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Sample records for phospholipid turnover relevant

  1. Differential turnover of phospholipid acyl groups in mouse peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwae, T.; Schmid, P.C.; Johnson, S.B.; Schmid, H.H. )

    1990-03-25

    Phospholipid acyl turnover was assessed in mouse peritoneal exudate cells which consisted primarily of macrophages. The cells were incubated for up to 5 h in media containing 40% H218O, and uptake of 18O into ester carbonyls of phospholipids was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of hydrogenated methyl esters. The uptake was highest in choline phospholipids and phosphatidylinositol, less in ethanolamine phospholipids, and much less in phosphatidylserine. Acyl groups at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of diacyl glycerophospholipids, including arachidonic and other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, acquired 18O at about the same rate. Acyl groups of alkylacyl glycerophosphocholine exhibited lower rates of 18O uptake, and acyl groups of ethanolamine plasmalogens (alkenylacyl glycerophosphoethanolamines) acquired only minimal amounts of 18O within 5 h, indicating a low average acyl turnover via free fatty acids. Pulse experiments with exogenous 3H-labeled arachidonic acid supported the concept that acylation of alkenyl glycerophosphoethanolamine occurs by acyl transfer from other phospholipids rather than via free fatty acids and acyl-CoA. The 18O content of intracellular free fatty acids increased gradually over a 5-h period, whereas in extracellular free fatty acids it reached maximal 18O levels within the first hour. Arachidonate and other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids were found to participate readily in deacylation-reacylation reactions but were present only in trace amounts in the free fatty acid pools inside and outside the cells. We conclude that acyl turnover of macrophage phospholipids through hydrolysis and reacylation is rapid but tightly controlled so that appreciable concentrations of free arachidonic acid do not occur.

  2. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reversibly inhibits erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dise, Craig A.; Clark, James M.; Lambersten, Christian J.; Goodman, David B. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hyperbaric hyperoxia on the acylation of membrane phospholipid was studied by measuring the rates of activation of exogenous tritiated oleic acid to acyl thioester and of transesterification of the thioester into membrane phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes obtained 1 h after an exposure of the subjects to a hyperbaric oxygen atmosphere (3.5 h, 100 pct O2, 3 ATA). Exposure to pure oxygen was found to inhibit both the acylation and transesterification reactions by more than 30 percent, with partial recovery detected 24 h later. On the other hand, no rate changes were observed when isolated membranes from the same batches of cells were used in similar experiments. It is suggested that the decrease in the incorporation of tritiated oleic acid after hyperbaric hyperoxia may reflect an early event in the pathogenesis of oxygen-induced cellular injury and that it may be a useful index for the assessment of the tolerance of tissues to hyperoxia.

  3. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reversibly inhibits erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dise, Craig A.; Clark, James M.; Lambersten, Christian J.; Goodman, David B. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hyperbaric hyperoxia on the acylation of membrane phospholipid was studied by measuring the rates of activation of exogenous tritiated oleic acid to acyl thioester and of transesterification of the thioester into membrane phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes obtained 1 h after an exposure of the subjects to a hyperbaric oxygen atmosphere (3.5 h, 100 pct O2, 3 ATA). Exposure to pure oxygen was found to inhibit both the acylation and transesterification reactions by more than 30 percent, with partial recovery detected 24 h later. On the other hand, no rate changes were observed when isolated membranes from the same batches of cells were used in similar experiments. It is suggested that the decrease in the incorporation of tritiated oleic acid after hyperbaric hyperoxia may reflect an early event in the pathogenesis of oxygen-induced cellular injury and that it may be a useful index for the assessment of the tolerance of tissues to hyperoxia.

  4. Cyclic AMP restores a normal phenotype to sis oncogene transformed cells and inhibits inositol phospholipid turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, S.K.; Lazarus, A.; Pendergas, M.; Lockwood, A.H.

    1987-05-01

    The sis oncogene encodes the A chain of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). NIH3T3 fibroblasts transfected with the cloned sis oncogene display a malignant phenotype and have enhanced turnover of the regulatory phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5 biphosphate (PIP2). They have found that elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP can restore many aspects of normal growth and morphology to sis-transformed cells. Cells rapidly become less refractile, flatten on the substratum, develop actomyosin bundles, and acquire a more tranquil membrane. Growth rate and saturation density are reduced. Cultures become contact-inhibited and, at confluence, assume a normal fibrobastic morphology. The ability to grow in low serum or suspension is lost. Following addition of 8-Br-cAMP, cellular levels of PIP and PIP2 increase to those in untransformed cells. Concurrently, the steady-state levels of inositol phosphates are reduced to normal values. They have found a similar effect of cAMP on inositol phospholipid metabolism in cells transformed by the human H-ras oncogene. These results suggest that cAMP, acting through the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, antagonizes ras and sis oncogene expression by inhibiting polyphosphoinositide turnover. Such action might occur by phosphorylation of the PDGF (sis) receptor or of a ras-stimulated phospholipase C.

  5. Ethanol stimulates phospholipid turnover and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production in Chlamydomonas eugametos gametes.

    PubMed

    Musgrave, A; Kuin, H; Jongen, M; de Wildt, P; Schuring, F; Klerk, H; van den Ende, H

    1992-02-01

    Alcohols induce mating-structure activation in Chlamydomonas eugametos gametes. From the effect of ethanol on the (32)P-labelling of polyphosphoinositides, we conclude that the synthesis of these lipids is stimulated. Biologically inactive concentrations of ethanol (<6%) had no effect on synthesis, but 6-8% ethanol stimulated synthesis for upto 60 min. The (32)P incorporated into polyphosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid during ethanol treatment was readily chased out when 1 mM unlabelled Na3PO4 was added. Using a binding assay for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, we show that the production of this phospholipid constituent is dramatically increased after ethanol treatment. This effect, coupled to a rise in intracellular calcium concentration, could explain gamete activation. The significance of these results in explaining other ethanol-induced phenomena in algae is discussed.

  6. Phospholipid turnover in Torpedo marmorata electric organ during discharge in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bleasdale, J E; Hawthorne, J N; Widlund, L; Heilbronn, E

    1976-01-01

    One electric organ of anaesthetized Torpedo marmorata was stimulated through electrodes placed on the electric lobe of the brain. Nerves to the other electric organ were cut to provide an unstimulated control. Glucose 6-[32P]phosphate was injected into each organ 16h before electrical stimulation. After stimulation for 10 min at 5 Hz, the organs were removed homogenized and centrifuged on a density gradient for the preparation of subcellular fractions. Stimulation increased the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidate, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine. The increased phosphatidate labelling, but not that of the other two lipids, was seen in fractions rich in synaptic vesicles. Stimulation had no effect on ATP labelling. The phosphatidate content of most fractions fell slightly after stimulation, but amounts of other phospholipids were not affected. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:825114

  7. Psychoses and creativity: is the missing link a biological mechanism related to phospholipids turnover?

    PubMed Central

    Folley, Bradley S.; Doop, Mikisha L.; Park, Sohee

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that genetic and biochemical factors associated with psychoses may also provide an increased propensity to think creatively. The evolutionary theories linking brain growth and diet to the appearance of creative endeavors have been made recently, but they lack a direct link to research on the biological correlates of divergent and creative thought. Expanding upon Horrobin’s theory that changes in brain size and in neural microconnectivity came about as a result of changes in dietary fat and phospholipid incorporation of highly unsaturated fatty acids, we propose a theory relating phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity to the neuromodulatory effects of the noradrenergic system. This theory offers probable links between attention, divergent thinking, and arousal through a mechanism that emphasizes optimal individual functioning of the PLA2 and NE systems as they interact with structural and biochemical states of the brain. We hope that this theory will stimulate new research in the neural basis of creativity and its connection to psychoses. PMID:14623501

  8. Phospholipid turnover and ultrastructural correlates during spontaneous germinal vesicle breakdown of the bovine oocyte: Effects of a cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Homa, S.T.; Webster, S.D.; Russell, R.K. )

    1991-08-01

    The turnover of (32P)orthophosphate in bovine oocyte phospholipids was studied during the early stages of spontaneous meiotic maturation, and during inhibition of this process by the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX). Radioactive lipids were separated by TLC and the meiotic stage was determined cytogenetically. Ultrastructure of the nuclear membrane was examined using transmission EM. During the commitment period to meiotic resumption, which precedes germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), small localized convolutions appeared in the intact nuclear membrane. This was accompanied by a decrease in (32P)phosphatidic acid (PA) and an increase in (32P)-phosphatidylcholine (PC). This was followed by extensive convolutions, and subsequent dissociation, of the nuclear membrane, concomitant with a tremendous surge in (32P)PC and (32P)phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The cAMP-mediated maintenance of meiotic arrest involved retention of entire nuclear envelope integrity and total inhibition of the surge in (32P)PC and (32P)PE which accompanied GVBD. The increase in (32P)phosphatidylinositol (PI) associated with all stages of early meiotic resumption was unaffected by IBMX. Microinjection of heparin inhibited GVBD, and injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) overrode IBMX-maintained meiotic arrest in almost 40% of the oocytes. The results suggest that there may be several functions for phospholipid turnover in the regulation of spontaneous meiotic resumption in the bovine oocyte. The first precedes the commitment period, and involves IP3 generation to serve as the primary signal for meiotic resumption. The second occurs concomitant with the commitment period, is unaffected by the level of intracellular cAMP, and is associated with the general turnover of phospholipid.

  9. Phospholipid:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Is a Multifunctional Enzyme Involved in Membrane Lipid Turnover and Degradation While Synthesizing Triacylglycerol in the Unicellular Green Microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kangsup; Han, Danxiang; Li, Yantao; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Many unicellular microalgae produce large amounts (∼20 to 50% of cell dry weight) of triacylglycerols (TAGs) under stress (e.g., nutrient starvation and high light), but the synthesis and physiological role of TAG are poorly understood. We present detailed genetic, biochemical, functional, and physiological analyses of phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT) in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which catalyzes TAG synthesis via two pathways: transacylation of diacylglycerol (DAG) with acyl groups from phospholipids and galactolipids and DAG:DAG transacylation. We demonstrate that PDAT also possesses acyl hydrolase activities using TAG, phospholipids, galactolipids, and cholesteryl esters as substrates. Artificial microRNA silencing of PDAT in C. reinhardtii alters the membrane lipid composition, reducing the maximum specific growth rate. The data suggest that PDAT-mediated membrane lipid turnover and TAG synthesis is essential for vigorous growth under favorable culture conditions and for membrane lipid degradation with concomitant production of TAG for survival under stress. The strong lipase activity of PDAT with broad substrate specificity suggests that this enzyme could be a potential biocatalyst for industrial lipid hydrolysis and conversion, particularly for biofuel production. PMID:23012436

  10. Phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase is a multifunctional enzyme involved in membrane lipid turnover and degradation while synthesizing triacylglycerol in the unicellular green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kangsup; Han, Danxiang; Li, Yantao; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2012-09-01

    Many unicellular microalgae produce large amounts (∼20 to 50% of cell dry weight) of triacylglycerols (TAGs) under stress (e.g., nutrient starvation and high light), but the synthesis and physiological role of TAG are poorly understood. We present detailed genetic, biochemical, functional, and physiological analyses of phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT) in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which catalyzes TAG synthesis via two pathways: transacylation of diacylglycerol (DAG) with acyl groups from phospholipids and galactolipids and DAG:DAG transacylation. We demonstrate that PDAT also possesses acyl hydrolase activities using TAG, phospholipids, galactolipids, and cholesteryl esters as substrates. Artificial microRNA silencing of PDAT in C. reinhardtii alters the membrane lipid composition, reducing the maximum specific growth rate. The data suggest that PDAT-mediated membrane lipid turnover and TAG synthesis is essential for vigorous growth under favorable culture conditions and for membrane lipid degradation with concomitant production of TAG for survival under stress. The strong lipase activity of PDAT with broad substrate specificity suggests that this enzyme could be a potential biocatalyst for industrial lipid hydrolysis and conversion, particularly for biofuel production.

  11. Fifteen weeks of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid deprivation increases turnover of n-6 docosapentaenoic acid in rat-brain phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Miki; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Gao, Fei; Chang, Lisa; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    Docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-6, 22:5n-6) is an n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) whose brain concentration can be increased in rodents by dietary n-3 PUFA deficiency, which may contribute to their behavioral dysfunction. We used our in vivo intravenous infusion method to see if brain DPAn-6 turnover and metabolism also were altered with deprivation. We studied male rats that had been fed for 15 weeks post-weaning an n-3 PUFA adequate diet containing 4.6% alpha-linolenic acid (α-LNA, 18:3n-3) or a deficient diet (0.2% α-LNA), each lacking docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6). [1-14C]DPAn-6 was infused intravenously for 5 min in unanesthetized rats, after which the brain underwent high-energy microwaving, and then was analyzed. The n-3 PUFA deficient compared with adequate diet increased DPAn-6 and decreased DHA concentrations in plasma and brain, while minimally changing brain AA concentration. Incorporation rates of unesterified DPAn-6 from plasma into individual brain phospholipids were increased 5.2–7.7 fold, while turnover rates were increased 2.1–4.7 fold. The observations suggest that increased metabolism and brain concentrations of DPAn-6 and its metabolites, together with a reduced brain DHA concentration, contribute to behavioral and functional abnormalities reported with dietary n-3 PUFA deprivation in rodents. PMID:22142872

  12. Chlorinated Phospholipids and Fatty Acids: (Patho)physiological Relevance, Potential Toxicity, and Analysis of Lipid Chlorohydrins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chlorinated phospholipids are formed by the reaction of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), generated by the enzyme myeloperoxidase under inflammatory conditions, and the unsaturated fatty acyl residues or the head group. In the first case the generated chlorohydrins are both proinflammatory and cytotoxic, thus having a significant impact on the structures of biomembranes. The latter case leads to chloramines, the properties of which are by far less well understood. Since HOCl is also widely used as a disinfecting and antibacterial agent in medicinal, industrial, and domestic applications, it may represent an additional source of danger in the case of abuse or mishandling. This review discusses the reaction behavior of in vivo generated HOCl and biomolecules like DNA, proteins, and carbohydrates but will focus on phospholipids. Not only the beneficial and pathological (toxic) effects of chlorinated lipids but also the importance of these chlorinated species is discussed. Some selected cleavage products of (chlorinated) phospholipids and plasmalogens such as lysophospholipids, (chlorinated) free fatty acids and α-chloro fatty aldehydes, which are all well known to massively contribute to inflammatory diseases associated with oxidative stress, will be also discussed. Finally, common analytical methods to study these compounds will be reviewed with focus on mass spectrometric techniques. PMID:28090245

  13. Is the ecological belt zonation of the Swiss Alps relevant for moth diversity and turnover?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jan; Rüdlinger, Cecil M.; McCain, Christy M.

    2017-04-01

    Mountain ecosystems are traditionally envisioned as elevational belts of homogenous vegetation, separated by intervening ecotones. Recent research has cast doubt on such predictable layering at least in animal communities. We test the link of two a priori defined ecological belt zonations to noctuid moth distributions in the Swiss Alps. Predictions, in particular, were a coincidence of proposed ecotones with increased range endpoint frequencies and with increased species turnover or species richness between equidistant elevational bands. Using >320,000 distributional records for >500 noctuid species, we found no support for these three predictions despite several contrasting analytical approaches. Concurrent with recently published vertebrate data, we conclude that simple ecological belt zonations are unrelated to the moth communities found along mountain slopes. Rather, species are distributed idiosyncratically following their specific niche requirements. Additional rigorous evidence, particularly comparing insect clades spanning a spectrum of host-plant relationships, may be required to support the relevance of the ecological belt concept in structuring mountain ecosystems beyond tree and plant communities.

  14. Sheep model for osteoporosis: sustainability and biomechanical relevance of low turnover osteoporosis induced by hypothalamic-pituitary disconnection.

    PubMed

    Oheim, Ralf; Beil, Frank Timo; Köhne, Till; Wehner, Tim; Barvencik, Florian; Ignatius, Anita; Amling, Michael; Clarke, Iain J; Pogoda, Pia

    2013-07-01

    Hypothalamo-pituitary disconnection (HPD) leads to low bone turnover and osteoporosis in sheep. To determine the sustainability of bone loss and its biomechanical relevance, we studied HPD-sheep 24 months after surgery (HPD + OVX-24) in comparison to untreated control (Control), ovariectomized sheep (OVX), and sheep 12 months after HPD (HPD + OVX-12). We performed histomorphometric, HR-pQCT, and qBEI analyses, as well as biomechanical testing of all ewes studied. Twenty-four months after HPD, histomorphometric analyses of the iliac crest showed a significant reduction of BV/TV by 60% in comparison to Control. Cortical thickness of the femora measured by HR-pQCT did not change between 12 and 24 months after HPD but remained decreased by 30%. These structural changes were caused by a persisting depression of osteoblast and osteoclast cellular activity. Biomechanical testing of the femora showed a significant reduction of bending strength, whereas calcium content and distribution was found to be unchanged. In conclusion, HPD surgery leads to a persisting low turnover status with negative turnover balance in sheep followed by dramatic cortical and trabecular bone loss with consequent biomechanical impairment.

  15. Minimal Peptidoglycan (PG) Turnover in Wild-Type and PG Hydrolase and Cell Division Mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 Growing Planktonically and in Host-Relevant Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Michael J.; Kuru, Erkin; Rittichier, Jonathan T.; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Brun, Yves V.

    2015-01-01

    as signals for bacteria to induce antibiotic resistance and as activators of innate immune responses. S. pneumoniae is a commensal bacterium that colonizes the human nasopharynx and opportunistically causes serious respiratory and invasive diseases. The results presented here demonstrate a distinct demarcation between regions of old PG and regions of new PG synthesis and minimal turnover of PG in S. pneumoniae cells growing in culture or in host-relevant biofilms. These findings suggest that S. pneumoniae minimizes the release of PG breakdown products by turnover, which may contribute to evasion of the innate immune system. PMID:26303829

  16. Metabolic turnover of myelin glycerophospholipids.

    PubMed

    Morell, P; Ousley, A H

    1994-08-01

    The apparent half life for metabolic turnover of glycerophospholipids in the myelin sheath, as determined by measuring the rate of loss of label in a myelin glycerophospholipid following radioactive precursor injection, varies with the radioactive precursor used, age of animal, and time after injection during which metabolic turnover is studied. Experimental strategies for resolving apparent inconsistencies consequent to these variables are discussed. Illustrative data concerning turnover of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in myelin of rat brain are presented. PC of the myelin membrane exhibits heterogeneity with respect to metabolic turnover rates. There are at least two metabolic pools of PC in myelin, one with a half life of the order of days, and another with a half life of the order of weeks. To a significant extent biphasic turnover is due to differential turnover of individual molecular species (which differ in acyl chain composition). The two predominant molecular species of myelin PC turnover at very different rates (16:0, 18:1 PC turning over several times more rapidly than 18:0, 18:1 PC). Therefore, within the same membrane, individual molecular species of a phospholipid class are metabolized at different rates. Possible mechanisms for differential turnover of molecular species are discussed, as are other factors that may contribute to a multiphasic turnover of glycerophospholipids.

  17. Phospholipid biosynthesis and solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida strains.

    PubMed

    Pinkart, H C; White, D C

    1997-07-01

    The role of the cell envelope in the solvent tolerance mechanisms of Pseudomonas putida was investigated. The responses of a solvent-tolerant strain, P. putida Idaho, and a solvent-sensitive strain, P. putida MW1200, were examined in terms of phospholipid content and composition and of phospholipid biosynthetic rate following exposure to a nonmetabolizable solvent, o-xylene. Following o-xylene exposure, P. putida MW1200 exhibited a decrease in total phospholipid content. In contrast, P. putida Idaho demonstrated an increase in phospholipid content 1 to 6 h after exposure. Analysis of phospholipid biosynthesis showed P. putida Idaho to have a higher basal rate of phospholipid synthesis than MW1200. This rate increased significantly following exposure to xylene. Both strains showed little significant turnover of phospholipid in the absence of xylene. In the presence of xylene, both strains showed increased phospholipid turnover. The rate of turnover was significantly greater in P. putida Idaho than in P. putida MW1200. These results suggest that P. putida Idaho has a greater ability than the solvent-sensitive strain MW1200 to repair damaged membranes through efficient turnover and increased phospholipid biosynthesis.

  18. Phospholipid biosynthesis and solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida strains.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkart, H C; White, D C

    1997-01-01

    The role of the cell envelope in the solvent tolerance mechanisms of Pseudomonas putida was investigated. The responses of a solvent-tolerant strain, P. putida Idaho, and a solvent-sensitive strain, P. putida MW1200, were examined in terms of phospholipid content and composition and of phospholipid biosynthetic rate following exposure to a nonmetabolizable solvent, o-xylene. Following o-xylene exposure, P. putida MW1200 exhibited a decrease in total phospholipid content. In contrast, P. putida Idaho demonstrated an increase in phospholipid content 1 to 6 h after exposure. Analysis of phospholipid biosynthesis showed P. putida Idaho to have a higher basal rate of phospholipid synthesis than MW1200. This rate increased significantly following exposure to xylene. Both strains showed little significant turnover of phospholipid in the absence of xylene. In the presence of xylene, both strains showed increased phospholipid turnover. The rate of turnover was significantly greater in P. putida Idaho than in P. putida MW1200. These results suggest that P. putida Idaho has a greater ability than the solvent-sensitive strain MW1200 to repair damaged membranes through efficient turnover and increased phospholipid biosynthesis. PMID:9209036

  19. The use of natural and synthetic phospholipids as pharmaceutical excipients*

    PubMed Central

    van Hoogevest, Peter; Wendel, Armin

    2014-01-01

    In pharmaceutical formulations, phospholipids obtained from plant or animal sources and synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are purified from, e.g., soybeans or egg yolk using non-toxic solvent extraction and chromatographic procedures with low consumption of energy and minimum possible waste. Because of the use of validated purification procedures and sourcing of raw materials with consistent quality, the resulting products differing in phosphatidylcholine content possess an excellent batch to batch reproducibility with respect to phospholipid and fatty acid composition. The natural phospholipids are described in pharmacopeias and relevant regulatory guidance documentation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Synthetic phospholipids with specific polar head group, fatty acid composition can be manufactured using various synthesis routes. Synthetic phospholipids with the natural stereochemical configuration are preferably synthesized from glycerophosphocholine (GPC), which is obtained from natural phospholipids, using acylation and enzyme catalyzed reactions. Synthetic phospholipids play compared to natural phospholipid (including hydrogenated phospholipids), as derived from the number of drug products containing synthetic phospholipids, a minor role. Only in a few pharmaceutical products synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are used in oral, dermal, and parenteral products including liposomes. Natural phospholipids instead of synthetic phospholipids should be selected as phospholipid excipients for formulation development, whenever possible, because natural phospholipids are derived from renewable sources and produced with more ecologically friendly processes and are available in larger scale at relatively low costs compared to synthetic phospholipids. Practical applications: For selection of phospholipid excipients for pharmaceutical formulations, natural phospholipids are preferred

  20. The use of natural and synthetic phospholipids as pharmaceutical excipients.

    PubMed

    van Hoogevest, Peter; Wendel, Armin

    2014-09-01

    In pharmaceutical formulations, phospholipids obtained from plant or animal sources and synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are purified from, e.g., soybeans or egg yolk using non-toxic solvent extraction and chromatographic procedures with low consumption of energy and minimum possible waste. Because of the use of validated purification procedures and sourcing of raw materials with consistent quality, the resulting products differing in phosphatidylcholine content possess an excellent batch to batch reproducibility with respect to phospholipid and fatty acid composition. The natural phospholipids are described in pharmacopeias and relevant regulatory guidance documentation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Synthetic phospholipids with specific polar head group, fatty acid composition can be manufactured using various synthesis routes. Synthetic phospholipids with the natural stereochemical configuration are preferably synthesized from glycerophosphocholine (GPC), which is obtained from natural phospholipids, using acylation and enzyme catalyzed reactions. Synthetic phospholipids play compared to natural phospholipid (including hydrogenated phospholipids), as derived from the number of drug products containing synthetic phospholipids, a minor role. Only in a few pharmaceutical products synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are used in oral, dermal, and parenteral products including liposomes. Natural phospholipids instead of synthetic phospholipids should be selected as phospholipid excipients for formulation development, whenever possible, because natural phospholipids are derived from renewable sources and produced with more ecologically friendly processes and are available in larger scale at relatively low costs compared to synthetic phospholipids. Practical applications: For selection of phospholipid excipients for pharmaceutical formulations, natural phospholipids are preferred

  1. Phospholipid-Nucleic Acid Complexation: Biomolecular Energetics of DNA-Mg2+-Phosphatidylcholine Ternary Complex Formation, Compaction and Relevance as Lipoplex Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Süleymanoglu, Erhan

    2006-01-01

    Thermodynamic features related to preparation and use of self-assemblies formed between multilamellar and unilamellar zwitterionic liposomes and polynucleotides with various conformation and sizes are presented. The divalent metal cation induced adsorption, aggregation and adhesion between single- and double-stranded polyribonucleotides and phosphatidylcholine vesicles was followed by differential adiabatic scanning microcalorimetry. Nucleic acid condensation and compaction mediated by Mg2+ was followed, with regard to interfacial interaction with unilamellar vesicles. Microcalorimetric measurements of synthetic phospholipid vesicles and poly(ribo) nucleotides and their ternary complexes with inorganic cations were used to build the thermodynamic model of their structural transitions. The increased thermal stability of the phospholipid bilayers is achieved by affecting their melting transition temperature by nucleic acid induced electrostatic charge screening. Measurements give evidence for the stabilization of polynucleotide helices upon their association with liposomes in presence of divalent metal cations. Such an induced aggregation vesicles either leads to heterogeneous multilamellar DNA-lipid arrangements, or to DNA-induced bilayer destabilization and lipid fusion. The further employment of these polyelectrolyte nanostructures as an improved formulations in therapeutic gene delivery trials, as well as in DNA chromatography is discussed. PMID:23675003

  2. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is comprised of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. PMID:23026158

  3. Turnover Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  4. Turnover Time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  5. Phospholipid Metabolism in Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Short, Steven A.; White, David C.; Aleem, M. I. H.

    1969-01-01

    The lipid composition of the chemoautotroph Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans has been examined. Fatty acids represent 2% of the dry weight of the cells and 86% of the total are extractable with organic solvents. About 25% of the total fatty acids are associated with diacyl phospholipids. Polar carotenoids, the benzoquinone coenzyme Q-8, and most of the fatty acids are present in the neutral lipids. The phospholipids have been identified as phosphatidyl monomethylethanolamine (42%), phosphatidyl glycerol (23%), phosphatidyl ethanolamine (20%), cardiolipin (13%), phosphatidyl choline (1.5%), and phosphatidyl dimethylethanolamine (1%) by chromatography of the diacyl lipids, by chromatography in four systems of the glycerol phosphate esters derived from the lipids by mild alkaline methanolysis, and by chromatographic identification of the products of acid hydrolysis of the esters. No trace of phosphatidylserine (PS), glycerolphosphorylserine, or serine could be detected in the lipid extract or in derivatives of that extract. This casts some doubt on the postulated involvement of PS in iron metabolism. After growth in the presence of 14C and 32P, there was essentially no difference in the turnover of either isotope in the glycerolphosphate ester derived from each lipid in cells grown at pH 1.5 or 3.5. Images PMID:5802599

  6. Phospholipids and Glycolipids of Sterol-requiring Mycoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.; Koostra, Walter L.

    1967-01-01

    The phospholipids of Mycoplasma hominis type 2 strain 07 are composed almost entirely of phosphatidyl glycerol. Traces of other glycerophospholipids may exist. No glycolipids are found. The phospholipids of Mycoplasma sp. avian strain J are composed of diphosphatidyl glycerol, which predominates in older cultures, a monoacyl glycerophosphoryl glycerophosphate, which may serve as a precursor of diphosphatidyl glycerol, and phosphatidyl glycerophosphate. This organism also contains cholesteryl glucoside and an unidentified glycolipid which appears to be similar to a monoglucosyl diglyceride. No turnover or radioisotope labeling of the phospholipids occurs during metabolism. This lack of turnover during growth is indicative of a structural role for these glycerophospholipids. A concomitant decrease of monoacyl glycerophosphoryl glycerophosphate and increase of diphosphatidyl glycerol occurs during growth. PMID:6025304

  7. Self-Perceived Abilities--Relevant in the Task (SPART): A Potential Predictor of Labor Turnover in an Industrial Work Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekpo-Ufot, Abel

    1976-01-01

    Describes the initial attempt to develop a SPART, Self-Perceived Abilities Relevant in the Task, inventory, the results and discussion of that attempt including its predictive validity, and speculations on the practical and theoretical implications of the SPART construct and instrument. (Author/RK)

  8. CYTOTOXIC PHOSPHOLIPID OXIDATION PRODUCTS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Yang, Lili; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Phospholipid oxidation products accumulate in the necrotic core of atherosclerotic lesions, in apoptotic cells, and circulate in oxidized LDL. Phospholipid oxidation generates toxic products, but little is known about which specific products are cytotoxic, their receptors, or the mechanism(s) that induces cell death. We find the most common phospholipid oxidation product of oxidized LDL, phosphatidylcholine with esterified sn-2 azelaic acid, induced apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. The synthetic ether phospholipid hexadecyl azelaoyl phosphatidylcholine (HAzPC) was rapidly internalized, and over-expression of PLA2g7 (PAF acetylhydrolase) that specifically hydrolyzes such oxidized phospholipids suppressed apoptosis. Internalized HAzPC associated with mitochondria, and cytochrome C and apoptosis-inducing factor escaped from mitochondria to the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively, in cells exposed to HAzPC. Isolated mitochondria exposed to HAzPC rapidly swelled, and released cytochrome C and apoptosis-inducing factor. Other phospholipid oxidation products induced swelling, but HAzPC was the most effective and was twice as effective as its diacyl homolog. Cytoplasmic cytochrome C completes the apoptosome, and activated caspase 9 and 3 were present in cells exposed to HAzPC. Irreversible inhibition of caspase 9 blocked downstream caspase 3 activation, and prevented apoptosis. Mitochondrial damage initiated this apoptotic cascade because over-expression of Bcl-XL, an anti-apoptotic protein localized to mitochondria, blocked cytochrome C escape, and apoptosis. Thus, exogenous phospholipid oxidation products target intracellular mitochondria to activate the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. PMID:17597068

  9. Characterization of phospholipid composition and its control in the plasma membrane of developing soybean root

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    The phospholipid composition of plasma membrane enriched fractions from developing soybean root and several mechanisms which may regulate it have been examined. Plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from meristematic and mature sections of four-day-old dark grown soybean roots (Glycine max (L.) Merr. Cult. Wells II). Analysis of lipid extracts revealed two major phospholipid classes: phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Minor phospholipid classes were phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylgylcerol and diphosphatidylgylcerol. Phospholipid composition was similar at each developmental stage. Fatty acids of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were 16:0, 18:0, 18:2, and 18:3. Fatty acid composition varied with both phospholipid class and the developmental stage of the root. The degradation of phosphatidylcholine by endogenous phospholipase D during membrane isolation indicated that this enzyme might be involved in phospholipid turnover within the membrane. Phospholipase D activity was heat labile and increasing the pH of the enzyme assay from 5.3 to 7.8 resulted in 90% inhibition of activity. The turnover of fatty acids within the phospholipids of the plasma membrane was studied. Mature root sections were incubated with (1-/sup 14/C) acetate, 1 mM Na acetate and 50 ..mu..g/ml chloramphenicol. Membrane lipid extracts analyzed for phospholipid class and acyl chain composition revealed that the long incubation times did not alter the phospholipid composition of the plasma membrane enriched fraction.

  10. Phospholipids of Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Jurtshuk, Peter; Schlech, Barry A.

    1969-01-01

    Analyses of resting cells of Azotobacter vinelandii revealed that numerous phospholipids were present that did not concentrate in the membranous R3 fraction which carried out electron transport function. PMID:5776538

  11. Phospholipids from Bacillus stearothermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Card, George L.; Georgi, Carl E.; Militzer, Walter E.

    1969-01-01

    The lipids of Bacillus stearothermophilus strain 2184 were extracted with chloroform-methanol and separated into neutral lipid and three phospholipid fractions by chromatography on silicic acid columns. The phospholipids were identified by specific staining reactions on silicic acid-impregnated paper, by chromatography of alkaline and acid hydrolysis products, and by determination of acyl ester:glycerol:nitrogen:phosphorus molar ratios. The total extractable lipid was 8% of the dry weight of whole cells and consisted of 30 to 40% neutral lipid and 60 to 70% phospholipid. The phospholipid consisted of diphosphatidyl glycerol (23 to 42%), phosphatidyl glycerol (22 to 39%), and phosphatidyl ethanolamine (21 to 32%). The concentrations of diphosphatidyl glycerol and phosphatidyl glycerol were lower in 2-hr cells than in 4- and 8-hr cells. Whole cells were fractionated by sonic treatment and differential centrifugation. The total lipid content, expressed in per cent of dry weight of each fraction was: whole protoplasts, 10%; membrane fraction, 18%; 30,000 × g particulate fraction, 22%; and 105,000 × g particulate fraction, 26%. The relative phospholipid concentrations in each fraction were about the same. As had been previously reported, none of the phospholipid was stable to alkaline hydrolysis. Images PMID:5764328

  12. Obstructed Diffusion of Phospholipids in Polymer-Tethered Phospholipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deverall, Miranda; Ke, Puchun; Saxton, Michael; Naumann, Christoph

    2002-03-01

    The obstructed diffusion of phospholipids in polymer-tethered phospholipid bilayers is studied via single molecule fluorescence imaging. Here phospholipids tethered to the polymer cushion act as obstacles for the lateral diffusion of non-tethered phospholipids. The relationship between averaged mean-square displacement and time suggests a random distribution of obstacles at low and moderate obstacle molar concentrations and a micro-phase separation at high obstacle molar concentrations of >30 molcomparison to Monte Carlo calculations indicates that tethered phospholipids behave like mobile point obstacles, thereby showing similar diffusion properties to non-tethered phospholipids. Since polymer-lipid tethering is achieved via lipopolymer molecules consisting of polymer and lipid moieties with a significant molecular area mismatch between both moieties, our studies could help understand the effect that molecules of similar molecular geometries have on lipid diffusion in plasma membranes. In addition, our data are necessary for the understanding of the diffusion of incorporated proteins in phospholipid bilayers.

  13. Nurse turnover: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Laureen J; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Duffield, Christine; Shamian, Judith; Buchan, James; Hughes, Frances; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; North, Nicola; Stone, Patricia W

    2006-02-01

    Ongoing instability in the nursing workforce is raising questions globally about the issue of nurse turnover. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken to examine the current state of knowledge about the scope of the nurse turnover problem, definitions of turnover, factors considered to be determinants of nurse turnover, turnover costs and the impact of turnover on patient, and nurse and system outcomes. Much of the research to date has focused on turnover determinants, and recent studies have provided cost estimations at the organizational level. Further research is needed to examine the impact of turnover on health system cost, and how nurse turnover influences patient and nurse outcomes.

  14. Abscisic acid-lipid interactions: a phospholipid monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Bürner, H; Benz, R; Gimmler, H; Hartung, W; Stillwell, W

    1993-08-15

    Lipid monolayer studies were performed on a Langmuir trough in the absence and in the presence of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The ABA-induced effects on the lipid monolayers can be summarized as follows: (i) ABA as the free acid (pH below 5.3) increased the molecular area and slightly decreased the surface pressure in the collapse points of monolayers made of saturated, unsaturated and of mixed lipids; ABA as the anion showed only minor effects. (ii) The ABA-induced area increase of the lipid monolayers decreased when the surface pressure increased, but some ABA remained in the monolayers made of unsaturated phospholipids even at collapse pressure. (iii) The incorporation of ABA into the monolayers could be inhibited by adding the plant sterol beta-sitosterol to the monolayer forming phospholipids. (iv) There was no substantial difference of ABA action on plant phospholipids as compared with other phospholipids. (v) ABA had a much stronger influence on unsaturated phospholipids than on saturated ones. (vi) ABA decreased the phase-transition temperature of saturated phospholipids. These results, which agree with those obtained from phospholipid vesicle studies, indicate that the physical state of the lipid is important for the ability of ABA penetrating into the lipid monolayer. Finally, a possible relevance of these results is discussed in terms of the action of ABA on guard cell membranes of plants.

  15. Tissue phospholipids (TPL) in avian tuberculosis (AT)

    SciTech Connect

    Nandedkar, A.K.N.; Malhotra, H.C.

    1986-05-01

    AT constitutes one of the major problems in animal husbandry. Chickens (white, leg horn, male, 400-600 g) were infected with Mycobacterium avium maintained on I.U.T. medium to induce clinical AT which was confirmed by histopathological examinations of the affected tissues. Fatty infiltration and tissue enlargement was visible in infected birds. After 4 wks, incorporation of i.v. /sup 32/P (50 uCi/100 g body wt.) in affected tissues was followed for 3,7,9,12 hr intervals. Lipids were extracted and fractionated by silicic acid (SA) column and SA impregnated paper chromatography. When compared with pair-fed controls, in AT slower turnover of TPL in liver, slightly higher in heart and significantly increased turnover of TPL in serum were observed. No appreciable change in total TPL content was noticed in brain, spleen and kidney. Further fractionation of TPL provided better understanding of the metabolism. Increase in lysophosphatidyl-choline (LPC) and -ethanolamine (LPE) content, powerful hemolytic agents, in liver may explain frequent occurrence of anemia in tuberculosis. Also, a concomitant marked increase in the ratio of total saturated/unsaturated fatty acids is observed in serum phosphatidyl choline fraction. This confirms the observation that the membrane phospholipid metabolism is significantly affected in tuberculosis infection.

  16. Soman-induced seizures impair norepinephrine-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Filbert, M.G.; Phann, S.; Forster, J.; Ballough, G.P.; Cann, F.J.

    1993-05-13

    Seizure activity increases turnover of phosphoinositide bisphosphate (PIP2). Turnover of PIP2 is thought to be modulated by neurotransmitter interactions. The effect of soman-induced seizures on neurotransmitter-stimulated PIP 2 turnover was examined in rats. Thirty minutes after induction of seizure activity, rats were euthanized and slices prepared from the hippocampus or cerebral cortex were incubated with myo-(2-3H) inositol for incorporation into phospholipids. Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides was determined by measuring the accumulation of (3H) inositol-l-phosphate (IP1) in the presence of LiCl. Carbachol, norepinephrine (NE) and high K+ increased accumulation of IP1 in slices from control rats. GABA was without effect on IP1 accumulation but potentiated the stimulation of PIP, hydrolysis by NE. NE-stimulated IP1 accumulation in slices from rats undergoing seizures was significantly reduced. GABA potentiation of the NE-stimulated hydrolysis was also reduced.

  17. Phosphatidylinositol turnover is associated with human natural killer cell activation by tumor target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, T.A.; Brahmi, Z.

    1986-03-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cell activity has been shown to be a binding-dependent event leading to the destruction of various targets. This suggests a possible role for plasma membrane phospholipid turnover in coupling a receptor-mediated binding event with transduction of a intracellular signal to result in the activation of the effector cell. Currently, phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover is implicated in several immune cell systems. Therefore, in this study, the authors examined phospholipid turnover in human NK cells upon exposure to a sensitive (K562) and a resistant (YAC-1) target cell (TC). NK cell membrane phospholipids were labelled with Phosphorus-32 (/sup 32/P) and, following stimulation, were extracted and run on silica gel thin-layer chromatography. Labelled phospholipids were visualized by autoradiography then scraped and counted in a liquid scintillation counter. A 2.5 fold increase in label incorporation into PI relative to controls was shown to occur when NK cells were stimulated by K562 for 2 hours. In contrast, no increased labelling of PI relative to controls was noted when NK cells were stimulated by YAC-1 for the same period of time. No change in incorporation of /sup 32/P into phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine occurred in either set of conditions. These results suggest that PI turnover may be an early activation event in NK cells following binding of K562.

  18. Anti phospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miah, M T; Hoque, M A; Sutradhar, S R; Mahmood, T; Tarafder, B K

    2009-01-01

    Anti Phospholipid Syndrome (APS) is a relatively new conception of syndrome complex first noticed in 1983. It may be primary or secondary to other diseases like SLE, RA, Systemic sclerosis, behchet's syndrome, temporal arteritis, sjogren's syndrome psoriatic arthropathy etc. Clinical manifestations are consequences of vascular thrombosis and embolism like DVT, pulmonary embolism, stroke, TIA, complication of pregnancy with pregnancy loss. We report a 34 years married female housewife who presented with sudden onset of nausea, vomiting, vertigo, dysphagia, dysarthria and ataxia. She had a chronic leg ulcer. Neurological findings were consistent with lateral medullary syndrome due to stroke though she was normotensive, nondiabetic with normal lipid profile. She had history of two abortions in last three years. Investigations were done accordingly and she fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of APS. No secondary cause was detected after thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations. She was treated symptomatically along with oral anticoagulation. She improved slowly but steadily.

  19. Bioactive Oxidatively Truncated Phospholipids in Inflammation and Apoptosis: Formation, Targets, and Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    This report reviews structurally related phospholipid oxidation products that are biologically active where molecular mechanisms have been defined. Phospholipids containing polyunsaturated fatty acyl residues are chemically or enzymatically oxidized to phospholipid hydroperoxides, which may fragment on either side of the newly introduced peroxy function to form phospholipids with a truncated sn-2 residue. These truncated phospholipids not subject to biologic control of their production and, depending on the sn-2 residue length and structure, can stimulate the plasma membrane receptor for PAF. Alternatively, these chemically formed products can be internalized by a transport system to either stimulate the lipid activated nuclear transcription factor PPARγ or at higher levels interact with mitochondria to initiate the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Intracellular PAF acetylhydrolases specifically hydrolyze truncated phospholipids, and not undamaged, biosynthetic phospholipids, to protect cells from oxidative death. Truncated phospholipids are also formed within cells where they couple cytokine stimulation to mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. The relevance of intracellular truncated phospholipids is shown by the complete protection from cytokine induced apoptosis by PAF acetylhydrolase expression. This protection shows truncated phospholipids are the actual effectors of cytokine mediated toxicity. PMID:22445850

  20. Turnover of synaptic membranes: age-related changes and modulation by dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Ando, Susumu; Tanaka, Yasukazu; Toyoda nee Ono, Yuriko; Kon, Kazuo; Kawashima, Sei-Ichi

    2002-11-01

    We examined age-related changes in the turnover rates of synaptic membrane components that might underlie the decrease in synaptic functions in senescence. Synaptic membrane constituents were labeled in vivo with deuterium and the disappearance of the deuterated molecules from synaptic membranes was measured by mass spectrometry. The turnover rates of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, cholesterol, and synaptophysin were all shown to slow down with aging. Dietary restriction, which is known to retard various aging processes, was found to decrease the turnover rates of membrane lipid species. Consequently, the fatty acid composition in phospholipids remained unchanged in the synaptic plasma membranes of food restricted mice. In contrast, the turnover rate of synaptophysin was accelerated under dietary restriction. This may mean that increased turnover enhances the removal of damaged proteins from membranes.

  1. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  2. Avifauna: Turnover on Islands.

    PubMed

    Mayr, E

    1965-12-17

    The percentage of endemic species of birds on islands increases with island area at a double logarithmic rate. This relation is apparently due to extinction, which is more rapid the smaller the island. The turnover resulting from extinction and replacement appears to be far more rapid than hitherto suspected.

  3. Predicting Turnover Intentions and Turnover Behavior: A Multivariate Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parasuraman, Saroj

    1982-01-01

    Assessed the relative influence of personal, attitudinal, and behavioral variables on behavioral intentions and voluntary turnover among nonsupervisory plant workers. Results show that personal variables have little direct effect on turnover; rather, their influence on turnover is channeled through their effects on behavioral intentions. (Author)

  4. Supported phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, L. K.; McConnell, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    Phospholipid bilayers have been formed on glass, quartz, and silicon surfaces by a sequential transfer of two monolayers at a pressure of approximately 40 dyn/cm from the air-water interface to the solid substrates. Lateral diffusion measurements of L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers supported on oxidized silicon wafers reveal two sharp phase transitions at temperatures similar to those found in multilayer systems with several different techniques. The diffusion measurements obtained using fluorescence recovery after pattern photobleaching provide evidence for the existence of an intermediate (probably P beta' or ripple) phase in single bilayers. While in the intermediate and high temperature (liquid-crystalline L alpha) phase, the diffusion coefficients do not vary very much with temperature, a strong temperature dependence is observed in the low temperature (gel L beta') phase. This is attributed to defect-mediated diffusion. Lipids in silicon supported bilayers made from L-alpha-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) or L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) diffuse rapidly above their respective chain-melting transition temperatures. Arrhenius plots show straight lines with activation energies of 40.9 and 43.7 kJ/mol, respectively. Supported DPPC bilayers on oxidized silicon form long tubular liposomes when heated through their oxidized silicon form long tubular liposomes when heated through their chain-melting-phase transition, as viewed with epifluorescence microscopy. It is suggested that this is a consequence of the expansion of the lipid on the fixed solid support. Conversely, DOPC bilayers form large void areas on this substrate upon cooling. Large circular membrane defects (holes) are observed under rapid coating conditions. The formation of these defects is modulated by including small amounts of lyso-L-palmitoyl phosphatidylcholine in the DMPC-supported bilayers. A simple model describes the dependence of hole size and hole

  5. The effects of sexual harassment on turnover in the military: time-dependent modeling.

    PubMed

    Sims, Carra S; Drasgow, Fritz; Fitzgerald, Louise F

    2005-11-01

    Sexual harassment has consistently negative consequences for working women, including changes in job attitudes (e.g., lower satisfaction) and behaviors (e.g., increased work withdrawal). Cross-sectional evidence suggests that harassment influences turnover intentions. However, few studies have used actual turnover; rather, they rely on proxies. With a sample of 11,521 military servicewomen with turnover data spanning approximately 4 years, the authors used the appropriate method for longitudinal turnover data--Cox's regression--to investigate the impact of harassment on actual turnover. Experiences of harassment led to increased turnover, even after controlling for job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and marital status. Among officers, harassment also affected turnover over and above rank. Given turnover's relevance to organizational bottom lines, these findings have important implications not only for individual women but also for organizations.

  6. Severe low turnover osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Pietrogrande, Luca

    2007-08-01

    Severe osteoporosis, a situation with fractures, can worsen in the case of poor response to usual therapies, such as bisphosphonates associated with calcium and vitamin D, especially if bone turnover is strongly suppressed. One way of inverting the poor evolution of non-responders is to use Teriparatide. The case of a non-responder is reported, with considerations about the possibility of detecting these patients before a new fracture takes place.

  7. Turnover of Junior Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    by reference to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory (24:42). The lowest needs on Maslow’s hierarchy are for survival and security. Pay is the principal... Hierarchy of Needs Theory (2:42) suggests that once pay is adequate to satisfy the lower needs for survival and security, it decreases in importance to...satisfaction increases. This result indicated that pay does not play the role depicted in the synthesized turnover model in Chapter II. Maslow’s

  8. Interactions of amelogenin with phospholipids

    DOE PAGES

    Bekshe Lokappa, Sowmya; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; ...

    2014-11-22

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral, and cell surfaces. In this paper, we investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin–cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (~334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. DLS studies indicated complexationmore » of rP172 and phospholipids, although the possibility of fusion of phospholipids following amelogenin addition cannot be ruled out. NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder–order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong fluorescence resonance energy transfer from Trp in rP172 to DNS-bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Finally, our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities.« less

  9. Interactions of amelogenin with phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Bekshe Lokappa, Sowmya; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; Perovic, Iva; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2014-11-22

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral, and cell surfaces. In this paper, we investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin–cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (~334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. DLS studies indicated complexation of rP172 and phospholipids, although the possibility of fusion of phospholipids following amelogenin addition cannot be ruled out. NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder–order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong fluorescence resonance energy transfer from Trp in rP172 to DNS-bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Finally, our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities.

  10. [Experiences of nurse turnover].

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Jung; Kim, Kwuy-Bun

    2008-04-01

    This study was designed to search for nursing intervention strategies centering around the meaning structure of the nurse's turnover experience by applying phenomenological methods. The participants were 6 nurses in small and medium sized hospitals who had experienced at least 1 turnover. Data were collected used MP3 records. The data analysis was done by Giorgi (1985) method. The results were divided into the following categories: 1) Careless decision: wrong decisions, imprudent desire, insufficient patience, unclear future, 2) Inappropriate working environment: irregular working hours, high workload, poor working environment, insufficient understanding of related divisions, lack of opinion collection, low salary, 3) Interpersonal relations problems: discord with colleagues, difficulty in relationships with others, difficulty in daily lives, 4) Lack of specialization: feeling of inertia, lack of role identification, lack of self identification, 5) Inappropriate coping: regret with clinical challenges, difficulty with a new environment, repentance, expectation, relative humility, 6) New self-dignity: expectation, new challenge, relaxing lives, decisions based on future-oriented confidence. The finding of this study will offer profound information on the nurse's turnover experience and provide basic raw materials for improving the quality of nursing performance and contribute to the development of hospital organization.

  11. [Phospholipids: properties and health effects].

    PubMed

    Torres García, Jairo; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2014-09-12

    Phospholipids are amphipathic lipids, which are found in all the cell membranes, organized as a lipid bilayer. They belong to the glycerol-derived lipids, showing a similar structure as triglycerides. The current interest of them comes from its effectiveness to incorporate different fatty acids in the cell membrane, as they exhibit better absorption and utilization than triglycerides. In this paper, the bibliographical data published about the benefits of the phospholipids in inflammatory processes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, liver disease and as an antioxidants transporter is reviewed.

  12. Age-related loss of phospholipid asymmetry in APPNLh/APPNLh × PS-1P264L/PS-1P264L human double knock-in mice: Relevance to Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Bader Lange, Miranda L.; Clair, Daret St.; Markesbery, William R.; Studzinski, Christa M.; Murphy, M. Paul; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2010-01-01

    Using APPNLh/APPNLh×PS-1P246L/PS-1P246L human double knock-in (APP/PS-1) mice, we examined whether phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) asymmetry is significantly altered in brain of this familial Alzheimer disease mouse model in an age-dependent manner as a result of oxidative stress, toxic Aβ(1–42) oligomer production, and/or apoptosis. Annexin V (AV) and NBD-PS fluorescence in synaptosomes of wild-type (WT) and APP/PS-1 mice were used to determine PtdSer exposure with age, while Mg2+ATPase activity was determined to correlate PtdSer asymmetry changes with PtdSer translocase, flippase, activity. AV and NBD-PS results demonstrated significant PtdSer exposure beginning at 9 months compared to 1 month-old WT controls for both assays, a trend that was exacerbated in synaptosomes of APP/PS-1 mice. Decreasing Mg2+ATPase activity confirms that the age-related loss of PtdSer asymmetry is likely due to loss of flippase activity, more prominent in APP/PS-1 brain. Two-site sandwich ELISA on SDS- and FA-soluble APP/PS-1 brain fractions were conducted to correlate Aβ(1–40) and Aβ(1–42) levels with age-related trends determined from the AV, NBD-PS, and Mg2+ATPase assays. ELISA revealed a significant increase in both SDS- and FA-soluble Aβ(1–40) and Aβ(1–42) with age, consistent with PtdSer and flippase assay trends. Lastly, because PtdSer exposure is affected by pro-apoptotic caspase-3, levels of both latent and active forms were measured. Western blotting results demonstrated an increase in both active fragments of caspase-3 with age, while levels of pro-caspase-3 decrease. These results are discussed with relevance to loss of lipid asymmetry and consequent neurotoxicity in brain of subjects with Alzheimer disease. PMID:20083199

  13. Age-related loss of phospholipid asymmetry in APP(NLh)/APP(NLh) x PS-1(P264L)/PS-1(P264L) human double mutant knock-in mice: relevance to Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Bader Lange, Miranda L; St Clair, Daret; Markesbery, William R; Studzinski, Christa M; Murphy, M Paul; Butterfield, D Allan

    2010-04-01

    Using APP(NLh)/APP(NLh) x PS-1(P246L)/PS-1(P246L) human double knock-in (APP/PS-1) mice, we examined whether phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) asymmetry is significantly altered in brain of this familial Alzheimer disease mouse model in an age-dependent manner as a result of oxidative stress, toxic Abeta(1-42) oligomer production, and/or apoptosis. Annexin V (AV) and NBD-PS fluorescence in synaptosomes of wild-type (WT) and APP/PS-1 mice were used to determine PtdSer exposure with age, while Mg(2+) ATPase activity was determined to correlate PtdSer asymmetry changes with PtdSer translocase, flippase, activity. AV and NBD-PS results demonstrated significant PtdSer exposure beginning at 9 months compared to 1-month-old WT controls for both assays, a trend that was exacerbated in synaptosomes of APP/PS-1 mice. Decreasing Mg(2+) ATPase activity confirms that the age-related loss of PtdSer asymmetry is likely due to loss of flippase activity, more prominent in APP/PS-1 brain. Two-site sandwich ELISA on SDS- and FA-soluble APP/PS-1 brain fractions were conducted to correlate Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) levels with age-related trends determined from the AV, NBD-PS, and Mg(2+) ATPase assays. ELISA revealed a significant increase in both SDS- and FA-soluble Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) with age, consistent with PtdSer and flippase assay trends. Lastly, because PtdSer exposure is affected by pro-apoptotic caspase-3, levels of both latent and active forms were measured. Western blotting results demonstrated an increase in both active fragments of caspase-3 with age, while levels of pro-caspase-3 decrease. These results are discussed with relevance to loss of lipid asymmetry and consequent neurotoxicity in brain of subjects with Alzheimer disease. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Generation and Biological Activities of Oxidized Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Oskolkova, Olga V.; Birukov, Konstantin G.; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Binder, Christoph J.; Stöckl, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Glycerophospholipids represent a common class of lipids critically important for integrity of cellular membranes. Oxidation of esterified unsaturated fatty acids dramatically changes biological activities of phospholipids. Apart from impairment of their structural function, oxidation makes oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) markers of “modified-self” type that are recognized by soluble and cell-associated receptors of innate immunity, including scavenger receptors, natural (germ line-encoded) antibodies, and C-reactive protein, thus directing removal of senescent and apoptotic cells or oxidized lipoproteins. In addition, OxPLs acquire novel biological activities not characteristic of their unoxidized precursors, including the ability to regulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Effects of OxPLs described in vitro and in vivo suggest their potential relevance in different pathologies, including atherosclerosis, acute inflammation, lung injury, and many other conditions. This review summarizes current knowledge on the mechanisms of formation, structures, and biological activities of OxPLs. Furthermore, potential applications of OxPLs as disease biomarkers, as well as experimental therapies targeting OxPLs, are described, providing a broad overview of an emerging class of lipid mediators. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 1009–1059. PMID:19686040

  15. Effect of gentamicin on phospholipid metabolism in cultured rabbit proximal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsammy, L.S.; Josepovitz, C.; Lane, B.; Kaloyanides, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that the accumulation of phospholipid in cells exposed to gentamicin is due to impaired degradation. Experiments were performed in rabbit proximal tubular cells grown in primary culture. Cells exposed to 10(-3) M gentamicin manifested myeloid body formation and a progressive increase in total phospholipid that by day 6 was 44% higher than that of control cells and reflected increases of phosphatidylinositol of 235%, phosphatidylcholine of 60%, phosphatidylethanolamine of 90%, and phosphatidylserine of 55% above control values. Gentamicin impaired the degradation of these phospholipids. The t1/2 of the phospholipid pool labeled with (3H)myoinositol increased 146% from 1.17 (control) to 2.88 days (gentamicin); the t1/2 of the (3H)choline pool increased 34% from 1.77 to 2.38 days; the t1/2 of the (3H)ethanolamine pool increased 57% from 3.14 to 4.93 days; the t1/2 of the (3H) serine pool increased 37% from 6.30 to 8.63 days. Exposure of cells to gentamicin for 2 days also stimulated increased incorporation of (3H)myoinositol (68%) and (3H)ethanolamine (59%) into phospholipid. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that gentamicin inhibits the activity of lysosomal phospholipases that results in the accumulation of phospholipid within the lysosome in the form of myeloid bodies. Increased phospholipid synthesis may represent a compensatory response to the impaired lysosomal degradation of phospholipid. We postulate that the preferential increase of phosphatidylinositol reflects the capacity of the polycationic gentamicin to interact electrostatically with the anionic phosphoinositides and inhibit their turnover.

  16. Long noncoding RNA turnover

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Kim, Jiyoung; Gorospe, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Most RNAs transcribed in mammalian cells lack protein-coding sequences. Among them is a vast family of long (>200 nt) noncoding (lnc)RNAs. LncRNAs can modulate cellular protein expression patterns by influencing the transcription of many genes, the post-transcriptional fate of mRNAs and ncRNAs, and the turnover and localization of proteins. Given the broad impact of lncRNAs on gene regulation, there is escalating interest in elucidating the mechanisms that govern the steady-state levels of lncRNAs. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the factors and mechanisms that modulate mammalian lncRNA stability. PMID:25769416

  17. Targeting Phospholipid Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Menglin; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    All cancers tested so far display abnormal choline and ethanolamine phospholipid metabolism, which has been detected with numerous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) approaches in cells, animal models of cancer, as well as the tumors of cancer patients. Since the discovery of this metabolic hallmark of cancer, many studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular origins of deregulated choline metabolism, to identify targets for cancer treatment, and to develop MRS approaches that detect choline and ethanolamine compounds for clinical use in diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Several enzymes in choline, and recently also ethanolamine, phospholipid metabolism have been identified, and their evaluation has shown that they are involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Several already established enzymes as well as a number of emerging enzymes in phospholipid metabolism can be used as treatment targets for anticancer therapy, either alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic approaches. This review summarizes the current knowledge of established and relatively novel targets in phospholipid metabolism of cancer, covering choline kinase α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D1, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C, sphingomyelinases, choline transporters, glycerophosphodiesterases, phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, and ethanolamine kinase. These enzymes are discussed in terms of their roles in oncogenic transformation, tumor progression, and crucial cancer cell properties such as fast proliferation, migration, and invasion. Their potential as treatment targets are evaluated based on the current literature. PMID:28083512

  18. Langmuir films containing ibuprofen and phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo, Vananélia P. N.; Pavinatto, Felippe J.; Nobre, Thatyane M.; Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2013-02-01

    This study shows the incorporation of ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory drug, in Langmuir monolayers as cell membrane models. Significant effects were observed for dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) monolayers with relevant changes in the elasticity of the monolayer. Dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG) monolayers were affected by small concentrations of ibuprofen, from 1 to 5 mol%. For both types of monolayer, ibuprofen could penetrate into the hydrophobic part of the monolayer, which was confirmed with polarization-modulated infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images showed that ibuprofen prevents the formation of large domains of DPPC. The pharmacological action should occur primarily with penetration of ibuprofen via electrically neutral phospholipid headgroups of the membrane.

  19. Metabolism of the phospholipid precursor inositol and its relationship to growth and viability in the natural auxotroph Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, S; Homann, M J; Henry, S A; Carman, G M

    1986-01-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was examined. Three enzymes of phospholipid biosynthesis, cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol synthase (CDP-DG), phosphatidylinositol (PI) synthase, and phosphatidylserine (PS) synthase, were characterized in extracts of S. pombe cells. Contrary to an earlier report, we were able to demonstrate that CDP-DG served as a precursor for PI and PS biosynthesis in S. pombe. S. pombe is naturally auxotrophic for the phospholipid precursor inositol. We found that S. pombe was much more resistant to loss of viability during inositol starvation than artificially generated inositol auxotrophs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phospholipid composition of S. pombe cells grown in inositol-rich medium (50 microM) was similar to that of S. cerevisiae cells grown under similar conditions. However, growth of S. pombe at low inositol concentrations (below 30 microM) affected the ratio of the anionic phospholipids PI and PS, while the relative proportions of other glycerophospholipids remained unchanged. During inositol starvation, the rate of PI synthesis decreased rapidly, and there was a concomitant increase in the rate of PS synthesis. Phosphatidic acid and CDP-DG, which are precursors to these phospholipids, also increased when PI synthesis was blocked by lack of exogenous inositol. The major product of turnover of inositol-containing phospholipids in S. pombe was found to be free inositol, which accumulated in the medium and could be reused by the cell. Images PMID:3011744

  20. Integrating Turnover Reasons and Shocks with Turnover Decision Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P., Jr.; Kmitta, Kayla R.

    2012-01-01

    We interviewed and classified 186 quitters from many jobs and organizations via a theoretically-based protocol into five decision process types. We then tested exploratory hypotheses comparing users of these types on their propensity to report certain turnover reasons and turnover shocks. "Impulsive-type quitters," with neither a job offer in hand…

  1. Integrating Turnover Reasons and Shocks with Turnover Decision Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maertz, Carl P., Jr.; Kmitta, Kayla R.

    2012-01-01

    We interviewed and classified 186 quitters from many jobs and organizations via a theoretically-based protocol into five decision process types. We then tested exploratory hypotheses comparing users of these types on their propensity to report certain turnover reasons and turnover shocks. "Impulsive-type quitters," with neither a job offer in hand…

  2. 13C- and 15N-Labeling Strategies Combined with Mass Spectrometry Comprehensively Quantify Phospholipid Dynamics in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Robin; Gafken, Philip R.; Olsen, Carissa Perez

    2015-01-01

    Membranes define cellular and organelle boundaries, a function that is critical to all living systems. Like other biomolecules, membrane lipids are dynamically maintained, but current methods are extremely limited for monitoring lipid dynamics in living animals. We developed novel strategies in C. elegans combining 13C and 15N stable isotopes with mass spectrometry to directly quantify the replenishment rates of the individual fatty acids and intact phospholipids of the membrane. Using multiple measurements of phospholipid dynamics, we found that the phospholipid pools are replaced rapidly and at rates nearly double the turnover measured for neutral lipid populations. In fact, our analysis shows that the majority of membrane lipids are replaced each day. Furthermore, we found that stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs), critical enzymes in polyunsaturated fatty acid production, play an unexpected role in influencing the overall rates of membrane maintenance as SCD depletion affected the turnover of nearly all membrane lipids. Additionally, the compromised membrane maintenance as defined by LC-MS/MS with SCD RNAi resulted in active phospholipid remodeling that we predict is critical to alleviate the impact of reduced membrane maintenance in these animals. Not only have these combined methodologies identified new facets of the impact of SCDs on the membrane, but they also have great potential to reveal many undiscovered regulators of phospholipid metabolism. PMID:26528916

  3. Mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last 20 years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium-dependent protein kinases that in turn activate transcription factors and coactivators such as PGC-1alpha that regulates the expression of genes coding for mitochondrial components. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis involves the balance of mitochondrial fission-fusion. Mitochondrial malfunction or defects in any of the many pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis can lead to degenerative diseases and possibly play an important part in aging.

  4. Commitment Profiles and Employee Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Laura; Vandenberghe, Christian; Vandenberg, Robert; Bentein, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    We examined how affective (AC), normative (NC), perceived sacrifice (PS), and few alternatives (FA) commitments combine to form profiles and determine turnover intention and turnover. We theorized that three mechanisms account for how profiles operate, i.e., the degree to which membership is internally regulated, the perceived desirability and…

  5. Salary, Performance, and Superintendent Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grissom, Jason A.; Mitani, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Superintendent retention is an important goal for many school districts, yet the factors contributing to superintendent turnover are poorly understood. Most prior quantitative studies of superintendent turnover have relied on small, cross-sectional samples, limiting the evidence base. Utilizing longitudinal administrative records from…

  6. Teacher Turnover: A Conceptual Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Garcia, Cynthia; Slate, John R.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we reviewed the available literature concerning teacher turnover. The seriousness of this issue was addressed as cause for concern is clearly present. Issues we examined in this conceptual analysis were the federal government's role in public education, the No Child Left Behind Act, teacher turnover, teacher retention, teacher…

  7. Salary, Performance, and Superintendent Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grissom, Jason A.; Mitani, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Superintendent retention is an important goal for many school districts, yet the factors contributing to superintendent turnover are poorly understood. Most prior quantitative studies of superintendent turnover have relied on small, cross-sectional samples, limiting the evidence base. Utilizing longitudinal administrative records from…

  8. Occupational stress and employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Robert S; Day, Andrea J; Morton, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Questionnaire data captured in January-March 2007 were examined in relation to turnover in males and females during the next five years. In general, most of the workplace stressors (such as role conflict or peer support) were not antecedents of turnover in any group. Junior personnel with psychological strain in 2007 had an increased risk of turnover in the next five years. Low commitment to the service in 2007 increased the odds of turnover in male and female juniors and in female officers. Female juniors with less effective skills for coping with stress and who exercised less frequently on a weekly basis were more likely to leave. An incidental finding was that the odds of turnover were three times greater in female officers with children than in female officers with no children. Stress management interventions focusing on effective coping and sports and exercise participation which are targeted appropriately may improve retention.

  9. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Ana C.; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan; Chronakis, Ioannis S.

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  10. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Ana C. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Chronakis, Ioannis S. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  11. Interactions of Amelogenin with Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Lokappa, Sowmya Bekshe; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; Perovic, Iva; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral and cell surfaces. We investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, towards the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin-cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (~334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. Though in DLS studies we cannot exclude the possibility of fusion of liposomes as the result of amelogenin addition, NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder-order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong FRET from Trp in rP172 to DNS–bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities. PMID:25298002

  12. Nutritional Deficiencies and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, María S.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gomez, Nidia N.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipids are important components of the cell membranes of all living species. They contribute to the physicochemical properties of the membrane and thus influence the conformation and function of membrane-bound proteins, such as receptors, ion channels, and transporters and also influence cell function by serving as precursors for prostaglandins and other signaling molecules and modulating gene expression through the transcription activation. The components of the diet are determinant for cell functionality. In this review, the effects of macro and micronutrients deficiency on the quality, quantity and metabolism of different phospholipids and their distribution in cells of different organs is presented. Alterations in the amount of both saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins A, E and folate, and other micronutrients, such as zinc and magnesium, are discussed. In all cases we observe alterations in the pattern of phospholipids, the more affected ones being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin. The deficiency of certain nutrients, such as essential fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and some metals may contribute to a variety of diseases that can be irreversible even after replacement with normal amount of the nutrients. Usually, the sequelae are more important when the deficiency is present at an early age. PMID:21731449

  13. Work and Career considerations in Understanding Employee Turnover Intentions and Turnover: Development of the Turnover Diagnostic.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    researchers have noted that organizations perceived not to link rewards to performance had higher turnover ( Hellriegel & White, 1973; Hulln, 1966, 1968...Telly, French, & Scott, 1971). Similarly, some company policy and administrative Issues related to pay and promotion ( Hellriegel & White, 1973...practices are a strong correlate of turnover (Dansereau, Cashman, & Graen, 1973; Fleishman & Harris, 1962; Graen & Ginsburgh, 1977; Hellriegel & White

  14. Modulation of Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase by Neutral Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, María Florencia; Dodes-Traian, Martín M.; González-Flecha, F. Luis; Sica, Mauricio; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lipids on membrane proteins are likely to be complex and unique for each membrane protein. Here we studied different detergent/phosphatidylcholine reconstitution media and tested their effects on plasma membrane Ca2+ pump (PMCA). We found that Ca2+-ATPase activity shows a biphasic behavior with respect to the detergent/phosphatidylcholine ratio. Moreover, the maximal Ca2+-ATPase activity largely depends on the length and the unsaturation degree of the hydrocarbon chain. Using static light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we monitored the changes in hydrodynamic radius of detergent/phosphatidylcholine particles during the micelle-vesicle transition. We found that, when PMCA is reconstituted in mixed micelles, neutral phospholipids increase the enzyme turnover. The biophysical changes associated with the transition from mixed micelles to bicelles increase the time of residence of the phosphorylated intermediate (EP), decreasing the enzyme turnover. Molecular dynamics simulations analysis of the interactions between PMCA and the phospholipid bilayer in which it is embedded show that in the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, charged residues of the protein are trapped in the hydrophobic core. Conversely, in the 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, the overall hydrophobic-hydrophilic requirements of the protein surface are fulfilled the best, reducing the thermodynamic cost of exposing charged residues to the hydrophobic core. The apparent mismatch produced by a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine thicker bilayer could be a structural foundation to explain its functional effect on PMCA. PMID:25605721

  15. Single step bottom-up process to generate solid phospholipid nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann-Trettenes, Ulla; Barnert, Sabine; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2014-05-01

    The particularity of the Nano Spray Dryer B-90 is the nozzle containing a mesh vibrating at ultrasonic frequency. To study process parameters and processability of crude phospholipid dispersions, in particular the effect of concentration and mesh aperture on both particle size of the dry solid phospholipid nano-particles and on the re-dispersed powder. Phospholipid dispersions containing trehalose as a stabilizer were spray dried. Particle size distributions of dry powders were evaluated by SEM micrographs and by PCS and cryo-TEM for the re-dispersed particles. Spray drying of crude liposome dispersions revealed solid phospholipid nano-particles. Aperture of nozzle mesh and concentration of the dispersions, respectively, both increased the size of solid phospholipid nano-particles. For crude dispersions, an upper limit with respect to processability was found close to below 10% (m/m) even if the crude dispersion was passed along the mesh several times; however, more effective dispersing methods such as pre-sonication can push the limit of processability to higher values. The nano spray dryer is capable of spray drying crude dispersions of phospholipids in concentrations below 10% (m/m) generating solid phospholipid nano-particles relevant for pulmonary delivery. Re-dispersion of spray dried powder reveals liposomes.

  16. The Physical Chemistry of the Enigmatic Phospholipid Diacylglycerol Pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Strawn, Liza; Babb, Amy; Testerink, Christa; Kooijman, Edgar Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a lipid second messenger that is formed transiently in plants in response to different stress conditions, and plays a role in recruiting protein targets, ultimately enabling an adequate response. Intriguingly, this increase in PA concentration in plants is generally followed by an increase in the phospholipid diacylglycerolpyrophosphate (DGPP), via turnover of PA. Although DGPP has been shown to induce stress-related responses in plants, it is unclear to date what its molecular function is and how it exerts its effect. Here, we describe the physicochemical properties, i.e., effective molecular shape and charge, of DGPP. We find that unlike PA, which imparts a negative curvature stress to a (phospho)lipid bilayer, DGPP stabilizes the bilayer phase of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), similar to the effect of phosphatidylcholine (PC). DGPP thus has zero curvature. The pKa2 of the phosphomonoester of DGPP is 7.44 ± 0.02 in a PC bilayer, compared to a pKa2 of 7.9 for PA. Replacement of half of the PC with PE decreases the pKa2 of DGPP to 6.71 ± 0.02, similar to the behavior previously described for PA and summarized in the electrostatic–hydrogen bond switch model. Implications for the potential function of DGPP in biomembranes are discussed. PMID:22645584

  17. The physical chemistry of the enigmatic phospholipid diacylglycerol pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Strawn, Liza; Babb, Amy; Testerink, Christa; Kooijman, Edgar Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a lipid second messenger that is formed transiently in plants in response to different stress conditions, and plays a role in recruiting protein targets, ultimately enabling an adequate response. Intriguingly, this increase in PA concentration in plants is generally followed by an increase in the phospholipid diacylglycerolpyrophosphate (DGPP), via turnover of PA. Although DGPP has been shown to induce stress-related responses in plants, it is unclear to date what its molecular function is and how it exerts its effect. Here, we describe the physicochemical properties, i.e., effective molecular shape and charge, of DGPP. We find that unlike PA, which imparts a negative curvature stress to a (phospho)lipid bilayer, DGPP stabilizes the bilayer phase of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), similar to the effect of phosphatidylcholine (PC). DGPP thus has zero curvature. The pKa(2) of the phosphomonoester of DGPP is 7.44 ± 0.02 in a PC bilayer, compared to a pKa(2) of 7.9 for PA. Replacement of half of the PC with PE decreases the pKa(2) of DGPP to 6.71 ± 0.02, similar to the behavior previously described for PA and summarized in the electrostatic-hydrogen bond switch model. Implications for the potential function of DGPP in biomembranes are discussed.

  18. Phospholipids as Biomarkers for Excessive Alcohol Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    is designed to evaluate the utility of levels of two phospholipids in serum as a marker of past drinking behavior across month - level time horizons...panel of serum phospholipids (sphingomyelin, and lysophosphatidylcholines) in proportion to the level of consumption in the past month . Further, we...the relationship between the panel of serum phospholipids of interest and the amount of alcohol consumption during the past month in returning

  19. Phospholipid synthesis and transport in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Vance, Jean E

    2015-01-01

    Membranes of mammalian subcellular organelles contain defined amounts of specific phospholipids that are required for normal functioning of proteins in the membrane. Despite the wide distribution of most phospholipid classes throughout organelle membranes, the site of synthesis of each phospholipid class is usually restricted to one organelle, commonly the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Thus, phospholipids must be transported from their sites of synthesis to the membranes of other organelles. In this article, pathways and subcellular sites of phospholipid synthesis in mammalian cells are summarized. A single, unifying mechanism does not explain the inter-organelle transport of all phospholipids. Thus, mechanisms of phospholipid transport between organelles of mammalian cells via spontaneous membrane diffusion, via cytosolic phospholipid transfer proteins, via vesicles and via membrane contact sites are discussed. As an example of the latter mechanism, phosphatidylserine (PS) is synthesized on a region of the ER (mitochondria-associated membranes, MAM) and decarboxylated to phosphatidylethanolamine in mitochondria. Some evidence is presented suggesting that PS import into mitochondria occurs via membrane contact sites between MAM and mitochondria. Recent studies suggest that protein complexes can form tethers that link two types of organelles thereby promoting lipid transfer. However, many questions remain about mechanisms of inter-organelle phospholipid transport in mammalian cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Oxidized Phospholipids: Biomarker for Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Mohammad Z.; Kar, Niladri S.; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    Biologically active oxidized phospholipids can initiate and modulate many of the cellular events attributed to inflammation leading to atherosclerosis. Produced by enzymatic or non-enzymatic processes, these molecules interact with various cells via specific receptors and in general give rise to inflammatory signals. There is considerable evidence that oxidized phospholipids accumulate in vivo and play significant roles in atherosclerosis and thrombosis, suggesting that oxidized phospholipids could be biomarkers that reflect the global extent of these diseases in vivo. Thus, understanding the biosynthetic pathways, receptor specificity and signaling processes of oxidized phospholipids is important in understanding atherosclerosis, thrombosis and related inflammatory diseases. PMID:19061967

  1. Mono-acyl arsenosugar phospholipids in the edible brown alga Kombu (Saccharina japonica).

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinwei; Xiong, Chan; Jensen, Kenneth B; Glabonjat, Ronald A; Stiboller, Michael; Raber, Georg; Francesconi, Kevin A

    2018-02-01

    Twenty one arsenolipids, including eight new compounds (AsSugPL 692, AsSugPL 706, AsSugPL 720, AsSugPL 734, AsSugPL 742, AsSugPL 746, AsSugPL 748, and AsSugPL 776) were identified in the edible brown alga Kombu, Saccharina japonica, by means of HPLC coupled with elemental and molecular mass spectrometry. The hitherto undescribed compounds are all mono-acyl arsenosugar phospholipids, differing from previously reported natural arsenic-containing phospholipids by containing only one fatty acid on the glycerol group. Collectively, this new group of mono-acyl compounds constituted about 30% of total lipid arsenic; other significant groups were the di-acyl arsenosugar phospholipids (50%) and arsenic hydrocarbons (20%). The origin and relevance of the mono-acyl arsenosugar phospholipids in Kombu, a commercial seafood product, is briefly discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    Our research for the past two years has involved the study of phosphoinositides and their potential role in regulating plant growth and development. Our initial goal was to document the sequence of events involved in inositol phospholipid metabolism in response to external stimuli. Our working hypothesis was that phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) was in the plasma membrane of plants cells and would be hydrolyzed by phospholipase C to yield the second messengers inositol triphosphate (IP/sub 3/) and diacyglycerol (DAG) and that IP/sub 3/ would mobilize intracellular calcium as has been shown for animal cells. Our results with both carrot suspension culture cells and sunflower hypocotyl indicate that this paradigm is not the primary mechanism of signal transduction in these systems. We have observed very rapid, within 5 sec, stimulation of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) kinase which resulted in an increase in PIP/sub 2/. However, there was no evidence for activation of phospholipase C. In addition, we have shown that PIP and PIP/sub 2/ can activate the plasma membrane ATPase. The results of these studies are described briefly in the paragraphs below. Inositol phospholipids are localized in distinct membrane fractions. If PIP and PIP/sub 2/ play a role in the transduction of external signals, they should be present in the plasma membrane. We used the fusogenic carrot suspension culture cells as a model system to study the distribution of inositol phospholipids in various membrane fractions and organelles. Cells were labeled 12 to 18 h with myo(2-/sup 3/H) inositol and the membranes were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The plasma membrane was enriched in PIP and PIP/sub 2/ compared to the intracellular membranes.

  3. Shapes of Mixed Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Maldonado, Amir

    2006-01-01

    We studied the shape of phospholipid vesicles prepared by hydration of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) and phosphatidylserine (SOPS) in different proportions. The aim of the work is to obtain some insight into the influence of the chemical composition of a biomembrane on its shape. The optical microscopy results show that the shape of the vesicles depend on the SOPC:SOPS composition. For low SOPS contents, coiled cylindrical vesicles are observed. The results suggest that specific compositions of the SOPC:SOPS vesicles produce some spontaneous curvature on the membrane and then a coiling instability. PMID:19669461

  4. Interaction of caldesmon with phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Czuryło, E A; Zborowski, J; Dabrowska, R

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of caldesmon with liposomes composed of various phospholipids has been examined by tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy. The results indicate that caldesmon makes its strongest complex with phosphatidylserine (PS) vesicles (Kass. = 1.45 x 10(5) M-1). Both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions contribute to the stability of this complex. The site for strong binding of PS seems to be located in the N-terminal part of the 34 kDa C-terminal fragment of caldesmon. Binding of PS at this site results in displacement of calmodulin from its complex with caldesmon. Images Figure 4 PMID:8484721

  5. Turnover Among Air Force Nurses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    profession. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 8(3), 227-235. Mowday, R.T. (1984). Strategies for adapting to high rates of employee turnover. Human Resource ...Behavior and Human Performance, 17(l), 66-75. Seybolt, J.W., Pavett, C., & Walker, D.D. (1978). Turnover among nurses: It can be managed . Journal of...committee member, and friend. - John W. Seybolt, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies, and Professor of Management , School of Business, for his

  6. Electrostatic control of phospholipid polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Tarahovsky, Y S; Arsenault, A L; MacDonald, R C; McIntosh, T J; Epand, R M

    2000-12-01

    A regular progression of polymorphic phase behavior was observed for mixtures of the anionic phospholipid, cardiolipin, and the cationic phospholipid derivative, 1, 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine. As revealed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray diffraction, whereas the two lipids separately assume only lamellar phases, their mixtures exhibit a symmetrical (depending on charge ratio and not polarity) sequence of nonlamellar phases. The inverted hexagonal phase, H(II,) formed from equimolar mixtures of the two lipids, i.e., at net charge neutrality (charge ratio (CR((+/-))) = 1:1). When one type of lipid was in significant excess (CR((+/-)) = 2:1 or CR((+/-)) = 1:2), a bicontinuous cubic structure was observed. These cubic phases were very similar to those sometimes present in cellular organelles that contain cardiolipin. Increasing the excess of cationic or anionic charge to CR((+/-)) = 4:1 or CR((+/-)) = 1:4 led to the appearance of membrane bilayers with numerous interlamellar contacts, i.e., sponge structures. It is evident that interactions between cationic and anionic moieties can influence the packing of polar heads and hence control polymorphic phase transitions. The facile isothermal, polymorphic interconversion of these lipids may have important biological and technical implications.

  7. Phospholipid liposomes functionalized by protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Savostyanov, G. V.; Grishina, O. A.

    2015-03-01

    Finding new ways to deliver neurotrophic drugs to the brain in newborns is one of the contemporary problems of medicine and pharmaceutical industry. Modern researches in this field indicate the promising prospects of supramolecular transport systems for targeted drug delivery to the brain which can overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, the solution of this problem is actual not only for medicine, but also for society as a whole because it determines the health of future generations. Phospholipid liposomes due to combination of lipo- and hydrophilic properties are considered as the main future objects in medicine for drug delivery through the BBB as well as increasing their bioavailability and toxicity. Liposomes functionalized by various proteins were used as transport systems for ease of liposomes use. Designing of modification oligosaccharide of liposomes surface is promising in the last decade because it enables the delivery of liposomes to specific receptor of human cells by selecting ligand and it is widely used in pharmacology for the treatment of several diseases. The purpose of this work is creation of a coarse-grained model of bilayer of phospholipid liposomes, functionalized by specific to the structural elements of the BBB proteins, as well as prediction of the most favorable orientation and position of the molecules in the generated complex by methods of molecular docking for the formation of the structure. Investigation of activity of the ligand molecule to protein receptor of human cells by the methods of molecular dynamics was carried out.

  8. Role of phospholipids in the actions of prolactin in the mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Etindi, R.O.N.

    1987-01-01

    These studies were designed to determine the role of phospholipid turnover in the mechanism of action of prolactin in mammary gland explants derived from 12-14 day pregnant mice. Prolactin stimulates phospholipid biosynthesis 12-16h after cultured mouse mammary tissues are exposed to it. Prolactin stimulates phospholipid biosynthesis at physiological concentrations and the response is maximal at all PRL concentrations above 25 ng/ml. p-Bromphenacyl bromide (BPB) at concentrations of 50 ..mu..M and above and quinacrine (50 ..mu..M) abolish the actions of prolactin on casein and lipid biosynthesis in cultured mouse mammary gland explants. In mouse mammary gland explants, binding of prolactin to its receptor leads to a phospholipase C type hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids, but this effect is transient and does not occur immediately after hormone exposure. Prolactin significantly stimulated the accumulation of (/sup 3/H)label in inositol monophosphate (IP/sub 1/), inositol bisphosphate (IP/sub 2/) and inositol trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) 1-3 hours after addition of prolactin. Gossypol, a drug which has been shown to be an inhibitor of kinase C activity in mouse mammary tissues, is shown to abolish several of the actions of prolactin in cultured mouse mammary gland expalants.

  9. Phospholipids in plant and animal chromatin.

    PubMed

    Viola-Magni, M P; Gahan, P B; Pacy, J

    1985-01-01

    Isolated hepatic nuclei and hepatic chromatin have been analysed for their DNA, RNA, protein and phospholipid content. The protein/DNA ratio is 3 for nuclei and 1.95 for chromatin extracted from Triton X-100 treated nuclei. The phospholipids, (2.36 +/- 0.91 (S.D.) per cent of the total nuclear material), are lost during the chromatin preparation mainly during the Triton X-100 washings of the nuclei. Nevertheless, 10 per cent of the total nuclear phospholipids remain bound to the chromatin. The comparative analysis of both nuclei and chromatin shows a difference in phospholipids and fatty acid composition. Thus, the chromatin-associated phospholipid cannot be attributed simply to contaminating nuclear membrane. This is supported by the autoradiographic study of semi-thin sections of interphase nuclei from root apices of Vicia faba in which [3H] ethanolamine is clearly localized in the chromatin and nucleolar regions of the nuclei.

  10. Microbial carbon turnover in the plant-rhizosphere-soil continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ashish; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert; Thomson, Bruce; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Soil microbial biomass contributes significantly to maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM). It is well known that biochemical fractions of soil microorganisms have varying turnover and therefore contribute differentially to soil C storage. Here we compare the turnover rates of different microbial biochemical fractions using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labelling experiment. The isotope signal was temporally traced into rhizosphere soil microorganisms using the following biomarkers: DNA, RNA, fatty acids and chloroform fumigation extraction derived microbial biomass size classes. C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed through phospholipid and neutral lipid fatty acid (PLFA/NLFA) analyses. Highest 13C enrichment was seen in the low molecular weight (LMW) size class of microbial biomass (Δδ13C =151) and in nucleic acids (DNA: 38o RNA: 66) immediately after the pulse followed by a sharp drop. The amount of 13C in the high molecular weight (HMW) microbial biomass (17-81) and total fatty acids (32-54) was lower initially and stayed relatively steady over the 4 weeks experimental period. We found significant differences in turnover rates of different microbial biochemical and size fractions. We infer that LMW cytosolic soluble compounds are rapidly metabolized and linked to respiratory C fluxes, whereas mid-sized products of microbial degradation and HMW polymeric compounds have lower renewal rate in that order. The turnover of cell wall fatty acids was also very slow. DNA and RNA showed faster turnover rate; and as expected RNA renewal was the fastest due to its rapid production by active microorganisms independent of cell replication. 13C incorporation into different functional groups confirmed that mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi rely on root C and are important in the initial plant C flux. We substantiated through measurements of isotope incorporation into bacterial RNA that rhizosphere bacteria are also important in the initial C conduit

  11. Effect of Cholesterol on the Structure of a Five-Component Mitochondria-Like Phospholipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, Kelly; Patel, Amit; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.; Fradin, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes have a complex phospholipid composition that varies greatly depending on the organism, cell type and function. In spite of this complexity, most structural data available for phospholipid bilayers concern model systems containing only one or two different phospholipids. Here, we examine the effect of cholesterol on the structure of a complex membrane reflecting the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes, with five different types of headgroups (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin (CL)) and a variety of hydrocarbon tails. This particular system was chosen because elevated cholesterol contents in mitochondrial membranes have been linked to a breaking down of Bax-mediated membrane permeabilization and resistance to cancer treatments. High resolution electron density profiles were determined by X-ray reflectivity, while the area per phospholipid chain, Apc, and the chain order parameter, SX-ray, were determined by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). We show that chain order increases upon the addition of cholesterol, resulting in both a thickening of the lipid bilayer and a reduction in the average surface area per phospholipid chain. This effect, well known as cholesterol’s condensation effect, is similar, but not as pronounced as for single-component phospholipid membranes. We conclude by discussing the relevance of these findings for the insertion of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax in mitochondrial membranes with elevated cholesterol content. PMID:26529029

  12. Egg phospholipids and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Blesso, Christopher N

    2015-04-13

    Eggs are a major source of phospholipids (PL) in the Western diet. Dietary PL have emerged as a potential source of bioactive lipids that may have widespread effects on pathways related to inflammation, cholesterol metabolism, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function. Based on pre-clinical studies, egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin appear to regulate cholesterol absorption and inflammation. In clinical studies, egg PL intake is associated with beneficial changes in biomarkers related to HDL reverse cholesterol transport. Recently, egg PC was shown to be a substrate for the generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a gut microbe-dependent metabolite associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. More research is warranted to examine potential serum TMAO responses with chronic egg ingestion and in different populations, such as diabetics. In this review, the recent basic science, clinical, and epidemiological findings examining egg PL intake and risk of CVD are summarized.

  13. Phospholipid Vesicles in Materials Science

    SciTech Connect

    Granick, Steve

    2016-05-11

    The objective of this research was to develop the science basis needed to deploy phospholipid vesicles as functional materials in energy contexts. Specifically, we sought to: (1) Develop an integrated molecular-level understanding of what determines their dynamical shape, spatial organization, and responsiveness to complex, time-varying environments; and (2) Develop understanding of their active transportation in crowded environments, which our preliminary measurements in cells suggest may hold design principles for targeting improved energy efficiency in new materials systems. The methods to do this largely involved fluorescence imaging and other spectroscopy involving single particles, vesicles, particles, DNA, and endosomes. An unexpected importance outcome was a new method to image light-emitting diodes during actual operation using super-resolution spectroscopy.

  14. Egg Phospholipids and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Blesso, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Eggs are a major source of phospholipids (PL) in the Western diet. Dietary PL have emerged as a potential source of bioactive lipids that may have widespread effects on pathways related to inflammation, cholesterol metabolism, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function. Based on pre-clinical studies, egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin appear to regulate cholesterol absorption and inflammation. In clinical studies, egg PL intake is associated with beneficial changes in biomarkers related to HDL reverse cholesterol transport. Recently, egg PC was shown to be a substrate for the generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a gut microbe-dependent metabolite associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. More research is warranted to examine potential serum TMAO responses with chronic egg ingestion and in different populations, such as diabetics. In this review, the recent basic science, clinical, and epidemiological findings examining egg PL intake and risk of CVD are summarized. PMID:25871489

  15. Localization of anionic phospholipids in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Piercen M; Crooks, John A; Leidl, Mathias; Yoon, Earl J; Saghatelian, Alan; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-10-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an anionic phospholipid with a characteristically large curvature and is of growing interest for two primary reasons: (i) it binds to and regulates many peripheral membrane proteins in bacteria and mitochondria, and (ii) it is distributed asymmetrically in rod-shaped cells and is concentrated at the poles and division septum. Despite the growing number of studies of CL, its function in bacteria remains unknown. 10-N-Nonyl acridine orange (NAO) is widely used to image CL in bacteria and mitochondria, as its interaction with CL is reported to produce a characteristic red-shifted fluorescence emission. Using a suite of biophysical techniques, we quantitatively studied the interaction of NAO with anionic phospholipids under physiologically relevant conditions. We found that NAO is promiscuous in its binding and has photophysical properties that are largely insensitive to the structure of diverse anionic phospholipids to which it binds. Being unable to rely solely on NAO to characterize the localization of CL in Escherichia coli cells, we instead used quantitative fluorescence microscopy, mass spectrometry, and mutants deficient in specific classes of anionic phospholipids. We found CL and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) concentrated in the polar regions of E. coli cell membranes; depletion of CL by genetic approaches increased the concentration of PG at the poles. Previous studies suggested that some CL-binding proteins also have a high affinity for PG and display a pattern of cellular localization that is not influenced by depletion of CL. Framed within the context of these previous experiments, our results suggest that PG may play an essential role in bacterial physiology by maintaining the anionic character of polar membranes.

  16. Vinculin acts as a sensor in lipid regulation of adhesion-site turnover.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Indra; Stradal, Theresia E B; Holt, Mark R; Entschladen, Frank; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2005-04-01

    The dynamics of cell adhesion sites control cell morphology and motility. Adhesion-site turnover is thought to depend on the local availability of the acidic phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). PIP(2) can bind to many cell adhesion proteins such as vinculin and talin, but the consequences of this interaction are poorly understood. To study the significance of phospholipid binding to vinculin for adhesion-site turnover and cell motility, we constructed a mutant, vinculin-LD, deficient in acidic phospholipid binding yet with functional actin-binding sites. When expressed in cells, vinculin-LD was readily recruited to adhesion sites, as judged by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis, but cell spreading and migration were strongly impaired, and PIP(2)-dependent disassembly of adhesions was suppressed. Thus, PIP(2) binding is not essential for vinculin activation and recruitment, as previously suggested. Instead, we propose that PIP(2) levels can regulate the uncoupling of adhesion sites from the actin cytoskeleton, with vinculin functioning as a sensor.

  17. Intermolecular forces in spread phospholipid monolayers at oil/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mingins, James; Pethica, Brian A

    2004-08-31

    The lateral intermolecular forces between phospholipids are of particular relevance to the behavior of biomembranes, and have been approached via studies of monolayer isotherms at aqueous interfaces, mostly restricted to air/water (A/W) systems. For thermodynamic properties, the oil/water (O/W) interface has major advantages but is experimentally more difficult and less studied. A comprehensive reanalysis of the available thermodynamic data on spread monolayers of phosphatidyl cholines (PC) and phosphatidyl ethanolamines (PE) at O/W interfaces is conducted to identify the secure key features that will underpin further development of molecular models. Relevant recourse is made to isotherms of single-chain molecules and of mixed monolayers to identify the contributions of chain-chain interactions and interionic forces. The emphasis is on the properties of the phase transitions for a range of oil phases. Apparent published discrepancies in thermodynamic properties are resolved and substantial agreement emerges on the main features of these phospholipid monolayer systems. In compression to low areas, the forces between the zwitterions of like phospholipids are repulsive. The molecular model for phospholipid headgroup interactions developed by Stigter et al. accounts well for the virial coefficients in expanded phospholipid O/W monolayers. Inclusion of the changes in configuration and orientation of the zwitterion headgroups on compression, which are indicated by the surface potentials in the phase transition region, and inclusion of the energy of chain demixing from the oil phase will be required for molecular modeling of the phase transitions.

  18. L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) enhances lung surfactant phospholipid flux in rabbit fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, B.; Datta, S.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Steinberg, H.; Das, D.K.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of thyroid hormone on surfactant phospholipid production in fetal lung was studied by simultaneously measuring the surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) content and its turnover in lamellar body and alveolar lavage fractions. Pregnant New Zealand white rabbits of 27 days' gestation were properly anesthetized and the uterus opened by a midline incision. Each fetus in each litter was injected with T/sub 3/ along with (/sup 14/C)-palmitate and (/sup 3/H)-choline. Control fetuses were injected with saline instead of T/sub 3/. PC was isolated from lamellar body and lung lavage from each fetus. Zilversmit equations for a two-compartment precursor-product model was used to analyze specific activity versus time curves and the turnover times for surfactant PC. Fluxes of surfactant PC were then calculated from its turnover times and pool sizes. The biological half-life for (/sup 14/C)-palmitate and (/sup 3/H)-choline labeled PC did not change by T/sub 3/ treatment. Turnover times for labeled palmitate and choline were 9.2 hr and 10.0 hr, respectively, for normal fetus and 6.0 hr and 5.8 hr, respectively, for T/sub 3/-treated fetus. While the pool size of PC recovered by the alveolar wash did not change significantly, T/sub 3/ enhanced the flux of this phospholipid from the lamellar bodies into alveolar space by 1.7 times within 4 hr. These results suggest that thyroid hormone may promote fetal lung development by enhancing the release of surfactant into the alveolar space.

  19. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  20. Real-time Visualization of Phospholipid Degradation by Outer Membrane Phospholipase A using High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rangl, Martina; Rima, Luca; Klement, Jessica; Miyagi, Atsushi; Keller, Sandro; Scheuring, Simon

    2017-04-07

    Phospholipases are abundant in various types of cells and compartments, where they play key roles in physiological processes as diverse as digestion, cell proliferation, and neural activation. In Gram-negative bacteria, outer membrane phospholipase A (OmpLA) is involved in outer-membrane lipid homeostasis and bacterial virulence. Although the enzymatic activity of OmpLA can be probed with an assay relying on an artificial monoacyl thioester substrate, only little is known about its activity on diacyl phospholipids. Here, we used high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) to directly image enzymatic phospholipid degradation by OmpLA in real time. In the absence of Ca(2+), reconstituted OmpLA diffused within a phospholipid bilayer without revealing any signs of phospholipase activity. Upon the addition of Ca(2+), OmpLA was activated and degraded the membrane with a turnover of ~2 phospholipid molecules per second and per OmpLA dimer until most of the membrane phospholipids were hydrolyzed and the protein became tightly packed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Turnover in the Advancement Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarrobino, Jon D.

    2006-01-01

    Recruitment and retention is an area with which most organizations are concerned. Excessive turnover has exorbitant costs and wastes valuable time. Institutions of higher education are no exception. One of the most vital operations in nonprofit colleges and universities is its Office of Institutional Advancement. More and more, an institution of…

  2. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  3. Gravimetric determination of phospholipid concentration.

    PubMed

    Tejera-Garcia, Roberto; Connell, Lisa; Shaw, Walter A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2012-09-01

    Accurate determination of lipid concentrations is an obligatory routine in a research laboratory engaged in studies using this class of biomaterials. For phospholipids, this is frequently accomplished using the phosphate assay (Bartlett, G.R. Phosphorus Assay in Column Chromatography. J. Biol. Chem. 234, 466-468, 1959). Given the purity of the currently commercially available synthetic and isolated natural lipids, we have observed that determination of the dry weight of lipid stock solutions provides the fastest, most accurate, and generic method to assay their concentrations. The protocol described here takes advantage of the high resolution and accuracy obtained by modern weighing technology. We assayed by this technique the concentrations of a number of phosphatidylcholine samples, with different degrees of acyl chain saturation and length, and in different organic solvents. The results were compared with those from Bartlett assay, (31)P NMR, and Langmuir compression isotherms. The data obtained show that the gravimetric assay yields lipid concentrations with a resolution similar or better than obtained by the other techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dielectrophoresis of Functional Phospholipid Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froude, Victoria; Zhu, Yingxi Elaine

    2008-03-01

    Recently, there has been an emerging interest in using AC-dielectrophoresis (DEP) to transport and assemble phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) and nanoparticles to form functional bio-assemblies where the underlying charge polarization mechanism of colloids in AC fields strongly depends on nano-scaled surface charge. In this work, we study liposomes segregation and aggregation in the presence of nanocolloids and salts in which the biological functionality of liposomes is augmented by the physical functionality of inorganic coating and particles. Liposomes, synthesized by sonication with 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphate (DOPA), are manipulated at varied AC-field frequencies across fabricated micro-electrodes in a quadrapole configuration on glass. We observe the co-assembly of liposome and opposite-charged nanocolloids by confocal microscopy and SEM, where the smaller nanocolloids are captured in between liposome junctions to form stabilized composite vesicles at several distinct frequencies. We observe a strong dependence of the liposome DEP mobility on the number of nanoparticles present in suspension and propose a new mechanism based on charge segregation and charged nanocolloid entrainment in the double layer.

  5. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  6. Predictors of Turnover of Female Factory Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, James L.; Rhodes, Susan R.

    1981-01-01

    Examines predictors of turnover of female factory workers in a multivariate framework. Findings indicate that organizational, job, and personal characteristics are equally important in explaining turnover. Variables significantly related to turnover are tenure, cycle time, peer leadership, communication flow, training time, family income, and…

  7. How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, though recent studies suggest this may not be the case. Using a unique identification strategy that employs school-by-grade level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 850,000 New York…

  8. A literature review of nursing turnover costs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Jones, Cheryl B

    2013-04-01

    To report the findings of a literature review of studies examining nursing staff turnover costs published between 1990 and 2010. Nurse turnover is a global concern that is both costly for health-care organizations and, in the context of the work environment, affects quality and safety. We reviewed past literature and describe the conceptualization of nurse turnover, evaluate the methodologies and calculation of costs, identify the reported range of turnover costs and provide suggestions for future study. We report inconsistencies in past studies in terms of the conceptualization and measurement of nurse turnover and turnover rates, the methodologies for gathering data and the data sources used, the approaches for calculating turnover costs and the resulting nursing staff turnover costs estimated. Past studies reached different conclusions about nurse turnover. We still need to explore the actual costs and benefits of nurse turnover and retention. This study should be helpful for nurse executives as they build a business case to address nurse turnover in their organizations, and for policy-makers as they develop policies about turnover. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Using Turnover as a Recruitment Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Teacher turnover is notoriously high in the field of early childhood education with an estimated 33% of staff exiting the workplace each year. Turnover is costly. Not only do high levels of turnover negatively impact children's growth and development, it also erodes the program's economic stability and wherewithal to provide effective operations…

  10. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  11. Using Turnover as a Recruitment Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Teacher turnover is notoriously high in the field of early childhood education with an estimated 33% of staff exiting the workplace each year. Turnover is costly. Not only do high levels of turnover negatively impact children's growth and development, it also erodes the program's economic stability and wherewithal to provide effective operations…

  12. Estimating Teacher Turnover Costs: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Abigail Jurist; Joy, Lois; Ellis, Pamela; Jablonski, Erica; Karelitz, Tzur M.

    2012-01-01

    High teacher turnover in large U.S. cities is a critical issue for schools and districts, and the students they serve; but surprisingly little work has been done to develop methodologies and standards that districts and schools can use to make reliable estimates of turnover costs. Even less is known about how to detect variations in turnover costs…

  13. Exit interviews to reduce turnover amongst healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Flint, Anndrea; Webster, Joan

    2013-03-28

    Exit interviews are widely used in healthcare organisations to identify reasons for staff attrition, yet their usefulness in limiting turnover is unclear. To determine the effectiveness of various exit interview strategies in decreasing turnover rates amongst healthcare professionals. We searched the Cochrane EPOC Group Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 11, 2012; MEDLINE, Ovid (1950- ); EMBASE, Ovid (1947- ); CINAHL, EbscoHost (1980- ), and PsycINFO, OVID (1806-) between October 31 and November 6, 2012. We also screened the reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews; and searched trial registries for planned and on-going trials. We did not restrict searches by language or publication date. Randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies comparing turnover rates between healthcare professionals who had undergone one form of exit interview with another form of exit interview or with no interview. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. The original search identified 1560 citations, of which we considered 19 potentially relevant. The two authors independently reviewed the abstracts of these studies and retrieved the full texts of eight studies. We excluded all eight following independent assessment; they were either interviews, commentaries on how to do an exit interview or descriptive studies about reasons for leaving. We found no trials that matched our inclusion criteria. For this first update, we screened 2220 citations and identified no new trials. Evidence about the effectiveness of exit interviews to reduce turnover is currently not available. However, exit interviews may provide useful information about the work environment which, in turn, may be useful in the development of interventions to reduce turnover.

  14. Exit interviews to reduce turnover amongst healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Webster, Joan; Flint, Anndrea

    2014-08-19

    Exit interviews are widely used in healthcare organisations to identify reasons for staff attrition, yet their usefulness in limiting turnover is unclear. To determine the effectiveness of various exit interview strategies in decreasing turnover rates amongst healthcare professionals. We searched the Cochrane EPOC Group Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 11, 2012; MEDLINE, Ovid (1950- ); EMBASE, Ovid (1947- ); CINAHL, EbscoHost (1980- ), and PsycINFO, OVID (1806-) between October 31 and November 6, 2012. We also screened the reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews; and searched trial registries for planned and on-going studies. We did not restrict searches by language or publication date. Randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies comparing turnover rates between healthcare professionals who had undergone one form of exit interview with another form of exit interview or with no interview. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. The original search identified 1560 citations, of which we considered 19 potentially relevant. The two authors independently reviewed the abstracts of these studies and retrieved the full texts of eight studies. We excluded all eight following independent assessment; they were either interviews, commentaries on how to do an exit interview or descriptive studies about reasons for leaving. We found no studies that matched our inclusion criteria. For this first update, we screened 2220 citations and identified no new studies. Evidence about the effectiveness of exit interviews to reduce turnover is currently not available. However, exit interviews may provide useful information about the work environment which, in turn, may be useful in the development of interventions to reduce turnover.

  15. Exit interviews to reduce turnover amongst healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Webster, Joan; Flint, Anndrea

    2014-03-15

    Exit interviews are widely used in healthcare organisations to identify reasons for staff attrition, yet their usefulness in limiting turnover is unclear. To determine the effectiveness of various exit interview strategies in decreasing turnover rates amongst healthcare professionals. We searched the Cochrane EPOC Group Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 11, 2012; MEDLINE, Ovid (1950- ); EMBASE, Ovid (1947- ); CINAHL, EbscoHost (1980- ), and PsycINFO, OVID (1806-) between October 31 and November 6, 2012. We also screened the reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews; and searched trial registries for planned and on-going trials. We did not restrict searches by language or publication date. Randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies comparing turnover rates between healthcare professionals who had undergone one form of exit interview with another form of exit interview or with no interview. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. The original search identified 1560 citations, of which we considered 19 potentially relevant. The two authors independently reviewed the abstracts of these studies and retrieved the full texts of eight studies. We excluded all eight following independent assessment; they were either interviews, commentaries on how to do an exit interview or descriptive studies about reasons for leaving. We found no trials that matched our inclusion criteria. For this first update, we screened 2220 citations and identified no new trials. Evidence about the effectiveness of exit interviews to reduce turnover is currently not available. However, exit interviews may provide useful information about the work environment which, in turn, may be useful in the development of interventions to reduce turnover.

  16. Altered bone turnover during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Morey, E. R.; Liu, C.; Baylink, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications in calcium metabolism during spaceflight were studied, using parameters that reflect bone turnover. Bone formation rate, medullary area, bone length, bone density, pore size distribution, and differential bone cell number were evaluated in growing rate both immediately after and 25 days after orbital spaceflights aboard the Soviet biological satellites Cosmos 782 and 936. The primary effect of space flight on bone turnover was a reversible inhibition of bone formation at the periosteal surface. A simultaneous increase in the length of the periosteal arrest line suggests that bone formation ceased along corresponding portions of that surface. Possible reasons include increased secretion of glucocorticoids and mechanical unloading of the skeleton due to near-weightlessness, while starvation and immobilization are excluded as causes.

  17. Altered bone turnover during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Morey, E. R.; Liu, C.; Baylink, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications in calcium metabolism during spaceflight were studied, using parameters that reflect bone turnover. Bone formation rate, medullary area, bone length, bone density, pore size distribution, and differential bone cell number were evaluated in growing rate both immediately after and 25 days after orbital spaceflights aboard the Soviet biological satellites Cosmos 782 and 936. The primary effect of space flight on bone turnover was a reversible inhibition of bone formation at the periosteal surface. A simultaneous increase in the length of the periosteal arrest line suggests that bone formation ceased along corresponding portions of that surface. Possible reasons include increased secretion of glucocorticoids and mechanical unloading of the skeleton due to near-weightlessness, while starvation and immobilization are excluded as causes.

  18. Turnover: strategies for staff retention.

    PubMed

    SnowAntle, S

    1990-01-01

    This discussion has focused on a number of areas where organizations may find opportunities for more effectively managing employee retention. Given the multitude of causes and consequences, there is no one quick fix. Effective management of employee retention requires assessment of the entire human resources process, that is, recruitment, selection, job design, compensation, supervision, work conditions, etc. Regular and systematic diagnosis of turnover and implementation of multiple strategies and evaluation are needed (Mobley, 1982).

  19. Health effects of dietary phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Küllenberg, Daniela; Taylor, Lenka A; Schneider, Michael; Massing, Ulrich

    2012-01-05

    Beneficial effects of dietary phospholipids (PLs) have been mentioned since the early 1900's in relation to different illnesses and symptoms, e.g. coronary heart disease, inflammation or cancer. This article gives a summary of the most common therapeutic uses of dietary PLs to provide an overview of their approved and proposed benefits; and to identify further investigational needs.From the majority of the studies it became evident that dietary PLs have a positive impact in several diseases, apparently without severe side effects. Furthermore, they were shown to reduce side effects of some drugs. Both effects can partially be explained by the fact that PL are highly effective in delivering their fatty acid (FA) residues for incorporation into the membranes of cells involved in different diseases, e.g. immune or cancer cells. The altered membrane composition is assumed to have effects on the activity of membrane proteins (e.g. receptors) by affecting the microstructure of membranes and, therefore, the characteristics of the cellular membrane, e.g. of lipid rafts, or by influencing the biosynthesis of FA derived lipid second messengers. However, since the FAs originally bound to the applied PLs are increased in the cellular membrane after their consumption or supplementation, the FA composition of the PL and thus the type of PL is crucial for its effect. Here, we have reviewed the effects of PL from soy, egg yolk, milk and marine sources. Most studies have been performed in vitro or in animals and only limited evidence is available for the benefit of PL supplementation in humans. More research is needed to understand the impact of PL supplementation and confirm its health benefits.

  20. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  1. Quantification of phospholipids classes in human milk.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Francesca; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Flück, Brigitte; Tavazzi, Isabelle; Thakkar, Sagar K; Destaillats, Frédéric; Braun, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    Phospholipids are integral constituents of the milk fat globule membranes and they play a central role in infants' immune and inflammatory responses. A methodology employing liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detector has been optimized and validated to quantify the major phospholipids classes in human milk. Phospholipids were extracted using chloroform and methanol and separated on C18 column. Repeatability, intermediate reproducibility, and recovery values were calculated and a large sample set of human milk analyzed. In human milk, phospholipid classes were quantified at concentrations of 0.6 mg/100 g for phosphatidylinositol; 4.2 mg/100 g for phosphatidylethanolamine, 0.4 mg/100 g for phosphatidylserine, 2.8 mg/100 g for phosphatidylcholine, and 4.6 mg/100 g for sphingomyelin. Their relative standard deviation of repeatability and intermediate reproducibility values ranging between 0.8 and 13.4 % and between 2.4 and 25.7 %, respectively. The recovery values ranged between 67 and 112 %. Finally, the validated method was used to quantify phospholipid classes in human milk collected from 50 volunteers 4 weeks postpartum providing absolute content of these lipids in a relatively large cohort. The average content of total phospholipids was 23.8 mg/100 g that corresponds to an estimated mean intake of 140 mg phospholipids/day in a 4-week old infant when exclusively breast-fed.

  2. Supervisory Turnover in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Danica K.; Broome, Kirk M.; Edwards, Jennifer R.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    Staff turnover is a significant issue within substance abuse treatment, with implications for service delivery and organizational health. This study examined factors associated with turnover among supervisors in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Turnover was conceptualized as being an individual response to organizational-level influences, and predictors represent aggregate program measures. Participants included 532 staff (including 467 counselors and 65 clinical/program directors) from 90 programs in four regions of the USA. Using logistic regression, analyses of structural factors indicated that programs affiliated with a parent organization and those providing more counseling hours to clients had higher turnover rates. When measures of job attitudes were included, only parent affiliation and collective appraisal of satisfaction were related to turnover. Subsequent analyses identified a trend toward increased supervisory turnover when satisfaction was low following the departure of a previous supervisor. These findings suggest that organizational-level factors can be influential in supervisory turnover. PMID:19949883

  3. Supervisory turnover in outpatient substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Knight, Danica K; Broome, Kirk M; Edwards, Jennifer R; Flynn, Patrick M

    2011-01-01

    Staff turnover is a significant issue within substance abuse treatment, with implications for service delivery and organizational health. This study examined factors associated with turnover among supervisors in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Turnover was conceptualized as being an individual response to organizational-level influences, and predictors represent aggregate program measures. Participants included 532 staff (including 467 counselors and 65 clinical/program directors) from 90 programs in four regions of the USA. Using logistic regression, analyses of structural factors indicated that programs affiliated with a parent organization and those providing more counseling hours to clients had higher turnover rates. When measures of job attitudes were included, only parent affiliation and collective appraisal of satisfaction were related to turnover. Subsequent analyses identified a trend toward increased supervisory turnover when satisfaction was low following the departure of a previous supervisor. These findings suggest that organizational-level factors can be influential in supervisory turnover.

  4. Filamentous Fungi with High Cytosolic Phospholipid Transfer Activity in the Presence of Exogenous Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Record, Eric; Lesage, Laurence; Cahagnier, Bernard; Marion, Didier; Asther, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    The phospholipid transfer activity of cell extracts from 15 filamentous fungus strains grown on a medium containing phospholipids as the carbon source was measured by a fluorescence assay. This assay was based on the transfer of pyrene-labeled phosphatidylcholines forming the donor vesicles to acceptor vesicles composed of egg phosphatidylcholines. The highest phosphatidylcholine transfer activity was obtained with cell extracts from Aspergillus oryzae. The presence of exogenous phospholipids in the culture medium of A. oryzae was shown to increase markedly the activity of phospholipid transfer as well as the pool of exocellular proteins during the primary phase of growth. Modifications in the biochemical marker activities of cellular organelles were observed: succinate dehydrogenase, a mitochondrial marker; inosine diphosphatase, a Golgi system marker; and cytochrome c oxidoreductase, an endoplasmic reticulum marker, were increased 7.3-, 2-, and 22-fold, respectively, when A. oryzae was grown in the presence of phospholipids. PMID:16349388

  5. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids*

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  6. Distinctive interactions of oleic acid covered magnetic nanoparticles with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids in Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Matshaya, Thabo J; Lanterna, Anabel E; Granados, Alejandro M; Krause, Rui W M; Maggio, Bruno; Vico, Raquel V

    2014-05-27

    The growing number of innovations in nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology are posing new challenges in understanding the full spectrum of interactions between nanomateriales and biomolecules at nano-biointerfaces. Although considerable achievements have been accomplished by in vivo applications, many issues regarding the molecular nature of these interactions are far from being well-understood. In this work, we evaluate the interaction of hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) covered with a single layer of oleic acid with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids found in biomembranes through the use of Langmuir monolayers. We find distinctive interactions among the MNP with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids that are reflected by both, the compression isotherms and the surface topography of the films. The interaction between MNP and saturated lipids causes a noticeable reduction of the mean molecular area in the interfacial plane, while the interaction with unsaturated lipids promotes area expansion compared to the ideally mixed films. Moreover, when liquid expanded and liquid condensed phases of the phospholipid(s) coexist, the MNP preferably partition to the liquid-expanded phase, thus hindering the coalescence of the condensed domains with increasing surface pressure. In consequence organizational information on long-range order is attained. These results evidence the existence of a sensitive composition-dependent surface regulation given by phospholipid-nanoparticle interactions which enhance the biophysical relevance of understanding nanoparticle surface functionalization in relation to its interactions in biointerfaces constituted by defined types of biomolecules.

  7. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Kraft, Thomas E; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Hruz, Paul W

    2016-08-12

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Kinetics of the activation of human prothrombin by human coagulation factor Xa. Initial rate studies in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipid.

    PubMed

    Kosow, D P; Orthner, C L

    1979-10-10

    Steady state kinetic studies have been performed to investigate the formation of thrombin from prothrombin by human coagulation Factor Xa in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipid. The concentration of ligand which gives 50% of the maximum velocity (K0.5) is 2.3 mM for Ca2+, 7.4 microM for phospholipid, and 0.006 microM for prothrombin. Hill plots of the Ca2+ enhancement of the reaction give a Hill coefficient of 3.1, indicating positive cooperativity. The initial velocity patterns are consistent with an ordered addition of reactants with phospholipid as the second reactant to bind to the enzyme. Although our results do not differentiate between Ca2+ or the prothrombin substrate as the first reactant to bind to Factor Xa, it is established that Ca2+ can bind to Factor Xa in the absence of the other reactants. Thus, the most probable order of addition of reactants is Ca2+, phospholipid, and the prothrombin substrate. Plots of (v)-1 versus (prothrombin)-1 or (v)-1 versus [(Ca2+)3]-1 at several constant concentrations of phospholipid indicate that the major effect of phospholipid is to increase the turnover number of Factor Xa.

  9. Phospholipid metabolism and protein kinase C mediated protein phosphorylation in dietary protein deficiency in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Surendra K; Kathayat, Rachna; Tyagi, Manoj; Taneja, Krishna K; Basir, Seemi F

    2005-07-01

    Nutritional deprivation of proteins decreases the protein kinase C (PKC) activity in rat lung. The activity of (PKC) is influenced by lipid metabolism. Changes in PKC activity may influence phosphorylation of its substrate proteins in the tissues. Therefore, alterations in phospholipid metabolism and PKC mediated protein phosphorylation in dietary protein deficiency in rat lung were envisaged. The study was conducted on rats fed on three different types of diet viz., casein (20% protein), deficient (4% protein, rice flour as source of protein) and supplemented (deficient diet supplemented with L-lysine and DL-threoning). Feeding of protein deficient diet caused reduction in incorporation of [3H] myo-inositol in the total phosphoinositides in lungs and an increase in total inositol phosphate pool. There was a significant reduction in the contents and turnover rate of phosphatidyl inositol and phosphatidyl inositol monophosphate. Supplementation of diet with L-lysine and DL-threonine had a reversing effect on total pool of phosphoinositides and, the metabolism of phosphatidyl inositol bisphosphate and phosphatidyl inositol. In phosphatidyl choline metabolism, the dietary protein deficiency led to a decrease in incorporation of [14C-methyl] choline-chloride in total phospholipids. In contrast, its incorporation increased in phosphatidyl choline pool. The contents of phosphatidyl choline and residue, incorporation of [14C-methyl] choline-chloride in them and their turnover rate also increased. Supplementation of diet had a reversal effect on most of these parameters. Phosphorylation of proteins of 84, 47, 35 and 16 kDa was identified to be mediated by PKC. In dietary protein deficiency, phosphorylation of all these proteins, except that of 47 kDa, increased. Supplementation of diet reversed the pattern except that of 84 kDa. The findings suggest that changes in phospholipid metabolism in dietary protein deficiency may effect the activity of PKC thereby influencing the

  10. Autistic disorder and phospholipids: A review.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christine M; Austin, David W

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulated phospholipid metabolism has been proposed as an underlying biological component of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autistic disorder (AD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This review provides an overview of fatty acid and phospholipid metabolism and evidence for phospholipid dysregulation with reference to the membrane hypothesis of schizophrenia. While there is evidence that phospholipid metabolism is at least impaired in individuals with AD, it has not been established whether phospholipid metabolism is implicated in causal, mechanistic or epiphenomenological models. More research is needed to ascertain whether breastfeeding, and specifically, the administration of colostrum or an adequate substitute can play a preventative role by supplying the neonate with essential fatty acids (EFAs) at a critical juncture in their development. Regarding treatment, further clinical trials of EFA supplementation are essential to determine the efficacy of EFAs in reducing AD symptomatology and whether supplementation can serve as a cost-effective and readily available intervention. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  12. Degradation of cholesterol crystals in phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Eugen; Koscec, Mirna; Fugate, Robert D.

    1993-02-01

    Based on previous studies from the laboratory that demonstrated degradation of cholesterol crystals ingested by macrophages in a cell culture system and indicated that intracellular phospholipids could play an important role in mobilization of crystalline cholesterol, the role of each of the three major intracellular phospholipid species in degradation of crystals is further explored. Fluorescently labeled cholesterol crystals are incubated with phospholipids over a period of 5 d. Morphological changes in crystals are monitored using digital imaging fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching, confocal microscopy, and epifluorescent and phase contrast microscopy. Results clearly demonstrate that all three phospholipids are able to mobilize crystalline cholesterol. However, the mechanisms by which they exert mobilization are different. Sphingomyelin and phosphatidylchloline are found to cause gradual and uniform dissolution of crystals, more or less preserving their original shape. Phosphatidylethanolamine appear to penetrate into the crystal, causing its fragmentation and solubilization. In the mixture of all three phospholipids representing the composition found in macrophages, both of the described mechanisms are working simultaneously.

  13. Protein turnover, nitrogen balance and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fern, E B; Waterlow, J C

    1983-01-01

    Not many studies have been done on protein turnover during recovery from malnutrition. Some relevant information can, however, be obtained from measurements on normal growing animals, since rehabilitation and normal growth have in common a rapid rate of net protein synthesis. The key question is the extent to which net gain in protein results from an increase in synthesis or a decrease in breakdown or both. Different studies have used different methods, and all methods for measuring protein turnover have some disadvantages and sources of error. It is important to bear this in mind in evaluating the results. Consequently, part of this paper will be devoted to questions of methodology. Whole body protein turnover has been measured in children recovering from severe malnutrition. During the phase of rapid catch-up growth the rate of protein synthesis is increased. As might be expected, it increases linearly with the rate of weight gain. At the same time there is a smaller increase in the rate of protein breakdown. The resultant of these two processes is that, over and above the basal rate of protein synthesis, 1.4 grams of protein have to be synthesized for 1 gram to be laid down. Very similar results have been obtained in rapidly growing young pigs. Experimental studies on muscle growth in general confirm the conclusion that, at least in muscle, rapid growth is associated with rapid rates of protein breakdown as well as of synthesis. This has been shown in muscles of young growing rats, as well as in muscles in which hypertrophy has been induced by stretch or other stimuli. In contrast, the evidence suggests that rapid growth involves a fall in the rate of protein degradation. The magnitude of the nitrogen balance under any conditions is determined by the difference between synthesis and breakdown. In the absence of any storage of amino acids, this must be the same as the difference between intake and excretion (S - B = I - E). A question of great interest is whether

  14. Phosphatidylinositol turnover in mitogen-activated lymphocytes. Suppression by low-density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David Y.; Harmony, Judith A. K.

    1980-01-01

    Low-density (LD) lipoproteins inhibit phytohaemagglutinin-enhanced turnover of phosphatidylinositol in human peripheral lymphocytes. Turnover was assessed by 32P incorporation into phospholipids and by loss of 32P from [32P]phosphatidylinositol. Inhibition of lipid turnover by LD lipoproteins is not the result of a change in the amount of phytohaemagglutinin required for maximum cellular response. Neither phytohaemagglutinin nor LD lipoproteins influence 32P incorporation into phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine during the first 60min after mitogenic challenge. The extent of inhibition of phosphatidylinositol turnover by LD lipoproteins depends on the concentration of LD lipoproteins present in the incubation medium: 50% of maximum inhibition occurs at a low-density-lipoprotein protein concentration of 33μg/ml and maximum inhibition occurs at low-density-lipoprotein protein concentrations above 100μg/ml. Phytohaemagglutinin stimulates 32P incorporation into phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol phosphate and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate. However, LD lipoproteins abolish 32P incorporation into phosphatidylinositol without affecting incorporation into phosphatidylinositol phosphate and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate. The ability of LD lipoproteins to inhibit phytohaemagglutinin-induced phosphatidylinositol turnover is mimicked by EGTA. Furthermore, inhibition of LD lipoproteins by phytohaemagglutinin-induced 32P incorporation into phosphatidylinositol correlates directly with inhibition by LD lipoproteins of Ca2+ accumulation. These results suggest that Ca2+ accumulation and turnover of phosphatidylinositol are coupled responses in lymphocytes challenged by mitogens. The step in phosphatidylinositol metabolism that is sensitive to LD lipoproteins and, by inference, that is coupled to Ca2+ accumulation is release of [32P]phosphoinositol from phosphatidylinositol. PMID:6796039

  15. Electrochemical modelling of QD-phospholipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengwen; Chen, Rongjun; Malhotra, Girish; Critchley, Kevin; Vakurov, Alexander; Nelson, Andrew

    2014-04-15

    The aggregation of quantum dots (QDs) and capping of individual QDs affects their activity towards biomembrane models. Electrochemical methods using a phospholipid layer on mercury (Hg) membrane model have been used to determine the phospholipid monolayer activity of thioglycollic acid (TGA) coated quantum dots (QDs) as an indicator of biomembrane activity. The particles were characterised for size and charge. The activity of the QDs towards dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) monolayers is pH dependent, and is most active at pH 8.2 within the pH range 8.2-6.5 examined in this work. This pH dependent activity is the result of increased particle aggregation coupled to decreasing surface charge emanating from the TGA carboxylic groups employed to stabilize the QD dispersion in aqueous media. Capping the QDs with CdS/ZnS lowers the particles' activity to phospholipid monolayers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bone turnover in malnourished children.

    PubMed

    Branca, F; Robins, S P; Ferro-Luzzi, A; Golden, M H

    Pyridinoline (PYD) and deoxypyridinoline (DPD) are cross-linking aminoacids of collagen that are located mainly in bone and cartilage. When bone matrix is resorbed these cross-links are quantitatively excreted in the urine and therefore represent specific markers. We have measured the urinary excretion rate of PYD and DPD in 46 severely malnourished boys to assess their skeletal turnover and to relate this to their subsequent rate of growth. The children were aged 13 months (SD 6), and height-for-age was -3.6 (1.6) Z-score, and weight-for-height was -2.4 (0.8) Z-score. PYD excretion when malnourished and after "recovery" was 11.2 (4.6) nmol h-1m-2 and 32.2 (10.8) nmol h-1m-2 and DPD excretion was 2.6 (1.3) nmol h-1m-2 and 7.5 (3.0) nmol h-1m-2, respectively. The ratio of the two cross-links did not change with recovery. These data show that cartilage and bone turnover is much lower in the malnourished than in the recovered child. There was no difference in the degree of depression of turnover between the children with marasmus, marasmic-kwashiorkor, or kwashiorkor. The rate of height gain during recovery was significantly related to cross-link excretion, age, and weight-for-height on admission. These three factors accounted for 44% of the variance in the height velocity of the children. PYD and DPD excretion rate could be used to assess therapeutic interventions designed to alleviate stunting.

  17. Hybrid Mathematical Model of Cardiomyocyte Turnover in the Adult Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Elser, Jeremy A.; Margulies, Kenneth B.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale The capacity for cardiomyocyte regeneration in the healthy adult human heart is fundamentally relevant for both myocardial homeostasis and cardiomyopathy therapeutics. However, estimates of cardiomyocyte turnover rates conflict greatly, with a study employing C14 pulse-chase methodology concluding 1% annual turnover in youth declining to 0.5% with aging and another using cell population dynamics indicating substantial, age-increasing turnover (4% increasing to 20%). Objective Create a hybrid mathematical model to critically examine rates of cardiomyocyte turnover derived from alternative methodologies. Methods and Results Examined in isolation, the cell population analysis exhibited severe sensitivity to a stem cell expansion exponent (20% variation causing 2-fold turnover change) and apoptosis rate. Similarly, the pulse-chase model was acutely sensitive to assumptions of instantaneous incorporation of atmospheric C14 into the body (4-fold impact on turnover in young subjects) while numerical restrictions precluded otherwise viable solutions. Incorporating considerations of primary variable sensitivity and controversial model assumptions, an unbiased numerical solver identified a scenario of significant, age-increasing turnover (4–6% increasing to 15–22% with age) that was compatible with data from both studies, provided that successive generations of cardiomyocytes experienced higher attrition rates than predecessors. Conclusions Assignment of histologically-observed stem/progenitor cells into discrete regenerative phenotypes in the cell population model strongly influenced turnover dynamics without being directly testable. Alternatively, C14 trafficking assumptions and restrictive models in the pulse-chase model artificially eliminated high-turnover solutions. Nevertheless, discrepancies among recent cell turnover estimates can be explained and reconciled. The hybrid mathematical model provided herein permits further examination of these and

  18. Determinants of turnover among nursing department employees.

    PubMed

    Curry, J P; Wakefield, D S; Price, J L; Mueller, C W; McCloskey, J C

    1985-12-01

    A causal model of turnover, or quitting, among hospital nursing department employees was evaluated. This model includes job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and intent to leave as intervening variables that mediate 13 determinants of turnover. The sample consisted of 841 female nursing department employees selected from five hospitals in a western state. Attitudinal and background data were obtained through a mail questionnaire survey, and turnover was monitored for 18 months following the survey. Intent to leave had a strong direct effect on turnover while kinship responsibility, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment had indirect effects on turnover through intent to leave. Task repetitiveness, autonomy, promotional opportunities, and fairness of rewards were important determinants of jobs satisfaction and thus provide a mechanism whereby hospital management may enhance commitment to the organization while reducing turnover.

  19. [Plasma lipoproteins as drug carriers. Effect of phospholipid formulations].

    PubMed

    Torkhovskaia, T I; Ipatova, O M; Medvedeva, N V; Ivanov, V S; Ivanova, L I

    2010-01-01

    The extensive development of nanotechnologies in the last two decades has brought about new understanding of plasma lipoproteins (LP) as natural drug nanocarriers that escape interaction with immune and reticuloendothelial systems. Drugs bound to LP (especially LDL) can more actively penetrate into cells of many cancer and inflammation tissues with enhanced expression or/and dysregulation of B,E receptors or possibly scavenger SR-BI receptors. Relevant studies are focused on the development of new dosage forms by conjugating lipophilic drugs either with isolated plasma LP or with their model formulations, such as nanoemulsions, mimetics, lipid nanospheres, etc. Some authors include in these particles serum or recombinant apoproteins, peptides, and modified polymer products. As shown recently, protein-free lipid nanoemulsions in plasma take up free apoA and apoE. Complexes with various LP also form after direct administration of lypophilic drugs into blood especially those enclosed in phospholipid formulations, e.g. liposomes. Results of evaluation of some lipophilic dugs (mainly cytostatics, amphotericin B, cyclosporine A, etc.) are discussed. Original data are presented on the influence of phospholipid formulations on the distribution of doxorubicin and indomethacin between LP classes after in vitro incubation in plasma. On the whole, the review illustrates the importance of research on LP and phospholi pid forms as drug nanocarriers to be used to enhance effect of therapy.

  20. Influence of Cholesterol on Phospholipid Bilayer Structure and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Boughter, Christopher T; Monje-Galvan, Viviana; Im, Wonpil; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2016-11-17

    In this study, the influence of cholesterol on lipid bilayers is investigated by changing phospholipid headgroup, cholesterol concentration, chain saturation, and temperature. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to characterize bilayers containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) head groups with either fully saturated dimyristoyl (DM) or monounsaturated dioleoyl (DO) acyl chains and cholesterol concentrations ranging from 5 to 50%. To further explore the effects of cholesterol on bilayers with different head groups, we also performed MD simulations of bilayer systems having 15% cholesterol with phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidylserine (PS), each having DM chains and at a temperature above the solid gel phase transition. Additionally, bilayers of DMPA, DMPE, and DMPS with 15% cholesterol were simulated at temperatures below the solid gel phase transition temperatures. Compared to membranes without cholesterol, cholesterol in the model bilayers increases chain order in bilayers with the highest order in the liquid ordered and solid gel phases. Head group properties and acyl chain saturation are also found to critically impact bilayer dynamics, largely through the formation of hydrogen bonds between membrane components. These results provide a better understanding of the basic characteristics on structure and dynamics of cholesterol-containing membranes by revealing molecular details of interactions between cholesterol and phospholipids as well as add to the library of simulation data necessary for the MD community to accurately represent relevant models of atomic-scale systems.

  1. The low levels of eicosapentaenoic acid in rat brain phospholipids are maintained via multiple redundant mechanisms[S

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuck T.; Domenichiello, Anthony F.; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; Liu, Zhen; Masoodi, Mojgan; Bazinet, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Brain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) levels are 250- to 300-fold lower than docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), at least partly, because EPA is rapidly β-oxidized and lost from brain phospholipids. Therefore, we examined if β-oxidation was necessary for maintaining low EPA levels by inhibiting β-oxidation with methyl palmoxirate (MEP). Furthermore, because other metabolic differences between DHA and EPA may also contribute to their vastly different levels, this study aimed to quantify the incorporation and turnover of DHA and EPA into brain phospholipids. Fifteen-week-old rats were subjected to vehicle or MEP prior to a 5 min intravenous infusion of 14C-palmitate, 14C-DHA, or 14C-EPA. MEP reduced the radioactivity of brain aqueous fractions for 14C-palmitate-, 14C-EPA-, and 14C-DHA-infused rats by 74, 54, and 23%, respectively; while it increased the net rate of incorporation of plasma unesterified palmitate into choline glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylinositol and EPA into ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylserine. MEP also increased the synthesis of n-3 docosapentaenoic acid (n-3 DPA) from EPA. Moreover, the recycling of EPA into brain phospholipids was 154-fold lower than DHA. Therefore, the low levels of EPA in the brain are maintained by multiple redundant pathways including β-oxidation, decreased incorporation from plasma unesterified FA pool, elongation/desaturation to n-3 DPA, and lower recycling within brain phospholipids. PMID:23836105

  2. Revisiting nurse turnover costs: adjusting for inflation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2008-01-01

    Organizational knowledge of nurse turnover costs is important, but gathering these data frequently may not always be feasible in today's fast-paced and complex healthcare environment. The author presents a method to inflation adjust baseline nurse turnover costs using the Consumer Price Index. This approach allows nurse executives to gain current knowledge of organizational nurse turnover costs when primary data collection is not practical and to determine costs and potential savings if nurse retention investments are made.

  3. Cholesterol and phospholipids in frontal cortex and synaptosomes of suicide completers: relationship with endosomal lipid trafficking genes.

    PubMed

    Freemantle, Erika; Mechawar, Naguib; Turecki, Gustavo

    2013-02-01

    Cholesterol (CHL) and phospholipid (PL) levels in synaptosomal membranes in particular can have an impact on cell signalling. Alterations in peripheral CHL measures have been consistently reported in suicidal behaviour. As CHL and PL turnover in the brain are important in synapse maintenance and function, the objective of this study was to determine if differences exist in synaptosomal cholesterol and phospholipid levels between suicide completers and controls. Expression measures of genes involved in lipid trafficking suggest an association between Lysosomal acid lipase A, cholesteryl ester hydrolase (LIPA) and brain PL levels, with LIPA being significantly increased in violent suicides and associated with alterations in brain PL. The results of this study suggest an altered PL content mediated by LIPA expression in violent suicides in the prefrontal cortex, which would have important consequences for inhibitory neurotransmission.

  4. Fat cell turnover in humans.

    PubMed

    Arner, Peter; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2010-05-21

    Obesity is a condition where excess body fat accumulates to such an extent that one's health may be affected. Owing to the cardiovascular and metabolic disorders associated with obesity, and the epidemic of obesity facing most countries today, life expectancy in the developed world may start to decrease for the first time in recent history. Other conditions, such as anorexia nervosa and cachexia, are characterised by subnormal levels of adipose tissue and as with obesity lead to morbidity and mortality. Given the significant personal and economic costs of these conditions and their increasing prevalence in society, understanding the factors that determine the fat mass is therefore of prime interest and may lead to effective treatments and/or interventions for these disorders. Fat mass can be regulated in two ways. The lipid filling of pre-existing fat cells could be altered and the number of fat cells could be changed by the generation of new fat cells or the dying of old ones (i.e. adipocyte turnover). This review summarizes what is known about fat cell turnover in humans and the potential clinical implications. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Alcohol, signaling, and ECM turnover.

    PubMed

    Seth, Devanshi; D'Souza El-Guindy, Nympha B; Apte, Minoti; Mari, Montserrat; Dooley, Steven; Neuman, Manuela; Haber, Paul S; Kundu, Gopal C; Darwanto, Agus; de Villiers, Willem J; Vonlaufen, A; Xu, Z; Phillips, P; Yang, S; Goldstein, D; Pirola, R M; Wilson, J S; Moles, Anna; Fernández, Anna; Colell, Anna; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C; Meyer, Christoph; Meindl-Beinker, Nadja M

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol is recognized as a direct hepatotoxin, but the precise molecular pathways that are important for the initiation and progression of alcohol-induced tissue injury are not completely understood. The current understanding of alcohol toxicity to organs suggests that alcohol initiates injury by generation of oxidative and nonoxidative ethanol metabolites and via translocation of gut-derived endotoxin. These processes lead to cellular injury and stimulation of the inflammatory responses mediated through a variety of molecules. With continuing alcohol abuse, the injury progresses through impairment of tissue regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover, leading to fibrogenesis and cirrhosis. Several cell types are involved in this process, the predominant being stellate cells, macrophages, and parenchymal cells. In response to alcohol, growth factors and cytokines activate many signaling cascades that regulate fibrogenesis. This mini-review brings together research focusing on the underlying mechanisms of alcohol-mediated injury in a number of organs. It highlights the various processes and molecules that are likely involved in inflammation, immune modulation, susceptibility to infection, ECM turnover and fibrogenesis in the liver, pancreas, and lung triggered by alcohol abuse.

  6. The costs of turnover in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Mukamel, Dana B; Spector, William D; Limcangco, Rhona; Wang, Ying; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent

    2009-10-01

    Turnover rates in nursing homes have been persistently high for decades, ranging upwards of 100%. To estimate the net costs associated with turnover of direct care staff in nursing homes. DATA AND SAMPLE: Nine hundred two nursing homes in California in 2005. Data included Medicaid cost reports, the Minimum Data Set, Medicare enrollment files, Census, and Area Resource File. We estimated total cost functions, which included in addition to exogenous outputs and wages, the facility turnover rate. Instrumental variable limited information maximum likelihood techniques were used for estimation to deal with the endogeneity of turnover and costs. The cost functions exhibited the expected behavior, with initially increasing and then decreasing returns to scale. The ordinary least square estimate did not show a significant association between costs and turnover. The instrumental variable estimate of turnover costs was negative and significant (P = 0.039). The marginal cost savings associated with a 10% point increase in turnover for an average facility was $167,063 or 2.9% of annual total costs. The net savings associated with turnover offer an explanation for the persistence of this phenomenon over the last decades, despite the many policy initiatives to reduce it. Future policy efforts need to recognize the complex relationship between turnover and costs.

  7. The costs of turnover in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Mukamel, Dana B.; Spector, William D.; Limcangco, Rhona; Wang, Ying; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Background Turnover rates in nursing homes have been persistently high for decades, ranging upwards of 100%. Objectives To estimate the net costs associated with turnover of direct care staff in nursing homes. Data and sample 902 nursing homes in California in 2005. Data included Medicaid cost reports, the Minimum Data Set (MDS), Medicare enrollment files, Census and Area Resource File (ARF). Research Design We estimated total cost functions, which included in addition to exogenous outputs and wages, the facility turnover rate. Instrumental variable (IV) limited information maximum likelihood techniques were used for estimation to deal with the endogeneity of turnover and costs. Results The cost functions exhibited the expected behavior, with initially increasing and then decreasing returns to scale. The ordinary least square estimate did not show a significant association between costs and turnover. The IV estimate of turnover costs was negative and significant (p=0.039). The marginal cost savings associated with a 10 percentage point increase in turnover for an average facility was $167,063 or 2.9% of annual total costs. Conclusion The net savings associated with turnover offer an explanation for the persistence of this phenomenon over the last decades, despite the many policy initiatives to reduce it. Future policy efforts need to recognize the complex relationship between turnover and costs. PMID:19648834

  8. Guide to good practices for operations turnover

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Operations Turnover, Chapter XII of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing operations turnover programs. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Operations Turnover is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a formal operations turnover program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  9. PLA2-responsive and SPIO-loaded phospholipid micelles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Yan, Lesan; Chiorazzo, Michael; Delikatny, E. James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cheng, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    A PLA2-responsive and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle-loaded phospholipid micelle was developed. The release of phospholipid-conjugated dye from these micelles was triggered due to phospholipid degradation by phospholipase A2. High relaxivity of the encapsulated SPIO could enable non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26139589

  10. An evaluation of serum high density lipoproteins-phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Ide, H; Tsuji, M; Shimada, M; Kondo, T; Fujiya, S; Asanuma, Y; Agishi, Y

    1988-07-01

    Phospholipids in high density lipoproteins (HDL) is being used as a negative risk indicator of atherosclerosis. Phospholipids in HDL may not demonstrate the actual level of HDL-phospholipids when determined by the precipitation or ultracentrifugal methods, because HDL fractions contain very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) and albumin. In the present study, the true level of phospholipids in HDL was estimated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was compared with the level of phospholipids in HDL determined by the precipitation method. Sera from 18 healthy subjects were used as materials. In the HPLC method, the HDL fraction was extracted making sure that it contained no free albumin, which is albumin not bound to phospholipids. The HDL fraction was separated into subfractions. It was found that phospholipids in the VHDL fraction make a 20.2 +/- 7.3% (mean +/- S.D.) part of the total HDL-phospholipids. A large part of the VHDL fraction was constituted of albumin-bound phospholipids. A significant correlation was observed between HDL-phospholipids determined by the precipitation method, which contain albumin, and the actual HDL fraction phospholipids determined by HPLC, which do not contain VHDL (r = 0.903, p less than 0.01). These results suggest that HDL-phospholipids values determined by the precipitation method give useful clinical data.

  11. Rpe65 isomerase associates with membranes through an electrostatic interaction with acidic phospholipid headgroups.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Quan; Kaylor, Joanna J; Miu, Anh; Bassilian, Sara; Whitelegge, Julian P; Travis, Gabriel H

    2010-01-08

    Opsins are light-sensitive pigments in the vertebrate retina, comprising a G protein-coupled receptor and an 11-cis-retinaldehyde chromophore. Absorption of a photon by an opsin pigment induces isomerization of its chromophore to all-trans-retinaldehyde. After a brief period of activation, opsin releases all-trans-retinaldehyde and becomes insensitive to light. Restoration of light sensitivity to the apo-opsin involves the conversion of all-trans-retinaldehyde back to 11-cis-retinaldehyde via an enzyme pathway called the visual cycle. The critical isomerization step in this pathway is catalyzed by Rpe65. Rpe65 is strongly associated with membranes but contains no membrane-spanning segments. It was previously suggested that the affinity of Rpe65 for membranes is due to palmitoylation of one or more Cys residues. In this study, we re-examined this hypothesis. By two independent strategies involving mass spectrometry, we show that Rpe65 is not palmitoylated nor does it appear to undergo other post-translational modifications at significant stoichiometry. Instead, we show that Rpe65 binds the acidic phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin, but not phosphatidic acid. No binding of Rpe65 to basic phospholipids or neutral lipids was observed. The affinity of Rpe65 to acidic phospholipids was strongly pH-dependent, suggesting an electrostatic interaction of basic residues in Rpe65 with negatively charged phospholipid headgroups. Binding of Rpe65 to liposomes containing phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylglycerol, but not the basic or neutral phospholipids, allowed the enzyme to extract its insoluble substrate, all-trans-retinyl palmitate, from the lipid bilayer for synthesis of 11-cis-retinol. The interaction of Rpe65 with acidic phospholipids is therefore biologically relevant.

  12. Phospholipids of New Zealand Edible Brown Algae.

    PubMed

    Vyssotski, Mikhail; Lagutin, Kirill; MacKenzie, Andrew; Mitchell, Kevin; Scott, Dawn

    2017-07-01

    Edible brown algae have attracted interest as a source of beneficial allenic carotenoid fucoxanthin, and glyco- and phospholipids enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Unlike green algae, brown algae contain no or little phosphatidylserine, possessing an unusual aminophospholipid, phosphatidyl-O-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl) glycine], PHEG, instead. When our routinely used technique of (31)P-NMR analysis of phospholipids was applied to the samples of edible New Zealand brown algae, a number of signals corresponding to unidentified phosphorus-containing compounds were observed in total lipids. NI (negative ion) ESI QToF MS spectra confirmed the presence of more familiar phospholipids, and also suggested the presence of PHEG or its isomers. The structure of PHEG was confirmed by comparison with a synthetic standard. An unusual MS fragmentation pattern that was also observed prompted us to synthesise a number of possible candidates, and was found to follow that of phosphatidylhydroxyethyl methylcarbamate, likely an extraction artefact. An unexpected outcome was the finding of ceramidephosphoinositol that has not been reported previously as occurring in brown algae. An uncommon arsenic-containing phospholipid has also been observed and quantified, and its TLC behaviour studied, along with that of the newly synthesised lipids.

  13. Feruloyl Dioleoyglycerol Antioxidant Capacity in Phospholipid Vesicles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ferulic acid and its esters are known to be effective antioxidants. Feruloyl dioleoylglycerol was assessed for its ability to serve as an antioxidant in model membrane phospholipid vesicles. The molecule was incorporated into single-lamellar vesicles of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine at ...

  14. Carbamoylcholine and gastrin induce inositol lipid turnover in canine gastric parietal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, T.; Fisher, S.K.; Park, J.; Seguin, E.B.; Agranoff, B.W.; Yamada, Tadataka )

    1988-07-01

    The potential role of inositol phospholipid turnover in mediating acid secretion was examined in a preparation enriched for isolated canine gastric parietal cells. The stimulatory effects of carbamoylcholine (carbachol) and gastrin on parietal cell uptake of ({sup 14}C)aminopyrine were linked to dose- and time-dependent selective reduction in cellular phosphatidylinositol content, although the specific fatty acid composition of the phosphoinositides was not altered. Analysis of ({sup 3}H)inositol phosphates accumulated in cells prelabeled with ({sup 3}H)inositol revealed an increase in labeled inositol trisphosphate by 5 min of incubation with either carbachol or gastrin. Furthermore, after preincubation of parietal cells in medium containing ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate, the two secretagogues elicited a time-dependent decrease in {sup 32}P labeling of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and concomitant increase in labeling of phosphatidic acid. These data demonstrate that the acid secretagogue actions of carbachol and gastrin are correlated with turnover of cellular inositol phospholipids in a preparation consisting predominantly of parietal cells.

  15. Tracking synthesis and turnover of triacylglycerol in leaves

    DOE PAGES

    Tjellstrom, Henrik; Strawsine, Merissa; Ohlrogge, John B.

    2015-01-21

    Triacylglycerol (TAG), typically represents <1% of leaf glycerolipids but can accumulate under stress and other conditions or if leaves are supplied with fatty acids, or in plants transformed with regulators or enzymes of lipid metabolism. To better understand the metabolism of TAG in leaves, pulse-chase radiolabelling experiments were designed to probe its synthesis and turnover. When Arabidopsis leaves were incubated with [14C]lauric acid (12:0), a major initial product was [14C]TAG. Thus, despite low steady-state levels, leaves possess substantial TAG biosynthetic capacity. The contributions of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 and phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 to leaf TAG synthesis were examined by labelling of dgat1 andmore » pdat1 mutants. The dgat1 mutant displayed a major (76%) reduction in [14C]TAG accumulation whereas pdat1 TAG labelling was only slightly reduced. Thus, DGAT1 has a principal role in TAG biosynthesis in young leaves. During a 4h chase period, radioactivity in TAG declined 70%, whereas the turnover of [14C]acyl chains of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and other polar lipids was much lower. Sixty percent of [14C]12:0 was directly incorporated into glycerolipids without modification, whereas 40% was elongated and desaturated to 16:0 and 18:1 by plastids. The unmodified [14C]12:0 and the plastid products of [14C]12:0 metabolism entered different pathways. Although plastid-modified 14C-labelled products accumulated in monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, PC, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diacylglcerol (DAG), there was almost no accumulation of [14C]16:0 and [14C]18:1 in TAG. Lastly, because DAG and acyl-CoA are direct precursors of TAG, the differential labelling of polar glycerolipids and TAG by [14C]12:0 and its plastid-modified products provides evidence for multiple subcellular pools of both acyl-CoA and DAG.« less

  16. Tracking synthesis and turnover of triacylglycerol in leaves.

    PubMed

    Tjellström, Henrik; Strawsine, Merissa; Ohlrogge, John B

    2015-03-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG), typically represents <1% of leaf glycerolipids but can accumulate under stress and other conditions or if leaves are supplied with fatty acids, or in plants transformed with regulators or enzymes of lipid metabolism. To better understand the metabolism of TAG in leaves, pulse-chase radiolabelling experiments were designed to probe its synthesis and turnover. When Arabidopsis leaves were incubated with [(14)C]lauric acid (12:0), a major initial product was [(14)C]TAG. Thus, despite low steady-state levels, leaves possess substantial TAG biosynthetic capacity. The contributions of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 and phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 to leaf TAG synthesis were examined by labelling of dgat1 and pdat1 mutants. The dgat1 mutant displayed a major (76%) reduction in [(14)C]TAG accumulation whereas pdat1 TAG labelling was only slightly reduced. Thus, DGAT1 has a principal role in TAG biosynthesis in young leaves. During a 4h chase period, radioactivity in TAG declined 70%, whereas the turnover of [(14)C]acyl chains of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and other polar lipids was much lower. Sixty percent of [(14)C]12:0 was directly incorporated into glycerolipids without modification, whereas 40% was elongated and desaturated to 16:0 and 18:1 by plastids. The unmodified [(14)C]12:0 and the plastid products of [(14)C]12:0 metabolism entered different pathways. Although plastid-modified (14)C-labelled products accumulated in monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, PC, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diacylglcerol (DAG), there was almost no accumulation of [(14)C]16:0 and [(14)C]18:1 in TAG. Because DAG and acyl-CoA are direct precursors of TAG, the differential labelling of polar glycerolipids and TAG by [(14)C]12:0 and its plastid-modified products provides evidence for multiple subcellular pools of both acyl-CoA and DAG.

  17. Dynamic Aspects of Voluntary Turnover: An Integrated Approach to Curvilinearity in the Performance-Turnover Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William J.; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a…

  18. Dynamic Aspects of Voluntary Turnover: An Integrated Approach to Curvilinearity in the Performance-Turnover Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William J.; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a…

  19. Blood clotting reactions on nanoscale phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James H; Pureza, Vincent; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Sligar, Stephen G; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-01-01

    Blood clotting reactions, such as those catalyzed by the tissue factor:factor VIIa complex (TF:FVIIa), assemble on membrane surfaces containing anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS). In fact, membrane binding is critical for the function of most of the steps in the blood clotting cascade. In spite of this, our understanding of how the membrane contributes to catalysis, or even how these proteins interact with phospholipids, is incomplete. Making matters more complicated, membranes containing mixtures of PS and neutral phospholipids are known to spontaneously form PS-rich membrane microdomains in the presence of plasma concentrations of calcium ions, and it is likely that blood-clotting proteases such as TF:FVIIa partition into these PS-rich microdomains. Unfortunately, little is known about how membrane microdomain composition influences the activity of blood-clotting proteases, which is typically not under experimental control even in "simple" model membranes. Our laboratories have developed and applied new technologies for studying membrane proteins to gain insights into how blood-clotting protease-cofactor pairs assemble and function on membrane surfaces. This includes using a novel, nanoscale bilayer system (Nanodiscs) that permits assembling blood-clotting protease-cofactor pairs on stable bilayers containing from 65 to 250 phospholipid molecules per leaflet. We have used this system to investigate how local (nanometer-scale) changes in phospholipid bilayer composition modulate TF:FVIIa activity. We have also used detailed molecular-dynamics simulations of nanoscale bilayers to provide atomic-scale predictions of how the membrane-binding domain of factor VIIa interacts with PS in membranes.

  20. Blood clotting reactions on nanoscale phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, James H.; Pureza, Vincent; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-01-01

    Blood clotting reactions, such as those catalyzed by the tissue factor/factor VIIa complex (TF:VIIa), assemble on membrane surfaces containing anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS). In fact, membrane binding is critical for the function of most of the steps in the blood clotting cascade. In spite of this, our understanding of how the membrane contributes to catalysis, or even how these proteins interact with phospholipids, is incomplete. Making matters more complicated, membranes containing mixtures of PS and neutral phospholipids are known to spontaneously form PS-rich membrane microdomains in the presence of plasma concentrations of calcium ions, and it is likely that blood clotting proteases such as TF:VIIa partition into these PS-rich microdomains. Unfortunately, little is known about how membrane microdomain composition influences the activity of blood clotting proteases, which is typically not under experimental control even in “simple” model membranes. Our laboratories have developed and applied new technologies for studying membrane proteins to gain insights into how blood clotting protease-cofactor pairs assemble and function on membrane surfaces. This includes using a novel, nanoscale bilayer system (Nanodiscs) that permits assembling blood clotting protease-cofactor pairs on stable bilayers containing from 65 to 250 phospholipid molecules per leaflet. We have used this system to investigate how local (nanometer-scale) changes in phospholipid bilayer composition modulate TF:VIIa activity. We have also used detailed molecular dynamics simulations of nanoscale bilayers to provide atomic-scale predictions of how the membrane-binding domain of factor VIIa interacts with PS in membranes. PMID:18691494

  1. Organization and function of anionic phospholipids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ti-Yu; Weibel, Douglas B

    2016-05-01

    In addition to playing a central role as a permeability barrier for controlling the diffusion of molecules and ions in and out of bacterial cells, phospholipid (PL) membranes regulate the spatial and temporal position and function of membrane proteins that play an essential role in a variety of cellular functions. Based on the very large number of membrane-associated proteins encoded in genomes, an understanding of the role of PLs may be central to understanding bacterial cell biology. This area of microbiology has received considerable attention over the past two decades, and the local enrichment of anionic PLs has emerged as a candidate mechanism for biomolecular organization in bacterial cells. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of anionic PLs in bacteria, including their biosynthesis, subcellular localization, and physiological relevance, discuss evidence and mechanisms for enriching anionic PLs in membranes, and conclude with an assessment of future directions for this area of bacterial biochemistry, biophysics, and cell biology.

  2. Ultrasensitive ROS-Responsive Coassemblies of Tellurium-Containing Molecules and Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Fan, Fuqiang; Cao, Wei; Xu, Huaping

    2015-07-29

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play crucial roles in cell signaling and redox homeostasis and are strongly related to metabolic activities. The increase of the ROS concentration in organisms can result in several diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The concentration of ROS in biologically relevant conditions is typically as low as around tens of micromolars to 100 μM H2O2, which makes it necessary to develop ultrasensitive ROS-responsive systems. A general approach is reported here to fabricate an ultrasensitive ROS-responsive system via coassembly between tellurium-containing molecules and phospholipids, combining the ROS-responsiveness of tellurium and the biocompatibility of phospholipids. By using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and NMR spectra, coassembly behaviors and the responsiveness of the coassemblies have been investigated. These coassemblies can respond to 100 μM H2O2, which is a biologically relevant ROS concentration, and demonstrate reversible redox properties.

  3. Employee Turnover: An Empirical and Methodological Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muchinsky, Paul M.; Tuttle, Mark L.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews research on the prediction of employee turnover. Groups predictor variables into five general categories: attitudinal (job satisfaction), biodata, work-related, personal, and test-score predictors. Consistent relationships between common predictor variables and turnover were found for four categories. Eight methodological problems/issues…

  4. Turnover among nursing home staff. A review.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Mansfield, J

    1997-05-01

    Turnover is especially critical in nursing homes: continuity of care and personal relationships between care-givers and residents are important determinants of quality of care. Additionally, for the cognitively impaired nursing home resident, constant change of staff is bound to aggravate disorientation. Research demonstrates links between turnover and employment/employee characteristics and employment availability.

  5. Principal Turnover. Information Capsule. Volume 0914

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that school districts are facing increasing rates of principal turnover. Frequent principal changes deprive schools of the leadership stability they need to succeed, disrupt long-term school reform efforts, and may even be linked to increased teacher turnover and lower levels of student achievement. This Information Capsule…

  6. Employee Turnover: Evidence from a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borland, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Patterns of employee turnover from a medium-sized law firm in Australia were examined in regard to theories of worker mobility (matching, sectoral shift, and incentive). Results support a role for matching effects, but personnel practices affect the timing of turnover. Matching and incentive-based theories do not explain the high rates of turnover…

  7. Social disadvantage and network turnover.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Research shows that socially disadvantaged groups--especially African Americans and people of low socioeconomic status (SES)--experience more unstable social environments. I argue that this causes higher rates of turnover within their personal social networks. This is a particularly important issue among disadvantaged older adults, who may benefit from stable networks. This article, therefore, examines whether social disadvantage is related to various aspects of personal network change. Social network change was assessed using longitudinal egocentric network data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a study of older adults conducted between 2005 and 2011. Data collection in Wave 2 included a technique for comparing respondents' confidant network rosters between waves. Rates of network losses, deaths, and additions were modeled using multivariate Poisson regression. African Americans and low-SES individuals lost more confidants--especially due to death--than did whites and college-educated respondents. African Americans also added more confidants than whites. However, neither African Americans nor low-SES individuals were able to match confidant losses with new additions to the extent that others did, resulting in higher levels of confidant network shrinkage. These trends are partly, but not entirely, explained by disadvantaged individuals' poorer health and their greater risk of widowhood or marital dissolution. Additional work is needed to shed light on the role played by race- and class-based segregation on group differences in social network turnover. Social gerontologists should examine the role these differences play in explaining the link between social disadvantage and important outcomes in later life, such as health decline. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Social Disadvantage and Network Turnover

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Research shows that socially disadvantaged groups—especially African Americans and people of low socioeconomic status (SES)—experience more unstable social environments. I argue that this causes higher rates of turnover within their personal social networks. This is a particularly important issue among disadvantaged older adults, who may benefit from stable networks. This article, therefore, examines whether social disadvantage is related to various aspects of personal network change. Method. Social network change was assessed using longitudinal egocentric network data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a study of older adults conducted between 2005 and 2011. Data collection in Wave 2 included a technique for comparing respondents’ confidant network rosters between waves. Rates of network losses, deaths, and additions were modeled using multivariate Poisson regression. Results. African Americans and low-SES individuals lost more confidants—especially due to death—than did whites and college-educated respondents. African Americans also added more confidants than whites. However, neither African Americans nor low-SES individuals were able to match confidant losses with new additions to the extent that others did, resulting in higher levels of confidant network shrinkage. These trends are partly, but not entirely, explained by disadvantaged individuals’ poorer health and their greater risk of widowhood or marital dissolution. Discussion. Additional work is needed to shed light on the role played by race- and class-based segregation on group differences in social network turnover. Social gerontologists should examine the role these differences play in explaining the link between social disadvantage and important outcomes in later life, such as health decline. PMID:24997286

  9. [Organizational socialization in the first three years of nursing profession: strategies to decrease turnover intention].

    PubMed

    Tomietto, Marco; Rappogliosi, Cristina Maria; Sartori, Riccardo; Battistelli, Adalgisa

    2014-01-01

    In the first years of nursing profession, new-graduate nurses' turnover intention is a relevant issue due to both the tangible and intangible costs it generates to health care organizations, such as selection and recruitment costs, ward team burden in the onboarding process and the possibility to enhance ward team stability in order to provide an effective and safe nusing care. Organizational socialization is the main factor involved in these dynamics of turnover intention in the first years of nursing profession. This study aims to identify the main factors involved in the organizational socialization process to reduce turnover intention in the first 3 years of nursing profession. 101 new-graduate nurses have been enrolled within the first three years of nursing profession. They have been stratified looking at tenure and years in nursing. Organizational Socialization Inventory scale has been used to assess the onboarding process and 4 items to assess turnover intention. Turnover intention is of 23% in the first year in nursing, and it's over the 26% starting from the second year. The onboarding process explains over the 26% of the variance in turnover intention, and over the 36% in the sub-sample with a stable tenure. Unstable tenured nurses prefer to acquire those competences useful to perform their work, while stable tenure nurses aim to search for professional growth opportunities and integration in the ward-team, in order to reduce turnover intention. Turnover intention is relevant in the first three years of nursing profession. According to the different tenure, different strategies are necessary to plan an effective onboarding process and enhance nursing retention.

  10. Predictors of turnover intention in nurse faculty.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Denise K; Kennerly, Susan

    2011-04-01

    Turnover of nurse faculty is an increasingly important issue in nursing as the available number of qualified faculty continues to decrease. Understanding the factors that contribute to turnover is important to academic administrators to retain and recruit qualified nursing faculty. The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of turnover intention in nurse faculty working in departments and schools of nursing in Carnegie Doctoral/Research Universities-Extensive, public and private, not-for-profit institutions. The multidimensional model of organizational commitment was used to frame this study. The predictor variables explored were organizational climate, organizational commitment, work role balance, role ambiguity, and role conflict. The work roles examined were research, teaching, and service. Logistical regression was performed to examine the predictors of turnover intention. Organizational climate intimacy and disengagement, affective and continuance organizational commitment, and role ambiguity were shown to predict turnover intention in nurse faculty. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Predictors of physical therapy faculty job turnover.

    PubMed

    Radtka, S

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what factors are predictive of job turnover of faculty in physical therapy education programs. Four hundred six physical therapy faculty and 92 academic program directors participated in the study. Data were collected from two questionnaires mailed to the participants. Fifteen predictors of turnover were tested, using correlational and multiple regression analyses for data on faculty and education programs. Findings showed that 10% of the faculty resigned within a 1-year period. Low, but significant, correlations were found between higher turnover and fewer years of employment, behavioral intentions to leave, lower salary, higher job stress, and baccalaureate programs. Multiple regression analysis revealed that education programs with faculty having fewer years of employment and the availability of many job alternatives demonstrated significantly higher turnover. Measures to reduce turnover, including faculty recruitment and retention plans, job redesign strategies, and faculty development programs for new faculty, are recommended.

  12. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Composition of Maternal Diet and Erythrocyte Phospholipid Status in Chilean Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Bascuñán, Karla A.; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Chamorro, Rodrigo; Valencia, Alejandra; Barrera, Cynthia; Puigrredon, Claudia; Sandoval, Jorge; Valenzuela, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Chilean diets are characterized by a low supply of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), which are critical nutrients during pregnancy and lactation, because of their role in brain and visual development. DHA is the most relevant n-3 PUFA in this period. We evaluated the dietary n-3 PUFA intake and erythrocyte phospholipids n-3 PUFA in Chilean pregnant women. Eighty healthy pregnant women (20–36 years old) in the 3rd–6th month of pregnancy were included in the study. Dietary assessment was done applying a food frequency questionnaire, and data were analyzed through the Food Processor SQL® software. Fatty acids of erythrocyte phospholipids were assessed by gas-liquid chromatography. Diet composition was high in saturated fat, low in mono- and PUFA, high in n-6 PUFA (linoleic acid) and low in n-3 PUFA (alpha-linolenic acid and DHA), with imbalance in the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio. Similar results were observed for fatty acids from erythrocyte phospholipids. The sample of Chilean pregnant women showed high consumption of saturated fat and low consumption of n-3 PUFA, which is reflected in the low DHA content of erythrocyte phospholipids. Imbalance between n-6/n-3 PUFA could negatively affect fetal development. New strategies are necessary to improve n-3 PUFA intake throughout pregnancy and breast feeding periods. Furthermore, it is necessary to develop dietary interventions to improve the quality of consumed foods with particular emphasis on n-3 PUFA. PMID:25386693

  13. Plasma membrane fluidity affects transient immobilization of oxidized phospholipids in endocytotic sites for subsequent uptake.

    PubMed

    Rhode, Sebastian; Grurl, Reinhard; Brameshuber, Mario; Hermetter, Albin; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2009-01-23

    Oxidized phospholipids in serum initiate severe pathophysiological responses during the process of atherogenesis. On the cellular level it is known that these lipids induce apoptosis; however, the uptake mechanism remains enigmatic. We investigated here the behavior of the fluorescent oxidized phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-N-Alexa647-ethanolamine (PGPE-Alexa647) in the plasma membrane of various cell lines. The probe was taken up by the cells unspecifically via caveolae or clathrin-coated pits. Interestingly, we found the uptake to be facilitated by the overexpression of the scavenger receptor class B type I. Ultra-sensitive microscopy allowed us to follow the uptake process at the single molecule level; we observed rapid diffusion of PGPE-Alexa647 in the plasma membrane, interrupted by transient halts with duration of approximately 0.9 s at endocytotic sites. Scavenger receptor class B type I overexpression yielded a pronounced increase in the single molecule mobility, and in consequence an increased frequency of immobilization. Alternatively, the plasma membrane fluidity could also be increased by treating cells with high levels of the unlabeled oxidized phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; also in this case, the immobilization frequency of PGPE-Alexa647 was concomitantly increased. The data demonstrate the relevance of plasma membrane properties for uptake of oxidized phospholipids, and indicate a novel indirect mechanism for the control of endocytosis.

  14. Local anesthetics structure-dependently interact with anionic phospholipid membranes to modify the fluidity.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-01-05

    While bupivacaine is more cardiotoxic than other local anesthetics, the mechanistic background for different toxic effects remains unclear. Several cardiotoxic compounds act on lipid bilayers to change the physicochemical properties of membranes. We comparatively studied the interaction of local anesthetics with lipid membranous systems which might be related to their structure-selective cardiotoxicity. Amide local anesthetics (10-300 microM) were reacted with unilamellar vesicles which were prepared with different phospholipids and cholesterol of varying lipid compositions. They were compared on the potencies to modify membrane fluidity by measuring fluorescence polarization. Local anesthetics interacted with liposomal membranes to increase the fluidity. Increasing anionic phospholipids in membranes enhanced the membrane-fluidizing effects of local anesthetics with the potency being cardiolipin>phosphatidic acid>phosphatidylglycerol>phosphatidylserine. Cardiolipin was most effective on bupivacaine, followed by ropivacaine. Local anesthetics interacted differently with biomimetic membranes consisting of 10mol% cardiolipin, 50mol% other phospholipids and 40mol% cholesterol with the potency being bupivacaine>ropivacaine>lidocaine>prilocaine, which agreed with the rank order of cardiotoxicity. Bupivacaine significantly fluidized 2.5-12.5mol% cardiolipin-containing membranes at cardiotoxicologically relevant concentrations. Bupivacaine is considered to affect lipid bilayers by interacting electrostatically with negatively charged cardiolipin head groups and hydrophobically with phospholipid acyl chains. The structure-dependent interaction with lipid membranes containing cardiolipin, which is preferentially localized in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes, may be a mechanistic clue to explain the structure-selective cardiotoxicity of local anesthetics.

  15. Relevancy 101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Newman, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Where we present an overview on why relevancy is a problem, how important it is and how we can improve it. The topic of relevancy is becoming increasingly important in earth data discovery as our audience is tuned to the accuracy of standard search engines like Google.

  16. A structural equation model of turnover for a longitudinal survey among early career registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Carol S; Chao, Ying-Yu; Colder, Craig R; Kovner, Christine T; Chacko, Thomas P

    2015-11-01

    because of its costs and related outcomes. The relevant strength and relationships of these key turnover predictors will be informative to employers for prioritizing strategies to retain their registered nurse workforce. We need more research on programs that implement changes in the work environment that impact these two outcomes, as well as research that focuses on the relevant strength or impact to help administrators prioritize translation of results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Interaction of isopropylthioxanthone with phospholipid liposomes.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Stevanato, Roberto

    2007-04-01

    Isopropylthioxanthone (ITX) is a highly lipophilic molecule which can be released in foods and beverages from the packages, where it is present as photoinitiator of inks in printing processes. Recently it was found in babies milk, and its toxicity cannot be excluded. The structure of the molecule suggests a possible strong interaction with the lipid moiety of biological membranes, and this is the first study of its effects on phospholipid organization, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and spin labelling techniques. The data obtained with multilamellar liposomes of saturated phospholipids of different length, with and without cholesterol, point out that the molecule changes the lipid structure; in particular, in the gel state, behaving like a disordering agent it increases the mobility of the bilayer, while, in the fluid state, tends to rigidify the membrane, in a cholesterol like way. This behavior supports the hypothesis that ITX experiences a relocation process when the lipid matrix passes from the gel to the fluid state.

  18. Phospholipid Bilayers: Stability and Encapsulation of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Elnaz; Halverson, Duncan; McWhirter, Samantha; Walker, Gilbert C.

    2017-05-01

    Nanoparticles are widely studied for their potential medical uses in diagnostics and therapeutics. The interface between a nanoparticle and its target has been a focus of research, both to guide the nanoparticle and to prevent it from deactivating. Given nature's frequent use of phospholipid vesicles as carriers, much attention has been paid to phospholipids as a vehicle for drug delivery. The physical chemistry of bilayer formation and nanoparticle encapsulation is complex, touching on fundamental properties of hydrophobicity. Understanding the design rules for particle synthesis and encapsulation is an active area of research. The aim of this review is to provide a perspective on what preparative guideposts have been empirically discovered and how these are related to theoretical understanding. In addition, we aim to summarize how modern theory is beginning to help guide the design of functional particles that can effectively cross biological membranes.

  19. Colorimetric estimation of phospholipids in aqueous dispersions.

    PubMed

    Hallen, R M

    1980-05-01

    A method for the estimation of phospholipids in aqueous dispersions is described. The method is based on the formation of a lipid-molybdenum blue complex, which is extracted into chloroform from the aqueous phase. Phosphate ions, detergents, proteins, neutral lipids and various other ions do not interfere in the lipid estimation. The method is sensitive down to a lipid concentration of 0.1 mumol/ml, with an accuracy better than +/- 3%.

  20. Visualization of Ca2+-Induced Phospholipid Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverstick, Doris M.; Glaser, Michael

    1987-07-01

    Large vesicles (5-15 μ m) were formed by hydrating a dried lipid film containing phospholipids labeled with a fluorophore in one fatty acid chain. By using a fluorescence microscope attached to a low-light-intensity charge-coupled-device camera and digital-image processor, the vesicles were easily viewed and initially showed uniform fluorescence intensity across the surface. The fluorescence pattern of vesicles made with a fluorophore attached to phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine was unaffected by the presence of divalent cations such as Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, or Cd2+. The fluorescence pattern of vesicles containing a fluorophore attached to the acidic phospholipids phosphatidylserine or phosphatidic acid showed distinct differences when treated with Ca2+ or Cd2+, although they were unaffected by Mg2+, Mn2+, or Zn2+. Treatment with 2.0 mM Ca2+ or Cd2+ resulted in the movement of the fluorophore to a single large patch on the surface of the vesicle. When vesicles were formed in the presence of 33 mol% cholesterol, patching was seen at a slightly lower Ca2+ concentration (1.0 mM). The possibility of interactions between Ca2+ and acidic phospholipids in plasma membranes was investigated by labeling erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts with fluorescent phosphatidic acid. When Ca2+ was added, multiple (five or six) small patches were seen per individual cell. The same pattern was observed when vesicles formed from whole lipid extracts of erythrocytes were labeled with fluorescent phosphatidic acid and then treated with Ca2+. This shows that the size and distribution of the Ca2+-induced domains depend on phospholipid composition.

  1. RNA turnover in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, B; Czichos, J; Overath, P

    1987-01-01

    Regulation of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) mRNA turnover in Trypanosoma brucei was studied in bloodstream forms, in procyclic cells, and during in vitro transformation of bloodstream forms to procyclic cells by approach-to-equilibrium labeling and pulse-chase experiments. Upon initiation of transformation at 27 degrees C in the presence of citrate-cis-aconitate, the half-life of VSG mRNA was reduced from 4.5 h in bloodstream forms to 1.2 h in transforming cells. Concomitantly, an approximately 25-fold decrease in the rate of transcription was observed, resulting in a 100-fold reduction in the steady-state level of de novo-synthesized VSG mRNA. This low level of expression was maintained for at least 7 h, finally decreasing to an undetectable level after 24 h. Transcription of the VSG gene in established procyclic cells was undetectable. For comparison, the turnover of polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated RNA, beta-tubulin mRNA, and mini-exon-derived RNA (medRNA) was studied. For medRNA, no significant changes in the rate of transcription or stability were observed during differentiation. In contrast, while the rate of transcription of beta-tubulin mRNA in in vitro-cultured bloodstream forms, transforming cells, and established procyclic cells was similar, the half life was four to five times longer in procyclic cells (t1/2, 7 h) than in cultured bloodstream forms (t1/2, 1.4 h) or transforming cells (t1/2, 1.7 h). Inhibition of protein synthesis in bloodstream forms at 37 degrees Celsius caused a dramatic 20-fold decrease in the rate of VSG mRNA synthesis and a 6-fold decrease in half-life to 45 min, while beta-tubulin mRNA was stabilized 2- to 3-fold and mRNA stability remained unaffected. It is postulated that triggering transformation or inhibiting protein synthesis induces changes in the abundance of the same regulatory molecules which effect the shutoff of VSG gene transcription in addition to shortening the half-life of VSG mRNA. Images PMID:2436040

  2. The island-mainland species turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Yoel E; Losos, Jonathan B; Algar, Adam C

    2012-10-07

    Many oceanic islands are notable for their high endemism, suggesting that islands may promote unique assembly processes. However, mainland assemblages sometimes harbour comparable levels of endemism, suggesting that island biotas may not be as unique as is often assumed. Here, we test the uniqueness of island biotic assembly by comparing the rate of species turnover among islands and the mainland, after accounting for distance decay and environmental gradients. We modelled species turnover as a function of geographical and environmental distance for mainland (M-M) communities of Anolis lizards and Terrarana frogs, two clades that have diversified extensively on Caribbean islands and the mainland Neotropics. We compared mainland-island (M-I) and island-island (I-I) species turnover with predictions of the M-M model. If island assembly is not unique, then the M-M model should successfully predict M-I and I-I turnover, given geographical and environmental distance. We found that M-I turnover and, to a lesser extent, I-I turnover were significantly higher than predicted for both clades. Thus, in the first quantitative comparison of mainland-island species turnover, we confirm the long-held but untested assumption that island assemblages accumulate biodiversity differently than their mainland counterparts.

  3. Phylogenomic investigation of phospholipid synthesis in archaea.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Jonathan; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2012-01-01

    Archaea have idiosyncratic cell membranes usually based on phospholipids containing glycerol-1-phosphate linked by ether bonds to isoprenoid lateral chains. Since these phospholipids strongly differ from those of bacteria and eukaryotes, the origin of the archaeal membranes (and by extension, of all cellular membranes) was enigmatic and called for accurate evolutionary studies. In this paper we review some recent phylogenomic studies that have revealed a modified mevalonate pathway for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors in archaea and suggested that this domain uses an atypical pathway of synthesis of fatty acids devoid of any acyl carrier protein, which is essential for this activity in bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition, we show new or updated phylogenetic analyses of enzymes likely responsible for the isoprenoid chain synthesis from their precursors and the phospholipid synthesis from glycerol phosphate, isoprenoids, and polar head groups. These results support that most of these enzymes can be traced back to the last archaeal common ancestor and, in many cases, even to the last common ancestor of all living organisms.

  4. Phospholipid nanodisc engineering for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Biocompatible mesoscale nanoparticles (5-100 nm in diameter) are attractive tools for drug delivery. Among them are several types of liposomes and polymer micelles already in clinical trial or use. Generally, biocompatibility of such particles is achieved by coating them with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Without PEG coating, particles are quickly trapped in the reticuloendothelial system when intravenously administered. However, recent studies have revealed several potential problems with PEG coating, including antigenicity and restriction of cellular uptake. This has motivated the development of alternative drug and gene delivery vehicles, including chemically and genetically engineered high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-like nanodiscs or "bicelles". HDL is a naturally occurring mesoscale nanoparticle that normally ferries cholesterol around in the body. Its initial "nascent" form is thought to be a simple 10 nm disc of phospholipids in a bilayer, and can be easily synthesized in vitro by mixing recombinant apoA-I proteins with various phospholipids. In this review, the use of synthetic HDL-like phospholipid nanodiscs as biocompatible drug carriers is summarized, focussing on manufacturing, size-control, drug loading and cell targeting. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Cholesterol autoxidation in phospholipid membrane bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sevanian, A.; McLeod, L.L.

    1987-09-01

    Lipid peroxidation in unilamellar liposomes of known cholesterol-phospholipid composition was monitored under conditions of autoxidation or as induced by a superoxide radical generating system, gamma-irradiation or cumene hydroperoxide. Formation of cholesterol oxidation products was indexed to the level of lipid peroxidation. The major cholesterol oxidation products identified were 7-keto-cholesterol, isomeric cholesterol 5,6-epoxides, isomeric 7-hydroperoxides and isomeric 3,7-cholestane diols. Other commonly encountered products included 3,5-cholestadiene-7-one and cholestane-3 beta, 5 alpha, 6 beta-triol. Superoxide-dependent peroxidation required iron and produced a gradual increase in 7-keto-cholesterol and cholesterol epoxides. Cholesterol oxidation was greatest in liposomes containing high proportions of unsaturated phospholipid to cholesterol (4:1 molar ratio), intermediate with low phospholipid to cholesterol ratios (2:1) and least in liposomes prepared with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. This relationship held regardless of the oxidizing conditions used. Cumene hydroperoxide-dependent lipid peroxidation and/or more prolonged oxidations with other oxidizing systems yielded a variety of products where cholesterol-5 beta,6 beta-epoxide, 7-ketocholesterol and the 7-hydroperoxides were most consistently elevated. Oxyradical initiation of lipid peroxidation produced a pattern of cholesterol oxidation products distinguishable from the pattern derived by cumene hydroperoxide-dependent peroxidation.

  6. Nursing home spending, staffing, and turnover.

    PubMed

    Kash, Bita A; Castle, Nicholas G; Phillips, Charles D

    2007-01-01

    Recent work on nursing home staffing and turnover has stressed the importance of ownership and resources. However, few studies have examined spending behaviors, which might also influence staffing levels and staff turnover rates. This study investigates whether spending behaviors measured by financial ratios are associated with staffing levels and staff turnover in nursing homes. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 1,014 Texas homes. Data were from the 2002 Texas Nursing Facility Medicaid Cost Report and the 2003 Area Resource File. First, we examined differences in financial ratios by ownership type. Next, the effect of 10 financial ratios on staffing levels and turnover rates for registered nurses, licensed vocational nurses, and certified nursing assistants was examined using robust regression models. Descriptive data indicated that expense ratios related to resident care activities and staff development were significantly higher among not-for-profit than for-profit homes. Higher profits were associated with lower staffing levels, but not higher turnover rates. Administrative expenses (a measure of management capacity) had a negative impact both on staffing levels and staff turnover for licensed vocational nurses and certified nursing assistants, but they did not affect registered nurse staffing. Employee benefit expenses exhibited a positive impact on registered nurse and licensed vocational nurse staffing levels. The addition of information on financial ratios to models predicting staffing indicators reduced the effect of ownership on these indicators. Solutions to the staffing and turnover problem should focus on more effective management practices. Certain levels of administrative and staff benefit expenses may be necessary to improve professional staff recruitment and reduce both staffing and turnover costs. Differences in these financial ratios may partially explain the role played by ownership in determining staffing levels and turnover.

  7. Bone turnover after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Melo, Thalita Lima; Froeder, Leila; Baia, Leandro da Cunha; Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate parameters of bone and mineral metabolism after bariatric surgery. This sectional study included data from medical records from 61 bariatric surgery (BS) patients (minimum period of 6 months after the procedure) and from 30 class II and III obese patients as a control group (Cont), consisting of daily dietary intake of macronutrients, calcium and sodium, serum 25(OH)D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) and other biochemical serum and urinary parameters. Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), leptin, fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and deoxypyridinoline (DPYD) were determined from available banked serum and urinary samples. Mean body mass index (BMI), median energy, carbohydrate, protein and sodium chloride consumption were significantly lower in the BS versus Cont, but calcium and lipids were not. No significant differences were found in ionized calcium, 25(OH)D, PTH and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) between groups. Mean serum BAP was significantly higher for BS versus Cont and had a positive correlation with time after the surgical procedure. Mean serum leptin was significantly lower and median urinary DPYD higher in BS versus Cont. The present study showed an increase in bone markers of both bone formation and resorption among bariatric patients up to more than 7 years after the surgical procedure, suggesting that an increased bone turnover persists even at a very long-term follow-up in such patients.

  8. Antidiabetic phospholipid-nuclear receptor complex reveals the mechanism for phospholipid-driven gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Musille, Paul M; Pathak, Manish C; Lauer, Janelle L; Hudson, William H; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2013-01-31

    The human nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) has an important role in controlling lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and is a potential target for the treatment of diabetes and hepatic diseases. LRH-1 is known to bind phospholipids, but the role of phospholipids in controlling LRH-1 activation remains highly debated. Here we describe the structure of both apo LRH-1 and LRH-1 in complex with the antidiabetic phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS and functional data, our studies show that DLPC binding is a dynamic process that alters co-regulator selectivity. We show that the lipid-free receptor undergoes previously unrecognized structural fluctuations, allowing it to interact with widely expressed co-repressors. These observations enhance our understanding of LRH-1 regulation and highlight its importance as a new therapeutic target for controlling diabetes.

  9. The longitudinal study of turnover and the cost of turnover in EMS

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Jones, Cheryl B.; Hubble, Michael W.; Carr, Matthew; Weaver, Matthew D.; Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have examined employee turnover and associated costs in emergency medical services (EMS). The purpose of this study was to quantify the mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination in a diverse sample of EMS agencies. Methods A convenience sample of 40 EMS agencies was followed over a 6 month period. Internet, telephone, and on-site data collection methods were used to document terminations, new hires, open positions, and costs associated with turnover. The cost associated with turnover was calculated based on a modified version of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology (NTCCM). The NTCCM identified direct and indirect costs through a series of questions that agency administrators answered monthly during the study period. A previously tested measure of turnover to calculate the mean annual rate of turnover was used. All calculations were weighted by the size of the EMS agency roster. The mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination were determined for 3 categories of agency staff mix: all paid staff, mix of paid and volunteer (mixed), and all-volunteer. Results The overall weighted mean annual rate of turnover was 10.7%. This rate varied slightly across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=10.2%, mixed=12.3%, all-volunteer=12.4%). Among agencies that experienced turnover (n=25), the weighted median cost of turnover was $71,613.75, which varied across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=$86,452.05, mixed=$9,766.65, and all-volunteer=$0). The weighted median cost per termination was $6,871.51 and varied across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=$7,161.38, mixed=$1,409.64, and all-volunteer=$0). Conclusions Annual rates of turnover and costs associated with turnover vary widely across types of EMS agencies. The study’s mean annual rate of turnover was lower than expected based on information appearing in the news media and EMS trade magazines. Findings

  10. The longitudinal study of turnover and the cost of turnover in emergency medical services.

    PubMed

    Patterson, P Daniel; Jones, Cheryl B; Hubble, Michael W; Carr, Matthew; Weaver, Matthew D; Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined employee turnover and associated costs in emergency medical services (EMS). To quantify the mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination in a diverse sample of EMS agencies. A convenience sample of 40 EMS agencies was followed over a six-month period. Internet, telephone, and on-site data-collection methods were used to document terminations, new hires, open positions, and costs associated with turnover. The cost associated with turnover was calculated based on a modified version of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology (NTCCM). The NTCCM identified direct and indirect costs through a series of questions that agency administrators answered monthly during the study period. A previously tested measure of turnover to calculate the mean annual rate of turnover was used. All calculations were weighted by the size of the EMS agency roster. The mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination were determined for three categories of agency staff mix: all-paid staff, mix of paid and volunteer (mixed) staff, and all-volunteer staff. The overall weighted mean annual rate of turnover was 10.7%. This rate varied slightly across agency staffing mix (all-paid = 10.2%, mixed = 12.3%, all-volunteer = 12.4%). Among agencies that experienced turnover (n = 25), the weighted median cost of turnover was $71,613.75, which varied across agency staffing mix (all-paid = $86,452.05, mixed = $9,766.65, and all-volunteer = $0). The weighted median cost per termination was $6,871.51 and varied across agency staffing mix (all-paid = $7,161.38, mixed = $1,409.64, and all-volunteer = $0). Annual rates of turnover and costs associated with turnover vary widely across types of EMS agencies. The study's mean annual rate of turnover was lower than expected based on information appearing in the news media and EMS trade magazines. Findings provide estimates of two key

  11. The herpes simplex virus 1 U{sub S}3 regulates phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, Peter; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Sonda, Sabrina; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt

    2012-10-25

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear and Golgi membranes for envelopment by phospholipid bilayers. In the absence of U{sub S}3, nuclear membranes form multiple folds harboring virions that suggests disturbance in membrane turnover. Therefore, we investigated phospholipid metabolism in cells infected with the U{sub S}3 deletion mutant R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), and quantified membranes involved in viral envelopment. We report that (i) [{sup 3}H]-choline incorporation into nuclear membranes and cytoplasmic membranes was enhanced peaking at 12 or 20 h post inoculation with wild type HSV-1 and R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), respectively, (ii) the surface area of nuclear membranes increased until 24 h of R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection forming folds that equaled {approx}45% of the nuclear surface, (iii) the surface area of viral envelopes between nuclear membranes equaled {approx}2400 R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) virions per cell, and (iv) during R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection, the Golgi complex expanded dramatically. The data indicate that U{sub S}3 plays a significant role in regulation of membrane biosynthesis.

  12. Modulation of phospholipid metabolism in murine keratinocytes by tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Galey, C.I.; Ziboh, V.A.; Marcelo, C.L.; Voorhees, J.J.

    1985-10-01

    The possibility that phospholipid deacylation may be a critical event in the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-associated effects on mouse skin prompted us to examine in vitro the effects of TPA on arachidonic acid metabolism in neonatal mouse keratinocytes. Three-day old neonatal keratinocytes were prelabeled with ( UC)arachidonic acid (( UC)AA) and ( UC) stearic acid (( UC)ST) and used to characterize the lipases that were activated when these cells were treated with TPA in culture. Data from these studies demonstrate that phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) are the major phospholipids that undergo early hydrolysis to release arachidonic acid when challenged by TPA. Of particular interest was the novel observation of the hydrolysis of UC-labeled PI in these keratinocytes, the accumulation of ( UC)1,2-diacylglyceride and the lack of the ( UC)diacylglyceride phosphorylation to form ( UC)phosphatidic acid. This lack of ( UC) phosphatidic accumulation implied that although TPA enhanced the hydrolysis of ( UC)PI resulting in increased ( UC)diacylglyceride it did not enhance the resynthesis of the ( UC)PI via the phosphorylation of the ( UC)diacylglyceride. Therefore, TPA probably is not involved in the turnover of PI in these cells but is involved in the activation of PC hydrolyzing phospholipase A2 and PI hydrolyzing phospholipase C in these keratinocytes releasing arachidonic acid which then undergoes oxygenation reactions to provide biologically active eicosanoids.

  13. Photoelectric currents across planar bilayer membranes containing bacterial reaction centers. Response under conditions of single electron turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Packham, N K; Dutton, P L; Mueller, P

    1982-01-01

    Light-induced electric current and potential responses have been measured across planar phospholipid membranes containing reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Under conditions in which the reaction centers are restricted to a single electron turnover, the responses can be correlated with the light-induced electron transfer reactions associated with the reaction center. The results indicate that electron transfer from the bacteriochlorophyll dimer to the primary ubiquinone molecule, and from ferrocytochrome c to the oxidized dimer occur in series across the planar membrane. Electron transfer from the primary to secondary ubiquinone molecule is not electrogenic. PMID:6277403

  14. Phospholipase D catalyzes phospholipid metabolism in chemotactic peptide-stimulated HL-60 granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, J.K.; Siegel, M.I.; Egan, R.W.; Billah, M.M.

    1988-09-05

    There exists circumstantial evidence for activation of phospholipase D (PLD) in intact cells. However, because of the complexity of phospholipid remodeling processes, it is essential to distinguish PLD clearly from other phospholipases and phospholipid remodeling enzymes. Therefore, to establish unequivocally PLD activity in dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 granulocytes, to demonstrate the relative contribution of PLD to phospholipid turnover, and to validate the hypothesis that the formation of phosphatidylethanol is an expression of PLD-catalyzed transphosphatidylation, we have developed methodologies to label HL-60 granulocytes in 1-O-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-PC) with 32P without labeling cellular ATP. These methodologies involve (a) synthesis of alkyl-lysoPC containing 32P by a combination of enzymatic and chemical procedures and (b) incubation of HL-60 granulocytes with this alkyl-(32P) lysoPC which enters the cell and becomes acylated into membrane-associated alkyl-(32P)PC. Upon stimulation of these 32P-labeled cells with the chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP), alkyl-(32P)phosphatidic acid (alkyl-(32P)PA) is formed rapidly. Because, under these conditions, cellular ATP has not been labeled with 32P, alkyl-(32P)PA must be formed via PLD-catalyzed hydrolysis of alkyl-(32P)PC at the terminal phosphodiester bond. This result conclusively demonstrates fMLP-induced activation of PLD in HL-60 granulocytes. These 32P-labeled HL-60 granulocytes have also been stimulated in the presence of ethanol to produce alkyl-(32P)phosphatidylethanol (alkyl-(32P)PEt). Formation of alkyl-(32P)PEt parallels that of alkyl-(32P)PA with respect to time course, fMLP concentration, inhibition by a specific fMLP antagonist (t-butoxycarbonyl-Met-Leu-Phe), and Ca2+ concentration.

  15. Dynamic structure of stock communities: a comparative study between stock returns and turnover rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Li-Ling; Jiang, Xiong-Fei; Li, Sai-Ping; Zhong, Li-Xin; Ren, Fei

    2017-07-01

    The detection of community structure in stock market is of theoretical and practical significance for the study of financial dynamics and portfolio risk estimation. We here study the community structures in Chinese stock markets from the aspects of both price returns and turnover rates, by using a combination of the PMFG and infomap methods based on a distance matrix. An empirical study using the overall data set shows that for both returns and turnover rates the largest communities are composed of specific industrial or conceptional sectors and the correlation inside a sector is generally larger than the correlation between different sectors. However, the community structure for turnover rates is more complex than that for returns, which indicates that the interactions between stocks revealed by turnover rates may contain more information. This conclusion is further confirmed by the analysis of the changes in the dynamics of community structures over five sub-periods. Sectors like banks, real estate, health care and New Shanghai take turns to comprise a few of the largest communities in different sub-periods, and more interestingly several specific sectors appear in the communities with different rank orders for returns and turnover rates even in the same sub-period. To better understand their differences, a comparison between the evolution of the returns and turnover rates of the stocks from these sectors is conducted. We find that stock prices only had large changes around important events while turnover rates surged after each of these events relevant to specific sectors, which shows strong evidence that the turnover rates are more susceptible to exogenous shocks than returns and its measurement for community detection may contain more useful information about market structure.

  16. Coping with Turnovers in School Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannell, Dorothy V.

    1988-01-01

    Labor shortages, cost increases, and turnover have prompted Fairfax County Schools, Virginia, food service managers to offer training programs and recruitment bonuses, to use more convenience foods, and to price out every service. (MLF)

  17. Regulation of Phospholipid Synthesis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Carman, George M.; Han, Gil-Soo

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with its full complement of organelles, synthesizes membrane phospholipids by pathways that are generally common to those found in higher eukaryotes. Phospholipid synthesis in yeast is regulated in response to a variety of growth conditions (e.g., inositol supplementation, zinc depletion, and growth stage) by a coordination of genetic (e.g., transcriptional activation and repression) and biochemical (e.g., activity modulation and localization) mechanisms. Phosphatidate (PA), whose cellular levels are controlled by the activities of key phospholipid synthesis enzymes, plays a central role in the transcriptional regulation of phospholipid synthesis genes. In addition to the regulation of gene expression, phosphorylation of key phospholipid synthesis catalytic and regulatory proteins controls the metabolism of phospholipid precursors and products. PMID:21275641

  18. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  19. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Carman, George M; Han, Gil-Soo

    2011-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with its full complement of organelles, synthesizes membrane phospholipids by pathways that are generally common to those found in higher eukaryotes. Phospholipid synthesis in yeast is regulated in response to a variety of growth conditions (e.g., inositol supplementation, zinc depletion, and growth stage) by a coordination of genetic (e.g., transcriptional activation and repression) and biochemical (e.g., activity modulation and localization) mechanisms. Phosphatidate (PA), whose cellular levels are controlled by the activities of key phospholipid synthesis enzymes, plays a central role in the transcriptional regulation of phospholipid synthesis genes. In addition to the regulation of gene expression, phosphorylation of key phospholipid synthesis catalytic and regulatory proteins controls the metabolism of phospholipid precursors and products.

  20. The Lantibiotic Nisin Induces Transmembrane Movement of a Fluorescent Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Gert N.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Nisin is a pore-forming antimicrobial peptide. The capacity of nisin to induce transmembrane movement of a fluorescent phospholipid in lipid vesicles was investigated. Unilamellar phospholipid vesicles that contained a fluorescent phospholipid (1-acyl-2-{6-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]caproyl}-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in the inner leaflet of the bilayer were used. Nisin-induced movement of the fluorescent phospholipid from the inner leaflet to the outer leaflet of the membrane reached stable levels, which were dependent on the concentration of nisin added. The rate constant k of this nisin-induced transmembrane movement increased with the nisin concentration but was not dependent on temperature within the range of 5 to 30°C. In contrast, the rate constant of movement of fluorescent phospholipid from vesicle to vesicle strongly depended on temperature. The data indicate that nisin transiently disturbs the phospholipid organization of the target membrane. PMID:9852000

  1. Expanding the scope of the turnover flap.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Avir; Spears, Julie; Newsome, Edward; McCampbell, Beth; Kiran, Ravi; Mitra, Amit

    2006-07-01

    Turnover flaps are often utilized as alternatives to more traditional flaps, especially in situations where traditional flap viability is limited. Most turnover flaps are currently used in the lower extremities. This study examined the senior author's use of the turnover flap in 103 cases between 1987 and 2004. Postoperative follow-up ranged from 3 months to 10 years, with an average follow-up of 9 months. The majority (n = 90) of the cases involved the lower extremities and carried high success rates; there were 72 successful operations (complete graft take), 10 partial flap losses (partial graft take that could be treated postoperatively without surgery), and eight complete flap losses (no graft take and the necessity of additional surgery). Three of the partial flap losses and two of the complete flap losses involved patients with end-stage vascular disease. End-stage vascular disease cases represented 20.0 percent of the lower extremity cases and carried a significantly higher percentage of partial or complete flap loss (27.8 percent). These circumstances were examined in detail; the authors found that the turnover flap provided improved outcome to such end-stage patients who otherwise would have undergone amputation. In 13 cases, turnover flaps were utilized in nontraditional regions, such as the chest wall, abdominal wall, head and neck region, and upper extremities, with a high degree of success (zero partial or complete flap losses). These approaches are discussed in detail. The surgical approach is examined with recommendations regarding preferred wound size and type and overall flap design. This study indicates that turnover flaps are effective and useful as an alternative and, in some cases, primary procedure. In addition, the results serve to expand the present scope of the turnover flap by examining nontraditional regions in which the flap was highly successful. The authors believe the turnover flap should be given higher priority as a reconstructive

  2. [Energy turnover of water bugs].

    PubMed

    Waitzbauer, Wolfgang

    1976-06-01

    1. This study concerns the energy turnover of the water bug species Naucoris cimicoides (Naucoridae), Notonecta glauca (Notonectidae) and Ranatra linearis (Nepidae). The results refer to the conditions in the reed belt of the lake "Neusiedler See" in eastern Austria. 2. Population density was, using various methods, quantitatively determined for each test species. In summer the values were as follows: Naucoris 8, Notonecta 2 and Ranatra 0.5 individuals per m(2) in the closed reed belt. Abundance in the next spring was a halving of the initial values due to an increase in the death rate of males in winter. Generally, mortality was very high; the highest death rate for all species occurred in the first two larval stages. The total mortality, beginning at emergence and continuing until immediately after oviposition, was determined to be 91% for Naucoris, 97% for Notonecta and 99% for Ranatra. 3. Production of an average male was 211.45 cal (Naucoris), 243.24 cal (Notonecta) and 256.26 cal (Ranatra) for the entire life span. The production values determined for average females until oviposition are 316.87 cal (Naucoris), 300.79 cal (Notonecta) and 559.51 cal (Ranatra). 53.89 cal (Naucoris), 73.35 cal (Notonecta) and 264.66 cal (Ranatra) are needed for egg production. 4. Respiration was determined by volumetric measurement for all developmental stages and the imago at different times of the year. From emergence until death the following spring the O2-consumption of an average individual was determined as 129.27 cal (♂), 156.45 cal (♀) for Naucoris, 690.66 cal (♂), 882.04 cal (♀) for Notonecta and 548.30 cal (♂), 589.16 cal (♀) for Ranatra. 5. Assimilation was calculated from production and respiration (A=P+R) for all larval and mature stages. Assimilation was determined as 340.72 cal (♂), 419.43 cal (♀) for Naucoris, 933.90 cal (♂), 1109.48 cal (♀) for Notonecta and 804.56 cal (♂), 884.01 cal (♀) for Ranatra, (cumulative values). 6. Since the

  3. Phospholipid methylation in starfish spermatozoa is linked to sperm chemoattraction.

    PubMed Central

    Tezon, J; Miller, R L; Bardin, C W

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism whereby ovarian peptides cause sperm attraction was studied in the starfish. Phospholipid methylation and protein-O-carboxyl methylation, reactions linked to chemotactic responses in a variety of systems, were studied in starfish sperm. When sperm were preincubated with [methyl-3H]methionine and then exposed to the attractant, a rapid drop in radioactivity occurred in the phospholipid fraction. Methylated phospholipids decreased by 90% in the first 2 sec; however, no change was observed in endogenous methylation of protein carboxyl groups. The effect on phospholipid methylation was dose dependent, with a 40% reduction in radioactive phospholipids in sperm occurring with the minimal amount of attractant necessary to obtain a positive response in a sperm attraction bioassay. Attractants from species of starfish with little or no cross-reactivity in the bioassay had a limited effect on phospholipid methylation. The transmethylase inhibitor, homocysteine, caused a marked decrease in the accumulation of methylated phospholipids under basal conditions, which was correlated with as much as a 50-fold increase in sperm sensitivity to the attractant. The addition of chemoattractant resulted in a reduction in the amount of all individual methylated phospholipids, but the amount of phosphatidylmono[3H]methylethanolamine relative to the other methylated phospholipid decreased by a factor of 4 after stimulation. Homocysteine had the same effect. The reduction in methylated phospholipids by attractants suggests that phospholipid methylation is linked to the mechanism of action of these peptides. Methylation of phospholipids may play a role in the rapid desensitization of sperm cells to the attractant, which would be required for the orientation of the spermatozoa in the gradient of ovarian peptide. PMID:3459145

  4. The costs of nurse turnover, part 2: application of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2005-01-01

    This is the second article in a 2-part series focusing on nurse turnover and its costs. Part 1 (December 2004) described nurse turnover costs within the context of human capital theory, and using human resource accounting methods, presented the updated Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. Part 2 presents an application of this method in an acute care setting and the estimated costs of nurse turnover that were derived. Administrators and researchers can use these methods and cost information to build a business case for nurse retention.

  5. Spatial turnover in the global avifauna

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kevin J; Davies, Richard G; Orme, C. David L; Olson, Valerie A; Thomas, Gavin H; Ding, Tzung-Su; Rasmussen, Pamela C; Lennon, Jack J; Bennett, Peter M; Owens, Ian P.F; Blackburn, Tim M

    2007-01-01

    Despite its wide implications for many ecological issues, the global pattern of spatial turnover in the occurrence of species has been little studied, unlike the global pattern of species richness. Here, using a database on the breeding distributions of birds, we present the first global maps of variation in spatial turnover for an entire taxonomic class, a pattern that has to date remained largely a matter of conjecture, based on theoretical expectations and extrapolation of inconsistent patterns from different biogeographic realms. We use these maps to test four predictions from niche theory as to the form that this variation should take, namely that turnover should increase with species richness, towards lower latitudes, and with the steepness of environmental gradients and that variation in turnover is determined principally by rare (restricted) species. Contrary to prediction, we show that turnover is high both in areas of extremely low and high species richness, does not increase strongly towards the tropics, and is related both to average environmental conditions and spatial variation in those conditions. These results are closely associated with a further important and novel finding, namely that global patterns of spatial turnover are driven principally by widespread species rather than the restricted ones. This complements recent demonstrations that spatial patterns of species richness are also driven principally by widespread species, and thus provides an important contribution towards a unified model of how terrestrial biodiversity varies both within and between the Earth's major land masses. PMID:17472910

  6. Spatial turnover in the global avifauna.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Kevin J; Davies, Richard G; Orme, C David L; Olson, Valerie A; Thomas, Gavin H; Ding, Tzung-Su; Rasmussen, Pamela C; Lennon, Jack J; Bennett, Peter M; Owens, Ian P F; Blackburn, Tim M

    2007-07-07

    Despite its wide implications for many ecological issues, the global pattern of spatial turnover in the occurrence of species has been little studied, unlike the global pattern of species richness. Here, using a database on the breeding distributions of birds, we present the first global maps of variation in spatial turnover for an entire taxonomic class, a pattern that has to date remained largely a matter of conjecture, based on theoretical expectations and extrapolation of inconsistent patterns from different biogeographic realms. We use these maps to test four predictions from niche theory as to the form that this variation should take, namely that turnover should increase with species richness, towards lower latitudes, and with the steepness of environmental gradients and that variation in turnover is determined principally by rare (restricted) species. Contrary to prediction, we show that turnover is high both in areas of extremely low and high species richness, does not increase strongly towards the tropics, and is related both to average environmental conditions and spatial variation in those conditions. These results are closely associated with a further important and novel finding, namely that global patterns of spatial turnover are driven principally by widespread species rather than the restricted ones. This complements recent demonstrations that spatial patterns of species richness are also driven principally by widespread species, and thus provides an important contribution towards a unified model of how terrestrial biodiversity varies both within and between the Earth's major land masses.

  7. Use of thiol-disulfide equilibria to measure the energetics of assembly of transmembrane helices in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristian, Lidia; Lear, James D.; Degrado, William F.

    2003-12-01

    Despite significant efforts and promising progress, the understanding of membrane protein folding lags behind that of soluble proteins. Insights into the energetics of membrane protein folding have been gained from biophysical studies in membrane-mimicking environments (primarily detergent micelles). However, the development of techniques for studying the thermodynamics of folding in phospholipid bilayers remains a considerable challenge. We had previously used thiol-disulfide exchange to study the thermodynamics of association of transmembrane -helices in detergent micelles; here, we extend this methodology to phospholipid bilayers. The system for this study is the homotetrameric M2 proton channel protein from the influenza A virus. Transmembrane peptides from this protein specifically self-assemble into tetramers that retain the ability to bind to the drug amantadine. Thiol-disulfide exchange under equilibrium conditions was used to quantitatively measure the thermodynamics of this folding interaction in phospholipid bilayers. The effects of phospholipid acyl chain length and cholesterol on the peptide association were investigated. The association of the helices strongly depends on the thickness of the bilayer and cholesterol levels present in the phospholipid bilayer. The most favorable folding occurred when there was a good match between the width of the apolar region of the bilayer and the hydrophobic length of the transmembrane helix. Physiologically relevant variations in the cholesterol level are sufficient to strongly influence the association. Evaluation of the energetics of peptide association in the presence and absence of cholesterol showed a significantly tighter association upon inclusion of cholesterol in the lipid bilayers.

  8. Keratins Stabilize Hemidesmosomes through Regulation of β4-Integrin Turnover.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Kristin; Cheng, Fang; Wiche, Gerhard; Eriksson, John E; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-06-01

    Epidermal integrity and wound healing depend on remodeling of cell-matrix contacts including hemidesmosomes. Mutations in β4-integrin and plectin lead to severe epidermolysis bullosa (EB). Whether mutations in keratins K5 or K14, which cause EB simplex, also compromise cell-matrix adhesion through altering hemidesmosomal components is not well investigated. In particular, the dependence of β4-integrin endocytosis and turnover on keratins remains incompletely understood. Here, we show that the absence of keratins causes loss of plectin-β4-integrin interaction and elevated β4-integrin phosphorylation at Ser1354 and Ser1362. This triggered a caveolin-dependent endocytosis of β4-integrin but not of other integrins through Rab5 and Rab11 compartments in keratinocytes. Expressing a phospho-deficient β4-integrin mutant reduces β4-integrin endocytosis and rescues plectin localization in keratin-free cells. β4-integrin phosphorylation in the absence of keratins resulted from elevated Erk1/2 activity downstream of increased EGFR and PKCα signaling. Further, increased Erk1/2 phosphorylation and altered plectin localization occur in keratin-deficient mouse epidermis in vivo. Strikingly, expression of the K14-R125P EBS mutant also resulted in plectin mislocalization and elevated β4-integrin turnover, suggesting disease relevance. Our data underscore a major role of keratins in controlling β4-integrin endocytosis involving a plectin-Erk1/2-dependent mechanism relevant for epidermal differentiation and pathogenesis.

  9. Looking beyond structure: membrane phospholipids of skeletal muscle mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Heden, Timothy D.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondria are highly dynamic and capable of tremendous expansion to meet cellular energetic demands. Such proliferation in mitochondrial mass requires a synchronized supply of enzymes and structural phospholipids. While transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial enzymes has been extensively studied, there is limited information on how mitochondrial membrane lipids are generated in skeletal muscle. Herein we describe how each class of phospholipids that constitute mitochondrial membranes are synthesized and/or imported, and summarize genetic evidence indicating that membrane phospholipid composition represents a significant modulator of skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function. We also discuss how skeletal muscle mitochondrial phospholipids may mediate the effect of diet and exercise on oxidative metabolism. PMID:27370525

  10. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  11. Partitioning of propranolol in the phospholipid bilayer coat of anionic magnetoliposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocquyt, J.; Soenen, S. J. H.; Saveyn, P.; Van der Meeren, P.; DeCuyper, M.

    2008-05-01

    This work deals with the partitioning of the cationic amphiphilic drug, propranolol, in the coating of so-called magnetoliposomes (MLs), which consist of nanometre-sized, magnetizable iron oxide cores covered with a phospholipid bilayer. MLs of two types were used: either the ML coat consisted entirely of anionic dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol, or it was mixed with zwitterionic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine in a 5/95 molar ratio. To separate sorbed from non-sorbed propranolol, high-gradient magnetophoresis was used. The sorption profiles clearly show that electrostatic interactions play a key role in the sorption process as drug incorporation in the ML coat was favoured by increasing the anionic character of the ML envelope and by reducing the salt concentration of the medium. Also, upon drug binding some phospholipid molecules were expelled from the ML coat. The observations may be of relevance in the biomedical field, i.e. in the development of ML-based, intracellular theranostics.

  12. Phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes in human brain.

    PubMed

    Ross, B M; Moszczynska, A; Blusztajn, J K; Sherwin, A; Lozano, A; Kish, S J

    1997-04-01

    Growing evidence suggests an involvement of brain membrane phospholipid metabolism in a variety of neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. This has prompted the use of drugs (e.g., CDPcholine) aimed at elevating the rate of neural membrane synthesis. However, no information is available regarding the human brain enzymes of phospholipid synthesis which these drugs affect. Thus, the objective of our study was to characterize the enzymes involved, in particular, whether differences existed in the relative affinity of substrates for the enzymes of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) compared to those of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. The concentration of choline in rapidly frozen human brain biopsies ranged from 32-186 nmol/g tissue, a concentration similar to that determined previously for ethanolamine. Since human brain ethanolamine kinase possessed a much lower affinity for ethanolamine (Km = 460 microM) than choline kinase did for choline (Km = 17 microM), the activity of ethanolamine kinase in vivo may be more dependent on substrate availability than that of choline kinase. In addition, whereas ethanolamine kinase was inhibited by choline, and to a lesser extent by phosphocholine, choline kinase activity was unaffected by the presence of ethanolamine, or phosphoethanolamine, and only weakly inhibited by phosphocholine. Phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (PECT) and phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (PCCT) also displayed dissimilar characteristics, with PECT and PCCT being located predominantly in the cytosolic and particulate fractions, respectively. Both PECT and PCCT exhibited a low affinity for CTP (Km approximately 1.2 mM), suggesting that the activities of these enzymes, and by implication, the rate of phospholipid synthesis, are highly dependent upon the cellular concentration of CTP. In conclusion our data indicate different regulatory properties of PE and PC synthesis in human brain, and suggest that the rate of PE synthesis may be more

  13. The costs of nurse turnover: part 1: an economic perspective.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl Bland

    2004-12-01

    Nurse turnover is costly for healthcare organizations. Administrators and nurse executives need a reliable estimate of nurse turnover costs and the origins of those costs if they are to develop effective measures of reducing nurse turnover and its costs. However, determining how to best capture and quantify nurse turnover costs can be challenging. Part 1 of this series conceptualizes nurse turnover via human capital theory and presents an update of a previously developed method for determining the costs of nurse turnover, the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Method. Part 2 (January 2005) presents a recent application of the methodology in an acute care hospital.

  14. Dietary Phospholipids and Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Jeffrey S.; Kamili, Alvin; Wat, Elaine; Chung, Rosanna W. S.; Tandy, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Experiments carried out with cultured cells and in experimental animals have consistently shown that phospholipids (PLs) can inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption. Limited evidence from clinical studies suggests that dietary PL supplementation has a similar effect in man. A number of biological mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain how PL in the gut lumen is able to affect cholesterol uptake by the gut mucosa. Further research is however required to establish whether the ability of PLs to inhibit cholesterol absorption is of therapeutic benefit. PMID:22254012

  15. Phospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    In many eukaryotes, phospholipids (PLs) and sphingolipids (SLs) are abundant membrane components and reservoirs for important signaling molecules. In Leishmania, the composition, metabolism, and function of PLs and SLs differ significantly from those in mammalian cells. Although only a handful of enzymes have been experimentally characterized, available data suggest many steps of PL/SL metabolism are critical for Leishmania viability and/or virulence, and could be a source for new drug targets. Further studies of genes involved in the synthesis (de novo and salvage) and degradation of PLs and SLs will reveal their diverse effects on Leishmania pathogenesis. PMID:20026359

  16. Membrane phospholipid asymmetry in human thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, F A; Yuan, J; Lewis, R A; Snyder, L M; Kiefer, C R; Bunyaratvej, A; Fucharoen, S; Ma, L; Styles, L; de Jong, K; Schrier, S L

    1998-04-15

    Phospholipid asymmetry in the red blood cell (RBC) lipid bilayer is well maintained during the life of the cell, with phosphatidylserine (PS) virtually exclusively located in the inner monolayer. Loss of phospholipid asymmetry, and consequently exposure of PS, is thought to play an important role in red cell pathology. The anemia in the human thalassemias is caused by a combination of ineffective erythropoiesis (intramedullary hemolysis) and a decreased survival of adult RBCs in the peripheral blood. This premature destruction of the thalassemic RBC could in part be due to a loss of phospholipid asymmetry, because cells that expose PS are recognized and removed by macrophages. In addition, PS exposure can play a role in the hypercoagulable state reported to exist in severe beta-thalassemia intermedia. We describe PS exposure in RBCs of 56 comparably anemic patients with different genetic backgrounds of the alpha- or beta-thalassemia phenotype. The use of fluorescently labeled annexin V allowed us to determine loss of phospholipid asymmetry in individual cells. Our data indicate that in a number of thalassemic patients, subpopulations of red cells circulate that expose PS on their outer surface. The number of such cells can vary dramatically from patient to patient, from as low as that found in normal controls (less than 0.2%) up to 20%. Analysis by fluorescent microscopy of beta-thalassemic RBCs indicates that PS on the outer leaflet is distributed either over the entire membrane or localized in areas possibly related to regions rich in membrane-bound alpha-globin chains. We hypothesize that these membrane sites in which iron carrying globin chains accumulate and cause oxidative damage, could be important in the loss of membrane lipid organization. In conclusion, we report the presence of PS-exposing subpopulations of thalassemic RBC that are most likely physiologically important, because they could provide a surface for enhancing hemostasis as recently reported

  17. Protein-phospholipid interactions in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James H; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Tavoosi, Narjes; Ke, Ke; Pureza, Vincent; Boettcher, John M; Clay, Mary C; Rienstra, Chad M; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-04-01

    Most steps of the blood clotting cascade require the assembly of a serine protease with its specific regulatory protein on a suitable phospholipid bilayer. Unfortunately, the molecular details of how blood clotting proteins bind to membrane surfaces remain poorly understood, owing to a dearth of techniques for studying protein-membrane interactions at high resolution. Our laboratories are tackling this question using a combination of approaches, including nanoscale membrane bilayers, solid-state NMR, and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. These studies are now providing structural insights at atomic resolution into clotting protein-membrane interactions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein-Phospholipid Interactions in Blood Clotting

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, James H.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Tavoosi, Narjes; Ke, Ke; Pureza, Vincent; Boettcher, John M.; Clay, Mary C.; Rienstra, Chad M.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-01-01

    Most steps of the blood clotting cascade require the assembly of a serine protease with its specific regulatory protein on a suitable phospholipid bilayer. Unfortunately, the molecular details of how blood clotting proteins bind to membrane surfaces remain poorly understood, owing to a dearth of techniques for studying protein-membrane interactions at high resolution. Our laboratories are tackling this question using a combination of approaches, including nanoscale membrane bilayers, solid-state NMR, and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. These studies are now providing structural insights at atomic resolution into clotting protein-membrane interactions. PMID:20129649

  19. Addressing employee turnover and retention: keeping your valued performers.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee turnover and employee retention are inextricably linked; to control turnover is to enhance retention. Turnover is a relatively simple concept; however, considerable confusion often results when addressing turnover because of differences in how it is defined; that is, what is counted, how it is counted, and how the turnover rates are expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to its cost because so much of it is indirect and thus not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some that can be corrected and some that cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role; every improvement in turnover is a direct improvement in retention, with eventual positive effects on the bottom line.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Actin Turnover in Listeria Comet Tails: Evidence for Catastrophic Filament Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Kueh, Hao Yuan; Brieher, William M.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid assembly and disassembly (turnover) of actin filaments in cytoplasm drives cell motility and shape remodeling. While many biochemical processes that facilitate filament turnover are understood in isolation, it remains unclear how they work together to promote filament turnover in cells. Here, we studied cellular mechanisms of actin filament turnover by combining quantitative microscopy with mathematical modeling. Using live cell imaging, we found that actin polymer mass decay in Listeria comet tails is very well fit by a simple exponential. By analyzing candidate filament turnover pathways using stochastic modeling, we found that exponential polymer mass decay is consistent with either slow treadmilling, slow Arp2/3-dissociation, or catastrophic bursts of disassembly, but is inconsistent with acceleration of filament turnover by severing. Imaging of single filaments in Xenopus egg extract provided evidence that disassembly by bursting dominates isolated filament turnover in a cytoplasmic context. Taken together, our results point to a pathway where filaments grow transiently from barbed ends, rapidly terminate growth to enter a long-lived stable state, and then undergo a catastrophic burst of disassembly. By keeping filament lengths largely constant over time, such catastrophic filament turnover may enable cellular actin assemblies to maintain their mechanical integrity as they are turning over. PMID:20923649

  1. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians’ responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction. PMID:25336960

  2. Tracking synthesis and turnover of triacylglycerol in leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Tjellstrom, Henrik; Strawsine, Merissa; Ohlrogge, John B.

    2015-01-21

    Triacylglycerol (TAG), typically represents <1% of leaf glycerolipids but can accumulate under stress and other conditions or if leaves are supplied with fatty acids, or in plants transformed with regulators or enzymes of lipid metabolism. To better understand the metabolism of TAG in leaves, pulse-chase radiolabelling experiments were designed to probe its synthesis and turnover. When Arabidopsis leaves were incubated with [14C]lauric acid (12:0), a major initial product was [14C]TAG. Thus, despite low steady-state levels, leaves possess substantial TAG biosynthetic capacity. The contributions of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 and phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 to leaf TAG synthesis were examined by labelling of dgat1 and pdat1 mutants. The dgat1 mutant displayed a major (76%) reduction in [14C]TAG accumulation whereas pdat1 TAG labelling was only slightly reduced. Thus, DGAT1 has a principal role in TAG biosynthesis in young leaves. During a 4h chase period, radioactivity in TAG declined 70%, whereas the turnover of [14C]acyl chains of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and other polar lipids was much lower. Sixty percent of [14C]12:0 was directly incorporated into glycerolipids without modification, whereas 40% was elongated and desaturated to 16:0 and 18:1 by plastids. The unmodified [14C]12:0 and the plastid products of [14C]12:0 metabolism entered different pathways. Although plastid-modified 14C-labelled products accumulated in monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, PC, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diacylglcerol (DAG), there was almost no accumulation of [14C]16:0 and [14C]18:1 in TAG. Lastly, because DAG and acyl-CoA are direct precursors of TAG, the differential labelling of polar glycerolipids and TAG by [14C]12:0 and its plastid-modified products provides evidence for multiple subcellular pools of both acyl-CoA and DAG.

  3. Low phospholipid-associated cholestasis and cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Erlinger, Serge

    2012-09-01

    Low phospholipid-associated cholestasis and cholelithiasis (LPAC) is a genetic disorder characterized by cholesterol gallbladder and intrahepatic stones. It is caused by a mutation of the gene ABCB4, which encodes the canalicular protein ABCB4/MDR3, a flippase that plays an essential role in the secretion of phosphatidylcholine into bile. Failure of this protein leads to secretion of bile that is poor in phospholipids and, hence, highly lithogenic, with potent detergent properties. This, in turn, leads to cholangiocyte luminal membrane injury and biliary lesions causing cholestasis. The diagnosis should be suspected when at least two of the following criteria are present: onset of symptoms before the age of 40 years; recurrence of biliary symptoms (biliary colic, jaundice, cholangitis, acute pancreatitis) after cholecystectomy; presence of echogenic foci within the liver indicative of intrahepatic stones or biliary sludge; previous episode(s) of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy; and family history of gallstones in first-degree relatives. Intrahepatic stones can be demonstrated by ultrasonography with color Doppler examination, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging with magnetic resonance cholangiography, and the diagnosis confirmed by ABCB4 genotyping. Therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid offers prompt relief of symptoms and usually prevents complications. In some cases, however, surgery may be necessary. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol antioxidant capacity in phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Joseph A; Evans, Kervin O; Compton, David L; Appell, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Antioxidants have critical roles in maintaining cellular homeostasis and disease-state prevention. The multi-functional agent α-lipoic acid offers numerous beneficial effects to oxidatively stressed tissues. α-Lipoic acid was enzymatically incorporated into a triglyceride in conjunction with oleic acid, creating lipoyl dioleoylglycerol, and chemically reduced to form dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol. The triglyceride forms of lipoic acid stabilized dioleoylphosphatidylcholine unilamellar liposomal vesicles, as judged by calcein-cobalt leakage. Stabilization resulted from increased packing density of phospholipid acyl chains. Scavenging activity against the 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) radical was monitored by oxidation of 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-undecanoic acid (C(11)-Bodipy). Dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol in vesicles demonstrated strong antioxidant capacity in comparison to the conventional Trolox standard. Fluorescence quenching measurements indicated the lipoyl moiety of dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol is positioned near the vesicle aqueous/lipid boundary. Treatment of intact vesicles with a nonpenetrating sulfhydryl reagent indicated that 80% of the dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol was available for reaction. Molecular modeling of lipoyl dioleoylglycerol and dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol in a phospholipid layer confirmed the existence of an extended configuration for the molecules that accounts for the interfacial location of the lipoyl moiety, which may allow the antioxidant to readily react with radical species approaching membranes from the aqueous phase. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Phospholipid imprinted polymers as selective endotoxin scavengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Robert; Szekely, Gyorgy; Shinde, Sudhirkumar; Wierzbicka, Celina; Vilela, Filipe; Bauer, David; Sellergren, Börje

    2017-03-01

    Herein we explore phospholipid imprinting as a means to design receptors for complex glycolipids comprising the toxic lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A series of polymerizable bis-imidazolium and urea hosts were evaluated as cationic and neutral hosts for phosphates and phosphonates, the latter used as mimics of the phospholipid head groups. The bis-imidazolium hosts interacted with the guests in a cooperative manner leading to the presence of tight and well defined 1:2 ternary complexes. Optimized monomer combinations were subsequently used for imprinting of phosphatidic acid as an endotoxin dummy template. Presence of the aforementioned ternary complexes during polymerization resulted in imprinting of lipid dimers – the latter believed to crudely mimic the endotoxin Lipid A motif. The polymers were characterized with respect to template rebinding, binding affinity, capacity and common structural properties, leading to the identification of polymers which were thereafter subjected to an industrially validated endotoxin removal test. Two of the polymers were capable of removing endotoxin down to levels well below the accepted threshold (0.005 EU/mg API) in pharmaceutical production.

  6. Phospholipid imprinted polymers as selective endotoxin scavengers

    PubMed Central

    Sulc, Robert; Szekely, Gyorgy; Shinde, Sudhirkumar; Wierzbicka, Celina; Vilela, Filipe; Bauer, David; Sellergren, Börje

    2017-01-01

    Herein we explore phospholipid imprinting as a means to design receptors for complex glycolipids comprising the toxic lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A series of polymerizable bis-imidazolium and urea hosts were evaluated as cationic and neutral hosts for phosphates and phosphonates, the latter used as mimics of the phospholipid head groups. The bis-imidazolium hosts interacted with the guests in a cooperative manner leading to the presence of tight and well defined 1:2 ternary complexes. Optimized monomer combinations were subsequently used for imprinting of phosphatidic acid as an endotoxin dummy template. Presence of the aforementioned ternary complexes during polymerization resulted in imprinting of lipid dimers – the latter believed to crudely mimic the endotoxin Lipid A motif. The polymers were characterized with respect to template rebinding, binding affinity, capacity and common structural properties, leading to the identification of polymers which were thereafter subjected to an industrially validated endotoxin removal test. Two of the polymers were capable of removing endotoxin down to levels well below the accepted threshold (0.005 EU/mg API) in pharmaceutical production. PMID:28303896

  7. The Effect of Primary Care Provider Turnover on Patient Experience of Care and Ambulatory Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Ashok; Pollack, Craig E.; Asch, David A.; Canamucio, Anne; Werner, Rachel M.

    2017-01-01

    % CI, −2.2 to −0.7). In 9 measures of ambulatory care quality, the difference between patients who experienced no PCP turnover and those who had a PCP turnover was less than 1 percentage point. These effects were moderated by the patients’ continuity with their PCP prior to turnover, with a larger detrimental effect of PCP turnover among those with higher continuity prior to the turnover. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Primary care provider turnover was associated with worse patient experiences of care but did not have a major effect on ambulatory care quality. PMID:25985320

  8. Turnover of microbial groups and cell components in soil: 13C analysis of cellular biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Dippold, Michaela; Glaser, Bruno; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms regulate the carbon (C) cycle in soil, controlling the utilization and recycling of organic substances. To reveal the contribution of particular microbial groups to C utilization and turnover within the microbial cells, the fate of 13C-labelled glucose was studied under field conditions. Glucose-derived 13C was traced in cytosol, amino sugars and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) pools at intervals of 3, 10 and 50 days after glucose addition into the soil. 13C enrichment in PLFAs ( ˜ 1.5 % of PLFA C at day 3) was an order of magnitude greater than in cytosol, showing the importance of cell membranes for initial C utilization. The 13C enrichment in amino sugars of living microorganisms at day 3 accounted for 0.57 % of total C pool; as a result, we infer that the replacement of C in cell wall components is 3 times slower than that of cell membranes. The C turnover time in the cytosol (150 days) was 3 times longer than in PLFAs (47 days). Consequently, even though the cytosol pool has the fastest processing rates compared to other cellular compartments, intensive recycling of components here leads to a long C turnover time. Both PLFA and amino-sugar profiles indicated that bacteria dominated in glucose utilization. 13C enrichment decreased with time for bacterial cell membrane components, but it remained constant or even increased for filamentous microorganisms. 13C enrichment of muramic acid was the 3.5 times greater than for galactosamine, showing a more rapid turnover of bacterial cell wall components compared to fungal. Thus, bacteria utilize a greater proportion of low-molecular-weight organic substances, whereas filamentous microorganisms are responsible for further C transformations. Thus, tracing 13C in cellular compounds with contrasting turnover rates elucidated the role of microbial groups and their cellular compartments in C utilization and recycling in soil. The results also reflect that microbial C turnover is not restricted to the death or

  9. Nurse turnover: the mediating role of burnout.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Michael P; Maslach, Christina

    2009-04-01

    This study tested whether the mediation model of burnout could predict nurses' turnover intentions. A better understanding of what factors support a commitment to a nursing career could inform both policies and workplace practices. The mediation model of burnout provides a way of linking the quality of a nurse's worklife to various outcomes, such as turnover. Data on areas of worklife, burnout, and turnover intentions were collected by surveying 667 Canadian nurses in the Atlantic Provinces. The findings supported the mediation model of burnout, in which areas of worklife predicted burnout, which in turn predicted turnover intentions. Cynicism was the key burnout dimension for turnover, and the most critical areas of worklife were value conflicts and inadequate rewards. The results of this study provide some new insights into how the intention of nurses to leave their job is related to particular aspects of their worklife and to burnout. These results suggest what may be the most appropriate areas to target for interventions to reduce the risk of nurses exiting early from their chosen career.

  10. Primary care physician job satisfaction and turnover.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, S B; Wilson, M; Melick, C F; Powe, N R

    2001-07-01

    To examine the relationship of personal characteristics, organizational characteristics, and overall job satisfaction to primary care physician (PCP) turnover. A cohort of 507 postresident, nonfederally employed PCPs younger than 45 years of age, who completed their medical training between 1982 and 1985, participated in national surveys in 1987 and 1991. Psychological, economic, and sociological theories and constructs provided a conceptual framework. Primary care physician personal, organizational, and overall job satisfaction variables from 1987 were considered independent variables. Turnover-related responses from 1991 were dependent variables. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. More than half (55%) of all PCPs in the cohort left at least 1 practice between 1987 and 1991. Twenty percent of the cohort left 2 employers. PCPs dissatisfied in 1987 were 2.38 times more likely to leave (P < .001). Primary care physicians who believed that third-party payer influence would decrease in 5 years were 1.29 times more likely to leave (P < .03). Non-board certified PCPs were 1.3 times more likely to leave (P < .003). Primary care physicians who believed that standardized protocols were overused were 1.18 times more likely to leave (P < .05). Specialty, gender, age, race, and practice setting were not associated with PCP turnover. Turnover was an important phenomenon among PCPs in this cohort. The results of this study could enable policy makers, managed care organizations, researchers, and others to better understand the relationship between job satisfaction and turnover.

  11. Phospholipid synthesis rates in the eastern subtropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mooy, B. A. S.; Moutin, T.; Duhamel, S.; Rimmelin, P.; van Wambeke, F.

    2008-02-01

    Membrane lipid molecules are a major component of planktonic organisms and this is particularly true of the microbial picoplankton that dominate the open ocean; with their high surface-area to volume ratios, the synthesis of membrane lipids places a major demand on their overall cell metabolism. Specifically, the synthesis of cell membrane phospholipids creates a demand for the nutrient phosphorus, and we sought to refine our understanding of the role of phospholipids in the upper ocean phosphorus cycle. We measured the rates of phospholipid synthesis in a transect of the eastern subtropical South Pacific from Easter Island to Concepcion, Chile as part of the BIOSOPE program. Our approach combined standard phosphorus radiotracer incubations and lipid extraction methods. We found that phospholipid synthesis rates varied from less than 1 to greater than 200 pmol P L-1 h-1, and that phospholipid synthesis contributed between less than 5% to greater than 22% of the total PO43- incorporation rate. Changes in the percentage that phospholipid synthesis contributed to total PO43- uptake were strongly correlated with the ratio of primary production to bacterial production, which supported our hypothesis that heterotrophic bacteria were the primary agents of phospholipid synthesis. The spatial variation in phospholipid synthesis rates underscored the importance of heterotrophic bacteria in the phosphorus cycle of the eastern subtropical South Pacific, particularly the hyperoligotrophic South Pacific subtropical gyre.

  12. Aldose Reductase-catalyzed Reduction of Aldehyde Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sanjay; Spite, Matthew; Trent, John O.; West, Matthew B.; Ahmed, Yonis; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Oxidation of unsaturated phospholipids results in the generation of aldehyde side chains that remain esterified to the phospholipid backbone. Such “core” aldehydes elicit immune responses and promote inflammation. However, the biochemical mechanisms by which phospholipid aldehydes are metabolized or detoxified are not well understood. In the studies reported here, we examined whether aldose reductase (AR), which reduces hydrophobic aldehydes, metabolizes phospholipid aldehydes. Incubation with AR led to the reduction of 5-oxovaleroyl, 7-oxo-5-heptenoyl, 5-hydroxy-6-oxo-caproyl, and 5-hydroxy-8-oxo-6-octenoyl phospholipids generated upon oxidation of 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC). The enzyme also catalyzed the reduction of phospholipid aldehydes generated from the oxidation of 1-alkyl, and 1-alkenyl analogs of PAPC, and 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl phosphatidic acid or phosphoglycerol. Aldose reductase catalyzed the reduction of chemically synthesized 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POVPC) with a Km of 10 μM. Addition of POVPC to the culture medium led to incorporation and reduction of the aldehyde in COS-7 and THP-1 cells. Reduction of POVPC in these cells was prevented by the AR inhibitors sorbinil and tolrestat and was increased in COS-7 cells overexpressing AR. Together, these observations suggest that AR may be a significant participant in the metabolism of several structurally diverse phospholipid aldehydes. This metabolism may be a critical regulator of the pro-inflammatory and immunogenic effects of oxidized phospholipids. PMID:15465833

  13. Different oxidized phospholipid molecules unequally affect bilayer packing.

    PubMed

    Megli, Francesco M; Russo, Luciana

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more detailed knowledge about the effect of the presence of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules in phospholipid bilayers. After chromatographic and mass spectrometry analysis, the previously used product of the Fenton reaction with unsaturated lecithins proved to consist of a plethora of oxidatively modified lecithins, useless either for the detailed study of the effects brought about in the bilayer or as the source of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules. The latter, particularly 2-(omega-carboxyacyl)- and 2-(n-hydroperoxyacyl)-lecithins, can be more conveniently prepared by chemical or enzymatic synthesis rather than by chemical or physical oxidation. The effect of those molecules and of commercially available 12-hydroxy-stearic and dodecanedioic acid was studied in planar supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) by use of EPR spectrometry. The SPBs also contained 2-(5-doxylstearoyl)-lecithin as the spin probe, and the EPR spectral anisotropy loss, indicative of bilayer disordering, was measured as a function of the molar percentage of oxidized lipid. Most oxidized lipid molecules examined in this study were able to induce bilayer disordering, while hydroperoxyl group-bearing acyl chains appeared to be much less effective. It is concluded that the effects of different oxidized phospholipids on phospholipid bilayer structure cannot be generalized, as happens with batch-oxidized phospholipids, and that the use of defined oxidized phospholipid molecular species for membrane oxidative stress guarantees a more reliable and detailed response.

  14. A Microscopic View of Phospholipid Insertion into Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the process of membrane insertion is an essential step in developing a detailed mechanism, e.g., for peripheral membrane protein association and membrane fusion. The Highly Mobile Membrane Mimetic (HMMM) has been used to accelerate the membrane association and binding of peripheral membrane proteins in simulations by increasing the lateral diffusion of phospholipid headgroups while retaining an atomistic description of the interface. Through a comparative study, we assess the difference in insertion rate of a free phospholipid into an HMMM as well as into a conventional phospholipid bilayer, and develop a detailed mechanistic model of free phospholipid insertion into biological membranes. The mechanistic insertion model shows that successful, irreversible association of the free phospholipid to the membrane interface, which results in its insertion, is the rate limiting step. Association is followed by independent, sequential insertion of the acyl tails of the free phospholipid into the membrane, with splayed acyl tail intermediates. Use of the HMMM is found to replicate the same intermediate insertion states as in the full phospholipid bilayer, however it accelerates overall insertion by approximately a factor of three, with the probability of successful association of phospholipid to the membrane being significantly enhanced. PMID:24313792

  15. Depletion of acidic phospholipids influences chromosomal replication in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fingland, Nicholas; Flåtten, Ingvild; Downey, Christopher D; Fossum-Raunehaug, Solveig; Skarstad, Kirsten; Crooke, Elliott

    2012-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, coordinated activation and deactivation of DnaA allows for proper timing of the initiation of chromosomal synthesis at the origin of replication (oriC) and assures initiation occurs once per cell cycle. In vitro, acidic phospholipids reactivate DnaA, and in vivo depletion of acidic phospholipids, results in growth arrest. Growth can be restored by the expression of a mutant form of DnaA, DnaA(L366K), or by oriC-independent DNA synthesis, suggesting acidic phospholipids are required for DnaA- and oriC-dependent replication. We observe here that when acidic phospholipids were depleted, replication was inhibited with a concomitant reduction of chromosomal content and cell mass prior to growth arrest. This global shutdown of biosynthetic activity was independent of the stringent response. Restoration of acidic phospholipid synthesis resulted in a resumption of DNA replication prior to restored growth, indicating a possible cell-cycle-specific growth arrest had occurred with the earlier loss of acidic phospholipids. Flow cytometry, thymidine uptake, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction data suggest that a deficiency in acidic phospholipids prolonged the time required to replicate the chromosome. We also observed that regardless of the cellular content of acidic phospholipids, expression of mutant DnaA(L366K) altered the DNA content-to-cell mass ratio. PMID:23233230

  16. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by zinc depletion

    PubMed Central

    Carman, George M.; Han, Gil-Soo

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of phospholipids in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by zinc, an essential mineral required for growth and metabolism. Cells depleted of zinc contain increased levels of phosphatidylinositol and decreased levels of phosphatidylethanolamine. In addition to the major phospholipids, the levels of the minor phospholipids phosphatidate and diacylglycerol pyrophosphate decrease in the vacuole membrane of zinc-depleted cells. Alterations in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine can be ascribed to an increase in PIS1-encoded phosphatidylinositol synthase activity and to decreases in the activities of CDP-diacylglycerol pathway enzymes including the CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase, respectively. Alterations in the minor vacuole membrane phospholipids are due to the induction of the DPP1-encoded diacylglycerol pyrophosphate phosphatase. These changes in the activities of phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes result from differential regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription. Under zinc-deplete conditions, the positive transcription factor Zap1p stimulates the expression of the DPP1 and PIS1 genes through the cis-acting element UASZRE. In contrast, the negative regulatory protein Opi1p, which is involved in inositol-mediated regulation of phospholipid synthesis, represses the expression of the CHO1 gene through the cis-acting element UASINO. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis may provide an important mechanism by which cells cope with the stress of zinc depletion, given the roles that phospholipids play in the structure and function of cellular membranes. PMID:16807089

  17. Phospholipid synthesis rates in the eastern subtropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mooy, B. A. S.; Moutin, T.; Duhamel, S.; Rimmelin, P.; van Wambeke, F.

    2007-08-01

    Membrane lipid molecules are a major component of planktonic organisms and this is particularly true of the microbial picoplankton that dominate the open ocean; with their high surface-area to volume ratios, the synthesis of membrane lipids places a major demand on their overall cell metabolism. The synthesis of one class of membrane lipids, the phospholipids, also creates a demand for the nutrient phosphorus, and we sought to refine our understanding of the role of phospholipids in the upper ocean phosphorus cycle. We measured the rates of phospholipid synthesis in a transect of the eastern subtropical South Pacific from Easter Island to Concepcion, Chile as part of the BIOSOPE program. Our approach combined standard phosphorus radiotracer incubations and lipid extraction methods. We found that phospholipid synthesis rates varied from less than 1 to greater than 200 pmol P L-1 h-1, and that phospholipid synthesis contributed between less than 5% to greater than 22% of the total PO43- incorporation rate. Changes in the percentage that phospholipid synthesis contributed to total PO43- incorporation were strongly correlated with the ratio of primary production to bacterial production, which supported our hypothesis that heterotrophic bacteria were the primary agents of phospholipid synthesis. The spatial variation in phospholipid synthesis rates underscored the importance of heterotrophic bacteria in the phosphorus cycle of the eastern subtropical South Pacific, particularly the hyperoligotrophic South Pacific subtropical gyre.

  18. Role of phospholipids of subunit III in the regulation of structural rearrangements in cytochrome c oxidase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Alnajjar, Khadijeh S; Cvetkov, Teresa; Prochaska, Lawrence

    2015-02-03

    Subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase possesses structural domains that contain conserved phospholipid binding sites. Mutations within these domains induce a loss of phospholipid binding, coinciding with decreased electron transfer activity. Functional and structural roles for phospholipids in the enzyme from Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been investigated. Upon the removal of intrinsic lipids using phospholipase A2, electron transfer activity was decreased 30-50%. Moreover, the delipidated enzyme exhibited turnover-induced, suicide inactivation, which was reversed by the addition of exogenous lipids, most specifically by cardiolipin. Cardiolipin exhibited two sites of interaction with the delipidated enzyme, a high-affinity site (Km = 0.14 μM) and a low-affinity site (Km = 26 μM). Subunit I of the delipidated enzyme exhibited a faster digestion rate when it was treated with α-chymotrypsin compared to that of the wild-type enzyme, suggesting that lipid removal induces a conformational change to expose the digestion sites further. Upon reaction of subunit III of the enzyme with a fluorophore (AEDANS), fluorescence anisotropy showed an increased rotational rate of the fluorophore in the absence of lipids, indicating increased flexibility of subunit III within the enzyme's tertiary structure. Additionally, Förster resonance energy transfer between AEDANS and a fluorescently labeled cardiolipin revealed that cardiolipin binds in the v-shaped cleft of subunit III in the delipidated enzyme and that it moves closer to the active site in subunit I upon a change in the redox state of the enzyme. In conclusion, these results show that the phospholipids regulate events occurring during electron transfer activity by maintaining the structural integrity of the enzyme at the active site.

  19. Organizational Nostalgia Lowers Turnover Intentions by Increasing Work Meaning: The Moderating Role of Burnout.

    PubMed

    Leunissen, Joost M; Sedikides, Constantine; Wildschut, Tim; Cohen, Taya R

    2016-10-27

    We report 3 studies addressing the relevance of organizational nostalgia for the meaning that employees ascribe to their work (work meaning). We hypothesized, and found, that organizational nostalgia enhances work meaning and thereby reduces turnover intentions. In Study 1, an employee survey, spontaneously experienced organizational nostalgia was associated with higher work meaning. In Study 2, an organizational-nostalgia induction increased work meaning, which subsequently predicted lowered turnover intentions. In Study 3, an organizational-nostalgia induction increased work meaning and thereby lowered turnover intentions, especially among employees who reported relatively high levels of burnout. When burnout is high, organizational nostalgia functions as a rich source of meaning that benefits employees' work experience. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Retaining your high performers: moderators of the performance-job satisfaction-voluntary turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Two divergent ideas explain the relationship between performance and voluntary turnover. One suggests that higher performing employees, who are rewarded for their superior work product, will desire to remain with an organization that values their performance and will, consequently, be less likely than lower performing employees to voluntarily leave. An alternative idea suggests that higher performing employees, who are more desirable to external companies as a result of their superior work product, will have more external job opportunities and will, consequently, be more likely than their lower performing colleagues to voluntarily leave. The current study evaluated the behaviors and attitudes of 12,545 insurance employees over a 3-year period to examine how these 2 divergent expectations influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship. Results show that both pay growth and the relevant unemployment rate interact with performance to influence the performance-voluntary turnover relationship and that they work independently of employee job satisfaction influences.

  1. Nursing home staffing, turnover, and case mix.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Charlene; Swan, James H

    2003-09-01

    This study examined the predictors of total nurse and registered nurse (RN) staffing hours per resident day separately in all free-standing California nursing homes (1,555), using staffing data from state cost reports in 1999. This study used a two-stage least squares model, taking into account nursing turnover rates, resident case mix levels, and other factors. As expected, total nurse and RN staffing hours were negatively associated with nurse staff turnover rates and positively associated with resident case mix. Facilities were resource dependent in that a high proportion of Medicare residents predicted higher staffing hours, and a higher proportion of Medicaid residents predicted lower staffing hours and higher turnover rates. Nursing assistant wages were positively associated with total nurse staffing hours. For-profit facilities and high-occupancy rate facilities had lower total nurse and RN staffing hours. Medicaid reimbursement rates and multifacility organizations were positively associated with RN staffing hours.

  2. Changes of Protein Turnover in Aging Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Ineke; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Bauer, Sophie; Brewer, Heather M; Smith, Richard D; Depuydt, Geert; Braeckman, Bart P

    2017-09-01

    Protein turnover rates severely decline in aging organisms, including C. elegans However, limited information is available on turnover dynamics at the individual protein level during aging. We followed changes in protein turnover at one-day resolution using a multiple-pulse (15)N-labeling and accurate mass spectrometry approach. Forty percent of the proteome shows gradual slowdown in turnover with age, whereas only few proteins show increased turnover. Decrease in protein turnover was consistent for only a minority of functionally related protein subsets, including tubulins and vitellogenins, whereas randomly diverging turnover patterns with age were the norm. Our data suggests increased heterogeneity of protein turnover of the translation machinery, whereas protein turnover of ubiquitin-proteasome and antioxidant systems are well-preserved over time. Hence, we presume that maintenance of quality control mechanisms is a protective strategy in aging worms, although the ultimate proteome collapse is inescapable. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Understanding phospholipid function: Why are there so many lipids?

    PubMed

    Dowhan, William

    2017-06-30

    In the 1970s, phospholipids were still considered mere building blocks of the membrane lipid bilayer, but the subsequent realization that phospholipids could also serve as second messengers brought new interest to the field. My own passion for the unique amphipathic properties of lipids led me to seek other, non-signaling functions for phospholipids, particularly in their interactions with membrane proteins. This seemed to be the last frontier in protein chemistry and enzymology to be conquered. I was fortunate to find my way to Eugene Kennedy's laboratory, where both membrane proteins and phospholipids were the foci of study, thus providing a jumping-off point for advancing our fundamental understanding of lipid synthesis, membrane protein biosynthesis, phospholipid and membrane protein trafficking, and the cellular roles of phospholipids. After purifying and characterizing enzymes of phospholipid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli and cloning of several of the genes encoding these enzymes in E. coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, I was in a position to alter phospholipid composition in a systematic manner during the cell cycle in these microorganisms. My group was able to establish, contrary to common assumption (derived from the fact that membrane proteins retain activity in detergent extracts) that phospholipid environment is a strong determining factor in the function of membrane proteins. We showed that molecular genetic alterations in membrane lipid composition result in many phenotypes, and uncovered direct lipid-protein interactions that govern dynamic structural and functional properties of membrane proteins. Here I present my personal "reflections" on how our understanding of phospholipid functions has evolved. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Quantifying phylogenetic beta diversity: distinguishing between 'true' turnover of lineages and phylogenetic diversity gradients.

    PubMed

    Leprieur, Fabien; Albouy, Camille; De Bortoli, Julien; Cowman, Peter F; Bellwood, David R; Mouillot, David

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionary dissimilarity between communities (phylogenetic beta diversity PBD) has been increasingly explored by ecologists and biogeographers to assess the relative roles of ecological and evolutionary processes in structuring natural communities. Among PBD measures, the PhyloSor and UniFrac indices have been widely used to assess the level of turnover of lineages over geographical and environmental gradients. However, these indices can be considered as 'broad-sense' measures of phylogenetic turnover as they incorporate different aspects of differences in evolutionary history between communities that may be attributable to phylogenetic diversity gradients. In the present study, we extend an additive partitioning framework proposed for compositional beta diversity to PBD. Specifically, we decomposed the PhyloSor and UniFrac indices into two separate components accounting for 'true' phylogenetic turnover and phylogenetic diversity gradients, respectively. We illustrated the relevance of this framework using simple theoretical and archetypal examples, as well as an empirical study based on coral reef fish communities. Overall, our results suggest that using PhyloSor and UniFrac may greatly over-estimate the level of spatial turnover of lineages if the two compared communities show contrasting levels of phylogenetic diversity. We therefore recommend that future studies use the 'true' phylogenetic turnover component of these indices when the studied communities encompass a large phylogenetic diversity gradient.

  5. Phospholipid Species in Newborn and 4 Month Old Infants after Consumption of Different Formulas or Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Olaf; Fleddermann, Manja; Hellmuth, Christian; Demmelmair, Hans; Koletzko, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are important long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids for neuronal and cognitive development and are ingredients of infant formulae that are recommended but there is no evidence based minimal supplementation level available. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the effect of supplemented AA and DHA on phospholipid metabolism. Methods Plasma samples of a randomized, double-blind infant feeding trial were used for the analyses of phospholipid species by flow-injection mass spectrometry. Healthy term infants consumed isoenergetic formulae (intervention formula with equal amounts of AA and DHA—IF, control formula without additional AA and DHA—CF) from the first month of life until the age of 120 days. A group of breast milk (BM) -fed infants was followed as a reference. Results The plasma profile detected in newborns was different from 4 month old infants, irrespective of study group. Most relevant changes were seen in higher level of LPC16:1, LPC20:4, PC32:1, PC34:1 and PC36:4 and lower level of LPC18:0, LPC18:2, PC32:2, PC36:2 and several ether-linked phosphatidylcholines in newborns. The sum of all AA and DHA species at 4 month old infants in the CF group showed level of 40% (AA) and 51% (DHA) of newborns. The supplemented amount of DHA resulted in phospholipid level comparable to BM infants, but AA phospholipids were lower than in BM infants. Interestingly, relative contribution of DHA was higher in ether-linked phosphatidylcholines in CF fed infants, but IF and BM fed infants showed higher overall ether-linked phosphatidylcholines levels. Conclusion In conclusion, we have shown that infant plasma phospholipid profile changes remarkably from newborn over time and is dependent on the dietary fatty acid composition. A supplementation of an infant formula with AA and DHA resulted in increased related phospholipid species. PMID:27571269

  6. Phospholipid Species in Newborn and 4 Month Old Infants after Consumption of Different Formulas or Breast Milk.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Olaf; Fleddermann, Manja; Hellmuth, Christian; Demmelmair, Hans; Koletzko, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are important long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids for neuronal and cognitive development and are ingredients of infant formulae that are recommended but there is no evidence based minimal supplementation level available. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the effect of supplemented AA and DHA on phospholipid metabolism. Plasma samples of a randomized, double-blind infant feeding trial were used for the analyses of phospholipid species by flow-injection mass spectrometry. Healthy term infants consumed isoenergetic formulae (intervention formula with equal amounts of AA and DHA-IF, control formula without additional AA and DHA-CF) from the first month of life until the age of 120 days. A group of breast milk (BM) -fed infants was followed as a reference. The plasma profile detected in newborns was different from 4 month old infants, irrespective of study group. Most relevant changes were seen in higher level of LPC16:1, LPC20:4, PC32:1, PC34:1 and PC36:4 and lower level of LPC18:0, LPC18:2, PC32:2, PC36:2 and several ether-linked phosphatidylcholines in newborns. The sum of all AA and DHA species at 4 month old infants in the CF group showed level of 40% (AA) and 51% (DHA) of newborns. The supplemented amount of DHA resulted in phospholipid level comparable to BM infants, but AA phospholipids were lower than in BM infants. Interestingly, relative contribution of DHA was higher in ether-linked phosphatidylcholines in CF fed infants, but IF and BM fed infants showed higher overall ether-linked phosphatidylcholines levels. In conclusion, we have shown that infant plasma phospholipid profile changes remarkably from newborn over time and is dependent on the dietary fatty acid composition. A supplementation of an infant formula with AA and DHA resulted in increased related phospholipid species.

  7. Ceramides in phospholipid membranes: effects on bilayer stability and transition to nonlamellar phases.

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, M P; Arrondo, J L; Goñi, F M; Alonso, A

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ceramides of natural origin on the gel-fluid and lamellar-inverted hexagonal phase transitions of phospholipids (mainly dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine) have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry, with additional support from infrared and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In the lamellar phase, ceramides do not mix ideally with phospholipids, giving rise to the coexistence of domains that undergo the gel-fluid transition at different temperatures. The combination of differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy, together with the use of deuterated lipids, allows the demonstration of independent melting temperatures for phospholipid and ceramide in the mixtures. In the lamellar-hexagonal phase transitions, ceramides (up to 15 mol %) decrease the transition temperature, without significantly modifying the transition enthalpy, thus facilitating the inverted hexagonal phase formation. 31P-NMR indicates the coexistence, within a certain range of temperatures, of lamellar and hexagonal phases, or hexagonal phase precursors. Ceramides from egg or from bovine brain are very similar in their effects on the lamellar-hexagonal transition. They are also comparable to diacylglycerides in this respect, although ceramides are less potent. These results are relevant in the interpretation of certain forms of interfacial enzyme activation and in the regulation and dynamics of the bilayer structure of cell membranes. PMID:9876146

  8. Studies of phospholipid oxidation by electrospray mass spectrometry: from analysis in cells to biological effects.

    PubMed

    Spickett, Corinne M; Dever, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation of lipids is important in many pathological conditions and lipid peroxidation products such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other aldehydes are commonly measured as biomarkers of oxidative stress. However, it is often useful to complement this with analysis of the original oxidized phospholipid. Electrospray mass spectrometry (ESMS) provides an informative method for detecting oxidative alterations to phospholipids, and has been used to investigate oxidative damage to cells, and low-density lipoprotein, as well as for the analysis of oxidized phosphatidylcholines present in atherosclerotic plaque material. There is increasing evidence that intact oxidized phospholipids have biological effects; in particular, oxidation products of 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerophosphocholine (PAPC) have been found to cause inflammatory responses, which could be potentially important in the progression of atherosclerosis. The effects of chlorohydrin derivatives of lipids have been much less studied, but it is clear that free fatty acid chlorohydrins and phosphatidylcholine chlorohydrins are toxic to cells at concentrations above 10 micromolar, a range comparable to that of HNE and oxidized PAPC. There is some evidence that chlorohydrins have biological effects that may be relevant to atherosclerosis, but further work is needed to elucidate their pro-inflammatory properties, and to understand the mechanisms and balance of biological effects that could result from oxidation of complex mixtures of lipids in a pathophysiological situation.

  9. Phospholipid composition modulates carbon nanodiamond-induced alterations in phospholipid domain formation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Aishik; Mucci, Nicolas J; Tan, Ming Li; Steckley, Ashleigh; Zhang, Ti; Forrest, M Laird; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2015-05-12

    The focus of this work is to elucidate how phospholipid composition can modulate lipid nanoparticle interactions in phospholipid monolayer systems. We report on alterations in lipid domain formation induced by anionically engineered carbon nanodiamonds (ECNs) as a function of lipid headgroup charge and alkyl chain saturation. Using surface pressure vs area isotherms, monolayer compressibility, and fluorescence microscopy, we found that anionic ECNs induced domain shape alterations in zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine lipids, irrespective of the lipid alkyl chain saturation, even when the surface pressure vs area isotherms did not show any significant changes. Bean-shaped structures characteristic of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were converted to multilobed, fractal, or spiral domains as a result of exposure to ECNs, indicating that ECNs lower the line tension between domains in the case of zwitterionic lipids. For membrane systems containing anionic phospholipids, ECN-induced changes in domain packing were related to the electrostatic interactions between the anionic ECNs and the anionic lipid headgroups, even when zwitterionic lipids are present in excess. By comparing the measured size distributions with our recently developed theory derived by minimizing the free energy associated with the domain energy and mixing entropy, we found that the change in line tension induced by anionic ECNs is dominated by the charge in the condensed lipid domains. Atomic force microscopy images of the transferred anionic films confirm that the location of the anionic ECNs in the lipid monolayers is also modulated by the charge on the condensed lipid domains. Because biological membranes such as lung surfactants contain both saturated and unsaturated phospholipids with different lipid headgroup charges, our results suggest that when studying potential adverse effects of nanoparticles on biological systems the role of lipid compositions cannot be neglected.

  10. Phospholipid monolayers between fluid and solid states.

    PubMed Central

    Helm, C A; Möhwald, H; Kjaer, K; Als-Nielsen, J

    1987-01-01

    Monolayers of the phospholipid dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid on the surface of water have been studied by a combination of the new techniques of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and fluorescence microscopy with classical surface pressure data. The pressure vs. area isotherm changes slope at the surface pressures pi c and pi s. The optical technique demonstrates that between pi c and pi s the fluid phase coexists with a denser "gel" phase. Electron diffraction data have shown that the gel phase has bond orientational order over tens of micrometers. However, the x-ray data demonstrate that positional correlations extend only over tens of angstroms. Thus, the gel phase is not crystalline. Above pi s a solid phase is formed with a positional correlation range that is eight times longer for the chemically purest films. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:3651557

  11. Cyclic phosphatidic acid - a unique bioactive phospholipid.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuko

    2008-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (CPA) is a naturally occurring analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid mediator, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). The sn-2 hydroxy group of CPA forms a 5-membered ring with the sn-3 phosphate. CPA affects numerous cellular functions, including anti-mitogenic regulation of the cell cycle, induction of stress fiber formation, inhibition of tumor cell invasion and metastasis, and regulation of differentiation and survival of neuronal cells. Interestingly, many of these cellular responses caused by CPA oppose those of LPA despite the activation of apparently overlapping receptor populations. Since the early 1990s, studies on CPA actions gradually developed, and we are now beginning to understand the importance of this lipid. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge about CPA, including enzymatic formation of CPA, unique biological activities and biological targets of CPA, and we also explore metabolically stabilized CPA analogs.

  12. Phospholipids in mitochondrial dysfunction during hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Leskova, Galina F

    2016-12-20

    Energy deficiency plays a key role in the development of irreversible shock conditions. Therefore, identifying mitochondrial functional disturbances during hemorrhagic shock should be considered a prospective direction for studying its pathogenesis. Phospholipid (PL)-dependent mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain (i.e., in the frontal lobes of the cerebral hemispheres and medulla oblongata) and liver, which, when damaged, leads to an encephalopathy, are examined in this review. These mechanisms show strong regional specificity. Analyzing the data presented in this review suggests that the basis for mitochondrial functional disturbances is cholinergic hyperactivation, accompanied by a choline deficiency and membrane phosphatidylcholine (PC) depletion. Stabilization of the PL composition in mitochondrial membranes using "empty" PC liposomes could be one of the most important methods for eliminating energy deficiency during massive blood loss.

  13. Lessons from the "Euro-Phospholipid" project.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Ricard

    2008-01-01

    The "Euro-Phospholipid" project started in 1999 with a multicentre, consecutive and prospective design. A total cohort of 1000 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), derived from 13 countries (Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and United Kingdom), has been followed since then by a European consortium that was created as part of the network promoted by the "European Forum on Antiphospholipid Antibodies", a study group devoted to the development of multicentre projects with large populations of APS patients. This project allowed the identification of the prevalence and characteristics of the main clinical and immunological manifestations at the onset and during the evolution of APS and demonstrated that it is possible to recognize more homogeneous subsets of clinical significance.

  14. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  15. Comparative Proteome Analysis of hAT-MSCs Isolated from Chronic Renal Failure Patients with Differences in Their Bone Turnover Status

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Gurler; Tuncay, Mehmet; Aksoy, Ayça; Karaoz, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the stem cells and the bone turnover in uremic bone disease due to chronic renal failure (CRF) is not described. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bone turnover status on stem cell properties. To search for the presence of such link and shed some light on stem-cell relevant mechanisms of bone turnover, we carried out a study with mesenchymal stem cells. Tissue biopsies were taken from the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of a CRF patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism with the high turnover bone disease. This patient underwent parathyroidectomy operation (PTX) and another sample was taken from this patient after PTX. A CRF patient with adynamic bone disease with low turnover and a healthy control were also included. Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the subjects were analyzed using proteomic and molecular approaches. Except ALP activity, the bone turnover status did not affect common stem cell properties. However, detailed proteome analysis revealed the presence of regulated protein spots. A total of 32 protein spots were identified following 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF analyzes. The identified proteins were classified into seven distinct groups and their potential relationship to bone turnover were discussed. Distinct protein expression patterns emerged in relation to the bone turnover status indicate a possible link between the stem cells and bone turnover in uremic bone disease due to CRF. PMID:26575497

  16. Hybrid copolymer-phospholipid vesicles: phase separation resembling mixed phospholipid lamellae, but with mechanical stability and control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Santore, Maria M

    2015-04-07

    Vesicles whose bilayer membranes contain phospholipids mixed with co-polymers or surfactants comprise new hybrid materials having potential applications in drug delivery, sensors, and biomaterials. Here we describe a model polymer-phospholipid hybrid membrane system exhibiting strong similarities to binary phospholipid mixtures, but with more robust membrane mechanics. A lamella-forming graft copolymer, PDMS-co-PEO (polydimethylsiloxane-co-polyethylene oxide) was blended with a high melting temperature phospholipid, DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), over a broad compositional range. The resulting giant hybrid unilamellar vesicles were compared qualitatively and quantitatively to analogous mixed phospholipid membranes in which a low melting temperature phospholipid, DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), was blended with DPPC. The mechanical properties of the hybrid vesicles, even when phase separated, were robust with high lysis stresses and strains approaching those of the pure copolymer vesicles. The temperature-composition phase diagram of the hybrid vesicles closely resembled that of the mixed phospholipids; with only slightly greater nonidealities in the hybrid compared with DOPC/DPPC mixed membranes. In both systems, it was demonstrated that tension could be used to manipulate DPPC solidification into domains of patchy or striped morphologies that exhibited different tracer incorporation. The patch and stripe-shaped domains are thought to be different solid DPPC polymorphys: ripple and tilt (or gel). This work demonstrates that in mixed-phospholipid bilayers where a high-melting phospholipid solidifies on cooling, the lower-melting phospholipid may be substituted by an appropriate copolymer to improve mechanical properties while retaining the underlying membrane physics.

  17. Anionic phospholipids modulate peptide insertion into membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, L P; Deber, C M

    1997-05-06

    While the insertion of a hydrophobic peptide or membrane protein segment into the bilayer can be spontaneous and driven mainly by the hydrophobic effect, anionic lipids, which comprise ca. 20% of biological membranes, provide a source of electrostatic attractions for binding of proteins/peptides into membranes. To unravel the interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatics in the binding of peptides into membranes, we designed peptides de novo which possess the typical sequence Lys-Lys-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Trp-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Al a-Ala-Lys-Lys-Lys-Lys-amide, where X residues correspond to "guest" residues which encompass a range of hydrophobicity (Leu, Ile, Gly, and Ser). Circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that peptides were partially (40-90%) random in aqueous buffer but were promoted to form 100% alpha-helical structures by anionic lipid micelles. In neutral lipid micelles, only the relatively hydrophobic peptides (X = L and I) spontaneously adopted the alpha-helical conformation, but when 25% of negatively charged lipids were mixed in to mimic the content of anionic lipids in biomembranes, the less hydrophobic (X = S and G) peptides then formed alpha-helical conformations. Consistent with these findings, fluorescence quenching by the aqueous-phase quencher iodide indicated that in anionic (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) vesicles, the peptide Trp residue was buried in the lipid vesicle hydrophobic core, while in neutral (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) vesicles, only hydrophobic (X = L and I) peptides were shielded from the aqueous solution. Trp emission spectra of peptides in the presence of phospholipids doxyl-labeled at the 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, and 16-fatty acid positions implied not only a transbilayer orientation for inserted peptides but also that mixed peptide populations (transbilayer + surface-associated) may arise. Overall results suggest that for hydrophobic peptides with segmental threshold hydrophobicity below that which

  18. Influence of pH and phospholipid species on release of acetaminophen from tablets containing phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Fujii, M; Moriyama, J; Hamazumi, N; Matsumoto, M

    1998-02-01

    The release of acetaminophen (AAP) from tablets containing phospholipids was examined using hydrogenated soybean phospholipid (HSL) and its main components, phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), although the PI was not well purified (PI rich). Tablets compressed with 400 kgf had about 9% porosity and 2-4 kgf hardness. The release patterns of AAP from the tablets were fitted to Higuchi's square root of time law. The release rate was influenced by the pH of the medium, though solubility of AAP did not change with pH. PC tablets showed faster release at pH of less than 3 than that at pH of above 3, whereas PI rich and HSL tablets showed faster release at pH of above 3 than that at pH of less than 3. The release rate from PE tablets was little affected by pH. A linear relationship exists between the release rate of AAP and the rate of water absorption by the tablet. The ionization state of the phospholipids changes with the pH of the medium, and affects the hydration characteristics. The fully ionized state, at pH of less than 3 in the case of PC and above 3 in the case of PI is most effective on hydration. PE does not fully ionize because of intermolecular hydrogen bonding.

  19. Phospholipid monolayers probed by vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy: instability of unsaturated phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Liljeblad, Jonathan F D; Bulone, Vincent; Tyrode, Eric; Rutland, Mark W; Johnson, C Magnus

    2010-05-19

    The surface specific technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy has been applied to in situ studies of the degradation of Langmuir monolayers of 1,2-diacyl-phosphocholines with various degrees of unsaturation in the aliphatic chains. To monitor the degradation of the phospholipids, the time-dependent change of the monolayer area at constant surface pressure and the sum frequency intensity of the vinyl CH stretch at the carbon-carbon double bonds were measured. The data show a rapid degradation of monolayers of phospholipids carrying unsaturated aliphatic chains compared to the stable lipids carrying fully saturated chains when exposed to the ambient laboratory air. In addition, the degradation of the phospholipids can be inhibited by purging the ambient air with nitrogen. This instability may be attributed to spontaneous degradation by oxidation mediated by various reactive species in the air. To further elucidate the process of lipid oxidation in biological membranes artificial Langmuir monolayers probed by a surface specific spectroscopic technique as in this study can serve as a model system for studying the degradation/oxidation of cell membrane constituents.

  20. Docosahexaenoate-containing molecular species of glycerophospholipids from frog retinal rod outer segments show different rates of biosynthesis and turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, K.; Wiegand, R.D.; Anderson, R.E.

    1988-12-13

    The authors have studied the de novo synthesis and subsequent turnover of major docosahexaenoate-containing molecular species in frog rod outer segment (ROS) phospholipids following intravitreal injection of (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol. On selected days after injection, ROS were prepared and phospholipids extracted. Phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and phosphatidylserine (PS) were isolated and converted to diradylglycerols with phospholipase C. Diradylglycerols were derivatized with benzoic anhydride and resolve into diacylglycerobenzoates and ether-linked glycerobenzoates. The diacylglycerobenzoates were fractionated into molecular species by HPLC, quantitated, and counted for radioactivity. Label was incorporated into ROS phospholipids by day 1 and was followed up through the eighth day. The dipolyenoic species 22:6-22:6 from PC showed 1 3-5 times higher radiospecific activity than the same species from either PE or PS. The rate of decline was determined by calculating the half-life of each molecular species, which was used as a measure of the turnover of the species. The percent distribution of radioactivity in the molecular species of PC and PE was quite different from the relative mass distribution at day 1. However, percent dpm approached the mole percent by 31 days. In PS, percent dpm and mole percent were the same at all time points. These results indicate that the molecular species composition of PC and PE in frog retinal ROS is determined by a combination of factors, which include rate of synthesis, rate of degradation, and selective interconversions. In contrast, PS composition appears to be determined at the time of synthesis.

  1. Marine by-product phospholipids as booster of medicinal compounds.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koretaro; Inoue, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Marine phospholipids are defined as phospholipids containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or eicosapentaenoic acid that would be more effective than fish oil, which is mostly composed of triacylglycerol, in exerting health benefits. Marine phospholipids would boost the effect of both the health-beneficial hydrophilic and the hydrophobic compounds such as cell differentiators, anticancer compounds, and antiobesity compounds. When marine phospholipids are served as liposomal drinks, they would be more effective than adding into solid foods or feeds. As long as the liposome bilayer is basically composed of marine phospholipids, they would promote the encapsulated functional compounds. And this is the principal advantage of choosing marine phospholipids as liposomal membrane. Bioconversion of marine phospholipid would also be advantageous in delivering DHA into the desired tissue. For example, lysophosphatidylserine obtained through phospholipase D-mediated transphosphatidylation and phospholipase A₁ or sn-1 positional specific lipase-mediated partial hydrolysis seemed to be the most effective chemical form in delivering DHA into brain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Employee Development and Turnover Intention: Theory Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Wali; Nas, Zekeriya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the pattern of behavior of turnover intentions in developing countries "vis-a-vis" the one in advanced countries through the empirical data from public universities in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The study provides empirical evidence from academia in Pakistan, thereby enriching the understanding of…

  3. Home Visitor Job Satisfaction and Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchbinder, Sharon B.; Duggan, Anne K.; Young, Elizabeth; Fuddy, Loretta; Sia, Cal

    This paper summarizes findings of a 3-year study of the job satisfaction and turnover of home visitors, both professional and paraprofessional, in programs which link families-at-risk for impaired functioning to medical home care and other resources. Specifically, the study examined: (1) home visitor personal characteristics that influence…

  4. Antecedents of Norwegian Beginning Teachers' Turnover Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiplic, Dijana; Brandmo, Christian; Elstad, Eyvind

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at exploring several individual, organizational, and contextual factors that may affect beginning teachers' turnover intentions during their first years of practice. The sample consists of 227 beginning teachers (69% female and 31% male) from 133 schools in Norway. The results show four important antecedents of beginning teachers'…

  5. Health care workplace discrimination and physician turnover.

    PubMed

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Pilgrim, Nanlesta; Wynia, Matthew; Desai, Mayur M; Bright, Cedric; Krumholz, Harlan M; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2009-12-01

    To examine the association between physician race/ ethnicity, workplace discrimination, and physician job turnover. Cross-sectional, national survey conducted in 2006-2007 of practicing physicians (n = 529) randomly identified via the American Medical Association Masterfile and the National Medical Association membership roster. We assessed the relationships between career racial/ethnic discrimination at work and several career-related dependent variables, including 2 measures of physician turnover, career satisfaction, and contemplation of career change. We used standard frequency analyses, odds ratios and chi2 statistics, and multivariate logistic regression modeling to evaluate these associations. Physicians who self-identified as nonmajority were significantly more likely to have left at least 1 job because of workplace discrimination (black, 29%; Asian, 24%; other race, 21%; Hispanic/Latino, 20%; white, 9%). In multivariate models, having experienced racial/ethnic discrimination at work was associated with high job turnover (adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-4.9). Among physicians who experienced workplace discrimination, only 45% of physicians were satisfied with their careers (vs 88% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .01), and 40% were contemplating a career change (vs 10% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .001). Workplace discrimination is associated with physician job turnover, career dissatisfaction, and contemplation of career change. These findings underscore the importance of monitoring for workplace discrimination and responding when opportunities for intervention and retention still exist.

  6. Teacher Turnover in Charter Schools. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuit, David; Smith, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to contribute to a deeper understanding of the organizational conditions of charter schools by examining teacher turnover. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) 2003-04 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) and the Teacher Follow-Up Survey (TFS), researchers from the National Center on School…

  7. Director Turnover: An Australian Academic Development Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

    2012-01-01

    Although it can be argued that directors of central academic development units (ADUs) are critical to the implementation of university teaching and learning strategies, it would appear there is a high director turnover rate. While research in the USA, the UK, and Australia illustrates that ADUs are frequently closed or restructured, that research…

  8. Costing Child Protective Services Staff Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graef, Michelle I.; Hill, Erick L.

    2000-01-01

    Details process of determining a child welfare agency's actual dollar costs directly attributed to protective services staff turnover, using the agency's human resources database and interviews with administrative personnel. Provides formulas and process for calculating specific cost elements due to employee separation, replacement, and training.…

  9. Director Turnover: An Australian Academic Development Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

    2012-01-01

    Although it can be argued that directors of central academic development units (ADUs) are critical to the implementation of university teaching and learning strategies, it would appear there is a high director turnover rate. While research in the USA, the UK, and Australia illustrates that ADUs are frequently closed or restructured, that research…

  10. Turnover of Public School Superintendents in Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Joyce Ntsoaki

    2013-01-01

    This study used a descriptive qualitative design utilizing a phenomenological approach to determine and examine the reasons behind the voluntary or involuntary turnover of Arizona school superintendents. Open-ended questions were used to interview five superintendents who had left their districts between 2008 and 2013 about their perceptions on…

  11. Minor psychiatric morbidity and labour turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, R

    1985-01-01

    The relation of minor psychiatric morbidity with labour turnover is examined, using data from a study of young, predominantly middle class, white collar men and women. The results suggest that the presence of psychiatric symptomatology is at least as important as occupational attitudes in identifying individuals who would subsequently leave the organisation. PMID:4016004

  12. Antecedents of Norwegian Beginning Teachers' Turnover Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiplic, Dijana; Brandmo, Christian; Elstad, Eyvind

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at exploring several individual, organizational, and contextual factors that may affect beginning teachers' turnover intentions during their first years of practice. The sample consists of 227 beginning teachers (69% female and 31% male) from 133 schools in Norway. The results show four important antecedents of beginning teachers'…

  13. Employee Development and Turnover Intention: Theory Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Wali; Nas, Zekeriya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the pattern of behavior of turnover intentions in developing countries "vis-a-vis" the one in advanced countries through the empirical data from public universities in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The study provides empirical evidence from academia in Pakistan, thereby enriching the understanding of…

  14. Dynamics of telomeric DNA turnover in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    McEachern, Michael J; Underwood, Dana Hager; Blackburn, Elizabeth H

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase adds telomeric DNA repeats to telomeric termini using a sequence within its RNA subunit as a template. We characterized two mutations in the Kluyveromyces lactis telomerase RNA gene (TER1) template. Each initially produced normally regulated telomeres. One mutation, ter1-AA, had a cryptic defect in length regulation that was apparent only if the mutant gene was transformed into a TER1 deletion strain to permit extensive replacement of basal wild-type repeats with mutant repeats. This mutant differs from previously studied delayed elongation mutants in a number of properties. The second mutation, TER1-Bcl, which generates a BclI restriction site in newly synthesized telomeric repeats, was indistinguishable from wild type in all phenotypes assayed: cell growth, telomere length, and in vivo telomerase fidelity. TER1-Bcl cells demonstrated that the outer halves of the telomeric repeat tracts turn over within a few hundred cell divisions, while the innermost few repeats typically resisted turnover for at least 3000 cell divisions. Similarly deep but incomplete turnover was also observed in two other TER1 template mutants with highly elongated telomeres. These results indicate that most DNA turnover in functionally normal telomeres is due to gradual replicative sequence loss and additions by telomerase but that there are other processes that also contribute to turnover. PMID:11805045

  15. Single Turnover at Molecular Polymerization Catalysts Reveals Spatiotemporally Resolved Reactions.

    PubMed

    Easter, Quinn T; Blum, Suzanne A

    2017-09-11

    Multiple active individual molecular ruthenium catalysts have been pinpointed within growing polynorbornene, thereby revealing information on the reaction dynamics and location that is unavailable through traditional ensemble experiments. This is the first single-turnover imaging of a molecular catalyst by fluorescence microscopy and allows detection of individual monomer reactions at an industrially important molecular ruthenium ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) catalyst under synthetically relevant conditions (e.g. unmodified industrial catalyst, ambient pressure, condensed phase, ca. 0.03 m monomer). These results further establish the key fundamentals of this imaging technique for characterizing the reactivity and location of active molecular catalysts even when they are the minor components. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Predicting nursing turnover with catastrophe theory.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Cheryl M

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study comparing an innovative nonlinear model and a traditional linear model for accuracy in prediction of nursing turnover. An international, sustained nursing shortage creates a need to target accurately the staff population at risk for turnover. Existing linear methodology is cumbersome with the number of variables needed, while producing inadequate results. Nonlinear modelling methods offer increased simplicity and accuracy in predictability. A correlational survey with a longitudinal cohort prospective study was carried out in 2005-2006 with a convenience sample of 1033 Registered Nurses from the Midwest region of the United States of America. At time 1, 756 usable questionnaires were returned and 496 at time 2. Data analysis included analyses of a cusp catastrophe model, a cube-shaped four-dimensional figure with a top that provided a down-turning slope area (the catastrophe/cusp zone). This fluid, dynamic cusp version employed the smallest number of control and dependent variables. The exceedingly small turnover sample preempted the use of the computerized program Cuspfit; a proven quasi-quantitative methodology demonstrated 80.4% predictability in the cusp catastrophe model overall and 53.6% correct predictions of actual terminations, particularly in nurses with <5 years of nursing experience. Additional accurate predictions were obtained with the use of a time-staged model. Organizational commitment and anticipated turnover were accurate predictor variables; job tension was not. Catastrophe models are useful in predicting nursing turnover. Future nursing researchers should act on this evidence to benefit forthcoming studies and the profession.

  17. Phospholipids at the Interface: Current Trends and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pichot, Roman; Watson, Richard L.; Norton, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipids are one of the major structural elements of biological membranes. Due to their amphiphilic character, they can adopt various molecular assemblies when dispersed in water, such as bilayer vesicles or micelles, which give them unique interfacial properties and render them very attractive in terms of foam or emulsion stabilization. This article aims at reviewing the properties of phospholipids at the air/water and oil/water interfaces, as well as the recent advances in using these natural components as stabilizers, alone or in combination with other compounds such as proteins. A discussion regarding the challenges and opportunities offered by phospholipids-stabilized structure concludes the review. PMID:23736688

  18. Making heads or tails of phospholipids in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Christof; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose functional integrity requires a coordinated supply of proteins and phospholipids. Defined functions of specific phospholipids, like the mitochondrial signature lipid cardiolipin, are emerging in diverse processes, ranging from protein biogenesis and energy production to membrane fusion and apoptosis. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on interorganellar lipid transport between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. The discovery of proteins that regulate mitochondrial membrane lipid composition and of a multiprotein complex tethering ER to mitochondrial membranes has unveiled novel mechanisms of mitochondrial membrane biogenesis. PMID:21220505

  19. Work-Related Variables and Turnover Intention among Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pooyan, Abdullah; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Health institutions have become more interested in the causes of job turnover among registered nurses. Proper management of job turnover can improve the financial health and long-term survival of health care institutions. (Author)

  20. Staff turnover: occasional friend, frequent foe, and continuing frustration.

    PubMed

    McConnell, C R

    1999-09-01

    Turnover appears to be a relatively simple concept. However, considerable confusion results when discussing turnover because of differences in how it is defined--what is counted, how it is counted, and how the rate of turnover is expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to turnover's cost because so much of it is indirect and thus not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some which can be corrected and some which cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of phospholipids in the brain, heart, kidney, and liver: brain phospholipids are least enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaewoo; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Lampe, Joshua W; Stevens, Jan F; Becker, Lance B; Kim, Junhwan

    2017-10-09

    It is commonly accepted that brain phospholipids are highly enriched with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). However, the evidence for this remains unclear. We used HPLC-MS to analyze the content and composition of phospholipids in rat brain and compared it to the heart, kidney, and liver. Phospholipids typically contain one PUFA, such as 18:2, 20:4, or 22:6, and one saturated fatty acid, such as 16:0 or 18:0. However, we found that brain phospholipids containing monounsaturated fatty acids in the place of PUFAs are highly elevated compared to phospholipids in the heart, kidney, and liver. The relative content of phospholipid containing PUFAs is ~ 60% in the brain, whereas it is over 90% in other tissues. The most abundant species of phosphatidylcholine (PC) is PC(16:0/18:1) in the brain, whereas PC(18:0/20:4) and PC(16:0/20:4) are predominated in other tissues. Moreover, several major species of plasmanyl and plasmenyl phosphatidylethanolamine are found to contain monounsaturated fatty acid in the brain only. Overall, our data clearly show that brain phospholipids are the least enriched with PUFAs of the four major organs, challenging the common belief that the brain is highly enriched with PUFAs.

  2. Belowground carbon turnover in a temperate ombrotrophic bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodau, Christian; Roulet, Nigel T.; Heitmann, Tobias; Stewart, Heather; Beer, Julia; Lafleur, Peter; Moore, Tim R.

    2007-03-01

    To examine belowground carbon (C) turnover in peatlands, we measured fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) by chamber measurements, estimated respiration by in situ incubations of peat, and in situ production of dissolved carbon (CO2; CH4; and dissolved organic carbon, DOC) by pore water modeling at an ombrotrophic temperate bog. Ecosystem respiration (ER) averaged 205 mmol m-2 d-1 in summer and was related to temperature, but not water table position, and in situ rates of heterotrophic respiration in the unsaturated zone were also temperature-dependent, with Q10 = 5.0 - 6.4. In the saturated zone, concentrations of 0.1 - 2.5 mmol L-1 (CO2), 0 to 0.6 mmol L-1 (CH4), and <10 - 120 mg L-1 (DOC) were recorded. Turnover was dominated by DOC unrelated to respiration, which ranged from <0.5 to 7 mmol m-2 d-1 and amounted on average to < 1% of ER. Peat decomposition constants kd were 0.060 yr-1 to 0.034 yr-1 in the unsaturated and <0.002 yr-1 in the saturated zone. Monthly averages of CH4 fluxes ranged from 0 to 1.6 mmol m-2 d-1 and were higher than modeled diffusive fluxes when threshold concentrations for CH4 ebullition were recorded closer to the peatland surface. Our results suggest that the saturated zone is of little relevance to ER in this dry temperate bog and that mobilization of DOC is a potentially more relevant process. Temperature is a more important control on ER than water table position because most of the ER is generated close to the peatland surface. Concurrent, moderate increases in temperature and soil moisture are thus likely to increase losses of CO2 from ER and of CH4 from this type of peatland.

  3. A Postnatal Diet Containing Phospholipids, Processed to Yield Large, Phospholipid-Coated Lipid Droplets, Affects Specific Cognitive Behaviors in Healthy Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Lidewij; van Dijk, Gertjan; Broersen, Laus M; Loos, Maarten; Bartke, Nana; Scheurink, Anton Jw; van der Beek, Eline M

    2016-06-01

    Infant cognitive development can be positively influenced by breastfeeding rather than formula feeding. The composition of breast milk, especially lipid quality, and the duration of breastfeeding have been linked to this effect. We investigated whether the physical properties and composition of lipid droplets in milk may contribute to cognitive development. From postnatal day (P) 16 to P44, healthy male C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice were fed either a control or a concept rodent diet, in which the dietary lipid droplets were large and coated with milk phospholipids, resembling more closely the physical properties and composition of breast milk lipids. Thereafter, all mice were fed an AIN-93M semisynthetic rodent diet. The mice were subjected to various cognitive tests during adolescence (P35-P44) and adulthood (P70-P101). On P102, mice were killed and brain phospholipids were analyzed. The concept diet improved performance in short-term memory tasks that rely on novelty exploration during adolescence (T-maze; spontaneous alternation 87% in concept-fed mice compared with 74% in mice fed control diet; P < 0.05) and adulthood (novel object recognition; preference index 0.48 in concept-fed mice compared with 0.05 in control-fed mice; P < 0.05). Cognitive performance in long-term memory tasks, however, was unaffected by diet. Brain phospholipid composition at P102 was not different between diet groups. Exposure to a diet with lipids mimicking more closely the structure and composition of lipids in breast milk improved specific cognitive behaviors in mice. These data suggest that lipid structure should be considered as a relevant target to improve dietary lipid quality in infant milk formulas. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Relating microbial community structure to functioning in forest soil organic carbon transformation and turnover

    PubMed Central

    You, Yeming; Wang, Juan; Huang, Xueman; Tang, Zuoxin; Liu, Shirong; Sun, Osbert J

    2014-01-01

    Forest soils store vast amounts of terrestrial carbon, but we are still limited in mechanistic understanding on how soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization or turnover is controlled by biotic and abiotic factors in forest ecosystems. We used phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) as biomarker to study soil microbial community structure and measured activities of five extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation of cellulose (i.e., β-1,4-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase), chitin (i.e., β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase), and lignin (i.e., phenol oxidase and peroxidase) as indicators of soil microbial functioning in carbon transformation or turnover across varying biotic and abiotic conditions in a typical temperate forest ecosystem in central China. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was performed to determine the interrelationship between individual PFLAs and biotic and abiotic site factors as well as the linkage between soil microbial structure and function. Path analysis was further conducted to examine the controls of site factors on soil microbial community structure and the regulatory pathway of changes in SOC relating to microbial community structure and function. We found that soil microbial community structure is strongly influenced by water, temperature, SOC, fine root mass, clay content, and C/N ratio in soils and that the relative abundance of Gram-negative bacteria, saprophytic fungi, and actinomycetes explained most of the variations in the specific activities of soil enzymes involved in SOC transformation or turnover. The abundance of soil bacterial communities is strongly linked with the extracellular enzymes involved in carbon transformation, whereas the abundance of saprophytic fungi is associated with activities of extracellular enzymes driving carbon oxidation. Findings in this study demonstrate the complex interactions and linkage among plant traits, microenvironment, and soil physiochemical properties in affecting SOC via microbial regulations. PMID

  5. Reduction-sensitive liposomes from a multifunctional lipid conjugate and natural phospholipids: reduction and release kinetics and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Brodersen, Nicolai; Gramatica, Andrea; Loew, Martin; Liebscher, Jürgen; Herrmann, Andreas; Egger, Holger; Budde, Bastian; Arbuzova, Anna

    2011-09-06

    The development of targeted and triggerable delivery systems is of high relevance for anticancer therapies. We report here on reduction-sensitive liposomes composed of a novel multifunctional lipidlike conjugate, containing a disulfide bond and a biotin moiety, and natural phospholipids. The incorporation of the disulfide conjugate into vesicles and the kinetics of their reduction were studied using dansyl-labeled conjugate 1 in using the dansyl fluorescence environmental sensitivity and the Förster resonance energy transfer from dansyl to rhodamine-labeled phospholipids. Cleavage of the disulfide bridge (e.g., by tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP), dithiothreitol (DTT), l-cysteine, or glutathione (GSH)) removed the hydrophilic headgroup of the conjugate and thus changed the membrane organization leading to the release of entrapped molecules. Upon nonspecific uptake of vesicles by macrophages, calcein release from reduction-sensitive liposomes consisting of the disulfide conjugate and phospholipids was more efficient than from reduction-insensitive liposomes composed only of phospholipids. The binding of streptavidin to the conjugates did not interfere with either the subsequent reduction of the disulfide bond of the conjugate or the release of entrapped molecules. Breast cancer cell line BT-474, overexpressing the HER2 receptor, showed a high uptake of the reduction-sensitive doxorubicin-loaded liposomes functionalized with the biotin-tagged anti-HER2 antibody. The release of the entrapped cargo inside the cells was observed, implying the potential of using our system for active targeting and delivery. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Salary and Ranking and Teacher Turnover: A Statewide Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Cynthia Martinez; Slate, John R.; Delgado, Carmen Tejeda

    2009-01-01

    This study examined three years of data obtained from the Academic Excellence Indicator System of the State of Texas regarding teacher turnover rate and teacher salary. Across all public school districts, teacher salary was consistently negatively related to teacher turnover; that is, where salary was lower, turnover rate was higher When data were…

  7. Turnover of regulated nurses in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Chu, Charlene H; Wodchis, Walter P; McGilton, Katherine S

    2014-07-01

    To describe the relationship between nursing staff turnover in long-term care (LTC) homes and organisational factors consisting of leadership practices and behaviours, supervisory support, burnout, job satisfaction and work environment satisfaction. The turnover of regulated nursing staff [Registered Nurses (RNs) and Registered Practical Nurses (RPNs)] in LTC facilities is a pervasive problem, but there is a scarcity of research examining this issue in Canada. The study was conceptualized using a Stress Process model. Distinct surveys were distributed to administrators to measure organisational factors and to regulated nurses to measure personal and job-related sources of stress and workplace support. In total, 324 surveys were used in the linear regression analysis to examine factors associated with high turnover rates. Higher leadership practice scores were associated with lower nursing turnover; a one score increase in leadership correlated with a 49% decrease in nursing turnover. A significant inverse relationship between leadership turnover and nurse turnover was found: the higher the administrator turnover the lower the nurse turnover rate. Leadership practices and administrator turnover are significant in influencing regulated nurse turnover in LTC. Long-term care facilities may want to focus on building good leadership and communication as an upstream method to minimize nurse turnover. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The shocking cost of turnover in health care.

    PubMed

    Waldman, J Deane; Kelly, Frank; Arora, Sanjeev; Smith, Howard L

    2004-01-01

    Review of turnover costs at a major medical center helps health care managers gain insights about the magnitude and determinants of this managerial challenge and assess the implications for organizational effectiveness. Here, turnover includes hiring, training, and productivity loss costs. Minimum cost of turnover represented a loss of >5 percent of the total annual operating budget.

  9. Factors Related to Turnover among Mental Health Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Thomas Li-Ping

    In view of the extremely high turnover among corporation recruits, there is growing and justified interest in having organizations identify the causes of turnover and possible ways of reducing it. Many studies have examined different variables related to turnover, including organizational commitment, career commitment, job satisfaction, and…

  10. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... comparison may be expressed either as a turnover ratio (dollar value of issues divided by dollar value...

  11. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... comparison may be expressed either as a turnover ratio (dollar value of issues divided by dollar value...

  12. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... comparison may be expressed either as a turnover ratio (dollar value of issues divided by dollar value...

  13. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... comparison may be expressed either as a turnover ratio (dollar value of issues divided by dollar value...

  14. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... comparison may be expressed either as a turnover ratio (dollar value of issues divided by dollar value...

  15. Superintendent Turnover in Kentucky. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 113

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jerry; Huffman, Tyler; Madden, Karen; Shope, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines superintendent turnover in Kentucky public school districts for 1998/99-2007/08, looking at how turnover varies by rural status, Appalachian and non-Appalachian region, and 2007/08 school district characteristics. Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08;…

  16. Looking Beyond Structure: Membrane Phospholipids of Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Heden, Timothy D; Neufer, P Darrell; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondria are highly dynamic and are capable of tremendous expansion to meet cellular energetic demands. Such proliferation in mitochondrial mass requires a synchronized supply of enzymes and structural phospholipids. While transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial enzymes has been extensively studied, there is limited information on how mitochondrial membrane lipids are generated in skeletal muscle. Herein we describe how each class of phospholipids that constitute mitochondrial membranes are synthesized and/or imported, and summarize genetic evidence indicating that membrane phospholipid composition represents a significant modulator of skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function. We also discuss how skeletal muscle mitochondrial phospholipids may mediate the effect of diet and exercise on oxidative metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Esther; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Sonda, Sabrina; Kaech, Andres; Lucas, Miriam S.; Ackermann, Mathias; Wild, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  18. Phospholipids of the lung in normal, toxic, and diseased states

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, T.; Ohno, K.

    1981-01-01

    The highly pulmonary concentration of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphorylcholine (dipalmitoyllecithin) and its implication as an important component of lung surfactant have promoted investigation of phospholipid metabolism in the lung. This review will set the contents including recent informations for better understanding of phospholipid metabolism of the lung in normal state (physiological significances of lung phospholipids, characteristics of phospholipids in lung tissue and alveolar washing, biosynthetic pathways of dipalmitoyllecithin, etc.) as well as in toxic states (pulmonary oxygen toxicity, etc.) and in diseased states (idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, etc.) Since our main concern has been to clarify the most important route for supplying dipalmitoyllecithin, this review will be focused upon the various biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of different molecular species of lecithin and their potential significance in the normal, toxic, and diseased lungs.

  19. Supported phospholipid/alkanethiol biomimetic membranes: insulating properties.

    PubMed Central

    Plant, A L; Gueguetchkeri, M; Yap, W

    1994-01-01

    A novel model lipid bilayer membrane is prepared by the addition of phospholipid vesicles to alkanethiol monolayers on gold. This supported hybrid bilayer membrane is rugged, easily and reproducibly prepared in the absence of organic solvent, and is stable for very long periods of time. We have characterized the insulating characteristics of this membrane by examining the rate of electron transfer and by impedance spectroscopy. Supported hybrid bilayers formed from phospholipids and alkanethiols are pinhole-free and demonstrate measured values of conductivity and resistivity which are within an order of magnitude of that reported for black lipid membranes. Capacitance values suggest a dielectric constant of 2.7 for phospholipid membranes in the absence of organic solvent. The protein toxin, melittin, destroys the insulating capability of the phospholipid layer without significantly altering the bilayer structure. This model membrane will allow the assessment of the effect of lipid membrane perturbants on the insulating properties of natural lipid membranes. PMID:7811924

  20. Biomolecular interactions at phospholipid-decorated surfaces of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Brake, Jeffrey M; Daschner, Maren K; Luk, Yan-Yeung; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2003-12-19

    The spontaneous assembly of phospholipids at planar interfaces between thermotropic liquid crystals and aqueous phases gives rise to patterned orientations of the liquid crystals that reflect the spatial and temporal organization of the phospholipids. Strong and weak specific-binding events involving proteins at these interfaces drive the reorganization of the phospholipids and trigger orientational transitions in the liquid crystals. Because these interfaces are fluid, processes involving the lateral organization of proteins (such as the formation of protein- and phospholipid-rich domains) are also readily imaged by the orientational response of the liquid crystal, as are stereospecific enzymatic events. These results provide principles for label-free monitoring of aqueous streams for molecular and biomolecular species without the need for complex instrumentation.

  1. A phospholipid uptake system in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Lisbeth R; López-Marqués, Rosa L; Pedas, Pai R; McDowell, Stephen C; Brown, Elizabeth; Kunze, Reinhard; Harper, Jeffrey F; Pomorski, Thomas G; Palmgren, Michael

    2015-07-27

    Plants use solar energy to produce lipids directly from inorganic elements and are not thought to require molecular systems for lipid uptake from the environment. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Aminophospholipid ATPase10 (ALA10) is a P4-type ATPase flippase that internalizes exogenous phospholipids across the plasma membrane, after which they are rapidly metabolized. ALA10 expression and phospholipid uptake are high in the epidermal cells of the root tip and in guard cells, the latter of which regulate the size of stomatal apertures to modulate gas exchange. ALA10-knockout mutants exhibit reduced phospholipid uptake at the root tips and guard cells and are affected in growth and transpiration. The presence of a phospholipid uptake system in plants is surprising. Our results suggest that one possible physiological role of this system is to internalize lysophosphatidylcholine, a signalling lipid involved in root development and stomatal control.

  2. Regional distribution of phospholipids in porcine vitreous humor.

    PubMed

    Schnepf, Abigail; Yappert, Marta Cecilia; Borchman, Douglas

    2017-07-01

    This project explores the regional phospholipid distribution in porcine vitreous humor, retina, and lens. Matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry has been used previously to image lipids, proteins, and other metabolites in retinas and lenses. However, the regional composition of phospholipids in vitreous humors is not known. To address this issue, we have applied this mass spectral method to explore the regional phospholipid distribution in porcine vitreous humor both ex-situ and in-vitro. To establish the possible source(s) of phospholipids in the vitreous humor, compositional studies of the lens and retina were also pursued. Due to the overall low levels of phospholipids in vitreous humor, it was necessary to optimize the experimental approaches for ex-situ and in-vitro studies. The sensitivity observed in the spectra of methanol extracts from the lens and retina was higher than that for methanol:chloroform extracts, but the compositional trends were the same. A fourfold improvement in sensitivity was observed in the analysis of vitreous humor extracts obtained with the Bligh and Dyer protocol relative to the other two extraction methods. For ex-situ studies, the 'stamp method' with para-nitroaniline as the matrix was chosen. Throughout the vitreous humor, phosphatidylcholines were the most abundant phospholipids. In-vitro results showed higher relative levels of phospholipids compared to the 'stamp' method. However, more details in the regional phospholipid distribution were provided by the ex-situ approach. Both in-vitro and ex-situ results indicated higher levels of phospholipids in the posterior vitreous region, followed by the anterior and central regions. The posterior region contained more unsaturated species whereas more saturated phospholipids were detected in the anterior region. The observed trends suggest that the phospholipids detected in the posterior vitreous humor migrate from the retina and associated vasculature while those present in

  3. Rhizosphere bacterial carbon turnover is higher in nucleic acids than membrane lipids: implications for understanding soil carbon cycling

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ashish A.; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert I.; Thomson, Bruce C.; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labeling experiment we compared the flow of plant carbon into macromolecular fractions of rhizosphere soil microorganisms. Time dependent 13C dilution patterns in microbial cellular fractions were used to calculate their turnover time. The turnover times of microbial biomolecules were found to vary: microbial RNA (19 h) and DNA (30 h) turned over fastest followed by chloroform fumigation extraction-derived soluble cell lysis products (14 days), while phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) had the slowest turnover (42 days). PLFA/NLFA 13C analyses suggest that both mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi are dominant in initial plant carbon uptake. In contrast, high initial 13C enrichment in RNA hints at bacterial importance in initial C uptake due to the dominance of bacterial derived RNA in total extracts of soil RNA. To explain this discrepancy, we observed low renewal rate of bacterial lipids, which may therefore bias lipid fatty acid based interpretations of the role of bacteria in soil microbial food webs. Based on our findings, we question current assumptions regarding plant-microbe carbon flux and suggest that the rhizosphere bacterial contribution to plant assimilate uptake could be higher. This highlights the need for more detailed quantitative investigations with nucleic acid biomarkers to further validate these findings. PMID:25914679

  4. Novel Phospholipid-Protein Conjugates Allow Improved Detection of Antibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nybo, Mads; Macaubas, Claudia; Lønstrup, Lars; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Reliable measurement of clinically relevant autoimmune antibodies toward phospholipid-protein conjugates is highly desirable in research and clinical assays. To date, the development in this field has been limited to the use of natural heterogeneous antigens. However, this approach does not take structural features of biologically active antigens into account and leads to low reliability and poor scientific test value. Here we describe novel phospholipid-protein conjugates for specific detection of human autoimmune antibodies. Our synthetic approach includes mild oxidation of synthetic phospholipid cardiolipin, and as the last step, coupling of the product with azide-containing linker and copper-catalyzed click chemistry with β2-glycoprotein I and prothrombin. To prove utility of the product antigens, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and three cohorts of samples obtained from patients in Denmark (n = 34) and the USA (n = 27 and n = 14). Afterwards we analyzed correlation of the obtained autoantibody titers with clinical parameters for each patient. Our results prove that using novel antigens clinically relevant autoantibodies can be detected with high repeatability, sensitivity and specificity. Unlike previously used antigens the obtained autoantibody titers strongly correlate with high disease activity and in particular, with arthritis, renal involvement, anti-Smith antibodies and high lymphocyte count. Importantly, chemical composition of antigens has a strong influence on the correlation of detected autoantibodies with disease activity and manifestations. This confirms the crucial importance of antigens’ composition on research and diagnostic assays, and opens up exciting perspectives for synthetic antigens in future studies of autoimmunity. PMID:27257889

  5. Delayed oxidative degradation of polyunsaturated diacyl phospholipids in the presence of plasmalogen phospholipids in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, D; Beyer, K; Engelmann, B

    1997-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of plasmalogen (alkenylacyl) phospholipids was analysed in the absence and the presence of polyunsaturated ester phospholipids by 1H-NMR and by chemical determination. Brain lysoplasmenylethanolamine (lyso-P-PE), brain P-PE and erythrocyte P-PE, containing an increasing number of intrachain double bonds at sn2, were oxidized with 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH; 2 or 10 mM) in Triton X-100 micelles (detergent/phospholipid 1:5, mol/mol). The formation of two peroxyl radicals was accompanied by the degradation of approx. one molecule of brain lyso-P-PE. On oxidation of brain P-PE or erythrocyte P-PE (320 nmol) with 2 mM AAPH, the (alpha-vinyl) methine 1H signal of the enol ether decreased more rapidly than the methine proton peak of intrachain double bonds. The rate of enol ether degradation increased in the order: erythrocyte P-PE>brain P-PE>brain lyso-P-PE. The disappearance of the polyunsaturated ester phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl phosphatidylcholine (16:0/20:4-PC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl phosphatidylcholine (16:0/18:2-PC) (100 nmol), as induced by 10 mM AAPH, was nearly completely inhibited by the plasmalogens (25 nmol) in the first 30 and 60 min of incubation respectively, and was delayed at later time points. Plasmalogens and vitamin E (4-25 nmol) mitigated the decreases in 16:0/[3H]20:4-PC (100 nmol) induced by 2 mM AAPH in a similar manner. The initial rate of degradation of intrachain double bonds of 16:0/20:4-PC and 16:0/18:2-PC (320 nmol; 2 mM AAPH) was decreased by 59% and 81% respectively in the presence of 80 nmol of brain lyso-P-PE. In conclusion, plasmalogens markedly delay the oxidative degradation of intrachain double bonds under in vitro conditions. Interactions of enol ether double bonds with initiating peroxyl radicals as well as with products generated by prior oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids are proposed to be responsible for this capacity of plasmalogens. Furthermore, the

  6. Enhancement by cytidine of membrane phospholipid synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    G-Coviella, I. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Cytidine, as cytidine 5'-diphosphate choline, is a major precursor in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine in cell membranes. In the present study, we examined the relationships between extracellular levels of cytidine, the conversion of [14C]choline to [14C]phosphatidylcholine, and the net syntheses of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine by PC12 cells. The rate at which cytidine (as [3H]cytidine) was incorporated into the PC12 cells followed normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 5 microM; Vmax = 12 x 10(-3) mmol/mg of protein/min) when the cytidine concentrations in the medium were below 50 microM; at higher concentrations, intracellular [3H]cytidine nucleotide levels increased linearly. Once inside the cell, cytidine was converted mainly into cytidine triphosphate. In pulse-chase experiments, addition of cytidine to the medium caused a time- and dose-dependent increase (by up to 30%) in the incorporation of [14C]choline into membrane [14C]-phosphatidylcholine. When the PC12 cells were supplemented with both cytidine and choline for 14 h, small but significant elevations (p less than 0.05) were observed in their absolute contents of membrane phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine, all increasing by 10-15% relative to their levels in cells incubated with choline alone. Exogenous cytidine, acting via cytidine triphosphate, can thus affect the synthesis and levels of cell membrane phospholipids.

  7. Molecular Insights into Phospholipid -- NSAID Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu Boggara, Mohan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2007-03-01

    Non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) e.g. Aspirin and Ibuprofen, with chronic usage cause gastro intestinal (GI) toxicity. It has been shown experimentally that NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipids reduce the GI toxicity and also increase the therapeutic activity of these drugs compared to the unmodified ones. Using all atomistic simulations and two different methodologies, we studied the partitioning behavior of two model NSAIDs (Aspirin and Ibuprofen) as a function of pH and drug loading. The results from two methodologies are consistent in describing the equilibrium drug distribution in the bilayers. Additionally, the heterogeneity in density and polarity of the bilayer in the normal direction along with the fact that NSAIDs are amphiphilic (all of them have a carboxylic acid group and a non-polar part consisting of aromatic moieties), indicate that the diffusion mechanism in the bilayer is far different compared to the same in a bulk medium. This study summarizes the various effects of NSAIDs and their behavior inside the lipid bilayer both as a function of pH and drug concentration.

  8. Millimeter-area, free standing, phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Peter J; Van Hooghten, Rob; Vermant, Jan

    2016-05-11

    Minimal model biomembrane studies have the potential to unlock the fundamental mechanisms of cellular function that govern the processes upon which life relies. However, existing methods to fabricate free-standing model membranes currently have significant limitations. Bilayer sizes are often tens of micrometers, decoupling curvature or substrate effects, orthogonal control over tension, and solvent exchange combined with microscopy techniques is not possible, which restricts the studies that can be performed. Here, we describe a versatile platform to generate free standing, planar, phospholipid bilayers with millimeter scale areas. The technique relies on an adapted thin-film balance apparatus allowing for the dynamic control of the nucleation and growth of a planar black lipid membrane in the center of an orifice surrounded by microfluidic channels. Success is demonstrated using several different lipid types, including mixtures that show the same temperature dependent phase separation as existing protocols, moreover, membranes are highly stable. Two advantages unique to the proposed method are the dynamic control of the membrane tension and the possibility to make extremely large area membranes. We demonstrate this by showing how a block polymer, F68, used in drug delivery increases the membrane compliance. Together, the results demonstrate a new paradigm for studying the mechanics, structure, and function of model membranes.

  9. Enhancement by cytidine of membrane phospholipid synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    G-Coviella, I. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Cytidine, as cytidine 5'-diphosphate choline, is a major precursor in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine in cell membranes. In the present study, we examined the relationships between extracellular levels of cytidine, the conversion of [14C]choline to [14C]phosphatidylcholine, and the net syntheses of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine by PC12 cells. The rate at which cytidine (as [3H]cytidine) was incorporated into the PC12 cells followed normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 5 microM; Vmax = 12 x 10(-3) mmol/mg of protein/min) when the cytidine concentrations in the medium were below 50 microM; at higher concentrations, intracellular [3H]cytidine nucleotide levels increased linearly. Once inside the cell, cytidine was converted mainly into cytidine triphosphate. In pulse-chase experiments, addition of cytidine to the medium caused a time- and dose-dependent increase (by up to 30%) in the incorporation of [14C]choline into membrane [14C]-phosphatidylcholine. When the PC12 cells were supplemented with both cytidine and choline for 14 h, small but significant elevations (p less than 0.05) were observed in their absolute contents of membrane phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine, all increasing by 10-15% relative to their levels in cells incubated with choline alone. Exogenous cytidine, acting via cytidine triphosphate, can thus affect the synthesis and levels of cell membrane phospholipids.

  10. Biomimetic surface modification of polyurethane with phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dongsheng; Liu, Liuxu; Li, Zhen; Fu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    To improve blood compatibility of polyurethane (PU), phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared through zwitterion-mediated cycloaddition reaction and amide condensation, and then were added to the PU as fillers via solution mixing to form biomimetic surface. The properties of phospholipids grafted CNTs (CNT-PC) were investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR). The results indicated that the phospholipids were grafted onto CNTs in high efficiency, and the hydrophilicity and dispersibility of the modified CNTs were improved effectively. The structures and properties of composites containing CNT-PC were investigated by optical microscope, XPS, and water contact angles. The results indicated that phospholipids were enriched on the surface with addition of 0.1 wt % of CNT-PC, which significantly reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The method of carrying phospholipids on the nanofiller to modify polymers has provided a promising way of constructing biomimetic phospholipid membrane on the surface to improve blood compatibility.

  11. Effects of Phenethyl Alcohol on Phospholipid Metabolism in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, William D.; Tropp, Burton E.

    1972-01-01

    The incorporation of labeled precursors into the deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid (RNA), proteins, and phospholipids of Escherichia coli cultured in the presence of phenethyl alcohol (PEA) was determined. PEA inhibited the uptake of labeled uracil to the same extent in cells exhibiting relaxed and stringent control of RNA synthesis. This indicates that PEA does not primarily affect amino acid synthesis or activation. Uptake of labeled acetate into the phospholipid fraction was more sensitive to inhibition by low concentrations of PEA than was the uptake of labeled precursors into the macromolecules. Thymine starvation or the addition of nalidixic acid (10 μg/ml) had no effect on acetate incorporation. Chloramphenicol (25 μg/ml) was a much less effective inhibitor of acetate incorporation than was PEA. The distribution of labeled acetate incorporated into phospholipids was markedly affected by the presence of PEA. The uptake of acetate into phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol was inhibited, whereas the uptake of acetate into the cardiolipin fraction was unaffected. Since acetate incorporation into phospholipid was quite sensitive to PEA, we suggest that the PEA-sensitive component required for the initiation of replication may be a phospholipid(s). PMID:4550658

  12. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by zinc.

    PubMed

    Iwanyshyn, Wendy M; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2004-05-21

    Zinc is an essential nutrient required for the growth and metabolism of eukaryotic cells. In this work, we examined the effects of zinc depletion on the regulation of phospholipid synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Zinc depletion resulted in a decrease in the activity levels of the CDP-diacylglycerol pathway enzymes phosphatidylserine synthase, phosphatidylserine decarboxylase, phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase, and phospholipid methyltransferase. In contrast, the activity of phosphatidylinositol synthase was elevated in response to zinc depletion. The level of Aut7p, a marker for the induction of autophagy, was also elevated in zinc-depleted cells. For the CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase, the reduction in activity in response to zinc depletion was controlled at the level of transcription. This regulation was mediated through the UAS(INO) element and by the transcription factors Ino2p, Ino4p, and Opi1p that are responsible for the inositol-mediated regulation of UAS(INO)-containing genes involved in phospholipid synthesis. Analysis of the cellular composition of the major membrane phospholipids showed that zinc depletion resulted in a 66% decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine and a 29% increase in phosphatidylinositol. A zrt1Delta zrt2Delta mutant (defective in the plasma membrane zinc transporters Zrt1p and Zrt2p) grown in the presence of zinc exhibited a phospholipid composition similar to that of wild type cells depleted for zinc. These results indicated that a decrease in the cytoplasmic levels of zinc was responsible for the alterations in phospholipid composition.

  13. Polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin alters its interaction with phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Kimberly B; Sapp, Ellen; Alexander, Jonathan; Valencia, Antonio; Reeves, Patrick; Li, Xueyi; Masso, Nicholas; Sobin, Lindsay; Aronin, Neil; DiFiglia, Marian

    2009-09-01

    Huntingtin has an expanded polyglutamine tract in patients with Huntington's disease. Huntingtin localizes to intracellular and plasma membranes but the function of huntingtin at membranes is unknown. Previously we reported that exogenously expressed huntingtin bound pure phospholipids using protein-lipid overlays. Here we show that endogenous huntingtin from normal (Hdh(7Q/7Q)) mouse brain and mutant huntingtin from Huntington's disease (Hdh(140Q/140Q)) mouse brain bound to large unilamellar vesicles containing phosphoinositol (PI) PI 3,4-bisphosphate, PI 3,5-bisphosphate, and PI 3,4,5-triphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3]. Huntingtin interactions with multivalent phospholipids were similar to those of dynamin. Mutant huntingtin associated more with phosphatidylethanolamine and PI(3,4,5)P3 than did wild-type huntingtin, and associated with other phospholipids not recognized by wild-type huntingtin. Wild-type and mutant huntingtin also bound to large unilamellar vesicles containing cardiolipin, a phospholipid specific to mitochondrial membranes. Maximal huntingtin-phospholipid association required inclusion of huntingtin amino acids 171-287. Endogenous huntingtin recruited to the plasma membrane in cells that incorporated exogenous PI 3,4-bisphosphate and PI(3,4,5)P3 or were stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor or insulin growth factor 1, which both activate PI 3-kinase. These data suggest that huntingtin interacts with membranes through specific phospholipid associations and that mutant huntingtin may disrupt membrane trafficking and signaling at membranes.

  14. Microtubes and nanotubes of a phospholipid bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Iglic, Ales; Gomiscek, Gregor; Sevsek, France; Arrigler, Vesna; Hägerstrand, Henry

    2002-02-01

    We propose a theory describing the stable structure of a phospholipid bilayer in pure water involving a spherical mother vesicle with long thin tubular protrusion. It is considered that the phospholipid molecules are in general anisotropic with respect to the axis normal to the membrane and can orient in the plane of the membrane if the curvature field is strongly anisotropic. Taking this into account, the membrane free energy is derived starting from a single-molecule energy and using methods of statistical mechanics. By linking the description on the microscopic level with the continuum theory of elasticity we recover the expression for the membrane bending energy and obtain an additional (deviatoric) contribution due to the orientational ordering of the phospholipid molecules. It is shown that the deviatoric contribution may considerably decrease the phospholipid vesicle membrane free energy if the vesicle involves regions where the difference between the two principal curvatures is large (thin cylindrical protrusions and/or thin finite necks) and thereby yields a possible explanation for the stability of the long thin tubular protrusions of the phospholipid bilayer vesicles. We report on the experiment exhibiting a stable shape of the spherical phospholipid vesicle with a long thin tubular protrusion in pure water.

  15. Coupling of Fatty Acid and Phospholipid Synthesis in Bacillus subtilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Luciana; Lu, Ying-Jie; Schujman, Gustavo E.; de Mendoza, Diego; Rock, Charles O.

    2007-01-01

    plsX (acyl-acyl carrier protein [ACP]:phosphate acyltransferase), plsY (yneS) (acyl-phosphate:glycerol-phosphate acyltransferase), and plsC (yhdO) (acyl-ACP:1-acylglycerol-phosphate acyltransferase) function in phosphatidic acid formation, the precursor to membrane phospholipids. The physiological functions of these genes was inferred from their in vitro biochemical activities, and this study investigated their roles in gram-positive phospholipid metabolism through the analysis of conditional knockout strains in the Bacillus subtilis model system. The depletion of PlsX led to the cessation of both fatty acid synthesis and phospholipid synthesis. The inactivation of PlsY also blocked phospholipid synthesis, but fatty acid formation continued due to the appearance of acylphosphate intermediates and fatty acids arising from their hydrolysis. Phospholipid synthesis ceased following PlsC depletion, but fatty acid synthesis continued at a high rate, leading to the accumulation of fatty acids arising from the dephosphorylation of 1-acylglycerol-3-P followed by the deacylation of monoacylglycerol. Analysis of glycerol 3-P acylation in B. subtilis membranes showed that PlsY was an acylphosphate-specific acyltransferase, whereas PlsC used only acyl-ACP as an acyl donor. PlsX was found in the soluble fraction of disrupted cells but was associated with the cell membrane in intact organisms. These data establish that PlsX is a key enzyme that coordinates the production of fatty acids and membrane phospholipids in B. subtilis. PMID:17557823

  16. Orthophosphate turnover in East African lakes.

    PubMed

    Peters, Robert Henry; MacIntyre, Sally

    1976-12-01

    Turnover rates of (32)P-PO4 and concentrations of orthophosphate as soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) were measured in five East African waters. Rapid incorporation of (32)P-PO4 by the seston and orthophosphate concentrations below the limit of detectibility were found in Lakes Elmenteita, Naivasha, and Naivasha Crater Lake. Turnover was slow and orthophosphate concentration high in both Lake Nakuru and the Crescent Island Crater basin of Lake Naivasha. Further experiments in Lake Nakuru indicated that colloidal binding of orthophosphate was limited and that particles retained by an 8.0 μ filter incorporated 66% as much tracer as particles retained by a 0.1 μ filter. These experiments strengthen our conclusion that a large quantity of orthophosphate is available for algal use in Lake Nakuru.

  17. Replicator dynamics with turnover of players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Jeppe; Kianercy, Ardeshir; Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Pigolotti, Simone

    2013-08-01

    We study adaptive dynamics in games where players abandon the population at a given rate and are replaced by naive players characterized by a prior distribution over the admitted strategies. We demonstrate how such a process leads macroscopically to a variant of the replicator equation, with an additional term accounting for player turnover. We study how Nash equilibria and the dynamics of the system are modified by this additional term for prototypical examples such as the rock-paper-scissors game and different classes of two-action games played between two distinct populations. We conclude by showing how player turnover can account for nontrivial departures from Nash equilibria observed in data from lowest unique bid auctions.

  18. Occupational turnover intentions among substance abuse counselors

    PubMed Central

    Rothrauff, Tanja C.; Abraham, Amanda J.; Bride, Brian E.; Roman, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of occupational turnover intention (OcTI) among substance abuse counselors. Data were obtained via questionnaires from 929 counselors working in 225 private substance abuse treatment (SAT) programs across the U.S. Hierarchical multiple regression models were conducted to assess predictor, moderator, and mediator variables of OcTI. OcTI scores were relatively low on a 7-point scale, indicating that very few counselors definitely intended to leave the SAT field. Age, certification, positive perceptions of procedural and distributive justice, and hospital-based status negatively predicted OcTI. Counselors’ substance use disorder impacted history moderated the association between organizational commitment and OcTI. Organizational turnover intention partially mediated the link between organizational commitment and OcTI. Workforce stability might be achieved by promoting perceptions of advantages to working in a particular treatment program, organizational commitment, showing appreciation for counselors’ work, and valuing employees from diverse backgrounds. PMID:20947285

  19. Turnover intention in new graduate nurses: a multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Beecroft, Pauline C; Dorey, Frederick; Wenten, Madé

    2008-01-01

    Title Turnover intention in new graduate nurses: a multivariate analysis Aim This paper is a report of a study to determine the relationship of new nurse turnover intent with individual characteristics, work environment variables and organizational factors and to compare new nurse turnover with actual turnover in the 18 months of employment following completion of a residency. Background Because of their influence on patient safety and health outcomes nurse turnover and turnover intent have received considerable attention worldwide. When nurse staffing is inadequate, especially during nursing shortages, unfavourable clinical outcomes have been documented. Method Prospective data collection took place from 1999 to 2006 with 889 new paediatric nurses who completed the same residency. Scores on study instruments were related to likelihood of turnover intent using logistic regression analysis models. Relationships between turnover intent and actual turnover were compared using Kaplan–Meier survivorship. Results The final model demonstrated that older respondents were more likely to have turnover intent if they did not get their ward choice. Also higher scores on work environment and organizational characteristics contributed to likelihood that the new nurse would not be in the turnover intent group. These factors distinguish a new nurse with turnover intent from one without 79% of the time. Increased seeking of social support was related to turnover intent and older new graduates were more likely to be in the turnover intent group if they did not get their ward choice. Conclusion When new graduate nurses are satisfied with their jobs and pay and feel committed to the organization, the odds against turnover intent decrease. What is already known about this topic There is concern in many countries about nurse turnover and the resulting effects on patient safety and quality of care. Decreasing ability to recruit experienced nurses has increased the emphasis on

  20. Review of nursing turnover research, 1977-1996.

    PubMed

    Tai, T W; Bame, S I; Robinson, C D

    1998-12-01

    Turnover represents a major problem for health care services in terms of cost and quality of care given. As a result, turnover has been the subject of a large number of investigations. However, the variety of study populations, research methodologies, and inconsistent definitions and measurements of turnover lead to difficulties when attempting to compare studies. The purpose of this paper is to present: (1) a summary of turnover study methods and procedures, and (2) a summary of socio-demographic, organizational, and social support factors associated with turnover of nursing staff.

  1. Health Care Workplace Discrimination and Physician Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Pilgrim, Nanlesta; Wynia, Matthew; Desai, Mayur M.; Bright, Cedric; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between physician race/ethnicity, workplace discrimination, and physician job turnover. Methods Cross-sectional, national survey conducted in 2006–2007 of practicing physicians [n = 529] randomly identified via the American Medical Association Masterfile and The National Medical Association membership roster. We assessed the relationships between career racial/ethnic discrimination at work and several career-related dependent variables, including 2 measures of physician turnover, career satisfaction, and contemplation of career change. We used standard frequency analyses, odds ratios and χ2 statistics, and multivariate logistic regression modeling to evaluate these associations. Results Physicians who self-identified as nonmajority were significantly more likely to have left at least 1 job because of workplace discrimination (black, 29%; Asian, 24%; other race, 21%; Hispanic/Latino, 20%; white, 9%). In multivariate models, having experienced racial/ethnic discrimination at work was associated with high job turnover [adjusted odes ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4–4.9]. Among physicians who experienced work-place discrimination, only 45% of physicians were satisfied with their careers (vs 88% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .01], and 40% were con-templating a career change (vs 10% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .001). Conclusion Workplace discrimination is associated with physician job turnover, career dissatisfaction, and contemplation of career change. These findings underscore the importance of monitoring for workplace discrimination and responding when opportunities for intervention and retention still exist. PMID:20070016

  2. Turnover of soil monosaccharides: Recycling versus Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, Anna; Dyckmans, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) represents a mixture of differently degradable compounds. Each of these compounds are characterised by different dynamics due to different chemical recalcitrance, transformation or stabilisation processes in soil. Carbohydrates represent one of these compounds and contribute up to 25 % to the soil organic matter. Vascular plants are the main source of pentose sugars (Arabinose and Xylose), whereas hexoses (Galactose and Mannose) are primarily produced by microorganisms. Several studies suggest that the mean turnover times of the carbon in soil sugars are similar to the turnover dynamics of the bulk carbon in soil. The aim of the study is to characterise the influence of stabilisation and turnover of soil carbohydrates. Soil samples are collected from (i) a continuous maize cropping experiment ('Höhere Landbauschule' Rotthalmünster, Bavaria) established 1979 on a Stagnic Luvisol and (ii) from a continuous wheat cropping, established 1969, as reference site. The effect of stabilisation is estimated by the comparison of turnover times of microbial and plant derived soil carbohydrates. As the dynamics of plant derived carbohydrate are solely influenced by stabilisation processes, whereas the dynamics of microbial derived carbohydrates are affected by recycling of organic carbon compounds derived by C3 plant substrate as well as stabilisation processes. The compound specific isotopic analysis (CSIA) of soil carbohydrates was performed using a HPLC/o/IRMS system. The chromatographic and mass spectrometric subunits were coupled with a LC-Isolink interface. Soil sugars were extracted after mild hydrolysis using 4 M trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Chromatographic separation of the sugars was achieved using a low strength 0.25 mM NaOH solution as mobile phase at a ?ow rate of 250 μL min-1 at 10 ° C.

  3. Costing child protective services staff turnover.

    PubMed

    Graef, M I; Hill, E L

    2000-01-01

    This article details the process used in one state to determine the financial costs to the child welfare agency accrued over the course of one year that were directly attributable to CPS staff turnover. The formulas and process for calculating specific cost elements due to separation, replacement and training are provided. The practical considerations inherent in this type of analysis are highlighted, as well as the use of this type of data to inform agency human resource strategies.

  4. Water turnover assessment in overweight adolescents.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Bláthnaid N; Weinheimer, Eileen M; Martin, Berdine R; Weaver, Connie M; Campbell, Wayne W

    2011-02-01

    Adequate intake (AI) standards for water in adolescents range between 2.4-3.3 l/day for males and 2.1-2.3 l/day for females, independent of obesity status. Water intakes and excretions of this population are not well documented. The purposes of this study were to assess water turnover, inputs, and outputs in overweight adolescents, compare these parameters between males and females, and evaluate the reproducibility of water turnover. Eighteen girls (BMI 31.7 ± 4 kg/m(2); mean ± s.d.) and nine boys (BMI 26.3 ± 3 kg/m(2)) aged 12-15 years completed two 3-week metabolic balance trials. Rate of water turnover (rH(2)O) was measured by tracking the decline of deuterated water from the body over 14 days. Water inputs (diet*, ad libitum(#), metabolic(#)) and outputs (urine*, feces*, insensible(#)) were assessed (*measured, #estimated). rH(2)O was lower (P = 0.002) in girls vs. boys (3,742 ± 536 vs. 4,537 ± 623 g/day). Per kg body weight, rH(2)O was 28% lower in girls vs. boys (46 ± 7 vs. 64 ± 9 g·kg(-1)·day(-1)). Water input from food and beverages provided and metabolic production were 44 and 28% lower, respectively, in girls vs. boys. Urine and insensible water losses were 21 and 17% lower in girls vs. boys. BMI was positively associated with water turnover in both sexes (girls P = 0.037; boys P = 0.014). The intraclass correlation of rH(2)O between trials was 0.981 (P < 0.001). In conclusion, these overweight adolescents consumed water well in excess of sex-specific AI standards. The lower rH(2)O in girls compared to boys is consistent with adult females and males.

  5. Employee Turnover and Post Decision Accommodation Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    1977; Dansereau et al., 1974; Koch and Steers, 1978, Waters et al., 1976; Krackhardt, McKenna , Porter and Steers, 1978). Variables such as these, when...worker. New York: Wiley, 1965. Krackhardt, D., McKenna , J., Porter, L. 14., and Steers, R. M. Coal- setting, supervisory behavior, and employee...consequences of turnover and to Larry Cummings, Daniel Ilgen, Terence R. Mitchell, Charles O’Reilly, and Barry Staw for their insightful and useful comments on

  6. Generational differences in registered nurse turnover.

    PubMed

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Wang, Chen-Yen; Mathews, Barbara; Boland, Mary

    2009-08-01

    The chronic nature of the nursing workforce shortage in the United States is a continuing concern. As the nationwide gap between supply and demand grows, it remains unknown what impact turnover will have on nursing, access to care, and efforts to improve quality and safety of health care. It also remains unclear whether the recent turnover trends among new graduate registered nurses differ from past generational cohorts of new nurses. The aims of this study were to identify the reasons why registered nurses turnover by generational cohort (Veterans, Baby Boomers, and GenXMs) and to compare the length of time nurses were employed in their first five nursing positions by generational cohort. The findings suggest the three generational cohorts displayed similar reasons for leaving nursing positions with relocation, career advancement, and personal/family reasons reported most frequently. Except for the first nursing position, significant generational effects were found in the length of time Veterans, Baby Boomer, and GenXMs stayed employed in their nursing positions. It remains unknown why the GenXMs displayed a significantly shorter length of employment time in their second, third, fourth, and fifth nursing positions. The decline in length of employment time displayed in both the Baby Boomers and GenXMs may be an issue of concern requiring future research.

  7. Glucose turnover and recycling in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kokal, W A; McCulloch, A; Wright, P D; Johnston, I D

    1983-11-01

    Glucose metabolism is affected by various pathologic states including tumors. In this project, glucose turnover and recycling rates in 11 patients with colorectal carcinoma were measured using a double-labelled 3-3H and 1-14C glucose injection technique. Fasting blood glucose, lactate, pyruvate, alanine, glycerol, 3-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, plasma cortisol, and plasma insulin concentrations were also measured. No patient in the study had a history of diabetes mellitus or endocrine disorders, nor any abnormal liver function tests. The findings demonstrated a significantly elevated glucose turnover rate in patients with Dukes C and D lesions in comparison to patients with Dukes B lesions. Cori recycling rates were not significantly different between Dukes B vs. Dukes C and D patients. There were no differences between Dukes B and Dukes C and D patients in any of the metabolites measured. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in glucose turnover or recycling rates as a function of pre-illness weight loss. These data suggest that, when colorectal carcinoma extends beyond the limits of the bowel wall, glucose metabolism is significantly altered.

  8. Quantitative analysis of protein turnover in plants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Clark J; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are constantly being synthesised and degraded as plant cells age and as plants grow, develop and adapt the proteome. Given that plants develop through a series of events from germination to fruiting and even undertake whole organ senescence, an understanding of protein turnover as a fundamental part of this process in plants is essential. Both synthesis and degradation processes are spatially separated in a cell across its compartmented structure. The majority of protein synthesis occurs in the cytosol, while synthesis of specific components occurs inside plastids and mitochondria. Degradation of proteins occurs in both the cytosol, through the action of the plant proteasome, and in organelles and lytic structures through different protease classes. Tracking the specific synthesis and degradation rate of individual proteins can be undertaken using stable isotope feeding and the ability of peptide MS to track labelled peptide fractions over time. Mathematical modelling can be used to follow the isotope signature of newly synthesised protein as it accumulates and natural abundance proteins as they are lost through degradation. Different technical and biological constraints govern the potential for the use of (13)C, (15)N, (2)H and (18)O for these experiments in complete labelling and partial labelling strategies. Future development of quantitative protein turnover analysis will involve analysis of protein populations in complexes and subcellular compartments, assessing the effect of PTMs and integrating turnover studies into wider system biology study of plants. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Forest turnover rates follow global and regional patterns of productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, N.L.; van Mantgem, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a global database, we found that forest turnover rates (the average of tree mortality and recruitment rates) parallel broad-scale patterns of net primary productivity. First, forest turnover was higher in tropical than in temperate forests. Second, as recently demonstrated by others, Amazonian forest turnover was higher on fertile than infertile soils. Third, within temperate latitudes, turnover was highest in angiosperm forests, intermediate in mixed forests, and lowest in gymnosperm forests. Finally, within a single forest physiognomic type, turnover declined sharply with elevation (hence with temperature). These patterns of turnover in populations of trees are broadly similar to the patterns of turnover in populations of plant organs (leaves and roots) found in other studies. Our findings suggest a link between forest mass balance and the population dynamics of trees, and have implications for understanding and predicting the effects of environmental changes on forest structure and terrestrial carbon dynamics. ??2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  10. Relative quantification of phospholipid accumulation in the PC12 cell plasma membrane following phospholipid incubation using TOF-SIMS imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Sjövall, Peter; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging has been used to investigate the incorporation of phospholipids into the plasma membrane of PC12 cells after incubation with phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The incubations were done at concentrations previously shown to change the rate of exocytosis in model cell lines. The use of TOF-SIMS in combination with an in situ freeze fracture device enables the acquisition of ion images from the plasma membrane in single PC12 cells. By incubating cells with deuterated phospholipids and acquiring ion images at high mass resolution, specific deuterated fragment ions were used to monitor the incorporation of lipids into the plasma membrane. The concentration of incorporated phospholipids relative to the original concentration of PC was thus determined. The observed relative amounts of phospholipid accumulation in the membrane ranges from 0.5 to 2 percent following 19 hours of incubation with PC at 100 to 300 μM and from 1 to 9 percent following incubation with PE at the same concentrations. Phospholipid accumulation is therefore shown to be dependent on the concentration in the surrounding media. In combination with previous exocytosis results, the present data suggests that very small changes in the plasma membrane phospholipid concentration are sufficient to produce significant effects on important cellular processes, such as exocytosis in PC12 cells. PMID:21563801

  11. SEC14 Phospholipid Transfer Protein Is Involved in Lipid Signaling-Mediated Plant Immune Responses in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Kiba, Akinori; Galis, Ivan; Hojo, Yuko; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a gene related to the SEC14-gene phospholipid transfer protein superfamily that is induced in Nicotiana benthamiana (NbSEC14) in response to infection with Ralstonia solanacearum. We here report that NbSEC14 plays a role in plant immune responses via phospholipid-turnover. NbSEC14-silencing compromised expression of defense–related PR-4 and accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivative JA-Ile. Transient expression of NbSEC14 induced PR-4 gene expression. Activities of diacylglycerol kinase, phospholipase C and D, and the synthesis of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid elicited by avirulent R. solanacearum were reduced in NbSEC14-silenced plants. Accumulation of signaling lipids and activation of diacylglycerol kinase and phospholipases were enhanced by transient expression of NbSEC14. These results suggest that the NbSEC14 protein plays a role at the interface between lipid signaling-metabolism and plant innate immune responses. PMID:24845602

  12. Molecular organization of the non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements that induce an autoimmune disease resembling human lupus in mice.

    PubMed

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Reséndiz, Albany; Tescucano, Alonso; Bustos, Israel; Ibáñez, Miguel; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2012-03-01

    Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements are three-dimensional structures that can form when anionic phospholipids with an intermediate form of the tubular hexagonal phase II (H(II)), such as phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine or cardiolipin, are present in a bilayer of lipids. The drugs chlorpromazine and procainamide, which trigger a lupus-like disease in humans, can induce the formation of non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements, and we have previously shown that liposomes with non-bilayer arrangements induced by these drugs cause an autoimmune disease resembling human lupus in mice. Here we show that liposomes with non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements induced by Mn²⁺ cause a similar disease in mice. We extensively characterize the physical properties and immunological reactivity of liposomes made of the zwitterionic lipid phosphatidylcholine and a H(II)-preferring lipid, in the absence or presence of Mn²⁺, chlorpromazine or procainamide. We use an hapten inhibition assay to define the epitope recognized by sera of mice with the disease, and by a monoclonal antibody that binds specifically to non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements, and we report that phosphorylcholine and glycerolphosphorylcholine, which form part of the polar region of phosphatidylcholine, are the only haptens that block the binding of the tested antibodies to non-bilayer arrangements. We propose a model in which the negatively charged H(II)-preferring lipids form an inverted micelle by electrostatic interactions with the positive charge of Mn²⁺, chlorpromazine or procainamide; the inverted micelle is inserted into the bilayer of phosphatidylcholine, whose polar regions are exposed and become targets for antibody production. This model may be relevant in the pathogenesis of human lupus.

  13. Modulation of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase by neutral phospholipids: effect of the micelle-vesicle transition and the bilayer thickness.

    PubMed

    Pignataro, María Florencia; Dodes-Traian, Martín M; González-Flecha, F Luis; Sica, Mauricio; Mangialavori, Irene C; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C

    2015-03-06

    The effects of lipids on membrane proteins are likely to be complex and unique for each membrane protein. Here we studied different detergent/phosphatidylcholine reconstitution media and tested their effects on plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump (PMCA). We found that Ca(2+)-ATPase activity shows a biphasic behavior with respect to the detergent/phosphatidylcholine ratio. Moreover, the maximal Ca(2+)-ATPase activity largely depends on the length and the unsaturation degree of the hydrocarbon chain. Using static light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we monitored the changes in hydrodynamic radius of detergent/phosphatidylcholine particles during the micelle-vesicle transition. We found that, when PMCA is reconstituted in mixed micelles, neutral phospholipids increase the enzyme turnover. The biophysical changes associated with the transition from mixed micelles to bicelles increase the time of residence of the phosphorylated intermediate (EP), decreasing the enzyme turnover. Molecular dynamics simulations analysis of the interactions between PMCA and the phospholipid bilayer in which it is embedded show that in the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, charged residues of the protein are trapped in the hydrophobic core. Conversely, in the 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, the overall hydrophobic-hydrophilic requirements of the protein surface are fulfilled the best, reducing the thermodynamic cost of exposing charged residues to the hydrophobic core. The apparent mismatch produced by a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine thicker bilayer could be a structural foundation to explain its functional effect on PMCA.

  14. Historical legacies in world amphibian diversity revealed by the turnover and nestedness components of Beta diversity.

    PubMed

    Baselga, Andrés; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carola; Lobo, Jorge M

    2012-01-01

    Historic processes are expected to influence present diversity patterns in combination with contemporary environmental factors. We hypothesise that the joint use of beta diversity partitioning methods and a threshold-based approach may help reveal the effect of large-scale historic processes on present biodiversity. We partitioned intra-regional beta diversity into its turnover (differences in composition caused by species replacements) and nestedness-resultant (differences in species composition caused by species losses) components. We used piecewise regressions to show that, for amphibian beta diversity, two different world regions can be distinguished. Below parallel 37, beta diversity is dominated by turnover, while above parallel 37, beta diversity is dominated by nestedness. Notably, these regions are revealed when the piecewise regression method is applied to the relationship between latitude and the difference between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the present temperature but not when present energy-water factors are analysed. When this threshold effect of historic climatic change is partialled out, current energy-water variables become more relevant to the nestedness-resultant dissimilarity patterns, while mountainous areas are associated with higher spatial turnover. This result suggests that nested patterns are caused by species losses that are determined by physiological constraints, whereas turnover is associated with speciation and/or Pleistocene refugia. Thus, the new threshold-based view may help reveal the role of historic factors in shaping present amphibian beta diversity patterns.

  15. Signal-dependent turnover of the bacterial flagellar switch protein FliM

    PubMed Central

    Delalez, Nicolas J.; Wadhams, George H.; Rosser, Gabriel; Xue, Quan; Brown, Mostyn T.; Dobbie, Ian M.; Berry, Richard M.; Leake, Mark C.; Armitage, Judith P.

    2010-01-01

    Most biological processes are performed by multiprotein complexes. Traditionally described as static entities, evidence is now emerging that their components can be highly dynamic, exchanging constantly with cellular pools. The bacterial flagellar motor contains ∼13 different proteins and provides an ideal system to study functional molecular complexes. It is powered by transmembrane ion flux through a ring of stator complexes that push on a central rotor. The Escherichia coli motor switches direction stochastically in response to binding of the response regulator CheY to the rotor switch component FliM. Much is known of the static motor structure, but we are just beginning to understand the dynamics of its individual components. Here we measure the stoichiometry and turnover of FliM in functioning flagellar motors, by using high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of E. coli expressing genomically encoded YPet derivatives of FliM at physiological levels. We show that the ∼30 FliM molecules per motor exist in two discrete populations, one tightly associated with the motor and the other undergoing stochastic turnover. This turnover of FliM molecules depends on the presence of active CheY, suggesting a potential role in the process of motor switching. In many ways the bacterial flagellar motor is as an archetype macromolecular assembly, and our results may have further implications for the functional relevance of protein turnover in other large molecular complexes. PMID:20498085

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL JUSTICE AND TURNOVER INTENTION OF HOSPITAL NURSES IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Tourani, Sogand; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Omrani, Amir; Sokhanvar, Mobin; Kakemam, Edris; Najafi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in science and technology, human resources are of the major capital for organizations. Workforce retention is required to improve organizational efficiencies. Objective: Therefore, in this study, the relationship between organizational justice (as one of the most influential factors) and turnover intention was investigated. Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was done in the Comprehensive Jame Women’s Hospital of Tehran in 2015. The statistical sample consisted of 135 nursing staff members. The data were collected using a questionnaire of Beugre’s organizational justice and analyzed by the use of Spearman’s and Anova statistical tests. Results: Averages of organizational justice was obtained to be 68.85 ± 7.67 . Among different sorts of organizational justice, the highest average score of 75.24 ± 16.68 was achieved relevant to interactional justice. A significant relationship was observed between organizational justice (r = -0.36), interactional justice (r = -0.38), and procedural justice (r = -0.36) and turnover intention, but no relation was found between turnover intention and systemic and distributive justice. Furthermore, there was no relationship between demographic variables, organizational justice, and turnover intention. Conclusion: Considering the prominent role of organizational justice in the personnel’s intention to stay or leave and due to the high costs of recruiting and training new staff, managers should pay especial attention to justice and provide their employees’ satisfaction and stability in their organizations by creating a positive mindset in them. PMID:27482163

  17. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL JUSTICE AND TURNOVER INTENTION OF HOSPITAL NURSES IN IRAN.

    PubMed

    Tourani, Sogand; Khosravizadeh, Omid; Omrani, Amir; Sokhanvar, Mobin; Kakemam, Edris; Najafi, Behnam

    2016-06-01

    Despite advances in science and technology, human resources are of the major capital for organizations. Workforce retention is required to improve organizational efficiencies. Therefore, in this study, the relationship between organizational justice (as one of the most influential factors) and turnover intention was investigated. This descriptive-analytic study was done in the Comprehensive Jame Women's Hospital of Tehran in 2015. The statistical sample consisted of 135 nursing staff members. The data were collected using a questionnaire of Beugre's organizational justice and analyzed by the use of Spearman's and Anova statistical tests. Averages of organizational justice was obtained to be 68.85 ± 7.67 . Among different sorts of organizational justice, the highest average score of 75.24 ± 16.68 was achieved relevant to interactional justice. A significant relationship was observed between organizational justice (r = -0.36), interactional justice (r = -0.38), and procedural justice (r = -0.36) and turnover intention, but no relation was found between turnover intention and systemic and distributive justice. Furthermore, there was no relationship between demographic variables, organizational justice, and turnover intention. Considering the prominent role of organizational justice in the personnel's intention to stay or leave and due to the high costs of recruiting and training new staff, managers should pay especial attention to justice and provide their employees' satisfaction and stability in their organizations by creating a positive mindset in them.

  18. Mixing of oxidized and bilayer phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasmeet; Ranganathan, Radha

    2015-07-01

    Composition and phase dependence of the mixing of 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), and 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), with the oxidized phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaryl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PGPC) were investigated by characterizing the aggregation states of DPPC/PGPC and DOPC/PGPC using a fluorescence quenching assay, dynamic light scattering, and time-resolved fluorescence quenching in the temperature range 5-60°C. PGPC forms 3.5nm radii micelles of aggregation number 33. In the gel phase, DPPC and PGPC fuse to form mixed vesicles for PGPC molar fraction, XPGPC≤0.3 and coexisting vesicles and micelles at higher XPGPC. Data suggest that liquid phase DPPC at 50°C forms mixed vesicles with segregated or hemi fused DPPC and PGPC for XPGPC≤0.3. At 60°C, DPPC and PGPC do not mix, but form coexisting vesicles and micelles. DOPC and PGPC do not mix in any proportion in the liquid phase. Two dissimilar aggregates of the sizes of vesicles and PGPC micelles were observed for all XPGPC for T≥22°C. DOPC-PGPC and DPPC-PGPC mixing is non-ideal for XPGPC>0.3 in both gel and fluid phases resulting in exclusion of PGPC from the bilayer. Formation of mixed vesicles is favored in the gel phase but not in the liquid phase for XPGPC≤0.3. For XPGPC≤0.3, aggregation states change progressively from mixed vesicles in the gel phase to component segregated mixed vesicles in the liquid phase close to the chain melting transition temperature to separated coexisting vesicles and micelles at higher temperatures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment staff turnover in organizations implementing evidence-based practices: turnover rates and their association with client outcomes.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D; Modisette, Kathryn C; Ihnes, Pamela C; Godley, Susan H

    2012-03-01

    High staff turnover has been described as a problem for the substance use disorder treatment field. This assertion is based primarily on the assumption that staff turnover adversely impacts treatment delivery and effectiveness. This assumption, however, has not been empirically tested. In this study, we computed annualized rates of turnover for treatment staff (N = 249) participating in an evidence-based practice implementation initiative and examined the association between organizational-level rates of staff turnover and client-level outcomes. Annualized rates of staff turnover were 31% for clinicians and 19% for clinical supervisors. In addition, multilevel analyses did not reveal the expected relationship between staff turnover and poorer client-level outcomes. Rather, organizational-level rates of staff turnover were found to have a significant positive association with two measures of treatment effectiveness: less involvement in illegal activity and lower social risk. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment staff turnover in organizations implementing evidence-based practices: Turnover rates and their association with client outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Bryan R.; Hunter, Brooke D.; Modisette, Kathryn C.; Ihnes, Pamela C.; Godley, Susan H.

    2011-01-01

    High staff turnover has been described as a problem for the substance use disorder treatment field. This assertion is based primarily on the assumption that staff turnover adversely impacts treatment delivery and effectiveness. This assumption, however, has not been empirically tested. In this study, we computed annualized rates of turnover for treatment staff (n=249) participating in an evidence-based practice implementation initiative and examined the association between organizational-level rates of staff turnover and client-level outcomes. Annualized rates of staff turnover were 31% for clinicians and 19% for clinical supervisors. Additionally, multilevel analyses did not reveal the expected relationship between staff turnover and poorer client-level outcomes. Rather, organizational-level rates of staff turnover were found to have a significant positive association with two measures of treatment effectiveness: less involvement in illegal activity and lower social risk. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed. PMID:22154040

  1. Dietary safflower phospholipid reduces liver lipids in laying hens.

    PubMed

    An, B K; Nishiyama, H; Tanaka, K; Ohtani, S; Iwata, T; Tsutsumi, K; Kasai, M

    1997-05-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of dietary safflower phospholipids (crude safflower phospholipid and purified safflower phospholipid) on performance and lipid metabolism of laying hens. Sixty-week-old Single Comb White Leghorn laying hens were divided into four groups of seven birds each, and were given one of four experimental diets containing 5% beef tallow (served as a control, tallow), a mixture of safflower oil and palm oil (SP-oil), crude safflower phospholipid (Saf-PLcrude), or purified safflower phospholipid (Saf-PL) for 7 wk. Egg production ratio and daily egg mass were significantly higher in hens fed Saf-PLcrude diets than in hens of the other diet groups. There were no significant differences in egg weight among groups. Liver cholesterol and triglyceride contents were significantly decreased in all treated groups as compared with the control. The activity of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3 methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase was the highest in hens fed the Saf-PLcrude diet. Serum esterified cholesterol concentration was decreased by feeding of SP-oil, Saf-PLcrude, or Saf-PL diets. Serum lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity was highest in hens fed the tallow diet. Excreta neutral steroid excretion was significantly increased in the Saf-PLcrude or Saf-PL diet groups, although acidic steroid excretion was not affected by dietary treatments. Total cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid contents in egg yolks were not different for any dietary treatments. The fatty acid compositions of egg yolks from hens fed Saf-PLcrude diets were not different with those fed the SP-oil diet, although eggs of hens fed the Saf-PL diet showed lower total polyunsaturated fatty acids. These results suggest that dietary safflower phospholipids may be a valuable ingredient to layers for reducing liver triglycerides and serum cholesterol without any adverse effects.

  2. Dynamic aspects of voluntary turnover: an integrated approach to curvilinearity in the performance-turnover relationship.

    PubMed

    Becker, William J; Cropanzano, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Previous research pertaining to job performance and voluntary turnover has been guided by 2 distinct theoretical perspectives. First, the push-pull model proposes that there is a quadratic or curvilinear relationship existing between these 2 variables. Second, the unfolding model of turnover posits that turnover is a dynamic process and that a downward performance change may increase the likelihood of organizational separation. Drawing on decision theory, we propose and test an integrative framework. This approach incorporates both of these earlier models. Specifically, we argue that individuals are most likely to voluntarily exit when they are below-average performers who are also experiencing a downward performance change. Furthermore, the interaction between this downward change and performance partially accounts for the curvilinear relationship proposed by the push-pull model. Findings from a longitudinal field study supported this integrative theory.

  3. Turnover in health care: the mediating effects of employee engagement.

    PubMed

    Collini, Stevie A; Guidroz, Ashley M; Perez, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to understand the interaction between interpersonal respect, diversity climate, mission fulfilment and engagement to better predict turnover in health care. Registered nurse turnover has averaged 14% and current nursing shortages are expected to spread. Few studies have studied employee engagement as a mediator between organisational context and turnover. Study participants were employees working within 185 departments across ten hospitals within a large healthcare organisation in the USA. Although a total of 5443 employees work in these departments, employee opinion survey responses were aggregated by department before being linked to turnover rates gathered from company records. Engagement fully mediated the relationship between respect and turnover and the relationship between mission fulfilment and turnover. Diversity climate was not related to turnover. Turnover in health care poses a significant threat to the mission of creating a healing environment for patients and these results demonstrate that workplace respect and connection to the mission affect turnover by decreasing engagement. The findings demonstrated that to increase engagement, and improve turnover rates in health care, it would be beneficial for organisations, and nurse management to focus on improving mission fulfilment and interpersonal relationships. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Concurrent changes in Dunaliella salina ultrastructure and membrane phospholipid metabolism after hyperosmotic shock

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Hyperosmotic shock, induced by raising the NaCl concentration of Dunaliella salina medium from 1.71 to 3.42 M, elicited a rapid decrease of nearly one-third in whole cell volume and in the volume of intracellular organelles. The decrease in cell volume was accompanied by plasmalemma infolding without overall loss of surface area. This contrasts with the dramatic increase in plasmalemma surface area after hypoosmotic shock (Maeda, M., and G. A. Thompson. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 102:289-297). Although plasmalemma surface area remained constant after hyperosmotic shock, the nucleus, chloroplast, and mitochondria lost membrane surface area, apparently through membrane fusion with the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus the endoplasmic reticulum serves as a reservoir for excess membrane during hyperosmotic stress, reversing its role as membrane donor to the same organelles during hypoosmotically induced cell expansion. Hyperosmotic shock also induced rapid changes in phospholipid metabolism. The mass of phosphatidic acid dropped to 56% of control and that of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate rose to 130% of control within 4 min. Further analysis demonstrated that within 10 min after hyperosmotic shock, there was 2.5-fold increase in phosphatidylcholine turnover, a twofold increase in lysophosphatidylcholine mass, a four-fold increase in lysophosphatidate mass, and an elevation in free fatty acids to 124% of control, all observations suggesting activation of phospholipase A. The observed biophysical and biochemical phenomena are likely to be causally interrelated in providing mechanisms for successful accommodation to such severe osmotic extremes. PMID:3417760

  5. Role of Cholesterol and Phospholipids in Amylin Misfolding, Aggregation and Etiology of Islet Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanghamitra; Trikha, Saurabh; Bhowmick, Diti Chatterjee; Sarkar, Anjali A.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a biological event in which proteins undergo structural transitions from soluble monomers and oligomers to insoluble fibrillar aggregates that are often toxic to cells. Exactly how amyloid proteins, such as the pancreatic hormone amylin, aggregate and kill cells is still unclear. Islet amyloid polypeptide, or amylin, is a recently discovered hormone that is stored and co-released with insulin from pancreatic islet β-cells. The pathology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by an excessive extracellular and intracellular accumulation of toxic amylin species, soluble oligomers and insoluble fibrils, in islets, eventually leading to β-cell loss. Obesity and elevated serum cholesterol levels are additional risk factors implicated in the development of T2DM. Because the homeostatic balance between cholesterol synthesis and uptake is lost in diabetics, and amylin aggregation is a hallmark of T2DM, this chapter focuses on the biophysical and cell biology studies exploring molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol and phospholipids modulate secondary structure, folding and aggregation of human amylin and other amyloid proteins on membranes and in cells. Amylin turnover and toxicity in pancreatic cells and the regulatory role of cholesterol in these processes are also discussed. PMID:26149927

  6. Decrease in Membrane Phospholipid Unsaturation Induces Unfolded Protein Response*

    PubMed Central

    Ariyama, Hiroyuki; Kono, Nozomu; Matsuda, Shinji; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Various kinds of fatty acids are distributed in membrane phospholipids in mammalian cells and tissues. The degree of fatty acid unsaturation in membrane phospholipids affects many membrane-associated functions and can be influenced by diet and by altered activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes such as fatty acid desaturases. However, little is known about how mammalian cells respond to changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition. In this study we showed that stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) knockdown increased the amount of saturated fatty acids and decreased that of monounsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids without affecting the amount or the composition of free fatty acid and induced unfolded protein response (UPR), evidenced by increased expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) mRNAs and splicing of Xbox-binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA. SCD1 knockdown-induced UPR was rescued by various unsaturated fatty acids and was enhanced by saturated fatty acid. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3), which incorporates preferentially polyunsaturated fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine, was up-regulated in SCD1 knockdown cells. Knockdown of LPCAT3 synergistically enhanced UPR with SCD1 knockdown. Finally we showed that palmitic acid-induced UPR was significantly enhanced by LPCAT3 knockdown as well as SCD1 knockdown. These results suggest that a decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces UPR. PMID:20489212

  7. Degradation of cholesterol crystals in macrophages: the role of phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Eugen; Koscec, Mirna; Fugate, Robert D.

    1991-05-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrated degradation of cholesterol crystals ingested by macrophages in a cell culture system. Those studies also indicated that intracellular phospholipids could play an important role in mobilization of crystalline cholesterol. The purpose of this study was to further explore the role of each of the three major intracellular phospholipid species in degradation of crystals. Fluorescently labeled cholesterol crystals were incubated with phospholipids over a period of 5 days. Morphological changes in crystals were monitored by the use of digital imaging fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching, confocal microscopy, as well as epifluorescent and phase contrast microscopy. Results clearly demonstrated that all three phospholipids were able to mobilize crystalline cholesterol; however, mechanisms by which they exerted mobilization were different. Sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine were found to cause gradual and uniform dissolution of crystals, more or less preserving their original shape. Phosphatidylethanolamine appeared to penetrate into the crystal, causing its fragmentation and solubilization. In the mixture of all three phospholipids representing the composition found in macrophages, both of the described mechanisms were working simultaneously.

  8. Morphological and Physical Analysis of Natural Phospholipids-Based Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Jacquot, Adrien; Francius, Grégory; Razafitianamaharavo, Angelina; Dehghani, Fariba; Tamayol, Ali; Linder, Michel; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira

    2014-01-01

    Background Liposomes are currently an important part of biological, pharmaceutical, medical and nutritional research, as they are considered to be among the most effective carriers for the introduction of various types of bioactive agents into target cells. Scope of Review In this work, we study the lipid organization and mechanical properties of biomembranes made of marine and plant phospholipids. Membranes based on phospholipids extracted from rapeseed and salmon are studied in the form of liposome and as supported lipid bilayer. Dioleylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) are used as references to determine the lipid organization of marine and plant phospholipid based membranes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy measurements are performed to investigate the membranes' topography at the micrometer scale and to determine their mechanical properties. Major Conclusions The mechanical properties of the membranes are correlated to the fatty acid composition, the morphology, the electrophoretic mobility and the membrane fluidity. Thus, soft and homogeneous mechanical properties are evidenced for salmon phospholipids membrane containing various polyunsaturated fatty acids. Besides, phase segregation in rapeseed membrane and more important mechanical properties were emphasized for this type of membranes by contrast to the marine phospholipids based membranes. General Significance This paper provides new information on the nanomechanical and morphological properties of membrane in form of liposome by AFM. The originality of this work is to characterize the physico-chemical properties of the nanoliposome from the natural sources containing various fatty acids and polar head. PMID:25238543

  9. Phospholipid dynamics in graphene of different topologies: predictive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Slepchenkov, M. M.

    2017-02-01

    The subject of our scientific interest is the dynamics of the phospholipid molecules into a corrugated graphene sheet. According to our assumption by changing the topology of graphene properly it is possible to find the ways for management of the selective localization of phospholipid molecules to form the desired configuration of these structures. We considered DPPC (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) phospholipids, which are the part of cell membranes and lipoproteins. We investigated the behavior of the phospholipids on the graphene sheet consisting of 1710 atoms with the size of 6.9 nm along the zigzag edge and 6.25 nm along the armchair edge. The numerical experiment was carried out using the original AMBER/AIREBO hybrid method with Lennard-Jones potential to describe the interaction between unbound atoms of different structures. The temperature was maintained at 300 K during the numerical experiment. All numerical experiments were performed using KVAZAR software system. We considered several cases of corrugated graphene with different width and dept of the corrugation. Special attention in our work was paid to the orientation of the phospholipids in the plane of graphene sheet.

  10. Stabilizing factors of phospholipid asymmetry in the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Dressler, V; Haest, C W; Plasa, G; Deuticke, B; Erusalimsky, J D

    1984-08-22

    Transbilayer reorientation (flip) of exogenous lysophospholipids and changes of the transbilayer distribution of endogenous phospholipids were studied in human erythrocytes and membrane vesicles. (1) Exogenous lysophosphatidylserine irreversibly accumulates in the inner membrane layer of resealed ghosts of human erythrocytes. (2) This accumulation even occurs after complete loss of asymmetric distribution of endogenous phosphatidylethanolamine and partial loss of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in diamide-treated cells. (3) Formation of inside-out and right-side-out vesicles from erythrocyte membranes results in a loss of endogenous phospholipid asymmetry as well as of the ability to establish asymmetry of exogenous lysophosphatidylserine. Rates of transbilayer reorientation of lysophospholipids for the vesicles, however, are comparable to those for intact cells. (4) Loss of endogenous asymmetry of phosphatidylserine is also observed in vesicles isolated from erythrocytes after heat denaturation of spectrin. The asymmetry in the residual cells is maintained. (5) In contrast to the loss of asymmetry of phosphatidylethanolamine and of phosphatidylserine, the asymmetry of sphingomyelin is completely maintained in the vesicles. (6) The stability of phospholipid asymmetry in the native cell is discussed in terms of a limitation of access of phospholipids to hypothetical reorientation sites. Such a limitation may either be the result of interaction of phospholipids with the membrane skeleton as in case of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, or the result of lipid-lipid interactions as in case of sphingomyelin.

  11. Ibuprofen-phospholipid solid dispersions: improved dissolution and gastric tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Delwar; Saxena, Vipin; Brausch, James F; Talukder, Rahmat M

    2012-01-17

    Solid dispersions of ibuprofen with various phospholipids were prepared, and the effect of phospholipids on the in vitro dissolution and in vivo gastrointestinal toxicity of ibuprofen was evaluated. Most phospholipids improved the dissolution of ibuprofen; dimyristoylphosphatidyl-glycerol (DMPG) had the greatest effect. At 45 min, the extent of dissolution of ibuprofen from the ibuprofen-DMPG system (weight ratio 9:1) increased about 69% compared to ibuprofen alone; the initial rate of dissolution increased sevenfold. Increasing the DMPG content from 9:1 to 4:1 in this system did not significantly increase the rate and the extent of dissolution. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron micrograph indicated a smaller crystallite size of ibuprofen with fairly uniform distribution in the ibuprofen-DMPG solid dispersion. A small amount of carrier phospholipid significantly increases the rate and the extent of dissolution, which may increase the bioavailability of ibuprofen. The number of ulcers >0.5mm in size formed in the gastric mucosa of rats following ibuprofen, DMPG, DMPC and DPPC solid dispersions (ibuprofen and phospholipid weight ratio 4:1) were 8.6 ± 6.2, 3.9 ± 5.3, 5.3 ± 4.9 and 9.1 ± 7.4, respectively. Solid dispersion of ibuprofen with DMPG was significantly less irritating to the gastric mucosa than ibuprofen itself (one-way ANOVA, p<0.05). Solid dispersion of ibuprofen and DMPG decreases the gastric side effects of ibuprofen.

  12. Turnover of xanthoma cholesterol in hyperlipoproteinemia patients.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, A K; Connor, W E; Mausolf, F A; Flatt, A D

    1976-03-01

    The turnover of xanthoma cholesterol was measured in 9 hyperlipidemic and one normocholesterolemic patients. Sequential biopsies of the xanthomas were obtained 13 to 364 days after the administration of isotopic cholesterol and were then analyzed for cholesterol specific activity. A total of 34 xanthomas of 3 different types - 10 tendon xanthomas, 3 tuberous xanthomas, and 21 xanthelasmas - comprised the material for analysis. The cholesterol specific activity ratio of tendron xanthomas to that of the plasma varied from 11 per cent at 21 days to a maximum of 543 per cent at 122 days after the intravenous administration of isotopic cholesterol. This ratio declined to 426 per cent at 182 days and was still 131 per cent at 364 days. Similarly, the cholesterol specific activity of xanthelasmas increased gradually. In most instances, the xanthelasma cholesterol attained isotopic equilibration with plasma cholesterol by about 50 days but varied from patient to patient (minimum time, 46 days and maximum time, 91 days). The cholesterol content of xanthomas ranged from 10.7 to 197.0 mg per gram of dry weight of the tissue. Sixty-one to 87 per cent of the total xanthoma cholesterol was esterified. No other sterols were identified in these xanthomas. Thus, the cholesterol of 3 types of xanthoma readily attained isotopic equilibration with the plasma cholesterol which suggested total exchangeability of cholesterol between plasma and xanthomas. The uptake of cholesterol by the xanthomas from plasma was rapid considering the large mass of cholesterol in the lesions. The turnover of xanthoma cholesterol was intermediate between that of the rapidly exchangeable pool and of the slowly exchangeable pool of body cholesterol. Comparison of these results with those obtained in human advanced atheroma suggest that the turnover of xanthoma cholesterol and atheroma cholesterol are quite different.

  13. Modulation of monoaminergic transporters by choline-containing phospholipids in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Tomassoni, Daniele; Nwankwo, Innocent Ejike; Di Stefano, Antonio; Sozio, Piera; Cerasa, Laura Serafina; Amenta, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    Choline-containing phospholipids were proposed as cognition enhancing agents, but evidence on their activity is controversial. CDP-choline (cytidine-5´-diphosphocholine, CDP) and choline alphoscerate (L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine, GPC) represent the choline-containing phospholipids with larger clinical evidence in the treatment of sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents and of cognitive disorders. These compounds which display mainly a cholinergic profile interfere with phospholipids biosynthesis, brain metabolism and neurotransmitter systems. Dated preclinical studies and clinical evidence suggested that CDP-choline may have also a monoaminergic profile. The present study was designed to assess the influence of treatment for 7 days with choline-equivalent doses (CDP-choline: 325 mg/Kg/day; GPC: 150 mg/Kg/day) of these compounds on brain dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT) levels and on DA plasma membrane transporter (DAT), vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1 and VMAT2), serotonin transporter (SERT), and norepinephrine transporter (NET) in the rat. Frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum were investigated by HPLC with electrochemical detection, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis and ELISA techniques. CDP-choline did not affect DA levels, which increased after GPC administration in frontal cortex and cerebellum. GPC increased also 5-HT levels in frontal cortex and striatum. DAT was stimulated in frontal cortex and cerebellum by both CDP and GPC, whereas VMAT2, SERT, NET were unaffected. VMAT1 was not detectable. The above data indicate that CDP-choline and GPC possess a monoaminergic profile and interfere to some extent with brain monoamine transporters. This activity on a relevant drug target, good tolerability and safety of CDP-choline and GPC suggests that these compounds may merit further investigations in appropriate clinical settings.

  14. Phosphocreatine interacts with phospholipids, affects membrane properties and exerts membrane-protective effects.

    PubMed

    Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Epand, Raquel F; Meiler, Flurina; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Neumann, Dietbert; Widmer, Hans R; Meier, Beat H; Epand, Richard M; Saks, Valdur; Wallimann, Theo; Schlattner, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A broad spectrum of beneficial effects has been ascribed to creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and their cyclic analogues cyclo-(cCr) and phospho-cyclocreatine (PcCr). Cr is widely used as nutritional supplement in sports and increasingly also as adjuvant treatment for pathologies such as myopathies and a plethora of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, Cr and its cyclic analogues have been proposed for anti-cancer treatment. The mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects are still controversial and far from being understood. The reversible conversion of Cr and ATP into PCr and ADP by creatine kinase, generating highly diffusible PCr energy reserves, is certainly an important element. However, some protective effects of Cr and analogues cannot be satisfactorily explained solely by effects on the cellular energy state. Here we used mainly liposome model systems to provide evidence for interaction of PCr and PcCr with different zwitterionic phospholipids by applying four independent, complementary biochemical and biophysical assays: (i) chemical binding assay, (ii) surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), (iii) solid-state (31)P-NMR, and (iv) differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SPR revealed low affinity PCr/phospholipid interaction that additionally induced changes in liposome shape as indicated by NMR and SPR. Additionally, DSC revealed evidence for membrane packing effects by PCr, as seen by altered lipid phase transition. Finally, PCr efficiently protected against membrane permeabilization in two different model systems: liposome-permeabilization by the membrane-active peptide melittin, and erythrocyte hemolysis by the oxidative drug doxorubicin, hypoosmotic stress or the mild detergent saponin. These findings suggest a new molecular basis for non-energy related functions of PCr and its cyclic analogue. PCr/phospholipid interaction and alteration of membrane structure may not only protect cellular membranes against various insults, but could

  15. CD36 Protein Influences Myocardial Ca2+ Homeostasis and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pietka, Terri A.; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Kuda, Ondrej; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Dequan; Yamada, Kathryn A.; Yang, Kui; Su, Xiong; Gross, Richard W.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.; Efimov, Igor R.; Abumrad, Nada A.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcolemmal CD36 facilitates myocardial fatty acid (FA) uptake, which is markedly reduced in CD36-deficient rodents and humans. CD36 also mediates signal transduction events involving a number of cellular pathways. In taste cells and macrophages, CD36 signaling was recently shown to regulate store-responsive Ca2+ flux and activation of Ca2+-dependent phospholipases A2 that cycle polyunsaturated FA into phospholipids. It is unknown whether CD36 deficiency influences myocardial Ca2+ handling and phospholipid metabolism, which could compromise the heart, typically during stresses. Myocardial function was examined in fed or fasted (18–22 h) CD36−/− and WT mice. Echocardiography and telemetry identified conduction anomalies that were associated with the incidence of sudden death in fasted CD36−/− mice. No anomalies or death occurred in WT mice during fasting. Optical imaging of perfused hearts from fasted CD36−/− mice documented prolongation of Ca2+ transients. Consistent with this, knockdown of CD36 in cardiomyocytes delayed clearance of cytosolic Ca2+. Hearts of CD36−/− mice (fed or fasted) had 3-fold higher SERCA2a and 40% lower phospholamban levels. Phospholamban phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA) was enhanced after fasting reflecting increased PKA activity and cAMP levels in CD36−/− hearts. Abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in the CD36−/− myocardium associated with increased lysophospholipid content and a higher proportion of 22:6 FA in phospholipids suggests altered phospholipase A2 activity and changes in membrane dynamics. The data support the role of CD36 in coordinating Ca2+ homeostasis and lipid metabolism and the importance of this role during myocardial adaptation to fasting. Potential relevance of the findings to CD36-deficient humans would need to be determined. PMID:23019328

  16. Platelet Turnover Predicts Outcome after Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Iliev, Liana; Bruno, Veronika; Rohla, Miklos; Egger, Florian; Weiss, Thomas W.; Hübl, Wolfgang; Willheim, Martin; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Summary Elevated platelet turnover contributes to high platelet reactivity. High platelet reactivity after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic value of platelet turnover and function with regard to MACE after PCI with stent implantation. In this prospective observational study, 486 consecutive patients after PCI on aspirin and clopidogrel were included to determine platelet turnover (mean platelet volume (MPV), reticulated platelet fraction (RPF)) and platelet function (multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA), vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein-phosphorylation (VASP-P) assay). At six-months follow-up, MACE occurred in 10.7 % of patients. RPF (odds ratio [OR]=1.173 (95% confidence interval [CI 95 %] 1.040–1.324), p=0.009) and MPV (OR=1.459 (CI 95 % 1.059–2.008), p=0.021) were univariable predictors of MACE, whereas VASP-P (OR=1.016 (CI 95 % 1.000–1.032), p=0.052) and MEA (OR=0.999 (CI 95 % 0.980–1.017), p=0.895) failed to predict MACE. RPF remained the only platelet variable independently associated with MACE. The best model to predict MACE included: troponin I (OR=1.007 (CI 95 % 1.002–1.012), p=0.009), RPF (OR=1.136 (CI 95 % 1.001–1.288), p=0.048), CRP (OR=1.008 (CI 95 % 1.001–1.014), p=0.023) and history of myocardial infarction (OR=2.039 (CI 95 % 1.093–3.806), p=0.025). RPF (OR=1.211 (CI 95 % 1.042–1.406), p=0.012) was also independently associated with in-hospital bleedings. In conclusion, RPF as index of platelet turnover is an independent predictor of MACE and bleeding events in PCI patients on dual antiplatelet therapy. Since RPF can reliably be quantified along with routine haemograms, RPF might easily be applied in the setting of cardiovascular risk prediction. PMID:28229159

  17. Sterol-Modified Phospholipids: Cholesterol and Phospholipid Chimeras with Improved Biomembrane Properties

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhaohua; Szoka, Francis C.

    2009-01-01

    We synthesized a family of sterol-modified glycerophospholipids (SML) in which the sn-1 or sn-2 position is covalently attached to cholesterol and the alternative position contains an aliphatic chain. The SML were used to explore how anchoring cholesterol to a phospholipid affects cholesterol behavior in a bilayer. Notably, cholesterol in the SML retains the membrane condensing properties of free cholesterol regardless of the chemistry or position of its attachment to the glycerol moiety of the phospholipid. SMLs by themselves formed liposomes upon hydration and in mixtures between an SML and diacylglycerophospholipids (C14 to C18 chain length) the thermotropic phase transition is eliminated at the SML equivalent of about 30 mole percent free cholesterol. Osmotic-induced contents leakage from SML (C14–C18) liposomes depends upon the linkage and position of cholesterol but in general is similar to that observed in diacylphosphatidylcholine/ cholesterol: 3/2 (mole ratio) liposomes. SML liposomes are exceptionally resistant to contents release in the presence of serum at 37 °C. This is probably due to fact that SML exchange between bilayers is more than 100 fold less than the exchange rate of free cholesterol in the same conditions. Importantly SML liposomes containing doxorubicin are as effective in treating the murine C26 colon carcinoma, as Doxil™ a commercial liposome doxorubicin formulation. SMLs stabilize bilayers but do not exchange hence provide a new tool for biophysical studies on membranes and they may improve liposomal drug delivery in organs predisposed to the extraction of free cholesterol from bilayers, such as; the skin, lung or blood. PMID:18950160

  18. Organizational commitment and turnover of nursing home administrators.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2006-01-01

    In this investigation, the associations between organizational commitment (OC), intent-to-turnover, and actual turnover of a large sample of nursing home administrators (NHAs) are examined. Data used come from a mail survey, from which 632 responses were received from the NHAs (response rate = 63%). The one-year turnover rate of NHAs was 39 percent, and in almost all cases (87%) these NHAs had also exhibited low OC scores. The intent-to-turnover results show thinking about quitting comes before searching for a new position, which in turn both comes before the intention to quit. Multivariate analyses show work overload has a strong and robust association with both intent-to-turnover and turnover of NHAs, and may indicate that NHAs are leaving their positions because they are understaffed.

  19. Mentor program boosts new nurses' satisfaction and lowers turnover rate.

    PubMed

    Fox, Kathy C

    2010-07-01

    In 2004, the turnover rate among first-year registered nurses (RNs) at St. Francis Hospital and Health Centers had mushroomed to 31%. Based on research, in 2006, the hospital embarked on a journey to implement an RN mentor program to improve satisfaction and reduce turnover. A pilot program was initiated, including 12 RN mentors and 12 RN protégés from select nursing units. The results showed a 0% turnover rate during the 1-year pilot program. Based on these findings, the mentor program was expanded to include RNs working in inpatient nursing units and surgery and emergency departments. Each year, the RN turnover rate has decreased. In 2009, the turnover rate was 10.3%. Because of the success of the program, it has been expanded in scope to include other professionals experiencing high turnover in targeted departments, including radiological technicians, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, and physical therapists.

  20. Plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate: relationship to plasma phospholipid and cholesteryl ester transfer activities and lipid parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheung, M C; Wolfbauer, G; Albers, J J

    1996-09-27

    Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) has been shown to facilitate the transfer of phospholipid from liposomes or isolated very low and low density lipoproteins to high density lipoproteins. Its activity in plasma and its physiological function are presently unknown. To elucidate the role of PLTP in lipoprotein metabolism and to delineate factors that may affect the rate of phospholipid transfer between lipoproteins, we determined the plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate (PLTR) in 16 healthy adult volunteers and assessed its relationship to plasma lipid levels, and to phospholipid transfer activity (PLTA) and cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) measured by radioassays. The plasma PLTR in these subjects was 27.2 +/- 11.8 nmol/ml per h at 37 degrees C (mean +/- S.D.), and their PLTA and CETA were 13.0 +/- 1.7 mumol/ml per h and 72.8 +/- 15.7 nmol/ml per h, respectively. Plasma PLTR was correlated directly with total, non-HDL, and HDL triglyceride (rs = 0.76, P < 0.001), total and non-HDL phospholipid (rs > 0.53, P < 0.05), and inversely with HDL free cholesterol (rs = -0.54, P < 0.05), but not with plasma PLTA and CETA. When 85% to 96% of the PLTA in plasma was removed by polyclonal antibodies against recombinant human PLTP, phospholipid mass transfer from VLDL and LDL to HDL was reduced by 50% to 72%, but 80% to 100% of CETA could still be detected. These studies demonstrate that PLTP plays a major role in facilitating the transfer of phospholipid between lipoproteins, and suggest that triglyceride is a significant modulator of intravascular phospholipid transport. Furthermore, most of the PLTP and CETP in human plasma is associated with different particles. Plasma PLTA and CETA were also measured in mouse, rat, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, dog, pig, and monkey. Compared to human, PLTA in rat and mouse was significantly higher and in rabbit and guinea pig was significantly lower while the remaining animal species had PLTA similar to humans. No

  1. Anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) and apoptosis: prothrombin-dependent aPL as a paradigm for phospholipid-dependent interactions with apoptotic cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Joyce; D’Agnillo, Paolo; Subang, Rebecca; Levine, Jerrold S.

    2012-01-01

    The natural targets of anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) and the stimuli that induce them remain unknown. Apoptotic cells have been proposed as both potential targets and immunogens for anti-phospholipid antibodies. Demonstration of selective recognition by anti-phospholipid antibodies provides support for apoptotic cells as antigenic targets. Here, we summarize data showing that prothrombin (PT) binds to apoptotic, but not viable, cells, and that apoptotic-cell bound prothrombin provides a target for human polyclonal and murine monoclonal lupus anticoagulant (LA) antibodies. We discuss findings for two monoclonal lupus anticoagulant antibodies that have high (antibody 29J3-62) or low (antibody 29I4-24) affinity, respectively, for soluble prothrombin. Despite their very different affinities for soluble prothrombin, both monoclonal antibodies reacted similarly with prothrombin bound to phospholipid or apoptotic cells. Furthermore, both antibodies enhanced the binding of prothrombin to apoptotic cells. We propose that the recognition of apoptotic cells by these prothrombin-dependent monoclonal antibodies provides a paradigm for other anti-phospholipid autoantibodies. 29I4-24 is prototypical of phospholipid-dependent anti-phospholipid antibodies, while 29J3-62 represents a prototype for phospholipid-independent anti-phospholipid antibodies. Proteins such as prothrombin and β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) bind to apoptotic cells, thereby enhancing the recognition of apoptotic cells by anti-phospholipid antibodies. Furthermore, anti-phospholipid antibodies potentiate the interaction of these proteins with apoptotic cells. While it is unclear whether apoptotic cells are the inducing stimuli in patients with anti-phospholipid antibodies or even whether anti-phospholipid antibodies interact with apoptotic cells in vivo, it is nonetheless clear that anti-phospholipid antibodies have the potential to affect both the procoagulant activity and the uptake and clearance of

  2. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J.; Duff, K.C.; Saxena, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  3. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Tessy T; Baldridge, Ryan D; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R

    2012-08-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Lipids and Vesicular Transport. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Shear-induced morphology in mixed phospholipid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsa, Amir; Young, James; Posada, David; Lopez, Juan

    2014-11-01

    Flow of mixed phospholipid films on liquid surfaces plays a significant role in biological processes ranging from lipid bilayer fluidity and the associated behavior of cellular membranes, to flow on the liquid lining in the lungs. Phospholipid films are also central to the process of two-dimensional protein crystallization below a ligand-bearing film. Here, we study a binary mixture of phospholipids that form an insoluble monolayer on the air-water interface. Brewster angle microscopy reveals that a shearing flow induces a phase separation in the binary film, resulting in the appearance of 10 micron-scale dark domains. Hydrodynamic response of the binary film is quantified at the macro-scale by measurements of the surface shear viscosity, via a deep-channel surface viscometer. Reynolds number was shown to be a state variable, along with surface pressure, controlling the surface shear viscosity of a biotinylated lipid film.

  5. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-05-14

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity.

  6. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity.

  7. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-05-14

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity.

  8. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  9. The role of lamellate phospholipid bilayers in lubrication of joints.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Zenon; Urbaniak, Wiesław; Gadomski, Adam; Yusuf, Kehinde Q; Afara, Isaac O; Oloyede, Adekunle

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of progressive loss of the surface active phospholipids on the characteristics, and hence tribological function of articular cartilage. In accordance to Hill's hypothesis, 3-7 lipid bilayers at pH 7.4 operate as the solid lubricant in the cartilage-cartilage interface during physiological function. These bilayers are known to be depleted during cartilage degeneration. This study models this loss of phospholipid bilayers, studying experimentally both wet and dry cartilage surfaces, measuring surface wettability, and friction coefficient under a constant stress of 1.2 MPa. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient increases gradually with loss of the phospholipid bilayers, and gains in value with decrease in wettability.

  10. Autoimmunity, phospholipid-reacting antibodies and malaria immunity.

    PubMed

    Gomes, L R; Martins, Y C; Ferreira-da-Cruz, M F; Daniel-Ribeiro, C T

    2014-10-01

    Several questions regarding the production and functioning of autoantibodies (AAb) during malaria infection remain open. Here we provide an overview of studies conducted in our laboratory that shed some light on the questions of whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and other AAb associated with autoimmune diseases (AID) can recognize Plasmodia antigens and exert anti-parasite activity; and whether anti-parasite phospholipid antibodies, produced in response to malaria, can inhibit phospholipid-induced inflammatory responses and protect against the pathogenesis of severe malaria. Our work showed that sera from patients with AID containing AAb against dsDNA, ssDNA, nuclear antigens (ANA), actin, cardiolipin (aCL) and erythrocyte membrane antigens recognize plasmodial antigens and can, similarly to monoclonal AAb of several specificities including phospholipid, inhibit the growth of P. falciparum in vitro. However, we did not detect a relationship between the presence of anti-glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) antibodies in the serum and asymptomatic malaria infection, although we did register a relationship between these antibodies and parasitemia levels in infected individuals. Taken together, these results indicate that autoimmune responses mediated by AAb of different specificities, including phospholipid, may have anti-plasmodial activity and protect against malaria, although it is not clear whether anti-parasite phospholipid antibodies can mediate the same effect. The potential effect of anti-parasite phospholipid antibodies in malarious patients that are prone to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome, as well as the (possibly protective?) role of the (pathogenic) aPL on the malaria symptomatology and severity in these individuals, remain open questions.

  11. NMR analyses of deuterated phospholipids isolated from Pichia angusta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massou, S.; Augé, S.; Tropis, M.; Lindley, N. D.; Milon, A.

    1998-02-01

    The phospholipid composition of methylotrophic yeasts grown on deuterated and hydrogenated media has been determined by proton and phosphorus NMR. By using a line narrowing solvent, we could obtain linewidth lower than 2 Hz, and all the resonances could be resolved. Phospholipids were identified on the basis of their chemical shift and by 31P - H correlations (HMQC - HOHAHA gradient enhanced experiments). We have thus analysed qualitatively and quantitatively lipids mixtures directly after chloroform-methanol extraction. The lipid composition is deeply modified after growth in deuterated medium were phosphatidyl Inositol (PI) becomes the major lipid, instead of a PC, PS, PI mixture in hydrogenated conditions. La composition en phospholipides de levures méthylotrophes ayant poussé sur des milieux de cultures hydrogénés et deutériés a été déterminée par RMN du proton et du phosphore31. L'utilisation d'un solvant d'affinement a permis d'obtenir des largeurs de raies inférieures à 2Hz et de résoudre toutes les classes de phospholipides. Ils sont ensuite identifiés par leur déplacement chimique et par des corrélations phosphore - proton spécifiques (expériences HMQC-HOHAHA gradients). Cette approche a permis une analyse qualitative et quantitative de mélanges de phospholipides directement après extraction au chloroforme-méthanol. La composition en phospholipides est profondément modifiée lors de la croissance en milieu perdeutérié où l'on observe un lipide majoritaire, le phosphatidyl Inositol (PI), au lieu d'un mélange PC, PS PI en milieu hydrogéné.

  12. Dynamics of Adipocyte Turnover in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, K; Arner, E; Westermark, P; Bernard, S; Buchholz, B; Bergmann, O; Blomqvist, L; Hoffstedt, J; Naslund, E; Britton, T; Concha, H; Hassan, M; Ryden, M; Frisen, J; Arner, P

    2007-07-16

    Obesity is increasing in an epidemic fashion in most countries and constitutes a public health problem by enhancing the risk for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Owing to the increase in obesity, life expectancy may start to decrease in developed countries for the first time in recent history. The factors determining fat mass in adult humans are not fully understood, but increased lipid storage in already developed fat cells is thought to be most important. We show that adipocyte number is a major determinant for the fat mass in adults. However, the number of fat cells stays constant in adulthood in lean and obese and even under extreme conditions, indicating that the number of adipocytes is set during childhood and adolescence. To establish the dynamics within the stable population of adipocytes in adults, we have measured adipocyte turnover by analyzing the integration of {sup 14}C derived from nuclear bomb tests in genomic DNA. Approximately 10% of fat cells are renewed annually at all adult ages and levels of body mass index. Neither adipocyte death nor generation rate is altered in obesity, suggesting a tight regulation of fat cell number that is independent of metabolic profile in adulthood. The high turnover of adipocytes establishes a new therapeutic target for pharmacological intervention in obesity.

  13. Nitrogen turnover in soil and global change.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, Julien; Töwe, Stefanie; Bannert, Andrea; Hai, Brigitte; Kastl, Eva-Maria; Meyer, Annabel; Su, Ming Xia; Kleineidam, Kristina; Schloter, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Nitrogen management in soils has been considered as key to the sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems and a protection of major ecosystem services. However, the microorganisms driving processes like nitrification, denitrification, N-fixation and mineralization are highly influenced by changing climatic conditions, intensification of agriculture and the application of new chemicals to a so far unknown extent. In this review, the current knowledge concerning the influence of selected scenarios of global change on the abundance, diversity and activity of microorganisms involved in nitrogen turnover, notably in agricultural and grassland soils, is summarized and linked to the corresponding processes. In this context, data are presented on nitrogen-cycling processes and the corresponding microbial key players during ecosystem development and changes in functional diversity patterns during shifts in land use. Furthermore, the impact of increased temperature, carbon dioxide and changes in precipitation regimes on microbial nitrogen turnover is discussed. Finally, some examples of the effects of pesticides and antibiotics after application to soil for selected processes of nitrogen transformation are also shown.

  14. Relationships between Bone Turnover and Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that diabetes can be detrimental to bone health, and its chronic complications have been associated with an increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. However, there is growing evidence that the skeleton plays a key role in a whole-organism approach to physiology. The hypothesis that bone may be involved in the regulation of physiological functions, such as insulin sensitivity and energy metabolism, has been suggested. Given the roles of insulin, adipokines, and osteocalcin in these pathways, the need for a more integrative conceptual approach to physiology is emphasized. Recent findings suggest that bone plays an important role in regulating intermediary metabolism, being possibly both a target of diabetic complications and a potential pathophysiologic factor in the disease itself. Understanding the relationships between bone turnover and glucose metabolism is important in order to develop treatments that might reestablish energy metabolism and bone health. This review describes new insights relating bone turnover and energy metabolism that have been reported in the literature. PMID:28695134

  15. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  16. Strategies for adapting to high rates of employee turnover.

    PubMed

    Mowday, R T

    1984-01-01

    For many organizations facing high rates of employee turnover, strategies for increasing employee retention may not be practical because employees leave for reasons beyond the control of management or the costs of reducing turnover exceed the benefits to be derived. In this situation managers need to consider strategies that can minimize or buffer the organization from the negative consequences that often follow from turnover. Strategies organizations can use to adapt to uncontrollably high employee turnover rates are presented in this article. In addition, suggestions are made for how managers should make choices among the alternative strategies.

  17. Chicory increases acetate turnover, but not propionate and butyrate peripheral turnovers in rats.

    PubMed

    Pouteau, Etienne; Rochat, Florence; Jann, Alfred; Meirim, Isabelle; Sanchez-Garcia, Jose-Luis; Ornstein, Kurt; German, Bruce; Ballèvre, Olivier

    2008-02-01

    Chicory roots are rich in inulin that is degraded into SCFA in the caecum and colon. Whole-body SCFA metabolism was investigated in rats during food deprivation and postprandial states. After 22 h of food deprivation, sixteen rats received an IV injection of radioactive 14C-labelled SCFA. The volume of distribution and the fractional clearance rate of SCFA were 0.25-0.27 litres/kg and 5.4-5.9 %/min, respectively. The half-life in the first extracellular rapidly decaying compartment was between 0.9 and 1.4 min. After 22 h of food deprivation, another seventeen rats received a primed continuous IV infusion of 13C-labelled SCFA for 2 h. Isotope enrichment (13C) of SCFA was determined in peripheral arterial blood by MS. Peripheral acetate, propionate and butyrate turnover rates were 29, 4 and 0.3 micromol/kg per min respectively. Following 4 weeks of treatment with chicory root or control diets, eighteen fed rats received a primed continuous IV infusion of 13C-labelled SCFA for 2 h. Intestinal degradation of dietary chicory lowered caecal pH, enhanced caecal and colonic weights, caecal SCFA concentrations and breath H2. The diet with chicory supplementation enhanced peripheral acetate turnover by 25 % (P = 0.017) concomitant with an increase in plasma acetate concentration. There were no changes in propionate or butyrate turnovers. In conclusion, by setting up a multi-tracer approach to simultaneously assess the turnovers of acetate, propionate and butyrate it was demonstrated that a chronic chicory-rich diet significantly increases peripheral acetate turnover but not that of propionate or butyrate in rats.

  18. Work–family climate, organizational commitment, and turnover: Multilevel contagion effects of leaders ⋆

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work–family climate (operationalized in terms of three work–family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using multilevel modeling, we found significant associations between work–family climate, and both organizational commitment and turnover intent, both within and between hotels. Findings underscored the importance of managerial support for employee work–family balance, the relevance of senior managers’ own work–family circumstances in relation to employees’ work outcomes, and the existence of possible contagion effects of leaders in relation to work–family climate. PMID:19412351

  19. Saturated anionic phospholipids enhance transdermal transport by electroporation.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arindam; Zhao, Ya-Li; Hui, Sek Wen

    2002-01-01

    Anionic phospholipids, but not cationic or neutral phospholipids, were found to enhance the transdermal transport of molecules by electroporation. When added as liposomes to the milieus of water-soluble molecules to be delivered through the epidermis of porcine skin by electroporation, these phospholipids enhance, by one to two orders of magnitude, the transdermal flux. Encapsulation of molecules in liposomes is not necessary. Dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS), phosphatidylserine from bovine brain (brain-PS), dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), and dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) were used to test factors affecting the potency of anionic lipid transport enhancers. DMPS with saturated acyl chains was found to be a much more potent transport enhancer than those with unsaturated acyl chains (DOPS and DOPG). There was no headgroup preference. Saturated DMPS was also more effective in delaying resistance recovery after pulsing, and with a greater affinity in the epidermis after pulsing. Using fluorescent carboxyl fluorescein and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Dextrans as test water-soluble molecules for transport, and rhodamine-labeled phospholipids to track anionic phospholipids, we found, by conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy, that transport of water-soluble molecules was localized in local transport spots or regions (LTRs) created by the electroporation pulses. Anionic phospholipids, especially DMPS, were located at the center of the LTRs and spanned the entire thickness of the stratum corneum (SC). The degree of saturation of anionic phospholipids made no difference in the densities of LTRs created. We deduce that, after being driven into the epidermis by negative electric pulses, saturated anionic phospholipids mix and are retained better by the SC lipids. Anionic lipids prefer loose layers or vesicular rather than multilamellar forms, thereby prolonging the structural recovery of SC lipids to the native multilamellar form. In the

  20. Genetic Analysis of Digestive Physiology Using Fluorescent Phospholipid Reporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Steven A.; Pack, Michael; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Johnson, Iain D.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Dosch, Roland; Mullins, Mary C.; Hendrickson, H. Stewart; Hendrickson, Elizabeth K.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2001-05-01

    Zebrafish are a valuable model for mammalian lipid metabolism; larvae process lipids similarly through the intestine and hepatobiliary system and respond to drugs that block cholesterol synthesis in humans. After ingestion of fluorescently quenched phospholipids, endogenous lipase activity and rapid transport of cleavage products results in intense gall bladder fluorescence. Genetic screening identifies zebrafish mutants, such as fat free, that show normal digestive organ morphology but severely reduced phospholipid and cholesterol processing. Thus, fluorescent lipids provide a sensitive readout of lipid metabolism and are a powerful tool for identifying genes that mediate vertebrate digestive physiology.

  1. New prodrugs based on phospholipid-nucleoside conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    MacCoss, M.

    1982-02-03

    A method is described for the preparation of defined, isomerically pure phospholipid-nucleoside conjugates as a prodrug in which the drug (araC) is attached to the phospholipid by a monophosphate linkage. Key intermediates in the process involve selective blocking and deblocking of the nucleoside derivative. These particular monophosphate-linked derivatives represent a new class of prodrug, which are useful by themselves or in combination with diphosphate linked derivatives. Several new compositions involving diphosphate linked derivatives are described in which the products are isomerically pure and having defined fatty acid chain lengths.

  2. Light and phospholipid driven structural transitions in nematic microdroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubtsov, A. V.; Pasechnik, S. V.; Shmeliova, D. V.; Kralj, Samo

    2014-10-01

    We studied the UV-irradiation and phospholipid driven bipolar-radial structural transitions within azoxybenzene nematic liquid crystal (LC) droplets dispersed in water. It was found that the UV-irradiation induced trans-cis isomerisation of LC molecules could enable structural transitions into radial-type configurations at a critical UV-irradiation time tc. In particular, we show that under appropriate conditions, a value of tc could sensitively fingerprint the concentration of phospholipid molecules present in LC-water dispersions. This demonstrated proof-of-principle mechanism could be exploited for development of sensitive detectors for specific nanoparticles (NPs), where value of tc reveals concentration of NPs.

  3. Turnover intentions and voluntary turnover: the moderating roles of self-monitoring, locus of control, proactive personality, and risk aversion.

    PubMed

    Allen, David G; Weeks, Kelly P; Moffitt, Karen R

    2005-09-01

    This article explores moderators of the relationship between turnover intentions and turnover behavior to better explain why some employees translate intentions into behavior and other employees do not. Individual differences in self-monitoring, locus of control, proactive personality, and risk aversion were examined. Results indicate that self-monitoring and risk aversion moderate the intentions-turnover link. Specifically, the relationship between turnover intentions and turnover is stronger for low self-monitors and those lower in risk aversion. Locus of control moderated the relationship in 1 of 2 samples such that the relationship was stronger for those with an internal locus of control. Proactive personality, however, did not directly moderate the relationship between intentions and turnover behaviors. Copyright 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Fish Oil Supplementation in Humans: Effects on Platelet Responses, Phospholipid Composition and Metabolism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeaff, Clark Murray

    Platelets are believed to play a significant role in the development of occlusive vascular diseases. Epidemiological reports have correlated the high intake of marine foods, rich in omega3 fatty acids, with diminished platelet responses and a low incidence of arterial thrombosis and myocardial infarction. The activation of platelet responses is mediated by the accelerated metabolism of membrane phospholipid; therefore, it was of interest to examine, in human volunteers, the effect of a dietary fish oil concentrate (MaxEPA), enriched in omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, on platelet aggregation and phospholipid composition/metabolism. For the complete separation of cellular phospholipids, a one-dimensional thin-layer chromatography system using silica-gel pre-coated glass plates was developed. The solvent system consisted of CHCl_3/CH_3OH/CH _3COOH/H_2O (50/37.5/3.5/2.0, by vol), required approximately 90-120 minutes for full phospholipid separation, and was highly reproducible even under conditions of variable humidity and temperature. The consumption of a fish oil concentrate (MaxEPA) for 6 weeks (3.6 g of 20:5omega 3 and 2.4 g of 22:6omega3 per day) diminished both the collagen- and platelet activating factor-induced maximum aggregation responses in washed human platelet suspensions by 50.1% and 27.2%, respectively, as compared to initial unsupplemented baseline responses. Thrombin -induced aggregation remained unchanged. Thrombin stimulation of intact human platelets produced a significant decrease in the mass of phosphatidylinositol in plasma membrane. In platelets pre-labelled with (2-^3H) glycerol and stimulated with either thrombin or low-dose collagen, the loss of (^3H) phosphatidylinositol did not differ between those subjects consuming olive oil or fish oil. Likewise, the thrombin-stimulated accumulation of diacylglycerol, an activator of protein kinase C, was unaffected by fish oil consumption. The ratio of collagen -induced increase in radioactivity

  5. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lipid-protein interactions: Human erythrocyte glycophorin and phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Yeagle, P.L.; Kelsey, D. )

    1989-03-07

    Human erythrocyte glycophorin containing four molecules of phospholipid tightly bound to the protein was isolated from human red cell ghosts. This protein preparation was reconstituted into a digalactosyl diglyceride bilayer. The {sup 31}P NMR spectrum of this reconstituted membrane produced an axially symmetric powder pattern arising exclusively from the phospholipids bound to glycophorin. The width of the powder pattern, about 90 ppm, is about twice as broad as that normally exhibited by a phospholipid bilayer. The chemical shift tensor is perturbed relative to phospholipids in a bilayer. The spin-lattice relaxation rate of these protein-bound phospholipids is found to be nearly an order of magnitude faster than phospholipids in a bilayer. The results are consistent with phospholipids tightly bound to the membrane protein and undergoing rotational diffusion, perhaps as a complex of phospholipid and protein.

  6. The Yeast Bsd2-1 Mutation Influences Both the Requirement for Phosphatidylinositol Transfer Protein Function and Derepression of Phospholipid Biosynthetic Gene Expression in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kagiwada, S.; Kearns, B. G.; McGee, T. P.; Fang, M.; Hosaka, K.; Bankaitis, V. A.

    1996-01-01

    The BSD2-1 allele renders Saccharomyces cerevisiae independent of its normally essential requirement for phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (Sec14p) in the stimulation of Golgi secretory function and cell viability. We now report that BSD2-1 yeast mutants also exhibit yet another phenotype, an inositol auxotrophy. We demonstrate that the basis for this Ino(-) phenotype is the inability of BSD2-1 strains to derepress transcription of INO1, the structural gene for the enzyme that catalyzes the committed step in de novo inositol biosynthesis in yeast. This constitutive repression of INO1 expression is mediated through specific inactivation of Ino2p, a factor required for trans-activation of INO1 transcription, and we show that these transcriptional regulatory defects can be uncoupled from the ``bypass Sec14p'' phenotype of BSD2-1 strains. Finally, we present evidence that newly synthesized phosphatidylinositol is subject to accelerated turnover in BSD2-1 mutants and that prevention of this accelerated phosphatidylinositol turnover in turn negates suppression of Sec14p defects by BSD2-1. We propose that, in BSD2-1 strains, a product(s) generated by phosphatidylinositol turnover coordinately modulates the activities of both the Sec14p/Golgi pathway and the pathway through which transcription of phospholipid biosynthetic genes is derepressed. PMID:8725219

  7. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A.; Maskrey, Benjamin H.; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B.; Harwood, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes. PMID:26968097

  8. Regulation and Essentiality of the StAR-related Lipid Transfer (START) Domain-containing Phospholipid Transfer Protein PFA0210c in Malaria Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ross J.; Ringel, Alessa; Knuepfer, Ellen; Moon, Robert W.; Blackman, Michael J.; van Ooij, Christiaan

    2016-01-01

    StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domains are phospholipid- or sterol-binding modules that are present in many proteins. START domain-containing proteins (START proteins) play important functions in eukaryotic cells, including the redistribution of phospholipids to subcellular compartments and delivering sterols to the mitochondrion for steroid synthesis. How the activity of the START domain is regulated remains unknown for most of these proteins. The Plasmodium falciparum START protein PFA0210c (PF3D7_0104200) is a broad-spectrum phospholipid transfer protein that is conserved in all sequenced Plasmodium species and is most closely related to the mammalian START proteins STARD2 and STARD7. PFA0210c is unusual in that it contains a signal sequence and a PEXEL export motif that together mediate transfer of the protein from the parasite to the host erythrocyte. The protein also contains a C-terminal extension, which is very uncommon among mammalian START proteins. Whereas the biochemical properties of PFA0210c have been characterized, the function of the protein remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the unusual C-terminal extension negatively regulates phospholipid transfer activity. Furthermore, we use the genetically tractable Plasmodium knowlesi model and recently developed genetic technology in P. falciparum to show that the protein is essential for growth of the parasite during the clinically relevant asexual blood stage life cycle. Finally, we show that the regulation of phospholipid transfer by PFA0210c is required in vivo, and we identify a potential second regulatory domain. These findings provide insight into a novel mechanism of regulation of phospholipid transfer in vivo and may have important implications for the interaction of the malaria parasite with its host cell. PMID:27694132

  9. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A; Maskrey, Benjamin H; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Harwood, John L

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Soft contact lens biomaterials from bioinspired phospholipid polymers.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2006-03-01

    Soft contact lens (SCL) biomaterials originated from the discovery of a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly[HEMA])-based hydrogel in 1960. Incorporation of hydrophilic polymers into poly(HEMA) hydrogels was performed in the 1970-1980s, which brought an increase in the equilibrium water content, leading to an enhancement of the oxygen permeability. Nowadays, the poly(HEMA)-based hydrogels have been applied in disposable SCL. At the same time, high oxygen-permeable silicone hydrogels were produced, which made it possible to continually wear SCL. Recently, numerous trials for improving the water wettability of silicone hydrogels have been performed. However, little attention has been paid to improving their anti-biofouling properties and biocompatibility. Since biomimetic phospholipid polymers possess excellent anti-biofouling properties and biocompatibility they have the potential to play a valuable role in the surface modification of the silicone hydrogel. The representative phospholipid polymers containing a 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) unit suppressed nonspecific protein adsorption, increased cell compatibility and contributed to blood compatible biomaterials. The MPC polymer coating on the silicone hydrogel improved its water wettability and biocompatibility, while maintaining high oxygen permeability compared with the original silicone hydrogel. Furthermore, the newly prepared phospholipid-type intermolecular crosslinker made it possible to synthesize a 100% phospholipid polymer hydrogel that can enhance the anti-biofouling properties and biocompatibility. In this review, the authors discuss how polymer hydrogels should be designed in order to obtain a biocompatible SCL and future perspectives.

  11. Comparative Phospholipid Profiles of Control and Glaucomatous Human Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Aribindi, Katyayini; Guerra, Yenifer; Lee, Richard K.; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We compared phospholipid (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol) profiles of control and glaucomatous trabecular meshwork (TM) derived from human donors. Methods. Control TM and most primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) TM were collected from cadaver donors. A select subset of POAG surgical TM samples also were collected for analyses. Lipid extraction was performed using a modification of the Bligh and Dyer method, protein concentrations were determined using the Bradford method, and for select samples confirmed with densitometry of PHAST gels. Lipids were identified and subjected to ratiometric quantification using a TSQ quantum Access Max triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with precursor ion scan (PIS) or neutral ion loss scan (NLS), using appropriate class specific lipid standards. Results. The comparative profiles of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphoethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol between control and glaucomatous TM showed several species common between them. A number of unique lipids in all four phospholipid classes also were identified in control TM that were absent in glaucoma TM and vice versa. Conclusions. A number of phospholipids were found to be uniquely present in control but absent in glaucomatous TM and vice versa. Compared to a previous study of control and POAG blood, a number of these phospholipids are absent locally (TM), as well as systemically (in blood). PMID:23557733

  12. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe cho1+ gene encodes a phospholipid methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Kanipes, M I; Hill, J E; Henry, S A

    1998-01-01

    The isolation of mutants of Schizosaccharomyces pombe defective in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine via the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine is reported. These mutants are choline auxotrophs and fall into two unlinked complementation groups, cho1 and cho2. We also report the analysis of the cho1+ gene, the first structural gene encoding a phospholipid biosynthetic enzyme from S. pombe to be cloned and characterized. The cho1+ gene disruption mutant (cho1Delta) is viable if choline is supplied and resembles the cho1 mutants isolated after mutagenesis. Sequence analysis of the cho1+ gene indicates that it encodes a protein closely related to phospholipid methyltransferases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and rat. Phospholipid methyltransferases encoded by a rat liver cDNA and the S. cerevisiae OPI3 gene are both able to complement the choline auxotrophy of the S. pombe cho1 mutants. These results suggest that both the structure and function of the phospholipid N-methyltransferases are broadly conserved among eukaryotic organisms. PMID:9755189

  13. PHOSPHOLIPIDS OF FIVE PSEUDOMONAD ARCHETYPES FOR DIFFERENT TOLUENE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) was used to determine phospholipid profiles for five reference pseudomonad strains harboring distinct toluene catabolic pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, Pseudomonas putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B...

  14. Four Acyltransferases Uniquely Contribute to Phospholipid Heterogeneity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Oelkers, Peter; Pokhrel, Keshav

    2016-01-01

    Diverse acyl-CoA species and acyltransferase isoenzymes are components of a complex system that synthesizes glycerophospholipids and triacylglycerols. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has four main acyl-CoA species, two main glycerol-3-phosphate 1-O-acyltransferases (Gat1p, Gat2p), and two main 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferases (Lpt1p, Slc1p). The in vivo contribution of these isoenzymes to phospholipid heterogeneity was determined using haploids with compound mutations: gat1Δlpt1Δ, gat2Δlpt1Δ, gat1Δslc1Δ, and gat2Δslc1Δ. All mutations mildly reduced [3H]palmitic acid incorporation into phospholipids relative to triacylglycerol. Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry identified few differences from wild type in gat1Δlpt1Δ, dramatic differences in gat2Δslc1Δ, and intermediate changes in gat2Δlpt1Δ and gat1Δslc1Δ. Yeast expressing Gat1p and Lpt1p had phospholipids enriched with acyl chains that were unsaturated, 18 carbons long, and paired for length. These alterations prevented growth at 18.5°C and in 10% ethanol. Therefore, Gat2p and Slc1p dictate phospholipid acyl chain composition in rich media at 30°C. Slc1p selectively pairs acyl chains of different lengths. PMID:27920551

  15. Characterization of associated proteins and phospholipids in natural rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Sansatsadeekul, Jitlada; Sakdapipanich, Jitladda; Rojruthai, Porntip

    2011-06-01

    Non-rubber components present in natural rubber (NR) latex, such as proteins and phospholipids, are presumed to be distributed in the serum fraction as well as surrounding the rubber particle surface. The phospholipid-protein layers covering the rubber particle surface are especially interesting due to their ability to enhance the colloidal stability of NR latex. In this study, we have characterized the components surrounding the NR particle surface and investigated their role in the colloidal stability of NR particles. Proteins from the cream fraction were proteolytically removed from the NR latex and compare to those from the serum fractions using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealing that both fractions contained similar proteins in certain molecular weights such as 14.5, 25 and 27 kDa. Phospholipids removed from latex by treatment with NaOH were analyzed using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and several major signals were assignable to -(CH(2))(n)-, -CH(2)OP, -CH(2)OC═O and -OCH(2)CH(2)NH-. These signals are important evidence that indicates phospholipids associate with the rubber chain. The colloidal behavior of rubber lattices before and after removal of protein-lipid membrane was evaluated by zeta potential analysis and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The lowest zeta potential value of NR particles was observed at pH 10, consequently leading to the highest stability of rubber particles. Additionally, SEM micrographs clearly displayed a gray ring near the particle surface corresponding to the protein-lipid membrane layer.

  16. Dictyostelium uses ether-linked inositol phospholipids for intracellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jonathan; Kay, Robert R; Kielkowska, Anna; Niewczas, Izabella; Fets, Louise; Oxley, David; Stephens, Len R; Hawkins, Phillip T

    2014-10-01

    Inositol phospholipids are critical regulators of membrane biology throughout eukaryotes. The general principle by which they perform these roles is conserved across species and involves binding of differentially phosphorylated inositol head groups to specific protein domains. This interaction serves to both recruit and regulate the activity of several different classes of protein which act on membrane surfaces. In mammalian cells, these phosphorylated inositol head groups are predominantly borne by a C38:4 diacylglycerol backbone. We show here that the inositol phospholipids of Dictyostelium are different, being highly enriched in an unusual C34:1e lipid backbone, 1-hexadecyl-2-(11Z-octadecenoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-myo-inositol), in which the sn-1 position contains an ether-linked C16:0 chain; they are thus plasmanylinositols. These plasmanylinositols respond acutely to stimulation of cells with chemoattractants, and their levels are regulated by PIPKs, PI3Ks and PTEN. In mammals and now in Dictyostelium, the hydrocarbon chains of inositol phospholipids are a highly selected subset of those available to other phospholipids, suggesting that different molecular selectors are at play in these organisms but serve a common, evolutionarily conserved purpose.

  17. Hexamodal imaging with porphyrin-phospholipid-coated upconversion nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rieffel, James; Chen, Feng; Kim, Jeesu; Chen, Guanying; Shao, Wei; Shao, Shuai; Chitgupi, Upendra; Hernandez, Reinier; Graves, Stephen A; Nickles, Robert J; Prasad, Paras N; Kim, Chulhong; Cai, Weibo; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2015-03-11

    Hexamodal imaging using simple nanoparticles is demonstrated. Porphyrin-phospholipids are used to coat upconversion nanoparticles in order to generate a new biocompatible material. The nanoparticles are characterized in vitro and in vivo for imaging via fluorescence, upconversion, positron emission tomography, computed tomography, Cerenkov luminescence, and photoacoustic tomography.

  18. The role of human phospholipid scramblases in apoptosis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Ulaganathan; Palanirajan, Santosh Kumar; Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N

    2017-08-24

    Human phospholipid scramblases (hPLSCRs) are a family of four homologous single pass transmembrane proteins (hPLSCR1-4) initially identified as the proteins responsible for Ca(2+) mediated bidirectional phospholipid translocation in plasma membrane. Though in-vitro assays had provided evidence, the role of hPLSCRs in phospholipid translocation is still debated. Recent reports revealed a new class of proteins, TMEM16 and Xkr8 to exhibit scramblase activity challenging the function of hPLSCRs. Apart from phospholipid scrambling, numerous reports have emphasized the multifunctional roles of hPLSCRs in key cellular processes including tumorigenesis, antiviral defense, protein and DNA interactions, transcriptional regulation and apoptosis. In this review, the role of hPLSCRs in mediating cell death through phosphatidylserine exposure, interaction with death receptors, cardiolipin exposure, heavy metal and radiation induced apoptosis and pathological apoptosis followed by their involvement in cancer cells are discussed. This review aims to connect the multifunctional characteristics of hPLSCRs to their decisive involvement in apoptotic pathways. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Hanatoxin inserts into phospholipid membranes without pore formation.

    PubMed

    Lou, Kuo-Long; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Chen, Wei-Jung; Cheng, Yu-Che; Jian, Jia-Nan; Lee, Ming-Tao; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Shiau, Yu-Shuan; Liou, Horng-Huei

    2017-05-01

    Hanatoxin (HaTx), a 35-residue polypeptide from spider venom, functions as an inhibitor of Kv2.1 channels by interacting with phospholipids prior to affecting the voltage-sensor. However, how this water-soluble peptide modifies the gating remains poorly understood, as the voltage-sensor is deeply embedded within the bilayer. To determine how HaTx interacts with phospholipid bilayers, in this study, we examined the toxin-induced partitioning of liposomal membranes. HPLC-results from high-speed spin-down vesicles with HaTx demonstrated direct binding. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and leakage assay results further indicated that neither membrane pores nor membrane fragmentations were observed in the presence of HaTx. To clarify the binding details, Langmuir trough experiments were performed with phospholipid monolayers by mimicking the external leaflet of membrane bilayers, indicating the involvement of acyl chains in such interactions between HaTx and phospholipids. Our current study thus describes the interaction pattern of HaTx with vesicle membranes, defining a membrane-partitioning mechanism for peptide insertion involving the membrane hydrocarbon core without pore formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phosphatidate phosphatase regulates membrane phospholipid synthesis via phosphatidylserine synthase.

    PubMed

    Carman, George M; Han, Gil-Soo

    2017-08-16

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as a model eukaryote to elucidate the regulation of lipid metabolism. In exponentially growing yeast, a diverse set of membrane lipids are synthesized from the precursor phosphatidate via the liponucleotide intermediate CDP-diacylglycerol. As cells exhaust nutrients and progress into the stationary phase, phosphatidate is channeled via diacylglycerol to the synthesis of triacylglycerol. The CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase, which catalyzes the committed step in membrane phospholipid synthesis via CDP-diacylglycerol, and the PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase, which catalyzes the committed step in triacylglycerol synthesis are regulated throughout cell growth by genetic and biochemical mechanisms to control the balanced synthesis of membrane phospholipids and triacylglycerol. The loss of phosphatidate phosphatase activity (e.g., pah1Δ mutation) increases the level of phosphatidate and its conversion to membrane phospholipids by inducing Cho1 expression and phosphatidylserine synthase activity. The regulation of the CHO1 expression is mediated through the inositol-sensitive upstream activation sequence (UASINO), a cis-acting element for the phosphatidate-controlled Henry (Ino2-Ino4/Opi1) regulatory circuit. Consequently, phosphatidate phosphatase activity regulates phospholipid synthesis through the transcriptional regulation of the phosphatidylserine synthase enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The...

  6. Interaction of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase monomer with phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, K A; Patel, H V; Freeman, K B; Papahadjopoulos, D

    1979-01-01

    The association between bovine and porcine mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37) and phospholipid vesicles was investigated. At concentrations at which malate dehydrogenase exists as a dimer, entrapment within the aqueous compartment but not binding of the 14C-labelled enzyme was observed. The dissociated enzyme was labile to moderate heat and to p-chloromercuribenzoate, but in both cases inactivation was decreased by incubation with suspensions of charged phospholipid vesicles. This suggested an interaction between enzyme subunits and phospholipid, and this was confirmed by direct binding measurements and by studies that followed changes in the fluorescein-labelled enzyme. The circular-dichroism spectra of the enzyme indicated a high alpha-helix content, and suggested that a small conformational change occurred when the enzyme dissociated. Fluorescence data also suggested less-rigid molecules after dissociation. A possible mechanism, based on the flexibility of enzyme monomer and its interaction with phospholipids, by which mitochondrial matrix enzymes are specifically localized in cells, is discussed. PMID:435273

  7. Protein Turnover during in vitro Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiyao; Chang, Zhen; Oliveira, Gisele; Xiong, Maiyer; Smith, Lloyd M.; Frey, Brian L.; Welham, Nathan V.

    2015-01-01

    Repopulating acellular biological scaffolds with phenotypically appropriate cells is a promising approach for regenerating functional tissues and organs. Under this tissue engineering paradigm, reseeded cells are expected to remodel the scaffold by active protein synthesis and degradation; however, the rate and extent of this remodeling remain largely unknown. Here, we present a technique to measure dynamic proteome changes during in vitro remodeling of decellularized tissue by reseeded cells, using vocal fold mucosa as the model system. Decellularization and recellularization were optimized, and a stable isotope labeling strategy was developed to differentiate remnant proteins constituting the original scaffold from proteins newly synthesized by reseeded cells. Turnover of matrix and cellular proteins and the effects of cell-scaffold interaction were elucidated. This technique sheds new light on in vitro tissue remodeling and the process of tissue regeneration, and is readily applicable to other tissue and organ systems. PMID:26724458

  8. Sexual selection affects local extinction and turnover in bird communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, P.F.; Sorci, G.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.; Boulinier, T.

    2003-01-01

    Predicting extinction risks has become a central goal for conservation and evolutionary biologists interested in population and community dynamics. Several factors have been put forward to explain risks of extinction, including ecological and life history characteristics of individuals. For instance, factors that affect the balance between natality and mortality can have profound effects on population persistence. Sexual selection has been identified as one such factor. Populations under strong sexual selection experience a number of costs ranging from increased predation and parasitism to enhanced sensitivity to environmental and demographic stochasticity. These findings have led to the prediction that local extinction rates should be higher for species/populations with intense sexual selection. We tested this prediction by analyzing the dynamics of natural bird communities at a continental scale over a period of 21 years (1975-1996), using relevant statistical tools. In agreement with the theoretical prediction, we found that sexual selection increased risks of local extinction (dichromatic birds had on average a 23% higher local extinction rate than monochromatic species). However, despite higher local extinction probabilities, the number of dichromatic species did not decrease over the period considered in this study. This pattern was caused by higher local turnover rates of dichromatic species, resulting in relatively stable communities for both groups of species. Our results suggest that these communities function as metacommunities, with frequent local extinctions followed by colonization. Anthropogenic factors impeding dispersal might therefore have a significant impact on the global persistence of sexually selected species.

  9. Microbial Turnover of Fixed Nitrogen Compounds in Oceanic Crustal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, B.; Wankel, S. D.; Glazer, B. T.; Huber, J. A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest aquifer on Earth, with a massive volume of seawater advecting through the basaltic crust. The microbiome of this deep marine subsurface biosphere has been estimated to be substantial, and consequently their metabolic activity may have major influences on global biogeochemical cycles. While earlier and recent studies provide insight into the microbial community composition of oceanic crustal fluids, information on the microbial ecophysiology is broadly missing. Therefore, to investigate the microbial transformation of fixed nitrogen compounds in crustal aquifer fluids, fluids were sampled from different horizons of two neighbouring CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories at the North Pond sediment pond. This site is located on the western flank of the Mid Atlantic Ridge and is characterized by relatively young oceanic crust and cold fluids. The crustal fluids contain oxygen and nitrate, which potentially both may serve as electron acceptor for respiration. In a multidisciplinary approach we combined stable isotope incubations, determination of the natural isotopic compositions and plan to analyse relevant functional genes from a metagenomic dataset to investigate the nitrogen cycling at North Pond. The turnover of fixed nitrogen in oceanic crustal fluids may have important implications for the understanding of the global nitrogen cycle.

  10. Teacher Turnover, Teacher Quality, and Student Achievement in DCPS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adnot, Melinda; Dee, Thomas; Katz, Veronica; Wyckoff, James

    2017-01-01

    In practice, teacher turnover appears to have negative effects on school quality as measured by student performance. However, some simulations suggest that turnover can instead have large positive effects under a policy regime in which low-performing teachers can be accurately identified and replaced with more effective teachers. This study…

  11. How Multiple Interventions Influenced Employee Turnover: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    A 3-year study of 46 textile industry workers identified causes of employee turnover (supervision, training, organizational communication) using performance analysis. A study of multiple interventions based on the analysis resulted in changes in orientation procedures, organizational leadership, and climate, reducing turnover by 24%. (SK)

  12. Creating a nursing residency: decrease turnover and increase clinical competence.

    PubMed

    Welding, Nicole M

    2011-01-01

    New graduates are the largest source of registered nurses available for recruitment, and graduates are expected to transition quickly into professional practice. Stress of this transition can lead to high turnover within the first year. The design and goals of a graduate nurse residency program to increase competence, leadership, and job satisfaction, and ultimately decrease turnover are reported.

  13. The Link between Training Satisfaction, Work Engagement and Turnover Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memon, Mumtaz Ali; Salleh, Rohani; Baharom, Mohamed Noor Rosli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the casual relationship between training satisfaction, work engagement (WE) and turnover intention and the mediating role of WE between training satisfaction and turnover intention. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 409 oil and gas professionals using an email survey…

  14. Re-Examining the Relationship between Age and Voluntary Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    In their quantitative review of the literature, Healy, Lehman, and McDaniel [Healy, M. C., Lehman, M., & McDaniel, M. A. (1995). Age and voluntary turnover: A quantitative review. "Personnel Psychology, 48", 335-345] concluded that age is only weakly related to voluntary turnover (average r = -0.08). However, with the significant changes in…

  15. Predicting Turnover: Validating the Intent to Leave Child Welfare Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Charles; Schudrich, Wendy Zeitlin; Lawrence, Catherine K.; Claiborne, Nancy; McGowan, Brenda G.

    2014-01-01

    A number of proxies have been used in child welfare workforce research to represent actual turnover; however, there have been no psychometric studies to validate a scale specifically designed for this purpose. The Intent to Leave Child Welfare Scale is a proxy for actual turnover that measures workers' intention to leave. This scale was validated…

  16. Analysis of the Educational Personnel System: IV. Teacher Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Emmett B.

    This report attempts to predict the rates of teacher turnover in the 1970s, which teachers will leave the profession, and what the effects of turnover will be on the educational personnel system. The overall termination rate has varied from six to 11 percent over the last 15 years. An analysis of recent changes in the teaching profession is used…

  17. How Multiple Interventions Influenced Employee Turnover: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    A 3-year study of 46 textile industry workers identified causes of employee turnover (supervision, training, organizational communication) using performance analysis. A study of multiple interventions based on the analysis resulted in changes in orientation procedures, organizational leadership, and climate, reducing turnover by 24%. (SK)

  18. Organizational Characteristics Associated with Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The association between certified nurse aide, licensed practical nurse, and registered nurse turnover and the organizational characteristics of nursing homes are examined. Design and Methods: Hypotheses for eight organizational characteristics are examined (staffing levels, top management turnover, resident case mix, facility quality,…

  19. Re-Examining the Relationship between Age and Voluntary Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    In their quantitative review of the literature, Healy, Lehman, and McDaniel [Healy, M. C., Lehman, M., & McDaniel, M. A. (1995). Age and voluntary turnover: A quantitative review. "Personnel Psychology, 48", 335-345] concluded that age is only weakly related to voluntary turnover (average r = -0.08). However, with the significant changes in…

  20. Teacher Turnover, Teacher Quality, and Student Achievement in DCPS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adnot, Melinda; Dee, Thomas; Katz, Veronica; Wyckoff, James

    2017-01-01

    In practice, teacher turnover appears to have negative effects on school quality as measured by student performance. However, some simulations suggest that turnover can instead have large positive effects under a policy regime in which low-performing teachers can be accurately identified and replaced with more effective teachers. This study…

  1. Voluntary Turnover and Women Administrators in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Victoria H.

    2008-01-01

    A salient characteristic about the U.S. workforce is the continual process of voluntary employee turnover, which can be problematic for employers who invest a substantial amount of time and money in recruiting and training employees. This paper discusses the effects of workplace policies and practices on the voluntary turnover of women…

  2. The Link between Training Satisfaction, Work Engagement and Turnover Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memon, Mumtaz Ali; Salleh, Rohani; Baharom, Mohamed Noor Rosli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the casual relationship between training satisfaction, work engagement (WE) and turnover intention and the mediating role of WE between training satisfaction and turnover intention. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 409 oil and gas professionals using an email survey…

  3. Estimating Cause: Teacher Turnover and School Effectiveness in Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keesler, Venessa; Schneider, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is investigate issues related to within-school teacher supply and school-specific teacher turnover within the state of Michigan using state administrative data on Michigan's teaching force. This paper 1) investigates the key predictors of teacher turnover and mobility, 2) develops a profile of schools that are likely to…

  4. Organizational Characteristics Associated with Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The association between certified nurse aide, licensed practical nurse, and registered nurse turnover and the organizational characteristics of nursing homes are examined. Design and Methods: Hypotheses for eight organizational characteristics are examined (staffing levels, top management turnover, resident case mix, facility quality,…

  5. Sponge mesoporous silica formation using disordered phospholipid bilayers as template.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, Anne; Sartori, Federica; Cangiotti, Michela; Mineva, Tzonka; Di Renzo, Francesco; Ottaviani, M Francesca

    2010-02-18

    Lecithin/dodecylamine/lactose mixtures in ethanol/aqueous media led to the formation of sponge mesoporous silica (SMS) materials by means of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as silica source. SMS materials show a "sponge-mesoporous" porosity with a pore diameter of about 5-6 nm, in accordance to the length of a lecithin bilayer. SMS synthesis was developed to create a new class of powerful biocatalysts able to efficiently encapsulate enzymes by adding a porosity control to the classical sol-gel synthesis and by using phospholipids and lactose as protecting agents for the enzymes. In the present study, the formation of SMS was investigated by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) probes inserted inside phospholipid bilayers. The influence of progressive addition of each component (ethanol, dodecylamine, lactose, TEOS) on phospholipid bilayers was first examined; then, the time evolution of EPR spectra during SMS synthesis was studied. Parameters informative of mobility, structure, order, and polarity around the probes were extracted by computer analysis of the EPR line shape. The results were discussed on the basis of solids characterization by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen isotherm, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results, together with the well-known ability of ethanol to promote membrane hemifusion, suggested that the templating structure is a bicontinuous phospholipid bilayer phase, shaped as a gyroid, resulting of multiple membrane hemifusions induced by the high alcohol content used in SMS synthesis. SMS synthesis was compared to hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) synthesis accomplished by adding TEOS to a dodecylamine/EtOH/water mixture. EPR evidenced the difference between HMS and SMS synthesis; the latter uses an already organized but slowly growing mesophase of phospholipids, never observed before, whereas the former shows a progressive elongation of micelles into wormlike structures. SMS-type materials represent a new

  6. Binding of Diphtheria Toxin to Phospholipids in Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alving, Carl R.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Urban, Katharine A.; Moss, Joel; Richards, Roberta L.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1980-04-01

    Diphtheria toxin bound to the phosphate portion of some, but not all, phospholipids in liposomes. Liposomes consisting of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol did not bind toxin. Addition of 20 mol% (compared to dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine) of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid, dicetyl phosphate, phosphatidylinositol phosphate, cardiolipin, or phosphatidylserine in the liposomes resulted in substantial binding of toxin. Inclusion of phosphatidylinositol in dimyristol phosphatidylcholine / cholesterol liposomes did not result in toxin binding. The calcium salt of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid was more effective than the sodium salt, and the highest level of binding occurred with liposomes consisting only of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (calcium salt) and cholesterol. Binding of toxin to liposomes was dependent on pH, and the pattern of pH dependence varied with liposomes having different compositions. Incubation of diphtheria toxin with liposomes containing dicetyl phosphate resulted in maximal binding at pH 3.6, whereas binding to liposomes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphate was maximal above pH 7. Toxin did not bind to liposomes containing 20 mol% of a free fatty acid (palmitic acid) or a sulfated lipid (3-sulfogalactosylceramide). Toxin binding to dicetyl phosphate or phosphatidylinositol phosphate was inhibited by UTP, ATP, phosphocholine, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate, but not by uracil. We conclude that (a) diphtheria toxin binds specifically to the phosphate portion of certain phospholipids, (b) binding to phospholipids in liposomes is dependent on pH, but is not due only to electrostatic interaction, and (c) binding may be strongly influenced by the composition of adjacent phospholipids that do not bind toxin. We propose that a minor membrane phospholipid (such as phosphatidylinositol phosphate or phosphatidic acid), or that some other phosphorylated membrane molecule (such as a phosphoprotein) may be important in the initial binding of

  7. Calcium-phospholipid enhanced protein phosphorylation in human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Moore, R.; Cardaman, R.C.

    1986-07-01

    Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation has not been studied in placenta. Human placental cytosol was subjected to an endogenous protein phosphorylation assay using (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP in the presence of calcium and phosphatidylserine. Protein phosphorylation was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. When compared to basal levels, calcium (10/sup -6/ M) in combination with phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml) significantly enhanced (P < 100) /sup 32/P incorporation into phosphoproteins having mol wt 47,000, 43,000, and 37,000. Half-maximal /sup 22/P incorporation was observed with 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M Ca/sup 2 +/ in the presence of phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml). The effect of phosphatidylserine was biphasic. In the presence of Ca 10/sup -6/ M, /sup 32/P incorporation increased to a maximum at 70 /sup +/g/ml of phosphatidylserine. The increase was suppressed at 150 ..mu..g/ml. Tetracaine caused a dose-dependent inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent enhancement of the three phosphoproteins. Calcium in the absence of phospholipid enhanced the phosphorylation of a protein of 98,000 mol wt. Phosphatidylserine suppressed this enhancement. Calmodulin (10/sup -6/ M) had no detectable effect upon phosphorylation beyond that of calcium alone, but the calmodulin inhibitor R-24571 specifically inhibited the calcium-stimulated 98,000 mol wt phosphoprotein. Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent phospholipid-dependent phosphoproteins are present in human placental cytosol; whether calcium-activated, calmodulin-dependent phosphoproteins also are present remains a question.

  8. One hundred years of employee turnover theory and research.

    PubMed

    Hom, Peter W; Lee, Thomas W; Shaw, Jason D; Hausknecht, John P

    2017-03-01

    We review seminal publications on employee turnover during the 100-year existence of the Journal of Applied Psychology. Along with classic articles from this journal, we expand our review to include other publications that yielded key theoretical and methodological contributions to the turnover literature. We first describe how the earliest papers examined practical methods for turnover reduction or control and then explain how theory development and testing began in the mid-20th century and dominated the academic literature until the turn of the century. We then track 21st century interest in the psychology of staying (rather than leaving) and attitudinal trajectories in predicting turnover. Finally, we discuss the rising scholarship on collective turnover given the centrality of human capital flight to practitioners and to the field of human resource management strategy. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Relationship between analgesia and turnover of brain biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    Bensemana, D; Gascon, A L

    1978-10-01

    The analgesic activity of morphine, delta9THC, and sodium salicylate was studied concomitantly with changes in brainstem and cortex turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5HT). The results show that a correlation exists between the presence of analgesia and the increased turnover rates of the three biogenic amines. Morphine and sodium salicylate induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of all three biogenic amines; delta9THC-induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of DA and 5HT only. There is, however, no consistent relationship between the degree of analgesia and the degree of change in the turnover rates. The existence of the endogenous morphine-like substances, endorphines, may explain why morphine analgesia is distinct from that of delta9THC and sodium salicylate. The possible relationship between this morphine-like substance and biogenic amines is discussed.

  10. Dynamical and phase behavior of a phospholipid membrane altered by an antimicrobial peptide at low concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Tyagi, M.; Qian, Shuo; Rai, Durgesh K.; Urban, Volker S.; Sharma, V. K.

    2016-05-27

    Here we discuss that the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature no longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.

  11. Tetanus toxin is labeled with photoactivatable phospholipids at low pH

    SciTech Connect

    Montecucco, C.; Schiavo, G.; Brunner, J.; Duflot, E.; Boquet, P.; Roa, M.

    1986-02-25

    The mechanism of cell penetration by tetanus toxin is unknown; it has been suggested that the toxin may penetrate into the lipid bilayer from a low-pH vesicular compartment. In this work, the interaction of tetanus toxin with liposomal model membranes has been studied by following its photoinduced cross-linking with either a nitrene or a carbene photolytically generated from corresponding light-sensitive phosphatidylcholine analogues. The toxin was labeled only at pHs lower than 5.5. The low pH acquired hydrophobicity of tetanus toxin appears to be confined to its light chain and to the 45-kDa NH2-terminal fragment of the heavy chain. Negatively charged lipids promote the interaction of this toxin with the hydrocarbon chain of phospholipids. The relevance of the present findings to the possible mechanism of nerve cell penetration by tetanus toxin is discussed.

  12. Dynamical and phase behavior of a phospholipid membrane altered by an antimicrobial peptide at low concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Tyagi, M.; Qian, Shuo; Rai, Durgesh K.; Urban, Volker S.; Sharma, V. K.

    2016-05-27

    Here we discuss that the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is traditionally attributed to the formation of pores in the lipid cell membranes of pathogens, which requires a substantial peptide to lipid ratio. However, using incoherent neutron scattering, we show that even at a concentration too low for pore formation, an archetypal antimicrobial peptide, melittin, disrupts the regular phase behavior of the microscopic dynamics in a phospholipid membrane, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). At the same time, another antimicrobial peptide, alamethicin, does not exert a similar effect on the DMPC microscopic dynamics. The melittin-altered lateral motion of DMPC at physiological temperature no longer resembles the fluid-phase behavior characteristic of functional membranes of the living cells. The disruptive effect demonstrated by melittin even at low concentrations reveals a new mechanism of antimicrobial action relevant in more realistic scenarios, when peptide concentration is not as high as would be required for pore formation, which may facilitate treatment with antimicrobial peptides.

  13. Fungal–bacterial dynamics and their contribution to terrigenous carbon turnover in relation to organic matter quality

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Jenny; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Mutz, Michael; Premke, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Ecological functions of fungal and bacterial decomposers vary with environmental conditions. However, the response of these decomposers to particulate organic matter (POM) quality, which varies widely in aquatic ecosystems, remains poorly understood. Here we investigated how POM pools of substrates of different qualities determine the relative contributions of aquatic fungi and bacteria to terrigenous carbon (C) turnover. To this end, surface sediments were incubated with different POM pools of algae and/or leaf litter. 13C stable-isotope measurements of C mineralization were combined with phospholipid analysis to link the metabolic activities and substrate preferences of fungal and bacterial heterotrophs to dynamics in their abundance. We found that the presence of labile POM greatly affected the dominance of bacteria over fungi within the degrader communities and stimulated the decomposition of beech litter primarily through an increase in metabolic activity. Our data indicated that fungi primarily contribute to terrigenous C turnover by providing litter C for the microbial loop, whereas bacteria determine whether the supplied C substrate is assimilated into biomass or recycled back into the atmosphere in relation to phosphate availability. Thus, this study provides a better understanding of the role of fungi and bacteria in terrestrial–aquatic C cycling in relation to environmental conditions. PMID:27983721

  14. Normal HDL-apo AI turnover and cholesterol enrichment of HDL subclasses in New Zealand rabbits with partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Ibelles, Paola; Franco, Martha; Carreón-Torres, Elizabeth; Luc, Gérald; Tailleux, Anne; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Fragoso, José Manuel; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Luna-Luna, María; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar

    2013-04-01

    The kidney has been proposed to play a central role in apo AI catabolism, suggesting that HDL structure is determined, at least in part, by this organ. Here, we aimed at determining the effects of a renal mass reduction on HDL size distribution, lipid content, and apo AI turnover. We characterized HDL subclasses in rabbits with a 75% reduction of functional renal mass (Nptx group), using enzymatic staining of samples separated on polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels, and also performed kinetic studies using radiolabeled HDL-apo AI in this animal model. Creatinine clearance was reduced to 35% after nephrectomy as compared to the basal values, but without increased proteinuria. A slight, but significant modification of the relative HDL size distribution was observed after nephrectomy, whereas cholesterol plasma concentrations gradually augmented from large HDL2b (+54%) to small HDL3b particles (+150%, P<0.05). Cholesteryl esters were the increased fraction; in contrast, free cholesterol phospholipids and triglycerides of HDL subclasses were not affected by nephrectomy. HDL-apo AI fractional catabolic rates were similar to controls. Reduction of functional renal mass is associated to enrichment of HDL subclasses with cholesteryl esters. Structural abnormalities were not related to a low apo AI turnover, suggesting renal contribution to HDL remodeling beyond being just a catabolic site for these lipoproteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Microbial communities mediating algal detritus turnover under anaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Jessica M.; Murphy, Chelsea L.; Baker, Kristina; Zamor, Richard M.; Nikolai, Steve J.; Wilder, Shawn; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Algae encompass a wide array of photosynthetic organisms that are ubiquitously distributed in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Algal species often bloom in aquatic ecosystems, providing a significant autochthonous carbon input to the deeper anoxic layers in stratified water bodies. In addition, various algal species have been touted as promising candidates for anaerobic biogas production from biomass. Surprisingly, in spite of its ecological and economic relevance, the microbial community involved in algal detritus turnover under anaerobic conditions remains largely unexplored. Results Here, we characterized the microbial communities mediating the degradation of Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophyta), Chara sp. strain IWP1 (Charophyceae), and kelp Ascophyllum nodosum (phylum Phaeophyceae), using sediments from an anaerobic spring (Zodlteone spring, OK; ZDT), sludge from a secondary digester in a local wastewater treatment plant (Stillwater, OK; WWT), and deeper anoxic layers from a seasonally stratified lake (Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees, OK; GL) as inoculum sources. Within all enrichments, the majority of algal biomass was metabolized within 13–16 weeks, and the process was accompanied by an increase in cell numbers and a decrease in community diversity. Community surveys based on the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene identified different lineages belonging to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria (alpha, delta, gamma, and epsilon classes), Spirochaetes, and Firmicutes that were selectively abundant under various substrate and inoculum conditions. Within all kelp enrichments, the microbial communities structures at the conclusion of the experiment were highly similar regardless of the enrichment source, and were dominated by the genus Clostridium, or family Veillonellaceae within the Firmicutes. In all other enrichments the final microbial community was dependent on the inoculum source, rather than the type of algae utilized as substrate. Lineages enriched

  16. Microbial communities mediating algal detritus turnover under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; Murphy, Chelsea L; Baker, Kristina; Zamor, Richard M; Nikolai, Steve J; Wilder, Shawn; Elshahed, Mostafa S; Youssef, Noha H

    2017-01-01

    Algae encompass a wide array of photosynthetic organisms that are ubiquitously distributed in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Algal species often bloom in aquatic ecosystems, providing a significant autochthonous carbon input to the deeper anoxic layers in stratified water bodies. In addition, various algal species have been touted as promising candidates for anaerobic biogas production from biomass. Surprisingly, in spite of its ecological and economic relevance, the microbial community involved in algal detritus turnover under anaerobic conditions remains largely unexplored. Here, we characterized the microbial communities mediating the degradation of Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorophyta), Chara sp. strain IWP1 (Charophyceae), and kelp Ascophyllum nodosum (phylum Phaeophyceae), using sediments from an anaerobic spring (Zodlteone spring, OK; ZDT), sludge from a secondary digester in a local wastewater treatment plant (Stillwater, OK; WWT), and deeper anoxic layers from a seasonally stratified lake (Grand Lake O' the Cherokees, OK; GL) as inoculum sources. Within all enrichments, the majority of algal biomass was metabolized within 13-16 weeks, and the process was accompanied by an increase in cell numbers and a decrease in community diversity. Community surveys based on the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene identified different lineages belonging to the phyla Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria (alpha, delta, gamma, and epsilon classes), Spirochaetes, and Firmicutes that were selectively abundant under various substrate and inoculum conditions. Within all kelp enrichments, the microbial communities structures at the conclusion of the experiment were highly similar regardless of the enrichment source, and were dominated by the genus Clostridium, or family Veillonellaceae within the Firmicutes. In all other enrichments the final microbial community was dependent on the inoculum source, rather than the type of algae utilized as substrate. Lineages enriched included the

  17. How Serious of a Problem is Staff Turnover in Substance Abuse Treatment? A Longitudinal Study of Actual Turnover1

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Lillian T.; Burk, Hannah; Maher, Charleen P.

    2010-01-01

    In the substance abuse treatment field, the annual turnover rate is cited as being anywhere between 19 and 50 percent (Johnson & Roman, 2002; Gallon, Gabriel, & Knudsen, 2003; Knudsen et al., 2003; McLellan et al., 2003). However, no research to date has evaluated these claims by tracking turnover longitudinally using organizational turnover data from substance abuse treatment centers. This research presents the results of a longitudinal study designed to systematically examine actual turnover among counselors and clinical supervisors. Twenty-seven geographically dispersed treatment organizations, serving a wide range of clients in the public and private sector, provided data for the study over a two year time span (2008–2009). The annual turnover rate was 33.2% for counselors and 23.4% for clinical supervisors. For both groups the majority of turnover was voluntary (employee-initiated). Specific reasons for turnover were largely consistent across the two groups, with the most common reason being a new job or new opportunity. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique employment context of substance abuse treatment. Practical recommendations are also discussed to help stem the tide of turnover in the field of substance abuse treatment. PMID:20675097

  18. How serious of a problem is staff turnover in substance abuse treatment? A longitudinal study of actual turnover.

    PubMed

    Eby, Lillian T; Burk, Hannah; Maher, Charleen P

    2010-10-01

    In the substance abuse treatment field, the annual turnover rate is cited as being anywhere between 19% and 50% (J.A. Johnson & P.M. Roman, 2002; S.L. Gallon, R.M. Gabriel, J.R.W. Knudsen, 2003; H.K. Knudsen, J.A. Johnson, & P.M. Roman, 2003; A.T. McLellan, D. Carise, & H.D. Kleber, 2003). However, no research to date has evaluated these claims by tracking turnover longitudinally using organizational turnover data from substance abuse treatment centers. This research presents the results of a longitudinal study designed to systematically examine actual turnover among counselors and clinical supervisors. Twenty-seven geographically dispersed treatment organizations, serving a wide range of clients in the public and private sector, provided data for the study over a 2-year time span (2008-2009). The annual turnover rate was 33.2% for counselors and 23.4% for clinical supervisors. For both groups, the majority of turnover was voluntary (employee-initiated). Specific reasons for turnover were largely consistent across the two groups, with the most common reason being a new job or new opportunity. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique employment context of substance abuse treatment. Practical recommendations are also discussed to help stem the tide of turnover in the field of substance abuse treatment. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantification of fatty acids as methyl esters and phospholipids in cheese samples after separation of triacylglycerides and phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Simone; Vetter, Walter

    2009-03-23

    Determination of the individual fatty acid composition of neutral- and phospholipids as well as the phospholipid content of dairy food and other foodstuffs are important tasks in life sciences. For these purposes, a method was developed for the separation of lipids (standards of triolein and diacylphosphatidylcholines as well as three cheese samples) by solid-phase extraction using a self-packed column filled with partly deactivated silica. Non-halogenated solvents were used for the elution of the lipid classes. Cyclohexane/ethyl acetate (1:1, v/v) served for the elution of neutral lipids, while polar lipids were eluted with three solvents (ethyl acetate/methanol, methanol, and methanol/water) into one fraction. The separated lipid fractions were transesterified and the individual fatty acids were quantified by using gas chromatography coupled to electron ionization mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The recovery rate for standard phosphatidylcholines was approximately 90% and cross-contamination from neutral lipids was negligible. The method was applied to cheese samples. Quantitative amounts of individual fatty acids in the phospholipid fraction were <0.002-0.29% of total lipids from camembert, <0.002-0.12% of total lipids from mozzarella, and <0.002-0.18% of total lipids in a goat cream cheese. Differences in the fatty acid pattern of neutral and polar lipids were detected. The quantity of the fatty acids determined in the phospholipid fraction was divided by the factor 0.7 in order to convert the fatty acid content into the phospholipid content of the cheese samples. This factor is based on the contribution of 16:0 to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The resulting DPPC equivalents (DPPC(eq)) were found to be representative for the average contribution of fatty acids to all classes of phospholipids in dairy products. Using this approach, the phospholipid content of lipids from mozzarella, camembert, and goat cream

  20. Water level changes affect carbon turnover and microbial community composition in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Weise, Lukas; Ulrich, Andreas; Moreano, Matilde; Gessler, Arthur; Kayler, Zachary E; Steger, Kristin; Zeller, Bernd; Rudolph, Kristin; Knezevic-Jaric, Jelena; Premke, Katrin

    2016-05-01

    Due to climate change, many lakes in Europe will be subject to higher variability of hydrological characteristics in their littoral zones. These different hydrological regimes might affect the use of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We used sandy sediment microcosms to examine the effects of different hydrological regimes (wet, desiccating, and wet-desiccation cycles) on carbon turnover. (13)C-labelled particulate organic carbon was used to trace and estimate carbon uptake into bacterial biomass (via phospholipid fatty acids) and respiration. Microbial community changes were monitored by combining DNA- and RNA-based real-time PCR quantification and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA. The shifting hydrological regimes in the sediment primarily caused two linked microbial effects: changes in the use of available organic carbon and community composition changes. Drying sediments yielded the highest CO2 emission rates, whereas hydrological shifts increased the uptake of allochthonous organic carbon for respiration. T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that only the most extreme hydrological changes induced a significant shift in the active and total bacterial communities. As current scenarios of climate change predict an increase of drought events, frequent variations of the hydrological regimes of many lake littoral zones in central Europe are anticipated. Based on the results of our study, this phenomenon may increase the intensity and amplitude in rates of allochthonous organic carbon uptake and CO2 emissions.

  1. Water level changes affect carbon turnover and microbial community composition in lake sediments

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Lukas; Ulrich, Andreas; Moreano, Matilde; Gessler, Arthur; E. Kayler, Zachary; Steger, Kristin; Zeller, Bernd; Rudolph, Kristin; Knezevic-Jaric, Jelena; Premke, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Due to climate change, many lakes in Europe will be subject to higher variability of hydrological characteristics in their littoral zones. These different hydrological regimes might affect the use of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We used sandy sediment microcosms to examine the effects of different hydrological regimes (wet, desiccating, and wet-desiccation cycles) on carbon turnover. 13C-labelled particulate organic carbon was used to trace and estimate carbon uptake into bacterial biomass (via phospholipid fatty acids) and respiration. Microbial community changes were monitored by combining DNA- and RNA-based real-time PCR quantification and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA. The shifting hydrological regimes in the sediment primarily caused two linked microbial effects: changes in the use of available organic carbon and community composition changes. Drying sediments yielded the highest CO2 emission rates, whereas hydrological shifts increased the uptake of allochthonous organic carbon for respiration. T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that only the most extreme hydrological changes induced a significant shift in the active and total bacterial communities. As current scenarios of climate change predict an increase of drought events, frequent variations of the hydrological regimes of many lake littoral zones in central Europe are anticipated. Based on the results of our study, this phenomenon may increase the intensity and amplitude in rates of allochthonous organic carbon uptake and CO2 emissions. PMID:26902802

  2. Cholesterol Translocation in a Phospholipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit; Kalia, Rajiv; Malmstadt, Noah; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashistha, Priya

    2013-03-01

    Cholesterol (CHOL) molecules play a key role in modulating the rigidity of cell membranes, and controlling intracellular transport and signal transduction. Using all-atom molecular dynamics and the parallel replica approach, we study the process of CHOL interleaflet transport (flip-flop) in a dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPC)-CHOL bilayer, the effect of this process on mechanical stress across the bilayer, and the role of CHOL in inducing molecular order in the respective bilayer leaflets. The simulations are carried out at physiologically relevant CHOL concentration (30%), temperature 323 K and pressure 1 bar. CHOL flip-flop events are observed with a rate constant of 3 ×104 s-1. Once a flip-flop event is triggered, a CHOL molecule takes an average of 73 nanoseconds to migrate from one bilayer leaflet to the other.

  3. Differential challenge stressor-hindrance stressor relationships with job attitudes, turnover intentions, turnover, and withdrawal behavior: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Podsakoff, Nathan P; LePine, Jeffery A; LePine, Marcie A

    2007-03-01

    In this article, a 2-dimensional work stressor framework is used to explain inconsistencies in past research with respect to stressor relationships with retention-related criteria. Results of meta-analyses of 183 independent samples indicated that whereas hindrance stressors had dysfunctional relationships with these criteria (negative relationships with job satisfaction and organizational commitment and positive relationships with turnover intentions, turnover, and withdrawal behavior), relationships with challenge stressors were generally the opposite (positive relationships with job satisfaction and organizational commitment and negative relationships with turnover intentions and turnover). Results also suggested that the differential relationships between challenge stressors and hindrance stressors and the more distal criteria (withdrawal behavior and turnover) were due, in part, to the mediating effects of job attitudes. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Large-scale variation in boreal and temperate forest carbon turnover rate related to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Carvalhais, Nuno; Forkel, Matthias; Santoro, Maurizio; Tum, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2016-05-01

    Vegetation carbon turnover processes in forest ecosystems and their dominant drivers are far from being understood at a broader scale. Many of these turnover processes act on long timescales and include a lateral dimension and thus can hardly be investigated by plot-level studies alone. Making use of remote sensing-based products of net primary production (NPP) and biomass, here we show that spatial gradients of carbon turnover rate (k) in Northern Hemisphere boreal and temperate forests are explained by different climate-related processes depending on the ecosystem. k is related to frost damage effects and the trade-off between growth and frost adaptation in boreal forests, while drought stress and climate effects on insects and pathogens can explain an elevated k in temperate forests. By identifying relevant processes underlying broadscale patterns in k, we provide the basis for a detailed exploration of these mechanisms in field studies, and ultimately the improvement of their representations in global vegetation models (GVMs).

  5. Changes in bone Pb accumulation: cause and effect of altered bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Brito, José A A; Costa, Isabel M; E Silva, Alexandra Maia; Marques, José M S; Zagalo, Carlos M; Cavaleiro, Inês I B; Fernandes, Tânia A P; Gonçalves, Luísa L

    2014-07-01

    This paper assesses the magnitude of Pb uptake in cortical and trabecular bones in healthy animals and animals with altered balance in bone turnover, and the impact of exposure to Pb on serum markers of bone formation and resorption. The results reported herein provide physiological evidence that Pb distributes differently in central compartments in Pb metabolism, such as cortical and trabecular bones, in healthy animals and animals with altered balance in bone turnover, and that exposure to Pb does have an impact on bone resorption resulting in OC-dependent osteopenia. These findings show that Pb may play a role in the etiology of osteoporosis and that its concentration in bones varies as a result of altered bone turnover characteristic of this disease, a long standing question in the field. In addition, data collected in this study are consistent with previous observations of increased half-life of Pb in bone at higher exposures. This evidence is relevant for the necessary revision of current physiologically based kinetic models for Pb in humans.

  6. Greater soil carbon stocks and faster turnover rates with increasing agricultural productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderman, Jonathan; Creamer, Courtney; Baisden, W. Troy; Farrell, Mark; Fallon, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Devising agricultural management schemes that enhance food security and soil carbon levels is a high priority for many nations. However, the coupling between agricultural productivity, soil carbon stocks and organic matter turnover rates is still unclear. Archived soil samples from four decades of a long-term crop rotation trial were analyzed for soil organic matter (SOM) cycling-relevant properties: C and N content, bulk composition by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, amino sugar content, short-term C bioavailability assays, and long-term C turnover rates by modeling the incorporation of the bomb spike in atmospheric 14C into the soil. After > 40 years under consistent management, topsoil carbon stocks ranged from 14 to 33 Mg C ha-1 and were linearly related to the mean productivity of each treatment. Measurements of SOM composition demonstrated increasing amounts of plant- and microbially derived SOM along the productivity gradient. Under two modeling scenarios, radiocarbon data indicated overall SOM turnover time decreased from 40 to 13 years with increasing productivity - twice the rate of decline predicted from simple steady-state models or static three-pool decay rates of measured C pool distributions. Similarly, the half-life of synthetic root exudates decreased from 30.4 to 21.5 h with increasing productivity, indicating accelerated microbial activity. These findings suggest that there is a direct feedback between accelerated biological activity, carbon cycling rates and rates of carbon stabilization with important implications for how SOM dynamics are represented in models.

  7. Clinical characteristics and laboratory findings of 252 Chinese patients with anti-phospholipid syndrome: comparison with Euro-Phospholipid cohort.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hui; Teng, Jia-Lin; Sun, Yue; Wu, Xin-Yao; Hu, Qiong-Yi; Liu, Hong-Lei; Cheng, Xiao-Bing; Yin, Yu-Feng; Ye, Jun-Na; Chen, Pojen P; Yang, Cheng-de

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to characterize the Chinese Han patients with anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and compare the data with those of the Euro-Phospholipid cohort. We conducted a single center study consisting of 252 patients with definite APS from 2000 to 2015. We analyzed the clinical and laboratory characteristics of our cohort and compared the data with those of the Euro-Phospholipid cohort. Our cohort consisted of 216 females and 36 males, with a mean age at entry into this study of 41 years (range 11-74 years). Of these patients, 69 (27.4%) patients had primary APS, and 183 (72.6%) had secondary APS (SAPS), including 163 (64.7%) patients had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Thrombotic events occurred in 190 (75.4%) patients, and the most common ones were deep vein thrombosis (40.1%) and stroke (23.8%), which were similar to the reports of the Euro-Phospholipid cohort. In contrast, our cohort had less pulmonary embolism (6.7%). Among 93 females with 299 pregnancy episodes, the rates of early (<10 weeks) and late fetal loss (≥10 weeks) were, respectively, 37.8% and 24.4%. The latter was significantly higher than that of the Euro-Phospholipid cohort. Moreover, 7 APS nephropathy patients (characterized histopathologically by thrombotic microangiopathy) and 8 catastrophic APS patients were found in our cohort. Anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL) were detected in 169 (67.1%) patients, lupus anti-coagulant (LA) was detected in 83 (32.9%), and anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-β2GPI) in 148 (58.7%) patients. These results show that some clinical manifestations of APS may vary among different racial groups.

  8. Staff turnover in statewide implementation of ACT: relationship with ACT fidelity and other team characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rollins, Angela L; Salyers, Michelle P; Tsai, Jack; Lydick, Jennifer M

    2010-09-01

    Staff turnover on assertive community treatment (ACT) teams is a poorly understood phenomenon. This study examined annual turnover and fidelity data collected in a statewide implementation of ACT over a 5-year period. Mean annual staff turnover across all observations was 30.0%. Turnover was negatively correlated with overall fidelity at Year 1 and 3. The team approach fidelity item was negatively correlated with staff turnover at Year 3. For 13 teams with 3 years of follow-up data, turnover rates did not change over time. Most ACT staff turnover rates were comparable or better than other turnover rates reported in the mental health and substance abuse literature.

  9. Staff turnover in statewide implementation of ACT: relationship with ACT fidelity and other team characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, Angela L.; Salyers, Michelle P.; Tsai, Jack; Lydick, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    Staff turnover on assertive community treatment (ACT) teams is a poorly understood phenomenon. This study examined annual turnover and fidelity data collected in a statewide implementation of ACT over a 5-year period. Mean annual staff turnover across all observations was 30.0%. Turnover was negatively correlated with overall fidelity at Year 1 and 3. The team approach fidelity item was negatively correlated with staff turnover at Year 3. For 13 teams with 3 years of follow-up data, turnover rates did not change over time. Most ACT staff turnover rates were comparable or better than other turnover rates reported in the mental health and substance abuse literature. PMID:20012481

  10. Turnover intention among intensive care unit nurses in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mosallam, Rasha; Hamidi, Samer; Elrefaay, Manal

    2015-06-01

    Given the difficulty in recruiting new nurses, it is imperative to retain those already in the profession. This cross-sectional study explored the relationship of demographic and work-related factors, burnout, conflict management and relationship between nurses and physicians on turnover intentions among ICU nurses in eight major hospitals in Alexandria, Egypt. Data on burnout, conflict management, nurse-physician communication, and turnover intention were collected by surveying 100 nurses in eight hospitals in Alexandria governorate. All nurses at the ICU of selected hospitals were approached (n=100) and a 47-item Likert scale questionnaire was administered to explore the factors affecting the turnover intention of ICU nurses in Alexandria. ICU nurses exhibited a mean score for turnover intention of 3.23 (mean score percentage 65.0%). There was a moderately positive statistically significant correlation between turnover intention and emotional exhaustion (r=0.29, P<0.05), nurse-physician communication (r=0.25, P<0.05), and age (r=0.21, P<0.05). The predicting factors for turnover intention were emotional exhaustion and age. Nurses turnover intention at the ICU of the selected hospitals is high and is significantly associated with nurses' emotional exhaustion, poor nurse-physician communication, and nurses age.

  11. Understanding the factors that determine registered nurses' turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Joseph; Uzoka, Faith-Michael; Aladi, Flora; El-Hussein, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Turnover among registered nurses (RNs) produces a negative impact on the health outcomes of any health care organization. It is also recognized universally as a problem in the nursing profession. Little is known about the turnover intentions and career orientations of RNs working in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge of and to advance the discussion on the turnover of nursing professionals. The study population consisted of RNs employed in the five major hospitals in Calgary. There were 193 surveys returned, representing a response rate of 77.2%. The results show that age and education have a negative effect on turnover intention. Education was found to have a significant negative effect on career satisfaction but not on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Length of service has a significant negative effect on turnover intention. Role ambiguity has significant highly negative effect on career satisfaction. Growth opportunity and supervisor support have a very significant positive effect on job satisfaction, career satisfaction, and organizational commitment. External career opportunities and organizational commitment do not seem to have a significant effect on turnover intention. Career satisfaction, on the other hand, had negative significant effects on turnover intention.

  12. Organizational characteristics associated with staff turnover in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G; Engberg, John

    2006-02-01

    The association between certified nurse aide, licensed practical nurse, and registered nurse turnover and the organizational characteristics of nursing homes are examined. Hypotheses for eight organizational characteristics are examined (staffing levels, top management turnover, resident case mix, facility quality, ownership, chain membership, size, and Medicaid census), using Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting (known as OSCAR) data. Turnover information came from primary data collected from 854 facilities in six states (Missouri, Texas, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey). The 1-year turnover rates were 56.4%, 39.7%, and 35.8% for certified nurse aides, licensed practical nurses, and registered nurses, respectively. The results consistently show that, for all caregivers, lower staffing levels, lower quality, for-profit ownership, and higher bed size are associated with higher turnover. Some differences also are found for different levels of turnover, but there are few differences among types of nursing staff. Given that turnover rates are problematic, this study gives us a better understanding of the phenomenon and at the same time helps us further understand the wide variation that is known to exist between nursing homes, based on their organizational characteristics.

  13. Biomass turnover time in terrestrial ecosystems halved by land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erb, Karl-Heinz; Fetzel, Tamara; Plutzar, Christoph; Kastner, Thomas; Lauk, Christian; Mayer, Andreas; Niedertscheider, Maria; Körner, Christian; Haberl, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is not well quantified. Biomass turnover time is a crucial parameter in the global carbon cycle, and contributes to the feedback between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate. Biomass turnover time varies substantially in time and space, but its determinants are not well known, making predictions of future global carbon cycle dynamics uncertain. Land use--the sum of activities that aim at enhancing terrestrial ecosystem services--alters plant growth and reduces biomass stocks, and is hence expected to affect biomass turnover. Here we explore land-use-induced alterations of biomass turnover at the global scale by comparing the biomass turnover of the actual vegetation with that of a hypothetical vegetation state with no land use under current climate conditions. We find that, in the global average, biomass turnover is 1.9 times faster with land use. This acceleration affects all biomes roughly equally, but with large differences between land-use types. Land conversion, for example from forests to agricultural fields, is responsible for 59% of the acceleration; the use of forests and natural grazing land accounts for 26% and 15% respectively. Reductions in biomass stocks are partly compensated by reductions in net primary productivity. We conclude that land use significantly and systematically affects the fundamental trade-off between carbon turnover and carbon stocks.

  14. Morphine and endorphins modulate dopamine turnover in rat median eminence.

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, S N; Swift, R M; Miller, R J

    1979-01-01

    The is evidence that some of the actions of both endogenous and exogenous opioids (e.g., stimulation of prolactin release) are mediated by interaction with catecholaminergic systems. Morphine (1.67, 5, and 15 mg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneally) altered dopamine turnover as measured by the alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine method in the median eminence, neostriatum, and frontal cortex of male Sprague-Dawley rats. The turnover rate of dopamine was reduced in the median eminence and frontal cortex but accelerated in the neostriatum. In the frontal cortex all doses were effective in decreasing dopamine turnover; however, in the median eminence the lowest dose of morphine did not significantly alter dopamine turnover. All three doses accelerated dopamine turnover in the neostriatum. Naloxone effectively reversed the effects of morphine at all doses in all brain areas, whereas it had no effect on turnover when given alone. In the median eminence, neostriatum, and frontal cortex, intraventricular injection of [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]-enkephalin (25 micrograms) or beta-endorphin (15 micrograms) produced the same effects on dopamine turnover as morphine. The actions of these peptides were blocked by naloxone. It is hypothesized that opiates and opioid peptides increase prolactin release by reducing the activity of the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic system. PMID:288082

  15. Transport of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin across cytoplasmic membranes and membranes composed of phospholipids derived from Escherichia coli occurs via a similar mechanism.

    PubMed

    Speelmans, G; Staffhorst, R W; Steenbergen, H G; de Kruijff, B

    1996-10-23

    An assay was developed to measure and directly compare transport of doxorubicin across right-side-out cytoplasmic membrane vesicles (ROV) and across model membranes (LUVET) composed of pure phospholipids, isolated from the corresponding cells. Escherichia coli was used as a model organism, since mutants are available which differ in phospholipid composition. Both in LUVET and ROV only passive diffusion across the bilayer is involved, because effects of drug concentration, pH, divalent cations, the phospholipid composition, and the active transport inhibitor verapamil were comparable. Permeability coefficients were about 2-3-times higher in ROV compared to LUVET. Furthermore, in LUVET an average activation energy of 87 kJ/mol and in ROV of 50 kJ/mol was observed. These differences are suggested to result from differences in membrane order between LUVET and ROV and differences in the temperature dependence of membrane order in LUVET and ROV, respectively. Because no background carrier-facilitated doxorubicin transport seems to be present, ROV are an excellent model system to study the effect of phospholipid composition on drug transport after expression of a multidrug resistance-conferring protein. Furthermore, data of passive diffusion of doxorubicin obtained with LUVET are representative for more complex, biologically relevant membrane systems.

  16. Earthdata Search: The Relevance of Relevance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Through recent usability studies, the issue of relevance became increasingly clear in the Earthdata Search Client. After all, if a user can't find the data they are looking for, nothing else we do matters. This presentation walks through usability testing findings and recent relevance improvements made to the Earthdata Search Client.

  17. Phospholipids profile in chloroplasts of Coffea spp. genotypes differing in cold acclimation ability.

    PubMed

    Scotti-Campos, Paula; Pais, Isabel P; Partelli, Fábio L; Batista-Santos, Paula; Ramalho, José C

    2014-02-15

    Environmental temperature change may induce modifications in membrane lipid properties and composition, which account for different physiological responses among plant species. Coffee plants, as many tropical species, are particularly sensitive to cold, but genotypes can present differences that can be exploited to improve crop management and breeding. This work intended to highlight the changes promoted by low non-freezing temperatures (chilling) in phospholipid (PL) composition of chloroplast membranes of genotypes from two Coffea species, Coffea arabica cv. Catuaí (moderately tolerant) and Coffea canephora cv. Conilon (Clone 153, more susceptible), and relate them with cold sensitivity differences. Such evaluation was performed considering a gradual temperature decrease, chilling (4 °C) exposure and a recovery period under rewarming conditions. Catuaí presented an earlier acclimation response than Clone 153 (CL 153). It displayed a higher metabolic activity during acclimation (total fatty acids and total PL increases) and chilling (phosphatidylglycerol increases), and an overall better recovery. Catuaí also showed the highest phosphatidylglycerol unsaturation (higher double bond index) after chilling, in contrast with CL 153 (gradual unsaturation decrease). Higher unsaturation degree in Catuaí than in CL 153 was also observed for phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol, resulting, mainly, from raises in unsaturated C18:2 and C18:3. It is suggested that an enhanced PL synthesis and turnover induced by a gradual cold exposure, as well as unsaturation increases in major PL classes, is related to decreased Catuaí susceptibility to low temperatures and strongly contributes to sustain photosynthetic activity in this genotype under chilling conditions, as reported in previous work by this team. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Job turnover intentions among Certified Pharmacy Technicians.

    PubMed

    Desselle, Shane P

    2005-01-01

    To describe the job withdrawal intentions of a nationwide sample of Certified Pharmacy Technicians (CPhTs). Cross-sectional descriptive design. A random sample of 3,200 CPhTs whose names and contact information were acquired from the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board. Mailed survey. Responses to questions eliciting job withdrawal intentions, reasons for remaining/staying with the employer, and various quality of worklife attitudes. Employment intentions were regressed over quality of worklife and practice environment variables in a forward-conditional logistic regression procedure. Nearly 4 in 5 respondents indicated intentions to remain with the current employer during the next 12 months. Relationships with coworkers, good benefits, and work schedule were frequently cited as reasons to stay. Poor salary, lack of advancement opportunity, and insufficient staffing were cited frequently as factors among those indicating intentions to leave. Mean hourly wages differed among respondents with intention to leave due to salary, those not citing salary as a reason to remain or leave, and those citing salary as a reason for staying. Intention to remain was associated with higher pay, perceived employer support, number of years with the current employer, and lower career turnover intentions, with organizational commitment acting as a powerful mediator for all of the variables. Differences in CPhTs' future employment intentions were described more comprehensively by perceptions of the employing organization than by perceptions of managers/supervisors and coworkers or personal/work environment variables. Implications for pharmacy organizations are discussed.

  19. Turnover of cytokeratin polypeptides in mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Denk, H.; Lackinger, E.; Zatloukal, K. ); Franke, W.W. )

    1987-11-01

    The turnover of cytokeratin polypeptides A (equivalent to No. 8 of the human cytokeratin catalog) and D (equivalent to human cytokeratin No. 18) of mouse hepatocytes was studied by pulse-labeling of mouse liver proteins after intraperitoneal injection of L-(guanido{sup 14}C)arginine and ({sup 14}C)sodium bicarbonate. With L-(guanido-{sup 14}C)arginine a rapid increase in the specific radioactivity of both cytokeratins was observed which reached a plateau between 12 and 24 h. With ({sup 14}C)sodium bicarbonate maximal specific radioactivity was obtained at 6 h followed by a rapid decrease to half maximum values within the subsequent 6 h and then a slower decrease. Half-lives were determined from the decrease of specific radioactivities after pulse-labeling by least-squares plots and found to be 84 h (for cytokeratin component A) and 104 h (component D) for arginine labeling . Values obtained after bicarbonate labeling were similar (95 h for A and 98 h for D). These results show that liver cytokeratins are relatively stable proteins and suggest that components A and D are synthesized and degraded at similar rates, probably in a coordinate way.

  20. Rapid turnover of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3

    PubMed Central

    Azzu, Vian; Mookerjee, Shona A.; Brand, Martin D.

    2013-01-01

    UCP3 (uncoupling protein 3) and its homologues UCP2 and UCP1 are regulators of mitochondrial function. UCP2 is known to have a short half-life of approx. 1 h, owing to its rapid degradation by the cytosolic 26S proteasome, whereas UCP1 is turned over much more slowly by mitochondrial autophagy. In the present study we investigate whether UCP3 also has a short half-life, and whether the proteasome is involved inUCP3 degradation. UCP3 half-life was examined in the mouse C2C12 myoblast cell line by inhibiting protein synthesis with cycloheximide and monitoring UCP3 protein levels by immunoblot analysis. We show that UCP3 has a short half-life of 0.5–4 h. Rapid degradation was prevented by a cocktail of proteasome inhibitors, supporting a proteasomal mechanism for turnover. In addition, this phenotype is recapitulated in vitro: UCP3 was degraded in mitochondria isolated from rat skeletal muscle or brown adipose tissue with a half-life of 0.5–4 h, but only in the presence of a purified 26S proteasomal fraction. This in vitro proteolysis was also sensitive to proteasome inhibition. This phenotype is in direct contrast with the related proteins UCP1 and the adenine nucleotide translocase, which have long half-lives. Therefore UCP3 is turned over rapidly in multiple cell types in a proteasome-dependent manner. PMID:19954423

  1. Triacylglycerol turnover in the failing heart.

    PubMed

    Carley, Andrew N; Lewandowski, E Douglas

    2016-10-01

    No longer regarded as physiologically inert the endogenous triacylglyceride (TAG) pool within the cardiomyocyte is now recognized to play a dynamic role in metabolic regulation. Beyond static measures of content, the relative rates of interconversion among acyl intermediates are more closely linked to dynamic processes of physiological function in normal and diseased hearts, with the potential for both adaptive and maladaptive contributions. Indeed, multiple inefficiencies in cardiac metabolism have been identified in the decompensated, hypertrophied and failing heart. Among the intracellular responses to physiological, metabolic and pathological stresses, TAG plays a central role in the balance of lipid handling and signaling mechanisms. TAG dynamics are profoundly altered from normal in both diabetic and pathologically stressed hearts. More than just expansion or contraction of the stored lipid pool, the turnover rates of TAG are sensitive to and compete against other enzymatic pathways, anabolic and catabolic, for reactive acyl-CoA units. The rates of TAG synthesis and lipolysis thusly affect multiple components of cardiomyocyte function, including energy metabolism, cell signaling, and enzyme activation, as well as the regulation of gene expression in both normal and diseased states. This review examines the multiple etiologies and metabolic consequences of the failing heart and the central role of lipid storage dynamics in the pathogenic process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nurse accountability program improves satisfaction, turnover.

    PubMed

    Ethridge, P

    1987-05-01

    St. Mary's Hospital and Health Center, Tucson, AZ, responding to changes in health care reimbursement and the need to maintain quality, developed a comprehensive program to improve nurses' professional accountability. The project was based on the assumption that increased job satisfaction and decreased job stress for nurses in an acute care facility would improve retention and recruitment and facilitate decentralization of care delivery. The plan included the following components: Identify and enhance qualifications of nurses through a credentialing mechanism. Restructure nurses' employment terms to professional salaried status. Implement a spiritual, holistic framework for nursing. Identify programs to extend nursing's sphere of influence to activities that promote a continuum of care. Use the patient classification staffing tool as an acuity billing system. Decentralize the nursing organization and move it into the community. Promote an environment conducive to two levels of nursing practice--professional nurse case managers and associate registered nurses. The program's effectiveness was evaluated by measuring nurses' job stress and job satisfaction in 1983 (before the program's implementation), 1985, and January 1987. In 1985, compared with 1983, job stress was significantly lower in several areas measured, while job satisfaction was higher in four of six areas measured. Turnover rate of nurses decreased from 15.2 percent in 1983 to 5.4 percent in 1986. Financial savings from the program also hve been substantial: more than $500,000 for the last two fiscal years.

  3. Light and phospholipid driven structural transitions in nematic microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Dubtsov, A. V. Pasechnik, S. V.; Shmeliova, D. V.; Kralj, Samo

    2014-10-13

    We studied the UV-irradiation and phospholipid driven bipolar-radial structural transitions within azoxybenzene nematic liquid crystal (LC) droplets dispersed in water. It was found that the UV-irradiation induced trans-cis isomerisation of LC molecules could enable structural transitions into radial-type configurations at a critical UV-irradiation time t{sub c}. In particular, we show that under appropriate conditions, a value of t{sub c} could sensitively fingerprint the concentration of phospholipid molecules present in LC-water dispersions. This demonstrated proof-of-principle mechanism could be exploited for development of sensitive detectors for specific nanoparticles (NPs), where value of t{sub c} reveals concentration of NPs.

  4. A Cholesterol Recognition Motif in Human Phospholipid Scramblase 1

    PubMed Central

    Posada, Itziar M.D.; Fantini, Jacques; Contreras, F. Xabier; Barrantes, Francisco; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M.

    2014-01-01

    Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) catalyzes phospholipid transmembrane (flip-flop) motion. This protein is assumed to bind the membrane hydrophobic core through a transmembrane domain (TMD) as well as via covalently bound palmitoyl residues. Here, we explore the possible interaction of the SCR TMD with cholesterol by using a variety of experimental and computational biophysical approaches. Our findings indicate that SCR contains an amino acid segment at the C-terminal region that shows a remarkable affinity for cholesterol, although it lacks the CRAC sequence. Other 3-OH sterols, but not steroids lacking the 3-OH group, also bind this region of the protein. The newly identified cholesterol-binding region is located partly at the C-terminal portion of the TMD and partly in the first amino acid residues in the SCR C-terminal extracellular coil. This finding could be related to the previously described affinity of SCR for cholesterol-rich domains in membranes. PMID:25229146

  5. Flagellar membranes are rich in raft-forming phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Serricchio, Mauro; Schmid, Adrien W.; Steinmann, Michael E.; Sigel, Erwin; Rauch, Monika; Julkowska, Daria; Bonnefoy, Serge; Fort, Cécile; Bastin, Philippe; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The observation that the membranes of flagella are enriched in sterols and sphingolipids has led to the hypothesis that flagella might be enriched in raft-forming lipids. However, a detailed lipidomic analysis of flagellar membranes is not available. Novel protocols to detach and isolate intact flagella from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms in combination with reverse-phase liquid chromatography high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry allowed us to determine the phospholipid composition of flagellar membranes relative to whole cells. Our analyses revealed that phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, ceramide and the sphingolipids inositol phosphorylceramide and sphingomyelin are enriched in flagella relative to whole cells. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol are strongly depleted in flagella. Within individual glycerophospholipid classes, we observed a preference for ether-type over diacyl-type molecular species in membranes of flagella. Our study provides direct evidence for a preferential presence of raft-forming phospholipids in flagellar membranes of T. brucei. PMID:26276100

  6. Structural relaxations of phospholipids and water in planar membranes.

    PubMed

    Svanberg, C; Berntsen, P; Johansson, A; Hedlund, T; Axén, E; Swenson, J

    2009-01-21

    We have used dielectric spectroscopy and temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) to investigate the structural relaxation processes and phase transitions of water and lipids in multilamellar, planar phospholipids. At low hydration levels we observe the main structural relaxation related to the glass transition of the phospholipids. With increasing water content a more pronounced pretransition, attributed to a gel to ripple phase transition, is observed in the TMDSC data. In the proximity of this pretransition, a distinct change in the temperature dependence or alternatively a bifurcation into two processes is observed in the dielectric data. Around this temperature a crossover in the long-range ionic conductivity across the membranes is also observed, which is one of the key parameters for biological membranes. Thus, the major dynamical changes do not occur at the main, i.e., the gel to liquid structural phase transition, but at a pretransition that occurs roughly 20 K below the main transition.

  7. Effect of Deep Eutectic Solvent Nanostructure on Phospholipid Bilayer Phases.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Saffron J; Atkin, Rob; Warr, Gregory G

    2017-07-11

    Phospholipids are shown by solvent penetration experiments to form lamellar phases and spontaneously spawn vesicles in a wide range of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) composed of alkylammonium halide salts and glycerol or ethylene glycol, which are shown to be nanostructured by X-ray scattering. In contrast with molecular solvents, the chain melting temperature of each phospholipid, which determines the stability of the swellable bilayer phase, depends on the structure of the cation, anion, and molecular H-bond donor that constitute the DES. Chain melting is most sensitive to the length of the alkyl chain of the cation, which is partitioned between apolar domains in the bulk, nanostructured DES and those within the lipid bilayer. This is moderated by the structures of the anion and the molecular hydrogen bond donor, which determine the extent of polar/apolar segregation in the bulk liquid.

  8. Can a carbon nanotube pierce through a phospholipid bilayer?

    PubMed

    Pogodin, Sergey; Baulin, Vladimir A

    2010-09-28

    Great efficiency to penetrate into living cells is attributed to carbon nanotubes due to a number of direct and indirect observations of carbon nanotubes inside the cells. However, a direct evidence of physical translocation of nanotubes through phospholipid bilayers and the exact microscopic mechanism of their penetration into cells are still lacking. In order to test one of the inferred translocation mechanisms, namely the spontaneous piercing through the membrane induced only by thermal motion, we calculate the energy cost associated with the insertion of a carbon nanotube into a model phospholipid bilayer using the single-chain mean field theory, which is particularly suitable for the accurate measurements of equilibrium free energies. We find that the energy cost of the bilayer rupture is quite high compared to that of the energy of thermal motion. This conclusion may indirectly support other energy-dependent translocation mechanisms, such as, for example, endocytosis.

  9. Effect of protic ionic liquid nanostructure on phospholipid vesicle formation.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Saffron J; Wood, Kathleen; Atkin, Rob; Warr, Gregory G

    2017-02-15

    The formation of bilayer-based lyotropic liquid crystals and vesicle dispersions by phospholipids in a range of protic ionic liquids has been investigated by polarizing optical microscopy using isothermal penetration scans, differential scanning calorimetry, and small angle X-ray and neutron scattering. The stability and structure of both lamellar phases and vesicle dispersions is found to depend primarily on the underlying amphiphilic nanostructure of the ionic liquid itself. This finding has significant implications for the use of ionic liquids in soft and biological materials and for biopreservation, and demonstrates how vesicle structure and properties can be controlled through selection of cation and anion. For a given ionic liquid, systematic trends in bilayer thickness, chain-melting temperature and enthalpy increase with phospholipid acyl chain length, paralleling behaviour in aqueous systems.

  10. Migration of phospholipid vesicles in response to OH(-) stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Atsuji; Sakuma, Yuka; Imai, Masayuki; Oya, Yutaka; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro; Puff, Nicolas; Angelova, Miglena I

    2016-03-21

    We demonstrate migration of phospholipid vesicles in response to a pH gradient. Upon simple micro-injection of a NaOH solution, the vesicles linearly moved to the tip of the micro-pipette and the migration velocity was proportional to the gradient of OH(-) concentration. Vesicle migration was characteristic of OH(-) ions and no migration was observed for monovalent salts or nonionic sucrose solutions. The migration of vesicles is quantitatively described by the surface tension gradient model where the hydrolysis of the phospholipids by NaOH solution decreases the surface tension of the vesicle. The vesicles move toward a direction where the surface energy decreases. Thus the chemical modification of lipids produces a mechanical force to drive vesicles.

  11. Occurrence of diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserines and major phospholipids in some plants.

    PubMed

    Rozentsvet, O A; Dembitsky, V M; Saksonov, S V

    2000-06-01

    Over 40 higher plant species were examined for the contents of total lipids, phospholipids, diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomoserine (DGTS), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) by using micro-HPTLC. The results showed a wider range of plants containing betaine lipids. So, DGTS was found in some higher plant species, not studied earlier, belonging to Equisetophyta, Polypodiophyta; the lipid composition of many other species from Spermatophyta was also studied. It was demonstrated that more primitive plant species contained, as a rule, the betaine lipid DGTS. The quantitative data for the distribution of the main phospholipid classes PC, PE, and PG in various plant species and their tissues are given in this paper.

  12. Supported phospholipid bilayers for two-dimensional protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Uzgiris, E E

    1986-01-29

    Phospholipid bilayers, supported on UV irradiated carbon shadowed nitrocellulose electron microscope grids, have been used to induce two-dimensional crystal growth of IgE and IgG anti-DNP monoclonal antibodies. The UV irradiation renders the grids hydrophilic in a very uniform fashion and allows for the transfer of phospholipid monolayers from an air/water interface in a sequential dipping procedure. The surface coverage achieved was nearly 100% as measured by antibody binding and by the formation of protein arrays on the bilayer covered grids. The supported bilayers appear to be stably held and are appropriate for slow binding conditions and long incubation times with low concentrations of binding protein.

  13. Mediating Role of Psychological Capital in Relationship between Occupational Stress and Turnover Intention among Nurses at Veterans Administration Hospitals in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yim, Hee-Yun; Seo, Hyun-Ju; Cho, Yoonhyung; Kim, JinHee

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mediating role of psychological capital (PCP) in the relationship between occupational stress and turnover intention in nurses. Data were collected from a sample of 447 nurses working at four Veterans Administration Hospitals throughout South Korea from July 1 to July 31, 2014. We collected data from the nurses using the following surveys: the Short Form Korean-Occupational Stress Scale, the Korean version of the Turnover Intention Scale, and the Korean version of the Psychological Capital Questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to examine the mediating role of PCP. The level of occupational stress was 1.81 ± 0.23, the level of turnover intention was 3.29 ± 0.86, and the PCP level was 3.95 ± 0.52. There were significant correlations among the three variables (occupational stress, turnover intention, and PCP). PCP played a partial mediating role (β=-0.22, p=.008) in the relationship between occupational stress and turnover intention (p<.001) among nurses working at the Veterans Administration Hospitals. Based on the findings of this study, we recommend that South Korean hospitals offer occupational stress management programs that incorporate relevant programs in efforts to strengthen the overall components of PCP among nurses to reduce turnover intentions. Further studies are required to determine the most effective intervention programs for hospital settings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Differential Intrahepatic Phospholipid Zonation in Simple Steatosis and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wattacheril, Julia; Seeley, Erin H.; Angel, Peggi; Chen, Heidi; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Lanciault, Christian; M.Caprioli, Richard; Abumrad, Naji; Flynn, Charles Robb

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) occurs frequently in a setting of obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, but the etiology of the disease, particularly the events favoring progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) as opposed to simple steatosis (SS), are not fully understood. Based on known zonation patterns in protein, glucose and lipid metabolism, coupled with evidence that phosphatidylcholine may play a role in NASH pathogenesis, we hypothesized that phospholipid zonation exists in liver and that specific phospholipid abundance and distribution may be associated with histologic disease. A survey of normal hepatic protein expression profiles in the Human Protein Atlas revealed pronounced zonation of enzymes involved in lipid utilization and storage, particularly those facilitating phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism. Immunohistochemistry of obese normal, SS and NASH liver specimens with anti-phosphatidylethanomine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) antibodies showed a progressive decrease in the zonal distribution of this PC biosynthetic enzyme. Phospholipid quantitation by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in hepatic extracts of Class III obese patients with increasing NAFLD severity revealed that most PC species with 32, 34 and 36 carbons as well as total PC abundance was decreased with SS and NASH. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization - imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) imaging revealed strong zonal distributions for 32, 34 and 36 carbon PCs in controls (minimal histologic findings) and SS that was lost in NASH specimens. Specific lipid species such as PC 34∶1 and PC 36∶2 best illustrated this phenomenon. These findings suggest that phospholipid zonation may be associated with the presence of an intrahepatic proinflammatory phenotype and thus have broad implications in the etiopathogenesis of NASH. PMID:23451176

  15. Bile salt-phospholipid aggregation at submicellar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Baskin, Rebekah; Frost, Laura D

    2008-04-01

    The aggregation behavior of the bile salts taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC) and sodium cholate (NaC), are followed at concentrations below critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) using the environment sensitive, fluorescent-labeled phospholipid, 2-(6-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoyl-1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-C(6)-HPC). A buffer solution containing NBD-C(6)-HPC is titrated with increasing NaC or NaTDC and the fluorescence changes followed. Both bile salts induced fluorescence changes below their critical micelle concentration indicating the presence of a bile salt-phospholipid aggregate. A critical control experiment using 6-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino) hexanoic acid (NBD-X) shows that the bile salts are interacting with the longer, C16 hydrocarbon tail, not the NBD probe. The fluorescence curves were fitted to the Hill equation as a model for cooperative aggregation. The cooperativity model provides a minimum estimate for the number of bile salts to give maximal fluorescence. This number was calculated for NaC and NaTDC to have a minimum value of approximately 2. A small aggregation number supports the existence of primary micellar aggregates at submicellar concentrations for bile salt-phospholipid aqueous solutions.

  16. Extraction and Analysis of Microbial Phospholipid Fatty Acids in Soils

    PubMed Central

    Quideau, Sylvie A.; McIntosh, Anne C.S.; Norris, Charlotte E.; Lloret, Emily; Swallow, Mathew J.B.; Hannam, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) are key components of microbial cell membranes. The analysis of PLFAs extracted from soils can provide information about the overall structure of terrestrial microbial communities. PLFA profiling has been extensively used in a range of ecosystems as a biological index of overall soil quality, and as a quantitative indicator of soil response to land management and other environmental stressors. The standard method presented here outlines four key steps: 1. lipid extraction from soil samples with a single-phase chloroform mixture, 2. fractionation using solid phase extraction columns to isolate phospholipids from other extracted lipids, 3. methanolysis of phospholipids to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), and 4. FAME analysis by capillary gas chromatography using a flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Two standards are used, including 1,2-dinonadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PC(19:0/19:0)) to assess the overall recovery of the extraction method, and methyl decanoate (MeC10:0) as an internal standard (ISTD) for the GC analysis. PMID:27685177

  17. Regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by phospholipid precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, M A; Homann, M J; Bae-Lee, M S; Carman, G M

    1986-01-01

    The addition of ethanolamine or choline to inositol-containing growth medium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type cells resulted in a reduction of membrane-associated phosphatidylserine synthase (CDPdiacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) activity in cell extracts. The reduction of activity did not occur when inositol was absent from the growth medium. Under the growth conditions where a reduction of enzyme activity occurred, there was a corresponding qualitative reduction of enzyme subunit as determined by immunoblotting with antiserum raised against purified phosphatidylserine synthase. Water-soluble phospholipid precursors did not effect purified phosphatidylserine synthase activity. Phosphatidylserine synthase (activity and enzyme subunit) was not regulated by the availability of water-soluble phospholipid precursors in S. cerevisiae VAL2C(YEp CHO1) and the opi1 mutant. VAL2C(YEp CHO1) is a plasmid-bearing strain that over produces phosphatidylserine synthase activity, and the opi1 mutant is an inositol biosynthesis regulatory mutant. The results of this study suggest that the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase by the availability of phospholipid precursors occurs at the level of enzyme formation and not at the enzyme activity level. Furthermore, the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase is coupled to inositol synthesis. Images PMID:3023284

  18. Ultraviolet radiation alters choline phospholipid metabolism in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    DeLeo, V.; Scheide, S.; Meshulam, J.; Hanson, D.; Cardullo, A.

    1988-10-01

    Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB-290-320 nm) induces inflammation and hyperproliferation in human epidermis. This response is associated with the recovery from irradiated skin of inflammatory mediators derived from membrane phospholipids. We have previously reported that UVB stimulates the production of such mediators by human keratinocytes (HK) in culture. In these studies we examined the effect of UVB on the metabolism of choline containing phospholipids in HK prelabeled with (/sup 3/H) choline. UVB (400-1600J/m2) stimulated a dose dependent release of (/sup 3/H) choline from HK within minutes of irradiation. Examination of media extracts by paper chromatography revealed that the released (/sup 3/H) choline was predominately in the form of glycerophosphorylcholine. Examination of label remaining in membranes of cells after irradiation by acid precipitation and HPLC revealed that the origin of the released (/sup 3/H) choline was the membrane phosphatidylcholine/lysophosphatidylcholine. These data support a concept of UVB stimulation of both a phospholipase A (1 or 2) and a lysophospholipase. These UVB induced alterations of HK membrane phospholipid metabolism likely have profound effects on UVB-induced inflammation and control of cell growth in human skin.

  19. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Infection Triggers Host Phospholipid Metabolism Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y.; Lau, B.; Smith, S.; Troyan, K.; Barnett Foster, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) specifically recognizes phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) on the outer leaflet of host epithelial cells. EPEC also induces apoptosis in epithelial cells, which results in increased levels of outer leaflet PE and increased bacterial binding. Consequently, it is of interest to investigate whether EPEC infection perturbs host cell phospholipid metabolism and whether the changes play a role in the apoptotic signaling. Our findings indicate that EPEC infection results in a significant increase in the epithelial cell PE level and a corresponding decrease in the phosphatidylcholine (PC) level. PE synthesis via both the de novo pathway and the serine decarboxylation pathway was enhanced, and de novo synthesis of phosphatidylcholine via CDP-choline was reduced. The changes were transitory, and the maximum change was noted after 4 to 5 h of infection. Addition of exogenous PC or CDP-choline to epithelial cells prior to infection abrogated EPEC-induced apoptosis, suggesting that EPEC infection inhibits the CTP-phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase step in PC synthesis, which is reportedly inhibited during nonmicrobially induced apoptosis. On the other hand, incorporation of exogenous PE by the host cells enhanced EPEC-induced apoptosis and necrosis without increasing bacterial adhesion. This is the first report that pathogen-induced apoptosis is associated with significant changes in PE and PC metabolism, and the results suggest that EPEC adhesion to a host membrane phospholipid plays a role in disruption of host phospholipid metabolism. PMID:15557596

  20. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection triggers host phospholipid metabolism perturbations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Lau, B; Smith, S; Troyan, K; Barnett Foster, D E

    2004-12-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) specifically recognizes phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) on the outer leaflet of host epithelial cells. EPEC also induces apoptosis in epithelial cells, which results in increased levels of outer leaflet PE and increased bacterial binding. Consequently, it is of interest to investigate whether EPEC infection perturbs host cell phospholipid metabolism and whether the changes play a role in the apoptotic signaling. Our findings indicate that EPEC infection results in a significant increase in the epithelial cell PE level and a corresponding decrease in the phosphatidylcholine (PC) level. PE synthesis via both the de novo pathway and the serine decarboxylation pathway was enhanced, and de novo synthesis of phosphatidylcholine via CDP-choline was reduced. The changes were transitory, and the maximum change was noted after 4 to 5 h of infection. Addition of exogenous PC or CDP-choline to epithelial cells prior to infection abrogated EPEC-induced apoptosis, suggesting that EPEC infection inhibits the CTP-phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase step in PC synthesis, which is reportedly inhibited during nonmicrobially induced apoptosis. On the other hand, incorporation of exogenous PE by the host cells enhanced EPEC-induced apoptosis and necrosis without increasing bacterial adhesion. This is the first report that pathogen-induced apoptosis is associated with significant changes in PE and PC metabolism, and the results suggest that EPEC adhesion to a host membrane phospholipid plays a role in disruption of host phospholipid metabolism.

  1. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  2. Nonenzymatic biomimetic remodeling of phospholipids in synthetic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Brea, Roberto J; Rudd, Andrew K; Devaraj, Neal K

    2016-08-02

    Cell membranes have a vast repertoire of phospholipid species whose structures can be dynamically modified by enzymatic remodeling of acyl chains and polar head groups. Lipid remodeling plays important roles in membrane biology and dysregulation can lead to disease. Although there have been tremendous advances in creating artificial membranes to model the properties of native membranes, a major obstacle has been developing straightforward methods to mimic lipid membrane remodeling. Stable liposomes are typically kinetically trapped and are not prone to exchanging diacylphospholipids. Here, we show that reversible chemoselective reactions can be harnessed to achieve nonenzymatic spontaneous remodeling of phospholipids in synthetic membranes. Our approach relies on transthioesterification/acyl shift reactions that occur spontaneously and reversibly between tertiary amides and thioesters. We demonstrate exchange and remodeling of both lipid acyl chains and head groups. Using our synthetic model system we demonstrate the ability of spontaneous phospholipid remodeling to trigger changes in vesicle spatial organization, composition, and morphology as well as recruit proteins that can affect vesicle curvature. Membranes capable of chemically exchanging lipid fragments could be used to help further understand the specific roles of lipid structure remodeling in biological membranes.

  3. Hybrid electrospun chitosan-phospholipids nanofibers for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Ana C; Gorzelanny, Christian; Halter, Natalia; Schneider, Stefan W; Chronakis, Ioannis S

    2016-08-20

    Chitosan (Ch) polysaccharide was mixed with phospholipids (P) to generate electrospun hybrid nanofibers intended to be used as platforms for transdermal drug delivery. Ch/P nanofibers exibithed average diameters ranging from 248±94nm to 600±201nm, depending on the amount of phospholipids used. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) data suggested the occurrence of electrostatic interactions between amine groups of chitosan with the phospholipid counterparts. The nanofibers were shown to be stable for at least 7days in Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) solution. Cytotoxicity studies (WST-1 and LDH assays) demonstrated that the hybrid nanofibers have suitable biocompatibility. Fluorescence microscopy, also suggested that L929 cells seeded on top of the CH/P hybrid have similar metabolic activity comparatively to the cells seeded on tissue culture plate (control). The release of curcumin, diclofenac and vitamin B12, as model drugs, from Ch/P hybrid nanofibers was investigated, demonstrating their potential utilization as a transdermal drug delivery system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spectroscopic Study on the Interaction of 4-dimethylaminochalcones with Phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomečková, V.; Revická, M.; Sassen, A.; Veliká, B.; Stupák, M.; Perjési, P.

    2014-11-01

    The ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic properties of 4'-dimethylaminochalcone ( 1a) and its cyclic analogs 2a-4a have been studied in the presence of phospholipid vesicles (i.e., egg yolk lecithin and dipalmitoylpho sphatidylcholine), bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lipoprotein particles (i.e., bovine serum albumin plus egg yolk lecithin). The spectral results showed that compounds 1a-4a formed hydrophobic interactions with the phospholipids, lipoproteins, and BSA at the polar/nonpolar interface. Compounds 3a and 4a exhibited the strongest hydrophobic interactions of all of the compounds tested towards the phospholipids. Compound 2a gave the best fluorescent fluorophore indicating interactions with the lipids, lipoproteins, and proteins. Fluorescent microscopic imaging of breast cancer cells treated with compounds 1a-4a revealed that they could be used to stain all of the cellular components and destroy the nuclear structure. Compounds 1a-4a were found to be concentrated predominantly on the surfaces of the liposomes and lipoproteins.

  5. Phospholipid Synthesis in Aging Potato Tuber Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wen-Jing; Castelfranco, Paul A.

    1968-01-01

    The effect of activation (“aging”) of potato tuber slices on their phospholipid metabolism was investigated. Aged slices were incubated with 14C labeled choline, ethanolamine, methionine, serine, and acetate. In all cases, the incorporation of radioactivity into the lipid fraction increased with the length of time the slices were aged. This incorporation was shown to be true synthesis and not exchange between precursors and existing phospholipids. The increased incorporation of labeled choline into lipids was mainly due to an increase in its uptake by the tissue, the presence of actidione during aging prevented this increased uptake. The increase in the incorporation of labeled acetate into lipids resulted from the development of a fatty acid synthetase during aging. In the case of ethanolamine, both its uptake into the tissue and its incorporation into the lipid fraction increased. The phospholipids formed from these precursors were identified by paper and thin-layer chromatography. The major compound formed from choline was lecithin, while phosphatidylethanolamine and a small amount of lecithin were formed from ethanolamine. Images PMID:16656906

  6. Antioxidant effect of lutein towards phospholipid hydroperoxidation in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kiko, Takehiro; Hatade, Keijiro; Sookwong, Phumon; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2009-11-01

    Peroxidised phospholipid-mediated cytotoxity is involved in the pathophysiology of many diseases; for example, phospholipid hydroperoxides (PLOOH) are abnormally increased in erythrocytes of dementia patients. Dietary carotenoids (especially xanthophylls, polar carotenoids such as lutein) have gained attention as potent inhibitors against erythrocyte phospholipid hydroperoxidation, thereby making them plausible candidates for preventing diseases (i.e. dementia). To evaluate these points, we investigated whether orally administered lutein is distributed to human erythrocytes, and inhibits erythrocyte PLOOH formation. Six healthy subjects took one capsule of food-grade lutein (9.67 mg lutein per capsule) once per d for 4 weeks. Before and during the supplementation period, carotenoids and PLOOH in erythrocytes and plasma were determined by our developed HPLC technique. The administered lutein was incorporated into human erythrocytes, and erythrocyte PLOOH level decreased after the ingestion for 2 and 4 weeks. The antioxidative effect of lutein was confirmed on erythrocyte membranes, but not in plasma. These results suggest that lutein has the potential to act as an important antioxidant molecule in erythrocytes, and it thereby may contribute to the prevention of dementia. Therefore future biological and clinical studies will be required to evaluate the efficacy as well as safety of lutein in models of dementia with a realistic prospect of its use in human therapy.

  7. THE CATION CONTENT OF PHOSPHOLIPIDES FROM SWINE ERYTHROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Leonard B.

    1958-01-01

    Phospholipides from swine erythrocytes were isolated and separated into four reproducible fractions. One of the fractions seems to be pure phosphatidylserine. The others are almost certainly not single compounds, although the analytical data indicate that they represent mixtures considerably simpler than the parent mixture extracted from the cells. All four fractions contained Na+ and K+, but very little Ca2+. Sodium was the predominant cation in two of the fractions under all conditions although the major intracellular cation was potassium. In the other two fractions the ratio Na/K varied with the extraction procedure largely because the quantity of K+ seemed to depend on the solvent system used. There appear to be reasons to believe that the entire system of phospholipides binds Na+ preferentially. In addition, it was observed that the quantity of Na+ found in the lipide extracts varied when the extrusion of Na+ from the cells was made to vary. Both of these observations are consistent with the possibility that the phospholipides play some part in the extrusion of Na+ from these cells. PMID:13587908

  8. Changes in phospholipid metabolism during B lymphocyte activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kriz, M.K.; Vitetta, E.S.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1986-07-15

    Phospholipid metabolism in murine B lymphocytes stimulated with anti-Ig bound to Sepharose has been examined. T cell-depleted splenic B lymphocytes cultured with Sepharose-coupled, affinity-purified goat anti-mouse Ig (GAMIg) increased the incorporation of /sup 32/PO/sub 4/ into phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol within 3 hr and increased (/sup 3/H)-thymidine uptake at 48 hr. No increase in labeling was observed in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, or phosphatidylserine. Based on both negative and positive selection procedures, it was demonstrated that these responses occurred in B lymphocytes. In contrast to the thymidine uptake response did not require the presence of accessory cells or exogenous cytokines. The same selective changes in phospholipid metabolism were observed in neoplastic B lymphocytes (BCL/sub 1/) after treatment with Sepharose anti-..mu.., but not with Sepharose anti-Ia or Sepharose normal Ig. The dose-response relationships of /sup 32/PO/sub 4/ incorporation into phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol and (/sup 3/H) thymidine uptake were nearly identical in BCL/sub 1/ cells. The results of these experiments indicate that interaction B lymphocytes with insolubilized anti-Ig results in prompt and selective changes in phospholipid metabolism that appear to be correlated with B lymphocyte proliferation.

  9. New HPLC method for separation of blood plasma phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Suchocka, Zofia; Gronostajska, Dorota; Suchocki, Piotr; Pachecka, Jan

    2003-08-08

    The aim of the present work was to develop a new HPLC method for separation of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) from small-volume samples of blood plasma. Human plasma glycerophospholipids were separated by liquid-liquid extraction method followed by solid phase extraction (SPE) on aminopropyl columns. Reversed-phase Sephasil C8 column (10 cm x 2.1 mm, I.D. 5 microm) and micropreparative chromatograph "SMART" were used for separation of PC, PE, LPC and PI from SPE phospholipids extract. Binary-step gradient of eluent A: acetonitrile-methanol (130:5, v/v) and B (0.01% trifluoroacetic acid) provided good, fast and reproducible resolution of investigated phospholipids classes in 12 min at 30 degrees C. Eluted phospholipids were detected at wavelengths lambda=235 and 254 nm. This method made it possible to determine quantitatively: 5 microg ml(-1) PC, 1 microg ml(-1) LPC, 4 microg ml(-1) PE and 3 microg ml(-1) PI in blood plasma samples.

  10. Label free detection of phospholipids by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Tahsin; Foster, Erick; Vigil, Genevieve; Khan, Aamir A.; Bohn, Paul; Howard, Scott S.

    2014-08-01

    We present our study on compact, label-free dissolved lipid sensing by combining capillary electrophoresis separation in a PDMS microfluidic chip online with mid-infrared (MIR) absorption spectroscopy for biomarker detection. On-chip capillary electrophoresis is used to separate the biomarkers without introducing any extrinsic contrast agent, which reduces both cost and complexity. The label free biomarker detection could be done by interrogating separated biomarkers in the channel by MIR absorption spectroscopy. Phospholipids biomarkers of degenerative neurological, kidney, and bone diseases are detectable using this label free technique. These phospholipids exhibit strong absorption resonances in the MIR and are present in biofluids including urine, blood plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid. MIR spectroscopy of a 12-carbon chain phosphatidic acid (PA) (1,2-dilauroyl-snglycero- 3-phosphate (sodium salt)) dissolved in N-methylformamide, exhibits a strong amide peak near wavenumber 1660 cm-1 (wavelength 6 μm), arising from the phosphate headgroup vibrations within a low-loss window of the solvent. PA has a similar structure to many important phospholipids molecules like phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylserine (PS), making it an ideal molecule for initial proof-of-concept studies. This newly proposed detection technique can lead us to minimal sample preparation and is capable of identifying several biomarkers from the same sample simultaneously.

  11. The local phospholipid environment modulates the activation of blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Andrew W; Pureza, Vincent S; Sligar, Stephen G; Morrissey, James H

    2007-03-02

    Examples abound of membrane-bound enzymes for which the local membrane environment plays an important role, including the ectoenzyme that triggers blood clotting, the plasma serine protease, factor VIIa, bound to the integral membrane protein, tissue factor. The activity of this enzyme complex is markedly influenced by lipid bilayer composition and further by tissue factor partitioning into membrane microdomains on some cell surfaces. Unfortunately, little is known about how membrane microdomain composition controls factor VIIa-tissue factor activity, as reactions catalyzed by membrane-tethered enzymes are typically studied under conditions in which the experimenter cannot control the composition of the membrane in the immediate vicinity of the enzyme. To overcome this problem, we used a nanoscale approach that afforded complete control over the membrane environment surrounding tissue factor by assembling the factor VIIa.tissue factor complex on stable bilayers containing 67 +/- 1 phospholipid molecules/leaflet (Nanodiscs). We investigated how local changes in phospholipid bilayer composition modulate the activity of the factor VIIa.tissue factor complex. We also addressed whether this enzyme requires a pool of membrane-bound protein substrate (factor X) for efficient catalysis, or alternatively if it could efficiently activate factor X, which binds directly to the membrane nanodomain adjacent to tissue factor. We have shown that full proteolytic activity of the factor VIIa.tissue factor complex requires extremely high local concentrations of anionic phospholipids and further that a large pool of membrane-bound factor X is not required to support sustained catalysis.

  12. Delayed platysma myocutaneous turnover flap for repair of pharyngocutaneous fistula.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Paul; Cañadas, Karina; Sasaki, Clarence T

    2015-01-01

    Pharyngocutaneous fistula (PCF) is a common and serious complication after total laryngectomy. Numerous surgical and non-surgical treatment approaches have been described. Here we describe a platysma myocutaneous turnover flap for repair of PCF. Platysma myocutaneous turnover flap is described and two patients are used as examples. Repair was initially successful in both patients; however, one patient had recurrence of fistula after her cancer recurred at the stoma. Numerous surgical techniques have been described for repair of PCF. Here a turnover flap was used, a technique not previously described for this problem. The delay technique enhances the viability of the flap thought to be through numerous mechanisms. The platysma myocutaneous turnover flap is useful for closure of pharyngocutaneous fistula when non-operative measures have failed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Report: Remedial Project Manager Turnover at Superfund Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2001-M-000015, June 15, 2001. We determined that EPA Region III did not have formal procedures in place to mitigate continuity problems caused by turnover of EPA personnel in the Superfund program.

  14. Organisational Commitment and Committee Turnover of Volunteers in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuskelly, Graham

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 328 volunteers serving on sports committees in Australia found that organizational commitment was higher in organizations with open decision making, conflict resolution, and attention to group process. Positive, effective committee functioning led to lower turnover. (SK)

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers utilizing a phospholipid spin label: the effect of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Dave, Paresh C; Nusair, Nisreen A; Inbaraj, Johnson J; Lorigan, Gary A

    2005-08-15

    X-band EPR spectroscopy has been employed to study the dynamic properties of magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) utilizing a variety of phosphocholine spin labels (n-PCSL) as a function of cholesterol content. The utilization of both perpendicular and parallel aligned bicelles in EPR spectroscopy provides a more detailed structural and orientational picture of the phospholipid bilayers. The magnetically aligned EPR spectra of the bicelles and the hyperfine splitting values reveal that the addition of cholesterol increases the phase transition temperature and alignment temperature of the DMPC/DHPC bicelles. The corresponding molecular order parameter, Smol, of the DMPC/DHPC bicelles increased upon addition of cholesterol. Cholesterol also decreased the rotational motion and increased the degree of anisotropy in the interior region of the bicelles. This report reveals that the dynamic properties of DMPC/DHPC bicelles agree well with other model membrane systems and that the magnetically aligned bicelles are an excellent model membrane system.

  16. A new liquid chromatography method with charge aerosol detector (CAD) for the determination of phospholipid classes. Application to milk phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kiełbowicz, Grzegorz; Micek, Piotr; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2013-02-15

    A new rapid method for the quantitative analysis of five classes of phospholipids (PLs) (phosphatidylcholine--PC, lysophosphatidylcholine--LPC, phosphatidylethanolamine--PE and phosphatidylserine--PS and phosphatidylinositol--PI) using liquid chromatography with charge aerosol detector (CAD) is described. The separation of the compounds of interest was achieved on a diol stationary phase with a mobile phase consisting of 13% HCOOH, hexane and 2-propanol in 19 min elution program, including 10 min equilibration of the column. The method was applied to characterize the phospholipid fractions of cow milk. PLs present in cow milk were separated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure with Si cartridges before LC analysis with recovery ranging from 95.3% to 104.4%. The use of CAD detection of the eluted compounds was precise, linear and sensitive.

  17. Effects of adenosine 5'-monophosphate on epidermal turnover.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Fukumi; Kanehara, Shoko; Harano, Fumiki; Shinohara, Shigeo; Kamimura, Junko; Kawabata, Shigekatsu; Igarashi, Sachiyo; Kawamura, Mitsuaki; Yamamoto, Yuki; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2008-10-01

    The structure and function of the epidermis is maintained by cell renewal based on epidermal turnover. Epidermal turnover is delayed by aging, and it is thought that the delay of the epidermal turnover is a cause of aging alternation of skin. The epidermal turnover is related to the energy metabolism of epidermal basal cells. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is needed for cell renewal: cell division, and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) increases the amount of intracellular ATP. These findings suggest that AMP accelerates the epidermal turnover delayed by aging. This study investigated whether AMP and adenosine 5'-monophosphate disodium salt (AMP2Na) accelerates the epidermal turnover. An effect of AMP2Na on cell proliferation was examined by our counting of keratinocytes. An effect of AMP2Na on cell cycle was examined by our counting of basal cells in DNA synthetic period of hairless rats. The effects of AMP2Na (or AMP) on the epidermal turnover were examined by our measuring stratum corneum transit time by use of guinea pigs, and by our measuring stratum corneum surface area by use of hairless rats and in a clinical pharmacological study. The AMP2Na showed two different profiles on the proliferation of primary cultured keratinocytes. At a low concentration it induced cell growth, whereas at a high concentration it inhibited cell growth. The number of basal cells in the DNA synthetic period of AMP2Na was significantly higher than that of the vehicle in hairless rats. The stratum corneum transit time of AMP2Na was significantly shorter than that of the vehicle in guinea pigs. The corneocyte surface area of emulsion containing AMP2Na was significantly smaller than that of the vehicle in volunteers. We conclude that AMP promotes the cell proliferation and the cell cycle progression of epidermal basal cells and accelerates epidermal turnover safely. In addition, AMP is useful for skin rejuvenation in dermatology and aesthetic dermatology.

  18. Turnover intention among new nurses: a generational perspective.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Melanie; Paquet, Maxime; Marchionni, Caroline; Drevniok, Ulrika

    2011-01-01

    With the current nursing shortage, it is crucial to understand the aspects of the nursing work environment that are related to turnover in new generation nurses. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index was administered to new nurses in Quebec from different generations to determine what domains of the work environment were related to turnover intention. Results can help nurses in leadership and development positions target interventions to retain new graduates.

  19. Reducing staff turnover: a case study of dialysis facilities.

    PubMed

    Tai, T W; Robinson, C D

    1998-01-01

    A multivariate logistic analysis of 42 Texas dialysis facilities indicated that younger, white, short tenure, an LVN/LPN, with less support from family and friends for emotional concerns, and less supervisor support significantly increased the likelihood of turnover (p < or = .05) in dialysis facilities. The high annual staff turnover of these dialysis facilities increases costs and impedes the delivery of quality patient care. Managerial strategies to increase staff retention are suggested.

  20. Aqueous solutions at the interface with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Max L; Vácha, Robert

    2012-01-17

    In a sense, life is defined by membranes, because they delineate the barrier between the living cell and its surroundings. Membranes are also essential for regulating the machinery of life throughout many interfaces within the cell's interior. A large number of experimental, computational, and theoretical studies have demonstrated how the properties of water and ionic aqueous solutions change due to the vicinity of membranes and, in turn, how the properties of membranes depend on the presence of aqueous solutions. Consequently, understanding the character of aqueous solutions at their interface with biological membranes is critical to research progress on many fronts. The importance of incorporating a molecular-level description of water into the study of biomembrane surfaces was demonstrated by an examination of the interaction between phospholipid bilayers that can serve as model biological membranes. The results showed that, in addition to well-known forces, such as van der Waals and screened Coulomb, one has to consider a repulsion force due to the removal of water between surfaces. It was also known that physicochemical properties of biological membranes are strongly influenced by the specific character of the ions in the surrounding aqueous solutions because of the observation that different anions produce different effects on muscle twitch tension. In this Account, we describe the interaction of pure water, and also of aqueous ionic solutions, with model membranes. We show that a symbiosis of experimental and computational work over the past few years has resulted in substantial progress in the field. We now better understand the origin of the hydration force, the structural properties of water at the interface with phospholipid bilayers, and the influence of phospholipid headgroups on the dynamics of water. We also improved our knowledge of the ion-specific effect, which is observed at the interface of the phospholipid bilayer and aqueous solution, and its