipids reveal a higher chain melting temperature for the trans isomer, indicating tighter molecular packing in the gel state. In the liquid crystalline, however, the difference between the trans and cis isomers is subtle. Order as probed by the perdeuterated [^2H31]18:0 sn-2 chain, and corroborated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, coincides within <5%.

  2. Influence of Alcohols on the Lateral Diffusion in Phospholipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Rifici, Simona; D'Angelo, Giovanna; Crupi, Cristina; Branca, Caterina; Conti Nibali, Valeria; Corsaro, Carmelo; Wanderlingh, Ulderico

    2016-02-25

    The effects of hexanol and octanol on the lateral mobility of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer are investigated by means of pulsed-gradient stimulated-echo NMR spectroscopy. Three distinct diffusions are identified for the DMPC/alcohol systems. They are ascribed to the water, the alcohol, and the lipid. We find that the presence of alcohols promotes the lipid diffusion process both in the liquid and in the interdigitated phases. Furthermore, using the Arrhenius approach, the activation energies are calculated. An explanation in terms of a free volume model, that takes into account also the observed increase of the activation energy in both phases, is proposed. The results obtained here are compared with those presented in our previous work on 1,2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) in order to examine the dependence of the lipid translational diffusion process upon the membrane acyl chain length. A peculiar influence of alcohols on different membranes is found.

  3. Thermodynamic and kinetic investigations of the release of oxidized phospholipids from lipid membranes and its effect on vascular integrity

    PubMed Central

    Heffern, Charles T.R.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Birukova, Anna A.; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Bochkov, Valery N.; Lee, Ka Yee C.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2013-01-01

    The lipid membrane not only provides a rich interface with an array of receptor signaling complexes with which a cell communicates, but it also serves as a source of lipid derived bioactive molecules. In pathologic conditions of acute lung injury (ALI) associated with activation of oxidative stress, unsaturated phosphatidyl cholines overlooking a luminal space undergo oxidation leading to generation of fragmented phospholipids such as 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (lysoPC), or 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC) full length oxygenation products (oxPAPC). Using Langmuir monolayers as models of the lipid bilayer, we evaluated the propensity of these phospholipids to solubilize from the cell membrane. The results suggest that lysoPC is rapidly released as it is produced, while oxPAPC has a longer membrane bound lifetime. After being released from cell membranes, these oxidized phospholipids exhibit potent agonist-like effects on neighboring cells. Therefore, we correlate the presence of the two phospholipid groups with the onset and resolution of increased vascular leakiness associated with ALI through testing their effect on vascular endothelial barrier integrity. Our work shows that cells respond differently to these two groups of products of phosphatidyl choline oxidation. LysoPC disrupts cell–cell junctions and increases endothelial permeability while oxPAPC enhances endothelial barrier. These data suggest a model whereby rapid release of lysoPC results in onset of ALI associated vascular leak, and the release of a reserve of oxPAPC as oxidative stress subsides restores the vascular barrier properties. PMID:23911706

  4. Decoding the membrane activity of the cyclotide kalata B1: the importance of phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipids and lipid organization on hemolytic and anti-HIV activities.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Huang, Yen-Hua; Rosengren, K Johan; Franquelim, Henri G; Carvalho, Filomena A; Johnson, Adam; Sonza, Secondo; Tachedjian, Gilda; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Daly, Norelle L; Craik, David J

    2011-07-01

    Cyclotides, a large family of cyclic peptides from plants, have a broad range of biological activities, including insecticidal, cytotoxic, and anti-HIV activities. In all of these activities, cell membranes seem likely to be the primary target for cyclotides. However, the mechanistic role of lipid membranes in the activity of cyclotides remains unclear. To determine the role of lipid organization in the activity of the prototypic cyclotide, kalata B1 (kB1), and synthetic analogs, their bioactivities and affinities for model membranes were evaluated. We found that the bioactivity of kB1 is dependent on the lipid composition of target cell membranes. In particular, the activity of kB1 requires specific interactions with phospholipids containing phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) headgroups but is further modulated by nonspecific peptide-lipid hydrophobic interactions, which are favored in raft-like membranes. Negatively charged phospholipids do not favor high kB1 affinity. This lipid selectivity explains trends in antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of kB1; it does not target bacterial cell walls, which are negatively charged and lacking PE-phospholipids but can insert in the membranes of red blood cells, which have a low PE content and raft domains in their outer layer. We further show that the anti-HIV activity of kB1 is the result of its ability to target and disrupt the membranes of HIV particles, which are raft-like membranes very rich in PE-phospholipids.

  5. Interaction of epicatechin gallate with phospholipid membranes as revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uekusa, Yoshinori; Kamihira-Ishijima, Miya; Sugimoto, Osamu; Ishii, Takeshi; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Nakamura, Kozo; Tanji, Ken-ichi; Naito, Akira; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Epicatechin gallate (ECg), a green tea polyphenol, has various physiological effects. Our previous nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) study using solution NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that ECg strongly interacts with the surface of phospholipid bilayers. However, the dynamic behavior of ECg in the phospholipid bilayers has not been clarified, especially the dynamics and molecular arrangement of the galloyl moiety, which supposedly has an important interactive role. In this study, we synthesized [13C]-ECg, in which the carbonyl carbon of the galloyl moiety was labeled by 13C isotope, and analyzed it by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state 31P NMR analysis indicated that ECg changes the gel-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature of DMPC bilayers as well as the dynamics and mobility of the phospholipids. In the solid-state 13C NMR analysis under static conditions, the carbonyl carbon signal of the [13C]-ECg exhibited an axially symmetric powder pattern. This indicates that the ECg molecules rotate about an axis tilting at a constant angle to the bilayer normal. The accurate intermolecular-interatomic distance between the labeled carbonyl carbon of [13C]-ECg and the phosphorus of the phospholipid was determined to be 5.3±0.1 Å by 13C-(31)P rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) measurements. These results suggest that the galloyl moiety contributes to increasing the hydrophobicity of catechin molecules, and consequently to high affinity of galloyl-type catechins for phospholipid membranes, as well as to stabilization of catechin molecules in the phospholipid membranes by cation-π interaction between the galloyl ring and quaternary amine of the phospholipid head-group. PMID:21352801

  6. Dynamic membrane protein topological switching upon changes in phospholipid environment

    PubMed Central

    Vitrac, Heidi; MacLean, David M.; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental objective in membrane biology is to understand and predict how a protein sequence folds and orients in a lipid bilayer. Establishing the principles governing membrane protein folding is central to understanding the molecular basis for membrane proteins that display multiple topologies, the intrinsic dynamic organization of membrane proteins, and membrane protein conformational disorders resulting in disease. We previously established that lactose permease of Escherichia coli displays a mixture of topological conformations and undergoes postassembly bidirectional changes in orientation within the lipid bilayer triggered by a change in membrane phosphatidylethanolamine content, both in vivo and in vitro. However, the physiological implications and mechanism of dynamic structural reorganization of membrane proteins due to changes in lipid environment are limited by the lack of approaches addressing the kinetic parameters of transmembrane protein flipping. In this study, real-time fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the rates of protein flipping in the lipid bilayer in both directions and transbilayer flipping of lipids triggered by a change in proteoliposome lipid composition. Our results provide, for the first time to our knowledge, a dynamic picture of these events and demonstrate that membrane protein topological rearrangements in response to lipid modulations occur rapidly following a threshold change in proteoliposome lipid composition. Protein flipping was not accompanied by extensive lipid-dependent unfolding of transmembrane domains. Establishment of lipid bilayer asymmetry was not required but may accelerate the rate of protein flipping. Membrane protein flipping was found to accelerate the rate of transbilayer flipping of lipids. PMID:26512118

  7. Rpe65 Isomerase Associates with Membranes through an Electrostatic Interaction with Acidic Phospholipid Headgroups*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Quan; Kaylor, Joanna J.; Miu, Anh; Bassilian, Sara; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Travis, Gabriel H.

    2010-01-01

    Opsins are light-sensitive pigments in the vertebrate retina, comprising a G protein-coupled receptor and an 11-cis-retinaldehyde chromophore. Absorption of a photon by an opsin pigment induces isomerization of its chromophore to all-trans-retinaldehyde. After a brief period of activation, opsin releases all-trans-retinaldehyde and becomes insensitive to light. Restoration of light sensitivity to the apo-opsin involves the conversion of all-trans-retinaldehyde back to 11-cis-retinaldehyde via an enzyme pathway called the visual cycle. The critical isomerization step in this pathway is catalyzed by Rpe65. Rpe65 is strongly associated with membranes but contains no membrane-spanning segments. It was previously suggested that the affinity of Rpe65 for membranes is due to palmitoylation of one or more Cys residues. In this study, we re-examined this hypothesis. By two independent strategies involving mass spectrometry, we show that Rpe65 is not palmitoylated nor does it appear to undergo other post-translational modifications at significant stoichiometry. Instead, we show that Rpe65 binds the acidic phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin, but not phosphatidic acid. No binding of Rpe65 to basic phospholipids or neutral lipids was observed. The affinity of Rpe65 to acidic phospholipids was strongly pH-dependent, suggesting an electrostatic interaction of basic residues in Rpe65 with negatively charged phospholipid headgroups. Binding of Rpe65 to liposomes containing phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylglycerol, but not the basic or neutral phospholipids, allowed the enzyme to extract its insoluble substrate, all-trans-retinyl palmitate, from the lipid bilayer for synthesis of 11-cis-retinol. The interaction of Rpe65 with acidic phospholipids is therefore biologically relevant. PMID:19892706

  8. Dynamics of bio-membranes investigated by neutron spin echo: Effects of phospholipid conformations and presence of lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zheng

    Bio-membranes of the natural living cells are made of bilayers of phospholipids molecules embedded with other constituents, such as cholesterol and membrane proteins, which help to accomplish a broad range of functions. Vesicles made of lipid bilayers can serve as good model systems for bio-membranes. Therefore these systems have been extensively characterized and much is known about their shape, size, porosity and functionality. In this dissertation we report the studies of the effects of the phosoholipid conformation, such as hydrocarbon number and presence of double bond in hydrophobic tails on dynamics of phospholipids bilayers studied by neutron spin echo (NSE) technique. We have investigated how lidocaine, the most medically used local anesthetics (LA), influence the structural and dynamical properties of model bio-membranes by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), NSE and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). To investigate the influence of phospholipid conformation on bio-membranes, the bending elasticities kappac of seven saturated and monounsaturated phospholipid bilayers were investigated by NSE spectroscopy. kappa c of phosphatidylcholines (PCS) in liquid crystalline (L alpha) phase ranges from 0.38x10-19 J for 1,2-Dimyristoyl- sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (14:0 PC) to 0.64x10-19 J for 1,2-Dieicosenoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (20:1 PC). It was confirmed that when the area modulus KA varies little with chain unsaturation or length, the elastic ratios (kappac/ KA)1/2 of bilayers varies linearly with lipid hydrophobic thickness d. For the study of the influence of LA on bio-membranes, SANS measurements have been performed on 14:0 PC bilayers with different concentrations of lidocaine to determine the bilayer thickness dL as a function of the lidocaine concentration. NSE has been used to study the influence of lidocaine on the bending elasticity of 14:0 PC bilayers in Lalpha and ripple gel (Pbeta') phases. Our results confirmed that the molecules of

  9. [Phospholipids and structural modification of tissues and cell membranes for adaptation in high altitude mountains].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, V M; Vishnevskiĭ, A A; Shanazarov, A S

    2012-01-01

    The nature of the impact of physical factors of high altitudes (3200 m) on the lipids of tissues and membranes of animals was researched. It was established that the adaptation process in Wistar rats was followed by peroxide degradation and subsequent modification of the phospholipids' structure of tissues and microsomal membranes. Adaptive phospholipids reconstruction takes place in microsomal membranes in the tissues of the lungs, brain, liver and skeletal muscles. Together with this, the amount of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid accumulates, indicating that the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol-4, 5 biphosphate to diacylglycerol and secondary messenger--inositol triphosphate, occurs. A decrease in temperature adaptation (+10 degrees C) leads to a more noticeable shift in peroxide oxidation of lipids, phospholipid structure in the tissues and membranes rather than adaptation in thermoneutral conditions (+30 degrees C). Modification of lipid composition of tissues and cell membranes in the highlands obviously increases the adaptive capabilities of cells of the whole body: physical performance and resistance to hypoxia increases in animals. PMID:22586936

  10. [Phospholipids and structural modification of tissues and cell membranes for adaptation in high altitude mountains].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, V M; Vishnevskiĭ, A A; Shanazarov, A S

    2012-01-01

    The nature of the impact of physical factors of high altitudes (3200 m) on the lipids of tissues and membranes of animals was researched. It was established that the adaptation process in Wistar rats was followed by peroxide degradation and subsequent modification of the phospholipids' structure of tissues and microsomal membranes. Adaptive phospholipids reconstruction takes place in microsomal membranes in the tissues of the lungs, brain, liver and skeletal muscles. Together with this, the amount of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid accumulates, indicating that the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol-4, 5 biphosphate to diacylglycerol and secondary messenger--inositol triphosphate, occurs. A decrease in temperature adaptation (+10 degrees C) leads to a more noticeable shift in peroxide oxidation of lipids, phospholipid structure in the tissues and membranes rather than adaptation in thermoneutral conditions (+30 degrees C). Modification of lipid composition of tissues and cell membranes in the highlands obviously increases the adaptive capabilities of cells of the whole body: physical performance and resistance to hypoxia increases in animals.

  11. Membrane deterioration in senescing carnation flowers : coordinated effects of phospholipid degradation and the action of membranous lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Fobel, M; Lynch, D V; Thompson, J E

    1987-09-01

    The lipid fluidity of microsomal membranes from the petals of cut carnation flowers decreases as the flowers senesce. A comparable change in fluidity was induced by in vitro aging of microsomal membranes from young flowers under conditions in which membranous lipoxygenase-like activity was active. There was no change in fluidity when the membranes were aged in the presence of inhibitors of lipoxygenase or were heat-denatured prior to aging. Membranes from naturally senesced flowers and membranes that had been aged in vitro both sustained an increase in saturated:unsaturated fatty acid ratio that accounted for the decrease in lipid fluidity, and in both instances there was evidence for depletion of the unsaturated fatty acids, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid, which are substrates for lipoxygenase. Loss of lipid phosphate reflecting breakdown of membrane phospholipids preceded the depletion of unsaturated fatty acids attributable to the lipoxygenase-like activity. The data have been interpreted as indicating that fatty acid substrates for membrane-associated lipoxygenase-like activity are made available by the initiation of phospholipid degradation, and that the utilization of these substrates results in a selective depletion of unsaturated fatty acids from the membrane and an ensuing decrease in bulk lipid fluidity.

  12. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Increases the Availability of Cholesterol in Phospholipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Ory, Daniel S.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-02-01

    Side-chain oxysterols are enzymatically generated oxidation products of cholesterol that serve a central role in mediating cholesterol homeostasis. Recent work has shown that side-chain oxysterols, such as 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC), alter membrane structure in very different ways from cholesterol, suggesting a possible mechanism for how these oxysterols regulate cholesterol homeostasis. Here we extend our previous work, using molecular dynamics simulations of 25-HC and cholesterol mixtures in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers to examine interactions between 25-HC and cholesterol in the same bilayer. When added to cholesterol-containing membranes, 25-HC causes larger changes in membrane structure than when added to cholesterol-free membranes, demonstrating interactions between the two sterols. We also find that the presence of 25-HC changes the position, orientation, and solvent accessibility of cholesterol, shifting it into the water interface and therefore its availability to external acceptors. This is consistent with experimental results showing that oxysterols can trigger cholesterol trafficking from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum. These interactions provide a potential mechanism for 25-HC-mediated regulation of cholesterol trafficking and homeostasis through direct modulation of cholesterol availability.

  13. Small Interfering RNA Transfection Across a Phospholipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Van; Choubey, Amit; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2012-02-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. We have performed steered MD simulations to study the transfection of a bare siRNA and siRNA/Oleic Acid (OA) complex across the dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPC) bilayer at T = 323 K. Bare siRNA induces the formation of frustrated lipid gel domains, whereas in the presence of siRNA/OA complex the membrane is found to be in the liquid-ordered phase. In both cases the stress profiles across the membrane indicate that the membrane is under tension near the head groups and highly compressed at the water-hydrophobic interface. During transfection, the membrane is deformed and the lateral stress is significantly lowered for the bare siRNA and siRNA/OA complex. The bare siRNA transfects through a lipid-nanopore of hydrophilic head-groups and hydrophobic carbon chains, whereas the siRNA/OA complex transfects through a lipid-nanopore of hydrophilic head groups.

  14. [Relevance of metabolism of membrane phospholipids for Alzheimer dementia].

    PubMed

    Gattaz, W F; Levy, R; Cairns, N J; Förstl, H; Braus, D F; Maras, A

    1996-01-01

    We found a decreased activity of the enzyme phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in brain tissue from 23 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to 20 non-demented controls. The decrement was more pronounced in patients with an early onset of disease and correlated significantly with higher counts of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Decreased PLA2 activity may inhibit the secretion of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and thus contribute to the formation of the beta-amyloid peptide, the major component of the amyloid plaque in AD. Because PLA2 activity is under genetic control, it is conceivable that the enzyme activity in the brain is related to the activity in blood cells. To test this assumption we investigated PLA2 in platelet membranes from AD patients compared to healthy and psychiatric controls. Platelets are interesting peripheral models in AD research, because they contain and secrete APP. We determined the platelet PLA2 activity in 16 patients with a "probable" AD (NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) as compared to 13 healthy controls and to 14 psychiatric patients with a major depression. There were no significant differences between the three groups regarding age and sex distribution. In the AD patients the cognitive performance was assessed with the CAMCOG and the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE). The radioenzymatic assay for the determination of PLA2 activity is described elsewhere. Platelet PLA2 activity was significantly reduced in AD patients as compared to healthy (p < 0.03) and to psychiatric controls (p < 0.002). The reduction of the enzyme activity correlated with an early onset of the disease (rs = .43, p < 0.10) and with the cognitive impairment in the CAMCOG (rs = .55, p < 0.05). AD patients with a MMSE-score lower than 10 (median) showed significantly lower PLA2 activity (11.8 +/- 3.1) than patients with MMSE-score higher than 10 (16.2 +/- 4.6, p < 0.05). These findings in platelets are in line with our previous results in brain tissue. In both

  15. Molecular species specificity of phospholipid breakdown in microsomal membranes of senescing carnation flowers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.H.; Lynch, D.V.; Thompson, J.E.

    1987-11-01

    During senescence of cut carnation flowers, there is extensive breakdown of microsomal phospholipid. This is attributable, at least in part, to lipolytic activity associated directly with the microsomal membranes. Evidence indicating that one or more of the lipid-degrading enzymes in these membranes preferentially degrade phospholipid molecular species containing two diunsaturated acyl chains or at least one polyunsaturated acyl chain has been obtained by using radiolabeled phosphatidylcholine substrates. 16:0/sup *//16:0/sup */; 16:0/18:2/sup */, and 18:1/sup *//18:1/sup */ phosphatidylcholine were degraded only minimally over a 3 hour period by microsomes isolated from senescing flowers. By contrast, (U-/sup 14/C)phosphatidylcholine, which comprises various molecular species including those containing polyunsaturated acyl chains, and 18:0/20:4/sup */ phosphatidylcholine were extensively degraded. Under identical conditions, but in the absence of added radiolabeled substrate, endogenous 18:2/18:2, 18:1/18:3, and 18:2/18:3 phosphatidylcholine were selectively depleted from the membranes. During natural senescence of the flowers, there was a sharp decline in microsomal 16:0/18:1 and 18:1/18:2 phosphatidylcholine, whereas molecular species containing two diunsaturated acyl chains or at least one polyunsaturated acyl chain remained unchanged or decreased only slightly. The data have been interpreted as indicating that provision of particular molecular species susceptible to lipase attack is a prerequisite to phospholipid catabolism in senescing membranes.

  16. Molecular species specificity of phospholipid breakdown in microsomal membranes of senescing carnation flowers.

    PubMed

    Brown, J H; Lynch, D V; Thompson, J E

    1987-11-01

    During senescence of cut carnation flowers, there is extensive breakdown of microsomal phospholipid. This is attributable, at least in part, to lipolytic activity associated directly with the microsomal membranes. Evidence indicating that one or more of the lipid-degrading enzymes in these membranes preferentially degrade phospholipid molecular species containing two diunsaturated acyl chains or at least one polyunsaturated acyl chain has been obtained by using radiolabeled phosphatidylcholine substrates. 16:0(*)/16:0(*), 16:0/18:2(*), and 18:1(*)/18:1(*) phosphatidylcholine were degraded only minimally over a 3 hour period by microsomes isolated from senescing flowers. By contrast, [U-(14)C]phosphatidylcholine, which comprises various molecular species including those containing polyunsaturated acyl chains, and 18:0/20:4(*) phosphatidylcholine were extensively degraded. Under identical conditions, but in the absence of added radiolabeled substrate, endogenous 18:2/18:2, 18:1/18:3, and 18:2/18:3 phosphatidylcholine were selectively depleted from the membranes. During natural senescence of the flowers, there was a sharp decline in microsomal 16:0/18:1 and 18:1/18:2 phosphatidylcholine, whereas molecular species containing two diunsaturated acyl chains or at least one polyunsaturated acyl chain remained unchanged or decreased only slightly. The data have been interpreted as indicating that provision of particular molecular species susceptible to lipase attack is a prerequisite to phospholipid catabolism in senescing membranes.

  17. Kinetics of a Ca-2+-triggered membrane aggregation reaction of phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Lansman, J; Haynes, D H

    1975-07-01

    Ca-2+ and other divalent cations can trigger aggregation of phospholipid vesicles containing phosphatidic acid or phosphatidylserine. The reaction, which can be detected by an increase in light scattering, has a critical dependence on the Ca-2+ concentration, with a threshold near 4 mM Ca-2+. This is the concentration for half-saturation of the polar head groups and for full neutralization of the membrane surface charge. The aggregation proceeds as a "polymerization" reaction, eventually forming such large aggregates that the vesicles precipitate. The stopped-flow rapid mixing technique was used to study the vesicle dimerization reaction which is the first step in the overall aggregation process. Vesicle dimerization resulted in a doubling of light scattering and had a vesicle concentration-dependent time constant (t1/2) which varied between 0.4 and 2.0s under the conditions of the study. Analysis of the dependence of the reaction amplitude and l/t 1/2 on the concentrations of vesicles and Ca-2+ showed that the Ca-2+ binding is fast, and that the dimerization proceeds by a mechanism in which the vesicles first collide to form an encounter complex followed by a slower conversion of the encounter complex to a stable complex. For phosphatidic acid vesicles, about 200-700 collisions are necessary to achieve a stable dimer. The rate-limiting step in the overall reaction is thus the transformation of the encounter complex into a stable complex, requiring 0.5 and 1.0 ms. The above-mentioned results are relatively insensitive insensitive to the type of divalent cation or to the choice of negatively charged lipid (phosphatidic acid or phosphatidylserine). Evidence is given that the stable complex is effected by Ca-2+-mediated salt bridges between the two membranes and that the rate constant of the transformation step derives from the statistics of the distribution and the rate of redistribution of Ca-2+-occupied polar head groups on the membrane surfaces. The relevance of

  18. Deposition of metal nanoparticles on phospholipid multilayer membranes modified by gramicidin.

    PubMed

    Han, Won Bae; Kim, Yongdeok; An, Hyeun Hwan; Kim, Hee-Soo; Yoon, Chong Seung

    2013-10-29

    A planar dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) multilayer phospholipid membrane was structurally modified by introducing a transmembrane protein, gramicidin (up to 25 mol %), to study its effect on the metal nanoparticles deposited on the membrane. Without gramicidin, when 3-nm-thick Ag, Sn, Al, and Au were deposited, the nanoparticles hardly nucleated on the DPPC membrane in rigid gel state (except for Au); however, the gramicidin addition dramatically enhanced the DPPC membrane surface's affinity for metal atoms so that a dense array of metal (Ag, Sn, and Au) or metal-oxide (Al-oxide) nanoparticles was produced on the membrane surface. The particle sizes ranged from 3 to 15 nm depending on the metal and gramicidin concentration, whereas the particle density was strongly dictated by the gramicidin concentration. The proposed method provides a convenient, generally applicable synthesis route for preparing different metal or metal-oxide nanoparticles on a relatively robust biocompatible membrane.

  19. Ginkgolide B Reduces the Degradation of Membrane Phospholipids to Prevent Ischemia/Reperfusion Myocardial Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Pei, Hong-Xia; Hua, Rong; Guan, Cha-Xiang; Fang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a bioactive phospholipid, plays an important role in the integrity of the cellular membrane structure, and is involved in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injuries. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that blockage of PAF receptor by BN 52021 (Ginkgolide B) can prevent IR-induced degradation of the myocardial membrane phospholipid, and deterioration of the cardiac function. Rat hearts in situ were subjected to 5 min ischemia and followed by 10 min reperfusion. Cardiac performances during periods of ischemia and reperfusion were monitored, and the amount of membrane phospholipids was analyzed. Myocardial total phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylethanolamine were decreased significantly in ischemia-reperfusion rat hearts compared with those of sham-operated rat hearts. Degradation of the membrane phospholipid was accompanied by the deterioration of cardiac functions and increase in serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. BN 52021 (15 mg/kg), given by intravenous infusion 10 min prior to the left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion, reduced IR-related degradation of the myocardial phospholipids, the activity of serum LDH, and was concomitant with improvement of cardiac function. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the production of PAF was increased and BN 52021 decreased cellular damage in cultured anoxic cardiomyocytes. These results indicated that PAF antagonist BN 52021 has a protective effect against IR-induced myocardial dysfunction and degradation of the membrane phospholipids. PMID:26382046

  20. Phospholipid molecular species of frog rod outer segment membranes.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, R D; Anderson, R E

    1983-08-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) were isolated from frog retinal rod outer segment (ROS) membranes and their major molecular species determined. Saturated fatty acids are predominantly located on position-1 and polyunsaturates on position-2, although this assignment is not absolute. One-fifth of the species of PC are of the saturated and monoenoic type, compared to only trace amounts of these species in PE. On the other hand, PE contains at least 50% dipolyunsaturated species, while PC has 6%. The predominant molecular species of frog PC are: 18:0-22:6 omega 3 (39%), 16:0-22:6 omega 3 (17%), 16:0-16:1 (6%), 16:0-18:1 (5%) and 16:0-16:0 (4%). The major molecular species of frog PE are: 22:6 omega 3-22:6 omega 3 (21%), 18:0-22:6 omega 3 (18%), 18:1-22:6 omega 3 (14%), 22:4 omega 6-22:6 omega 3 (10%), 22:5 omega (3 + 6)-22:6 omega 3 (10%), 16:0-22:6 omega 3 (7%) and 20:4 omega 6-22:6 omega 3 (5%). The specific molecular species are discussed in relation to their effect on fluidity and asymmetry of ROS disc membranes.

  1. Tissue Factor Residues That Putatively Interact with Membrane Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ke; Yuan, Jian; Morrissey, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Blood clotting is initiated by the two-subunit enzyme consisting of the plasma protease, factor VIIa (the catalytic subunit), bound to the integral membrane protein, tissue factor (the regulatory subunit). Molecular dynamics simulations have predicted that certain residues in the tissue factor ectodomain interact with phosphatidylserine headgroups to ensure optimal positioning of the tissue factor/factor VIIa complex relative to its membrane-bound protein substrates, factors IX and X. In this study, we individually mutated to alanine all the putative phosphatidylserine-interactive residues in the tissue factor ectodomain and measured their effects on tissue factor cofactor function (activation of factors IX and X by tissue factor/factor VIIa, and clotting of plasma). Some tissue factor mutants exhibited decreased activity in all three assays, with the most profound defects observed from mutations in or near the flexible loop from Lys159 to Gly164. The decreased activity of all of these tissue factor mutants could be partially or completely overcome by increasing the phosphatidylserine content of tissue factor-liposomes. Additionally, yeast surface display was used to screen a random library of tissue factor mutants for enhanced factor VIIa binding. Surprisingly, mutations at a single amino acid (Lys165) predominated, with the Lys165→Glu mutant exhibiting a 3-fold enhancement in factor VIIa binding affinity. Our studies reveal the functional contributions of residues in the C-terminal half of the tissue factor ectodomain that are implicated in interacting with phosphatidylserine headgroups to enhance tissue factor cofactor activity, possibly by allosterically modulating the conformation of the adjacent substrate-binding exosite region of tissue factor. PMID:24516673

  2. Perimicrovillar membrane assembly: the fate of phospholipids synthesised by the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt-Cunha, Paula Rêgo; Silva-Cardoso, Livia; de Oliveira, Giselle Almeida; da Silva, José Roberto; da Silveira, Alan Barbosa; Kluck, George Eduardo Gabriel; Souza-Lima, Michele; Gondim, Katia Calp; Dansa-Petretsky, Marilvia; Silva, Carlos Peres; Masuda, Hatisaburo; da Silva, Mario Alberto Cardoso; Atella, Georgia Correa

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we describe the fate of fatty acids that are incorporated from the lumen by the posterior midgut epithelium of Rhodnius prolixus and the biosynthesis of lipids. We also demonstrate that neutral lipids (NL) are transferred to the haemolymphatic lipophorin (Lp) and that phospholipids remain in the tissue in which they are organised into perimicrovillar membranes (PMMs). 3H-palmitic acid added at the luminal side of isolated midguts of R. prolixus females was readily absorbed and was used to synthesise phospholipids (80%) and NL (20%). The highest incorporation of 3H-palmitic acid was on the first day after a blood meal. The amounts of diacylglycerol (DG) and triacylglycerol synthesised by the tissue decreased in the presence of Lp in the incubation medium. The metabolic fates of 3H-lipids synthesised by the posterior midgut were followed and it was observed that DG was the major lipid released to Lp particles. However, the majority of phospholipids were not transferred to Lp, but remained in the tissue. The phospholipids that were synthesised and accumulated in the posterior midgut were found to be associated with Rhodnius luminal contents as structural components of PMMs. PMID:23827998

  3. Micropipette aspiration of human erythrocytes induces echinocytes via membrane phospholipid translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Artmann, G M; Sung, K L; Horn, T; Whittemore, D; Norwich, G; Chien, S

    1997-01-01

    When a discocytic erythrocyte (RBC) was partially aspirated into a 1.5-microns glass pipette with a high negative aspiration pressure (delta P = -3.9 kPa), held in the pipette for 30 s (holding time, th), and then released, it underwent a discocyte-echinocyte shape transformation. The degree of shape transformation increased with an increase in th. The echinocytes recovered spontaneously to discocytes in approximately 10 min, and there was no significant difference in recovery time at 20.9 degrees C, 29.5 degrees C, and 37.4 degrees C, respectively. At 11 degrees C the recovery time was significantly elevated to 40.1 +/- 6.7 min. At 20.9 degrees C the shape recovery time varied directly with the isotropic RBC tension induced by the pipetting. Sodium orthovanadate (vanadate, 200 microM), which inhibits the phospholipid translocase, blocks the shape recovery. Chlorpromazine (CP, 25 microM) reversed the pipette-induced echinocytic shape to discocytic in < 2 min, and the RBC became a spherostomatocyte-II after another 30 min. It was hypothesized that the increase in cytosolic pressure during the pipette aspiration induced an isotropic tension in the RBC membrane followed by a net inside-to-outside membrane lipid translocation. After a sudden release of the aspiration pressure the cytosolic pressure and the membrane tension normalized immediately, but the translocated phospholipids remained temporarily "trapped" in the outer layer, causing an area excess and hence the echinocytic shape. The phospholipid translocase activity, when not inhibited by vanadate, caused a gradual return of the translocated phospholipids to the inner layer, and the RBC shape recovered with time. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:9138589

  4. Analysis of the induction of the myelin basic protein binding to the plasma membrane phospholipid monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Hao, Changchun; Feng, Ying; Gao, Feng; Lu, Xiaolong; Li, Junhua; Sun, Runguang

    2016-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an essential structure involved in the generation of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Myelin shape has been described as liquid crystal structure of biological membrane. The interactions of MBP with monolayers of different lipid compositions are responsible for the multi-lamellar structure and stability of myelin. In this paper, we have designed MBP-incorporated model lipid monolayers and studied the phase behavior of MBP adsorbed on the plasma membrane at the air/water interface by thermodynamic method and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By analyzing the pressure-area (π-A) and pressure-time (π-T) isotherms, univariate linear regression equation was obtained. In addition, the elastic modulus, surface pressure increase, maximal insertion pressure, and synergy factor of monolayers were detected. These parameters can be used to modulate the monolayers binding of protein, and the results show that MBP has the strongest affinity for 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphoserine (DPPS) monolayer, followed by DPPC/DPPS mixed and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline (DPPC) monolayers via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. AFM images of DPPS and DPPC/DPPS mixed monolayers in the presence of MBP (5 nM) show a phase separation texture at the surface pressure of 20 mN/m and the incorporation of MBP put into the DPPC monolayers has exerted a significant effect on the domain structure. MBP is not an integral membrane protein but, due to its positive charge, interacts with the lipid head groups and stabilizes the membranes. The interaction between MBP and phospholipid membrane to determine the nervous system of the disease has a good biophysical significance and medical value. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21402114 and 11544009), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2016JM2010), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central

  5. Analysis of the induction of the myelin basic protein binding to the plasma membrane phospholipid monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Hao, Changchun; Feng, Ying; Gao, Feng; Lu, Xiaolong; Li, Junhua; Sun, Runguang

    2016-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an essential structure involved in the generation of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Myelin shape has been described as liquid crystal structure of biological membrane. The interactions of MBP with monolayers of different lipid compositions are responsible for the multi-lamellar structure and stability of myelin. In this paper, we have designed MBP-incorporated model lipid monolayers and studied the phase behavior of MBP adsorbed on the plasma membrane at the air/water interface by thermodynamic method and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By analyzing the pressure–area (π–A) and pressure–time (π–T) isotherms, univariate linear regression equation was obtained. In addition, the elastic modulus, surface pressure increase, maximal insertion pressure, and synergy factor of monolayers were detected. These parameters can be used to modulate the monolayers binding of protein, and the results show that MBP has the strongest affinity for 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphoserine (DPPS) monolayer, followed by DPPC/DPPS mixed and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline (DPPC) monolayers via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. AFM images of DPPS and DPPC/DPPS mixed monolayers in the presence of MBP (5 nM) show a phase separation texture at the surface pressure of 20 mN/m and the incorporation of MBP put into the DPPC monolayers has exerted a significant effect on the domain structure. MBP is not an integral membrane protein but, due to its positive charge, interacts with the lipid head groups and stabilizes the membranes. The interaction between MBP and phospholipid membrane to determine the nervous system of the disease has a good biophysical significance and medical value. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21402114 and 11544009), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (Grant No. 2016JM2010), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central

  6. Adsorption of monovalent cations to bilayer membranes containing negative phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, M; Gresalfi, T; Riccio, T; McLaughlin, S

    1979-11-13

    The electrophoretic mobilities of multilamellar phosphatidylserine vesicles were measured in solutions containing monovalent cations, and the xi potentials, the electrostatic potentials at the hydrodynamic plane of shear, were calculated from the Helmholtz--Smoluchowski equation. In the presence of 0.1 M lithium, sodium, ammonium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, tetraethylammonium, and tetramethylammonium chloride, the xi potentials were -60, -62, -72, -73, -77, -80, -82, and -91 mV, respectively. Similar results were obtained with phosphatidylglycerol vesicles; different results were obtained with cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid vesicles. The phosphatidylserine results are interpreted in terms of the Stern equation, a combination of the Gouy equation from the theory of the diffuse double layer, the Boltzmann relation, and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Evidence is presented that suggests the hydrodynamic plane of shear is 2 A from the surface of the membrane in solutions containing the alkali metal cations. With this assumption, the intrinsic association constants of the above monovalent cations with phosphatidylserine are 0.8, 0.6, 0.17, 0.15, 0.08, 0.05, 0.03, and 0 M-1, respectively. The validity of this approach was tested in two ways. First, the xi potentials of vesicles formed from mixtures of phosphatidylserine and a zwitterionic lipid, phosphatidylcholine, were measured in solutions containing different concentrations of sodium. All the data could be described by the Stern equation if the "relaxation" of the ionic atmosphere, which is predicted by classic electrostatic and hydrodynamic theory to occur at low salt concentrations and high potentials, was circumvented by using only large (diameter greater than 13 micrometers) vesicles for these measurements. Second, the fluorescent probe 2-(p-toluidinyl)naphthalene-6-sulfonate was used to estimate the potential at the surface of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylglycerol vesicles

  7. Phospholipid Scramblases

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of phospholipid types between the two leaflets of a membrane bilayer is a controlled feature of membrane structure. One of the two membrane catalytic activities governing this distribution randomizes the composition of the two leaflets—the phospholipid scramblases. Two proteins (Xkr8 and TMEM16F) required for the activation of these activities have been identified. One of these proteins (TMEM16F) is quite clearly a scramblase itself and provides insight into the mechanism by which transbilayer phospholipid movement is facilitated. PMID:26843813

  8. Seasonal changes in minor membrane phospholipid classes, sterols and tocopherols in overwintering insect, Pyrrhocoris apterus.

    PubMed

    Koštál, Vladimír; Urban, Tomáš; Rimnáčová, Lucie; Berková, Petra; Simek, Petr

    2013-09-01

    Ectotherm animals including insects are known to undergo seasonal restructuring of the cell membranes in order to keep their functionality and/or protect their structural integrity at low body temperatures. Studies on insects so far focused either on fatty acids or on composition of molecular species in major phospholipid classes. Here we extend the scope of analysis and bring results on seasonal changes in minor phospholipid classes, lysophospholipids (LPLs), free fatty acids, phytosterols and tocopherols in heteropteran insect, Pyrrhocoris apterus. We found that muscle tissue contains unusually high amounts of LPLs. Muscle and fat body tissues also contain high amounts of β-sitosterol and campesterol, two phytosterols derived from plant food, while only small amounts of cholesterol are present. In addition, two isomers (γ and δ) of tocopherol (vitamin E) are present in quantities comparable to, or even higher than phytosterols in both tissues. Distinct seasonal patterns of sterol and tocopherol concentrations were observed showing a minimum in reproductively active bugs in summer and a maximum in diapausing, cold-acclimated bugs in winter. Possible adaptive meanings of such changes are discussed including: preventing the unregulated transition of membrane lipids from functional liquid crystalline phase to non-functional gel phase; decreasing the rates of ion/solute leakage; silencing the activities of membrane bound enzymes and receptors; and counteracting the higher risk of oxidative damage to PUFA in winter membranes.

  9. The insertion of human apolipoprotein H into phospholipid membranes: a monolayer study.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S X; Cai, G P; Sui, S F

    1998-01-01

    Apolipoprotein H (ApoH) is a plasma glycoprotein isolated from human serum. The interactions of ApoH with lipid membrane were reported to be essential for its physiological and pathogenic roles. In this paper we studied the ability of ApoH to insert into phospholipid membranes using the monolayer approach. The results show that ApoH is surface active and can insert into the lipid monolayers. The insertion ability of ApoH is stronger when a higher content of negatively charged lipids is present in the membrane. The acidic-pH and low-ionic-strength conditions will also enhance ApoH insertion, but these factors may not have much influence on the final insertion ability of ApoH, suggesting that, in the mechanism of ApoH insertion, not only electrostatic forces, but also hydrophobic interactions, are evidently involved. Modification by heat inactivation and reduction/alkylation does not change the critical insertion pressure (pic) of ApoH, suggesting a stable domain, maybe a linear sequence motif, but not the native three-dimensional structure of ApoH, is responsible for its insertion. The extent to which insertion of ApoH into phospholipid membranes may facilitate the 'immune cleaning' of plasma liposomes is discussed. PMID:9761718

  10. The insertion of human apolipoprotein H into phospholipid membranes: a monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Wang, S X; Cai, G P; Sui, S F

    1998-10-15

    Apolipoprotein H (ApoH) is a plasma glycoprotein isolated from human serum. The interactions of ApoH with lipid membrane were reported to be essential for its physiological and pathogenic roles. In this paper we studied the ability of ApoH to insert into phospholipid membranes using the monolayer approach. The results show that ApoH is surface active and can insert into the lipid monolayers. The insertion ability of ApoH is stronger when a higher content of negatively charged lipids is present in the membrane. The acidic-pH and low-ionic-strength conditions will also enhance ApoH insertion, but these factors may not have much influence on the final insertion ability of ApoH, suggesting that, in the mechanism of ApoH insertion, not only electrostatic forces, but also hydrophobic interactions, are evidently involved. Modification by heat inactivation and reduction/alkylation does not change the critical insertion pressure (pic) of ApoH, suggesting a stable domain, maybe a linear sequence motif, but not the native three-dimensional structure of ApoH, is responsible for its insertion. The extent to which insertion of ApoH into phospholipid membranes may facilitate the 'immune cleaning' of plasma liposomes is discussed.

  11. On the effect of serum on the transport of reactive oxygen species across phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Szili, Endre J; Hong, Sung-Ha; Short, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    The transport of plasma generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) across a simple phospholipid membrane mimic of a (real) cell was investigated. Experiments were performed in cell culture media (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, DMEM), with and without 10% serum. A (broad spectrum) ROS reporter dye, 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCFH), was used to detect the generation of ROS by a helium (He) plasma jet in DMEM using free DCFH and with DCFH encapsulated inside phospholipid membrane vesicles dispersed in DMEM. The authors focus on the concentration and on the relative rates (arbitrary units) for oxidation of DCFH [or the appearance of the oxidized product 2,7-dichlorofluorescein (DCF)] both in solution and within vesicles. In the first 1 h following plasma exposure, the concentration of free DCF in DMEM was ~15× greater in the presence of serum (cf. to the serum-free DMEM control). The DCF in vesicles was ~2× greater in DMEM containing serum compared to the serum-free DMEM control. These data show that serum enhances plasma ROS generation in DMEM. As expected, the role of the phospholipid membrane was to reduce the rate of oxidation of the encapsulated DCFH (with and without serum). And the efficiency of ROS transport into vesicles was lower in DMEM containing serum (at 4% efficiency) when compared to serum-free DMEM (at 32% efficiency). After 1 h, the rate of DCFH oxidation was found to have significantly reduced. Based upon a synthesis of these data with results from the open literature, the authors speculate on how the components of biological fluid and cellular membranes might affect the kinetics of consumption of plasma generated ROS.

  12. Transcytotic vesicle fusion with canalicular membranes is modulated by phospholipid species: implications for biliary lipid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hirano, N; Tazuma, S; Kajiyama, G

    1997-07-01

    Phospholipid species modulate bile metastability and the subselection of such species for biliary secretion occurs at the canalicular membrane. In this study, the role of phospholipid head groups and hydrophobic indices in transcytotic vesicle fusion with the canalicular membrane inner leaflet was investigated using rat canalicular membrane vesicles (CMV) and liposomes. The CMV were purified from Sprague-Dawley rat liver, and small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) of phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and mixtures of PS/PC (1:1, 2:1 and 4:1) were labelled with 8 mol% of octadecyl rhodamine B chloride (R18). The PC species used in this study were egg yolk PC (EYPC), soybean PC (SBPC), dipalmitoyl PC (DPPC) and dilinoleoyl PC (DLPC). Fusion of SUV with CMV was initiated by the addition of a millimolar concentration of Ca2+ and the degree of fusion was estimated by the increase of R18 fluorescence. Ca(2+)-dependent fusion of SUV consisting of PS, and PS/PC (4:1) with CMV was observed (PS > PS/PC; 4:1), whereas no detectable fusion was evident between CMV and SUV of PC alone or PS/PC (1:1 or 2:1). The rank order of fusibility between CMV and SUV of PS/PC (4:1) containing various PC species was PS/DLPC > PS/SBPC > PS/EYPC > PS/DPPC. The hydrophobic index of PC as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was related closely to liposome fusibility (r = -0.88). These results suggest that transcytotic vesicle fusion with the canalicular membrane inner leaflet is regulated by the phospholipid hydrophobicity of the vesicles.

  13. Dynamical and Phase Behavior of a Phospholipid Membrane Altered by an Antimicrobial Peptide at Low Concentration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V K; Mamontov, E; Tyagi, M; Qian, S; Rai, D K; Urban, V S

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature no longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.

  14. Destructive extraction of phospholipids from Escherichia coli membranes by graphene nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yusong; Lv, Min; Xiu, Peng; Huynh, Tien; Zhang, Meng; Castelli, Matteo; Liu, Zengrong; Huang, Qing; Fan, Chunhai; Fang, Haiping; Zhou, Ruhong

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how nanomaterials interact with cell membranes is related to how they cause cytotoxicity and is therefore critical for designing safer biomedical applications. Recently, graphene (a two-dimensional nanomaterial) was shown to have antibacterial activity on Escherichia coli, but its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show experimentally and theoretically that pristine graphene and graphene oxide nanosheets can induce the degradation of the inner and outer cell membranes of Escherichia coli, and reduce their viability. Transmission electron microscopy shows three rough stages, and molecular dynamics simulations reveal the atomic details of the process. Graphene nanosheets can penetrate into and extract large amounts of phospholipids from the cell membranes because of the strong dispersion interactions between graphene and lipid molecules. This destructive extraction offers a novel mechanism for the molecular basis of graphene's cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity.

  15. Role of phospholipids in destabilization of lysosomal membranes in chronic alcohol poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Tadevosyan, Y.V.; Batikyan, T.B.; Gevorkyan, G.A.; Karagezyan, K.G.

    1986-04-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study changes in the phospholipids (PL) spectrum and possible activity of membrane-bound phospholipase A/sub 2/ in lysosomal membranes from albino rat liver under conditions of the normally metabolizing tissue and during long-term alcohol poisoning. Changes in stability of the lysosomal membranes were determined by measuring nonsedimented acid phosphatase (AP) activity. The substance 1-acyl-2-(1-/sup 14/C)-oleoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (/sup 14/C-PCh) was synthesized by an enzymic method. Phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity was determined in an incubation medium of Tris-Maleate buffer containing 20 nanomoles (/sup 14/C)-PCH, 8 mM CaC1/sub 2/, and about 100 micrograms protein.

  16. A common mechanism for the regulation of vesicular SNAREs on phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kuang; Rickman, Colin; Carroll, Joe; Davletov, Bazbek

    2004-02-01

    The SNARE (soluble N -ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor) family of proteins is essential for membrane fusion in intracellular traffic in eukaryotic organisms. v-SNAREs (vesicular SNAREs) must engage target SNAREs in the opposing membrane to form the fusogenic SNARE complex. Temporal and spatial control of membrane fusion is important for many aspects of cell physiology and may involve the regulation of the SNAREs resident on intracellular membranes. Here we show that the v-SNARE synaptobrevin 2, also known as VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein) 2, is restricted from forming the SNARE complex in chromaffin granules from adrenal medullae to the same degree as in brain-purified synaptic vesicles. Our analysis indicates that the previously reported synaptophysin-synaptobrevin interaction is not likely to be involved in regulation of the v-SNARE. Indeed, the restriction can be reproduced for two distinct v-SNARE homologues, synaptobrevin 2 and cellubrevin/VAMP3, by reconstituting them in pure liposomal membranes. Overall, our data uncover a common mechanism for the control of SNARE engagement where intact phospholipid membranes rather than proteins down-regulate vesicular SNAREs in different cellular organelles.

  17. Ceramides in phospholipid membranes: effects on bilayer stability and transition to nonlamellar phases.

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, M P; Arrondo, J L; Goñi, F M; Alonso, A

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ceramides of natural origin on the gel-fluid and lamellar-inverted hexagonal phase transitions of phospholipids (mainly dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine) have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry, with additional support from infrared and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In the lamellar phase, ceramides do not mix ideally with phospholipids, giving rise to the coexistence of domains that undergo the gel-fluid transition at different temperatures. The combination of differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy, together with the use of deuterated lipids, allows the demonstration of independent melting temperatures for phospholipid and ceramide in the mixtures. In the lamellar-hexagonal phase transitions, ceramides (up to 15 mol %) decrease the transition temperature, without significantly modifying the transition enthalpy, thus facilitating the inverted hexagonal phase formation. 31P-NMR indicates the coexistence, within a certain range of temperatures, of lamellar and hexagonal phases, or hexagonal phase precursors. Ceramides from egg or from bovine brain are very similar in their effects on the lamellar-hexagonal transition. They are also comparable to diacylglycerides in this respect, although ceramides are less potent. These results are relevant in the interpretation of certain forms of interfacial enzyme activation and in the regulation and dynamics of the bilayer structure of cell membranes. PMID:9876146

  18. Drug-Membrane Interactions Studied in Phospholipid Monolayers Adsorbed on Non-porous Alkylated Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    LUKACOVA, VIERA; PENG, MING; FANUCCI, GAIL; TANDLICH, ROMAN; HINDERLITER, ANNE; MAITY, BIKASH; MANIVANNAN, ETHIRAJAN; COOK, GREGORY R.; BALAZ, STEFAN

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of interactions with phospholipids is an integral part of the in vitro profiling of drug candidates because of the roles the interactions play in tissue accumulation and passive diffusion. Currently used test systems may inadequately emulate the bilayer core solvation properties (immobilized artificial membranes - IAM), suffer from potentially slow transport of some chemicals (liposomes in free or immobilized forms), and require a tedious separation (if used for free liposomes). Here we introduce a well-defined system overcoming these drawbacks: nonporous octadecylsilica particles coated with a self-assembled phospholipid monolayer. The coating mimics the structure of the headgroup region, as well as the thickness and properties of the hydrocarbon core more closely than IAM. The monolayer has a similar transition temperature pattern as the corresponding bilayer. The particles can be separated by filtration or a mild centrifugation. The partitioning equilibria of 81 tested chemicals were dissected into the headgroup and core contributions, the latter using the alkane/water partition coefficients. The deconvolution allowed a successful prediction of the bilayer/water partition coefficients with the standard deviation of 0.26 log units. The plate-friendly assay is suitable for high-throughput profiling of drug candidates without sacrificing the quality of analysis or details of the drug-phospholipid interactions. PMID:17218665

  19. Electrostatic interactions in phospholipid membranes revealed by coherent 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, V. V.; Chelli, R.; Zhuang, W.; Nuti, F.; Takaoka, Y.; Papini, A. M.; Mukamel, S.; Righini, R.

    2007-01-01

    The inter- and intramolecular interactions of the carbonyl moieties at the polar interface of a phospholipid membrane are probed by using nonlinear femtosecond infrared spectroscopy. Two-dimensional IR correlation spectra separate homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and show a distinct cross-peak pattern controlled by electrostatic interactions. The inter- and intramolecular electrostatic interactions determine the inhomogeneous character of the optical response. Using molecular dynamics simulation and the nonlinear exciton equations approach, we extract from the spectra short-range structural correlations between carbonyls at the interface. PMID:17881567

  20. Myosin-I moves actin filaments on a phospholipid substrate: implications for membrane targeting

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Acanthamoeba myosin-I bound to substrates of nitrocellulose or planar lipid membranes on glass moved actin filaments at an average velocity of 0.2 micron/s. This movement required ATP and phosphorylation of the myosin-I heavy chain. We prepared planar lipid membranes on a glass support by passive fusion of lipid vesicles (Brian, A. A., and H. M. McConnell. 1984. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 81:6159-6163) composed of phosphatidylcholine and containing 0-40% phosphatidylserine. The mass of lipid that bound to the glass was the same for membranes of 2 and 20% phosphatidylserine in phosphatidylcholine and was sufficient to form a single bilayer. Myosin-I moved actin filaments on planar membranes of 5-40% but not 0-2% phosphatidylserine. At the low concentrations of phosphatidylserine, actin filaments tended to detach suggesting that less myosin-I was bound. We used the cooperative activation of Acanthamoeba myosin-I ATPase by low concentrations of actin to assess the association of phospholipids with myosin-I. Under conditions where activity depends on the binding of actin to the tail of myosin-I (Albanesi, J. P., H. Fujisaki, and E. D. Korn. 1985. J. Biol. Chem. 260:11174-11179), phospholipid vesicles with 5-40% phosphatidylserine inhibited ATPase activity. The motility and ATPase results demonstrate a specific interaction of the tail of myosin-I with physiological concentrations of phosphatidylserine. This interaction is sufficient to support motility and may provide a mechanism to target myosin-I to biological membranes. PMID:1530945

  1. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 Membrane Anchor on a Phospholipid Bilayer by Using All-Atom Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S.; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-01-01

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington’s disease. Its first exon—more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)—is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin’s activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties—order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid—of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions. PMID:25762330

  2. What are the sites water occupies at the interface of a phospholipid membrane?

    PubMed

    Volkov, Victor V; Takaoka, Yuji; Righini, Roberto

    2009-04-01

    We explore the two-dimensional infrared response of D(2)O and of OD impurity at the interface of phospholipid membrane fragments. The spectra of the two aqueous states are inhomogeneously broadened due to the absorption of water molecule associated with the membrane interface in different structural sites. The nonlinear spectra of the two species allow disentangling of the spectral contributions of the aqueous states of two types: where the stretching modes are under effective mixing and where the stretching modes are uncoupled. By reviewing the results of the experimental studies with the support of molecular dynamic simulation we identify the spectral signatures of the main structural motives responsible for the inhomogeneous distribution of resonances in the infrared OD stretching region. Our analysis provides a quantitative estimate of the statistical population of the different aqueous species at the polar interface of the bilayer.

  3. Modulation by small hydrophobic molecules of valinomycin-mediated potassium transport across phospholipid vesicle membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, N.R.; Gould, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of small hydrophobic molecules on valinonycin-mediated K/sup +/ transport in small unilamellar soybean phospholipid vesicles have been studied by using a vesicle-entrapped pH-sensitive hydropholic fluorescence probe to monitor counterion-limited, passive H/sup +/ diffusion into vesicles after an abrupt decrease in external pH. Under conditions where, even in the absence of valinomycin, transmembrane K/sup +/ movement represented the primary and limiting counterion flux, <1 valinomycin molecule/vesicle was sufficient to accelerate the rate of H/sup +/ entry into all of the vesicles. Incorporation of the bulkily substituted molecules butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), and p-di-tert-butylbenzene into soybean lipid bilayers had no effect upon K/sup +/ diffusion in the absence of valinomycin. However, the presence of these hydrophobic molecules increased the apparent efficacy for K/sup +/ transport of a given valinomycin concentration by as much as 4-6 fold. The less bulky membrane perturbants tert-butyl alcohol, phenol, and heptane showed very much less dramatic effects. While the rate of valinomycin-mediated K/sup +/ transport (in the presence or absence of BHT) was very sensitive to temperature-induced changes in membrane fluidity, the degree of synergistic interaction between valinomycin and BHT was independent of temperature. Furthermore, BHT, BHA, and p-di-tert-butylbenzene, at levels which alter valinomycin-mediated K/sup +/ transport, did not by themselves induce changes in membrane fluidity. It is postulated that changes in phospholipid head-group packing and/or surface charge density brought about by the presence of bulky perturber molecules leads to changes in partitioning of valinomycin or the valinomycin-K/sup +/ complex between the aqueous and membrane phases.

  4. Structural Thermodynamics of myr-Src(2–19) Binding to Phospholipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Holger A.; Klingler, Johannes; Huster, Daniel; Keller, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are anchored to lipid bilayer membranes through a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. In the case of the membrane-bound nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src from Rous sarcoma virus, these interactions are mediated by an N-terminal myristoyl chain and an adjacent cluster of six basic amino-acid residues, respectively. In contrast with the acyl modifications of other lipid-anchored proteins, the myristoyl chain of Src does not match the host lipid bilayer in terms of chain conformation and dynamics, which is attributed to a tradeoff between hydrophobic burial of the myristoyl chain and repulsion of the peptidic moiety from the phospholipid headgroup region. Here, we combine thermodynamic information obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry with structural data derived from 2H, 13C, and 31P solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to decipher the hydrophobic and electrostatic contributions governing the interactions of a myristoylated Src peptide with zwitterionic and anionic membranes made from lauroyl (C12:0) or myristoyl (C14:0) lipids. Although the latter are expected to enable better hydrophobic matching, the Src peptide partitions more avidly into the shorter-chain lipid analog because this does not require the myristoyl chain to stretch extensively to avoid unfavorable peptide/headgroup interactions. Moreover, we find that Coulombic and intrinsic contributions to membrane binding are not additive, because the presence of anionic lipids enhances membrane binding more strongly than would be expected on the basis of simple Coulombic attraction. PMID:26244740

  5. Differential mode of attack on membrane phospholipids by an acidic phospholipase A₂ (RVVA-PLA₂-I) from Daboia russelli venom.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Debashree; Bordoloi, Naba K; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Choklingam, S; Ghosh, Siddhartha S; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2012-12-01

    An acidic phospholipase A₂ (RVVA-PLA₂-I) purified from Daboia russelli venom demonstrated dose-dependent catalytic, mitochondrial and erythrocyte membrane damaging activities. RVVA-PLA₂-I was non-lethal to mice at the tested dose, however, it affected the different organs of mice particularly the liver and cardiac tissues as deduced from the enzymatic activities measured in mice serum after injection of this PLA₂ enzyme. RVVA-PLA₂-I preferentially hydrolyzed phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine) of erythrocyte membrane compared to the liver mitochondrial membrane. Interestingly, RVVA-PLA₂-I failed to hydrolyze membrane phospholipids of HT-29 (colon adenocarcinoma) cells, which contain an abundance of phosphatidylcholine in its outer membrane, within 24h of incubation. The gas-chromatographic (GC) analysis of saturated/unsaturated fatty acids' release patterns from intact mitochondrial and erythrocyte membranes after the addition of RVVA-PLA₂-I showed a distinctly different result. The results are certainly a reflection of differences in the outer membrane phospholipid composition of tested membranes owing to which they are hydrolyzed by the venom PLA₂s to a different extent. The chemical modification of essential amino acids present in the active site, neutralization study with polyvalent antivenom and heat-inactivation of RVVA-PLA₂-I suggested the correlation between catalytic and membrane damaging activities of this PLA₂ enzyme. Our study advocates that the presence of a large number of PLA₂-sensitive phospholipid domains/composition, rather than only the phosphatidylcholine (PC) content of that particular membrane may determine the extent of membrane damage by a particular venom PLA₂ enzyme.

  6. Oxidized Phospholipids Inhibit the Formation of Cholesterol-Dependent Plasma Membrane Nanoplatforms.

    PubMed

    Brameshuber, Mario; Sevcsik, Eva; Rossboth, Benedikt K; Manner, Christina; Deigner, Hans-Peter; Peksel, Begüm; Péter, Mária; Török, Zsolt; Hermetter, Albin; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a single-molecule microscopy method termed TOCCSL (thinning out clusters while conserving stoichiometry of labeling), which allows for direct imaging of stable nanoscopic platforms with raft-like properties diffusing in the plasma membrane. As a consensus raft marker, we chose monomeric GFP linked via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor to the cell membrane (mGFP-GPI). With this probe, we previously observed cholesterol-dependent homo-association to nanoplatforms diffusing in the plasma membrane of live CHO cells. Here, we report the release of this homo-association upon addition of 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC) or 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, two oxidized phospholipids (oxPLs) that are typically present in oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein. We found a dose-response relationship for mGFP-GPI nanoplatform disintegration upon addition of POVPC, correlating with the signal of the apoptosis marker Annexin V-Cy3. Similar concentrations of lysolipid showed no effect, indicating that the observed phenomena were not linked to properties of the lipid bilayer itself. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by NB-19 before addition of POVPC completely abolished nanoplatform disintegration by oxPLs. In conclusion, we were able to determine how oxidized lipid species disrupt mGFP-GPI nanoplatforms in the plasma membrane. Our results favor an indirect mechanism involving acid sphingomyelinase activity rather than a direct interaction of oxPLs with nanoplatform constituents.

  7. Phospholipid composition of plasma and erythrocyte membranes in animal species by 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Ferlazzo, Alida Maria; Bruschetta, Giuseppe; Di Pietro, Patrizia; Medica, Pietro; Notti, Anna; Rotondo, Enrico

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to provide basal values of phospholipid (PL) composition in different animal species by 31P NMR analysis using detergents. This fast and accurate method allowed a quantitative analysis of PLs without any previous separation. Plasma and erythrocyte membrane PLs were investigated in mammals (pig, cow, horse). Moreover, for the first time, the composition of plasma PLs in avian (chicken and ostrich) was performed by 31P NMR. Significant qualitative and quantitative interspecies differences in plasma PL levels were found. Phosphatidilcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SPH) levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in chicken plasma than all the other species tested. In erythrocytes, cow PC and phosphatidylcholine diarachidoyl were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than for pigs and horses, whereas pig PC presented intermediate values among cows and horses. Inorganic phosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels were also significantly different between the species under investigation. The [SPH/total PLs] molar ratios in erythrocytes confirmed interspecies differences in phospholipid composition while the PC/SPH molar ratios could be related to a distinct erythrocyte flexibility and aggregability. Diet and nutrition may contribute primarily to the interspecies differences in plasma PL amounts detected. Significant differences between chicken plasma PC and SPH levels and those of the other animal species could be ascribed to a fat metabolism specific to egg production.

  8. Effect of gramicidin A on the dipole potential of phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Shapovalov, V L; Kotova, E A; Rokitskaya, T I; Antonenko, Y N

    1999-01-01

    The effect of channel-forming peptide gramicidin A on the dipole potential of phospholipid monolayers and bilayers has been studied. Surface pressure and surface potential isotherms of monolayers have been measured with a Langmuir trough equipped with a Wilhelmy balance and a surface potential meter (Kelvin probe). Gramicidin has been shown to shift pressure-area isotherms of phospholipids and to reduce their monolayer surface potentials. Both effects increase with the increase in gramicidin concentration and depend on the kind of phosphatidylcholine used. Application of the dual-wavelength ratiometric fluorescence method using the potential-sensitive dye RH421 has revealed that the addition of gramicidin A to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes leads to a decrease in the fluorescence ratio of RH421. This is similar to the effect of phloretin, which is known to decrease the dipole potential. The comparison of the concentration dependences of the fluorescence ratio for gramicidin and phloretin shows that gramicidin is as potent as phloretin in modifying the membrane dipole potential. PMID:10388758

  9. Liquid crystals and their interactions with colloidal particles and phospholipid membranes: Molecular simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Evelina B.

    Experimentally, liquid crystals (LC) can be used as the basis for optical biomolecular sensors that rely on LC ordering. Recently, the use of LC as a reporting medium has been extended to investigations of molecular scale processes at lipid laden aqueous-LC interfaces and at biological cell membranes. In this thesis, we present two related studies where liquid crystals are modelled at different length scales. We examine (a) the behavior of nanoscopic colloidal particles in LC systems, using Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulations and a mesoscopic dynamic field theory (DyFT); and (b) specific interactions of two types of mesogens with a model phospholipid bilayer, using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) at the A-nm scale. In (a), we consider colloidal particles suspended in a LC, confined between two walls. We calculate the colloid-substrate and colloid-colloid potentials of mean force (PMF). For the MC simulations, we developed a new technique (ExEDOS or Expanded Ensemble Density Of States) that ensures good sampling of phase space without prior knowledge of the energy landscape of the system. Both results, simulation and DyFT, indicate a repulsive force acting between a colloid and a wall. In contrast, both techniques indicate an overall colloid-colloid attraction and predict a new topology of the disclination lines that arises when the particles approach each other. In (b), we find that mesogens (pentylcyanobiphenyl [5CB] or difluorophenyl-pentylbicyclohexyl [5CF]) preferentially partition from the aqueous phase into a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer. We find highly favorable free energy differences for partitioning (-18kBT for 5CB, -26k BT for 5CF). We also simulated fully hydrated bilayers with embedded 5CB or 5CF at concentrations used in recent experiments (6 mol% and 20 mol%). The presence of mesogens in the bilayer enhances the order of lipid acyl tails and changes the spatial and orientational arrangement of lipid headgroup atoms. A stronger

  10. Plasma and erythrocyte membrane phospholipids and fatty acids in Italian general population and hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia and abnormal phospholipid metabolism are frequent in uremic patients and increase their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD): ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may reduce this risk in the general population. In this study we compared the plasma and erythrocyte cell membrane composition of PUFAs in a group of Caucasian hemodialysis (HD) patients and in a control group of healthy subjects and evaluated the erythrocyte/cell membrane fatty acid ratio as a marker of the dietary intake of phospholipids. The relationship between ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids and the possible differences in PUFAs concentrations were also investigated. Methods and results After obtaining a fully informed consent, a total of ninety-nine HD patients and 160 non uremic control subjects from “Tor Vergata” University Hospital were enrolled into the study. None of them took antioxidant drugs or dietary supplements for at least 90 days prior to the observation. Blood samples were analysed by gas-chromatographic coupled to a mass spectrometric detector. The daily intake of total calories, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates is significantly lower in HD patients than in controls (p < 0.001). Most plasma and erythrocyte PUFA were also reduced significantly in HD patients (p < 0.001). Conclusions Our results suggest that many classes of PUFAs are lacking in HD patients, due to the removal of nutrients during the dialysis and to persistent malnutrition. A dietary treatment addressed to increase plasma ω-3 PUFAs and to optimize ω-6/ω-3 ratio may exert a protective action and reduce the risk of CVD in HD patient. PMID:24655786

  11. Speed and Sensitivity of Phototransduction in Drosophila Depend on Degree of Saturation of Membrane Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Alex S.; Liu, Che-Hsiung; Chu, Brian; Zhang, Qifeng; Dongre, Sidharta A.; Juusola, Mikko; Franze, Kristian; Wakelam, Michael J.O.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila phototransduction is mediated via a G-protein-coupled PLC cascade. Recent evidence, including the demonstration that light evokes rapid contractions of the photoreceptors, suggested that the light-sensitive channels (TRP and TRPL) may be mechanically gated, together with protons released by PLC-mediated PIP2 hydrolysis. If mechanical gating is involved we predicted that the response to light should be influenced by altering the physical properties of the membrane. To achieve this, we used diet to manipulate the degree of saturation of membrane phospholipids. In flies reared on a yeast diet, lacking polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), mass spectrometry showed that the proportion of polyunsaturated phospholipids was sevenfold reduced (from 38 to ∼5%) but rescued by adding a single species of PUFA (linolenic or linoleic acid) to the diet. Photoreceptors from yeast-reared flies showed a 2- to 3-fold increase in latency and time to peak of the light response, without affecting quantum bump waveform. In the absence of Ca2+ influx or in trp mutants expressing only TRPL channels, sensitivity to light was reduced up to ∼10-fold by the yeast diet, and essentially abolished in hypomorphic G-protein mutants (Gαq). PLC activity appeared little affected by the yeast diet; however, light-induced contractions measured by atomic force microscopy or the activation of ectopic mechanosensitive gramicidin channels were also slowed ∼2-fold. The results are consistent with mechanosensitive gating and provide a striking example of how dietary fatty acids can profoundly influence sensory performance in a classical G-protein-coupled signaling cascade. PMID:25673862

  12. Co-existence of Gel and Fluid Lipid Domains in Single-component Phospholipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Barrett, M; Toppozini, L; Yamani, Zahra; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Fragneto, Giovanna; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2012-01-01

    Lateral nanostructures in membranes, so-called rafts, are believed to strongly influence membrane properties and functions. The experimental observation of rafts has proven difficult as they are thought to be dynamic structures that likely fluctuate on nano- to microsecond time scales. Using neutron diffraction we present direct experimental evidence for the co-existence of gel and fluid lipid domains in a single-component phospholipid membrane made of DPPC as it undergoes its main phase transition. The coherence length of the neutron beam sets a lower limit for the size of structures that can be observed. Neutron coherence lengths between 30 and 242A used in this study were obtained by varying the incident neutron energy and the resolution of the neutron spectrometer. We observe Bragg peaks corresponding to co-existing nanometer sized structures, both in out-of-plane and in-plane scans, by tuning the neutron coherence length. During the main phase transition, instead of a continuous transition that shows a pseudo-critical behavior, we observe the co-existence of gel and fluid domains.

  13. Dynamical and phase behavior of a phospholipid membrane altered by an antimicrobial peptide at low concentration

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mamontov, Eugene; Tyagi, M.; Qian, Shuo; Rai, Durgesh K.; Urban, Volker S.; Sharma, V. K.

    2016-05-27

    Here we discuss that the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature nomore » longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.« less

  14. Calcium- and calmodulin-regulated breakdown of phospholipid by microsomal membranes from bean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Paliyath, G.; Thompson, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin in the regulation of phospholipid breakdown by microsomal membranes from bean cotyledons has been obtained by following the formation of radiolabeled degradation products from (U-/sup 14/C)phosphatidylcholine. Three membrane-associated enzymes were found to mediate the breakdown of (U-/sup 14/C) phosphatidylcholine, viz. phospholipase D phosphatidic acid phosphatase and lipolytic acyl hydrolase. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid phosphatase were both stimulated by physiological levels of free Ca/sup 2 +/, whereas lipolytic acyl hydrolase proved to be insensitive to Ca/sup 2 +/. Phospholipase D was unaffected by calmodulin, but the activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was additionally stimulated by nanomolar levels of calmodulin in the presence of 15 micromolar free Ca/sup 2 +/. Calmidazolium, a calmodulin antagonist, inhibited phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity at IC/sub 50/ values ranging from 10 to 15 micromolar. Thus, the Ca/sup 2 +/-induced stimulation of phosphatidic acid phosphatase appears to be mediated through calmodulin, whereas the effect of Ca/sup 2 +/ on phospholipase D is independent of calmodulin. The role of Ca/sup 2 +/ as a second messenger in the initiation of membrane lipid degradation is discussed.

  15. Amino-terminal basic residues of Src mediate membrane binding through electrostatic interaction with acidic phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, C T; Zhou, W; Buser, C A; McLaughlin, S; Resh, M D

    1994-01-01

    Membrane targeting of pp60src (Src) is mediated by its myristoylated amino terminus. We demonstrate that, in addition to myristate, six basic residues in the amino terminus are essential for high-affinity binding to the lipid bilayer via electrostatic interaction with acidic phospholipids. Specifically, c-Src was shown to bind 2500-fold more strongly to vesicles composed of the physiological ratio of 2:1 phosphatidylcholine (PC)/phosphatidylserine (PS) than to neutral PC bilayer vesicles. The apparent Kd for binding of c-Src to the PC/PS bilayer was 6 x 10(-7) M. This interaction is sufficiently strong to account for c-Src membrane targeting. Mutants of c-Src in which the amino-terminal basic residues were replaced by neutral asparagine residues exhibited binding isotherms approaching that of wild-type binding to neutral bilayers (apparent Kd of 2 x 10(-3) M). The transforming v-Src and activated c-Src (Y527F) proteins also bound more strongly to PC/PS bilayers (apparent Kd of approximately 1 x 10(-5) M) than to neutral PC bilayers. In vivo experiments with Src mutants confirmed the role of positive charge in mediating membrane binding and cellular transformation. Images PMID:7527558

  16. Adaptive modification of membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition and metabolic thermosuppression of brown adipose tissue in heat-acclimated rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S. K.; Ohno, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Kuroshima, A.

    Thermogenesis, especially facultative thermogenesis by brown adipose tissue (BAT), is less important in high ambient temperature and the heat-acclimated animals show a lower metabolic rate. Adaptive changes in the metabolic activity of BAT are generally found to be associated with a modification of membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition. However, the effect of heat acclimation on membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition is as yet unknown. In this study, we examined the thermogenic activity and phospholipid fatty acid composition of interscapular BAT from heat-acclimated rats (control: 25+/-1°C, 50% relative humidity and heat acclimation: 32+/-0.5°C, 50% relative humidity). Basal thermogenesis and the total thermogenic capacity after noradrenaline stimulation, as estimated by in vitro oxygen consumption of BAT (measured polarographically using about 1-mm3 tissue blocks), were smaller in the heat-acclimated group than in the control group. There was no difference in the tissue content of phospholipids between the groups when expressed per microgram of DNA. The phospholipid fatty acid composition was analyzed by a capillary gas chromatograph. The state of phospholipid unsaturation, as estimated by the number of double bonds per fatty acid molecule, was similar between the groups. The saturated fatty acid level was higher in the heat-acclimated group. Among the unsaturated fatty acids, heat acclimation decreased docosahexaenoic acid and oleic acid levels, and increased the arachidonic acid level. The tissue level of docosahexaenoic acid correlated with the basal oxygen consumption of BAT (r=0.6, P<0.01) and noradrenaline-stimulated maximum values of oxygen consumption (r=0.5, P<0.05). Our results show that heat acclimation modifies the BAT phospholipid fatty acids, especially the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid, which is possibly involved in the metabolic thermosuppression.

  17. Serum and erythrocyte membrane phospholipids fatty acid composition in hyperlipidemia: effects of dietary intervention and combined diet and fibrate therapy.

    PubMed

    Ristic-Medic, Danijela; Suzic, Slavica; Vucic, Vesna; Takic, Marija; Tepsic, Jasna; Glibetic, Marija

    2009-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is found to be associated with changes in fatty acid (FA) profiles. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AHA-Step-1 dietary treatment and combination of fibrates (gemfibrozil) with dietary intervention on serum and erythrocyte phospholipid FA composition in human hyperlipidemia. 78 study participants with hyperlipidemia were divided in two groups. In D group (n = 41) subjects followed AHA-Step-1 diet (<30% of total from fat, <10% of energy from saturated fat, and <300 mg cholesterol per day). D+F group (n = 37) followed Step-1 diet and were receiving gemfibrozil (300 mg/twice per day). Serum lipid levels and phospholipid serum and erythrocyte FA compositions were analyzed at the beginning and after 12 weeks of treatment. Alteration in serum and erythrocyte phospholipid FA profile were found in both groups. After both treatments we found significantly higher serum phospholipid percentages of n-3, n-6 and total polyunsaturated FA. Linoleic (LA, n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, n-3) were higher in D group, but arachidonic (AA, n-6) and linolenic acid (LNA, n-3) in D+F group. In erythrocyte phospholipid levels of stearic, palmitoleic (16 : 1, n-7) and LA were significantly higher in D group, but palmitic acid, AA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, n-3) in D+F group. Stronger correlation between serum triglycerides with EPA and DHA in erythrocyte membrane phospholipid was found in D+F group. Markedly increased percentage of AA in serum and erythrocyte membrane phospholipid in hyperlipidemic patients receiving gemfibrozil on Step-1 diet is especially important for physiological functions (inflammation, vascular tone, hemostasis etc.) in relation to cardiometabolic risk.

  18. Fluorescent probes sensitive to changes in the cholesterol-to-phospholipids molar ratio in human platelet membranes during atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posokhov, Yevgen

    2016-09-01

    Environment-sensitive fluorescent probes were used for the spectroscopic visualization of pathological changes in human platelet membranes during cerebral atherosclerosis. It has been estimated that the ratiometric probes 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole and 2-phenyl-phenanthr[9,10]oxazole can detect changes in the cholesterol-to-phospholipids molar ratio in human platelet membranes during the disease.

  19. Lipophilic and polar interaction forces between acidic drugs and membrane phospholipids encoded in IAM-HPLC indexes: their role in membrane partition and relationships with BBB permeation data.

    PubMed

    Grumetto, Lucia; Carpentiero, Carmen; Di Vaio, Paola; Frecentese, Francesco; Barbato, Francesco

    2013-03-01

    The membrane phospholipid affinity data, log k(w)(IAM), for 18 acidic and unionized drugs spanning a wide lipophilicity range were measured by HPLC on two different phospholipid stationary phases, i.e. IAM.PC.MG and IAM.PC.DD2. These data related weakly with both log P(N) values, the n-octanol/water partition coefficients of the neutral forms, and log D(7.4) values, the n-octanol/water partition coefficients of the mixtures of neutral and ionized forms at pH 7.4. The lack of collinearity confirms that, differently from partition in n-octanol/water, partition in phospholipids encodes not only lipophilic/hydrophobic intermolecular recognition forces but also ionic bonds, due to electrostatic interactions between electrically charged species and phospholipids, according to the "pH piston hypothesis". Since, differently from bases, electrostatic interactions between acids and phospholipids take place at the surface of phospholipid layers (choline moieties), and not near their lipophilic core (phosphate moieties), they were parameterized by a new procedure yielding "Δ'log k(w)(IAM)" parameters, i.e. the difference between the IAM retention factors observed for the analytes and those of neutral compounds with the same n-octanol partition values displayed by the analytes at pH 7.4. All acidic analytes, but one, and all unionized analytes, but the unionizable ones, showed positive Δ'log k(w)(IAM) values, indicating that they partition stronger in phospholipids than in n-octanol. Log BB values (capability to pass BBB) weakly related with both lipophilicity and phospholipid affinity values; in contrast they are inversely related with Δ'log k(w)(IAM) values. The relationships between log BB and Δ'log k(w)(IAM) practically overlapped the previously found log BB/Δlog k(w)(IAM) relationships for bases. The excess of polar interaction component between acidic drugs and phospholipids, mainly electrostatic forces, although enhancing partition in phospholipids, hinders membrane

  20. Improved 1H amide resonance line narrowing in oriented sample solid-state NMR of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, George J.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate 1H amide resonance line widths <300 Hz in 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra of membrane proteins in aligned phospholipid bilayers. This represents a substantial improvement over typically observed line widths of ˜1 kHz. Furthermore, in a proton detected local field (PDLF) version of the experiment that measures heteronuclear dipolar couplings, line widths <130 Hz are observed. This dramatic line narrowing of 1H amide resonances enables many more individual signals to be resolved and assigned from uniformly 15N labeled membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions of temperature and pH. Finding that the decrease in line widths occurs only for membrane proteins that undergo fast rotational diffusion around the bilayer normal, but not immobile molecules, such as peptide single crystals, identifies a potential new direction for pulse sequence development that includes overall molecular dynamics in their design.

  1. Gold nanoparticle supported phospholipid membranes as a biomimetic biosensor platform for phosphoinositide signaling detection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qian; Liu, Si-Jia; Tang, Li-Juan; Tang, Ying; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2014-12-15

    Enzyme mediated phosphoinositide signaling plays important regulatory roles in diverse cellular processes and has close implication in human diseases. However, detection of phosphoinositide enzymes remains a challenge because of the difficulty in discriminating the phosphorylation patterns of phosphoinositide. Here we develop a novel enzyme-activated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) assembly strategy as a homogeneous colorimetric biosensor for activity detection of phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases. This strategy utilizes a biomimetic mechanism of phosphoinositide signaling, in which AuNP supported phospholipid membranes are constructed to mimic the cellular membrane substrate, and AuNPs modified with the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of cytosolic proteins are designed for specific, multivalent recognition of phosphorylated phosphoinositides. This biomimetic strategy enables efficient enzymatic reactions of the substrate and highly selective detection of target enzyme. The biosensor is demonstrated for the detection of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphatase with tensin homology (PTEN). The results revealed that it allows sensitive, rapid visual detection of the enzymes with pM detection limits and four-decade wide dynamic ranges, and is capable of detecting enzyme activities in complex cell lysate samples. This biosensor might provide a general biosensor platform for high-throughput detection of phosphoinositide enzymes with high sensitivity and selectivity in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics.

  2. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  3. 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole-4-yl-labeled phospholipids in lipid membranes: differences in fluorescence behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Mazères, S; Schram, V; Tocanne, J F; Lopez, A

    1996-01-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence properties of the 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole-4-yl (NBD) fluorophore attached either to the sn-2 acyl chain of various phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidic acid) or to the polar headgroup of phosphatidylethanolamine were studied after insertion of these NBD-labeled lipid probes into unilamellar vesicles of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, and phosphatidylserine. The fluorescence response of the NBD group was observed to strongly depend on the chemical structure and physical state of the host phospholipids and on the chemical structure of the lipid probe itself. Among the various fluorescence parameters studied, i.e., Stokes' shifts, lifetimes, and quantum yields, the quantum yields were by far the most affected by these structural and environmental factors, whereas the Stokes' shifts were practically unaffected. Thus, depending on the phospholipid probe and the host phospholipid, the fluorescence emission of the NBD group was found to vary by a factor of up to 5. Careful analysis of the data shows that for the various couples of probe and host lipid molecules studied, deexcitation of the fluorophore was dominated by nonradiative deactivation processes. This great sensitivity of the NBD group to environmental factors originates from its well-known solvatochromic properties, and comparison of these knr values with those obtained for n-propylamino-NBD in a set of organic solvents covering a large scale of polarity indicates that in phospholipids, the NBD fluorophore experiences a dielectric constant of around 27-41, corresponding to a medium of relatively high polarity. From these epsilon values and on the basis of models of the dielectric transition that characterizes any water-phospholipid interface, it can be inferred that for all of the phospholipid probes and host phospholipids tested, the NBD group is located in the region of

  4. Relationship between wettability and lubrication characteristics of the surfaces of contacting phospholipid-based membranes.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Zenon; Petelska, Aneta D; Urbaniak, Wieslaw; Yusuf, Kehinde Q; Oloyede, Adekunle

    2013-04-01

    The wettability of the articular surface of cartilage depends on the condition of its surface active phospholipid overlay, which is structured as multi-bilayer. Based on a hypothesis that the surface of cartilage facilitates the almost frictionless lubrication of the joint, we examined the characteristics of this membrane surface entity in both its normal and degenerated conditions using a combination of atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurement, and friction test methods. The observations have led to the conclusions that (1) the acid-base equilibrium condition influences the lubrication effectiveness of the surface of cartilage and (2) the friction coefficient is significantly dependent on the hydrophobicity of the surface of the tissue, thereby confirming the hypothesis tested in this paper. Both wettability angle and interfacial energy were obtained for varying conditions of the cartilage surface both in its wet, dry and lipid-depleted conditions. The interfacial energy also increased with mole fraction of the lipid species reaching an asymptotic value after 0.6. Also, the friction coefficient was found to decrease to an asymptotic level as the wettability angle increased. The result reveal that the interfacial energy increased with pH till pH = 4.0, and then decreased from pH = 4.0 to reach equilibrium at pH = 7.0.

  5. Phospholipid nanosomes.

    PubMed

    Castor, Trevor P

    2005-10-01

    Phospholipid nanosomes are small, uniform liposomes manufactured utilizing supercritical fluid technologies. Supercritical fluids are first used to solvate phospholipid raw materials, and then decompressed to form phospholipid nanosomes that can encapsulate hydrophilic molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. Hydrophobic therapeutics are co-solvated with phospholipid raw materials in supercritical fluids that, when decompressed, form phospholipid nanosomes encapsulating these drugs in their lipid bilayers. Mathematical modeling and semi-empirical experiments indicate that the size and character of phospholipid nanosomes depend on the several process parameters and material properties including the size and design of decompression nozzle, bubble size, pressure and the rate of decompression, interfacial forces, charge distribution and the nature of compound being encapsulated. Examples are presented for the encapsulation of a protein and hydrophobic drugs. In vitro and in vivo data on breast cancer cells and xenografts in nude mice indicate that paclitaxel nanosomes are less toxic and much more effective than paclitaxel in Cremophor EL (Taxol). Camptothecin nanosomes demonstrate that the normally very water-insoluble camptothecin can be formulated in a biocompatible aqueous medium while retaining in vivo efficacy against lymphoma xenografts in nude mice. In vitro data for betulinic acid nanosomes demonstrate enhanced efficacy against HIV-1 (EC50 of 1.01 microg/ml versus 6.72 microg/ml for neat betulinic acid). Phospholipid nanosomes may find utility in the enhanced delivery of hydrophilic drugs such as recombinant proteins and nucleic acid as well as hydrophobic anticancer and anti-HIV drugs.

  6. Prediction of Phospholipid-Water Partition Coefficients of Ionic Organic Chemicals Using the Mechanistic Model COSMOmic.

    PubMed

    Bittermann, Kai; Spycher, Simon; Endo, Satoshi; Pohler, Larissa; Huniar, Uwe; Goss, Kai-Uwe; Klamt, Andreas

    2014-12-26

    The partition coefficient of chemicals from water to phospholipid membrane, K(lipw), is of central importance for various fields. For neutral organic molecules, log K(lipw) correlates with the log of bulk solvent-water partition coefficients such as the octanol-water partition coefficient. However, this is not the case for charged compounds, for which a mechanistic modeling approach is highly necessary. In this work, we extend the model COSMOmic, which adapts the COSMO-RS theory for anisotropic phases and has been shown to reliably predict K(lipw) for neutral compounds, to the use of ionic compounds. To make the COSMOmic model applicable for ionic solutes, we implemented the internal membrane dipole potential in COSMOmic. We empirically optimized the potential with experimental K(lipw) data of 161 neutral and 75 ionic compounds, yielding potential shapes that agree well with experimentally determined potentials from the literature. This model refinement has no negative effect on the prediction accuracy of neutral compounds (root-mean-square error, RMSE = 0.62 log units), while it highly improves the prediction of ions (RMSE = 0.70 log units). The refined COSMOmic is, to our knowledge, the first mechanistic model that predicts K(lipw) of both ionic and neutral species with accuracies better than 1 log unit.

  7. Investigating the protective properties of milk phospholipids against ultraviolet light exposure in a skin equivalent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ashley; Laubscher, Andrea; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Laiho, Lily H.

    2010-02-01

    Current research on bioactive molecules in milk has documented health advantages of bovine milk and its components. Milk Phospholipids, selected for this study, represent molecules with great potential benefit in human health and nutrition. In this study we used confocal reflectance and multiphoton microscopy to monitor changes in skin morphology upon skin exposure to ultraviolet light and evaluate the potential of milk phospholipids in preventing photodamage to skin equivalent models. The results suggest that milk phospholipids act upon skin cells in a protective manner against the effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Similar results were obtained from MTT tissue viability assay and histology.

  8. The enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid alters brain and plasma phospholipid molecular species: further development of a rodent model of autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms and altered blood phospholipid profiles have been reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Most of the phospholipid analyses have been conducted on the fatty acid composition of isolated phospholipid classes following hydrolysis. A paucity of information exists on how the intact phospholipid molecular species are altered in ASD. We applied ESI/MS to determine how brain and blood intact phospholipid species were altered during the induction of ASD-like behaviors in rats following intraventricular infusions with the enteric bacterial metabolite propionic acid. Animals were infused daily for 8 days, locomotor activity assessed, and animals killed during the induced behaviors. Propionic acid infusions increased locomotor activity. Lipid analysis revealed treatment altered 21 brain and 30 blood phospholipid molecular species. Notable alterations were observed in the composition of brain SM, diacyl mono and polyunsaturated PC, PI, PS, PE, and plasmalogen PC and PE molecular species. These alterations suggest that the propionic acid rat model is a useful tool to study aberrations in lipid metabolism known to affect membrane fluidity, peroxisomal function, gap junction coupling capacity, signaling, and neuroinflammation, all of which may be associated with the pathogenesis of ASD. PMID:22747852

  9. Effect of Selection for High Activity-Related Metabolism on Membrane Phospholipid Fatty Acid Composition in Bank Voles.

    PubMed

    Stawski, Clare; Valencak, Teresa G; Ruf, Thomas; Sadowska, Edyta T; Dheyongera, Geoffrey; Rudolf, Agata; Maiti, Uttaran; Koteja, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Endothermy, high basal metabolic rates (BMRs), and high locomotor-related metabolism were important steps in the evolution of mammals. It has been proposed that the composition of membrane phospholipid fatty acids plays an important role in energy metabolism and exercise muscle physiology. In particular, the membrane pacemaker theory of metabolism suggests that an increase in cell membrane fatty acid unsaturation would result in an increase in BMR. We aimed to determine whether membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition of heart, liver, and gastrocnemius muscles differed between lines of bank voles selected for high swim-induced aerobic metabolism-which also evolved an increased BMR-and unselected control lines. Proportions of fatty acids significantly differed among the organs: liver was the least unsaturated, whereas the gastrocnemius muscles were most unsaturated. However, fatty acid proportions of the heart and liver did not differ significantly between selected and control lines. In gastrocnemius muscles, significant differences between selection directions were found: compared to control lines, membranes of selected voles were richer in saturated C18:0 and unsaturated C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3, whereas the pattern was reversed for saturated C16:0 and unsaturated C20:4n-6. Neither unsaturation index nor other combined indexes of fatty acid proportions differed between lines. Thus, our results do not support the membrane pacemaker hypothesis. However, the differences between selected and control lines in gastrocnemius muscles reflect chain lengths rather than number of double bonds and are probably related to differences in locomotor activity per se rather than to differences in the basal or routine metabolic rate. PMID:26658414

  10. Effect of Selection for High Activity-Related Metabolism on Membrane Phospholipid Fatty Acid Composition in Bank Voles.

    PubMed

    Stawski, Clare; Valencak, Teresa G; Ruf, Thomas; Sadowska, Edyta T; Dheyongera, Geoffrey; Rudolf, Agata; Maiti, Uttaran; Koteja, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Endothermy, high basal metabolic rates (BMRs), and high locomotor-related metabolism were important steps in the evolution of mammals. It has been proposed that the composition of membrane phospholipid fatty acids plays an important role in energy metabolism and exercise muscle physiology. In particular, the membrane pacemaker theory of metabolism suggests that an increase in cell membrane fatty acid unsaturation would result in an increase in BMR. We aimed to determine whether membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition of heart, liver, and gastrocnemius muscles differed between lines of bank voles selected for high swim-induced aerobic metabolism-which also evolved an increased BMR-and unselected control lines. Proportions of fatty acids significantly differed among the organs: liver was the least unsaturated, whereas the gastrocnemius muscles were most unsaturated. However, fatty acid proportions of the heart and liver did not differ significantly between selected and control lines. In gastrocnemius muscles, significant differences between selection directions were found: compared to control lines, membranes of selected voles were richer in saturated C18:0 and unsaturated C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3, whereas the pattern was reversed for saturated C16:0 and unsaturated C20:4n-6. Neither unsaturation index nor other combined indexes of fatty acid proportions differed between lines. Thus, our results do not support the membrane pacemaker hypothesis. However, the differences between selected and control lines in gastrocnemius muscles reflect chain lengths rather than number of double bonds and are probably related to differences in locomotor activity per se rather than to differences in the basal or routine metabolic rate.

  11. Swelling of phospholipid membranes by divalent metal ions depends on the location of the ions in the bilayers.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Richard J; Maria Schober, Rafaëla; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2016-08-10

    The Hofmeister series illustrates how salts produce a wide range of effects in biological systems, which are not exclusively explained by ion charge. In lipid membranes, charged ions have been shown to bind to lipids and either hydrate or dehydrate lipid head groups, and also to swell the water layer in multi-lamellar systems. Typically, Hofmeister phenomena are explained by the interaction of the ions with water, as well as with biological interfaces, such as proteins or membranes. We studied the effect of the divalent cations Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) on oriented, stacked, phospholipid bilayers made of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). Using high-resolution X-ray diffraction, we observed that the cations lead to a swelling of the water layer between the bilayers, without causing significant changes to the bilayer structure. The cations swelled the bilayers in different amounts, in the order Fe(2+) > Mg(2+) > Ca(2+) > Zn(2+). By decomposing the total bilayer electron density into different molecular groups, Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) were found to interact with the glycerol groups of the lipid molecules and cause minor swelling of the bilayers. Mg(2+) and Fe(2+) were found to position near the phosphate groups and cause a strong increase in the number of hydration water molecules. Our results present a molecular mechanism-of-action for the Hofmeister series in phospholipid membranes. PMID:27453289

  12. Phospholipid: diacylglycerol acyltransferase contributes to the conversion of membrane lipids into triacylglycerol in Myrmecia incisa during the nitrogen starvation stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Ouyang, Long-Ling; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the Kennedy pathway for de novo biosynthesis, triacylglycerol (TAG), the most important stock for microalgae-based biodiesel production, can be synthesized by phospholipid: diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT) that transfers an acyl group from phospholipids (PLs) to diacylglycerol (DAG). This study presents a novel gene that encodes PDAT from the green microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl H4301 (designated MiPDAT ). MiPDAT is localized on the plasma membrane (PM) via the agroinfiltration of tobacco leaves with a green fluorescent protein-fused construct. MiPDAT synthesizes TAG based on functional complementary experiments in the mutant yeast strain H1246 and the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) is preferentially used as substrates as revealed by in vitro enzyme activity assay. The gradually increased transcription levels of MiPDAT in M. incisa during the cultivation under nitrogen starvation conditions is proposed to be responsible for the decrease and increase of the PC and TAG levels, respectively, as detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry after 4 d of nitrogen starvation. In addition, the mechanism by which MiPDAT in this microalga uses PC to yield TAG is discussed. Accordingly, it is concluded that this PM-located PDAT contributes to the conversion of membrane lipids into TAG in M. incisa during the nitrogen starvation stress. PMID:27216435

  13. Phospholipid: diacylglycerol acyltransferase contributes to the conversion of membrane lipids into triacylglycerol in Myrmecia incisa during the nitrogen starvation stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Ouyang, Long-Ling; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the Kennedy pathway for de novo biosynthesis, triacylglycerol (TAG), the most important stock for microalgae-based biodiesel production, can be synthesized by phospholipid: diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT) that transfers an acyl group from phospholipids (PLs) to diacylglycerol (DAG). This study presents a novel gene that encodes PDAT from the green microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl H4301 (designated MiPDAT ). MiPDAT is localized on the plasma membrane (PM) via the agroinfiltration of tobacco leaves with a green fluorescent protein-fused construct. MiPDAT synthesizes TAG based on functional complementary experiments in the mutant yeast strain H1246 and the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) is preferentially used as substrates as revealed by in vitro enzyme activity assay. The gradually increased transcription levels of MiPDAT in M. incisa during the cultivation under nitrogen starvation conditions is proposed to be responsible for the decrease and increase of the PC and TAG levels, respectively, as detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry after 4 d of nitrogen starvation. In addition, the mechanism by which MiPDAT in this microalga uses PC to yield TAG is discussed. Accordingly, it is concluded that this PM-located PDAT contributes to the conversion of membrane lipids into TAG in M. incisa during the nitrogen starvation stress. PMID:27216435

  14. Studies on rat liver plasma membrane. Altered protein and phospholipid metabolism after injection of D-galactosamine.

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, W; Harms, E; Hassels, B; Henninger, H; Reuitter, W

    1977-01-01

    1. The metabolism of protein and phospholipid in rat liver plasma membranes isolated by the method of Neville [(1960) J. Biophys. Biochem. Cytol. 8, 413-422] was investigated 3 and 6 h after the injection of D-galactosamine in vivo. During this time, all the biochemical and morphological alterations associated with hepatitis developed. 2. After the injection of D-galactosamine the concentration of sphingomyelin in the plasma membrane decreased to below 60% of the control values. 3. The activity of 5'-nucleotidase (EC 3.1.3.5), which has been purified as a sphingomyelin-protein complex, decreased in the total homogenate as well as in the plasma-membrane fraction of livers of rats treated with galactosamine, to about 60% of the control values. 4. Protein synthesis, as measured by the incorporation of [14C]leucine into plasma membranes, was decreased to 45% of that of the controls. However, only small differences were observed in the amino acid composition of the plasma membrane after D-galactosamine treatment. 5. The protein composition of the plasma membranes was determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The results showed a change from low- to high-molecular-weight proteins after the injection of galactosamine. 6. These results demonstrate different metabolic processes of the plasma membrane altered during the induction of galactosamine hepatitis. Images Fig. 1. PMID:597240

  15. Membrane-surfactant interactions. The role of surfactant in mitochondrial complex III-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Valpuesta, J.M.; Arrondo, J.L.; Barbero, M.C.; Pons, M.; Goni, F.M.

    1986-05-15

    Complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase) was purified from beef heart mitochondria in the form of protein-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles (about 1:80:100 molar ratio). Detergent may be totally removed by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and the resulting lipoprotein complexes retain full enzyme activity. In order to understand the role of surfactant in the mixed micelles, and the interaction of Triton X-100 with integral membrane proteins and phospholipid bilayers, both the protein-lipid-surfactant mixed micelles and the detergent-free lipoprotein system were examined from the point of view of particle size and ultrastructure, enzyme activity, tryptophan fluorescence quenching, 31P NMR, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NMR and IR spectroscopic studies show that surfactant withdrawal induces a profound change in phospholipid architecture, from a micellar to a lamellar-like phase. However, electron microscopic observations fail to reveal the existence of lipid bilayers in the absence of detergent. We suggest that, under these conditions, the lipid:protein molar ratio (80:1) is too low to permit the formation of lipid bilayer planes, but the relative orientation and mobility of phospholipids with respect to proteins is similar to that of the lamellar phase. Protein conformational changes are also detected as a consequence of surfactant removal. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates an increase of peptide beta-structure in the absence of Triton X-100; changes in the amide II/amide I intensity ratio are also detected, although the precise meaning of these observations is unclear.

  16. Impaired Lysosomal Integral Membrane Protein 2-dependent Peroxiredoxin 6 Delivery to Lamellar Bodies Accounts for Altered Alveolar Phospholipid Content in Adaptor Protein-3-deficient pearl Mice.

    PubMed

    Kook, Seunghyi; Wang, Ping; Young, Lisa R; Schwake, Michael; Saftig, Paul; Weng, Xialian; Meng, Ying; Neculai, Dante; Marks, Michael S; Gonzales, Linda; Beers, Michael F; Guttentag, Susan

    2016-04-15

    The Hermansky Pudlak syndromes (HPS) constitute a family of disorders characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and bleeding diathesis, often associated with lethal lung fibrosis. HPS results from mutations in genes of membrane trafficking complexes that facilitate delivery of cargo to lysosome-related organelles. Among the affected lysosome-related organelles are lamellar bodies (LB) within alveolar type 2 cells (AT2) in which surfactant components are assembled, modified, and stored. AT2 from HPS patients and mouse models of HPS exhibit enlarged LB with increased phospholipid content, but the mechanism underlying these defects is unknown. We now show that AT2 in the pearl mouse model of HPS type 2 lacking the adaptor protein 3 complex (AP-3) fails to accumulate the soluble enzyme peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) in LB. This defect reflects impaired AP-3-dependent trafficking of PRDX6 to LB, because pearl mouse AT2 cells harbor a normal total PRDX6 content. AP-3-dependent targeting of PRDX6 to LB requires the transmembrane protein LIMP-2/SCARB2, a known AP-3-dependent cargo protein that functions as a carrier for lysosomal proteins in other cell types. Depletion of LB PRDX6 in AP-3- or LIMP-2/SCARB2-deficient mice correlates with phospholipid accumulation in lamellar bodies and with defective intraluminal degradation of LB disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, AP-3-dependent LB targeting is facilitated by protein/protein interaction between LIMP-2/SCARB2 and PRDX6 in vitro and in vivo Our data provide the first evidence for an AP-3-dependent cargo protein required for the maturation of LB in AT2 and suggest that the loss of PRDX6 activity contributes to the pathogenic changes in LB phospholipid homeostasis found HPS2 patients.

  17. Impaired Lysosomal Integral Membrane Protein 2-dependent Peroxiredoxin 6 Delivery to Lamellar Bodies Accounts for Altered Alveolar Phospholipid Content in Adaptor Protein-3-deficient pearl Mice.

    PubMed

    Kook, Seunghyi; Wang, Ping; Young, Lisa R; Schwake, Michael; Saftig, Paul; Weng, Xialian; Meng, Ying; Neculai, Dante; Marks, Michael S; Gonzales, Linda; Beers, Michael F; Guttentag, Susan

    2016-04-15

    The Hermansky Pudlak syndromes (HPS) constitute a family of disorders characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and bleeding diathesis, often associated with lethal lung fibrosis. HPS results from mutations in genes of membrane trafficking complexes that facilitate delivery of cargo to lysosome-related organelles. Among the affected lysosome-related organelles are lamellar bodies (LB) within alveolar type 2 cells (AT2) in which surfactant components are assembled, modified, and stored. AT2 from HPS patients and mouse models of HPS exhibit enlarged LB with increased phospholipid content, but the mechanism underlying these defects is unknown. We now show that AT2 in the pearl mouse model of HPS type 2 lacking the adaptor protein 3 complex (AP-3) fails to accumulate the soluble enzyme peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) in LB. This defect reflects impaired AP-3-dependent trafficking of PRDX6 to LB, because pearl mouse AT2 cells harbor a normal total PRDX6 content. AP-3-dependent targeting of PRDX6 to LB requires the transmembrane protein LIMP-2/SCARB2, a known AP-3-dependent cargo protein that functions as a carrier for lysosomal proteins in other cell types. Depletion of LB PRDX6 in AP-3- or LIMP-2/SCARB2-deficient mice correlates with phospholipid accumulation in lamellar bodies and with defective intraluminal degradation of LB disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, AP-3-dependent LB targeting is facilitated by protein/protein interaction between LIMP-2/SCARB2 and PRDX6 in vitro and in vivo Our data provide the first evidence for an AP-3-dependent cargo protein required for the maturation of LB in AT2 and suggest that the loss of PRDX6 activity contributes to the pathogenic changes in LB phospholipid homeostasis found HPS2 patients. PMID:26907692

  18. Interaction of Gramicidin S and its Aromatic Amino-Acid Analog with Phospholipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Jelokhani-Niaraki, Masoud; Hodges, Robert S.; Meissner, Joseph E.; Hassenstein, Una E.; Wheaton, Laura

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of interaction of gramicidin S-like antimicrobial peptides with biological membranes, a series of five decameric cyclic cationic β-sheet-β-turn peptides with all possible combinations of aromatic D-amino acids, Cyclo(Val-Lys-Leu-D-Ar1-Pro-Val-Lys-Leu-D-Ar2-Pro) (Ar ≡ Phe, Tyr, Trp), were synthesized. Conformations of these cyclic peptides were comparable in aqueous solutions and lipid vesicles. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements revealed entropy-driven binding of cyclic peptides to POPC and POPE/POPG lipid vesicles. Binding of peptides to both vesicle systems was endothermic—exceptions were peptides containing the Trp-Trp and Tyr-Trp pairs with exothermic binding to POPC vesicles. Application of one- and two-site binding (partitioning) models to binding isotherms of exothermic and endothermic binding processes, respectively, resulted in determination of peptide-lipid membrane binding constants (Kb). The Kb1 and Kb2 values for endothermic two-step binding processes corresponded to high and low binding affinities (Kb1 ≥ 100 Kb2). Conformational change of cyclic peptides in transferring from buffer to lipid bilayer surfaces was estimated using fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the Tyr-Trp pair in one of the peptide constructs. The cyclic peptide conformation expands upon adsorption on lipid bilayer surface and interacts more deeply with the outer monolayer causing bilayer deformation, which may lead to formation of nonspecific transient peptide-lipid porelike zones causing membrane lysis. PMID:18621820

  19. Permeation of aldopentoses and nucleosides through fatty acid and phospholipid membranes: implications to the origins of life.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    Permeation of aldopentoses and nucleosides through fatty acid and phospholipid membranes was investigated by way of molecular dynamics simulations. Calculated permeability coefficients of membranes to aldopentoses, which exist predominantly in the pyranose form, are in a very good agreement with experimental results. The unexpected preferential permeation of ribose, compared to its diastereomers, found by Sacerdote and Szostak, is explained in terms of inter- and intramolecular interactions involving hydroxyl groups. In aqueous solution, these groups favor the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds with neighboring water molecules. Inside the membrane, however, they form intramolecular hydrogen bonds, which in ribose are arranged in a chain. In its diastereomers this chain is broken, which yields higher free energy barrier to transfer through membranes. Faster permeation of ribose would lead to its preferential accumulation inside cells if sugars were converted sufficiently quickly to nonpermeable derivatives. An estimate for the rate of such reaction was derived. Preferential accumulation of ribose would increase the probability of correct monomers' incorporation during synthesis of nucleic acids inside protocells. The same mechanism does not apply to nucleosides or their activated derivatives because sugars are locked in the furanose form, which contains fewer exocyclic hydroxyl groups than does pyranose. The results of this study underscore concerted early evolution of membranes and the biochemical processes that they encapsulated. PMID:23397957

  20. Cyclic and Linear Monoterpenes in Phospholipid Membranes: Phase Behavior, Bilayer Structure, and Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pham, Quoc Dat; Topgaard, Daniel; Sparr, Emma

    2015-10-13

    Monoterpenes are abundant in essential oils extracted from plants. These relatively small and hydrophobic molecules have shown important biological functions, including antimicrobial activity and membrane penetration enhancement. The interaction between the monoterpenes and lipid bilayers is considered important to the understanding of the biological functions of monoterpenes. In this study, we investigated the effect of cyclic and linear monoterpenes on the structure and dynamics of lipids in model membranes. We have studied the ternary system 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-monoterpene-water as a model with a focus on dehydrated conditions. By combining complementary techniques, including differential scanning calorimetry, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, bilayer structure, phase transitions, and lipid molecular dynamics were investigated at different water contents. Monoterpenes cause pronounced melting point depression and phase segregation in lipid bilayers, and the extent of these effects depends on the hydration conditions. The addition of a small amount of thymol to the fluid bilayer (volume fraction of 0.03 in the bilayer) leads to an increased order in the acyl chain close to the bilayer interface. The findings are discussed in relation to biological systems and lipid formulations. PMID:26375869

  1. Effects of smoking on fatty acid composition of phospholipid sperm membrane and the malondialdehyde levels in human seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Štramová, X; Čegan, A; Hampl, R; Kanďár, R

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate fatty acids composition of sperm phospholipids, level of lipoperoxidation represented by malondialdehyde and to examine differences between recent smokers and nonsmokers. The levels of malondialdehyde were in the group of all patients 1.51 ± 0.56 μmol l(-1) , in smokers 1.36 ± 0.59 μmol l(-1) and in nonsmokers 1.53 ± 0.55 μmol l(-1) . Total sperm membrane phospholipid fatty acids were profiled into several groups, saturated acids (in smokers 61.86 ± 9.02%, in nonsmokers 61.20 ± 11.66%), polyunsaturated acids n-3 (in smokers 12.62 ± 8.18%, in nonsmokers 14.28 ± 13.65%), polyunsaturated acids n-6 (in smokers 9.13 ± 4.37%, in nonsmokers 10.10 ± 3.79%) and other acids (in smokers 14.36 ± 3.94%, in nonsmokers 13.88 ± 2.31%). Significant correlations were found between the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and total sperm motility in all patients (r = -0.358, P = 0.013), between both the level of MDA and progressive motility (r = -0.465, P = 0.001) and between the level of MDA and total motility (r = -0.382, P = 0.037) in nonsmokers. There were no statistically significant differences between composition of sperm phospholipid important fatty acids in smokers and nonsmokers. Significant correlations between selected sperm fatty acids and sperm motility and morphology in smokers and nonsmokers were not observed. PMID:25311153

  2. Effects of smoking on fatty acid composition of phospholipid sperm membrane and the malondialdehyde levels in human seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Štramová, X; Čegan, A; Hampl, R; Kanďár, R

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate fatty acids composition of sperm phospholipids, level of lipoperoxidation represented by malondialdehyde and to examine differences between recent smokers and nonsmokers. The levels of malondialdehyde were in the group of all patients 1.51 ± 0.56 μmol l(-1) , in smokers 1.36 ± 0.59 μmol l(-1) and in nonsmokers 1.53 ± 0.55 μmol l(-1) . Total sperm membrane phospholipid fatty acids were profiled into several groups, saturated acids (in smokers 61.86 ± 9.02%, in nonsmokers 61.20 ± 11.66%), polyunsaturated acids n-3 (in smokers 12.62 ± 8.18%, in nonsmokers 14.28 ± 13.65%), polyunsaturated acids n-6 (in smokers 9.13 ± 4.37%, in nonsmokers 10.10 ± 3.79%) and other acids (in smokers 14.36 ± 3.94%, in nonsmokers 13.88 ± 2.31%). Significant correlations were found between the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and total sperm motility in all patients (r = -0.358, P = 0.013), between both the level of MDA and progressive motility (r = -0.465, P = 0.001) and between the level of MDA and total motility (r = -0.382, P = 0.037) in nonsmokers. There were no statistically significant differences between composition of sperm phospholipid important fatty acids in smokers and nonsmokers. Significant correlations between selected sperm fatty acids and sperm motility and morphology in smokers and nonsmokers were not observed.

  3. Interaction of gramicidin S and its aromatic amino-acid analog with phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Jelokhani-Niaraki, Masoud; Hodges, Robert S; Meissner, Joseph E; Hassenstein, Una E; Wheaton, Laura

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the mechanism of interaction of gramicidin S-like antimicrobial peptides with biological membranes, a series of five decameric cyclic cationic beta-sheet-beta-turn peptides with all possible combinations of aromatic D-amino acids, Cyclo(Val-Lys-Leu-D-Ar1-Pro-Val-Lys-Leu-D-Ar2-Pro) (Ar identical with Phe, Tyr, Trp), were synthesized. Conformations of these cyclic peptides were comparable in aqueous solutions and lipid vesicles. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements revealed entropy-driven binding of cyclic peptides to POPC and POPE/POPG lipid vesicles. Binding of peptides to both vesicle systems was endothermic-exceptions were peptides containing the Trp-Trp and Tyr-Trp pairs with exothermic binding to POPC vesicles. Application of one- and two-site binding (partitioning) models to binding isotherms of exothermic and endothermic binding processes, respectively, resulted in determination of peptide-lipid membrane binding constants (K(b)). The K(b1) and K(b2) values for endothermic two-step binding processes corresponded to high and low binding affinities (K(b1) >or= 100 K(b2)). Conformational change of cyclic peptides in transferring from buffer to lipid bilayer surfaces was estimated using fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the Tyr-Trp pair in one of the peptide constructs. The cyclic peptide conformation expands upon adsorption on lipid bilayer surface and interacts more deeply with the outer monolayer causing bilayer deformation, which may lead to formation of nonspecific transient peptide-lipid porelike zones causing membrane lysis.

  4. Aggregation of oligoarginines at phospholipid membranes: molecular dynamics simulations, time-dependent fluorescence shift, and biomimetic colorimetric assays.

    PubMed

    Vazdar, Mario; Wernersson, Erik; Khabiri, Morteza; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Mann, Ella; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Jelinek, Raz; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2013-10-01

    A time-dependent fluorescence shift method, biomimetic colorimetric assays, and molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in search of explanations why arginine rich peptides with intermediate lengths of about 10 amino acids translocate well through cellular membranes, while analogous lysine rich peptides do not. First, we demonstrate that an important factor for efficient peptide adsorption, as the first prerequisite for translocation across the membrane, is the presence of negatively charged phospholipids in the bilayer. Second, we observe a strong tendency of adsorbed arginine (but not lysine) containing peptides to aggregate at the bilayer surface. We suggest that this aggregation of oligoarginines leads to partial disruption of the bilayer integrity due to the accumulated large positive charge at its surface, which increases membrane-surface interactions due to the increased effective charge of the aggregates. As a result, membrane penetration and translocation of medium length oligoarginines becomes facilitated in comparison to single arginine and very long polyarginines, as well as to lysine containing peptides.

  5. Hydration strongly affects the molecular and electronic structure of membrane phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashaghi, Alireza; Partovi-Azar, P.; Jadidi, Tayebeh; Nafari, Nasser; Maass, Philipp; Tabar, M. Reza Rahimi; Bonn, Mischa; Bakker, Huib J.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the structure and electronic properties of phosphatidylcholine (PC) under different degrees of hydration at the single-molecule and monolayer type level by linear scaling ab initio calculations. Upon hydration, the phospholipid undergoes drastic long-range conformational rearrangements which lead to a sickle-like ground-state shape. The structural unit of the tilted gel-phase PC appears to be a water-bridged PC dimer. We find that hydration dramatically alters the surface potential, dipole and quadrupole moments of the lipids and consequently guides the interactions of the lipids with other molecules and the communication between cells.

  6. Hysteresis-like binding of coagulation factors X/Xa to procoagulant activated platelets and phospholipids results from multistep association and membrane-dependent multimerization.

    PubMed

    Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Kurasawa, James H; Sarafanov, Andrey G; Chambost, Herve; Vasil'ev, Sergey A; Demina, Irina A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-06-01

    Binding of coagulation factors X (fX) and Xa (fXa) to activated platelets is required for the formation of membrane-dependent enzymatic complexes of intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase. We carried out an in-depth characterization of fX/fXa binding to phospholipids and gel-filtered, thrombin-activated platelets. Flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and computational modeling were used to investigate interactions of fX/fXa with the membranes. Confocal microscopy was employed to study fXa binding to platelet thrombi formed in flowing whole blood under arterial conditions. Binding of fX/fXa to either vesicles or procoagulant platelets did not follow a traditional one-step reversible binding model. Their dissociation was a two-step process resulting in a plateau that was up to 10-fold greater than the saturation value observed in the association experiments. Computational modeling and experimental evidence suggested that this was caused by a combination of two-step association (mainly for fX) and multimerization on the membrane (mainly for fXa). Importantly, fX formed multimers with fXa, thereby improving its retention. The same binding/dissociation hysteresis was observed for annexin V known to form trimers on the membranes. Experiments with platelets from gray syndrome patients showed that alpha-granular factor Va provided an additional high-affinity binding site for fXa that did not affect the hysteresis. Confocal microscopy observation of fXa binding to platelet thrombi in a flow chamber and its wash-out confirmed that this phenomenon persisted under physiologically relevant conditions. This suggests its possible role of "locking" coagulation factors on the membrane and preventing their inhibition in plasma and removal from thrombi by flow.

  7. Phospholipids Induce Conformational Changes of SecA to Form Membrane-Specific Domains: AFM Structures and Implication on Protein-Conducting Channels

    PubMed Central

    You, Zhipeng; Liao, Meijiang; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Hsiuchin; Pan, Xijian; Houghton, John E.; Sui, Sen-fang; Tai, Phang C.

    2013-01-01

    SecA, an essential component of the Sec machinery, exists in a soluble and a membrane form in Escherichia coli. Previous studies have shown that the soluble SecA transforms into pore structures when it interacts with liposomes, and integrates into membranes containing SecYEG in two forms: SecAS and SecAM; the latter exemplified by two tryptic membrane-specific domains, an N-terminal domain (N39) and a middle M48 domain (M48). The formation of these lipid-specific domains was further investigated. The N39 and M48 domains are induced only when SecA interacts with anionic liposomes. Additionally, the N-terminus, not the C-terminus of SecA is required for inducing such conformational changes. Proteolytic treatment and sequence analyses showed that liposome-embedded SecA yields the same M48 and N39 domains as does the membrane-embedded SecA. Studies with chemical extraction and resistance to trypsin have also shown that these proteoliposome-embedded SecA fragments exhibit the same stability and characteristics as their membrane-embedded SecA equivalents. Furthermore, the cloned lipid-specific domains N39 and M48, but not N68 or C34, are able to form partial, but imperfect ring-like structures when they interact with phospholipids. These ring-like structures are characteristic of a SecA pore-structure, suggesting that these domains contribute part of the SecA-dependent protein-conducting channel. We, therefore, propose a model in which SecA alone is capable of forming a lipid-specific, asymmetric dimer that is able to function as a viable protein-conducting channel in the membrane, without any requirement for SecYEG. PMID:23977317

  8. Enhanced level of n-3 fatty acid in membrane phospholipids induces lipid peroxidation in rats fed dietary docosahexaenoic acid oil.

    PubMed

    Song, J H; Miyazawa, T

    2001-03-01

    The effect of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) oil with different lipid types on lipid peroxidation was studied in rats. Each group of male Sprague-Dawley rats was pair fed 15% (w/w) of either DHA-triglycerides (DHA-TG), DHA-ethyl esters (DHA-EE) or DHA-phospholipids (DHA-PL) for up to 3 weeks. The palm oil (supplemented with 20% soybean oil) diet without DHA was fed as the control. Dietary DHA oils lowered plasma triglyceride concentrations in rats fed DHA-TG (by 30%), DHA-EE (by 45%) and DHA-PL (by 27%), compared to control. The incorporation of dietary DHA into plasma and liver phospholipids was more pronounced in the DHA-TG and DHA-EE group than in the DHA-PL group. However, DHA oil intake negatively influenced lipid peroxidation in both plasma and liver. Phospholipid peroxidation in plasma and liver was significantly higher than control in rats fed DHA-TG or DHA-EE, but not DHA-PL. These results are consistent with increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and decreased alpha-tocopherol levels in plasma and liver. In addition, liver microsomes from rats of each group were exposed to a mixture of chelated iron (Fe(3+)/ADP) and NADPH to determine the rate of peroxidative damage. During NADPH-dependent peroxidation of microsomes, the accumulation of phospholipid hydroperoxides, as well as TBARS, were elevated and alpha-tocopherol levels were significantly exhausted in DHA-TG and DHA-EE groups. During microsomal lipid peroxidation, there was a greater loss of n-3 fatty acids (mainly DHA) than of n-6 fatty acids, including arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). These results indicate that polyunsaturation of n-3 fatty acids is the most important target for lipid peroxidation. This suggests that the ingestion of large amounts of DHA oil enhances lipid peroxidation in the target membranes where greater amounts of n-3 fatty acids are incorporated, thereby increasing the peroxidizability and possibly accelerating the atherosclerotic process.

  9. Thallium-205 NMR determination of the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of monovalent and divalent cations to gramicidin A and C incorporated into model phospholipid membranes: An equilibrium study

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters have been determined for the binding of monovalent and divalent cations to gramicidin A and C incorporated in lyso-{alpha}-phosphatidylcholine dispersions. The thermodynamic analyses used equilibrium constants derived from the analysis of Tl-205 NMR chemical shifts using a one-site binding model of the gramicidin channel. Initial experiments determined the thermodynamic parameters of the Tl{sup +} ion binding to gramicidin A. Next, the competitive binding-Tl-205 NMR technique was used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and Ag{sup +} cations to gramicidin A. A similar experiment for the binding of the Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Rb{sup +} cations to gramicidin C was performed. Similar experiments determined the thermodynamic parameter for the Cd{sup ++}, Mg{sup ++}, Ca{sup ++}, Sr{sup ++} and Ba{sup ++} cations. Thermodynamic parameters have also been determined for the binding of the Tl{sup +} ion to gramicidin A incorporated into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles using Tl-205 NMR spectroscopy.

  10. The membrane-activity of Ibuprofen, Diclofenac, and Naproxen: a physico-chemical study with lecithin phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Moreno, Marcela Manrique; Garidel, Patrick; Suwalsky, Mario; Howe, Jörg; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) represent non-specific inhibitors of the cycloxygenase pathway of inflammation, and therefore an understanding of the interaction process of the drugs with membrane phospholipids is of high relevance. We have studied the interaction of the NSAIDs with phospholipid membranes made from dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) by applying Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy (FRET), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). FTIR data obtained via attenuated total reflectance (ATR) show that the interaction between DMPC and NSAIDs is limited to a strong interaction of the drugs with the phosphate region of the lipid head group. The FTIR transmission data furthermore are indicative of a strong effect of the drugs on the hydrocarbon chains inducing a reduction of the chain-chain interactions, i.e., a fluidization effect. Parallel to this, from the DSC data beside the decrease of T(m) a reduction of the peak height of the melting endotherm connected with its broadening is observed, but leaving the overall phase transition enthalpy constant. Additionally, phase separation is observed, inducing the formation of a NSAID-rich and a NSAID-poor phase. This is especially pronounced for Diclofenac. Despite the strong influence of the drugs on the acyl chain moiety, FRET data do not reveal any evidence for drug incorporation into the lipid matrix, and ITC measurements performed do not exhibit any heat production due to drug binding. This implies that the interaction process is governed by only entropic reactions at the lipid/water interface. PMID:19366589

  11. Interaction of 3β-amino-5-cholestene with phospholipids in binary and ternary bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lönnfors, Max; Engberg, Oskar; Peterson, Blake R.; Slotte, J. Peter

    2011-01-01

    3β-Amino-5-cholestene (aminocholesterol) is a synthetic sterol whose properties in bilayer membranes have been examined. In fluid palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM) bilayers, aminocholesterol and cholesterol were equally effective in increasing acyl chain order, based on changes in diphenylhexatriene (DPH) anisotropy. In fluid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers, aminocholesterol ordered acyl chains, but slightly less efficiently than cholesterol. Aminocholesterol eliminated the PSM and DPPC gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition enthalpy linearly with concentration, and the enthalpy approached zero at 30 mol% sterol. Whereas cholesterol was able to increase the thermostability of ordered PSM domains in a fluid bilayer, aminocholesterol under equal conditions failed to do this, suggesting that its interaction with PSM was not as favorable as cholesterol’s. In ternary mixed bilayers, containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), PSM or DPPC, and cholesterol at proportions to contain a liquid-ordered phase (60:40 by mol of POPC and PSM or DPPC, and 30 mol% cholesterol), the average life-time of trans parinaric acid (tPA) was close to 20 ns. When cholesterol was replaced with aminocholesterol in such mixed bilayers, the average life-time of tPA was only marginally shorter (about 18 ns). This observation, together with acyl chain ordering data, clearly shows that aminocholesterol was able to form a liquid-ordered phase with saturated PSM or DPPC. We conclude that aminocholesterol should be a good sterol replacement in model membrane systems for which a partial positive charge is deemed beneficial. PMID:22128897

  12. Regulation of gene expression through a transcriptional repressor that senses acyl-chain length in membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Harald F; Schopf, Florian H; Schleifer, Hannes; Knittelfelder, Oskar L; Pieber, Bartholomäus; Rechberger, Gerald N; Wolinski, Heimo; Gaspar, Maria L; Kappe, C Oliver; Stadlmann, Johannes; Mechtler, Karl; Zenz, Alexandra; Lohner, Karl; Tehlivets, Oksana; Henry, Susan A; Kohlwein, Sepp D

    2014-06-23

    Membrane phospholipids typically contain fatty acids (FAs) of 16 and 18 carbon atoms. This particular chain length is evolutionarily highly conserved and presumably provides maximum stability and dynamic properties to biological membranes in response to nutritional or environmental cues. Here, we show that the relative proportion of C16 versus C18 FAs is regulated by the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of FA de novo synthesis. Acc1 activity is attenuated by AMPK/Snf1-dependent phosphorylation, which is required to maintain an appropriate acyl-chain length distribution. Moreover, we find that the transcriptional repressor Opi1 preferentially binds to C16 over C18 phosphatidic acid (PA) species: thus, C16-chain containing PA sequesters Opi1 more effectively to the ER, enabling AMPK/Snf1 control of PA acyl-chain length to determine the degree of derepression of Opi1 target genes. These findings reveal an unexpected regulatory link between the major energy-sensing kinase, membrane lipid composition, and transcription.

  13. Pore formation of phospholipid membranes by the action of two hemolytic arachnid peptides of different size.

    PubMed

    Belokoneva, Olga S; Satake, Honoo; Mal'tseva, Elena L; Pal'mina, Nadezhda P; Villegas, Elba; Nakajima, Terumi; Corzo, Gerardo

    2004-08-30

    Pin2 and Oxki1 are cationic amphipathic peptides that permeate lipid membranes through formation of pores. Their mechanism of binding to phosphocholine (PC) membranes differs. Spin-probe experiments showed that both Pin2 and Oxki1 penetrate the lipid membrane of small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs). Moreover, the leakage of calcein and dextrans from PC vesicles showed that Pin2 agrees with the accumulation of peptides on lipid membranes and form pores of different size. On the other hand, Oxki1 did not act strictly cooperatively and form pores of limited size.

  14. Electrostatic potential and Born energy of charged molecules interacting with phospholipid membranes: calculation via 3-D numerical solution of the full Poisson equation.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, J E; Lambrakis, K C

    1991-09-21

    Understanding the physicochemical basis of the interaction of molecules with lipid bilayers is fundamental to membrane biology. In this study, a new, three-dimensional numerical solution of the full Poisson equation including local dielectric variation is developed using finite difference techniques in order to model electrostatic interactions of charged molecules with a non-uniform dielectric. This solution is used to describe the electric field and electrostatic potential profile of a charged molecule interacting with a phospholipid bilayer in a manner consistent with the known composition and structure of the membrane. Furthermore, the Born interaction energy is then calculated by appropriate integration of the electric field over whole space. Numerical computations indicate that the electrostatic potential profile surrounding a charge molecule and its resultant Born interaction energy are a function of molecular position within the membrane and change most significantly within the polar region of the bilayer. The maximum interaction energy is observed when the charge is placed at the center of the hydrophobic core of the membrane and is strongly dependent on the size of the charge and on the thickness of the hydrocarbon core of the bilayer. The numerical results of this continuum model are compared with various analytical approximations for the Born energy including models established for discontinuous slab dielectrics. The calculated energies agree with the well-known Born analytical expression only when the charge is located near the center of a hydrocarbon core of greater than 60 A in thickness. The Born-image model shows excellent agreement with the numerical results only when modified to include an appropriate effective thickness of the low dielectric region. In addition, a newly derived approximation which considers the local mean dielectric provides a simple and continuous solution that also agrees well with the numerical results.

  15. Accelerating membrane insertion of peripheral proteins with a novel membrane mimetic model.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V; Arcario, Mark J; Christensen, Geoff A; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2012-05-01

    Characterizing atomic details of membrane binding of peripheral membrane proteins by molecular dynamics (MD) has been significantly hindered by the slow dynamics of membrane reorganization associated with the phenomena. To expedite lateral diffusion of lipid molecules without sacrificing the atomic details of such interactions, we have developed a novel membrane representation, to our knowledge, termed the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model to study binding and insertion of various molecular species into the membrane. The HMMM model takes advantage of an organic solvent layer to represent the hydrophobic core of the membrane and short-tailed phospholipids for the headgroup region. We demonstrate that using these components, bilayer structures are formed spontaneously and rapidly, regardless of the initial position and orientation of the lipids. In the HMMM membrane, lipid molecules exhibit one to two orders of magnitude enhancement in lateral diffusion. At the same time, the membrane atomic density profile of the headgroup region produced by the HMMM model is essentially identical to those obtained for full-membrane models, indicating the faithful representation of the membrane surface by the model. We demonstrate the efficiency of the model in capturing spontaneous binding and insertion of peripheral proteins by using the membrane anchor (γ-carboxyglutamic-acid-rich domain; GLA domain) of human coagulation factor VII as a test model. Achieving full insertion of the GLA domain consistently in 10 independent unbiased simulations within short simulation times clearly indicates the robustness of the HMMM model in capturing membrane association of peripheral proteins very efficiently and reproducibly. The HMMM model will provide significant improvements to the current all-atom models by accelerating lipid dynamics to examine protein-membrane interactions more efficiently. PMID:22824277

  16. Accelerating Membrane Insertion of Peripheral Proteins with a Novel Membrane Mimetic Model

    PubMed Central

    Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Arcario, Mark J.; Christensen, Geoff A.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing atomic details of membrane binding of peripheral membrane proteins by molecular dynamics (MD) has been significantly hindered by the slow dynamics of membrane reorganization associated with the phenomena. To expedite lateral diffusion of lipid molecules without sacrificing the atomic details of such interactions, we have developed a novel membrane representation, to our knowledge, termed the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model to study binding and insertion of various molecular species into the membrane. The HMMM model takes advantage of an organic solvent layer to represent the hydrophobic core of the membrane and short-tailed phospholipids for the headgroup region. We demonstrate that using these components, bilayer structures are formed spontaneously and rapidly, regardless of the initial position and orientation of the lipids. In the HMMM membrane, lipid molecules exhibit one to two orders of magnitude enhancement in lateral diffusion. At the same time, the membrane atomic density profile of the headgroup region produced by the HMMM model is essentially identical to those obtained for full-membrane models, indicating the faithful representation of the membrane surface by the model. We demonstrate the efficiency of the model in capturing spontaneous binding and insertion of peripheral proteins by using the membrane anchor (γ-carboxyglutamic-acid-rich domain; GLA domain) of human coagulation factor VII as a test model. Achieving full insertion of the GLA domain consistently in 10 independent unbiased simulations within short simulation times clearly indicates the robustness of the HMMM model in capturing membrane association of peripheral proteins very efficiently and reproducibly. The HMMM model will provide significant improvements to the current all-atom models by accelerating lipid dynamics to examine protein-membrane interactions more efficiently. PMID:22824277

  17. Hybrid copolymer-phospholipid vesicles: phase separation resembling mixed phospholipid lamellae, but with mechanical stability and control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Santore, Maria M

    2015-04-01

    Vesicles whose bilayer membranes contain phospholipids mixed with co-polymers or surfactants comprise new hybrid materials having potential applications in drug delivery, sensors, and biomaterials. Here we describe a model polymer-phospholipid hybrid membrane system exhibiting strong similarities to binary phospholipid mixtures, but with more robust membrane mechanics. A lamella-forming graft copolymer, PDMS-co-PEO (polydimethylsiloxane-co-polyethylene oxide) was blended with a high melting temperature phospholipid, DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), over a broad compositional range. The resulting giant hybrid unilamellar vesicles were compared qualitatively and quantitatively to analogous mixed phospholipid membranes in which a low melting temperature phospholipid, DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), was blended with DPPC. The mechanical properties of the hybrid vesicles, even when phase separated, were robust with high lysis stresses and strains approaching those of the pure copolymer vesicles. The temperature-composition phase diagram of the hybrid vesicles closely resembled that of the mixed phospholipids; with only slightly greater nonidealities in the hybrid compared with DOPC/DPPC mixed membranes. In both systems, it was demonstrated that tension could be used to manipulate DPPC solidification into domains of patchy or striped morphologies that exhibited different tracer incorporation. The patch and stripe-shaped domains are thought to be different solid DPPC polymorphys: ripple and tilt (or gel). This work demonstrates that in mixed-phospholipid bilayers where a high-melting phospholipid solidifies on cooling, the lower-melting phospholipid may be substituted by an appropriate copolymer to improve mechanical properties while retaining the underlying membrane physics.

  18. Ultrasonic study of melittin effects on phospholipid model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Colotto, A; Kharakoz, D P; Lohner, K; Laggner, P

    1993-01-01

    Low dose effects of melittin on dilute suspensions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine multilamellar vesicles are investigated by studying the acoustic properties of the system. The temperature dependencies of sound velocity and absorption have been measured at 7.2 MHz in the temperature range of 20-55 degrees C, for different peptide/lipid molar ratios, R. The most pronounced effects were observed at R = 5 x 10(-3), in the vicinity of the pretransition, with a simultaneous increase in sound absorption and velocity. This indicates that melittin affects the polar head group region of the bilayer resulting in a decrease in mobility of the polar head groups. A nonmonotonic dependence of the main transition temperature, with an initial decrease followed by an increase as melittin is added, is interpreted as a consequence of a destabilizing action of the interfaces between mellitin-affected clusters and the unaffected phase. PMID:8312475

  19. Omega-3 DHA and EPA for cognition, behavior, and mood: clinical findings and structural-functional synergies with cell membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Parris M

    2007-09-01

    The omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are orthomolecular, conditionally essential nutrients that enhance quality of life and lower the risk of premature death. They function exclusively via cell membranes, in which they are anchored by phospholipid molecules. DHA is proven essential to pre- and postnatal brain development, whereas EPA seems more influential on behavior and mood. Both DHA and EPA generate neuroprotective metabolites. In double-blind, randomized, controlled trials, DHA and EPA combinations have been shown to benefit attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), autism, dyspraxia, dyslexia, and aggression. For the affective disorders, meta-analyses confirm benefits in major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder, with promising results in schizophrenia and initial benefit for borderline personality disorder. Accelerated cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) correlate with lowered tissue levels of DHA/EPA, and supplementation has improved cognitive function. Huntington disease has responded to EPA. Omega-3 phospholipid supplements that combine DHA/EPA and phospholipids into the same molecule have shown marked promise in early clinical trials. Phosphatidylserine with DHA/EPA attached (Omega-3 PS) has been shown to alleviate AD/HD symptoms. Krill omega-3 phospholipids, containing mostly phosphatidylcholine (PC) with DHA/EPA attached, markedly outperformed conventional fish oil DHA/EPA triglycerides in double-blind trials for premenstrual syndrome/dysmenorrhea and for normalizing blood lipid profiles. Krill omega-3 phospholipids demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity, lowering C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in a double-blind trial. Utilizing DHA and EPA together with phospholipids and membrane antioxidants to achieve a triple cell membrane synergy may further diversify their currently wide range of clinical applications. PMID:18072818

  20. Membrane curvature, lipid segregation, and structural transitions for phospholipids under dual-solvent stress

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, R.P.; Fuller, N.L. ); Gruner, S.M. ); Parsegian, V.A. )

    1990-01-09

    Amphiphiles respond both to polar and to nonpolar solvents. In this paper X-ray diffraction and osmotic stress have been used to examine the phase behavior, the structural dimensions, and the work of deforming the monolayer-lined aqueous cavities formed by mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) as a function of the concentration of two solvents, water and tetradecane (td). In the absence of td, most PE/PC mixtures show only lamellar phases in excess water; all of these become single reverse hexagonal (H{sub II}) phases with addition of excess td. The spontaneous radius of curvature R{sub 0} of lipid monolayers, as expressed in these H{sub II} phases, is allowed by the relief of hydrocarbon chain stress by td; R{sub 0} increases with the ratio DOPC/DOPE. Single H{sub II} phases stressed by limited water or td show several responses. (a) the molecular area is compressed at the polar end of the molecule and expanded at the hydrocarbon ends. (b) For circularly symmetrical water cylinders, the degrees of hydrocarbon chain splaying and polar group compression are different for molecules aligned in different directions around the water cylinder. (c) A pivotal position exists along the length of the phospholipid molecule where little area change occurs as the monolayer is bent to increasing curvatures. (d) By defining R{sub 0} at the pivotal position, the authors find that measured energies are well fit by a quadratic bending energy. (e) For lipid mixtures, enforced deviation of the H{sub II} monolayer from R{sub 0} is sufficiently powerful to cause demixing of the phospholipids in a way suggesting that the DOPE/DOPC ratio self-adjusts so that its R{sub 0} matches the amount of td or water available, i.e., that curvature energy is minimized.

  1. Amounts of phospholipids and cholesterol in lipid domains formed in intact lens membranes: Methodology development and its application to studies of porcine lens membranes.

    PubMed

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2015-11-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling method has been developed that allows quantitative evaluation of the amounts of phospholipids and cholesterol in lipid domains of intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of eye lenses. The long term goal of this research is the assessment of organizational changes in human lens fiber cell membranes that occur with age and during cataract development. The measurements needed to be performed on lens membranes prepared from eyes of single donors and from single eyes. For these types of studies it is necessary to separate the age/cataract related changes from preparation/technique related changes. Human lenses differ not only because of age, but also because of the varying health histories of the donors. To solve these problems the sample-to-sample preparation/technique related changes were evaluated for cortical and nuclear lens membranes prepared from single porcine eyes. It was assumed that the differences due to the age (animals were two year old) and environmental conditions for raising these animals were minimal. Mean values and standard deviations from preparation/technique changes for measured amounts of lipids in membrane domains were calculated. Statistical analysis (Student's t-test) of the data also allowed determining the differences of mean values which were statistically significant with P ≤ 0.05. These differences defined for porcine lenses will be used for comparison of amounts of lipids in domains in human lens membranes prepared from eyes of single donors and from single eyes. Greater separations will indicate that differences were statistically significant with (P ≤ 0.05) and that they came from different than preparation/technique sources. Results confirmed that in nuclear porcine membranes the amounts of lipids in domains created due to the presence of membrane proteins were greater than those in cortical membranes and the differences were larger than

  2. Inward multivesiculation at the basal membrane of adherent giant phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Flores, Susana

    2016-04-01

    Adherent giant vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine and biotinylated lipids form clusters of inward spherical buds at their basal membrane. The process is spontaneous and occurs when the vesicles undergo a sequence of osmotic swelling and deswelling. The daughter vesicles have a uniform size (diameter ≈ 2-3 μm), engulf small volumes of outer fluid and remain attached to the region of the membrane from which they generate, even after restoring the isotonicity. A pinning-sealing mechanism of long-wavelength modes of membrane fluctuations is proposed, by which the just-deflated vesicles reduce the surplus of membrane area and avoid excessive spreading and compression via biotin anchors. The work discusses the rationale behind the mechanism that furnishes GUVs with basal endovesicles, and its prospective use to simulate cellular events or to create molecular carriers. PMID:26828120

  3. Dimeric peptides with three different linkers self-assemble with phospholipids to form peptide nanodiscs that stabilize membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andreas N; Sørensen, Kasper K; Johansen, Nicolai T; Martel, Anne; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Jensen, Knud J; Arleth, Lise; Midtgaard, Søren Roi

    2016-07-01

    Three dimers of the amphipathic α-helical peptide 18A have been synthesized with different interhelical linkers inserted between the two copies of 18A. The dimeric peptides were denoted 'beltides' where Beltide-1 refers to the 18A-dimer without a linker, Beltide-2 is the 18A-dimer with proline (Pro) as a linker and Beltide-3 is the 18A-dimer linked by two glycines (Gly-Gly). The self-assembly of the beltides with the phospholipid DMPC was studied with and without the incorporated membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) through a combination of coarse-grained MD simulations, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle scattering (SAS), static light scattering (SLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. For all three beltides, MD and combined small-angle X-ray and -neutron scattering were consistent with a disc structure composed by a phospholipid bilayer surrounded by a belt of peptides and with a total disc diameter of approximately 10 nm. CD confirmed that all three beltides were α-helical in the free form and with DMPC. However, as shown by SEC the different interhelical linkers clearly led to different properties of the beltides. Beltide-3, with the Gly-Gly linker, was very adaptable such that peptide nanodiscs could be formed for a broad range of different peptide to lipid stoichiometries and therefore also possible disc-sizes. On the other hand, both Beltide-2 with the Pro linker and Beltide-1 without a linker were less adaptable and would only form discs of certain peptide to lipid stoichiometries. SLS revealed that the structural stability of the formed peptide nanodiscs was also highly affected by the linkers and it was found that Beltide-1 gave more stable discs than the other two beltides. With respect to membrane protein stabilization, each of the three beltides in combination with DMPC stabilizes the seven-helix transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin significantly better than the detergent octyl glucoside, but no

  4. Dimeric peptides with three different linkers self-assemble with phospholipids to form peptide nanodiscs that stabilize membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andreas N; Sørensen, Kasper K; Johansen, Nicolai T; Martel, Anne; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Jensen, Knud J; Arleth, Lise; Midtgaard, Søren Roi

    2016-07-01

    Three dimers of the amphipathic α-helical peptide 18A have been synthesized with different interhelical linkers inserted between the two copies of 18A. The dimeric peptides were denoted 'beltides' where Beltide-1 refers to the 18A-dimer without a linker, Beltide-2 is the 18A-dimer with proline (Pro) as a linker and Beltide-3 is the 18A-dimer linked by two glycines (Gly-Gly). The self-assembly of the beltides with the phospholipid DMPC was studied with and without the incorporated membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) through a combination of coarse-grained MD simulations, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle scattering (SAS), static light scattering (SLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. For all three beltides, MD and combined small-angle X-ray and -neutron scattering were consistent with a disc structure composed by a phospholipid bilayer surrounded by a belt of peptides and with a total disc diameter of approximately 10 nm. CD confirmed that all three beltides were α-helical in the free form and with DMPC. However, as shown by SEC the different interhelical linkers clearly led to different properties of the beltides. Beltide-3, with the Gly-Gly linker, was very adaptable such that peptide nanodiscs could be formed for a broad range of different peptide to lipid stoichiometries and therefore also possible disc-sizes. On the other hand, both Beltide-2 with the Pro linker and Beltide-1 without a linker were less adaptable and would only form discs of certain peptide to lipid stoichiometries. SLS revealed that the structural stability of the formed peptide nanodiscs was also highly affected by the linkers and it was found that Beltide-1 gave more stable discs than the other two beltides. With respect to membrane protein stabilization, each of the three beltides in combination with DMPC stabilizes the seven-helix transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin significantly better than the detergent octyl glucoside, but no

  5. Effects of Different Maturation Systems on Bovine Oocyte Quality, Plasma Membrane Phospholipid Composition and Resistance to Vitrification and Warming

    PubMed Central

    Sprícigo, José F. W.; Diógenes, Mateus N.; Leme, Ligiane O.; Guimarães, Ana L.; Muterlle, Carolle V.; Silva, Bianca Damiani Marques; Solà-Oriol, David; Pivato, Ivo; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Dode, Margot A. N.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different maturation systems on oocyte resistance after vitrification and on the phospholipid profile of the oocyte plasma membrane (PM). Four different maturation systems were tested: 1) in vitro maturation using immature oocytes aspirated from slaughterhouse ovaries (CONT; n = 136); 2) in vitro maturation using immature oocytes obtained by ovum pick-up (OPU) from unstimulated heifers (IMA; n = 433); 3) in vitro maturation using immature oocytes obtained by OPU from stimulated heifers (FSH; n = 444); and 4) in vivo maturation using oocytes obtained from heifers stimulated 24 hours prior by an injection of GnRH (MII; n = 658). A sample of matured oocytes from each fresh group was analyzed by matrix associated laser desorption-ionization (MALDI-TOF) to determine their PM composition. Then, half of the matured oocytes from each group were vitrified/warmed (CONT VIT, IMA VIT, FSH VIT and MII VIT), while the other half were used as fresh controls. Afterwards, the eight groups underwent IVF and IVC, and blastocyst development was assessed at D2, D7 and D8. A chi-square test was used to compare embryo development between the groups. Corresponding phospholipid ion intensity was expressed in arbitrary units, and following principal components analyses (PCA) the data were distributed on a 3D graph. Oocytes obtained from superstimulated animals showed a greater rate of developmental (P<0.05) at D7 (MII = 62.4±17.5% and FSH = 58.8±16.1%) compared to those obtained from unstimulated animals (CONT = 37.9±8.5% and IMA = 50.6±14.4%). However, the maturation system did not affect the resistance of oocytes to vitrification because the blastocyst rate at D7 was similar (P>0.05) for all groups (CONT VIT = 2.8±3.5%, IMA VIT = 2.9±4.0%, FSH VIT = 4.3±7.2% and MII VIT = 3.6±7.2%). MALDI-TOF revealed that oocytes from all maturation groups had similar phospholipid contents, except for 760.6 ([PC (34:1) + H]+), which was

  6. Cholate extracts of mitochondrial outer membranes increase inhibition by malonyl-CoA of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I by a mechanism involving phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Mynatt, R L; Greenhaw, J J; Cook, G A

    1994-01-01

    It has been reported that sodium cholate can separate the catalytic component of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I (CPT-I) from a putative malonyl-CoA-binding regulatory protein capable of conferring sensitivity to malonyl-CoA on CPT-II. We found that cholate preferentially extracted a contaminating malonyl-CoA-sensitive CPT from mitochondrial inner membranes. When cholate extracts of outer membranes were incubated either with cholate extracts of inner membranes or with osmotically swollen mitochondria, inhibition of CPT by malonyl-CoA was increased. Treatment of intact mitochondria with subtilisin abolished the increased inhibition by malonyl-CoA, suggesting that the outer-membrane CPT-I was responsible for the increased inhibition. Incubation of cholate extracts with proteinase K did not prevent the increased inhibition. Fractionation of the cholate extract indicated the presence of phospholipids. Addition of cardiolipin or phosphatidylglycerol to osmotically swollen mitochondria increased sensitivity of CPT to malonyl-CoA, but several other phospholipids did not. When cardiolipin was added to intact mitochondria from either starved or fed rats, there were large increases in inhibition by malonyl-CoA; sensitivity in mitochondria from starved rats increased to that normally observed with mitochondria from fed rats. These results suggest that phospholipids are responsible for the increased inhibition of CPT by malonyl-CoA with added cholate extracts and that changes in membrane composition may be involved in the physiological regulation of CPT-I. PMID:8192665

  7. Accurate determination of the orientational distribution of a fluorescent molecule in a phospholipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Timr, Štěpán; Bondar, Alexey; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Štefl, Martin; Hof, Martin; Vazdar, Mario; Lazar, Josef; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-01-30

    Orientation of lipophilic dye molecules within a biological membrane can report on the molecular environment, i.e., the physical and chemical properties of the surrounding membrane. This fact, however, remains under-utilized, largely because of our limited quantitative knowledge of molecular orientational distributions and the fact that robust techniques allowing experimental observation of molecular orientations of dyes in biological membranes are only being developed. In order to begin filling this lack of knowledge and to develop appropriate tools, we have investigated the membrane orientational distribution of the 3-hydroxyflavone-based membrane dye F2N12S. Results of our single- and two-photon polarization microscopy observations of linear dichroism of F2N12S-labeled giant unilamellar vesicles are consistent with a Gaussian-like orientational distribution of the transition dipole moment of the dye, with a mean tilt angle of 53.2 ± 0.1° with respect to the bilayer normal and a standard deviation of 13.3 ± 0.6°. Independently, by combining quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, we obtained very similar values; a mean tilt angle of 48 ± 4° and a standard deviation of 13 ± 2°. The good agreement between the experimentally and computationally obtained values cross-validates both approaches and gives confidence to the results obtained. The results open a door to robust quantitative determinations of orientational distributions of fluorescent molecules (ranging from simple synthetic dyes to fluorescent proteins attached to membrane proteins) associated with lipid membranes. Such determinations enable rational development of a novel class of sensitive fluorescent optical probes, reporting on cellular events through changes in linear dichroism.

  8. On the application of the MARTINI coarse-grained model to immersion of a protein in a phospholipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Ghulam; Nandekar, Prajwal P.; Yu, Xiaofeng; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2015-12-01

    An important step in the simulation of a membrane protein in a phospholipid bilayer is the correct immersion of the protein in the bilayer. Crystal structures are determined without the bilayer. Particularly for proteins with monotopic domains, it can be unclear how deeply and in which orientation the protein is being inserted in the membrane. We have previously developed a procedure combining coarse-grain (CG) with all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to insert and simulate a cytochrome P450 (CYP) possessing an N-terminal transmembrane helix connected by a flexible linker region to a globular domain that dips into the membrane. The CG simulations provide a computationally efficient means to explore different orientations and conformations of the CYP in the membrane. Converged configurations obtained in the CG simulations are then refined in AA simulations. Here, we tested different variants of the MARTINI CG model, differing in the water model, the treatment of long-range non-bonded interactions, and the implementation (GROMACS 4.5.5 vs 5.0.4), for this purpose. We examined the behavior of the models for simulating a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer in water and for the immersion of CYP3A4 in a POPC bilayer, and compared the CG-MD results with the previously reported experimental and simulation results. We also tested the methodology on a set of four other CYPs. Finally, we propose an optimized protocol for modeling such protein-membrane systems that provides the most plausible configurations and is computationally efficient; this incorporates the standard non-polar water model and the GROMACS 5.0.4 implementation with a reaction field treatment of long-range interactions.

  9. On the application of the MARTINI coarse-grained model to immersion of a protein in a phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, Ghulam E-mail: rebecca.wade@h-its.org; Nandekar, Prajwal P.; Yu, Xiaofeng; Wade, Rebecca C. E-mail: rebecca.wade@h-its.org

    2015-12-28

    An important step in the simulation of a membrane protein in a phospholipid bilayer is the correct immersion of the protein in the bilayer. Crystal structures are determined without the bilayer. Particularly for proteins with monotopic domains, it can be unclear how deeply and in which orientation the protein is being inserted in the membrane. We have previously developed a procedure combining coarse-grain (CG) with all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to insert and simulate a cytochrome P450 (CYP) possessing an N-terminal transmembrane helix connected by a flexible linker region to a globular domain that dips into the membrane. The CG simulations provide a computationally efficient means to explore different orientations and conformations of the CYP in the membrane. Converged configurations obtained in the CG simulations are then refined in AA simulations. Here, we tested different variants of the MARTINI CG model, differing in the water model, the treatment of long-range non-bonded interactions, and the implementation (GROMACS 4.5.5 vs 5.0.4), for this purpose. We examined the behavior of the models for simulating a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer in water and for the immersion of CYP3A4 in a POPC bilayer, and compared the CG-MD results with the previously reported experimental and simulation results. We also tested the methodology on a set of four other CYPs. Finally, we propose an optimized protocol for modeling such protein-membrane systems that provides the most plausible configurations and is computationally efficient; this incorporates the standard non-polar water model and the GROMACS 5.0.4 implementation with a reaction field treatment of long-range interactions.

  10. The cooperative interaction between vitamin E and vitamin C in suppression of peroxidation of membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Leung, H W; Vang, M J; Mavis, R D

    1981-05-22

    The time course of peroxidation of rat liver microsomes by FeSO4 in the presence of ascorbate showed a delay in the onset of peroxidation compared to the time course when NADPH replaced ascorbate as the electron donor. The delay was consistent with an antioxidant function of ascorbate, possibly mediated through endogenous vitamin E. In order to further investigate the cooperation between ascorbate and vitamin E in suppressing lipid peroxidation, a liposomal system containing polyunsaturated phospholipids was used. Peroxidation was initiated by ferrous iron at pH 5, where spontaneous oxidation of Fe2+ did not occur and the antioxidant properties of ascorbic acid could be characterized independently of its pro-oxidant properties as a reducer of Fe3+. Ascorbic acid alone at concentrations of 30--100 microM delayed peroxidation by 20 min and at higher concentrations prevented peroxidation for 60 min. Physiological levels of vitamin E decreased peroxidation at early time points but the vitamin was apparently consumed during the course of the incubation. The presence of both vitamin C and vitamin E produced suppression of peroxidation at early time points (0--20 min) which was approximately the sum of the individual inhibitions. At longer time points, however, the mixture of antioxidants was much more effective than the sum of both vitamins alone. This suggests that interaction between these antioxidants yields and enhanced delivery of antioxidant protection.

  11. MICOS and phospholipid transfer by Ups2-Mdm35 organize membrane lipid synthesis in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, Mari J; Friedman, Jonathan R; Osman, Christof; Salin, Bénédicte; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Nunnari, Jodi; Langer, Thomas; Tatsuta, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria exert critical functions in cellular lipid metabolism and promote the synthesis of major constituents of cellular membranes, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine. Here, we demonstrate that the phosphatidylserine decarboxylase Psd1, located in the inner mitochondrial membrane, promotes mitochondrial PE synthesis via two pathways. First, Ups2-Mdm35 complexes (SLMO2-TRIAP1 in humans) serve as phosphatidylserine (PS)-specific lipid transfer proteins in the mitochondrial intermembrane space, allowing formation of PE by Psd1 in the inner membrane. Second, Psd1 decarboxylates PS in the outer membrane in trans, independently of PS transfer by Ups2-Mdm35. This latter pathway requires close apposition between both mitochondrial membranes and the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS). In MICOS-deficient cells, limiting PS transfer by Ups2-Mdm35 and reducing mitochondrial PE accumulation preserves mitochondrial respiration and cristae formation. These results link mitochondrial PE metabolism to MICOS, combining functions in protein and lipid homeostasis to preserve mitochondrial structure and function. PMID:27241913

  12. Interaction of Sindbis virus with liposomal model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, J J; Dalrymple, J M; Alving, C R; Russell, P K

    1975-01-01

    Radiolabeled Sindbis virus was found to bind to protein-free lipid model membranes (liposomes) derived from extracts of sheep erythrocytes. The virus interaction was dependent on initial pH, and the range of pH dependence (pH 6.0 to 6.8) was the same as the observed with virus-dependent hemagglutination. After the initial interaction, pH changes no longer influenced the virus binding to liposomes. Virus bound to liposomes prepared from a mixture of erythrocyte phospholipids, but the binding was greatly diminished when either cholesterol or phosphatidylethanolamine was omitted from the liposomal lipid mixture. It was concluded that phospholipids and cholesterol, in a bilayer configuration, may be sufficient for specific virus binding in the absence of membrane protein. PMID:234538

  13. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    Our research for the past two years has involved the study of phosphoinositides and their potential role in regulating plant growth and development. Our initial goal was to document the sequence of events involved in inositol phospholipid metabolism in response to external stimuli. Our working hypothesis was that phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) was in the plasma membrane of plants cells and would be hydrolyzed by phospholipase C to yield the second messengers inositol triphosphate (IP/sub 3/) and diacyglycerol (DAG) and that IP/sub 3/ would mobilize intracellular calcium as has been shown for animal cells. Our results with both carrot suspension culture cells and sunflower hypocotyl indicate that this paradigm is not the primary mechanism of signal transduction in these systems. We have observed very rapid, within 5 sec, stimulation of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) kinase which resulted in an increase in PIP/sub 2/. However, there was no evidence for activation of phospholipase C. In addition, we have shown that PIP and PIP/sub 2/ can activate the plasma membrane ATPase. The results of these studies are described briefly in the paragraphs below. Inositol phospholipids are localized in distinct membrane fractions. If PIP and PIP/sub 2/ play a role in the transduction of external signals, they should be present in the plasma membrane. We used the fusogenic carrot suspension culture cells as a model system to study the distribution of inositol phospholipids in various membrane fractions and organelles. Cells were labeled 12 to 18 h with myo(2-/sup 3/H) inositol and the membranes were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The plasma membrane was enriched in PIP and PIP/sub 2/ compared to the intracellular membranes.

  14. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  15. Identification of a secretory phospholipase A2 from Papaver somniferum L. that transforms membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Jablonická, Veronika; Mansfeld, Johanna; Heilmann, Ingo; Obložinský, Marek; Heilmann, Mareike

    2016-09-01

    The full-length sequence of a new secretory phospholipase A2 was identified in opium poppy seedlings (Papaver somniferum L.). The cDNA of poppy phospholipase A2, denoted as pspla2, encodes a protein of 159 amino acids with a 31 amino acid long signal peptide at the N-terminus. PsPLA2 contains a PLA2 signature domain (PA2c), including the Ca(2+)-binding loop (YGKYCGxxxxGC) and the catalytic site motif (DACCxxHDxC) with the conserved catalytic histidine and the calcium-coordinating aspartate residues. The aspartate of the His/Asp dyad playing an important role in animal sPLA2 catalysis is substituted by a serine residue. Furthermore, the PsPLA2 sequence contains 12 conserved cysteine residues to form 6 structural disulfide bonds. The calculated molecular weight of the mature PsPLA2 is 14.0 kDa. Based on the primary structure PsPLA2 belongs to the XIB group of PLA2s. Untagged recombinant PsPLA2 obtained by expression in Escherichia coli, renaturation from inclusion bodies and purification by cation-exchange chromatography was characterized in vitro. The pH optimum for activity of PsPLA2 was found to be pH 7, when using mixed micelles of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and Triton X-100. PsPLA2 specifically cleaves fatty acids from the sn-2 position of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and shows a pronounced preference for PC over phosphatidyl ethanolamine, -glycerol and -inositol. The active recombinant enzyme was tested in vitro against natural phospholipids isolated from poppy plants and preferably released the unsaturated fatty acids, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, from the naturally occurring mixture of substrate lipids.

  16. Interaction of melittin with mixed phospholipid membranes composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine studied by deuterium NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, C.; Bitbol, M.; Watts, A. )

    1989-08-08

    The interaction of bee venom melittin with mixed phospholipid bilayers composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine deuterated in the {alpha}- and {beta}-methylenes of the choline head group (DMPC-d{sub 4}) and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine deuterated in the {alpha}-methylene and {beta}-CH positions of the serine head group (DMPS-d{sub 3}) was studied in ternary mixtures by using deuterium NMR spectroscopy. The changes in the deuterium quadrupole splittings of the head-group deuteriomethylenes of DMPC-d{sub 4} induced by DMPS in binary mixtures were systematically reversed by increasing concentrations of melittin, so that at a melittin concentration of 4 mol % relative to total lipid the deuterium NMR spectrum from DMPC-d{sub 4} in the ternary mixture was similar to the spectrum from pure DMPC-d{sub 4} bilayers. The absence of deuterium NMR signals arising from melittin-bound DMPS in ternary mixtures containing DMPS-d{sub 3} indicates that the reversal by melittin of the effects of DMPS on the quadrupole splittings of DMPC-d{sub 4} results from the response of the choline head group to the net surface charge rather than from phase separation of melittin-DMPS complexes. The similarity in the effects of the two cationic but otherwise dissimilar peptides indicates that the DMPS head group responds to the surface charge resulting from the presence in the bilayer of charged amphiphiles, in a manner analogous to the response of the choline head group of phosphatidylcholine to the bilayer surface charge. The presence of DMPS greatly stabilized DMPC bilayers with respect to melittin-induced micellization, indicating that the latter effect of melittin may not be important for the hemolytic activity of the peptide.

  17. Identification of a secretory phospholipase A2 from Papaver somniferum L. that transforms membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Jablonická, Veronika; Mansfeld, Johanna; Heilmann, Ingo; Obložinský, Marek; Heilmann, Mareike

    2016-09-01

    The full-length sequence of a new secretory phospholipase A2 was identified in opium poppy seedlings (Papaver somniferum L.). The cDNA of poppy phospholipase A2, denoted as pspla2, encodes a protein of 159 amino acids with a 31 amino acid long signal peptide at the N-terminus. PsPLA2 contains a PLA2 signature domain (PA2c), including the Ca(2+)-binding loop (YGKYCGxxxxGC) and the catalytic site motif (DACCxxHDxC) with the conserved catalytic histidine and the calcium-coordinating aspartate residues. The aspartate of the His/Asp dyad playing an important role in animal sPLA2 catalysis is substituted by a serine residue. Furthermore, the PsPLA2 sequence contains 12 conserved cysteine residues to form 6 structural disulfide bonds. The calculated molecular weight of the mature PsPLA2 is 14.0 kDa. Based on the primary structure PsPLA2 belongs to the XIB group of PLA2s. Untagged recombinant PsPLA2 obtained by expression in Escherichia coli, renaturation from inclusion bodies and purification by cation-exchange chromatography was characterized in vitro. The pH optimum for activity of PsPLA2 was found to be pH 7, when using mixed micelles of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and Triton X-100. PsPLA2 specifically cleaves fatty acids from the sn-2 position of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and shows a pronounced preference for PC over phosphatidyl ethanolamine, -glycerol and -inositol. The active recombinant enzyme was tested in vitro against natural phospholipids isolated from poppy plants and preferably released the unsaturated fatty acids, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, from the naturally occurring mixture of substrate lipids. PMID:27473012

  18. Interactions of Borneol with DPPC Phospholipid Membranes: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Ding, Haiou; Dai, Xingxing; Wan, Guang; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Borneol, known as a “guide” drug in traditional Chinese medicine, is widely used as a natural penetration enhancer in modern clinical applications. Despite a large number of experimental studies on borneol’s penetration enhancing effect, the molecular basis of its action on bio-membranes is still unclear. We carried out a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the borneol concentration ranging from 3.31% to 54.59% (v/v, lipid-free basis) to study the interactions of borneol with aDPPC(1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bilayer membrane, and the temperature effects were also considered. At concentrations below 21.89%, borneol’s presence only caused DPPC bilayer thinning and an increase in fluidity; A rise in temperature could promote the diffusing progress of borneol. When the concentration was 21.89% or above, inverted micelle-like structures were formed within the bilayer interior, which led to increased bilayer thickness, and an optimum temperature was found for the interaction of borneol with the DPPC bilayer membrane. These findings revealed that the choice of optimal concentration and temperature is critical for a given application in which borneol is used as a penetration enhancer. Our results not only clarify some molecular basis for borneol’s penetration enhancing effects, but also provide some guidance for the development and applications of new preparations containing borneol. PMID:25383679

  19. Interactions of borneol with DPPC phospholipid membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Ding, Haiou; Dai, Xingxing; Wan, Guang; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2014-11-06

    Borneol, known as a "guide" drug in traditional Chinese medicine, is widely used as a natural penetration enhancer in modern clinical applications. Despite a large number of experimental studies on borneol's penetration enhancing effect, the molecular basis of its action on bio-membranes is still unclear. We carried out a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the borneol concentration ranging from 3.31% to 54.59% (v/v, lipid-free basis) to study the interactions of borneol with aDPPC(1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bilayer membrane, and the temperature effects were also considered. At concentrations below 21.89%, borneol's presence only caused DPPC bilayer thinning and an increase in fluidity; A rise in temperature could promote the diffusing progress of borneol. When the concentration was 21.89% or above, inverted micelle-like structures were formed within the bilayer interior, which led to increased bilayer thickness, and an optimum temperature was found for the interaction of borneol with the DPPC bilayer membrane. These findings revealed that the choice of optimal concentration and temperature is critical for a given application in which borneol is used as a penetration enhancer. Our results not only clarify some molecular basis for borneol's penetration enhancing effects, but also provide some guidance for the development and applications of new preparations containing borneol.

  20. General model of phospholipid bilayers in fluid phase within the single chain mean field theory.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yachong; Pogodin, Sergey; Baulin, Vladimir A

    2014-05-01

    Coarse-grained model for saturated phospholipids: 1,2-didecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DCPC), 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and unsaturated phospholipids: 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 1,2- dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) is introduced within the single chain mean field theory. A single set of parameters adjusted for DMPC bilayers gives an adequate description of equilibrium and mechanical properties of a range of saturated lipid molecules that differ only in length of their hydrophobic tails and unsaturated (POPC, DOPC) phospholipids which have double bonds in the tails. A double bond is modeled with a fixed angle of 120°, while the rest of the parameters are kept the same as saturated lipids. The thickness of the bilayer and its hydrophobic core, the compressibility, and the equilibrium area per lipid correspond to experimentally measured values for each lipid, changing linearly with the length of the tail. The model for unsaturated phospholipids also fetches main thermodynamical properties of the bilayers. This model is used for an accurate estimation of the free energies of the compressed or stretched bilayers in stacks or multilayers and gives reasonable estimates for free energies. The proposed model may further be used for studies of mixtures of lipids, small molecule inclusions, interactions of bilayers with embedded proteins.

  1. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  2. Site-selective red-edge spectroscopy of disordered materials and microheterogeneous systems: polymers, phospholipid membranes and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchenko, Alexander P.; Ercelen, Sebnem; Klymchenko, Andriy S.

    2002-12-01

    For aromatic fluorophores embedded into different rigid and highly viscous media with low structural order the spectroscopic properties do not conform to classical rules. The fluorescence spectra can depend on excitation wavelength, and the excited-state energy transfer, if present, fails at the 'red' excitation edge. These Red-Edge effects are observed due to the existence of excited-state distribution of fluorophores on their interaction energy with the environment and the slow rate of dielectric relaxations. In these conditions the site-selection can be provided by variation of energy of illuminating light quanta, and the behavior of selected species can be followed as a function of time and other variables. These observations foudn extensive application in different areas of research: colloid and polymer science, photophysics and molecular biophysics. Site-selection effects were discovered for electron-transfer and proton-transfer reactions if they depend on the dynamics of the environment. In this report we concentrate on fluroescence of 3-hydroxyflavone derivatives as the probes that exhibit the excited-state proton transfer reaction. The studies in polymer films, phospholipid membranes and in complexes with proteins allow characterizing the static and dynamic disorder in these systems.

  3. Response of Halomonas campisalis to saline stress: changes in growth kinetics, compatible solute production and membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Aston, John E; Peyton, Brent M

    2007-09-01

    The haloalkaliphile Halomonas campisalis, isolated near Soap Lake, Washington, was grown under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions from 0 to 260 g L(-1) NaCl, with optimal growth occurring at 20 and 30 g L(-1) NaCl, respectively. Halomonas campisalis was observed to produce high concentrations of compatible solutes, most notably ectoine (up to 500 mM within the cytoplasm), but hydroxyectoine and glycine betaine were also detected. The types and amounts of compatible solutes produced depended on salinity and specific growth rate, as well as on the terminal electron acceptor available (O(2) or NO(3) (-)). A decrease in ectoine production was observed with NO(3) (-) as compared with O(2) as the terminal electron acceptor. In addition, changes in the phospholipid fatty acid composition were measured with changing salinity. An increase in trans fatty acids was observed in the absence of salinity, and may be a response to membrane instability. Cyclic fatty acids were also observed to increase, both in the absence of salinity, and at very high salinities, indicating cell stress at these conditions. PMID:17651393

  4. Antioxidant effect of 4-nerolidylcatechol and α-tocopherol in erythrocyte ghost membranes and phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, K S; Silva, A H M; Mendanha, S A; Rezende, K R; Alonso, A

    2013-09-01

    4-Nerolidylcatechol (4-NC) is found in Pothomorphe umbellata root extracts and is reported to have a topical protective effect against UVB radiation-induced skin damage, toxicity in melanoma cell lines, and antimalarial activity. We report a comparative study of the antioxidant activity of 4-NC and α-tocopherol against lipid peroxidation initiated by two free radical-generating systems: 2,2'-azobis(2-aminopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) and FeSO4/H2O2, in red blood cell ghost membranes and in egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. Lipid peroxidation was monitored by membrane fluidity changes assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of a spin-labeled lipid and by the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. When lipoperoxidation was initiated by the hydroxyl radical in erythrocyte ghost membranes, both 4-NC and α-tocopherol acted in a very efficient manner. However, lower activities were observed when lipoperoxidation was initiated by the peroxyl radical; and, in this case, the protective effect of α-tocopherol was lower than that of 4-NC. In egg PC vesicles, malondialdehyde formation indicated that 4-NC was effective against lipoperoxidation initiated by both AAPH and FeSO4/H2O2, whereas α-tocopherol was less efficient in protecting against lipoperoxidation by AAPH, and behaved as a pro-oxidant for FeSO4/H2O2. The DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free-radical assay indicated that two free radicals were scavenged per 4-NC molecule, and one free radical was scavenged per α-tocopherol molecule. These data provide new insights into the antioxidant capacity of 4-NC, which may have therapeutic applications for formulations designed to protect the skin from sunlight irradiation.

  5. Emerging roles for anionic non-bilayer phospholipids in fortifying the outer membrane permeability barrier.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Russell E

    2014-09-01

    Lately, researchers have been actively investigating Escherichia coli lptD mutants, which exhibit reduced transport of lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Sutterlin et al. (H. A. Sutterlin, S. Zhang, and T. J. Silhavy, J. Bacteriol. 196:3214-3220, 2014) now reveal an important functional role for phosphatidic acid in fortifying the outer membrane permeability barrier in certain lptD mutant backgrounds. These findings come on the heels of the first reports of two LptD crystal structures, which now provide a structural framework for interpreting lptD genetics.

  6. Emerging Roles for Anionic Non-Bilayer Phospholipids in Fortifying the Outer Membrane Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lately, researchers have been actively investigating Escherichia coli lptD mutants, which exhibit reduced transport of lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Sutterlin et al. (H. A. Sutterlin, S. Zhang, and T. J. Silhavy, J. Bacteriol. 196:3214–3220, 2014) now reveal an important functional role for phosphatidic acid in fortifying the outer membrane permeability barrier in certain lptD mutant backgrounds. These findings come on the heels of the first reports of two LptD crystal structures, which now provide a structural framework for interpreting lptD genetics. PMID:25022852

  7. Effects of the local anesthetic benzocaine on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2004-04-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic benzocaine with the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphospatidylcholine (DMPC), and phospholipid multilayers of DMPC and dimyristoylphospatidyletanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy of human erythrocytes revealed that benzocaine induced the formation of echinocytes. Experiments performed on IUM and DMPC LUV by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that benzocaine interacted with the phospholipid bilayer polar groups and hydrophobic acyl chains. X-ray diffraction analysis of DMPC confirmed these results and showed that benzocaine had no effects on DMPE. The effect on sodium transport was also studied using the isolated toad skin. Electrophysiological measurements indicated a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of benzocaine, reflecting inhibition of active ion transport. PMID:15059670

  8. Phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase is a multifunctional enzyme involved in membrane lipid turnover and degradation while synthesizing triacylglycerol in the unicellular green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kangsup; Han, Danxiang; Li, Yantao; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2012-09-01

    Many unicellular microalgae produce large amounts (∼20 to 50% of cell dry weight) of triacylglycerols (TAGs) under stress (e.g., nutrient starvation and high light), but the synthesis and physiological role of TAG are poorly understood. We present detailed genetic, biochemical, functional, and physiological analyses of phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT) in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which catalyzes TAG synthesis via two pathways: transacylation of diacylglycerol (DAG) with acyl groups from phospholipids and galactolipids and DAG:DAG transacylation. We demonstrate that PDAT also possesses acyl hydrolase activities using TAG, phospholipids, galactolipids, and cholesteryl esters as substrates. Artificial microRNA silencing of PDAT in C. reinhardtii alters the membrane lipid composition, reducing the maximum specific growth rate. The data suggest that PDAT-mediated membrane lipid turnover and TAG synthesis is essential for vigorous growth under favorable culture conditions and for membrane lipid degradation with concomitant production of TAG for survival under stress. The strong lipase activity of PDAT with broad substrate specificity suggests that this enzyme could be a potential biocatalyst for industrial lipid hydrolysis and conversion, particularly for biofuel production.

  9. Higher sterol content regulated by CYP51 with concomitant lower phospholipid content in membranes is a common strategy for aluminium tolerance in several plant species.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Tadao; Khan, Md Shahadat Hossain; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Maejima, Eriko; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Yokota, Takao; Nakano, Takeshi; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Matsuo; Ishikawa, Satoru; Ikka, Takashi; Ishikawa, Akifumi; Kawamura, Takeshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Ueki, Nozomi; Umetsu, Asami; Kannari, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have shown that differences in lipid composition and in the lipid biosynthetic pathway affect the aluminium (Al) tolerance of plants, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Phospholipids create a negative charge at the surface of the plasma membrane and enhance Al sensitivity as a result of the accumulation of positively charged Al(3+) ions. The phospholipids will be balanced by other electrically neutral lipids, such as sterols. In the present research, Al tolerance was compared among pea (Pisum sativum) genotypes. Compared with Al-tolerant genotypes, the Al-sensitive genotype accumulated more Al in the root tip, had a less intact plasma membrane, and showed a lower expression level of PsCYP51, which encodes obtusifoliol-14α-demethylase (OBT 14DM), a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme. The ratio of phospholipids to sterols was higher in the sensitive genotype than in the tolerant genotypes, suggesting that the sterol biosynthetic pathway plays an important role in Al tolerance. Consistent with this idea, a transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana line with knocked-down AtCYP51 expression showed an Al-sensitive phenotype. Uniconazole-P, an inhibitor of OBT 14DM, suppressed the Al tolerance of Al-tolerant genotypes of maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), rice (Oryza sativa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and triticale (×Triticosecale Wittmark cv. Currency). These results suggest that increased sterol content, regulated by CYP51, with concomitant lower phospholipid content in the root tip, results in lower negativity of the plasma membrane. This appears to be a common strategy for Al tolerance among several plant species.

  10. Higher sterol content regulated by CYP51 with concomitant lower phospholipid content in membranes is a common strategy for aluminium tolerance in several plant species.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Tadao; Khan, Md Shahadat Hossain; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Maejima, Eriko; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Yokota, Takao; Nakano, Takeshi; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Matsuo; Ishikawa, Satoru; Ikka, Takashi; Ishikawa, Akifumi; Kawamura, Takeshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Ueki, Nozomi; Umetsu, Asami; Kannari, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have shown that differences in lipid composition and in the lipid biosynthetic pathway affect the aluminium (Al) tolerance of plants, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Phospholipids create a negative charge at the surface of the plasma membrane and enhance Al sensitivity as a result of the accumulation of positively charged Al(3+) ions. The phospholipids will be balanced by other electrically neutral lipids, such as sterols. In the present research, Al tolerance was compared among pea (Pisum sativum) genotypes. Compared with Al-tolerant genotypes, the Al-sensitive genotype accumulated more Al in the root tip, had a less intact plasma membrane, and showed a lower expression level of PsCYP51, which encodes obtusifoliol-14α-demethylase (OBT 14DM), a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme. The ratio of phospholipids to sterols was higher in the sensitive genotype than in the tolerant genotypes, suggesting that the sterol biosynthetic pathway plays an important role in Al tolerance. Consistent with this idea, a transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana line with knocked-down AtCYP51 expression showed an Al-sensitive phenotype. Uniconazole-P, an inhibitor of OBT 14DM, suppressed the Al tolerance of Al-tolerant genotypes of maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), rice (Oryza sativa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and triticale (×Triticosecale Wittmark cv. Currency). These results suggest that increased sterol content, regulated by CYP51, with concomitant lower phospholipid content in the root tip, results in lower negativity of the plasma membrane. This appears to be a common strategy for Al tolerance among several plant species. PMID:25416794

  11. GTP but not GDP analogues promote association of ADP-ribosylation factors, 20-kDa protein activators of cholera toxin, with phospholipids and PC-12 cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M W; Bobak, D A; Tsai, S C; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1992-02-15

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are a family of approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins initially identified by their ability to enhance cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in the presence of GTP. ARFs have been purified from both membrane and cytosolic fractions. ARF purified from bovine brain cytosol requires phospholipid plus detergent for high affinity guanine nucleotide binding and for optimal enhancement of cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. The phospholipid requirements, combined with a putative role for ARF in vesicular transport, suggested that the soluble protein might interact reversibly with membranes. A polyclonal antibody against purified bovine ARF (sARF II) was used to detect ARF by immunoblot in membrane and soluble fractions from rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cell homogenates. ARF was predominantly cytosolic but increased in membranes during incubation of homogenates with nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), guanylyl-(beta gamma-imido)-diphosphate, and guanylyl-(beta gamma-methylene)-diphosphate, and to a lesser extent, adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). GTP, GDP, GMP, and ATP were inactive. Cytosolic ARF similarly associated with added phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, or cardiolipin in GTP gamma S-dependent fashion. ARF binding to phosphatidylserine was reversible and coincident with stimulation of cholera toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. These observations may reflect a mechanism by which ARF could cycle between soluble and membrane compartments in vivo.

  12. Cortical actin networks induce spatio-temporal confinement of phospholipids in the plasma membrane - a minimally invasive investigation by STED-FCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.; Keller, Jan; Mueller, Veronika; Wu, Congying; Bear, James E.; Hell, Stefan W.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Eggeling, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Important discoveries in the last decades have changed our view of the plasma membrane organisation. Specifically, the cortical cytoskeleton has emerged as a key modulator of the lateral diffusion of membrane proteins. Cytoskeleton-dependent compartmentalised lipid diffusion has been proposed, but this concept remains controversial because this phenomenon has thus far only been observed with artefact-prone probes in combination with a single technique: single particle tracking. In this paper, we report the first direct observation of compartmentalised phospholipid diffusion in the plasma membrane of living cells using a minimally invasive, fluorescent dye labelled lipid analogue. These observations were made using optical STED nanoscopy in combination with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (STED-FCS), a technique which allows the study of membrane dynamics on a sub-millisecond time-scale and with a spatial resolution of down to 40 nm. Specifically, we find that compartmentalised phospholipid diffusion depends on the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and that this constrained diffusion is directly dependent on the F-actin branching nucleator Arp2/3. These findings provide solid evidence that the Arp2/3-dependent cortical actin cytoskeleton plays a pivotal role in the dynamic organisation of the plasma membrane, potentially regulating fundamental cellular processes.

  13. Induction of intranuclear membranes by overproduction of Opi1p and Scs2p, regulators for yeast phospholipid biosynthesis, suggests a mechanism for Opi1p nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Miki; Oshima, Ayaka; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Kagiwada, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the expression of phospholipid biosynthetic genes is suppressed by the Opi1p negative regulator. Opi1p enters into the nucleoplasm from the nuclear membrane to suppress the gene expression under repressing conditions. The binding of Opi1p to the nuclear membrane requires an integral membrane protein, Scs2p and phosphatidic acid (PA). Although it is demonstrated that the association of Opi1p with membranes is affected by PA levels, how Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p is unknown. Here, we found that fluorescently labelled Opi1p accumulated on a perinuclear region in an Scs2p-dependent manner. Electron microscopic analyses indicated that the perinuclear region consists of intranuclear membranes, which may be formed by the invagination of the nuclear membrane due to the accumulation of Opi1p and Scs2p in a restricted area. As expected, localization of Opi1p and Scs2p in the intranuclear membranes was detected by immunoelectron microscopy. Biochemical analysis showed that Opi1p recovered in the membrane fraction was detergent insoluble while Scs2p was soluble, implying that Opi1p behaves differently from Scs2p in the fraction. We hypothesize that Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p after targeting to the nuclear membrane, making it possible to be released from the membrane quickly when PA levels decrease. PMID:26590299

  14. Effect of Sterol Structure on Chain Ordering of an Unsaturated Phospholipid: A 2H-NMR Study of POPC/Sterol Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaghaghi, Mehran; Thewalt, Jenifer; Zuckermann, Martin

    2012-10-01

    The physical properties of biological membranes are considerably altered by the presence of sterols. In particular, sterols help to maintain the integrity of the cell by adjusting the fluidity of the plasma membrane. Cholesterol is in addition an important component of lipid rafts which are hypothesized to compartmentalize the cell membrane surface thereby making it possible for certain proteins to function. Using 2H-NMR spectroscopy, we studied the effect of a series of different sterols on the chain ordering of POPC, an unsaturated phospholipid present in eukaryotic cell membranes. We were able to assigned specific roles to the structural differences between the sterols by comparing the manner in which they affect the average lipid chain conformation of POPC.

  15. Dibucaine-induced modification of sodium transport in toad skin and of model membrane structures.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Schneider, C; Villena, F; Norris, B; Cárdenas, H; Cuevas, F; Sotomayor, C P

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic dibucaine with the isolated toad skin and membrane models is described. The latter consisted of human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and phospholipid multilayers built-up of DMPC and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Results indicate a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of dibucaine in toad skin, which may be interpreted as reflecting inhibition of the active transport of ions. This finding might be explained on the basis of the results obtained from fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on membrane models. In fact, dibucaine induced structural perturbations in IUM, DMPC LUV and phospholipid multilayers. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that dibucaine induced erythrocyte stomatocytosis. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis an echinocytic type of shape change would have been expected given the preferential interaction of dibucaine with DMPC. Although it is still premature to define the molecular mechanism of action of dibucaine, the experimental results confirm the important role played by the phospholipid bilayers in the association of the anesthetic with cell membranes. PMID:11531098

  16. Binding of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-zeta (PLC-zeta) to phospholipid membranes: potential role of an unstructured cluster of basic residues.

    PubMed

    Nomikos, Michail; Mulgrew-Nesbitt, Anna; Pallavi, Payal; Mihalyne, Gyongyi; Zaitseva, Irina; Swann, Karl; Lai, F Anthony; Murray, Diana; McLaughlin, Stuart

    2007-06-01

    Phospholipase C-zeta (PLC-zeta) is a sperm-specific enzyme that initiates the Ca2+ oscillations in mammalian eggs that activate embryo development. It shares considerable sequence homology with PLC-delta1, but lacks the PH domain that anchors PLC-delta1 to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, PIP2. Thus it is unclear how PLC-zeta interacts with membranes. The linker region between the X and Y catalytic domains of PLC-zeta, however, contains a cluster of basic residues not present in PLC-delta1. Application of electrostatic theory to a homology model of PLC-zeta suggests this basic cluster could interact with acidic lipids. We measured the binding of catalytically competent mouse PLC-zeta to phospholipid vesicles: for 2:1 phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PC/PS) vesicles, the molar partition coefficient, K, is too weak to be of physiological significance. Incorporating 1% PIP2 into the 2:1 PC/PS vesicles increases K about 10-fold, to 5x10(3) M-1, a biologically relevant value. Expressed fragments corresponding to the PLC-zeta X-Y linker region also bind with higher affinity to polyvalent than monovalent phosphoinositides on nitrocellulose filters. A peptide corresponding to the basic cluster (charge=+7) within the linker region, PLC-zeta-(374-385), binds to PC/PS vesicles with higher affinity than PLC-zeta, but its binding is less sensitive to incorporating PIP2. The acidic residues flanking this basic cluster in PLC-zeta may account for both these phenomena. FRET experiments suggest the basic cluster could not only anchor the protein to the membrane, but also enhance the local concentration of PIP2 adjacent to the catalytic domain.

  17. Formation and dynamics of supported phospholipid membranes on a periodic nanotextured substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H; Montano, Gabriel M; Shreve, Andrew P

    2008-01-01

    We have studied and modeled the morphology and dynamics of planar lipid bilayer assemblies supported on a textured silicon substrate that contains nano-structured features perpendicular to the plane of observation. Using a combination of characterization methods, including atomic force microscopy and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, we have discovered the bilayer assemblies are conformal to the underlying nanostructured substrate. As far as the dynamics are concnerned, the lipids freely diffuse in and out of the plane of observation while supported by the nanotextured material. In a microscopic sense, diffusion is isotropic along the patterned substrate. Macroscopically, when observed over length scales exceeding the dimensions of the nano-structured features, the diffusion appears anisotropic. The observed macroscopic anisotropy is well simulated using models of diffusion on the nanostructured surface that assume the lipids diffuse homogeneously and isotropically on the supporting nanotextured substrate.

  18. Effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids and phospholipids on ( sup 3 H)-vitamin E incorporation into pulmonary artery endothelial cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Sekharam, K.M.; Patel, J.M.; Block, E.R. )

    1990-12-01

    Vitamin E, a dietary antioxidant, is presumed to be incorporated into the lipid bilayer of biological membranes to an extent proportional to the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids or phospholipids in the membrane. In the present study we evaluated the distribution of incorporated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in various membranes of pulmonary artery endothelial cells. We also studied whether incorporation of PUFA or PE is responsible for increased incorporation of (3H)-vitamin E into the membranes of these cells. Following a 24-hr incubation with linoleic acid (18:2), 18:2 was increased by 6.9-, 9.2-, and 13.2-fold in plasma, mitochondrial, and microsomal membranes, respectively. Incorporation of 18:2 caused significant increases in the unsaturation indexes of mitochondrial and microsomal polyunsaturated fatty acyl chains (P less than .01 versus control in both membranes). Incubation with arachidonic acid (20:4) for 24 hr resulted in 1.5-, 2.3-, and 2.4-fold increases in 20:4 in plasma, mitochondrial, and microsomal membranes, respectively. The unsaturation indexes of polyunsaturated fatty acyl chains of mitochondrial and microsomal membranes also increased (P less than .01 versus control in both membranes). Although incubations with 18:2 or 20:4 resulted in several-fold increases in membrane 18:2 or 20:4 fatty acids, incorporation of (3H)-vitamin E into these membranes was similar to that in controls. Following a 24-hr incubation with PE, membrane PE content was significantly increased, and (3H)-vitamin E incorporation was also increased to a comparable degree, i.e., plasma membrane greater than mitochondria greater than microsomes. Endogenous vitamin E content of the cells was not altered because of increased incorporation of PE and (3H)-vitamin E.

  19. Adsorption of apolipoprotein A-I to biological membranes. A statistical mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Eitan

    2012-07-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I), the main protein component of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), reduces the risk for atherosclerosis by removing cholesterol from the membrane of foam cells. Experiments with model membrane systems have indicated, however, that membrane cholesterol reduces apo A-I binding to the membrane. Foam cells resolve this discrepancy electrostatically by co-inserting negatively charged phospholipids in their membrane. Here we present a statistical mechanical model to account for the effect of cholesterol. Our model is based on the Haugen and May model which takes into account the dipolar nature of the zwitterionic phospholipid head group in the membrane, in which the positive end of the zwitterionic dipole moment can move randomly on a hemispherical surface with a radius equal to the arm of the dipole moment and with the negative end fixed at the hydrocarbon layer. Adsorption of a positively charged apo A-I macroion to the surface of the membrane modifies the electric field within the head group region and induces lateral demixing of phospholipid molecules in the membrane. Results from numerical integration of model equations show that i) as a result of the strong charge-dipole electrostatic coupling, the positive end of the dipoles tilts away from the adsorbed macroion in a cooperative manner; and ii) cholesterol reduces macroion adsorption to the membrane by reducing the surface area of the membrane and restricting the dipoles range of rotation. Model predictions for the change in free energy of adsorption to zwitterionic membrane are in good agreement with previously reported experimental data with liposomes. The model can assist in designing new mimetic peptides.

  20. Multivariate data analysis of erythrocyte membrane phospholipid Fatty Acid profiles in the discrimination between normal blood tissue and various disease States.

    PubMed

    Kodba, Zdenka Cencič; Darinka Vončina, Brodnjak; Novič, Marjana; Potočnik, Uroš

    2010-09-01

    The investigation presented here aims to compare the fatty acid composition of red blood cells of patients with different disease states and to test the hypothesis that the changes in fatty acid profiles derived from erythrocyte phospholipids might be relevant to various diseases. The study sample consisted of 342 blood donors, among them 135 with inflammatory bowel disease, 53 with uterine leiomyoma, 14 with verified absence of uterine leiomyoma, 52 with asthma, 18 with colon adenomas, and 70 blood samples without any of mentioned diseases that was used as a control group. After the isolation of erythrocytes from blood samples, total extracted lipids were separated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) into non polar lipids and polar phospholipids. After the saponification of phospholipid fraction, the esterification process followed with boron trifluoride-methanol reagent. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition of the total red blood cell phospholipid fraction was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detector (FID). Additionally two fatty aldehyde dimethyl acetals (hexadecanal and octadecanal dimethyl acetals; 16:0 DMA and 18:0 DMA) derived from erythrocyte membrane plasmalogen phospholipids were also determined. The resulting fatty acid and plasmalogen linked fatty acid composition was evaluated by the principal component analysis (PCA). We demonstrated decreased levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in red blood cell membrane of patients with colon adenomas. Also, a large negative correlation was observed among all samples between the quantity of saturated acids and arachidonic (20:4n6) acid as well as saturated acids and adrenic (22:4n6) acid. In PCA score plot a group of female donors is distinguished mainly by the content of linoleic (18:2n6) acid; a small subgroup shows its concentration highly above the average value. At the same time, the same subgroup has both dimethyl acetals below the average concentrations

  1. Permeation of protons, potassium ions, and small polar molecules through phospholipid bilayers as a function of membrane thickness.

    PubMed Central

    Paula, S; Volkov, A G; Van Hoek, A N; Haines, T H; Deamer, D W

    1996-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for solute permeation of lipid bilayers. Partitioning into the hydrophobic phase of the bilayer, followed by diffusion, is accepted by many for the permeation of water and other small neutral solutes, but transient pores have also been proposed to account for both water and ionic solute permeation. These two mechanisms make distinctively different predictions about the permeability coefficient as a function of bilayer thickness. Whereas the solubility-diffusion mechanism predicts only a modest variation related to bilayer thickness, the pore model predicts an exponential relationship. To test these models, we measured the permeability of phospholipid bilayers to protons, potassium ions, water, urea, and glycerol. Bilayers were prepared as liposomes, and thickness was varied systematically by using unsaturated lipids with chain lengths ranging from 14 to 24 carbon atoms. The permeability coefficient of water and neutral polar solutes displayed a modest dependence on bilayer thickness, with an approximately linear fivefold decrease as the carbon number varied from 14 to 24 atoms. In contrast, the permeability to protons and potassium ions decreased sharply by two orders of magnitude between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, and leveled off, when the chain length was further extended to 24 carbon atoms. The results for water and the neutral permeating solutes are best explained by the solubility-diffusion mechanism. The results for protons and potassium ions in shorter-chain lipids are consistent with the transient pore model, but better fit the theoretical line predicted by the solubility-diffusion model at longer chain lengths. PMID:8770210

  2. Permeation of protons, potassium ions, and small polar molecules through phospholipid bilayers as a function of membrane thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paula, S.; Volkov, A. G.; Van Hoek, A. N.; Haines, T. H.; Deamer, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for solute permeation of lipid bilayers. Partitioning into the hydrophobic phase of the bilayer, followed by diffusion, is accepted by many for the permeation of water and other small neutral solutes, but transient pores have also been proposed to account for both water and ionic solute permeation. These two mechanisms make distinctively different predictions about the permeability coefficient as a function of bilayer thickness. Whereas the solubility-diffusion mechanism predicts only a modest variation related to bilayer thickness, the pore model predicts an exponential relationship. To test these models, we measured the permeability of phospholipid bilayers to protons, potassium ions, water, urea, and glycerol. Bilayers were prepared as liposomes, and thickness was varied systematically by using unsaturated lipids with chain lengths ranging from 14 to 24 carbon atoms. The permeability coefficient of water and neutral polar solutes displayed a modest dependence on bilayer thickness, with an approximately linear fivefold decrease as the carbon number varied from 14 to 24 atoms. In contrast, the permeability to protons and potassium ions decreased sharply by two orders of magnitude between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, and leveled off, when the chain length was further extended to 24 carbon atoms. The results for water and the neutral permeating solutes are best explained by the solubility-diffusion mechanism. The results for protons and potassium ions in shorter-chain lipids are consistent with the transient pore model, but better fit the theoretical line predicted by the solubility-diffusion model at longer chain lengths.

  3. Changes in the Fatty Acid Profile and Phospholipid Molecular Species Composition of Human Erythrocyte Membranes after Hybrid Palm and Extra Virgin Olive Oil Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pacetti, D; Gagliardi, R; Balzano, M; Frega, N G; Ojeda, M L; Borrero, M; Ruiz, A; Lucci, P

    2016-07-13

    This work aims to evaluate and compare, for the first time, the effects of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and hybrid palm oil (HPO) supplementation on the fatty acid profile and phospholipid (PL) molecular species composition of human erythrocyte membranes. Results supported the effectiveness of both HPO and EVOO supplementation (3 months, 25 mL/day) in decreasing the lipophilic index of erythrocytes with no significant differences between HPO and EVOO groups at month 3. On the other hand, the novel and rapid ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method used for PL analysis reveals an increase in the levels of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine species esterified with polyunsaturated fatty acids. This work demonstrates the ability of both EVOO and HPO to increase the degree of unsaturation of erythrocyte membrane lipids with an improvement in membrane fluidity that could be associated with a lower risk of developing cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Changes in the Fatty Acid Profile and Phospholipid Molecular Species Composition of Human Erythrocyte Membranes after Hybrid Palm and Extra Virgin Olive Oil Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pacetti, D; Gagliardi, R; Balzano, M; Frega, N G; Ojeda, M L; Borrero, M; Ruiz, A; Lucci, P

    2016-07-13

    This work aims to evaluate and compare, for the first time, the effects of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and hybrid palm oil (HPO) supplementation on the fatty acid profile and phospholipid (PL) molecular species composition of human erythrocyte membranes. Results supported the effectiveness of both HPO and EVOO supplementation (3 months, 25 mL/day) in decreasing the lipophilic index of erythrocytes with no significant differences between HPO and EVOO groups at month 3. On the other hand, the novel and rapid ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method used for PL analysis reveals an increase in the levels of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine species esterified with polyunsaturated fatty acids. This work demonstrates the ability of both EVOO and HPO to increase the degree of unsaturation of erythrocyte membrane lipids with an improvement in membrane fluidity that could be associated with a lower risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27315139

  5. Escherichia coli mutants defective in membrane phospholipid synthesis: binding and metabolism of 1-oleoylglycerol 3-phosphate by a plsB deep rough mutant.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, T M; Bell, R M

    1978-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli containing a defective sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase are conditionally defective in the synthesis of acylglycerol phosphate (acylglycerol-P). Incubation of a deep rough derivative of one of these plsB strains with 1-[3H]oleoylglycerol-32P resulted in the binding of up to 70 nmol of oleoylglycerol-P per 100 nmol of cellular phospholipid. The binding was dependent on time, oleoylglycerol-P concentration, and the quantity of cells employed. The rate and extent of oleoylglycerol-P binding was affected by the deep rough mutation. The altered phospholipid composition due to oleoylglycerol-P binding was without consequence on cell growth and viability, but caused the appearance of intracellular multilamellar structures. Use of the double-labeled oleoylglycerol P demonstrated that the entire molecule was bound to the cell. Intact [3H]-oleoylglycerol-32P was converted to phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphotidyl-glycerol at a rate about 40% of that of de novo phospholipid synthesis. These data demonstrate the transmembrane movement of oleoylglycerol-P to the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane and suggest that it may become possible to supplement plsB strains of E. coli with acylglycerol-P's. Images PMID:353031

  6. [ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID RELATIVE CONTENT CHANGES IN ERYTHROCYTES AND PLATELETS PHOSPHOLIPIDS MEMBRANES FEATURES IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Lizogub, V G; Zavalska, T V; Merkulova, I O; Bryuzgina, T S

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes and platelets phospholipid membranes fatty acid spectrum was detected in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients and in patients with coronary heart disease without atrial fibrillation. 87 patients were investigated. Significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease patients compared with healthy individuals was related. As well as a significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients compared with coronary heart disease patients without atrial fibrillation was related too. These dates may indicate that decreasing relative content arachidonic acid can be possible pathogenetic link in the development of arrhythmias.

  7. Cadmium-induced changes in the membrane of human erythrocytes and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Villena, F; Norris, B; Cuevas, F; Sotomayor, C P

    2004-06-01

    The structural effects of cadmium on cell membranes were studied through the interaction of Cd(2+) ions with human erythrocytes and their isolated unsealed membranes (IUM). Studies were carried out by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. Cd(2+) induced shape changes in erythrocytes, which took the form of echinocytes. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this result meant that Cd(2+) ions located in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements in IUM indicated a disordering effect at both the polar headgroup and the acyl chain packing arrangements of the membrane phospholipid bilayer. Cd(2+) ions also interacted with molecular models of the erythrocyte membrane consisting in bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representing classes of phospholipids located in the outer and inner monolayers the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. X-ray diffraction indicated that Cd(2+) ions induced structural perturbation of the polar headgroup and of the hydrophobic acyl regions of DMPC, while the effects of cadmium on DMPE bilayers were much milder. This conclusion is supported by fluorescence spectroscopy measurements on DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV). All these findings point to the important role of phospholipid bilayers in the interaction of cadmium on cell membranes. PMID:15149816

  8. Poly(ethylene glycol)-induced and temperature-dependent phase separation in fluid binary phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, J. Y.; Kinnunen, P. K.

    1995-01-01

    Exclusion of the strongly hygroscopic polymer, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), from the surface of phosphatidylcholine liposomes results in an osmotic imbalance between the hydration layer of the liposome surface and the bulk polymer solution, thus causing a partial dehydration of the phospholipid polar headgroups. PEG (average molecular weight of 6000 and in concentrations ranging from 5 to 20%, w/w) was added to the outside of large unilamellar liposomes (LUVs). This leads to, in addition to the dehydration of the outer monolayer, an osmotically driven water outflow and shrinkage of liposomes. Under these conditions phase separation of the fluorescent lipid 1-palmitoyl-2[6-(pyren-1-yl)]decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PPDPC) embedded in various phosphatidylcholine matrices was observed, evident as an increase in the excimer-to-monomer fluorescence intensity ratio (IE/IM). Enhanced segregation of the fluorescent lipid was seen upon increasing and equal concentrations of PEG both inside and outside of the LUVs, revealing that osmotic gradient across the membrane is not required, and phase separation results from the dehydration of the lipid. Importantly, phase separation of PPDPC could be induced by PEG also in binary mixtures with 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), for which temperature-induced phase segregation of the fluorescent lipid below Tm was otherwise not achieved. In the different lipid matrices the segregation of PPDPC caused by PEG was abolished above characteristic temperatures T0 well above their respective main phase transition temperatures Tm. For 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), DMPC, SOPC, and POPC, T0 was observed at approximately 50, 32, 24, and 20 degrees C, respectively. Notably, the observed phase separation of PPDPC cannot be accounted for the 1 degree C increase in Tm for DMPC or for the

  9. Trypanosoma brucei: a model micro-organism to study eukaryotic phospholipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Serricchio, Mauro; Bütikofer, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Although the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, can acquire lipids from its environment, recent reports have shown that it is also capable of de novo synthesis of all major phospholipids. Here we provide an overview of the biosynthetic pathways involved in phospholipid formation in T. brucei and highlight differences to corresponding pathways in other eukaryotes, with the aim of promoting trypanosomes as an attractive model organism to study lipid biosynthesis. We show that de novo synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine involving CDP-activated intermediates is essential in T. brucei and that a reduction in its cellular content affects mitochondrial morphology and ultrastructure. In addition, we highlight that reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine inhibit nuclear division, suggesting a role for phosphatidylcholine formation in the control of cell division. Furthermore, we discuss possible routes leading to phosphatidylserine and cardiolipin formation in T. brucei and review the biosynthesis of phosphatidylinositol, which seems to take place in two separate compartments. Finally, we emphasize that T. brucei represents the only eukaryote so far that synthesizes all three sphingophospholipid classes, sphingomyelin, inositolphosphorylceramide and ethanolaminephosphorylceramide, and that their production is developmentally regulated.

  10. Effects of DHA-phospholipids, melatonin and tryptophan supplementation on erythrocyte membrane physico-chemical properties in elderly patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Roberta; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Faliva, Milena; Cestaro, Benvenuto

    2012-12-01

    A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out to assess the efficacy of a docosahexenoic acid (DHA)-phospholipids, melatonin and tryptophan supplemented diet in improving the erythrocyte oxidative stress, membrane fluidity and membrane-bound enzyme activities of elderly subjects suffering from mild cognitive impairment (MCI). These subjects were randomly assigned to the supplement group (11 subjects, 9F and 2M; age 85.3±5.3y) or placebo group (14-matched subjects, 11F and 3M; 86.1±6.5). The duration of the treatment was 12weeks. The placebo group showed no significant changes in erythrocyte membrane composition and function. The erythrocyte membranes of the supplement group showed a significant increase in eicosapentenoic acid, docosapentenoic acid and DHA concentrations and a significant decrease in arachidonic acid, malondialdehyde and lipofuscin levels. These changes in membrane composition resulted in an increase in the unsaturation index, membrane fluidity and acetylcholine esterase activity. Moreover, a significant increase in the ratio between reduced and oxidized glutathione was observed in the erythrocyte of the supplement group. Although this study is a preliminary investigation, we believe these findings to be of great speculative and interpretative interest to better understand the complex and multi-factorial mechanisms behind the possible links between diets, their functional components and possible molecular processes that contribute to increasing the risk of developing MCI and Alzheimer's.

  11. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit

    Biological cell membranes provide mechanical stability to cells and understanding their structure, dynamics and mechanics are important biophysics problems. Experiments coupled with computational methods such as molecular dynamics (MD) have provided insight into the physics of membranes. We use long-time and large-scale MD simulations to study the structure, dynamics and mechanical behavior of membranes. We investigate shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water using MD simulations based on a reactive force field. We observe a focused jet at the onset of bubble shrinkage and a secondary shock wave upon bubble collapse. The jet length scales linearly with the nanobubble radius, as observed in experiments on micron-to-millimeter size bubbles. Shock induces dramatic structural changes, including an ice-VII-like structural motif at a particle velocity of 1 km/s. The incipient ice VII formation and the calculated Hugoniot curve are in good agreement with experimental results. We also investigate molecular mechanisms of poration in lipid bilayers due to shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles. Our multimillion-atom MD simulations reveal that the jet impact generates shear flow of water on bilayer leaflets and pressure gradients across them. This transiently enhances the bilayer permeability by creating nanopores through which water molecules translocate rapidly across the bilayer. Effects of nanobubble size and temperature on the porosity of lipid bilayers are examined. The second research project focuses on cholesterol (CHOL) dynamics in phospholipid bilayers. Several experimental and computational studies have been performed on lipid bilayers consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and CHOL molecules. CHOL interleaflet transport (flip-flop) plays an important role in interleaflet coupling and determining CHOL flip-flop rate has been elusive. Various studies report that the rate ranges between milliseconds to seconds. We calculate CHOL flip-flop rates by

  12. A new set of regulatory molecules in plants: A plant phospholipid similar to platelet-activating factor stimulates protein kinase and proton-translocating ATPase in membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Scherer, G F; Martiny-Baron, G; Stoffel, B

    1988-08-01

    1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, an ether phospholipid from mammals known as platelet-activating factor (PAF), specifically stimulates proton transport in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) microsomes (G.F.E. Scherer, 1985, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commm. 133, 1160-1167). When plant lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography a lipid was found with chromatographic properties very similar to the PAF (G.F.E. Scherer and B. Stoffel, 1987, Planta, 172, 127-130). This lipid was isolated from zucchini hypocotyls, red beet root, lupin root, maize seedlings and crude soybean phospholipids. It had biological activity similar to that of the PAF, based on phosphorus content, and stimulated the steady-state ΔpH in zucchini hypocotyl microsomes about twofold. Other phospholipids, monoglyceride, diglyceride, triglyceride, oleic acid, phorbol ester, and 1-O-alkylglycerol did not stimulate proton transport. When microsomes were washed the PAF was ineffective but when soluble protein was added the PAF stimulation of H(+) transport was reconstituted. The soluble protein responsible for the PAF-dependent stimulation of transport activity could be partially purified by diethylaminoethyl Sephacel column chromatography. In the same fractions where the PAF-dependent transport-stimulatory protien was found, a protein kinase was active. This protein kinase was stimulated twofold either by the PAF or by Ca(2+). When Ca(2+) was present the PAF did not stimulate protein-kinase activity. When either the PAF, protein kinase, or both were added to membranes isolated on a linear sucrose gradient, ATPase activity was stimulated up to 30%. Comparison with marker enzymes indicated the possibility that tonoplast and plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase might be stimulated by the PAF and protein kinase. We speculate that a PAF-dependent protein kinase is involved in the regulation of proton transport in plants in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Changes in mitochondrial oxidative capacities during thermal acclimation of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss: roles of membrane proteins, phospholipids and their fatty acid compositions.

    PubMed

    Kraffe, Edouard; Marty, Yanic; Guderley, Helga

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the properties of mitochondria from oxidative muscle of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were examined during warm (5 degrees C to 15 degrees C) acclimation. Trout were studied shortly after the initial thermal change and after 8 weeks acclimation to 15 degrees C. To identify potential mechanisms by which oxidative capacities change, the modifications of phospholipid composition, membrane proteins and functional capacities of red muscle mitochondria were examined. Marked functional changes of isolated muscle mitochondria during warm acclimation of rainbow trout were reflected by a host of modifications in phospholipid composition, but by few shifts in protein components. Shortly after transfer of trout from 5 degrees C to 15 degrees C, the maximal oxidative capacity of mitochondria measured at 15 degrees C increased slightly, but rates at both assay temperatures (5 degrees C and 15 degrees C) decreased markedly after warm acclimation. The increase in capacity in short-term warm exposed trout was most pronounced when rates at 15 degrees C were expressed relative to cytochrome a and c(1) levels. Non-phosphorylating (State 4) rates of oxygen uptake increased with short-term warm exposure before returning to initial levels after warm acclimation. Cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) activity in the mitochondrial preparations decreased with warm acclimation. The thermal sensitivity of the ADP affinity was markedly modified during short-term warm exposure, when the ADP/O ratio increased, but warm acclimation returned these values to those observed initially. ADP affinity increased after warm acclimation. Changes in the mitochondrial content of cytochromes and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) could not explain these patterns. On the other hand, changes in the proportions of the lipid classes and in the acyl chain composition of certain phospholipid classes mirror the modifications in functional properties. Short-term exposure to 15 degrees C decreased the ratio of

  14. Tracking Membrane Protein Association in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Reffay, Myriam; Gambin, Yann; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Phan, Gilles; Taulier, Nicolas; Ducruix, Arnaud; Hodges, Robert S.; Urbach, Wladimir

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue. We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well. After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 Å, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the bilayers. We

  15. Identification of a Plasmodium falciparum Phospholipid Transfer Protein*

    PubMed Central

    van Ooij, Christiaan; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Ringel, Alessa; Cockcroft, Shamshad; Haldar, Kasturi; Blackman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of erythrocytes by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum results in dramatic modifications to the host cell, including changes to its antigenic and transport properties and the de novo formation of membranous compartments within the erythrocyte cytosol. These parasite-induced structures are implicated in the transport of nutrients, metabolic products, and parasite proteins, as well as in parasite virulence. However, very few of the parasite effector proteins that underlie remodeling of the host erythrocyte are functionally characterized. Using bioinformatic examination and modeling, we have found that the exported P. falciparum protein PFA0210c belongs to the START domain family, members of which mediate transfer of phospholipids, ceramide, or fatty acids between membranes. In vitro phospholipid transfer assays using recombinant PFA0210 confirmed that it can transfer phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin between phospholipid vesicles. Furthermore, assays using HL60 cells containing radiolabeled phospholipids indicated that orthologs of PFA0210c can also transfer phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Biochemical and immunochemical analysis showed that PFA0210c associates with membranes in infected erythrocytes at mature stages of intracellular parasite growth. Localization studies in live parasites revealed that the protein is present in the parasitophorous vacuole during growth and is later recruited to organelles in the parasite. Together these data suggest that PFA0210c plays a role in the formation of the membranous structures and nutrient phospholipid transfer in the malaria-parasitized erythrocyte. PMID:24043620

  16. Electric field effect on cholesterol–phospholipid complexes

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Arun; McConnell, Harden M.

    2000-01-01

    Monolayer mixtures of dihydrocholesterol and phospholipids at the air–water interface are used to model membranes containing cholesterol and phospholipids. Specific, stoichiometric interactions between cholesterol and some but not all phospholipids have been proposed to lead to the formation of condensed complexes. It is reported here that an externally applied electric field of the appropriate sign can destabilize these complexes, resulting in their dissociation. This is demonstrated through the application of an electric field gradient that leads to phase separations in otherwise homogeneous monolayers. This is observed only when the monolayer composition is close to the stoichiometry of the complex. The electric field effect is analyzed with the same mean field thermodynamic model as that used previously to account for pairs of upper miscibility critical points in these mixtures. The concentrations of dihydrocholesterol, phospholipid, and complex vary strongly and sometimes discontinuously in the monolayer membrane in the field gradient. The model is an approximation to a two-dimensional liquid in which molecules freely exchange between free and complexed form so that the chemical potentials are constant throughout the membrane. The calculations are illustrated for a complex of about 15 molecules, composed of 5 cholesterol molecules and 10 phospholipid molecules. PMID:10655486

  17. A new technique of depositing phospholipid bilayers on quartz surfaces: its use in membrane spin-label studies.

    PubMed

    Kawano, I; Floyd, R A; Sridhar, R

    1981-03-01

    We have developed a new improved technique termed the parallel-beam spattering (PBS) method for depositing phospholipid bilayers on quartz surfaces. This technique involves atomizing the phospholipid mixture with a stream of nitrogen gas and passing this atomized mixture through two orifices separated by a distance to achieve a parallel beam of atomized particles before deposition on the quartz plate. A static electric field can easily be applied to the quartz surface. Also a goniometer of new design has been constructed to allow precise positioning of the deposited phospholipid bilayers with reference to the magnetic field. We have utilized the PBS method to deposit phosphatidylcholine/nitroxyl labeled cholestane mixtures on quartz plates and have found that hydrated bilayers of these mixtures yield ESR spectra with essentially the same characteristics as those obtained using more conventional techniques. The distinct advantage of the new technique for depositing bilayers is that there is no spectral anomaly present which usually is present when the more conventional method of depositing bilayers is used. The spectral anomaly is apparently caused by a portion of the bilayers aligned in directions not directly parallel to the quartz surface. For precision work the spectral anomaly is unacceptable. It is not observed with the new PBS method which has yielded highly reproducible results. PMID:6263962

  18. Modeling of mass transfer of Phospholipids in separation process with supercritical CO2 fluid by RBF artificial neural networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An artificial Radial Basis Function (RBF) neural network model was developed for the prediction of mass transfer of the phospholipids from canola meal in supercritical CO2 fluid. The RBF kind of artificial neural networks (ANN) with orthogonal least squares (OLS) learning algorithm were used for mod...

  19. How Do Membranes Respond to Pressure?

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Bilayers formed by phospholipids are fundamental structures of biological membranes. The mechanical perturbation brought about by pressure significantly affects the membrane states of phospholipid bilayers. In this chapter, we focus our attention on the pressure responsivity for bilayers of some major phospholipids contained in biological membranes. At first, the membrane states and phase transitions of phospholipid bilayers depending on water content, temperature and pressure are explained by using the bilayer phase diagrams of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), which is the most familiar phospholipid in model membrane studies. Subsequently, the thermotropic and barotropic bilayer phase behavior of various kinds of phospholipids with different molecular structures is discussed from the comparison of their temperature--pressure phase diagrams to that of the DPPC bilayer. It turns out that a slight change in the molecular structure of the phospholipids produces a significant difference in the bilayer phase behavior. The systematic pressure studies on the phase behavior of the phospholipid bilayers reveal not only the pressure responsivity for the bilayers but also the role and meaning of several important phospholipids existing in real biological membranes. PMID:26174389

  20. Modeling Electrically Active Viscoelastic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sitikantha; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric) force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism. PMID:22701528

  1. A phospholipid is the membrane-anchoring domain of a protein growth factor of molecular mass 34 kDa in placental trophoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Choudhury, S; Mishra, V S; Low, M G; Das, M

    1988-01-01

    Recently we isolated a protein growth factor of 34 kDa from trophoblastic membranes of human placenta. A fraction (approximately equal to 50%) of the membrane-associated 34-kDa protein is peripherally associated--i.e., it can be released by high salt treatment. The remainder shows the characteristics of an integral membrane protein--i.e., its release requires detergent treatment. Here we report studies on the structural basis for membrane anchorage of the protein. Phospholipase C was found to release an immunoreactive 34-kDa polypeptide from intact isolated cytotrophoblasts. Studies with isolated trophoblastic membranes showed that phospholipase C specifically released the salt-resistant fraction of the 34-kDa polypeptide. The polypeptide released by phospholipase C showed the same electrophoretic mobility in NaDodSO4/PAGE as the polypeptide prior to phospholipase C treatment. The identity of the released protein with the 34-kDa growth factor has been established by both immunologic and receptor-binding assays. Other studies show that there is biosynthetic incorporation of [3H]myristate into the 34-kDa protein. The myristate label is labile to phospholipase C treatment. These results suggest that some of the 34-kDa protein is anchored to the plasma membrane via a posttranslationally added phospholipid. This mode of anchorage has been observed for some other membrane proteins and raises interesting questions regarding the role of this novel linkage in the mitogenic function of the 34-kDa polypeptide. Images PMID:3162324

  2. Cholesterol-based tethers and markers for model membranes investigation.

    PubMed

    Eicher-Lorka, O; Charkova, T; Matijoška, A; Kuodis, Z; Urbelis, G; Penkauskas, T; Mickevičius, M; Bulovas, A; Valinčius, G

    2016-02-01

    A series of new bifunctional cholesterol compounds for tethered bilayer membrane (tBLM) systems were synthesized and tested. The compounds containing cyclic disulfide group may be used as molecular anchors for phospholipid bilayers. Anchoring occurs through the insertion of the cholesterol moiety into the hydrophobic slab of the phospholipid layer, while the surface density of anchor molecules may be adjusted using disulfides terminated spacers. Five ethylene oxide segments between the disulfide group and the cholesteryl provide hydration of the layer separating solid support and model membrane. Another group of cholesterol derivatives described in this work contains either fluorescence probe or electroactive functional groups. We demonstrated the practical utility of these compounds for visualization of cholesterol extraction from and loading to tBLMs. We demonstrated that electroactive group containing cholesterol derivatives can be reconstituted either into vesicles or tBLMs. In both cases an electrochemical signal can be generated on electrodes from these probes. In general, the newly synthesized compound may be utilized in a variety of applications involving tethered bilayer systems and vesicles.

  3. Iron affects the structure of cell membrane molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Martínez, F; Cárdenas, H; Grzyb, J; Strzałka, K

    2005-03-01

    The effects of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) on molecular models of biomembranes were investigated. These consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), classes of phospholipids located in the outer and inner moieties of cell membranes, respectively. X-ray studies showed that very low concentrations of Fe(3+) affected DMPC organization and 10(-3)M induced a total loss of its multilamellar periodic stacking. Experiments carried out with Fe(2+) on DMPC showed weaker effects than those induced by Fe(3+) ions. Similar experiments were performed on DMPE bilayers. Fe(3+) from 10(-7)M up to 10(-4)M had practically no effect on DMPE structure. However, 10(-3)M Fe(3+) induced a deep perturbation of the multilamellar structure of DMPE. However, 10(-3)M Fe(2+) had no effect on DMPE organization practically. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements also revealed different effects of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) on the phase transition and other thermal properties of the examined lipids. In conclusion, the results obtained indicate that iron ions interact with phospholipid bilayers perturbing their structures. These findings are consistent with the observation that iron ions change cell membrane fluidity and, therefore, affect its functions. PMID:15752465

  4. Regulation of maternal phospholipid composition and IP3-dependent embryonic membrane dynamics by a specific fatty acid metabolic event in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kniazeva, Marina; Shen, Huali; Euler, Tetyana; Wang, Chen; Han, Min

    2012-01-01

    Natural fatty acids (FAs) exhibit vast structural diversity, but the functional importance of FA variations and the mechanism by which they contribute to a healthy lipid composition in animals remain largely unexplored. A large family of acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) regulates FA metabolism by esterifying FA to coenyzme A. However, little is known about how particular FA–ACS combinations affect lipid composition and specific cellular functions. We analyzed how the activity of ACS-1 on branched chain FA C17ISO impacts maternal lipid content, signal transduction, and development in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. We show that expression of ACS-1 in the somatic gonad guides the incorporation of C17ISO into certain phospholipids and thus regulates the phospholipid composition in the zygote. Disrupting this ACS-1 function causes striking defects in complex membrane dynamics, including exocytosis and cytokinesis, leading to early embryonic lethality. These defects are suppressed by hyperactive IP3 signaling, suggesting that C17ISO and ACS-1 functions are necessary for optimal IP3 signaling essential for early embryogenesis. This study shows a novel role of branched chain FAs whose functions in humans and animals are unknown and uncovers a novel intercellular regulatory pathway linking a specific FA–ACS interaction to specific developmental events. PMID:22426533

  5. The relationship between calcium and the metabolism of plasma membrane phospholipids in hemolysis induced by brown spider venom phospholipase-D toxin.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Souza, Fernanda N; Fogaça, Rosalvo T H; Mangili, Oldemir C; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Chaim, Olga M; Veiga, Silvio S

    2011-09-01

    -mediated rather than leak-promoted because the influx was inhibited by L-type calcium channel inhibitors but not by a T-type calcium channel blocker, sodium channel inhibitor or a specific inhibitor of calcium activated potassium channels. Finally, this inhibition of hemolysis following recombinant phospholipase-D treatment occurred in a concentration-dependent manner in the presence of L-type calcium channel blockers such as nifedipine and verapamil. The data provided herein, suggest that the brown spider venom phospholipase-D-induced hemolysis of human erythrocytes is dependent on the metabolism of membrane phospholipids, such as SM and LPC, generating bioactive products that stimulate a calcium influx into red blood cells mediated by the L-type channel.

  6. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  7. Chemical Compensation of Mitochondrial Phospholipid Depletion in Yeast and Animal Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaoxiao; Zhang, Siyuan; Xu, Chuan; Barron, Addie; Galiano, Floyd; Patel, Dhaval; Lee, Yong Joo; Caldwell, Guy A.; Caldwell, Kim A.

    2016-01-01

    We have been investigating the role that phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) content plays in modulating the solubility of the Parkinson’s disease protein alpha-synuclein (α-syn) using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans. One enzyme that synthesizes PE is the conserved enzyme phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (Psd1/yeast; PSD-1/worms), which is lodged in the inner mitochondrial membrane. We previously found that decreasing the level of PE due to knockdown of Psd1/psd-1 affects the homeostasis of α-syn in vivo. In S. cerevisiae, the co-occurrence of low PE and α-syn in psd1Δ cells triggers mitochondrial defects, stress in the endoplasmic reticulum, misprocessing of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, and a 3-fold increase in the level of α-syn. The goal of this study was to identify drugs that rescue this phenotype. We screened the Prestwick library of 1121 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs using psd1Δ + α-syn cells and identified cyclosporin A, meclofenoxate hydrochloride, and sulfaphenazole as putative protective compounds. The protective activity of these drugs was corroborated using C. elegans in which α-syn is expressed specifically in the dopaminergic neurons, with psd-1 depleted by RNAi. Worm populations were examined for dopaminergic neuron survival following psd-1 knockdown. Exposure to cyclosporine, meclofenoxate, and sulfaphenazole significantly enhanced survival at day 7 in α-syn-expressing worm populations whereby 50–55% of the populations displayed normal neurons, compared to only 10–15% of untreated animals. We also found that all three drugs rescued worms expressing α-syn in dopaminergic neurons that were deficient in the phospholipid cardiolipin following cardiolipin synthase (crls-1) depletion by RNAi. We discuss how these drugs might block α-syn pathology in dopaminergic neurons. PMID:27736935

  8. Planar asymmetric lipid bilayers of glycosphingolipid or lipopolysaccharide on one side and phospholipids on the other: membrane potential, porin function, and complement activation.

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, A; Reiners, J O; Brandenburg, K; Kawahara, K; Zähringer, U; Seydel, U

    1996-01-01

    We have determined some physicochemical properties of the monosaccharide-type fraction (GSL-1) of glycosphingolipids, the major glycolipid components of the outer leaflet of the Gram-negative species Sphingomonas paucimobilis. These properties included the state of order of the hydrocarbon moiety, the effective molecular area, surface charge density, and intrinsic transmembrane potential profile of reconstituted planar asymmetric GSL-1/phospholipid bilayer membranes. We have, furthermore, investigated the insertion into and the function of porin channels in the reconstituted bilayers and the complement-activating capability of GSL-1 surfaces. All results were compared with respective data for deep rough mutant lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella minnesota R595. We found a remarkable agreement in most functional properties of the two glycolipids. PMID:8770208

  9. Vaccenic and elaidic acid modify plasma and splenocyte membrane phospholipids and mitogen-stimulated cytokine production in obese insulin resistant JCR: LA-cp rats.

    PubMed

    Ruth, Megan R; Wang, Ye; Yu, Howe-Ming; Goruk, Susan; Reaney, Martin J; Proctor, Spencer D; Vine, Donna F; Field, Catherine J

    2010-02-01

    This study assessed the long-term effects of dietary vaccenic acid (VA) and elaidic acid (EA) on plasma and splenocyte phospholipid (PL) composition and related changes in inflammation and splenocyte phenotypes and cytokine responses in obese/insulin resistant JCR:LA-cp rats. Relative to lean control (Ctl), obese Ctl rats had higher serum haptoglobin and impaired T-cell-stimulated cytokine responses. VA and EA diets improved T-cell-stimulated cytokine production; but, only VA normalized serum haptoglobin. However, EA- and VA-fed rats had enhanced LPS-stimulated cytokine responses. The changes elicited by VA were likely due changes in essential fatty acid composition in PL; whereas EA-induced changes may due to direct incorporation into membrane PL.

  10. The interaction of small molecules with phospholipid membranes studied by 1H NOESY NMR under magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Huster, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of small molecules with lipid membranes and the exact knowledge of their binding site and bilayer distribution is of great pharmacological importance and represents an active field of current biophysical research. Over the last decade, a highly resolved 1H solid-state NMR method has been developed that allows measuring localization and distribution of small molecules in membranes. The classical solution 1H NMR NOESY technique is applied to lipid membrane samples under magic-angle spinning (MAS) and NOESY cross-relaxation rates are determined quantitatively. These rates are proportional to the contact probability between molecular segments and therefore an ideal tool to study intermolecular interactions in membranes. Here, we review recent 1H MAS NOESY applications that were carried out to study lateral lipid organization in mixed membranes and the interaction of membranes with water, ethanol, small aromatic compounds, peptides, fluorescence labels, and lipophilic nucleosides.

  11. Role of hydrophobic interactions in the adsorption of poly(ethylene glycol) chains on phospholipid membranes investigated with a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangming; Fu, Li; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2009-03-19

    We have investigated the adsorption of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with different end groups onto phospholipid membranes at the liquid/solid interface by use of a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation in real time. On a SiO(2)-coated surface, the adsorption of lipid vesicles results in a solid-supported lipid bilayer. Our experiments demonstrate that PEG chains with enough hydrophobic end groups (PEG-C(18)H(37)) can insert in the bilayer and form aggregates on the membrane surface. On the other hand, the adsorbed vesicles are intact on a gold surface. When the end group of PEG chain is not hydrophobic enough, PEG chains do not interact with the vesicles so that they have slight effect on the vesicle stability. However, PEG-C(18)H(37) chains with enough hydrophobic end groups lead to a vesicle-to-bilayer transition because of the insertion of the chains and their aggregation on the membrane surface. In addition, the studies on effect of polymer concentration show that PEG-C(18)H(37) can readily induce the rupture of vesicles at a concentration above the critical micelle concentration.

  12. Multiplexed biomimetic lipid membranes on graphene by dip-pen nanolithography

    PubMed Central

    Hirtz, Michael; Oikonomou, Antonios; Georgiou, Thanasis; Fuchs, Harald; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind

    2013-01-01

    The application of graphene in sensor devices depends on the ability to appropriately functionalize the pristine graphene. Here we show the direct writing of tailored phospholipid membranes on graphene using dip-pen nanolithography. Phospholipids exhibit higher mobility on graphene compared with the commonly used silicon dioxide substrate, leading to well-spread uniform membranes. Dip-pen nanolithography allows for multiplexed assembly of phospholipid membranes of different functionalities in close proximity to each other. The membranes are stable in aqueous environments and we observe electronic doping of graphene by charged phospholipids. On the basis of these results, we propose phospholipid membranes as a route for non-covalent immobilization of various functional groups on graphene for applications in biosensing and biocatalysis. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate the specific binding of streptavidin to biotin-functionalized membranes. The combination of atomic force microscopy and binding experiments yields a consistent model for the layer organization within phospholipid stacks on graphene. PMID:24107937

  13. A comparison of ethanol partitioning in biological and model membranes: nonideal partitioning is enhanced in synaptosomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Sarasua, M M; Faught, K R; Steedman, S L; Gordin, M D; Washington, M K

    1989-10-01

    The partitioning of ethanol into mouse brain synaptosomes at 37 degrees C was characterized as a function of ethanol concentration. In addition, the partitioning of ethanol into multilamellar dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles was characterized as a function of ethanol concentration and temperature. DPPC liposomes provided a model for ethanol partitioning into a phospholipid bilayer of defined composition allowing comparison to the more complex synaptosomal membrane. The values of the partition coefficients for ethanol depend on the convention used to express concentration in the partition coefficient ratio. We express these concentrations as mole fractions as ethanol in the membrane and aqueous phases. Ethanol partitioning is nonideal (ethanol membrane: buffer partition coefficients vary with total ethanol concentration). In synaptosomes, the partition coefficients vary markedly with concentration and asymptotically approach zero at higher concentrations. In the DPPC system, the variation of the partition coefficient is less pronounced, but significant. The ethanol: DPPC partition coefficients decrease by a factor of 2 at ethanol concentrations above 3.2 x 10(-3) M. This suggests a model involving at least two distinguishable types of interactions of ethanol with the membrane. Ethanol appears to undergo both bulk phase partitioning into the membrane bilayer core and nonspecific binding to the membrane surface. In pure DPPC, bulk phase hydrophobic partitioning predominates. In synaptosomes, nonspecific surface binding appears to be a major interaction. Temperature studies indicate ethanol partitioning into DPPC increases above the phospholipid gel to liquid crystalline phase transition temperature. This suggests a preferred partitioning of ethanol into fluid state lipid. However, significant membrane concentrations of ethanol are found in gel state DPPC.

  14. Formation of pit-spanning phospholipid bilayers on nanostructured silicon dioxide surfaces for studying biological membrane events.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Indriati; Zäch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Zwitterionic phospholipid vesicles are known to adsorb and ultimately rupture on flat silicon dioxide (SiO2) surfaces to form supported lipid bilayers. Surface topography, however, alters the kinetics and mechanistic details of vesicles adsorption, which under certain conditions may be exploited to form a suspended bilayer. Here we describe the use of nanostructured SiO2 surfaces prepared by the colloidal lithography technique to scrutinize the formation of suspended 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid bilayers from a solution of small unilamellar lipid vesicles (SUVs). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) were employed to characterize nanostructure fabrication and lipid bilayer assembly on the surface.

  15. Interaction of antiarrhythmic drugs with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Sánchez, I; Bagnara, M; Sotomayor, C P

    1994-11-01

    Several hypotheses link the molecular mechanism of action of the antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) that belong to class I to nonspecific interactions with phospholipids sited in the neighborhood of the sodium channels in the membrane of the myocard. The interactions of asocainol (ASOC), procainamide (PROC) and quinidine (QUIN) with: (a) multibilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), in both a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic medium, and (b) DMPC vesicles, were studied, respectively, by X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that the three AAD interacted with the lipid bilayers. However, the extension of these interactions depended on the nature and concentration of the lipids and AAD as well as on the medium where the interactions were performed. The different capacity of ASOC and PROC to perturb the bilayer structures, mainly that of DMPC, indicated that the interactions were strongly dependent on the lipophilicity of these drugs. The fact that QUIN did not completely interact in accordance to its lipophilicity suggested that other factors also play a role in these interactions. It is concluded that it may be valid the suggested molecular mechanisms of action of class I AAD involving their interaction with the membrane phospholipids. PMID:7947909

  16. Structural effects of the local anesthetic bupivacaine hydrochloride on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic bupivacaine with the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and phospholipid multilayers built-up of DMPC and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy revealed that bupivacaine induced erythrocyte spheroechinocytosis. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this result implied that bupivacaine inserted in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Experiments performed on IUM and DMPC LUV by fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction on DMPC and DMPE multilayers confirmed this result. Changes in the molecular organization of membranes alter lipid-protein interactions and induce functional perturbation of membrane proteins such as Na(+) channels. Since local anesthetics may control the influx of Na(+) into the human erythrocyte, in order to relate the structural perturbations induced by bupivacaine in these systems to Na(+) transport, the interaction of this anesthetic with isolated toad skin was also studied. Electrophysiological measurements indicated a significant decrease in the potential difference and in the short-circuit current of the skin after the application of the anesthetic, reflecting inhibition of the active transport of ions. These results suggest that bupivacaine-induced conformational changes of the lipid molecules alter the lipid-protein boundaries of the outer moiety of the erythrocyte membrane, thus interfering with the function of neighboring sodium channels. PMID:12482399

  17. Modeling Nanoparticle Wrapping or Translocation in Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Emily M.; Bahrami, Amir H.; Weikl, Thomas R.; Hall, Carol K.

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes is of increasing interest as nanoparticles become more prevalent in consumer products and hence more likely to enter the human body. We introduce a simulations-based tool that can be used to visualize the molecular level interaction between nanoparticles and bilayer membranes. By combining LIME, an intermediate resolution, implicit solvent model for phospholipids, with discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD), we are able to simulate the wrapping or embedding of nanoparticles by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Simulations of hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters from 10Å to 250Å show that hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20Å become wrapped while the nanoparticle with a diameter of 10Å does not . Instead this smaller particle became embedded in the bilayer surface where it could interact with the hydrophilic head groups of the lipid molecules. We also investigate the interaction between a DPPC bilayer and hydrophobic nanoparticles with diameters 10Å to 40Å. These nanoparticles do not undergo the wrapping process; instead they directly penetrate the membrane and embed themselves within the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayers. PMID:26260123

  18. Modeling nanoparticle wrapping or translocation in bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Emily M.; Bahrami, Amir H.; Weikl, Thomas R.; Hall, Carol K.

    2015-08-01

    The spontaneous wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes is of increasing interest as nanoparticles become more prevalent in consumer products and hence more likely to enter the human body. We introduce a simulations-based tool that can be used to visualize the molecular level interaction between nanoparticles and bilayer membranes. By combining LIME, an intermediate resolution, implicit solvent model for phospholipids, with discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD), we are able to simulate the wrapping or embedding of nanoparticles by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Simulations of hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters from 10 Å to 250 Å show that hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 Å become wrapped while the nanoparticle with a diameter of 10 Å does not. Instead this smaller particle became embedded in the bilayer surface where it can interact with the hydrophilic head groups of the lipid molecules. We also investigate the interaction between a DPPC bilayer and hydrophobic nanoparticles with diameters 10 Å to 40 Å. These nanoparticles do not undergo the wrapping process; instead they directly penetrate the membrane and embed themselves within the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayers.

  19. Modeling nanoparticle wrapping or translocation in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Emily M; Bahrami, Amir H; Weikl, Thomas R; Hall, Carol K

    2015-09-14

    The spontaneous wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes is of increasing interest as nanoparticles become more prevalent in consumer products and hence more likely to enter the human body. We introduce a simulations-based tool that can be used to visualize the molecular level interaction between nanoparticles and bilayer membranes. By combining LIME, an intermediate resolution, implicit solvent model for phospholipids, with discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD), we are able to simulate the wrapping or embedding of nanoparticles by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Simulations of hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters from 10 Å to 250 Å show that hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 Å become wrapped while the nanoparticle with a diameter of 10 Å does not. Instead this smaller particle became embedded in the bilayer surface where it can interact with the hydrophilic head groups of the lipid molecules. We also investigate the interaction between a DPPC bilayer and hydrophobic nanoparticles with diameters 10 Å to 40 Å. These nanoparticles do not undergo the wrapping process; instead they directly penetrate the membrane and embed themselves within the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayers.

  20. Computational modeling of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Julia Koehler; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Gray, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    The determination of membrane protein (MP) structures has always trailed that of soluble proteins due to difficulties in their overexpression, reconstitution into membrane mimetics, and subsequent structure determination. The percentage of MP structures in the protein databank (PDB) has been at a constant 1-2% for the last decade. In contrast, over half of all drugs target MPs, only highlighting how little we understand about drug-specific effects in the human body. To reduce this gap, researchers have attempted to predict structural features of MPs even before the first structure was experimentally elucidated. In this review, we present current computational methods to predict MP structure, starting with secondary structure prediction, prediction of trans-membrane spans, and topology. Even though these methods generate reliable predictions, challenges such as predicting kinks or precise beginnings and ends of secondary structure elements are still waiting to be addressed. We describe recent developments in the prediction of 3D structures of both α-helical MPs as well as β-barrels using comparative modeling techniques, de novo methods, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The increase of MP structures has (1) facilitated comparative modeling due to availability of more and better templates, and (2) improved the statistics for knowledge-based scoring functions. Moreover, de novo methods have benefitted from the use of correlated mutations as restraints. Finally, we outline current advances that will likely shape the field in the forthcoming decade. PMID:25355688

  1. [Phospholipids: properties and health effects].

    PubMed

    Torres García, Jairo; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2014-09-12

    Phospholipids are amphipathic lipids, which are found in all the cell membranes, organized as a lipid bilayer. They belong to the glycerol-derived lipids, showing a similar structure as triglycerides. The current interest of them comes from its effectiveness to incorporate different fatty acids in the cell membrane, as they exhibit better absorption and utilization than triglycerides. In this paper, the bibliographical data published about the benefits of the phospholipids in inflammatory processes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, liver disease and as an antioxidants transporter is reviewed.

  2. Milk phospholipid's protective effects against UV damage in skin equivalent models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargitz, Carl; Russell, Ashley; Bingham, Michael; Achay, Zyra; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Laiho, Lily H.

    2012-03-01

    Exposure of skin tissue to UV radiation has been shown to cause DNA photodamage. If this damaged DNA is allowed to replicate, carcinogenesis may occur. DNA damage is prevented from being passed on to daughter cells by upregulation of the protein p21. p21 halts the cells cycle allowing the cell to undergo apoptosis, or repair its DNA before replication. Previous work suggested that milk phospholipids may possess protective properties against UV damage. In this study, we observed cell morphology, cell apoptosis, and p21 expression in tissue engineered epidermis through the use of Hematoxylin and Eosin staining, confocal microscopy, and western blot respectively. Tissues were divided into four treatment groups including: a control group with no UV and no milk phospholipid treatment, a group exposed to UV alone, a group incubated with milk phospholipids alone, and a group treated with milk phospholipids and UV. All groups were incubated for twenty-four hours after treatment. Tissues were then fixed, processed, and embedded in paraffin. Performing western blots resulted in visible p21 bands for the UV group only, implying that in every other group, p21 expression was lesser. Numbers of apoptotic cells were determined by observing the tissues treated with Hoechst dye under a confocal microscope, and counting the number of apoptotic and total cells to obtain a percentage of apoptotic cells. We found a decrease in apoptotic cells in tissues treated with milk phospholipids and UV compared to tissues exposed to UV alone. Collectively, these results suggest that milk phospholipids protect cell DNA from damage incurred from UV light.

  3. Protein-Phospholipid Interactions in Nonclassical Protein Secretion: Problem and Methods of Study

    PubMed Central

    Prudovsky, Igor; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh; Sterling, Sarah; Neivandt, David

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular proteins devoid of signal peptides use nonclassical secretion mechanisms for their export. These mechanisms are independent of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. Some nonclassically released proteins, particularly fibroblast growth factors (FGF) 1 and 2, are exported as a result of their direct translocation through the cell membrane. This process requires specific interactions of released proteins with membrane phospholipids. In this review written by a cell biologist, a structural biologist and two membrane engineers, we discuss the following subjects: (i) Phenomenon of nonclassical protein release and its biological significance; (ii) Composition of the FGF1 multiprotein release complex (MRC); (iii) The relationship between FGF1 export and acidic phospholipid externalization; (iv) Interactions of FGF1 MRC components with acidic phospholipids; (v) Methods to study the transmembrane translocation of proteins; (vi) Membrane models to study nonclassical protein release. PMID:23396106

  4. Differential hydrolysis of erythrocyte and mitochondrial membrane phospholipids by two phospholipase A2 isoenzymes (NK-PLA2-I and NK-PLA2-II) from the venom of the Indian monocled cobra Naja kaouthia.

    PubMed

    Doley, Robin; King, Glenn F; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2004-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that venom from the Indian monocled cobra Naja kaouthia is a rich source of phospholipase A2 enzymes, and we purified and characterized a major PLA2 isoenzyme (NK-PLA2-I) from N. kaouthia venom. In the present study, we report the purification and biochemical characterization of a second PLA2 isoenzyme (NK-PLA2-II) from the same venom. A comparison of the membrane phospholipid hydrolysis patterns by these two PLA2s has revealed that they cause significantly more damage to mitochondrial membranes (NK-PLA2-I > NK-PLA2-II) as compared to erythrocyte membranes due to more efficient binding of the enzymes to mitochondrial membranes. Fatty acid release patterns by these PLA2s from the membrane phospholipid PC-pools indicate that NK-PLA2-I does not discriminate between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids whereas NK-PLA2-II shows a preference for unsaturated fatty acids during the initial phase of attack. The current investigation provides new insight into the molecular arrangement of NK-PLA2-sensitive domains in erythrocyte and mitochondrial membranes and highlights the contribution of polar, but uncharged, amino acids such as serine and cysteine in NK-PLA2 induced membrane damage. PMID:15081888

  5. Differential hydrolysis of erythrocyte and mitochondrial membrane phospholipids by two phospholipase A2 isoenzymes (NK-PLA2-I and NK-PLA2-II) from the venom of the Indian monocled cobra Naja kaouthia.

    PubMed

    Doley, Robin; King, Glenn F; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2004-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that venom from the Indian monocled cobra Naja kaouthia is a rich source of phospholipase A2 enzymes, and we purified and characterized a major PLA2 isoenzyme (NK-PLA2-I) from N. kaouthia venom. In the present study, we report the purification and biochemical characterization of a second PLA2 isoenzyme (NK-PLA2-II) from the same venom. A comparison of the membrane phospholipid hydrolysis patterns by these two PLA2s has revealed that they cause significantly more damage to mitochondrial membranes (NK-PLA2-I > NK-PLA2-II) as compared to erythrocyte membranes due to more efficient binding of the enzymes to mitochondrial membranes. Fatty acid release patterns by these PLA2s from the membrane phospholipid PC-pools indicate that NK-PLA2-I does not discriminate between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids whereas NK-PLA2-II shows a preference for unsaturated fatty acids during the initial phase of attack. The current investigation provides new insight into the molecular arrangement of NK-PLA2-sensitive domains in erythrocyte and mitochondrial membranes and highlights the contribution of polar, but uncharged, amino acids such as serine and cysteine in NK-PLA2 induced membrane damage.

  6. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Fluorescent Dyes Allow for Accurate Determination of Their Molecular Orientations in Phospholipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Timr, Štěpán; Brabec, Jiří; Bondar, Alexey; Ryba, Tomáš; Železný, Miloš; Lazar, Josef; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-07-30

    Several methods based on single- and two-photon fluorescence detected linear dichroism have recently been used to determine the orientational distributions of fluorescent dyes in lipid membranes. However, these determinations relied on simplified descriptions of nonlinear anisotropic properties of the dye molecules, using a transition dipole-moment-like vector instead of an absorptivity tensor. To investigate the validity of the vector approximation, we have now carried out a combination of computer simulations and polarization microscopy experiments on two representative fluorescent dyes (DiI and F2N12S) embedded in aqueous phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Our results indicate that a simplified vector-like treatment of the two-photon transition tensor is applicable for molecular geometries sampled in the membrane at ambient conditions. Furthermore, our results allow evaluation of several distinct polarization microscopy techniques. In combination, our results point to a robust and accurate experimental and computational treatment of orientational distributions of DiI, F2N12S, and related dyes (including Cy3, Cy5, and others), with implications to monitoring physiologically relevant processes in cellular membranes in a novel way.

  7. Fusion of phospholipid vesicles arrested by quick-freezing. The question of lipidic particles as intermediates in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Bearer, E L; Düzgünes, N; Friend, D S; Papahadjopoulos, D

    1982-12-01

    We have examined the early events in Ca2+-induced fusion of large (0.2 microns diameter) unilamellar cardiolipin/phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylethanolamine vesicles by quick-freezing freeze-fracture electron microscopy, eliminating the necessity of using glycerol as a cryoprotectant. Freeze-fracture replicas of vesicle suspensions frozen after 1-2 s of stimulation revealed that the majority of vesicles had already undergone membrane fusion, as evidenced by dumbbell-shaped structures and large vesicles. In the absence of glycerol, lipidic particles or the hexagonal HII phase, which have been proposed to be intermediate structures in membrane fusion, were not observed at the sites of fusion. Lipidic particles were evident in less than 5% of the cardiolipin/phosphatidylcholine vesicles after long-term incubation with Ca2+, and the addition of glycerol produced more vesicles displaying the particles. We have also shown that rapid fusion occurred within seconds of Ca2+ addition by the time-course of fluorescence emission produced by the intermixing of aqueous contents of two separate vesicle populations. These studies therefore have produced no evidence that lipidic particles are necessary intermediates for membrane fusion. On the contrary, they indicate that lipidic particles are structures obtained at equilibrium long after fusion has occurred and they become particularly prevalent in the presence of glycerol.

  8. The highly charged region of plant beta-type phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase is involved in membrane targeting and phospholipid binding.

    PubMed

    Lou, Ying; Ma, Hui; Lin, Wen-Hui; Chu, Zhao-Qing; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2006-03-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, two types of PI 4-kinase (PI4Ks) have been isolated and functionally characterized. The alpha-type PI4Ks (approximately 220 kDa) contain a PH domain, which is lacking in beta-type PI4Ks (approximately 120 kDa). Beta-type PI4Ks, exemplified by Arabidopsis AtPI4Kbeta and rice OsPI4K2, contain a highly charged repetitive segment designated PPC (Plant PI4K Charged) region, which is an unique domain only found in plant beta-type PI4Ks at present. The PPC region has a length of approximately 300 amino acids and harboring 11 (AtPI4Kbeta) and 14 (OsPI4K2) repeats, respectively, of a 20-aa motif. Studies employing a modified yeast-based "Sequence of Membrane-Targeting Detection" system demonstrate that the PPC(OsPI4K2) region, as well as the former 8 and latter 6 repetitive motifs within the PPC region, are able to target fusion proteins to the plasma membrane. Further detection on the transiently expressed GFP fusion proteins in onion epidermal cells showed that the PPC(OsPI4K2) region alone, as well as the region containing repetitive motifs 1-8, was able to direct GFP to the plasma membrane, while the regions containing less repetitive motifs, i.e. 6, 4, 2 or single motif(s) led to predominantly intracellular localization. Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of PPC-GFP fusion protein further confirms the membrane-targeting capacities of PPC region. In addition, the predominant plasma membrane localization of AtPI4Kbeta was mediated by the PPC region. Recombinant PPC peptide, expressed in E. coli, strongly binds phosphatidic acid, PI and PI4P, but not phosphatidylcholine, PI5P, or PI(4,5)P2 in vitro, providing insights into potential mechanisms for regulating sub-cellular localization and lipid binding for the plant beta-type PI4Ks. PMID:16649109

  9. Millimeter-area, free standing, phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Peter J; Van Hooghten, Rob; Vermant, Jan

    2016-05-11

    Minimal model biomembrane studies have the potential to unlock the fundamental mechanisms of cellular function that govern the processes upon which life relies. However, existing methods to fabricate free-standing model membranes currently have significant limitations. Bilayer sizes are often tens of micrometers, decoupling curvature or substrate effects, orthogonal control over tension, and solvent exchange combined with microscopy techniques is not possible, which restricts the studies that can be performed. Here, we describe a versatile platform to generate free standing, planar, phospholipid bilayers with millimeter scale areas. The technique relies on an adapted thin-film balance apparatus allowing for the dynamic control of the nucleation and growth of a planar black lipid membrane in the center of an orifice surrounded by microfluidic channels. Success is demonstrated using several different lipid types, including mixtures that show the same temperature dependent phase separation as existing protocols, moreover, membranes are highly stable. Two advantages unique to the proposed method are the dynamic control of the membrane tension and the possibility to make extremely large area membranes. We demonstrate this by showing how a block polymer, F68, used in drug delivery increases the membrane compliance. Together, the results demonstrate a new paradigm for studying the mechanics, structure, and function of model membranes.

  10. Millimeter-area, free standing, phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Peter J; Van Hooghten, Rob; Vermant, Jan

    2016-05-11

    Minimal model biomembrane studies have the potential to unlock the fundamental mechanisms of cellular function that govern the processes upon which life relies. However, existing methods to fabricate free-standing model membranes currently have significant limitations. Bilayer sizes are often tens of micrometers, decoupling curvature or substrate effects, orthogonal control over tension, and solvent exchange combined with microscopy techniques is not possible, which restricts the studies that can be performed. Here, we describe a versatile platform to generate free standing, planar, phospholipid bilayers with millimeter scale areas. The technique relies on an adapted thin-film balance apparatus allowing for the dynamic control of the nucleation and growth of a planar black lipid membrane in the center of an orifice surrounded by microfluidic channels. Success is demonstrated using several different lipid types, including mixtures that show the same temperature dependent phase separation as existing protocols, moreover, membranes are highly stable. Two advantages unique to the proposed method are the dynamic control of the membrane tension and the possibility to make extremely large area membranes. We demonstrate this by showing how a block polymer, F68, used in drug delivery increases the membrane compliance. Together, the results demonstrate a new paradigm for studying the mechanics, structure, and function of model membranes. PMID:27050618

  11. Nanoparticles meet cell membranes: probing nonspecific interactions using model membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai Loon; Bothun, Geoffrey D

    2014-01-21

    Nanotoxicity studies have shown that both carbon-based and inorganic engineered nanoparticles can be toxic to microorganisms. Although the pathways for cytotoxicity are diverse and dependent upon the nature of the engineered nanoparticle and the chemical environment, numerous studies have provided evidence that direct contact between nanoparticles and bacterial cell membranes is necessary for cell inactivation or damage, and may in fact be a primary mechanism for cytotoxicity. The propensities for nanoparticles to attach to and disrupt cell membranes are still not well understood due to the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of biological membranes. Model biological membranes can be employed for systematic investigations of nanoparticle-membrane interactions. In this article, current and emerging experimental approaches to identify the key parameters that control the attachment of ENPs on model membranes and the disruption of membranes by ENPs will be discussed. This critical information will help enable the "safe-by-design" production of engineered nanoparticles that are nontoxic or biocompatible, and also allow for the design of antimicrobial nanoparticles for environmental and biomedical applications.

  12. The Membrane Phospholipid Binding Protein Annexin A2 Promotes Phagocytosis and Nonlytic Exocytosis of Cryptococcus neoformans and Impacts Survival in Fungal Infection.

    PubMed

    Stukes, Sabriya; Coelho, Carolina; Rivera, Johanna; Jedlicka, Anne E; Hajjar, Katherine A; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-08-15

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen with a unique intracellular pathogenic strategy that includes nonlytic exocytosis, a phenomenon whereby fungal cells are expunged from macrophages without lysing the host cell. The exact mechanism and specific proteins involved in this process have yet to be completely defined. Using murine macrophages deficient in the membrane phospholipid binding protein, annexin A2 (ANXA2), we observed a significant decrease in both phagocytosis of yeast cells and the frequency of nonlytic exocytosis. Cryptococcal cells isolated from Anxa2-deficient (Anxa2(-/-)) bone marrow-derived macrophages and lung parenchyma displayed significantly larger capsules than those isolated from wild-type macrophages and tissues. Concomitantly, we observed significant differences in the amount of reactive oxygen species produced between Anxa2(-/-) and Anxa2(+/+) macrophages. Despite comparable fungal burden, Anxa2(-/-) mice died more rapidly than wild-type mice when infected with C. neoformans, and Anxa2(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced inflammatory responses, suggesting that the reduced survival reflected greater immune-mediated damage. Together, these findings suggest a role for ANXA2 in the control of cryptococcal infection, macrophage function, and fungal morphology. PMID:27371724

  13. Dynamics of intracellular phospholipid membrane organization during oocyte maturation and successful vitrification of immature oocytes retrieved by ovum pick-up in cattle.

    PubMed

    Aono, Akira; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Takuma, Tetsuya; Nonaka, Rika; Ono, Yoshitaka; Wada, Yasuhiko; Abe, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Masashi; Watanabe, Tomomasa; Kawahara, Manabu

    2013-05-01

    The objective was to determine if immature bovine oocytes with cumulus cells at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage could be vitrified by aluminum sheets (AS; pieces of sheet-like aluminum foil). Cleavage rates in fertilized oocytes previously vitrified by the AS procedure were higher than those vitrified by a nylon-mesh holder (NM) procedure (89.3 ± 2.1% vs. 65.0 ± 3.7%). Cleaved embryos derived from the AS but not from the NM procedures developed to blastocysts. Furthermore, to investigate the effects of vitrifying GV oocytes on cytoplasmic structure and on the ability to undergo cytoplasmic changes, the intracellular phospholipid membrane (IM) was stained with the lipophilic fluorescent dye, 3,3'-dioctadecyloxa-carbocyanine perchlorate. After vitrification by AS, the IM remained intact relative to that of oocytes vitrified by NM. During in vitro maturation, reorganization of the IM was also undamaged in oocytes vitrified by AS before oocyte maturation, and the IM within oocytes vitrified by the NM procedure was evidently impaired. Finally, vitrification (AS) was used for GV oocytes collected using the ovum pick-up method. A bull calf was born after in vitro production and subsequent embryo transfer. The vitrification techniques described herein should facilitate generation of viable in vitro production bovine blastocysts using oocytes recovered using the ovum pick-up method.

  14. Effects of hypothermic liquid storage and cryopreservation on basal and induced plasma membrane phospholipid disorder and acrosome exocytosis in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R

    2005-01-01

    Flow cytometry was utilised to determine whether short-term (Day 1) or long-term hypothermic liquid storage (Day 5), or cryopreservation of boar spermatozoa (1) caused changes in plasma membrane phospholipid disorder (MPLD) and acrosome exocytosis (AE), indicative of an advanced stage of capacitation or acrosome status, and (2) facilitated or inhibited the induction of capacitation and the acrosome reaction. Merocyanine with Yo-Pro-1 and peanut agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate with propidium iodide were used to identify MPLD and AE, respectively, in viable spermatozoa. The incidence of basal sperm MPLD and AE in fresh semen was very low (1.1 and 2.2%, respectively) and was increased (P < 0.05) only a small amount in Day 5 and cryopreserved semen (3-8%). Compared to no bicarbonate, incubation with bicarbonate increased MPLD, but the response was greatest (P < 0.05) in fresh sperm (52.3%) compared with Day 1 (36.6%), Day 5 (13.9%) and cryopreserved sperm (13.6%). Incubation with calcium ionophore A23187 increased AE in spermatozoa, but the response was less (P < 0.05) for fresh (34%) and cryopreserved (27%) semen than for Day 1 (45%) and Day 5 (57%) semen. In summary, hypothermic liquid storage and cryopreservation of boar spermatozoa did not advance capacitation or acrosome status in viable spermatozoa, but did alter their responses to induction of capacitation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:15899159

  15. Connexin channels and phospholipids: association and modulation

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Darren; Harris, Andrew L

    2009-01-01

    Background For membrane proteins, lipids provide a structural framework and means to modulate function. Paired connexin hemichannels form the intercellular channels that compose gap junction plaques while unpaired hemichannels have regulated functions in non-junctional plasma membrane. The importance of interactions between connexin channels and phospholipids is poorly understood. Results Endogenous phospholipids most tightly associated with purified connexin26 or connexin32 hemichannels or with junctional plaques in cell membranes, those likely to have structural and/or modulatory effects, were identified by tandem electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry using class-specific interpretative methods. Phospholipids were characterized by headgroup class, charge, glycerol-alkyl chain linkage and by acyl chain length and saturation. The results indicate that specific endogenous phospholipids are uniquely associated with either connexin26 or connexin32 channels, and some phospholipids are associated with both. Functional effects of the major phospholipid classes on connexin channel activity were assessed by molecular permeability of hemichannels reconstituted into liposomes. Changes to phospholipid composition(s) of the liposome membrane altered the activity of connexin channels in a manner reflecting changes to the surface charge/potential of the membrane and, secondarily, to cholesterol content. Together, the data show that connexin26 and connexin32 channels have a preference for tight association with unique anionic phospholipids, and that these, independent of headgroup, have a positive effect on the activity of both connexin26 and connexin32 channels. Additionally, the data suggest that the likely in vivo phospholipid modulators of connexin channel structure-function that are connexin isoform-specific are found in the cytoplasmic leaflet. A modulatory role for phospholipids that promote negative curvature is also inferred. Conclusion This study is the first to

  16. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A; Maskrey, Benjamin H; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Harwood, John L

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes.

  17. Extensive exchange of rat liver microsomal phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Zilversmit, D B; Hughes, M E

    1977-08-15

    Liver microsomal fractions were prepared from rats injected with a single dose of choline [14C]methylchloride or with single or multiple doses of 32Pi. Exchangeability of microsomal phospholipids was determined by incubation with an excess of mitochondria and phospholipid exchange proteins derived from beef heart, beef liver or rat liver. Labeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were found to act as a single pool and were 85--95% exchangeable in 1--2h. High latencies of mannose-6-phosphate phosphohydrolase activities and impermeability of microsomes to EDTA proved that phospholipid exchange proteins did not have access to the intracisternal space. If microsomal membranes are largely composed of phospholipid bilayers, the experiments suggest that one or more of the phospholipid classes in microsomal membranes undergo rapid translocation between the inner and outer portions of the bilayer.

  18. Extensive exchange of rat liver microsomal phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Zilversmit, D B; Hughes, M E

    1977-08-15

    Liver microsomal fractions were prepared from rats injected with a single dose of choline [14C]methylchloride or with single or multiple doses of 32Pi. Exchangeability of microsomal phospholipids was determined by incubation with an excess of mitochondria and phospholipid exchange proteins derived from beef heart, beef liver or rat liver. Labeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were found to act as a single pool and were 85--95% exchangeable in 1--2h. High latencies of mannose-6-phosphate phosphohydrolase activities and impermeability of microsomes to EDTA proved that phospholipid exchange proteins did not have access to the intracisternal space. If microsomal membranes are largely composed of phospholipid bilayers, the experiments suggest that one or more of the phospholipid classes in microsomal membranes undergo rapid translocation between the inner and outer portions of the bilayer. PMID:889827

  19. The Impact of N-terminal Acetylation of α-Synuclein on Phospholipid Membrane Binding and Fibril Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Aditya; Roeters, Steven J.; Schilderink, Nathalie; Hommersom, Bob; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Woutersen, Sander; Claessens, Mireille M. A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Human α-synuclein (αS) has been shown to be N terminally acetylated in its physiological state. This modification is proposed to modulate the function and aggregation of αS into amyloid fibrils. Using bacterially expressed acetylated-αS (NTAc-αS) and endogenous αS (Endo-αS) from human erythrocytes, we show that N-terminal acetylation has little impact on αS binding to anionic membranes and thus likely not relevant for regulating membrane affinity. N-terminal acetylation does have an effect on αS aggregation, resulting in a narrower distribution of the aggregation lag times and rates. 2D-IR spectra show that acetylation changes the secondary structure of αS in fibrils. This difference may arise from the slightly higher helical propensity of acetylated-αS in solution leading to a more homogenous fibril population with different fibril structure than non-acetylated αS. We speculate that N-terminal acetylation imposes conformational restraints on N-terminal residues in αS, thus predisposing αS toward specific interactions with other binding partners or alternatively decrease nonspecific interactions. PMID:27531743

  20. Membranes and theoretical modeling of membrane distillation: a review.

    PubMed

    Khayet, Mohamed

    2011-05-11

    Membrane distillation (MD) is one of the non-isothermal membrane separation processes used in various applications such desalination, environmental/waste cleanup, food, etc. It is known since 1963 and is still being developed at laboratory stage for different purposes and not fully implemented in industry. An abrupt increase in the number of papers on MD membrane engineering (i.e. design, fabrication and testing in MD) is seen since only 6 years ago. The present paper offers a comprehensive MD state-of-the-art review covering a wide range of commercial membranes, MD membrane engineering, their MD performance, transport mechanisms, experimental and theoretical modeling of different MD configurations as well as recent developments in MD. Improved MD membranes with specific morphology, micro- and nano-structures are highly demanded. Membranes with different pore sizes, porosities, thicknesses and materials as well as novel structures are required in order to carry out systematic MD studies for better understanding mass transport in different MD configurations, thereby improving the MD performance and looking for MD industrialization.

  1. Peptide models for membrane channels.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, D

    1996-01-01

    Peptides may be synthesized with sequences corresponding to putative transmembrane domains and/or pore-lining regions that are deduced from the primary structures of ion channel proteins. These can then be incorporated into lipid bilayer membranes for structural and functional studies. In addition to the ability to invoke ion channel activity, critical issues are the secondary structures adopted and the mode of assembly of these short transmembrane peptides in the reconstituted systems. The present review concentrates on results obtained with peptides from ligand-gated and voltage-gated ion channels, as well as proton-conducting channels. These are considered within the context of current molecular models and the limited data available on the structure of native ion channels and natural channel-forming peptides. PMID:8615800

  2. Amyloid-β peptides in interaction with raft-mime model membranes: a neutron reflectivity insight.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, Valeria; Brocca, Paola; Motta, Simona; Messa, Massimo; Colombo, Laura; Salmona, Mario; Fragneto, Giovanna; Cantù, Laura; Del Favero, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The role of first-stage β-amyloid aggregation in the development of the Alzheimer disease, is widely accepted but still unclear. Intimate interaction with the cell membrane is invoked. We designed Neutron Reflectometry experiments to reveal the existence and extent of the interaction between β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides and a lone customized biomimetic membrane, and their dependence on the aggregation state of the peptide. The membrane, asymmetrically containing phospholipids, GM1 and cholesterol in biosimilar proportion, is a model for a raft, a putative site for amyloid-cell membrane interaction. We found that the structured-oligomer of Aβ(1-42), its most acknowledged membrane-active state, is embedded as such into the external leaflet of the membrane. Conversely, the Aβ(1-42) unstructured early-oligomers deeply penetrate the membrane, likely mimicking the interaction at neuronal cell surfaces, when the Aβ(1-42) is cleaved from APP protein and the membrane constitutes a template for its further structural evolution. Moreover, the smaller Aβ(1-6) fragment, the N-terminal portion of Aβ, was also used. Aβ N-terminal is usually considered as involved in oligomer stabilization but not in the peptide-membrane interaction. Instead, it was seen to remove lipids from the bilayer, thus suggesting its role, once in the whole peptide, in membrane leakage, favouring peptide recruitment. PMID:26880066

  3. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Esther; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Sonda, Sabrina; Kaech, Andres; Lucas, Miriam S.; Ackermann, Mathias; Wild, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  4. Interaction of Defensins with Model Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Yang, Lihua; Mishra, Abhijit; Gordon, Vernita D.; Selsted, Michael E.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. For many AMPs, activity comes from their ability to selectively disrupt and lyse bacterial cell membranes. There are a number of proposed models for this action, but the detailed molecular mechanism of selective membrane permeation remains unclear. Theta defensins are circularized peptides with a high degree of selectivity. We investigate the interaction of model bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes with theta defensins RTD-1, BTD-7, and compare them to protegrin PG-1, a prototypical AMP, using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The relationship between membrane composition and peptide induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. By comparing the membrane phase behavior induced by these different peptides we will discuss the importance of amino acid composition and placement on membrane rearrangement.

  5. Macroscopic Modeling of Polymer-Electrolyte Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.Z.; Newman, J.

    2007-04-01

    In this chapter, the various approaches for the macroscopic modeling of transport phenomena in polymer-electrolyte membranes are discussed. This includes general background and modeling methodologies, as well as exploration of the governing equations and some membrane-related topic of interest.

  6. The Rab GTPase-activating protein TBC1D4/AS160 contains an atypical phosphotyrosine-binding domain that interacts with plasma membrane phospholipids to facilitate GLUT4 trafficking in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shi-Xiong; Ng, Yvonne; Burchfield, James G; Ramm, Georg; Lambright, David G; Stöckli, Jacqueline; James, David E

    2012-12-01

    The Rab GTPase-activating protein TBC1D4/AS160 regulates GLUT4 trafficking in adipocytes. Nonphosphorylated AS160 binds to GLUT4 vesicles and inhibits GLUT4 translocation, and AS160 phosphorylation overcomes this inhibitory effect. In the present study we detected several new functional features of AS160. The second phosphotyrosine-binding domain in AS160 encodes a phospholipid-binding domain that facilitates plasma membrane (PM) targeting of AS160, and this function is conserved in other related RabGAP/Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC) proteins and an AS160 ortholog in Drosophila. This region also contains a nonoverlapping intracellular GLUT4-containing storage vesicle (GSV) cargo-binding site. The interaction of AS160 with GSVs and not with the PM confers the inhibitory effect of AS160 on insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Constitutive targeting of AS160 to the PM increased the surface GLUT4 levels, and this was attributed to both enhanced AS160 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding and inhibition of AS160 GAP activity. We propose a model wherein AS160 acts as a regulatory switch in the docking and/or fusion of GSVs with the PM.

  7. The Rab GTPase-Activating Protein TBC1D4/AS160 Contains an Atypical Phosphotyrosine-Binding Domain That Interacts with Plasma Membrane Phospholipids To Facilitate GLUT4 Trafficking in Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shi-Xiong; Ng, Yvonne; Burchfield, James G.; Ramm, Georg; Lambright, David G.; Stöckli, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    The Rab GTPase-activating protein TBC1D4/AS160 regulates GLUT4 trafficking in adipocytes. Nonphosphorylated AS160 binds to GLUT4 vesicles and inhibits GLUT4 translocation, and AS160 phosphorylation overcomes this inhibitory effect. In the present study we detected several new functional features of AS160. The second phosphotyrosine-binding domain in AS160 encodes a phospholipid-binding domain that facilitates plasma membrane (PM) targeting of AS160, and this function is conserved in other related RabGAP/Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC) proteins and an AS160 ortholog in Drosophila. This region also contains a nonoverlapping intracellular GLUT4-containing storage vesicle (GSV) cargo-binding site. The interaction of AS160 with GSVs and not with the PM confers the inhibitory effect of AS160 on insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Constitutive targeting of AS160 to the PM increased the surface GLUT4 levels, and this was attributed to both enhanced AS160 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding and inhibition of AS160 GAP activity. We propose a model wherein AS160 acts as a regulatory switch in the docking and/or fusion of GSVs with the PM. PMID:23045393

  8. Molecular dynamics generation of nonarbitrary membrane models reveals lipid orientational correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Takaoka, Y; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, M; Miyagawa, H; Kitamura, K; Tamura, Y; Kusumi, A

    2000-01-01

    This report addresses the following problems associated with the generation of computer models of phospholipid bilayer membranes using molecular dynamics simulations: arbitrary initial structures and short equilibration periods, an Ewald-induced strong coupling of phospholipids, uncertainty regarding which value should be used for surface tension to alleviate the problem of the small size of the membrane, and simultaneous realization of both order parameters and the surface area. We generated a computer model of the liquid-crystalline L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer, starting from a configuration based on a crystal structure (rather than from an arbitrary structure). To break the crystalline structure, a 20-ps high-temperature pulse of 510 K (but not 450 or 480 K) was effective. The system finally obtained is an all-atom model, with Ewald summation to evaluate Coulombic interactions and a constant surface tension of 35 dynes/cm/water-membrane interface, equilibrated for 12 ns (over 50 ns total calculation time), which reproduces all of the experimentally observed parameters examined in this work. Furthermore, this model shows the presence of significant orientational correlations between neighboring alkyl chains and between shoulder vectors (which show the orientations of the lipids about their long axes) of neighboring DMPCs. PMID:11106617

  9. Interaction of penicillin G with the human erythrocyte membrane and models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Villena, F; Aguilar, F; Sotomayor, C P

    1996-01-01

    Penicillin G (PEN) is a widely used antibiotic whose mechanism of action is related to the interference with the synthesis of bacteria cell wall. In order to evaluate its perturbing effect upon human cell membranes PEN was made to interact with human erythrocytes, isolated resealed human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models. The latter were multibilayers of the phospholipids dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) as well as DMPC large unilamellar vesicles. These studies were performed by scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. The observed results coincide in that PEN did not exert any significant effect upon the structures of the red cell membrane neither on its molecular models. This is in agreement with its reported lack of major toxicity and hematological reactions. PMID:8639231

  10. LipidBuilder: A Framework To Build Realistic Models for Biological Membranes.

    PubMed

    Bovigny, Christophe; Tamò, Giorgio; Lemmin, Thomas; Maïno, Nicolas; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2015-12-28

    The physical and chemical characterization of biological membranes is of fundamental importance for understanding the functional role of lipid bilayers in shaping cells and organelles, steering vesicle trafficking and promoting membrane-protein signaling. Molecular dynamics simulations stand as a powerful tool to probe the properties of membranes at atomistic level. However, the biological membrane is highly complex, and closely mimicking its physiological constitution in silico is not a straightforward task. Here, we present LipidBuilder, a framework for creating and storing models of biologically relevant phospholipid species with acyl tails of heterogeneous composition. LipidBuilder also enables the assembly of these database-stored lipids into realistic bilayers featuring asymmetric distribution on layer leaflets and concentration of given membrane constituents as defined, for example, by lipidomics experiments. The ability of LipidBuilder to assemble robust membrane models was validated by simulating membranes of homogeneous lipid composition for which experimental data are available. Furthermore, taking advantage of the extensive lipid headgroup repertoire, we assembled models of membranes of heterogeneous nature as naturally found in viral (phage PRD1), bacterial (Salmonella enterica, Laurinavicius , S. ; Kakela , R. ; Somerharju , P. ; Bamford , D. H. ; Virology 2004 , 322 , 328 - 336 ) and plant (Chlorella kessleri, Rezanka , T. ; Podojil , M. ; J. Chromatogr. 1989 , 463 , 397 - 408 ) organisms. These realistic membrane models were built using a near-exact lipid composition revealed from analytical chemistry experiments. We suggest LipidBuilder as a useful tool to model biological membranes of near-biological complexity, and as a robust complement to the current efforts to characterize the biophysical properties of biological membrane using molecular simulation. PMID:26606666

  11. A study of the perturbation effects of the local anesthetic procaine on human erythrocyte and model membranes and of modifications of the sodium transport in toad skin.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2005-08-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic procaine with human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), isolated toad skins, and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of phospholipid multilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy of human erythrocytes revealed that procaine induced the formation of stomatocytes. Experiments performed on IUM at 37 degrees C by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that procaine interacted with the phospholipid bilayer polar groups but not with the hydrophobic acyl chains. X-ray diffraction indicated that procaine perturbed DMPC structure to a higher extent when compared with DMPE, its polar head region being more affected. Electrophysiological measurements disclosed a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of procaine to isolated toad skin, reflecting inhibition of active ion transport. PMID:15894419

  12. The amphiphilic alkyl ester derivatives of l-ascorbic acid induce reorganization of phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Francesca; Ambroggio, Ernesto E; Mottola, Milagro; Fanani, Maria Laura

    2016-09-01

    l-ascorbic acid alkyl esters (ASCn) are lipophilic forms of vitamin C, which maintain some of its antioxidant power. Those properties make this drug family attractive to be used in pharmacological preparations protecting other redox-sensible drugs or designed to reduce possible toxic oxidative processes. In this work, we tested the ability of l-ascorbic acid alkyl esters (ASCn) to modulate the structure, permeability, and rheological properties of phospholipid bilayers. The ASCn studied here (ASC16, ASC14, and ASC12) alter the structural integrity as well as the rheological properties of phospholipid membranes without showing any evident detergent activity. ASC14 appeared as the most efficient drug in destabilize the membrane structure of nano- and micro-size phospholipid liposomes inducing vesicle content leakage and shape elongation on giant unilamellar vesicles. It also was the most potent enhancer of membrane microviscosity and surface water structuring. Only ASC16 induced the formation of drug-enriched condensed domains after its incorporation into the lipid bilayer, while ASC12 appeared as the less membrane-disturbing compound, likely because of its poor, and more superficial, partition into the membrane. We also found that incorporation of ASCn into the lipid bilayers enhanced the reduction of membrane components, compared with soluble vitamin C. Our study shows that ASCn compounds, which vary in the length of the acyl chain, show different effects on phospholipid vesicles used as biomembrane models. Those variances may account for subtly differences in the effectiveness on their pharmacological applications. PMID:27342371

  13. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  14. Langmuir films containing ibuprofen and phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo, Vananélia P. N.; Pavinatto, Felippe J.; Nobre, Thatyane M.; Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2013-02-01

    This study shows the incorporation of ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory drug, in Langmuir monolayers as cell membrane models. Significant effects were observed for dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) monolayers with relevant changes in the elasticity of the monolayer. Dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG) monolayers were affected by small concentrations of ibuprofen, from 1 to 5 mol%. For both types of monolayer, ibuprofen could penetrate into the hydrophobic part of the monolayer, which was confirmed with polarization-modulated infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images showed that ibuprofen prevents the formation of large domains of DPPC. The pharmacological action should occur primarily with penetration of ibuprofen via electrically neutral phospholipid headgroups of the membrane.

  15. The Phospholipid:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Lro1 Is Responsible for Hepatitis C Virus Core-Induced Lipid Droplet Formation in a Yeast Model System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Wen; Cheng, Yun-Hsin; Irokawa, Hayato; Hwang, Gi-Wook; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus frequently induces steatosis, which is a significant risk factor for liver pathogenesis. Steatosis is characterized by the accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatocytes. The structural protein core of the virus induces lipid droplet formation and localizes on the surface of the lipid droplets. However, the precise molecular mechanisms for the core-induced formation of lipid droplets remain elusive. Recently, we showed that the expression of the core protein in yeast as a model system could induce lipid droplet formation. In this study, we probed the cellular factors responsible for the formation of core-induced lipid-droplets in yeast cells. We demonstrated that one of the enzymes responsible for triglyceride synthesis, a phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (Lro1), is required for the core-induced lipid droplet formation. While core proteins inhibit Lro1 degradation and alter Lro1 localization, the characteristic localization of Lro1 adjacent to the lipid droplets appeared to be responsible for the core-induced lipid droplet formation. RNA virus genomes have evolved using high mutation rates to maintain their ability to replicate. Our observations suggest a functional relationship between the core protein with hepatocytes and yeast cells. The possible interactions between core proteins and the endoplasmic reticulum membrane affect the mobilization of specific proteins. PMID:27459103

  16. Profile structures of the voltage-sensor domain and the voltage-gated K+-channel vectorially oriented in a single phospholipid bilayer membrane at the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces determined by x-ray interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S.; Liu, J.; Strzalka, J.; Blasie, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    One subunit of the prokaryotic voltage-gated potassium ion channel from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) is comprised of six transmembrane α helices, of which S1–S4 form the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) and S5 and S6 contribute to the pore domain (PD) of the functional homotetramer. However, the mechanism of electromechanical coupling interconverting the closed-to-open (i.e., nonconducting-to-K+-conducting) states remains undetermined. Here, we have vectorially oriented the detergent (OG)-solubilized VSD in single monolayers by two independent approaches, namely “directed-assembly” and “self-assembly,” to achieve a high in-plane density. Both utilize Ni coordination chemistry to tether the protein to an alkylated inorganic surface via its C-terminal His6 tag. Subsequently, the detergent is replaced by phospholipid (POPC) via exchange, intended to reconstitute a phospholipid bilayer environment for the protein. X-ray interferometry, in which interference with a multilayer reference structure is used to both enhance and phase the specular x-ray reflectivity from the tethered single membrane, was used to determine directly the electron density profile structures of the VSD protein solvated by detergent versus phospholipid, and with either a moist He (moderate hydration) or bulk aqueous buffer (high hydration) environment to preserve a native structure conformation. Difference electron density profiles, with respect to the multilayer substrate itself, for the VSD-OG monolayer and VSD-POPC membranes at both the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces, reveal the profile structures of the VSD protein dominating these profiles and further indicate a successful reconstitution of a lipid bilayer environment. The self-assembly approach was similarly extended to the intact full-length KvAP channel for comparison. The spatial extent and asymmetry in the profile structures of both proteins confirm their unidirectional vectorial orientation within the reconstituted membrane and

  17. THE INTEGRITY OF THE α-HELICAL DOMAIN OF INTESTINAL FATTY ACID BINDING PROTEIN IS ESSENTIAL FOR THE COLLISION-MEDIATED TRANSFER OF FATTY ACIDS TO PHOSPHOLIPID MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, G. R.; Storch, J.; Corsico, B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Intestinal FABP (IFABP) and liver FABP (LFABP), homologous proteins expressed at high levels in intestinal absorptive cells, employ markedly different mechanisms of fatty acid transfer to acceptor model membranes. Transfer from IFABP occurs during protein-membrane-collisional interactions, while for LFABP transfer occurs by diffusion through the aqueous phase. In addition, transfer from IFABP is markedly faster than from LFABP. The overall goal of this study was to further explore the structural differences between IFABP and LFABP which underlie their large functional differences in ligand transport. In particular, we addressed the role of the αI-helix domain in the unique transport properties of intestinal FABP. A chimeric protein was engineered with the ‘body’ (ligand binding domain) of IFABP and the αI-helix of LFABP (α(I)LβIFABP), and the fatty acid transfer properties of the chimeric FABP were examined using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. The results showed a significant decrease in the absolute rate of FA transfer from α(I)LβIFABP compared to IFABP. The results indicate that the αI-helix is crucial for IFABP collisional FA transfer, and further indicate the participation of the αII-helix in the formation of a protein-membrane “collisional complex”. Photo-crosslinking experiments with a photoactivable reagent demonstrated the direct interaction of IFABP with membranes and further supports the importance of the αI helix of IFABP in its physical interaction with membranes. PMID:18284926

  18. Diffusion through thin membranes: Modeling across scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Vesa; Mattila, Keijo; Kühn, Thomas; Kekäläinen, Pekka; Pulkkinen, Otto; Minussi, Roberta Brondani; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-04-01

    From macroscopic to microscopic scales it is demonstrated that diffusion through membranes can be modeled using specific boundary conditions across them. The membranes are here considered thin in comparison to the overall size of the system. In a macroscopic scale the membrane is introduced as a transmission boundary condition, which enables an effective modeling of systems that involve multiple scales. In a mesoscopic scale, a numerical lattice-Boltzmann scheme with a partial-bounceback condition at the membrane is proposed and analyzed. It is shown that this mesoscopic approach provides a consistent approximation of the transmission boundary condition. Furthermore, analysis of the mesoscopic scheme gives rise to an expression for the permeability of a thin membrane as a function of a mesoscopic transmission parameter. In a microscopic model, the mean waiting time for a passage of a particle through the membrane is in accordance with this permeability. Numerical results computed with the mesoscopic scheme are then compared successfully with analytical solutions derived in a macroscopic scale, and the membrane model introduced here is used to simulate diffusive transport between the cell nucleus and cytoplasm through the nuclear envelope in a realistic cell model based on fluorescence microscopy data. By comparing the simulated fluorophore transport to the experimental one, we determine the permeability of the nuclear envelope of HeLa cells to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein.

  19. Antimicrobial mechanism of flavonoids against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by model membrane study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mengying; Wu, Ting; Pan, Siyi; Xu, Xiaoyun

    2014-06-01

    Antimicrobial mechanism of four flavonoids (kaempferol, hesperitin, (+)-catechin hydrate, biochanin A) against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was investigated through cell membranes and a liposome model. The release of bacterial protein and images from transmission electron microscopy demonstrated damage to the E. coli ATCC 25922 membrane. A liposome model with dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) (0.6 molar ratio) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) (0.4 molar ratio), representative of the phospholipid membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922, was used to specify the mode of action of four selected flavonoids through Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is suggested that for flavonoids, to be effective antimicrobials, interaction with the polar head-group of the model membrane followed by penetration into the hydrophobic regions must occur. The antimicrobial efficacies of the flavonoids were consistent with liposome interaction activities, kaempferol > hesperitin > (+)-catechin hydrate > biochanin A. This study provides a liposome model capable of mimicking the cell membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922. The findings are important in understanding the antibacterial mechanism on cell membranes.

  20. A Model for Membrane Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngatchou, Annita

    2010-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor of the adrenal gland which originates from chromaffin cells and is characterized by the secretion of excessive amounts of neurotransmitter which lead to high blood pressure and palpitations. Pheochromocytoma contain membrane bound granules that store neurotransmitter. The release of these stored molecules into the extracellular space occurs by fusion of the granule membrane with the cell plasma membrane, a process called exocytosis. The molecular mechanism of this membrane fusion is not well understood. It is proposed that the so called SNARE proteins [1] are the pillar of vesicle fusion as their cleavage by clostridial toxin notably, Botulinum neurotoxin and Tetanus toxin abrogate the secretion of neurotransmitter [2]. Here, I describe how physical principles are applied to a biological cell to explore the role of the vesicle SNARE protein synaptobrevin-2 in easing granule fusion. The data presented here suggest a paradigm according to which the movement of the C-terminal of synaptobrevin-2 disrupts the lipid bilayer to form a fusion pore through which molecules can exit.

  1. The organochlorine pesticide heptachlor disrupts the structure of model and cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Benites, M; Villena, F; Aguilar, F; Sotomayor, C P

    1997-05-22

    Heptachlor is an organochlorine pesticide which is particularly toxic for aquatic life. A significant source of this pesticide for infants is breast milk, where its concentration is considerably higher than in dairy milk. Given the lipophilic character of heptachlor, lipid-rich cell membranes are a very plausible target for its interaction with living organisms. In order to evaluate its toxicity towards cell membranes, heptachlor was made to interact with human erythrocytes and molecular models of the red cell membrane. These consisted of multilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), which are types of phospholipids that are respectively located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of DMPC. Observations by scanning electron microscopy showed that 10 mM heptachlor produced various degrees of shape alterations to erythrocytes, which ranged from a few blebs in some cells to a great number of protuberances in others. On the other hand, experiments performed by X-ray diffraction on DMPC and DMPE indicated that the bilayer structure of DMPC was much more affected by heptachlor than that of DMPE. Measurements by fluorescence spectroscopy on DMPC LUV confirmed the X-ray diffraction results in that both the hydrocarbon chain and polar head regions of DMPC were structurally perturbed by heptachlor. The results obtained from the model studies could explain the shape changes induced to red cells by heptachlor. According to the bilayer hypothesis, they were due to the preferential interaction of heptachlor with the phosphatidylcholine-rich external moiety of the erythrocyte membrane. It is therefore concluded that toxic effects of this pesticide can be related to its capacity to perturb the phospholipid bilayer structure, whose integrity is essential for cell membrane functions. PMID:9188806

  2. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  3. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A.; Maskrey, Benjamin H.; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B.; Harwood, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes. PMID:26968097

  4. Nutritional Deficiencies and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, María S.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gomez, Nidia N.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipids are important components of the cell membranes of all living species. They contribute to the physicochemical properties of the membrane and thus influence the conformation and function of membrane-bound proteins, such as receptors, ion channels, and transporters and also influence cell function by serving as precursors for prostaglandins and other signaling molecules and modulating gene expression through the transcription activation. The components of the diet are determinant for cell functionality. In this review, the effects of macro and micronutrients deficiency on the quality, quantity and metabolism of different phospholipids and their distribution in cells of different organs is presented. Alterations in the amount of both saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins A, E and folate, and other micronutrients, such as zinc and magnesium, are discussed. In all cases we observe alterations in the pattern of phospholipids, the more affected ones being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin. The deficiency of certain nutrients, such as essential fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and some metals may contribute to a variety of diseases that can be irreversible even after replacement with normal amount of the nutrients. Usually, the sequelae are more important when the deficiency is present at an early age. PMID:21731449

  5. Linking Phospholipid flippases to vesicle-mediated protein transport

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Baby-Periyanayaki; Natarajan, Paramasivam; Zhou, Xiaoming; Graham, Todd R.

    2013-01-01

    Type IV P-type ATPases (P4-ATPases) are a large family of putative phospholipid translocases (flippases) implicated in the generation of phospholipid asymmetry in biological membranes. P4-ATPases are typically the largest P-type ATPase subgroup found in eukaryotic cells, with five members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, six members in Caenorhabditis elegans, 12 members in Arabidopsis thaliani and 14 members in humans. In addition, many of the P4-ATPases require interaction with a noncatalytic subunit from the CDC50 gene family for their transport out of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Deficiency of a P4-ATPase (Atp8b1) causes liver disease in humans, and studies in a variety of model systems indicate that P4-ATPases play diverse and essential roles in membrane biogenesis. In addition to their proposed role in establishing and maintaining plasma membrane asymmetry, P4-ATPases are linked to vesicle-mediated protein transport in the exocytic and endocytic pathways. Recent studies have also suggested a role for P4-ATPases in the nonvesicular intracellular trafficking of sterols. Here, we discuss the physiological requirements for yeast P4-ATPases in phospholipid translocase activity, transport vesicle budding and ergosterol metabolism, with an emphasis on Drs2p and its noncatalytic subunit, Cdc50p. PMID:19286470

  6. Modulation of membrane phospholipids, the cytosolic calcium influx and cell proliferation following treatment of B16-F10 cells with recombinant phospholipase-D from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    PubMed

    Wille, Ana Carolina Martins; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Magnoni, Mariana Gabriel; Boia-Ferreira, Marianna; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Gremski, Waldemiro; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism through which brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) cause dermonecrosis, dysregulated inflammatory responses, hemolysis and platelet aggregation, which are effects reported following spider bites, is currently attributed to the presence of phospholipase-D in the venom. In the present investigation, through two-dimensional immunoblotting, we observed immunological cross-reactivity for at least 25 spots in crude Loxosceles intermedia venom, indicating high expression levels for different isoforms of phospholipase-D. Using a recombinant phospholipase-D from the venom gland of L. intermedia (LiRecDT1) in phospholipid-degrading kinetic experiments, we determined that this phospholipase-D mainly hydrolyzes synthetic sphingomyelin in a time-dependent manner, generating ceramide 1-phosphate plus choline, as well as lysophosphatidylcholine, generating lysophosphatidic acid plus choline, but exhibits little activity against phosphatidylcholine. Through immunofluorescence assays with antibodies against LiRecDT1 and using a recombinant GFP-LiRecDT1 fusion protein, we observed direct binding of LiRecDT1 to the membrane of B16-F10 cells. We determined that LiRecDT1 hydrolyzes phospholipids in detergent extracts and from ghosts of B16-F10 cells, generating choline, indicating that the enzyme can access and modulate and has activity against membrane phospholipids. Additionally, using Fluo-4, a calcium-sensitive fluorophore, it was shown that treatment of cells with phospholipase-D induced an increase in the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, but without altering viability or causing damage to cells. Finally, based on the known endogenous activity of phospholipase-D as an inducer of cell proliferation and the fact that LiRecDT1 binds to the cell surface, hydrolyzing phospholipids to generate bioactive lipids, we employed LiRecDT1 as an exogenous source of phospholipase-D in B16-F10 cells. Treatment of the cells was effective in increasing their proliferation in a

  7. Dependence of synergistic fungicidal activity of Cu2+ and allicin, an allyl sulfur compound from garlic, on selective accumulation of the ion in the plasma membrane fraction via allicin-mediated phospholipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Akira; Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Taniguchi, Makoto; Tanaka, Toshio

    2006-08-01

    Allicin was effective in decreasing the lethal concentration of Cu (2+) against various fungal strains including a plant pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum, so that the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of the ion for the fungus could be reduced to 2 % of that detected without allicin. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cu (2+) was not apparently taken up by cells when added alone at a non-lethal concentration, whereas the ion was efficiently incorporated into cells in the presence of allicin, as in the case of cells treated with the ion at a lethal concentration. Although allicin likely increased cellular permeability to Cu (2+) due to its promotive effect on plasma membrane phospholipid peroxidation, these cell-surface events did not result in endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, a typical toxic effect of the ion. Cu (2+) was detected in the cytoplasmic fraction of cells that had been treated with the ion at a lethal concentration, whereas the ion was entrapped in the plasma membrane fraction upon their treatment with the ion at a low concentration in combination with allicin. Cu (2+) could be solubilized from the plasma membrane fraction by a procedure for the extraction of hydrophobic proteins rather than the extraction of phospholipids, suggesting its complexation with a plasma membrane protein as a result of allicin treatment. Such a subcellular localization of Cu (2+) resulted in the selective leakage of intracellular K (+), but not in the disruptive damage on the plasma membrane, and was considered to underlie the synergistic fungicidal activity of Cu (2+) and allicin. PMID:16972197

  8. Membrane–drug interactions studied using model membrane systems

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Jacqueline; Suhendro, Daniel K.; Zieleniecki, Julius L.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Köper, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The direct interaction of drugs with the cell membrane is often neglected when drug effects are studied. Systematic investigations are hindered by the complexity of the natural membrane and model membrane systems can offer a useful alternative. Here some examples are reviewed of how model membrane architectures including vesicles, Langmuir monolayers and solid supported membranes can be used to investigate the effects of drug molecules on the membrane structure, and how these interactions can translate into effects on embedded membrane proteins. PMID:26586998

  9. Understanding transport in model water desalination membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Edwin

    Polyamide based thin film composites represent the the state-of-the-art nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used in water desalination. The performance of these membranes is enabled by the ultrathin (~100 nm) crosslinked polyamide film in facilitating the selective transport of water over salt ions. While these materials have been refined over the last several decades, understanding the relationships between polyamide structure and membrane performance remains a challenge because of the complex and heterogeneous nature of the polyamide film. In this contribution, we present our approach to addressing this challenge by studying the transport properties of model polyamide membranes synthesized via molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. First, we demonstrate that mLbL can successfully construct polyamide membranes with well-defined nanoscale thickness and roughness using a variety of monomer formulations. Next, we present measurement tools for characterizing the network structure and transport of these model polyamide membranes. Specifically, we used X-ray and neutron scattering techniques to characterize their structure as well as a recently-developed indentation based poromechanics approach to extrapolate their water diffusion coefficient. Finally, we illustrate how these measurements can provide insight into the original problem by linking the key polyamide network properties, i.e. water-polyamide interaction parameter and characteristic network mesh size, to the membrane performance.

  10. Regulation by Phospholipids and Kinetic Studies of Plant Membrane-Bound UDP-Glucose Sterol β-d-Glucosyl Transferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, Pascaline; Bouvier-Navé, Pierrette; Benveniste, P.

    1987-01-01

    Solubilization and partial purification of the microsomal UDP-glucose sterol glucosyl transferase activity from maize coleoptiles by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose resulted in a highly delipidated (>95%) and inactive enzymic preparation. Addition of sterols revealed part of the activity and subsequent addition of phospholipids further increased the activity. Negatively charged phospholipids were shown to be by far the best activators. The purification step also produced the elimination of two interfering microsomal enzymic activities: UDPase and steryl glucoside acyl transferase. The removal of these two enzymic activities was a prerequisite for kinetic studies including product-inhibition studies, since the substrates of these two latter enzymes are the products of UDPG-SGTase activity. The results of the kinetic studies strongly suggest an ordered bi-bi mechanism for the glucosylation of sterols. Finally the effect of different phospholipids on the kinetic parameters of the reaction was studied. Both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol significantly decrease Km-sterol (and not Km-UDPglucose) and increase the reaction Vmax. The decrease of Km-sterol is similar with both phospholipids whereas the increase of Vmax is much greater with phosphatidylglycerol than with phosphatidylcholine. PMID:16665682

  11. Comparisons of the interaction of propranolol and timolol with model and biological membrane systems

    SciTech Connect

    Herbette, L.; Katz, A.M.; Sturtevant, J.M.

    1983-09-01

    The nonspecific interaction of the beta-adrenergic blocking drugs, propranolol and timolol, with model and biological membranes has been investigated. Radioisotope measurements of the association of these drugs with dimyristoyl lecithin (DMPC) bilayers showed that both propranolol and timolol had a significantly greater molar association (mole of drug per mole of lipid) with DMPC above its phase transition temperature than below. Timolol had a much lower molar association with DMPC as compared with propranolol both above and below the phase transition temperature. For the DMPC model membrane system, the molar association of propranolol as measured by radioisotope and inferred from calorimetric studies was similar. Neutron diffraction utilizing propranolol deuterated in the naphthalene moiety showed that the naphthalene moiety of propranolol partitions into the hydrocarbon core of the DMPC lipid bilayer, and that the charged amine side chain is most likely positioned in the aqueous phospholipid head group region. For timolol, the association as measured by radioisotope methods was apparently greater than the partitioning inferred from calorimetric studies using freezing point depression analysis, suggesting a more complex interaction of timolol as compared with propranolol with the DMPC lipid bilayer. The association of propranolol with the SR membrane (mole of propranolol per mole of SR phospholipid) correlated with its ability to inhibit calcium uptake, whereas only a fraction of the total association of timolol with the SR membrane appeared to lead to inhibition of calcium uptake. Both propranolol and timolol appear to perturb the functional properties of the calcium pump protein in the SR membrane (inhibition of ATP-induced calcium uptake) indirectly by partitioning into the bulk lipid matrix of the SR lipid bilayer, although other sites of interaction cannot be excluded.

  12. Interaction of 5-fluorouracil loaded nanoparticles with 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes used as a cellular membrane model.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Silvia; Simeonova, Margarita; Gameiro, Paula; Rangel, Maria; Ivanova, Galya

    2012-01-12

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and steady-state fluorescence anisotropy were used to study the behavior and interaction of 5-fluorouracil, both in a free form (5FU) and included in the polymer matrix of poly(butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles (5FUPBCN) with a phospholipid bilayer of large unilammellar vesicles composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), as a model system of biomembranes. The results confirm an interaction and penetration of 5FU into the phospholipid bilayer of DMPC liposomes. Different mechanisms of drug transfer from the aqueous environment into the model membrane environment, for the free drug and that incorporated into polymer nanoparticles, are suggested: (i) concentration-dependent reversible diffusion of the free 5FU and (ii) sustained 5FU release from nanoparticles adsorbed on the liposome surface resulting in continuous delivery of the drug into the phospholipid bilayers of the DMPC liposomes.

  13. Phospholipid mass is increased in fibroblasts bearing the Swedish amyloid precursor mutation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Eric J; Huang, Hsueh-Meei; Cowburn, Richard F; Lannfelt, Lars; Gibson, Gary E

    2006-03-15

    Phospholipid changes occur in brain regions affected by Alzheimer disease (AD), including a marked reduction in plasmalogens, which could diminish brain function either by directly altering signaling events or by bulk membrane effects. However, model systems for studying the dynamics of lipid biosynthesis in AD are lacking. To determine if fibroblasts bearing the Swedish amyloid precursor protein (swAPP) mutation are a useful model to study the mechanism(s) associated with altered phospholipid biosynthesis in AD, we examined the steady-state phospholipid mass and composition of fibroblasts, including plasmalogens. We found a 15% increase in total phospholipid mass, accounted for by a 24% increase in the combined total of phosphatidylethanolamine and plasmanylethanolamine mass and a 19% increase in the combined total of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) and plasmanycholine (PakCho) mass in the swAPP mutant bearing fibroblasts. Cholesterol mass was unchanged in these cells. The changes in phospholipid mass did not alter the cellular molar composition of the phospholipids nor the cholesterol to phospholipid ratio. While plasmalogen mass was not altered, the ratio of choline plasmalogen (PlsCho) mass to PtdCho+PakCho mass was decreased 16% and there was a 14% reduction in the proportion of PlsCho as a percent of total phospholipids in the swAPP mutant bearing fibroblasts. This change in choline plasmalogen is consistent with the reported decreases in plasmalogen proportions in affected regions of AD brain, suggesting that these cells may serve as a useful model to determine the mechanism underlying changes in plasmalogen biosynthesis in AD brain. PMID:16464688

  14. Structural intermediates during α-synuclein fibrillogenesis on phospholipid vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Comellas, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Zhou, Donghua H.; George, Julia M.

    2012-01-01

    α-Synuclein (AS) fibrils are the main protein component of Lewy Bodies, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease and other related disorders. AS forms helices that bind phospholipid membranes with high affinity, but no atomic level data for AS aggregation in the presence of lipids is yet available. Here, we present direct evidence of a conversion from α-helical conformation to β-sheet fibrils in the presence of anionic phospholipid vesicles and direct conversion to β-sheet fibrils in their absence. We have trapped intermediate states throughout the fibril formation pathways to examine the structural changes using solid-state NMR spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The comparison between mature AS fibrils formed in aqueous buffer and those derived in the presence of anionic phospholipids demonstrates no major changes in the overall fibril fold. However, a site-specific comparison of these fibrillar states demonstrates major perturbations in the N-terminal domain with a partial disruption of the long β-strand located in the 40’s and small perturbations in residues located in the “non-β amyloid component” (NAC) domain. Combining all these results, we propose a model for AS fibrillogenesis in the presence of phospholipid vesicles. PMID:22352310

  15. Erythrocyte Membrane Model with Explicit Description of the Lipid Bilayer and the Spectrin Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2014-01-01

    The membrane of the red blood cell (RBC) consists of spectrin tetramers connected at actin junctional complexes, forming a two-dimensional (2D) sixfold triangular network anchored to the lipid bilayer. Better understanding of the erythrocyte mechanics in hereditary blood disorders such as spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and especially, sickle cell disease requires the development of a detailed membrane model. In this study, we introduce a mesoscale implicit-solvent coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) model of the erythrocyte membrane that explicitly describes the phospholipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton, by extending a previously developed two-component RBC membrane model. We show that the proposed model represents RBC membrane with the appropriate bending stiffness and shear modulus. The timescale and self-consistency of the model are established by comparing our results with experimentally measured viscosity and thermal fluctuations of the RBC membrane. Furthermore, we measure the pressure exerted by the cytoskeleton on the lipid bilayer. We find that defects at the anchoring points of the cytoskeleton to the lipid bilayer (as in spherocytes) cause a reduction in the pressure compared with an intact membrane, whereas defects in the dimer-dimer association of a spectrin filament (as in elliptocytes) cause an even larger decrease in the pressure. We conjecture that this finding may explain why the experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of band-3 proteins are higher in elliptocytes than in spherocytes, and higher than in normal RBCs. Finally, we study the effects that possible attractive forces between the spectrin filaments and the lipid bilayer have on the pressure applied on the lipid bilayer by the filaments. We discover that the attractive forces cause an increase in the pressure as they diminish the effect of membrane protein defects. As this finding contradicts with experimental results, we conclude that the attractive forces are moderate and do

  16. Erythrocyte membrane model with explicit description of the lipid bilayer and the spectrin network.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2014-08-01

    The membrane of the red blood cell (RBC) consists of spectrin tetramers connected at actin junctional complexes, forming a two-dimensional (2D) sixfold triangular network anchored to the lipid bilayer. Better understanding of the erythrocyte mechanics in hereditary blood disorders such as spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and especially, sickle cell disease requires the development of a detailed membrane model. In this study, we introduce a mesoscale implicit-solvent coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) model of the erythrocyte membrane that explicitly describes the phospholipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton, by extending a previously developed two-component RBC membrane model. We show that the proposed model represents RBC membrane with the appropriate bending stiffness and shear modulus. The timescale and self-consistency of the model are established by comparing our results with experimentally measured viscosity and thermal fluctuations of the RBC membrane. Furthermore, we measure the pressure exerted by the cytoskeleton on the lipid bilayer. We find that defects at the anchoring points of the cytoskeleton to the lipid bilayer (as in spherocytes) cause a reduction in the pressure compared with an intact membrane, whereas defects in the dimer-dimer association of a spectrin filament (as in elliptocytes) cause an even larger decrease in the pressure. We conjecture that this finding may explain why the experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of band-3 proteins are higher in elliptocytes than in spherocytes, and higher than in normal RBCs. Finally, we study the effects that possible attractive forces between the spectrin filaments and the lipid bilayer have on the pressure applied on the lipid bilayer by the filaments. We discover that the attractive forces cause an increase in the pressure as they diminish the effect of membrane protein defects. As this finding contradicts with experimental results, we conclude that the attractive forces are moderate and do

  17. Phospholipid transfer proteins revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, K W

    1997-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PI-TP) and the non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsL-TP) (identical with sterol carrier protein 2) belong to the large and diverse family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins. Although these two proteins may express a comparable phospholipid transfer activity in vitro, recent studies in yeast and mammalian cells have indicated that they serve completely different functions. PI-TP (identical with yeast SEC14p) plays an important role in vesicle flow both in the budding reaction from the trans-Golgi network and in the fusion reaction with the plasma membrane. In yeast, vesicle budding is linked to PI-TP regulating Golgi phosphatidylcholine (PC) biosynthesis with the apparent purpose of maintaining an optimal PI/PC ratio of the Golgi complex. In mammalian cells, vesicle flow appears to be dependent on PI-TP stimulating phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) synthesis. This latter process may also be linked to the ability of PI-TP to reconstitute the receptor-controlled PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity. The nsL-TP is a peroxisomal protein which, by its ability to bind fatty acyl-CoAs, is most likely involved in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids in this organelle. This protein constitutes the N-terminus of the 58 kDa protein which is one of the peroxisomal 3-oxo-acyl-CoA thiolases. Further studies on these and other known phospholipid transfer proteins are bound to reveal new insights in their important role as mediators between lipid metabolism and cell functions. PMID:9182690

  18. Vacuum membrane distillation: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bandini, S.; Saavedra, A.; Sarti, G.C.

    1997-02-01

    Vacuum membrane distillation is a membrane-based separation process considered here to remove volatile organic compounds from aqueous streams. Microporous hydrophobic membranes are used to separate the aqueous stream from a gas phase kept under vacuum. The evaporation of the liquid stream takes place on one side of the membrane, and mass transfer occurs through the vapor phase inside the membrane. The role of operative conditions on the process performance is widely investigated in the case of dilute binary aqueous mixtures containing acetone, ethanol, isopropanol, ethylacetate, methylacetate, or methylterbutyl ether. Temperature, composition, flow rate of the liquid feed, and pressure downstream the membrane are the main operative variables. Among these, the vacuum-side pressure is the major design factor since it greatly affects the separation efficiency. A mathematical model description of the process is developed, and the results are compared with the experiments. The model is finally used to predict the best operative conditions in which the process can work for the case of benzene removal from waste waters.

  19. Antagonistic effects of α-tocopherol and ursolic acid on model bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Flasiński, Michał; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna

    2015-10-01

    α-tocopherol (Toc), the most active component of vitamin E can exert antagonistic effects disabling the therapy of cancers and bacterial infections. Such antagonisms were observed also between Toc and bioactive pentacyclic triterpenes (PT) exhibiting anticancer and antibacterial properties. Both Toc and PT are water-insoluble membrane active substances. Thus, our idea was to emulate their interactions with model Escherichia coli membranes. E. coli inner membranes were selected for the experiments because their lipid composition is quite simple and well characterized and the two main components are phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. As a model of E. coli membranes we applied Langmuir monolayers formed by the E. coli total extract of polar lipids (Etotal) as well as by the main lipid components: phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) and phosphatidylglycerol (ECPG). The antagonistic effects of ursolic acid (Urs) and Toc were investigated with the application of ternary Langmuir monolayers formed by Urs, Toc and one of the phospholipids POPE or ECPG. Our studies indicated that the affinities of Urs and Toc towards the POPE molecule are comparable; whereas there are profound differences in the interactions of Urs and Toc with ECPG. Thus, the model experiments prove that in the case of E. coli membrane, the differences in the interactions between Urs and Toc with the anionic bacterial phosphatidylglycerol can be the key factor responsible for the antagonistic effects observed between PT and Toc in vivo.

  20. The location of coenzyme Q10 in phospholipid membranes made of POPE: a small-angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Wollstein, Christoph; Winterhalter, Mathias; Funari, Sérgio S

    2015-07-01

    The location of coenzyme Q10 (Q10) inside the inner mitochondrial membrane is a topic of research aiming at a deeper understanding of the function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. We investigated the location of Q10 inside model membranes made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine by means of small-angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Q10, which stands for ubiquinone-10 (UQ) or ubihydroquinone-10 (UH), did not remarkably influence the main phase transition temperature, but significantly decreased the lamellar-inverse hexagonal phase transition temperature (T(h)). The effect of UH on T(h) was stronger than the effect of UQ and the effect of liquid Q10 on T(h) was stronger than the effect of crystalline Q10. In the presence of Q10, the lattice parameters of the lamellar phases remained unchanged, whereas the H II lattice parameter was clearly influenced: While UQ had an increasing effect, UH had a decreasing effect. Furthermore, Q10 prevented the formation of cubic phases. The results give new evidence that the headgroup of Q10 is distant from the center of the membrane, which might be important for the function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  1. Surface Characterization of Bovine Milk Phospholipid Monolayers by Langmuir Isotherms and Microscopic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Gallier, Sophie; Gragson, Derek; Jiménez-Flores, Rafael; Everett, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Monolayers were prepared from phospholipids extracted from bovine milk and used as a model system to mimic the native milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) surface structure in various microscopic experiments. The natural complex mixtures of phospholipids were isolated from bovine raw milk, raw cream, processed whole milk and buttermilk powder by total lipid extraction and solid-phase extraction. A Langmuir film balance mounted on an epifluorescence microscope was used to analyze the physical behavior of the monolayer films and the phase coexistence resulting from the formation of phospholipid microdomains within these films. Atomic force microscopy was used for nanometer scale topographic resolution of the microdomains. This study allowed us to compare the behavior of phospholipid monolayers from dairy products at different stages of processing, to analyze the formation of microdomains, and to study the effect of milk processing on lipid-lipid interactions and phase coexistence. We observe that milk processing changes the physical behavior of phospholipid monolayers by altering the phospholipid profile and the fatty acid distribution. PMID:21067228

  2. Correlation of [RuCl3(dppb)(VPy)] cytotoxicity with its effects on the cell membranes: an investigation using Langmuir monolayers as membrane models.

    PubMed

    Sandrino, B; Tominaga, T T; Nobre, T M; Scorsin, L; Wrobel, E C; Fiorin, B C; de Araujo, M P; Caseli, L; Oliveira, O N; Wohnrath, K

    2014-09-11

    One of the major challenges in drug design is to identify compounds with potential toxicity toward target cells, preferably with molecular-level understanding of their mode of action. In this study, the antitumor property of a ruthenium complex, mer-[RuCl3(dppb)(VPy)] (dppb = 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphine)butane and VPy = 4-vinylpyridine) (RuVPy), was analyzed. Results showed that this compound led to a mortality rate of 50% of HEp-2 cell with 120 ± 10 μmol L(-1), indicating its high toxicity. Then, to prove if its mode of action is associated with its interaction with cell membranes, Langmuir monolayers were used as a membrane model. RuVPy had a strong effect on the surface pressure isotherms, especially on the elastic properties of both the zwitterionic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and the negatively charged dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) phospholipids. These data were confirmed by polarization-modulated infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). In addition, interactions between the positive group from RuVPy and the phosphate group from the phospholipids were corroborated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, allowing the determination of the Ru complex orientation at the air-water interface. Although possible contributions from receptors or other cell components cannot be discarded, the results reported here represent evidence for significant effects on the cell membranes which are probably associated with the high toxicity of RuVPy.

  3. Impact of lipid oxidization on biophysical properties of model cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Makky, Ali; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-05-01

    The oxidization of glycerophospholipids in cell membranes due to aging and environmental stresses may cause a variety of pathological and physiological consequences. A variety of oxidized phospholipid products (OxPl) are produced by the chemical oxidization of unsaturated hydrocarbon chains, which would significantly change the physicochemical properties of cell membranes. In this work, we constructed cell membrane models in the absence and presence of two stable oxidized lipid products and investigated their impact on physical properties of supported membranes using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and high-energy X-ray reflectivity (XRR). Our experimental findings suggest that the lipid oxidization up to 20 mol % leads to the rupture of vesicles right after the adsorption. Our XRR analysis unravels the membrane thinning and the decrease in the lateral ordering of lipids, which can be explained by the decrease in the lateral packing of hydrocarbon chains. Further studies on mechanics of membranes incorporating oxidized lipids can be attributed to the decrease in the bending rigidity and the increase in the permeability. PMID:25870900

  4. Dehydration of model membranes induced by lectins from Ricinus communis and Viscum album.

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, P; Saparov, S M; Pohl, E E; Evtodienko, V Y; Agapov, I I; Tonevitsky, A G

    1998-01-01

    The effects of ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) from Ricinus communis and from Viscum album on the water permeability, Pf, and the surface dielectric constant, epsilon, of model membranes were studied. Pf was calculated from microelectrode measurements of the ion concentration distribution in the immediate vicinity of a planar membrane, and epsilon was obtained from the fluorescence of dansyl phosphatidylethanolamine incorporated into unilamellar vesicles. Pf and epsilon of fully saturated phosphatidylcholine membranes were affected only in the presence of a lectin receptor (monosialoganglioside, GM1) in the bilayer. It is suggested that the membrane area occupied by clustered lectin-receptor complexes is markedly less permeable to water. Protein binding to the receptor was not a prelude for hydrophobic lipid-protein interactions when the membranes were formed from a mixture of natural phospholipids with a high content of unsaturated fatty acids. These membranes, characterized by a high initial water permeability, were found to interact with the RIPs unspecifically. From a decrease of both Pf and epsilon it was concluded that not only water partitioning but also protein adsorption correlates with looser packing of polyunsaturated lipids at the lipid-water interface. PMID:9826608

  5. Cytochrome c impaled: investigation of the extended lipid anchorage of a soluble protein to mitochondrial membrane models.

    PubMed

    Kalanxhi, Erta; Wallace, Carmichael J A

    2007-10-15

    Cyt c (cytochrome c) has been traditionally envisioned as rapidly diffusing in two dimensions at the surface of the mitochondrial inner membrane when not engaged in redox reactions with physiological partners. However, the discovery of the extended lipid anchorage (insertion of an acyl chain of a bilayer phospholipid into the protein interior) suggests that this may not be exclusively the case. The physical and structural factors underlying the conformational changes that occur upon interaction of ferrous cyt c with phospholipid membrane models have been investigated by monitoring the extent of the spin state change that result from this interaction. Once transiently linked by electrostatic forces between basic side chains and phosphate groups, the acyl chain entry may occur between two parallel hydrophobic polypeptide stretches that are surrounded by positively charged residues. Alteration of these charges, as in the case of non-trimethylated (TML72K) yeast cyt c and Arg91Nle horse cyt c (where Nle is norleucine), led to a decline in the binding affinity for the phospholipid liposomes. The electrostatic association was sensitive to ionic strength, polyanions and pH, whereas the hydrophobic interactions were enhanced by conformational changes that contributed to the loosening of the tertiary structure of cyt c. In addition to proposing a mechanistic model for the extended lipid anchorage of cyt c, we consider what, if any, might be the physiological relevance of the phenomenon. PMID:17614790

  6. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes.

  7. Penetration of Milk-Derived Antimicrobial Peptides into Phospholipid Monolayers as Model Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Rogalska, Ewa; Więcław-Czapla, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Three antimicrobial peptides derived from bovine milk proteins were examined with regard to penetration into insoluble monolayers formed with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) sodium salt (DPPG). Effects on surface pressure (Π) and electric surface potential (ΔV) were measured, Π with a platinum Wilhelmy plate and ΔV with a vibrating plate. The penetration measurements were performed under stationary diffusion conditions and upon the compression of the monolayers. The two type measurements showed greatly different effects of the peptide-lipid interactions. Results of the stationary penetration show that the peptide interactions with DPPC monolayer are weak, repulsive, and nonspecific while the interactions with DPPG monolayer are significant, attractive, and specific. These results are in accord with the fact that antimicrobial peptides disrupt bacteria membranes (negative) while no significant effect on the host membranes (neutral) is observed. No such discrimination was revealed from the compression isotherms. The latter indicate that squeezing the penetrant out of the monolayer upon compression does not allow for establishing the penetration equilibrium, so the monolayer remains supersaturated with the penetrant and shows an under-equilibrium orientation within the entire compression range, practically. PMID:24455264

  8. Penetration of milk-derived antimicrobial peptides into phospholipid monolayers as model biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Barzyk, Wanda; Rogalska, Ewa; Więcław-Czapla, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Three antimicrobial peptides derived from bovine milk proteins were examined with regard to penetration into insoluble monolayers formed with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) sodium salt (DPPG). Effects on surface pressure (Π) and electric surface potential (ΔV) were measured, Π with a platinum Wilhelmy plate and ΔV with a vibrating plate. The penetration measurements were performed under stationary diffusion conditions and upon the compression of the monolayers. The two type measurements showed greatly different effects of the peptide-lipid interactions. Results of the stationary penetration show that the peptide interactions with DPPC monolayer are weak, repulsive, and nonspecific while the interactions with DPPG monolayer are significant, attractive, and specific. These results are in accord with the fact that antimicrobial peptides disrupt bacteria membranes (negative) while no significant effect on the host membranes (neutral) is observed. No such discrimination was revealed from the compression isotherms. The latter indicate that squeezing the penetrant out of the monolayer upon compression does not allow for establishing the penetration equilibrium, so the monolayer remains supersaturated with the penetrant and shows an under-equilibrium orientation within the entire compression range, practically. PMID:24455264

  9. Triangle-hinge models for unoriented membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sugishita, Sotaro; Umeda, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    Triangle-hinge models [M. Fukuma, S. Sugishita, and N. Umeda, J. High Energy Phys. 1507, 088 (2015)] are introduced to describe worldvolume dynamics of membranes. The Feynman diagrams consist of triangles glued together along hinges and can be restricted to tetrahedral decompositions in a large-N limit. In this paper, after clarifying that all the tetrahedra resulting in the original models are orientable, we define a version of triangle-hinge models that can describe the dynamics of unoriented membranes. By regarding each triangle as representing a propagation of an open membrane of disk topology, we introduce a local worldvolume parity transformation which inverts the orientation of a triangle, and define unoriented triangle-hinge models by gauging the transformation. Unlike two-dimensional cases, this local transformation generally relates a manifold to a nonmanifold, but still is a well-defined manipulation among tetrahedral decompositions. We further show that matter fields can be introduced in the same way as in the original oriented models. In particular, the models will describe unoriented membranes in a target spacetime by taking matter fields to be the target space coordinates.

  10. Structural effects of Zn(2+) on cell membranes and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Novoa, V; Villena, F; Sotomayor, C P; Aguilar, L F; Ronowska, A; Szutowicz, A

    2009-05-01

    Zinc is an essential element for nutrition as well as for the proper development and function of brain cells, and its traces are present in a wide range of foods. It is a constituent of many enzyme systems and is an integral part of insulin and of the active site of intracellular enzymes. However, excessive accumulation of zinc or its release from the binding sites may become detrimental for neurons. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of zinc ions with cell membranes, it was incubated with intact human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), cholinergic murine neuroblastoma cells, and molecular models of cell membranes. These consisted in bilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), phospholipid classes present in the outer and inner monolayers of most plasmatic cell membranes, particularly that of human erythrocytes, respectively. The capacity of zinc ions to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was assessed by X-ray diffraction, DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) and IUM were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, intact human erythrocytes were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and neuroblastoma cell morphology was observed under inverted microscope. This study presents evidence that 0.1mM Zn and higher concentrations affect cell membrane and molecular models. PMID:19327840

  11. Effects of lithium on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Fierro, Paulo; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2007-08-01

    The mechanism whereby lithium carbonate controls manic episodes and possibly influences affective disorders is not yet known. There is evidence, however, that lithium alters sodium transport and may interfere with ion exchange mechanisms and nerve conduction. For these reasons it was thought of interest to study its perturbing effects upon membrane structures. The effects of lithium carbonate (Li+) on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models have been investigated. The molecular models consisted in bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representing classes of phospholipids located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. This report presents the following evidence that Li+ interacts with cell membranes: a) X-ray diffraction indicated that Li+ induced structural perturbation of the polar head group and of the hydrophobic acyl regions of DMPC and DMPE; b) experiments performed on DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) by fluorescence spectroscopy also showed that Li+ interacted with the lipid polar groups and hydrophobic acyl chains, and c) in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on intact human erythrocytes the formation of echinocytes was observed, effect that might be due to the insertion of Li+ in the outer monolayer of the red cell membrane. PMID:17532553

  12. Molecular determinants of phospholipid synergy in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Tavoosi, Narjes; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Pogorelov, Taras V; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Arcario, Mark J; Clay, Mary C; Rienstra, Chad M; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Morrissey, James H

    2011-07-01

    Many regulatory processes in biology involve reversible association of proteins with membranes. Clotting proteins bind to phosphatidylserine (PS) on cell surfaces, but a clear picture of this interaction has yet to emerge. We present a novel explanation for membrane binding by GLA domains of clotting proteins, supported by biochemical studies, solid-state NMR analyses, and molecular dynamics simulations. The model invokes a single "phospho-L-serine-specific" interaction and multiple "phosphate-specific" interactions. In the latter, the phosphates in phospholipids interact with tightly bound Ca(2+) in GLA domains. We show that phospholipids with any headgroup other than choline strongly synergize with PS to enhance factor X activation. We propose that phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin (the major external phospholipids of healthy cells) are anticoagulant primarily because their bulky choline headgroups sterically hinder access to their phosphates. Following cell damage or activation, exposed PS and phosphatidylethanolamine collaborate to bind GLA domains by providing phospho-L-serine-specific and phosphate-specific interactions, respectively. PMID:21561861

  13. Molecular Determinants of Phospholipid Synergy in Blood Clotting*

    PubMed Central

    Tavoosi, Narjes; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Arcario, Mark J.; Clay, Mary C.; Rienstra, Chad M.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Morrissey, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Many regulatory processes in biology involve reversible association of proteins with membranes. Clotting proteins bind to phosphatidylserine (PS) on cell surfaces, but a clear picture of this interaction has yet to emerge. We present a novel explanation for membrane binding by GLA domains of clotting proteins, supported by biochemical studies, solid-state NMR analyses, and molecular dynamics simulations. The model invokes a single “phospho-l-serine-specific” interaction and multiple “phosphate-specific” interactions. In the latter, the phosphates in phospholipids interact with tightly bound Ca2+ in GLA domains. We show that phospholipids with any headgroup other than choline strongly synergize with PS to enhance factor X activation. We propose that phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin (the major external phospholipids of healthy cells) are anticoagulant primarily because their bulky choline headgroups sterically hinder access to their phosphates. Following cell damage or activation, exposed PS and phosphatidylethanolamine collaborate to bind GLA domains by providing phospho-l-serine-specific and phosphate-specific interactions, respectively. PMID:21561861

  14. A Membrane Model from Implicit Elasticity Theory

    PubMed Central

    Freed, A. D.; Liao, J.; Einstein, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    A Fungean solid is derived for membranous materials as a body defined by isotropic response functions whose mathematical structure is that of a Hookean solid where the elastic constants are replaced by functions of state derived from an implicit, thermodynamic, internal-energy function. The theory utilizes Biot’s (1939) definitions for stress and strain that, in 1-dimension, are the stress/strain measures adopted by Fung (1967) when he postulated what is now known as Fung’s law. Our Fungean membrane model is parameterized against a biaxial data set acquired from a porcine pleural membrane subjected to three, sequential, proportional, planar extensions. These data support an isotropic/deviatoric split in the stress and strain-rate hypothesized by our theory. These data also demonstrate that the material response is highly non-linear but, otherwise, mechanically isotropic. These data are described reasonably well by our otherwise simple, four-parameter, material model. PMID:24282079

  15. Interaction of Mastoparan with Model Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haloot, Justin

    2010-10-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents began during the 20th century to reduce the effects of infectious diseases. Since the 1990s, antimicrobial resistance has become an ever-increasing global problem. Our laboratory recently found that small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have potent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms including antibiotic resistant organisms. These AMPs are potential therapeutic agents against the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. AMPs are small peptides produced by plants, insects and animals. Several hypotheses concede that these peptides cause some type of structural perturbations and increased membrane permeability in bacteria however, how AMPs kill bacteria remains unclear. The goal of this study was to design an assay that would allow us to evaluate and monitor the pore forming ability of an AMP, Mastoparan, on model membrane structures called liposomes. Development of this model will facilitate the study of how mastoparan and related AMPs interact with the bacterial membrane.

  16. Evidence for the hydration effect at the semiconductor phospholipid-bilayer interface by TiO2 photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Schneider, C; Mansilla, H D; Kiwi, J

    2005-03-01

    The interactions of TiO2 with phospholipid bilayers found in cell membrane walls were observed to perturb the bilayer structure under UVA light irradiation. The structure changes in the phospholipid bilayers upon contact with TiO2 under light and in the dark were followed by X-ray diffraction. Hydration effects at the semiconductor-phospholipid interface played an important role in the degradation of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) bilayers taken as cell wall lipid bilayer models. Evidence is provided that the fluidity of the phospholipid bilayers plays a significant role when interacting in the dark with the TiO2 or in processes mediated by TiO2 under light irradiation. PMID:15708523

  17. Fusion of Boar Sperm with Nanoliposomes Prepared from Synthetic Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kasimanickam, V R; Buhr, M M

    2016-08-01

    Liposomes are artificial membrane vesicles that can be used to test and model the functions and interactions of various biological membranes, or as a carrier system to deliver biologically active substances into the cells, or to incorporate lipids into the plasma membrane of target cells to modify membrane structure-function relationships. Sperm plasma membrane undergoes lipid modification during maturation in epididymis and during capacitation in the female reproductive tract to facilitate fertilization. Natural variation in the amounts and composition of lipids in the sperm plasma membrane may also contribute to the species-specific sperm sensitivities to handling and storage conditions. Boar sperm are notoriously susceptible to membrane damage and are resistant to compositional alteration by artificial liposomes. This study used flow cytometry to demonstrate stable incorporation of nanoliposomes prepared from a complex mixture of various phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine : phosphatidylethanolamine : sphingomyelin : phosphatidylserine : phosphatidylinositol) with high fusion efficiency. Over 90% of sperm rapidly took up fluorescently labelled liposomes and retained the lipids for at least 60 min, in a significant time- and concentration-dependent manner. This unique fusion efficacy could be used to alter sperm plasma membrane composition and hence membrane-based functional responses. PMID:27217373

  18. Fusion of Boar Sperm with Nanoliposomes Prepared from Synthetic Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kasimanickam, V R; Buhr, M M

    2016-08-01

    Liposomes are artificial membrane vesicles that can be used to test and model the functions and interactions of various biological membranes, or as a carrier system to deliver biologically active substances into the cells, or to incorporate lipids into the plasma membrane of target cells to modify membrane structure-function relationships. Sperm plasma membrane undergoes lipid modification during maturation in epididymis and during capacitation in the female reproductive tract to facilitate fertilization. Natural variation in the amounts and composition of lipids in the sperm plasma membrane may also contribute to the species-specific sperm sensitivities to handling and storage conditions. Boar sperm are notoriously susceptible to membrane damage and are resistant to compositional alteration by artificial liposomes. This study used flow cytometry to demonstrate stable incorporation of nanoliposomes prepared from a complex mixture of various phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine : phosphatidylethanolamine : sphingomyelin : phosphatidylserine : phosphatidylinositol) with high fusion efficiency. Over 90% of sperm rapidly took up fluorescently labelled liposomes and retained the lipids for at least 60 min, in a significant time- and concentration-dependent manner. This unique fusion efficacy could be used to alter sperm plasma membrane composition and hence membrane-based functional responses.

  19. Microbial Community Evolution as Evidenced by Isotopic Incorporation into Phospholipid Fatty Acids in a Model Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, L.; Mailloux, B. J.; Kujawinski, E. B.

    2004-12-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of biomarkers such as phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) has been used successfully to identify active microbial communities in a variety of environments. We are interested in extending this approach to examine the evolution of microbial communities over time. We tested this capability within the context of a larger experiment examining the role of microbes in mediating transformations of organic matter within an aquifer system. A laboratory flow-through column experiment was conducted with sediment collected from a pristine, shallow, coastal plain aquifer. The groundwater medium was amended with low levels of an isotopically labeled substrate, 13C-acetate, for approximately one month and then with non-labeled acetate for one month. PLFAs were extracted from sediments prior to and after labeled-acetate addition. In addition, PLFAs were isolated from effluent samples during selected time points within the two-month experiment. Incorporation of the 13C label into the PLFAs was monitored using isotope-ratio GC/MS. Because some PLFAs can be used to infer the presence of specific microbial groups, we used the relative concentration of different PLFAs and the timing and degree of isotopic incorporation (or loss) to examine the progression of different microbial communities within our model system. This powerful method can be used to untangle the complex interactions within microbial systems and can be extended to a variety of ecosystems.

  20. A rhenium tris-carbonyl derivative as a model molecule for incorporation into phospholipid assemblies for skin applications.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Estibalitz; Rodríguez, Gelen; Hostachy, Sarah; Clède, Sylvain; Cócera, Mercedes; Sandt, Christophe; Lambert, François; de la Maza, Alfonso; Policar, Clotilde; López, Olga

    2015-07-01

    A rhenium tris-carbonyl derivative (fac-[Re(CO)3Cl(2-(1-dodecyl-1H-1,2,3,triazol-4-yl)-pyridine)]) was incorporated into phospholipid assemblies, called bicosomes, and the penetration of this molecule into skin was monitored using Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR). To evaluate the capacity of bicosomes to promote the penetration of this derivative, the skin penetration of the Re(CO)3 derivative dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a typical enhancer, was also studied. Dynamic light scattering results (DLS) showed an increase in the size of the bicosomes with the incorporation of the Re(CO)3 derivative, and the FTIR microspectroscopy showed that the Re(CO)3 derivative incorporated in bicosomes penetrated deeper into the skin than when dissolved in DMSO. When this molecule was applied on the skin using the bicosomes, 60% of the Re(CO)3 derivative was retained in the stratum corneum (SC) and 40% reached the epidermis (Epi). Otherwise, the application of this molecule via DMSO resulted in 95% of the Re(CO)3 derivative being in the SC and only 5% reaching the Epi. Using a Re(CO)3 derivative with a dodecyl-chain as a model molecule, it was possible to determine the distribution of molecules with similar physicochemical characteristics in the skin using bicosomes. This fact makes these nanostructures promising vehicles for the application of lipophilic molecules inside the skin.

  1. Modeling of interactions between nanoparticles and cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Young-Min

    Rapid development of nanotechnology and ability to manufacture materials and devices with nanometer feature size leads to exciting innovations in many areas including the medical and electronic fields. However, the possible health and environmental impacts of manufactured nanomaterials are not fully known. Recent experimental reports suggest that some of the manufactured nanomaterials, such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, are highly toxic even in small concentrations. The goal of the current work is to understand the mechanisms responsible for the toxicity of nanomaterials. In the current study coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the interactions between NPs and cellular membranes at a molecular level. One of the possible toxicity mechanisms of the nanomaterials is membrane disruption. Possibility of membrane disruption exposed to the manufactured nanomaterials are examined by considering chemical reactions and non-reactive physical interactions as chemical as well as physical mechanisms. Mechanisms of transport of carbon-based nanoparticles (fullerene and its derivative) across a phospholipid bilayer are investigated. The free energy profile is obtained using constrained simulations. It is shown that the considered nanoparticles are hydrophobic and therefore they tend to reside in the interior of the lipid bilayer. In addition, the dynamics of the membrane fluctuations is significantly affected by the nanoparticles at the bilayer-water interface. The hydrophobic interaction between the particles and membrane core induces the strong coupling between the nanoparticle motion and membrane deformation. It is observed that the considered nanoparticles affect several physical properties of the membrane. The nanoparticles embedded into the membrane interior lead to the membrane softening, which becomes more significant with increase in CNT length and concentration. The lateral pressure profile and membrane energy in the membrane

  2. Interaction of C60 fullerene complexed to doxorubicin with model bilipid membranes and its uptake by HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Prylutskyy, Yu; Bychko, A; Sokolova, V; Prylutska, S; Evstigneev, M; Rybalchenko, V; Epple, M; Scharff, P

    2016-02-01

    With an aim to elucidate the effects of C60 fullerene complexed with antibiotic doxorubicin (Dox) on model bilipid membranes (BLM), the investigation of the electrical properties of BLM under the action of Dox and C60 fullerene, and of their complex, C60+Dox,was performed. The complex as well as its components exert a clearly detectable influence on BLM, which is concentration-dependent and also depends on phospholipid composition. The mechanism of this effect originates either from intermolecular interaction of the drug with fatty-acid residues of phospholipids, or from membranotropic effects of the drug-induced lipid peroxidation, or from the sum of these two effects. By fluorescence microscopy the entering of C60 + Dox complex into HeLa cells was directly shown.

  3. Membrane Packing Problems: A short Review on computational Membrane Modeling Methods and Tools

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Björn

    2013-01-01

    The use of model membranes is currently part of the daily workflow for many biochemical and biophysical disciplines. These membranes are used to analyze the behavior of small substances, to simulate transport processes, to study the structure of macromolecules or for illustrative purposes. But, how can these membrane structures be generated? This mini review discusses a number of ways to obtain these structures. First, the problem will be formulated as the Membrane Packing Problem. It will be shown that the theoretical problem of placing proteins and lipids onto a membrane area differ significantly. Thus, two sub-problems will be defined and discussed. Then, different – partly historical – membrane modeling methods will be introduced. And finally, membrane modeling tools will be evaluated which are able to semi-automatically generate these model membranes and thus, drastically accelerate and simplify the membrane generation process. The mini review concludes with advice about which tool is appropriate for which application case. PMID:24688707

  4. The aminosterol antibiotic squalamine permeabilizes large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Selinsky, B S; Zhou, Z; Fojtik, K G; Jones, S R; Dollahon, N R; Shinnar, A E

    1998-03-13

    The ability of the shark antimicrobial aminosterol squalamine to induce the leakage of polar fluorescent dyes from large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (LUVs) has been measured. Micromolar squalamine causes leakage of carboxyfluorescein (CF) from vesicles prepared from the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), and cardiolipin. Binding analyses based on the leakage data show that squalamine has its highest affinity to phosphatidylglycerol membranes, followed by phosphatidylserine and cardiolipin membranes. Squalamine will also induce the leakage of CF from phosphatidylcholine (PC) LUVs at low phospholipid concentrations. At high phospholipid concentrations, the leakage of CF from PC LUVs deviates from a simple dose-response relationship, and it appears that some of the squalamine can no longer cause leakage. Fluorescent dye leakage generated by squalamine is graded, suggesting the formation of a discrete membrane pore rather than a generalized disruption of vesicular membranes. By using fluorescently labeled dextrans of different molecular weight, material with molecular weight /=10,000 is retained. Negative stain electron microscopy of squalamine-treated LUVs shows that squalamine decreases the average vesicular size in a concentration-dependent manner. Squalamine decreases the size of vesicles containing anionic phospholipid at a lower squalamine/lipid molar ratio than pure PC LUVs. In a centrifugation assay, squalamine solubilizes phospholipid, but only at significantly higher squalamine/phospholipid ratios than required for either dye leakage or vesicle size reduction. Squalamine solubilizes PC at lower squalamine/phospholipid ratios than PG. We suggest that squalamine complexes with phospholipid to form a discrete structure within the bilayers of LUVs, resulting in the transient leakage of small encapsulated molecules. At higher

  5. Model-building codes for membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, David Noyes; Hunt, Thomas W.; Brown, W. Michael; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Slepoy, Alexander; Sale, Kenneth L.; Young, Malin M.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Gray, Genetha Anne

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach to modeling the transmembrane spanning helical bundles of integral membrane proteins using only a sparse set of distance constraints, such as those derived from MS3-D, dipolar-EPR and FRET experiments. Algorithms have been written for searching the conformational space of membrane protein folds matching the set of distance constraints, which provides initial structures for local conformational searches. Local conformation search is achieved by optimizing these candidates against a custom penalty function that incorporates both measures derived from statistical analysis of solved membrane protein structures and distance constraints obtained from experiments. This results in refined helical bundles to which the interhelical loops and amino acid side-chains are added. Using a set of only 27 distance constraints extracted from the literature, our methods successfully recover the structure of dark-adapted rhodopsin to within 3.2 {angstrom} of the crystal structure.

  6. Modelling Of Manufacturing Processes With Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crăciunean, Daniel Cristian; Crăciunean, Vasile

    2015-07-01

    The current objectives to increase the standards of quality and efficiency in manufacturing processes can be achieved only through the best combination of inputs, independent of spatial distance between them. This paper proposes modelling production processes based on membrane structures introduced in [4]. Inspired from biochemistry, membrane computation [4] is based on the concept of membrane represented in its formalism by the mathematical concept of multiset. The manufacturing process is the evolution of a super cell system from its initial state according to the given actions of aggregation. In this paper we consider that the atomic production unit of the process is the action. The actions and the resources on which the actions are produced, are distributed in a virtual network of companies working together. The destination of the output resources is specified by corresponding output events.

  7. Binding of small basic peptides to membranes containing acidic lipids: theoretical models and experimental results.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Tal, N; Honig, B; Peitzsch, R M; Denisov, G; McLaughlin, S

    1996-01-01

    We measured directly the binding of Lys3, Lys5, and Lys7 to vesicles containing acidic phospholipids. When the vesicles contain 33% acidic lipids and the aqueous solution contains 100 mM monovalent salt, the standard Gibbs free energy for the binding of these peptides is 3, 5, and 7 kcal/mol, respectively. The binding energies decrease as the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane decreases and/or as the salt concentration increases. Several lines of evidence suggest that these hydrophilic peptides do not penetrate the polar headgroup region of the membrane and that the binding is mainly due to electrostatic interactions. To calculate the binding energies from classical electrostatics, we applied the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation to atomic models of the phospholipid bilayers and the basic peptides in aqueous solution. The electrostatic free energy of interaction, which arises from both a long-range coulombic attraction between the positively charged peptide and the negatively charged lipid bilayer, and a short-range Born or image charge repulsion, is a minimum when approximately 2.5 A (i.e., one layer of water) exists between the van der Waals surfaces of the peptide and the lipid bilayer. The calculated molar association constants, K, agree well with the measured values: K is typically about 10-fold smaller than the experimental value (i.e., a difference of about 1.5 kcal/mol in the free energy of binding). The predicted dependence of K (or the binding free energies) on the ionic strength of the solution, the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane, and the number of basic residues in the peptide agree very well with the experimental measurements. These calculations are relevant to the membrane binding of a number of important proteins that contain clusters of basic residues. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8842196

  8. Effects of lead on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Villena, F; Norris, B; Cuevas, Y F; Sotomayor, C P; Zatta, P

    2003-11-01

    Lead has no biological function; however, low, and particularly, high levels of exposure have a number of negative consequences for human health. Despite the number of reports about lead toxicity, very little information has been obtained regarding its effects on cell membranes. For this reason, the structural effects of lead on the human erythrocyte membranes were investigated. This aim was attained by making lead ions interact with intact erythrocytes, isolated unsealed erythrocyte membranes (IUM) and molecular models. The latter consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representing phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane. The results, obtained by electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, indicated that (a) lead particles adhered to the external and internal surfaces of the human erythrocyte membrane; (b) lead ions disturbed the lamellar organization of IUM and DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) and (c) induced considerable molecular disorder in both lipid multilayers, the effects being much more pronounced in DMPC. PMID:14511893

  9. Partitioning of amino-acid analogues in a five-slab membrane model

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, D; Smith, Jeremy C; Ullmann, G. Matthias

    2008-09-01

    The positional preferences of the twenty amino-acid residues in a phospholipid bilayer are investigated by calculating the solvation free energy of the corresponding side chain analogues using a five-slab continuum electrostatic model. The side-chain analogues of the aromatic residues tryptophan and tyrosine are found to partition in the head-group region, due to compensation between the increase of the non-polar component of the solvation free energy at the boundary with the aqueous region and the decrease in the electrostatic component. The side chain analogue of phenylalanine differs from the other aromatic molecules by being able to partition in both the head-group region and the membrane core. This finding is consistent with experimental findings of the position of phenylalanine in membrane helices. Interestingly, the charged side-chain analogues of arginine and lysine are shown to prefer the head-group region in an orientation that allows the charged moiety to interact with the aqueous layer. The orientation adopted is similar to the 'snorkelling' effect seen in lysine and arginine residues in membrane helices. In contrast, the preference of the charged side-chain analogues of histidine (protonated) and aspartate (deprotonated) for the aqueous layer is shown to be due to a steep decrease in the electrostatic component of the solvation free energy at the boundary to the aqueous region. The calculations allow an understanding of the origins of side chain positioning in membranes and are thus useful in understanding membrane-protein:lipid thermodynamics.

  10. Phospholipid membrane-interaction of a peptide from S4 segment of KvAP K(+) channel and the influence of the positive charges and an identified heptad repeat in its interaction with a S3 peptide.

    PubMed

    Verma, Richa; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2011-06-01

    In order to examine the ability of S3 and S4 segments of a Kv channel to interact with each other, two wild type short peptides derived from the S3 and S4 segments of KvAP channel were synthesized. Additionally, to evaluate the role of positive charges and an identified heptad repeat in the S4 segment, two S4 mutants of the same size as the S4 peptide, one with substitution of two leucine residues in the heptad repeat sequence by two alanine residues and in the other two arginine residues replaced by two glutamines residues were synthesized. Our results show that only the wild type S4 peptide, but not its mutants, self-assembled and permeabilized negatively charged phospholipid vesicles. The S3 peptide showed lesser affinity toward the same kind of lipid vesicles and localized onto its surface. However, the S3 peptide interacted only with S4 wild type peptide, but not with S4 mutants, and altered its localization onto the phospholipid membrane with increased resistance against the proteolytic enzyme, proteinase-k, in the presence of the S4 peptide. The results demonstrate that the selected, synthetic S3 and S4 segments possess the required amino acid sequences to interact with each other and show that the positive charges and the identified heptad repeat in S4 contribute to its assembly and interaction with S3 segment.

  11. Cholesterol transport in model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Sumit; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Perez-Salas, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Physiological processes distribute cholesterol unevenly within the cell. The levels of cholesterol are maintained by intracellular transport and a disruption in the cell's ability to keep these normal levels will lead to disease. Exchange rates of cholesterol are generally studied in model systems using labeled lipid vesicles. Initially donor vesicles have all the cholesterol and acceptor vesicles are devoid of it. They are mixed and after some time the vesicles are separated and cholesterol is traced in each vesicle. The studies performed up to date have significant scatter indicating that the methodologies are not consistent. The present work shows in-situ Time-Resolved SANS studies of cholesterol exchange rates in unsaturated PC lipid vesicles. Molecular dynamics simulations were done to investigate the energetic and kinetic behavior of cholesterol in this system. This synergistic approach will provide insight into our efforts to understand cholesterol traffic.

  12. Tombusviruses upregulate phospholipid biosynthesis via interaction between p33 replication protein and yeast lipid sensor proteins during virus replication in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas, Daniel; Xu, Kai; Sharma, Monika; Wu, Cheng-Yu; Nagy, Peter D.

    2014-12-15

    Positive-stranded RNA viruses induce new membranous structures and promote membrane proliferation in infected cells to facilitate viral replication. In this paper, the authors show that a plant-infecting tombusvirus upregulates transcription of phospholipid biosynthesis genes, such as INO1, OPI3 and CHO1, and increases phospholipid levels in yeast model host. This is accomplished by the viral p33 replication protein, which interacts with Opi1p FFAT domain protein and Scs2p VAP protein. Opi1p and Scs2p are phospholipid sensor proteins and they repress the expression of phospholipid genes. Accordingly, deletion of OPI1 transcription repressor in yeast has a stimulatory effect on TBSV RNA accumulation and enhanced tombusvirus replicase activity in an in vitro assay. Altogether, the presented data convincingly demonstrate that de novo lipid biosynthesis is required for optimal TBSV replication. Overall, this work reveals that a (+)RNA virus reprograms the phospholipid biosynthesis pathway in a unique way to facilitate its replication in yeast cells. - Highlights: • Tombusvirus p33 replication protein interacts with FFAT-domain host protein. • Tombusvirus replication leads to upregulation of phospholipids. • Tombusvirus replication depends on de novo lipid synthesis. • Deletion of FFAT-domain host protein enhances TBSV replication. • TBSV rewires host phospholipid synthesis.

  13. Cost effective, robust, and reliable coupled separation techniques for the identification and quantification of phospholipids in complex biological matrices: application to insects.

    PubMed

    Zahradníčková, Helena; Tomčala, Aleš; Berková, Petra; Schneedorferová, Ivana; Okrouhlík, Jan; Simek, Petr; Hodková, Magdalena

    2014-08-01

    The quantification of phospholipid classes and the determination of their molecular structures are crucial in physiological and medical studies. This paper's target analytes are cell membrane phospholipids, which play an important role in the seasonal acclimation processes of poikilothermic organisms. We introduce a set of simple and cost-effective analytical methods that enable efficient characterization and quantification of particular phospholipid classes and the identification and relative distribution of the individual phospholipid species. The analytical approach involves solid-phase extraction and high-performance thin-layer chromatography, which facilitate the separation of particular lipid classes. The obtained fractions are further transesterified to fatty acid methyl esters and subjected to gas chromatography coupled to flame ionization detection, which enables the determination of the position of double bonds. Phospholipid species separation is achieved by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, which gives information about the headgroup moiety and attached fatty acids. The total content of each phospholipids class is assessed by phosphorus determination by UV spectrophotometry. The simultaneous analysis of phosphorus, fatty acid residues, and phospholipid species provides detailed information about phospholipid composition. Evaluation of these coupled methods was achieved by application to an insect model, Pyrrhocoris apterus. High correlation was observed between fatty acid compositions as determined by gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. PMID:24799084

  14. Morphological and Physical Analysis of Natural Phospholipids-Based Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Jacquot, Adrien; Francius, Grégory; Razafitianamaharavo, Angelina; Dehghani, Fariba; Tamayol, Ali; Linder, Michel; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira

    2014-01-01

    Background Liposomes are currently an important part of biological, pharmaceutical, medical and nutritional research, as they are considered to be among the most effective carriers for the introduction of various types of bioactive agents into target cells. Scope of Review In this work, we study the lipid organization and mechanical properties of biomembranes made of marine and plant phospholipids. Membranes based on phospholipids extracted from rapeseed and salmon are studied in the form of liposome and as supported lipid bilayer. Dioleylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) are used as references to determine the lipid organization of marine and plant phospholipid based membranes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy measurements are performed to investigate the membranes' topography at the micrometer scale and to determine their mechanical properties. Major Conclusions The mechanical properties of the membranes are correlated to the fatty acid composition, the morphology, the electrophoretic mobility and the membrane fluidity. Thus, soft and homogeneous mechanical properties are evidenced for salmon phospholipids membrane containing various polyunsaturated fatty acids. Besides, phase segregation in rapeseed membrane and more important mechanical properties were emphasized for this type of membranes by contrast to the marine phospholipids based membranes. General Significance This paper provides new information on the nanomechanical and morphological properties of membrane in form of liposome by AFM. The originality of this work is to characterize the physico-chemical properties of the nanoliposome from the natural sources containing various fatty acids and polar head. PMID:25238543

  15. Shapes of Mixed Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Maldonado, Amir

    2006-01-01

    We studied the shape of phospholipid vesicles prepared by hydration of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) and phosphatidylserine (SOPS) in different proportions. The aim of the work is to obtain some insight into the influence of the chemical composition of a biomembrane on its shape. The optical microscopy results show that the shape of the vesicles depend on the SOPC:SOPS composition. For low SOPS contents, coiled cylindrical vesicles are observed. The results suggest that specific compositions of the SOPC:SOPS vesicles produce some spontaneous curvature on the membrane and then a coiling instability. PMID:19669461

  16. A quantitative model for hyaline membrane disease.

    PubMed

    Rojas, J; Green, R S; Fannon, L; Olssen, T; Lindstrom, D P; Stahlman, M T; Cotton, R B

    1982-01-01

    A model based on the course of 31 infants with uncomplicated hyaline membrane disease is described. Based on data collected over the first 12 hr of life, it predicts the course of an infant for the next 60 hr, and estimates the outcome in terms of length of oxygen requirement and assisted ventilation. For the construction of the model, right-to-left intra- and extra-pulmonary shunting, expressed as venous admixture, was considered as the principal mechanism of hypoxemia in hyaline membrane disease and mean applied proximal airway pressure was used to quantify management. The model provides an objective estimate of severity early in the course of disease, uses variables routinely available in an intensive care unit, and its use would strengthen the interpretation of clinical studies in which the comparability of experimental and control groups is critical. PMID:7070873

  17. Modeling the endosomal escape of cell-penetrating peptides: transmembrane pH gradient driven translocation across phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Magzoub, Mazin; Pramanik, Aladdin; Gräslund, Astrid

    2005-11-15

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to mediate the efficient cellular uptake of a wide range of cargoes. Internalization of a number of CPPs requires uptake by endocytosis, initiated by binding to anionic cell surface heparan sulfate (HS), followed by escape from endosomes. To elucidate the endosomal escape mechanism, we have modeled the process for two CPPs: penetratin (pAntp) and the N-terminal signal peptide of the unprocessed bovine prion protein (bPrPp). Large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (LUVs) were produced encapsulating either peptide, and an ionophore, nigericin, was used to create a transmembrane pH gradient (DeltapH(mem), inside acidic) similar to the one arising in endosomes in vivo. In the absence of DeltapH(mem), no pAntp escape from the LUVs is observed, while a fraction of bPrPp escapes. In the presence of DeltapH(mem), a significant amount of pAntp escapes and an even higher degree of bPrPp escape takes place. These results, together with the differences in kinetics of escape, indicate different escape mechanisms for the two peptides. A minimum threshold peptide concentration exists for the escape of both peptides. Coupling of the peptides to a cargo reduces the fraction escaping, while complexation with HS significantly hinders the escape. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy results show that during the escape process the LUVs are intact. Taken together, these results suggest a model for endosomal escape of CPPs: DeltapH(mem)-mediated mechanism, following dissociation from HS of the peptides, above a minimum threshold peptide concentration, in a process that does not involve lysis of the vesicles.

  18. Effects of phenylpropanolamine (PPA) on in vitro human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models

    SciTech Connect

    Suwalsky, Mario; Zambrano, Pablo; Mennickent, Sigrid; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P.; Aguilar, Luis F.; Bolognin, Silvia

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} PPA is a common ingredient in cough-cold medication and appetite suppressants. {yields} Reports on its effects on human erythrocytes are very scarce. {yields} We found that PPA induced in vitro morphological changes to human erythrocytes. {yields} PPA interacted with isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes. {yields} PPA interacted with class of lipid present in the erythrocyte membrane outer monolayer. -- Abstract: Norephedrine, also called phenylpropanolamine (PPA), is a synthetic form of the ephedrine alkaloid. After reports of the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhage and other adverse effects, including several deaths, PPA is no longer sold in USA and Canada. Despite the extensive information about PPA toxicity, reports on its effects on cell membranes are scarce. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of PPA with cell membranes, ranges of concentrations were incubated with intact human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), and molecular models of cell membranes. The latter consisted in bilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), phospholipid classes present in the outer and inner monolayers of most plasmatic cell membranes, respectively. The capacity of PPA to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was assessed by X-ray diffraction, DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) and IUM were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, and intact human erythrocytes were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study presents evidence that PPA affects human red cell membranes as follows: (a) in SEM studies on human erythrocytes it was observed that 0.5 mM PPA induced shape changes; (b) in IUM PPA induced a sharp decrease in the fluorescence anisotropy in the lipid bilayer acyl chains in a concentration range lower than 100 {mu}M; (c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that PPA in the 0.1-0.5 m

  19. The local anesthetic proparacaine modifies sodium transport in toad skin and perturbs the structures of model and cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Norris, Beryl; Villena, Fernando; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2002-01-01

    Experimental results indicate a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of proparacaine to isolated toad skin, which may reflect an inhibition of the active transport of ions. This finding was explained on the basis of the results obtained from membrane models incubated with proparacaine. These consisted of human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), phospholipid multilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively, and in large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of DMPC X-ray diffraction showed that proparacaine interaction with DMPC and DMPE bilayers perturbed both structures, especially DMPC. This result, confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy of DMPC LUV at 18 degrees C, demonstrated that the local anesthetic (LA) could interact with the lipid moiety of cell membranes. However, effects observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of human erythrocytes and by fluorescence spectroscopy of IUM might also imply proparacaine-protein interactions. Thus, the LA may alter epitheial sodium channels through interaction with the lipid matrix and with channel protein residues. PMID:12440736

  20. Thyroid hormone-induced alterations in membrane structure-function relationships: studies on kinetic properties of rat kidney microsomal Na(+),K (+)-ATPase and lipid/phospholipid profiles.

    PubMed

    Katyare, Surendra S; Modi, Hiren R; Patel, Samir P; Patel, Minal A

    2007-10-01

    The effects of thyroidectomy (Tx) and subsequent treatment with 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T(3)) or combined replacement therapy (T(R)) with T(3 )and thyroxine (T(4)) on the substrate and temperature kinetics properties of Na+,K+-ATPase and lipid/phospholipid makeup of rat kidney microsomes were examined. Enzyme activity was somewhat high in the hypothyroid (Tx) animals and increased significantly following T(3) treatment, while T(R) treatment caused a decrease. In the Tx and T(3) groups enzyme activity resolved in two kinetic components, while in the T(R) group the enzyme showed allosteric behavior up to 0.5 mM: ATP concentration. The K(m) and V(max) values of both the components decreased in Tx animals without affecting the catalytic efficiency. T(3) treatment caused a significant increase in the V(max) of both the components, with a significant increase in the catalytic efficiency, while the K(m) values were not upregulated. The T(R) regimen lowered the K(m) and V(max) of component II but improved the catalytic efficiency. Thyroid status-dependent changes were also noted in the temperature kinetics of the enzyme. Regression analysis revealed that changes in the substrate and temperature kinetics parameters correlated with specific phospholipid components. PMID:17721830

  1. Analytical coupled vibroacoustic modeling of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials: membrane model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangyang; Huang, Guoliang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai; Sun, Chin-Teh

    2014-09-01

    Membrane-type acoustic metamaterials (MAMs) have demonstrated unusual capacity in controlling low-frequency sound transmission/reflection. In this paper, an analytical vibroacoustic membrane model is developed to study sound transmission behavior of the MAM under a normal incidence. The MAM is composed of a prestretched elastic membrane with attached rigid masses. To accurately capture finite-dimension rigid mass effects on the membrane deformation, the point matching approach is adopted by applying a set of distributed point forces along the interfacial boundary between masses and the membrane. The accuracy and capability of the theoretical model is verified through the comparison with the finite element method. In particular, microstructure effects such as weight, size, and eccentricity of the attached mass, pretension, and thickness of the membrane on the resulting transmission peak and dip frequencies of the MAM are quantitatively investigated. New peak and dip frequencies are found for the MAM with one and multiple eccentric attached masses. The developed model can be served as an efficient tool for design of such membrane-type metamaterials. PMID:25190372

  2. Interactions of Model Cell Membranes with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, S. M.; Camesano, T. A.; Nagarajan, R.

    2011-12-01

    The same properties that give nanoparticles their enhanced function, such as high surface area, small size, and better conductivity, can also alter the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Ultimately, many of these nanomaterials will be released into the environment, and can cause cytotoxic effects to environmental bacteria, aquatic organisms, and humans. Previous results from our laboratory suggest that nanoparticles can have a detrimental effect on cells, depending on nanoparticle size. It is our goal to characterize the properties of nanomaterials that can result in membrane destabilization. We tested the effects of nanoparticle size and chemical functionalization on nanoparticle-membrane interactions. Gold nanoparticles at 2, 5,10, and 80 nm were investigated, with a concentration of 1.1x1010 particles/mL. Model cell membranes were constructed of of L-α-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), which has negatively charged lipid headgroups. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to measure frequency changes at different overtones, which were related to mass changes corresponding to nanoparticle interaction with the model membrane. In QCM-D, a lipid bilayer is constructed on a silicon dioxide crystal. The crystals, oscillate at different harmonic frequencies depending upon changes in mass or energy dissipation. When mass is added to the crystal surface, such as through addition of a lipid vesicle solution, the frequency change decreases. By monitoring the frequency and dissipation, we could verify that a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formed on the silica surface. After formation of the SLB, the nanoparticles can be added to the system, and the changes in frequency and dissipation are monitored in order to build a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell membrane interactions. For all of the smaller nanoparticles (2, 5, and 10 nm), nanoparticle addition caused a loss of mass from the lipid bilayer, which appears to be due to the formation of holes

  3. Membrane Compartmentalization Reducing the Mobility of Lipids and Proteins within a Model Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Koldsø, Heidi; Reddy, Tyler; Fowler, Philip W; Duncan, Anna L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-01

    The cytoskeleton underlying cell membranes may influence the dynamic organization of proteins and lipids within the bilayer by immobilizing certain transmembrane (TM) proteins and forming corrals within the membrane. Here, we present coarse-grained resolution simulations of a biologically realistic membrane model of asymmetrically organized lipids and TM proteins. We determine the effects of a model of cytoskeletal immobilization of selected membrane proteins using long time scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing compartments with varying degrees of restraints within the membrane models, we are able to reveal how compartmentalization caused by cytoskeletal immobilization leads to reduced and anomalous diffusional mobility of both proteins and lipids. This in turn results in a reduced rate of protein dimerization within the membrane and of hopping of membrane proteins between compartments. These simulations provide a molecular realization of hierarchical models often invoked to explain single-molecule imaging studies of membrane proteins.

  4. Interaction of the organochlorine pesticide dieldrin with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Benites, M; Villena, F; Aguilar, F; Sotomayor, C P

    1997-01-01

    Dieldrin is an organochlorine insecticide highly toxic for human beings. Although its exact mechanism of action is not well known, there is evidence that it acts at the cell membrane level. In fact, the lipophilicity of the pesticide as well as that of the phospholipid bilayer present in biological membranes makes the latter a most likely target for the interaction of dieldrin with living organisms. In order to evaluate its perturbing effect upon cell membranes the pesticide was made to interact with human erythrocytes and molecular models. These studies were performed by scanning electron microscopy on erythrocytes, fluorescence spectroscopy on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) large unilamellar vesicles and X-ray diffraction on multilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE). It was observed that dieldrin particularly interacted with DMPC liposomes and multilayers perturbing its molecular arrangements. However, no effect was noticed on erythrocytes, which might be due to its high cholesterol content. PMID:9309876

  5. The interactions of squalene, alkanes and other mineral oils with model membranes; effects on membrane heterogeneity and function.

    PubMed

    Richens, Joanna L; Lane, Jordan S; Mather, Melissa L; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) offer many favourable facets as an artificial membrane system but the influence of any residual oil that remains in the bilayer following preparation is ill-defined. In this study the fluorescent membrane probes di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (Di-8-ANEPPS) and Fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE) were used to help understand the nature of the phospholipid-oil interaction and to examine any structural and functional consequences of such interactions on membrane bilayer properties. Concentration-dependent modifications of the membrane dipole potential were found to occur in phospholipid vesicles exposed to a variety of different oils. Incorporation of oil into the lipid bilayer was shown to have no significant effect on the movement of fatty acids across the lipid bilayer. Changes in membrane heterogeneity were, however, demonstrated with increased microdomain formation being visible in the bilayer following exposure to mineral oil, pentadecane and squalene. As it is important that artificial systems provide an accurate representation of the membrane environment, careful consideration should be taken prior to the application of DIBs in studies of membrane structure and organisation.

  6. Protein-phospholipid interactions in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James H; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Tavoosi, Narjes; Ke, Ke; Pureza, Vincent; Boettcher, John M; Clay, Mary C; Rienstra, Chad M; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-04-01

    Most steps of the blood clotting cascade require the assembly of a serine protease with its specific regulatory protein on a suitable phospholipid bilayer. Unfortunately, the molecular details of how blood clotting proteins bind to membrane surfaces remain poorly understood, owing to a dearth of techniques for studying protein-membrane interactions at high resolution. Our laboratories are tackling this question using a combination of approaches, including nanoscale membrane bilayers, solid-state NMR, and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. These studies are now providing structural insights at atomic resolution into clotting protein-membrane interactions. PMID:20129649

  7. Protein-Phospholipid Interactions in Blood Clotting

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, James H.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Tavoosi, Narjes; Ke, Ke; Pureza, Vincent; Boettcher, John M.; Clay, Mary C.; Rienstra, Chad M.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-01-01

    Most steps of the blood clotting cascade require the assembly of a serine protease with its specific regulatory protein on a suitable phospholipid bilayer. Unfortunately, the molecular details of how blood clotting proteins bind to membrane surfaces remain poorly understood, owing to a dearth of techniques for studying protein-membrane interactions at high resolution. Our laboratories are tackling this question using a combination of approaches, including nanoscale membrane bilayers, solid-state NMR, and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. These studies are now providing structural insights at atomic resolution into clotting protein-membrane interactions. PMID:20129649

  8. Hepatic secretion of phospholipid vesicles in the mouse critically depends on mdr2 or MDR3 P-glycoprotein expression. Visualization by electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, A R; Smith, A J; Hatch, V C; Oude Elferink, R P; Borst, P; Crawford, J M

    1997-01-01

    Hepatocellular secretion of bile salts into the biliary space induces phospholipid and cholesterol secretion, but the mechanism for integrated lipid secretion is poorly understood. Knockout mice unable to make the canalicular membrane mdr2 P-glycoprotein exhibit normal rates of bile salt secretion, yet are virtually incapable of secreting biliary phospholipid and cholesterol. As the mdr2 P-glycoprotein is thought to mediate transmembrane movement of phospholipid molecules, this mouse model was used to examine the mechanism for biliary phospholipid secretion. In wild-type mdr2 (+/+) mice, ultrarapid cryofixation of livers in situ revealed abundant unilamellar lipid vesicles within bile canalicular lumina. Although 74% of vesicles were adherent to the external aspect of the canalicular plasma membrane, bilayer exocytosis was not observed. Vesicle numbers in mdr2 (+/-) and (-/-) mice were 55 and 12% of wild-type levels, respectively. In a strain of mdr2 (-/-) mice which had been "rescued" by heterozygous genomic insertion of the MDR3 gene, the human homologue of the murine mdr2 gene, vesicle numbers returned to 95% of wild-type levels. Our findings indicate that biliary phospholipid is secreted as vesicles by a process largely dependent on the action of the murine mdr2 P-glycoprotein or human MDR3 P-glycoprotein. We conclude that mdr2-mediated phospholipid translocation from the internal to external hemileaflet of the canalicular membrane permits exovesiculation of the external hemileaflet, a vesiculation process promoted by the detergent environment of the bile canalicular lumen. PMID:9366571

  9. Hepatic secretion of phospholipid vesicles in the mouse critically depends on mdr2 or MDR3 P-glycoprotein expression. Visualization by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Crawford, A R; Smith, A J; Hatch, V C; Oude Elferink, R P; Borst, P; Crawford, J M

    1997-11-15

    Hepatocellular secretion of bile salts into the biliary space induces phospholipid and cholesterol secretion, but the mechanism for integrated lipid secretion is poorly understood. Knockout mice unable to make the canalicular membrane mdr2 P-glycoprotein exhibit normal rates of bile salt secretion, yet are virtually incapable of secreting biliary phospholipid and cholesterol. As the mdr2 P-glycoprotein is thought to mediate transmembrane movement of phospholipid molecules, this mouse model was used to examine the mechanism for biliary phospholipid secretion. In wild-type mdr2 (+/+) mice, ultrarapid cryofixation of livers in situ revealed abundant unilamellar lipid vesicles within bile canalicular lumina. Although 74% of vesicles were adherent to the external aspect of the canalicular plasma membrane, bilayer exocytosis was not observed. Vesicle numbers in mdr2 (+/-) and (-/-) mice were 55 and 12% of wild-type levels, respectively. In a strain of mdr2 (-/-) mice which had been "rescued" by heterozygous genomic insertion of the MDR3 gene, the human homologue of the murine mdr2 gene, vesicle numbers returned to 95% of wild-type levels. Our findings indicate that biliary phospholipid is secreted as vesicles by a process largely dependent on the action of the murine mdr2 P-glycoprotein or human MDR3 P-glycoprotein. We conclude that mdr2-mediated phospholipid translocation from the internal to external hemileaflet of the canalicular membrane permits exovesiculation of the external hemileaflet, a vesiculation process promoted by the detergent environment of the bile canalicular lumen.

  10. Interaction of the human N-Ras protein with lipid raft model membranes of varying degrees of complexity.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Alexander; Nikolaus, Jörg; Weise, Katrin; Triola, Gemma; Waldmann, Herbert; Winter, Roland; Herrmann, Andreas; Huster, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Ternary lipid mixtures composed of cholesterol, saturated (frequently with sphingosine backbone), and unsaturated phospholipids show stable phase separation and are often used as model systems of lipid rafts. Yet, their ability to reproduce raft properties and function is still debated. We investigated the properties and functional aspects of three lipid raft model systems of varying degrees of biological relevance--PSM/POPC/Chol, DPPC/POPC/Chol, and DPPC/DOPC/Chol--using 2H solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. While some minor differences were observed, the general behavior and properties of all three model mixtures were similar to previously investigated influenza envelope lipid membranes, which closely mimic the lipid composition of biological membranes. For the investigation of the functional aspects, we employed the human N-Ras protein, which is posttranslationally modified by two lipid modifications that anchor the protein to the membrane. It was previously shown that N-Ras preferentially resides in liquid-disordered domains and exhibits a time-dependent accumulation in the domain boundaries of influenza envelope lipid membranes. For all three model mixtures, we observed the same membrane partitioning behavior for N-Ras. Therefore, we conclude that even relatively simple models of raft membranes are able to reproduce many of their specific properties and functions.

  11. Efficient radical trapping at the surface and inside the phospholipid membrane is responsible for highly potent antiperoxidative activity of the carotenoid astaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Goto, S; Kogure, K; Abe, K; Kimata, Y; Kitahama, K; Yamashita, E; Terada, H

    2001-06-01

    The effects of the carotenoids beta-carotene and astaxanthin on the peroxidation of liposomes induced by ADP and Fe(2+) were examined. Both compounds inhibited production of lipid peroxides, astaxanthin being about 2-fold more effective than beta-carotene. The difference in the modes of destruction of the conjugated polyene chain between beta-carotene and astaxanthin suggested that the conjugated polyene moiety and terminal ring moieties of the more potent astaxanthin trapped radicals in the membrane and both at the membrane surface and in the membrane, respectively, whereas only the conjugated polyene chain of beta-carotene was responsible for radical trapping near the membrane surface and in the interior of the membrane. The efficient antioxidant activity of astaxanthin is suggested to be due to the unique structure of the terminal ring moiety. PMID:11406102

  12. Interaction of the anticancer drug tamoxifen with the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Hernández, P; Villena, F; Aguilar, F; Sotomayor, C P

    1998-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a non steroidal antiestrogen drug extensively used in the prevention and treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer. To evaluate its perturbing effect upon cell membranes it was made to interact with human erythrocytes and molecular models. These consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipids classes located in the outer and inner leaflets of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Experiments by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that tamoxifen interacted with DMPC vesicles fluidizing both its polar head and acyl chain regions. These results were confirmed by X-ray diffraction which indicated that tamoxifen perturbed the same regions of the lipid. However, it did not cause any significant structural perturbation to DMPE bilayers. The examination by electron microscopy of human erythrocytes incubated with tamoxifen revealed that they changed their normal discoid shape to stomatocytes. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this result means that the drug is inserted in the inner leaflet of the erythrocyte membrane. Given the fact that tamoxifen did not interact with DMPE, it is concluded that it interacted with a protein located in the cytoplasmic moiety of the erythrocyte membrane. PMID:9618934

  13. Effects of AlCl3 on toad skin, human erythrocytes, and model cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Ungerer, B; Villena, F; Norris, B; Cárdenas, H; Zatta, P

    2001-05-15

    Aluminum, a very abundant metal, could play a toxic role in several pathological processes, including neurodegeneration. Although the effects of Al(III) on biological membranes have been extensively described, direct information concerning the molecular basis of its biological activity is rather scanty. To examine aluminum challenges on cell membranes, various concentrations of AlCl3 in aqueous solutions were incubated with human erythrocytes, isolated toad skin, and molecular models of biomembranes. The latter consisted of multilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine, representing phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane. These specimens were studied by scanning electron microscopy, electrophysiological measurements, and x-ray diffraction. The results indicate that Al(III) in the concentration range of 10-100 microM induced the following structural and functional effects: (i) change in the normal discoid shape of human erythrocytes to echinocytes due to the accumulation of Al(III) ions in the outer moiety of the red cell membrane; (ii) perturbation of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, and to a lesser extent of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine bilayers, and (iii) decrease in the short-circuit current and in the potential difference of the isolated toad skin, effects that are in accordance with a time-dependent modulation of ion transport in response to changes in the molecular structure of the lipid bilayer. PMID:11470316

  14. Mammalian P4-ATPases and ABC transporters and their role in phospholipid transport.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jonathan A; Quazi, Faraz; Molday, Robert S

    2013-03-01

    Transport of phospholipids across cell membranes plays a key role in a wide variety of biological processes. These include membrane biosynthesis, generation and maintenance of membrane asymmetry, cell and organelle shape determination, phagocytosis, vesicle trafficking, blood coagulation, lipid homeostasis, regulation of membrane protein function, apoptosis, etc. P(4)-ATPases and ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are the two principal classes of membrane proteins that actively transport phospholipids across cellular membranes. P(4)-ATPases utilize the energy from ATP hydrolysis to flip aminophospholipids from the exocytoplasmic (extracellular/lumen) to the cytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes generating membrane lipid asymmetry and lipid imbalance which can induce membrane curvature. Many ABC transporters play crucial roles in lipid homeostasis by actively transporting phospholipids from the cytoplasmic to the exocytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes or exporting phospholipids to protein acceptors or micelles. Recent studies indicate that some ABC proteins can also transport phospholipids in the opposite direction. The importance of P(4)-ATPases and ABC transporters is evident from the findings that mutations in many of these transporters are responsible for severe human genetic diseases linked to defective phospholipid transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism.

  15. Triangular springs for modeling nonlinear membranes.

    PubMed

    Delingette, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a formal connexion between springs and continuum mechanics in the context of one-dimensional and two-dimensional elasticity. In a first stage, the equivalence between tensile springs and the finite element discretization of stretching energy on planar curves is established. Furthermore, when considering a quadratic strain function of stretch, we introduce a new type of springs called tensile biquadratic springs. In a second stage, we extend this equivalence to non-linear membranes (St Venant-Kirchhoff materials) on triangular meshes leading to triangular biquadratic and quadratic springs. Those tensile and angular springs produce isotropic deformations parameterized by Young modulus and Poisson ratios on unstructured meshes in an efficient and simple way. For a specific choice of the Poisson ratio, 0.3, we show that regular spring-mass models may be used realistically to simulate a membrane behavior. Finally, the different spring formulations are tested in pure traction and cloth simulation experiments.

  16. Salicylic acid induces vanillin synthesis through the phospholipid signaling pathway in Capsicum chinense cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rodas-Junco, Beatriz A; Cab-Guillén, Yahaira; Muñoz-Sánchez, J Armando; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe; Monforte-González, Miriam; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M Teresa

    2013-10-01

    Signal transduction via phospholipids is mediated by phospholipases such as phospholipase C (PLC) and D (PLD), which catalyze hydrolysis of plasma membrane structural phospholipids. Phospholipid signaling is also involved in plant responses to phytohormones such as salicylic acid (SA). The relationships between phospholipid signaling, SA, and secondary metabolism are not fully understood. Using a Capsicum chinense cell suspension as a model, we evaluated whether phospholipid signaling modulates SA-induced vanillin production through the activation of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway. Salicylic acid was found to elicit PAL activity and consequently vanillin production, which was diminished or reversed upon exposure to the phosphoinositide-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) signaling inhibitors neomycin and U73122. Exposure to the phosphatidic acid inhibitor 1-butanol altered PLD activity and prevented SA-induced vanillin production. Our results suggest that PLC and PLD-generated secondary messengers may be modulating SA-induced vanillin production through the activation of key biosynthetic pathway enzymes.

  17. Effects of chronic treatment with sodium tetrachloroaurate(III) in mice and membrane models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Zambenedetti, Pamela; Carpené, Emilio; Ibnlkayat, Meryem; Wittkowski, Werner; Messori, Luigi; Zatta, Paolo

    2004-12-01

    Gold is a nonessential element with a variety of applications in medicine. A few gold(I) compounds are used in the clinics for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and of discoid lupus. Some novel gold(III) compounds are under evaluation as anticancer agents. It is known that gold compounds generally produce toxic effects on the kidneys and characteristic lesions in the brain. However, information concerning the neurotoxicity of gold derivatives in humans as well as in experimental toxicology is rather scarce. For this reason we tried to shed some further light on this aspect of gold neurotoxicity by chronic treatment of mice with sodium tetrachloroaurate(III) in order to observe possible biophysical and morphological alterations that may occur in the brain. Chronic gold treatment resulted in a markedly decreased expression of metallothioneins and of glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes of different brain areas. To examine its effects on cell membranes, interactions of sodium tetrachloroaurate(III) with molecular models were also evaluated. The models consisted in bilayers built-up of classes of phospholipids located in the outer and inner monolayers of biological membranes. Structural perturbation of cell membrane models was observed only at concentrations 10(5) times higher than those detected in the brains of animals after three months' treatment. These results show that toxic effects on animal brain upon treatment with sodium tetrachloroaurate develop with difficulty and may be observed only at high doses. PMID:15541497

  18. Orientation and effects of mastoparan X on phospholipid bicelles.

    PubMed Central

    Whiles, J A; Brasseur, R; Glover, K J; Melacini, G; Komives, E A; Vold, R R

    2001-01-01

    Mastoparan X (MPX: INWKGIAAMAKKLL-NH2) belongs to a family of ionophoric peptides found in wasp venom. Upon binding to the membrane, MPX increases the cell's permeability to cations leading to a disruption in the electrolyte balance and cell lysis. This process is thought to occur either through a membrane-thinning mechanism, where the peptide resides on the membrane surface thereby disrupting lipid packing, or through formation of an oligomeric pore. To address this issue, we have used both high-resolution and solid-state 2H NMR techniques to study the structure and orientation of MPX when associated with bicelles. NOESY and chemical shift analysis showed that in bicelles, MPX formed a well-structured amphipathic alpha-helix. In zwitterionic bicelles, the helical axis was found to rest generally perpendicular to the membrane normal, which could be consistent with the "carpet" mechanism for lytic activity. In anionic bicelles, on the other hand, the helical axis was generally parallel to the membrane normal, which is more consistent with the pore model for lytic activity. In addition, MPX caused significant disruption in lipid packing of the negatively charged phospholipids. Taken together, these results show that MPX associates differently with zwitterionic membranes, where it rests parallel to the surface, compared with negatively charged membranes, where it penetrates longitudinally. PMID:11159401

  19. Molecular interactions of quinidine with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Villena, F; Bagnara, M; Sotomayor, C P

    1995-01-01

    Quinidine (QUIN) is one of the most important and efficient antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD). It belongs to class I, which are the drugs that exert their action at the level of the sodium channels in the membrane of the myocard. Several hypotheses support the idea that the molecular mechanism of action of the AAD is via nonspecific interactions with phospholipids sited in the neighborhood of the channels. In order to probe the validity of these hypotheses, QUIN was made to interact with the phospholipids dimyristoylphosphadidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE). These interactions were performed in a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic medium under a wide range of molar ratios. The resulting products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. QUIN solutions were also made to interact with DMPC liposomes, which were studied by fluorescent spectroscopy. Finally, human erythrocytes which were incubated with QUIN solutions were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results of these experiments proved that QUIN indeed interacted with phospholipid bilayers. PMID:7546041

  20. Transbilayer mobility and distribution of red cell phospholipids during storage.

    PubMed Central

    Geldwerth, D; Kuypers, F A; Bütikofer, P; Allary, M; Lubin, B H; Devaux, P F

    1993-01-01

    We studied phospholipid topology and transbilayer mobility in red cells during blood storage. The distribution of phospholipids was determined by measuring the reactivity of phosphatidylethanolamine with fluorescamine and the degradation of phospholipids by phospholipase A2 and sphingomyelinase C. Phospholipid mobility was measured by determining transbilayer movements of spin-labeled phospholipids. We were unable to detect a change in the distribution of endogenous membrane phospholipids in stored red cells even after 2-mo storage. The rate of inward movement of spin-labeled phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine was progressively reduced, whereas that for phosphatidylcholine was increased. These changes in phospholipid translocation correlated with a fall in cellular ATP. However, following restoration of ATP, neither the rate of aminophospholipid translocation nor the transbilayer movement of phosphatidylcholine were completely corrected. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that red cell storage alters the kinetics of transbilayer mobility of phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine, the activity of the aminophospholipid translocase, but not the asymmetric distribution of endogenous membrane phospholipids, at least at a level detectable with phospholipases. Thus, if phosphatidylserine appearance on the outer monolayer is a signal for red cell elimination, the amount that triggers macrophage recognition is below the level of detection upon using the phospholipase technique. PMID:8325999

  1. Extending David Horrobin's membrane phospholipid theory of schizophrenia: overactivity of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) in the brain is caused by overdrive of coupled serotonergic 5HT(2A/2C) receptors in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Arnold E

    2012-12-01

    David Horrobin's membrane phospholipid theory of schizophrenia has held up well over time because his therapeutic prediction that dietary supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) would have a therapeutic effect has been partially verified and undergoes continued testing. In the final version of his theory, he hypothesized that there was hyperactivity of phosphoslipase A(2) (PLA(2)) or a related enzyme but did not explain how the hyperactivity came about. It is known that serotonergic 5HT(2A/2C) receptors are coupled to PLA(2), which hydrolyzes both arachidonic acid (AA) and EPA from diacylglycerides at the sn-2 position. In this paper, Horrobin's theory is combined with a previously published theory of chronic stress in which it was hypothesized that a disinhibited dorsal raphe nucleus, the principal nucleus of the serotonergic system, can organize the neuropathology of diseases such as migraine, hypertension, and the metabolic syndrome. The new or combined theory is that schizophrenia is a disease of chronic stress in which a disinhibited DRN causes widespread serotonergic overdrive in the cerebral cortex. This in turn causes overdrive of cPLA(2) and both central and peripheral depletion of AA and EPA. Because EPA is present in smaller amounts, it falls below threshold for maintaining an intracellular balance between AA-derived and EPA-derived second messenger cascades, which leads to abnormal patterns of neuronal firing. There are two causes of neuronal dysfunction: the disinhibited DRN and EPA depletion. Schizophrenia is statistically associated with metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and migraine because they form a cluster of diseases with similar pathophysiology. The theory provides an explanation for both the central and peripheral phospholipid abnormalities in schizophrenia. It also explains the role of stress in schizophrenia, elevated serum PLA(2) activity in schizophrenia, the relationship between untreated schizophrenia and metabolic syndrome

  2. Phospholipid profile of amniotic fluid in ovine model of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH): the effect of fetal tracheal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Mimmi, Maria Chiara; Ballico, Maurizio; Amoroso, Francesco; Calcaterra, Valeria; Marotta, Mario; Peiro, Jose Luis; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2015-03-01

    Fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion has been proposed as a prenatal intervention to ameliorate congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) prognosis. Tracheal occlusion (TO) prevents pulmonary fluid egress, leading to tissue expansion, reversal of lung hypoplasia, and potential maturation. Fetal lung maturity strongly correlates with amniotic fluid (AF) phospholipidic composition. In this preliminary study, we characterized the AF phospholipidic profile in CDH-induced, TO-treated, and healthy fetal lambs to define the prenatal treatment benefits of TO on lung maturity. CDH induction was performed at 70 days of gestation, TO was carried out at 102 days of gestation, and caesarean section was carried out at 136 days of gestation. AF samples, taken at 102-136 days of gestation, were evaluated using mass spectrometry. The analysis focused on phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and sphingomyelins (SMs). The most abundant phosphatidylcholine species retrieved in healthy AF was POPC [PC(18:1/16:0)], while the level of DPPC [PC(16:0/16:0)] was extremely low at both gestational ages. CDH induction caused a decrease in POPC and many other PCs. A substantial return of some PCs, in particular POPC, PC(34:2) and PC(18:0/16:0), to a more physiological level was prompted by TO. SMs were unaltered. The AF phospholipidic profile could provide prenatal prognostic markers of CDH and possible indices of lung maturation after fetal treatment. PMID:25625961

  3. Development of Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micellar formation for docetaxel and assessment of its in vivo distribution in animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hua; Geng, Hongquan; Ruan, Jing; Wang, Kan; Bao, Chenchen; Wang, Juan; Peng, Xia; Zhang, Xueqing; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-04-01

    Docetaxel (DTX) is a very important member of taxoid family. Despite several alternative delivery systems reported recently, DTX formulated by Polysorbate 80 and alcohol (Taxotere®) is still the most frequent administration in clinical practice. In this study, we incorporated DTX into Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micelles and compared its structural characteristics, pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and blood compatibility with its conventional counterparts. Results showed that the mixed micelles loaded DTX possessed a mean size of approximately 13 nm with narrow size distribution and a rod-like micelle shape. In the pharmacokinetics assessment, there was no significant difference between the two preparations ( P > 0.05), which demonstrated that the DTX in the two preparations may share a similar pharmacokinetic process. However, the Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micelles can increase the drug residence amount of DTX in kidney, spleen, ovary and uterus, heart, and liver. The blood compatibility assessment study revealed that the mixed micelles were safe for intravenous injection. In conclusion, Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micelle is safe, can improve the tumor therapeutic effects of DTX in the chosen organs, and may be a potential alternative dosage form for clinical intravenous administration of DTX.

  4. Structural effects in vitro of the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac on human erythrocytes and molecular models of cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Manrique, Marcela; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2009-04-01

    Diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been widely investigated in terms of its pharmacological action, but less is known about its effects on cell membranes and particularly on those of human erythrocytes. In the present work, the structural effects on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models have been investigated and reported. This report presents the following evidence that diclofenac interacts with red cell membranes: a) X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy of phospholipid bilayers showed that diclofenac interacted with a class of lipids found in the outer moiety of the erythrocyte membrane; b) in isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) the drug induced a disordering effect on the acyl chains of the membrane lipid bilayer; c) in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on human erythrocytes it was observed that the drug induced changes different from the normal biconcave morphology of most red blood cells. This is the first time in which structural effects of diclofenac on the human erythrocyte membrane have been described. PMID:19157682

  5. Continuous fluorescence microphotolysis of anthracene-labeled phospholipids in membranes. Theoretical approach of the simultaneous determination of their photodimerization and lateral diffusion rates.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrières, X; Lopez, A; Altibelli, A; Dupou-Cezanne, L; Lagouanelle, J L; Tocanne, J F

    1989-01-01

    Anthracene is a fluorescent and photoactivatable (dimerization) group which can be used for investigating the lateral distribution and dynamics of lipids in membranes. In fluorescence recovery after photobleaching or in microphotolysis experiments, and when using this fluorophore, the bleaching (or microphotolysis) step in the illuminated part of the membrane is in fact the sum of two antagonistic processes: fluorescence decay, which is due to dimerization of anthracene residues, and fluorescence recovery, which is due to a diffusion mediated exchange of bleached and unbleached particles between the illuminated and diffusion area in the membrane. Here, we propose a new mathematical algorithm that enables such a second-order reaction-diffusion process to be analyzed. After coupling a fluorescence recovery step to a microphotolysis step, this algorithm allows us to calculate the lateral diffusion coefficient D and the photodimerization constant K of anthracene-labeled lipids in membranes, two parameters which contribute to the understanding of the fluidity of the lipid phase in membranes. This algorithm also provides us with a complete description of the anthracene-labeled molecules distribution in the illuminated and diffusion area, at any time of the experiment. The fluorescence recovery after microphotolysis procedure we propose was tested with an anthracene-labeled phosphatidylcholine inserted in egg-phosphatidylcholine multilayers, in monolayers adsorbed onto alkylated glass surfaces and in the plasma membrane of Chinese hamster ovary cells. It is shown that this procedure can also be used to evaluate the important parameters of probe mobile fraction and to determine the relative size of the illuminated and diffusion areas. This will enable membranes to be explored in terms of microdomains and/or macrodomains. PMID:2765646

  6. Effects of lipids on the interaction of SecA with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, T; Kim, J S; Lee, B C; Yun, C H

    2001-11-01

    The effects of nonlamellar-prone lipids, diacylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), on the kinetic association of SecA with model membranes were examined by measuring changes in the intrinsic emission fluorescence with a stopped-flow apparatus. Upon interaction with standard liposomes composed of 50 mol% dioleolyphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and 50 mol% of dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG), the intrinsic fluorescence intensity of SecA was decreased after a lapse of time with a rate constant of 0.0049 s(-1). When the DOPC of the standard vesicles was gradually replaced with either dioeloyl PE (DOPE) or Escherichia coli (E. coli) PE, the rate constant increased appreciably as a function of PE concentration, in the order DOPE > E. coli PE. In addition, when the PE of E. coli PE/DOPG (50/50) vesicles was replaced with more than 5 mol% dioleoylglycerol (DOG), the rate constant further increased by 40%. The incorporation of nonlamellar-prone lipids in the vesicles also enhanced the binding of SecA to model membranes in the order DOPE > or = E. coli PE/DOG > E. coli PE > DOPC. These results provide the first kinetic evidence for the importance of nonlamellar-prone phospholipids for the association rate of SecA with membranes.

  7. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  8. Effects of fish oil supplementation on the fatty acid profile in erythrocyte membrane and plasma phospholipids of pregnant women and their offspring: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Escolano-Margarit, M Victoria; Campoy, Cristina; Ramírez-Tortosa, M Carmen; Demmelmair, Hans; Miranda, M Teresa; Gil, Angel; Decsi, Tamás; Koletzko, Berthold V

    2013-05-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of fish oil (FO) supplementation to pregnant women on the maternal and fetal fatty acid profile in plasma and erythrocyte phospholipids (PL) and to identify the best compartment for the assessment of fatty acid status. A multi-centre, double-blind, controlled trial was conducted. Healthy pregnant women from three European centres were randomly assigned to receive from week 20 of gestation until delivery a daily dietary supplement with either FO (500 mg DHA+150 mg EPA), 400 μg 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, both or placebo. Fatty acids in plasma and erythrocyte PL were determined in maternal blood (week 20, week 30 of pregnancy and delivery) and in cord blood (delivery). FO supplementation increased DHA levels in maternal and cord plasma and erythrocyte PL. Higher percentage changes were observed in erythrocyte PL than in plasma PL. There were significant correlations between plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid levels in maternal and cord blood. Significant correlations between maternal and cord fatty acid levels at delivery in plasma and erythrocytes were also observed; however, correlation coefficients were higher for erythrocyte phophatidylethanolamine. FO supplementation increases maternal and fetal DHA status. Both plasma and erythrocytes appear to be suitable to evaluate the fatty acid status of mothers but erythrocytes seem to be a more reliable marker in neonates.

  9. Phenethyl alcohol disorders phospholipid acyl chains and promotes translocation of the mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c across a lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Jordi, W; Nibbeling, R; de Kruijff, B

    1990-02-12

    The interaction of phenethyl alcohol with model membranes and its effect on translocation of the chemically prepared mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c across a lipid bilayer was studied. Phenethyl alcohol efficiently penetrates into monolayers and causes acyl chain disordering judged from deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance measurements with specific acyl chain-deuterated phospholipids. Translocation of apocytochrome c across a phospholipid bilayer was stimulated on addition of phenethyl alcohol indicating that the efficiency of translocation of this precursor protein is enhanced due to a disorder of the acyl chain region of the bilayer.

  10. Interaction of the antimicrobial peptide gomesin with model membranes: a calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Tatiana M; Mattei, Bruno; Seelig, Joachim; Perez, Katia R; Miranda, Antonio; Riske, Karin A

    2013-07-01

    Gomesin is a potent cationic antimicrobial peptide (z = +6) isolated from the Brazilian spider Acanthoscurria gomesiana . The interaction of gomesin with large unilamellar vesicles composed of a 1:1 mixture of zwitterionic (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and anionic (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) phospholipids is studied with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). In parallel, light scattering and optical microscopy are used to assess peptide-induced vesicle aggregation. The ability of gomesin to permeabilize the membrane is examined with fluorescence spectroscopy of the leakage of 5,6-carboxyfluorescein (CF). Vesicles coated with 3 mol % 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (PE-PEG) lipids are also investigated to assess the influence of peptide-induced vesicle aggregation in the activity of gomesin. The ITC and light scattering titrations are done in two ways: lipid into peptide and peptide into lipid injections. Although some differences arise between the two setups, the basic interaction of gomesin with anionic vesicles is preserved. A surface partition model combined with the Gouy-Chapman theory is put forward to fit the ITC results. The intrinsic binding constant of gomesin is found to be K ≈ 10(3) M(-1). The interaction of gomesin with anionic membranes is highly exothermic and enthalpy-driven. Binding of gomesin is virtually always accompanied by vesicle aggregation and changes in membrane permeability, leading to CF leakage. Addition of PE-PEG to the membrane strongly attenuates vesicle aggregation but does not significantly change the mode of action of gomesin. The results point to a strong interaction of gomesin with the membrane surface, causing membrane rupture without a deep penetration into the bilayer core.

  11. Effects of phenylpropanolamine (PPA) on in vitro human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Zambrano, Pablo; Mennickent, Sigrid; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P; Aguilar, Luis F; Bolognin, Silvia

    2011-03-18

    Norephedrine, also called phenylpropanolamine (PPA), is a synthetic form of the ephedrine alkaloid. After reports of the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhage and other adverse effects, including several deaths, PPA is no longer sold in USA and Canada. Despite the extensive information about PPA toxicity, reports on its effects on cell membranes are scarce. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of PPA with cell membranes, ranges of concentrations were incubated with intact human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), and molecular models of cell membranes. The latter consisted in bilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), phospholipid classes present in the outer and inner monolayers of most plasmatic cell membranes, respectively. The capacity of PPA to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was assessed by X-ray diffraction, DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) and IUM were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, and intact human erythrocytes were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study presents evidence that PPA affects human red cell membranes as follows: (a) in SEM studies on human erythrocytes it was observed that 0.5 mM PPA induced shape changes; (b) in IUM PPA induced a sharp decrease in the fluorescence anisotropy in the lipid bilayer acyl chains in a concentration range lower than 100 μM; (c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that PPA in the 0.1-0.5 mM range induced increasing structural perturbation to DMPC, but no effects on DMPE multibilayers were detected. PMID:21320467

  12. Structure-activity relationships of the antimicrobial peptide gramicidin S and its analogs: aqueous solubility, self-association, conformation, antimicrobial activity and interaction with model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Thomas; Prenner, Elmar J; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; Mant, Colin T; Keller, Sandro; Hodges, Robert S; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2014-05-01

    GS10 [cyclo-(VKLdYPVKLdYP)] is a synthetic analog of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide gramicidin (GS) in which the two positively charged ornithine (Orn) residues are replaced by two positively charged lysine (Lys) residues and the two less polar aromatic phenylalanine (Phe) residues are replaced by the more polar tyrosine (Tyr) residues. In this study, we examine the effects of these seemingly conservative modifications to the parent GS molecule on the physical properties of the peptide, and on its interactions with lipid bilayer model and biological membranes, by a variety of biophysical techniques. We show that although GS10 retains the largely β-sheet conformation characteristic of GS, it is less structured in both water and membrane-mimetic solvents. GS10 is also more water soluble and less hydrophobic than GS, as predicted, and also exhibits a reduced tendency for self-association in aqueous solution. Surprisingly, GS10 associates more strongly with zwitterionic and anionic phospholipid bilayer model membranes than does GS, despite its greater water solubility, and the presence of anionic phospholipids and cholesterol (Chol) modestly reduces the association of both GS10 and GS to these model membranes. The strong partitioning of both peptides into lipid bilayers is driven by a large favorable entropy change opposed by a much smaller unfavorable enthalpy change. However, GS10 is also less potent than GS at inducing inverted cubic phases in phospholipid bilayer model membranes and at inhibiting the growth of the cell wall-less bacterium Acholeplasma laidlawii B. These results are discussed in terms of the comparative antibiotic and hemolytic activities of these peptides.

  13. The relevance of membrane models to understand nanoparticles-cell membrane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascol, Estelle; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Chopineau, Joël

    2016-02-01

    Over the past two decades, numerous types of nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed for medical applications; however only a few nanomedicines are actually available on the market. One reason is the lack of understanding and data concerning the NP fate and their behavior upon contact with biological media and cell membranes. Biomimetic membrane models are interesting tools to approach and understand NPs-cell membrane interactions. The use of these models permits one to control physical and chemical parameters and to rapidly compare membrane types and the influence of different media conditions. The interactions between NPs and cell membranes can be qualified and quantified using analytical and modeling methods. In this review, the major studies concerning NPs-cell membrane models and associated methods are described. The advantages and drawbacks for each method are compared for the different models. The key mechanisms of interactions between NPs and cell membranes are revealed using cell membrane models and are interrogated in comparison with the NP behavior in cellulo or in vivo. Investigating the interactions between NPs and cell membrane models is now proposed as an intermediate step between physicochemical characterization of NPs and biological assays.

  14. Phase transitions in hydrophobe/phospholipid mixtures: hints at connections between pheromones and anaesthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Borsacchi, Silvia; Geppi, Marco; Macchi, Sara; Ninham, Barry W; Fratini, Emiliano; Ambrosi, Moira; Baglioni, Piero; Lo Nostro, Pierandrea

    2016-06-01

    The phase behavior of a mixture of a typical insect pheromone (olean) and a phospholipid (DOPC)/water dispersion is extensively explored through SAXS, NMR and DSC experiments. The results mimic those obtained with anaesthetics in phospholipid/water systems. They also mimic the behavior and microstructure of ternary mixtures of a membrane mimetic, bilayer-forming double chained surfactants, oils and water. Taken together with recent models for conduction of the nervous impulse, all hint at lipid involvement and the underlying unity in mechanisms of pheromone, anaesthetic and hydrophobic drugs, where a local phase change in the lipid membrane architecture may be at least partly involved in the transmission of the signal. PMID:27210443

  15. A mitochondrial late embryogenesis abundant protein stabilizes model membranes in the dry state.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Hincha, Dirk K; Macherel, David

    2010-10-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a highly diverse group of polypeptides expected to play important roles in desiccation tolerance of plant seeds. They are also found in other plant tissues and in some anhydrobotic invertebrates, fungi, protists and prokaryotes. The LEA protein LEAM accumulates in the matrix space of pea (Pisum sativum) mitochondria during late seed maturation. LEAM is an intrinsically disordered protein folding into amphipathic alpha-helix upon desiccation. This suggests that it could interact with the inner mitochondrial membrane, providing structural protection in dry seeds. Here, we have used Fourier-transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy to gain insight into the molecular details of interactions of LEAM with phospholipid bilayers in the dry state and their effects on liposome stability. LEAM interacted specifically with negatively charged phosphate groups in dry phospholipids, increasing fatty acyl chain mobility. This led to an enhanced stability of liposomes during drying and rehydration, but also upon freezing. Protection depended on phospholipid composition and was strongly enhanced in membranes containing the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin. Collectively, the results provide strong evidence for a function of LEAM as a mitochondrial membrane protectant during desiccation and highlight the role of lipid composition in the interactions between LEA proteins and membranes.

  16. Temperature-Dependent Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies of Docosahexaenoic Acid and Gamma Linolenic Acid Effects on Phospholipid Membranes With and Without Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonar, D.; Horasanb, N.; Sünnetçioğlu, M. Maral

    2016-07-01

    Free docosahexaenoic acid (DHAn-3) and gamma linolenic acid (GLAn-6) effects on dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes were studied as a function of temperature by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acid (5-, 16-DS) spin labels were utilized to obtain information from the interfacial and alkyl chain region, respectively. In the studied temperature range, the presence of DHAn-3 or GLAn-6 caused decreases in maximum hyperfi ne splitting values and correlation times of DMPC membranes. Both in the interfacial region and depths of membrane, changes were more pronounced for DHAn-3 in pure DMPC. In the presence of cholesterol (CH), DHAn-3 and GLAn-6 effects were similar and more pronounced in the depths of the membrane. The changes in the structure and dynamics of samples were obtained from simulations of spectra, which indicated some changes in the number of spectral components by incorporation of DHAn-3 and GLAn-6. In the interfacial region and below the main phase transition temperature of DMPC, there was an increase in heterogeneity. For temperatures above the phase transition, a more homogeneous environment for spin label was obtained in the presence of fatty acids.

  17. Human Type IV P-type ATPases That Work as Plasma Membrane Phospholipid Flippases and Their Regulation by Caspase and Calcium.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Katsumori; Kurata, Sachiko; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2016-01-01

    In plasma membranes, flippases translocate aminophospholipids such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine from the extracellular to the cytoplasmic leaflet. Mammalian ATP11C, a type IV P-type ATPase, acts as a flippase at the plasma membrane. Here, by expressing 12 human type IV P-type ATPases in ATP11C-deficient cells, we determined that ATP8A2 and ATP11A can also act as plasma membrane flippases. As with ATP11C, ATP8A2 and ATP11A localized to the plasma membrane in a CDC50A-dependent manner. ATP11A was cleaved by caspases during apoptosis, and a caspase-resistant ATP11A blocked apoptotic PtdSer exposure. In contrast, ATP8A2 was not cleaved by caspase, and cells expressing ATP8A2 did not expose PtdSer during apoptosis. Similarly, high Ca(2+) concentrations inhibited the ATP11A and ATP11C PtdSer flippase activity, but ATP8A2 flippase activity was relatively resistant to Ca(2+). ATP11A and ATP11C were ubiquitously expressed in human and mouse adult tissues. In contrast, ATP8A2 was expressed in specific tissues, such as the brain and testis. Thus, ATP8A2 may play a specific role in translocating PtdSer in these tissues.

  18. Order of lipid phases in model and plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Lingwood, Daniel; Levental, Ilya; Sampaio, Julio L.; Kalvodova, Lucie; Rajendran, Lawrence; Simons, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are nanoscopic assemblies of sphingolipids, cholesterol, and specific membrane proteins that contribute to lateral heterogeneity in eukaryotic membranes. Separation of artificial membranes into liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered phases is regarded as a common model for this compartmentalization. However, tight lipid packing in Lo phases seems to conflict with efficient partitioning of raft-associated transmembrane (TM) proteins. To assess membrane order as a component of raft organization, we performed fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy with the membrane probes Laurdan and C-laurdan. First, we assessed lipid packing in model membranes of various compositions and found cholesterol and acyl chain dependence of membrane order. Then we probed cell membranes by using two novel systems that exhibit inducible phase separation: giant plasma membrane vesicles [Baumgart et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:3165–3170] and plasma membrane spheres. Notably, only the latter support selective inclusion of raft TM proteins with the ganglioside GM1 into one phase. We measured comparable small differences in order between the separated phases of both biomembranes. Lateral packing in the ordered phase of giant plasma membrane vesicles resembled the Lo domain of model membranes, whereas the GM1 phase in plasma membrane spheres exhibited considerably lower order, consistent with different partitioning of lipid and TM protein markers. Thus, lipid-mediated coalescence of the GM1 raft domain seems to be distinct from the formation of a Lo phase, suggesting additional interactions between proteins and lipids to be effective. PMID:19805351

  19. Location of chlorhexidine in DMPC model membranes: a neutron diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, Ivana; Marquardt, Drew; Harroun, Thad A; Sternin, Edward

    2010-06-01

    Chlorhexidine (CHX) is an effective anti-bacterial agent whose mode of action is thought to be the disruption of the cell membrane. It is known to partition into phospholipid bilayers of aqueous model-membrane preparations. Neutron diffraction data taken at 36 degrees C on the location of CHX in phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers is presented. The center of mass of the deuterated hydrocarbon chain of CHX is found to reside 16A from the center of the bilayer in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (14:0-14:0PC). This places the drug near the glycerol backbone of the lipid, and suggests a mode of action whereby the molecule is bent in half and inserts wedge-like into the lipid matrix. This mechanism is distinct from detergent-like mechanisms of membrane disruption and more similar to some anti-microbial peptide action, where peptides insert obliquely into the bilayer headgroup region to disrupt its structure. PMID:20359468

  20. Membrane attachment and structure models of lipid storage droplet protein 1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Penghui; Chen, Xiao; Moktan, Hem; Arrese, Estela L; Duan, Lian; Wang, Liying; Soulages, Jose L; Zhou, Donghua H

    2014-03-01

    Neutral lipid triglycerides, a main reserve for fat and energy, are stored in organelles called lipid droplets. The storage and release of triglycerides are actively regulated by several proteins specific to the droplet surface, one of which in insects is PLIN1. PLIN1 plays a key role in the activation of triglyceride hydrolysis upon phosphorylation. However, the structure of PLIN1 and its relation to functions remain elusive due to its insolubility and crystallization difficulty. Here we report the first solid-state NMR study on the Drosophila melanogaster PLIN1 in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to show the structural basis for its lipid droplet attachment. NMR spin diffusion experiments were consistent with the predicted membrane attachment motif of PLIN1. The data indicated that PLIN1 has close contact with the terminal methyl groups of the phospholipid acyl chains. Structure models for the membrane attachment motif were generated based on hydrophobicity analysis and NMR membrane insertion depth information. Simulated NMR spectra from a trans-model agreed with experimental spectra. In this model, lipids from the bottom leaflet were very close to the surface in the region enclosed by membrane attachment motif. This may imply that in real lipid droplet, triglyceride molecules might be brought close to the surface by the same mechanism, ready to leave the droplet in the event of lipolysis. Juxtaposition of triglyceride lipase structure to the trans-model suggested a possible interaction of a conserved segment with the lipase by electrostatic interactions, opening the lipase lid to expose the catalytic center. PMID:24333382

  1. Membrane attachment and structure models of lipid storage droplet protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Penghui; Chen, Xiao; Moktan, Hem; Arrese, Estela L.; Duan, Lian; Wang, Liying; Soulages, Jose L.; Zhou, Donghua H.

    2014-01-01

    Neutral lipid triglycerides, a main reserve for fat and energy, are stored in organelles called lipid droplets. The storage and release of triglycerides are actively regulated by several proteins specific to the droplet surface, one of which in insects is PLIN1. PLIN1 plays a key role in the activation of triglyceride hydrolysis upon phosphorylation. However, the structure of PLIN1 and its relation to functions remain elusive due to its insolubility and crystallization difficulty. Here we report the first solid-state NMR study on the Drosophila melanogaster PLIN1 in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to show the structural basis for its lipid droplet attachment. NMR spin diffusion experiments were consistent with the predicted membrane attachment motif of PLIN1. The data indicated that PLIN1 has close contact with the terminal methyl groups of the phospholipid acyl chains. Structure models for the membrane attachment motif were generated based on hydrophobicity analysis and NMR membrane insertion depth information. Simulated NMR spectra from a trans-model agreed with experimental spectra. In this model, lipids from the bottom leaflet were very close to the surface in the region enclosed by membrane attachment motif. This may imply that in real lipid droplet, triglyceride molecules might be brought close to the surface by the same mechanism, ready to leave the droplet in the event of lipolysis. Juxtaposition of triglyceride lipase structure to the trans-model suggested a possible interaction of a conserved segment with the lipase by electrostatic interactions, opening the lipase lid to expose the catalytic center. PMID:24333382

  2. Development of a tympanic membrane model for laser myringotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmaier, Benedikt W.; Bloedow, Alexander; Jovanovic, Sergije

    1997-05-01

    This study investigates guinea-pig and horse tympanic membranes, sheep dura and chicken eggshell membranes in terms of thickness, histology and tissue interaction with the carbon-dioxide and the erbium:YAG laser. Comparison with formalin-fixed human tympanic membranes as reference structure has provided a suitable model for further research in laser myringotomy. The horse tympanic membrane seems to meet our demands regarding the three parameters mentioned above.

  3. Health effects of dietary phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Beneficial effects of dietary phospholipids (PLs) have been mentioned since the early 1900's in relation to different illnesses and symptoms, e.g. coronary heart disease, inflammation or cancer. This article gives a summary of the most common therapeutic uses of dietary PLs to provide an overview of their approved and proposed benefits; and to identify further investigational needs. From the majority of the studies it became evident that dietary PLs have a positive impact in several diseases, apparently without severe side effects. Furthermore, they were shown to reduce side effects of some drugs. Both effects can partially be explained by the fact that PL are highly effective in delivering their fatty acid (FA) residues for incorporation into the membranes of cells involved in different diseases, e.g. immune or cancer cells. The altered membrane composition is assumed to have effects on the activity of membrane proteins (e.g. receptors) by affecting the microstructure of membranes and, therefore, the characteristics of the cellular membrane, e.g. of lipid rafts, or by influencing the biosynthesis of FA derived lipid second messengers. However, since the FAs originally bound to the applied PLs are increased in the cellular membrane after their consumption or supplementation, the FA composition of the PL and thus the type of PL is crucial for its effect. Here, we have reviewed the effects of PL from soy, egg yolk, milk and marine sources. Most studies have been performed in vitro or in animals and only limited evidence is available for the benefit of PL supplementation in humans. More research is needed to understand the impact of PL supplementation and confirm its health benefits. PMID:22221489

  4. Continuous flow atomic force microscopy imaging reveals fluidity and time-dependent interactions of antimicrobial dendrimer with model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup; Zielińska, Paulina; Wacklin, Hanna Pauliina; Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia; Cárdenas, Marité

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, an amphiphilic peptide dendrimer with potential applications against multi-resistant bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus was synthesized and studied on model cell membranes. The combination of quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy imaging during continuous flow allowed for in situ monitoring of the very initial interaction processes and membrane transformations on longer time scales. We used three different membrane compositions of low and high melting temperature phospholipids to vary the membrane properties from a single fluid phase to a pure gel phase, while crossing the phase coexistence boundaries at room temperature. The interaction mechanism of the dendrimer was found to be time-dependent and to vary remarkably with the fluidity and coexistence of liquid-solid phases in the membrane. Spherical micelle-like dendrimer-lipid aggregates were formed in the fluid-phase bilayer and led to partial solubilization of the membrane, while in gel-phase membranes, the dendrimers caused areas of local depressions followed by redeposition of flexible lipid patches. Domain coexistence led to a sequence of events initiated by the formation of a ribbon-like network and followed by membrane solubilization via spherical aggregates from the edges of bilayer patches. Our results show that the dendrimer molecules were able to destroy the membrane integrity through different mechanisms depending on the lipid phase and morphology and shed light on their antimicrobial activity. These findings could have an impact on the efficacy of the dendrimers since lipid membranes in certain bacteria have transition temperatures very close to the host body temperature.

  5. Interaction of isopropylthioxanthone with phospholipid liposomes.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Stevanato, Roberto

    2007-04-01

    Isopropylthioxanthone (ITX) is a highly lipophilic molecule which can be released in foods and beverages from the packages, where it is present as photoinitiator of inks in printing processes. Recently it was found in babies milk, and its toxicity cannot be excluded. The structure of the molecule suggests a possible strong interaction with the lipid moiety of biological membranes, and this is the first study of its effects on phospholipid organization, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and spin labelling techniques. The data obtained with multilamellar liposomes of saturated phospholipids of different length, with and without cholesterol, point out that the molecule changes the lipid structure; in particular, in the gel state, behaving like a disordering agent it increases the mobility of the bilayer, while, in the fluid state, tends to rigidify the membrane, in a cholesterol like way. This behavior supports the hypothesis that ITX experiences a relocation process when the lipid matrix passes from the gel to the fluid state.

  6. Characterisation of reaction centers and their phospholipids from Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Snozzi, M; Bachofen, R

    1979-05-01

    1. Reaction centers from Rhodospirillum rubrum have been extracted with the zwitterionic detergent lauryl dimethyl amine oxide. Subsequent purification has been achieved by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. The pure reaction centers are composed of three protein subunits (L, M, H), bacteriocholorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in the ratio 2 : 1 and phospholipids. 2. The phospholipid composition has been found to be similar to that of whole chromatophore membrane, except that diphosphatidyl glycerol is present in higher amount in the isolated complex. When the detergent treatment of the chromatophore membrane is done in the presence of NaCl, a lower phospholipid content in isolated reaction centers has been found together with a lower stability in the association among the protein subunits. In this complex, the largest subunit H is easily split off and a LM complex is obtained. It is concluded that the phospholipids play an important role in the stability of reaction center complexes.

  7. Influence of metal ions on phosphatidylcholine bovine serum albumin model membrane, an FTIR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Yang, Zhanlan; Zhou, Yong; Weng, Shifu; Zhang, Li; Wu, Jinguang

    2006-08-01

    suggested that phospholipid-protein mixture system could be a better model in the studies of interaction between metal ions and biological membranes using FTIR spectroscopy.

  8. Atomic force microscopy of model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Morandat, Sandrine; Azouzi, Slim; Beauvais, Estelle; Mastouri, Amira; El Kirat, Karim

    2013-02-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are biomimetic model systems that are now widely used to address the biophysical and biochemical properties of biological membranes. Two main methods are usually employed to form SLBs: the transfer of two successive monolayers by Langmuir-Blodgett or Langmuir-Schaefer techniques, and the fusion of preformed lipid vesicles. The transfer of lipid films on flat solid substrates offers the possibility to apply a wide range of surface analytical techniques that are very sensitive. Among them, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened new opportunities for determining the nanoscale organization of SLBs under physiological conditions. In this review, we first focus on the different protocols generally employed to prepare SLBs. Then, we describe AFM studies on the nanoscale lateral organization and mechanical properties of SLBs. Lastly, we survey recent developments in the AFM monitoring of bilayer alteration, remodeling, or digestion, by incubation with exogenous agents such as drugs, proteins, peptides, and nanoparticles.

  9. Modeling bioaugmentation with nitrifiers in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Alberto; Munz, Giulio; Mori, Gualtiero; Makinia, Jacek; Lubello, Claudio; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2015-01-01

    Bioaugmentation with nitrifiers was studied using two pilot-scale membrane bioreactors, with the purpose of assessing the suitability of state-of-the-art activated sludge models (ASMs) in predicting the efficiency of bioaugmentation as a function of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that the temperature difference between seeding and seeded reactors (ΔT) affects bioaugmentation efficiency. Experimental data were accurately predicted when ΔT was within a range of up to 10 °C at the higher range, and when the temperature was significantly lower in the seeded reactor compared to the seeding one, standard ASMs overestimated the efficiency of bioaugmentation. A modified ASM, capable of accurately representing the behavior of seeded nitrifying biomass in the presence of high ΔT, would require the inclusion of the effect of temperature time gradients on nitrifiers. A simple linear correlation between ΔT and the Arrhenius coefficient was proposed as a preliminary step.

  10. Phospholipids at the Interface: Current Trends and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pichot, Roman; Watson, Richard L.; Norton, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipids are one of the major structural elements of biological membranes. Due to their amphiphilic character, they can adopt various molecular assemblies when dispersed in water, such as bilayer vesicles or micelles, which give them unique interfacial properties and render them very attractive in terms of foam or emulsion stabilization. This article aims at reviewing the properties of phospholipids at the air/water and oil/water interfaces, as well as the recent advances in using these natural components as stabilizers, alone or in combination with other compounds such as proteins. A discussion regarding the challenges and opportunities offered by phospholipids-stabilized structure concludes the review. PMID:23736688

  11. A Bioenergetic Basis for Membrane Divergence in Archaea and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sojo, Víctor; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Lane, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Membrane bioenergetics are universal, yet the phospholipid membranes of archaea and bacteria—the deepest branches in the tree of life—are fundamentally different. This deep divergence in membrane chemistry is reflected in other stark differences between the two domains, including ion pumping and DNA replication. We resolve this paradox by considering the energy requirements of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). We develop a mathematical model based on the premise that LUCA depended on natural proton gradients. Our analysis shows that such gradients can power carbon and energy metabolism, but only in leaky cells with a proton permeability equivalent to fatty acid vesicles. Membranes with lower permeability (equivalent to modern phospholipids) collapse free-energy availability, precluding exploitation of natural gradients. Pumping protons across leaky membranes offers no advantage, even when permeability is decreased 1,000-fold. We hypothesize that a sodium-proton antiporter (SPAP) provided the first step towards modern membranes. SPAP increases the free energy available from natural proton gradients by ∼60%, enabling survival in 50-fold lower gradients, thereby facilitating ecological spread and divergence. Critically, SPAP also provides a steadily amplifying advantage to proton pumping as membrane permeability falls, for the first time favoring the evolution of ion-tight phospholipid membranes. The phospholipids of archaea and bacteria incorporate different stereoisomers of glycerol phosphate. We conclude that the enzymes involved took these alternatives by chance in independent populations that had already evolved distinct ion pumps. Our model offers a quantitatively robust explanation for why membrane bioenergetics are universal, yet ion pumps and phospholipid membranes arose later and independently in separate populations. Our findings elucidate the paradox that archaea and bacteria share DNA transcription, ribosomal translation, and ATP synthase

  12. Modelling and simulations of multi-component lipid membranes and open membranes via diffuse interface approaches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Du, Qiang

    2008-03-01

    Diffuse interface (phase field) models are developed for multi-component vesicle membranes with different lipid compositions and membranes with free boundary. These models are used to simulate the deformation of membranes under the elastic bending energy and the line tension energy with prescribed volume and surface area constraints. By comparing our numerical simulations with recent biological experiments, it is demonstrated that the diffuse interface models can effectively capture the rich phenomena associated with the multi-component vesicle transformation and thus offering great functionality in their simulation and modelling.

  13. Phylogenomic investigation of phospholipid synthesis in archaea.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Jonathan; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2012-01-01

    Archaea have idiosyncratic cell membranes usually based on phospholipids containing glycerol-1-phosphate linked by ether bonds to isoprenoid lateral chains. Since these phospholipids strongly differ from those of bacteria and eukaryotes, the origin of the archaeal membranes (and by extension, of all cellular membranes) was enigmatic and called for accurate evolutionary studies. In this paper we review some recent phylogenomic studies that have revealed a modified mevalonate pathway for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors in archaea and suggested that this domain uses an atypical pathway of synthesis of fatty acids devoid of any acyl carrier protein, which is essential for this activity in bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition, we show new or updated phylogenetic analyses of enzymes likely responsible for the isoprenoid chain synthesis from their precursors and the phospholipid synthesis from glycerol phosphate, isoprenoids, and polar head groups. These results support that most of these enzymes can be traced back to the last archaeal common ancestor and, in many cases, even to the last common ancestor of all living organisms.

  14. Phospholipid flippases Lem3p-Dnf1p and Lem3p-Dnf2p are involved in the sorting of the tryptophan permease Tat2p in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hachiro, Takeru; Yamamoto, Takaharu; Nakano, Kenji; Tanaka, Kazuma

    2013-02-01

    The type 4 P-type ATPases are flippases that generate phospholipid asymmetry in membranes. In budding yeast, heteromeric flippases, including Lem3p-Dnf1p and Lem3p-Dnf2p, translocate phospholipids to the cytoplasmic leaflet of membranes. Here, we report that Lem3p-Dnf1/2p are involved in transport of the tryptophan permease Tat2p to the plasma membrane. The lem3Δ mutant exhibited a tryptophan requirement due to the mislocalization of Tat2p to intracellular membranes. Tat2p was relocalized to the plasma membrane when trans-Golgi network (TGN)-to-endosome transport was inhibited. Inhibition of ubiquitination by mutations in ubiquitination machinery also rerouted Tat2p to the plasma membrane. Lem3p-Dnf1/2p are localized to endosomal/TGN membranes in addition to the plasma membrane. Endocytosis mutants, in which Lem3p-Dnf1/2p are sequestered to the plasma membrane, also exhibited the ubiquitination-dependent missorting of Tat2p. These results suggest that Tat2p is ubiquitinated at the TGN and missorted to the vacuolar pathway in the lem3Δ mutant. The NH(2)-terminal cytoplasmic region of Tat2p containing ubiquitination acceptor lysines interacted with liposomes containing acidic phospholipids, including phosphatidylserine. This interaction was abrogated by alanine substitution mutations in the basic amino acids downstream of the ubiquitination sites. Interestingly, a mutant Tat2p containing these substitutions was missorted in a ubiquitination-dependent manner. We propose the following model based on these results; Tat2p is not ubiquitinated when the NH(2)-terminal region is bound to membrane phospholipids, but if it dissociates from the membrane due to a low level of phosphatidylserine caused by perturbation of phospholipid asymmetry in the lem3Δ mutant, Tat2p is ubiquitinated and then transported from the TGN to the vacuole.

  15. The local phospholipid environment modulates the activation of blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Andrew W; Pureza, Vincent S; Sligar, Stephen G; Morrissey, James H

    2007-03-01

    Examples abound of membrane-bound enzymes for which the local membrane environment plays an important role, including the ectoenzyme that triggers blood clotting, the plasma serine protease, factor VIIa, bound to the integral membrane protein, tissue factor. The activity of this enzyme complex is markedly influenced by lipid bilayer composition and further by tissue factor partitioning into membrane microdomains on some cell surfaces. Unfortunately, little is known about how membrane microdomain composition controls factor VIIa-tissue factor activity, as reactions catalyzed by membrane-tethered enzymes are typically studied under conditions in which the experimenter cannot control the composition of the membrane in the immediate vicinity of the enzyme. To overcome this problem, we used a nanoscale approach that afforded complete control over the membrane environment surrounding tissue factor by assembling the factor VIIa.tissue factor complex on stable bilayers containing 67 +/- 1 phospholipid molecules/leaflet (Nanodiscs). We investigated how local changes in phospholipid bilayer composition modulate the activity of the factor VIIa.tissue factor complex. We also addressed whether this enzyme requires a pool of membrane-bound protein substrate (factor X) for efficient catalysis, or alternatively if it could efficiently activate factor X, which binds directly to the membrane nanodomain adjacent to tissue factor. We have shown that full proteolytic activity of the factor VIIa.tissue factor complex requires extremely high local concentrations of anionic phospholipids and further that a large pool of membrane-bound factor X is not required to support sustained catalysis.

  16. Modeling kinetics and equilibrium of membranes with fields: Milestoning analysis and implication to permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Alfredo E.; Elber, Ron

    2014-08-07

    Coarse graining of membrane simulations by translating atomistic dynamics to densities and fields with Milestoning is discussed. The space of the membrane system is divided into cells and the different cells are characterized by order parameters presenting the number densities. The dynamics of the order parameters are probed with Milestoning. The methodology is illustrated here for a phospholipid membrane system (a hydrated bilayer of DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) lipid molecules). Significant inhomogeneity in membrane internal number density leads to complex free energy landscape and local maps of transition times. Dynamics and distributions of cavities within the membrane assist the permeation of nonpolar solutes such as xenon atoms. It is illustrated that quantitative and detailed dynamics of water transport through DOPC membrane can be analyzed using Milestoning with fields. The reaction space for water transport includes at least two slow variables: the normal to the membrane plane, and the water density.

  17. Transport in Polymer-Electrolyte Membranes I. Physical Model

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

    2003-06-02

    In this paper, a physical model is developed that is semiphenomenological and takes into account Schroeder's paradox. Using the wealth of knowledge contained in the literature regarding polymer-electrolyte membranes as a basis, a novel approach is taken in tying together all of the data into a single coherent theory. This approach involves describing the structural changes of the membrane due to water content, and casting this in terms of capillary phenomena. By treating the membrane in this fashion, Schroeder's paradox can be elucidated. Along with the structural changes, two different transport mechanisms are presented and discussed. These mechanisms, along with the membrane's structural changes, comprise the complete physical model of the membrane. The model is shown to agree qualitatively with different membranes and different membrane forms, and is applicable to modeling perfluorinated sulfonic acid and similar membranes. It is also the first physically based comprehensive model of transport in a membrane that includes a physical description of Schroeder's paradox, and it bridges the gap between the two types of macroscopic models currently in the literature.

  18. Magainin 2 Revisited: A Test of the Quantitative Model for the All-or-None Permeabilization of Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Sonia M.; Pokorny, Antje; Almeida, Paulo F.F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The all-or-none kinetic model that we recently proposed for the antimicrobial peptide cecropin A is tested here for magainin 2. In mixtures of phosphatidylcholine (PC)/phosphatidylglycerol (PG) 50:50 and 70:30, release of contents from lipid vesicles occurs in an all-or-none fashion and the differences between PC/PG 50:50 and 70:30 can be ascribed mainly to differences in binding, which was determined independently and is ∼20 times greater to PC/PG 50:50 than to 70:30. Only one variable parameter, β, corresponding to the ratio of the rates of pore opening to pore closing, is used to fit dye release kinetics from these two mixtures, for several peptide/lipid ratios ranging from 1:25 to 1:200. However, unlike for cecropin A where it stays almost constant, β increases five times as the PG content of the vesicles increases from 30 to 50%. Thus, magainin 2 is more sensitive to anionic lipid content than cecropin A. But overall, magainin follows the same all-or-none kinetic model as cecropin A in these lipid mixtures, with slightly different parameter values. When the PG content is reduced to 20 mol %, dye release becomes very low; the mechanism appears to change, and is consistent with a graded kinetic model. We suggest that the peptide may be inducing formation of PG domains. In either mechanism, no peptide oligomerization occurs and magainin catalyzes dye release in proportion to its concentration on the membrane in a peptide state that we call a pore. We envision this structure as a chaotic or stochastic type of pore, involving both lipids and peptides, not a well-defined, peptide-lined channel. PMID:19134472

  19. Membrane Fission: Model for Intermediate Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Membrane budding-fission is a fundamental process generating intracellular carriers of proteins. Earlier works were focused only on formation of coated buds connected to the initial membrane by narrow membrane necks. We present the theoretical analysis of the whole pathway of budding-fission, including the crucial stage where the membrane neck undergoes fission and the carrier separates from the donor membrane. We consider two successive intermediates of the reaction: 1), a constricted membrane neck coming out of aperture of the assembling protein coat, and 2), hemifission intermediate resulting from self-fusion of the inner monolayer of the neck, while its outer monolayer remains continuous. Transformation of the constricted neck into the hemifission intermediate is driven by the membrane stress produced in the neck by the protein coat. Although apparently similar to hemifusion, the fission is predicted to have an opposite dependence on the monolayer spontaneous curvature. Analysis of the further stages of the process demonstrates that in all practically important cases the hemifission intermediate decays spontaneously into two separate membranes, thereby completing the fission process. We formulate the “job description” for fission proteins by calculating the energy they have to deliver and the radii of the protein coat aperture which have to be reached to drive the fission process. PMID:12829467

  20. Modeling of Fluid-Membrane Interaction in Cellular Microinjection Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karzar-Jeddi, Mehdi; Diaz, Jhon; Olgac, Nejat; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2009-11-01

    Cellular microinjection is a well-accepted method to deliver matters such as sperm, nucleus, or macromolecules into biological cells. To improve the success rate of in vitro fertilization and to establish the ideal operating conditions for a novel computer controlled rotationally oscillating intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) technology, we investigate the fluid-membrane interactions in the ICSI procedure. The procedure consists of anchoring the oocyte (a developing egg) using a holding pipette, penetrating oocyte's zona pellucida (the outer membrane) and the oolemma (the plasma or inner membrane) using an injection micropipette, and finally to deliver sperm into the oocyte for fertilization. To predict the large deformation of the oocyte membranes up to the piercing of the oolemma and the motion of fluids across both membranes, the dynamic fluid-pipette-membrane interactions are formulated by the coupled Stokes' equations and the continuum membrane model based on Helfrich's energy theory. A boundary integral model is developed to simulate the transient membrane deformation and the local membrane stress induced by the longitudinal motion of the injection pipette. The model captures the essential features of the membranes shown on optical images of ICSI experiments, and is capable of suggesting the optimal deformation level of the oolemma to start the rotational oscillations for piercing into the oolemma.

  1. A model analysis of static stress in the vestibular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pender, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Background The scheme of the core vestibular membranes, consisting of serially connected utricle, ampulla and semicircular canal, first appeared hundreds of millions of years ago in primitive fish and has remained largely unchanged during the subsequent course of evolution. The labyrinths of higher organisms build on this core structure, with the addition of the phylogenetically newer membrane structures, namely, saccule, lagena and cochlea. An analysis of static stress in these core vestibular membranes may contribute to a better understanding of the role of stress in the evolution of derivative membrane structures over the long term as well as the short-term membrane distortions seen in Meniere's disease. Methods A model of these core vestibular membranes is proposed in order to analyze the distribution of stress in the walls of the component chambers. The model uses basic geometrical elements of hollow cylinders and spheres to emulate the actual structures. These model elements lend themselves to a mathematical analysis of static stress in their membranes. Results Hoop stress, akin to the stress in hoops used to reinforce barrel walls, is found to be the predominant stress in the model membranes. The level of hoop stress depends not only on pressure but as well on a geometric stress factor that incorporates membrane shape, thickness and curvature. This result implies that hoop stress may be unevenly distributed in the membranes of the several vestibular chambers due to variations in these dimensional parameters. These results provide a theoretical framework for appraising hoop stress levels in any vestibular labyrinth whose dimensions are known. Conclusion Static hoop stress disparities are likely to exist in the vestibular membranes given their complex physical configurations. Such stress disparities may contribute to the development of membrane pathologies as seen in Meniere's Disease. They may also factor in the evolutionary development of other derivative

  2. Membrane-dependent Activities of Human 15-LOX-2 and Its Murine Counterpart: IMPLICATIONS FOR MURINE MODELS OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS.

    PubMed

    Bender, Gunes; Schexnaydre, Erin E; Murphy, Robert C; Uhlson, Charis; Newcomer, Marcia E

    2016-09-01

    The enzyme encoded by the ALOX15B gene has been linked to the development of atherosclerotic plaques in humans and in a mouse model of hypercholesterolemia. In vitro, these enzymes, which share 78% sequence identity, generate distinct products from their substrate arachidonic acid: the human enzyme, a 15-S-hydroperoxy product; and the murine enzyme, an 8-S-product. We probed the activities of these enzymes with nanodiscs as membrane mimics to determine whether they can access substrate esterified in a bilayer and characterized their activities at the membrane interface. We observed that both enzymes transform phospholipid-esterified arachidonic acid to a 15-S-product. Moreover, when expressed in transfected HEK cells, both enzymes result in significant increases in the amounts of 15-hydroxyderivatives of eicosanoids detected. In addition, we show that 15-LOX-2 is distributed at the plasma membrane when the HEK293 cells are stimulated by the addition Ca(2+) ionophore and that cellular localization is dependent upon the presence of a putative membrane insertion loop. We also report that sequence differences between the human and mouse enzymes in this loop appear to confer distinct mechanisms of enzyme-membrane interaction for the homologues.

  3. An in vitro study on the antioxidant capacity of usnic acid on human erythrocytes and molecular models of its membrane.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Jemiola-Rzeminska, M; Astudillo, C; Gallardo, M J; Staforelli, J P; Villena, F; Strzalka, K

    2015-11-01

    Usnic acid (UA) has been associated with chronic diseases through its antioxidant action. Its main target is the cell membrane; however, its effect on that of human erythrocytes has been scarcely investigated. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of the interaction between UA and cell membranes human erythrocytes and molecular models of its membrane have been utilized. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) were chosen as representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Results by X-ray diffraction showed that UA produced structural perturbations on DMPC and DMPE bilayers. DSC studies have indicated that thermotropic behavior of DMPE was most strongly distorted by UA than DMPC, whereas the latter is mainly affected on the pretransition. Scanning electron (SEM) and defocusing microscopy (DM) showed that UA induced alterations to erythrocytes from the normal discoid shape to echinocytes. These results imply that UA molecules were located in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Results of its antioxidant properties showed that UA neutralized the oxidative capacity of HClO on DMPC and DMPE bilayers; SEM, DM and hemolysis assays demonstrated the protective effect of UA against the deleterious oxidant effects of HClO upon human erythrocytes.

  4. Mn2+ exerts stronger structural effects than the Mn-citrate complex on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Villena, F; Sotomayor, C P

    2010-01-01

    While traces of manganese (Mn) take part in important and essential functions in biology, elevated exposures have been shown to cause significant toxicity. Chronic exposure to the metal leads to manganese neurotoxicity (or manganism), a brain disorder that resembles Parkinsonism. Toxic effect mechanisms of Mn is not understood, toxic concentrations of manganese are not well defined and blood manganese concentration at which neurotoxicity occurs has not been identified. There are reports indicating that the most abundant Mn-species in Mn carriers within blood is the Mn-citrate complex. Despite the well-documented information about the toxic effects of Mn, there are scarce reports concerning the effects of manganese compounds on both structure and functions of cell membranes, particularly those of human erythrocytes. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of Mn with cell membranes, MnCl(2), and the Mn-citrate complex were incubated with intact erythrocytes, isolated unsealead human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), and molecular models of the erythrocyte membrane. These consisted in bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), phospholipid classes present in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of the Mn compounds to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction, IUM were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, and intact human erythrocytes were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In all these systems it was found that Mn(2+) exerted considerable higher structural perturbations than the Mn-citrate complex. PMID:19880186

  5. Cr(III) exerts stronger structural effects than Cr(VI) on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Castro, R; Villena, F; Sotomayor, C P

    2008-04-01

    Chromium exists in many oxidation states, of which only the hexavalent Cr(VI) and the trivalent Cr(III) ions are stable under environmental conditions. It is generally reported that Cr(VI) is highly toxic while Cr(III) is relatively innocuous, although others have reported just the opposite. On the other hand, despite the many studies on chromium toxicity, and particularly after the knowledge that Cr(VI) anions readily enter the erythrocytes where they are reduced to Cr(III), there are practically no reports on the structural effects induced by chromium compounds on the erythrocyte membrane. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) with cell membranes, CrCl(3), and K(2)CrO(4) were incubated with intact erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), and molecular models of the erythrocyte membrane. These consisted in bilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPE), phospholipid classes present in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction, DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) and IUM were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, and intact human erythrocytes were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In all these systems, it was found that Cr(III) induced considerably higher structural perturbations than Cr(VI). PMID:18234343

  6. An in vitro study on the antioxidant capacity of usnic acid on human erythrocytes and molecular models of its membrane.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Jemiola-Rzeminska, M; Astudillo, C; Gallardo, M J; Staforelli, J P; Villena, F; Strzalka, K

    2015-11-01

    Usnic acid (UA) has been associated with chronic diseases through its antioxidant action. Its main target is the cell membrane; however, its effect on that of human erythrocytes has been scarcely investigated. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of the interaction between UA and cell membranes human erythrocytes and molecular models of its membrane have been utilized. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) were chosen as representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Results by X-ray diffraction showed that UA produced structural perturbations on DMPC and DMPE bilayers. DSC studies have indicated that thermotropic behavior of DMPE was most strongly distorted by UA than DMPC, whereas the latter is mainly affected on the pretransition. Scanning electron (SEM) and defocusing microscopy (DM) showed that UA induced alterations to erythrocytes from the normal discoid shape to echinocytes. These results imply that UA molecules were located in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Results of its antioxidant properties showed that UA neutralized the oxidative capacity of HClO on DMPC and DMPE bilayers; SEM, DM and hemolysis assays demonstrated the protective effect of UA against the deleterious oxidant effects of HClO upon human erythrocytes. PMID:26299817

  7. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pineda De Castro, Luis Felipe; Dopson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures) such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF) to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow. PMID:27167213

  8. Comparison of lipid membrane-water partitioning with various organic solvent-water partitions of neutral species and ionic species: Uniqueness of cerasome as a model for the stratum corneum in partition processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keda; Fahr, Alfred; Abraham, Michael H; Acree, William E; Tobin, Desmond J; Liu, Xiangli

    2015-10-15

    Lipid membrane-water partitions (e.g., immobilized artificial membrane systems where the lipid membrane is a neutral phospholipid monolayer bound to gel beads) were compared to various organic solvent-water partitions using linear free energy relationships. To this end, we also measured the retention factors of 36 compounds (including neutral and ionic species) from water to liposomes made up of 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine and 3-sn-phosphatidyl-l-serine (80:20, mol/mol), employing liposome electrokinetic chromatography in this work. The results show that lipid membranes exhibit a considerably different chemical environment from those of organic solvents. For both neutral species and ionic species, partitions into the more polar hydroxylic solvents are chemically closer to partition into the lipid membrane as compared to partitions into the less polar hydroxylic solvents and into aprotic solvents. This means that solutes partition into the polar parts of lipid membranes, regardless of whether they are charged or not. In addition, cerasome (i.e., liposome composed mainly of stratum corneum lipids) was compared with regular phospholipid liposomes as a possible model for human stratum corneum in partitions. It was found that the cerasome-water partition exhibits a better chemical similarity to skin permeation. This is probably due to the unique structures of ceramides that occur in cerasome and in the stratum corneum lipid domain. We further show that membranes in membrane-water partitions exhibit very different properties.

  9. Salicylic acid induces vanillin synthesis through the phospholipid signaling pathway in Capsicum chinense cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Rodas-Junco, Beatriz A; Cab-Guillen, Yahaira; Muñoz-Sanchez, J Armando; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe; Monforte-Gonzalez, Miriam; Hérnandez-Sotomayor, S M Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Signal transduction via phospholipids is mediated by phospholipases such as phospholipase C (PLC) and D (PLD), which catalyze hydrolysis of plasma membrane structural phospholipids. Phospholipid signaling is also involved in plant responses to phytohormones such as salicylic acid (SA). The relationships between phospholipid signaling, SA, and secondary metabolism are not fully understood. Using a Capsicum chinense cell suspension as a model, we evaluated whether phospholipid signaling modulates SA-induced vanillin production through the activation of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway. Salicylic acid was found to elicit PAL activity and consequently vanillin production, which was diminished or reversed upon exposure to the phosphoinositide-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) signaling inhibitors neomycin and U73122. Exposure to the phosphatidic acid inhibitor 1-butanol altered PLD activity and prevented SA-induced vanillin production. Our results suggest that PLC and PLD-generated secondary messengers may be modulating SA-induced vanillin production through the activation of key biosynthetic pathway enzymes.

  10. Interaction Study of Phospholipid Membranes with an N-Glucosylated β-Turn Peptide Structure Detecting Autoantibodies Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Becucci, Lucia; Benci, Stefano; Nuti, Francesca; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Vaezi, Zahra; Stella, Lorenzo; Venanzi, Mariano; Rovero, Paolo; Papini, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of lipid environments with the type I' β-turn peptide structure called CSF114 and its N-glucosylated form CSF114(Glc), previously developed as a synthetic antigenic probe recognizing specific autoantibodies in a subpopulation of multiple sclerosis patients' serum, was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and electrochemical experiments using large unilamellar vesicles, mercury supported lipid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs). The synthetic antigenic probe N-glucosylated peptide CSF114(Glc) and its unglucosylated form interact with the polar heads of lipid SAMs of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine at nonzero transmembrane potentials, probably establishing a dual electrostatic interaction of the trimethylammonium  and phosphate groups of the phosphatidylcholine polar head with the Glu⁵ and His⁸ residues on the opposite ends of the CSF114(Glc) β-turn encompassing residues 6-9. His⁸ protonation at pH 7 eliminates this dual interaction. CSF114(Glc) is adsorbed on top of SAMs of mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with sphingomyelin, an important component of myelin, whose proteins are hypothesized to undergo an aberrant N-glucosylation triggering the autoimmune response. Incorporation of the type I' β-turn peptide structure CSF114 into lipid SAMs by potential scans of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy induces defects causing a slight permeabilization toward cadmium ions. The N-glucopeptide CSF114(Glc) does not affect  tBLMs to a detectable extent. PMID:26437433

  11. Interaction Study of Phospholipid Membranes with an N-Glucosylated β-Turn Peptide Structure Detecting Autoantibodies Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Becucci, Lucia; Benci, Stefano; Nuti, Francesca; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Vaezi, Zahra; Stella, Lorenzo; Venanzi, Mariano; Rovero, Paolo; Papini, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of lipid environments with the type I’ β-turn peptide structure called CSF114 and its N-glucosylated form CSF114(Glc), previously developed as a synthetic antigenic probe recognizing specific autoantibodies in a subpopulation of multiple sclerosis patients’ serum, was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and electrochemical experiments using large unilamellar vesicles, mercury supported lipid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs). The synthetic antigenic probe N-glucosylated peptide CSF114(Glc) and its unglucosylated form interact with the polar heads of lipid SAMs of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine at nonzero transmembrane potentials, probably establishing a dual electrostatic interaction of the trimethylammonium  and phosphate groups of the phosphatidylcholine polar head with the Glu5 and His9 residues on the opposite ends of the CSF114(Glc) β-turn encompassing residues 6-9. His9 protonation at pH 7 eliminates this dual interaction. CSF114(Glc) is adsorbed on top of SAMs of mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with sphingomyelin, an important component of myelin, whose proteins are hypothesized to undergo an aberrant N-glucosylation triggering the autoimmune response. Incorporation of the type I’ β-turn peptide structure CSF114 into lipid SAMs by potential scans of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy induces defects causing a slight permeabilization toward cadmium ions. The N-glucopeptide CSF114(Glc) does not affect  tBLMs to a detectable extent. PMID:26437433

  12. Interaction Study of Phospholipid Membranes with an N-Glucosylated β-Turn Peptide Structure Detecting Autoantibodies Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Becucci, Lucia; Benci, Stefano; Nuti, Francesca; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Vaezi, Zahra; Stella, Lorenzo; Venanzi, Mariano; Rovero, Paolo; Papini, Anna Maria

    2015-09-30

    The interaction of lipid environments with the type I' β-turn peptide structure called CSF114 and its N-glucosylated form CSF114(Glc), previously developed as a synthetic antigenic probe recognizing specific autoantibodies in a subpopulation of multiple sclerosis patients' serum, was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and electrochemical experiments using large unilamellar vesicles, mercury supported lipid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs). The synthetic antigenic probe N-glucosylated peptide CSF114(Glc) and its unglucosylated form interact with the polar heads of lipid SAMs of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine at nonzero transmembrane potentials, probably establishing a dual electrostatic interaction of the trimethylammonium  and phosphate groups of the phosphatidylcholine polar head with the Glu⁵ and His⁸ residues on the opposite ends of the CSF114(Glc) β-turn encompassing residues 6-9. His⁸ protonation at pH 7 eliminates this dual interaction. CSF114(Glc) is adsorbed on top of SAMs of mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with sphingomyelin, an important component of myelin, whose proteins are hypothesized to undergo an aberrant N-glucosylation triggering the autoimmune response. Incorporation of the type I' β-turn peptide structure CSF114 into lipid SAMs by potential scans of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy induces defects causing a slight permeabilization toward cadmium ions. The N-glucopeptide CSF114(Glc) does not affect  tBLMs to a detectable extent.

  13. Free radical mediated x-ray damage of model membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, A; Caffrey, M

    1996-01-01

    The damaging effects of synchrotron-derived x rays on aqueous phospholipid dispersions have been evaluated. The effect of degree of lipid hydration, phospholipid chemical structure, mesophase identity, aqueous medium composition, and incident flux on the severity and progress of damage was quantified using time-resolved x-ray diffraction and chromatographic analysis of damage products. Electron spin resonance measurements of spin-trapped intermediates generated during irradiation suggest a free radical-mediated process. Surprisingly, radiation damage effects revealed by x-ray diffraction were imperceptible when the lamellar phases were prepared under water-stressed conditions, despite the fact that x-ray-induced chemical breakdown of the lipid occurred regardless of hydration level. Of the fully hydrated lipid systems studied, saturated diacyl-phosphatidylcholines were most sensitive to radiation damage compared to the ester- and ether-linked phosphatidylethanolamines and the ether-linked phosphatidylcholines. The inclusion of buffers or inorganic salts in the dispersing medium had only a minor effect in reducing damage development. A small inverse dose-rate effect was found when the x-ray beam intensity was changed 15-fold. These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of radiation damage, to our appreciation of the importance of monitoring both structure and composition when evaluating biomaterials radiation sensitivity, and to the development of strategies for eliminating or reducing the severity of damage due to an increasingly important source of x rays, synchrotron radiation. Because damage is shown to be free radical mediated, these results have an important bearing on age-related accumulation of free radicals in cells and how these might compromise membrane integrity, culminating in cell death. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 PMID:9172745

  14. Membranous obliterative bronchitis: a proposed unifying model.

    PubMed

    Colin, Andrew A; Tsiligiannis, Theofanis; Nosé, Vânia; Waltz, David A

    2006-02-01

    Three adults with cystic fibrosis (one after lung transplantation) presented with fever, chest pain, and acute radiographic changes. The changes included a cavitary lesion of the lung, acute dense infiltrates, and lobar collapse. After failing conventional antibiotic therapy, the patients underwent flexible bronchoscopy. All had bronchial obstruction by a membrane that had completely occluded the bronchial orifice at the bifurcation of the bronchi. Therapeutic interventions ranged from continuing intravenous antibiotics, bronchoscopy-assisted perforation of the membrane by sharp instrumentation, and transthoracic needle-guided perforation of the membrane with subsequent stenting of the orifice. The patients recovered, but the posttransplant patient had recurrent membranous obstructions with multiple interventions. The cause and triggers of the process are unknown. Based on repeated observations of the evolution of the membranes, and histologic material from bronchoscopies, we propose a putative paradigm of the natural history of the process. We suggest that local stimuli generate a richly vascularized granulation polyp, which progresses in a "shutter-like" motion to form partial or completely obstructive membranes. The subsequent course depends on the vascular supply to the membrane. We also propose that similar processes may be the underlying pathologic events in some cases of lung abscess and necrotizing pneumonia. PMID:16358340

  15. The Drosophila photoreceptor as a model system for studying signalling at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shweta; Cockcroft, Shamshad; Raghu, Padinjat

    2016-04-15

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the existence of membrane contact sites (MCS) between intracellular organelles in eukaryotic cells. Recent exciting studies have also demonstrated the existence of biomolecular interactions at these contact sites in mediating changes in the membrane composition of the cellular compartments. However, the role of such contact sites in regulating organelle function and physiological processes remains less clear. In this review we discuss the existence of a contact site between the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) inDrosophilaphotoreceptors. Further, we discuss the role of specific proteins present at this location in regulating phospholipid turnover and its impact in regulating a physiological process, namely phototransduction. PMID:27068953

  16. Membrane Elastegrities: A New Model Viscoelastic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlides, Eleftherios; Pearce, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    We propose a new class of structures, membrane elastegrities, a network of rigid and elastic members maintaining shape through elastic forces, named by analogy to tensegrities that maintain shape through tension alone. Numerous researchers have proposed tensegrities as models to biological structure. Elastegrities expand tensegrity properties primarily by suggesting a mechanism for containing and pumping non-Newtonian fluids in living organisms. The chiral icosahedral elastegrity compared to the 6-strut tensegrity have identical symmetry, negative Poisson Ratio, and the reaction force to external forces is distributed throughout the elastic members causing reversible deformation. They also have important differences: a) elastic hinge connections enable containment and pumping of fluids versus nodal connections, b) simple assembly by folding a flat shape-memory material versus assembly requiring scaffolding, c) hinge connections limit freedom of movement resulting in isometric forces as members rotate cooperatively contracting versus large freedom of movement with unpredictable deformation. d) The chiral icosahedral elastegrity can contain liquid and requires increased force for equal displacement as it rotates towards a zero volume octahedron suggesting a mechanism for a non-Newtonian pump.

  17. Membranous nephropathy: from models to man

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Laurence H.; Salant, David J.

    2014-01-01

    As recently as 2002, most cases of primary membranous nephropathy (MN), a relatively common cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults, were considered idiopathic. We now recognize that MN is an organ-specific autoimmune disease in which circulating autoantibodies bind to an intrinsic antigen on glomerular podocytes and form deposits of immune complexes in situ in the glomerular capillary walls. Here we define the clinical and pathological features of MN and describe the experimental models that enabled the discovery of the major target antigen, the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R). We review the pathophysiology of experimental MN and compare and contrast it with the human disease. We discuss the diagnostic value of serological testing for anti-PLA2R and tissue staining for the redistributed antigen, and their utility for differentiating between primary and secondary MN, and between recurrent MN after kidney transplant and de novo MN. We end with consideration of how knowledge of the antigen might direct future therapeutic strategies. PMID:24892704

  18. FINAL REPORT:Observation and Simulations of Transport of Molecules and Ions Across Model Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    MURAD, SOHAIL; JAMESON, CYNTHIA J

    2013-10-22

    During the this new grant we developed a robust methodology for investigating a wide range of properties of phospho-lipid bilayers. The approach developed is unique because despite using periodic boundary conditions, we can simulate an entire experiment or process in detail. For example, we can follow the entire permeation process in a lipid-membrane. This includes transport from the bulk aqueous phase to the lipid surface; permeation into the lipid; transport inside the lipid; and transport out of the lipid to the bulk aqueous phase again. We studied the transport of small gases in both the lipid itself and in model protein channels. In addition, we have examined the transport of nanocrystals through the lipid membrane, with the main goal of understanding the mechanical behavior of lipids under stress including water and ion leakage and lipid flip flop. Finally we have also examined in detail the deformation of lipids when under the influence of external fields, both mechanical and electrostatic (currently in progress). The important observations and conclusions from our studies are described in the main text of the report

  19. Human cells and cell membrane molecular models are affected in vitro by chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P; Bolognin, Silvia; Zatta, Paolo

    2008-06-01

    This study presents evidence that chlorpromazine (CPZ) affects human cells and cell membrane molecular models. Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells incubated with 0.1 mM CPZ suffered a decrease of cell viability. On the other hand, phase contrast microscopy observations of human erythrocytes indicated that they underwent a morphological alteration as 1 microM CPZ changed their discoid normal shape to stomatocytes, and to hemolysis with 1 mM CPZ. X-ray diffraction experiments performed on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) bilayers, classes of the major phospholipids present in the outer and inner sides of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively showed that CPZ disordered the polar head and acyl chain regions of both DMPC and DMPE, where these interactions were stronger with DMPC bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy on DMPC LUV at 18 degrees C confirmed these results. In fact, the assays showed that CPZ induced a significant reduction of their generalized polarization (GP) and anisotropy (r) values, indicative of enhanced disorder at the polar head and acyl chain regions of the DMPC lipid bilayer. PMID:18372093

  20. Binding of Pediocin PA-1 with Anionic Lipid Induces Model Membrane Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Gaussier, Hélène; Lefèvre, Thierry; Subirade, Muriel

    2003-01-01

    To obtain molecular insights into the action mode of antimicrobial activity of pediocin PA-1, the interactions between this bacteriocin and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) model membranes have been investigated in D2O at pD 6 by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The interactions were monitored with respect to alteration of the secondary structure of pediocin, as registered by the amide I′ band, and phospholipid conformation, as revealed by the methylene νs(CH2) and carbonyl ν(C=O) stretching vibrations. The results show that no interaction between pediocin and DMPC occurs. By contrast, pediocin undergoes a structural reorganization in the presence of DMPG. Upon heating, pediocin self-aggregates, which is not observed for this pD in aqueous solution. The gel-to-crystalline phase transition of DMPG shifts to higher temperatures with a concomitant dehydration of the interfacial region. Our results indicate that pediocin is an extrinsic peptide and that its action mechanism may lie in a destabilization of the cell membrane. PMID:14602640

  1. Effect of Divalent Cation Removal on the Structure of Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clifton, Luke A.; Skoda, Maximilian W. A.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ciesielski, Filip; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Holt, Stephen A.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2014-12-09

    The Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane (GNB-OM) is asymmetric in its lipid composition with a phospholipid-rich inner leaflet and an outer leaflet predominantly composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS are polyanionic molecules, with numerous phosphate groups present in the lipid A and core oligosaccharide regions. The repulsive forces due to accumulation of the negative charges are screened and bridged by the divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) that are known to be crucial for the integrity of the bacterial OM. Indeed, chelation of divalent cations is a well-established method to permeabilize Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Here, we use X-ray and neutronmore » reflectivity (XRR and NR, respectively) techniques to examine the role of calcium ions in the stability of a model GNB-OM. Using XRR we show that Ca2+ binds to the core region of the rough mutant LPS (RaLPS) films, producing more ordered structures in comparison to divalent cation free monolayers. Using recently developed solid-supported models of the GNB-OM, we study the effect of calcium removal on the asymmetry of DPPC:RaLPS bilayers. We show that without the charge screening effect of divalent cations, the LPS is forced to overcome the thermodynamically unfavorable energy barrier and flip across the hydrophobic bilayer to minimize the repulsive electrostatic forces, resulting in about 20% mixing of LPS and DPPC between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. These results reveal for the first time the molecular details behind the well-known mechanism of outer membrane stabilization by divalent cations. This confirms the relevance of the asymmetric models for future studies of outer membrane stability and antibiotic penetration.« less

  2. Effect of Divalent Cation Removal on the Structure of Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Models

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, Luke A.; Skoda, Maximilian W. A.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ciesielski, Filip; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Holt, Stephen A.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2014-12-09

    The Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane (GNB-OM) is asymmetric in its lipid composition with a phospholipid-rich inner leaflet and an outer leaflet predominantly composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS are polyanionic molecules, with numerous phosphate groups present in the lipid A and core oligosaccharide regions. The repulsive forces due to accumulation of the negative charges are screened and bridged by the divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) that are known to be crucial for the integrity of the bacterial OM. Indeed, chelation of divalent cations is a well-established method to permeabilize Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Here, we use X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XRR and NR, respectively) techniques to examine the role of calcium ions in the stability of a model GNB-OM. Using XRR we show that Ca2+ binds to the core region of the rough mutant LPS (RaLPS) films, producing more ordered structures in comparison to divalent cation free monolayers. Using recently developed solid-supported models of the GNB-OM, we study the effect of calcium removal on the asymmetry of DPPC:RaLPS bilayers. We show that without the charge screening effect of divalent cations, the LPS is forced to overcome the thermodynamically unfavorable energy barrier and flip across the hydrophobic bilayer to minimize the repulsive electrostatic forces, resulting in about 20% mixing of LPS and DPPC between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. These results reveal for the first time the molecular details behind the well-known mechanism of outer membrane stabilization by divalent cations. This confirms the relevance of the asymmetric models for future studies of outer membrane stability and antibiotic penetration.

  3. Spatiotemporal Organization of Spin-Coated Supported Model Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    All cells of living organisms are separated from their surroundings and organized internally by means of flexible lipid membranes. In fact, there is consensus that the minimal requirements for self-replicating life processes include the following three features: (1) information carriers (DNA, RNA), (2) a metabolic system, and (3) encapsulation in a container structure [1]. Therefore, encapsulation can be regarded as an essential part of life itself. In nature, membranes are highly diverse interfacial structures that compartmentalize cells [2]. While prokaryotic cells only have an outer plasma membrane and a less-well-developed internal membrane structure, eukaryotic cells have a number of internal membranes associated with the organelles and the nucleus. Many of these membrane structures, including the plasma membrane, are complex layered systems, but with the basic structure of a lipid bilayer. Biomembranes contain hundreds of different lipid species in addition to embedded or peripherally associated membrane proteins and connections to scaffolds such as the cytoskeleton. In vitro, lipid bilayers are spontaneously self-organized structures formed by a large group of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous suspensions. Bilayer formation is driven by the entropic properties of the hydrogen bond network in water in combination with the amphiphilic nature of the lipids. The molecular shapes of the lipid constituents play a crucial role in bilayer formation, and only lipids with approximately cylindrical shapes are able to form extended bilayers. The bilayer structure of biomembranes was discovered by Gorter and Grendel in 1925 [3] using monolayer studies of lipid extracts from red blood cells. Later, a number of conceptual models were developed to rationalize the organization of lipids and proteins in biological membranes. One of the most celebrated is the fluid-mosaic model by Singer and Nicolson (1972) [4]. According to this model, the lipid bilayer component of

  4. The GacS/A-RsmA Signal Transduction Pathway Controls the Synthesis of Alkylresorcinol Lipids that Replace Membrane Phospholipids during Encystment of Azotobacter vinelandii SW136

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Yanet; Guzmán, Josefina; Moreno, Soledad; Cocotl-Yañez, Miguel; Vences-Guzmán, Miguel Ángel; Castañeda, Miguel; Espín, Guadalupe; Segura, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a soil bacterium that undergoes a differentiation process that forms cysts resistant to desiccation. During encystment, a family of alkylresorcinols lipids (ARs) are synthesized and become part of the membrane and are also components of the outer layer covering the cyst, where they play a structural role. The synthesis of ARs in A. vinelandii has been shown to occur by the activity of enzymes encoded in the arsABCD operon. The expression of this operon is activated by ArpR, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator whose transcription occurs during encystment and is dependent on the alternative sigma factor RpoS. In this study, we show that the two component response regulator GacA, the small RNA RsmZ1 and the translational repressor protein RsmA, implicated in the control of the synthesis of other cysts components (i.e., alginate and poly-ß-hydroxybutyrate), are also controlling alkylresorcinol synthesis. This control affects the expression of arsABCD and is exerted through the regulation of arpR expression. We show that RsmA negatively regulates arpR expression by binding its mRNA, repressing its translation. GacA in turn, positively regulates arpR expression through the activation of transcription of RsmZ1, that binds RsmA, counteracting its repressor activity. This regulatory cascade is independent of RpoS. We also show evidence suggesting that GacA exerts an additional regulation on arsABCD expression through an ArpR independent route. PMID:27055016

  5. Efficient isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion translocators and assembly of heteromeric transmembrane pores in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Romano, Fabian B; Rossi, Kyle C; Savva, Christos G; Holzenburg, Andreas; Clerico, Eugenia M; Heuck, Alejandro P

    2011-08-23

    Translocation of bacterial toxins or effectors into host cells using the type III secretion (T3S) system is a conserved mechanism shared by many Gram-negative pathogens. Pseudomonas aeruginosa injects different proteins across the plasma membrane of target cells, altering the normal metabolism of the host. Protein translocation presumably occurs through a proteinaceous transmembrane pore formed by two T3S secreted protein translocators, PopB and PopD. Unfolded translocators are secreted through the T3S needle prior to insertion into the target membrane. Purified PopB and PopD form pores in model membranes. However, their tendency to form heterogeneous aggregates in solution had hampered the analysis of how these proteins undergo the transition from a denatured state to a membrane-inserted state. Translocators were purified as stable complexes with the cognate chaperone PcrH and isolated from the chaperone using 6 M urea. We report here the assembly of stable transmembrane pores by dilution of urea-denatured translocators in the presence of membranes. PopB and PopD spontaneously bound liposomes containing anionic phospholipids and cholesterol in a pH-dependent manner as observed by two independent assays, time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer and sucrose-step gradient ultracentrifugation. Using Bodipy-labeled proteins, we found that PopB interacts with PopD on the membrane surface as determined by excitation energy migration and fluorescence quenching. Stable transmembrane pores are more efficiently assembled at pH <5.0, suggesting that acidic residues might be involved in the initial membrane binding and/or insertion. Altogether, the experimental setup described here represents an efficient method for the reconstitution and analysis of membrane-inserted translocators.

  6. PHYSICAL STUDIES OF PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, D.; Fluck, D. J.

    1966-01-01

    On heating pure, fully saturated 2,3-diacyl-DL-phosphatidyl-ethanolamines and 2,3-diacylphosphatidyl-cholines (lecithins) in water to the transition temperature at which large endothermic heat changes occur, they are observed, by light microscopy, to form myelin figures. This result is discussed in terms of the large difference in the transition temperature for "melting" of the hydrocarbon chains of unsaturated and saturated phospholipids and is illustrated by means of differential thermal analysis (D.T.A.) curves. These structures have been examined by electron microscopy after negative staining and after reaction with osmium tetroxide. Typical phospholipid lamella structures are seen in the phosphatidylcholines after negative staining, and in the phosphatidyl-ethanolamines after both negative staining and osmium fixation. The distances across these lamellae have been measured. Some preliminary investigations of the nature of the osmium tetroxide reaction with the phosphatidyl-ethanolamines have been made. PMID:4165077

  7. Conserved SMP domains of the ERMES complex bind phospholipids and mediate tether assembly.

    PubMed

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Jiang, Jiansen; Zhang, Jiang; Khoi Dang, Xuan; Loo, Joseph A; Zhou, Z Hong; Egea, Pascal F

    2015-06-23

    Membrane contact sites (MCS) between organelles are proposed as nexuses for the exchange of lipids, small molecules, and other signals crucial to cellular function and homeostasis. Various protein complexes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial encounter structure (ERMES), function as dynamic molecular tethers between organelles. Here, we report the reconstitution and characterization of subcomplexes formed by the cytoplasm-exposed synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid-binding protein (SMP) domains present in three of the five ERMES subunits--the soluble protein Mdm12, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident membrane protein Mmm1, and the mitochondrial membrane protein Mdm34. SMP domains are conserved lipid-binding domains found exclusively in proteins at MCS. We show that the SMP domains of Mdm12 and Mmm1 associate into a tight heterotetramer with equimolecular stoichiometry. Our 17-Å-resolution EM structure of the complex reveals an elongated crescent-shaped particle in which two Mdm12 subunits occupy symmetric but distal positions at the opposite ends of a central ER-anchored Mmm1 homodimer. Rigid body fitting of homology models of these SMP domains in the density maps reveals a distinctive extended tubular structure likely traversed by a hydrophobic tunnel. Furthermore, these two SMP domains bind phospholipids and display a strong preference for phosphatidylcholines, a class of phospholipids whose exchange between the ER and mitochondria is essential. Last, we show that the three SMP-containing ERMES subunits form a ternary complex in which Mdm12 bridges Mmm1 to Mdm34. Our findings highlight roles for SMP domains in ERMES assembly and phospholipid binding and suggest a structure-based mechanism for the facilitated transport of phospholipids between organelles. PMID:26056272

  8. CHARMM-GUI HMMM Builder for Membrane Simulations with the Highly Mobile Membrane-Mimetic Model.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yifei; Cheng, Xi; Lee, Jumin; Vermaas, Josh V; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Park, Soohyung; Klauda, Jeffery B; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-17

    Slow diffusion of the lipids in conventional all-atom simulations of membrane systems makes it difficult to sample large rearrangements of lipids and protein-lipid interactions. Recently, Tajkhorshid and co-workers developed the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model with accelerated lipid motion by replacing the lipid tails with small organic molecules. The HMMM model provides accelerated lipid diffusion by one to two orders of magnitude, and is particularly useful in studying membrane-protein associations. However, building an HMMM simulation system is not easy, as it requires sophisticated treatment of the lipid tails. In this study, we have developed CHARMM-GUI HMMM Builder (http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/hmmm) to provide users with ready-to-go input files for simulating HMMM membrane systems with/without proteins. Various lipid-only and protein-lipid systems are simulated to validate the qualities of the systems generated by HMMM Builder with focus on the basic properties and advantages of the HMMM model. HMMM Builder supports all lipid types available in CHARMM-GUI and also provides a module to convert back and forth between an HMMM membrane and a full-length membrane. We expect HMMM Builder to be a useful tool in studying membrane systems with enhanced lipid diffusion. PMID:26588561

  9. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design

    PubMed Central

    Weitzner, Brian D.; Duran, Amanda M.; Tilley, Drew C.; Elazar, Assaf; Gray, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1) prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2) high-resolution structural refinement; (3) protein-protein docking; and (4) assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design. PMID:26325167

  10. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design.

    PubMed

    Alford, Rebecca F; Koehler Leman, Julia; Weitzner, Brian D; Duran, Amanda M; Tilley, Drew C; Elazar, Assaf; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2015-09-01

    Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1) prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2) high-resolution structural refinement; (3) protein-protein doc