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Sample records for phospholipid turnover relevant

  1. Phospholipid turnover during phagocytosis in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    PubMed Central

    García Gil, Merche; Alonso, Fernando; Alvarez Chiva, Vicente; Sánchez Crespo, Mariano; Mato, José M.

    1982-01-01

    We have previously observed that the phagocytosis of zymosan particles coated with complement by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes is accompanied by a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by transmethylation [García Gil, Alonso, Sánchez Crespo & Mato (1981) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 101, 740–748]. The present studies show that phosphatidylcholine synthesis by a cholinephosphotransferase reaction is enhanced, up to 3-fold, during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear cells. This effect was tested by both measuring the incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine in cells labelled with [Me-14C]choline, and by assaying the activity of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase. The time course of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase activation by zymosan mirrors the inhibition of phospholipid methyltransferase activity previously reported. The extent of incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine induced by various doses of zymosan correlates with the physiological response of the cells to this stimulus. This effect was specific for phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine turnover was not affected by zymosan. The purpose of this enhanced phosphatidylcholine synthesis is not to provide phospholipid molecules rich in arachidonic acid. The present studies show that about 80% of the arachidonic acid generated in response to zymosan derives from phosphatidylinositol. A transient accumulation of arachidonoyldiacylglycerol has also been observed, which indicates that a phospholipase C is responsible, at least in part, for the generation of arachidonic acid. Finally, isobutylmethylxanthine and quinacrine, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol turnover, inhibit both arachidonic acid generation and phagocytosis, indicating a function for this pathway during this process. PMID:6181780

  2. Phospholipid fatty acid turnover in erythrocyte membranes from humans exposed to hyperbaric hyperoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine phospholipid fatty acid turnover in erythrocyte membranes from human subjects exposed to hyperbaric, hyperoxic conditions. Seven males breathed 100% oxygen at two atmospheres of pressure for nine hours. Venous blood was collected one hour before the oxygen exposure; one hour, five hours, and nine hours into the exposure; and one hour, 24 hours, 48 hours and one week after the exposure ended. Washed erythrocytes were incubated with ({sup 3}H) oleic acid for thirty minutes at 37{degree}C. Phospholipids were extracted with methanol and chloroform, separated by thin layer chromatography, and quantitated by spectrodensitometry. Radioactivity was measured in four phospholipid classes and incorporation of ({sup 3}H) oleic acid into phospholipids calculated. Phospholipid fatty acid turnover was used as an indicator of membrane metabolism.

  3. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reversibly inhibits erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dise, Craig A.; Clark, James M.; Lambersten, Christian J.; Goodman, David B. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hyperbaric hyperoxia on the acylation of membrane phospholipid was studied by measuring the rates of activation of exogenous tritiated oleic acid to acyl thioester and of transesterification of the thioester into membrane phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes obtained 1 h after an exposure of the subjects to a hyperbaric oxygen atmosphere (3.5 h, 100 pct O2, 3 ATA). Exposure to pure oxygen was found to inhibit both the acylation and transesterification reactions by more than 30 percent, with partial recovery detected 24 h later. On the other hand, no rate changes were observed when isolated membranes from the same batches of cells were used in similar experiments. It is suggested that the decrease in the incorporation of tritiated oleic acid after hyperbaric hyperoxia may reflect an early event in the pathogenesis of oxygen-induced cellular injury and that it may be a useful index for the assessment of the tolerance of tissues to hyperoxia.

  4. Turnover of phospholipids isolated from fractions of lung lavage fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Baritussio, A.; Carraro, R.; Bellina, L.; Rossi, A.; Bruni, R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Enzi, G.

    1985-10-01

    To clarify the steps following surfactant secretion, we injected adult rabbits with radioactive palmitate, lavaged the airways, removed the cells, separated by ultracentrifugation lavage components into two fractions (B and C), and followed the labeling of phospholipids of these fractions. The results were compatible with the view that total and saturated phosphatidylcholine are transferred from B to C. Furthermore, the fluxes of total and saturated phosphatidylcholine through fraction C (0.45 and 0.30 mumol . h-1 . g lung-1, respectively) were compatible with the actual estimates of surfactant recycling. The labeling of phosphatidylglycerol ruled out a simple precursor-product relationship between B and C but was compatible with a nonideal first-order relationship. The labeling of phosphatidylinositol, cardiolipin, and phosphatidylethanolamine was incompatible with the existence of a direct precursor-product relationship between B and C. The labeling of total and saturated phosphatidylcholine suggests that fraction B may be made by active surfactant, whereas fraction C may contain surfactant modified for reuptake or for reuptake and catabolism.

  5. Turnover of phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine in ether-phospholipids of Krebs II ascite cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tamer, A.E.; Record, M.; Chap, H.; Douste-Blazy, L.

    1985-10-01

    Krebs II ascite cells suspended in Eagle medium were incubated at 37 C for up to 6 hr in the presence of (TH) glycerol or (TSP) orthophosphate. After extraction, their lipids were treated with guinea pig phospholipase A1 under conditions where all diacyl-phospholipids (diacyl-PL) became hydrolyzed with 55% recovery of lyso-PL. Using a bidimensional thin layer chromatography (TLC) involving exposure to HCl fumes between the two runs, it then became possible to determine at once the specific radioactivity of the three subclasses present in choline glycerophospholipids (CGP) and ethanolamineglycerophospholipids (EGP). Compared to diacyl-PL, a lower de novo synthesis of ether subclasses was evidenced in both CGP and EGP by (TH) glycerol incorporation. Although the same profile was obtained for CGP with (TSP) orthophosphate, the three EGP subclasses displayed in this case the same specific radioactivity. These data indicate a higher turnover rate of the polar head group of ether-EGP compared to either-CGP. The simple methodology used in the present study might thus prove helpful in developing enzymatic studies dealing with the mechanism of this accelerated renewal.

  6. Trifluoperazine increases fatty acid turnover in phospholipids in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mazière, C; Mazière, J C; Mora, L; Auclair, M; Polonovski, J

    1988-05-01

    A 24-hr pretreatment of cultured human fibroblasts with trifluoperazine induced a marked increase in incorporation of saturated (stearic, palmitic) and unsaturated (oleic, arachidonic) fatty acids into phospholipids (1.5- to 2-fold for 5.10(-5) M trifluoperazine). Concomitantly, incorporation into cholesteryl esters was strongly inhibited (20% of control for 5.10(-5) M trifluoperazine). The drug did not change the phospholipid composition of treated cells. The effect of trifluoperazine on oleic acid incorporation into phospholipids was time-dependent and reached a maximum after a six-hr preincubation with the drug. Trifluoperazine also induced an increase in the rate of chase of oleic acid from the different phospholipid classes. In vitro preincubation of cell-free extracts with trifluoperazine resulted in activation of phospholipid acyltransferases, whereas cholesterol acyltransferase activity was decreased. The rapid effect of trifluoperazine together with its effect on a cell-free system suggests a direct action of this amphiphilic drug on the acyltransferase activities, probably by modification of the structural organization of cellular membranes.

  7. Phospholipid turnover in Torpedo marmorata electric organ during discharge in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bleasdale, J E; Hawthorne, J N; Widlund, L; Heilbronn, E

    1976-01-01

    One electric organ of anaesthetized Torpedo marmorata was stimulated through electrodes placed on the electric lobe of the brain. Nerves to the other electric organ were cut to provide an unstimulated control. Glucose 6-[32P]phosphate was injected into each organ 16h before electrical stimulation. After stimulation for 10 min at 5 Hz, the organs were removed homogenized and centrifuged on a density gradient for the preparation of subcellular fractions. Stimulation increased the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidate, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine. The increased phosphatidate labelling, but not that of the other two lipids, was seen in fractions rich in synaptic vesicles. Stimulation had no effect on ATP labelling. The phosphatidate content of most fractions fell slightly after stimulation, but amounts of other phospholipids were not affected. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:825114

  8. Phospholipid turnover and ultrastructural correlates during spontaneous germinal vesicle breakdown of the bovine oocyte: Effects of a cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Homa, S.T.; Webster, S.D.; Russell, R.K. )

    1991-08-01

    The turnover of (32P)orthophosphate in bovine oocyte phospholipids was studied during the early stages of spontaneous meiotic maturation, and during inhibition of this process by the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX). Radioactive lipids were separated by TLC and the meiotic stage was determined cytogenetically. Ultrastructure of the nuclear membrane was examined using transmission EM. During the commitment period to meiotic resumption, which precedes germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), small localized convolutions appeared in the intact nuclear membrane. This was accompanied by a decrease in (32P)phosphatidic acid (PA) and an increase in (32P)-phosphatidylcholine (PC). This was followed by extensive convolutions, and subsequent dissociation, of the nuclear membrane, concomitant with a tremendous surge in (32P)PC and (32P)phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The cAMP-mediated maintenance of meiotic arrest involved retention of entire nuclear envelope integrity and total inhibition of the surge in (32P)PC and (32P)PE which accompanied GVBD. The increase in (32P)phosphatidylinositol (PI) associated with all stages of early meiotic resumption was unaffected by IBMX. Microinjection of heparin inhibited GVBD, and injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) overrode IBMX-maintained meiotic arrest in almost 40% of the oocytes. The results suggest that there may be several functions for phospholipid turnover in the regulation of spontaneous meiotic resumption in the bovine oocyte. The first precedes the commitment period, and involves IP3 generation to serve as the primary signal for meiotic resumption. The second occurs concomitant with the commitment period, is unaffected by the level of intracellular cAMP, and is associated with the general turnover of phospholipid.

  9. Phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase is a multifunctional enzyme involved in membrane lipid turnover and degradation while synthesizing triacylglycerol in the unicellular green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kangsup; Han, Danxiang; Li, Yantao; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2012-09-01

    Many unicellular microalgae produce large amounts (∼20 to 50% of cell dry weight) of triacylglycerols (TAGs) under stress (e.g., nutrient starvation and high light), but the synthesis and physiological role of TAG are poorly understood. We present detailed genetic, biochemical, functional, and physiological analyses of phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT) in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which catalyzes TAG synthesis via two pathways: transacylation of diacylglycerol (DAG) with acyl groups from phospholipids and galactolipids and DAG:DAG transacylation. We demonstrate that PDAT also possesses acyl hydrolase activities using TAG, phospholipids, galactolipids, and cholesteryl esters as substrates. Artificial microRNA silencing of PDAT in C. reinhardtii alters the membrane lipid composition, reducing the maximum specific growth rate. The data suggest that PDAT-mediated membrane lipid turnover and TAG synthesis is essential for vigorous growth under favorable culture conditions and for membrane lipid degradation with concomitant production of TAG for survival under stress. The strong lipase activity of PDAT with broad substrate specificity suggests that this enzyme could be a potential biocatalyst for industrial lipid hydrolysis and conversion, particularly for biofuel production.

  10. Minimal Peptidoglycan (PG) Turnover in Wild-Type and PG Hydrolase and Cell Division Mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 Growing Planktonically and in Host-Relevant Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Michael J.; Kuru, Erkin; Rittichier, Jonathan T.; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Brun, Yves V.

    2015-01-01

    as signals for bacteria to induce antibiotic resistance and as activators of innate immune responses. S. pneumoniae is a commensal bacterium that colonizes the human nasopharynx and opportunistically causes serious respiratory and invasive diseases. The results presented here demonstrate a distinct demarcation between regions of old PG and regions of new PG synthesis and minimal turnover of PG in S. pneumoniae cells growing in culture or in host-relevant biofilms. These findings suggest that S. pneumoniae minimizes the release of PG breakdown products by turnover, which may contribute to evasion of the innate immune system. PMID:26303829

  11. Turnover Begets Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the association between turnover of caregivers and turnover of nursing home top management. The top managers examined were administrators and directors of nursing, and the caregivers examined were registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nurse aides. Design and Methods: The data came from a survey of 419…

  12. Phospholipid nanosomes.

    PubMed

    Castor, Trevor P

    2005-10-01

    Phospholipid nanosomes are small, uniform liposomes manufactured utilizing supercritical fluid technologies. Supercritical fluids are first used to solvate phospholipid raw materials, and then decompressed to form phospholipid nanosomes that can encapsulate hydrophilic molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. Hydrophobic therapeutics are co-solvated with phospholipid raw materials in supercritical fluids that, when decompressed, form phospholipid nanosomes encapsulating these drugs in their lipid bilayers. Mathematical modeling and semi-empirical experiments indicate that the size and character of phospholipid nanosomes depend on the several process parameters and material properties including the size and design of decompression nozzle, bubble size, pressure and the rate of decompression, interfacial forces, charge distribution and the nature of compound being encapsulated. Examples are presented for the encapsulation of a protein and hydrophobic drugs. In vitro and in vivo data on breast cancer cells and xenografts in nude mice indicate that paclitaxel nanosomes are less toxic and much more effective than paclitaxel in Cremophor EL (Taxol). Camptothecin nanosomes demonstrate that the normally very water-insoluble camptothecin can be formulated in a biocompatible aqueous medium while retaining in vivo efficacy against lymphoma xenografts in nude mice. In vitro data for betulinic acid nanosomes demonstrate enhanced efficacy against HIV-1 (EC50 of 1.01 microg/ml versus 6.72 microg/ml for neat betulinic acid). Phospholipid nanosomes may find utility in the enhanced delivery of hydrophilic drugs such as recombinant proteins and nucleic acid as well as hydrophobic anticancer and anti-HIV drugs.

  13. Phospholipid Scramblases

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of phospholipid types between the two leaflets of a membrane bilayer is a controlled feature of membrane structure. One of the two membrane catalytic activities governing this distribution randomizes the composition of the two leaflets—the phospholipid scramblases. Two proteins (Xkr8 and TMEM16F) required for the activation of these activities have been identified. One of these proteins (TMEM16F) is quite clearly a scramblase itself and provides insight into the mechanism by which transbilayer phospholipid movement is facilitated. PMID:26843813

  14. The use of natural and synthetic phospholipids as pharmaceutical excipients*

    PubMed Central

    van Hoogevest, Peter; Wendel, Armin

    2014-01-01

    In pharmaceutical formulations, phospholipids obtained from plant or animal sources and synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are purified from, e.g., soybeans or egg yolk using non-toxic solvent extraction and chromatographic procedures with low consumption of energy and minimum possible waste. Because of the use of validated purification procedures and sourcing of raw materials with consistent quality, the resulting products differing in phosphatidylcholine content possess an excellent batch to batch reproducibility with respect to phospholipid and fatty acid composition. The natural phospholipids are described in pharmacopeias and relevant regulatory guidance documentation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Synthetic phospholipids with specific polar head group, fatty acid composition can be manufactured using various synthesis routes. Synthetic phospholipids with the natural stereochemical configuration are preferably synthesized from glycerophosphocholine (GPC), which is obtained from natural phospholipids, using acylation and enzyme catalyzed reactions. Synthetic phospholipids play compared to natural phospholipid (including hydrogenated phospholipids), as derived from the number of drug products containing synthetic phospholipids, a minor role. Only in a few pharmaceutical products synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are used in oral, dermal, and parenteral products including liposomes. Natural phospholipids instead of synthetic phospholipids should be selected as phospholipid excipients for formulation development, whenever possible, because natural phospholipids are derived from renewable sources and produced with more ecologically friendly processes and are available in larger scale at relatively low costs compared to synthetic phospholipids. Practical applications: For selection of phospholipid excipients for pharmaceutical formulations, natural phospholipids are preferred

  15. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is comprised of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. PMID:23026158

  16. Turnover Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  17. Phospholipid Metabolism in Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Short, Steven A.; White, David C.; Aleem, M. I. H.

    1969-01-01

    The lipid composition of the chemoautotroph Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans has been examined. Fatty acids represent 2% of the dry weight of the cells and 86% of the total are extractable with organic solvents. About 25% of the total fatty acids are associated with diacyl phospholipids. Polar carotenoids, the benzoquinone coenzyme Q-8, and most of the fatty acids are present in the neutral lipids. The phospholipids have been identified as phosphatidyl monomethylethanolamine (42%), phosphatidyl glycerol (23%), phosphatidyl ethanolamine (20%), cardiolipin (13%), phosphatidyl choline (1.5%), and phosphatidyl dimethylethanolamine (1%) by chromatography of the diacyl lipids, by chromatography in four systems of the glycerol phosphate esters derived from the lipids by mild alkaline methanolysis, and by chromatographic identification of the products of acid hydrolysis of the esters. No trace of phosphatidylserine (PS), glycerolphosphorylserine, or serine could be detected in the lipid extract or in derivatives of that extract. This casts some doubt on the postulated involvement of PS in iron metabolism. After growth in the presence of 14C and 32P, there was essentially no difference in the turnover of either isotope in the glycerolphosphate ester derived from each lipid in cells grown at pH 1.5 or 3.5. Images PMID:5802599

  18. PHYSICAL STUDIES OF PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, D.; Fluck, D. J.

    1966-01-01

    On heating pure, fully saturated 2,3-diacyl-DL-phosphatidyl-ethanolamines and 2,3-diacylphosphatidyl-cholines (lecithins) in water to the transition temperature at which large endothermic heat changes occur, they are observed, by light microscopy, to form myelin figures. This result is discussed in terms of the large difference in the transition temperature for "melting" of the hydrocarbon chains of unsaturated and saturated phospholipids and is illustrated by means of differential thermal analysis (D.T.A.) curves. These structures have been examined by electron microscopy after negative staining and after reaction with osmium tetroxide. Typical phospholipid lamella structures are seen in the phosphatidylcholines after negative staining, and in the phosphatidyl-ethanolamines after both negative staining and osmium fixation. The distances across these lamellae have been measured. Some preliminary investigations of the nature of the osmium tetroxide reaction with the phosphatidyl-ethanolamines have been made. PMID:4165077

  19. Phospholipid transfer proteins revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, K W

    1997-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PI-TP) and the non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsL-TP) (identical with sterol carrier protein 2) belong to the large and diverse family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins. Although these two proteins may express a comparable phospholipid transfer activity in vitro, recent studies in yeast and mammalian cells have indicated that they serve completely different functions. PI-TP (identical with yeast SEC14p) plays an important role in vesicle flow both in the budding reaction from the trans-Golgi network and in the fusion reaction with the plasma membrane. In yeast, vesicle budding is linked to PI-TP regulating Golgi phosphatidylcholine (PC) biosynthesis with the apparent purpose of maintaining an optimal PI/PC ratio of the Golgi complex. In mammalian cells, vesicle flow appears to be dependent on PI-TP stimulating phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) synthesis. This latter process may also be linked to the ability of PI-TP to reconstitute the receptor-controlled PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity. The nsL-TP is a peroxisomal protein which, by its ability to bind fatty acyl-CoAs, is most likely involved in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids in this organelle. This protein constitutes the N-terminus of the 58 kDa protein which is one of the peroxisomal 3-oxo-acyl-CoA thiolases. Further studies on these and other known phospholipid transfer proteins are bound to reveal new insights in their important role as mediators between lipid metabolism and cell functions. PMID:9182690

  20. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  1. Phorbol esters promote alpha 1-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and receptor uncoupling from inositol phospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Leeb-Lundberg, L M; Cotecchia, S; Lomasney, J W; DeBernardis, J F; Lefkowitz, R J; Caron, M G

    1985-01-01

    DDT1 MF-2 cells, which are derived from hamster vas deferens smooth muscle, contain alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (54,800 +/- 2700 sites per cell) that are coupled to stimulation of inositol phospholipid metabolism. Incubation of these cells with tumor-promoting phorbol esters, which stimulate calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, leads to a marked attenuation of the ability of alpha 1-receptor agonists such as norepinephrine to stimulate the turnover of inositol phospholipids. This turnover was measured by determining the 32P content of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid after prelabeling of the cellular ATP pool with 32Pi. These phorbol ester-treated cells also displayed a decrease in binding affinity of cellular alpha 1 receptors for agonists with no change in antagonist affinity. By using affinity chromatography on the affinity resin Affi-Gel-A55414, the alpha 1 receptors were purified approximately equal to 300-fold from control and phorbol ester-treated 32Pi-prelabeled cells. As assessed by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the Mr 80,000 alpha 1-receptor ligand-binding subunit is a phosphopeptide containing 1.2 mol of phosphate per mol of alpha 1 receptor. After phorbol ester treatment this increased to 3.6 mol of phosphate per mol of alpha 1 receptor. The effect of phorbol esters on norepinephrine-stimulated inositol phospholipid turnover and alpha 1-receptor phosphorylation showed the same rapid time course with a t1/2 less than 2 min. These results indicate that calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase may play an important role in regulating the function of receptors that are coupled to the inositol phospholipid cycle by phosphorylating and deactivating them. Images PMID:2994039

  2. Predicting Turnover Intentions and Turnover Behavior: A Multivariate Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parasuraman, Saroj

    1982-01-01

    Assessed the relative influence of personal, attitudinal, and behavioral variables on behavioral intentions and voluntary turnover among nonsupervisory plant workers. Results show that personal variables have little direct effect on turnover; rather, their influence on turnover is channeled through their effects on behavioral intentions. (Author)

  3. [Phospholipids: properties and health effects].

    PubMed

    Torres García, Jairo; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2014-09-12

    Phospholipids are amphipathic lipids, which are found in all the cell membranes, organized as a lipid bilayer. They belong to the glycerol-derived lipids, showing a similar structure as triglycerides. The current interest of them comes from its effectiveness to incorporate different fatty acids in the cell membrane, as they exhibit better absorption and utilization than triglycerides. In this paper, the bibliographical data published about the benefits of the phospholipids in inflammatory processes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, liver disease and as an antioxidants transporter is reviewed.

  4. Phospholipid Metabolism and Membrane Synthesis During Sporulation in Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Karen; White, David

    1974-01-01

    In view of previously published reports of localized membrane growth in exponentially growing Bacillus megaterium and in sporulating Bacillus cereus, an attempt was made to describe phospholipid metabolism and the topology of membrane synthesis during sporulation in B. megaterium. The cells were pulsed with radioactive glycerol or acetate at the time of septum formation, and the specific activity of the lipid fraction was measured at various times through the free spore stage. The bulk of the material labeled during septation could not be recovered in the spore. Rather, it was found that the labeled lipid fraction underwent considerable turnover during spore development. Additionally, other experiments revealed that the lipid made before the initiation of sporulation was also subject to extensive turnover. In order to minimize both the confounding effects of lipid turnover and the possible presence of lateral diffusion of labeled lipid in the membrane, autoradiography of cells pulse labeled with radioactive glycerol at the time of septation was performed; a symmetrical grain distribution resulted. Thus, despite previously published suggestions to the contrary, the current experimental techniques could not demonstrate the existence of localized membrane synthesis in B. megaterium during sporulation. PMID:4206872

  5. Langmuir films containing ibuprofen and phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo, Vananélia P. N.; Pavinatto, Felippe J.; Nobre, Thatyane M.; Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2013-02-01

    This study shows the incorporation of ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory drug, in Langmuir monolayers as cell membrane models. Significant effects were observed for dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) monolayers with relevant changes in the elasticity of the monolayer. Dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG) monolayers were affected by small concentrations of ibuprofen, from 1 to 5 mol%. For both types of monolayer, ibuprofen could penetrate into the hydrophobic part of the monolayer, which was confirmed with polarization-modulated infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images showed that ibuprofen prevents the formation of large domains of DPPC. The pharmacological action should occur primarily with penetration of ibuprofen via electrically neutral phospholipid headgroups of the membrane.

  6. Phospholipids in foods: prooxidants or antioxidants?

    PubMed

    Cui, Leqi; Decker, Eric A

    2016-01-15

    Lipid oxidation is one of the major causes of quality deterioration in natural and processed foods and thus a large economic concern in the food industry. Phospholipids, especially lecithins, are already widely used as natural emulsifiers and have been gaining increasing interest as natural antioxidants to control lipid oxidation. This review summarizes the fatty acid composition and content of phospholipids naturally occurring in several foods. The role of phospholipids as substrates for lipid oxidation is discussed, with a focus on meats and dairy products. Prooxidant and antioxidant mechanisms of phospholipids are also discussed to get a better understanding of the possible opportunities for using phospholipids as food antioxidants.

  7. Metabolism of the phospholipid precursor inositol and its relationship to growth and viability in the natural auxotroph Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, S; Homann, M J; Henry, S A; Carman, G M

    1986-01-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was examined. Three enzymes of phospholipid biosynthesis, cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol synthase (CDP-DG), phosphatidylinositol (PI) synthase, and phosphatidylserine (PS) synthase, were characterized in extracts of S. pombe cells. Contrary to an earlier report, we were able to demonstrate that CDP-DG served as a precursor for PI and PS biosynthesis in S. pombe. S. pombe is naturally auxotrophic for the phospholipid precursor inositol. We found that S. pombe was much more resistant to loss of viability during inositol starvation than artificially generated inositol auxotrophs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phospholipid composition of S. pombe cells grown in inositol-rich medium (50 microM) was similar to that of S. cerevisiae cells grown under similar conditions. However, growth of S. pombe at low inositol concentrations (below 30 microM) affected the ratio of the anionic phospholipids PI and PS, while the relative proportions of other glycerophospholipids remained unchanged. During inositol starvation, the rate of PI synthesis decreased rapidly, and there was a concomitant increase in the rate of PS synthesis. Phosphatidic acid and CDP-DG, which are precursors to these phospholipids, also increased when PI synthesis was blocked by lack of exogenous inositol. The major product of turnover of inositol-containing phospholipids in S. pombe was found to be free inositol, which accumulated in the medium and could be reused by the cell. Images PMID:3011744

  8. [Relevance of metabolism of membrane phospholipids for Alzheimer dementia].

    PubMed

    Gattaz, W F; Levy, R; Cairns, N J; Förstl, H; Braus, D F; Maras, A

    1996-01-01

    We found a decreased activity of the enzyme phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in brain tissue from 23 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to 20 non-demented controls. The decrement was more pronounced in patients with an early onset of disease and correlated significantly with higher counts of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Decreased PLA2 activity may inhibit the secretion of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and thus contribute to the formation of the beta-amyloid peptide, the major component of the amyloid plaque in AD. Because PLA2 activity is under genetic control, it is conceivable that the enzyme activity in the brain is related to the activity in blood cells. To test this assumption we investigated PLA2 in platelet membranes from AD patients compared to healthy and psychiatric controls. Platelets are interesting peripheral models in AD research, because they contain and secrete APP. We determined the platelet PLA2 activity in 16 patients with a "probable" AD (NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) as compared to 13 healthy controls and to 14 psychiatric patients with a major depression. There were no significant differences between the three groups regarding age and sex distribution. In the AD patients the cognitive performance was assessed with the CAMCOG and the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE). The radioenzymatic assay for the determination of PLA2 activity is described elsewhere. Platelet PLA2 activity was significantly reduced in AD patients as compared to healthy (p < 0.03) and to psychiatric controls (p < 0.002). The reduction of the enzyme activity correlated with an early onset of the disease (rs = .43, p < 0.10) and with the cognitive impairment in the CAMCOG (rs = .55, p < 0.05). AD patients with a MMSE-score lower than 10 (median) showed significantly lower PLA2 activity (11.8 +/- 3.1) than patients with MMSE-score higher than 10 (16.2 +/- 4.6, p < 0.05). These findings in platelets are in line with our previous results in brain tissue. In both studies decreased PLA2 activity was related to a more severe form of AD (early onset, more cognitive impairment and higher number of plaques and tangles). Moreover, reduced platelet PLA2 activity was specific for AD as compared to age-matched psychiatric controls. Further studies should clarify whether PLA2 activity in platelets could be useful as a peripheral marker for a subgroup of AD. PMID:8850090

  9. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Ana C. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Chronakis, Ioannis S. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  10. Nutritional Deficiencies and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, María S.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gomez, Nidia N.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipids are important components of the cell membranes of all living species. They contribute to the physicochemical properties of the membrane and thus influence the conformation and function of membrane-bound proteins, such as receptors, ion channels, and transporters and also influence cell function by serving as precursors for prostaglandins and other signaling molecules and modulating gene expression through the transcription activation. The components of the diet are determinant for cell functionality. In this review, the effects of macro and micronutrients deficiency on the quality, quantity and metabolism of different phospholipids and their distribution in cells of different organs is presented. Alterations in the amount of both saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins A, E and folate, and other micronutrients, such as zinc and magnesium, are discussed. In all cases we observe alterations in the pattern of phospholipids, the more affected ones being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin. The deficiency of certain nutrients, such as essential fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and some metals may contribute to a variety of diseases that can be irreversible even after replacement with normal amount of the nutrients. Usually, the sequelae are more important when the deficiency is present at an early age. PMID:21731449

  11. 13C- and 15N-Labeling Strategies Combined with Mass Spectrometry Comprehensively Quantify Phospholipid Dynamics in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Robin; Gafken, Philip R.; Olsen, Carissa Perez

    2015-01-01

    Membranes define cellular and organelle boundaries, a function that is critical to all living systems. Like other biomolecules, membrane lipids are dynamically maintained, but current methods are extremely limited for monitoring lipid dynamics in living animals. We developed novel strategies in C. elegans combining 13C and 15N stable isotopes with mass spectrometry to directly quantify the replenishment rates of the individual fatty acids and intact phospholipids of the membrane. Using multiple measurements of phospholipid dynamics, we found that the phospholipid pools are replaced rapidly and at rates nearly double the turnover measured for neutral lipid populations. In fact, our analysis shows that the majority of membrane lipids are replaced each day. Furthermore, we found that stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs), critical enzymes in polyunsaturated fatty acid production, play an unexpected role in influencing the overall rates of membrane maintenance as SCD depletion affected the turnover of nearly all membrane lipids. Additionally, the compromised membrane maintenance as defined by LC-MS/MS with SCD RNAi resulted in active phospholipid remodeling that we predict is critical to alleviate the impact of reduced membrane maintenance in these animals. Not only have these combined methodologies identified new facets of the impact of SCDs on the membrane, but they also have great potential to reveal many undiscovered regulators of phospholipid metabolism. PMID:26528916

  12. Modulation of Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase by Neutral Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, María Florencia; Dodes-Traian, Martín M.; González-Flecha, F. Luis; Sica, Mauricio; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lipids on membrane proteins are likely to be complex and unique for each membrane protein. Here we studied different detergent/phosphatidylcholine reconstitution media and tested their effects on plasma membrane Ca2+ pump (PMCA). We found that Ca2+-ATPase activity shows a biphasic behavior with respect to the detergent/phosphatidylcholine ratio. Moreover, the maximal Ca2+-ATPase activity largely depends on the length and the unsaturation degree of the hydrocarbon chain. Using static light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we monitored the changes in hydrodynamic radius of detergent/phosphatidylcholine particles during the micelle-vesicle transition. We found that, when PMCA is reconstituted in mixed micelles, neutral phospholipids increase the enzyme turnover. The biophysical changes associated with the transition from mixed micelles to bicelles increase the time of residence of the phosphorylated intermediate (EP), decreasing the enzyme turnover. Molecular dynamics simulations analysis of the interactions between PMCA and the phospholipid bilayer in which it is embedded show that in the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, charged residues of the protein are trapped in the hydrophobic core. Conversely, in the 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, the overall hydrophobic-hydrophilic requirements of the protein surface are fulfilled the best, reducing the thermodynamic cost of exposing charged residues to the hydrophobic core. The apparent mismatch produced by a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine thicker bilayer could be a structural foundation to explain its functional effect on PMCA. PMID:25605721

  13. Integrating Turnover Reasons and Shocks with Turnover Decision Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P., Jr.; Kmitta, Kayla R.

    2012-01-01

    We interviewed and classified 186 quitters from many jobs and organizations via a theoretically-based protocol into five decision process types. We then tested exploratory hypotheses comparing users of these types on their propensity to report certain turnover reasons and turnover shocks. "Impulsive-type quitters," with neither a job offer in hand…

  14. Commitment Profiles and Employee Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Laura; Vandenberghe, Christian; Vandenberg, Robert; Bentein, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    We examined how affective (AC), normative (NC), perceived sacrifice (PS), and few alternatives (FA) commitments combine to form profiles and determine turnover intention and turnover. We theorized that three mechanisms account for how profiles operate, i.e., the degree to which membership is internally regulated, the perceived desirability and…

  15. Breaking the turnover cycle.

    PubMed

    Nakhnikian, Elise

    2005-01-01

    The Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute, Bronx, NY, identifies seven elements which are essential for employers in their creation of a stable, well-qualified direct-care workforce. These "common sense" elements--ranging from paying family-sustaining wages to strengthening the caregiving relationship between the workers and those whom they serve--can make the difference between chronic turnover, on one hand, and employing a dedicated staff large enough to keep pace with the growing need for long-term care and services, on the other. However, implementing the seven elements requires the commitment, coordination, and the cooperation of the entire long-term care system, especially the state and federal reimbursement systems that pay for most care and services. By joining forces with other long-term care stakeholders, through organizations such as the Direct Care Alliance, providers can help stabilize the workforce and, ultimately, help to increase the allocation of public resources. PMID:16350897

  16. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    Our research for the past two years has involved the study of phosphoinositides and their potential role in regulating plant growth and development. Our initial goal was to document the sequence of events involved in inositol phospholipid metabolism in response to external stimuli. Our working hypothesis was that phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) was in the plasma membrane of plants cells and would be hydrolyzed by phospholipase C to yield the second messengers inositol triphosphate (IP/sub 3/) and diacyglycerol (DAG) and that IP/sub 3/ would mobilize intracellular calcium as has been shown for animal cells. Our results with both carrot suspension culture cells and sunflower hypocotyl indicate that this paradigm is not the primary mechanism of signal transduction in these systems. We have observed very rapid, within 5 sec, stimulation of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) kinase which resulted in an increase in PIP/sub 2/. However, there was no evidence for activation of phospholipase C. In addition, we have shown that PIP and PIP/sub 2/ can activate the plasma membrane ATPase. The results of these studies are described briefly in the paragraphs below. Inositol phospholipids are localized in distinct membrane fractions. If PIP and PIP/sub 2/ play a role in the transduction of external signals, they should be present in the plasma membrane. We used the fusogenic carrot suspension culture cells as a model system to study the distribution of inositol phospholipids in various membrane fractions and organelles. Cells were labeled 12 to 18 h with myo(2-/sup 3/H) inositol and the membranes were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The plasma membrane was enriched in PIP and PIP/sub 2/ compared to the intracellular membranes.

  17. Shapes of Mixed Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Maldonado, Amir

    2006-01-01

    We studied the shape of phospholipid vesicles prepared by hydration of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) and phosphatidylserine (SOPS) in different proportions. The aim of the work is to obtain some insight into the influence of the chemical composition of a biomembrane on its shape. The optical microscopy results show that the shape of the vesicles depend on the SOPC:SOPS composition. For low SOPS contents, coiled cylindrical vesicles are observed. The results suggest that specific compositions of the SOPC:SOPS vesicles produce some spontaneous curvature on the membrane and then a coiling instability. PMID:19669461

  18. Phospholipid liposomes functionalized by protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Savostyanov, G. V.; Grishina, O. A.

    2015-03-01

    Finding new ways to deliver neurotrophic drugs to the brain in newborns is one of the contemporary problems of medicine and pharmaceutical industry. Modern researches in this field indicate the promising prospects of supramolecular transport systems for targeted drug delivery to the brain which can overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, the solution of this problem is actual not only for medicine, but also for society as a whole because it determines the health of future generations. Phospholipid liposomes due to combination of lipo- and hydrophilic properties are considered as the main future objects in medicine for drug delivery through the BBB as well as increasing their bioavailability and toxicity. Liposomes functionalized by various proteins were used as transport systems for ease of liposomes use. Designing of modification oligosaccharide of liposomes surface is promising in the last decade because it enables the delivery of liposomes to specific receptor of human cells by selecting ligand and it is widely used in pharmacology for the treatment of several diseases. The purpose of this work is creation of a coarse-grained model of bilayer of phospholipid liposomes, functionalized by specific to the structural elements of the BBB proteins, as well as prediction of the most favorable orientation and position of the molecules in the generated complex by methods of molecular docking for the formation of the structure. Investigation of activity of the ligand molecule to protein receptor of human cells by the methods of molecular dynamics was carried out.

  19. Phospholipid composition and kinetics in different endobronchial fractions from healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alterations in surfactant phospholipid compositions are a recognized feature of many acute and chronic lung diseases. Investigation of underlying mechanisms requires assessment of surfactant phospholipid molecular composition and kinetics of synthesis and turnover. Such studies have recently become possible in humans due to the development of stable isotope labelling combined with advances in analytical methods in lipidomics. The objectives of this study are to compare phospholipid molecular species composition and phosphatidylcholine synthesis and turnover in surfactant isolated from various endobronchial compartments in healthy adults. Methods Healthy adults (N = 10) were infused with methyl-D9-choline chloride and samples of induced sputum, tracheal wash and small volume bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were obtained subsequently at intervals up to 96 hours. Surfactant phospholipid composition and incorporation of stable isotope into surfactant phosphatidylcholine were determined by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. Results While molecular species compositions of phospholipids were similar for all three sample types, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine content was highest in lavage, intermediate in tracheal wash and lowest in sputum. Methyl-D9-choline incorporation into surfactant phosphatidylcholine was lower for sputum at 24 hours but reached equilibrium with other sample types by 48 hours. Fractional methyl-D9-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine incorporation for all sample types was about 0.5% of the endogenous composition. Lysophosphatidylcholine enrichment was twice than that of phosphatidylcholine. Conclusions Tracheal secretions may be of value as a surrogate to assess bronchoalveolar lavage fluid surfactant molecular composition and metabolism in healthy people. Despite minor differences, the phospholipid molecular composition of induced sputum also showed similarities to that of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Detailed analysis of newly

  20. Extensive exchange of rat liver microsomal phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Zilversmit, D B; Hughes, M E

    1977-08-15

    Liver microsomal fractions were prepared from rats injected with a single dose of choline [14C]methylchloride or with single or multiple doses of 32Pi. Exchangeability of microsomal phospholipids was determined by incubation with an excess of mitochondria and phospholipid exchange proteins derived from beef heart, beef liver or rat liver. Labeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were found to act as a single pool and were 85--95% exchangeable in 1--2h. High latencies of mannose-6-phosphate phosphohydrolase activities and impermeability of microsomes to EDTA proved that phospholipid exchange proteins did not have access to the intracisternal space. If microsomal membranes are largely composed of phospholipid bilayers, the experiments suggest that one or more of the phospholipid classes in microsomal membranes undergo rapid translocation between the inner and outer portions of the bilayer.

  1. Extensive exchange of rat liver microsomal phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Zilversmit, D B; Hughes, M E

    1977-08-15

    Liver microsomal fractions were prepared from rats injected with a single dose of choline [14C]methylchloride or with single or multiple doses of 32Pi. Exchangeability of microsomal phospholipids was determined by incubation with an excess of mitochondria and phospholipid exchange proteins derived from beef heart, beef liver or rat liver. Labeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were found to act as a single pool and were 85--95% exchangeable in 1--2h. High latencies of mannose-6-phosphate phosphohydrolase activities and impermeability of microsomes to EDTA proved that phospholipid exchange proteins did not have access to the intracisternal space. If microsomal membranes are largely composed of phospholipid bilayers, the experiments suggest that one or more of the phospholipid classes in microsomal membranes undergo rapid translocation between the inner and outer portions of the bilayer. PMID:889827

  2. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... measure phospholipids in serum and plasma. Measurements of phospholipids are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  3. Role of phospholipids in the actions of prolactin in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Etindi, R.O.N.

    1987-01-01

    These studies were designed to determine the role of phospholipid turnover in the mechanism of action of prolactin in mammary gland explants derived from 12-14 day pregnant mice. Prolactin stimulates phospholipid biosynthesis 12-16h after cultured mouse mammary tissues are exposed to it. Prolactin stimulates phospholipid biosynthesis at physiological concentrations and the response is maximal at all PRL concentrations above 25 ng/ml. p-Bromphenacyl bromide (BPB) at concentrations of 50 ..mu..M and above and quinacrine (50 ..mu..M) abolish the actions of prolactin on casein and lipid biosynthesis in cultured mouse mammary gland explants. In mouse mammary gland explants, binding of prolactin to its receptor leads to a phospholipase C type hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids, but this effect is transient and does not occur immediately after hormone exposure. Prolactin significantly stimulated the accumulation of (/sup 3/H)label in inositol monophosphate (IP/sub 1/), inositol bisphosphate (IP/sub 2/) and inositol trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) 1-3 hours after addition of prolactin. Gossypol, a drug which has been shown to be an inhibitor of kinase C activity in mouse mammary tissues, is shown to abolish several of the actions of prolactin in cultured mouse mammary gland expalants.

  4. Egg phospholipids and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Blesso, Christopher N

    2015-04-01

    Eggs are a major source of phospholipids (PL) in the Western diet. Dietary PL have emerged as a potential source of bioactive lipids that may have widespread effects on pathways related to inflammation, cholesterol metabolism, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function. Based on pre-clinical studies, egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin appear to regulate cholesterol absorption and inflammation. In clinical studies, egg PL intake is associated with beneficial changes in biomarkers related to HDL reverse cholesterol transport. Recently, egg PC was shown to be a substrate for the generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a gut microbe-dependent metabolite associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. More research is warranted to examine potential serum TMAO responses with chronic egg ingestion and in different populations, such as diabetics. In this review, the recent basic science, clinical, and epidemiological findings examining egg PL intake and risk of CVD are summarized.

  5. Peroxidase activation of cytoglobin by anionic phospholipids: Mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Jesús; Kapralov, Alexandr A; Baumgartner, Matthew P; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E; Anthonymutu, Tamil S; Vlasova, Irina I; Camacho, Carlos J; Gladwin, Mark T; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E

    2016-05-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a hexa-coordinated hemoprotein with yet to be defined physiological functions. The iron coordination and spin state of the Cygb heme group are sensitive to oxidation of two cysteine residues (Cys38/Cys83) and/or the binding of free fatty acids. However, the roles of redox vs lipid regulators of Cygb's structural rearrangements in the context of the protein peroxidase competence are not known. Searching for physiologically relevant lipid regulators of Cygb, here we report that anionic phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositolphosphates, affect structural organization of the protein and modulate its iron state and peroxidase activity both conjointly and/or independently of cysteine oxidation. Thus, different anionic lipids can operate in cysteine-dependent and cysteine-independent ways as inducers of the peroxidase activity. We establish that Cygb's peroxidase activity can be utilized for the catalysis of peroxidation of anionic phospholipids (including phosphatidylinositolphosphates) yielding mono-oxygenated molecular species. Combined with the computational simulations we propose a bipartite lipid binding model that rationalizes the modes of interactions with phospholipids, the effects on structural re-arrangements and the peroxidase activity of the hemoprotein.

  6. Connexin channels and phospholipids: association and modulation

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Darren; Harris, Andrew L

    2009-01-01

    Background For membrane proteins, lipids provide a structural framework and means to modulate function. Paired connexin hemichannels form the intercellular channels that compose gap junction plaques while unpaired hemichannels have regulated functions in non-junctional plasma membrane. The importance of interactions between connexin channels and phospholipids is poorly understood. Results Endogenous phospholipids most tightly associated with purified connexin26 or connexin32 hemichannels or with junctional plaques in cell membranes, those likely to have structural and/or modulatory effects, were identified by tandem electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry using class-specific interpretative methods. Phospholipids were characterized by headgroup class, charge, glycerol-alkyl chain linkage and by acyl chain length and saturation. The results indicate that specific endogenous phospholipids are uniquely associated with either connexin26 or connexin32 channels, and some phospholipids are associated with both. Functional effects of the major phospholipid classes on connexin channel activity were assessed by molecular permeability of hemichannels reconstituted into liposomes. Changes to phospholipid composition(s) of the liposome membrane altered the activity of connexin channels in a manner reflecting changes to the surface charge/potential of the membrane and, secondarily, to cholesterol content. Together, the data show that connexin26 and connexin32 channels have a preference for tight association with unique anionic phospholipids, and that these, independent of headgroup, have a positive effect on the activity of both connexin26 and connexin32 channels. Additionally, the data suggest that the likely in vivo phospholipid modulators of connexin channel structure-function that are connexin isoform-specific are found in the cytoplasmic leaflet. A modulatory role for phospholipids that promote negative curvature is also inferred. Conclusion This study is the first to

  7. Effect of Cholesterol on the Structure of a Five-Component Mitochondria-Like Phospholipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, Kelly; Patel, Amit; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.; Fradin, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes have a complex phospholipid composition that varies greatly depending on the organism, cell type and function. In spite of this complexity, most structural data available for phospholipid bilayers concern model systems containing only one or two different phospholipids. Here, we examine the effect of cholesterol on the structure of a complex membrane reflecting the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes, with five different types of headgroups (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin (CL)) and a variety of hydrocarbon tails. This particular system was chosen because elevated cholesterol contents in mitochondrial membranes have been linked to a breaking down of Bax-mediated membrane permeabilization and resistance to cancer treatments. High resolution electron density profiles were determined by X-ray reflectivity, while the area per phospholipid chain, Apc, and the chain order parameter, SX-ray, were determined by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). We show that chain order increases upon the addition of cholesterol, resulting in both a thickening of the lipid bilayer and a reduction in the average surface area per phospholipid chain. This effect, well known as cholesterol’s condensation effect, is similar, but not as pronounced as for single-component phospholipid membranes. We conclude by discussing the relevance of these findings for the insertion of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax in mitochondrial membranes with elevated cholesterol content. PMID:26529029

  8. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  9. Intermolecular forces in spread phospholipid monolayers at oil/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mingins, James; Pethica, Brian A

    2004-08-31

    The lateral intermolecular forces between phospholipids are of particular relevance to the behavior of biomembranes, and have been approached via studies of monolayer isotherms at aqueous interfaces, mostly restricted to air/water (A/W) systems. For thermodynamic properties, the oil/water (O/W) interface has major advantages but is experimentally more difficult and less studied. A comprehensive reanalysis of the available thermodynamic data on spread monolayers of phosphatidyl cholines (PC) and phosphatidyl ethanolamines (PE) at O/W interfaces is conducted to identify the secure key features that will underpin further development of molecular models. Relevant recourse is made to isotherms of single-chain molecules and of mixed monolayers to identify the contributions of chain-chain interactions and interionic forces. The emphasis is on the properties of the phase transitions for a range of oil phases. Apparent published discrepancies in thermodynamic properties are resolved and substantial agreement emerges on the main features of these phospholipid monolayer systems. In compression to low areas, the forces between the zwitterions of like phospholipids are repulsive. The molecular model for phospholipid headgroup interactions developed by Stigter et al. accounts well for the virial coefficients in expanded phospholipid O/W monolayers. Inclusion of the changes in configuration and orientation of the zwitterion headgroups on compression, which are indicated by the surface potentials in the phase transition region, and inclusion of the energy of chain demixing from the oil phase will be required for molecular modeling of the phase transitions.

  10. Microbial carbon turnover in the plant-rhizosphere-soil continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ashish; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert; Thomson, Bruce; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Soil microbial biomass contributes significantly to maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM). It is well known that biochemical fractions of soil microorganisms have varying turnover and therefore contribute differentially to soil C storage. Here we compare the turnover rates of different microbial biochemical fractions using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labelling experiment. The isotope signal was temporally traced into rhizosphere soil microorganisms using the following biomarkers: DNA, RNA, fatty acids and chloroform fumigation extraction derived microbial biomass size classes. C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed through phospholipid and neutral lipid fatty acid (PLFA/NLFA) analyses. Highest 13C enrichment was seen in the low molecular weight (LMW) size class of microbial biomass (Δδ13C =151) and in nucleic acids (DNA: 38o RNA: 66) immediately after the pulse followed by a sharp drop. The amount of 13C in the high molecular weight (HMW) microbial biomass (17-81) and total fatty acids (32-54) was lower initially and stayed relatively steady over the 4 weeks experimental period. We found significant differences in turnover rates of different microbial biochemical and size fractions. We infer that LMW cytosolic soluble compounds are rapidly metabolized and linked to respiratory C fluxes, whereas mid-sized products of microbial degradation and HMW polymeric compounds have lower renewal rate in that order. The turnover of cell wall fatty acids was also very slow. DNA and RNA showed faster turnover rate; and as expected RNA renewal was the fastest due to its rapid production by active microorganisms independent of cell replication. 13C incorporation into different functional groups confirmed that mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi rely on root C and are important in the initial plant C flux. We substantiated through measurements of isotope incorporation into bacterial RNA that rhizosphere bacteria are also important in the initial C conduit

  11. L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) enhances lung surfactant phospholipid flux in rabbit fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, B.; Datta, S.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Steinberg, H.; Das, D.K.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of thyroid hormone on surfactant phospholipid production in fetal lung was studied by simultaneously measuring the surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) content and its turnover in lamellar body and alveolar lavage fractions. Pregnant New Zealand white rabbits of 27 days' gestation were properly anesthetized and the uterus opened by a midline incision. Each fetus in each litter was injected with T/sub 3/ along with (/sup 14/C)-palmitate and (/sup 3/H)-choline. Control fetuses were injected with saline instead of T/sub 3/. PC was isolated from lamellar body and lung lavage from each fetus. Zilversmit equations for a two-compartment precursor-product model was used to analyze specific activity versus time curves and the turnover times for surfactant PC. Fluxes of surfactant PC were then calculated from its turnover times and pool sizes. The biological half-life for (/sup 14/C)-palmitate and (/sup 3/H)-choline labeled PC did not change by T/sub 3/ treatment. Turnover times for labeled palmitate and choline were 9.2 hr and 10.0 hr, respectively, for normal fetus and 6.0 hr and 5.8 hr, respectively, for T/sub 3/-treated fetus. While the pool size of PC recovered by the alveolar wash did not change significantly, T/sub 3/ enhanced the flux of this phospholipid from the lamellar bodies into alveolar space by 1.7 times within 4 hr. These results suggest that thyroid hormone may promote fetal lung development by enhancing the release of surfactant into the alveolar space.

  12. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  13. Gravimetric determination of phospholipid concentration.

    PubMed

    Tejera-Garcia, Roberto; Connell, Lisa; Shaw, Walter A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2012-09-01

    Accurate determination of lipid concentrations is an obligatory routine in a research laboratory engaged in studies using this class of biomaterials. For phospholipids, this is frequently accomplished using the phosphate assay (Bartlett, G.R. Phosphorus Assay in Column Chromatography. J. Biol. Chem. 234, 466-468, 1959). Given the purity of the currently commercially available synthetic and isolated natural lipids, we have observed that determination of the dry weight of lipid stock solutions provides the fastest, most accurate, and generic method to assay their concentrations. The protocol described here takes advantage of the high resolution and accuracy obtained by modern weighing technology. We assayed by this technique the concentrations of a number of phosphatidylcholine samples, with different degrees of acyl chain saturation and length, and in different organic solvents. The results were compared with those from Bartlett assay, (31)P NMR, and Langmuir compression isotherms. The data obtained show that the gravimetric assay yields lipid concentrations with a resolution similar or better than obtained by the other techniques.

  14. Health effects of dietary phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Beneficial effects of dietary phospholipids (PLs) have been mentioned since the early 1900's in relation to different illnesses and symptoms, e.g. coronary heart disease, inflammation or cancer. This article gives a summary of the most common therapeutic uses of dietary PLs to provide an overview of their approved and proposed benefits; and to identify further investigational needs. From the majority of the studies it became evident that dietary PLs have a positive impact in several diseases, apparently without severe side effects. Furthermore, they were shown to reduce side effects of some drugs. Both effects can partially be explained by the fact that PL are highly effective in delivering their fatty acid (FA) residues for incorporation into the membranes of cells involved in different diseases, e.g. immune or cancer cells. The altered membrane composition is assumed to have effects on the activity of membrane proteins (e.g. receptors) by affecting the microstructure of membranes and, therefore, the characteristics of the cellular membrane, e.g. of lipid rafts, or by influencing the biosynthesis of FA derived lipid second messengers. However, since the FAs originally bound to the applied PLs are increased in the cellular membrane after their consumption or supplementation, the FA composition of the PL and thus the type of PL is crucial for its effect. Here, we have reviewed the effects of PL from soy, egg yolk, milk and marine sources. Most studies have been performed in vitro or in animals and only limited evidence is available for the benefit of PL supplementation in humans. More research is needed to understand the impact of PL supplementation and confirm its health benefits. PMID:22221489

  15. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  17. Filamentous Fungi with High Cytosolic Phospholipid Transfer Activity in the Presence of Exogenous Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Record, Eric; Lesage, Laurence; Cahagnier, Bernard; Marion, Didier; Asther, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    The phospholipid transfer activity of cell extracts from 15 filamentous fungus strains grown on a medium containing phospholipids as the carbon source was measured by a fluorescence assay. This assay was based on the transfer of pyrene-labeled phosphatidylcholines forming the donor vesicles to acceptor vesicles composed of egg phosphatidylcholines. The highest phosphatidylcholine transfer activity was obtained with cell extracts from Aspergillus oryzae. The presence of exogenous phospholipids in the culture medium of A. oryzae was shown to increase markedly the activity of phospholipid transfer as well as the pool of exocellular proteins during the primary phase of growth. Modifications in the biochemical marker activities of cellular organelles were observed: succinate dehydrogenase, a mitochondrial marker; inosine diphosphatase, a Golgi system marker; and cytochrome c oxidoreductase, an endoplasmic reticulum marker, were increased 7.3-, 2-, and 22-fold, respectively, when A. oryzae was grown in the presence of phospholipids. PMID:16349388

  18. Distinctive interactions of oleic acid covered magnetic nanoparticles with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids in Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Matshaya, Thabo J; Lanterna, Anabel E; Granados, Alejandro M; Krause, Rui W M; Maggio, Bruno; Vico, Raquel V

    2014-05-27

    The growing number of innovations in nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology are posing new challenges in understanding the full spectrum of interactions between nanomateriales and biomolecules at nano-biointerfaces. Although considerable achievements have been accomplished by in vivo applications, many issues regarding the molecular nature of these interactions are far from being well-understood. In this work, we evaluate the interaction of hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) covered with a single layer of oleic acid with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids found in biomembranes through the use of Langmuir monolayers. We find distinctive interactions among the MNP with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids that are reflected by both, the compression isotherms and the surface topography of the films. The interaction between MNP and saturated lipids causes a noticeable reduction of the mean molecular area in the interfacial plane, while the interaction with unsaturated lipids promotes area expansion compared to the ideally mixed films. Moreover, when liquid expanded and liquid condensed phases of the phospholipid(s) coexist, the MNP preferably partition to the liquid-expanded phase, thus hindering the coalescence of the condensed domains with increasing surface pressure. In consequence organizational information on long-range order is attained. These results evidence the existence of a sensitive composition-dependent surface regulation given by phospholipid-nanoparticle interactions which enhance the biophysical relevance of understanding nanoparticle surface functionalization in relation to its interactions in biointerfaces constituted by defined types of biomolecules.

  19. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids*

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  20. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Kraft, Thomas E; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Hruz, Paul W

    2016-08-12

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  1. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  2. Estimating Teacher Turnover Costs: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Abigail Jurist; Joy, Lois; Ellis, Pamela; Jablonski, Erica; Karelitz, Tzur M.

    2012-01-01

    High teacher turnover in large U.S. cities is a critical issue for schools and districts, and the students they serve; but surprisingly little work has been done to develop methodologies and standards that districts and schools can use to make reliable estimates of turnover costs. Even less is known about how to detect variations in turnover costs…

  3. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  4. Using Turnover as a Recruitment Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Teacher turnover is notoriously high in the field of early childhood education with an estimated 33% of staff exiting the workplace each year. Turnover is costly. Not only do high levels of turnover negatively impact children's growth and development, it also erodes the program's economic stability and wherewithal to provide effective operations…

  5. How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, though recent studies suggest this may not be the case. Using a unique identification strategy that employs school-by-grade level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 850,000 New York…

  6. Molecular interactions of quinidine with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Villena, F; Bagnara, M; Sotomayor, C P

    1995-01-01

    Quinidine (QUIN) is one of the most important and efficient antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD). It belongs to class I, which are the drugs that exert their action at the level of the sodium channels in the membrane of the myocard. Several hypotheses support the idea that the molecular mechanism of action of the AAD is via nonspecific interactions with phospholipids sited in the neighborhood of the channels. In order to probe the validity of these hypotheses, QUIN was made to interact with the phospholipids dimyristoylphosphadidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE). These interactions were performed in a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic medium under a wide range of molar ratios. The resulting products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. QUIN solutions were also made to interact with DMPC liposomes, which were studied by fluorescent spectroscopy. Finally, human erythrocytes which were incubated with QUIN solutions were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results of these experiments proved that QUIN indeed interacted with phospholipid bilayers. PMID:7546041

  7. Turnover of fatty acids in the 1-position of phosphatidylethanolamine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rock, C O

    1984-05-25

    Phosphatidylethanolamine is the major membrane phospholipid of Escherichia coli, and two experimental approaches were used to investigate the metabolic activity of the fatty acids occupying the 1-position of this phospholipid. [3H]Acetate pulse-chase experiments with logarithmically growing cells indicated that 3-5% of the acyl groups were removed from the phosphatidylethanolamine pool/generation. The reacylation aspect of the turnover cycle was demonstrated by the incorporation of fatty acids into the 1-position of pre-existing phosphatidylethanolamine when de novo phospholipid biosynthesis was inhibited using the plsB acyltransferase mutant. 2- Acylglycerophosphoethanolamine would be the intermediate in a 1-position turnover cycle, and this lysophospholipid was identified as a membrane component that could re-esterified by a membrane-bound acyltransferase. The acyltransferase either utilized acyl-acyl carrier protein directly as an acyl donor or activated fatty acids for acyl transfer in the presence of ATP and Mg2+. Acyl-acyl carrier protein was also indicated as an intermediate in the latter reacylation reaction by the complete inhibition of phosphatidylethanolamine formation from fatty acids by acyl carrier protein-specific antibodies and by the observation that the inhibition of the acyltransferase by LiCl was reversed by the addition of acyl carrier protein. Coenzyme A thioesters were not substrates for this acyltransferase. These results suggest the existence of a metabolic cycle for the utilization of 1-position acyl moieties of phosphatidylethanolamine followed by the resynthesis of this membrane phospholipid from 2- acylglycerophosphoethanolamine by an acyl carrier protein-dependent 1-position acyltransferase.

  8. Matrix metalloproteinases in fish biology and matrix turnover.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mona E; Vuong, Tram T; Rønning, Sissel B; Kolset, Svein O

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases have important functions for tissue turnover in fish, with relevance both for the fish industry and molecular and cellular research on embryology, inflammation and tissue repair. These metalloproteinases have been studied in different fish types, subjected to both aquaculture and experimental conditions. This review highlights studies on these metalloproteinases in relation to both fish quality and health and further, the future importance of fish for basic research studies.

  9. Altered bone turnover during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Morey, E. R.; Liu, C.; Baylink, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications in calcium metabolism during spaceflight were studied, using parameters that reflect bone turnover. Bone formation rate, medullary area, bone length, bone density, pore size distribution, and differential bone cell number were evaluated in growing rate both immediately after and 25 days after orbital spaceflights aboard the Soviet biological satellites Cosmos 782 and 936. The primary effect of space flight on bone turnover was a reversible inhibition of bone formation at the periosteal surface. A simultaneous increase in the length of the periosteal arrest line suggests that bone formation ceased along corresponding portions of that surface. Possible reasons include increased secretion of glucocorticoids and mechanical unloading of the skeleton due to near-weightlessness, while starvation and immobilization are excluded as causes.

  10. Sex-chromosome turnovers induced by deleterious mutation load.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Olivier; Grossen, Christine; Neuenschwander, Samuel; Perrin, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    In sharp contrast with mammals and birds, many cold-blooded vertebrates present homomorphic sex chromosomes. Empirical evidence supports a role for frequent turnovers, which replace nonrecombining sex chromosomes before they have time to decay. Three main mechanisms have been proposed for such turnovers, relying either on neutral processes, sex-ratio selection, or intrinsic benefits of the new sex-determining genes (due, e.g., to linkage with sexually antagonistic mutations). Here, we suggest an additional mechanism, arising from the load of deleterious mutations that accumulate on nonrecombining sex chromosomes. In the absence of dosage compensation, this load should progressively lower survival rate in the heterogametic sex. Turnovers should occur when this cost outweighs the benefits gained from any sexually antagonistic genes carried by the nonrecombining sex chromosome. We use individual-based simulations of a Muller's ratchet process to test this prediction, and investigate how the relevant parameters (effective population size, strength and dominance of deleterious mutations, size of nonrecombining segment, and strength of sexually antagonistic selection) are expected to affect the rate of turnovers. PMID:23461315

  11. PLA2-responsive and SPIO-loaded phospholipid micelles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Yan, Lesan; Chiorazzo, Michael; Delikatny, E. James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cheng, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    A PLA2-responsive and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle-loaded phospholipid micelle was developed. The release of phospholipid-conjugated dye from these micelles was triggered due to phospholipid degradation by phospholipase A2. High relaxivity of the encapsulated SPIO could enable non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26139589

  12. Multidisciplinary analytical investigation of phospholipids and triglycerides in offshore farmed gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) fed commercial diets.

    PubMed

    Anedda, Roberto; Piga, Carlo; Santercole, Viviana; Spada, Simona; Bonaglini, Elia; Cappuccinelli, Roberto; Mulas, Gilberto; Roggio, Tonina; Uzzau, Sergio

    2013-06-01

    In this work, a quantitative characterisation of lipid (both triglycerides and phospholipids) rearrangements in the muscle of offshore-raised gilthead sea bream was carried out as a function of fish growth between April and September. Relative percentages of lipid classes and fatty acids/acyls composition of the commercial feeds and fish dorsal muscles were assessed by means of an interdisciplinary analytical approach. A combination of preparative chemistry and experimental results from NMR spectroscopy, GC, 3D-TLC as well as proximate analysis permitted the observed growth parameters in key metabolic events to be linked with fish fattening and lipid turnover. While defined effects of feed composition on fatty acid profiles of fillets were ascertained, the relative increase of fatty acyls in triglycerides and phospholipids were also estimated enabling detailed evaluation of TAG:PL ratio in adult offshore-farmed gilthead sea bream. NMR was also used to quantify PUFA regiospecific distribution in TAG and PL.

  13. Rpe65 Isomerase Associates with Membranes through an Electrostatic Interaction with Acidic Phospholipid Headgroups*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Quan; Kaylor, Joanna J.; Miu, Anh; Bassilian, Sara; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Travis, Gabriel H.

    2010-01-01

    Opsins are light-sensitive pigments in the vertebrate retina, comprising a G protein-coupled receptor and an 11-cis-retinaldehyde chromophore. Absorption of a photon by an opsin pigment induces isomerization of its chromophore to all-trans-retinaldehyde. After a brief period of activation, opsin releases all-trans-retinaldehyde and becomes insensitive to light. Restoration of light sensitivity to the apo-opsin involves the conversion of all-trans-retinaldehyde back to 11-cis-retinaldehyde via an enzyme pathway called the visual cycle. The critical isomerization step in this pathway is catalyzed by Rpe65. Rpe65 is strongly associated with membranes but contains no membrane-spanning segments. It was previously suggested that the affinity of Rpe65 for membranes is due to palmitoylation of one or more Cys residues. In this study, we re-examined this hypothesis. By two independent strategies involving mass spectrometry, we show that Rpe65 is not palmitoylated nor does it appear to undergo other post-translational modifications at significant stoichiometry. Instead, we show that Rpe65 binds the acidic phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin, but not phosphatidic acid. No binding of Rpe65 to basic phospholipids or neutral lipids was observed. The affinity of Rpe65 to acidic phospholipids was strongly pH-dependent, suggesting an electrostatic interaction of basic residues in Rpe65 with negatively charged phospholipid headgroups. Binding of Rpe65 to liposomes containing phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylglycerol, but not the basic or neutral phospholipids, allowed the enzyme to extract its insoluble substrate, all-trans-retinyl palmitate, from the lipid bilayer for synthesis of 11-cis-retinol. The interaction of Rpe65 with acidic phospholipids is therefore biologically relevant. PMID:19892706

  14. Protein turnover, ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schutz, Yves

    2011-03-01

    The major processes discussed below are protein turnover (degradation and synthesis), degradation into urea, or conversion into glucose (gluconeogenesis, Figure 1). Daily protein turnover is a dynamic process characterized by a double flux of amino acids: the amino acids released by endogenous (body) protein breakdown can be reutilized and reconverted to protein synthesis, with very little loss. Daily rates of protein turnover in humans (300 to 400 g per day) are largely in excess of the level of protein intake (50 to 80 g per day). A fast growing rate, as in premature babies or in children recovering from malnutrition, leads to a high protein turnover rate and a high protein and energy requirement. Protein metabolism (synthesis and breakdown) is an energy-requiring process, dependent upon endogenous ATP supply. The contribution made by whole-body protein turnover to the resting metabolic rate is important: it represents about 20 % in adults and more in growing children. Metabolism of proteins cannot be disconnected from that of energy since energy balance influences net protein utilization, and since protein intake has an important effect on postprandial thermogenesis - more important than that of fats or carbohydrates. The metabolic need for amino acids is essentially to maintain stores of endogenous tissue proteins within an appropriate range, allowing protein homeostasis to be maintained. Thanks to a dynamic, free amino acid pool, this demand for amino acids can be continuously supplied. The size of the free amino acid pool remains limited and is regulated within narrow limits. The supply of amino acids to cover physiological needs can be derived from 3 sources: 1. Exogenous proteins that release amino acids after digestion and absorption 2. Tissue protein breakdown during protein turnover 3. De novo synthesis, including amino acids (as well as ammonia) derived from the process of urea salvage, following hydrolysis and microflora metabolism in the hind gut

  15. Bone turnover in malnourished children.

    PubMed

    Branca, F; Robins, S P; Ferro-Luzzi, A; Golden, M H

    Pyridinoline (PYD) and deoxypyridinoline (DPD) are cross-linking aminoacids of collagen that are located mainly in bone and cartilage. When bone matrix is resorbed these cross-links are quantitatively excreted in the urine and therefore represent specific markers. We have measured the urinary excretion rate of PYD and DPD in 46 severely malnourished boys to assess their skeletal turnover and to relate this to their subsequent rate of growth. The children were aged 13 months (SD 6), and height-for-age was -3.6 (1.6) Z-score, and weight-for-height was -2.4 (0.8) Z-score. PYD excretion when malnourished and after "recovery" was 11.2 (4.6) nmol h-1m-2 and 32.2 (10.8) nmol h-1m-2 and DPD excretion was 2.6 (1.3) nmol h-1m-2 and 7.5 (3.0) nmol h-1m-2, respectively. The ratio of the two cross-links did not change with recovery. These data show that cartilage and bone turnover is much lower in the malnourished than in the recovered child. There was no difference in the degree of depression of turnover between the children with marasmus, marasmic-kwashiorkor, or kwashiorkor. The rate of height gain during recovery was significantly related to cross-link excretion, age, and weight-for-height on admission. These three factors accounted for 44% of the variance in the height velocity of the children. PYD and DPD excretion rate could be used to assess therapeutic interventions designed to alleviate stunting. PMID:1361595

  16. Guide to good practices for operations turnover

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Operations Turnover, Chapter XII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing operations turnover programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Operations Turnover is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a formal operations turnover program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  17. Alcohol, signaling, and ECM turnover.

    PubMed

    Seth, Devanshi; D'Souza El-Guindy, Nympha B; Apte, Minoti; Mari, Montserrat; Dooley, Steven; Neuman, Manuela; Haber, Paul S; Kundu, Gopal C; Darwanto, Agus; de Villiers, Willem J; Vonlaufen, A; Xu, Z; Phillips, P; Yang, S; Goldstein, D; Pirola, R M; Wilson, J S; Moles, Anna; Fernández, Anna; Colell, Anna; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C; Meyer, Christoph; Meindl-Beinker, Nadja M

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol is recognized as a direct hepatotoxin, but the precise molecular pathways that are important for the initiation and progression of alcohol-induced tissue injury are not completely understood. The current understanding of alcohol toxicity to organs suggests that alcohol initiates injury by generation of oxidative and nonoxidative ethanol metabolites and via translocation of gut-derived endotoxin. These processes lead to cellular injury and stimulation of the inflammatory responses mediated through a variety of molecules. With continuing alcohol abuse, the injury progresses through impairment of tissue regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover, leading to fibrogenesis and cirrhosis. Several cell types are involved in this process, the predominant being stellate cells, macrophages, and parenchymal cells. In response to alcohol, growth factors and cytokines activate many signaling cascades that regulate fibrogenesis. This mini-review brings together research focusing on the underlying mechanisms of alcohol-mediated injury in a number of organs. It highlights the various processes and molecules that are likely involved in inflammation, immune modulation, susceptibility to infection, ECM turnover and fibrogenesis in the liver, pancreas, and lung triggered by alcohol abuse.

  18. Local anesthetics structure-dependently interact with anionic phospholipid membranes to modify the fluidity.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-01-01

    While bupivacaine is more cardiotoxic than other local anesthetics, the mechanistic background for different toxic effects remains unclear. Several cardiotoxic compounds act on lipid bilayers to change the physicochemical properties of membranes. We comparatively studied the interaction of local anesthetics with lipid membranous systems which might be related to their structure-selective cardiotoxicity. Amide local anesthetics (10-300 microM) were reacted with unilamellar vesicles which were prepared with different phospholipids and cholesterol of varying lipid compositions. They were compared on the potencies to modify membrane fluidity by measuring fluorescence polarization. Local anesthetics interacted with liposomal membranes to increase the fluidity. Increasing anionic phospholipids in membranes enhanced the membrane-fluidizing effects of local anesthetics with the potency being cardiolipin>phosphatidic acid>phosphatidylglycerol>phosphatidylserine. Cardiolipin was most effective on bupivacaine, followed by ropivacaine. Local anesthetics interacted differently with biomimetic membranes consisting of 10mol% cardiolipin, 50mol% other phospholipids and 40mol% cholesterol with the potency being bupivacaine>ropivacaine>lidocaine>prilocaine, which agreed with the rank order of cardiotoxicity. Bupivacaine significantly fluidized 2.5-12.5mol% cardiolipin-containing membranes at cardiotoxicologically relevant concentrations. Bupivacaine is considered to affect lipid bilayers by interacting electrostatically with negatively charged cardiolipin head groups and hydrophobically with phospholipid acyl chains. The structure-dependent interaction with lipid membranes containing cardiolipin, which is preferentially localized in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes, may be a mechanistic clue to explain the structure-selective cardiotoxicity of local anesthetics.

  19. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Composition of Maternal Diet and Erythrocyte Phospholipid Status in Chilean Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Bascuñán, Karla A.; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Chamorro, Rodrigo; Valencia, Alejandra; Barrera, Cynthia; Puigrredon, Claudia; Sandoval, Jorge; Valenzuela, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Chilean diets are characterized by a low supply of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), which are critical nutrients during pregnancy and lactation, because of their role in brain and visual development. DHA is the most relevant n-3 PUFA in this period. We evaluated the dietary n-3 PUFA intake and erythrocyte phospholipids n-3 PUFA in Chilean pregnant women. Eighty healthy pregnant women (20–36 years old) in the 3rd–6th month of pregnancy were included in the study. Dietary assessment was done applying a food frequency questionnaire, and data were analyzed through the Food Processor SQL® software. Fatty acids of erythrocyte phospholipids were assessed by gas-liquid chromatography. Diet composition was high in saturated fat, low in mono- and PUFA, high in n-6 PUFA (linoleic acid) and low in n-3 PUFA (alpha-linolenic acid and DHA), with imbalance in the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio. Similar results were observed for fatty acids from erythrocyte phospholipids. The sample of Chilean pregnant women showed high consumption of saturated fat and low consumption of n-3 PUFA, which is reflected in the low DHA content of erythrocyte phospholipids. Imbalance between n-6/n-3 PUFA could negatively affect fetal development. New strategies are necessary to improve n-3 PUFA intake throughout pregnancy and breast feeding periods. Furthermore, it is necessary to develop dietary interventions to improve the quality of consumed foods with particular emphasis on n-3 PUFA. PMID:25386693

  20. Interaction of isopropylthioxanthone with phospholipid liposomes.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Stevanato, Roberto

    2007-04-01

    Isopropylthioxanthone (ITX) is a highly lipophilic molecule which can be released in foods and beverages from the packages, where it is present as photoinitiator of inks in printing processes. Recently it was found in babies milk, and its toxicity cannot be excluded. The structure of the molecule suggests a possible strong interaction with the lipid moiety of biological membranes, and this is the first study of its effects on phospholipid organization, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and spin labelling techniques. The data obtained with multilamellar liposomes of saturated phospholipids of different length, with and without cholesterol, point out that the molecule changes the lipid structure; in particular, in the gel state, behaving like a disordering agent it increases the mobility of the bilayer, while, in the fluid state, tends to rigidify the membrane, in a cholesterol like way. This behavior supports the hypothesis that ITX experiences a relocation process when the lipid matrix passes from the gel to the fluid state.

  1. Phospholipid biosynthesis in some anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Silber, P; Borie, R P; Mikowski, E J; Goldfine, H

    1981-01-01

    We have identified and characterized enzymes of phospholipid synthesis in two plasmalogen-rich anaerobes. Megasphaera elsdenii and Veillonella parvula, and one anaerobe lacking plasmalogens. Desulfovibrio vulgaris. All three species contained phosphatidate cytidylyltransferase and phosphatidylserine synthase. Phosphatidylglycerophosphate synthesis was detected only D. vulgaris extracts. Phosphatidylserine (diacyl form) was the major product of the phosphatidylserine synthase assay with particles from M. elsdenii or V. parvula. The amounts of phosphatidylethanolamine formed were very low. Only D. vulgaris particles had an active phosphatidylserine decarboxylase. PMID:6263870

  2. Phospholipid nanodisc engineering for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Biocompatible mesoscale nanoparticles (5-100 nm in diameter) are attractive tools for drug delivery. Among them are several types of liposomes and polymer micelles already in clinical trial or use. Generally, biocompatibility of such particles is achieved by coating them with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Without PEG coating, particles are quickly trapped in the reticuloendothelial system when intravenously administered. However, recent studies have revealed several potential problems with PEG coating, including antigenicity and restriction of cellular uptake. This has motivated the development of alternative drug and gene delivery vehicles, including chemically and genetically engineered high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-like nanodiscs or "bicelles". HDL is a naturally occurring mesoscale nanoparticle that normally ferries cholesterol around in the body. Its initial "nascent" form is thought to be a simple 10 nm disc of phospholipids in a bilayer, and can be easily synthesized in vitro by mixing recombinant apoA-I proteins with various phospholipids. In this review, the use of synthetic HDL-like phospholipid nanodiscs as biocompatible drug carriers is summarized, focussing on manufacturing, size-control, drug loading and cell targeting.

  3. Steam sterilisation of vesicular phospholipid gels.

    PubMed

    Tardi, C; Drechsler, M; Bauer, K H; Brandl, M

    2001-04-17

    Vesicular phospholipid gels (VPGs), highly concentrated phospholipid dispersions of semisolid consistency and vesicular morphology are under investigation as potential implantable depots for sustained release of drugs and as intermediates for subsequent dilution into 'conventional' liposome dispersions. It was investigated here if VPGs can be steam sterilised. VPGs prepared from 400 mg/g egg-phosphatidylcholine by high-pressure homogenisation retained their vesicular structure but showed a slight increase in vesicle size (freeze-fracture electron microscopy). However, autoclaving slowed down both, the in vitro release of the hydrophilic marker carboxyfluorescein and vesicles from VPGs. This was assumed to be due to bigger vesicle sizes and corresponding increase in packing density of the vesicular matrix. Upon dilution into a liposome dispersion both negative staining electron microscopy and dynamic laser light scattering analysis confirmed a distinct increase in liposome size, mainly due to fusion of small (20 nm) vesicles with unfavourable curvature. This was consistent with the observed increase in encapsulation efficiency of carboxyfluorescein. Phospholipid hydrolysis during autoclaving was negligible with lysophosphatidylcholine formation of less than 2% (thin layer chromatography). Despite significant change of their morphological and functional properties during autoclaving VPGs retained their main characteristics, such as vesicular structure, sustained release and dilutability to liposome dispersions, and are, therefore, considered as autoclavable.

  4. Phylogenomic investigation of phospholipid synthesis in archaea.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Jonathan; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2012-01-01

    Archaea have idiosyncratic cell membranes usually based on phospholipids containing glycerol-1-phosphate linked by ether bonds to isoprenoid lateral chains. Since these phospholipids strongly differ from those of bacteria and eukaryotes, the origin of the archaeal membranes (and by extension, of all cellular membranes) was enigmatic and called for accurate evolutionary studies. In this paper we review some recent phylogenomic studies that have revealed a modified mevalonate pathway for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors in archaea and suggested that this domain uses an atypical pathway of synthesis of fatty acids devoid of any acyl carrier protein, which is essential for this activity in bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition, we show new or updated phylogenetic analyses of enzymes likely responsible for the isoprenoid chain synthesis from their precursors and the phospholipid synthesis from glycerol phosphate, isoprenoids, and polar head groups. These results support that most of these enzymes can be traced back to the last archaeal common ancestor and, in many cases, even to the last common ancestor of all living organisms.

  5. Cholesterol autoxidation in phospholipid membrane bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sevanian, A.; McLeod, L.L.

    1987-09-01

    Lipid peroxidation in unilamellar liposomes of known cholesterol-phospholipid composition was monitored under conditions of autoxidation or as induced by a superoxide radical generating system, gamma-irradiation or cumene hydroperoxide. Formation of cholesterol oxidation products was indexed to the level of lipid peroxidation. The major cholesterol oxidation products identified were 7-keto-cholesterol, isomeric cholesterol 5,6-epoxides, isomeric 7-hydroperoxides and isomeric 3,7-cholestane diols. Other commonly encountered products included 3,5-cholestadiene-7-one and cholestane-3 beta, 5 alpha, 6 beta-triol. Superoxide-dependent peroxidation required iron and produced a gradual increase in 7-keto-cholesterol and cholesterol epoxides. Cholesterol oxidation was greatest in liposomes containing high proportions of unsaturated phospholipid to cholesterol (4:1 molar ratio), intermediate with low phospholipid to cholesterol ratios (2:1) and least in liposomes prepared with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. This relationship held regardless of the oxidizing conditions used. Cumene hydroperoxide-dependent lipid peroxidation and/or more prolonged oxidations with other oxidizing systems yielded a variety of products where cholesterol-5 beta,6 beta-epoxide, 7-ketocholesterol and the 7-hydroperoxides were most consistently elevated. Oxyradical initiation of lipid peroxidation produced a pattern of cholesterol oxidation products distinguishable from the pattern derived by cumene hydroperoxide-dependent peroxidation.

  6. Dynamic Aspects of Voluntary Turnover: An Integrated Approach to Curvilinearity in the Performance-Turnover Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William J.; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a…

  7. Relevancy 101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Newman, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Where we present an overview on why relevancy is a problem, how important it is and how we can improve it. The topic of relevancy is becoming increasingly important in earth data discovery as our audience is tuned to the accuracy of standard search engines like Google.

  8. Antidiabetic phospholipid-nuclear receptor complex reveals the mechanism for phospholipid-driven gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Musille, Paul M; Pathak, Manish C; Lauer, Janelle L; Hudson, William H; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2013-01-31

    The human nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) has an important role in controlling lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and is a potential target for the treatment of diabetes and hepatic diseases. LRH-1 is known to bind phospholipids, but the role of phospholipids in controlling LRH-1 activation remains highly debated. Here we describe the structure of both apo LRH-1 and LRH-1 in complex with the antidiabetic phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS and functional data, our studies show that DLPC binding is a dynamic process that alters co-regulator selectivity. We show that the lipid-free receptor undergoes previously unrecognized structural fluctuations, allowing it to interact with widely expressed co-repressors. These observations enhance our understanding of LRH-1 regulation and highlight its importance as a new therapeutic target for controlling diabetes.

  9. Contextual Factors Related to Elementary Principal Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partlow, Michelle C.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of school leadership instability and how it affects schools and student achievement has been studied. The question of how to predict turnover of the principal remains an unknown. The purpose of this research was to search for possible relationships between certain contextual variables and principal turnover and to test the independent…

  10. Employee Turnover: Evidence from a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borland, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Patterns of employee turnover from a medium-sized law firm in Australia were examined in regard to theories of worker mobility (matching, sectoral shift, and incentive). Results support a role for matching effects, but personnel practices affect the timing of turnover. Matching and incentive-based theories do not explain the high rates of turnover…

  11. Principal Turnover. Information Capsule. Volume 0914

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that school districts are facing increasing rates of principal turnover. Frequent principal changes deprive schools of the leadership stability they need to succeed, disrupt long-term school reform efforts, and may even be linked to increased teacher turnover and lower levels of student achievement. This Information Capsule…

  12. Social Disadvantage and Network Turnover

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Research shows that socially disadvantaged groups—especially African Americans and people of low socioeconomic status (SES)—experience more unstable social environments. I argue that this causes higher rates of turnover within their personal social networks. This is a particularly important issue among disadvantaged older adults, who may benefit from stable networks. This article, therefore, examines whether social disadvantage is related to various aspects of personal network change. Method. Social network change was assessed using longitudinal egocentric network data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a study of older adults conducted between 2005 and 2011. Data collection in Wave 2 included a technique for comparing respondents’ confidant network rosters between waves. Rates of network losses, deaths, and additions were modeled using multivariate Poisson regression. Results. African Americans and low-SES individuals lost more confidants—especially due to death—than did whites and college-educated respondents. African Americans also added more confidants than whites. However, neither African Americans nor low-SES individuals were able to match confidant losses with new additions to the extent that others did, resulting in higher levels of confidant network shrinkage. These trends are partly, but not entirely, explained by disadvantaged individuals’ poorer health and their greater risk of widowhood or marital dissolution. Discussion. Additional work is needed to shed light on the role played by race- and class-based segregation on group differences in social network turnover. Social gerontologists should examine the role these differences play in explaining the link between social disadvantage and important outcomes in later life, such as health decline. PMID:24997286

  13. Modulation of phospholipid metabolism in murine keratinocytes by tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate.

    PubMed

    Galey, C I; Ziboh, V A; Marcelo, C L; Voorhees, J J

    1985-10-01

    The possibility that phospholipid deacylation may be a critical event in the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-associated effects on mouse skin prompted us to examine in vitro the effects of TPA on arachidonic acid metabolism in neonatal mouse keratinocytes. Three-day old neonatal keratinocytes were prelabeled with [14C]arachidonic acid ([14C]AA) and [14C] stearic acid ([14C]ST) and used to characterize the lipases that were activated when these cells were treated with TPA in culture. Data from these studies demonstrate that phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) are the major phospholipids that undergo early hydrolysis to release arachidonic acid when challenged by TPA. Of particular interest was the novel observation of the hydrolysis of 14C-labeled PI in these keratinocytes, the accumulation of [14C]1,2-diacylglyceride and the lack of the [14C]diacylglyceride phosphorylation to form [14C]phosphatidic acid. This lack of [14C] phosphatidic accumulation implied that although TPA enhanced the hydrolysis of [14C]PI resulting in increased [14C]diacylglyceride it did not enhance the resynthesis of the [14C]PI via the phosphorylation of the [14C]diacylglyceride. Therefore, TPA probably is not involved in the turnover of PI in these cells but is involved in the activation of PC hydrolyzing phospholipase A2 and PI hydrolyzing phospholipase C in these keratinocytes releasing arachidonic acid which then undergoes oxygenation reactions to provide biologically active eicosanoids.

  14. Modulation of phospholipid metabolism in murine keratinocytes by tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Galey, C.I.; Ziboh, V.A.; Marcelo, C.L.; Voorhees, J.J.

    1985-10-01

    The possibility that phospholipid deacylation may be a critical event in the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-associated effects on mouse skin prompted us to examine in vitro the effects of TPA on arachidonic acid metabolism in neonatal mouse keratinocytes. Three-day old neonatal keratinocytes were prelabeled with ( UC)arachidonic acid (( UC)AA) and ( UC) stearic acid (( UC)ST) and used to characterize the lipases that were activated when these cells were treated with TPA in culture. Data from these studies demonstrate that phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) are the major phospholipids that undergo early hydrolysis to release arachidonic acid when challenged by TPA. Of particular interest was the novel observation of the hydrolysis of UC-labeled PI in these keratinocytes, the accumulation of ( UC)1,2-diacylglyceride and the lack of the ( UC)diacylglyceride phosphorylation to form ( UC)phosphatidic acid. This lack of ( UC) phosphatidic accumulation implied that although TPA enhanced the hydrolysis of ( UC)PI resulting in increased ( UC)diacylglyceride it did not enhance the resynthesis of the ( UC)PI via the phosphorylation of the ( UC)diacylglyceride. Therefore, TPA probably is not involved in the turnover of PI in these cells but is involved in the activation of PC hydrolyzing phospholipase A2 and PI hydrolyzing phospholipase C in these keratinocytes releasing arachidonic acid which then undergoes oxygenation reactions to provide biologically active eicosanoids.

  15. The herpes simplex virus 1 U{sub S}3 regulates phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, Peter; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Sonda, Sabrina; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt

    2012-10-25

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear and Golgi membranes for envelopment by phospholipid bilayers. In the absence of U{sub S}3, nuclear membranes form multiple folds harboring virions that suggests disturbance in membrane turnover. Therefore, we investigated phospholipid metabolism in cells infected with the U{sub S}3 deletion mutant R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), and quantified membranes involved in viral envelopment. We report that (i) [{sup 3}H]-choline incorporation into nuclear membranes and cytoplasmic membranes was enhanced peaking at 12 or 20 h post inoculation with wild type HSV-1 and R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), respectively, (ii) the surface area of nuclear membranes increased until 24 h of R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection forming folds that equaled {approx}45% of the nuclear surface, (iii) the surface area of viral envelopes between nuclear membranes equaled {approx}2400 R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) virions per cell, and (iv) during R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection, the Golgi complex expanded dramatically. The data indicate that U{sub S}3 plays a significant role in regulation of membrane biosynthesis.

  16. Hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids precedes cellular proliferation in asbestos-stimulated tracheobronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sesko, A.; Mossman, B. ); Cabot, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Metabolism of inositol phospholipids and phosphatidylcholine was investigated in tracheobronchial epithelial cells exposed to mitogenic concentrations of crocidolite asbestos. Alterations in levels of diacylglycerol, the endogenous activator of protein kinase C, and inositol polyphosphates, presumed mobilizers of intracellular calcium, were examined. Cultures labeled with ({sup 3}H)diacylglycerol. In contrast, crocidolite-exposed cells labeled with ({sup 3}H)myristic acid or ({sup 3}H)choline did not display elevated production of ({sup 3}H)diacylglycerol or release of ({sup 3}H)choline metabolites (i.e., evidence of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis). The soluble tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate catalyzed both of these changes. myo-({sup 3}H)Inositol-labeled cells exposed as briefly as 10 min to mitogenic concentrations of crocidolite demonstrated elevations in ({sup 3}H)inositol mono-, tris-, and terakisphosphates, phenomena indicating turnover of inositol phospholipids. The detection of diacylglycerol and inositol phosphates in crocidolite asbestos-exposed cells suggests that this fibrous tumor promoter activates phospholipase C as it stimulates cellular proliferation.

  17. Neutral lipid metabolism influences phospholipid synthesis and deacylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mora, Gabriel; Scharnewski, Michael; Fulda, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Establishment and maintenance of equilibrium in the fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids (PL) requires both regulation of the substrate available for PL synthesis (the acyl-CoA pool) and extensive PL turnover and acyl editing. In the present study, we utilize acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) deficient cells, unable to recycle FA derived from lipid deacylation, to evaluate the role of several enzymatic activities in FA trafficking and PL homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The data presented show that phospholipases B are not contributing to constitutive PL deacylation and are therefore unlikely to be involved in PL remodeling. In contrast, the enzymes of neutral lipid (NL) synthesis and mobilization are central mediators of FA trafficking. The phospholipid:DAG acyltransferase (PDAT) Lro1p has a substantial effect on FA release and on PL equilibrium, emerging as an important mediator in PL remodeling. The acyl-CoA dependent biosynthetic activities of NL metabolism are also involved in PL homeostasis through active modulation of the substrate available for PL synthesis. In addition TAG mobilization makes an important contribution, especially in cells from stationary phase, to FA availability. Beyond its well-established role in the formation of a storage pool, NL metabolism could play a crucial role as a mechanism to uncouple the pools of PL and acyl-CoAs from each other and thereby to allow independent regulation of each one.

  18. Phospholipase D catalyzes phospholipid metabolism in chemotactic peptide-stimulated HL-60 granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, J.K.; Siegel, M.I.; Egan, R.W.; Billah, M.M.

    1988-09-05

    There exists circumstantial evidence for activation of phospholipase D (PLD) in intact cells. However, because of the complexity of phospholipid remodeling processes, it is essential to distinguish PLD clearly from other phospholipases and phospholipid remodeling enzymes. Therefore, to establish unequivocally PLD activity in dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 granulocytes, to demonstrate the relative contribution of PLD to phospholipid turnover, and to validate the hypothesis that the formation of phosphatidylethanol is an expression of PLD-catalyzed transphosphatidylation, we have developed methodologies to label HL-60 granulocytes in 1-O-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-PC) with 32P without labeling cellular ATP. These methodologies involve (a) synthesis of alkyl-lysoPC containing 32P by a combination of enzymatic and chemical procedures and (b) incubation of HL-60 granulocytes with this alkyl-(32P) lysoPC which enters the cell and becomes acylated into membrane-associated alkyl-(32P)PC. Upon stimulation of these 32P-labeled cells with the chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP), alkyl-(32P)phosphatidic acid (alkyl-(32P)PA) is formed rapidly. Because, under these conditions, cellular ATP has not been labeled with 32P, alkyl-(32P)PA must be formed via PLD-catalyzed hydrolysis of alkyl-(32P)PC at the terminal phosphodiester bond. This result conclusively demonstrates fMLP-induced activation of PLD in HL-60 granulocytes. These 32P-labeled HL-60 granulocytes have also been stimulated in the presence of ethanol to produce alkyl-(32P)phosphatidylethanol (alkyl-(32P)PEt). Formation of alkyl-(32P)PEt parallels that of alkyl-(32P)PA with respect to time course, fMLP concentration, inhibition by a specific fMLP antagonist (t-butoxycarbonyl-Met-Leu-Phe), and Ca2+ concentration.

  19. Determination of metals in phospholipids by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Montford, B; Cribbs, S C

    1969-07-01

    A procedure is described for the determination of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and manganese in phospholipids by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. The method uses a solution of phospholipid in isopentyl acetate; phosphate interference is controlled by the addition of aqueous lanthanum chloride solution homogenized with ethanol. Standards are prepared in a similar solvent mixture. A comparison between the described method and that of standard additions show it to be free of phospholipid matrix effects. PMID:18960604

  20. Essential phospholipids in fatty liver: a scientific update

    PubMed Central

    Gundermann, Karl-Josef; Gundermann, Simon; Drozdzik, Marek; Mohan Prasad, VG

    2016-01-01

    Aim Although essential phospholipids (EPL) from soybean are often used in membrane-associated disorders and diseases, their high quality of purification and effects on prevalent liver diseases, especially on fatty liver diseases (FLDs) of different origin, are still widely unknown and a matter of continuous active research. The aim of this article is to review, discuss, and summarize the available results of EPL in the treatment of FLD. Methods Database research was carried out on Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, country-specific journals, and follow-up literature citations for relevant hepatogastroenterological articles published between 1988 and 2014. We searched for and reviewed only those papers that indicated minimum extraction amount of 72% (3-sn-phosphatidyl)choline from soybean as being necessary to treat patients with a considerable amount of 1,2-dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine as a key component in EPL. Results EPL has a well-established mode of action, therapeutic effectiveness, and lack of toxicity, which ensures clinically relevant efficacy-to-safety ratio. It influences membrane- dependent cellular functions and shows anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antifibrogenic, anti apoptotic, membrane-protective, and lipid-regulating effects. Due to its positive effects on membrane composition and functions, it accelerates the improvement or normalization of subjective symptoms; pathological, clinical, and biochemical findings; hepatic imaging; and liver histology. It is justified to administer EPL together with other therapeutic measurements in the liver. Conclusion Pharmacological and clinical results confirm the efficacy of EPL in the treatment of FLD. PMID:27217791

  1. Novel Phospholipid-Protein Conjugates Allow Improved Detection of Antibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Samuelsen, Simone V; Maity, Arindam; Nybo, Mads; Macaubas, Claudia; Lønstrup, Lars; Balboni, Imelda M; Mellins, Elizabeth D; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Reliable measurement of clinically relevant autoimmune antibodies toward phospholipid-protein conjugates is highly desirable in research and clinical assays. To date, the development in this field has been limited to the use of natural heterogeneous antigens. However, this approach does not take structural features of biologically active antigens into account and leads to low reliability and poor scientific test value. Here we describe novel phospholipid-protein conjugates for specific detection of human autoimmune antibodies. Our synthetic approach includes mild oxidation of synthetic phospholipid cardiolipin, and as the last step, coupling of the product with azide-containing linker and copper-catalyzed click chemistry with β2-glycoprotein I and prothrombin. To prove utility of the product antigens, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and three cohorts of samples obtained from patients in Denmark (n = 34) and the USA (n = 27 and n = 14). Afterwards we analyzed correlation of the obtained autoantibody titers with clinical parameters for each patient. Our results prove that using novel antigens clinically relevant autoantibodies can be detected with high repeatability, sensitivity and specificity. Unlike previously used antigens the obtained autoantibody titers strongly correlate with high disease activity and in particular, with arthritis, renal involvement, anti-Smith antibodies and high lymphocyte count. Importantly, chemical composition of antigens has a strong influence on the correlation of detected autoantibodies with disease activity and manifestations. This confirms the crucial importance of antigens' composition on research and diagnostic assays, and opens up exciting perspectives for synthetic antigens in future studies of autoimmunity.

  2. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  3. Protein-phospholipid interactions in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James H; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Tavoosi, Narjes; Ke, Ke; Pureza, Vincent; Boettcher, John M; Clay, Mary C; Rienstra, Chad M; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-04-01

    Most steps of the blood clotting cascade require the assembly of a serine protease with its specific regulatory protein on a suitable phospholipid bilayer. Unfortunately, the molecular details of how blood clotting proteins bind to membrane surfaces remain poorly understood, owing to a dearth of techniques for studying protein-membrane interactions at high resolution. Our laboratories are tackling this question using a combination of approaches, including nanoscale membrane bilayers, solid-state NMR, and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. These studies are now providing structural insights at atomic resolution into clotting protein-membrane interactions. PMID:20129649

  4. Protein-Phospholipid Interactions in Blood Clotting

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, James H.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Tavoosi, Narjes; Ke, Ke; Pureza, Vincent; Boettcher, John M.; Clay, Mary C.; Rienstra, Chad M.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-01-01

    Most steps of the blood clotting cascade require the assembly of a serine protease with its specific regulatory protein on a suitable phospholipid bilayer. Unfortunately, the molecular details of how blood clotting proteins bind to membrane surfaces remain poorly understood, owing to a dearth of techniques for studying protein-membrane interactions at high resolution. Our laboratories are tackling this question using a combination of approaches, including nanoscale membrane bilayers, solid-state NMR, and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. These studies are now providing structural insights at atomic resolution into clotting protein-membrane interactions. PMID:20129649

  5. Drug induced `softening' in phospholipid monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Uttam Kumar; Datta, Alokmay; Bhattacharya, Dhananjay

    2015-06-01

    Compressibility measurements on Langmuir monolayers of the phospholipid Dimystoryl Phospatidylcholine (DMPC) in pristine form and in the presence of the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID) Piroxicam at 0.025 drug/lipid (D/L) molecular ratio at different temperatures, show that the monolayer exhibits large increase (and subsequent decrease) in compressibility due to the drug in the vicinity of the Liquid Expanded - Liquid Condensed (LE-LC) phase transition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the lipid monolayer in presence of drug molecules show a disordering of the tail tilt, which is consistent with the above result.

  6. Specific heating power of fatty acid and phospholipid stabilized magnetic fluids in an alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCuyper, M.; Hodenius, M.; Ivanova, G.; Baumann, M.; Paciok, E.; Eckert, T.; Soenen, S. J. H.; Schmitz-Rode, T.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic fluids (MFs) with a similar narrow size distribution of the iron oxide core were stabilized with lauric acid (MF 1), oleate (MF 2) or, after dialysis in the presence of liposomes, with phospholipid molecules (MF 3 and MF 4, respectively). The hydrodynamic sizes of the MF 1 and MF 3 were half those found for MF 2 and MF 4. The MFs were exposed to inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field at a frequency of 200 kHz and a maximum magnetic field strength of 3.8 kA m-1. Specific absorption rates (SAR) of 294 ± 42 (MF 1), 214 ± 16 (MF 2), 297 ± 13 (MF 3) and 213 ± 6 W g-1 Fe (MF 4) were obtained. The data for MF 2 and MF 4 were identical to those found for the commercially available ferucarbotran. The biomedical relevance of the phospholipid-coated MFs is briefly discussed.

  7. The island-mainland species turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Yoel E; Losos, Jonathan B; Algar, Adam C

    2012-10-01

    Many oceanic islands are notable for their high endemism, suggesting that islands may promote unique assembly processes. However, mainland assemblages sometimes harbour comparable levels of endemism, suggesting that island biotas may not be as unique as is often assumed. Here, we test the uniqueness of island biotic assembly by comparing the rate of species turnover among islands and the mainland, after accounting for distance decay and environmental gradients. We modelled species turnover as a function of geographical and environmental distance for mainland (M-M) communities of Anolis lizards and Terrarana frogs, two clades that have diversified extensively on Caribbean islands and the mainland Neotropics. We compared mainland-island (M-I) and island-island (I-I) species turnover with predictions of the M-M model. If island assembly is not unique, then the M-M model should successfully predict M-I and I-I turnover, given geographical and environmental distance. We found that M-I turnover and, to a lesser extent, I-I turnover were significantly higher than predicted for both clades. Thus, in the first quantitative comparison of mainland-island species turnover, we confirm the long-held but untested assumption that island assemblages accumulate biodiversity differently than their mainland counterparts.

  8. Partial coverage of phospholipid model membranes with annexin V may completely inhibit their degradation by phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Speijer, H; Jans, S W; Reutelingsperger, C P; Hack, C E; van der Vusse, G J; Hermens, W T

    1997-02-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-mediated hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids was measured by ellipsometry, and the inhibition of this process by annexin V was studied. Planar membranes, consisting of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine (PC/PE/PS; 54:33:13, on molar basis), were degraded by pancreatic PLA2, and the rate of hydrolysis was limited to about 0.7%/min. The influence of graded coverage of the membrane with annexin V was studied. The degree of PLA2 inhibition was nonlinearly related to the amount of membrane-bound annexin V, and binding of only 12% and 54% of full membrane coverage resulted in, respectively, 50% and 93% inhibition. These findings indicate that the inhibition of PLA2-mediated hydrolysis by annexin V cannot be simply explained by shielding of phospholipid substrates from the enzyme. Moreover, the present results leave room for a role of endogenous annexin V in regulating phospholipid turnover in the plasma membrane of parenchymal cells such as cardiomyocytes.

  9. The aminosterol antibiotic squalamine permeabilizes large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Selinsky, B S; Zhou, Z; Fojtik, K G; Jones, S R; Dollahon, N R; Shinnar, A E

    1998-03-13

    The ability of the shark antimicrobial aminosterol squalamine to induce the leakage of polar fluorescent dyes from large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (LUVs) has been measured. Micromolar squalamine causes leakage of carboxyfluorescein (CF) from vesicles prepared from the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), and cardiolipin. Binding analyses based on the leakage data show that squalamine has its highest affinity to phosphatidylglycerol membranes, followed by phosphatidylserine and cardiolipin membranes. Squalamine will also induce the leakage of CF from phosphatidylcholine (PC) LUVs at low phospholipid concentrations. At high phospholipid concentrations, the leakage of CF from PC LUVs deviates from a simple dose-response relationship, and it appears that some of the squalamine can no longer cause leakage. Fluorescent dye leakage generated by squalamine is graded, suggesting the formation of a discrete membrane pore rather than a generalized disruption of vesicular membranes. By using fluorescently labeled dextrans of different molecular weight, material with molecular weight /=10,000 is retained. Negative stain electron microscopy of squalamine-treated LUVs shows that squalamine decreases the average vesicular size in a concentration-dependent manner. Squalamine decreases the size of vesicles containing anionic phospholipid at a lower squalamine/lipid molar ratio than pure PC LUVs. In a centrifugation assay, squalamine solubilizes phospholipid, but only at significantly higher squalamine/phospholipid ratios than required for either dye leakage or vesicle size reduction. Squalamine solubilizes PC at lower squalamine/phospholipid ratios than PG. We suggest that squalamine complexes with phospholipid to form a discrete structure within the bilayers of LUVs, resulting in the transient leakage of small encapsulated molecules. At higher

  10. Specific Ion Binding at Phospholipid Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Calero, Carles; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Martí, Jordi

    2015-09-01

    Metal cations are ubiquitous components in biological environments and play an important role in regulating cellular functions and membrane properties. By applying metadynamics simulations, we have performed systematic free energy calculations of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) bound to phospholipid membrane surfaces for the first time. The free energy landscapes unveil specific binding behaviors of metal cations on phospholipid membranes. Na(+) and K(+) are more likely to stay in the aqueous solution and can bind easily to a few lipid oxygens by overcoming low free energy barriers. Ca(2+) is most stable when it is bound to four lipid oxygens of the membrane rather than being hydrated in the aqueous solution. Mg(2+) is tightly hydrated, and it shows hardly any loss of a hydration water or binding directly to the membrane. When bound to the membrane, the cations' most favorable total coordination numbers with water and lipid oxygens are the same as their corresponding hydration numbers in aqueous solution, indicating a competition between ion binding to water and lipids. The binding specificity of metal cations on membranes is highly correlated with the hydration free energy and the size of the hydration shell.

  11. Biomimetic catalysis: Taking on the turnover challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooley, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    Emulating the efficiency with which enzymes catalyse reactions has often been used as inspiration to develop self-assembled cages. Now two studies present approaches to achieving catalyst turnover -- one of the biggest challenges in achieving truly biomimetic catalysis.

  12. Depletion of acidic phospholipids influences chromosomal replication in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fingland, Nicholas; Flåtten, Ingvild; Downey, Christopher D; Fossum-Raunehaug, Solveig; Skarstad, Kirsten; Crooke, Elliott

    2012-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, coordinated activation and deactivation of DnaA allows for proper timing of the initiation of chromosomal synthesis at the origin of replication (oriC) and assures initiation occurs once per cell cycle. In vitro, acidic phospholipids reactivate DnaA, and in vivo depletion of acidic phospholipids, results in growth arrest. Growth can be restored by the expression of a mutant form of DnaA, DnaA(L366K), or by oriC-independent DNA synthesis, suggesting acidic phospholipids are required for DnaA- and oriC-dependent replication. We observe here that when acidic phospholipids were depleted, replication was inhibited with a concomitant reduction of chromosomal content and cell mass prior to growth arrest. This global shutdown of biosynthetic activity was independent of the stringent response. Restoration of acidic phospholipid synthesis resulted in a resumption of DNA replication prior to restored growth, indicating a possible cell-cycle-specific growth arrest had occurred with the earlier loss of acidic phospholipids. Flow cytometry, thymidine uptake, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction data suggest that a deficiency in acidic phospholipids prolonged the time required to replicate the chromosome. We also observed that regardless of the cellular content of acidic phospholipids, expression of mutant DnaA(L366K) altered the DNA content-to-cell mass ratio. PMID:23233230

  13. Transbilayer mobility and distribution of red cell phospholipids during storage.

    PubMed Central

    Geldwerth, D; Kuypers, F A; Bütikofer, P; Allary, M; Lubin, B H; Devaux, P F

    1993-01-01

    We studied phospholipid topology and transbilayer mobility in red cells during blood storage. The distribution of phospholipids was determined by measuring the reactivity of phosphatidylethanolamine with fluorescamine and the degradation of phospholipids by phospholipase A2 and sphingomyelinase C. Phospholipid mobility was measured by determining transbilayer movements of spin-labeled phospholipids. We were unable to detect a change in the distribution of endogenous membrane phospholipids in stored red cells even after 2-mo storage. The rate of inward movement of spin-labeled phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine was progressively reduced, whereas that for phosphatidylcholine was increased. These changes in phospholipid translocation correlated with a fall in cellular ATP. However, following restoration of ATP, neither the rate of aminophospholipid translocation nor the transbilayer movement of phosphatidylcholine were completely corrected. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that red cell storage alters the kinetics of transbilayer mobility of phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine, the activity of the aminophospholipid translocase, but not the asymmetric distribution of endogenous membrane phospholipids, at least at a level detectable with phospholipases. Thus, if phosphatidylserine appearance on the outer monolayer is a signal for red cell elimination, the amount that triggers macrophage recognition is below the level of detection upon using the phospholipase technique. PMID:8325999

  14. The costs of nurse turnover, part 2: application of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2005-01-01

    This is the second article in a 2-part series focusing on nurse turnover and its costs. Part 1 (December 2004) described nurse turnover costs within the context of human capital theory, and using human resource accounting methods, presented the updated Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. Part 2 presents an application of this method in an acute care setting and the estimated costs of nurse turnover that were derived. Administrators and researchers can use these methods and cost information to build a business case for nurse retention. PMID:15647669

  15. Spatial turnover in the global avifauna.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Kevin J; Davies, Richard G; Orme, C David L; Olson, Valerie A; Thomas, Gavin H; Ding, Tzung-Su; Rasmussen, Pamela C; Lennon, Jack J; Bennett, Peter M; Owens, Ian P F; Blackburn, Tim M

    2007-07-01

    Despite its wide implications for many ecological issues, the global pattern of spatial turnover in the occurrence of species has been little studied, unlike the global pattern of species richness. Here, using a database on the breeding distributions of birds, we present the first global maps of variation in spatial turnover for an entire taxonomic class, a pattern that has to date remained largely a matter of conjecture, based on theoretical expectations and extrapolation of inconsistent patterns from different biogeographic realms. We use these maps to test four predictions from niche theory as to the form that this variation should take, namely that turnover should increase with species richness, towards lower latitudes, and with the steepness of environmental gradients and that variation in turnover is determined principally by rare (restricted) species. Contrary to prediction, we show that turnover is high both in areas of extremely low and high species richness, does not increase strongly towards the tropics, and is related both to average environmental conditions and spatial variation in those conditions. These results are closely associated with a further important and novel finding, namely that global patterns of spatial turnover are driven principally by widespread species rather than the restricted ones. This complements recent demonstrations that spatial patterns of species richness are also driven principally by widespread species, and thus provides an important contribution towards a unified model of how terrestrial biodiversity varies both within and between the Earth's major land masses.

  16. The costs of nurse turnover: part 1: an economic perspective.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2004-12-01

    Nurse turnover is costly for healthcare organizations. Administrators and nurse executives need a reliable estimate of nurse turnover costs and the origins of those costs if they are to develop effective measures of reducing nurse turnover and its costs. However, determining how to best capture and quantify nurse turnover costs can be challenging. Part 1 of this series conceptualizes nurse turnover via human capital theory and presents an update of a previously developed method for determining the costs of nurse turnover, the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Method. Part 2 (January 2005) presents a recent application of the methodology in an acute care hospital. PMID:15632752

  17. Ceramides in phospholipid membranes: effects on bilayer stability and transition to nonlamellar phases.

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, M P; Arrondo, J L; Goñi, F M; Alonso, A

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ceramides of natural origin on the gel-fluid and lamellar-inverted hexagonal phase transitions of phospholipids (mainly dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine) have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry, with additional support from infrared and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In the lamellar phase, ceramides do not mix ideally with phospholipids, giving rise to the coexistence of domains that undergo the gel-fluid transition at different temperatures. The combination of differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy, together with the use of deuterated lipids, allows the demonstration of independent melting temperatures for phospholipid and ceramide in the mixtures. In the lamellar-hexagonal phase transitions, ceramides (up to 15 mol %) decrease the transition temperature, without significantly modifying the transition enthalpy, thus facilitating the inverted hexagonal phase formation. 31P-NMR indicates the coexistence, within a certain range of temperatures, of lamellar and hexagonal phases, or hexagonal phase precursors. Ceramides from egg or from bovine brain are very similar in their effects on the lamellar-hexagonal transition. They are also comparable to diacylglycerides in this respect, although ceramides are less potent. These results are relevant in the interpretation of certain forms of interfacial enzyme activation and in the regulation and dynamics of the bilayer structure of cell membranes. PMID:9876146

  18. Plasma phospholipid arachidonic acid and lignoceric acid are associated with the risk of cardioembolic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Yoonsu; Do, Hyun Ju; Oh, Kyungmi; Seo, Woo-Keun; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2015-11-01

    Cardioembolic (CE) stroke is the most severe subtype of ischemic stroke with high recurrence and mortality. However, there is still little information on the association of plasma fatty acid (FA) with CE stroke. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis whether the composition of plasma phospholipid FA is associated with the risk of CE stroke. The study subjects were collected from the Korea University Stroke Registry. Twenty-one subjects were selected as CE stroke group, and 39 age- and sex-matched subjects with non-CE stroke were selected as controls. Sociodemographic factors, clinical measurements, and plasma phospholipid FA compositions were compared between the groups. Logistic regression was used to obtain estimates of the associations between the relevant FAs and CE stroke. The result showed that the CE stroke group had higher levels of free FA and lower levels of triglycerides before and after adjustment (all P < .05). In the regression analysis, elaidic acid (18:1Tn9) and arachidonic acid (20:4n6) were positively related, but lignoceric acid (24:0) was negatively related to CE stroke in all constructed models (all P < .05). In conclusion, plasma phospholipid FA composition was associated with CE stroke risk in Korean population, with higher proportions of elaidic acid and arachidonic acid and lower proportion of lignoceric acid in CE stroke. PMID:26452419

  19. Phospholipid Species in Newborn and 4 Month Old Infants after Consumption of Different Formulas or Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Olaf; Fleddermann, Manja; Hellmuth, Christian; Demmelmair, Hans; Koletzko, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are important long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids for neuronal and cognitive development and are ingredients of infant formulae that are recommended but there is no evidence based minimal supplementation level available. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the effect of supplemented AA and DHA on phospholipid metabolism. Methods Plasma samples of a randomized, double-blind infant feeding trial were used for the analyses of phospholipid species by flow-injection mass spectrometry. Healthy term infants consumed isoenergetic formulae (intervention formula with equal amounts of AA and DHA—IF, control formula without additional AA and DHA—CF) from the first month of life until the age of 120 days. A group of breast milk (BM) -fed infants was followed as a reference. Results The plasma profile detected in newborns was different from 4 month old infants, irrespective of study group. Most relevant changes were seen in higher level of LPC16:1, LPC20:4, PC32:1, PC34:1 and PC36:4 and lower level of LPC18:0, LPC18:2, PC32:2, PC36:2 and several ether-linked phosphatidylcholines in newborns. The sum of all AA and DHA species at 4 month old infants in the CF group showed level of 40% (AA) and 51% (DHA) of newborns. The supplemented amount of DHA resulted in phospholipid level comparable to BM infants, but AA phospholipids were lower than in BM infants. Interestingly, relative contribution of DHA was higher in ether-linked phosphatidylcholines in CF fed infants, but IF and BM fed infants showed higher overall ether-linked phosphatidylcholines levels. Conclusion In conclusion, we have shown that infant plasma phospholipid profile changes remarkably from newborn over time and is dependent on the dietary fatty acid composition. A supplementation of an infant formula with AA and DHA resulted in increased related phospholipid species. PMID:27571269

  20. Hybrid copolymer-phospholipid vesicles: phase separation resembling mixed phospholipid lamellae, but with mechanical stability and control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Santore, Maria M

    2015-04-01

    Vesicles whose bilayer membranes contain phospholipids mixed with co-polymers or surfactants comprise new hybrid materials having potential applications in drug delivery, sensors, and biomaterials. Here we describe a model polymer-phospholipid hybrid membrane system exhibiting strong similarities to binary phospholipid mixtures, but with more robust membrane mechanics. A lamella-forming graft copolymer, PDMS-co-PEO (polydimethylsiloxane-co-polyethylene oxide) was blended with a high melting temperature phospholipid, DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), over a broad compositional range. The resulting giant hybrid unilamellar vesicles were compared qualitatively and quantitatively to analogous mixed phospholipid membranes in which a low melting temperature phospholipid, DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), was blended with DPPC. The mechanical properties of the hybrid vesicles, even when phase separated, were robust with high lysis stresses and strains approaching those of the pure copolymer vesicles. The temperature-composition phase diagram of the hybrid vesicles closely resembled that of the mixed phospholipids; with only slightly greater nonidealities in the hybrid compared with DOPC/DPPC mixed membranes. In both systems, it was demonstrated that tension could be used to manipulate DPPC solidification into domains of patchy or striped morphologies that exhibited different tracer incorporation. The patch and stripe-shaped domains are thought to be different solid DPPC polymorphys: ripple and tilt (or gel). This work demonstrates that in mixed-phospholipid bilayers where a high-melting phospholipid solidifies on cooling, the lower-melting phospholipid may be substituted by an appropriate copolymer to improve mechanical properties while retaining the underlying membrane physics.

  1. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A; Maskrey, Benjamin H; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Harwood, John L

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes.

  2. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians' responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction. PMID:25336960

  3. Periodic synthesis of phospholipids during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, E A; Bender, R A

    1987-01-01

    Net phospholipid synthesis is discontinuous during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle with synthesis restricted to two discrete periods. The first period of net phospholipid synthesis begins in the swarmer cell shortly after cell division and ends at about the time when DNA replication initiates. The second period of phospholipid synthesis begins at a time when DNA replication is about two-thirds complete and ends at about the same time that DNA replication terminates. Thus, considerable DNA replication, growth, and differentiation (stalk growth) occur in the absence of net phospholipid synthesis. In fact, when net phospholipid synthesis was inhibited by the antibiotic cerulenin through the entire cell cycle, both the initiation and the elongation phases of DNA synthesis occurred normally. An analysis of the kinetics of incorporation of radioactive phosphate into macromolecules showed that the periodicity of phospholipid synthesis could not have been detected by pulse-labeling techniques, and only an analysis of cells prelabeled to equilibrium allowed detection of the periodicity. Equilibrium-labeled cells also allowed determination of the absolute amount of phosphorus-containing macromolecules in newborn swarmer cells. These cells contain about as much DNA as one Escherichia coli chromosome and about four times as much RNA as DNA. The amount of phosphorus in phospholipids is about one-seventh of that in DNA, or about 3% of the total macromolecular phosphorus. PMID:3584065

  4. Quantification of phospholipids in excised tissues by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Barany, M.; Venkatasubramanian, P.N.

    1986-05-01

    A fraction of the total phospholipids is visible in natural abundance /sup 13/C NMR spectra of diseased human muscle biopsies which have been extracted with isopentane to remove neutral fats. The authors have quantified the visible phospholipids by inserting into the muscle biopsies a dioxane capillary which was calibrated against phospholipid vesicles (with known phosphate concentration) prepared from rat muscle and liver, and against pure palmitic and linolenic acid. The phospholipid content of the human muscles was calculated from the integrated peak area of the dioxane capillary, from the area of the 30.5 and 128.5 ppm peaks in the /sup 13/C spectrum of the muscle, and from the dry weight of the muscle, determined on the same sample which was used for /sup 13/C spectroscopy. The same experiments were carried out with rat muscle, brain, liver, and kidney. Furthermore, after the /sup 13/C spectrum of the tissue was recorded excess halothane was added into the NMR tube, the sample incubated, then the /sup 13/C spectrum re-recorded for quantification of the total phospholipids. Thus, their procedure quantitates both the NMR visible and the total phospholipids of the tissue. The total phospholipid content determined by NMR was in good agreement with that determined by chemical analysis.

  5. Retaining your high performers: moderators of the performance-job satisfaction-voluntary turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Two divergent ideas explain the relationship between performance and voluntary turnover. One suggests that higher performing employees, who are rewarded for their superior work product, will desire to remain with an organization that values their performance and will, consequently, be less likely than lower performing employees to voluntarily leave. An alternative idea suggests that higher performing employees, who are more desirable to external companies as a result of their superior work product, will have more external job opportunities and will, consequently, be more likely than their lower performing colleagues to voluntarily leave. The current study evaluated the behaviors and attitudes of 12,545 insurance employees over a 3-year period to examine how these 2 divergent expectations influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship. Results show that both pay growth and the relevant unemployment rate interact with performance to influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship and that they work independently of employee job satisfaction influences. PMID:20476825

  6. Retaining your high performers: moderators of the performance-job satisfaction-voluntary turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Two divergent ideas explain the relationship between performance and voluntary turnover. One suggests that higher performing employees, who are rewarded for their superior work product, will desire to remain with an organization that values their performance and will, consequently, be less likely than lower performing employees to voluntarily leave. An alternative idea suggests that higher performing employees, who are more desirable to external companies as a result of their superior work product, will have more external job opportunities and will, consequently, be more likely than their lower performing colleagues to voluntarily leave. The current study evaluated the behaviors and attitudes of 12,545 insurance employees over a 3-year period to examine how these 2 divergent expectations influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship. Results show that both pay growth and the relevant unemployment rate interact with performance to influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship and that they work independently of employee job satisfaction influences.

  7. Phospholipids at the Interface: Current Trends and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pichot, Roman; Watson, Richard L.; Norton, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipids are one of the major structural elements of biological membranes. Due to their amphiphilic character, they can adopt various molecular assemblies when dispersed in water, such as bilayer vesicles or micelles, which give them unique interfacial properties and render them very attractive in terms of foam or emulsion stabilization. This article aims at reviewing the properties of phospholipids at the air/water and oil/water interfaces, as well as the recent advances in using these natural components as stabilizers, alone or in combination with other compounds such as proteins. A discussion regarding the challenges and opportunities offered by phospholipids-stabilized structure concludes the review. PMID:23736688

  8. Reduction-sensitive liposomes from a multifunctional lipid conjugate and natural phospholipids: reduction and release kinetics and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Brodersen, Nicolai; Gramatica, Andrea; Loew, Martin; Liebscher, Jürgen; Herrmann, Andreas; Egger, Holger; Budde, Bastian; Arbuzova, Anna

    2011-09-01

    The development of targeted and triggerable delivery systems is of high relevance for anticancer therapies. We report here on reduction-sensitive liposomes composed of a novel multifunctional lipidlike conjugate, containing a disulfide bond and a biotin moiety, and natural phospholipids. The incorporation of the disulfide conjugate into vesicles and the kinetics of their reduction were studied using dansyl-labeled conjugate 1 in using the dansyl fluorescence environmental sensitivity and the Förster resonance energy transfer from dansyl to rhodamine-labeled phospholipids. Cleavage of the disulfide bridge (e.g., by tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP), dithiothreitol (DTT), l-cysteine, or glutathione (GSH)) removed the hydrophilic headgroup of the conjugate and thus changed the membrane organization leading to the release of entrapped molecules. Upon nonspecific uptake of vesicles by macrophages, calcein release from reduction-sensitive liposomes consisting of the disulfide conjugate and phospholipids was more efficient than from reduction-insensitive liposomes composed only of phospholipids. The binding of streptavidin to the conjugates did not interfere with either the subsequent reduction of the disulfide bond of the conjugate or the release of entrapped molecules. Breast cancer cell line BT-474, overexpressing the HER2 receptor, showed a high uptake of the reduction-sensitive doxorubicin-loaded liposomes functionalized with the biotin-tagged anti-HER2 antibody. The release of the entrapped cargo inside the cells was observed, implying the potential of using our system for active targeting and delivery.

  9. Biomolecular interactions at phospholipid-decorated surfaces of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Brake, Jeffrey M; Daschner, Maren K; Luk, Yan-Yeung; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2003-12-19

    The spontaneous assembly of phospholipids at planar interfaces between thermotropic liquid crystals and aqueous phases gives rise to patterned orientations of the liquid crystals that reflect the spatial and temporal organization of the phospholipids. Strong and weak specific-binding events involving proteins at these interfaces drive the reorganization of the phospholipids and trigger orientational transitions in the liquid crystals. Because these interfaces are fluid, processes involving the lateral organization of proteins (such as the formation of protein- and phospholipid-rich domains) are also readily imaged by the orientational response of the liquid crystal, as are stereospecific enzymatic events. These results provide principles for label-free monitoring of aqueous streams for molecular and biomolecular species without the need for complex instrumentation.

  10. Characterisation of reaction centers and their phospholipids from Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Snozzi, M; Bachofen, R

    1979-05-01

    1. Reaction centers from Rhodospirillum rubrum have been extracted with the zwitterionic detergent lauryl dimethyl amine oxide. Subsequent purification has been achieved by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. The pure reaction centers are composed of three protein subunits (L, M, H), bacteriocholorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in the ratio 2 : 1 and phospholipids. 2. The phospholipid composition has been found to be similar to that of whole chromatophore membrane, except that diphosphatidyl glycerol is present in higher amount in the isolated complex. When the detergent treatment of the chromatophore membrane is done in the presence of NaCl, a lower phospholipid content in isolated reaction centers has been found together with a lower stability in the association among the protein subunits. In this complex, the largest subunit H is easily split off and a LM complex is obtained. It is concluded that the phospholipids play an important role in the stability of reaction center complexes.

  11. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Esther; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Sonda, Sabrina; Kaech, Andres; Lucas, Miriam S.; Ackermann, Mathias; Wild, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  12. Evidence that phospholipid turnover is the signal transducing system coupled to serotonin-S2 receptor sites

    SciTech Connect

    de Chaffoy de Courcelles, D.; Leysen, J.E.; De Clerck, F.; Van Belle, H.; Janssen, P.A.

    1985-06-25

    Upon stimulation with serotonin of washed human platelets prelabeled with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate, the authors found an approximately 250% increase in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidic acid (PA) formation, a small decrease in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and a concomitant increase in (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. Using (/sup 3/H)arachidonate for prelabeling, (/sup 3/H)diacylglycerol accumulated transiently at 10 s after addition of the agonist, (/sup 3/H)PA increased but to a lower extent compared to /sup 32/P-labeled lipid, and the formation of both (/sup 3/H)polyphosphoinositides increased. The serotonin-induced dose-dependent changes in (/sup 32/P)PA correlate with its effect on the changes in slope of aggregation of platelets. The potency of 13 drugs to antagonize the serotonin-induced PA formation closely corresponds to both their potency to inhibit platelet aggregation and their binding affinity for serotonin-S2 receptor sites. It is suggested that at least part of the signal transducing system following activation of the serotonin-S2 receptors involves phospholipase C catalyzed inositol lipid breakdown yielding diacylglycerol which is subsequently phosphorylated to PA.

  13. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  14. Millimeter-area, free standing, phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Peter J; Van Hooghten, Rob; Vermant, Jan

    2016-05-11

    Minimal model biomembrane studies have the potential to unlock the fundamental mechanisms of cellular function that govern the processes upon which life relies. However, existing methods to fabricate free-standing model membranes currently have significant limitations. Bilayer sizes are often tens of micrometers, decoupling curvature or substrate effects, orthogonal control over tension, and solvent exchange combined with microscopy techniques is not possible, which restricts the studies that can be performed. Here, we describe a versatile platform to generate free standing, planar, phospholipid bilayers with millimeter scale areas. The technique relies on an adapted thin-film balance apparatus allowing for the dynamic control of the nucleation and growth of a planar black lipid membrane in the center of an orifice surrounded by microfluidic channels. Success is demonstrated using several different lipid types, including mixtures that show the same temperature dependent phase separation as existing protocols, moreover, membranes are highly stable. Two advantages unique to the proposed method are the dynamic control of the membrane tension and the possibility to make extremely large area membranes. We demonstrate this by showing how a block polymer, F68, used in drug delivery increases the membrane compliance. Together, the results demonstrate a new paradigm for studying the mechanics, structure, and function of model membranes.

  15. Remodeling of cardiolipin by phospholipid transacylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Kelley, Richard I; Blanck, Thomas J J; Schlame, Michael

    2003-12-19

    Mitochondrial cardiolipin (CL) contains unique fatty acid patterns, but it is not known how the characteristic molecular species of CL are formed. We found a novel reaction that transfers acyl groups from phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine to CL in mitochondria of rat liver and human lymphoblasts. Acyl transfer was stimulated by ADP, ATP, and ATP gamma S, but not by other nucleotides. Coenzyme A stimulated the reaction only in the absence of adenine nucleotides. Free fatty acids were not incorporated into CL under the same incubation condition. The transacylation required addition of exogenous CL or monolyso-CL, whereas dilyso-CL was not a substrate. Transacylase activity was decreased in lymphoblasts from patients with Barth syndrome (tafazzin deletion), and this was accompanied by drastic changes in the molecular composition of CL. In rat liver, where linoleic acid was the most abundant residue of CL, only linoleoyl groups were transferred into CL, but not oleoyl or arachidonoyl groups. We demonstrated complete remodeling of tetraoleoyl-CL to tetralinoleoyl-CL in rat liver mitochondria and identified the intermediates linoleoyl-trioleoyl-CL, dilinoleoyl-dioleoyl-CL, and trilinoleoyl-oleoyl-CL by high-performance liquid chromatography. The data suggest that CL is remodeled by acyl specific phospholipid transacylation and that tafazzin is an acyltransferase involved in this mechanism.

  16. Interaction of abscisic acid with phospholipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stillwell, W.; Brengle, B.; Hester, P.; Wassall, S.T. )

    1989-04-04

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is shown, under certain conditions, to greatly enhance the permeability of phospholipid bilayer membranes to the nonelectrolyte erythritol (followed spectrophotometrically by osmotic swelling) and the anion carboxyfluorescein (followed by fluorescence). The hormone is ineffective with single- and mixed-component phosphatidylcholine membranes in the liquid-crystalline or gel states. In contrast, substantial ABA-induced permeability is measured for two-component membranes containing lipids with different polar head groups or containing phosphatidylcholines with different acyl chains at temperatures where gel and liquid-crystalline phases coexist. Despite the large ABA-induced enhancement in bilayer permeability, no evidence for a substantial change at the molecular level was seen in the membranes by magnetic resonance techniques. {sup 13}C NMR spin-lattice relaxation times, T{sub 1}, in sonicated unilamellar vesicles and ESR of spin-labeled fatty acids intercalated into membranes showed negligible effect on acyl chain order and dynamics within the bilayer, while {sup 31}P NMR of sonicated unilamellar vesicles indicated negligible effect on molecular motion and conformation in the head-group region. The authors propose that, instead of causing a general nonspecific perturbation to the membrane, the hormone acts at membrane defects formed due to mismatch in molecular packing where two different head groups or acyl chain states interface. Increased membrane disruption by ABA at these points of membrane instability could then produce an enhancement in permeability.

  17. Enhancement by cytidine of membrane phospholipid synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    G-Coviella, I. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Cytidine, as cytidine 5'-diphosphate choline, is a major precursor in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine in cell membranes. In the present study, we examined the relationships between extracellular levels of cytidine, the conversion of [14C]choline to [14C]phosphatidylcholine, and the net syntheses of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine by PC12 cells. The rate at which cytidine (as [3H]cytidine) was incorporated into the PC12 cells followed normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 5 microM; Vmax = 12 x 10(-3) mmol/mg of protein/min) when the cytidine concentrations in the medium were below 50 microM; at higher concentrations, intracellular [3H]cytidine nucleotide levels increased linearly. Once inside the cell, cytidine was converted mainly into cytidine triphosphate. In pulse-chase experiments, addition of cytidine to the medium caused a time- and dose-dependent increase (by up to 30%) in the incorporation of [14C]choline into membrane [14C]-phosphatidylcholine. When the PC12 cells were supplemented with both cytidine and choline for 14 h, small but significant elevations (p less than 0.05) were observed in their absolute contents of membrane phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine, all increasing by 10-15% relative to their levels in cells incubated with choline alone. Exogenous cytidine, acting via cytidine triphosphate, can thus affect the synthesis and levels of cell membrane phospholipids.

  18. Millimeter-area, free standing, phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Peter J; Van Hooghten, Rob; Vermant, Jan

    2016-05-11

    Minimal model biomembrane studies have the potential to unlock the fundamental mechanisms of cellular function that govern the processes upon which life relies. However, existing methods to fabricate free-standing model membranes currently have significant limitations. Bilayer sizes are often tens of micrometers, decoupling curvature or substrate effects, orthogonal control over tension, and solvent exchange combined with microscopy techniques is not possible, which restricts the studies that can be performed. Here, we describe a versatile platform to generate free standing, planar, phospholipid bilayers with millimeter scale areas. The technique relies on an adapted thin-film balance apparatus allowing for the dynamic control of the nucleation and growth of a planar black lipid membrane in the center of an orifice surrounded by microfluidic channels. Success is demonstrated using several different lipid types, including mixtures that show the same temperature dependent phase separation as existing protocols, moreover, membranes are highly stable. Two advantages unique to the proposed method are the dynamic control of the membrane tension and the possibility to make extremely large area membranes. We demonstrate this by showing how a block polymer, F68, used in drug delivery increases the membrane compliance. Together, the results demonstrate a new paradigm for studying the mechanics, structure, and function of model membranes. PMID:27050618

  19. Molecular Insights into Phospholipid -- NSAID Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu Boggara, Mohan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2007-03-01

    Non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) e.g. Aspirin and Ibuprofen, with chronic usage cause gastro intestinal (GI) toxicity. It has been shown experimentally that NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipids reduce the GI toxicity and also increase the therapeutic activity of these drugs compared to the unmodified ones. Using all atomistic simulations and two different methodologies, we studied the partitioning behavior of two model NSAIDs (Aspirin and Ibuprofen) as a function of pH and drug loading. The results from two methodologies are consistent in describing the equilibrium drug distribution in the bilayers. Additionally, the heterogeneity in density and polarity of the bilayer in the normal direction along with the fact that NSAIDs are amphiphilic (all of them have a carboxylic acid group and a non-polar part consisting of aromatic moieties), indicate that the diffusion mechanism in the bilayer is far different compared to the same in a bulk medium. This study summarizes the various effects of NSAIDs and their behavior inside the lipid bilayer both as a function of pH and drug concentration.

  20. Novel Phospholipid-Protein Conjugates Allow Improved Detection of Antibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nybo, Mads; Macaubas, Claudia; Lønstrup, Lars; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Reliable measurement of clinically relevant autoimmune antibodies toward phospholipid-protein conjugates is highly desirable in research and clinical assays. To date, the development in this field has been limited to the use of natural heterogeneous antigens. However, this approach does not take structural features of biologically active antigens into account and leads to low reliability and poor scientific test value. Here we describe novel phospholipid-protein conjugates for specific detection of human autoimmune antibodies. Our synthetic approach includes mild oxidation of synthetic phospholipid cardiolipin, and as the last step, coupling of the product with azide-containing linker and copper-catalyzed click chemistry with β2-glycoprotein I and prothrombin. To prove utility of the product antigens, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and three cohorts of samples obtained from patients in Denmark (n = 34) and the USA (n = 27 and n = 14). Afterwards we analyzed correlation of the obtained autoantibody titers with clinical parameters for each patient. Our results prove that using novel antigens clinically relevant autoantibodies can be detected with high repeatability, sensitivity and specificity. Unlike previously used antigens the obtained autoantibody titers strongly correlate with high disease activity and in particular, with arthritis, renal involvement, anti-Smith antibodies and high lymphocyte count. Importantly, chemical composition of antigens has a strong influence on the correlation of detected autoantibodies with disease activity and manifestations. This confirms the crucial importance of antigens’ composition on research and diagnostic assays, and opens up exciting perspectives for synthetic antigens in future studies of autoimmunity. PMID:27257889

  1. Phospholipid Synthesis in Sindbis Virus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Marilynn R. F.; Pfefferkorn, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    We investigated the metabolic requirements for the decrease in phospholipid synthesis previously observed by Pfefferkorn and Hunter in primary cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts infected with Sindbis virus. The incorporation of 32PO4 into all classes of phospholipids was found to decline at the same rate and to the same extent; thus, incorporation of 14C-choline into acid-precipitable form provided a convenient measure of phospholipid synthesis that was used in subsequent experiments. Experiments with temperature-sensitive mutants suggested that some viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was essential for the inhibition of choline incorporation, but that functional viral structural proteins were not required. The reduction in phospholipid synthesis was probably a secondary effect of infection resulting from viral inhibition of the cellular RNA and protein synthesis. All three inhibitory effects required about the same amount of viral RNA synthesis; the inhibition of host RNA and protein synthesis began sooner than the decline in phospholipid synthesis; and both actinomycin D and cycloheximide inhibited 14C-choline incorporation in uninfected cells. In contrast, incorporation of 14C-choline into BHK-21 cells was not decreased by 10 hr of exposure to actinomycin D and declined only slowly after cycloheximide treatment. Growth of Sindbis virus in BHK cells did not cause the marked stimulation of phospholipid synthesis seen in picornavirus infections of other mammalian cells; however, inhibition was seen only late in infection. PMID:5530011

  2. Biomimetic surface modification of polyurethane with phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dongsheng; Liu, Liuxu; Li, Zhen; Fu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    To improve blood compatibility of polyurethane (PU), phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared through zwitterion-mediated cycloaddition reaction and amide condensation, and then were added to the PU as fillers via solution mixing to form biomimetic surface. The properties of phospholipids grafted CNTs (CNT-PC) were investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR). The results indicated that the phospholipids were grafted onto CNTs in high efficiency, and the hydrophilicity and dispersibility of the modified CNTs were improved effectively. The structures and properties of composites containing CNT-PC were investigated by optical microscope, XPS, and water contact angles. The results indicated that phospholipids were enriched on the surface with addition of 0.1 wt % of CNT-PC, which significantly reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The method of carrying phospholipids on the nanofiller to modify polymers has provided a promising way of constructing biomimetic phospholipid membrane on the surface to improve blood compatibility.

  3. Altered turnover and synthesis rates of lung surfactant following thoracic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, P.G.; Ahier, R.G.; Anderson, R.L.

    1987-02-01

    Between 2-6 weeks after thoracic irradiation with 10 Gy X rays, when levels of surfactant in the alveoli show the greatest increase, there is a reduction in the rate of radioactivity loss from /sup 3/H-choline labeled disaturated phosphatidylcholine from the lung. This indicates a reduced turnover of surfactant. Discrepancies between the halving times for specific activity and for total radioactivity of the disaturated phospholipids suggest that at between 2 and 3 weeks post-irradiation, removal and degradation of surfactant almost ceases, but that synthesis continues normally. However, by 3 weeks post-irradiation, choline-/sup 3/H incorporation into disaturated phosphatidylcholine suggests that surfactant synthesis is increased about two-fold. The reduced number of macrophages recovered from alveolar lavage between about 2 and 6 weeks post-irradiation may indicate a reason for the lengthened turnover times of surfactant over this period. Nevertheless, the stimulated surfactant production that takes place from about 3 weeks onward suggests an additional active response to radiation or to radiation damage by the type II pneumonocytes. These studies confirm that the maximum levels of alveolar surfactant seen at 3 weeks post-irradiation result from a different lung response than that responsible for the increase in surfactant, which occurs within hours of irradiation.

  4. Employee Development and Turnover Intention: Theory Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Wali; Nas, Zekeriya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the pattern of behavior of turnover intentions in developing countries "vis-a-vis" the one in advanced countries through the empirical data from public universities in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The study provides empirical evidence from academia in Pakistan, thereby enriching the understanding of…

  5. Antecedents of Norwegian Beginning Teachers' Turnover Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiplic, Dijana; Brandmo, Christian; Elstad, Eyvind

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at exploring several individual, organizational, and contextual factors that may affect beginning teachers' turnover intentions during their first years of practice. The sample consists of 227 beginning teachers (69% female and 31% male) from 133 schools in Norway. The results show four important antecedents of beginning teachers'…

  6. Teacher Turnover in Charter Schools. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuit, David; Smith, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to contribute to a deeper understanding of the organizational conditions of charter schools by examining teacher turnover. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) 2003-04 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) and the Teacher Follow-Up Survey (TFS), researchers from the National Center on School…

  7. Turnover of Public School Superintendents in Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Joyce Ntsoaki

    2013-01-01

    This study used a descriptive qualitative design utilizing a phenomenological approach to determine and examine the reasons behind the voluntary or involuntary turnover of Arizona school superintendents. Open-ended questions were used to interview five superintendents who had left their districts between 2008 and 2013 about their perceptions on…

  8. Home Visitor Job Satisfaction and Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchbinder, Sharon B.; Duggan, Anne K.; Young, Elizabeth; Fuddy, Loretta; Sia, Cal

    This paper summarizes findings of a 3-year study of the job satisfaction and turnover of home visitors, both professional and paraprofessional, in programs which link families-at-risk for impaired functioning to medical home care and other resources. Specifically, the study examined: (1) home visitor personal characteristics that influence…

  9. Identifying Determinants of Commitment and Turnover Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Thomas L.

    A study tested the precursors to vocational teachers' commitment to teaching as suggested by the commitment model proposed by Pierce and Dunham. Important consequences of commitment were examined by identifying relationships between commitment, behavioral intentions, and resulting turnover. The study examined the entire population of teachers…

  10. Job Turnover Intentions Among Pharmacy Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Mark H.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To determine the primary reasons why pharmacy faculty intend to remain or leave their current institution and why they left their most recent academic institution, and the relative contribution of various organizational and individual characteristics toward explaining variance in turnover intentions. Methods A survey instrument was e-mailed to pharmacy faculty members asking respondents to indicate up to 5 reasons for their intentions and up to 5 reasons why they left a previous institution. The survey also elicited perceptions on quality of work life in addition to demographic and institutional data, upon which turnover intentions were regressed using a forward-conditional procedure. Organizational commitment as a moderator of turnover intentions was regressed over the remaining variables not acting directly on employer intentions. Results Just over 1 in 5 respondents indicated intentions to leave their current academic institution. Excessive workload, seeking a new challenge, poor salary, and poor relationships with college or school administrators were frequently cited as reasons for leaving. Turnover intentions are influenced directly by department chair support and organizational commitment, which moderates various support and satisfaction variables. Conclusions Pharmacy faculty members’ decision to remain or leave an institution is dependent upon developing a sense of commitment toward the institution. Commitment is facilitated by support from the institution and department chair, in addition to a sense of satisfaction with the teaching environment. PMID:17786250

  11. Director Turnover: An Australian Academic Development Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

    2012-01-01

    Although it can be argued that directors of central academic development units (ADUs) are critical to the implementation of university teaching and learning strategies, it would appear there is a high director turnover rate. While research in the USA, the UK, and Australia illustrates that ADUs are frequently closed or restructured, that research…

  12. Uncoupling binding of substrate CO from turnover by vanadium nitrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chung; Fay, Aaron W.; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Krest, Courtney M.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W.

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalysis by nitrogenase, particularly the reduction of N2 and CO by this enzyme, has tremendous significance in environment- and energy-related areas. Elucidation of the detailed mechanism of nitrogenase has been hampered by the inability to trap substrates or intermediates in a well-defined state. Here, we report the capture of substrate CO on the resting-state vanadium-nitrogenase in a catalytically competent conformation. The close resemblance of this active CO-bound conformation to the recently described structure of CO-inhibited molybdenum-nitrogenase points to the mechanistic relevance of sulfur displacement to the activation of iron sites in the cofactor for CO binding. Moreover, the ability of vanadium-nitrogenase to bind substrate in the resting-state uncouples substrate binding from subsequent turnover, providing a platform for generation of defined intermediate(s) of both CO and N2 reduction. PMID:26515097

  13. New insights into water-phospholipid model membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Milhaud, Jeannine

    2004-05-27

    Modulating the relative humidity (RH) of the ambient gas phase of a phospholipid/water sample for modifying the activity of phospholipid-sorbed water [humidity-controlled osmotic stress methods, J. Chem. Phys. 92 (1990) 4519 and J. Phys. Chem. 96 (1992) 446] has opened a new field of research of paramount importance. New types of phase transitions, occurring at specific values of this activity, have been then disclosed. Hence, it is become recognized that this activity, like the temperature T, is an intensive parameter of the thermodynamical state of these samples. This state can be therefore changed (phase transition) either, by modulating T at a given water activity (a given hydration level), or, by modulating the water activity, at a given T. The underlying mechanisms of these two types of transition differ, especially when they appear as disorderings of fatty chains. In lyotropic transitions, this disordering follows from two thermodynamical laws. First, acting on the activity (the chemical potential) of water external to a phospholipid/water sample, a transbilayer gradient of water chemical potential is created, leading to a transbilayer flux of water (Fick's law). Second, water molecules present within the hydrocarbon region of this phospholipid bilayer interact with phospholipid molecules through their chemical potential (Gibbs-Duhem relation): the conformational state of fatty chains (the thermodynamical state of the phospholipid molecules) changes. This process is slow, as revealed by osmotic stress time-resolved experiments. In thermal chain-melting transitions, the first rapid step is the disordering of fatty chains of a fraction of phospholipid molecules. It occurs a few degrees before the main transition temperature, T(m), during the pretransition and the sub-main transition. The second step, less rapid, is the redistribution of water molecules between the different parts of the sample, as revealed by T-jump time-resolved experiments. Finally, in

  14. Relating microbial community structure to functioning in forest soil organic carbon transformation and turnover

    PubMed Central

    You, Yeming; Wang, Juan; Huang, Xueman; Tang, Zuoxin; Liu, Shirong; Sun, Osbert J

    2014-01-01

    Forest soils store vast amounts of terrestrial carbon, but we are still limited in mechanistic understanding on how soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization or turnover is controlled by biotic and abiotic factors in forest ecosystems. We used phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) as biomarker to study soil microbial community structure and measured activities of five extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation of cellulose (i.e., β-1,4-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase), chitin (i.e., β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase), and lignin (i.e., phenol oxidase and peroxidase) as indicators of soil microbial functioning in carbon transformation or turnover across varying biotic and abiotic conditions in a typical temperate forest ecosystem in central China. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was performed to determine the interrelationship between individual PFLAs and biotic and abiotic site factors as well as the linkage between soil microbial structure and function. Path analysis was further conducted to examine the controls of site factors on soil microbial community structure and the regulatory pathway of changes in SOC relating to microbial community structure and function. We found that soil microbial community structure is strongly influenced by water, temperature, SOC, fine root mass, clay content, and C/N ratio in soils and that the relative abundance of Gram-negative bacteria, saprophytic fungi, and actinomycetes explained most of the variations in the specific activities of soil enzymes involved in SOC transformation or turnover. The abundance of soil bacterial communities is strongly linked with the extracellular enzymes involved in carbon transformation, whereas the abundance of saprophytic fungi is associated with activities of extracellular enzymes driving carbon oxidation. Findings in this study demonstrate the complex interactions and linkage among plant traits, microenvironment, and soil physiochemical properties in affecting SOC via microbial regulations. PMID

  15. The Charge Properties of Phospholipid Nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Her, Cheng; Filoti, Dana I; McLean, Mark A; Sligar, Stephen G; Alexander Ross, J B; Steele, Harmen; Laue, Thomas M

    2016-09-01

    Phospholipids (PLs) are a major, diverse constituent of cell membranes. PL diversity arises from the nature of the fatty acid chains, as well as the headgroup structure. The headgroup charge is thought to contribute to both the strength and specificity of protein-membrane interactions. Because it has been difficult to measure membrane charge, ascertaining the role charge plays in these interactions has been challenging. Presented here are charge measurements on lipid Nanodiscs at 20°C in 100 mM NaCl, 50 mM Tris, at pH 7.4. Values are also reported for measurements made in the presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and temperature, and in solvents containing other types of cations and anions. Measurements were made for neutral (phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine) and anionic (phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, cardiolipin, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2)) PLs containing palmitoyl-oleoyl and dimyristoyl fatty acid chains. In addition, charge measurements were made on Nanodiscs containing an Escherichia coli lipid extract. The data collected reveal that 1) POPE is anionic and not neutral at pH 7.4; 2) high-anionic-content Nanodiscs exhibit polyelectrolyte behavior; 3) 3 mM Ca(2+) neutralizes a constant fraction of the charge, but not a constant amount of charge, for POPS and POPC Nanodiscs; 4) in contrast to some previous work, POPC only interacts weakly with Ca(2+); 5) divalent cations interact with lipids in a lipid- and ion-specific manner for POPA and PIP2 lipids; and 6) the monovalent anion type has little influence on the lipid charge. These results should help eliminate inconsistencies among data obtained using different techniques, membrane systems, and experimental conditions, and they provide foundational data for developing an accurate view of membranes and membrane-protein interactions. PMID:27602726

  16. Investing in Leadership: The District's Role in Managing Principal Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascall, Blair; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of research into the impact of principal turnover on schools, and the ability of schools to mitigate the negative effects of frequent turnover by distributing leadership in the schools. The findings from this qualitative and quantitative analysis show that rapid principal turnover does indeed have a negative…

  17. Salary and Ranking and Teacher Turnover: A Statewide Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Cynthia Martinez; Slate, John R.; Delgado, Carmen Tejeda

    2009-01-01

    This study examined three years of data obtained from the Academic Excellence Indicator System of the State of Texas regarding teacher turnover rate and teacher salary. Across all public school districts, teacher salary was consistently negatively related to teacher turnover; that is, where salary was lower, turnover rate was higher When data were…

  18. High School Band Students' Perspectives of Teacher Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloss, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Teacher turnover remains an important issue in education. The least researched perspectives, though, are those of the students who experience teacher turnover. The purpose of this study was to examine how high school band students experience teacher turnover. A total of twelve students were interviewed, representing three schools that experienced…

  19. Superintendent Turnover in Kentucky. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 113

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jerry; Huffman, Tyler; Madden, Karen; Shope, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines superintendent turnover in Kentucky public school districts for 1998/99-2007/08, looking at how turnover varies by rural status, Appalachian and non-Appalachian region, and 2007/08 school district characteristics. Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08;…

  20. A Ministudy of employee turnover in US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard C; Matthews, Eric P; Collins, Kevin S

    2015-01-01

    A ministudy was conducted to collect self-reported employee turnover rates in US hospitals. The results indicate many hospitals are struggling with high employee turnover rates. Widespread variances in ratings were observed across hospitals, which may be due to lack of consistency in how they each calculate their employee turnover. This makes benchmarking for the purposes of performance improvement challenging. PMID:25627851

  1. Rhizosphere bacterial carbon turnover is higher in nucleic acids than membrane lipids: implications for understanding soil carbon cycling

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ashish A.; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert I.; Thomson, Bruce C.; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labeling experiment we compared the flow of plant carbon into macromolecular fractions of rhizosphere soil microorganisms. Time dependent 13C dilution patterns in microbial cellular fractions were used to calculate their turnover time. The turnover times of microbial biomolecules were found to vary: microbial RNA (19 h) and DNA (30 h) turned over fastest followed by chloroform fumigation extraction-derived soluble cell lysis products (14 days), while phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) had the slowest turnover (42 days). PLFA/NLFA 13C analyses suggest that both mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi are dominant in initial plant carbon uptake. In contrast, high initial 13C enrichment in RNA hints at bacterial importance in initial C uptake due to the dominance of bacterial derived RNA in total extracts of soil RNA. To explain this discrepancy, we observed low renewal rate of bacterial lipids, which may therefore bias lipid fatty acid based interpretations of the role of bacteria in soil microbial food webs. Based on our findings, we question current assumptions regarding plant-microbe carbon flux and suggest that the rhizosphere bacterial contribution to plant assimilate uptake could be higher. This highlights the need for more detailed quantitative investigations with nucleic acid biomarkers to further validate these findings. PMID:25914679

  2. Binding of chara Myosin globular tail domain to phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Nunokawa, Shun-Ya; Anan, Hiromi; Shimada, Kiyo; Hachikubo, You; Kashiyama, Taku; Ito, Kohji; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2007-11-01

    Binding of Chara myosin globular tail domain to phospholipid vesicles was investigated quantitatively. It was found that the globular tail domain binds to vesicles made from acidic phospholipids but not to those made from neutral phospholipids. This binding was weakened at high KCl concentration, suggesting that the binding is electrostatic by nature. The dissociation constant for the binding of the globular tail domain to 20% phosphatidylserine vesicles (similar to endoplasmic reticulum in acidic phospholipid contents) at 150 mM KCl was 273 nM. The free energy change due to this binding calculated from the dissociation constant was -37.3 kJ mol(-1). Thus the bond between the globular tail domain and membrane phospholipids would not be broken when the motor domain of Chara myosin moves along the actin filament using the energy of ATP hydrolysis (DeltaG degrees ' = -30.5 kJ mol(-1)). Our results suggested that direct binding of Chara myosin to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane through the globular tail domain could work satisfactorily in Chara cytoplasmic streaming. We also suggest a possible regulatory mechanism of cytoplasmic streaming including phosphorylation-dependent dissociation of the globular tail domain from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

  3. Morphological and Physical Analysis of Natural Phospholipids-Based Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Jacquot, Adrien; Francius, Grégory; Razafitianamaharavo, Angelina; Dehghani, Fariba; Tamayol, Ali; Linder, Michel; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira

    2014-01-01

    Background Liposomes are currently an important part of biological, pharmaceutical, medical and nutritional research, as they are considered to be among the most effective carriers for the introduction of various types of bioactive agents into target cells. Scope of Review In this work, we study the lipid organization and mechanical properties of biomembranes made of marine and plant phospholipids. Membranes based on phospholipids extracted from rapeseed and salmon are studied in the form of liposome and as supported lipid bilayer. Dioleylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) are used as references to determine the lipid organization of marine and plant phospholipid based membranes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy measurements are performed to investigate the membranes' topography at the micrometer scale and to determine their mechanical properties. Major Conclusions The mechanical properties of the membranes are correlated to the fatty acid composition, the morphology, the electrophoretic mobility and the membrane fluidity. Thus, soft and homogeneous mechanical properties are evidenced for salmon phospholipids membrane containing various polyunsaturated fatty acids. Besides, phase segregation in rapeseed membrane and more important mechanical properties were emphasized for this type of membranes by contrast to the marine phospholipids based membranes. General Significance This paper provides new information on the nanomechanical and morphological properties of membrane in form of liposome by AFM. The originality of this work is to characterize the physico-chemical properties of the nanoliposome from the natural sources containing various fatty acids and polar head. PMID:25238543

  4. Identification of a Plasmodium falciparum Phospholipid Transfer Protein*

    PubMed Central

    van Ooij, Christiaan; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Ringel, Alessa; Cockcroft, Shamshad; Haldar, Kasturi; Blackman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of erythrocytes by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum results in dramatic modifications to the host cell, including changes to its antigenic and transport properties and the de novo formation of membranous compartments within the erythrocyte cytosol. These parasite-induced structures are implicated in the transport of nutrients, metabolic products, and parasite proteins, as well as in parasite virulence. However, very few of the parasite effector proteins that underlie remodeling of the host erythrocyte are functionally characterized. Using bioinformatic examination and modeling, we have found that the exported P. falciparum protein PFA0210c belongs to the START domain family, members of which mediate transfer of phospholipids, ceramide, or fatty acids between membranes. In vitro phospholipid transfer assays using recombinant PFA0210 confirmed that it can transfer phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin between phospholipid vesicles. Furthermore, assays using HL60 cells containing radiolabeled phospholipids indicated that orthologs of PFA0210c can also transfer phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Biochemical and immunochemical analysis showed that PFA0210c associates with membranes in infected erythrocytes at mature stages of intracellular parasite growth. Localization studies in live parasites revealed that the protein is present in the parasitophorous vacuole during growth and is later recruited to organelles in the parasite. Together these data suggest that PFA0210c plays a role in the formation of the membranous structures and nutrient phospholipid transfer in the malaria-parasitized erythrocyte. PMID:24043620

  5. Decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Ariyama, Hiroyuki; Kono, Nozomu; Matsuda, Shinji; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-16

    Various kinds of fatty acids are distributed in membrane phospholipids in mammalian cells and tissues. The degree of fatty acid unsaturation in membrane phospholipids affects many membrane-associated functions and can be influenced by diet and by altered activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes such as fatty acid desaturases. However, little is known about how mammalian cells respond to changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition. In this study we showed that stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) knockdown increased the amount of saturated fatty acids and decreased that of monounsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids without affecting the amount or the composition of free fatty acid and induced unfolded protein response (UPR), evidenced by increased expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) mRNAs and splicing of Xbox-binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA. SCD1 knockdown-induced UPR was rescued by various unsaturated fatty acids and was enhanced by saturated fatty acid. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3), which incorporates preferentially polyunsaturated fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine, was up-regulated in SCD1 knockdown cells. Knockdown of LPCAT3 synergistically enhanced UPR with SCD1 knockdown. Finally we showed that palmitic acid-induced UPR was significantly enhanced by LPCAT3 knockdown as well as SCD1 knockdown. These results suggest that a decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces UPR.

  6. Electric field effect on cholesterol–phospholipid complexes

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Arun; McConnell, Harden M.

    2000-01-01

    Monolayer mixtures of dihydrocholesterol and phospholipids at the air–water interface are used to model membranes containing cholesterol and phospholipids. Specific, stoichiometric interactions between cholesterol and some but not all phospholipids have been proposed to lead to the formation of condensed complexes. It is reported here that an externally applied electric field of the appropriate sign can destabilize these complexes, resulting in their dissociation. This is demonstrated through the application of an electric field gradient that leads to phase separations in otherwise homogeneous monolayers. This is observed only when the monolayer composition is close to the stoichiometry of the complex. The electric field effect is analyzed with the same mean field thermodynamic model as that used previously to account for pairs of upper miscibility critical points in these mixtures. The concentrations of dihydrocholesterol, phospholipid, and complex vary strongly and sometimes discontinuously in the monolayer membrane in the field gradient. The model is an approximation to a two-dimensional liquid in which molecules freely exchange between free and complexed form so that the chemical potentials are constant throughout the membrane. The calculations are illustrated for a complex of about 15 molecules, composed of 5 cholesterol molecules and 10 phospholipid molecules. PMID:10655486

  7. Role of Cholesterol and Phospholipids in Amylin Misfolding, Aggregation and Etiology of Islet Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanghamitra; Trikha, Saurabh; Bhowmick, Diti Chatterjee; Sarkar, Anjali A.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a biological event in which proteins undergo structural transitions from soluble monomers and oligomers to insoluble fibrillar aggregates that are often toxic to cells. Exactly how amyloid proteins, such as the pancreatic hormone amylin, aggregate and kill cells is still unclear. Islet amyloid polypeptide, or amylin, is a recently discovered hormone that is stored and co-released with insulin from pancreatic islet β-cells. The pathology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by an excessive extracellular and intracellular accumulation of toxic amylin species, soluble oligomers and insoluble fibrils, in islets, eventually leading to β-cell loss. Obesity and elevated serum cholesterol levels are additional risk factors implicated in the development of T2DM. Because the homeostatic balance between cholesterol synthesis and uptake is lost in diabetics, and amylin aggregation is a hallmark of T2DM, this chapter focuses on the biophysical and cell biology studies exploring molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol and phospholipids modulate secondary structure, folding and aggregation of human amylin and other amyloid proteins on membranes and in cells. Amylin turnover and toxicity in pancreatic cells and the regulatory role of cholesterol in these processes are also discussed. PMID:26149927

  8. Organisation turnover among registered nurses: an exploratory model.

    PubMed

    Bloom, J R; Alexander, J A; Flatt, S

    1988-11-01

    In light of current concerns over nursing shortages and productivity, turnover among hospital nurses has assumed renewed importance as a managerial issue. This study examines the thesis that organisation of hospital work is a determinant of voluntary turnover among registered nurses. This perspective differs from previous work in this area in that both turnover and its determinants are conceptualised at the organisational rather than individual level, thus opening the way for administrative intervention to reduce turnover. The conceptual model is tested using multiple regression techniques on a sample of 310 community hospitals. Results suggest the importance of administrative work structures and the professionalisation of the workforce as contributors to higher turnover.

  9. Replicator dynamics with turnover of players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Jeppe; Kianercy, Ardeshir; Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Pigolotti, Simone

    2013-08-01

    We study adaptive dynamics in games where players abandon the population at a given rate and are replaced by naive players characterized by a prior distribution over the admitted strategies. We demonstrate how such a process leads macroscopically to a variant of the replicator equation, with an additional term accounting for player turnover. We study how Nash equilibria and the dynamics of the system are modified by this additional term for prototypical examples such as the rock-paper-scissors game and different classes of two-action games played between two distinct populations. We conclude by showing how player turnover can account for nontrivial departures from Nash equilibria observed in data from lowest unique bid auctions.

  10. Occupational turnover intentions among substance abuse counselors.

    PubMed

    Rothrauff, Tanja C; Abraham, Amanda J; Bride, Brian E; Roman, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    This study examined predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of occupational turnover intention (OcTI) among substance abuse counselors. Data were obtained via questionnaires from 929 counselors working in 225 private substance abuse treatment (SAT) programs across the United States. Hierarchical multiple regression models were conducted to assess predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of OcTI. OcTI scores were relatively low on a 7-point scale, indicating that very few counselors definitely intended to leave the SAT field. Age, certification, positive perceptions of procedural and distributive justice, and hospital-based status negatively predicted OcTI. Counselors' substance use disorder-impacted history moderated the association between organizational commitment and OcTI. Organizational turnover intention partially mediated the link between organizational commitment and OcTI. Workforce stability might be achieved by promoting perceptions of advantages to working in a particular treatment program, having organizational commitment, showing appreciation for counselors' work, and valuing employees from diverse backgrounds.

  11. Facts about Women's Absenteeism and Labor Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    The average worktime lost in 1967 because of illness or injury for persons 17 years of age or older was 5.6 days for women and 5.3 days for men. Women lost more time because of acute illness, but men were more likely to be absent because of chronic conditions such as heart trouble. Labor turnover rates show that absentee rates of women have been…

  12. Turnover of soil monosaccharides: Recycling versus Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, Anna; Dyckmans, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents a mixture of differently degradable compounds. Each of these compounds are characterised by different dynamics due to different chemical recalcitrance, transformation or stabilisation processes in soil. Carbohydrates represent one of these compounds and contribute up to 25 % to the soil organic matter. Vascular plants are the main source of pentose sugars (Arabinose and Xylose), whereas hexoses (Galactose and Mannose) are primarily produced by microorganisms. Several studies suggest that the mean turnover times of the carbon in soil sugars are similar to the turnover dynamics of the bulk carbon in soil. The aim of the study is to characterise the influence of stabilisation and turnover of soil carbohydrates. Soil samples are collected from (i) a continuous maize cropping experiment ('Höhere Landbauschule' Rotthalmünster, Bavaria) established 1979 on a Stagnic Luvisol and (ii) from a continuous wheat cropping, established 1969, as reference site. The effect of stabilisation is estimated by the comparison of turnover times of microbial and plant derived soil carbohydrates. As the dynamics of plant derived carbohydrate are solely influenced by stabilisation processes, whereas the dynamics of microbial derived carbohydrates are affected by recycling of organic carbon compounds derived by C3 plant substrate as well as stabilisation processes. The compound specific isotopic analysis (CSIA) of soil carbohydrates was performed using a HPLC/o/IRMS system. The chromatographic and mass spectrometric subunits were coupled with a LC-Isolink interface. Soil sugars were extracted after mild hydrolysis using 4 M trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Chromatographic separation of the sugars was achieved using a low strength 0.25 mM NaOH solution as mobile phase at a ?ow rate of 250 μL min-1 at 10 ° C.

  13. CD36 Protein Influences Myocardial Ca2+ Homeostasis and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pietka, Terri A.; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Kuda, Ondrej; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Dequan; Yamada, Kathryn A.; Yang, Kui; Su, Xiong; Gross, Richard W.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.; Efimov, Igor R.; Abumrad, Nada A.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcolemmal CD36 facilitates myocardial fatty acid (FA) uptake, which is markedly reduced in CD36-deficient rodents and humans. CD36 also mediates signal transduction events involving a number of cellular pathways. In taste cells and macrophages, CD36 signaling was recently shown to regulate store-responsive Ca2+ flux and activation of Ca2+-dependent phospholipases A2 that cycle polyunsaturated FA into phospholipids. It is unknown whether CD36 deficiency influences myocardial Ca2+ handling and phospholipid metabolism, which could compromise the heart, typically during stresses. Myocardial function was examined in fed or fasted (18–22 h) CD36−/− and WT mice. Echocardiography and telemetry identified conduction anomalies that were associated with the incidence of sudden death in fasted CD36−/− mice. No anomalies or death occurred in WT mice during fasting. Optical imaging of perfused hearts from fasted CD36−/− mice documented prolongation of Ca2+ transients. Consistent with this, knockdown of CD36 in cardiomyocytes delayed clearance of cytosolic Ca2+. Hearts of CD36−/− mice (fed or fasted) had 3-fold higher SERCA2a and 40% lower phospholamban levels. Phospholamban phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA) was enhanced after fasting reflecting increased PKA activity and cAMP levels in CD36−/− hearts. Abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in the CD36−/− myocardium associated with increased lysophospholipid content and a higher proportion of 22:6 FA in phospholipids suggests altered phospholipase A2 activity and changes in membrane dynamics. The data support the role of CD36 in coordinating Ca2+ homeostasis and lipid metabolism and the importance of this role during myocardial adaptation to fasting. Potential relevance of the findings to CD36-deficient humans would need to be determined. PMID:23019328

  14. Generational differences in registered nurse turnover.

    PubMed

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Wang, Chen-Yen; Mathews, Barbara; Boland, Mary

    2009-08-01

    The chronic nature of the nursing workforce shortage in the United States is a continuing concern. As the nationwide gap between supply and demand grows, it remains unknown what impact turnover will have on nursing, access to care, and efforts to improve quality and safety of health care. It also remains unclear whether the recent turnover trends among new graduate registered nurses differ from past generational cohorts of new nurses. The aims of this study were to identify the reasons why registered nurses turnover by generational cohort (Veterans, Baby Boomers, and GenXMs) and to compare the length of time nurses were employed in their first five nursing positions by generational cohort. The findings suggest the three generational cohorts displayed similar reasons for leaving nursing positions with relocation, career advancement, and personal/family reasons reported most frequently. Except for the first nursing position, significant generational effects were found in the length of time Veterans, Baby Boomer, and GenXMs stayed employed in their nursing positions. It remains unknown why the GenXMs displayed a significantly shorter length of employment time in their second, third, fourth, and fifth nursing positions. The decline in length of employment time displayed in both the Baby Boomers and GenXMs may be an issue of concern requiring future research. PMID:20026454

  15. Quantitative analysis of protein turnover in plants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Clark J; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are constantly being synthesised and degraded as plant cells age and as plants grow, develop and adapt the proteome. Given that plants develop through a series of events from germination to fruiting and even undertake whole organ senescence, an understanding of protein turnover as a fundamental part of this process in plants is essential. Both synthesis and degradation processes are spatially separated in a cell across its compartmented structure. The majority of protein synthesis occurs in the cytosol, while synthesis of specific components occurs inside plastids and mitochondria. Degradation of proteins occurs in both the cytosol, through the action of the plant proteasome, and in organelles and lytic structures through different protease classes. Tracking the specific synthesis and degradation rate of individual proteins can be undertaken using stable isotope feeding and the ability of peptide MS to track labelled peptide fractions over time. Mathematical modelling can be used to follow the isotope signature of newly synthesised protein as it accumulates and natural abundance proteins as they are lost through degradation. Different technical and biological constraints govern the potential for the use of (13)C, (15)N, (2)H and (18)O for these experiments in complete labelling and partial labelling strategies. Future development of quantitative protein turnover analysis will involve analysis of protein populations in complexes and subcellular compartments, assessing the effect of PTMs and integrating turnover studies into wider system biology study of plants.

  16. Bone turnover markers: use in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Kim; Eastell, Richard

    2012-07-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover (bone turnover markers, BTMs) can be used to study changes in bone remodelling in osteoporosis. Investigators and clinicians should be aware of the appropriate sample collection and storage conditions for optimum measurements of these markers. Improvements in the variability of BTM measurements have resulted from the development of assays for automated analysers, and from international consensus regarding their use. Appropriate reference intervals should be used for the optimum interpretation of results. BTMs can provide information that is useful for the management of patients with osteoporosis, for both the initial clinical assessment and for guiding and monitoring of treatment. BTMs are clinically useful to determine possible causes of secondary osteoporosis by identifying patients with high bone turnover and rapid bone loss. In the follow-up of treatment response, BTM levels respond rapidly to both anabolic and antiresorptive treatments. BTM changes can also be used for understanding the mechanism of action of drugs in development and identifying the correct dose; they are also potentially useful as surrogate biomarkers for fracture.

  17. Forest turnover rates follow global and regional patterns of productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, N.L.; van Mantgem, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a global database, we found that forest turnover rates (the average of tree mortality and recruitment rates) parallel broad-scale patterns of net primary productivity. First, forest turnover was higher in tropical than in temperate forests. Second, as recently demonstrated by others, Amazonian forest turnover was higher on fertile than infertile soils. Third, within temperate latitudes, turnover was highest in angiosperm forests, intermediate in mixed forests, and lowest in gymnosperm forests. Finally, within a single forest physiognomic type, turnover declined sharply with elevation (hence with temperature). These patterns of turnover in populations of trees are broadly similar to the patterns of turnover in populations of plant organs (leaves and roots) found in other studies. Our findings suggest a link between forest mass balance and the population dynamics of trees, and have implications for understanding and predicting the effects of environmental changes on forest structure and terrestrial carbon dynamics. ??2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  18. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J.; Duff, K.C.; Saxena, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  19. The role of lamellate phospholipid bilayers in lubrication of joints.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Zenon; Urbaniak, Wiesław; Gadomski, Adam; Yusuf, Kehinde Q; Afara, Isaac O; Oloyede, Adekunle

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of progressive loss of the surface active phospholipids on the characteristics, and hence tribological function of articular cartilage. In accordance to Hill's hypothesis, 3-7 lipid bilayers at pH 7.4 operate as the solid lubricant in the cartilage-cartilage interface during physiological function. These bilayers are known to be depleted during cartilage degeneration. This study models this loss of phospholipid bilayers, studying experimentally both wet and dry cartilage surfaces, measuring surface wettability, and friction coefficient under a constant stress of 1.2 MPa. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient increases gradually with loss of the phospholipid bilayers, and gains in value with decrease in wettability.

  20. [Tracheal phospholipid composition and respiratory distress syndrome of the newborn].

    PubMed

    Obladen, M

    1979-03-01

    Tracheal or pharyngeal aspirates were collected in 50 newborn infants with and without respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). After lipid extraction the phospholipids were analyzed with 2-dimensional thin layer chromatography. Surface-active are lecithin (PC), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylinositol (PI). Newborn infants with RDS always have a complete lack of PG, which makes up to 11% of phospholipid-phosphors in mature newborns. In all infants with and without RDS, a sharp increase of PC occurs in the lung effluent after birth. The recovery from RDS is characterized by marked changes of PI: this phospholipid rises up to twice its initial value if the infants survive. The PI-increase parallels the clinical improvement and reaches its maximum usually on the 5th day of life. At the time of the PI-peak, the infants' surfactant function is sufficient to maintain alveolar stability with spontaneous breathing. In infants dying from RDS the PI-increase was not observed.

  1. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  2. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-05-14

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity.

  3. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL JUSTICE AND TURNOVER INTENTION OF HOSPITAL NURSES IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Tourani, Sogand; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Omrani, Amir; Sokhanvar, Mobin; Kakemam, Edris; Najafi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in science and technology, human resources are of the major capital for organizations. Workforce retention is required to improve organizational efficiencies. Objective: Therefore, in this study, the relationship between organizational justice (as one of the most influential factors) and turnover intention was investigated. Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was done in the Comprehensive Jame Women’s Hospital of Tehran in 2015. The statistical sample consisted of 135 nursing staff members. The data were collected using a questionnaire of Beugre’s organizational justice and analyzed by the use of Spearman’s and Anova statistical tests. Results: Averages of organizational justice was obtained to be 68.85 ± 7.67 . Among different sorts of organizational justice, the highest average score of 75.24 ± 16.68 was achieved relevant to interactional justice. A significant relationship was observed between organizational justice (r = -0.36), interactional justice (r = -0.38), and procedural justice (r = -0.36) and turnover intention, but no relation was found between turnover intention and systemic and distributive justice. Furthermore, there was no relationship between demographic variables, organizational justice, and turnover intention. Conclusion: Considering the prominent role of organizational justice in the personnel’s intention to stay or leave and due to the high costs of recruiting and training new staff, managers should pay especial attention to justice and provide their employees’ satisfaction and stability in their organizations by creating a positive mindset in them. PMID:27482163

  4. NMR analyses of deuterated phospholipids isolated from Pichia angusta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massou, S.; Augé, S.; Tropis, M.; Lindley, N. D.; Milon, A.

    1998-02-01

    The phospholipid composition of methylotrophic yeasts grown on deuterated and hydrogenated media has been determined by proton and phosphorus NMR. By using a line narrowing solvent, we could obtain linewidth lower than 2 Hz, and all the resonances could be resolved. Phospholipids were identified on the basis of their chemical shift and by 31P - H correlations (HMQC - HOHAHA gradient enhanced experiments). We have thus analysed qualitatively and quantitatively lipids mixtures directly after chloroform-methanol extraction. The lipid composition is deeply modified after growth in deuterated medium were phosphatidyl Inositol (PI) becomes the major lipid, instead of a PC, PS, PI mixture in hydrogenated conditions. La composition en phospholipides de levures méthylotrophes ayant poussé sur des milieux de cultures hydrogénés et deutériés a été déterminée par RMN du proton et du phosphore31. L'utilisation d'un solvant d'affinement a permis d'obtenir des largeurs de raies inférieures à 2Hz et de résoudre toutes les classes de phospholipides. Ils sont ensuite identifiés par leur déplacement chimique et par des corrélations phosphore - proton spécifiques (expériences HMQC-HOHAHA gradients). Cette approche a permis une analyse qualitative et quantitative de mélanges de phospholipides directement après extraction au chloroforme-méthanol. La composition en phospholipides est profondément modifiée lors de la croissance en milieu perdeutérié où l'on observe un lipide majoritaire, le phosphatidyl Inositol (PI), au lieu d'un mélange PC, PS PI en milieu hydrogéné.

  5. Genetic Analysis of Digestive Physiology Using Fluorescent Phospholipid Reporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Steven A.; Pack, Michael; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Johnson, Iain D.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Dosch, Roland; Mullins, Mary C.; Hendrickson, H. Stewart; Hendrickson, Elizabeth K.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2001-05-01

    Zebrafish are a valuable model for mammalian lipid metabolism; larvae process lipids similarly through the intestine and hepatobiliary system and respond to drugs that block cholesterol synthesis in humans. After ingestion of fluorescently quenched phospholipids, endogenous lipase activity and rapid transport of cleavage products results in intense gall bladder fluorescence. Genetic screening identifies zebrafish mutants, such as fat free, that show normal digestive organ morphology but severely reduced phospholipid and cholesterol processing. Thus, fluorescent lipids provide a sensitive readout of lipid metabolism and are a powerful tool for identifying genes that mediate vertebrate digestive physiology.

  6. Saturated anionic phospholipids enhance transdermal transport by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Sen, Arindam; Zhao, Ya-Li; Hui, Sek Wen

    2002-10-01

    Anionic phospholipids, but not cationic or neutral phospholipids, were found to enhance the transdermal transport of molecules by electroporation. When added as liposomes to the milieus of water-soluble molecules to be delivered through the epidermis of porcine skin by electroporation, these phospholipids enhance, by one to two orders of magnitude, the transdermal flux. Encapsulation of molecules in liposomes is not necessary. Dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS), phosphatidylserine from bovine brain (brain-PS), dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), and dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) were used to test factors affecting the potency of anionic lipid transport enhancers. DMPS with saturated acyl chains was found to be a much more potent transport enhancer than those with unsaturated acyl chains (DOPS and DOPG). There was no headgroup preference. Saturated DMPS was also more effective in delaying resistance recovery after pulsing, and with a greater affinity in the epidermis after pulsing. Using fluorescent carboxyl fluorescein and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Dextrans as test water-soluble molecules for transport, and rhodamine-labeled phospholipids to track anionic phospholipids, we found, by conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy, that transport of water-soluble molecules was localized in local transport spots or regions (LTRs) created by the electroporation pulses. Anionic phospholipids, especially DMPS, were located at the center of the LTRs and spanned the entire thickness of the stratum corneum (SC). The degree of saturation of anionic phospholipids made no difference in the densities of LTRs created. We deduce that, after being driven into the epidermis by negative electric pulses, saturated anionic phospholipids mix and are retained better by the SC lipids. Anionic lipids prefer loose layers or vesicular rather than multilamellar forms, thereby prolonging the structural recovery of SC lipids to the native multilamellar form. In the

  7. Stability of Monodisperse Phospholipid-Coated Microbubbles Formed by Flow-Focusing at High Production Rates.

    PubMed

    Segers, Tim; de Rond, Leonie; de Jong, Nico; Borden, Mark; Versluis, Michel

    2016-04-26

    Monodisperse microbubble ultrasound contrast agents may dramatically increase the sensitivity and efficiency in ultrasound imaging and therapy. They can be produced directly in a microfluidic flow-focusing device, but questions remain as to the interfacial chemistry, such as the formation and development of the phospholipid monolayer coating over time. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of monodisperse bubbles with radii of 2-10 μm at production rates ranging from 10(4) to 10(6) bubbles/s. All bubbles were found to dissolve to a stable final radius 2.55 times smaller than their initial radius, independent of the nozzle size and shear rate, indicating that the monolayer self-assembles prior to leaving the nozzle. The corresponding decrease in surface area by a factor 6.6 reveals that lipid molecules are adsorbed to the gas-liquid interface in the disordered expanded state, and they become mechanically compressed by Laplace pressure-driven bubble dissolution to a more ordered condensed state with near zero surface tension. Acoustic characterization of the stabilized microbubbles revealed that their shell stiffness gradually increased from 0.8 to 2.5 N/m with increasing number of insonations through the selective loss of the more soluble lipopolymer molecules. This work therefore demonstrates high-throughput production of clinically relevant monodisperse contrast microbubbles with excellent control over phospholipid monolayer elasticity and microbubble resonance.

  8. Stability of Monodisperse Phospholipid-Coated Microbubbles Formed by Flow-Focusing at High Production Rates.

    PubMed

    Segers, Tim; de Rond, Leonie; de Jong, Nico; Borden, Mark; Versluis, Michel

    2016-04-26

    Monodisperse microbubble ultrasound contrast agents may dramatically increase the sensitivity and efficiency in ultrasound imaging and therapy. They can be produced directly in a microfluidic flow-focusing device, but questions remain as to the interfacial chemistry, such as the formation and development of the phospholipid monolayer coating over time. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of monodisperse bubbles with radii of 2-10 μm at production rates ranging from 10(4) to 10(6) bubbles/s. All bubbles were found to dissolve to a stable final radius 2.55 times smaller than their initial radius, independent of the nozzle size and shear rate, indicating that the monolayer self-assembles prior to leaving the nozzle. The corresponding decrease in surface area by a factor 6.6 reveals that lipid molecules are adsorbed to the gas-liquid interface in the disordered expanded state, and they become mechanically compressed by Laplace pressure-driven bubble dissolution to a more ordered condensed state with near zero surface tension. Acoustic characterization of the stabilized microbubbles revealed that their shell stiffness gradually increased from 0.8 to 2.5 N/m with increasing number of insonations through the selective loss of the more soluble lipopolymer molecules. This work therefore demonstrates high-throughput production of clinically relevant monodisperse contrast microbubbles with excellent control over phospholipid monolayer elasticity and microbubble resonance. PMID:27006083

  9. Fish Oil Supplementation in Humans: Effects on Platelet Responses, Phospholipid Composition and Metabolism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeaff, Clark Murray

    Platelets are believed to play a significant role in the development of occlusive vascular diseases. Epidemiological reports have correlated the high intake of marine foods, rich in omega3 fatty acids, with diminished platelet responses and a low incidence of arterial thrombosis and myocardial infarction. The activation of platelet responses is mediated by the accelerated metabolism of membrane phospholipid; therefore, it was of interest to examine, in human volunteers, the effect of a dietary fish oil concentrate (MaxEPA), enriched in omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, on platelet aggregation and phospholipid composition/metabolism. For the complete separation of cellular phospholipids, a one-dimensional thin-layer chromatography system using silica-gel pre-coated glass plates was developed. The solvent system consisted of CHCl_3/CH_3OH/CH _3COOH/H_2O (50/37.5/3.5/2.0, by vol), required approximately 90-120 minutes for full phospholipid separation, and was highly reproducible even under conditions of variable humidity and temperature. The consumption of a fish oil concentrate (MaxEPA) for 6 weeks (3.6 g of 20:5omega 3 and 2.4 g of 22:6omega3 per day) diminished both the collagen- and platelet activating factor-induced maximum aggregation responses in washed human platelet suspensions by 50.1% and 27.2%, respectively, as compared to initial unsupplemented baseline responses. Thrombin -induced aggregation remained unchanged. Thrombin stimulation of intact human platelets produced a significant decrease in the mass of phosphatidylinositol in plasma membrane. In platelets pre-labelled with (2-^3H) glycerol and stimulated with either thrombin or low-dose collagen, the loss of (^3H) phosphatidylinositol did not differ between those subjects consuming olive oil or fish oil. Likewise, the thrombin-stimulated accumulation of diacylglycerol, an activator of protein kinase C, was unaffected by fish oil consumption. The ratio of collagen -induced increase in radioactivity

  10. Nature of the charged headgroup determines the fusogenic potential and membrane properties of lithocholic acid phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Priyanshu; Singh, Manish; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-08-01

    Phospholipids play a crucial role in many cellular processes ranging from selective membrane permeability, to membrane fission and fusion, to cellular signaling. Headgroups of phospholipids determine the membrane properties and fusogenicity of these lipids with target cell membranes. We studied the fusogenic and membrane properties of phospholipids possessing unnatural charged headgroups with model membranes using laurdan based membrane hydration studies, DPH based membrane fluidity, and differential scanning calorimetry. We unravel that fusogenicity, membrane hydration, and fluidity of membranes are strongly contingent on the nature of the phospholipid charged headgroup. Our studies unraveled that introduction of bulky headgroups like dimethylamino pyridine induces maximum membrane hydration and perturbations with high fusogenicity as compared to small headgroup based phospholipids. These phospholipids also have the capability of high retention in DPPC membranes. Hydration and fluidity of these phospholipid-doped DPPC membranes are contingent on the nature of the charged headgroup. This study would help in future design of phospholipid based nanomaterials for effective drug delivery.

  11. Palladacycle-Catalyzed Carbonylative Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling with High Turnover Number and Turnover Frequency.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Prashant; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2015-08-01

    This work reports the carbonylative Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of aryl iodides catalyzed by palladacycles. More importantly, the palladacycles have been used to generate high turnover numbers (TON's) and turnover frequencies (TOF's). A range of aryl iodides can be coupled with arylboronic acids, generating TON's in the range of 10(6) to 10(7) and TOF's in the range of 10(5) to 10(6) h(-1). Comparison of the palladacycles with a conventional palladium source shows their superiority in generating high TON's and TOF's. PMID:26166246

  12. Dictyostelium uses ether-linked inositol phospholipids for intracellular signalling

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jonathan; Kay, Robert R; Kielkowska, Anna; Niewczas, Izabella; Fets, Louise; Oxley, David; Stephens, Len R; Hawkins, Phillip T

    2014-01-01

    Inositol phospholipids are critical regulators of membrane biology throughout eukaryotes. The general principle by which they perform these roles is conserved across species and involves binding of differentially phosphorylated inositol head groups to specific protein domains. This interaction serves to both recruit and regulate the activity of several different classes of protein which act on membrane surfaces. In mammalian cells, these phosphorylated inositol head groups are predominantly borne by a C38:4 diacylglycerol backbone. We show here that the inositol phospholipids of Dictyostelium are different, being highly enriched in an unusual C34:1e lipid backbone, 1-hexadecyl-2-(11Z-octadecenoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-myo-inositol), in which the sn-1 position contains an ether-linked C16:0 chain; they are thus plasmanylinositols. These plasmanylinositols respond acutely to stimulation of cells with chemoattractants, and their levels are regulated by PIPKs, PI3Ks and PTEN. In mammals and now in Dictyostelium, the hydrocarbon chains of inositol phospholipids are a highly selected subset of those available to other phospholipids, suggesting that different molecular selectors are at play in these organisms but serve a common, evolutionarily conserved purpose. PMID:25180230

  13. Phospholipid composition and phospholipase A activity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Senff, L M; Wegener, W S; Brooks, G F; Finnerty, W R; Makula, R A

    1976-01-01

    Exponential-phase cells of Neisseria gonorrhaeae 2686 were examined for phospholipid composition and for membrane-associated phospholipase A activity. When cells were harvested by centrifugation, washed, and lyophilized before extraction, approximately 74% of the total phospholipid was phosphatidylethanolamine, 18% was phosphatidylglycerol, 2% was cardiolipin, and 10% was lysophosphatidylethanolamine. However, when cells still suspended in growth medium were extracted, the amount of lysophosphatidylethanolamine decreased to approximately 1% of the phospholipid composition. This suggests that a gonococcal phospholipase A may be activated by conditions encountered during centrifugation and/or lyophilization of cells preceding extraction. Phospholipase A activity associated with cell membranes was assayed by measuring the conversion of tritiated phosphatidylethanolamine to lysophosphatidylethanolamine. Optimal activity was demonstrated in 10% methanol at pH 8.0 to 8.5, in the presence of calcium ions. The activity was both detergent sensitive and thermolabile. Comparisons of gonococcal colony types 1 and 4 showed no significant differences between the two types with respect to either phospholipid content or phospholipase A activity. Images PMID:821921

  14. Phospholipid composition and phospholipase A activity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Senff, L M; Wegener, W S; Brooks, G F; Finnerty, W R; Makula, R A

    1976-08-01

    Exponential-phase cells of Neisseria gonorrhaeae 2686 were examined for phospholipid composition and for membrane-associated phospholipase A activity. When cells were harvested by centrifugation, washed, and lyophilized before extraction, approximately 74% of the total phospholipid was phosphatidylethanolamine, 18% was phosphatidylglycerol, 2% was cardiolipin, and 10% was lysophosphatidylethanolamine. However, when cells still suspended in growth medium were extracted, the amount of lysophosphatidylethanolamine decreased to approximately 1% of the phospholipid composition. This suggests that a gonococcal phospholipase A may be activated by conditions encountered during centrifugation and/or lyophilization of cells preceding extraction. Phospholipase A activity associated with cell membranes was assayed by measuring the conversion of tritiated phosphatidylethanolamine to lysophosphatidylethanolamine. Optimal activity was demonstrated in 10% methanol at pH 8.0 to 8.5, in the presence of calcium ions. The activity was both detergent sensitive and thermolabile. Comparisons of gonococcal colony types 1 and 4 showed no significant differences between the two types with respect to either phospholipid content or phospholipase A activity.

  15. Structural intermediates during α-synuclein fibrillogenesis on phospholipid vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Comellas, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Zhou, Donghua H.; George, Julia M.

    2012-01-01

    α-Synuclein (AS) fibrils are the main protein component of Lewy Bodies, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease and other related disorders. AS forms helices that bind phospholipid membranes with high affinity, but no atomic level data for AS aggregation in the presence of lipids is yet available. Here, we present direct evidence of a conversion from α-helical conformation to β-sheet fibrils in the presence of anionic phospholipid vesicles and direct conversion to β-sheet fibrils in their absence. We have trapped intermediate states throughout the fibril formation pathways to examine the structural changes using solid-state NMR spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The comparison between mature AS fibrils formed in aqueous buffer and those derived in the presence of anionic phospholipids demonstrates no major changes in the overall fibril fold. However, a site-specific comparison of these fibrillar states demonstrates major perturbations in the N-terminal domain with a partial disruption of the long β-strand located in the 40’s and small perturbations in residues located in the “non-β amyloid component” (NAC) domain. Combining all these results, we propose a model for AS fibrillogenesis in the presence of phospholipid vesicles. PMID:22352310

  16. Characterization of associated proteins and phospholipids in natural rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Sansatsadeekul, Jitlada; Sakdapipanich, Jitladda; Rojruthai, Porntip

    2011-06-01

    Non-rubber components present in natural rubber (NR) latex, such as proteins and phospholipids, are presumed to be distributed in the serum fraction as well as surrounding the rubber particle surface. The phospholipid-protein layers covering the rubber particle surface are especially interesting due to their ability to enhance the colloidal stability of NR latex. In this study, we have characterized the components surrounding the NR particle surface and investigated their role in the colloidal stability of NR particles. Proteins from the cream fraction were proteolytically removed from the NR latex and compare to those from the serum fractions using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealing that both fractions contained similar proteins in certain molecular weights such as 14.5, 25 and 27 kDa. Phospholipids removed from latex by treatment with NaOH were analyzed using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and several major signals were assignable to -(CH(2))(n)-, -CH(2)OP, -CH(2)OC═O and -OCH(2)CH(2)NH-. These signals are important evidence that indicates phospholipids associate with the rubber chain. The colloidal behavior of rubber lattices before and after removal of protein-lipid membrane was evaluated by zeta potential analysis and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The lowest zeta potential value of NR particles was observed at pH 10, consequently leading to the highest stability of rubber particles. Additionally, SEM micrographs clearly displayed a gray ring near the particle surface corresponding to the protein-lipid membrane layer.

  17. PHOSPHOLIPIDS OF FIVE PSEUDOMONAD ARCHETYPES FOR DIFFERENT TOLUENE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) was used to determine phospholipid profiles for five reference pseudomonad strains harboring distinct toluene catabolic pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, Pseudomonas putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B...

  18. Synthetic phospholipids as specific substrates for plasma endothelial lipase.

    PubMed

    Papillon, Julien P N; Pan, Meihui; Brousseau, Margaret E; Gilchrist, Mark A; Lou, Changgang; Singh, Alok K; Stawicki, Todd; Thompson, James E

    2016-08-01

    We designed and prepared synthetic phospholipids that generate lyso-phosphatidylcholine products with a unique mass for convenient detection by LC-MS in complex biological matrices. We demonstrated that compound 4, formulated either as a Triton X-100 emulsion or incorporated in synthetic HDL particles can serve as a substrate for plasma EL with useful specificity. PMID:27344207

  19. Hexamodal imaging with porphyrin-phospholipid-coated upconversion nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rieffel, James; Chen, Feng; Kim, Jeesu; Chen, Guanying; Shao, Wei; Shao, Shuai; Chitgupi, Upendra; Hernandez, Reinier; Graves, Stephen A; Nickles, Robert J; Prasad, Paras N; Kim, Chulhong; Cai, Weibo; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2015-03-11

    Hexamodal imaging using simple nanoparticles is demonstrated. Porphyrin-phospholipids are used to coat upconversion nanoparticles in order to generate a new biocompatible material. The nanoparticles are characterized in vitro and in vivo for imaging via fluorescence, upconversion, positron emission tomography, computed tomography, Cerenkov luminescence, and photoacoustic tomography.

  20. Ganglioside/glycosphingolipid turnover: new concepts.

    PubMed

    Tettamanti, G

    2004-01-01

    In this review focus is given to the metabolic turnover of gangliosides/glycosphingolipids. The metabolism and accompanying intracellular trafficking of gangliosides/glycosphingolipids is illustrated with particular attention to the following events: (a) the de novo biosynthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, followed by vesicular sorting to the plasma membrane; (b) the enzyme-assisted chemical modifications occurring at the plasma membrane level; (c) the internalization via endocytosis and recycling to the plasma membrane; (d) the direct glycosylations taking place after sorting from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus; (e) the degradation at the late endosomal/lysosomal level with formation of fragments of sugar (glucose, galactose, hexosamine, sialic acid) and lipid (ceramide, sphingosine, fatty acid) nature; (f) the metabolic recycling of these fragments for biosynthetic purposes (salvage pathways); and (g) further degradation of fragments to waste products. Noteworthy, the correct course of ganglioside/glycosphingolipid metabolism requires the presence of the vimentin intracellular filament net work, likely to assist intracellular transport of sphingoid molecules. ut of the above events those that can be quantitatively evaluated with acceptable reliability are the processes of de novo biosynthesis, metabolic salvage and direct glycosylation. Depending on the cultured cells employed, the percentage of distribution of de novo biosynthesis, salvage pathways, and direct glycosylation, over total metabolism were reported to be: 35% (range: 10-90%) for de novo biosynthesis, 7% (range: 5-10%) for direct glycosylation, and 58% (range: 10-90%) for salvage pathways. The attempts made to calculate the half-life of overall ganglioside turnover provided data of unsure reliability, especially because in many studies salvage pathways were not taken into consideration. The values of half-life range from 2 to 6.5 h to 3 days depending on the cells used

  1. Chronic erythroid hyperplasia and accelerated bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, R S; Lutcher, C L

    Bone atrophy is generally thought to be the etiology of the decreased skeletal mass and fractures found in patients with ineffective hematopoiesis and associated erythroid hyperplasia. A bone biopsy from a patient with chronic erythroid hyperplasia and diffuse cortical osteopenia revealed a normal trabecular bone volume, excess osteoid, numerous osteoblasts, and increased osteoclastic resorptive surface. The increased fractional labeled surfaces and widely spaced double tetracycline labels indicated accelerated bone turnover, despite demonstrable iron deposits at the calcification front and cement lines and a low serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. The relationship between the expanded marrow space and trabecular bone suggests that local marrow factors may be responsible for the rapid bone remodeling.

  2. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A.; Maskrey, Benjamin H.; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B.; Harwood, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes. PMID:26968097

  3. Sponge mesoporous silica formation using disordered phospholipid bilayers as template.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, Anne; Sartori, Federica; Cangiotti, Michela; Mineva, Tzonka; Di Renzo, Francesco; Ottaviani, M Francesca

    2010-02-18

    Lecithin/dodecylamine/lactose mixtures in ethanol/aqueous media led to the formation of sponge mesoporous silica (SMS) materials by means of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as silica source. SMS materials show a "sponge-mesoporous" porosity with a pore diameter of about 5-6 nm, in accordance to the length of a lecithin bilayer. SMS synthesis was developed to create a new class of powerful biocatalysts able to efficiently encapsulate enzymes by adding a porosity control to the classical sol-gel synthesis and by using phospholipids and lactose as protecting agents for the enzymes. In the present study, the formation of SMS was investigated by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) probes inserted inside phospholipid bilayers. The influence of progressive addition of each component (ethanol, dodecylamine, lactose, TEOS) on phospholipid bilayers was first examined; then, the time evolution of EPR spectra during SMS synthesis was studied. Parameters informative of mobility, structure, order, and polarity around the probes were extracted by computer analysis of the EPR line shape. The results were discussed on the basis of solids characterization by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen isotherm, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results, together with the well-known ability of ethanol to promote membrane hemifusion, suggested that the templating structure is a bicontinuous phospholipid bilayer phase, shaped as a gyroid, resulting of multiple membrane hemifusions induced by the high alcohol content used in SMS synthesis. SMS synthesis was compared to hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) synthesis accomplished by adding TEOS to a dodecylamine/EtOH/water mixture. EPR evidenced the difference between HMS and SMS synthesis; the latter uses an already organized but slowly growing mesophase of phospholipids, never observed before, whereas the former shows a progressive elongation of micelles into wormlike structures. SMS-type materials represent a new

  4. The experience of work and turnover intentions: interactive effects of value attainment, job satisfaction, and positive mood.

    PubMed

    George, J M; Jones, G R

    1996-06-01

    The researchers proposed that the phenomenological experience of work is multifaceted and that simultaneously considering the combined effects of the different aspects of the work experience holds considerable promise for increasing understanding of turnover intentions and other organizationally relevant outcomes. Research in subjective well-being and other areas suggests that there are 3 important aspects of the experience of work: attainment of values, attitudes, and moods. It was hypothesized and found that the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover intentions is jointly moderated by value attainment and positive mood. The nature of this triple interaction was such that the job satisfaction-turnover intention relationship was strongest when workers' jobs did not help them to attain terminal values and positive moods were experienced, and the relationship was weakest when jobs helped workers to attain terminal values and positive moods were experienced. PMID:8690691

  5. Work–family climate, organizational commitment, and turnover: Multilevel contagion effects of leaders ⋆

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work–family climate (operationalized in terms of three work–family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using multilevel modeling, we found significant associations between work–family climate, and both organizational commitment and turnover intent, both within and between hotels. Findings underscored the importance of managerial support for employee work–family balance, the relevance of senior managers’ own work–family circumstances in relation to employees’ work outcomes, and the existence of possible contagion effects of leaders in relation to work–family climate. PMID:19412351

  6. Dynamical and Phase Behavior of a Phospholipid Membrane Altered by an Antimicrobial Peptide at Low Concentration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V K; Mamontov, E; Tyagi, M; Qian, S; Rai, D K; Urban, V S

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature no longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.

  7. Tetanus toxin is labeled with photoactivatable phospholipids at low pH

    SciTech Connect

    Montecucco, C.; Schiavo, G.; Brunner, J.; Duflot, E.; Boquet, P.; Roa, M.

    1986-02-25

    The mechanism of cell penetration by tetanus toxin is unknown; it has been suggested that the toxin may penetrate into the lipid bilayer from a low-pH vesicular compartment. In this work, the interaction of tetanus toxin with liposomal model membranes has been studied by following its photoinduced cross-linking with either a nitrene or a carbene photolytically generated from corresponding light-sensitive phosphatidylcholine analogues. The toxin was labeled only at pHs lower than 5.5. The low pH acquired hydrophobicity of tetanus toxin appears to be confined to its light chain and to the 45-kDa NH2-terminal fragment of the heavy chain. Negatively charged lipids promote the interaction of this toxin with the hydrocarbon chain of phospholipids. The relevance of the present findings to the possible mechanism of nerve cell penetration by tetanus toxin is discussed.

  8. Occupational turnover intentions among substance abuse counselors.

    PubMed

    Rothrauff, Tanja C; Abraham, Amanda J; Bride, Brian E; Roman, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    This study examined predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of occupational turnover intention (OcTI) among substance abuse counselors. Data were obtained via questionnaires from 929 counselors working in 225 private substance abuse treatment (SAT) programs across the United States. Hierarchical multiple regression models were conducted to assess predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of OcTI. OcTI scores were relatively low on a 7-point scale, indicating that very few counselors definitely intended to leave the SAT field. Age, certification, positive perceptions of procedural and distributive justice, and hospital-based status negatively predicted OcTI. Counselors' substance use disorder-impacted history moderated the association between organizational commitment and OcTI. Organizational turnover intention partially mediated the link between organizational commitment and OcTI. Workforce stability might be achieved by promoting perceptions of advantages to working in a particular treatment program, having organizational commitment, showing appreciation for counselors' work, and valuing employees from diverse backgrounds. PMID:20947285

  9. Dynamics of Adipocyte Turnover in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, K; Arner, E; Westermark, P; Bernard, S; Buchholz, B; Bergmann, O; Blomqvist, L; Hoffstedt, J; Naslund, E; Britton, T; Concha, H; Hassan, M; Ryden, M; Frisen, J; Arner, P

    2007-07-16

    Obesity is increasing in an epidemic fashion in most countries and constitutes a public health problem by enhancing the risk for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Owing to the increase in obesity, life expectancy may start to decrease in developed countries for the first time in recent history. The factors determining fat mass in adult humans are not fully understood, but increased lipid storage in already developed fat cells is thought to be most important. We show that adipocyte number is a major determinant for the fat mass in adults. However, the number of fat cells stays constant in adulthood in lean and obese and even under extreme conditions, indicating that the number of adipocytes is set during childhood and adolescence. To establish the dynamics within the stable population of adipocytes in adults, we have measured adipocyte turnover by analyzing the integration of {sup 14}C derived from nuclear bomb tests in genomic DNA. Approximately 10% of fat cells are renewed annually at all adult ages and levels of body mass index. Neither adipocyte death nor generation rate is altered in obesity, suggesting a tight regulation of fat cell number that is independent of metabolic profile in adulthood. The high turnover of adipocytes establishes a new therapeutic target for pharmacological intervention in obesity.

  10. 14C in cropland soil of a long-term field trial - experimental variability and implications for estimating carbon turnover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifeld, J.; Mayer, J.

    2015-07-01

    Because of their controlled nature, the presence of independent replicates, and their known management history, long-term field experiments are key to the understanding of factors controlling soil carbon. Together with isotope measurements, they provide profound insight into soil carbon dynamics. For soil radiocarbon, an important tracer for understanding these dynamics, experimental variability across replicates is usually not accounted for; hence, a relevant source of uncertainty for quantifying turnover rates is missing. Here, for the first time, radiocarbon measurements of five independent field replicates, and for different layers, of soil from the 66-year-old controlled field experiment ZOFE in Zurich, Switzerland, are used to address this issue. 14C variability was the same across three different treatments and for three different soil layers between the surface and 90 cm depths. On average, experimental variability in 14C content was 12 times the analytical error but still, on a relative basis, smaller than variability in soil carbon concentration. Despite a relative homogeneous variability across the field and along the soil profile, the curved nature of the relationship between radiocarbon content and modelled carbon mean residence time implies that the absolute error of calculated soil carbon turnover time increases with soil depth. In our field experiment findings on topsoil carbon turnover variability would, if applied to subsoil, tend to underweight turnover variability even if experimental variability in the subsoil isotope concentration is the same. Together, experimental variability in radiocarbon is an important component in an overall uncertainty assessment of soil carbon turnover.

  11. Identification of bisphosphatidic acid and its plasmalogen analogues in the phospholipids of a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    McAllister, D J; De Siervo, A J

    1975-07-01

    A relatively nonpolar unidentified phospholipid (phospholipid X) , isolated from the gram-negative marine bacterium MB 45, was characterized both chromatographically and by chemical analysis. Phospholipid X was shown to be an acidic phospholipid without vicinal hydroxyl, free-amino, or amide groups. The presence of O-alkenyl groups was indicated by a positive reaction for plasmalogen. Mild alkaline methanolysis of phospholipid X yielded only glycerophosphoryglycerol as the derivative. Acetolysis produced only diacyl-glycerol monoacetate. Clevage of O-alkenyl chains by methanolic hydrochloride resulted in the formation of three lyso derivatives. It was estimated that 18.2% of phospholipid X was plasmalogen. From these data, together with chromatographic comparisons with standards, infrared spectra, a molecular weight estimation, and the determination of the glycerol-phosphate-acyl ester ratio, it was concluded that phospholipid X was bisphosphatidic acid mixed with its plasmalogen analogues. PMID:1141198

  12. Microbial Turnover of Fixed Nitrogen Compounds in Oceanic Crustal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, B.; Wankel, S. D.; Glazer, B. T.; Huber, J. A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest aquifer on Earth, with a massive volume of seawater advecting through the basaltic crust. The microbiome of this deep marine subsurface biosphere has been estimated to be substantial, and consequently their metabolic activity may have major influences on global biogeochemical cycles. While earlier and recent studies provide insight into the microbial community composition of oceanic crustal fluids, information on the microbial ecophysiology is broadly missing. Therefore, to investigate the microbial transformation of fixed nitrogen compounds in crustal aquifer fluids, fluids were sampled from different horizons of two neighbouring CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories at the North Pond sediment pond. This site is located on the western flank of the Mid Atlantic Ridge and is characterized by relatively young oceanic crust and cold fluids. The crustal fluids contain oxygen and nitrate, which potentially both may serve as electron acceptor for respiration. In a multidisciplinary approach we combined stable isotope incubations, determination of the natural isotopic compositions and plan to analyse relevant functional genes from a metagenomic dataset to investigate the nitrogen cycling at North Pond. The turnover of fixed nitrogen in oceanic crustal fluids may have important implications for the understanding of the global nitrogen cycle.

  13. Sexual selection affects local extinction and turnover in bird communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, P.F.; Sorci, G.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.; Boulinier, T.

    2003-01-01

    Predicting extinction risks has become a central goal for conservation and evolutionary biologists interested in population and community dynamics. Several factors have been put forward to explain risks of extinction, including ecological and life history characteristics of individuals. For instance, factors that affect the balance between natality and mortality can have profound effects on population persistence. Sexual selection has been identified as one such factor. Populations under strong sexual selection experience a number of costs ranging from increased predation and parasitism to enhanced sensitivity to environmental and demographic stochasticity. These findings have led to the prediction that local extinction rates should be higher for species/populations with intense sexual selection. We tested this prediction by analyzing the dynamics of natural bird communities at a continental scale over a period of 21 years (1975-1996), using relevant statistical tools. In agreement with the theoretical prediction, we found that sexual selection increased risks of local extinction (dichromatic birds had on average a 23% higher local extinction rate than monochromatic species). However, despite higher local extinction probabilities, the number of dichromatic species did not decrease over the period considered in this study. This pattern was caused by higher local turnover rates of dichromatic species, resulting in relatively stable communities for both groups of species. Our results suggest that these communities function as metacommunities, with frequent local extinctions followed by colonization. Anthropogenic factors impeding dispersal might therefore have a significant impact on the global persistence of sexually selected species.

  14. How Multiple Interventions Influenced Employee Turnover: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    A 3-year study of 46 textile industry workers identified causes of employee turnover (supervision, training, organizational communication) using performance analysis. A study of multiple interventions based on the analysis resulted in changes in orientation procedures, organizational leadership, and climate, reducing turnover by 24%. (SK)

  15. Understanding the Impacts of Induction Programs on Beginning Teacher Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Seok

    2010-01-01

    This study examines impacts of mentoring and induction activities on beginning teacher turnover using the School and Staffing Survey (SASS) of 1999-2000 and the Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) of 2000-2001. In order to improve understanding of the influence of induction programs on beginning teacher turnover, three models are developed to achieve…

  16. Estimating Cause: Teacher Turnover and School Effectiveness in Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keesler, Venessa; Schneider, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is investigate issues related to within-school teacher supply and school-specific teacher turnover within the state of Michigan using state administrative data on Michigan's teaching force. This paper 1) investigates the key predictors of teacher turnover and mobility, 2) develops a profile of schools that are likely to…

  17. Organizational Characteristics Associated with Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The association between certified nurse aide, licensed practical nurse, and registered nurse turnover and the organizational characteristics of nursing homes are examined. Design and Methods: Hypotheses for eight organizational characteristics are examined (staffing levels, top management turnover, resident case mix, facility quality,…

  18. Re-Examining the Relationship between Age and Voluntary Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    In their quantitative review of the literature, Healy, Lehman, and McDaniel [Healy, M. C., Lehman, M., & McDaniel, M. A. (1995). Age and voluntary turnover: A quantitative review. "Personnel Psychology, 48", 335-345] concluded that age is only weakly related to voluntary turnover (average r = -0.08). However, with the significant changes in…

  19. Analysis of the Educational Personnel System: IV. Teacher Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Emmett B.

    This report attempts to predict the rates of teacher turnover in the 1970s, which teachers will leave the profession, and what the effects of turnover will be on the educational personnel system. The overall termination rate has varied from six to 11 percent over the last 15 years. An analysis of recent changes in the teaching profession is used…

  20. Predicting Turnover: Validating the Intent to Leave Child Welfare Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Charles; Schudrich, Wendy Zeitlin; Lawrence, Catherine K.; Claiborne, Nancy; McGowan, Brenda G.

    2014-01-01

    A number of proxies have been used in child welfare workforce research to represent actual turnover; however, there have been no psychometric studies to validate a scale specifically designed for this purpose. The Intent to Leave Child Welfare Scale is a proxy for actual turnover that measures workers' intention to leave. This scale was…

  1. Voluntary Turnover and Women Administrators in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Victoria H.

    2008-01-01

    A salient characteristic about the U.S. workforce is the continual process of voluntary employee turnover, which can be problematic for employers who invest a substantial amount of time and money in recruiting and training employees. This paper discusses the effects of workplace policies and practices on the voluntary turnover of women…

  2. The Link between Training Satisfaction, Work Engagement and Turnover Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memon, Mumtaz Ali; Salleh, Rohani; Baharom, Mohamed Noor Rosli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the casual relationship between training satisfaction, work engagement (WE) and turnover intention and the mediating role of WE between training satisfaction and turnover intention. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 409 oil and gas professionals using an email survey…

  3. Regulation of the Golgi Complex by Phospholipid Remodeling Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kevin D.; Clarke, Benjamin A.; Brown, William J.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian Golgi complex is a highly dynamic organelle consisting of stacks of flattened cisternae with associated coated vesicles and membrane tubules that contribute to cargo import and export, intra-cisternal trafficking, and overall Golgi architecture. At the morphological level, all of these structures are continuously remodeled to carry out these trafficking functions. Recent advances have shown that continual phospholipid remodeling by phospholipase A (PLA) and lysophospholipid acyltransferase (LPAT) enzymes, which deacylate and reacylate Golgi phospholipids, respectively, contributes to this morphological remodeling. Here we review the identification and characterization of four cytoplasmic PLA enzymes and one integral membrane LPAT that participate in the dynamic functional organization of the Golgi complex, and how some of these enzymes are integrated to determine the relative abundance of COPI vesicle and membrane tubule formation. PMID:22562055

  4. Migration of phospholipid vesicles in response to OH(-) stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Atsuji; Sakuma, Yuka; Imai, Masayuki; Oya, Yutaka; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro; Puff, Nicolas; Angelova, Miglena I

    2016-03-21

    We demonstrate migration of phospholipid vesicles in response to a pH gradient. Upon simple micro-injection of a NaOH solution, the vesicles linearly moved to the tip of the micro-pipette and the migration velocity was proportional to the gradient of OH(-) concentration. Vesicle migration was characteristic of OH(-) ions and no migration was observed for monovalent salts or nonionic sucrose solutions. The migration of vesicles is quantitatively described by the surface tension gradient model where the hydrolysis of the phospholipids by NaOH solution decreases the surface tension of the vesicle. The vesicles move toward a direction where the surface energy decreases. Thus the chemical modification of lipids produces a mechanical force to drive vesicles. PMID:26883729

  5. Flagellar membranes are rich in raft-forming phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Serricchio, Mauro; Schmid, Adrien W.; Steinmann, Michael E.; Sigel, Erwin; Rauch, Monika; Julkowska, Daria; Bonnefoy, Serge; Fort, Cécile; Bastin, Philippe; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The observation that the membranes of flagella are enriched in sterols and sphingolipids has led to the hypothesis that flagella might be enriched in raft-forming lipids. However, a detailed lipidomic analysis of flagellar membranes is not available. Novel protocols to detach and isolate intact flagella from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms in combination with reverse-phase liquid chromatography high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry allowed us to determine the phospholipid composition of flagellar membranes relative to whole cells. Our analyses revealed that phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, ceramide and the sphingolipids inositol phosphorylceramide and sphingomyelin are enriched in flagella relative to whole cells. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol are strongly depleted in flagella. Within individual glycerophospholipid classes, we observed a preference for ether-type over diacyl-type molecular species in membranes of flagella. Our study provides direct evidence for a preferential presence of raft-forming phospholipids in flagellar membranes of T. brucei. PMID:26276100

  6. Light and phospholipid driven structural transitions in nematic microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Dubtsov, A. V. Pasechnik, S. V.; Shmeliova, D. V.; Kralj, Samo

    2014-10-13

    We studied the UV-irradiation and phospholipid driven bipolar-radial structural transitions within azoxybenzene nematic liquid crystal (LC) droplets dispersed in water. It was found that the UV-irradiation induced trans-cis isomerisation of LC molecules could enable structural transitions into radial-type configurations at a critical UV-irradiation time t{sub c}. In particular, we show that under appropriate conditions, a value of t{sub c} could sensitively fingerprint the concentration of phospholipid molecules present in LC-water dispersions. This demonstrated proof-of-principle mechanism could be exploited for development of sensitive detectors for specific nanoparticles (NPs), where value of t{sub c} reveals concentration of NPs.

  7. A Cholesterol Recognition Motif in Human Phospholipid Scramblase 1

    PubMed Central

    Posada, Itziar M.D.; Fantini, Jacques; Contreras, F. Xabier; Barrantes, Francisco; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M.

    2014-01-01

    Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) catalyzes phospholipid transmembrane (flip-flop) motion. This protein is assumed to bind the membrane hydrophobic core through a transmembrane domain (TMD) as well as via covalently bound palmitoyl residues. Here, we explore the possible interaction of the SCR TMD with cholesterol by using a variety of experimental and computational biophysical approaches. Our findings indicate that SCR contains an amino acid segment at the C-terminal region that shows a remarkable affinity for cholesterol, although it lacks the CRAC sequence. Other 3-OH sterols, but not steroids lacking the 3-OH group, also bind this region of the protein. The newly identified cholesterol-binding region is located partly at the C-terminal portion of the TMD and partly in the first amino acid residues in the SCR C-terminal extracellular coil. This finding could be related to the previously described affinity of SCR for cholesterol-rich domains in membranes. PMID:25229146

  8. Differential Intrahepatic Phospholipid Zonation in Simple Steatosis and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wattacheril, Julia; Seeley, Erin H.; Angel, Peggi; Chen, Heidi; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Lanciault, Christian; M.Caprioli, Richard; Abumrad, Naji; Flynn, Charles Robb

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) occurs frequently in a setting of obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, but the etiology of the disease, particularly the events favoring progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) as opposed to simple steatosis (SS), are not fully understood. Based on known zonation patterns in protein, glucose and lipid metabolism, coupled with evidence that phosphatidylcholine may play a role in NASH pathogenesis, we hypothesized that phospholipid zonation exists in liver and that specific phospholipid abundance and distribution may be associated with histologic disease. A survey of normal hepatic protein expression profiles in the Human Protein Atlas revealed pronounced zonation of enzymes involved in lipid utilization and storage, particularly those facilitating phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism. Immunohistochemistry of obese normal, SS and NASH liver specimens with anti-phosphatidylethanomine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) antibodies showed a progressive decrease in the zonal distribution of this PC biosynthetic enzyme. Phospholipid quantitation by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in hepatic extracts of Class III obese patients with increasing NAFLD severity revealed that most PC species with 32, 34 and 36 carbons as well as total PC abundance was decreased with SS and NASH. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization - imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) imaging revealed strong zonal distributions for 32, 34 and 36 carbon PCs in controls (minimal histologic findings) and SS that was lost in NASH specimens. Specific lipid species such as PC 34∶1 and PC 36∶2 best illustrated this phenomenon. These findings suggest that phospholipid zonation may be associated with the presence of an intrahepatic proinflammatory phenotype and thus have broad implications in the etiopathogenesis of NASH. PMID:23451176

  9. Inhibition of phospholipid methylation by a cytosolic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Chiva, V; Mato, J M

    1984-01-01

    Rat liver cytosol contains a heat-stable factor which inhibits phospholipid methylation by rat liver microsomes. The effect of this factor on lipid methylation was dose- and pH-dependent. This factor has an Mr of approx. 3200 as estimated by gel filtration. It could not be extracted by chloroform/methanol (2:1, v/v), and its action was inhibited by incubation with subtilisin. PMID:6712636

  10. Earthdata Search: The Relevance of Relevance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Through recent usability studies, the issue of relevance became increasingly clear in the Earthdata Search Client. After all, if a user can't find the data they are looking for, nothing else we do matters. This presentation walks through usability testing findings and recent relevance improvements made to the Earthdata Search Client.

  11. Molecular determinants of phospholipid synergy in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Tavoosi, Narjes; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Pogorelov, Taras V; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Arcario, Mark J; Clay, Mary C; Rienstra, Chad M; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Morrissey, James H

    2011-07-01

    Many regulatory processes in biology involve reversible association of proteins with membranes. Clotting proteins bind to phosphatidylserine (PS) on cell surfaces, but a clear picture of this interaction has yet to emerge. We present a novel explanation for membrane binding by GLA domains of clotting proteins, supported by biochemical studies, solid-state NMR analyses, and molecular dynamics simulations. The model invokes a single "phospho-L-serine-specific" interaction and multiple "phosphate-specific" interactions. In the latter, the phosphates in phospholipids interact with tightly bound Ca(2+) in GLA domains. We show that phospholipids with any headgroup other than choline strongly synergize with PS to enhance factor X activation. We propose that phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin (the major external phospholipids of healthy cells) are anticoagulant primarily because their bulky choline headgroups sterically hinder access to their phosphates. Following cell damage or activation, exposed PS and phosphatidylethanolamine collaborate to bind GLA domains by providing phospho-L-serine-specific and phosphate-specific interactions, respectively. PMID:21561861

  12. A Fluorescence-based Assay of Phospholipid Scramblase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ploier, Birgit; Menon, Anant K

    2016-01-01

    Scramblases translocate phospholipids across the membrane bilayer bidirectionally in an ATP-independent manner. The first scramblase to be identified and biochemically verified was opsin, the apoprotein of the photoreceptor rhodopsin. Rhodopsin is a G protein-coupled receptor localized in rod photoreceptor disc membranes of the retina where it is responsible for the perception of light. Rhodopsin's scramblase activity does not depend on its ligand 11-cis-retinal, i.e., the apoprotein opsin is also active as a scramblase. Although constitutive and regulated phospholipid scrambling play an important role in cell physiology, only a few phospholipid scramblases have been identified so far besides opsin. Here we describe a fluorescence-based assay of opsin's scramblase activity. Opsin is reconstituted into large unilamellar liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol and a trace quantity of fluorescent NBD-labeled PC (1-palmitoyl-2-{6-[7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazole-4-yl)amino]hexanoyl}-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine). Scramblase activity is determined by measuring the extent to which NBD-PC molecules located in the inner leaflet of the vesicle are able to access the outer leaflet where their fluorescence is chemically eliminated by a reducing agent that cannot cross the membrane. The methods we describe have general applicability and can be used to identify and characterize scramblase activities of other membrane proteins. PMID:27684510

  13. The innate immune response to products of phospholipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Weismann, David; Binder, Christoph J

    2012-10-01

    Lipid peroxidation occurs in the context of many physiological processes but is greatly increased in various pathological situations. A consequence of phospholipid peroxidation is the generation of oxidation-specific epitopes, such as phosphocholine of oxidized phospholipids and malondialdehyde, which form neo-self determinants on dying cells and oxidized low-density lipoproteins. In this review we discuss evidence demonstrating that pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system recognize oxidation-specific epitopes as endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns, allowing the host to identify dangerous biological waste. Oxidation-specific epitopes are important targets of both cellular and soluble pattern recognition receptors, including toll-like and scavenger receptors, C-reactive protein, complement factor H, and innate natural IgM antibodies. This recognition allows the innate immune system to mediate important physiological house keeping functions, for example by promoting the removal of dying cells and oxidized molecules. Once this system is malfunctional or overwhelmed the development of diseases, such as atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration is favored. Understanding the molecular components and mechanisms involved in this process, will help the identification of individuals with increased risk of developing chronic inflammation, and indicate novel points for therapeutic intervention. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxidized phospholipids-their properties and interactions with proteins. PMID:22305963

  14. Hybrid electrospun chitosan-phospholipids nanofibers for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Ana C; Gorzelanny, Christian; Halter, Natalia; Schneider, Stefan W; Chronakis, Ioannis S

    2016-08-20

    Chitosan (Ch) polysaccharide was mixed with phospholipids (P) to generate electrospun hybrid nanofibers intended to be used as platforms for transdermal drug delivery. Ch/P nanofibers exibithed average diameters ranging from 248±94nm to 600±201nm, depending on the amount of phospholipids used. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) data suggested the occurrence of electrostatic interactions between amine groups of chitosan with the phospholipid counterparts. The nanofibers were shown to be stable for at least 7days in Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) solution. Cytotoxicity studies (WST-1 and LDH assays) demonstrated that the hybrid nanofibers have suitable biocompatibility. Fluorescence microscopy, also suggested that L929 cells seeded on top of the CH/P hybrid have similar metabolic activity comparatively to the cells seeded on tissue culture plate (control). The release of curcumin, diclofenac and vitamin B12, as model drugs, from Ch/P hybrid nanofibers was investigated, demonstrating their potential utilization as a transdermal drug delivery system. PMID:27286632

  15. Tumour necrosis factor induction by malaria exoantigens depends upon phospholipid.

    PubMed Central

    Bate, C A; Taverne, J; Román, E; Moreno, C; Playfair, J H

    1992-01-01

    In patients with malaria, the clinical manifestations of the disease are associated with the presence of high concentrations of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in the serum. Blood-stage parasites of human and rodent malarial parasites release serologically related exoantigens which induce the production of TNF in vitro and in vivo and which can kill mice made hypersensitive to TNF by pretreatment with D-galactosamine. They also elicit the production of T-independent antibody, which blocks these effects. The capacity of the exoantigens to stimulate macrophages to secrete TNF does not require the presence of protein or carbohydrate, but is associated with a lipid whose activity can be abolished by treatment with phospholipase C. Treatments of the exoantigens which destroyed their activity in vitro also abrogated their immunogenicity and their toxicity for mice. No TNF-inducing activity could be detected in preparations of parasitized erythrocytes that was not associated with phospholipid, and the TNF-inducing properties of the malarial phospholipids are quite distinct from those of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. We conclude that release of potentially toxic phospholipids by parasites may be responsible for some of the pathology of malaria. PMID:1537589

  16. Label free detection of phospholipids by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Tahsin; Foster, Erick; Vigil, Genevieve; Khan, Aamir A.; Bohn, Paul; Howard, Scott S.

    2014-08-01

    We present our study on compact, label-free dissolved lipid sensing by combining capillary electrophoresis separation in a PDMS microfluidic chip online with mid-infrared (MIR) absorption spectroscopy for biomarker detection. On-chip capillary electrophoresis is used to separate the biomarkers without introducing any extrinsic contrast agent, which reduces both cost and complexity. The label free biomarker detection could be done by interrogating separated biomarkers in the channel by MIR absorption spectroscopy. Phospholipids biomarkers of degenerative neurological, kidney, and bone diseases are detectable using this label free technique. These phospholipids exhibit strong absorption resonances in the MIR and are present in biofluids including urine, blood plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid. MIR spectroscopy of a 12-carbon chain phosphatidic acid (PA) (1,2-dilauroyl-snglycero- 3-phosphate (sodium salt)) dissolved in N-methylformamide, exhibits a strong amide peak near wavenumber 1660 cm-1 (wavelength 6 μm), arising from the phosphate headgroup vibrations within a low-loss window of the solvent. PA has a similar structure to many important phospholipids molecules like phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylserine (PS), making it an ideal molecule for initial proof-of-concept studies. This newly proposed detection technique can lead us to minimal sample preparation and is capable of identifying several biomarkers from the same sample simultaneously.

  17. The local phospholipid environment modulates the activation of blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Andrew W; Pureza, Vincent S; Sligar, Stephen G; Morrissey, James H

    2007-03-01

    Examples abound of membrane-bound enzymes for which the local membrane environment plays an important role, including the ectoenzyme that triggers blood clotting, the plasma serine protease, factor VIIa, bound to the integral membrane protein, tissue factor. The activity of this enzyme complex is markedly influenced by lipid bilayer composition and further by tissue factor partitioning into membrane microdomains on some cell surfaces. Unfortunately, little is known about how membrane microdomain composition controls factor VIIa-tissue factor activity, as reactions catalyzed by membrane-tethered enzymes are typically studied under conditions in which the experimenter cannot control the composition of the membrane in the immediate vicinity of the enzyme. To overcome this problem, we used a nanoscale approach that afforded complete control over the membrane environment surrounding tissue factor by assembling the factor VIIa.tissue factor complex on stable bilayers containing 67 +/- 1 phospholipid molecules/leaflet (Nanodiscs). We investigated how local changes in phospholipid bilayer composition modulate the activity of the factor VIIa.tissue factor complex. We also addressed whether this enzyme requires a pool of membrane-bound protein substrate (factor X) for efficient catalysis, or alternatively if it could efficiently activate factor X, which binds directly to the membrane nanodomain adjacent to tissue factor. We have shown that full proteolytic activity of the factor VIIa.tissue factor complex requires extremely high local concentrations of anionic phospholipids and further that a large pool of membrane-bound factor X is not required to support sustained catalysis.

  18. Linking Phospholipid flippases to vesicle-mediated protein transport

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Baby-Periyanayaki; Natarajan, Paramasivam; Zhou, Xiaoming; Graham, Todd R.

    2013-01-01

    Type IV P-type ATPases (P4-ATPases) are a large family of putative phospholipid translocases (flippases) implicated in the generation of phospholipid asymmetry in biological membranes. P4-ATPases are typically the largest P-type ATPase subgroup found in eukaryotic cells, with five members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, six members in Caenorhabditis elegans, 12 members in Arabidopsis thaliani and 14 members in humans. In addition, many of the P4-ATPases require interaction with a noncatalytic subunit from the CDC50 gene family for their transport out of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Deficiency of a P4-ATPase (Atp8b1) causes liver disease in humans, and studies in a variety of model systems indicate that P4-ATPases play diverse and essential roles in membrane biogenesis. In addition to their proposed role in establishing and maintaining plasma membrane asymmetry, P4-ATPases are linked to vesicle-mediated protein transport in the exocytic and endocytic pathways. Recent studies have also suggested a role for P4-ATPases in the nonvesicular intracellular trafficking of sterols. Here, we discuss the physiological requirements for yeast P4-ATPases in phospholipid translocase activity, transport vesicle budding and ergosterol metabolism, with an emphasis on Drs2p and its noncatalytic subunit, Cdc50p. PMID:19286470

  19. Molecular Determinants of Phospholipid Synergy in Blood Clotting*

    PubMed Central

    Tavoosi, Narjes; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Arcario, Mark J.; Clay, Mary C.; Rienstra, Chad M.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Morrissey, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Many regulatory processes in biology involve reversible association of proteins with membranes. Clotting proteins bind to phosphatidylserine (PS) on cell surfaces, but a clear picture of this interaction has yet to emerge. We present a novel explanation for membrane binding by GLA domains of clotting proteins, supported by biochemical studies, solid-state NMR analyses, and molecular dynamics simulations. The model invokes a single “phospho-l-serine-specific” interaction and multiple “phosphate-specific” interactions. In the latter, the phosphates in phospholipids interact with tightly bound Ca2+ in GLA domains. We show that phospholipids with any headgroup other than choline strongly synergize with PS to enhance factor X activation. We propose that phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin (the major external phospholipids of healthy cells) are anticoagulant primarily because their bulky choline headgroups sterically hinder access to their phosphates. Following cell damage or activation, exposed PS and phosphatidylethanolamine collaborate to bind GLA domains by providing phospho-l-serine-specific and phosphate-specific interactions, respectively. PMID:21561861

  20. Reconstitution of rat liver vasopressin receptors into phospholipid vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, B.; Navarro, J.; Fishman, J.; Fine, R.

    1986-05-01

    Isolation and characterization of the hepatic vasopressin (V1) receptor has been hampered by the loss of vasopressin binding when the receptor is solubilized. An alternative to a soluble binding assay is reconstitution of solubilized receptors into phospholipid vesicles. They report here the initial reconstitution of solubilized vasopressin receptors. Rat liver microsomes were solubilized with 3% 3-((3-cholamido-propyl)dimethyl-ammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) in 20mM HEPES (pH 7.4). The solubilized protein was combined with an equal volume of 7% soybean phospholipids dissolved in 3% CHAPS. This solution was passed over a column of Sephadex G50 equilibrated with 30 mM HEPES, 5mM MgCl/sub 2/ (pH 7.4). Reconstituted vesicles containing the microsomal proteins were recovered in the void volume. Binding of (/sup 3/H)-Vasopressin to the reconstituted vesicles at pH 7.4 was 80% specific, saturable, reversible and required magnesium. Solubilization of microsomes in the presence of glycerol, prebound ligand, phospholipids or magnesium did not improve subsequent binding. This reconstitution procedure will allow examination of signal transduction mechanisms and may be used as a functional assay in isolating the receptor.

  1. Penetration of surfactin into phospholipid monolayers: nanoscale interfacial organization.

    PubMed

    Eeman, M; Berquand, A; Dufrêne, Y F; Paquot, M; Dufour, S; Deleu, M

    2006-12-19

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with surface pressure-area isotherms were used to probe the interfacial behavior of phospholipid monolayers following penetration of surfactin, a cyclic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus subtilis strains. Prior to penetration experiments, interfacial behavior of different surfactin molecules (cyclic surfactins with three different aliphatic chain lengths--S13, S14, and S15--and a linear surfactin obtained by chemical cleavage of the cycle of the surfactin S15) has been investigated. A more hydrophobic aliphatic chain induces greater surface-active properties of the lipopeptide. The opening of the peptide ring reduces the surface activity. The effect of phospholipid acyl chain length (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine- (DPPC), and distearoylphosphatidylcholine) and phospholipid polar head (DPPC, dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine) on monolayer penetration properties of the surfactin S15 has been explored. Results showed that while the lipid monolayer thickness and the presence of electrostatic repulsions from the interfacial film do not significantly influence surfactin insertion, these parameters strongly modulate the ability of the surfactin to alter the nanoscale organization of the lipid films. We also probed the effect of surfactin structure (influence of the aliphatic chain length and of the cyclic structure of the peptide ring) on the behavior of DPPC monolayers. AFM images and isotherms showed that surfactin penetration is promoted by longer lipopeptide chain length and a cyclic polar head. This indicates that hydrophobic interactions are of main importance for the penetration power of surfactin molecules.

  2. Phospholipid and Respiratory Quinone Analyses From Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfiffner, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    Extreme environments on Earth have been chosen as surrogate sites to test methods and strategies for the deployment of space craft in the search for extraterrestrial life. Surrogate sites for many of the NASA astrobiology institutes include the South African gold mines, Canadian subpermafrost, Atacama Desert, and acid rock drainage. Soils, sediments, rock cores, fracture waters, biofilms, and service and drill waters represent the types of samples collected from these sites. These samples were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry for phospholipid fatty acid methyl esters and by high performance liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry for respiratory quinones. Phospholipid analyses provided estimates of biomass, community composition, and compositional changes related to nutritional limitations or exposure to toxic conditions. Similar to phospholipid analyses, respiratory quinone analyses afforded identification of certain types of microorganisms in the community based on respiration and offered clues to in situ redox conditions. Depending on the number of samples analyzed, selected multivariate statistical methods were applied to relate membrane lipid results with site biogeochemical parameters. Successful detection of life signatures and refinement of methodologies at surrogate sites on Earth will be critical for the recognition of extraterrestrial life. At this time, membrane lipid analyses provide useful information not easily obtained by other molecular techniques.

  3. Spectroscopic Study on the Interaction of 4-dimethylaminochalcones with Phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomečková, V.; Revická, M.; Sassen, A.; Veliká, B.; Stupák, M.; Perjési, P.

    2014-11-01

    The ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic properties of 4'-dimethylaminochalcone ( 1a) and its cyclic analogs 2a-4a have been studied in the presence of phospholipid vesicles (i.e., egg yolk lecithin and dipalmitoylpho sphatidylcholine), bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lipoprotein particles (i.e., bovine serum albumin plus egg yolk lecithin). The spectral results showed that compounds 1a-4a formed hydrophobic interactions with the phospholipids, lipoproteins, and BSA at the polar/nonpolar interface. Compounds 3a and 4a exhibited the strongest hydrophobic interactions of all of the compounds tested towards the phospholipids. Compound 2a gave the best fluorescent fluorophore indicating interactions with the lipids, lipoproteins, and proteins. Fluorescent microscopic imaging of breast cancer cells treated with compounds 1a-4a revealed that they could be used to stain all of the cellular components and destroy the nuclear structure. Compounds 1a-4a were found to be concentrated predominantly on the surfaces of the liposomes and lipoproteins.

  4. Interaction of general anesthetics with phospholipid vesicles and biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Vanderkooi, J M; Landesberg, R; Selick, H; McDonald, G G

    1977-01-01

    Low concentrations of general anesthetics, including halothane, ethrane, trilene, diethyl ether and chloroform are observed to shift the phase transitions of phospholipid vesicles to lower temperatures, and from these data partition coefficients for the anesthetic between lipid and water can be calculated. In contrast to the anesthetics, high concentrations of ethanol are required to shift the phase transition of lipids and glycerol causes no effect. Above the phase transition general anesthetics alter nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of phospholipid dispersions and increase the rotational and lateral diffusion rates of fluorescent probes located in the hydrocarbon core of the bilayer, indicating that they induce disorder in the structure. In red blood cell membranes and sarcoplasmic reticulum fragments, the rotational diffusion rate of 1-phenyl-6-phenylhexatriene is increased in the presence of general anesthetics. The 220 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of sarcoplasmic reticulum reveal some resolved lines from the lecithin fatty acid protons; addition of general anesthetic increases the contribution of these peaks. The data from the NMR and fluorescence techniques lead to the conclusion that general anesthetics increase the pool size of melted lipids in the bimolecular phospholipid layers of biological membranes; this would account for the ability of general anesthetics to increase passive diffusion rates of various substances in membranes.

  5. Water level changes affect carbon turnover and microbial community composition in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Weise, Lukas; Ulrich, Andreas; Moreano, Matilde; Gessler, Arthur; Kayler, Zachary E; Steger, Kristin; Zeller, Bernd; Rudolph, Kristin; Knezevic-Jaric, Jelena; Premke, Katrin

    2016-05-01

    Due to climate change, many lakes in Europe will be subject to higher variability of hydrological characteristics in their littoral zones. These different hydrological regimes might affect the use of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We used sandy sediment microcosms to examine the effects of different hydrological regimes (wet, desiccating, and wet-desiccation cycles) on carbon turnover. (13)C-labelled particulate organic carbon was used to trace and estimate carbon uptake into bacterial biomass (via phospholipid fatty acids) and respiration. Microbial community changes were monitored by combining DNA- and RNA-based real-time PCR quantification and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA. The shifting hydrological regimes in the sediment primarily caused two linked microbial effects: changes in the use of available organic carbon and community composition changes. Drying sediments yielded the highest CO2 emission rates, whereas hydrological shifts increased the uptake of allochthonous organic carbon for respiration. T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that only the most extreme hydrological changes induced a significant shift in the active and total bacterial communities. As current scenarios of climate change predict an increase of drought events, frequent variations of the hydrological regimes of many lake littoral zones in central Europe are anticipated. Based on the results of our study, this phenomenon may increase the intensity and amplitude in rates of allochthonous organic carbon uptake and CO2 emissions. PMID:26902802

  6. Water level changes affect carbon turnover and microbial community composition in lake sediments

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Lukas; Ulrich, Andreas; Moreano, Matilde; Gessler, Arthur; E. Kayler, Zachary; Steger, Kristin; Zeller, Bernd; Rudolph, Kristin; Knezevic-Jaric, Jelena; Premke, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Due to climate change, many lakes in Europe will be subject to higher variability of hydrological characteristics in their littoral zones. These different hydrological regimes might affect the use of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We used sandy sediment microcosms to examine the effects of different hydrological regimes (wet, desiccating, and wet-desiccation cycles) on carbon turnover. 13C-labelled particulate organic carbon was used to trace and estimate carbon uptake into bacterial biomass (via phospholipid fatty acids) and respiration. Microbial community changes were monitored by combining DNA- and RNA-based real-time PCR quantification and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA. The shifting hydrological regimes in the sediment primarily caused two linked microbial effects: changes in the use of available organic carbon and community composition changes. Drying sediments yielded the highest CO2 emission rates, whereas hydrological shifts increased the uptake of allochthonous organic carbon for respiration. T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that only the most extreme hydrological changes induced a significant shift in the active and total bacterial communities. As current scenarios of climate change predict an increase of drought events, frequent variations of the hydrological regimes of many lake littoral zones in central Europe are anticipated. Based on the results of our study, this phenomenon may increase the intensity and amplitude in rates of allochthonous organic carbon uptake and CO2 emissions. PMID:26902802

  7. Does a Corresponding Set of Variables for Explaining Voluntary Organizational Turnover Transfer to Explaining Voluntary Occupational Turnover?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Gary

    2007-01-01

    This study proposed and tested corresponding sets of variables for explaining voluntary organizational versus occupational turnover for a sample of medical technologists. This study is believed to be the first test of the Rhodes and Doering (1983) occupational change model using occupational turnover data. Results showed that corresponding job…

  8. Large-scale variation in boreal and temperate forest carbon turnover rate related to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Carvalhais, Nuno; Forkel, Matthias; Santoro, Maurizio; Tum, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2016-05-01

    Vegetation carbon turnover processes in forest ecosystems and their dominant drivers are far from being understood at a broader scale. Many of these turnover processes act on long timescales and include a lateral dimension and thus can hardly be investigated by plot-level studies alone. Making use of remote sensing-based products of net primary production (NPP) and biomass, here we show that spatial gradients of carbon turnover rate (k) in Northern Hemisphere boreal and temperate forests are explained by different climate-related processes depending on the ecosystem. k is related to frost damage effects and the trade-off between growth and frost adaptation in boreal forests, while drought stress and climate effects on insects and pathogens can explain an elevated k in temperate forests. By identifying relevant processes underlying broadscale patterns in k, we provide the basis for a detailed exploration of these mechanisms in field studies, and ultimately the improvement of their representations in global vegetation models (GVMs).

  9. β-CD-dextran polymer for efficient sequestration of cholesterol from phospholipid bilayers: Mechanistic and safe-toxicity investigations.

    PubMed

    Stelzl, Dominik; Nielsen, Thorbjørn Terndrup; Hansen, Terkel; di Cagno, Massimiliano

    2015-12-30

    The aim of this work was to investigate the suitability of β-cyclodextrin-dextran (BCD-dextran) polymer as cholesterol sequestering agent in vitro. For this purpose, BCD-dextran-cholesterol complexation was studied by phase solubility studies as well as with a specifically designed in vitro model based on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to evaluate the ability of this polymer to sequestrate cholesterol from phospholipid bilayers. Cholesterol-sequestering ability of BCD-dextran was also investigated on different cell lines relevant for the hematopoietic system and results were correlated to cells toxicity. BCD-dextran polymer was capable of extracting significant amount of cholesterol from phospholipid bilayers and to a higher extent in comparison to available β-cyclodextrins (BCDs). The ability of BCD-dextran in sequestering cholesterol resulted also very high on cell lines relevant for the hematopoietic system. Moreover, BCD-dextran resulted less toxic on cell cultures due to higher selectivity in sequestering cholesterol in comparison to MBCD (that sequestrated also significant amounts of cholesteryl esters). In conclusion, BCD-dextran resulted an extremely efficient cholesterol-sequestering agent and BCD-dextran resulted more selective to cholesterol extraction in comparison to other BCDs (therefore of lower cytotoxicity). This phenomenon might play a key role to develop an efficient treatment for hypercholesterolemia based on cholesterol segregation.

  10. Biomass turnover time in terrestrial ecosystems halved by land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Fetzel, Tamara; Plutzar, Christoph; Kastner, Thomas; Lauk, Christian; Mayer, Andreas; Niedertscheider, Maria; Körner, Christian; Haberl, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is not well quantified. Biomass turnover time is a crucial parameter in the global carbon cycle, and contributes to the feedback between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate. Biomass turnover time varies substantially in time and space, but its determinants are not well known, making predictions of future global carbon cycle dynamics uncertain. Land use--the sum of activities that aim at enhancing terrestrial ecosystem services--alters plant growth and reduces biomass stocks, and is hence expected to affect biomass turnover. Here we explore land-use-induced alterations of biomass turnover at the global scale by comparing the biomass turnover of the actual vegetation with that of a hypothetical vegetation state with no land use under current climate conditions. We find that, in the global average, biomass turnover is 1.9 times faster with land use. This acceleration affects all biomes roughly equally, but with large differences between land-use types. Land conversion, for example from forests to agricultural fields, is responsible for 59% of the acceleration; the use of forests and natural grazing land accounts for 26% and 15% respectively. Reductions in biomass stocks are partly compensated by reductions in net primary productivity. We conclude that land use significantly and systematically affects the fundamental trade-off between carbon turnover and carbon stocks.

  11. Organizational culture, job satisfaction, and clinician turnover in primary care.

    PubMed

    Hall, Charles B; Brazil, Kevin; Wakefield, Dorothy; Lerer, Trudy; Tennen, Howard

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine how organizational culture and job satisfaction affect clinician turnover in primary care pediatric practices. One hundred thirty clinicians from 36 primary care pediatric practices completed the Primary Care Organizational Questionnaire (PCOQ), which evaluates interactions among members of the practice and job-related attributes measuring 8 organizational factors, along with a separate 3-item instrument measuring job satisfaction. Random effects logistic models were used to assess the associations between job satisfaction, the organizational factors from the PCOQ, and clinician turnover over the subsequent year. All 8 measured organizational factors from the PCOQ, particularly perceived effectiveness, were associated with job satisfaction. Five of the 8 organizational factors were also associated with clinician turnover. The effects of the organizational factors on turnover were substantially reduced in a model that included job satisfaction; only 1 organizational factor, communication between clinicians and nonclinicians, remained significant (P = .05). This suggests that organizational culture affects subsequent clinician turnover primarily through its effect on job satisfaction. Organizational culture, in particular perceived effectiveness and communication, affects job satisfaction, which in turn affects clinician turnover in primary care pediatric practices. Strategies to improve job satisfaction through changes in organizational culture could potentially reduce clinician turnover. PMID:23804066

  12. Amino Acid Recycling in Relation to Protein Turnover 1

    PubMed Central

    Davies, David D.; Humphrey, Thomas J.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of measuring amino acid recycling in Lemna minor are described. The extent to which the recycling of individual amino acids may underestimate protein turnover has been measured for a number of amino acids. The methods have been used to study the relationship between protein turnover and amino acid recycling during nitrogen starvation. It is concluded that following the removal of nitrate from the environment, protein turnover is enhanced, the partitioning of amino acids between protein synthesis and amino acid metabolism is relatively constant, but the total amount of amino acids recycling is increased. PMID:16660236

  13. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated.

  14. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated. PMID:27423860

  15. Anchoring Transitions of Liquid Crystals for Optical Amplification of Phospholipid Oxidation Inhibition by Ascorbic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minmin; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the antioxidant property of ascorbic acid (AH) is effective for reducing oxidative stress of phospholipids. Herein, a liquid crystals (LCs)-based method was developed for the optical amplification of resistance to phospholipid oxidation by AH. Phospholipid peroxidation initiated by free radicals was monitored from a homeotropic-to-planar anchoring transition of LCs via polarized optical microscopy. Alternatively, consistent homeotropic anchoring of LCs was observed when the oxidation caused by free radicals was blocked by AH.

  16. Flow of glucose carbon into cholesterol and phospholipids in various regions of the adult rat brain: enhanced incorporation into hypothalamic phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Barkai, A.I.

    1981-01-01

    The contribution of glucose carbon to the biosynthesis of cholesterol and phospholipids in distinct brain regions was studied quantitatively in the adult male rat. Rates of flow of glucose carbon into the lipids in vivo were calculated from two measurements: the curve representing the decrease in plasma /sup 14/C-glucose with time and the specific activity of the cerebral lipid 180 minutes after a rapid intravenous injection of a tracer dose of D-U /sup 14/C-glucose. The following brain regions were studied: cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, medulla, and corpus callosum and cerebellum. The values for carbon flow into phospholipids were significantly higher in the hypothalamus than in the whole brain, whereas small, but insignificant, regional differences were found for carbon flow into cholesterol. The conversion of U-/sup 14/C-glucose to individual phospholipids of both hypothalamus and cerebral cortex was further investigated in vitro in order to establish whether the higher rate of carbon flow into hypothalamic phospholipids resulted from enhanced synthesis of a particular phospholipid. In agreement with the results obtained in vivo, the rate of incorporation of /sup 14/C into total phospholipids was 60% higher in hypothalamic tissue. The results indicate that the higher rate of carbon flow into hypothalamic phospholipids might be attributed to enhanced incorporation of glucose carbon to phosphatidyl-choline and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine following a faster conversion of glucose to glycerol in this brain region.

  17. Formation of oil-in-water emulsions from natural emulsifiers using spontaneous emulsification: sunflower phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Komaiko, Jennifer; Sastrosubroto, Ashtri; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-18

    This study examined the possibility of producing oil-in-water emulsions using a natural surfactant (sunflower phospholipids) and a low-energy method (spontaneous emulsification). Spontaneous emulsification was carried out by titrating an organic phase (oil and phospholipid) into an aqueous phase with continuous stirring. The influence of phospholipid composition, surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR), initial phospholipids location, storage time, phospholipid type, and preparation method was tested. The initial droplet size depended on the nature of the phospholipid used, which was attributed to differences in phospholipid composition. Droplet size decreased with increasing SOR and was smallest when the phospholipid was fully dissolved in the organic phase rather than the aqueous phase. The droplets formed using spontaneous emulsification were relatively large (d > 10 μm), and so the emulsions were unstable to gravitational separation. At low SORs (0.1 and 0.5), emulsions produced with phospholipids had a smaller particle diameter than those produced with a synthetic surfactant (Tween 80), but at a higher SOR (1.0), this trend was reversed. High-energy methods (microfluidization and sonication) formed significantly smaller droplets (d < 10 μm) than spontaneous emulsification. The results from this study show that low-energy methods could be utilized with natural surfactants for applications for which fine droplets are not essential.

  18. Formation of oil-in-water emulsions from natural emulsifiers using spontaneous emulsification: sunflower phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Komaiko, Jennifer; Sastrosubroto, Ashtri; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-18

    This study examined the possibility of producing oil-in-water emulsions using a natural surfactant (sunflower phospholipids) and a low-energy method (spontaneous emulsification). Spontaneous emulsification was carried out by titrating an organic phase (oil and phospholipid) into an aqueous phase with continuous stirring. The influence of phospholipid composition, surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR), initial phospholipids location, storage time, phospholipid type, and preparation method was tested. The initial droplet size depended on the nature of the phospholipid used, which was attributed to differences in phospholipid composition. Droplet size decreased with increasing SOR and was smallest when the phospholipid was fully dissolved in the organic phase rather than the aqueous phase. The droplets formed using spontaneous emulsification were relatively large (d > 10 μm), and so the emulsions were unstable to gravitational separation. At low SORs (0.1 and 0.5), emulsions produced with phospholipids had a smaller particle diameter than those produced with a synthetic surfactant (Tween 80), but at a higher SOR (1.0), this trend was reversed. High-energy methods (microfluidization and sonication) formed significantly smaller droplets (d < 10 μm) than spontaneous emulsification. The results from this study show that low-energy methods could be utilized with natural surfactants for applications for which fine droplets are not essential. PMID:26528859

  19. Update on anti-phospholipid antibodies in SLE: the Hopkins' Lupus Cohort.

    PubMed

    Petri, M

    2010-04-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies are common in patients in the Hopkins' Lupus Cohort: 47% have anti-cardiolipin, 32.5% anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I and 26% lupus anticoagulant (by dRVVT confirmatory testing). Systemic lupus erythematosus patients with the lupus anticoagulant at baseline have a 50% chance of a deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolus in the next 20 years. Anti-phospholipid antibodies differ in their association with thrombosis: the lupus anticoagulant is most strongly associated with arterial and venous thrombosis and is the only anti-phospholipid antibody associated with myocardial infarction. Anti-phospholipid antibodies are not associated with atherosclerosis.

  20. A retrospective: Use of Escherichia coli as a vehicle to study phospholipid synthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Dowhan, William

    2012-01-01

    Although the study of individual phospholipids and their synthesis began in the 1920’s first in plants and then mammals, it was not until the early 1960’s that Eugene Kennedy using Escherichia coli initiated studies of bacterial phospholipid metabolism. With the base of information already available from studies of mammalian tissue, the basic blueprint of phospholipid biosynthesis in E. coli was worked out by the late 1960’s. In 1970’s and 1980’s most of the enzymes responsible for phospholipid biosynthesis were purified and many of the genes encoding these enzymes were identified. By the late 1990’s conditional and null mutants were available along with clones of the genes for every step of phospholipid biosynthesis. Most of these genes had been sequenced before the complete E. coli genome sequence was available. Strains of E. coli were developed in which phospholipid composition could be changed in a systematic manner while maintaining cell viability. Null mutants, strains in which phospholipid metabolism was artificially regulated, and strains synthesizing foreign lipids not found in E. coli have been used to this day to define specific roles for individual phospholipid. This review will trace the findings that have led to the development of E. coli as an excellent model system to study mechanisms underlying the synthesis and function of phospholipids that are widely applicable to other prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. PMID:22925633

  1. Intracellular Signaling by Hydrolysis of Phospholipids and Activation of Protein Kinase C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, Yasutomi

    1992-10-01

    Hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids by phospholipase C is initiated by either receptor stimulation or opening of Ca2+ channels. This was once thought to be the sole mechanism to produce the diacylglycerol that links extracellular signals to intracellular events through activation of protein kinase C. It is becoming clear that agonist-induced hydrolysis of other membrane phospholipids, particularly choline phospholipids, by phospholipase D and phospholipase A_2 may also take part in cell signaling. The products of hydrolysis of these phospholipids may enhance and prolong the activation of protein kinase C. Such prolonged activation of protein kinase C is essential for long-term cellular responses such as cell proliferation and differentiation.

  2. Interactions of phospholipids with the potassium channel KcsA.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ian M; Alvis, Simon J; East, J Malcolm; Lee, Anthony G

    2002-10-01

    The potassium channel KcsA from Streptomyces lividans has been reconstituted into bilayers of phosphatidylcholines and fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to characterize the response of KcsA to changes in bilayer thickness. The Trp residues in KcsA form two bands, one on each side of the membrane. Trp fluorescence emission spectra and the proportion of the Trp fluorescence intensity quenchable by I(-) hardly vary in the lipid chain length range C10 to C24, suggesting efficient hydrophobic matching between KcsA and the lipid bilayer over this range. Measurements of fluorescence quenching for KcsA reconstituted into mixtures of brominated and nonbrominated phospholipids have been analyzed to give binding constants of lipids for KcsA, relative to that for dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (di(C18:1)PC). Relative lipid binding constants increase by only a factor of three with increasing chain length from C10 to C22 with a decrease from C22 to C24. Strongest binding to di(C22:1)PC corresponds to a state in which the side chains of the lipid-exposed Trp residues are likely to be located within the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer. It is suggested that matching of KcsA to thinner bilayers than di(C24:1)PC is achieved by tilting of the transmembrane alpha-helices in KcsA. Measurements of fluorescence quenching of KcsA in bilayers of brominated phospholipids as a function of phospholipid chain length suggest that in the chain length range C14 to C18 the Trp residues move further away from the center of the lipid bilayer with increasing chain length, which can be partly explained by a decrease in helix tilt angle with increasing bilayer thickness. In the chain length range C18 to C24 it is suggested that the Trp residues become more buried within the hydrocarbon core of the bilayer. PMID:12324421

  3. Transfer of oleic acid between albumin and phospholipid vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.A.; Cistola, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The net transfer of oleic acid between egg phosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles and bovine serum albumin has been monitored by TC NMR spectroscopy and 90% isotopically substituted (1- TC)oleic acid. The carboxyl chemical shifts of oleic acid bound to albumin were different from those for oleic acid in phospholipid vesicles. Therefore, in mixtures of donor particles, the equilibrium distribution of oleic acid was determined from chemical shift and peak intensity data without separation of donor and acceptor particles. In a system containing equal masses of albumin and phospholipid and a stoichiometry of 4-5 mol of oleic acid per mol of albumin, the oleic acid distribution was pH dependent, with greater than or equal to80% of the oleic acid associated with albumin at pH 7.4; association was greater than or equal to90% at pH 8.0. Decreasing the pH below 7.4 markedly decreased the proportion of fatty acid bound to albumin. The distribution was reversible with pH and was independent of whether vesicles or albumin acted as a donor. These data suggest that pH may strongly influence the partitioning of fatty acid between cellular membranes and albumin. The TC NMR method is also advantageous because it provides information about the structural environments of oleic acid bound to albumin or phospholipid, the ionization state of oleic acid in each environment, and the structural integrity of the vesicles. In addition, minimum and maximum limits for the exchange rates of oleic acid among different environments were obtained from the NMR data.

  4. Amniotic fluid phospholipids after maternal administration of dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Farrell, P M; Engle, M J; Zachman, R D; Curet, L B; Morrison, J C; Rao, A V; Poole, W K

    1983-02-15

    The administration of corticosteroids to pregnant women in premature labor can accelerate fetal lung development and potentially prevent neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Controversy exists, however, as to whether amniotic fluid phospholipid indices of lung maturation are influenced by such treatment. Without a suitable test for evaluating the fetal response to corticosteroids, there is no method of recognizing whether and when lung development has been stimulated. In an attempt to resolve this issue, we carried out a study of amniotic fluid phospholipids as part of the National Institutes of Health multicenter trial of prenatal corticosteroids. Amniocenteses were performed before the administration of either steroid hormone or placebo and approximately 1 week after a series of four injections was initiated. Analysis of the ratio of lecithin (phosphatidylcholine) to sphingomyelin (L/S ratio) revealed nearly identical values initially and no significant difference in the posttreatment means when 25 steroid-treated pregnancies were compared to 20 control pregnancies. Although there were significant increases in both groups during the interval between amniocenteses, no statistical difference was found in the extent of change in L/S ratios between the two groups, when pretreatment values were compared with those obtained an average of 1 week later. In addition to evaluating L/S ratios, we performed an assessment of phospholipid concentrations in 17 pregnancies before and after administration of dexamethasone. This revealed no detectable phosphatidylglycerol. There were increases in the absolute concentrations of phosphatidylcholine and disaturated phosphatidylcholine, but these changes were relatively modest in magnitude and could be attributable to either advanced gestational age or dexamethasone. Our results demonstrate that current tests of fetal lung maturity do not provide a routine means for prenatal detection of pulmonary maturational responses to

  5. Transfer of oleic acid between albumin and phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J A; Cistola, D P

    1986-01-01

    The net transfer of oleic acid between egg phosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles and bovine serum albumin has been monitored by 13C NMR spectroscopy and 90% isotopically substituted [1-13C]oleic acid. The carboxyl chemical shifts of oleic acid bound to albumin were different from those for oleic acid in phospholipid vesicles. Therefore, in mixtures of donor particles (vesicles or albumin with oleic acid) and acceptor particles (fatty acid-free albumin or vesicles), the equilibrium distribution of oleic acid was determined from chemical shift and peak intensity data without separation of donor and acceptor particles. In a system containing equal masses of albumin and phospholipid and a stoichiometry of 4-5 mol of oleic acid per mol of albumin, the oleic acid distribution was pH dependent, with greater than or equal to 80% of the oleic acid associated with albumin at pH 7.4; association was greater than or equal to 90% at pH 8.0. Decreasing the pH below 7.4 markedly decreased the proportion of fatty acid bound to albumin; at pH 5.4, less than or equal to 10% of the oleic acid was bound to albumin and greater than 90% was associated with vesicles. The distribution was reversible with pH and was independent of whether vesicles or albumin acted as a donor. These data suggest that pH may strongly influence the partitioning of fatty acid between cellular membranes and albumin. The 13C NMR method is also advantageous because it provides information about the structural environments of oleic acid bound to albumin or phospholipid, the ionization state of oleic acid in each environment, and the structural integrity of the vesicles. In addition, minimum and maximum limits for the exchange rates of oleic acid among different environments were obtained from the NMR data. PMID:3455761

  6. Computational study of coagulation factor VIIa's affinity for phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Taboureau, Olivier; Olsen, Ole Hvilsted

    2007-02-01

    The interaction between the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-rich domain of coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa), a vitamin-K-dependent enzyme, and phospholipid membranes plays a major role in initiation of blood coagulation. However, despite a high sequence and structural similarity to the Gla domain of other vitamin-K-dependent enzymes with a high membrane affinity, its affinity for negatively charged phospholipids is poor. A few amino acid differences are responsible for this observation. Based on the X-ray structure of lysophosphatidylserine (lysoPS) bound to the Gla domain of bovine prothrombin (Prth), models of the Gla domain of wildtype FVIIa and mutated FVIIa Gla domains in complex with lysoPS were built. Molecular dynamics (MD) and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations on the complexes were applied to investigate the significant difference in the binding affinity. The MD simulation approach provides a structural and dynamic support to the role of P10Q and K32E mutations in the improvement of the membrane contact. Hence, rotation of the Gly11 main chain generated during the MD simulation results in a hydrogen bond with Q10 side chain as well as the appearance of a hydrogen bond between E32 and Q10 forcing the loop harbouring Arg9 and Arg15 to shrink and thereby enhances the accessibility of the phospholipids to the calcium ions. Furthermore, the application of the SMD simulation method to dissociate C6-lysoPS from a series of Gla domain models exhibits a ranking of the rupture force that can be useful in the interpretation of the PS interaction with Gla domains. Finally, adiabatic mapping of Gla6 residue in FVIIa with or without insertion of Tyr4 confirms the critical role of the insertion on the conformation of the side chain Gla6 in FVIIa and the corresponding Gla7 in Prth. PMID:17131117

  7. Transfer of Oleic Acid between Albumin and Phospholipid Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, James A.; Cistola, David P.

    1986-01-01

    The net transfer of oleic acid between egg phosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles and bovine serum albumin has been monitored by 13C NMR spectroscopy and 90% isotopically substituted [1-13C]oleic acid. The carboxyl chemical shifts of oleic acid bound to albumin were different from those for oleic acid in phospholipid vesicles. Therefore, in mixtures of donor particles (vesicles or albumin with oleic acid) and acceptor particles (fatty acid-free albumin or vesicles), the equilibrium distribution of oleic acid was determined from chemical shift and peak intensity data without separation of donor and acceptor particles. In a system containing equal masses of albumin and phospholipid and a stoichiometry of 4-5 mol of oleic acid per mol of albumin, the oleic acid distribution was pH dependent, with >= 80% of the oleic acid associated with albumin at pH 7.4; association was >= 90% at pH 8.0. Decreasing the pH below 7.4 markedly decreased the proportion of fatty acid bound to albumin; at pH 5.4, <= 10% of the oleic acid was bound to albumin and >90% was associated with vesicles. The distribution was reversible with pH and was independent of whether vesicles or albumin acted as a donor. These data suggest that pH may strongly influence the partitioning of fatty acid between cellular membranes and albumin. The 13C NMR method is also advantageous because it provides information about the structural environments of oleic acid bound to albumin or phospholipid, the ionization state of oleic acid in each environment, and the structural integrity of the vesicles. In addition, minimum and maximum limits for the exchange rates of oleic acid among different environments were obtained from the NMR data.

  8. Magnetic field alignable domains in phospholipid vesicle membranes containing lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Beck, Paul; Liebi, Marianne; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Ishikawa, Takashi; Rüegger, Heinz; Zepik, Helmut; Fischer, Peter; Walde, Peter; Windhab, Erich

    2010-01-14

    Magnetic fields were applied as a structuring force on phospholipid-based vesicular systems, using paramagnetic lanthanide ions as magnetic handles anchored to the vesicle membrane. Different vesicle formulations were investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) in a magnetic field of up to 8 T, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), (31)P NMR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and permeability measurements with a fluorescent water-soluble marker (calcein). The investigated vesicle formulations consisted usually of 80 mol % of the phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 20 mol % of a chelator lipid (DMPE-DTPA; 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate) with complexed lanthanide ions (Tm(3+), Dy(3+), or La(3+)), and the total lipid concentration was 15 mM. Vesicles containing the paramagnetic lanthanide Tm(3+) or Dy(3+) exhibited a temperature-dependent response to magnetic fields, which can be explained by considering the formation of lipid domains, which upon reaching a critical size become alignable in a magnetic field. The features of this "magnetic field alignable domain model" are as follows: with decreasing temperature (from 30 to 2.5 degrees C) solid domains, consisting mainly of the higher melting phospholipid (DMPE-DTPA.lanthanide), begin to form and grow in size. The domains assemble the large magnetic moments conferred by the lanthanides and orient in magnetic fields. The direction of alignment depends on the type of lanthanide used. The domains orient with their normal parallel to the magnetic field with thulium (Tm(3+)) and perpendicular with dysprosium (Dy(3+)). No magnetic field alignable domains were observed if DMPE-DTPA is replaced either by POPE-DTPA (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetate) or by DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine).

  9. Transmembrane peptides influence the affinity of sterols for phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Joel H; Lönnfors, Max; Nyholm, Thomas K M

    2010-07-21

    Cholesterol is distributed unevenly between different cellular membrane compartments, and the cholesterol content increases from the inner bilayers toward the plasma membrane. It has been suggested that this cholesterol gradient is important in the sorting of transmembrane proteins. Cholesterol has also been to shown play an important role in lateral organization of eukaryotic cell membranes. In this study the aim was to determine how transmembrane proteins influence the lateral distribution of cholesterol in phospholipid bilayers. Insight into this can be obtained by studying how cholesterol interacts with bilayer membranes of different composition in the presence of designed peptides that mimic the transmembrane helices of proteins. For this purpose we developed an assay in which the partitioning of the fluorescent cholesterol analog CTL between LUVs and mbetaCD can be measured. Comparison of how cholesterol and CTL partitioning between mbetaCD and phospholipid bilayers with different composition suggests that CTL sensed changes in bilayer composition similarly as cholesterol. Therefore, the results obtained with CTL can be used to understand cholesterol distribution in lipid bilayers. The effect of WALP23 on CTL partitioning between DMPC bilayers and mbetaCD was measured. From the results it was clear that WALP23 increased both the order in the bilayers (as seen from CTL and DPH anisotropy) and the affinity of the sterol for the bilayer in a concentration dependent way. Although WALP23 also increased the order in DLPC and POPC bilayers the effects on CTL partitioning was much smaller with these lipids. This indicates that proteins have the largest effect on sterol interactions with phospholipids that have longer and saturated acyl chains. KALP23 did not significantly affect the acyl chain order in the phospholipid bilayers, and inclusion of KALP23 into DMPC bilayers slightly decreased CTL partitioning into the bilayer. This shows that transmembrane proteins can

  10. Photoluminescence-enhanced biocompatible quantum dots by phospholipid functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Yunfeng; He Peng Zhu Xinyuan

    2008-10-02

    A simple two-step strategy using phospholipid (PPL) to functionalize core/shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) has been described. The experimental data show that the use of S-H terminated PPL results not only in the high colloidal stability of core/shell CdSe/ZnS QDs in the aqueous phase, but also in the significant enhancement of photoluminescence. The degree of the enhancement is a function of the PPL-CdSe/ZnS QDs sample concentration. These results might be promising for future biological platform in new devices ranging from photovoltaic cells to biosensors and other devices.

  11. Autoradiographic imaging of phosphoinositide turnover in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, P.M.; Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1990-08-17

    With ({sup 3}H)cytidine as a precursor, phosphoinositide turnover can be localized in brain slices by selective autoradiography of the product ({sup 3}H)cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol, which is membrane-bound. In the cerebellum, glutamatergic stimulation elicits an increase of phosphoinositide turnover only in Purkinje cells and the molecular layer. In the hippocampus, both glutamatergic and muscarinic cholinergic stimulation increase phosphoinositide turnover, but with distinct localizations. Cholinergic stimulation affects CA1, CA3, CA4, and subiculum, whereas glutamatergic effects are restricted to the subiculum and CA3. Imaging phosphoinositide turnover in brain slices, which are amenable to electrophysiologic studies, will permit a dynamic localized analysis of regulation of this second messenger in response to synaptic stimulation of specific neuronal pathways.

  12. Warming Effects Enzyme Turnover During Decomposition of Subtropical Peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihi, D.; Inglett, P.; Inglett, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are the proximate agents for organic matter degradation, but the turnover rate of enzymes is often assumed in most decomposition models without direct observations. Here, we assess turnover rates of C (ß-D-glucosidase), N (Leucine aminopeptidase), and P (Phosphomonoesterase) degrading enzymes by spiking commercially available enzymes to the dissolved organic matter of two subtropical peats incubated at 15°C and 25°C and monitoring of net activity of spiked enzymes (i.e. the difference between the spiked and the non-spiked samples) over time. Turnover rates of all three enzymes were greater in the samples incubated at 25°C (ranged between 0.006 hr-1 to 0.014 hr-1) as compared to those incubated at 15°C (ranged between 0.002 hr-1 to 0.009 hr-1). Concentrations of dissolved organic matter were positively correlated with the turnover rates (R2 ranged between 0.71-0.77) of all enzyme groups. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to evaluate the turnover rates of enzymes in wetland soils as a function of warming and dissolved organic matter concentration. The findings suggest that warming-induced changes in the size of soil enzyme pool due to direct (by increasing protease activity) and indirect (by increasing concentrations of dissolved organic matter) effects on their turnover rates has potential to alter soil C stocks in a warmer world.

  13. Plant species persistence and turnover on small Bahamian islands.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Lloyd W

    2003-06-01

    I conducted surveys of the plant species occupying 136 small islands in the Exuma Cays and 58 small islands near Andros, Bahamas. Most species occurred on relatively few islands, and most islands contained relatively few species. Identities of the most common species differed between the two archipelagos. Comparisons with earlier surveys revealed species extinctions and immigrations. Turnover was relatively low on both a per island and a per species basis on both archipelagos, although significant spatial variation in turnover rates between archipelagos was found. Most islands experienced no turnover; islands on which turnover did occur were larger and had higher species richness. Likewise, most species did not turnover, although much variation existed in turnover rates among those that did. Experimental introductions of two species to very small islands naturally devoid of vegetation revealed that these islands could support plant life. One species survived on eight of ten islands for >9 years, including the effects of a moderate (class 2) hurricane. This hurricane caused substantial damage and loss of plant biomass, but resulted in no species extinctions on 30 small islands. Data for the small islands in this region, now spanning almost a decade, reveal that most populations are persistent over periods of years to decades, rarely going extinct or immigrating. Even moderate hurricanes seem to have little impact on species compositions.

  14. Extracellular proteases modify cell wall turnover in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Jolliffe, L K; Doyle, R J; Streips, U N

    1980-01-01

    The rate of turnover of peptidoglycan in exponentially growing cultures of Bacillus subtilis was observed to be sensitive to extracellular protease. In protease-deficient mutants the rates of cell wall turnover were greater than that of wild-type strain 168, whereas hyperprotease-producing strains exhibited decreased rates of peptidoglycan turnover. The rate of peptidogylcan turnover in a protease-deficient strain was decreased when the mutant was grown in the presence of a hyperprotease-producing strain. The addition of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a serine protease inhibitor, to cultures of hyperprotease-producing strains increased their rates of cell wall turnover. Isolated cell walls of all protease mutants contained autolysin levels equal to or greater than that of wild-type strain 168. The presence of filaments, or cells with incomplete septa, was observed in hyperprotease-producing strains or when a protease-deficient strain was grown in the presence of subtilisin. The results suggest that the turnover of cell walls in B. subtilis may be regulated by extracellular proteases. Images PMID:6102558

  15. Are you interested? A meta-analysis of relations between vocational interests and employee performance and turnover.

    PubMed

    Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Roth, Philip L; Putka, Dan J; Lanivich, Stephen E

    2011-11-01

    A common belief among researchers is that vocational interests have limited value for personnel selection. However, no comprehensive quantitative summaries of interests validity research have been conducted to substantiate claims for or against the use of interests. To help address this gap, we conducted a meta-analysis of relations between interests and employee performance and turnover using data from 74 studies and 141 independent samples. Overall validity estimates (corrected for measurement error in the criterion but not for range restriction) for single interest scales were .14 for job performance, .26 for training performance, -.19 for turnover intentions, and -.15 for actual turnover. Several factors appeared to moderate interest-criterion relations. For example, validity estimates were larger when interests were theoretically relevant to the work performed in the target job. The type of interest scale also moderated validity, such that corrected validities were larger for scales designed to assess interests relevant to a particular job or vocation (e.g., .23 for job performance) than for scales designed to assess a single, job-relevant realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising, or conventional (i.e., RIASEC) interest (.10) or a basic interest (.11). Finally, validity estimates were largest when studies used multiple interests for prediction, either by using a single job or vocation focused scale (which tend to tap multiple interests) or by using a regression-weighted composite of several RIASEC or basic interest scales. Overall, the results suggest that vocational interests may hold more promise for predicting employee performance and turnover than researchers may have thought.

  16. Explaining the Gap in Charter and Traditional Public School Teacher Turnover Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuit, David A.; Smith, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses national survey data to examine why charter school teachers are more likely to turnover than their traditional public school counterparts. We test whether the turnover gap is explained by different distributions of factors that are empirically and theoretically linked to turnover risk. We find that the turnover rate of charter…

  17. The Cost of Teacher Turnover in Five School Districts: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Gary; Crowe, Edward: Schaefer, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of a pilot study of the cost of teacher turnover in five school districts. We examine the rate of turnover, the relationship between turnover and teacher and school characteristics, and the costs associated with recruiting, hiring, and training replacement teachers. We find evidence that turnover costs,…

  18. Reviewing Employee Turnover: Focusing on Proximal Withdrawal States and an Expanded Criterion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hom, Peter W.; Mitchell, Terence R.; Lee, Thomas W.; Griffeth, Rodger W.

    2012-01-01

    We reconceptualize employee turnover to promote researchers' understanding and prediction of why employees quit or stay in employing institutions. A literature review identifies shortcomings with prevailing turnover dimensions. In response, we expand the conceptual domain of the turnover criterion to include multiple types of turnover (notably,…

  19. Structure and organization of phospholipid/polysaccharide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerelli, Y.; Di Bari, M. T.; Deriu, A.; Cantù, L.; Colombo, P.; Como, C.; Motta, S.; Sonvico, F.; May, R.

    2008-03-01

    In recent years nanoparticles and microparticles composed of polymeric or lipid material have been proposed as drug carriers for improving the efficacy of encapsulated drugs. For the production of these systems different materials have been proposed, among them phospholipids and polysaccharides due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, low cost and safety. We report here a morphological and structural investigation, performed using cryo-TEM, static light scattering and small angle neutron and x-ray scattering, on phospholipid/saccharide nanoparticles loaded with a lipophilic positively charged drug (tamoxifen citrate) used in breast cancer therapy. The lipid component was soybean lecithin; the saccharide one was chitosan that usually acts as an outer coating increasing vesicle stability. The microscopy and scattering data indicate the presence of two distinct nanoparticle families: uni-lamellar vesicles with average radius 90 Å and multi-lamellar vesicles with average radius 440 Å. In both families the inner core is occupied by the solvent. The presence of tamoxifen gives rise to a multi-lamellar structure of the lipid outer shell. It also induces a positive surface charge into the vesicles, repelling the positively charged chitosan molecules which therefore do not take part in nanoparticle formation.

  20. Infant cerebral cortex phospholipid fatty-acid composition and diet.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, J; Cockburn, F; Patrick, W A; Jamieson, E C; Logan, R W

    1992-10-01

    It has not been established whether nutrition in early infancy affects subsequent neurodevelopment and function. If there is an effect, it seems probable that the essential fatty acids and their metabolites, the major constituents of brain structure, will be the most susceptible to dietary influence. We determined the phospholipid fatty-acid composition of cerebral cortex grey matter obtained from 20 term and 2 preterm infants who had died of "cot deaths" and related results to the milk diet the infants had received. Tissues were analysed by gas chromatography. The mean weight percentage of docosahexaenoic acid was significantly greater (p less than 0.02) in 5 breast-milk-fed infants (9.7%) than in 5 age-comparable formula-milk-fed infants (7.6%). In these formula-fed babies, the overall percentage of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids was maintained by increased incorporation of the major n-6 series fatty acids. In 1 formula-fed preterm infant, in whom the lowest concentration of cortical docosahexaenoic acid was found, the compensatory effect was only partial with both n-9 series eicosatrienoic acid or Mead acid and docosatrienoic acid also detected in the phospholipid. Supplementation of formula milks for term infants with docosahexaenoic acid and those for preterm infants with both docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid could prove beneficial to subsequent neurodevelopment.

  1. Effect of Lysophosphatidylcholine on the Surface Hydration of Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Marilene; Bales, Barney L.; Peric, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    The interfacial properties of the negatively charged dimyristoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) and the zwitterionic dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) vesicles mixed with the fusion inhibitor lysomyristoylphosphatidylcholine (LMPC) are investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). At 35 °C, addition of 20 mole percent of LMPC to the DMPG vesicles increases the effective concentration of water in the interfacial layer of DMPG vesicles from 19.3 M to 27.7 M, whereas in the case of mixed DMPC-LMPC vesicle the effective water concentration in the interfacial layer of DMPC vesicles only changes, from 15.1 M to 18.4 M. The hydrogen bonding structure in both mixed DMPG-LMPC and mixed DMPC-LMPC vesicles becomes stronger with an increasing fraction of LMPC in the vesicles. The average area per phospholipid decreases in mixed DMPC-LMPC vesicles, while it increases in mixed DMPG-LMPC vesicles as the proportion of LMPC in the vesicle increases. The inhibitory nature of LMPC in both vesicle and biological fusion comes from the increase in surface hydration, as well as from the dynamic cone shape of LMPC in the phospholipid bilayer PMID:18070590

  2. Cationic Polyene Phospholipids as DNA Carriers for Ocular Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Susana; Calado, Sofia; Bitoque, Diogo; Oliveira, Ana Vanessa; Øpstad, Christer L.; Zeeshan, Muhammad; Sliwka, Hans-Richard; Partali, Vassilia; Pungente, Michael D.; Silva, Gabriela A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent success in the treatment of congenital blindness demonstrates the potential of ocular gene therapy as a therapeutic approach. The eye is a good target due to its small size, minimal diffusion of therapeutic agent to the systemic circulation, and low immune and inflammatory responses. Currently, most approaches are based on viral vectors, but efforts continue towards the synthesis and evaluation of new nonviral carriers to improve nucleic acid delivery. Our objective is to evaluate the efficiency of novel cationic retinoic and carotenoic glycol phospholipids, designated C20-18, C20-20, and C30-20, to deliver DNA to human retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells. Liposomes were produced by solvent evaporation of ethanolic mixtures of the polyene compounds and coformulated with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) or cholesterol (Chol). Addition of DNA to the liposomes formed lipoplexes, which were characterized for binding, size, biocompatibility, and transgene efficiency. Lipoplex formulations of suitable size and biocompatibility were assayed for DNA delivery, both qualitatively and quantitatively, using RPE cells and a GFP-encoding plasmid. The retinoic lipoplex formulation with DOPE revealed a transfection efficiency comparable to the known lipid references 3β-[N-(N′,N′-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]-cholesterol (DC-Chol) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC) and GeneJuice. The results demonstrate that cationic polyene phospholipids have potential as DNA carriers for ocular gene therapy. PMID:25147812

  3. Phospholipid Polymer Biointerfaces for Lab-on-a-Chip Devices.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Takai, Madoka; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2010-06-01

    This review summarizes recent achievements and progress in the development of various functional 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer biointerfaces for lab-on-a-chip devices and applications. As phospholipid polymers, MPC polymers can form cell-membrane-like surfaces by surface chemistry and physics and thereby provide biointerfaces capable of suppressing protein adsorption and many subsequent biological responses. In order to enable application to microfluidic devices, a number of MPC polymers with diverse functions have been specially designed and synthesized by incorporating functional units such as charge and active ester for generating the microfluidic flow and conjugating biomolecules, respectively. Furthermore, these polymers were incorporated with silane or hydrophobic moiety to construct stable interfaces on various substrate materials such as glass, quartz, poly(methyl methacrylate), and poly(dimethylsiloxane), via a silane-coupling reaction or hydrophobic interactions. The basic interfacial properties of these interfaces have been characterized from multiple aspects of chemistry, physics, and biology, and the suppression of nonspecific bioadsorption and control of microfluidic flow have been successfully achieved using these biointerfaces on a chip. Further, many chip-based biomedical applications such as immunoassays and DNA separation have been accomplished by integrating these biointerfaces on a chip. Therefore, functional phospholipid polymer interfaces are promising and useful for application to lab-on-a-chip devices in biomedicine.

  4. [Some peculiarities of brain phospholipids in deep sea fishes].

    PubMed

    Pomazanskaia, L F; Pravdina, N I; Chirkovskaia, E V

    1975-01-01

    Total phospholipids (PL) as well as the content of various phospholipid classes and their fatty acid composition have been investigated in the brain of mesopelagic and abyssal marine teleosts. These species were compared to shallow water ones. The brain of deep sea fishes was found to be very poor in PL as compared to the brain of mesopelagic ans surface water species. No differences concerning the brain PL content were revealed between the two last mentioned groups. The relative content of separate PL classes was very similar in all the species studied irrespectively of the depth of their habitat. Peculiarities were found in fatty acid composition of individual PL from deep sea species as compared to surface ones. The deeper the habitat, the lower the content of saturated fatty acids, especially of the stearic acid. The lowest content of saturated fatty acids, maximum level of polyenoic fatty acids as well as some peculiarities in the relative content of particular fatty acids were found in the brain of ultraabyssal (6, 000 m) Leucicorus sp. PMID:1217333

  5. Chemical modification of proteins during peroxidation of phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Januszewski, Andrzej S; Alderson, Nathan L; Jenkins, Alicia J; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2005-07-01

    Chemical modification of proteins by advanced glycation and lipoxidation end products is implicated in the pathogenesis of macrovascular disease in aging and diabetes. To identify biomarkers of the lipoxidative modification of protein, we studied the oxidation of phospholipids in the presence of the model protein RNase A and compared protein-bound products formed in these reactions with those formed during oxidation of plasma proteins. Metal-catalyzed oxidation of 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-phosphatidylcholine or 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-phosphatidylcholine in the presence of RNase led to the loss of amino groups in RNase and the incorporation of phosphate, hexanoate, pentanedioate, nonanedioate, and palmitate into protein. Protein-bound palmitate and phosphate correlated strongly with one another, and protein-bound pentanedioate and nonanedioate, derived from arachidonate and linoleate, respectively, accounted for approximately 20% of the cross-linking of lipid phosphorus to protein. Similar results were obtained on oxidation of total plasma or isolated LDL. We conclude that alkanedioic acids are quantitatively important linkers of oxidized phospholipids to proteins and that measurement of protein-bound phosphate and long-chain fatty acids may be useful for assessing long-term lipid peroxidative damage to proteins in vivo. Analyses of plasma proteins from control and diabetic patients indicated significant increases in lipoxidative modification of protein in diabetic compared with control subjects.

  6. Human autoreactive T cells recognize CD1b and phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; van Berlo, Twan; Hilmenyuk, Tamara; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Wolf, Benjamin J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Uldrich, Adam P.; Napolitani, Giorgio; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Altman, John D.; Willemsen, Peter; Huang, Shouxiong; Rossjohn, Jamie; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Brenner, Michael B.; Godfrey, Dale I.; Moody, D. Branch

    2016-01-01

    In contrast with the common detection of T cells that recognize MHC, CD1a, CD1c, or CD1d proteins, CD1b autoreactive T cells have been difficult to isolate in humans. Here we report the development of polyvalent complexes of CD1b proteins and carbohydrate backbones (dextramers) and their use in identifying CD1b autoreactive T cells from human donors. Activation is mediated by αβ T-cell receptors (TCRs) binding to CD1b-phospholipid complexes, which is sufficient to activate autoreactive responses to CD1b-expressing cells. Using mass spectrometry and T-cell responses to scan through the major classes of phospholipids, we identified phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as the immunodominant lipid antigen. T cells did not discriminate the chemical differences that distinguish mammalian PG from bacterial PG. Whereas most models of T-cell recognition emphasize TCR discrimination of differing self and foreign structures, CD1b autoreactive T cells recognize lipids with dual self and foreign origin. PG is rare in the cellular membranes that carry CD1b proteins. However, bacteria and mitochondria are rich in PG, so these data point to a more general mechanism of immune detection of infection- or stress-associated lipids. PMID:26621732

  7. Metformin Decouples Phospholipid Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tim A. D.; Phyu, Su M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The antidiabetic drug metformin, currently undergoing trials for cancer treatment, modulates lipid and glucose metabolism both crucial in phospholipid synthesis. Here the effect of treatment of breast tumour cells with metformin on phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) metabolism which plays a key role in membrane synthesis and intracellular signalling has been examined. Methods MDA-MB-468, BT474 and SKBr3 breast cancer cell lines were treated with metformin and [3H-methyl]choline and [14C(U)]glucose incorporation and lipid accumulation determined in the presence and absence of lipase inhibitors. Activities of choline kinase (CK), CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyl transferase (CCT) and PtdCho-phospholipase C (PLC) were also measured. [3H] Radiolabelled metabolites were determined using thin layer chromatography. Results Metformin-treated cells exhibited decreased formation of [3H]phosphocholine but increased accumulation of [3H]choline by PtdCho. CK and PLC activities were decreased and CCT activity increased by metformin-treatment. [14C] incorporation into fatty acids was decreased and into glycerol was increased in breast cancer cells treated with metformin incubated with [14C(U)]glucose. Conclusion This is the first study to show that treatment of breast cancer cells with metformin induces profound changes in phospholipid metabolism. PMID:26959405

  8. Extended elution of phospholipid from silicone hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Pitt, William G; Zhao, Yibei; Jack, Daniel R; Perez, Krystian X; Jones, Peter W; Marelli, Ryan; Nelson, Jared L; Pruitt, John D

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of phospholipid release from an experimental reusable wear silicone hydrogel contact lens was performed to assess the possible use of these lenses for phospholipid delivery to increase eye comfort to patients who prefer reusable wear lenses. Contact lenses were loaded with 200 μg of radio-labeled 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) from a solution of n-propanol. To simulate 30 days of diurnal use with overnight cleaning, these lenses were eluted for 16 h at 35 °C into artificial tear fluid (ATF), and then eluted at room temperature (~22 °C) for 8 h in one of three commercial contact lens cleaning systems. This was repeated for 30 days. The elution of DMPC into ATF was greater on the first day, followed by a fairly constant amount of elution each day thereafter. The type of cleaning system had a statistically significant effect on the elution rate during daily exposure to ATF. The rate of elution into cleaning solutions did not show any enhanced elution on the first day; there was a fairly constant elution rate. Again, the type of cleaning system significantly influenced the elution rate into the nightly cleaner.

  9. Inositol depletion restores vesicle transport in yeast phospholipid flippase mutants.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Kanako; Yamamoto, Takaharu; Sakai, Shota; Mioka, Tetsuo; Sano, Takamitsu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, type 4 P-type ATPases function as phospholipid flippases, which translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic leaflet to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the lipid bilayer. Flippases function in the formation of transport vesicles, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here, we isolate an arrestin-related trafficking adaptor, ART5, as a multicopy suppressor of the growth and endocytic recycling defects of flippase mutants in budding yeast. Consistent with a previous report that Art5p downregulates the inositol transporter Itr1p by endocytosis, we found that flippase mutations were also suppressed by the disruption of ITR1, as well as by depletion of inositol from the culture medium. Interestingly, inositol depletion suppressed the defects in all five flippase mutants. Inositol depletion also partially restored the formation of secretory vesicles in a flippase mutant. Inositol depletion caused changes in lipid composition, including a decrease in phosphatidylinositol and an increase in phosphatidylserine. A reduction in phosphatidylinositol levels caused by partially depleting the phosphatidylinositol synthase Pis1p also suppressed a flippase mutation. These results suggest that inositol depletion changes the lipid composition of the endosomal/TGN membranes, which results in vesicle formation from these membranes in the absence of flippases.

  10. Hydrated cholesterol: Phospholipid domains probed by synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonov, I.; Daillant, J.; Fragneto, G.; Kjaer, K.; Micha, J. S.; Rieutord, F.; Leiserowitz, L.

    2009-10-01

    X-ray scattering experiments on mixed films of cholesterol and phospholipids at air-water and Si solid-water interfaces were undertaken to glean information on pathological crystallization of cholesterol bilayers. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction patterns at the air-water interface of various cholesterol:dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (Ch:DPPC) monolayer mixtures compressed beyond monolayer collapse yielded the established 10×7.5 Å2 Ch bilayer motif, for Ch:DPPC molar ratios higher than 2.5:1. Attempts to obtain a diffraction signal from various Ch:phospholipid film mixtures at the Si solid-water interface, indicative of the presence of the Ch bilayer motif, were unsuccessful. Only after removal of sufficient water from the cell was a weak diffraction signal obtained suggestive of a cholesterol film two bilayers thick. Off-specular X-ray reflectivity measurements made on a 1.75:1 mixture of Ch and bovine cardiac phosphatidylcholine (BCPC) deposited as a bilayer on a Si wafer and placed in a cell filled with water yielded positive results. The derived electron density profile showed the presence of a bilayer mixture consistent with a phase separation of cholesterol and BCPC, and possible formation of a crystalline cholesterol bilayer within the hydrated mixed bilayer, but not a proof thereof.

  11. Purification of phospholipid methyltransferase from rat liver microsomal fraction.

    PubMed Central

    Pajares, M A; Villalba, M; Mato, J M

    1986-01-01

    Phospholipid methyltransferase, the enzyme that converts phosphatidylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine with S-adenosyl-L-methionine as the methyl donor, was purified to apparent homogeneity from rat liver microsomal fraction. When analysed by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis only one protein, with molecular mass about 50 kDa, is detected. This protein could be phosphorylated at a single site by incubation with [alpha-32P]ATP and the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. A less-purified preparation of the enzyme is mainly composed of two proteins, with molecular masses about 50 kDa and 25 kDa, the 50 kDa form being phosphorylated at the same site as the homogeneous enzyme. After purification of both proteins by electro-elution, the 25 kDa protein forms a dimer and migrates on SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with molecular mass about 50 kDa. Peptide maps of purified 25 kDa and 50 kDa proteins are identical, indicating that both proteins are formed by the same polypeptide chain(s). It is concluded that rat liver phospholipid methyltransferase can exist in two forms, as a monomer of 25 kDa and as a dimer of 50 kDa. The dimer can be phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3800912

  12. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust soot dispersed in phospholipid surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.; Keane, M.; Xing, S.; Harrison, J.; Gautam, M.; Ong, T.

    1994-06-01

    Organics extractable from respirable diesel exhaust soot particles by organic solvents have been known for some time to be direct acting frameshift mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay. Upon deposition in a pulmonary alveolus or respiratory bronchiole, respirable diesel soot particles will contact first the hypophase which is coated by and laden with surfactants. To model interactions of soot and pulmonary surfactant, the authors dispersed soots in vitro in the primary phospholipid pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl glycerophosphorylcholine (lecithin) (DPL) in physiological saline. They have shown that diesel soots dispersed in lecithin surfactant can express mutagenic activity, in the Ames assay system using S. typhimurium TA98, comparable to that expressed by equal amounts of soot extracted by dichloromethane/dimethylsulfoxide (DCM/DMSO). Here the authors report additional data on the same system using additional exhaust soots and also using two other phospholipids, dipalmitoyl glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine (DPPE), and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA), with different ionic character hydrophilic moieties. A preliminary study of the surfactant dispersed soot in an eucaryotic cell test system also is reported.

  13. Condensed complexes and the calorimetry of cholesterol-phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, T G; McConnell, H M

    2001-01-01

    A recent thermodynamic model describes a reversible reaction between cholesterol (C) and phospholipid (P) to form a condensed complex C(nq)P(np). Here q and p are relatively prime integers used to define the stoichiometric composition, and n is a measure of cooperativity. The present study applies this model to the scanning calorimetry of binary mixtures of cholesterol and saturated phosphatidylcholines, especially work by McElhaney and collaborators. These mixtures generally show two heat capacity peaks, a sharp peak and a broad peak. The sharp heat absorption is largely due to the chain melting transition of pure phospholipid. In the present work the broad heat absorption is attributed to the thermal dissociation of complexes. The best fits of the model to the data require the complex formation to be highly cooperative, with cooperativity n = 12. Detailed comparisons are made between model calculations and calorimetric data. A number of unusual features of the data arise naturally in the model. The principal discrepancy between the calculations and experimental results is a spurious calculated heat absorption peak. This discrepancy is related to the reported relative magnitudes of the integrated broad and sharp heat absorption curves. PMID:11606290

  14. Warming Alters the Routing of Labile and Slower-Turnover Carbon Through Distinct Microbial Groups in Boreal Forest Organic Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, S. E.; Billings, S. A.; Lane, C. S.; Li, J.; Fogel, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Increased temperature has been linked to greater losses of soil organic carbon (SOC) via microbial respiration and potentially greater relative increases in mineralization of more complex, slow-turnover SOC pools. Though critical for predicting climate feedbacks, our mechanistic understanding of these temperature responses remains limited. Here we report results from a warming experiment using organic horizon soils from two mesic, boreal forest sites with contrasting climate regimes. We replaced extant Oi soil sub-horizons with another coniferous Oi possessing a distinct δ13C signature, and tracked incorporation of the replaced Oi-C and, by difference, the more humified Oea sub-horizon C into microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) following 120 day incubations at 15C and 20C. We demonstrate how regional climate (site effects) and experimental warming (temperature effects) influence microbial incorporation of Oi versus slower-turnover Oea SOC pools. Congruent with increased mineralization in these soils, the quantity of total PLFA, a proxy for microbial biomass, increased by 32-60% with experimental warming and was 20-42% higher within soils from the warmer versus cooler site. The proportion of Gram-positive bacterial PLFA-C derived from Oi-C more than doubled and coincided with a reduction in the incorporation of Oi-C into fungal relative to bacterial PLFA with laboratory warming and in soils from the warmer site. In conjunction with the relative decrease in fungal incorporation of Oi-C, warming led to an increase of 22-31% in the proportion of fungal PLFA-C derived from the Oea-C. This is consistent with site effects and an increased incorporation of this slower-turnover SOC pool in soils from the warmer site. The increase in microbial biomass and shift in routing of Oi and Oea pools through PLFA indicate that warming increases fungal mineralization of more slow-turnover C pools in these boreal organic soils. This increased exploitation of low C:N Oea by fungi

  15. Mammalian P4-ATPases and ABC transporters and their role in phospholipid transport.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jonathan A; Quazi, Faraz; Molday, Robert S

    2013-03-01

    Transport of phospholipids across cell membranes plays a key role in a wide variety of biological processes. These include membrane biosynthesis, generation and maintenance of membrane asymmetry, cell and organelle shape determination, phagocytosis, vesicle trafficking, blood coagulation, lipid homeostasis, regulation of membrane protein function, apoptosis, etc. P(4)-ATPases and ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are the two principal classes of membrane proteins that actively transport phospholipids across cellular membranes. P(4)-ATPases utilize the energy from ATP hydrolysis to flip aminophospholipids from the exocytoplasmic (extracellular/lumen) to the cytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes generating membrane lipid asymmetry and lipid imbalance which can induce membrane curvature. Many ABC transporters play crucial roles in lipid homeostasis by actively transporting phospholipids from the cytoplasmic to the exocytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes or exporting phospholipids to protein acceptors or micelles. Recent studies indicate that some ABC proteins can also transport phospholipids in the opposite direction. The importance of P(4)-ATPases and ABC transporters is evident from the findings that mutations in many of these transporters are responsible for severe human genetic diseases linked to defective phospholipid transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism.

  16. Phospholipid profile in tracheal aspirates of very preterm neonates: effect of prenatal betamethasone administration.

    PubMed

    Landmann, Eva; Weller, Eberhard; Stoll-Becker, Simone; Gortner, Ludwig

    2004-07-15

    We compared the phospholipid profile in tracheal aspirates from surfactant-treated preterm neonates with and without prenatal betamethasone administration. We found higher phosphatidylglycerol concentrations and lower phosphatidylinositol and sphingomyelin concentrations in corticosteroid-treated preterms ( P < 0.01). We speculate that prenatal corticosteroids enhance biochemical surfactant phospholipid maturation.

  17. Phospholipid-binding proteins differ in their capacity to induce autoantibodies and murine systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Levine, J S; Subang, R; Setty, S; Cabrera, J; Laplante, P; Fritzler, M J; Rauch, J

    2014-07-01

    We have previously shown that immunization of nonautoimmune mice with the phospholipid-binding protein β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), in combination with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induces a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with sequential emergence of autoantibodies and glomerulonephritis. Here, we determine whether the paradigm for induction of murine SLE extends to other phospholipid-binding proteins. Mice were immunized with a phospholipid-binding protein (prothrombin (PT), protein S, or β2GPI), or a nonphospholipid-binding protein (glu-plasminogen), in the presence of LPS. The breadth and degree of the autoantibody response, and the frequency of glomerulonephritis, varied among the three proteins, with β2GPI being the most effective in inducing SLE-like disease. The phospholipid-binding proteins also differed in the pattern of serum cytokines they elicited. The most apparent difference between β2GPI and the other phospholipid-binding proteins was in their ability to bind to LPS: β2GPI bound to LPS, while PT and protein S did not. Our data suggest that binding to phospholipid(s) is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for full induction of murine SLE. We propose that other properties, such as physiologic function, avidity for anionic phospholipids, and degree of interaction with other cell surface and/or circulating molecules (particularly LPS) may determine the range and severity of disease.

  18. Crystal and molecular structure of a phospholipid component: L-alpha-glycerophosphorylcholine cadmium chloride trihydrate.

    PubMed

    Sundaralingam, M; Jensen, L H

    1965-11-19

    The structure of L-alpha-glycerophosphorylcholine cadmium chloride trihydrate has been determined by the conventional, single-crystal, x-ray diffraction technique. The phospholipid component displays the characteristic gauche conformation for the choline residue and the gauche-gauche conformation for the glycerol moiety. Therefore, a possible model for the structures of phospholipids is similar to that proposed by Finean.

  19. Protein turnover methods in single-celled organisms: dynamic SILAC.

    PubMed

    Claydon, Amy J; Beynon, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Early achievements in proteomics were qualitative, typified by the identification of very small quantities of proteins. However, as the subject has developed, there has been a pressure to develop approaches to define the amounts of each protein--whether in a relative or an absolute sense. A further dimension to quantitative proteomics embeds the behavior of each protein in terms of its turnover. Virtually every protein in the cell is in a dynamic state, subject to continuous synthesis and degradation, the relative rates of which control the expansion or the contraction of the protein pool, and the absolute values of which dictate the temporal responsiveness of the protein pool. Strategies must therefore be developed to assess the turnover of individual proteins in the proteome. Because a protein can be turning over rapidly even when the protein pool is in steady state, the only acceptable approach to measure turnover is to use metabolic labels that are incorporated or lost from the protein pool as it is replaced. Using metabolic labeling on a proteome-wide scale in turn requires metabolic labels that contain stable isotopes, the incorporation or loss of which can be assessed by mass spectrometry. A typical turnover experiment is complex. The choice of metabolic label is dictated by several factors, including abundance in the proteome, metabolic redistribution of the label in the precursor pool, and the downstream mass spectrometric analytical protocols. Key issues include the need to control and understand the relative isotope abundance of the precursor, the optimization of label flux into and out of the protein pool, and a sampling strategy that ensures the coverage of the greatest range of turnover rates. Finally, the informatics approaches to data analysis will not be as straightforward as in other areas of proteomics. In this chapter, we will discuss the principles and practice of workflow development for turnover analysis, exemplified by the development of

  20. Plasma phospholipid pentadecanoic acid, EPA, and DHA, and the frequency of dairy and fish product intake in young children

    PubMed Central

    Lund-Blix, Nicolai A.; Rønningen, Kjersti S.; Bøås, Håkon; Tapia, German; Andersen, Lene F.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a lack of studies comparing dietary assessment methods with the biomarkers of fatty acids in children. Objective The objective was to evaluate the suitability of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to rank young children according to their intake of dairy and fish products by comparing food frequency estimates to the plasma phospholipid fatty acids pentadecanoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Design Cross-sectional data for the present study were derived from the prospective cohort ‘Environmental Triggers of Type 1 Diabetes Study’. Infants were recruited from the Norwegian general population during 2001–2007. One hundred and ten (age 3–10 years) children had sufficient volumes of plasma and FFQ filled in within 2 months from blood sampling and were included in this evaluation study. The quantitative determination of plasma phospholipid fatty acids was done by fatty acid methyl ester analysis. The association between the frequency of dairy and fish product intake and the plasma phospholipid fatty acids was assessed by a Spearman correlation analysis and by investigating whether participants were classified into the same quartiles of distribution. Results Significant correlations were found between pentadecanoic acid and the intake frequency of total dairy products (r=0.29), total fat dairy products (r=0.39), and cheese products (r=0.36). EPA and DHA were significantly correlated with the intake frequency of oily fish (r=0.26 and 0.37, respectively) and cod liver/fish oil supplements (r=0.47 for EPA and r=0.50 DHA). To a large extent, the FFQ was able to classify individuals into the same quartile as the relevant fatty acid biomarker. Conclusions The present study suggests that, when using the plasma phospholipid fatty acids pentadecanoic acid, EPA, and DHA as biomarkers, the FFQ used in young children showed a moderate capability to rank the intake frequency of dairy products with a high-fat content

  1. Pharmacological characterization of muscarinic receptors implicated in rabbit detrusor muscle contraction and activation of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis in rabbit detrusor and parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Barras, M; Coste, A; Eon, M T; Guillot, E

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the pharmacological characteristics of the functional muscarinic receptors implicated in rabbit detrusor contraction and coupled to inositol phospholipid turnover in rabbit detrusor and parotid gland. The selectivity of several muscarinic antagonists for detrusor vs. salivary gland muscarinic receptors was also examined. The affinities for the muscarinic m1-, m2- and m3-receptor subtypes were determined using membranes from human cloned receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells using [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine as a radioligand. Anti-muscarinic activity was determined in isolated rabbit detrusor by measuring the displacement of the contractile response to carbachol, and in rabbit detrusor and rabbit parotid by measuring the displacement of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis (total inositol phosphate accumulation) to carbachol. A significant correlation was found between the potencies to antagonize carbachol-induced rabbit detrusor contraction (pK(B)) and the affinities (pKi) for the m3-receptor subtype (r = 0.93, P = 5 x 10(-6)). Lower, but significant, correlations [0.88 (P = 6.3 x 10(-5)), 0.72 (P = 4.6 x 10(-3))] were obtained with m1- or m2-receptor subtypes, respectively. Each muscarinic antagonist tested displayed similar potency to antagonize carbachol-stimulated inositol phospholipid hydrolysis in rabbit detrusor and parotid (r = 0.96, P = 8 x 10(-3)). A significant correlation was found between the potencies to antagonize carbachol-stimulated inositol phospholipid hydrolysis (pK(B)), determined in rabbit detrusor and rabbit parotid, and the affinities (pK(i)) for the m3-receptor subtype [r = 0.96 (P = 0.01), 0.99 (P = 5 x 10(-5)), respectively] and for the m1-receptor subtype [r = 0.98 (P = 3.5 x 10(-3)), 0.94 (P = 0.02), respectively] but not for the m2-receptor subtype [r = 0.33, 0.57, ns, respectively]. In each in vitro assay, methoctramine (preferential M2 selective antagonist) and pirenzepine (preferential M1 selective

  2. STRUCTURAL DETERMINATION AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL PHOSPHOLIPIDS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a comprehensive spectral analysis of common bacterial phospholipids using electrospray/mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) under both negative and positive ionization conditions. Phospholipids under positive ionization yield sodium-adduct molecular ions which are mos...

  3. Phospholipid Membrane Protection by Sugar Molecules during Dehydration-Insights into Molecular Mechanisms Using Scattering Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Christopher J.; Lenné, Thomas; Koster, Karen L.; Kent, Ben; Bryant, Gary

    2014-09-24

    Scattering techniques have played a key role in our understanding of the structure and function of phospholipid membranes. These techniques have been applied widely to study how different molecules (e.g., cholesterol) can affect phospholipid membrane structure. However, there has been much less attention paid to the effects of molecules that remain in the aqueous phase. One important example is the role played by small solutes, particularly sugars, in protecting phospholipid membranes during drying or slow freezing. In this paper, we present new results and a general methodology, which illustrate how contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and synchrotron-based X-ray scattering (small angle (SAXS) and wide angle (WAXS)) can be used to quantitatively understand the interactions between solutes and phospholipids. Specifically, we show the assignment of lipid phases with synchrotron SAXS and explain how SANS reveals the exclusion of sugars from the aqueous region in the particular example of hexagonal II phases formed by phospholipids.

  4. Self-reproducing catalyst drives repeated phospholipid synthesis and membrane growth

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Michael D.; Yang, Jun; Selimkhanov, Jangir; Cole, Christian M.; Tsimring, Lev S.; Devaraj, Neal K.

    2015-01-01

    Cell membranes are dynamic structures found in all living organisms. There have been numerous constructs that model phospholipid membranes. However, unlike natural membranes, these biomimetic systems cannot sustain growth owing to an inability to replenish phospholipid-synthesizing catalysts. Here we report on the design and synthesis of artificial membranes embedded with synthetic, self-reproducing catalysts capable of perpetuating phospholipid bilayer formation. Replacing the complex biochemical pathways used in nature with an autocatalyst that also drives lipid synthesis leads to the continual formation of triazole phospholipids and membrane-bound oligotriazole catalysts from simpler starting materials. In addition to continual phospholipid synthesis and vesicle growth, the synthetic membranes are capable of remodeling their physical composition in response to changes in the environment by preferentially incorporating specific precursors. These results demonstrate that complex membranes capable of indefinite self-synthesis can emerge when supplied with simpler chemical building blocks. PMID:26100914

  5. Critical Assessment of Glyco- and Phospholipid Separation by Using Silica Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Nicole J.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs) are commonly used to characterize microbial communities in situ and the phylogenetic positions of newly isolated microorganisms. PLFAs are obtained through separation of phospholipids from glycolipids and neutral lipids using silica column chromatography. We evaluated the performance of this separation method for the first time using direct detection of intact polar lipids (IPLs) with high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). We show that under either standard or modified conditions, the phospholipid fraction contains not only phospholipids but also other lipid classes such as glycolipids, betaine lipids, and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols. Thus, commonly reported PLFA compositions likely are not derived purely from phospholipids and perhaps may not be representative of fatty acids present in living microbes. PMID:24162579

  6. Oxidative assessment of phospholipid-stabilized perfluorocarbon-based blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Tarara, T E; Malinoff, S H; Pelura, T J

    1994-01-01

    Methods based on the HPLC separation with subsequent UV detection and spectrofluorimetry have been developed to monitor the formation of oxidative decomposition products of phospholipids in perfluorocarbon emulsions. Catalytic, as well as emulsion oxidative stability studies have been conducted utilizing egg yolk phospholipid (EYP) and perfluorocarbons of varied compositions/purity in order to assess their effect on susceptibility to oxidation. Our studies indicate that phospholipid composition, degree of unsaturation, perfluorocarbon purity and the presence of oxygen and trace metals have a significant effect on the formation of oxidative decomposition products. A combination of methods has proven useful in monitoring the levels of oxidative decomposition products of phospholipids in phospholipid-stabilized perfluorocarbon-based blood substitutes. Such an approach has proven beneficial in the development of pharmaceutical agents of potentially higher quality and storage stability. PMID:7849935

  7. Similar Processes but Different Environmental Filters for Soil Bacterial and Fungal Community Composition Turnover on a Broad Spatial Scale

    PubMed Central

    Chemidlin Prévost-Bouré, Nicolas; Dequiedt, Samuel; Thioulouse, Jean; Lelièvre, Mélanie; Saby, Nicolas P. A.; Jolivet, Claudy; Arrouays, Dominique; Plassart, Pierre; Lemanceau, Philippe; Ranjard, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Spatial scaling of microorganisms has been demonstrated over the last decade. However, the processes and environmental filters shaping soil microbial community structure on a broad spatial scale still need to be refined and ranked. Here, we compared bacterial and fungal community composition turnovers through a biogeographical approach on the same soil sampling design at a broad spatial scale (area range: 13300 to 31000 km2): i) to examine their spatial structuring; ii) to investigate the relative importance of environmental selection and spatial autocorrelation in determining their community composition turnover; and iii) to identify and rank the relevant environmental filters and scales involved in their spatial variations. Molecular fingerprinting of soil bacterial and fungal communities was performed on 413 soils from four French regions of contrasting environmental heterogeneity (Landesturnovers. The relative importance of processes and filters was assessed by distance-based redundancy analysis. This study demonstrates significant community composition turnover rates for soil bacteria and fungi, which were dependent on the region. Bacterial and fungal community composition turnovers were mainly driven by environmental selection explaining from 10% to 20% of community composition variations, but spatial variables also explained 3% to 9% of total variance. These variables highlighted significant spatial autocorrelation of both communities unexplained by the environmental variables measured and could partly be explained by dispersal limitations. Although the identified filters and their hierarchy were dependent on the region and organism, selection was systematically based on a common group of environmental variables: pH, trophic resources, texture and land use. Spatial autocorrelation was also important at coarse (80 to

  8. Enhancing Phospholipid Fatty Acid Profiling of Soil Bacterial Communities via Substrate- Specific 13C-labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evershed, R. P.; Maxfield, P. J.; Bingham, E. M.; Dildar, N.; Brennand, E. L.; Hornibrook, E.

    2008-12-01

    A range of culture-independent methods, has recently emerged to study environmental microorganisms in situ[1]. One such method is phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, wherein these ubiquitous membrane lipids provide a powerful tool for the study of unculturable soil microorganisms. PLFA analyses have been used to investigate the impacts of a wide range of environmental factors on the soil microbial community. An acknowledged shortcoming of the PLFAs approach is the lack the chemotaxonoic specificity, which restricts the ability of the method to probe the activities of specific functional groups of the microbial community selectively. However, the selectivity of PLFAs analyses can be enhanced by incubating soils with 13C- labelled substrates followed by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry to reveal the specific PLFAs incorporating the 13C-label. The application of this approach will be demonstrated through our recent work on methanotrophic bacteria in soils. We applied this approach initially to mineral soils[2] and then extended chemotaxonomic assessments by using a combination of 13C-labelled PLFAs and hopanoids [3]. We have used this approach to explore the properties of high affinity methanotrophs in a range of environments, investigating the relationship between methane oxidation rates and the nature and magnitude of the methanotrophic community for the first time[4,5] More recently we extended the technique using a novel time series 13C-labelling of PLFAs[6] to estimate the rate and progression of 13C- label incorporation and turnover of methanotrophic populations. This modified approach has been used to investigate the impacts of various environmental variables, e.g. soil type, vegetation cover and land use, on the methanotrophic biomass[7.8]. The unique nature of the 13CH4 as a gaseous substate/carbon source means that can be readily introduced into soils via a specific subset of the soil microbial biomass, thereby offering many

  9. Effect of Vesicle-to-Micelle Transition on the Interactions of Phospholipid/Sodium Cholate Mixed Systems with Curcumin in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sha; Wang, Xiaoyong

    2016-08-01

    The role of vesicle-to-micelle transition has been investigated in the interactions of phospholipid vesicles, phospholipid/sodium cholate (NaC) mixed vesicles, and phospholipid/NaC mixed micelles with curcumin in aqueous solution. The addition of NaC causes phospholipid vesicles to transit into phospholipid/NaC mixed vesicles and phospholipid/NaC mixed micelles. Turbidity measurement reveals that the presence of curcumin increases the NaC concentration for the solubilization of phospholipid vesicles, which indicates that the bound curcumin tends to suppress the vesicle-to-micelle transition. The pyrene polarity index and curcumin fluorescence anisotropy measurements suggest that phospholipid/NaC mixed micelles have a more compact structure than that of phospholipid vesicles and phospholipid/NaC mixed vesicles. Curcumin associated with phospholipid vesicles, phospholipid/NaC mixed vesicles, and phospholipid/NaC mixed micelles often results in higher intensities of absorption and fluorescence than those of free curcumin. However, phospholipid/NaC mixed vesicles lead to the highest values of absorption and fluorescence intensities, binding constant, and radical-scavenging capacity with curcumin. The different structures in the phospholipid bilayer of phospholipid/NaC mixed vesicles and the hydrophobic part of phospholipid/NaC mixed micelles where curcumin located are discussed to explain the interaction behaviors of phospholipid/NaC mixed systems with curcumin.

  10. Evolution of phospholipid contents during the production of quark cheese from buttermilk.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, T; Martínez, S; Gayoso, L; Rodríguez-Otero, J L

    2016-06-01

    We report the evolution of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), and sphingomyelin (SM) contents during the production of quark cheese from buttermilk by successive ultrafiltration concentration, enrichment with cream, concurrent homogenization and pasteurization, fermentative coagulation, and separation of quark from whey by further ultrafiltration. Buttermilk is richer than milk itself in phospholipids that afford desirable functional and technological properties, and is widely used in dairy products. To investigate how phospholipid content is affected by end-product production processes such as ultrafiltration, homogenization, pasteurization or coagulation, we measured the phospholipids at several stages of each of 5 industrial-scale quark cheese production runs. In each run, 10,000L of buttermilk was concentrated to half volume by ultrafiltration, enriched with cream, homogenized, pasteurized, inoculated with lactic acid bacteria, incubated to coagulation, and once more concentrated to half volume by ultrafiltration. Phospholipid contents were determined by HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection in the starting buttermilk, concentrated buttermilk, ultrafiltrate, cream-enriched concentrated buttermilk (both before and after concurrent homogenization and pasteurization), coagulate, and quark, and also in the rinsings obtained when the ultrafiltration equipment was washed following initial concentration. The average phospholipid content of buttermilk was approximately 5 times that of milk, and the phospholipid content of buttermilk fat 26 to 29 times that of milk fat. Although phospholipids did not cross ultrafiltration membranes, significant losses occurred during ultrafiltration (due to retention on the membranes) and during the homogenization and pasteurization process. During coagulation, however, phospholipid content rose, presumably as a consequence of the proliferation of the

  11. Changes during hibernation in different phospholipid and free and esterified cholesterol serum levels in black bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chauhan, V.; Sheikh, A.; Chauhan, A.; Tsiouris, J.; Malik, M.; Vaughan, M.

    2002-01-01

    During hibernation, fat is known to be the preferred source of energy. A detailed analysis of different phospholipids, as well as free and esterified cholesterol, was conducted to investigate lipid abnormalities during hibernation. The levels of total phospholipids and total cholesterol in the serum of black bears were found to increase significantly in hibernation as compared with the active state. Both free and esterified cholesterol were increased in the hibernating state in comparison with the active state (P < 0.05). The percentage increase during hibernation was more in free cholesterol (57%) than in esterified cholesterol (27%). Analysis of subclasses of serum phospholipids showed that choline containing phospholipids, i.e., sphingomyelin (SPG) (14%) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) (76%), are the major phospholipids in the serum of bear. The minor phospholipids included 8% of phosphatidylserine (PS) + phosphatidylinositol (PI), while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was only 2% of the total phospholipids. A comparison of phospholipid subclasses showed that PC, PS + PI and SPG were significantly increased, while PE was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in the hibernating state as compared with the active state in black bears. These results suggest that the catabolism of phospholipids and cholesterol is decreased during hibernation in black bears, leading to their increased levels in the hibernating state as compared with the active state. In summary, our results indicate that serum cholesterol and phospholipid fractions (except PE) are increased during hibernation in bears. It is proposed that the increase of these lipids may be due to the altered metabolism of lipoproteins that are responsible for the clearance of the lipids. ?? 2002 E??ditions scientifiques et me??dicales Elsevier SAS and Socie??te?? franc??aise de biochimie et biologie mole??culaire. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolution of phospholipid contents during the production of quark cheese from buttermilk.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, T; Martínez, S; Gayoso, L; Rodríguez-Otero, J L

    2016-06-01

    We report the evolution of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), and sphingomyelin (SM) contents during the production of quark cheese from buttermilk by successive ultrafiltration concentration, enrichment with cream, concurrent homogenization and pasteurization, fermentative coagulation, and separation of quark from whey by further ultrafiltration. Buttermilk is richer than milk itself in phospholipids that afford desirable functional and technological properties, and is widely used in dairy products. To investigate how phospholipid content is affected by end-product production processes such as ultrafiltration, homogenization, pasteurization or coagulation, we measured the phospholipids at several stages of each of 5 industrial-scale quark cheese production runs. In each run, 10,000L of buttermilk was concentrated to half volume by ultrafiltration, enriched with cream, homogenized, pasteurized, inoculated with lactic acid bacteria, incubated to coagulation, and once more concentrated to half volume by ultrafiltration. Phospholipid contents were determined by HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection in the starting buttermilk, concentrated buttermilk, ultrafiltrate, cream-enriched concentrated buttermilk (both before and after concurrent homogenization and pasteurization), coagulate, and quark, and also in the rinsings obtained when the ultrafiltration equipment was washed following initial concentration. The average phospholipid content of buttermilk was approximately 5 times that of milk, and the phospholipid content of buttermilk fat 26 to 29 times that of milk fat. Although phospholipids did not cross ultrafiltration membranes, significant losses occurred during ultrafiltration (due to retention on the membranes) and during the homogenization and pasteurization process. During coagulation, however, phospholipid content rose, presumably as a consequence of the proliferation of the

  13. Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Jacqueline Jordan

    2010-01-01

    Many teachers have only a cursory understanding of culturally relevant pedagogy, and their efforts to bridge the cultural gap often fall short. Culturally relevant pedagogy is a term that describes effective teaching in culturally diverse classrooms. It can be a daunting idea to understand and implement. Yet people tend to appreciate culturally…

  14. Making Science Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eick, Charles; Deutsch, Bill; Fuller, Jennifer; Scott, Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    Science teachers are always looking for ways to demonstrate the relevance of science to students. By connecting science learning to important societal issues, teachers can motivate students to both enjoy and engage in relevant science (Bennet, Lubben, and Hogarth 2007). To develop that connection, teachers can help students take an active role in…

  15. Bioorthogonal tetrazine-mediated transfer reactions facilitate reaction turnover in nucleic acid-templated detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoxing; Cisneros, Brandon T; Cole, Christian M; Devaraj, Neal K

    2014-12-31

    Tetrazine ligations have proven to be a powerful bioorthogonal technique for the detection of many labeled biomolecules, but the ligating nature of these reactions can limit reaction turnover in templated chemistry. We have developed a transfer reaction between 7-azabenzonorbornadiene derivatives and fluorogenic tetrazines that facilitates turnover amplification of the fluorogenic response in nucleic acid-templated reactions. Fluorogenic tetrazine-mediated transfer (TMT) reaction probes can be used to detect DNA and microRNA (miRNA) templates to 0.5 and 5 pM concentrations, respectively. The endogenous oncogenic miRNA target mir-21 could be detected in crude cell lysates and detected by imaging in live cells. Remarkably, the technique is also able to differentiate between miRNA templates bearing a single mismatch with high signal to background. We imagine that TMT reactions could find wide application for amplified fluorescent detection of clinically relevant nucleic acid templates.

  16. Climate change creates rapid species turnover in montane communities.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Reinemer, Daniel K; Sheldon, Kimberly S; Rahel, Frank J

    2015-06-01

    Recent decades have seen substantial changes in patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Simultaneously, climate change is producing a widespread pattern of species' range shifts to higher latitudes and higher elevations, potentially creating novel assemblages as species shift at different rates. However, the direct link between species' turnover as a result of climate-induced range shifts has not yet been empirically evaluated. We measured rates of species turnover associated with species' range shifts in relatively undisturbed montane areas in Asia, Europe, North America, South America, and the Indo-Pacific. We show that species turnover is rapidly creating novel assemblages, and this can be explained by variable changes in species' range limits following warming. Across all the areas we analyzed, mean species' turnover was 12% per decade, which was nearly balanced between the loss of existing co-occurrences and the gain of novel co-occurrences. Turnover appears to be more rapid among ectothermic assemblages, and some evidence suggests tropical assemblages may be responding at more rapid rates than temperate assemblages.

  17. Health insurance, cost expectations, and adverse job turnover.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Randall P; Albert Ma, Ching-To

    2011-01-01

    Because less healthy employees value health insurance more than the healthy ones, when health insurance is newly offered job turnover rates for healthier employees decline less than turnover rates for the less healthy. We call this adverse job turnover, and it implies that a firm's expected health costs will increase when health insurance is first offered. Health insurance premiums may fail to adjust sufficiently fast because state regulations restrict annual premium changes, or insurers are reluctant to change premiums rapidly. Even with premiums set at the long run expected costs, some firms may be charged premiums higher than their current expected costs and choose not to offer insurance. High administrative costs at small firms exacerbate this dynamic selection problem. Using 1998-1999 MEDSTAT MarketScan and 1997 Employer Health Insurance Survey data, we find that expected employee health expenditures at firms that offer insurance have lower within-firm and higher between-firm variance than at firms that do not. Turnover rates are systematically higher in industries in which firms are less likely to offer insurance. Simulations of the offer decision capturing between-firm health-cost heterogeneity and expected turnover rates match the observed pattern across firm sizes well.

  18. Climate change creates rapid species turnover in montane communities

    PubMed Central

    Gibson-Reinemer, Daniel K; Sheldon, Kimberly S; Rahel, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    Recent decades have seen substantial changes in patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Simultaneously, climate change is producing a widespread pattern of species’ range shifts to higher latitudes and higher elevations, potentially creating novel assemblages as species shift at different rates. However, the direct link between species’ turnover as a result of climate-induced range shifts has not yet been empirically evaluated. We measured rates of species turnover associated with species’ range shifts in relatively undisturbed montane areas in Asia, Europe, North America, South America, and the Indo-Pacific. We show that species turnover is rapidly creating novel assemblages, and this can be explained by variable changes in species’ range limits following warming. Across all the areas we analyzed, mean species’ turnover was 12% per decade, which was nearly balanced between the loss of existing co-occurrences and the gain of novel co-occurrences. Turnover appears to be more rapid among ectothermic assemblages, and some evidence suggests tropical assemblages may be responding at more rapid rates than temperate assemblages. PMID:26120424

  19. Turnover of recently assimilated carbon in arctic bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Street, L E; Subke, J A; Sommerkorn, M; Heinemeyer, A; Williams, M

    2011-10-01

    Carbon (C) allocation and turnover in arctic bryophytes is largely unknown, but their response to climatic change has potentially significant impacts on arctic ecosystem C budgets. Using a combination of pulse-chase experiments and a newly developed model of C turnover in bryophytes, we show significant differences in C turnover between two contrasting arctic moss species (Polytrichum piliferum and Sphagnum fuscum). (13)C abundance in moss tissues (measured up to 1 year) and respired CO(2) (traced over 5 days) were used to parameterise the bryophyte C model with four pools representing labile and structural C in photosynthetic and stem tissue. The model was optimised using an Ensemble Kalman Filter to ensure a focus on estimating the confidence intervals (CI) on model parameters and outputs. The ratio of aboveground NPP:GPP in Polytrichum piliferum was 23% (CI 9-35%), with an average turnover time of 1.7 days (CI 1.1-2.5 days). The aboveground NPP:GPP ratio in Sphagnum fuscum was 43% (CI 19-65%) with an average turnover time of 3.1 days (CI 1.6-6.1 days). These results are the first to show differences in C partitioning between arctic bryophyte species in situ and highlight the importance of modelling C dynamics of this group separately from vascular plants for a realistic representation of vegetation in arctic C models.

  20. Counselor emotional exhaustion and turnover intention in therapeutic communities.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Ducharme, Lori J; Roman, Paul M

    2006-09-01

    Counselor turnover is a significant problem facing substance abuse treatment agencies. Understanding the role of organizational culture in predicting burnout and turnover intention may yield important information on how to address turnover in treatment organizations. Using data collected from 817 counselors employed in a national sample of 253 therapeutic communities (TCs), structural equation modeling was used to estimate the associations between emotional exhaustion, turnover intention, and three measures of organizational culture: centralized decision making, distributive justice, and procedural justice. The model controlled for counselor demographics, credentials, and earnings. Counselors' emotional exhaustion scores were higher in TCs with greater centralized decision making (p < .01) but lower in TCs where greater distributive justice (p < .05) and procedural justice (p < .001) were reported. Likewise, turnover intention was positively associated with centralized decision making (p < .05) and inversely associated with the workplace justice measures (p < .001). These data suggest that management practices in TCs and perhaps in other types of substance abuse treatment facilities likely play a substantial role in counselors' well-being and in their decisions to leave their jobs. Because these practices are not structural features of organizations, they may be targeted for intervention and change.

  1. Anatomical Location of LPA1 Activation and LPA Phospholipid Precursors in Rodent and Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    González de San Román, E; Manuel, I; Giralt, MT; Chun, J; Estivill-Torrús, G; Rodriguez de Fonseca, F; Santín, LJ; Ferrer, I; Rodriguez-Puertas, R

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a signaling molecule that binds to six known G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): LPA1–LPA6. LPA evokes several responses in the CNS including cortical development and folding, growth of the axonal cone and its retraction process. Those cell processes involve survival, migration, adhesion proliferation, differentiation and myelination. The anatomical localization of LPA1 is incompletely understood, particularly with regard to LPA binding. Therefore, we have used functional [35S]GTPγS autoradiography to verify the anatomical distribution of LPA1 binding sites in adult rodent and human brain. The greatest activity was observed in myelinated areas of the white matter such as corpus callosum, internal capsule and cerebellum. MaLPA1-null mice (a variant of LPA1-null) lack [35S]GTPγS basal binding in white matter areas, where the LPA1 receptor is expressed at high levels, suggesting a relevant role of the activity of this receptor in the most myelinated brain areas. In addition, phospholipid precursors of LPA were localized by MALDI-IMS in both rodent and human brain slices identifying numerous species of phosphatides (PA) and phosphatidylcholines (PC). Both PA and PC species represent potential LPA precursors. The anatomical distribution of these precursors in rodent and human brain may indicate a metabolic relationship between LPA and LPA1 receptors. PMID:25857358

  2. Luminescent nanocrystals in phospholipid micelles for bioconjugation: an optical and structural investigation.

    PubMed

    Depalo, Nicoletta; Mallardi, Antonia; Comparelli, Roberto; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Curri, Maria Lucia

    2008-09-15

    Organic capped luminescent CdSe@ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) have been incorporated in block copolymer micelles, formed by polyethylene glycol modified phospholipids (PEG lipids). The obtained water soluble NC including PEG lipid micelles have been conjugated with bovine serum albumine (BSA). The entire process has been investigated by using optical, structural and electrophoretic complementary techniques. Such an integrated approach has allowed to elucidate critical issues, such as the time and temperature effects on the phase behavior of the PEG lipid/NC aggregate structures, the emitting properties of the NCs before and after micelle formation and bio-conjugation and the effect of conjugation on the biological moiety. The overall results provide relevant insight on the fabrication of the bio-conjugates, on their stability and on preparative procedure reproducibility, in view of the use of the resulting protein decorated NCs as multifunctional hybrid building blocks for the fabrication of a variety of supramolecular assemblies to exploit in biological sensing and diagnostic applications.

  3. Interactions of Aqueous Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquid Mixtures with Solid-Supported Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Khorshid, Mehran; Renner, Frank Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Despite the environmentally friendly reputation of ionic liquids (ILs), their safety has been recently questioned given their potential as cytotoxic agents. The fundamental mechanisms underlying the interactions between ILs and cells are less studied and by far not completely understood. Biomimetic films are here important biophysical model systems to elucidate fundamental aspects and mechanisms relevant for a large range of biological interaction ranging from signaling to drug reception or toxicity. Here we use dissipative quartz crystal microbalance QCM-D to examine the effect of aqueous imidazolium-based ionic liquid mixtures on solid-supported biomimetic membranes. Specifically, we assess in real time the effect of the cation chain length and the anion nature on a supported vesicle layer of the model phospholipid DMPC. Results indicate that interactions are mainly driven by the hydrophobic components of the IL, which significantly distort the layer and promote vesicle rupture. Our analyses evidence the gradual decrease of the main phase transition temperature upon increasing IL concentration, reflecting increased disorder by weakening of lipid chain interactions. The degree of rupture is significant for ILs with long hydrophobic cation chains and large hydrophobic anions whose behavior is reminiscent of that of antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27684947

  4. Dynamical and phase behavior of a phospholipid membrane altered by an antimicrobial peptide at low concentration

    DOE PAGES

    Mamontov, Eugene; Tyagi, M.; Qian, Shuo; Rai, Durgesh K.; Urban, Volker S.; Sharma, V. K.

    2016-05-27

    Here we discuss that the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature nomore » longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.« less

  5. Effect of Trehalose on a Phospholipid Membrane under Mechanical Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Cristina S.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2008-01-01

    Explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate at atomic resolution the effect of trehalose on a hydrated phospholipid bilayer under mechanical stress (stretching forces imposed in the form of negative lateral pressure). Simulations were performed in the absence or presence of trehalose at 325 K, and with different values for negative lateral pressure. In the concentration regime (2 molal) and range of lateral pressures (1 to −250 bar) investigated, trehalose was found to interact directly with the membrane, partially replacing water molecules in the formation of hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroups. Similar to previous findings in the context of thermal stress, the number, degree of bridging, and reaching depth of these hydrogen bonds increased with the magnitude of perturbation. However, at the concentration considered, trehalose was not sufficient to preserve the integrity of the membrane structure and to prevent its extreme elongation (and possible disruption) under the effect of stretching forces. PMID:18599628

  6. The metabolism of phospholipids in mouse brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P. A.; Rowe, C. E.

    1966-01-01

    1. Slices of mouse brain grey matter were incubated with [32P]phosphate and [1-14C]acetate. Doubly labelled phospholipids were extracted from subcellular fractions prepared from the slices in a mixture of metabolic inhibitors, under conditions where there was negligible change in radioactive labelling during the preparation. Two tissue fractions were studied in detail; one contained a high proportion of mitochondria and the other was mainly microsomal. 2. In all tissue fractions the highest incorporations of both [32P]phosphate and [1-14C]acetate occurred into phosphatidylcholine. 3. After incubation for 1hr., the 32P/14C ratios for phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid in the mitochondrial fraction were similar to those in the microsomal fraction. 4. The 32P/14C ratios were similar in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine and much lower than those in phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol. PMID:16742443

  7. Sarcolemmal phospholipid N-methylation in genetically determined hamster cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, K.; Panagia, V.; Jasmin, G.; Dhalla, N.S.

    1987-02-27

    The heart sarcolemmal phosphatidylethanolamine N-methylation in UM-X7.1 strain of cardiomyopathic hamsters was examined by using 0.055, 10 and 150 microM S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-/sup 3/H) methionine as methyl donor for sites I, II and III, respectively. In comparison with control values, methylation activities at site I was increased in 40, 120 and 250 days old cardiomyopathic hamsters. On the other hand, methylation activities at sites II and III in 120 and 250 days old cardiomyopathic animals were depressed without any change in the 40 days old group. The alterations in N-methylation activities were associated with kinetic changes in apparent Vmax values without any changes in the apparent Km. These results indicate a defect in the phospholipid N-methylation process in heart sarcolemma during the development of genetically determined cardiomyopathy.

  8. Interaction of the organochlorine pesticide dieldrin with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Benites, M; Villena, F; Aguilar, F; Sotomayor, C P

    1997-01-01

    Dieldrin is an organochlorine insecticide highly toxic for human beings. Although its exact mechanism of action is not well known, there is evidence that it acts at the cell membrane level. In fact, the lipophilicity of the pesticide as well as that of the phospholipid bilayer present in biological membranes makes the latter a most likely target for the interaction of dieldrin with living organisms. In order to evaluate its perturbing effect upon cell membranes the pesticide was made to interact with human erythrocytes and molecular models. These studies were performed by scanning electron microscopy on erythrocytes, fluorescence spectroscopy on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) large unilamellar vesicles and X-ray diffraction on multilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE). It was observed that dieldrin particularly interacted with DMPC liposomes and multilayers perturbing its molecular arrangements. However, no effect was noticed on erythrocytes, which might be due to its high cholesterol content. PMID:9309876

  9. Interaction of the antiarrhythmic drug procainamide with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Villena, F; Bagnara, M; Sotomayor, C P

    1995-01-01

    Several hypotheses link the molecular mechanism of action of the antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) that belong to class I to non-specific interactions with phospholipids sited in the neighborhood of sodium channels in the membrane of the myocardium. Procainamide (PROC), one of the least lipophilic drugs of this group, was induced to interact with bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimirystoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), liposomes of DMPC and human erythrocytes. The perturbing effects of PROC upon these systems were respectively determined by X-ray diffraction, fluorescence spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that PROC exerted very little effect upon DMPC and DMPE even at such a high concentration as 10 mM. However, at therapeutical plasma concentrations, PROC induced shape changes in vitro to red cells. PMID:7766259

  10. Marine Omega-3 Phospholipids: Metabolism and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Lena; Hoem, Nils; Banni, Sebastiano; Berge, Kjetil

    2012-01-01

    The biological activities of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) have been under extensive study for several decades. However, not much attention has been paid to differences of dietary forms, such as triglycerides (TGs) versus ethyl esters or phospholipids (PLs). New innovative marine raw materials, like krill and fish by-products, present n-3 FAs mainly in the PL form. With their increasing availability, new evidence has emerged on n-3 PL biological activities and differences to n-3 TGs. In this review, we describe the recently discovered nutritional properties of n-3 PLs on different parameters of metabolic syndrome and highlight their different metabolic bioavailability in comparison to other dietary forms of n-3 FAs. PMID:23203133

  11. Stabilization of perflubron emulsions with egg yolk phospholipid.

    PubMed

    Pelura, T J; Johnson, C S; Tarara, T E; Weers, J G

    1992-01-01

    Egg Yolk Phospholipid(EYP) has been used extensively as the primary surfactant in parenteral fat emulsions for many years. The simplicity, functionality and physiologic tolerance of EYP has contributed greatly to its success in the intravenous emulsion arena. The mechanism of stabilization in triglyceride emulsions is well understood; however, this is not the case with perfluorocarbon emulsions. Interfacial models, as well as emulsion stability studies, have been conducted utilizing EYP of varied composition in order to derive a structure/function relationship. Our studies indicate that minor components, total unsaturation, acyl chain length and presence of charged species have significant impact on the functional properties of EYP and the subsequent stability of the emulsion product. These findings contribute to our ability to design and manipulate natural surfactants with superior properties for use in medical applications of perfluorocarbon emulsions. PMID:1391521

  12. The interaction of N-oleylethanolamine with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Epps, D E; Cardin, A D

    1987-10-16

    Long chain acylamides of ethanolamine were previously found to increase in the infarcted canine myocardium. Subsequent in vitro experiments established a number of interesting biological and physiological properties of these compounds including alteration of rabbit skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum function and inhibition of permeability dependent calcium release from heart mitochondria. These results suggested an interaction between the N-acylethanolamines and biological membranes. In the present work we show that the most potent species in previous studies, N-oleylethanolamine, forms stable complexes with phospholipid vesicles, lowers diphenylhexatriene polarization ratios in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine uni- and multilamellar bilayer vesicles, and also produces a concentration dependent decrease in the phase transitions of these lipid structures. In addition studies with parinaric acids also suggested that N-oleylethanolamine partitions preferentially into more fluid areas of the bilayer. The results are discussed in terms of possible effects on biological membranes.

  13. Accelerated bone turnover identifies hemiplegic patients at higher risk of demineralization.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, A; Pappone, N; Servodio Iammarrone, C; Esposito, A; Scarpa, R; Costa, L; Caso, F; Bardoscia, A; Del Puente, A

    2016-01-01

    Immobilization osteoporosis represents a severe complication in hemiplegic patients (HPs), causing fragility fractures, which may occur during rehabilitation reducing functional recovery and survival. The aim of the study was to investigate determinants of bone loss, independent from length of immobilization, which may be useful in early identification of HPs at higher risk of demineralization. Forty-eight HPs of both sexes underwent anthropometric measurements, evaluation of scores of spasticity and of lower limb motory capacity. Laboratory tests were performed. On serum: calcium; phosphorus; creatinine; ALP; iPTH; 25(OH) vitamin-D; sex hormones; Δ4-androstenedione; DHEA-S; insulin; IGF-1; FT3; FT4; TSH; c-AMP. On urine: c-AMP and calcium/creatinine ratio. Two bone turnover markers were measured: serum osteocalcin (BGP) and urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD). Bone mineral density was determined at both femoral necks, defining a percentage difference in bone loss between paretic and non-paretic limb, thus controlling for the complex cofactors involved. Only bone turnover markers significantly and directly correlated with the entity of demineralization, controlling for age, sex and length of immobilization in the multivariate analysis (BGP coefficient estimate=0.008; SE=0.003; p=0.020; DPD coefficient estimate=0.005; SE=0.002; p=0.036). BGP and DPD are not dependent on anthropometric and endocrine-metabolic parameters, disability patterns and duration of immobilization, thus represent independent determinants of the degree of demineralization. A cutoff was defined for BGP and DPD above which subjects show significantly greater risk of demineralization. The immobilization event generates more severe bone loss when it occurs in subjects with higher bone turnover. BGP and DPD measurements may be of primary importance for early identification of HPs at risk, with relevant preventive implications. PMID:27049105

  14. Accelerated bone turnover identifies hemiplegic patients at higher risk of demineralization.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, A; Pappone, N; Servodio Iammarrone, C; Esposito, A; Scarpa, R; Costa, L; Caso, F; Bardoscia, A; Del Puente, A

    2016-01-01

    Immobilization osteoporosis represents a severe complication in hemiplegic patients (HPs), causing fragility fractures, which may occur during rehabilitation reducing functional recovery and survival. The aim of the study was to investigate determinants of bone loss, independent from length of immobilization, which may be useful in early identification of HPs at higher risk of demineralization. Forty-eight HPs of both sexes underwent anthropometric measurements, evaluation of scores of spasticity and of lower limb motory capacity. Laboratory tests were performed. On serum: calcium; phosphorus; creatinine; ALP; iPTH; 25(OH) vitamin-D; sex hormones; Δ4-androstenedione; DHEA-S; insulin; IGF-1; FT3; FT4; TSH; c-AMP. On urine: c-AMP and calcium/creatinine ratio. Two bone turnover markers were measured: serum osteocalcin (BGP) and urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD). Bone mineral density was determined at both femoral necks, defining a percentage difference in bone loss between paretic and non-paretic limb, thus controlling for the complex cofactors involved. Only bone turnover markers significantly and directly correlated with the entity of demineralization, controlling for age, sex and length of immobilization in the multivariate analysis (BGP coefficient estimate=0.008; SE=0.003; p=0.020; DPD coefficient estimate=0.005; SE=0.002; p=0.036). BGP and DPD are not dependent on anthropometric and endocrine-metabolic parameters, disability patterns and duration of immobilization, thus represent independent determinants of the degree of demineralization. A cutoff was defined for BGP and DPD above which subjects show significantly greater risk of demineralization. The immobilization event generates more severe bone loss when it occurs in subjects with higher bone turnover. BGP and DPD measurements may be of primary importance for early identification of HPs at risk, with relevant preventive implications.

  15. Membrane-derived phospholipids control synaptic neurotransmission and plasticity.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; González-Forero, David; Rodríguez-Bey, Guillermo; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; Medialdea-Wandossell, María Jesús; Domínguez-Vías, Germán; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-05-01

    Synaptic communication is a dynamic process that is key to the regulation of neuronal excitability and information processing in the brain. To date, however, the molecular signals controlling synaptic dynamics have been poorly understood. Membrane-derived bioactive phospholipids are potential candidates to control short-term tuning of synaptic signaling, a plastic event essential for information processing at both the cellular and neuronal network levels in the brain. Here, we showed that phospholipids affect excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by different degrees, loci, and mechanisms of action. Signaling triggered by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked rapid and reversible depression of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. At excitatory synapses, LPA-induced depression depended on LPA1/Gαi/o-protein/phospholipase C/myosin light chain kinase cascade at the presynaptic site. LPA increased myosin light chain phosphorylation, which is known to trigger actomyosin contraction, and reduced the number of synaptic vesicles docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. At inhibitory synapses, postsynaptic LPA signaling led to dephosphorylation, and internalization of the GABAAγ2 subunit through the LPA1/Gα12/13-protein/RhoA/Rho kinase/calcineurin pathway. However, LPA-induced depression of GABAergic transmission was correlated with an endocytosis-independent reduction of GABAA receptors, possibly by GABAAγ2 dephosphorylation and subsequent increased lateral diffusion. Furthermore, endogenous LPA signaling, mainly via LPA1, mediated activity-dependent inhibitory depression in a model of experimental synaptic plasticity. Finally, LPA signaling, most likely restraining the excitatory drive incoming to motoneurons, regulated performance of motor output commands, a basic brain processing task. We propose that lysophospholipids serve as potential local messengers that tune synaptic strength to precedent activity of the neuron.

  16. Myo1e binds anionic phospholipids with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Feeser, Elizabeth A; Ignacio, Cherry Mae G; Krendel, Mira; Ostap, E Michael

    2010-11-01

    Myo1e is a single-headed motor protein that has been shown to play roles in clathrin-mediated endocytosis in HeLa cells and podocyte function in the kidney. The myo1e C-terminal tail domain includes a basic region that is required for localization to clathrin-coated vesicles and contains a putative pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain that has been shown to play a role in phospholipid binding in other myosin-I proteins. We used sedimentation assays, stopped-flow fluorescence, and fluorescence microscopy to determine the membrane binding affinities, kinetics, and in vivo localization of fluorescently labeled recombinant myo1e-tail constructs. We found that the myo1e tail binds tightly to large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) containing physiological concentrations of the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) or phosphatidylserine. The rate of myo1e attachment to LUVs nears the diffusion limit while the calculated rate of detachment from LUVs is slow (k(diss) ≤ 0.4 s(-1)). Mutation of conserved residues in the myo1e PH domain has little effect on lipid binding in vitro or membrane localization in vivo. Soluble inositol phosphate headgroups, such as inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, can compete with PtdIns(4,5)P(2) for binding, but the apparent affinity for the soluble inositol phosphate is substantially lower than that for PtdIns(4,5)P(2). These results suggest that myo1e binds lipids through nonspecific electrostatic interactions rather than a stereospecific protein-phosphoinositide interaction. PMID:20860408

  17. Identification of Unusual Phospholipid Fatty Acyl Compositions of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Kania, Magdalena; Turska-Szewczuk, Anna; Danikiewicz, Witold; Russa, Ryszard; Fuchs, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba are opportunistic protozoan pathogens that may lead to sight-threatening keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The successful prognosis requires early diagnosis and differentiation of pathogenic Acanthamoeba followed by aggressive treatment regimen. The plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba consists of 25% phospholipids (PL). The presence of C20 and, recently reported, 28- and 30-carbon fatty acyl residues is characteristic of amoeba PL. A detailed knowledge about this unusual PL composition could help to differentiate Acanthamoeba from other parasites, e.g. bacteria and develop more efficient treatment strategies. Therefore, the detailed PL composition of Acanthamoeba castellanii was investigated by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Normal and reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detection was used for detailed characterization of the fatty acyl composition of each detected PL. The most abundant fatty acyl residues in each PL class were octadecanoyl (18∶0), octadecenoyl (18∶1 Δ9) and hexadecanoyl (16∶0). However, some selected PLs contained also very long fatty acyl chains: the presence of 28- and 30-carbon fatty acyl residues was confirmed in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid and cardiolipin. The majority of these fatty acyl residues were also identified in PE that resulted in the following composition: 28∶1/20∶2, 30∶2/18∶1, 28∶0/20∶2, 30∶2/20∶4 and 30∶3/20∶3. The PL of amoebae are significantly different in comparison to other cells: we describe here for the first time unusual, very long chain fatty acids with Δ5-unsaturation (30∶35,21,24) and 30∶221,24 localized exclusively in specific phospholipid classes of A. castellanii protozoa that could serve as specific biomarkers for the presence of these

  18. PPAR-β/δ activation promotes phospholipid transfer protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chehaibi, Khouloud; Cedó, Lídia; Metso, Jari; Palomer, Xavier; Santos, David; Quesada, Helena; Naceur Slimane, Mohamed; Wahli, Walter; Julve, Josep; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Jauhiainen, Matti; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles

    2015-03-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-β/δ has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for treating dyslipidemia, including beneficial effects on HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). In the current study, we determined the effects of the PPAR-β/δ agonist GW0742 on HDL composition and the expression of liver HDL-related genes in mice and cultured human cells. The experiments were carried out in C57BL/6 wild-type, LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice and PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice treated with GW0742 (10mg/kg/day) or a vehicle solution for 14 days. GW0742 upregulated liver phospholipid transfer protein (Pltp) gene expression and increased serum PLTP activity in mice. When given to wild-type mice, GW0742 significantly increased serum HDL-C and HDL phospholipids; GW0742 also raised serum potential to generate preβ-HDL formation. The GW0742-mediated effects on liver Pltp expression and serum enzyme activity were completely abolished in PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice. GW0742 also stimulated PLTP mRNA expression in mouse J774 macrophages, differentiated human THP-1 macrophages and human hepatoma Huh7. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a common transcriptional upregulation by GW0742-activated PPAR-β/δ of Pltp expression in cultured cells and in mouse liver resulting in enhanced serum PLTP activity. Our results also indicate that PPAR-β/δ activation may modulate PLTP-mediated preβ-HDL formation and macrophage cholesterol efflux.

  19. Membrane-Derived Phospholipids Control Synaptic Neurotransmission and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; González-Forero, David; Rodríguez-Bey, Guillermo; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; Medialdea-Wandossell, María Jesús; Domínguez-Vías, Germán; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic communication is a dynamic process that is key to the regulation of neuronal excitability and information processing in the brain. To date, however, the molecular signals controlling synaptic dynamics have been poorly understood. Membrane-derived bioactive phospholipids are potential candidates to control short-term tuning of synaptic signaling, a plastic event essential for information processing at both the cellular and neuronal network levels in the brain. Here, we showed that phospholipids affect excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by different degrees, loci, and mechanisms of action. Signaling triggered by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked rapid and reversible depression of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. At excitatory synapses, LPA-induced depression depended on LPA1/Gαi/o-protein/phospholipase C/myosin light chain kinase cascade at the presynaptic site. LPA increased myosin light chain phosphorylation, which is known to trigger actomyosin contraction, and reduced the number of synaptic vesicles docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. At inhibitory synapses, postsynaptic LPA signaling led to dephosphorylation, and internalization of the GABAAγ2 subunit through the LPA1/Gα12/13-protein/RhoA/Rho kinase/calcineurin pathway. However, LPA-induced depression of GABAergic transmission was correlated with an endocytosis-independent reduction of GABAA receptors, possibly by GABAAγ2 dephosphorylation and subsequent increased lateral diffusion. Furthermore, endogenous LPA signaling, mainly via LPA1, mediated activity-dependent inhibitory depression in a model of experimental synaptic plasticity. Finally, LPA signaling, most likely restraining the excitatory drive incoming to motoneurons, regulated performance of motor output commands, a basic brain processing task. We propose that lysophospholipids serve as potential local messengers that tune synaptic strength to precedent activity of the neuron. PMID:25996636

  20. Effect of B Vitamin (Folate, B6, and B12) Supplementation on Osteoporotic Fracture and Bone Turnover Markers: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Jianwei; Gong, Xiaokang; Kong, Jinsong; Wang, Haibao; Zheng, Xin; Chen, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background B vitamins (including folate, B6, and B12) supplementation can effectively and easily modify high plasma homocysteine (Hcy). However, the role of Hcy in the pathogenesis of osteoporotic fracture and bone turnover is still controversial. This meta-analysis aimed to assess the impact of B vitamin supplementation on occurrence of any osteoporotic fracture and bone turnover by pooling the results of previous studies. Material/Methods Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched in databases. Data integration and analysis were done by using Review Manager 5.3 (the Cochrane Collaboration). The risk ratio (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) of fracture (intervention vs. control) were estimated. Changes in bone turnover indicators (continuous data), weighted mean difference (WMD), and corresponding 95% (CI) were pooled for estimation. Results Based on the results of 4 RCTs, this meta-analysis failed to identify a risk-reducing effect of daily supplementation of B vitamins on osteoporotic fracture in patients with vascular disease and with relatively normal plasma Hcy. In addition, we also did not find any positive effects of B vitamin supplementation on bone turnover. Conclusions B vitamin supplementation might not be effective in preventing fracture and improving bone turnover. However, the possible benefits in selective populations, such as populations with very high plasma Hcy and from regions without B vitamin fortification should be explored in the future. PMID:25805360

  1. Quality of Working Life: An Antecedent to Employee Turnover Intention

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to measure the level of quality of work life (QWL) among hospital employees in Iran. Additionally, it aimed to identify the factors that are critical to employees’ QWL. It also aimed to test a theoretical model of the relationship between employees’ QWL and their intention to leave the organization. Methods: A survey study was conducted based on a sample of 608 hospital employees using a validated questionnaire. Face, content and construct validity were conducted on the survey instrument. Results: Hospital employees reported low QWL. Employees were least satisfied with pay, benefits, job promotion, and management support. The most important predictor of QWL was management support, followed by job proud, job security and job stress. An inverse relationship was found between employees QWL and their turnover intention. Conclusion: This study empirically examined the relationships between employees’ QWL and their turnover intention. Managers can take appropriate actions to improve employees’ QWL and subsequently reduce employees’ turnover. PMID:24596835

  2. Dynamics of Cell Generation and Turnover in the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Olaf; Zdunek, Sofia; Felker, Anastasia; Salehpour, Mehran; Alkass, Kanar; Bernard, Samuel; Sjostrom, Staffan L; Szewczykowska, Mirosława; Jackowska, Teresa; Dos Remedios, Cris; Malm, Torsten; Andrä, Michaela; Jashari, Ramadan; Nyengaard, Jens R; Possnert, Göran; Jovinge, Stefan; Druid, Henrik; Frisén, Jonas

    2015-06-18

    The contribution of cell generation to physiological heart growth and maintenance in humans has been difficult to establish and has remained controversial. We report that the full complement of cardiomyocytes is established perinataly and remains stable over the human lifespan, whereas the numbers of both endothelial and mesenchymal cells increase substantially from birth to early adulthood. Analysis of the integration of nuclear bomb test-derived (14)C revealed a high turnover rate of endothelial cells throughout life (>15% per year) and more limited renewal of mesenchymal cells (<4% per year in adulthood). Cardiomyocyte exchange is highest in early childhood and decreases gradually throughout life to <1% per year in adulthood, with similar turnover rates in the major subdivisions of the myocardium. We provide an integrated model of cell generation and turnover in the human heart.

  3. Light-stimulated inositolphospholipid turnover in Samanea saman leaf pulvini

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, M.J.; Crain, R.C.; Satter, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    Leaflets of Samanea saman open and close rhythmically, driven by an endogenous circadian clock. Light has a rapid, direct effect on the movements and also rephases the rhythm. The authors investigated whether light signals might be mediated by increased inositolphospholipid turnover, a mechanism for signal transduction that is widely utilized in animal systems. Samanea motor organs (pulvini) labeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol were irradiated briefly (5-30 sec) with white light, and membrane-localized phosphatidylinositol phosphates and their aqueous breakdown products, the inositol phosphates, were examined. After a 15-sec or longer light pulse, labeled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate decreased and their labeled metabolic products inositol 1,4-biphosphate and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate increased changes characteristic of inositolphospholipid turnover. The authors conclude that inositolphospholipid turnover may act as a phototransduction mechanism in Samanea pulvini in a manner that is similar to that reported in animal systems.

  4. No turnover in lens lipids for the entire human lifespan.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jessica R; Levchenko, Vladimir A; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mitchell, Todd W; Williams, Alan; Truscott, Roger J W

    2015-01-01

    Lipids are critical to cellular function and it is generally accepted that lipid turnover is rapid and dysregulation in turnover results in disease (Dawidowicz 1987; Phillips et al., 2009; Liu et al., 2013). In this study, we present an intriguing counter-example by demonstrating that in the center of the human ocular lens, there is no lipid turnover in fiber cells during the entire human lifespan. This discovery, combined with prior demonstration of pronounced changes in the lens lipid composition over a lifetime (Hughes et al., 2012), suggests that some lipid classes break down in the body over several decades, whereas others are stable. Such substantial changes in lens cell membranes may play a role in the genesis of age-related eye disorders. Whether long-lived lipids are present in other tissues is not yet known, but this may prove to be important in understanding the development of age-related diseases. PMID:25760082

  5. Methionine deficiency does not increase polyamine turnover through depletion of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine in juvenile Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Espe, Marit; Andersen, Synne Marte; Holen, Elisabeth; Rønnestad, Ivar; Veiseth-Kent, Eva; Zerrahn, Jens-Erik; Aksnes, Anders

    2014-10-28

    During the last few decades, plant protein ingredients such as soya proteins have replaced fishmeal in the diets of aquacultured species. This may affect the requirement and metabolism of methionine as soya contains less methionine compared with fishmeal. To assess whether methionine limitation affects decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine availability and polyamine status, in the present study, juvenile Atlantic salmon were fed a methionine-deficient plant protein-based diet or the same diet supplemented with dl-methionine for 8 weeks. The test diets were compared with a fishmeal-based control diet to assess their effects on the growth performance of fish. Methionine limitation reduced growth and protein accretion, but when fish were fed the dl-methionine-supplemented diet their growth and protein accretion equalled those of fish fed the fishmeal-based control diet. Methionine limitation reduced free methionine concentrations in the plasma and muscle, while those in the liver were not affected. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) concentrations were higher in the liver of fish fed the methionine-deficient diet, while S-adenosylhomocysteine concentrations were not affected. Putrescine concentrations were higher and spermine concentrations were lower in the liver of fish fed the methionine-deficient diet, while the gene expression of SAM decarboxylase (SAMdc) and the rate-limiting enzyme of polyamine synthesis ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) was not affected. Polyamine turnover, as assessed by spermine/spermidine acetyltransferase (SSAT) abundance, activity and gene expression, was not affected by treatment. However, the gene expression of the cytokine TNF-α increased in fish fed the methionine-deficient diet, indicative of stressful conditions in the liver. Even though taurine concentrations in the liver were not affected by treatment, methionine and taurine concentrations in muscle decreased due to methionine deficiency. Concomitantly, liver phospholipid and cholesterol

  6. Anatomical location of LPA1 activation and LPA phospholipid precursors in rodent and human brain.

    PubMed

    González de San Román, Estibaliz; Manuel, Iván; Giralt, María Teresa; Chun, Jerold; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Santín, Luis Javier; Ferrer, Isidro; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a signaling molecule that binds to six known G protein-coupled receptors: LPA1 -LPA6 . LPA evokes several responses in the CNS, including cortical development and folding, growth of the axonal cone and its retraction process. Those cell processes involve survival, migration, adhesion proliferation, differentiation, and myelination. The anatomical localization of LPA1 is incompletely understood, particularly with regard to LPA binding. Therefore, we have used functional [(35) S]GTPγS autoradiography to verify the anatomical distribution of LPA1 binding sites in adult rodent and human brain. The greatest activity was observed in myelinated areas of the white matter such as corpus callosum, internal capsule and cerebellum. MaLPA1 -null mice (a variant of LPA1 -null) lack [(35) S]GTPγS basal binding in white matter areas, where the LPA1 receptor is expressed at high levels, suggesting a relevant role of the activity of this receptor in the most myelinated brain areas. In addition, phospholipid precursors of LPA were localized by MALDI-IMS in both rodent and human brain slices identifying numerous species of phosphatides and phosphatidylcholines. Both phosphatides and phosphatidylcholines species represent potential LPA precursors. The anatomical distribution of these precursors in rodent and human brain may indicate a metabolic relationship between LPA and LPA1 receptors. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a signaling molecule that binds to six known G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), LPA1 to LPA6 . LPA evokes several responses in the central nervous system (CNS), including cortical development and folding, growth of the axonal cone and its retraction process. We used functional [(35) S]GTPγS autoradiography to verify the anatomical distribution of LPA1 -binding sites in adult rodent and human brain. The distribution of LPA1 receptors in rat, mouse and human brains show the highest activity in white matter myelinated areas. The basal and

  7. Anatomical location of LPA1 activation and LPA phospholipid precursors in rodent and human brain.

    PubMed

    González de San Román, Estibaliz; Manuel, Iván; Giralt, María Teresa; Chun, Jerold; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Santín, Luis Javier; Ferrer, Isidro; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a signaling molecule that binds to six known G protein-coupled receptors: LPA1 -LPA6 . LPA evokes several responses in the CNS, including cortical development and folding, growth of the axonal cone and its retraction process. Those cell processes involve survival, migration, adhesion proliferation, differentiation, and myelination. The anatomical localization of LPA1 is incompletely understood, particularly with regard to LPA binding. Therefore, we have used functional [(35) S]GTPγS autoradiography to verify the anatomical distribution of LPA1 binding sites in adult rodent and human brain. The greatest activity was observed in myelinated areas of the white matter such as corpus callosum, internal capsule and cerebellum. MaLPA1 -null mice (a variant of LPA1 -null) lack [(35) S]GTPγS basal binding in white matter areas, where the LPA1 receptor is expressed at high levels, suggesting a relevant role of the activity of this receptor in the most myelinated brain areas. In addition, phospholipid precursors of LPA were localized by MALDI-IMS in both rodent and human brain slices identifying numerous species of phosphatides and phosphatidylcholines. Both phosphatides and phosphatidylcholines species represent potential LPA precursors. The anatomical distribution of these precursors in rodent and human brain may indicate a metabolic relationship between LPA and LPA1 receptors. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a signaling molecule that binds to six known G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), LPA1 to LPA6 . LPA evokes several responses in the central nervous system (CNS), including cortical development and folding, growth of the axonal cone and its retraction process. We used functional [(35) S]GTPγS autoradiography to verify the anatomical distribution of LPA1 -binding sites in adult rodent and human brain. The distribution of LPA1 receptors in rat, mouse and human brains show the highest activity in white matter myelinated areas. The basal and

  8. 'Memory and molecular turnover,' 30 years after inception.

    PubMed

    Meagher, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    In 1984 Sir Francis Crick hypothesized that memory is recorded in the brain as reversible modifications to DNA and protein, but acknowledged that most biomolecules turn over too rapidly to account for long-term memories. To accommodate this possible paradox he modeled an enzymatic mechanism to maintain modifications on hemi-modified multimeric symmetrical molecules. While studies on the turnover of chromatin modifications that may be involved in memory are in their infancy, an exploration of his model in the light of modern epigenetics produced somewhat surprising results. The molecular turnover rates for two classes of chromatin modifications believed to record and store durable memories were approximated from experiments using diverse approaches and were found to be remarkably short. The half-lives of DNA cytosine methylation and post-translationally modified nucleosomal histones are measured in hours and minutes, respectively, for a subset of sites on chromatin controlling gene expression. It appears likely that the turnover of DNA methylation in the brain and in neurons, in particular, is even more rapid than in other cell types and organs, perhaps accommodating neuronal plasticity, learning, and memory. The machinery responsible for the rapid turnover of DNA methylation and nucleosomal histone modifications is highly complex, partially redundant, and appears to act in a sequence specific manner. Molecular symmetry plays an important part in maintaining site-specific turnover, but its particular role in memory maintenance is unknown. Elucidating Crick's paradox, the contradiction between rapid molecular turnover of modified biomolecules and long-term memory storage, appears fundamental to understanding cognitive function and neurodegenerative disease.

  9. Copper-deficient mice have higher cardiac norepinephrine turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, A.M.; Prohaska, J.R. )

    1989-02-01

    Male Swiss albino mice were studied at 6 weeks of age. Their dams were fed a copper-deficient diet (modified AIN-76A) starting 4 days after birth and given deionized water (-Cu) or water with CuSO{sub 4} added (+Cu) (20 {mu}g Cu/ml). When 3 weeks of age mice were weaned and housed in stainless steel cages on the respective treatment of their dams. Turnover of norepinephrine (NE) was studied in 8 experiments using 2 separate techniques. The first procedure used {alpha}-methyl-p-tyrosine methyl ester (300 mg/kg i.p.) to inhibit tyrosine hydroxlase activity. The loss of residual NE was determined by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Regression lines were constructed and fractional turnover (%/h) and calculated turnover (ng/g/h) were determined for heart, cerebellum and adrenal gland. In 4 experiments loss of NE in cerebellum of -Cu ad +Cu mice was equivalent. Loss of NE from adrenal gland could not be detected in the 8 h time course. Loss of NE, both fractional turnover and calculated turnover, from heart of -Cu mice was 4-5 fold higher compared to +Cu controls. A second method using m- hydroxybenzylhydrazine (NSD-1015) (100 mg/kg i.p.), which inhibits aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, confirmed the results. For all 4 experiments the cardiac accumulation of L-DOPA (measured by HPLC) was faster in -Cu mice compared to controls. The higher turnover rate of NE in heart and perhaps other sympathetic nerves may contribute to the higher urinary NE output observed previously.

  10. Human turnover dynamics during sleep: Statistical behavior and its modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Utsumi, Hiroya; Terashi, Hiroo; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Turnover is a typical intermittent body movement while asleep. Exploring its behavior may provide insights into the mechanisms and management of sleep. However, little is understood about the dynamic nature of turnover in healthy humans and how it can be modified in disease. Here we present a detailed analysis of turnover signals that are collected by accelerometry from healthy elderly subjects and age-matched patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In healthy subjects, the time intervals between consecutive turnover events exhibit a well-separated bimodal distribution with one mode at ⩽10 s and the other at ⩾100 s, whereas such bimodality tends to disappear in neurodegenerative patients. The discovery of bimodality and fine temporal structures (⩽10 s) is a contribution that is not revealed by conventional sleep recordings with less time resolution (≈30 s). Moreover, we estimate the scaling exponent of the interval fluctuations, which also shows a clear difference between healthy subjects and patients. We incorporate these experimental results into a computational model of human decision making. A decision is to be made at each simulation step between two choices: to keep on sleeping or to make a turnover, the selection of which is determined dynamically by comparing a pair of random numbers assigned to each choice. This decision is weighted by a single parameter that reflects the depth of sleep. The resulting simulated behavior accurately replicates many aspects of observed turnover patterns, including the appearance or disappearance of bimodality and leads to several predictions, suggesting that the depth parameter may be useful as a quantitative measure for differentiating between normal and pathological sleep. These findings have significant clinical implications and may pave the way for the development of practical sleep assessment technologies.

  11. Human turnover dynamics during sleep: statistical behavior and its modeling.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Utsumi, Hiroya; Terashi, Hiroo; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Turnover is a typical intermittent body movement while asleep. Exploring its behavior may provide insights into the mechanisms and management of sleep. However, little is understood about the dynamic nature of turnover in healthy humans and how it can be modified in disease. Here we present a detailed analysis of turnover signals that are collected by accelerometry from healthy elderly subjects and age-matched patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In healthy subjects, the time intervals between consecutive turnover events exhibit a well-separated bimodal distribution with one mode at ⩽10 s and the other at ⩾100 s, whereas such bimodality tends to disappear in neurodegenerative patients. The discovery of bimodality and fine temporal structures (⩽10 s) is a contribution that is not revealed by conventional sleep recordings with less time resolution (≈30 s). Moreover, we estimate the scaling exponent of the interval fluctuations, which also shows a clear difference between healthy subjects and patients. We incorporate these experimental results into a computational model of human decision making. A decision is to be made at each simulation step between two choices: to keep on sleeping or to make a turnover, the selection of which is determined dynamically by comparing a pair of random numbers assigned to each choice. This decision is weighted by a single parameter that reflects the depth of sleep. The resulting simulated behavior accurately replicates many aspects of observed turnover patterns, including the appearance or disappearance of bimodality and leads to several predictions, suggesting that the depth parameter may be useful as a quantitative measure for differentiating between normal and pathological sleep. These findings have significant clinical implications and may pave the way for the development of practical sleep assessment technologies.

  12. Fluorometric High-Throughput Screening Assay for Secreted Phospholipases A2 Using Phospholipid Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Heather; Fernández-Vega, Virneliz; Spicer, Timothy P; Chase, Peter; Brown, Steven; Scampavia, Louis; Roush, William R; Riley, Sean; Rosen, Hugh; Hodder, Peter; Lambeau, Gerard; Gelb, Michael H

    2016-08-01

    There is interest in developing inhibitors of human group III secreted phospholipase A2 (hGIII-sPLA2) because this enzyme plays a role in mast cell maturation. There are no potent inhibitors for hGIII-sPLA2 reported to date, so we adapted a fluorescence-based enzyme activity monitoring method to a high-throughput screening format. We opted to use an assay based on phospholipid substrate present in phospholipid vesicles since this matrix more closely resembles the natural substrate of hGIII-sPLA2, as opposed to phospholipid/detergent mixed micelles. The substrate is a phospholipid analogue containing BODIPY fluorophores dispersed as a minor component in vesicles of nonfluorescent phospholipids. Action of hGIII-sPLA2 liberates a free fatty acid from the phospholipid, leading to a reduction in quenching of the fluorophore and hence an increase in fluorescence. The assay uses optical detection in a 1536-well plate format with an excitation wavelength far away from the UV range so as to minimize false-positive library hits that result from quenching of the fluorescence. The high-throughput screen was successfully carried out on a library of 370,276 small molecules. Several hits were discovered, and data have been uploaded to PubChem. This study describes the first high-throughput optical screening assay for secreted phospholipase A2 inhibitors based on a phospholipid vesicle substrate. PMID:27146384

  13. [sup 31]P NMR study of immobilized artificial membrane surfaces. Structure and dynamics of immobilized phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, X.; Pidgeon, C. )

    1993-11-25

    Chromatography surfaces were prepared by immobilizing a single-chain ether phospholipid at approximately a monolayer density on silica particles. The chromatography particles are denoted as [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3], and they are stable to all solvents. The structure and dynamics of the interphase created by immobilizing phospholipids on silica particles were studied by [sup 31]P NMR methods. [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] spontaneously wets when suspended in both aqueous and organic solvents, and [sup 31]P NMR spectra were obtained in water, methanol, chloroform, acetonitrile, and acetone. [sup 31]P NMR spectra were subjected to line-shape analysis. From line-shape analysis, the correlation times for rapid internal motion ([tau]-PLL) and wobbling ([tau]-PRP) of the phospholipid headgroup were calculated for each solvent. Immobilized phospholipid headgroups comprising the IAM interfacial region undergo rapid reorientation similar to the case of the phospholipids forming liposome membranes with [tau]-PLL approximately 1 ns. Phospholipids in liposome membranes exhibit slower wobbling motion ([tau]-PRP approximately 1 ms) in the plane of the membrane. However, the immobilized phospholipids on [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surfaces wobble with correlation times [tau]-PRP that depend on the solvent bathing the [sup ether]IAM.PC[sup C10/C3] surface. 41 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. A phospholipid transfer function of ER-mitochondria encounter structure revealed in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Rieko; Endo, Toshiya; Tamura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    As phospholipids are synthesized mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial inner membranes, how cells properly distribute specific phospholipids to diverse cellular membranes is a crucial problem for maintenance of organelle-specific phospholipid compositions. Although the ER-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) was proposed to facilitate phospholipid transfer between the ER and mitochondria, such a role of ERMES is still controversial and awaits experimental demonstration. Here we developed a novel in vitro assay system with isolated yeast membrane fractions to monitor phospholipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria. With this system, we found that phospholipid transport between the ER and mitochondria relies on membrane intactness, but not energy sources such as ATP, GTP or the membrane potential across the mitochondrial inner membrane. We further found that lack of the ERMES component impairs the phosphatidylserine transport from the ER to mitochondria, but not the phosphatidylethanolamine transport from mitochondria to the ER. This in vitro assay system thus offers a powerful tool to analyze the non-vesicular phospholipid transport between the ER and mitochondria. PMID:27469264

  15. Chlamydia trachomatis Relies on Autonomous Phospholipid Synthesis for Membrane Biogenesis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Cherian, Philip T.; Frank, Matthew W.; Rock, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis has a reduced genome and is thought to rely on its mammalian host cell for nutrients. Although several lines of evidence suggest C. trachomatis utilizes host phospholipids, the bacterium encodes all the genes necessary for fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis found in free living Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterially derived phospholipids significantly increased in infected HeLa cell cultures. These new phospholipids had a distinct molecular species composition consisting of saturated and branched-chain fatty acids. Biochemical analysis established the role of C. trachomatis-encoded acyltransferases in producing the new disaturated molecular species. There was no evidence for the remodeling of host phospholipids and no change in the size or molecular species composition of the phosphatidylcholine pool in infected HeLa cells. Host sphingomyelin was associated with C. trachomatis isolated by detergent extraction, but it may represent contamination with detergent-insoluble host lipids rather than being an integral bacterial membrane component. C. trachomatis assembles its membrane systems from the unique phospholipid molecular species produced by its own fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthetic machinery utilizing glucose, isoleucine, and serine. PMID:25995447

  16. A comparison of the gas phase acidities of phospholipid headgroups: experimental and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael C; Mitchell, Todd W; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2005-06-01

    Proton-bound dimers consisting of two glycerophospholipids with different headgroups were prepared using negative ion electrospray ionization and dissociated in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Analysis of the tandem mass spectra of the dimers using the kinetic method provides, for the first time, an order of acidity for the phospholipid classes in the gas phase of PE < PA < PG < PS < PI. Hybrid density functional calculations on model phospholipids were used to predict the absolute deprotonation enthalpies of the phospholipid classes from isodesmic proton transfer reactions with phosphoric acid. The computational data largely support the experimental acidity trend, with the exception of the relative acidity ranking of the two most acidic phospholipid species. Possible causes of the discrepancy between experiment and theory are discussed and the experimental trend is recommended. The sequence of gas phase acidities for the phospholipid headgroups is found to (1) have little correlation with the relative ionization efficiencies of the phospholipid classes observed in the negative ion electrospray process, and (2) correlate well with fragmentation trends observed upon collisional activation of phospholipid [M - H](-) anions. PMID:15907707

  17. Chemical stability of phospholipid-stabilized supercooled smectic cholesteryl myristate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mengersen, Friederike; Bunjes, Heike

    2012-10-01

    Supercooled smectic cholesteryl myristate nanoparticle dispersions, a potential carrier system for lipophilic drugs, can be stabilized with phospholipids and their mixtures with sodium glycocholate. Such dispersions are commonly prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization. As cholesterol esters and phospholipids are both susceptible to oxidation and hydrolysis, the chemical stability of the dispersions was studied directly after preparation and during storage. Despite the high temperatures occurring during processing, no hydrolysis was detected in the dispersions directly after preparation. During storage for 5-8 months, dispersions solely stabilized with phospholipids exhibited massive phospholipid hydrolysis as determined by HPTLC. Phospholipid hydrolysis resulted in distinct changes of the physicochemical properties such as pH, zeta potential, and phase behavior of the dispersions. In systems additionally containing sodium glycocholate as stabilizer, hydrolytic degradation occurred only to a minor extent. Phospholipid hydrolysis could also be reduced by adding TRIS- or phosphate-buffer (10mM, pH 7.4) to the aqueous phase before the preparation process. The addition of EDTA and α-tocopherol, which were mainly employed with the aim to suppress oxidation processes, also reduced the phospholipid hydrolysis to a certain extent. A partial oxidation of the cholesteryl myristate was observed in several dispersions by HPTLC, HPLC and mass spectrometry after long-term storage, but could be reduced by adding EDTA or α-tocopherol.

  18. Nonlicensed employee turnover in a long-term care facility.

    PubMed

    Gaddy, T; Bechtel, G A

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze nonlicensed employee turnover in a long-term care facility using Maslow's hierarchy of needs as a framework. During exit interviews, a convenience sample of 34 employees completed an attitudes and beliefs survey regarding their work environment. Findings were mixed; 39.6 percent of the employees stated positive personal relationships were a strength of the organization, although 24.3 percent resigned because of personal/staff conflicts. Financial concerns were not a major factor in their resignations. The study suggests that decreasing nonlicensed employee stress and increasing their personal satisfaction with patient care may decrease employee turnover.

  19. The Relevant Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herr, Edwin L.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the questions of school counselors' obsolescence and relevance. Cites examples of national indicators of support for school counselors. Suggests the need for sharpening the counselor's role and reducing the unevenness in guidance services' availability. (ABB)

  20. Protein turnover and cellular autophagy in growing and growth-inhibited 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, T.; Pfeifer, U. )

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between growth, protein degradation, and cellular autophagy was tested in growing and in growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers. For the biochemical evaluation of DNA and protein metabolism, growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers with high cell density and growing 3T3 cell monolayers with low cell density were labeled simultaneously with ({sup 14}C)thymidine and ({sup 3}H)leucine. The evaluation of the DNA turnover and additional ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography showed that 24 to 5% of 3T3 cells continue to replicate even in the growth-inhibited state, where no accumulation of protein and DNA can be observed. Cell loss, therefore, has to be assumed to compensate for the ongoing cell proliferation. When the data of protein turnover were corrected for cell loss, it was found that the rate constant of protein synthesis in nongrowing monolayers was reduced to half the value found in growing monolayers. Simultaneously, the rate constant of protein degradation in nongrowing monolayers was increased to about 1.5-fold the value of growing monolayers. These data are in agreement with the assumption that cellular autophagy represents a major pathway of regulating protein degradation in 3T3 cells and that the regulation of autophagic protein degradation is of relevance for the transition from a growing to a nongrowing state.

  1. Serum Phospholipid Docosahexaenoic Acid Is Inversely Associated with Arterial Stiffness in Metabolically Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kwon, Nayeon; Yoon, So Ra

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that lower proportion of serum phospholipid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is inversely associated with increased cardiovascular risk and vascular function in metabolically healthy men. To elucidate it, we first compared serum phospholipid free fatty acid (FA) compositions and cardiovascular risk parameters between healthy men (n = 499) and male patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, n = 111) (30-69 years) without metabolic syndrome, and then further-analyzed the association of serum phospholipid DHA composition with arterial stiffness expressed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) in metabolically healthy men. Basic parameters, lipid profiles, fasting glycemic status, adiponectin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and LDL particle size, and serum phospholipid FA compositions were significantly different between the two subject groups. Serum phospholipid DHA was highly correlated with most of long-chain FAs. Metabolically healthy men were subdivided into tertile groups according to serum phospholipid DHA proportion: lower (< 2.061%), middle (2.061%-3.235%) and higher (> 3.235%). Fasting glucose, insulin resistance, hs-CRP and ba-PWVs were significantly higher and adiponectin and LDL particle size were significantly lower in the lower-DHA group than the higher-DHA group after adjusted for confounding factors. In metabolically healthy men, multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed that serum phospholipid DHA mainly contributed to arterial stiffness (β′-coefficients = -0.127, p = 0.006) together with age, systolic blood pressure, triglyceride (r = 0.548, p = 0.023). Lower proportion of serum phospholipid DHA was associated with increased cardiovascular risk and arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men. It suggests that maintaining higher proportion of serum phospholipid DHA may be beneficial for reducing cardiovascular risk including arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men. PMID:27482523

  2. Effects of analogues of ethanolamine and choline on phospholipid metabolism in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Åkesson, Björn

    1977-01-01

    1. Analogues of ethanolamine and choline were incubated with different labelled precursors of phospholipids and isolated hepatocytes and the effects on phospholipid synthesis were studied. 2. 2-Aminopropan-1-ol and 2-aminobutan-1-ol were the most efficient inhibitors of [14C]ethanolamine incorporation into phospholipids, whereas the incorporation of [3H]choline was inhibited most extensively by NN-diethylethanolamine and NN-dimethylethanolamine. 3. When the analogues were incubated with [3H]glycerol and hepatocytes, the appearance of 3H in unnatural phospholipids indicated that they were incorporated, at least in part, via CDP-derivatives. The distribution of [3H]glycerol among molecular species of phospholipids containing 2-aminopropan-1-ol and 1-aminopropan-2-ol was the same as in phosphatidylethanolamine. In other phospholipid analogues the distribution of 3H was more similar to that in phosphatidylcholine. 4. NN-Diethylethanolamine stimulated both the conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine and the incorporation of [Me-14C]methionine into phospholipids. Other N-alkyl- or NN-dialkyl-ethanolamines also stimulated [14C]methionine incorporation, but inhibited the conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine. This indicates that phosphatidyl-NN-diethylethanolamine is a poor methyl acceptor, in contrast with other N-alkylated phosphatidylethanolamines. 5. These results on the regulation of phospholipid metabolism in intact cells are discussed with respect to the possible control points. They also provide guidelines for future experiments on the manipulation of phospholipid polar-headgroup composition in primary cultures of hepatocytes. PMID:606244

  3. Effect of the nature of phospholipids on the degree of their interaction with isobornylphenol antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marakulina, K. M.; Kramor, R. V.; Lukanina, Yu. K.; Plashchina, I. G.; Polyakov, A. V.; Fedorova, I. V.; Chukicheva, I. Yu.; Kutchin, A. V.; Shishkina, L. N.

    2016-02-01

    The parameters of complexation between natural phospholipids (lecithin, sphingomyelin, and cephalin) with antioxidants of a new class, isobornylphenols (IBPs), were determined by UV and IR spectroscopy. The self-organization of phospholipids (PLs) was studied depending on the structure of IBPs by dynamic light scattering. The nature of phospholipids and the structure of IBPs was found to produce a substantial effect both on the degree of complexation and on the size of PL aggregates in a nonpolar solvent. Based on the obtained data it was concluded that the structure of biological membranes mainly depends on the complexation of IBP with sphingomyelin.

  4. Investigating the protective properties of milk phospholipids against ultraviolet light exposure in a skin equivalent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ashley; Laubscher, Andrea; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Laiho, Lily H.

    2010-02-01

    Current research on bioactive molecules in milk has documented health advantages of bovine milk and its components. Milk Phospholipids, selected for this study, represent molecules with great potential benefit in human health and nutrition. In this study we used confocal reflectance and multiphoton microscopy to monitor changes in skin morphology upon skin exposure to ultraviolet light and evaluate the potential of milk phospholipids in preventing photodamage to skin equivalent models. The results suggest that milk phospholipids act upon skin cells in a protective manner against the effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Similar results were obtained from MTT tissue viability assay and histology.

  5. Microfluidics fabrication of monodisperse biocompatible phospholipid vesicles for encapsulation and delivery of hydrophilic drug or active compound.

    PubMed

    Kong, Feng; Zhang, Xu; Hai, Mingtan

    2014-04-01

    We encapsulate the hydrophilic anti-cancer drug doxurubicin hydrochloride (DOX) with about 94% drug encapsulation efficiency, either alone or with nanomagnetite, in monodisperse biocompatible phospholipid vesicles. Glass capillary microfluidics is used to generate monodisperse water in oil in water (w/o/w) double-emulsion templates with a core-shell structure by using a mixture of liquid unsaturated phospholipids and powdered saturated phospholipid. This combination would overcome the low transition temperature of unsaturated powdered phospholipid and the solubility limitation of saturated phospholipid, as well as improving the fabrication of stable monodisperse phospholipid vesicles. The double-emulsion droplet is controlled from 50 to 200 μm according to different flow rates, and the final phospholipid vesicles are retained after a solvent removal step by dewetting. DOX-loaded phospholipid vesicles show sustained release compared with free DOX water solution. The in vitro cell viability of 100 μg/mL phospholipid vesicles on HeLa or MCF-7 cells after 24 h incubation at 310 K is above 90%, confirming the excellent biocompatibility of the phospholipid vesicles. These biocompatible phospholipid vesicles are promising oral drug delivery vehicles for biomedical applications and magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for biomedical diagnosis. PMID:24552433

  6. Differences in Bone Quality between High versus Low Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Daniel S.; Pienkowski, David; Faugere, Marie-Claude; Malluche, Hartmut H.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal bone turnover is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its effects on bone quality remain unclear. This study sought to quantify the relationship between abnormal bone turnover and bone quality. Iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from CKD-5 patients on dialysis with low (n=18) or high (n=17) turnover, and from volunteers (n=12) with normal turnover and normal kidney function. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the microstructural parameters; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to quantify the material and mechanical properties in bone. Reduced mineral-to-matrix ratio, mineral crystal size, stiffness and hardness were observed in bone with high turnover compared to bone with normal or low turnover. Decreased cancellous bone volume and trabecular thickness were seen in bone with low turnover compared to bone with normal or high turnover. Bone quality, as defined by its microstructural, material, and mechanical properties, is related to bone turnover. These data suggest that turnover related alterations in bone quality may contribute to the known diminished mechanical competence of bone in CKD patients, albeit from different mechanisms for bone with high (material abnormality) vs. low (microstructural alteration) turnover. The present findings suggest that improved treatments for renal osteodystrophy should seek to avoid low or high bone turnover and aim for turnover rates as close to normal as possible.

  7. The formation and continuous turnover of a fraction of phosphatidic acid on stimulation of NaC1 secretion by acetylcholine in the salt gland.

    PubMed

    Hokin, M R; Hokin, L E

    1967-03-01

    Acetylcholine, which stimulates NaCl secretion in the avian salt gland, causes the rapid formation of a fraction of phosphatidic acid, as measured by (32)P incorporation, which amounts maximally to about 0.18 micromoles per g of fresh tissue. This does not appear to involve synthesis of the diglyceride moiety of phosphatidic acid, as measured by glycerol-1-(14)C incorporation. It presumably involves formation of phosphatidic acid by the diglyceride kinase pathway from preformed diglyceride and ATP. The specific activity of the AT(32)P of the tissue is not increased in the presence of acetylcholine. At time intervals after addition of acetylcholine during which a full response, measured as increased O(2) uptake, may be observed, phosphatidic acid appears to be the only phosphatide which shows any increase either in total (32)P radioactivity or in net specific acitvity. This responsive fraction of phosphatidic acid undergoes continuous turnover of its phosphate moiety. There is no evidence that this turnover is due to the phosphatidic acid acting as a pool of intermediate for the synthesis of other phospholipids or glycerides. The responsive fraction amounts to not more than 20% of the total phosphatidic acid of the tissue; it does not mix with the other (non-responsive) phosphatidic acid of the tissue. The observations suggest that this phosphatidic acid plays some role in the over-all secretory process.

  8. Biophysical studies of cholesterol in unsaturated phospholipid model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Justin Adam

    Cellular membranes contain a staggering diversity of lipids. The lipids are heterogeneously distributed to create regions, or domains, whose physical properties differ from the bulk membrane and play an essential role in modulating the function of resident proteins. Many basic questions pertaining to the formation of these lateral assemblies remain. This research employs model membranes of well-defined composition to focus on the potential role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and their interaction with cholesterol (chol) in restructuring the membrane environment. Omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs are the main bioactive components of fish oil, whose consumption alleviates a variety of health problems by a molecular mechanism that is unclear. We hypothesize that the incorporation of PUFAs into membrane lipids and the effect they have on molecular organization may be, in part, responsible. Chol is a major constituent in the plasma membrane of mammals. It determines the arrangement and collective properties of neighboring lipids, driving the formation of domains via differential affinity for different lipids. The molecular organization of 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-eicosapentaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PEPC-d31) and 1-[2H31]palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PDPC-d31) in membranes with sphingomyelin (SM) and chol (1:1:1 mol) was compared by solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are the two major n-3 PUFAs found in fish oil, while PEPC-d31 and PDPC-d31 are phospholipids containing the respective PUFAs at the sn-2 position and a perdeuterated palmitic acid at the sn-1 position. Analysis of spectra recorded as a function of temperature indicates that in both cases, formation of PUFA-rich (less ordered) and SM-rich (more ordered) domains occurred. A surprisingly substantial proportion of PUFA was found to infiltrate the more ordered domain. There was almost twice as much DHA (65%) as EPA (30%). The implication is that n-3

  9. Ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelia turnover in a longleaf pine forest.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Joseph J; Mitchell, Robert J; Kuehn, Kevin A; Pecot, Stephen D

    2016-03-01

    Elucidation of the patterns and controls of carbon (C) flow and nitrogen (N) cycling in forests has been hindered by a poor understanding of ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelia (EFM) dynamics. In this study, EFM standing biomass (based on soil ergosterol concentrations), production (based on ergosterol accrual in ingrowth cores), and turnover rate (the quotient of annual production and average standing biomass estimates) were assessed in a 25-yr-old longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) plantation where C flow was manipulated by foliar scorching and N fertilization for 5 yr before study initiation. In the controls, EFM standing biomass was 30 ± 7 g m(-2) , production was 279 ± 63 g m(-2)  yr(-1) , and turnover rate was 10 ± 3 times yr(-1) . The scorched × fertilized treatment had significantly higher EFM standing biomass (38 ± 8 g m(-2) ), significantly lower production (205 ± 28 g m(-2)  yr(-1) ), and a trend of decreased turnover rate (6 ± 1 times yr(-1) ). The EFM turnover estimates, which are among the first reported for natural systems, indicate that EFM are a dynamic component of ecosystems, and that conventional assessments have probably underestimated the role of EFM in C flow and nutrient cycling.

  10. Quantifying Assemblage Turnover and Species Contributions at Ecologic Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C.; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA. PMID:24130679

  11. Teachers' Perceptions of Administrative Support and Antecedents of Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Elizabeth Morgan; Williams, Sue W.; Gleason-Gomez, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the degree to which teachers' age, perceptions of fair pay, receipt of employer-sponsored health insurance, and administrative support, as operationalized by the Competing Values Framework, predicted antecedents of turnover. Teachers' thoughts of leaving their current job and commitment to a center…

  12. Faculty Turnover: Discipline-Specific Attention Is Warranted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Yonghong Jade

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the importance of discipline variations in understanding faculty turnover behaviors. A representative sample of university faculty in Research and Doctoral universities was obtained from a national database. Faculty members, self-identified into a primary academic area, were grouped into eight discipline clusters according…

  13. Bone Turnover Markers and Osteoprotegerin in Uncomplicated Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Styczynska, Hanna; Sobanska, Izabela; Pater, Agnieszka; Pollak, Joanna; Mankowska, Aneta

    2009-01-01

    Although calcium metabolism during pregnancy is well described the mechanisms involved in bone metabolism are not quite clear. Increase of osteoprotegerin (OPG) with elevated bone turnover is supposed to be a homeostatic mechanism limiting bone loss. The aim of the study was to assess bone turnover in pregnancy in relation to serum osteoprotegerin level. Osteocalcin (OC), beta-crosslaps (CTx), OPG, vitamin 25 OH D3, parathormone (PTH), and calcium (Ca) were determined in 30 healthy women at 1st and at 3rd trimester of pregnancy and 27 healthy age-matched non pregnant women. In pregnant women average OPG, CTx and serum calcium concentrations were found to be highly elevated. During pregnancy OPG and bone resorption significantly rised whereas only slight increase in OC level was found with concomitant decrease in serum calcium. OPG correlated positively with OC and Ca only at 1st trimester. Serum CTx and OPG at 1st trimester seemed to be the only parameters to differentiate between elevated and normal bone turnover among pregnant women. In pregnancy bone turnover increases mainly due to enhanced bone resorption. The determination of osteocalcin at the beginning of pregnancy seems to be of limited clinical use, whereas measuring bone resorption markers such as CTx and/or osteoprotegerin may have a good predictive value for later pregnancy-associated bone loss.

  14. An Investigation of Chief Administrator Turnover in International Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, John

    2011-01-01

    This article explores chief administrator turnover in international schools. Quantitative and qualitative data from the 83 chief administrators who participated in the study suggests that the average tenure of an international school chief administrator is 3.7 years and that the main reason chief administrators leave international schools is…

  15. Chinese Teachers' Work Stress and Their Turnover Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Shujie; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    This survey study employed qualitative dominant mixed research to explore the sources of teacher stress in China and the possible reasons for Chinese teachers' turnover intention. The data were collected in Jilin Province of China, and 510 teachers participated in the survey. Quantitatively, 40.4% of the surveyed teachers reported that they…

  16. The Effects of Turnover: What We Know about Teacher Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAngelis, Karen

    2012-01-01

    School business officials are likely to know better than anyone else about the financial costs to districts and schools associated with teacher attrition. Perhaps less well-known, though, is what else has been learned about this issue in recent years--information that may affect how one thinks about teacher turnover. Here is some of that research:…

  17. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stores inventory turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY...

  18. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stores inventory turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY...

  19. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stores inventory turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY...

  20. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stores inventory turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.50-Inventory Management Policies, Procedures, and Guidelines §...

  1. Turnover at the Top: Superintendent Vacancies and the Urban School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    The leadership turnover in America's largest school districts has increased so rapidly that the average urban superintendent tenure is only about two years. In fact, many urban superintendents are hired knowing that they will either be terminated or forced to resign in a short period of time. This cycle has created a class of superintendents who…

  2. Teacher Turnover in Malawi's Ministry of Education: Realities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayuni, Happy; Tambulasi, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The teaching profession is no longer a concern of academicians but the public in general who yearn for positive results. Internationally, the profession is continuously beset by several serious problems. One of the most serious problems in the teaching profession is teacher turnover. Governments are finding it difficult to retain teachers in…

  3. The Prediction of Teacher Turnover Employing Time Series Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Crist H.

    The purpose of this study was to combine knowledge of teacher demographic data with time-series forecasting methods to predict teacher turnover. Moving averages and exponential smoothing were used to forecast discrete time series. The study used data collected from the 22 largest school districts in Iowa, designated as FACT schools. Predictions…

  4. Organizational Career Growth, Affective Occupational Commitment and Turnover Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Qingxiong; McElroy, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Survey data, collected from the People's Republic of China, were used to test Weng's (2010) four facet model of career growth and to examine its effect on occupational commitment and turnover intentions. Weng conceptualized career growth as consisting of four factors: career goal progress, professional ability development, promotion speed, and…

  5. Relationships between Emotional Labor, Job Performance, and Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Robyn E.; Groth, Markus; Frenkel, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between the emotional labor strategies surface acting and deep acting and organizational outcomes, specifically, employees' overall job performance and turnover. Call center employees from two large financial service organizations completed an online survey about their use of surface and deep acting.…

  6. Ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelia turnover in a longleaf pine forest.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Joseph J; Mitchell, Robert J; Kuehn, Kevin A; Pecot, Stephen D

    2016-03-01

    Elucidation of the patterns and controls of carbon (C) flow and nitrogen (N) cycling in forests has been hindered by a poor understanding of ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelia (EFM) dynamics. In this study, EFM standing biomass (based on soil ergosterol concentrations), production (based on ergosterol accrual in ingrowth cores), and turnover rate (the quotient of annual production and average standing biomass estimates) were assessed in a 25-yr-old longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) plantation where C flow was manipulated by foliar scorching and N fertilization for 5 yr before study initiation. In the controls, EFM standing biomass was 30 ± 7 g m(-2) , production was 279 ± 63 g m(-2)  yr(-1) , and turnover rate was 10 ± 3 times yr(-1) . The scorched × fertilized treatment had significantly higher EFM standing biomass (38 ± 8 g m(-2) ), significantly lower production (205 ± 28 g m(-2)  yr(-1) ), and a trend of decreased turnover rate (6 ± 1 times yr(-1) ). The EFM turnover estimates, which are among the first reported for natural systems, indicate that EFM are a dynamic component of ecosystems, and that conventional assessments have probably underestimated the role of EFM in C flow and nutrient cycling. PMID:26537020

  7. Consistent assignment of nurse aides: association with turnover and absenteeism.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2013-01-01

    Consistent assignment refers to the same caregivers consistently caring for the same residents almost every time caregivers are on duty. This article examines the association of consistent assignment of nurse aides with turnover and absenteeism. Data came from a survey of nursing home administrators, the Online Survey Certification and Reporting data, and the Area Resource File. The measures were from 2007 and came from 3,941 nursing homes. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine turnover and absenteeism. An average of 68% of nursing homes reported using consistent assignment, with 28% of nursing homes using nurse aides consistent assignment at the often recommended level of 85% (or more). Nursing homes using recommended levels of consistent assignment had significantly lower rates of turnover and of absenteeism. In the multivariate analyses, consistent assignment was significantly associated with both lower turnover and lower absenteeism (p < .01). Consistent assignment is a practice recommended by many policy makers, government agencies, and industry advocates. The findings presented here provide some evidence that the use of this staffing practice can be beneficial.

  8. Quantifying assemblage turnover and species contributions at ecologic boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA.

  9. Principal Turnover: Upheaval and Uncertainty in Charter Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Yongmei; Sun, Min; Rorrer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Informed by literature on labor market and school choice, this study aims to examine the dynamics of principal career movements in charter schools by comparing principal turnover rates and patterns between charter schools and traditional public schools. Research Methods/Approach: This study uses longitudinal data on Utah principals and…

  10. Sustaining Effective Practices in the Face of Principal Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland-Cohen, M. Kathleen; McIntosh, Kent; Horner, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    In the face of principal turnover, a common approach taken by staff is to simply wait until the new school year begins and hope that the new administrator will continue to support current programs. It is our experience that this passive strategy is not as helpful, because there are proactive approaches that are more likely to be successful. The…

  11. Type I IFN regulate DC turnover in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Fabrizio; Bracci, Laura; Tough, David F; Belardelli, Filippo; Schiavoni, Giovanna

    2009-07-01

    DC are the most potent antigen-presenting cells that recognise signs of infection and serve as the main activators of naïve T cells. We have previously shown that type I IFN (IFN-I) are produced by DC and can act in an autocrine manner to activate DC. In the present study, we have investigated the role of IFN-I in regulating the turnover and lifespan of DC. We found that DC, especially the CD8alpha(+) subset, from type I IFN receptor knock out (IFNAR KO) mice, display a reduced turnover rate when compared with DC from WT mice, as revealed by BrdU labelling kinetics. In vitro, IFNAR KO BM precursor cells cultured in the presence of GM-CSF generated CD11c(+) DC less efficiently than WT BM, and the IFNAR KO DC that arose displayed reduced migratory ability. Interestingly, splenic DC from IFNAR KO mice exhibited a higher survival rate in short-term culture compared with control DC. Exposure to IFN-I in vivo markedly increased the turnover rate of splenic DC, particularly CD8alpha(+) DC, which was preceded by a transient induction of apoptosis. In accordance with this, IFN-I stimulated the apoptosis of splenic DC in vitro. Overall, our data indicate that IFN-I are important regulators of DC turnover in vivo and suggest that these cytokines may exert this function through the modulation of multiple processes involving DC apoptosis, proliferation and migration. PMID:19544312

  12. Faculty Turnover: An Analysis by Rank, Gender, Ethnicity and Reason.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeyman, David S., Jr.; Summers, Susan Robinson

    In spring 1992, a study was conducted to determine factors associated with the attrition of faculty at the University of Florida (UF) from fiscal year (FY) 1989 through FY 1990. Specifically, the study sought to determine the relative level of turnover at UF compared to other institutions, the demographics of and motives given by leaving faculty,…

  13. Factors Affecting Principal Turnover: A Study of Three Midwestern Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belt, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. This dissertation addresses the problem of principal turnover. Using state and city level administrative data, a study of principals and their schools in greater Kansas City, Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was conducted with the goal of discovering themes that emerge regarding the factors associated with turnover…

  14. Quantifying assemblage turnover and species contributions at ecologic boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA. PMID:24130679

  15. Employees as Customers: Exploring Service Climate, Employee Patronage, and Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abston, Kristie A.; Kupritz, Virginia W.

    2011-01-01

    The role of retail employees as customers was explored by quantitatively examining the influence of service climate and employee patronage on employee turnover intentions. Employees representing all shifts in two stores of a national retailer participated. Results indicated that employee patronage partially mediates the effects of service climate…

  16. 2D dynamical arrest transition in a mixed nanoparticle-phospholipid layer studied in real and momentum spaces.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Davide; Guzmán, Eduardo; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca; Ruta, Beatrice; Chushkin, Yuriy; Rimoldi, Tiziano; Cristofolini, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interfacial dynamics of a 2D self-organized mixed layer made of silica nanoparticles interacting with phospholipid (DPPC) monolayers at the air/water interface. This system has biological relevance, allowing investigation of toxicological effects of nanoparticles on model membranes and lung surfactants. It might also provide bio-inspired technological solutions, exploiting the self-organization of DPPC to produce a non-trivial 2D structuration of nanoparticles. The characterization of interfacial dynamics yields information on the effects of NPs on the mechanical properties, important to improve performances of systems such as colloidosomes, foams, creams. For this, we combine micro-tracking in real-space with measurement in momentum-space via x-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy and Digital Fourier Microscopy. Using these complementary techniques, we extend the spatial range of investigation beyond the limits of each one. We find a dynamical transition from Brownian diffusion to an arrested state driven by compression, characterized by intermittent rearrangements, compatible with a repulsive glass phase. The rearrangement and relaxation of the monolayer structure results dramatically hindered by the presence of NPs, which is relevant to explain some the mechanical features observed for the dynamic surface pressure response of these systems and which can be relevant for the respiratory physiology and for future drug-delivery composite systems. PMID:26658474

  17. 2D dynamical arrest transition in a mixed nanoparticle-phospholipid layer studied in real and momentum spaces

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Davide; Guzmán, Eduardo; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca; Ruta, Beatrice; Chushkin, Yuriy; Rimoldi, Tiziano; Cristofolini, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interfacial dynamics of a 2D self-organized mixed layer made of silica nanoparticles interacting with phospholipid (DPPC) monolayers at the air/water interface. This system has biological relevance, allowing investigation of toxicological effects of nanoparticles on model membranes and lung surfactants. It might also provide bio-inspired technological solutions, exploiting the self-organization of DPPC to produce a non-trivial 2D structuration of nanoparticles. The characterization of interfacial dynamics yields information on the effects of NPs on the mechanical properties, important to improve performances of systems such as colloidosomes, foams, creams. For this, we combine micro-tracking in real-space with measurement in momentum-space via x-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy and Digital Fourier Microscopy. Using these complementary techniques, we extend the spatial range of investigation beyond the limits of each one. We find a dynamical transition from Brownian diffusion to an arrested state driven by compression, characterized by intermittent rearrangements, compatible with a repulsive glass phase. The rearrangement and relaxation of the monolayer structure results dramatically hindered by the presence of NPs, which is relevant to explain some the mechanical features observed for the dynamic surface pressure response of these systems and which can be relevant for the respiratory physiology and for future drug-delivery composite systems. PMID:26658474

  18. 2D dynamical arrest transition in a mixed nanoparticle-phospholipid layer studied in real and momentum spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, Davide; Guzmán, Eduardo; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca; Ruta, Beatrice; Chushkin, Yuriy; Rimoldi, Tiziano; Cristofolini, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the interfacial dynamics of a 2D self-organized mixed layer made of silica nanoparticles interacting with phospholipid (DPPC) monolayers at the air/water interface. This system has biological relevance, allowing investigation of toxicological effects of nanoparticles on model membranes and lung surfactants. It might also provide bio-inspired technological solutions, exploiting the self-organization of DPPC to produce a non-trivial 2D structuration of nanoparticles. The characterization of interfacial dynamics yields information on the effects of NPs on the mechanical properties, important to improve performances of systems such as colloidosomes, foams, creams. For this, we combine micro-tracking in real-space with measurement in momentum-space via x-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy and Digital Fourier Microscopy. Using these complementary techniques, we extend the spatial range of investigation beyond the limits of each one. We find a dynamical transition from Brownian diffusion to an arrested state driven by compression, characterized by intermittent rearrangements, compatible with a repulsive glass phase. The rearrangement and relaxation of the monolayer structure results dramatically hindered by the presence of NPs, which is relevant to explain some the mechanical features observed for the dynamic surface pressure response of these systems and which can be relevant for the respiratory physiology and for future drug-delivery composite systems.

  19. RNAi targeting putative genes in phosphatidylcholine turnover results in significant change in fatty acid composition in Crambe abyssinica seed oil.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rui; Li, Xueyuan; Hofvander, Per; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Wang, Danni; Stymne, Sten; Zhu, Li-Hua

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the importance of three enzymes, LPCAT, PDCT and PDAT, involved in acyl turnover in phosphatidylcholine in order to explore the possibility of further increasing erucic acid (22:1) content in Crambe seed oil. The complete coding sequences of LPCAT1-1 and LPCAT1-2 encoding lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT), PDCT1 and PDCT2 encoding phosphatidylcholine:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase (PDCT), and PDAT encoding phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT) were cloned from developing Crambe seeds. The alignment of deduced amino acid sequences displayed a high similarity to the Arabidopsis homologs. Transgenic lines expressing RNA interference (RNAi) targeting either single or double genes showed significant changes in the fatty acid composition of seed oil. An increase in oleic acid (18:1) was observed, to varying degrees, in all of the transgenic lines, and a cumulative effect of increased 18:1 was shown in the LPCAT-PDCT double-gene RNAi. However, LPCAT single-gene RNAi led to a decrease in 22:1 accumulation, while PDCT or PDAT single-gene RNAi had no obvious effect on the level of 22:1. In agreement with the abovementioned oil phenotypes, the transcript levels of the target genes in these transgenic lines were generally reduced compared to wild-type levels. In this paper, we discuss the potential to further increase the 22:1 content in Crambe seed oil through downregulation of these genes in combination with fatty acid elongase and desaturases.

  20. Relevance, Derogation and Permission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolpe, Audun

    We show that a recently developed theory of positive permission based on the notion of derogation is hampered by a triviality result that indicates a problem with the underlying full-meet contraction operation. We suggest a solution that presupposes a particular normal form for codes of norms, adapted from the theory of relevance through propositional letter sharing. We then establish a correspondence between contractions on sets of norms in input/output logic (derogations), and AGM-style contractions on sets of formulae, and use it as a bridge to migrate results on propositional relevance from the latter to the former idiom. Changing the concept accordingly we show that positive permission now incorporates a relevance requirement that wards off triviality.

  1. OPTIMIZING MINIRHIZOTRON SAMPLE FREQUENCY FOR ESTIMATING FINE ROOT PRODUCTION AND TURNOVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most frequent reason for using minirhizotrons in natural ecosystems is the determination of fine root production and turnover. Our objective is to determine the optimum sampling frequency for estimating fine root production and turnover using data from evergreen (Pseudotsuga ...

  2. Whole body and tissue cholesterol turnover in the baboon

    SciTech Connect

    Dell, R.B.; Mott, G.E.; Jackson, E.M.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Carey, K.D.; McGill, H.C. Jr.; Goodman, D.S.

    1985-03-01

    Cholesterol turnover was studied in four baboons by injecting (/sup 14/C)cholesterol 186 days and (/sup 3/H)cholesterol 4 days before necropsy, and fitting a two- or three-pool model to the resulting specific activity-time data. At necropsy, cholesterol mass and specific activity were determined for the total body and for many tissues. The principal aim of this study was to estimate the extent of cholesterol synthesis in the side pools of the model, by computing the amount of side pool synthesis needed to equal the measured total body cholesterol. Central pool synthesis varied from 61 to 89% of the total cholesterol production rate. Moreover, the finding that the measured total body cholesterol fell within the range obtained from the kinetic analysis by using reasonable assumptions, provides evidence for the physiological validity of the model. A second aim of this study was to explore cholesterol turnover in various tissues. A pool model predicts that rapidly turning over tissues will have higher specific activities at early times and lower specific activities at later times after injection of tracer relative to slowly turning over tissues, except where significant synthesis occurs. Results in all four baboons were similar. Turnover rates for the different tissues loosely fell into three groups which were turning over at fast, intermediate, and slow rates. Finally, the magnitude of variation of cholesterol specific activity was moderate for several distributed tissues (fat, muscle, arteries, and the alimentary tract), but was small for liver. Cholesterol turnover in serial biopsies of skin, muscle, and fat could, however, be fitted with a single pool to estimate tissue turnover rates.

  3. Biotic turnover rates during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stivrins, Normunds; Soininen, Janne; Amon, Leeli; Fontana, Sonia L.; Gryguc, Gražyna; Heikkilä, Maija; Heiri, Oliver; Kisielienė, Dalia; Reitalu, Triin; Stančikaitė, Miglė; Veski, Siim; Seppä, Heikki

    2016-11-01

    The Northern Hemisphere is currently warming at the rate which is unprecedented during the Holocene. Quantitative palaeoclimatic records show that the most recent time in the geological history with comparable warming rates was during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (PHT) about 14,000 to 11,000 years ago. To better understand the biotic response to rapid temperature change, we explore the community turnover rates during the PHT by focusing on the Baltic region in the southeastern sector of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, where an exceptionally dense network on microfossil and macrofossil data that reflect the biotic community history are available. We further use a composite chironomid-based summer temperature reconstruction compiled specifically for our study region to calculate the rate of temperature change during the PHT. The fastest biotic turnover in the terrestrial and aquatic communities occurred during the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift at 11,700 years ago. This general shift in species composition was accompanied by regional extinctions, including disappearance of mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) and many arctic-alpine plant taxa, such as Dryas octopetala, Salix polaris and Saxifraga aizoides, from the region. This rapid biotic turnover rate occurred when the rate of warming was 0.17 °C/decade, thus slightly lower than the current Northern Hemisphere warming of 0.2 °C/decade. We therefore conclude that the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift with its rapid turnover rates and associated regional extinctions represents an important palaeoanalogue to the current high latitude warming and gives insights about the probable future turnover rates and patterns of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem change.

  4. Hypoxic cell turnover in different solid tumor lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungkvist, Anna S.E. . E-mail: a.ljungkvist@rther.umcn.nl; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Rijken, Paulus F.J.W.; Begg, Adrian C.; Raleigh, James A.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and the amount of tumor hypoxia has been shown to have a negative impact on the outcome of radiotherapy. The efficacy of combined modality treatments depends both on the sequence and timing of the treatments. Hypoxic cell turnover in tumors may be important for optimal scheduling of combined modality treatments, especially when hypoxic cell targeting is involved. Methods and Materials: Previously we have shown that a double bioreductive hypoxic marker assay could be used to detect changes of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature after carbogen and hydralazine treatments. This assay was used in the current study to establish the turnover rate of hypoxic cells in three different tumor models. The first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times before tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. Hypoxic cell turnover was defined as loss of pimonidazole (first marker) relative to CCI-103F (second marker). Results: The half-life of hypoxic cell turnover was 17 h in the murine C38 colon carcinoma line, 23 h and 49 h in the human xenograft lines MEC82 and SCCNij3, respectively. Within 24 h, loss of pimonidazole-stained areas in C38 and MEC82 occurred concurrent with the appearance of pimonidazole positive cell debris in necrotic regions. In C38 and MEC82, most of the hypoxic cells had disappeared after 48 h, whereas in SCCNij3, viable cells that had been labeled with pimonidazole were still observed after 5 days. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that the double hypoxia marker assay can be used to study changes in both the proportion of hypoxic tumor cells and their lifespan at the same time. The present study shows that large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rates may exist among tumor lines, with half-lives ranging from 17-49 h.

  5. The Limits to Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averill, M.; Briggle, A.

    2006-12-01

    Science policy and knowledge production lately have taken a pragmatic turn. Funding agencies increasingly are requiring scientists to explain the relevance of their work to society. This stems in part from mounting critiques of the "linear model" of knowledge production in which scientists operating according to their own interests or disciplinary standards are presumed to automatically produce knowledge that is of relevance outside of their narrow communities. Many contend that funded scientific research should be linked more directly to societal goals, which implies a shift in the kind of research that will be funded. While both authors support the concept of useful science, we question the exact meaning of "relevance" and the wisdom of allowing it to control research agendas. We hope to contribute to the conversation by thinking more critically about the meaning and limits of the term "relevance" and the trade-offs implicit in a narrow utilitarian approach. The paper will consider which interests tend to be privileged by an emphasis on relevance and address issues such as whose goals ought to be pursued and why, and who gets to decide. We will consider how relevance, narrowly construed, may actually limit the ultimate utility of scientific research. The paper also will reflect on the worthiness of research goals themselves and their relationship to a broader view of what it means to be human and to live in society. Just as there is more to being human than the pragmatic demands of daily life, there is more at issue with knowledge production than finding the most efficient ways to satisfy consumer preferences or fix near-term policy problems. We will conclude by calling for a balanced approach to funding research that addresses society's most pressing needs but also supports innovative research with less immediately apparent application.

  6. Proportion of phospholipids in the plasma membrane is an important factor in Al tolerance.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Eriko; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    The negative charge on the plasma membrane (PM) is mainly derived from the phosphate group of phospholipids. One of the mechanisms of aluminum (Al) toxicity is to increase the PM permeability of root cells by binding to the negative sites on the PM. Thus, PM with a higher proportion of phospholipids could be more susceptible to Al toxicity. In our previous study, we showed that tolerance to Al and low-calcium in rice was enhanced by decreasing the proportion of phospholipids in root cells. Both Melastoma malabathricum L. and Melaleuca cajuputi Powell are dominant woody species that grow in tropical acid sulfate soils, and have been reported to be more tolerant to Al than rice. Surprisingly, the proportion of PM phospholipids in root cells of M. malabathricum and M. cajuputi was considerably low. Our present findings suggest that PM lipid composition plays an important role in Al tolerance mechanisms in various plant species. PMID:25763499

  7. Diagnosing turnover times of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems to address global climate co-variability and for model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalhais, Nuno; Thurner, Martin; Forkel, Matthias; Beer, Christian; Reichstein, Markus

    2016-04-01

    formulations. Despite the challenges in underpinning the exact dynamics behind the observed relationships these findings highlight the relevance of the hydrological cycle in controlling the mean turnover times of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. Overall we acknowledge that carbon turnover times are an emergent property that translates different aspects of ecosystem dynamics, which enable diagnosing ecosystem functioning as well as evaluating model behavior.

  8. Role of hepatic lipase and scavenger receptor BI in clearing phospholipid/free cholesterol-rich lipoproteins in PLTP-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Koichi; Qin, Shucun; Vieu, Claude; Collet, Xavier; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2002-07-11

    Phospholipid transfer protein knock-out (PLTP0) mice have defective transfer of phospholipids (PL) from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) into high-density lipoproteins (HDL). In this study, we examined the role of diet, hepatic lipase (HL) and scavenger receptor BI (SRBI) in determining the accumulation of excess PL and free cholesterol (FC, "surface remnants") in plasma of PLTP0 mice. PL and FC accumulated in the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-LDL region of PLTP0 mice on a highly saturated, coconut oil-based diet, but not on chow or milk-fat based Western diets. Accumulation of PL and FC was dramatically increased in PLTP0/HL0 mice, compared to PLTP0 mice, but only on the coconut oil diet. Turnover studies indicated that the coconut oil diet was associated with delayed catabolism of PL of PL/FC-rich particles. Incubation of these particles with primary hepatocytes in the presence of SRBI neutralizing antibody indicated that SRBI was primarily responsible for removal of FC and PL on the Western diet. In hepatocytes of coconut oil-fed mice, removal of FC and PL from these particles by SRBI was markedly reduced, even though SRBI protein expression levels were unchanged. These studies indicate that HL and SRBI both have major role in the clearance of PL and FC of surface remnants in PLTP0 mice. SRBI appears to be dysfunctional in coconut oil diet-fed animals, possibly related to changes in hepatocyte membrane fatty acid composition. PMID:12117557

  9. Examining the job search-turnover relationship: the role of embeddedness, job satisfaction, and available alternatives.

    PubMed

    Swider, Brian W; Boswell, Wendy R; Zimmerman, Ryan D

    2011-03-01

    This study examined factors that may help explain under what conditions employee job search effort may most strongly (or weakly) predict subsequent turnover. As predicted, the job search-turnover relationship was stronger when employees had lower levels of job embeddedness and job satisfaction and higher levels of available alternatives. These findings suggest that there may be a number of factors interacting to influence employees' turnover decisions, indicating greater complexity to the process than described in prominent sequential turnover models. PMID:21142342

  10. Standardization of immunoassays for antiphospholipid antibodies with beta 2GPI and role of other phospholipid cofactors.

    PubMed

    Amiral, J; Larrivaz, I; Cluzeau, D; Adam, M

    1994-01-01

    Presence of beta 2 Glycoprotein I (beta 2GPI), in addition to phospholipids, is an absolute requirement for binding APA. This binding is frequently observed with beta 2GPI coated alone, however many APA react only with beta 2GPI complexed to phospholipids, but not with phospholipids alone. We demonstrate that a subgroup of rabbit polyclonal antibodies to human beta 2GPI binds to this protein only when it is coated on a solid surface, but not if it is in solution. In addition, beta 2GPI present in goat serum is strongly fixed by the coated phospholipids and the complexes formed bind as well APA as the rabbit antibodies to beta 2GPI. The diluent used for testing APA, has a strong incidence on APA's reactivity as it can be a source of beta 2GPI. Antibody binding to beta 2GPI, Prothrombin, Protein S, and Annexin V, coated in the presence or in the absence of phospholipids, was tested in 55 patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome. The strongest binding of antibodies was observed in 39 plasma to a mixture of phospholipids and purified human beta 2GPI, however 17 samples also presented a significant reactivity to beta 2GPI alone. Nine plasmas contained antibodies to Prothrombin, 4 to Protein S, 3 to Annexin V, and 1 to Protein C. We conclude that most of the APA are directed to a complex of beta 2GPI and phospholipids although in some patients antibodies to beta 2GPI alone or to other phospholipid binding proteins are present.

  11. Phospholipid mass is increased in fibroblasts bearing the Swedish amyloid precursor mutation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Eric J; Huang, Hsueh-Meei; Cowburn, Richard F; Lannfelt, Lars; Gibson, Gary E

    2006-03-15

    Phospholipid changes occur in brain regions affected by Alzheimer disease (AD), including a marked reduction in plasmalogens, which could diminish brain function either by directly altering signaling events or by bulk membrane effects. However, model systems for studying the dynamics of lipid biosynthesis in AD are lacking. To determine if fibroblasts bearing the Swedish amyloid precursor protein (swAPP) mutation are a useful model to study the mechanism(s) associated with altered phospholipid biosynthesis in AD, we examined the steady-state phospholipid mass and composition of fibroblasts, including plasmalogens. We found a 15% increase in total phospholipid mass, accounted for by a 24% increase in the combined total of phosphatidylethanolamine and plasmanylethanolamine mass and a 19% increase in the combined total of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) and plasmanycholine (PakCho) mass in the swAPP mutant bearing fibroblasts. Cholesterol mass was unchanged in these cells. The changes in phospholipid mass did not alter the cellular molar composition of the phospholipids nor the cholesterol to phospholipid ratio. While plasmalogen mass was not altered, the ratio of choline plasmalogen (PlsCho) mass to PtdCho+PakCho mass was decreased 16% and there was a 14% reduction in the proportion of PlsCho as a percent of total phospholipids in the swAPP mutant bearing fibroblasts. This change in choline plasmalogen is consistent with the reported decreases in plasmalogen proportions in affected regions of AD brain, suggesting that these cells may serve as a useful model to determine the mechanism underlying changes in plasmalogen biosynthesis in AD brain. PMID:16464688

  12. The identification and quantification of phospholipids from Thermus and Meiothermus bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lagutin, Kirill; MacKenzie, Andrew; Houghton, Karen M; Stott, Matthew B; Vyssotski, Mikhail

    2014-11-01

    Structural identities of the major phospholipid (PL-2), minor phospholipid (PL-1) and trace phospholipid (PL-0) from representative strains of the genera Thermus and Meiothermus were established. Phospholipids were quantified using phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P-NMR). The structures of the major phospholipid (PL-2) from Thermus filiformis MOK14.7 and Meiothermus ruber WRG6.9 were identified as 2'-O-(1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho)-3'-O-(α-N-acetylglucosaminyl)-N-glyceroyl alkylamine (GlcNAc-PGAA) and 2'-O-(2-acylalkyldiol-1-O-phospho)-3'-O-(α-N-acetylglucosaminyl)-N-glyceroyl alkylamine (GlcNAc-diolPGAA). Interestingly, M. ruber contained only a diacyl form of GlcNAc-PGAA (87 %), while T. filiformis contained both GlcNAc-PGAA (59 %) and GlcNAc-diolPGAA (18 %). The structures of the minor phospholipid (PL-1) were established as 2'-O-(1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho)-3'-O-(α-glucosaminyl)-N-glyceroyl alkylamine (GlcN-PGAA, 13 %) in T. filiformis and 2'-O-(1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho)-3'-O-(α-galactosaminyl)-N-glyceroyl alkylamine (GalN-PGAA, 19 %) in M. ruber. This is the first reliable discovery of phosphatidylglyceroylalkylamines modified by glucosamine or galactosamine with a free amino group. No signs of diol-based phosphatidylglyceroylalkylamines were found in PL-1 phospholipids. Similar to PL-2, trace phospholipid (PL-0) from T. filiformis contained both unsubstituted diol-based phosphatidylglyceroylalkylamine (diolPGAA) and PGAA, while M. ruber contained only free PGAA. Unlike analysis using TLC, the diol form of phosphatidylglyceroylalkylamines is clearly resolved from the diacyl form via (31)P-NMR. PMID:25204578

  13. Smoking and red blood cell phospholipid membrane fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Murff, H J; Tindle, H A; Shrubsole, M J; Cai, Q; Smalley, W; Milne, G L; Swift, L L; Ness, R M; Zheng, W

    2016-09-01

    Smoking is associated with lower n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) concentrations; however, limited studies have accounted for dietary PUFA intake or whether tobacco dose or smoking duration influences this association. We measured red blood cell phospholipid (RBC) membrane concentrations of fatty acids in 126 current smokers, 311 former smokers, and 461 never smokers using gas liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Smokers had lower RBC membrane percentages of total n-3 LCPUFAs compared to former smokers or never smokers (median percent: 5.46, [interquartile range (IQR) 4.52, 6.28] versus 6.39; [IQR: 5.18, 7.85] versus 6.59; [IQR 5.34, 8.01]) (p<0.001) and this association remained after adjusting for dietary PUFA intake. Duration of smoking and cigarettes per day were not associated with RBC membrane n-3 LCPUFA differences. Smoking is associated with lower n-3 LCPUFA RBC membrane percentages and this association was not influenced by diet or smoking dose or duration. PMID:27637337

  14. Fusion of Boar Sperm with Nanoliposomes Prepared from Synthetic Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kasimanickam, V R; Buhr, M M

    2016-08-01

    Liposomes are artificial membrane vesicles that can be used to test and model the functions and interactions of various biological membranes, or as a carrier system to deliver biologically active substances into the cells, or to incorporate lipids into the plasma membrane of target cells to modify membrane structure-function relationships. Sperm plasma membrane undergoes lipid modification during maturation in epididymis and during capacitation in the female reproductive tract to facilitate fertilization. Natural variation in the amounts and composition of lipids in the sperm plasma membrane may also contribute to the species-specific sperm sensitivities to handling and storage conditions. Boar sperm are notoriously susceptible to membrane damage and are resistant to compositional alteration by artificial liposomes. This study used flow cytometry to demonstrate stable incorporation of nanoliposomes prepared from a complex mixture of various phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine : phosphatidylethanolamine : sphingomyelin : phosphatidylserine : phosphatidylinositol) with high fusion efficiency. Over 90% of sperm rapidly took up fluorescently labelled liposomes and retained the lipids for at least 60 min, in a significant time- and concentration-dependent manner. This unique fusion efficacy could be used to alter sperm plasma membrane composition and hence membrane-based functional responses. PMID:27217373

  15. Visualization and analysis of lipopolysaccharide distribution in binary phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Maria Florencia; Sanchez, Susana; Bakas, Laura

    2009-05-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria during infections. It have been reported that LPS may play a role in the outer membrane of bacteria similar to that of cholesterol in eukaryotic plasma membranes. In this article we compare the effect of introducing LPS or cholesterol in liposomes made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine on the solubilization process by Triton X-100. The results show that liposomes containing LPS or cholesterol are more resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 than the binary phospholipid mixtures at 4 {sup o}C. The LPS distribution was analyzed on GUVs of DPPC:DOPC using FITC-LPS. Solid and liquid-crystalline domains were visualized labeling the GUVs with LAURDAN and GP images were acquired using a two-photon microscope. The images show a selective distribution of LPS in gel domains. Our results support the hypothesis that LPS could aggregate and concentrate selectively in biological membranes providing a mechanism to bring together several components of the LPS-sensing machinery.

  16. Isolation and Analysis of Phospholipids in Dairy Foods.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Lígia; Gomes, Ana; Pintado, Manuela; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The lipid fraction of milk is one of the most complex matrixes in foodstuffs due to the presence of a high number of moieties with different physical and chemical properties. Glycerolipids include glycerol and two fatty acids esterified in positions sn-1 and sn-2 with higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids than in the triglyceride fraction of milk. Sphingolipids consist of a sphingoid base linked to a fatty acid across an amide bond. Their amphiphilic nature makes them suitable to be added into a variety of foods and recent investigations show that phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin, can exert antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer activities as well as positive effects in Alzheimer's disease, stress, and memory decline. Polar lipids can be found as natural constituents in the membranes of all living organisms with soybean and eggs as the principal industrial sources, yet they have low contents in phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin. Animal products are rich sources of these compounds but since there are legal restrictions to avoid transmission of prions, milk and dairy products are gaining interest as alternative sources. This review summarizes the analysis of polar lipids in dairy products including sample preparation (extraction and fractionation/isolation) and analysis by GC or HPLC and the latest research works using ELSD, CAD, and MS detectors.

  17. Isolation and Analysis of Phospholipids in Dairy Foods

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Lígia; Gomes, Ana; Pintado, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The lipid fraction of milk is one of the most complex matrixes in foodstuffs due to the presence of a high number of moieties with different physical and chemical properties. Glycerolipids include glycerol and two fatty acids esterified in positions sn-1 and sn-2 with higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids than in the triglyceride fraction of milk. Sphingolipids consist of a sphingoid base linked to a fatty acid across an amide bond. Their amphiphilic nature makes them suitable to be added into a variety of foods and recent investigations show that phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin, can exert antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer activities as well as positive effects in Alzheimer's disease, stress, and memory decline. Polar lipids can be found as natural constituents in the membranes of all living organisms with soybean and eggs as the principal industrial sources, yet they have low contents in phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin. Animal products are rich sources of these compounds but since there are legal restrictions to avoid transmission of prions, milk and dairy products are gaining interest as alternative sources. This review summarizes the analysis of polar lipids in dairy products including sample preparation (extraction and fractionation/isolation) and analysis by GC or HPLC and the latest research works using ELSD, CAD, and MS detectors. PMID:27610267

  18. Synthesis and characterisation of cationically modified phospholipid polymers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Andrew L; Berwick, James; Davies, Martyn C; Roberts, Clive J; Wang, Jin-Hai; Small, Sharon; Dunn, Anthony; O'Byrne, Vincent; Redman, Richard P; Jones, Stephen A

    2004-07-01

    Phospholipid-like copolymers based on 2-(methacryloyloxyethyl) phosphorylcholine were synthesised using monomer-starved free radical polymerisation methods and incorporating cationic charge in the form of the choline methacrylate monomer in amounts varying from 0 to 30 wt%, together with a 5 wt% silyl cross-linking agent in order to render them water-insoluble once thermally cured. Characterisation using a variety of techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high-pressure liquid chromatography and gel permeation chromatography showed the cationic monomer did not interfere with the polymerisation and that the desired amount of charge had been incorporated. Gravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used to evaluate the water contents of polymer membranes cured at 70 degrees C, which was seen to increase with increasing cation content, producing materials with water contents ranging from 50% to 98%. Surface plasmon resonance indicated that the coatings swelled rapidly in water, the rate and extent of swelling increasing with increasing cation level. Dynamic contact angle showed that coatings of all the polymers possessed a hydrophobic surface when dry in air, characteristic of the alkyl chains expressed at the surface (>100 degrees advancing angle). Rearrangement of the hydrophilic groups to the surface occurred once wet, to produce highly wettable surfaces with a decrease in advancing angle with increasing cation content. Atomic force microscopy showed all polymer films to be smooth with no features in topographical or phase imaging. Mechanical properties of the dry films were also unaffected by the increase in cation content.

  19. VISUALIZATION AND ANALYSIS OF LPS DISTRIBUTION IN BINARY PHOSPHOLIPID BILAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Florencia, Henning María; Susana, Sanchez; Laura, Bakás

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin released from the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria during infections. It have been reported that LPS may play a rol in the outer membrane of bacteria similar to that of cholesterol in eukaryotic plasma membranes. In this article we compare the effect of introducing LPS or cholesterol in liposomes made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine on the solubilization process by Triton X-100. The results show that liposomes containing LPS or Cholesterol are more resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 than the binary phospholipid mixtures at 4°C. The LPS distribution was analyzed on GUVs of DPPC:DOPC using FITC-LPS. Solid and liquid-crystalline domains were visualized labeling the GUVs with LAURDAN and GP images were acquired using a two-photon microscope. The images show a selective distribution of LPS in gel domains. Our results support the hypothesis that LPS could aggregate and concentrate selectively in biological membranes providing a mechanism to bring together several components of the LPS-sensing machinery. PMID:19324006

  20. Anisotropic metal growth on phospholipid nanodiscs via lipid bilayer expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel, Jana; Keller, Adrian; Prinz, Julia; Schreiber, Benjamin; Hübner, René; Kerbusch, Jochen; Bald, Ilko; Fahmy, Karim

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembling biomolecules provide attractive templates for the preparation of metallic nanostructures. However, the intuitive transfer of the “outer shape” of the assembled macromolecules to the final metallic particle depends on the intermolecular forces among the biomolecules which compete with interactions between template molecules and the metal during metallization. The shape of the bio-template may thus be more dynamic than generally assumed. Here, we have studied the metallization of phospholipid nanodiscs which are discoidal particles of ~10 nm diameter containing a lipid bilayer ~5 nm thick. Using negatively charged lipids, electrostatic adsorption of amine-coated Au nanoparticles was achieved and followed by electroless gold deposition. Whereas Au nanoparticle adsorption preserves the shape of the bio-template, metallization proceeds via invasion of Au into the hydrophobic core of the nanodisc. Thereby, the lipidic phase induces a lateral growth that increases the diameter but not the original thickness of the template. Infrared spectroscopy reveals lipid expansion and suggests the existence of internal gaps in the metallized nanodiscs, which is confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the encapsulated lipids. Interference of metallic growth with non-covalent interactions can thus become itself a shape-determining factor in the metallization of particularly soft and structurally anisotropic biomaterials.

  1. Isolation and Analysis of Phospholipids in Dairy Foods.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Lígia; Gomes, Ana; Pintado, Manuela; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The lipid fraction of milk is one of the most complex matrixes in foodstuffs due to the presence of a high number of moieties with different physical and chemical properties. Glycerolipids include glycerol and two fatty acids esterified in positions sn-1 and sn-2 with higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids than in the triglyceride fraction of milk. Sphingolipids consist of a sphingoid base linked to a fatty acid across an amide bond. Their amphiphilic nature makes them suitable to be added into a variety of foods and recent investigations show that phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin, can exert antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer activities as well as positive effects in Alzheimer's disease, stress, and memory decline. Polar lipids can be found as natural constituents in the membranes of all living organisms with soybean and eggs as the principal industrial sources, yet they have low contents in phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin. Animal products are rich sources of these compounds but since there are legal restrictions to avoid transmission of prions, milk and dairy products are gaining interest as alternative sources. This review summarizes the analysis of polar lipids in dairy products including sample preparation (extraction and fractionation/isolation) and analysis by GC or HPLC and the latest research works using ELSD, CAD, and MS detectors. PMID:27610267

  2. Impaired phospholipid-related signal transduction in advanced Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Puri, B K

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that Huntington's disease is associated with impaired phospholipid-related signal transduction using the niacin skin flush test. This is the first reported use of this test in this patient group. The response to topical aqueous methyl nicotinate solution was recorded at 5 min intervals over 20 min in six in-patients with advanced (stage III) Huntington's disease and in 14 age- and sex-matched normal individuals with no history of this or any other major neurological disorder. The volumetric niacin response (VNR) (mean +/- S.E.M.) in the patients with Huntington's disease, 16.3 +/- 2.6 mol x s x l(-1), was significantly lower than the mean VNR of 28.3 +/- 2.1 mol x s x l(-1) in the control group (P = 0.004). These results are consistent with the conclusion that Huntington's disease may be associated with an abnormality of neuronal membrane fatty acid metabolism, possibly as a consequence of an as yet unidentified action of huntingtin.

  3. Anisotropic metal growth on phospholipid nanodiscs via lipid bilayer expansion

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Jana; Keller, Adrian; Prinz, Julia; Schreiber, Benjamin; Hübner, René; Kerbusch, Jochen; Bald, Ilko; Fahmy, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling biomolecules provide attractive templates for the preparation of metallic nanostructures. However, the intuitive transfer of the “outer shape” of the assembled macromolecules to the final metallic particle depends on the intermolecular forces among the biomolecules which compete with interactions between template molecules and the metal during metallization. The shape of the bio-template may thus be more dynamic than generally assumed. Here, we have studied the metallization of phospholipid nanodiscs which are discoidal particles of ~10 nm diameter containing a lipid bilayer ~5 nm thick. Using negatively charged lipids, electrostatic adsorption of amine-coated Au nanoparticles was achieved and followed by electroless gold deposition. Whereas Au nanoparticle adsorption preserves the shape of the bio-template, metallization proceeds via invasion of Au into the hydrophobic core of the nanodisc. Thereby, the lipidic phase induces a lateral growth that increases the diameter but not the original thickness of the template. Infrared spectroscopy reveals lipid expansion and suggests the existence of internal gaps in the metallized nanodiscs, which is confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the encapsulated lipids. Interference of metallic growth with non-covalent interactions can thus become itself a shape-determining factor in the metallization of particularly soft and structurally anisotropic biomaterials. PMID:27216789

  4. Fusion of Boar Sperm with Nanoliposomes Prepared from Synthetic Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kasimanickam, V R; Buhr, M M

    2016-08-01

    Liposomes are artificial membrane vesicles that can be used to test and model the functions and interactions of various biological membranes, or as a carrier system to deliver biologically active substances into the cells, or to incorporate lipids into the plasma membrane of target cells to modify membrane structure-function relationships. Sperm plasma membrane undergoes lipid modification during maturation in epididymis and during capacitation in the female reproductive tract to facilitate fertilization. Natural variation in the amounts and composition of lipids in the sperm plasma membrane may also contribute to the species-specific sperm sensitivities to handling and storage conditions. Boar sperm are notoriously susceptible to membrane damage and are resistant to compositional alteration by artificial liposomes. This study used flow cytometry to demonstrate stable incorporation of nanoliposomes prepared from a complex mixture of various phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine : phosphatidylethanolamine : sphingomyelin : phosphatidylserine : phosphatidylinositol) with high fusion efficiency. Over 90% of sperm rapidly took up fluorescently labelled liposomes and retained the lipids for at least 60 min, in a significant time- and concentration-dependent manner. This unique fusion efficacy could be used to alter sperm plasma membrane composition and hence membrane-based functional responses.

  5. Iron-ascorbate-phospholipid mediated modification of low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, P; Yu, H; Gutman, R L; Mao, F; Ryu, B H; Lou, P

    1996-06-11

    LDL can be oxidized by a variety of agents to form a modified lipoprotein which is capable of being avidly metabolized by macrophages. While previous in vitro studies have focused exclusively on the oxidation of LDL, other lipids found in the atheroma are also subject to oxidation and its lipoperoxide byproducts may contribute to the process of LDL modification. To examine the relationship between the oxidation of phospholipids and the subsequent modification of LDL, we incubated 250 microM phosphatidylcholine with 10 microM ferrous sulfate and 50 microM ascorbic acid in 10 mM Tris (pH 7.0). After 18 h at 37 degrees C, significant amounts of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were formed. The inclusion of LDL (100 micrograms protein/ml) elevated the TBARS and increased the electrophoretic mobility of the lipoprotein. LDL treated with iron and ascorbate in the absence of phosphatidylcholine did not result in the modification of this lipoprotein. LDL that was incubated with phosphatidylcholine, iron and ascorbate was found to be metabolized by macrophages to a far greater extent than native LDL or LDL treated with phosphatidylcholine alone. Probucol (10 microM) inhibited the LDL modification process. These results demonstrate that while iron and ascorbate cannot oxidize LDL directly, the addition of phosphatidylcholine to these initiators of lipid peroxidation can mediate and lead to the modification of LDL. PMID:8664335

  6. Probing Lipid Membrane Rafts (Microdomains) with Fluorescent Phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Mitchel, Drake

    2011-10-01

    Membrane rafts are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, they exist in a more ordered state (the liquid-ordered phase; lo) than the bulk membrane (the liquid-disordered phase; ld). Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form membrane rafts over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes, NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions into the lo phase, and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions into the ld phase, to detect these two phases. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the size and stability of POPC/SPM/Chol membrane rafts. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of two fluorescent probes. Data were acquired via frequency-domain measurements from 5 to 250 MHz.

  7. Plasmalogen phospholipids protect internodal myelin from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Luoma, Adrienne M; Kuo, Fonghsu; Cakici, Ozgur; Crowther, Michelle N; Denninger, Andrew R; Avila, Robin L; Brites, Pedro; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in a range of degenerative conditions, including aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and neurological disorders. Myelin is a lipid-rich multilamellar sheath that facilitates rapid nerve conduction in vertebrates. Given the high energetic demands and low antioxidant capacity of the cells that elaborate the sheaths, myelin is considered intrinsically vulnerable to oxidative damage, raising the question whether additional mechanisms prevent structural damage. We characterized the structural and biochemical basis of ROS-mediated myelin damage in murine tissues from both central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). To determine whether ROS can cause structural damage to the internodal myelin, whole sciatic and optic nerves were incubated ex vivo with a hydroxyl radical-generating system consisting of copper (Cu), hydrogen peroxide (HP), and ortho-phenanthroline (OP). Quantitative assessment of unfixed tissue by X-ray diffraction revealed irreversible compaction of myelin membrane stacking in both sciatic and optic nerves. Incubation in the presence of the hydroxyl radical scavenger sodium formate prevented this damage, implicating hydroxyl radical species. Myelin membranes are particularly enriched in plasmalogens, a class of ether-linked phospholipids proposed to have antioxidant properties. Myelin in sciatic nerve from plasmalogen-deficient (Pex7 knockout) mice was significantly more vulnerable to Cu/OP/HP-mediated ROS-induced compaction than myelin from WT mice. Our results directly support the role of plasmalogens as endogenous antioxidants providing a defense that protects ROS-vulnerable myelin.

  8. Isolation and Analysis of Phospholipids in Dairy Foods

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Lígia; Gomes, Ana; Pintado, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The lipid fraction of milk is one of the most complex matrixes in foodstuffs due to the presence of a high number of moieties with different physical and chemical properties. Glycerolipids include glycerol and two fatty acids esterified in positions sn-1 and sn-2 with higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids than in the triglyceride fraction of milk. Sphingolipids consist of a sphingoid base linked to a fatty acid across an amide bond. Their amphiphilic nature makes them suitable to be added into a variety of foods and recent investigations show that phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin, can exert antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer activities as well as positive effects in Alzheimer's disease, stress, and memory decline. Polar lipids can be found as natural constituents in the membranes of all living organisms with soybean and eggs as the principal industrial sources, yet they have low contents in phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin. Animal products are rich sources of these compounds but since there are legal restrictions to avoid transmission of prions, milk and dairy products are gaining interest as alternative sources. This review summarizes the analysis of polar lipids in dairy products including sample preparation (extraction and fractionation/isolation) and analysis by GC or HPLC and the latest research works using ELSD, CAD, and MS detectors.

  9. Orientation and effects of mastoparan X on phospholipid bicelles.

    PubMed Central

    Whiles, J A; Brasseur, R; Glover, K J; Melacini, G; Komives, E A; Vold, R R

    2001-01-01

    Mastoparan X (MPX: INWKGIAAMAKKLL-NH2) belongs to a family of ionophoric peptides found in wasp venom. Upon binding to the membrane, MPX increases the cell's permeability to cations leading to a disruption in the electrolyte balance and cell lysis. This process is thought to occur either through a membrane-thinning mechanism, where the peptide resides on the membrane surface thereby disrupting lipid packing, or through formation of an oligomeric pore. To address this issue, we have used both high-resolution and solid-state 2H NMR techniques to study the structure and orientation of MPX when associated with bicelles. NOESY and chemical shift analysis showed that in bicelles, MPX formed a well-structured amphipathic alpha-helix. In zwitterionic bicelles, the helical axis was found to rest generally perpendicular to the membrane normal, which could be consistent with the "carpet" mechanism for lytic activity. In anionic bicelles, on the other hand, the helical axis was generally parallel to the membrane normal, which is more consistent with the pore model for lytic activity. In addition, MPX caused significant disruption in lipid packing of the negatively charged phospholipids. Taken together, these results show that MPX associates differently with zwitterionic membranes, where it rests parallel to the surface, compared with negatively charged membranes, where it penetrates longitudinally. PMID:11159401

  10. Anisotropic metal growth on phospholipid nanodiscs via lipid bilayer expansion.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Jana; Keller, Adrian; Prinz, Julia; Schreiber, Benjamin; Hübner, René; Kerbusch, Jochen; Bald, Ilko; Fahmy, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling biomolecules provide attractive templates for the preparation of metallic nanostructures. However, the intuitive transfer of the "outer shape" of the assembled macromolecules to the final metallic particle depends on the intermolecular forces among the biomolecules which compete with interactions between template molecules and the metal during metallization. The shape of the bio-template may thus be more dynamic than generally assumed. Here, we have studied the metallization of phospholipid nanodiscs which are discoidal particles of ~10 nm diameter containing a lipid bilayer ~5 nm thick. Using negatively charged lipids, electrostatic adsorption of amine-coated Au nanoparticles was achieved and followed by electroless gold deposition. Whereas Au nanoparticle adsorption preserves the shape of the bio-template, metallization proceeds via invasion of Au into the hydrophobic core of the nanodisc. Thereby, the lipidic phase induces a lateral growth that increases the diameter but not the original thickness of the template. Infrared spectroscopy reveals lipid expansion and suggests the existence of internal gaps in the metallized nanodiscs, which is confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the encapsulated lipids. Interference of metallic growth with non-covalent interactions can thus become itself a shape-determining factor in the metallization of particularly soft and structurally anisotropic biomaterials. PMID:27216789

  11. Observation of Iron Specific Interaction with a Charge Neutral Phospholipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Feng, Shuren; San Emeterio, Josue; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2015-03-01

    Using surface sensitive X-ray scattering and spectroscopic techniques we show that phosphatidyl choline (PC) head groups attract positively charged iron ions and complexes even at pH values that are lower than 3. DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a zwitterionic lipid typically used as a model system for cell membranes. Within a large pH range (3 -11), it carries a negative charge on the phosphate group and a positive charge on the quaternary ammonium cation, thus appears charge neutral. Further lowering the pH, i.e. adding a proton to the phosphate group, results in a positively charged headgroup. Surprisingly, we detect significant enrichment of iron at the interface of the DPPC monolayer and the aqueous subphase with the pH maintained at 3 or even lower. With a supposedly charge neutral or even positive surface, the observation of surface bound, charge positive iron ions or iron hydroxides is counter-intuitive and suggests iron-specific interaction with the phospholipid headgroup, which is not governed by electrostatic interaction. The effect of the integration of Mms6, a membrane protein that promotes the formation of magnetic nanocrystals, into the DPPC monolayer will also be discussed. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  12. Metal ion binding to phospholipid bilayers evaluated by microaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ross, Eric E; Hoag, Christian; Pfeifer, Zach; Lundeen, Christopher; Owens, Sarah

    2016-06-17

    Group I and II ion binding to phospholipid membranes was evaluated by affinity chromatography utilizing a new stationary phase system based on lipid bilayers supported within large-pore particles composed of Stöber silica spheres. Using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer for detection, robust determination of binding selectivity within group II ions is achieved with capillary columns containing nanomole quantities of lipid and using picomoles of metal analyte. Columns with a unique lipid formulation can be prepared within three hours using a solvent-casting assembly method. The observable thermotropic phase behavior of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine has a significant effect on alkaline metal binding and demonstrates the dynamic nature of the supported bilayers. Of the group I ions, only lithium exhibits retention with neutral phosphatidylcholine bilayer stationary phases. A comparison of Stöber-based supports with two commercially available large-pore silicas reveals the effect that particle structure has on analyte accessibility to the bilayer surface as evaluated by retention per supported lipid mass. PMID:27189434

  13. In vivo phospholipid biosynthesis in cotton cotyledons during glyoxysome enlargement

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K.D.; Trelease, R.N. )

    1990-05-01

    The surface are of cottonseed glyoxysomes increases about 4 fold within 36 h after imbibition. Membrane phospholipid must become available to glyoxysomes to accommodate expansion. Incubation of cotyledons (18-h-old) in 14C-choline (1 h) resulted in at least 85% recovery of 14C-phosphatidylcholine (PC) in membranes comigrating on sucrose gradients (20-59% w/w) with antimycin A-insensitive cytochrome c reductase (CCR) activity and choline- and ethanolaminephosphotransferase (CPT and EPT) activities (ER at about 24% w/w sucrose). Chase experiments with 3.4 M choline chloride for 2, 12, or 24 h led to increasing proportions of 14C-PC (36% after 24 h) recovery in mitochondria. No transfer of 14C-PC to enlarging glyoxysomes was detected. Incubations in 14C-ethanolamine yielded ER labeling after only 30 min. 14C-PE chased into mitochondria membranes more rapidly than PC (45% after 12 h), and no 14C-PE chased into glyoxysome membranes. Evidence for synthesis of 14C-PC from 14C-PE was found after 12 h chase with 1 M ethanolamine hydrochloride. Our results indicate that ER is the primary site of PC and PE synthesis in vivo and that ER contributes newly synthesized PC and PE to mitochondrial membranes but not to expanding glyoxysomal membranes. This is different from membrane biogenesis of glyoxysomes proliferating in castor bean endosperm.

  14. Membrane binding of human phospholipid scramblase 1 cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Posada, Itziar M D; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Hervás, Javier H; Alonso, Alicia; Monaco, Hugo L; Goñi, Félix M

    2014-07-01

    Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) consists of a large cytoplasmic domain and a small presumed transmembrane domain near the C-terminal end of the protein. Previous studies with the SCRΔ mutant lacking the C-terminal portion (last 28 aa) revealed the importance of this C-terminal moiety for protein function and calcium-binding affinity. The present contribution is intended to elucidate the effect of the transmembrane domain suppression on SCRΔ binding to model membranes (lipid monolayers and bilayers) and on SCRΔ reconstitution in proteoliposomes. In all cases the protein cytoplasmic domain showed a great affinity for lipid membranes, and behaved in most aspects as an intrinsic membrane protein. Assays have been performed in the presence of phosphatidylserine, presumably important for the SCR cytoplasmic domain to be electrostatically anchored to the plasma membrane inner surface. The fusion protein maltose binding protein-SCR has also been studied as an intermediate case of a molecule that can insert into the bilayer hydrophobic core, yet it is stable in detergent-free buffers. Although the intracellular location of SCR has been the object of debate, the present data support the view of SCR as an integral membrane protein, in which not only the transmembrane domain but also the cytoplasmic moiety play a role in membrane docking of the protein.

  15. Nutritional Properties of Dietary Omega-3-Enriched Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Murru, Elisabetta; Carta, Gianfranca

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fatty acids regulate several physiological functions. However, to exert their properties, they have to be present in the diet in an optimal balance. Particular attention has been focused on tissue highly polyunsaturated fatty acids (HPUFAs) n-6/n-3 ratio, influenced by the type and the esterified form of dietary fatty acids. Dietary EPA and DHA when esterified to phospholipids (PLs) are more efficiently incorporated into tissue PLs and seem to possess peculiar properties through specific mechanism(s) of action, such as the capacity to affect endocannabinoid biosynthesis at much lower doses than EPA and DHA in triglyceride form, probably because of the above mentioned higher incorporation into tissue PLs. Downregulation of the endocannabinoid system seems to mediate the positive effects exerted by omega-3-enriched PLs on several parameters of metabolic syndrome. PLs are one of the major dietary forms of EPA and DHA we are exposed to with the everyday diet; therefore, it is not surprising that it guarantees an effective EPA and DHA nutritional activity. Future studies should address whether EPA and DHA in PL form are also more effective than other formulations in ameliorating other pathological conditions where n-3 HPUFAs seem to exert beneficial activities such as cancer and psychiatric disorders. PMID:23984423

  16. Is Information Still Relevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  17. The Relevance of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, L. L.

    1971-01-01

    The "legacy" of the humanities is discussed in terms of relevance, involvement, and other philosophical considerations. Reasons for studying foreign literature in language classes are developed in the article. Comment is also made on attitudes and ideas culled from the writings of Clifton Fadiman, Jean Paul Sartre, and James Baldwin. (RL)

  18. Relevance and Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Rita

    1995-01-01

    Examined whether the use of superordinate terms in 206 children's definitions is predictable by relevance theory. Children (ages 5-10) gave definitions for 16 basic-level words and 4 superordinate words from natural kind and artifact semantic domains. Superordinate terms were used more frequently when they supported more inferences. Findings…

  19. Reading, Writing and Relevance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Mary

    This monograph presents classroom activities that were designed to encourage children to read and write in a self-reliant and responsible manner. The activities were chosen for their relevance to the children involved and because the vocabulary involved was interesting, familiar, and worth remembering and using again. The topics are arranged in…

  20. Surface Characterization of Bovine Milk Phospholipid Monolayers by Langmuir Isotherms and Microscopic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Gallier, Sophie; Gragson, Derek; Jiménez-Flores, Rafael; Everett, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Monolayers were prepared from phospholipids extracted from bovine milk and used as a model system to mimic the native milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) surface structure in various microscopic experiments. The natural complex mixtures of phospholipids were isolated from bovine raw milk, raw cream, processed whole milk and buttermilk powder by total lipid extraction and solid-phase extraction. A Langmuir film balance mounted on an epifluorescence microscope was used to analyze the physical behavior of the monolayer films and the phase coexistence resulting from the formation of phospholipid microdomains within these films. Atomic force microscopy was used for nanometer scale topographic resolution of the microdomains. This study allowed us to compare the behavior of phospholipid monolayers from dairy products at different stages of processing, to analyze the formation of microdomains, and to study the effect of milk processing on lipid-lipid interactions and phase coexistence. We observe that milk processing changes the physical behavior of phospholipid monolayers by altering the phospholipid profile and the fatty acid distribution. PMID:21067228

  1. Reassessment of the role of phospholipids in sexual reproduction by sterol-auxotrophic fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Kerwin, J L; Duddles, N D

    1989-01-01

    Several genera of oomycete fungi which are incapable of de novo sterol synthesis do not require these compounds for vegetative growth. The requirement for an exogenous source of sterols for sexual reproduction by several members of the Pythiaceae has been questioned by reports of apparent induction and maturation of oospores on defined media supplemented with phospholipids in the absence of sterols. A more detailed examination of this phenomenon suggested that trace levels of sterols in the inoculum of some pythiaceous fungi act synergistically with phospholipid medium supplements containing unsaturated fatty acid moieties to induce oosporogenesis. Phospholipid analysis of one species, Pythium ultimum, suggested that only the fatty acid portion of the exogenous phospholipid is taken up by the fungus. Enrichment of the phospholipid fraction of total cell lipid of P. ultimum with unsaturated fatty acids promoted oospore induction, and enhanced levels of unsaturated fatty acids in the neutral lipid fraction increased oospore viability. For some pythiaceous fungi, the levels of sterols required for the maturation of oospores with appropriate phospholipid medium supplementation suggest that these compounds are necessary only for the sparking and critical domain roles previously described in other fungi. PMID:2738023

  2. Lipidomic analysis of fibroblasts from Zellweger spectrum disorder patients identifies disease-specific phospholipid ratios.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Katharina; Pras-Raves, Mia L; Vervaart, Martin A T; Luyf, Angela C M; van Kampen, Antoine H C; Wanders, Ronald J A; Waterham, Hans R; Vaz, Frédéric M

    2016-08-01

    Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles involved in various metabolic processes, including fatty acid and phospholipid homeostasis. The Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSDs) represent a group of diseases caused by a defect in the biogenesis of peroxisomes. Accordingly, cells from ZSD patients are expected to have an altered composition of fatty acids and phospholipids. Using an LC/MS-based lipidomics approach, we show that the phospholipid composition is characteristically altered in cultured primary skin fibroblasts from ZSD patients when compared with healthy controls. We observed a marked overall increase of phospholipid species containing very long-chain fatty acids, and a decrease of phospholipid species with shorter fatty acid species in ZSD patient fibroblasts. In addition, we detected a distinct phosphatidylcholine profile in ZSD patients with a severe and mild phenotype when compared with control cells. Based on our data, we present a set of specific phospholipid ratios for fibroblasts that clearly discriminate between mild and severe ZSD patients, and those from healthy controls. Our findings will aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of ZSD patients, including an increasing number of mild patients in whom hardly any abnormalities are observed in biochemical parameters commonly used for diagnosis. PMID:27284103

  3. c-Fos activated phospholipid synthesis is required for neurite elongation in differentiating PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Gil, Germán A; Bussolino, Daniela F; Portal, Maximiliano M; Alfonso Pecchio, Adolfo; Renner, Marianne L; Borioli, Graciela A; Guido, Mario E; Caputto, Beatriz L

    2004-04-01

    We have previously shown that c-Fos activates phospholipid synthesis through a mechanism independent of its genomic AP-1 activity. Herein, using PC12 cells induced to differentiate by nerve growth factor, the genomic effect of c-Fos in initiating neurite outgrowth is shown as distinct from its nongenomic effect of activating phospholipid synthesis and sustaining neurite elongation. Blocking c-Fos expression inhibited differentiation, phospholipid synthesis activation, and neuritogenesis. In cells primed to grow, blocking c-Fos expression determined neurite retraction. However, transfected cells expressing c-Fos or c-Fos deletion mutants with capacity to activate phospholipid synthesis sustain neurite outgrowth and elongation in the absence of nerve growth factor. Results disclose a dual function of c-Fos: it first releases the genomic program for differentiation and then associates to the endoplasmic reticulum and activates phospholipid synthesis. Because phospholipids are key membrane components, we hypothesize this latter phenomenon as crucial to support membrane genesis demands required for cell growth and neurite elongation. PMID:14767061

  4. Effects of cholesterol or gramicidin on slow and fast motions of phospholipids in oriented bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Z.Y.; Simplaceanu, V.; Dowd, S.R.; Ho, C. )

    1989-11-01

    Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation both in the rotating frame and in the laboratory frame is used to investigate the slow and fast molecular motions of phospholipids in oriented bilayers in the liquid crystalline phase. The bilayers are prepared from a perdeuterated phospholipid labeled with a pair of {sup 19}F atoms at the 7 position of the 2-sn acyl chain. Phospholipid-cholesterol or phospholipid-gramicidin interactions are characterized by measuring the relaxation rates as a function of the bilayer orientation, the locking field, and the temperature. These studies show that cholesterol or gramicidin can specifically enhance the relaxation due to slow motions in phospholipid bilayers with correlation times {tau}{sub s} longer than 10{sup {minus}8} sec. The perturbations of the geometry of the slow motions induced by cholesterol are qualitatively different from those induced by gramicidin. In contrast, the presence of cholesterol or gramicidin slightly suppresses the fast motions with correlation times {tau}{sub f} = 10{sup {minus}9} to 10{sup {minus}10} sec without significantly affecting their geometry. Weak locking-field and temperature dependences are observed for both pure lipid bilayers and bilayers containing either cholesterol or gramicidin, suggesting that the motions of phospholipid acyl chains may have dispersed correlation times.

  5. Blind Spots: Small Rural Communities and High Turnover in the Superintendency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamrath, Barry; Brunner, C. Cryss

    2014-01-01

    This article examines high superintendency turnover through rural community members' perceptions of such attrition in their districts. Findings indicate that community members perceived high turnover as negative and believed that turnover was created by financial pressures, rural community resistance to educational trends, and bias against…

  6. Superintendent Turnover in Kentucky. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 113

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jerry; Huffman, Tyler; Madden, Karen; Shope, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines superintendent turnover in Kentucky public school districts for 1998/99-2007/08, looking at how turnover varies by rural status, Appalachian and non-Appalachian region, and 2007/08 school district characteristics. Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08;…

  7. How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 17176

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2011-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, but recent evidence calls into question this assumption. Using a unique identification strategy that employs grade-level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 600,000 New York City 4th…

  8. When the Going Gets Tough: Direct, Buffering and Indirect Effects of Social Support on Turnover Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomaki, Georgia; DeLongis, Anita; Frey, Daniela; Short, Kathy; Woehrle, Trish

    2010-01-01

    We examined the role of social support in turnover intention among new teachers. First, we tested and found evidence for a direct negative relationship between social support and turnover intention. Second, we tested the social support buffer hypothesis, and found that teachers with higher social support had lower turnover intention in the face of…

  9. Measuring Worker Turnover in Long-Term Care: Lessons from the Better Jobs Better Care Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercy, Kathleen Walsh, Ed.; Barry, Theresa; Kemper, Peter; Brannon, S. Diane

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Turnover among direct-care workers (DCWs) continues to be a challenge in long-term care. Both policy makers and provider organizations recognize this issue as a major concern and are designing efforts to reduce turnover among these workers. However, there is currently no standardized method of measuring turnover to define the scope of the…

  10. Multivariate data analysis of erythrocyte membrane phospholipid Fatty Acid profiles in the discrimination between normal blood tissue and various disease States.

    PubMed

    Kodba, Zdenka Cencič; Darinka Vončina, Brodnjak; Novič, Marjana; Potočnik, Uroš

    2010-09-01

    The investigation presented here aims to compare the fatty acid composition of red blood cells of patients with different disease states and to test the hypothesis that the changes in fatty acid profiles derived from erythrocyte phospholipids might be relevant to various diseases. The study sample consisted of 342 blood donors, among them 135 with inflammatory bowel disease, 53 with uterine leiomyoma, 14 with verified absence of uterine leiomyoma, 52 with asthma, 18 with colon adenomas, and 70 blood samples without any of mentioned diseases that was used as a control group. After the isolation of erythrocytes from blood samples, total extracted lipids were separated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) into non polar lipids and polar phospholipids. After the saponification of phospholipid fraction, the esterification process followed with boron trifluoride-methanol reagent. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition of the total red blood cell phospholipid fraction was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detector (FID). Additionally two fatty aldehyde dimethyl acetals (hexadecanal and octadecanal dimethyl acetals; 16:0 DMA and 18:0 DMA) derived from erythrocyte membrane plasmalogen phospholipids were also determined. The resulting fatty acid and plasmalogen linked fatty acid composition was evaluated by the principal component analysis (PCA). We demonstrated decreased levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in red blood cell membrane of patients with colon adenomas. Also, a large negative correlation was observed among all samples between the quantity of saturated acids and arachidonic (20:4n6) acid as well as saturated acids and adrenic (22:4n6) acid. In PCA score plot a group of female donors is distinguished mainly by the content of linoleic (18:2n6) acid; a small subgroup shows its concentration highly above the average value. At the same time, the same subgroup has both dimethyl acetals below the average concentrations

  11. Detergent-Mediated Phospholipidation of Plasma Lipoproteins Increases HDL Cholesterophilicity and Cholesterol Efflux Via SR-BI†

    PubMed Central

    Pownall, Henry J.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol efflux is an early, obligatory step in reverse cholesterol transport, the putative antiatherogenic mechanism by which human plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) transport cholesterol from peripheral tissue to the liver for recycling or disposal. HDL-phospholipid content is the essential cholesterol-binding component of lipoproteins and therefore a major determinant of cholesterol efflux. Thus, increased phospholipidation of lipoproteins, particularly HDL, is one strategy for increasing cholesterol efflux. This study validates a simple, new detergent perturbation method for the phospholipidation of plasma lipoproteins; we have quantified the cholesterophilicity of human plasma lipoproteins and the effects of lipoprotein phospholipidation on cholesterophilicity and cellular cholesterol efflux mediated by the class B type I scavenger receptor (SR-BI). We determined that low density lipoproteins (LDL) are more cholesterophilic than HDL and that LDL has a higher affinity for phospholipids than HDL whereas HDL has a higher phospholipid capacity than LDL. Phospholipidation of total human plasma lipoproteins enhances cholesterol efflux, an effect that occurs largely through the preferential phospholipidation of HDL. We conclude that increasing HDL phospholipid increases its cholesterophilicity thereby making it a better acceptor of cellular cholesterol efflux. Phospholipidation of lipoproteins by detergent perturbation is a simple way to increase HDL cholesterophilicity and cholesterol efflux in a way that may be clinically useful. PMID:16981711

  12. Effect of Alkyl Chain Length and Unsaturation of the Phospholipid on the Physicochemical Properties of Lipid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Yuka; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we developed lipid nanoparticles (LNs) containing poorly water-soluble drugs using two types of phospholipids, a neutral phospholipid (hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine) and a negatively-charged phospholipid (dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol), with mean particle sizes of less than 100 nm. Here, we studied the effects of alkyl chain length and unsaturation of neutral and negatively-charged phospholipids on the physicochemical properties of LNs. Three neutral phospholipids, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and distearoylphosphatidylcholine, having different alkyl chain lengths, were compared. The mean particle size of the LNs increased with the alkyl chain length, while the concentration of the drug entrapped in the LNs decreased. The particle size of all of the LNs could be maintained at less than 100 nm for 1 month in cool and dark conditions, with the LNs with longer alkyl chain lipids showing greater stability. In the unsaturated phospholipids, the double bond in the alkyl chain of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine and dierucoylphosphatidylcholine did not affect the physicochemical properties of the LNs. The negatively-charged phospholipids dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol and distearoylphosphatidylglycerol were also compared; LNs with longer alkyl chain lipids had larger particle sizes and lower drug concentrations, similar to the results for neutral phospholipids. We concluded that although some changes in physicochemical properties were observed among LNs with different phospholipid alkyl chain lengths, this methodology was general. LNs with suitable physicochemical properties could be prepared irrespective of the type of phospholipids used.

  13. Revealing Beta-Diversity Patterns of Breeding Bird and Lizard Communities on Inundated Land-Bridge Islands by Separating the Turnover and Nestedness Components

    PubMed Central

    Si, Xingfeng; Baselga, Andrés; Ding, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Beta diversity describes changes in species composition among sites in a region and has particular relevance for explaining ecological patterns in fragmented habitats. However, it is difficult to reveal the mechanisms if broad sense beta-diversity indices (i.e. yielding identical values under nestedness and species replacement) are used. Partitioning beta diversity into turnover (caused by species replacement from site to site) and nestedness-resultant components (caused by nested species losses) could provide a unique way to understand the variation of species composition in fragmented habitats. Here, we collected occupancy data of breeding birds and lizards on land-bridge islands in an inundated lake in eastern China. We decomposed beta diversity of breeding bird and lizard communities into spatial turnover and nestedness-resultant components to assess their relative contributions and respective relationships to differences in island area, isolation, and habitat richness. Our results showed that spatial turnover contributed more to beta diversity than the nestedness-resultant component. The degree of isolation had no significant effect on overall beta diversity or its components, neither for breeding birds nor for lizards. In turn, in both groups the nestedness-resultant component increased with larger differences in island area and habitat richness, respectively, while turnover component decreased with them. The major difference among birds and lizards was a higher relevance of nestedness-resultant dissimilarity in lizards, suggesting that they are more prone to local extinctions derived from habitat fragmentation. The dominance of the spatial turnover component of beta diversity suggests that all islands have potential conservation value for breeding bird and lizard communities. PMID:25992559

  14. Revealing Beta-diversity patterns of breeding bird and lizard communities on inundated land-bridge islands by separating the turnover and nestedness components.

    PubMed

    Si, Xingfeng; Baselga, Andrés; Ding, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Beta diversity describes changes in species composition among sites in a region and has particular relevance for explaining ecological patterns in fragmented habitats. However, it is difficult to reveal the mechanisms if broad sense beta-diversity indices (i.e. yielding identical values under nestedness and species replacement) are used. Partitioning beta diversity into turnover (caused by species replacement from site to site) and nestedness-resultant components (caused by nested species losses) could provide a unique way to understand the variation of species composition in fragmented habitats. Here, we collected occupancy data of breeding birds and lizards on land-bridge islands in an inundated lake in eastern China. We decomposed beta diversity of breeding bird and lizard communities into spatial turnover and nestedness-resultant components to assess their relative contributions and respective relationships to differences in island area, isolation, and habitat richness. Our results showed that spatial turnover contributed more to beta diversity than the nestedness-resultant component. The degree of isolation had no significant effect on overall beta diversity or its components, neither for breeding birds nor for lizards. In turn, in both groups the nestedness-resultant component increased with larger differences in island area and habitat richness, respectively, while turnover component decreased with them. The major difference among birds and lizards was a higher relevance of nestedness-resultant dissimilarity in lizards, suggesting that they are more prone to local extinctions derived from habitat fragmentation. The dominance of the spatial turnover component of beta diversity suggests that all islands have potential conservation value for breeding bird and lizard communities.

  15. Revealing Beta-diversity patterns of breeding bird and lizard communities on inundated land-bridge islands by separating the turnover and nestedness components.

    PubMed

    Si, Xingfeng; Baselga, Andrés; Ding, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Beta diversity describes changes in species composition among sites in a region and has particular relevance for explaining ecological patterns in fragmented habitats. However, it is difficult to reveal the mechanisms if broad sense beta-diversity indices (i.e. yielding identical values under nestedness and species replacement) are used. Partitioning beta diversity into turnover (caused by species replacement from site to site) and nestedness-resultant components (caused by nested species losses) could provide a unique way to understand the variation of species composition in fragmented habitats. Here, we collected occupancy data of breeding birds and lizards on land-bridge islands in an inundated lake in eastern China. We decomposed beta diversity of breeding bird and lizard communities into spatial turnover and nestedness-resultant components to assess their relative contributions and respective relationships to differences in island area, isolation, and habitat richness. Our results showed that spatial turnover contributed more to beta diversity than the nestedness-resultant component. The degree of isolation had no significant effect on overall beta diversity or its components, neither for breeding birds nor for lizards. In turn, in both groups the nestedness-resultant component increased with larger differences in island area and habitat richness, respectively, while turnover component decreased with them. The major difference among birds and lizards was a higher relevance of nestedness-resultant dissimilarity in lizards, suggesting that they are more prone to local extinctions derived from habitat fragmentation. The dominance of the spatial turnover component of beta diversity suggests that all islands have potential conservation value for breeding bird and lizard communities. PMID:25992559

  16. The membrane-activity of Ibuprofen, Diclofenac, and Naproxen: a physico-chemical study with lecithin phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Moreno, Marcela Manrique; Garidel, Patrick; Suwalsky, Mario; Howe, Jörg; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) represent non-specific inhibitors of the cycloxygenase pathway of inflammation, and therefore an understanding of the interaction process of the drugs with membrane phospholipids is of high relevance. We have studied the interaction of the NSAIDs with phospholipid membranes made from dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) by applying Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy (FRET), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). FTIR data obtained via attenuated total reflectance (ATR) show that the interaction between DMPC and NSAIDs is limited to a strong interaction of the drugs with the phosphate region of the lipid head group. The FTIR transmission data furthermore are indicative of a strong effect of the drugs on the hydrocarbon chains inducing a reduction of the chain-chain interactions, i.e., a fluidization effect. Parallel to this, from the DSC data beside the decrease of T(m) a reduction of the peak height of the melting endotherm connected with its broadening is observed, but leaving the overall phase transition enthalpy constant. Additionally, phase separation is observed, inducing the formation of a NSAID-rich and a NSAID-poor phase. This is especially pronounced for Diclofenac. Despite the strong influence of the drugs on the acyl chain moiety, FRET data do not reveal any evidence for drug incorporation into the lipid matrix, and ITC measurements performed do not exhibit any heat production due to drug binding. This implies that the interaction process is governed by only entropic reactions at the lipid/water interface. PMID:19366589

  17. Mitochondrial Injury after Mechanical Stretch of Cortical Neurons in vitro: Biomarkers of Apoptosis and Selective Peroxidation of Anionic Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jing; Tang, Minke; Feng, Weihong; Stolz, Donna B.; Clark, Robert S.B.; Meaney, David F.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Mechanical injury of neurites accompanied by rupture of mitochondrial membranes may lead to immediate nonspecific release and spreading of pro-apoptotic factors and activation of proteases, that is, execution of apoptotic program. In the current work, we studied the time course of the major biomarkers of apoptosis as they are induced by exposure of rat cortical neurons to mechanical stretch. By using transmission electron microscopy, we found that mitochondria in the neurites were damaged early (1 h) after mechanical stretch injury whereas somal mitochondria were significantly more resistant and demonstrated structural damage and degenerative mitochondrial changes at a later time point after stretch (12 h). We also report that the stretch injury caused immediate activation of reactive oxygen species production followed by selective oxidation of a mitochondria-specific phospholipid, cardiolipin, whose individual peroxidized molecular species have been identified and quantified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis. Most abundant neuronal phospholipids – phosphatidylcholine, phophatidylethanolamine – did not undergo oxidative modification. Simultaneously, a small-scale release of cytochrome c was observed. Notably, caspase activation and phosphatidylserine externalization – two irreversible apoptotic events designating a point of no return – are substantially delayed and do not occur until 6–12 h after the initial impact. The early onset of reactive oxygen species production and cytochrome c release may be relevant to direct stretch-induced damage to mitochondria. The delayed emergence of apoptotic neuronal death after the immediate mechanical damage to mitochondria suggests a possible window of opportunity for targeted therapies. PMID:21895519

  18. Antigen-induced generation of lyso-phospholipids in human airways

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to examine the formation of phospholipids, 1-radyl-2-lysosn-glycero-phospholipids (lyso-PL) and 2- acetylated phospholipids (such as PAF) as well as mechanisms responsible for generating these phospholipids in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAI.F) from allergic subjects challenged with antigen. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in normal and allergic subjects before, 5-30 min, 6 h, and 20 h after segmental antigen challenge via a wedged bronchoscope. Levels of 1-hexadecyl-2-lyso-phospholipids and 1- hexadecyl-2-acetyl-phospholipids were initially determined by negative ion chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (NICI- GC/MS). Antigen dramatically elevated quantities of 1-hexadecyl-2-lyso- phospholipids in allergic subjects 20 h after challenge when compared to non-allergic controls. In contrast, there was not a significant increase in levels of 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-phospholipids after antigen challenge. Closer examination of 1-radyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine (GPC) revealed that 1-palmitoyl-2-lyso-GPC, 1-myristoyl- 2-lyso-GPC and 1-hexadecyl-2-lyso-GPC were three major molecular species produced after antigen challenge. 1-palmitoyl-2-lyso-GPC increased sevenfold to levels of 222 +/- 75 ng/ml of BALF 20 h after antigen challenge. The elevated levels of lyso-PL correlated with levels of albumin used to assess plasma exudation induced by allergen challenge. In contrast, the time course of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) or 9 alpha, 11 beta PGF2 (11 beta PGF2) formation did not correlate with lyso-PL generation. To examine the mechanism leading to lyso- phospholipid formation in antigen-challenged allergic subjects, secretory phospholipase A2 (PI.A2) and acetyl hydrolase activities were measured. There was a significant increase in PLA2 activity found in BALF of allergic subjects challenged with antigen when compared to saline controls. This activity was neutralized by an antibody directed against low molecular

  19. The effects of autonomy and empowerment on employee turnover: test of a multilevel model in teams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Lei; Lee, Thomas W

    2011-11-01

    Extending research on voluntary turnover in the team setting, this study adopts a multilevel self-determination theoretical approach to examine the unique roles of individual and social-contextual motivational precursors, autonomy orientation and autonomy support, in reducing team member voluntary turnover. Analysis of multilevel time-lagged data collected from 817 employees on 115 teams indicates that psychological empowerment mediates the main effect of autonomy orientation and the interactive effect of autonomy support and its differentiation on a team member's voluntary turnover. The findings have meaningful implications for the turnover and self-determination literatures as well as for managers who endeavor to prevent voluntary turnover in teams. PMID:21744939

  20. The effects of autonomy and empowerment on employee turnover: test of a multilevel model in teams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Lei; Lee, Thomas W

    2011-11-01

    Extending research on voluntary turnover in the team setting, this study adopts a multilevel self-determination theoretical approach to examine the unique roles of individual and social-contextual motivational precursors, autonomy orientation and autonomy support, in reducing team member voluntary turnover. Analysis of multilevel time-lagged data collected from 817 employees on 115 teams indicates that psychological empowerment mediates the main effect of autonomy orientation and the interactive effect of autonomy support and its differentiation on a team member's voluntary turnover. The findings have meaningful implications for the turnover and self-determination literatures as well as for managers who endeavor to prevent voluntary turnover in teams.

  1. Phospholipid-templated silica nanocapsules as efficient polyenzymatic biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Phuoc, Lai Truong; Laveille, Paco; Chamouleau, Françoise; Renard, Gilbert; Drone, Jullien; Coq, Bernard; Fajula, François; Galarneau, Anne

    2010-09-28

    Solid polyenzymatic biocatalysts have been designed by combining two immobilized enzymes, the first one allowing the in situ generation of H(2)O(2) from air and the second one performing an oxidation reaction. The in situ H(2)O(2) generation system is based on the reaction of glucose with air using a glucose oxidase (GOx). The optimization of the encapsulation of GOx into phospholipids-templated silica capsules (NPS) was performed. A bienzymatic system made of GOx and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied. Optimal conditions for the activity of the GOx/HRP bienzymatic system have been determined for both homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions. The encapsulation in NPS materials increases the stability of both enzymes. The performance of the encapsulated bienzymatic GOx/HRP system in the model reaction of 4-aminoantipyridine with phenol is similar when the enzymes are immobilized separately in two NPS or coencapsulated in the same NPS. An excess of peroxidase compared to GOx ([HRP]/[GOx] = 5-10) is necessary to obtain the optimal activity. To show the potentiality of bienzymatic systems in real applications, HRP has been replaced by hemoglobin, which is known for its ability to oxidize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) pollutants through a pseudoperoxidase pathway. A larger excess of Hb compared to GOx ([Hb]/[GOx] = 1000) was necessary to obtain the maximum PAH removal, as Hb is not a real peroxidase as HRP but a hemoprotein with some pseudoperoxidase activity. In opposite to real enzymes, the immobilization of Hb by adsorption in mesoporous silica is preferable as its encapsulation. Therefore, the bienzymatic system made of GOx encapsulated in NPS and Hb adsorbed in mesoporous silica has been used for the removal of 11 PAH from water. This heterogeneous bienzymatic system allows 64% of PAH removal from water using simple air as oxidant.

  2. Study of supported phospholipid bilayers by THz-TDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Alina; Mernea, Maria; Vasile, Ionut; Brandus, Catalina Alice; Barbinta-Patrascu, Marcela Elisabeta; Tugulea, Laura; Mihailescu, Dan; Dascalu, Traian

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a new technique in studying the conformational state of molecules. Cell membranes are important structures in the interaction with extra cellular entities. Their principal building blocks are lipids, amphiphilic molecules that spontaneously self-assemble when in contact with water. In this work we report the use of THz-TDS in transmission mode to examine the behavior of supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) within the frequency range of 0.2 THz to 3 THz. SPBs were obtained by vesicle adsorption method involving the spread of a suspension (50-100 μl) of small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) or multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) dissolved in PBS (phosphate buffer solution) on a support of silicon wafers. Both SUVs and MLVs were obtained from dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and lecithin by using the thin-film hydration method. Broadband THz pulses are generated and detected using photoconductive antennas optically excited by a femtosecond laser pulse emitted from a self-mode locked fiber laser at a wavelength of 780 nm with a pulse widths of 150 fs. THz-TDS was proven to be a useful method in studying SPBs and their hydration states. The absorption coefficient and refractive index of the samples were calculated from THz measurements data. The THz absorption spectra for different lipids in SPBs indicate specific absorption frequency lines. A difference in the magnitude of the refractive index was also observed due to the different structure of supported lipid bilayers. The THz spectrum of DPPC was obtained by using theoretical simulations and then the experimental and theoretical THz spectra were compared.

  3. Rhamnose Links Moonlighting Proteins to Membrane Phospholipid in Mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Daubenspeck, James M; Liu, Runhua; Dybvig, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins that have a primary function as a cytoplasmic protein are known to have the ability to moonlight on the surface of nearly all organisms. An example is the glycolytic enzyme enolase, which can be found on the surface of many types of cells from bacteria to human. Surface enolase is not enzymatic because it is monomeric and oligomerization is required for glycolytic activity. It can bind various molecules and activate plasminogen. Enolase lacks a signal peptide and the mechanism by which it attaches to the surface is unknown. We found that treatment of whole cells of the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis with phospholipase D released enolase and other common moonlighting proteins. Glycostaining suggested that the released proteins were glycosylated. Cytoplasmic and membrane-bound enolase was isolated by immunoprecipitation. No post-translational modification was detected on cytoplasmic enolase, but membrane enolase was associated with lipid, phosphate and rhamnose. Treatment with phospholipase released the lipid and phosphate from enolase but not the rhamnose. The site of rhamnosylation was identified as a glutamine residue near the C-terminus of the protein. Rhamnose has been found in all species of mycoplasma examined but its function was previously unknown. Mycoplasmas are small bacteria with have no peptidoglycan, and rhamnose in these organisms is also not associated with polysaccharide. We suggest that rhamnose has a central role in anchoring proteins to the membrane by linkage to phospholipid, which may be a general mechanism for the membrane association of moonlighting proteins in mycoplasmas and perhaps other bacteria. PMID:27603308

  4. Rhamnose Links Moonlighting Proteins to Membrane Phospholipid in Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Daubenspeck, James M.; Liu, Runhua; Dybvig, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins that have a primary function as a cytoplasmic protein are known to have the ability to moonlight on the surface of nearly all organisms. An example is the glycolytic enzyme enolase, which can be found on the surface of many types of cells from bacteria to human. Surface enolase is not enzymatic because it is monomeric and oligomerization is required for glycolytic activity. It can bind various molecules and activate plasminogen. Enolase lacks a signal peptide and the mechanism by which it attaches to the surface is unknown. We found that treatment of whole cells of the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis with phospholipase D released enolase and other common moonlighting proteins. Glycostaining suggested that the released proteins were glycosylated. Cytoplasmic and membrane-bound enolase was isolated by immunoprecipitation. No post-translational modification was detected on cytoplasmic enolase, but membrane enolase was associated with lipid, phosphate and rhamnose. Treatment with phospholipase released the lipid and phosphate from enolase but not the rhamnose. The site of rhamnosylation was identified as a glutamine residue near the C-terminus of the protein. Rhamnose has been found in all species of mycoplasma examined but its function was previously unknown. Mycoplasmas are small bacteria with have no peptidoglycan, and rhamnose in these organisms is also not associated with polysaccharide. We suggest that rhamnose has a central role in anchoring proteins to the membrane by linkage to phospholipid, which may be a general mechanism for the membrane association of moonlighting proteins in mycoplasmas and perhaps other bacteria. PMID:27603308

  5. The Role of Phospholipid Oxidation Products in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangderk; Birukov, Konstantin G.; Romanoski, Casey E.; Springstead, James R.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Berliner, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing clinical evidence that phospholipid oxidation products (Ox-PL) play a role in atherosclerosis. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which Ox-PL interact with endothelial cells, monocyte/macrophages, platelets, smooth muscle cells and HDL to promote atherogenesis. In the last few years major progress has been made in identifying these mechanisms. It has been recognized that Ox-PL promote phenotypic changes in these cell types that have long term consequences for the vessel wall. Individual Ox-PL responsible for specific cellular effects has been identified. A model of the configuration of bioactive truncated Ox-PL within membranes has been developed that demonstrates that the oxidized fatty acid moiety protrudes into the aqueous phase, rendering it accessible for receptor recognition. Receptors and signaling pathways for individual Ox-PL species are now determined and receptor independent signaling pathways identified. The effects of Ox-PL are mediated both by gene regulation and transcription independent processes. It has now become apparent that Ox-PL affects multiple genes and pathways some of which are pro-atherogenic and some are protective. However, at concentrations that are likely present in the vessel wall in atherosclerotic lesions, the effects promote atherogenesis. There have also been new insights on enzymes that metabolize Ox-PL and the significance of these enzymes for atherosclerosis. With the knowledge we now have on the regulation and effects of Ox-PL in different vascular cell types, it should be possible to design experiments to test the role of specific Ox-PL on the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22935534

  6. Cationic Phospholipids Forming Cubic Phases: Lipoplex Structure and Transfection Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana; Wang, Li; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2008-10-29

    The transfection activity and the phase behavior of two novel cationic O-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-hexylphosphocholine (C6-DOPC) and 1,2-dierucoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (di22:1-EPC), have been examined with the aim of more completely understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery. Both lipids form cubic phases: C6-DOPC in the entire temperature range from -10 to 90 C, while di22:1-EPC exhibits an irreversible lamellar-cubic transition between 50 and 70 C on heating. The lipoplexes formed by C6-DOPC arrange into hexagonal phase, while the lipoplexes of di22:1-EPC are lamellar. Both lipids exhibit lower transfection activity than the lamellar-forming 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EDOPC). Thus, for the studied cationic phospholipid-DNA systems, the lipoplex phase state is a factor that does not seem to correlate with transfection activity. The parameter that exhibits better correlation with the transfection activity within the present data set is the phase state of the lipid dispersion prior to the addition of DNA. Thus, the lamellar lipid dispersion (EDOPC) produces more efficient lipoplexes than the dispersion with coexisting lamellar and cubic aggregates (diC22:1-EPC), which is even more efficient than the purely cubic dispersions (C6-DOPC; diC22:1-EPC after heating). It could be inferred from these data and from previous research that cubic phase lipid aggregates are unlikely to be beneficial to transfection. The lack of correlation between the phase state of lipoplexes and their transfection activity observed within the present data set does not mean that lipid phase state is generally unimportant for lipofection: a viewpoint now emerging from our previous studies is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids.

  7. The Behavior of Oxonol Dyes in Phospholipid Dispersions

    PubMed Central

    Bashford, C. Lindsay; Chance, Britton; Smith, Jerry C.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of a class of oxonol dyes with sonicated phospholipid vesicles was followed optically. The spectra of vesicle-associated dyes resemble those found for the dyes in organic solvents, indicating that the oxonols occupy a hydrophobic region of the membrane. At equilibrium the affinity of the oxonols for the vesicles depends on the structure of the dye, the physical and chemical composition of the vesicles, and the ionic strength of the medium. The oxonols occupy soybean lipid vesicles to a level of 147.9 ± 17.1 nmol/mg lipid with a dye membrane dissociation constant of 3.33 ± 0.54 μM. The interaction of the oxonols with soybean lipid vesicles is biphasic. The fast phase has a second order rate constant of 9.04 ± 0.36 × 106M-1 s-1 and the number of “fast” binding sites, 68 ± 8 nmol/mg lipid, was determined from the ratio of the second order rate constants obtained with lipid and with dye in excess. The dissociation of oxonols from soybean lipid vesicles is also biphasic, and the fast process has a rate constant of 17 ± 2 s-1, yielding a dissociation constant for the fast sites (k-1/k2) of 1.88 ± 0.15 μM. The slow phases of oxonol association with, and release from, soybean lipid vesicles are not second order and have half times of between 0.2 and 5 min, depending on the physical and chemical composition of the membrane lipids. The amplitudes of the slow phases are sensitive to the composition of the aqueous media on each side of the vesicle membranes, which suggests that the slow processes represent the permeation of the membrane by the oxonols. The importance of the properties of the oxonol dyes in the interpretation of their behavior in natural membranes is discussed. PMID:263685

  8. Coverage and disruption of phospholipid membranes by oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pera, Harke; Nolte, Tom M; Leermakers, Frans A M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2014-12-01

    We studied the interactions of silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with phospholipid membranes and show how electrostatics plays an important role. For this, we systematically varied the charge density of both the membranes by changing their lipid composition and the oxide particles by changing the pH. For the silica nanoparticles, results from our recently presented fluorescence vesicle leakage assay are combined with data on particle adsorption onto supported lipid bilayers obtained by optical reflectometry. Because of the strong tendency of the TiO2 nanoparticles to aggregate, the interaction of these particles with the bilayer was studied only in the leakage assay. Self-consistent field (SCF) modeling was applied to interpret the results on a molecular level. At low charge densities of either the silica nanoparticles or the lipid bilayers, no electrostatic barrier to adsorption exists. However, the adsorption rate and adsorbed amounts drop with increasing (negative) charge densities on particles and membranes because of electric double-layer repulsion, which is confirmed by the effect of the ionic strength. SCF calculations show that charged particles change the structure of lipid bilayers by a reorientation of a fraction of the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) headgroups. This explains the affinity of the silica particles for pure PC lipid layers, even at relatively high particle charge densities. Particle adsorption does not always lead to the disruption of the membrane integrity, as is clear from a comparison of the leakage and adsorption data for the silica particles. The attraction should be strong enough, and in line with this, we found that for positively charged TiO2 particles vesicle disruption increases with increasing negative charge density on the membranes. Our results may be extrapolated to a broader range of oxide nanoparticles and ultimately may be used for establishing more accurate nanoparticle toxicity assessments and drug

  9. Signaling Pathways That Control mRNA Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Denmon, Andria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cells regulate their genomes mainly at the level of transcription and at the level of mRNA decay. While regulation at the level of transcription is clearly important, the regulation of mRNA turnover by signaling networks is essential for a rapid response to external stimuli. Signaling pathways result in posttranslational modification of RNA binding proteins by phosphorylation, ubiquitination, methylation, acetylation etc. These modifications are important for rapid remodeling of dynamic ribonucleoprotein complexes and triggering mRNA decay. Understanding how these posttranslational modifications alter gene expression is therefore a fundamental question in biology. In this review we highlight recent findings on how signaling pathways and cell cycle checkpoints involving phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and arginine methylation affect mRNA turnover. PMID:23602935

  10. Keratin dynamics: modeling the interplay between turnover and transport.

    PubMed

    Portet, Stéphanie; Madzvamuse, Anotida; Chung, Andy; Leube, Rudolf E; Windoffer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Keratin are among the most abundant proteins in epithelial cells. Functions of the keratin network in cells are shaped by their dynamical organization. Using a collection of experimentally-driven mathematical models, different hypotheses for the turnover and transport of the keratin material in epithelial cells are tested. The interplay between turnover and transport and their effects on the keratin organization in cells are hence investigated by combining mathematical modeling and experimental data. Amongst the collection of mathematical models considered, a best model strongly supported by experimental data is identified. Fundamental to this approach is the fact that optimal parameter values associated with the best fit for each model are established. The best candidate among the best fits is characterized by the disassembly of the assembled keratin material in the perinuclear region and an active transport of the assembled keratin. Our study shows that an active transport of the assembled keratin is required to explain the experimentally observed keratin organization.

  11. Intraflagellar transport balances continuous turnover of outer doublet microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2001-01-01

    A central question in cell biology is how cells determine the size of their organelles. Flagellar length control is a convenient system for studying organelle size regulation. Mechanistic models proposed for flagellar length regulation have been constrained by the assumption that flagella are static structures once they are assembled. However, recent work has shown that flagella are dynamic and are constantly turning over. We have determined that this turnover occurs at the flagellar tips, and that the assembly portion of the turnover is mediated by intraflagellar transport (IFT). Blocking IFT inhibits the incorporation of tubulin at the flagellar tips and causes the flagella to resorb. These results lead to a simple steady-state model for flagellar length regulation by which a balance of assembly and disassembly can effectively regulate flagellar length. PMID:11684707

  12. [Bone turnover and mineralization in patients with kidney failure].

    PubMed

    James, Junichiro

    2016-09-01

    Bone remodeling is a device to accomplish "the buffering of the extracellular fluid mineral", which is one of the two major physiological functions of bone. Bone turnover is a term to express the frequency of bone remodeling, and its last step is calcification. When remodeling is induced, at first a large amount of mineral is released from bone to extracellular fluid transiently, and thereafter mineral is slowly and steadily drawn into bone. The extracellular minerals, especially calcium, are maintained by this repetition. When kidney is injured, bone turnover takes a wide spectrum from remarkably high cases to low cases. Primary calcification also shows marked individual differences. The classic renal bone diseases 5 classification clearly categorizes these disease condition, which is synonymous with renal osteodystrophy today. PMID:27561340

  13. Biosynthesis, Turnover, and Functions of Chitin in Insects.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kun Yan; Merzendorfer, Hans; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Jianzhen; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is a major component of the exoskeleton and the peritrophic matrix of insects. It forms complex structures in association with different assortments of cuticle and peritrophic matrix proteins to yield biocomposites with a wide range of physicochemical and mechanical properties. The growth and development of insects are intimately coupled with the biosynthesis, turnover, and modification of chitin. The genes encoding numerous enzymes of chitin metabolism and proteins that associate with and organize chitin have been uncovered by bioinformatics analyses. Many of these proteins are encoded by sets of large gene families. There is specialization among members within each family, which function in particular tissues or developmental stages. Chitin-containing matrices are dynamically modified at every developmental stage and are under developmental and/or physiological control. A thorough understanding of the diverse processes associated with the assembly and turnover of these chitinous matrices offers many strategies to achieve selective pest control. PMID:26982439

  14. Assembly and Turnover of Caveolae: What Do We Really Know?

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Copeland, Courtney A.; Tiwari, Ajit; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to containing highly dynamic nanoscale domains, the plasma membranes of many cell types are decorated with caveolae, flask-shaped domains enriched in the structural protein caveolin-1 (Cav1). The importance of caveolae in numerous cellular functions and processes has become well-recognized, and recent years have seen dramatic advances in our understanding of how caveolae assemble and the mechanisms control the turnover of Cav1. At the same time, work from our lab and others have revealed that commonly utilized strategies such as overexpression and tagging of Cav1 have unexpectedly complex consequences on the trafficking and fate of Cav1. Here, we discuss the implications of these findings for current models of caveolae biogenesis and Cav1 turnover. In addition, we discuss how disease-associated mutants of Cav1 impact caveolae assembly and outline open questions in this still-emerging area. PMID:27446919

  15. Nursing assistant turnover in nursing homes and need satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Caudill, M; Patrick, M

    1989-06-01

    1. Level of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is basic physiological needs measured by salary, adequate housing, and food. Attainment of these needs increased the length of stay of nursing assistants in nursing homes. 2. Safety and security (level 2) influenced length of stay of nursing assistants. Those with benefits of retirement, vacation, and holiday pay tended to have less turnover. 3. Praise by the patient and family was most important to nursing assistants. Belonging to a peer group and praise by charge nurse also decreased turnover of nursing assistants (level 3). 4. Level 4, self-esteem measured by input into decisions and being able to criticize, increased length of stay of nursing assistants.

  16. Regulation of protein turnover by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2014-12-01

    Protein turnover reflects the balance between synthesis and degradation of proteins, and it is a crucial process for the maintenance of the cellular protein pool. The folding of proteins, refolding of misfolded proteins, and also degradation of misfolded and damaged proteins are involved in the protein quality control (PQC) system. Correct protein folding and degradation are controlled by many different factors, one of the most important of which is the heat shock protein family. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are in the class of molecular chaperones, which may prevent the inappropriate interaction of proteins and induce correct folding. On the other hand, these proteins play significant roles in the degradation pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy. This review focuses on the emerging role of HSPs in the regulation of protein turnover; the effects of HSPs on the degradation machineries ERAD, autophagy, and proteasome; as well as the role of posttranslational modifications in the PQC system.

  17. Pattern and process in Amazon tree turnover, 1976-2001.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, O L; Baker, T R; Arroyo, L; Higuchi, N; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Lewis, S L; Lloyd, J; Malhi, Y; Monteagudo, A; Neill, D A; Vargas, P Núñez; Silva, J N M; Terborgh, J; Martínez, R Vásquez; Alexiades, M; Almeida, S; Brown, S; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Czimczik, C I; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T; Kuebler, C; Laurance, S G; Nascimento, H E M; Olivier, J; Palacios, W; Patiño, S; Pitman, N C A; Quesada, C A; Saldias, M; Lezama, A Torres; Vinceti, B

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has shown that tree turnover, tree biomass and large liana densities have increased in mature tropical forest plots in the late twentieth century. These results point to a concerted shift in forest ecological processes that may already be having significant impacts on terrestrial carbon stocks, fluxes and biodiversity. However, the findings have proved controversial, partly because a rather limited number of permanent plots have been monitored for rather short periods. The aim of this paper is to characterize regional-scale patterns of 'tree turnover' (the rate with which trees die and recruit into a population) by using improved datasets now available for Amazonia that span the past 25 years. Specifically, we assess whether concerted changes in turnover are occurring, and if so whether they are general throughout the Amazon or restricted to one region or environmental zone. In addition, we ask whether they are driven by changes in recruitment, mortality or both. We find that: (i) trees 10 cm or more in diameter recruit and die twice as fast on the richer soils of southern and western Amazonia than on the poorer soils of eastern and central Amazonia; (ii) turnover rates have increased throughout Amazonia over the past two decades; (iii) mortality and recruitment rates have both increased significantly in every region and environmental zone, with the exception of mortality in eastern Amazonia; (iv) recruitment rates have consistently exceeded mortality rates; (v) absolute increases in recruitment and mortality rates are greatest in western Amazonian sites; and (vi) mortality appears to be lagging recruitment at regional scales. These spatial patterns and temporal trends are not caused by obvious artefacts in the data or the analyses. The trends cannot be directly driven by a mortality driver (such as increased drought or fragmentation-related death) because the biomass in these forests has simultaneously increased. Our findings therefore indicate that

  18. Pattern and process in Amazon tree turnover, 1976-2001.

    PubMed

    Phillips, O L; Baker, T R; Arroyo, L; Higuchi, N; Killeen, T J; Laurance, W F; Lewis, S L; Lloyd, J; Malhi, Y; Monteagudo, A; Neill, D A; Vargas, P Núñez; Silva, J N M; Terborgh, J; Martínez, R Vásquez; Alexiades, M; Almeida, S; Brown, S; Chave, J; Comiskey, J A; Czimczik, C I; Di Fiore, A; Erwin, T; Kuebler, C; Laurance, S G; Nascimento, H E M; Olivier, J; Palacios, W; Patiño, S; Pitman, N C A; Quesada, C A; Saldias, M; Lezama, A Torres; Vinceti, B

    2004-03-29

    Previous work has shown that tree turnover, tree biomass and large liana densities have increased in mature tropical forest plots in the late twentieth century. These results point to a concerted shift in forest ecological processes that may already be having significant impacts on terrestrial carbon stocks, fluxes and biodiversity. However, the findings have proved controversial, partly because a rather limited number of permanent plots have been monitored for rather short periods. The aim of this paper is to characterize regional-scale patterns of 'tree turnover' (the rate with which trees die and recruit into a population) by using improved datasets now available for Amazonia that span the past 25 years. Specifically, we assess whether concerted changes in turnover are occurring, and if so whether they are general throughout the Amazon or restricted to one region or environmental zone. In addition, we ask whether they are driven by changes in recruitment, mortality or both. We find that: (i) trees 10 cm or more in diameter recruit and die twice as fast on the richer soils of southern and western Amazonia than on the poorer soils of eastern and central Amazonia; (ii) turnover rates have increased throughout Amazonia over the past two decades; (iii) mortality and recruitment rates have both increased significantly in every region and environmental zone, with the exception of mortality in eastern Amazonia; (iv) recruitment rates have consistently exceeded mortality rates; (v) absolute increases in recruitment and mortality rates are greatest in western Amazonian sites; and (vi) mortality appears to be lagging recruitment at regional scales. These spatial patterns and temporal trends are not caused by obvious artefacts in the data or the analyses. The trends cannot be directly driven by a mortality driver (such as increased drought or fragmentation-related death) because the biomass in these forests has simultaneously increased. Our findings therefore indicate that

  19. Composition and metabolism of phospholipids in Octopus vulgaris and Sepia officinalis hatchlings.

    PubMed

    Reis, Diana B; Acosta, Nieves G; Almansa, Eduardo; Tocher, Douglas R; Andrade, José P; Sykes, António V; Rodríguez, Covadonga

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterise the fatty acid (FA) profiles of the major phospholipids, of Octopus vulgaris and Sepia officinalis hatchlings, namely phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE); and to evaluate the capability of both cephalopod species on dietary phospholipid remodelling. Thus, O. vulgaris and S. officinalis hatchlings were in vivo incubated with 0.3μM of L-∝-1-palmitoyl-2-[1-(14)C]arachidonyl-PC or L-∝-1-palmitoyl-2-[1-(14)C]arachidonyl-PE. Octopus and cuttlefish hatchlings phospholipids showed a characteristic FA profiles with PC presenting high contents of 16:0 and 22:6n-3 (DHA); PS having high 18:0, DHA and 20:5n-3 (EPA); PI a high content of saturated FA; and PE showing high contents of DHA and EPA. Interestingly, the highest content of 20:4n-6 (ARA) was found in PE rather than PI. Irrespective of the phospholipid in which [1-(14)C]ARA was initially bound (either PC or PE), the esterification pattern of [1-(14)C]ARA in octopus lipids was similar to that found in their tissues with high esterification of this FA into PE. In contrast, in cuttlefish hatchlings [1-(14)C]ARA was mainly recovered in the same phospholipid that was provided. These results showed a characteristic FA profiles in the major phospholipids of the two species, as well as a contrasting capability to remodel dietary phospholipids, which may suggest a difference in phospholipase activities.

  20. The effect of borage oil consumption on the composition of individual phospholipids in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Barre, D E; Holub, B J

    1992-05-01

    The effect of supplementation with borage oil containing gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3n-6) on the levels and fatty acid compositions of individual human platelet phospholipids was evaluated. For this purpose, male volunteers were given an average daily intake of 5.23 g of GLA (as borage oil) for 42 days, after which the supplement was withdrawn for an additional 42-day period. No significant differences were found in the relative amounts of the choline phospholipids (PC), ethanolamine phospholipids (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and sphingomyelin (SPH) at days 0, 22, 43, 64, and 85. However, marked differences were observed in the fatty acid compositions of all the phospholipids including a marked, and reversible, rise in the level of dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA, 20:3n-6), without a significant elevation in arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) and decreases in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the case of PC, a net rise in DGLA of 1.8 mol% was observed by day 22 (from 2.1 to 3.9 mol%). The DGLA/AA ratios at day 43 exhibited considerable variability across phospholipids with PC greater than PS greater than PE = PI; the PC, PE, PS, and PI accounted for 67.6, 16.7, 12.9, and 2.6%, respectively, of the total DGLA in platelet phospholipids. Interestingly, despite the lack of DGLA in SPH, this phospholipid exhibited a marked enrichment in nervonic acid (NA, 24:1n-9) from 16.2 to 24.7 mol% upon borage oil consumption. The observed alterations may represent biochemical strategies for adaptation to dietary fatty acid modifications and the regulation of platelet membrane functioning.

  1. Interaction of epicatechin gallate with phospholipid membranes as revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uekusa, Yoshinori; Kamihira-Ishijima, Miya; Sugimoto, Osamu; Ishii, Takeshi; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Nakamura, Kozo; Tanji, Ken-ichi; Naito, Akira; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Epicatechin gallate (ECg), a green tea polyphenol, has various physiological effects. Our previous nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) study using solution NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that ECg strongly interacts with the surface of phospholipid bilayers. However, the dynamic behavior of ECg in the phospholipid bilayers has not been clarified, especially the dynamics and molecular arrangement of the galloyl moiety, which supposedly has an important interactive role. In this study, we synthesized [13C]-ECg, in which the carbonyl carbon of the galloyl moiety was labeled by 13C isotope, and analyzed it by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state 31P NMR analysis indicated that ECg changes the gel-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature of DMPC bilayers as well as the dynamics and mobility of the phospholipids. In the solid-state 13C NMR analysis under static conditions, the carbonyl carbon signal of the [13C]-ECg exhibited an axially symmetric powder pattern. This indicates that the ECg molecules rotate about an axis tilting at a constant angle to the bilayer normal. The accurate intermolecular-interatomic distance between the labeled carbonyl carbon of [13C]-ECg and the phosphorus of the phospholipid was determined to be 5.3±0.1 Å by 13C-(31)P rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) measurements. These results suggest that the galloyl moiety contributes to increasing the hydrophobicity of catechin molecules, and consequently to high affinity of galloyl-type catechins for phospholipid membranes, as well as to stabilization of catechin molecules in the phospholipid membranes by cation-π interaction between the galloyl ring and quaternary amine of the phospholipid head-group. PMID:21352801

  2. Composition and metabolism of phospholipids in Octopus vulgaris and Sepia officinalis hatchlings.

    PubMed

    Reis, Diana B; Acosta, Nieves G; Almansa, Eduardo; Tocher, Douglas R; Andrade, José P; Sykes, António V; Rodríguez, Covadonga

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterise the fatty acid (FA) profiles of the major phospholipids, of Octopus vulgaris and Sepia officinalis hatchlings, namely phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE); and to evaluate the capability of both cephalopod species on dietary phospholipid remodelling. Thus, O. vulgaris and S. officinalis hatchlings were in vivo incubated with 0.3μM of L-∝-1-palmitoyl-2-[1-(14)C]arachidonyl-PC or L-∝-1-palmitoyl-2-[1-(14)C]arachidonyl-PE. Octopus and cuttlefish hatchlings phospholipids showed a characteristic FA profiles with PC presenting high contents of 16:0 and 22:6n-3 (DHA); PS having high 18:0, DHA and 20:5n-3 (EPA); PI a high content of saturated FA; and PE showing high contents of DHA and EPA. Interestingly, the highest content of 20:4n-6 (ARA) was found in PE rather than PI. Irrespective of the phospholipid in which [1-(14)C]ARA was initially bound (either PC or PE), the esterification pattern of [1-(14)C]ARA in octopus lipids was similar to that found in their tissues with high esterification of this FA into PE. In contrast, in cuttlefish hatchlings [1-(14)C]ARA was mainly recovered in the same phospholipid that was provided. These results showed a characteristic FA profiles in the major phospholipids of the two species, as well as a contrasting capability to remodel dietary phospholipids, which may suggest a difference in phospholipase activities. PMID:27267253

  3. Nonsedimentable Microvesicles from Senescing Bean Cotyledons Contain Gel Phase-Forming Phospholipid Degradation Products 1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kening; Paliyath, Gopinadhan; Thompson, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A mixture of liquid-crystalline and gel-phase lipid domains is detectable by wide angle x-ray diffraction in smooth microsomal membranes isolated from senescent 7-day-old cotyledons, whereas corresponding membranes from young 2-day-old cotyledons are exclusively liquid-crystalline. The gel-phase domains in the senescent membranes comprise phospholipid degradation products including diacylglycerols, free fatty acids, long-chain aldehydes, and long-chain hydrocarbons. The same complement of phospholipid degradation products is also present in nonsedimentable microvesicles isolated from senescent 7-day-old cotyledons by filtration of a 250,000g, 12-hour supernatant through a 300,000 dalton cut-off filter. The phospholipid degradation products in the microvesicles form gel-phase lipid domains when reconstituted into phospholipid liposomes. Nonsedimentable microvesicles of a similar size, which are again enriched in the same gel-phase-forming phospholipid degradation products, are also generated in vitro from smooth microsomal membranes isolated from 2-day-old cotyledons when Ca2+ is added to activate membrane-associated lipolytic enzymes. The Ca2+-treated membranes do not contain detectable gel-phase domains, suggesting that the phospholipid degradation products are completely removed by microvesiculation. The observations collectively indicate that these nonsedimentable microvesicles serve as a vehicle for moving phospholipid degradation products out of membrane bilayers into the cytosol. As noted previously (Yao K, Paliyath G, Humphrey RW, Hallett FR, Thompson JE [1991] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 88: 2269-2273), the term “deteriosome” connotes this putative function and would serve to distinguish these microvesicles from other cytoplasmic microvesicles unrelated to deterioration. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:16668427

  4. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy.

    PubMed

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-06-18

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication. Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements and autophagy has an important role in this process. However, its underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unexplained. Here we show that members of the FAM134 reticulon protein family are ER-resident receptors that bind to autophagy modifiers LC3 and GABARAP, and facilitate ER degradation by autophagy ('ER-phagy'). Downregulation of FAM134B protein in human cells causes an expansion of the ER, while FAM134B overexpression results in ER fragmentation and lysosomal degradation. Mutant FAM134B proteins that cause sensory neuropathy in humans are unable to act as ER-phagy receptors. Consistently, disruption of Fam134b in mice causes expansion of the ER, inhibits ER turnover, sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptotic cell death and leads to degeneration of sensory neurons. Therefore, selective ER-phagy via FAM134 proteins is indispensable for mammalian cell homeostasis and controls ER morphology and turnover in mice and humans.

  5. Rapid Skeletal Turnover In A Radiographic Mimic Of Osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Michael P.; Madson, Katherine L.; Mumm, Steven; McAlister, William H.; Novack, Deborah V.; Blair, Jo C.; Helliwell, Timothy R.; Stolina, Marina; Abernethy, Laurence J.; Shaw, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Among the high bone mass disorders, the osteopetroses reflect osteoclast failure that prevents skeletal resorption and turnover leading to reduced bone growth and modeling and characteristic histopathological and radiographic findings. We report an 11-year-old boy with a new syndrome that radiographically mimics osteopetrosis but features rapid skeletal turnover. He presented at age 21 months with a parasellar, osteoclast-rich giant cell granuloma. Radiographs showed a dense skull, generalized osteosclerosis, and cortical thickening, medullary cavity narrowing, and diminished modeling of tubular bones. His serum alkaline phosphatase was > 5,000 IU/L (normal < 850). After partial resection, the granuloma re-grew but then regressed and stabilized during three years of uncomplicated pamidronate treatment. His hyperphosphatasemia transiently diminished but all bone turnover markers, especially those of apposition, remained elevated. Two years after pamidronate therapy stopped, BMD z-scores reached + 9.1 and + 5.8 in the lumbar spine and hip, respectively, and iliac crest histopathology confirmed rapid bone remodeling. Serum multiplex biomarker profiling was striking for low sclerostin. Mutation analysis was negative for activation of LRP4, LRP5, or TGFβ1 and for defective SOST, OPG, RANKL, RANK, SQSTM1, or sFRP1. Microarray showed no notable copy number variation. Studies of his non-consanguineous parents were unremarkable. The etiology and pathogenesis of this unique syndrome are unknown. PMID:24919763

  6. Species Turnover through Time: Colonization and Extinction Dynamics across Metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Nuvoloni, Felipe Micali; Feres, Reinaldo José Fazzio; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Island biogeography and metacommunity theory often use equilibrium assumptions to predict local diversity, yet nonequilibrium dynamics are common in nature. In nonequilibrium communities, local diversity fluctuates through time as the relative importance of colonization and extinction change. Here, we test the prevalence and causes of nonequilibrium dynamics in metacommunities of mites associated with rubber trees distributed over large spatial (>1,000 km) and temporal (>30-60 generations) scales in Brazil. We measured colonization and extinction rates to test species turnover and nonequilibrium dynamics over a growing season. Mite metacommunities exhibited nonequilibrium dynamics for most months of the year, and these dynamics tracked climatic conditions. Monthly shifts in temperature of more than 1°C resulted in nonequilibrium dynamics, as did mean temperatures outside of two critical ranges. Nonequilibrium dynamics were caused by a change in colonization with temperature change and changes in both colonization and extinction with absolute temperature. Species turnover showed different trends; high relative humidity increased both colonization and extinction rates, increasing turnover but not nonequilibrium dynamics. Our study illustrates that testing nonequilibrium dynamics can provide new insights into the drivers of colonization, extinction, and diversity fluctuations in metacommunities. PMID:27172597

  7. No turnover in lens lipids for the entire human lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jessica R; Levchenko, Vladimir A; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mitchell, Todd W; Williams, Alan; Truscott, Roger JW

    2015-01-01

    Lipids are critical to cellular function and it is generally accepted that lipid turnover is rapid and dysregulation in turnover results in disease (Dawidowicz 1987; Phillips et al., 2009; Liu et al., 2013). In this study, we present an intriguing counter-example by demonstrating that in the center of the human ocular lens, there is no lipid turnover in fiber cells during the entire human lifespan. This discovery, combined with prior demonstration of pronounced changes in the lens lipid composition over a lifetime (Hughes et al., 2012), suggests that some lipid classes break down in the body over several decades, whereas others are stable. Such substantial changes in lens cell membranes may play a role in the genesis of age-related eye disorders. Whether long-lived lipids are present in other tissues is not yet known, but this may prove to be important in understanding the development of age-related diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06003.001 PMID:25760082

  8. Turnover and dispersal of prairie falcons in southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehman, Robert N.; Steenhof, Karen; Carpenter, L.B.; Kochert, Michael N.

    2000-01-01

    We studied Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) breeding dispersal, natal dispersal, and turnover at nesting areas in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (NCA) from 1971- 95. Of 61 nesting areas where falcons identified one year were known to be present or absent the following year, 57% had a different falcon. This turnover rate was 2-3 times higher than that reported elsewhere for large falcons, and may have been related to high nesting densities in the NCA. Turnover at nesting areas was independent of nesting success in the previous year, but was significantly higher for females nesting on large cliffs. Mean distance between natal and breeding locations for 26 falcons banded as nestlings and later encountered as nesting adults was 8.9 km. Natal dispersal distances were similar for males and females, but more than twice as many males marked as nestlings were later encountered nesting in the NCA. Fourteen adult falcons found on different nesting areas in successive years moved an average of 1.5 km between nesting areas; males dispersed significantly farther than females. Natal and breeding dispersal distances in the NCA were lower than those reported for Prairie Falcons in other study areas. Only four falcons banded as nestlings were found outside NCA boundaries during the breeding period, and only one of these birds was known to be occupying a nesting area. We encountered no falcons banded outside the NCA occupying nesting areas in the NCA during this study.

  9. New Insights into the Protein Turnover Regulation in Ethylene Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Gyeong Mee

    2015-07-01

    Biosynthesis of the phytohormone ethylene is under tight regulation to satisfy the need for appropriate levels of ethylene in plants in response to exogenous and endogenous stimuli. The enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of ethylene biosynthesis, plays a central role to regulate ethylene production through changes in ACS gene expression levels and the activity of the enzyme. Together with molecular genetic studies suggesting the roles of post-translational modification of the ACS, newly emerging evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of ACS protein stability is an alternative mechanism that controls ethylene production, in addition to the transcriptional regulation of ACS genes. In this review, recent new insight into the regulation of ACS protein turnover is highlighted, with a special focus on the roles of phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and novel components that regulate the turnover of ACS proteins. The prospect of cross-talk between ethylene biosynthesis and other signaling pathways to control turnover of the ACS protein is also considered.

  10. Piribedil affects dopamine turnover in cochleas stimulated by white noise.

    PubMed

    Gil-Loyzaga, P; Vicente-Torres, M A; Fernández-Mateos, P; Arce, A; Esquifino, A

    1994-09-01

    The presence of dopamine (DA) within the cochlea has been previously reported, indicating that its turnover increases under noise stimulation. In the present report, piribedil, a dopaminergic D2 agonist, was used in order to provide evidence of the activity of D2 receptors in the turnover of DA under noise stimulation. Long-Evans rats were intraperitoneally injected with distilled water or with a solution of piribedil one hour previously to either noise or silence exposure. Noise stimulation was performed in an anechoic chamber at 70, 90 or 110 dB SPL for one hour. The animals were then sacrificed and the cochlear contents of DA and its metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were quantified by HPLC with electrochemical detection. The administration of piribedil to animals kept in silence did not modify the cochlear DA, DOPAC and HVA content. Noise stimulation resulted in a decrease of the cochlear DA content and an increase of the cochlear DOPAC and HVA contents in vehicle treated animals. The administration of piribedil resulted in a blockade of this noise induced cochlear DA turnover. These results suggest that piribedil stimulates cochlear D2 receptors controlling the cochlear DA release. Piribedil action on D2 receptors could explain the improvement observed in some cochleo-vestibular diseases signs after piribedil treatment. PMID:7806480

  11. Causes and consequences of collective turnover: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Heavey, Angela L; Holwerda, Jacob A; Hausknecht, John P

    2013-05-01

    Given growing interest in collective turnover (i.e., employee turnover at unit and organizational levels), the authors propose an organizing framework for its antecedents and consequences and test it using meta-analysis. Based on analysis of 694 effect sizes drawn from 82 studies, results generally support expected relationships across the 6 categories of collective turnover antecedents, with somewhat stronger and more consistent results for 2 categories: human resource management inducements/investments and job embeddedness signals. Turnover was negatively related to numerous performance outcomes, more strongly so for proximal rather than distal outcomes. Several theoretically grounded moderators help to explain average effect-size heterogeneity for both antecedents and consequences of turnover. Relationships generally did not vary according to turnover type (e.g., total or voluntary), although the relative absence of collective-level involuntary turnover studies is noted and remains an important avenue for future research. PMID:23668597

  12. Examining the temporal relationship between psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Bryan R.; Hunter, Brooke D.

    2012-01-01

    Relative to the broader industrial-organizational (I-O) psychology field, research on the turnover of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment staff is in its infancy. Despite its long and rich history, recent reviews of the turnover literature within I-O psychology have noted there remains considerable room for improvement. In particular, recommendations have been made for research that considers time in the turnover process and explores more distal causes of staff turnover. Addressing these gaps, this paper examined the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover. Using data from 95 SUD treatment staff clustered within 29 treatment organizations, multilevel discrete-time survival analyses revealed that a latent measure of work attitude (e.g., job satisfaction, pay satisfaction, turnover intentions) fully mediated the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate (e.g., supervisor support, coworker support, role conflict) and subsequent staff turnover. PMID:22658290

  13. The effect of culture on the curvilinear relationship between performance and turnover.

    PubMed

    Sturman, Michael C; Shao, Lian; Katz, Jan H

    2012-01-01

    Although researchers have theorized that there exists a curvilinear relationship between job performance and voluntary turnover, their research has been tested in the United States or culturally similar Switzerland. Through a study of the performance-turnover relationship from a multinational service-oriented organization in 24 countries, we demonstrate that the general relationship between performance and turnover is similar across countries but the details of that relationship change across countries. Using 4 cultural dimensions--in-group collectivism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and performance orientation--we find that cultural factors alter the overall probability of voluntary turnover and influence the degree of curvilinearity in the performance-turnover relationship. Our findings have implications for research on the performance-turnover relationship, turnover research, and practice. PMID:22023074

  14. The effect of culture on the curvilinear relationship between performance and turnover.

    PubMed

    Sturman, Michael C; Shao, Lian; Katz, Jan H

    2012-01-01

    Although researchers have theorized that there exists a curvilinear relationship between job performance and voluntary turnover, their research has been tested in the United States or culturally similar Switzerland. Through a study of the performance-turnover relationship from a multinational service-oriented organization in 24 countries, we demonstrate that the general relationship between performance and turnover is similar across countries but the details of that relationship change across countries. Using 4 cultural dimensions--in-group collectivism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and performance orientation--we find that cultural factors alter the overall probability of voluntary turnover and influence the degree of curvilinearity in the performance-turnover relationship. Our findings have implications for research on the performance-turnover relationship, turnover research, and practice.

  15. Synthesis of redox active ferrocene-modified phospholipids by transphosphatidylation reaction and chronoamperometry study of the corresponding redox sensitive liposome.

    PubMed

    Correia-Ledo, Debby; Arnold, Alexandre A; Mauzeroll, Janine

    2010-11-01

    The design of stable redox active liposomes where the organometallic electroactive pendent was covalently bound to the phospholipid headgroup through a phospholipase D (PLD)-catalyzed transphosphatidylation reaction between a choline-bearing phospholipid and a primary alcohol containing a ferrocene derivative is reported. The functionalization of a liposome surface with this organometallic redox phospholipid allowed the study of membrane-bound electrochemical reactions, which are important in the design of redox-sensitive liposome delivery systems.

  16. Synthesis of redox active ferrocene-modified phospholipids by transphosphatidylation reaction and chronoamperometry study of the corresponding redox sensitive liposome.

    PubMed

    Correia-Ledo, Debby; Arnold, Alexandre A; Mauzeroll, Janine

    2010-11-01

    The design of stable redox active liposomes where the organometallic electroactive pendent was covalently bound to the phospholipid headgroup through a phospholipase D (PLD)-catalyzed transphosphatidylation reaction between a choline-bearing phospholipid and a primary alcohol containing a ferrocene derivative is reported. The functionalization of a liposome surface with this organometallic redox phospholipid allowed the study of membrane-bound electrochemical reactions, which are important in the design of redox-sensitive liposome delivery systems. PMID:20932007

  17. Inorganic pyrophosphate pool size and turnover rate in arthritic joints.

    PubMed

    Camerlain, M; McCarty, D J; Silcox, D C; Jung, A

    1975-06-01

    Recent studies have shown elevated inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) levels in most knee joint fluid supernates from patients with pseudogout (PG) or osteoarthritis (OA) and more modestly elevated levels in some supernates from patients with gout or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) relative to PPi levels found in the venous blood plasma of normal or arthritic subjects. We measured the intraarticular PPi pool and its rate of turnover to better understand the significance of the joint fluid-plasma PPi gradient. Preliminary studies in rabbits showed that (32-P)PPi passed from joint space to blood and vice versa without detectable hydrolysis. Incubation of natural or synthetic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) microcrystals with synovial fluid in vitro in the presence of (32P)PPi tracer showed no change in PPi specific activity in the supernate over a 19-h period so that exchange of PPi in solution with that in CPPD microcrystals could be ignored. Clearance rates of (32P)PPi and of (33P)Pi, as determined by serially sampling the catheterized knee joints of volunteers with various types of arthritis over a 3-h period, were nearly identical. The (32P)PPi/(32P)Pi was determined in each sample. A mixture of a large excess of cold PPi did not influence the clearance rate of either nuclide. The quantity of PPi turned over per hous was calculated from the pool size as determined by isotope dilution and the turnover rate. The residual joint fluid nuclide was shown to be (32P)PPi. The PPi pool was generally smaller and the rate of turnover was greater in clinically inflamed joints. The mean plus or minus SEM pool size (mu-moles) and turnover rate (percent/hour) in PG knees was 0.23 plus or minus 0.07 and 117 plus or minus 11.9, hydrolysis rate (%/h) to Pi was 27.7 plus or minus 13.2; in OA knees: 0.45 plus or minus 0.26 and 72 plus or minus 9.2, hydrolysis 6.9 plus or minus 0.9; in gouty knees: 0.8 plus or minus 0.41 and 50 plus or minus 11.6, hydrolysis 9.8 plus or minus 2.8; and in

  18. Ethylene-Mediated Phospholipid Catabolic Pathway in Glucose-Starved Carrot Suspension Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Hyun Lee, Soo; Sook Chae, Hyun; Kyun Lee, Taek; Hee Kim, Se; Ho Shin, Sung; Huey Cho, Bong; Ho Cho, Sung; Kang, Bin G.; Sung Lee, Woo

    1998-01-01

    Glucose (Glc) starvation of suspension-cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells resulted in sequential activation of phospholipid catabolic enzymes. Among the assayed enzymes involved in the degradation, phospholipase D (PLD) and lipolytic acyl hydrolase were activated at the early part of starvation, and these activities were followed by β-oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle enzymes in order. The activity of PLD and lipolytic acyl hydrolase was further confirmed by in vivo-labeling experiments. It was demonstrated that Glc added to a medium containing starving cells inhibited the phospholipid catabolic activities, indicating that phospholipid catabolism is negatively regulated by Glc. There was a burst of ethylene production 6 h after starvation. Ethylene added exogeneously to a Glc-sufficient medium activated PLD, indicating that ethylene acts as an element in the signal transduction pathway leading from Glc depletion to PLD activation. Activation of lipid peroxidation, suggestive of cell death, occurred immediately after the decrease of the phospholipid degradation, suggesting that the observed phospholipid catabolic pathway is part of the metabolic strategies by which cells effectively survive under Glc starvation.

  19. Phospholipid molecular profiles in the seed kernel from different sunflower (Helianthus annuus) mutants.

    PubMed

    Salas, Joaquín J; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Garcés, Rafael

    2006-08-01

    Phospholipids are essential components of plant cell membranes whose acyl composition appears to be influenced by oil composition in the sunflower. In the current study, we have determined the diacylglycerol profile of the main phospholipids using phospholipase C degradation and separation of the diacylglycerols by HPLC and GLC. The main polar lipid molecular species were defined in different classes of sunflower kernel: PC, PE, and PI. The proportions of each were determined at different stages of development in order to define the point at which the mutations carried by each sunflower line affected the phospholipid composition of the seeds. The results indicated that modifications to intraplastidial de novo FA synthesis affected the seed phospholipid profile during the whole period of the seed formation, including accumulation and maturation, whereas the influence of mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum desaturases were more readily detected at later stages of development. These results are discussed in terms of the pathways involved in glycerolipid synthesis and phospholipid conversion in sunflower seeds.

  20. Phospholipid liposomes acquire apolipoprotein E in atherogenic plasma and block cholesterol loading of cultured macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K J; Tall, A R; Bisgaier, C; Brocia, R

    1987-01-01

    A single infusion of phospholipid liposomes promptly and persistently abolished the ability of hypercholesterolemic rabbit plasma to cause cholesteryl ester loading in cultured macrophages. This phospholipid enrichment of plasma caused moderate stimulation of cellular cholesterol efflux and, unexpectedly, almost complete inhibition of cellular uptake of beta-very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), the major cholesteryl ester-rich particle in hypercholesterolemic rabbit plasma. Cell viability and LDL receptor activity were unaffected. Incubation of liposomes with beta-VLDL resulted in transfer of apolipoprotein-E (apoE) to the liposomes; reisolated apoE-phospholipid liposomes then competed efficiently for cellular apoprotein receptors. Thus, a major mechanism by which phospholipid infusions result in diminished accumulation of cholesteryl ester in cultured macrophages is by blocking cellular uptake of beta-VLDL. The liposomes deplete beta-VLDL of apoE, then compete for receptor-mediated uptake. These results suggest a novel mechanism contributing to the known antiatherogenic effect of phospholipid infusions: infused liposomes acquire apoE, then block uptake of atherogenic lipoproteins by arterial wall macrophages. Images PMID:3571495